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Sample records for mrna blotting fluorescence

  1. A Guide to Modern Quantitative Fluorescent Western Blotting with Troubleshooting Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Samantha L.; Hurtado, Maica Llavero; Oldknow, Karla J.; Graham, Laura C.; Marchant, Thomas W.; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Farquharson, Colin; Wishart, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The late 1970s saw the first publicly reported use of the western blot, a technique for assessing the presence and relative abundance of specific proteins within complex biological samples. Since then, western blotting methodology has become a common component of the molecular biologists experimental repertoire. A cursory search of PubMed using the term “western blot” suggests that in excess of two hundred and twenty thousand published manuscripts have made use of this technique by the year 2014. Importantly, the last ten years have seen technical imaging advances coupled with the development of sensitive fluorescent labels which have improved sensitivity and yielded even greater ranges of linear detection. The result is a now truly Quantifiable Fluorescence based Western Blot (QFWB) that allows biologists to carry out comparative expression analysis with greater sensitivity and accuracy than ever before. Many “optimized” western blotting methodologies exist and are utilized in different laboratories. These often prove difficult to implement due to the requirement of subtle but undocumented procedural amendments. This protocol provides a comprehensive description of an established and robust QFWB method, complete with troubleshooting strategies. PMID:25490604

  2. Analyzing the Homeostasis of Signaling Proteins by a Combination of Western Blot and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yi-Da; Sinzinger, Michael D.; Bovee-Geurts, Petra; Krause, Marina; Dinkla, Sip; Joosten, Irma; Koopman, Werner J.; Adjobo-Hermans, Merel J.W.; Brock, Roland

    2011-01-01

    The determination of intracellular protein concentrations is a prerequisite for understanding protein interaction networks in systems biology. Today, protein quantification is based either on mass spectrometry, which requires large cell numbers and sophisticated measurement protocols, or on quantitative Western blotting, which requires the expression and purification of a recombinant protein as a reference. Here, we present a method that uses a transiently expressed fluorescent fusion protein of the protein-of-interest as an easily accessible reference in small volumes of crude cell lysates. The concentration of the fusion protein is determined by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and this concentration is used to calibrate the intensity of bands on a Western blot. We applied this method to address cellular protein homeostasis by determining the concentrations of the plasma membrane-located transmembrane scaffolding protein LAT and soluble signaling proteins in naïve T cells and transformed T-cell lymphoma (Jurkat) cells (with the latter having nine times the volume of the former). Strikingly, the protein numbers of soluble proteins scaled with the cell volume, whereas that of the transmembrane protein LAT scaled with the membrane surface. This leads to significantly different stoichiometries of signaling proteins in transformed and naïve cells in concentration ranges that may translate directly into differences in complex formation. PMID:22261070

  3. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Nanoflares for mRNA Detection in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Zhou, Ming; Gong, Aihua; Li, Qijun; Wu, Qian; Cheng, Gary J; Yang, Mingyang; Sun, Yaocheng

    2016-02-16

    The expression level of tumor-related mRNA can reveal significant information about tumor progression and prognosis, so specific mRNA in cells provides an important approach for biological and disease studies. Here, fluorescence lifetime imaging of nanoflares in living cells was first employed to detect specific intracellular mRNA. We characterized the lifetime changes of the prepared nanoflares before and after the treatment of target mRNA and also compared the results with those of fluorescence intensity-based measurements both intracellularly and extracellularly. The nanoflares released the cy5-modified oligonucleotides and bound to the targets, resulting in a fluorescence lifetime lengthening. This work puts forward another dimension of detecting specific mRNA in cells and can also open new ways for detection of many other biomolecules. PMID:26813157

  4. Southern blotting.

    PubMed

    Brown, T

    2001-05-01

    Southern blotting is the transfer of DNA fragments from an electrophoresis gel to a membrane support, resulting in immobilization of the DNA fragments, so the membrane carries a semipermanent reproduction of the banding pattern of the gel. After immobilization, the DNA can be subjected to hybridization analysis, enabling bands with sequence similarity to a labeled probe to be identified. This unit describes Southern blotting via upward capillary transfer of DNA from an agarose gel onto a nylon or nitrocellulose membrane, and subsequent immobilization by UV irradiation (for nylon) or baking (for nitrocellulose). A Support Protocol describes how to calibrate a UV transilluminator for optimal UV irradiation of a nylon membrane. An alternate protocol details transfer using nylon membranes and an alkaline buffer, and is primarily used with positively charged nylon membranes. A second alternate protocol describes a transfer method based on a different transfer-stack setup. The traditional method of upward capillary transfer of DNA from gel to membrane has certain disadvantages, notably the fact that the gel can become crushed by the weighted filter papers and paper towels that are laid on top of it. This slows down the blotting process and may reduce the amount of DNA that can be transferred. The downward capillary method described in the second alternate protocol is therefore more rapid and can result in more complete transfer. PMID:18432697

  5. Southern blotting.

    PubMed

    Brown, T

    2001-05-01

    Southern blotting is the transfer of DNA fragments from an electrophoresis gel to a membrane support (the properties and advantages of the different types of membrane, transfer buffer, and transfer method are discussed in detail), resulting in immobilization of the DNA fragments, so the membrane carries a semipermanent reproduction of the banding pattern of the gel. After immobilization, the DNA can be subjected to hybridization analysis, enabling bands with sequence similarity to a labeled probe to be identified. This appendix describes Southern blotting via upward capillary transfer of DNA from an agarose gel onto a nylon or nitrocellulose membrane, using a high-salt transfer buffer to promote binding of DNA to the membrane. With the high-salt buffer, the DNA becomes bound to the membrane during transfer but not permanently immobilized. Immobilization is achieved by UV irradiation (for nylon) or baking (for nitrocellulose). A Support Protocol describes how to calibrate a UV transilluminator for optimal UV irradiation of a nylon membrane. An alternate protocol details transfer using nylon membranes and an alkaline buffer, and is primarily used with positively charged nylon membranes. The advantage of this combination is that no post-transfer immobilization step is required, as the positively charged membrane binds DNA irreversibly under alkaline transfer conditions. The method can also be used with neutral nylon membranes but less DNA will be retained. A second alternate protocol describes a transfer method based on a different transfer-stack setup. The traditional method of upward capillary transfer of DNA from gel to membrane described in the first basic and alternate protocols has certain disadvantages, notably the fact that the gel can become crushed by the weighted filter papers and paper towels that are laid on top of it. This slows down the blotting process and may reduce the amount of DNA that can be transferred. The downward capillary method described in

  6. Western blots.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Lita A

    2013-01-01

    Western analysis of apolipoproteins, lipoproteins, and proteins involved in lipoprotein metabolism can be challenging due to their size, hydrophobic nature, and, in some cases, low abundance. Here we describe a Western blotting method that has been used successfully for many proteins involved in lipoprotein metabolism, as well as intact LDL or HDL particles. Proteins or lipoprotein particles separated by gel electrophoresis are transferred to a PVDF membrane in a Hoefer TE22 transfer tank with Tris-Glycine-SDS-Methanol transfer buffer. The membrane is blocked with 3 % BSA/5 % milk to prevent nonspecific binding of antibody to the membrane and is then incubated with primary antibody that binds specifically to the protein of interest. After washing away unbound primary antibody, the membrane is then incubated with an HRP-labeled secondary antibody that binds primary antibody. After washing away unbound secondary antibody, the membrane is then incubated with a substrate for HRP, generating a chemiluminescent signal at the location of the protein of interest. The protein is visualized by exposing the membrane to an autoradiography film or an imaging device. Information on the use of several human antibodies, including apoA-I, A-II, apoB, apoC-II, apoC-III, apoD, apoL1, apoM, PON1, SAA, ABCA1, nitrotyrosine, and LCAT, is provided. This method can be used for Western blotting of virtually any protein as well as native lipoprotein particles. PMID:23912997

  7. Green/red dual fluorescence detection of total protein and alkaline phosphate-conjugated probes on blotting membranes.

    PubMed

    Top, K P; Hatleberg, G; Berggren, K N; Ryan, D; Kemper, C; Haugland, R P; Patton, W F

    2001-03-01

    A two-color fluorescence detection method is described based upon covalently coupling the succinimidyl ester of BODIPY FL-X to proteins immobilized on poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) membranes, followed by detection of target proteins using the fluorogenic substrate 9H-(1,3-dichloro-9,9-dimethylacridin-2-one-7-yl(DDAO)-phosphate in combination with alkaline-phosphatase-conjugated reporter molecules. This results in all proteins in the profile being visualized as green signal while those detected specifically with the alkaline-phosphatase conjugate appear as red signal. The dichromatic detection system is broadly compatible with a wide range of analytical imaging devices including UV epi- or transilluminators combined with photographic or charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras, xenon-arc sources equipped with appropriate excitation/emission filters, and dual laser gel scanners outfitted with a 473 nm second-harmonic generation or 488 nm argon-ion laser as well as a 633 nm helium-neon or 635 nm diode laser. The dichromatic detection method permits detection of low nanogram amounts of protein and allows for unambiguous identification of target proteins relative to the entire protein profile on a single electroblot, obviating the need to run replicate gels that would otherwise require visualization of total proteins by silver staining and subsequent alignment with chemiluminescent or colorimetric signals generated on electroblots. PMID:11332758

  8. Preparation of Functional, Fluorescently Labeled mRNA Capped with Anthraniloyl-m(7)GpppG.

    PubMed

    Domashevskiy, Artem V; Rodriguez, David J; Gunawardana, Dilantha; Goss, Dixie J

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent mRNA molecules offer a wide range of applications for studying capping/decapping reactions, translation, and other biophysical studies. Furthermore, fluorescent tags prove invaluable for tracking RNA molecules in cells. Here, we describe an efficient synthesis of a fluorescent cap analog, anthranioyl-GTP, its purification, and in vitro cap labeling of transcribed mRNA catalyzed by the recombinant vaccinia capping enzyme to produce anthranioyl-m(7)GpppG-capped RNA. PMID:27236792

  9. Using fluorescent proteins to study mRNA trafficking in living cells.

    PubMed

    Querido, Emmanuelle; Chartrand, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    This chapter presents the MS2-GFP system, a method to study the trafficking of RNA molecules in living cells. This system is based on two components: a fusion of the MS2 coat protein to a fluorescent protein and a reporter mRNA containing multimers of the RNA stem-loop recognized by the MS2 coat protein. The MS2-GFP protein bound to the RNA stem-loops acts as a beacon that allows the detection of this mRNA within a cell by epifluorescence or confocal microscopy. This chapter focuses on the use of this system in mammalian fibroblast cells and in yeast cells, and discusses several technical considerations of the MS2-GFP system. Detailed protocols for validating the MS2-GFP signal in fixed cells by fluorescent in situ hybridization of the target RNA using fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotide probes are also provided.

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of fluorescent cap analogues for mRNA labelling

    PubMed Central

    Ziemniak, Marcin; Szabelski, Mariusz; Lukaszewicz, Maciej; Nowicka, Anna; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Rhoads, Robert E.; Wieczorek, Zbigniew; Jemielity, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    We describe the synthesis and properties of five dinucleotide fluorescent cap analogues labelled at the ribose of the 7-methylguanosine moiety with either anthraniloyl (Ant) or N-methylanthraniloyl (Mant), which have been designed for the preparation of fluorescent mRNAs via transcription in vitro. Two of the analogues bear a methylene modification in the triphosphate bridge, providing resistance against either the Dcp2 or DcpS decapping enzymes. All these compounds were prepared by ZnCl2-mediated coupling of a nucleotide P-imidazolide with a fluorescently labelled mononucleotide. To evaluate the utility of these compounds for studying interactions with cap-binding proteins and cap-related cellular processes, both biological and spectroscopic features of those compounds were determined. The results indicate acceptable quantum yields of fluorescence, pH independence, environmental sensitivity, and photostability. The cap analogues are incorporated by RNA polymerase into mRNA transcripts that are efficiently translated in vitro. Transcripts containing fluorescent caps but unmodified in the triphosphate chain are hydrolysed by Dcp2 whereas those containing a α-β methylene modification are resistant. Model studies exploiting sensitivity of Mant to changes of local environment demonstrated utility of the synthesized compounds for studying cap-related proteins. PMID:24273643

  11. IgG Western Blot for Confirmatory Diagnosis of Equivocal Cases of Toxoplasmosis by EIA-IgG and Fluorescent Antibody Test

    PubMed Central

    Saghrouni, Fatma; Yaacoub, Alia; Gaied Meksi, Sondoss; Ach, Hinda; Garma, Lamia; Fathallah, Akila; Ben Saïd, Moncef

    2013-01-01

    The performance values of available techniques used in serodiagnosis of toxoplasmosis are satisfactory but they raise problems of equivocal and discordant results for very low IgG titers. Recently marketed, LDBio-Toxo II IgG Western blot (IB) showed an excellent correlation with the dye test. We estimated the proportion of equivocal and discordant results between the enzyme immunoassay Platelia Toxo IgG (EIA-IgG) and fluorescent antibody test (FAT) and assessed the usefulness of the IB as a confirmatory test. Out of 2,136 sera collected from pregnant women, 1,644 (77.0%) tested unequivocally positive and 407 (19.0%) were negative in both EIA-IgG and FAT. The remaining 85 (4%) sera showed equivocal or discordant results. Among them, 73 (85.9%) were positive and 12 (14.1%) were negative in IB. Forty-one (89.1%) equivocal sera in EIA-IgG and 46 (86.8%) equivocal sera in FAT were positive in IB. Reducing the cut-off values of both screening techniques improved significantly their sensitivity in detecting very low IgG titers at the expense of their specificity. In conclusion, equivocal results in routine-used techniques and their discordance in determination of the immune status in pregnancy women were not uncommon. IB test appeard to be highly useful in these situations as a confirmatory technique. PMID:24039295

  12. Expression of fluorescent proteins in Branchiostoma lanceolatum by mRNA injection into unfertilized oocytes.

    PubMed

    Hirsinger, Estelle; Carvalho, João Emanuel; Chevalier, Christine; Lutfalla, Georges; Nicolas, Jean-François; Peyriéras, Nadine; Schubert, Michael

    2015-01-12

    We report here a robust and efficient protocol for the expression of fluorescent proteins after mRNA injection into unfertilized oocytes of the cephalochordate amphioxus, Branchiostoma lanceolatum. We use constructs for membrane and nuclear targeted mCherry and eGFP that have been modified to accommodate amphioxus codon usage and Kozak consensus sequences. We describe the type of injection needles to be used, the immobilization protocol for the unfertilized oocytes, and the overall injection set-up. This technique generates fluorescently labeled embryos, in which the dynamics of cell behaviors during early development can be analyzed using the latest in vivo imaging strategies. The development of a microinjection technique in this amphioxus species will allow live imaging analyses of cell behaviors in the embryo as well as gene-specific manipulations, including gene overexpression and knockdown. Altogether, this protocol will further consolidate the basal chordate amphioxus as an animal model for addressing questions related to the mechanisms of embryonic development and, more importantly, to their evolution.

  13. Expression of fluorescent proteins in Branchiostoma lanceolatum by mRNA injection into unfertilized oocytes.

    PubMed

    Hirsinger, Estelle; Carvalho, João Emanuel; Chevalier, Christine; Lutfalla, Georges; Nicolas, Jean-François; Peyriéras, Nadine; Schubert, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We report here a robust and efficient protocol for the expression of fluorescent proteins after mRNA injection into unfertilized oocytes of the cephalochordate amphioxus, Branchiostoma lanceolatum. We use constructs for membrane and nuclear targeted mCherry and eGFP that have been modified to accommodate amphioxus codon usage and Kozak consensus sequences. We describe the type of injection needles to be used, the immobilization protocol for the unfertilized oocytes, and the overall injection set-up. This technique generates fluorescently labeled embryos, in which the dynamics of cell behaviors during early development can be analyzed using the latest in vivo imaging strategies. The development of a microinjection technique in this amphioxus species will allow live imaging analyses of cell behaviors in the embryo as well as gene-specific manipulations, including gene overexpression and knockdown. Altogether, this protocol will further consolidate the basal chordate amphioxus as an animal model for addressing questions related to the mechanisms of embryonic development and, more importantly, to their evolution. PMID:25650764

  14. Design and characterization of two-dye and three-dye binary fluorescent probes for mRNA detection

    PubMed Central

    Martí, Angel A.; Li, Xiaoxu; Jockusch, Steffen; Stevens, Nathan; Li, Zengmin; Raveendra, Bindu; Kalachikov, Sergey; Morozova, Irina; Russo, James J.; Akins, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    We report the design, synthesis and characterization of binary oligonucleotide probes for mRNA detection. The probes were designed to avoid common problems found in standard binary probes such as direct excitation of the acceptor fluorophore and overlap between the donor and acceptor emission spectra. Two different probes were constructed that contained an array of either two or three dyes and that were characterized using steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence depolarization measurements. The three-dye binary probe (BP-3d) consists of a Fam fluorophore which acts as a donor, collecting light and transferring it as energy to Tamra, which subsequently transfers energy to Cy5 when the two probes are hybridized to mRNA. This design allows the use of 488 nm excitation, which avoids the direct excitation of Cy5 and at the same time provides a good fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency. The two-dye binary probe system (BP-2d) was constructed of Alexa488 and Cy5 fluorophores. Although the overlap between the fluorescence of Alexa488 and the absorption of Cy5 is relatively low, FRET still occurs due to their close physical proximity when the probes are hybridized to mRNA. This framework also decreases the direct excitation of Cy5 and reduces the fluorescence overlap between the donor and the acceptor. Picosecond time-resolved spectroscopy showed a reduction in the fluorescence lifetime of donor fluorophores after the formation of the hybrid between the probes and target mRNA. Interestingly, BP-2d in the presence of mRNA shows a slow rise in the fluorescence decay of Cy5 due to a relatively low FRET rate, which together with the reduction in the Alexa488 lifetime provides a way to improve the signal to background ratio using time-resolved fluorescence spectra (TRES). In addition, fluorescence depolarization measurements showed complete depolarization of the acceptor dyes (Cy5) for both BP-3d (due

  15. Analyzing abundance of mRNA molecules with a near-infrared fluorescence technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Pan, Yan; Zhang, Beibei; Wang, Jinke

    2014-01-01

    This study describes a simple method for analyzing the abundance of mRNA molecules in a total DNA sample. Due to the dependence on the near-infrared fluorescence technique, this method is named near-infrared fluorescence gene expression detection (NIRF-GED). The procedure has three steps: (1) isolating total RNA from detected samples and reverse-transcription into cDNA with a biotin-labeled oligo dT; (2) hybridizing cDNA to oligonucleotide probes coupled to a 96-well microplate; and (3) detecting biotins with NIRF-labeled streptavidin. The method was evaluated by performing proof-in-concept detections of absolute and relative expressions of housekeeping and NF-κB target genes in HeLa cells. As a result, the absolute expression of three genes, Ccl20, Cxcl2, and Gapdh, in TNF-α-uninduced HeLa cells was determined with a standard curve constructed on the same microplate, and the relative expression of five genes, Ccl20, Cxcl2, Il-6, STAT5A, and Gapdh, in TNF-α-induced and -uninduced HeLa cells was measured by using NIRF-GED. The results were verified by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and DNA microarray detections. The biggest advantage of NIRF-GED over the current techniques lies in its independence of exponential or linear amplification of nucleic acids. Moreover, NIRF-GED also has several other benefits, including high sensitivity as low as several fmols, absolute quantification in the range of 9 to 147 fmols, low cDNA consumption similar to qPCR template, and the current medium throughput in 96-well microplate format and future high throughput in DNA microarray format. NIRF-GED thus provides a new tool for analyzing gene transcripts and other nucleic acid molecules. PMID:24317515

  16. The western blot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western blotting is a technique that involves the separation of proteins by gel electrophoresis, their blotting or transfer to a membrane, and selective immunodetection of an immobilized antigen. This is an important and routine method for protein analysis that depends on the specificity of antibod...

  17. The Dot Blot ELISA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerbig, Donald G., Jr.; Fenk, Christopher J.; Goodhart, Amy S.

    2000-01-01

    Uses two laboratory techniques, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and Western Blot, to demonstrate antibody-antigen binding concepts. Includes a list of required materials and directions for the procedure, and makes suggestions for classroom applications. (Contains 13 references.) (YDS)

  18. Single-cell western blotting

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alex J.; Spelke, Dawn P.; Xu, Zhuchen; Kang, Chi-Chih; Schaffer, David V.; Herr, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    To measure cell-to-cell variation in protein-mediated functions — a hallmark of biological processes — we developed an approach to conduct ~103 concurrent single-cell western blots (scWesterns) in ~4 hours. A microscope slide supporting a 30 µm-thick photoactive polyacrylamide gel enables western blotting comprised of: settling of single cells into microwells, lysis in situ, gel electrophoresis, photoinitiated blotting to immobilize proteins, and antibody probing. We apply this scWestern to monitor single rat neural stem cell differentiation and responses to mitogen stimulation. The scWestern quantifies target proteins even with off-target antibody binding, multiplexes to 11 protein targets per single cell with detection thresholds of <30,000 molecules, and supports analyses of low starting cell numbers (~200) when integrated with fluorescence activated cell sorting. The scWestern thus overcomes limitations in single-cell protein analysis (i.e., antibody fidelity, sensitivity, and starting cell number) and constitutes a versatile tool for the study of complex cell populations at single-cell resolution. PMID:24880876

  19. Measuring mRNA copy-number in individual Escherichia coli cells using single-molecule fluorescent in situ hybridization (smFISH)

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Samuel O.; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A.; Xu, Heng; Golding, Ido

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for measuring the absolute number of mRNA molecules from a gene of interest in individual, chemically fixed Escherichia coli cells. A set of fluorescently-labeled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the target mRNA, so that each mRNA molecule is decorated by a known number of fluorescent dyes. Cells are then imaged using fluorescence microscopy. The number of target mRNA is estimated from the total intensity of fluorescent foci in the cell, rather than from counting discrete “spots” as in other currently available protocols. Image analysis is performed using an automated algorithm. The measured mRNA copy-number distribution obtained from many individual cells can be used to extract the parameters of stochastic gene activity, namely the frequency and size of transcription bursts from the gene of interest. The experimental procedure takes 2 days, with another 2-3 days typically required for image and data analysis. PMID:23680982

  20. Detection of proteins on blot transfer membranes.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Joachim; Gallagher, Sean R

    2008-11-01

    Staining of blot transfer membranes permits visualization of proteins and allows the extent of transfer to be monitored. In the protocols described in this unit, proteins are stained after electroblotting from one-dimensional or two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels to blot membranes such as polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF), nitrocellulose, or nylon membranes. Protocols are provided for the use of six general protein stains: Amido black, Coomassie blue, Ponceau S, colloidal gold, colloidal silver, and India ink. In addition, the fluorescent stains fluorescamine and IAEDANS, which covalently react with bound proteins, are described. Approximate detection limits for each nonfluorescent stain are indicated along with membrane compatibilities.

  1. Detection of proteins on blot membranes.

    PubMed

    Harper, S; Speicher, D W

    2001-05-01

    Staining of blot transfer membranes permits visualization of proteins and allows the extent of transfer to be monitored. In the protocols described in this unit, proteins are stained after electroblotting from one-dimensional or two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels to blot membranes such as polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF), nitrocellulose, or nylon membranes. Protocols are provided for the use of six general protein stains: amido black, Coomassie blue, Ponceau S, colloidal gold, colloidal silver, and India ink. In addition, the fluorescent stains fluorescamine and IAEDANS, which covalently react with bound proteins, are described. Approximate detection limits for each nonfluorescent stain are indicated along with membrane compatibilities. PMID:18429099

  2. Detection of proteins on blot transfer membranes.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Joachim; Gallagher, Sean R

    2008-11-01

    Staining of blot transfer membranes permits visualization of proteins and allows the extent of transfer to be monitored. In the protocols described in this unit, proteins are stained after electroblotting from one-dimensional or two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels to blot membranes such as polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF), nitrocellulose, or nylon membranes. Protocols are provided for the use of six general protein stains: Amido black, Coomassie blue, Ponceau S, colloidal gold, colloidal silver, and India ink. In addition, the fluorescent stains fluorescamine and IAEDANS, which covalently react with bound proteins, are described. Approximate detection limits for each nonfluorescent stain are indicated along with membrane compatibilities. PMID:19016450

  3. Fluorescence detection of KRAS2 mRNA hybridization in lung cancer cells with PNA-peptides containing an internal thiazole orange.

    PubMed

    Sonar, Mahesh V; Wampole, Matthew E; Jin, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Chang-Po; Thakur, Mathew L; Wickstrom, Eric

    2014-09-17

    We previously developed reporter-peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-peptides for sequence-specific radioimaging and fluorescence imaging of particular mRNAs in cells and tumors. However, a direct test for PNA-peptide hybridization with RNA in the cytoplasm would be desirable. Thiazole orange (TO) dye at the 5' end of a hybridization agent shows a strong increase in fluorescence quantum yield when stacked upon a 5' terminal base pair, in solution and in cells. We hypothesized that hybridization agents with an internal TO could distinguish a single base mutation in RNA. Thus, we designed KRAS2 PNA-IGF1 tetrapeptide agents with an internal TO adjacent to the middle base of the 12th codon, a frequent site of cancer-initiating mutations. Our molecular dynamics calculations predicted a disordered bulge with weaker hybridization resulting from a single RNA mismatch. We observed that single-stranded PNA-IGF1 tetrapeptide agents with an internal TO showed low fluorescence, but fluorescence escalated 5-6-fold upon hybridization with KRAS2 RNA. Circular dichroism melting curves showed ∼10 °C higher Tm for fully complementary vs single base mismatch TO-PNA-peptide agent duplexes with KRAS2 RNA. Fluorescence measurements of treated human lung cancer cells similarly showed elevated cytoplasmic fluorescence intensity with fully complementary vs single base mismatch agents. Sequence-specific elevation of internal TO fluorescence is consistent with our hypothesis of detecting cytoplasmic PNA-peptide:RNA hybridization if a mutant agent encounters the corresponding mutant mRNA.

  4. Fluorescence Detection of KRAS2 mRNA Hybridization in Lung Cancer Cells with PNA-Peptides Containing an Internal Thiazole Orange

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We previously developed reporter-peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-peptides for sequence-specific radioimaging and fluorescence imaging of particular mRNAs in cells and tumors. However, a direct test for PNA-peptide hybridization with RNA in the cytoplasm would be desirable. Thiazole orange (TO) dye at the 5′ end of a hybridization agent shows a strong increase in fluorescence quantum yield when stacked upon a 5′ terminal base pair, in solution and in cells. We hypothesized that hybridization agents with an internal TO could distinguish a single base mutation in RNA. Thus, we designed KRAS2 PNA-IGF1 tetrapeptide agents with an internal TO adjacent to the middle base of the 12th codon, a frequent site of cancer-initiating mutations. Our molecular dynamics calculations predicted a disordered bulge with weaker hybridization resulting from a single RNA mismatch. We observed that single-stranded PNA-IGF1 tetrapeptide agents with an internal TO showed low fluorescence, but fluorescence escalated 5–6-fold upon hybridization with KRAS2 RNA. Circular dichroism melting curves showed ∼10 °C higher Tm for fully complementary vs single base mismatch TO-PNA-peptide agent duplexes with KRAS2 RNA. Fluorescence measurements of treated human lung cancer cells similarly showed elevated cytoplasmic fluorescence intensity with fully complementary vs single base mismatch agents. Sequence-specific elevation of internal TO fluorescence is consistent with our hypothesis of detecting cytoplasmic PNA-peptide:RNA hybridization if a mutant agent encounters the corresponding mutant mRNA. PMID:25180641

  5. The effect of acute haloperidol treatment on brain proneurotensin mRNA: in situ hybridization analyses using a novel fluorescence detection procedure.

    PubMed

    Williams, F G; Murtaugh, M P; Beitz, A J

    1990-05-01

    These studies describe the normal anatomical distribution of neurons containing the mRNA coding for neurotensin (proneurotensin/neuromedin N) in the rat forebrain and midbrain and examine how that distribution is altered by acute administration of the dopamine antagonist haloperidol. A novel fluorescence detection method was developed and employed with biotinylated oligonucleotides to permit the rapid, sensitive visualization of in situ hybridization. The hybridization was temperature-sensitive, eliminated by ribonuclease, and co-localized in neurotensin-immunoreactive perikarya in the midbrain. In the forebrain of control rats, proneurotensin mRNA-containing neurons were found in the dorsomedial and ventrolateral caudate/putamen, in the nucleus accumbens, in the ventral striatum including the olfactory tubercles, and in the septal nuclei. Haloperidol induced significant increases in the frequencies and distributions of hybridization-positive neurons in the striatum and septal nuclei. In the midbrain, the highest frequency of hybridization-positive neurons occurred in the substantia nigra and the superior colliculus. Prominent populations were also present in the dorsal and ventral periaqueductal gray, the oculomotor region, and the medial longitudinal fasciculus. Less prominent were populations of neurons in the dorsomedial deep mesencephalic nuclei and the ventral tegmental area. Haloperidol induced only modest increases in the frequency of pro-neurotensin mRNA-containing neurons in the ventral tegmental area, and had no effects elsewhere in the midbrain. These results show that the fluorescent detection techniques used in this analysis provide a very rapid, reliable method for localizing hybridized mRNA in the rat brain. This study also suggests that a subpopulation of striatal neurons begin to express proneurotensin mRNA in response to haloperidol treatment. This effect of haloperidol on striatal neurons contrasts with results from additional studies of

  6. RNase protection assays and RNA gel blots: a direct comparison of sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Higgs, D C; Colbert, J T

    1992-01-01

    RNase protection assays are commonly thought to be a more sensitive means of detecting and quantitating specific mRNAs than are RNA gel blots (Northern blots). We have directly compared the sensitivity of these two approaches by assaying for known amounts of in vitro synthesized beta-glucuronidase mRNA. With the probes and protocols employed here, the ability to detect a specific mRNA was similar whether RNase protection or RNA gel blot analyses were performed.

  7. Mutation detection by Southern blotting.

    PubMed

    Mellars, Gillian; Gomez, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Following the discovery of the structure of DNA in 1953, it became clear that scientists needed to be able to distinguish different DNA sequences. In 1975, Edward Southern published details of a new method for detecting DNA fragments based upon their specific sequence [corrected]. An indication of the importance of his work is that the technique was eponymously named after him and that subsequent methods based loosely on similar principles were named using a play on his surname (western and northern blot). The simplicity and effectiveness of the technique led to its universal acceptance as a standard method for identification of DNA sequences. In the modern laboratory where turn-around times assume ever greater importance, the process can seem relatively time-consuming. In some cases, this has led to its replacement by more rapid techniques such as long-range PCR. Nevertheless, more than 30 years after its invention, the Southern blot remains a cornerstone of molecular biology. PMID:20938846

  8. BLOT Ver. 1.65

    SciTech Connect

    MEYERS, RAY; GLICK, III, JOHN; FORSYTHE, CHRISTI; GILKEY, AMY; SJAARDEMA, GREGORY

    2009-03-24

    BLOT is a graphic program for post-processing finite element analyses output in the EXODUS II database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive graphics devices supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots of the analysis output variables including deformed mesh plots, line contours, filled (painted) contours, vector plots of two/three variables (velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (discrete cracks). Features include pathlines of analysis variables drawn on the mesh, element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. X-Y plots of the analysis variables include time vs. variable plots or variable vs. variable plots, and distance vs. variable plots at selected time steps where distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers. BLOT is written in as portable a form as possible. Fortran code is written in ANSI Standard FORTRAN-77. Machine-specific routines are limited in number and are grouped together to minimize the time required to adapt them to a new system. SEACAS codes have been ported to several Unix systems

  9. BLOT Ver. 1.65

    2009-03-24

    BLOT is a graphic program for post-processing finite element analyses output in the EXODUS II database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive graphics devices supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots of the analysis output variables including deformed mesh plots, line contours, filled (painted) contours, vector plots of two/three variables (velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (discrete cracks). Features include pathlines of analysis variablesmore » drawn on the mesh, element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. X-Y plots of the analysis variables include time vs. variable plots or variable vs. variable plots, and distance vs. variable plots at selected time steps where distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers. BLOT is written in as portable a form as possible. Fortran code is written in ANSI Standard FORTRAN-77. Machine-specific routines are limited in number and are grouped together to minimize the time required to adapt them to a new system. SEACAS codes have been ported to several Unix systems« less

  10. Continuous Monitoring of Specific mRNA Expression Responses with a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-Based DNA Nano-tweezer Technique That Does Not Require Gene Recombination.

    PubMed

    Shigeto, Hajime; Nakatsuka, Keisuke; Ikeda, Takeshi; Hirota, Ryuichi; Kuroda, Akio; Funabashi, Hisakage

    2016-08-16

    This letter discusses the feasibility of continuously monitoring specific mRNA expression responses in a living cell with a probe structured as a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based DNA nano-tweezer (DNA-NT). The FRET-based DNA-NT, self-assembled from three single-stranded DNAs, alters its structure from an open state to a closed state in recognition of a target mRNA, resulting in the closing of the distal relation of previously modified FRET-paired fluorescent dyes and generating a FRET signal. The expressions of glucose transporters (GLUT) 1 and 4 in a mouse hepato-carcinoma (Hepa 1-6 cells) were selected as the target model. Live-cell imaging analysis of Hepa 1-6 cells with both FRET-based DNA-NTs indicated that the behaviors of the FRET signals integrated in each individual cell were similar to those measured with the conventional mass analysis technique of semiquantitative real-time (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR). From these results, it is concluded that continuous monitoring of gene expression response without gene recombination is feasible with a FRET-based DNA-NT, even in a single cell manner. PMID:27458920

  11. Isolation of full-size mRNA from ethanol-fixed cells after cellular immunofluorescence staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, C.; Kremer, J.; Hundeiker, C.; Goettlinger, C.; Radbruch, A.

    1995-12-01

    Preparation of intact, full-size RNA from tissues or cells requires stringent precautions against ubiquitous and rather stable RNases. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) usually aims at the isolation of cells according to cell surface markers on living cells, from which RNA can be obtained by standard protocols. The separation of cells according to intracellular immunofluorescence markers, such as intranuclear, intracytoplasmic, or secreted molecules, requires permeation of the cell membrane for the staining antibodies, which is usually achieved by fixation. However, commonly used fixatives such as ethanol, methanol, or formaldehyde do not inactivate RNases completely, thereby hampering the analysis of complete RNA molecules from fixed cells. We report isolation of intact, full size RNA suitable for Northern blotting from cells that were fixed by 95% ethanol/5% acetic acid containing RNase inhibitors, stained intracellularly, and sorted by FACS. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. A fluorescent HTS assay for phosphohydrolases based on nucleoside 5'-fluorophosphates: its application in screening for inhibitors of mRNA decapping scavenger and PDE-I.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, M R; Nowicka, A; Jemielity, J; Kowalska, J

    2016-05-18

    Several nucleotide-specific phosphohydrolases can cleave P-F bonds in substrate analogues containing a fluorophosphate moiety to release fluoride ions. In this work, by employing a fluoride-sensitive molecular sensor, we harnessed this cleavage reaction to develop a fluorescence assay to screen for phosphohydrolase inhibitors. The assay is rapid, sensitive, and based on simple and synthetically available reagents. The assay was adapted to the high-throughput screening (HTS) format and its utility was demonstrated by screening an 'in-house' library of small nucleotides against two enzymes: DcpS, a metal-independent mRNA decapping pyrophosphatase of the histidine triad (HIT) family; and PDE-I, a divalent cation-dependent nuclease. Our screening results agreed with the known specificities of DcpS and PDE-I, and led to the selection of several inhibitors featuring low-micromolar IC50 values. For DcpS, we also verified the results by using an alternative method with the natural substrate. Notably, the assay presented here is the first fluorescence-based HTS-adaptable assay for DcpS, an established therapeutic target for spinal muscular atrophy. The assay should be useful for phosphohydrolase specificity profiling and inhibitor discovery, particularly in the context of DcpS and other HIT-family enzymes, which play key roles in maintaining cellular functions and have been linked to disease development.

  13. A fluorescent HTS assay for phosphohydrolases based on nucleoside 5'-fluorophosphates: its application in screening for inhibitors of mRNA decapping scavenger and PDE-I.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, M R; Nowicka, A; Jemielity, J; Kowalska, J

    2016-05-18

    Several nucleotide-specific phosphohydrolases can cleave P-F bonds in substrate analogues containing a fluorophosphate moiety to release fluoride ions. In this work, by employing a fluoride-sensitive molecular sensor, we harnessed this cleavage reaction to develop a fluorescence assay to screen for phosphohydrolase inhibitors. The assay is rapid, sensitive, and based on simple and synthetically available reagents. The assay was adapted to the high-throughput screening (HTS) format and its utility was demonstrated by screening an 'in-house' library of small nucleotides against two enzymes: DcpS, a metal-independent mRNA decapping pyrophosphatase of the histidine triad (HIT) family; and PDE-I, a divalent cation-dependent nuclease. Our screening results agreed with the known specificities of DcpS and PDE-I, and led to the selection of several inhibitors featuring low-micromolar IC50 values. For DcpS, we also verified the results by using an alternative method with the natural substrate. Notably, the assay presented here is the first fluorescence-based HTS-adaptable assay for DcpS, an established therapeutic target for spinal muscular atrophy. The assay should be useful for phosphohydrolase specificity profiling and inhibitor discovery, particularly in the context of DcpS and other HIT-family enzymes, which play key roles in maintaining cellular functions and have been linked to disease development. PMID:27031609

  14. Quantification of human telomerase reverse transcriptase mRNA in testicular germ cell tumors by quantitative fluorescence real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Mark; Burger, Angelika M; Müller, Markus; Krause, Hans; Straub, Bernd; Smith, Gilian L; Newlands, Eward S; Miller, Kurt

    2002-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme which is endogenously expressed in germ, stem and tumor cells, but absent in benign somatic cells. The two major telomerase components are human telomerase RNA (hTR) and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). It has been shown that hTERT is rate-limiting for telomerase activity and that it plays a central role in human carcinogenesis. Here, we investigated the potential of hTERT and hTR gene expression as diagnostic markers in testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT). hTERT mRNA and hTR expression were quantified in 55 testicular germ cell tumors comprising 36 primary and 19 germ cell tumors from retroperitonal sides by fluorescence real-time RT-PCR using the LightCycler technology. Porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) was used as housekeeping gene and to enable relative quantification. For comparison to TGCTs, 38 benign testicular biopsies from patients with fertility disorders were assayed. hTERT expression was detected in all examined undifferentiated TGCTs and in the benign testicular tissue specimens with germ cell content (N(hTERT) 38-127). In contrast, mature teratomas from primary and post-chemotherapy masses, which are characterized by well-differentiated tissue components showed a nearly complete downregulation of hTERT expression (N(hTERT) 2-4, p<0.001). hTR levels however, were high in all tumors and independently of the presence of germ cells also in the benign tissue control group. hTERT mRNA is expressed in all undifferentiated TGCTs but repressed in mature teratomas. This suggests an inverse correlation between the differentiation status of germ cell tumors and hTERT expression. Thus, detection of hTERT expression in tumors histopathologically classified as mature teratomas enables a molecular-diagnostic confirmation and might aid decision making for treatment of patients presenting with this tumor subtype.

  15. Multiplexed miRNA northern blots via hybridization chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzkopf, Maayan; Pierce, Niles A.

    2016-01-01

    Northern blots enable detection of a target RNA of interest in a biological sample using standard benchtop equipment. miRNAs are the most challenging targets as they must be detected with a single short nucleic acid probe. With existing approaches, it is cumbersome to perform multiplexed blots in which several RNAs are detected simultaneously, impeding the study of interacting regulatory elements. Here, we address this shortcoming by demonstrating multiplexed northern blotting based on the mechanism of hybridization chain reaction (HCR). With this approach, nucleic acid probes complementary to RNA targets trigger chain reactions in which fluorophore-labeled DNA hairpins self-assemble into tethered fluorescent amplification polymers. The programmability of HCR allows multiple amplifiers to operate simultaneously and independently within a blot, enabling straightforward multiplexing. We demonstrate simultaneous detection of three endogenous miRNAs in total RNA extracted from 293T and HeLa cells. For a given target, HCR signal scales linearly with target abundance, enabling relative and absolute quantitation. Using non-radioactive HCR, sensitive and selective miRNA detection is achieved using 2′OMe-RNA probes. The HCR northern blot protocol takes ∼1.5 days independent of the number of target RNAs. PMID:27270083

  16. Multiplexed miRNA northern blots via hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Maayan; Pierce, Niles A

    2016-09-01

    Northern blots enable detection of a target RNA of interest in a biological sample using standard benchtop equipment. miRNAs are the most challenging targets as they must be detected with a single short nucleic acid probe. With existing approaches, it is cumbersome to perform multiplexed blots in which several RNAs are detected simultaneously, impeding the study of interacting regulatory elements. Here, we address this shortcoming by demonstrating multiplexed northern blotting based on the mechanism of hybridization chain reaction (HCR). With this approach, nucleic acid probes complementary to RNA targets trigger chain reactions in which fluorophore-labeled DNA hairpins self-assemble into tethered fluorescent amplification polymers. The programmability of HCR allows multiple amplifiers to operate simultaneously and independently within a blot, enabling straightforward multiplexing. We demonstrate simultaneous detection of three endogenous miRNAs in total RNA extracted from 293T and HeLa cells. For a given target, HCR signal scales linearly with target abundance, enabling relative and absolute quantitation. Using non-radioactive HCR, sensitive and selective miRNA detection is achieved using 2'OMe-RNA probes. The HCR northern blot protocol takes ∼1.5 days independent of the number of target RNAs. PMID:27270083

  17. Problem-Solving Test: Southwestern Blotting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberényi, József

    2014-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: Southern blotting, Western blotting, restriction endonucleases, agarose gel electrophoresis, nitrocellulose filter, molecular hybridization, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, proto-oncogene, c-abl, Src-homology domains, tyrosine protein kinase, nuclear localization signal, cDNA,…

  18. Single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis of mRNA transcripts for highly sensitive gene expression profiling in near real time.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhiyong; Young, Brandon; Baird, Alison E; Soper, Steven A

    2013-08-20

    Expression analysis of mRNAs transcribed from certain genes can be used as important sources of biomarkers for in vitro diagnostics. While the use of reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) can provide excellent analytical sensitivity for monitoring transcript numbers, more sensitive approaches for expression analysis that can report results in near real-time are needed for many critical applications. We report a novel assay that can provide exquisite limits-of-quantitation and consists of reverse transcription (RT) followed by a ligase detection reaction (LDR) with single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) to provide digital readout through molecular counting. For this assay, no PCR was employed, which enabled short assay turnaround times. To facilitate implementation of the assay, a cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) microchip, which was fabricated using hot embossing, was employed to carry out the LDR in a continuous flow format with online single-molecule detection following the LDR. As demonstrators of the assay's utility, MMP-7 mRNA was expression profiled from several colorectal cancer cell lines. It was found that the RT-LDR/spFRET assay produced highly linear calibration plots even in the low copy number regime. Comparison to RT-qPCR indicated a better linearity over the low copy number range investigated (10-10,000 copies) with an R(2) = 0.9995 for RT-LDR/spFRET and R(2) = 0.98 for RT-qPCR. In addition, differentiating between copy numbers of 10 and 50 could be performed with higher confidence using RT-LDR/spFRET. To demonstrate the short assay turnaround times obtainable using the RT-LDR/spFRET assay, a two thermal cycle LDR was carried out on amphiphysin gene transcripts that can serve as important diagnostic markers for ischemic stroke. The ability to supply diagnostic information on possible stroke events in short turnaround times using RT-LDR/spFRET will enable clinicians to treat patients effectively with appropriate time

  19. Studying protein-protein interactions via blot overlay/far western blot.

    PubMed

    Hall, Randy A

    2015-01-01

    Blot overlay is a useful method for studying protein-protein interactions. This technique involves fractionating proteins on SDS-PAGE, blotting to nitrocellulose or PVDF membrane, and then incubating with a probe of interest. The probe is typically a protein that is radiolabeled, biotinylated, or simply visualized with a specific antibody. When the probe is visualized via antibody detection, this technique is often referred to as "Far Western blot." Many different kinds of protein-protein interactions can be studied via blot overlay, and the method is applicable to screens for unknown protein-protein interactions as well as to the detailed characterization of known interactions.

  20. Streamlined Strategies to Better Visualize Southern Blotting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Derek M.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I describe an animated slideshow of Southern blotting that I have made freely available to other instructors. My hope is to provide a clear visualization of the logistics behind the technique so that instructors have a solid basis--as well as time freed up--to discuss its applications with students.

  1. Multiplexed Western Blotting Using Microchip Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shi; Furtaw, Michael D; Chen, Huaxian; Lamb, Don T; Ferguson, Stephen A; Arvin, Natalie E; Dawod, Mohamed; Kennedy, Robert T

    2016-07-01

    Western blotting is a commonly used protein assay that combines the selectivity of electrophoretic separation and immunoassay. The technique is limited by long time, manual operation with mediocre reproducibility, and large sample consumption, typically 10-20 μg per assay. Western blots are also usually used to measure only one protein per assay with an additional housekeeping protein for normalization. Measurement of multiple proteins is possible; however, it requires stripping membranes of antibody and then reprobing with a second antibody. Miniaturized alternatives to Western blot based on microfluidic or capillary electrophoresis have been developed that enable higher-throughput, automation, and greater mass sensitivity. In one approach, proteins are separated by electrophoresis on a microchip that is dragged along a polyvinylidene fluoride membrane so that as proteins exit the chip they are captured on the membrane for immunoassay. In this work, we improve this method to allow multiplexed protein detection. Multiple injections made from the same sample can be deposited in separate tracks so that each is probed with a different antibody. To further enhance multiplexing capability, the electrophoresis channel dimensions were optimized for resolution while keeping separation and blotting times to less than 8 min. Using a 15 μm deep × 50 μm wide × 8.6 cm long channel, it is possible to achieve baseline resolution of proteins that differ by 5% in molecular weight, e.g., ERK1 (44 kDa) from ERK2 (42 kDa). This resolution allows similar proteins detected by cross-reactive antibodies in a single track. We demonstrate detection of 11 proteins from 9 injections from a single Jurkat cell lysate sample consisting of 400 ng of total protein using this procedure. Thus, multiplexed Western blots are possible without cumbersome stripping and reprobing steps. PMID:27270033

  2. Single cell-resolution western blotting.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chi-Chih; Yamauchi, Kevin A; Vlassakis, Julea; Sinkala, Elly; Duncombe, Todd A; Herr, Amy E

    2016-08-01

    This protocol describes how to perform western blotting on individual cells to measure cell-to-cell variation in protein expression levels and protein state. Like conventional western blotting, single-cell western blotting (scWB) is particularly useful for protein targets that lack selective antibodies (e.g., isoforms) and in cases in which background signal from intact cells is confounding. scWB is performed on a microdevice that comprises an array of microwells molded in a thin layer of a polyacrylamide gel (PAG). The gel layer functions as both a molecular sieving matrix during PAGE and a blotting scaffold during immunoprobing. scWB involves five main stages: (i) gravity settling of cells into microwells; (ii) chemical lysis of cells in each microwell; (iii) PAGE of each single-cell lysate; (iv) exposure of the gel to UV light to blot (immobilize) proteins to the gel matrix; and (v) in-gel immunoprobing of immobilized proteins. Multiplexing can be achieved by probing with antibody cocktails and using antibody stripping/reprobing techniques, enabling detection of 10+ proteins in each cell. We also describe microdevice fabrication for both uniform and pore-gradient microgels. To extend in-gel immunoprobing to gels of small pore size, we describe an optional gel de-cross-linking protocol for more effective introduction of antibodies into the gel layer. Once the microdevice has been fabricated, the assay can be completed in 4-6 h by microfluidic novices and it generates high-selectivity, multiplexed data from single cells. The technique is relevant when direct measurement of proteins in single cells is needed, with applications spanning the fundamental biosciences to applied biomedicine. PMID:27466711

  3. BLOT II Ver.1.39

    2003-06-03

    BLOT II is a graphic program for post-processing finite element analyses output in the EXODUS II database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive graphics devices supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots of the analysis output variables including deformed mesh plots, line contours, filled (painted) contours, vector plots of two/three variables (velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (discrete cracks). Features include pathlines of analysismore » variables drawn on the mesh, element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. X-Y plots of the analysis variables include time vs. variable plots or variable vs. variable plots, and distance vs. variable plots at selected time stips where distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers.« less

  4. BLOT II Ver.1.39

    SciTech Connect

    2003-06-03

    BLOT II is a graphic program for post-processing finite element analyses output in the EXODUS II database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive graphics devices supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots of the analysis output variables including deformed mesh plots, line contours, filled (painted) contours, vector plots of two/three variables (velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (discrete cracks). Features include pathlines of analysis variables drawn on the mesh, element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. X-Y plots of the analysis variables include time vs. variable plots or variable vs. variable plots, and distance vs. variable plots at selected time stips where distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers.

  5. Western Blotting Inaccuracies with Unverified Antibodies: Need for a Western Blotting Minimal Reporting Standard (WBMRS)

    PubMed Central

    Gilda, Jennifer E.; Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Cheah, Jenice X.; West, Toni M.; Bodine, Sue C.; Gomes, Aldrin V.

    2015-01-01

    Western blotting is a commonly used technique in biological research. A major problem with Western blotting is not the method itself, but the use of poor quality antibodies as well as the use of different experimental conditions that affect the linearity and sensitivity of the Western blot. Investigation of some conditions that are commonly used and often modified in Western blotting, as well as some commercial antibodies, showed that published articles often fail to report critical parameters needed to reproduce the results. These parameters include the amount of protein loaded, the blocking solution and conditions used, the amount of primary and secondary antibodies used, the antibody incubation solutions, the detection method and the quantification method utilized. In the present study, comparison of ubiquitinated proteins in rat heart and liver samples showed different results depending on the antibody utilized. Validation of five commercial ubiquitin antibodies using purified ubiquitinated proteins, ubiquitin chains and free ubiquitin showed that these antibodies differ in their ability to detect free ubiquitin or ubiquitinated proteins. Investigating proteins modified with interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) in young and old rat hearts using six commercially available antibodies showed that most antibodies gave different semi-quantitative results, suggesting large variability among antibodies. Evidence showing the importance of the Western blot buffer and the concentration of antibody used is presented. Hence there is a critical need for comprehensive reporting of experimental conditions to improve the accuracy and reproducibility of Western blot analysis. A Western blotting minimal reporting standard (WBMRS) is suggested to improve the reproducibility of Western blot analysis. PMID:26287535

  6. Using a large area CMOS APS for direct chemiluminescence detection in Western blotting electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Michela; Newcombe, Jane; Anaxagoras, Thalis; Allinson, Nigel M.; Wells, Kevin

    2012-03-01

    Western blotting electrophoretic sequencing is an analytical technique widely used in Functional Proteomics to detect, recognize and quantify specific labelled proteins in biological samples. A commonly used label for western blotting is Enhanced ChemiLuminescence (ECL) reagents based on fluorescent light emission of Luminol at 425nm. Film emulsion is the conventional detection medium, but is characterized by non-linear response and limited dynamic range. Several western blotting digital imaging systems have being developed, mainly based on the use of cooled Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) and single avalanche diodes that address these issues. Even so these systems present key drawbacks, such as a low frame rate and require operation at low temperature. Direct optical detection using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Active Pixel Sensors (APS)could represent a suitable digital alternative for this application. In this paper the authors demonstrate the viability of direct chemiluminescent light detection in western blotting electrophoresis using a CMOS APS at room temperature. Furthermore, in recent years, improvements in fabrication techniques have made available reliable processes for very large imagers, which can be now scaled up to wafer size, allowing direct contact imaging of full size western blotting samples. We propose using a novel wafer scale APS (12.8 cm×13.2 cm), with an array architecture using two different pixel geometries that can deliver an inherently low noise and high dynamic range image at the same time representing a dramatic improvement with respect to the current western blotting imaging systems.

  7. Validation of a Dot-Blot quantitative technique for large scale analysis of beef tenderness biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Guillemin, N; Meunier, B; Jurie, C; Cassar-Malek, I; Hocquette, J-F; Leveziel, H; Picard, B

    2009-10-01

    Beef tenderness is a very complex and multifactorial sensorial meat quality trait, which depends partly on muscle characteristics. This tissue is very variable according to animal type (age, breed and sex) and rearing conditions. Consequently, beef tenderness exhibits a great variability. Different research programs have revealed several genes or proteins which could be good markers of beef tenderness. In order to validate the relation of these markers with beef tenderness on a large population of bovines, it is necessary to have a large-scale and trusty technique which can access different quantities of proteins related to tenderness. In this study we firstly compared Western-Blot and Dot-Blot. Secondly, we evaluated Dot-Blot technical and biological capabilities for the quantification of protein biomarkers. The results demonstrated that the Dot-Blot technique with fluorescence detection presents numerous interests. This technique allows a good reproducibility and permits the simultaneous analysis of a large number of samples. The Dot-Blot technique defined and validated in this study can be used for protein biomarkers analyses, notably to predict beef tenderness. Another major result of this study is that about 5 to 10 animals per group are required to detect large differences (>1.5) in biomarker expression between tender and tough beef, whereas much larger numbers of animals (10 to 30) are required to detect smaller differences (about 1.2 to 1.3) taking into account the biological variability of these markers.

  8. Mapping Point Mutations in the Drosophila Rosy Locus Using Denaturing Gradient Gel Blots

    PubMed Central

    Gray, M.; Charpentier, A.; Walsh, K.; Wu, P.; Bender, W.

    1991-01-01

    Mutations within the rosy locus of Drosophila were mapped using blots of genomic DNA fragments separated on denaturing gradient gels. DNA sequence differences between otherwise identical small rosy DNA fragments were detected among the mutants as mobility shifts on the blots. Mutations were mapped to within a few hundred base pairs of rosy sequence in 100 of 130 mutants tested--a 77% detection rate. The sequence changes in 43 rosy mutations are presented; all but six of these were single base changes. Thirty-four of 36 sequenced mutations induced by the alkylating agents N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and ethyl methanesulfonate were transitions. All of the mutations mapped in the rosy transcription unit. Twenty-three of the 43 sequenced mutations change the predicted rosy gene polypeptide sequence; the remainder would interrupt protein translation (17), or disrupt mRNA processing (3). PMID:1901817

  9. BLOTS AND ALL: A HISTORY OF THE RORSCHACH INK BLOT TEST IN BRITAIN.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Katherine; Hegarty, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Despite the easily recognizable nature of the Rorschach ink blot test very little is known about the history of the test in Britain. We attend to the oft-ignored history of the Rorschach test in Britain and compare it to its history in the US. Prior to the Second World War, Rorschach testing in Britain had attracted advocates and critiques. Afterward, the British Rorschach Forum, a network with a high proportion of women, developed around the Tavistock Institute in London and The Rorschach Newsletter. In 1968, the International Rorschach Congress was held in London but soon after the group became less exclusive, and fell into decline. A comparative account of the Rorschach in Britain demonstrates how different national institutions invested in the 'projective hypothesis' according to the influence of psychoanalysis, the adoption of a nationalized health system, and the social positioning of 'others' throughout the twentieth century. In comparing and contrasting the history of the Rorschach in Britain and the US, we decentralize and particularize the history of North American Psychology. PMID:26924673

  10. Improvement of antigen blotting in a tissue blot immunobinding assay for the detection of two chili pepper viruses.

    PubMed

    Han, Jung-Heon; Shin, Jun-Sung; Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Byung-Dong

    2007-11-01

    The tissue blot immunobinding assay (TBIA) is widely used for the detection and localization of plant viruses in various plant tissues. The basic experimental procedures of TBIA sampling and blotting were simplified using commercially available micropipette tips. This method was termed the ring-blot immunobinding assay (R-BIA), as the blot on the membrane forms a ring shape. The detection efficacy of R-BIA was tested for two chili pepper viruses, pepper mild mottle tobamovirus (PMMoV) and pepper mottle potyvirus (PepMoV), following the optimized serological procedures of TBIA (length of the incubation period and BSA concentration, and primary and secondary antibodies). Sensitivity of the R-BIA was about 1 ng/ml of purified PMMoV in pepper leaf sap from a healthy pepper plant. R-BIA also showed high specificity in the detection of PMMoV and PepMoV. Moreover, the modified sampling and blotting procedures were simpler and more reliable than other TBIA methods (such as whole-leaf blotting and crushed-leaf blotting), suggesting that the R-BIA may be used for medium- to large-scale detection of plant viruses in laboratories with minimal facilities.

  11. Mixed lubrication after rewetting of blotted pleural mesothelium.

    PubMed

    Bodega, Francesca; Sironi, Chiara; Porta, Cristina; Pecchiari, Matteo; Zocchi, Luciano; Agostoni, Emilio

    2013-01-15

    Coefficient of kinetic friction (μ) of pleural mesothelium blotted with filter paper, and rewetted with Ringer solution markedly increases; this increase is removed if a sufficient amount of sialomucin or hyaluronan is added to Ringer (Bodega et al., 2012. Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology 180, 34-39). In this research we found that μ of pleural mesothelium blotted, rewetted, and sliding at physiological velocities and loads, decreased with increase of velocity, mainly at low velocities. Despite this decrease, μ at highest velocity was still double that before blotting. With small concentration of sialomucin or hyaluronan μ was markedly smaller at each velocity, decreased less with increase of velocity, and at highest velocity approached preblotting value. These findings indicate a regime of mixed lubrication in post-blotting Ringer, at variance with boundary lubrication occurring before blotting or postblotting with sufficient macromolecule addition. Greater roughness of mesothelial surface, caused by blotting, likely induces zones of elastohydrodynamic lubrication, which increase with velocity, while contact area decreases.

  12. Analysis of Gene and Protein Expression in Atherosclerotic Mouse Aorta by Western Blot and Quantitative Real-Time PCR.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Torres, José

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis involves changes in gene and protein expression patterns in affected arteries. Quantification of these alterations is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathology. Western blot and real-time PCR-used to quantify protein and messenger RNA levels, respectively-are invaluable molecular biology tools, particularly when material is limited. The availability of many genetically modified mouse models of atherosclerosis makes the mouse aorta an ideal tissue in which to carry out these expression pattern analyses. In this chapter, protocols are presented for mRNA and protein extraction from mouse aorta and for the accurate quantification of mRNA expression by RT-PCR and of proteins by western blot.

  13. Western Blot of Stained Proteins from Dried Polyacrylamide Gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, Claudia; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    1996-01-01

    Western blotting of proteins is customarily performed following their separation on polyacrylamide gels, either prior to staining (1) or, as recently reported, following staining (2). We describe here Western blotting with stained gels, which had been dried and some of which had been stored for years. This procedure permits immunological analysis of proteins, to which antisera may have become available only later, or where the application of newly developed sensitive detection methods is desired. Once rehydration of the gels is achieved, proteins can be-transferred to blotting membranes by any appropriate protocol. Proteins stained with Coomassie Blue have to be detected with a non-chromogenic method, such as the film-based enhanced chemiluminescence (ECL)2) procedure (3). Silver stained proteins, which transfer in the colorless form, may be visualized by any detection method, although, because of the usually very low amounts of proteins, detection by ECL is preferable. Blotting of stained proteins from rehydrated gels is as rapid and as quantitative as from freshly prepared gels, in contrast to blotting from wet stained gels, which requires extensive washing and results in low transfer efficiency (2). Together with a photographic record of the gel pattern, unambiguous identification of immunoreactive proteins from complex mixtures is possible. Some further applications of this work are discussed.

  14. Amplification with molecular beacon primers and reverse line blotting for the detection and typing of human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Jordens, J Z; Lanham, S; Pickett, M A; Amarasekara, S; Abeywickrema, I; Watt, P J

    2000-09-01

    A novel method for the detection and typing of human papillomavirus (HPV) was developed using molecular beacon primers. The method is based on the use of HPV-specific primers containing a hairpin loop structure in which fluorescent donor and quencher groups are held in close proximity such that fluorescence is quenched. Amplification of the target sequence results in the opening of the loop and the resulting fluorescence can be detected on a sequence detector system (SDS) 7700 (Applied Biosystems), as used for TaqMan assays. Fluorescent amplicons were identified on the SDS 7700 and then typed by a single hybridisation with specific probes immobilised in lines on a nylon membrane and detected on a fluorescent scanner. This novel beacon primer method compared well with conventional PCR for cervical scrape specimens. The combination of the beacon primer method and reverse line blotting should enable large-scale population studies of HPV infection.

  15. Improved semiquantitative Western blot technique with increased quantification range.

    PubMed

    Heidebrecht, F; Heidebrecht, A; Schulz, I; Behrens, S-E; Bader, A

    2009-06-30

    With the development of new interdisciplinary fields such as systems biology, the quantitative analysis of protein expression in biological samples gains more and more importance. Although the most common method for this is ELISA, Western blot also has advantages: The separation of proteins by size allows the evaluation of only specifically bound protein. This work examines the Western blot signal chain, determines some of the parameters relevant for quantitative analysis and proposes a mathematical model of the reaction kinetics. Using this model, a semiquantitative Western blot method for simultaneous quantification of different proteins using a hyperbolic calibration curve was developed. A program was written for the purpose of hyperbolic regression that allows quick determination of the calibration curve coefficients. This program can be used also for approximation of calibration curves in other applications such as ELISA, BCA or Bradford assays. PMID:19351538

  16. Detection of Blotted Proteins: Not All Blockers Are Created Equal.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Vishal; Mathews, Suresh T

    2015-01-01

    Western blotting is a standard analytical technique for detection of proteins. It is dependent on a number of components; from the specificity of the primary antibody to the reduction of competing biomolecules present in the assay. Blocking agents are a critical component for western blotting protocols as these diminish nonspecific binding by blocking off-target sites on the membrane. A variety of blocking agents are available and these are selected in an empirical manner, as no single blocker is compatible with every system. The best blocking agent and method for any particular assay will be an optimized but not absolute choice. Here, we describe characteristics of the most common blocking agents used in western blotting and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:26139251

  17. A Dual Color Southern Blot to Visualize Two Genomes or Genic Regions Simultaneously

    PubMed Central

    Zavala, Anamaria G.; Kulkarni, Amit S.; Fortunato, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel dual color Southern protocol to visualize two distinct genomes or genic regions simultaneously on a single Southern blot. The blot is developed with IRDye-conjugated antibody (Ab) and streptavidin that recognize Digoxigenin- (Dig) or biotin-labeled probes, respectively and visualized on an infrared imager. This protocol was validated by visualizing viral and host genomes of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-infected human fibroblasts. This technique utilizes extremely sensitive fluorescent imaging, allowing the detection of nanogram quantities of DNA, as opposed to microgram quantities needed in Southerns using radioactively labeled probes, and eliminates the inherent loss in signal after stripping and reprobing a Southern blot. The probes are labeled with non-radioactive Dig and biotin and can be stored for extended periods of time. This protocol will aid in studies of any system with two genomes, such as cells infected with numerous types of microorganisms (virus/parasites/bacteria), or studies of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA within the same cells. PMID:24389128

  18. A brief review of other notable protein blotting methods.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Biji T; Scofield, R Hal

    2009-01-01

    A plethora of methods have been used for transferring proteins from the gel to the membrane. These include centrifuge blotting, electroblotting of proteins to Teflon tape and membranes for N- and C-terminal sequence analysis, multiple tissue blotting, a two-step transfer of low and high molecular weight proteins, blotting of Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB)-stained proteins from polyacrylamide gels to transparencies, acid electroblotting onto activated glass, membrane-array method for the detection of human intestinal bacteria in fecal samples, protein microarray using a new black cellulose nitrate support, electrotransfer using square wave alternating voltage for enhanced protein recovery, polyethylene glycol-mediated significant enhancement of the immunoblotting transfer, parallel protein chemical processing before and during western blot and the molecular scanner concept, electronic western blot of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry-identified polypeptides from parallel processed gel-separated proteins, semidry electroblotting of peptides and proteins from acid-urea polyacrylamide gels, transfer of silver-stained proteins from polyacrylamide gels to polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes, and the display of K(+) channel proteins on a solid nitrocellulose support for assaying toxin binding. The quantification of proteins bound to PVDF membranes by elution of CBB, clarification of immunoblots on PVDF for transmission densitometry, gold coating of nonconductive membranes before MALDI tandem mass spectrometric analysis to prevent charging effect for analysis of peptides from PVDF membranes, and a simple method for coating native polysaccharides onto nitrocellulose are some of the methods involving either the manipulation of membranes with transferred proteins or just a passive transfer of antigens to membranes. All these methods are briefly reviewed in this chapter. PMID:19378075

  19. Other notable protein blotting methods: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Biji T; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Proteins have been transferred from the gel to the membrane by a variety of methods. These include vacuum blotting, centrifuge blotting, electroblotting of proteins to Teflon tape and membranes for N- and C-terminal sequence analysis, multiple tissue blotting, a two-step transfer of low- and high-molecular-weight proteins, acid electroblotting onto activated glass, membrane-array method for the detection of human intestinal bacteria in fecal samples, protein microarray using a new black cellulose nitrate support, electrotransfer using square wave alternating voltage for enhanced protein recovery, polyethylene glycol-mediated significant enhancement of the immunoblotting transfer, parallel protein chemical processing before and during western blot and the molecular scanner concept, electronic western blot of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric-identified polypeptides from parallel processed gel-separated proteins, semidry electroblotting of peptides and proteins from acid-urea polyacrylamide gels, transfer of silver-stained proteins from polyacrylamide gels to polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes, and the display of K(+) channel proteins on a solid nitrocellulose support for assaying toxin binding. The quantification of proteins bound to PVDF membranes by elution of CBB, clarification of immunoblots on PVDF for transmission densitometry, gold coating of nonconductive membranes before matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem mass spectrometric analysis to prevent charging effect for analysis of peptides from PVDF membranes, and a simple method for coating native polysaccharides onto nitrocellulose are some of the methods involving either the manipulation of membranes with transferred proteins or just a passive transfer of antigens to membranes. All these methods are briefly reviewed in this chapter. PMID:26044032

  20. Changing blue fluorescent protein to green fluorescent protein using chemical RNA editing as a novel strategy in genetic restoration.

    PubMed

    Vu, Luyen T; Nguyen, Thanh T K; Alam, Shafiul; Sakamoto, Takashi; Fujimoto, Kenzo; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2015-11-01

    Using the transition from cytosine of BFP (blue fluorescent protein) gene to uridine of GFP (green fluorescent protein) gene at position 199 as a model, we successfully controlled photochemical RNA editing to effect site-directed deamination of cytidine (C) to uridine (U). Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing 5'-carboxyvinyl-2'-deoxyuridine ((CV) U) were used for reversible photoligation, and single-stranded 100-nt BFP DNA and in vitro-transcribed full-length BFP mRNA were the targets. Photo-cross-linking with the responsive ODNs was performed using UV (366 nm) irradiation, which was followed by heat treatment, and the cross-linked nucleotide was cleaved through photosplitting (UV, 312 nm). The products were analyzed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and fluorescence measurements. Western blotting and fluorescence-analysis results revealed that in vitro-translated proteins were synthesized from mRNAs after site-directed RNA editing. We detected substantial amounts of the target-base-substituted fragment using RFLP and observed highly reproducible spectra of the transition-GFP signal using fluorescence spectroscopy, which indicated protein stability. ODNc restored approximately 10% of the C-to-U transition. Thus, we successfully used non-enzymatic site-directed deamination for genetic restoration in vitro. In the near future, in vivo studies that include cultured cells and model animals will be conducted to treat genetic disorders.

  1. mRNA imprinting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Following its synthesis in the nucleus, mRNA undergoes various stages that are critical for the proper synthesis, localization and possibly functionality of its encoded protein. Recently, we have shown that two RNA polymerase II (Pol II) subunits, Rpb4p and Rpb7p, associate with the nascent transcript co-transcriptionally. This “mRNA imprinting” lasts throughout the mRNA lifetime and is required for proper regulation of all major stages that the mRNA undergoes. Other possible cases of co-transcriptional imprinting are discussed. Since mRNAs can be transported from the synthesizing cell to other cells, we propose that mRNA imprinting can also affect the phenotype of the recipient cells. This can be viewed as “mRNA-based epigenetics.” PMID:21686103

  2. RNA Colony Blot Hybridization Method for Enumeration of Culturable Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus Bacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Grim, Christopher J.; Zo, Young-Gun; Hasan, Nur A.; Ali, Afsar; Chowdhury, Wasimul B.; Islam, Atiqul; Rashid, Mohammed H.; Alam, Munirul; Morris, J. Glenn; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R.

    2009-01-01

    A species-specific RNA colony blot hybridization protocol was developed for enumeration of culturable Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus bacteria in environmental water samples. Bacterial colonies on selective or nonselective plates were lysed by sodium dodecyl sulfate, and the lysates were immobilized on nylon membranes. A fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probe targeting a phylogenetic signature sequence of 16S rRNA of V. cholerae and V. mimicus was hybridized to rRNA molecules immobilized on the nylon colony lift blots. The protocol produced strong positive signals for all colonies of the 15 diverse V. cholerae-V. mimicus strains tested, indicating 100% sensitivity of the probe for the targeted species. For visible colonies of 10 nontarget species, the specificity of the probe was calculated to be 90% because of a weak positive signal produced by Grimontia (Vibrio) hollisae, a marine bacterium. When both the sensitivity and specificity of the assay were evaluated using lake water samples amended with a bioluminescent V. cholerae strain, no false-negative or false-positive results were found, indicating 100% sensitivity and specificity for culturable bacterial populations in freshwater samples when G. hollisae was not present. When the protocol was applied to laboratory microcosms containing V. cholerae attached to live copepods, copepods were found to carry approximately 10,000 to 50,000 CFU of V. cholerae per copepod. The protocol was also used to analyze pond water samples collected in an area of cholera endemicity in Bangladesh over a 9-month period. Water samples collected from six ponds demonstrated a peak in abundance of total culturable V. cholerae bacteria 1 to 2 months prior to observed increases in pathogenic V. cholerae and in clinical cases recorded by the area health clinic. The method provides a highly specific and sensitive tool for monitoring the dynamics of V. cholerae in the environment. The RNA blot hybridization protocol can also be

  3. A high-affinity reversible protein stain for Western blots.

    PubMed

    Antharavally, Babu S; Carter, Brad; Bell, Peter A; Krishna Mallia, A

    2004-06-15

    We describe a reversible staining technique, using MemCode, a reversible protein stain by which proteins can be visualized on nitrocellulose and polyvinylidine fluoride (PVDF) membranes without being permanently fixed to the membrane itself. This allows subsequent immunoblot analysis of the proteins to be performed. The procedure is applicable only to protein blots on nitrocellulose and PVDF membranes. MemCode is a reversible protein stain composed of copper as a part of an organic complex that interacts noncovalently with proteins. MemCode shows rapid protein staining, taking 30s to 1 min for completion. The method is simple and utilizes convenient application conditions that are compatible with the matrix materials and the protein. The stain is more sensitive than any previously described dye-based universal protein staining system. The turquoise-blue-stained protein bands do not fade with time and are easy to photograph compared to those stained with Ponceau S. Absorbance in the blue region of the spectrum offers good properties for photo documentation and avoids interference from common biological chromophores. The stain on the protein is easily reversible in 2 min for nitrocellulose membrane and in 10 min for PVDF membrane with MemCode stain eraser. The stain is compatible with general Western blot detection systems, and membrane treatment with MemCode stain does not interfere with conventional chemiluminescent or chromogenic detection using horseradish peroxide and alkaline phosphatase substrates. The stain is also compatible with N-terminal sequence analysis of proteins.

  4. Quantitative Northern Blot Analysis of Mammalian rRNA Processing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minshi; Pestov, Dimitri G

    2016-01-01

    Assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes is an elaborate biosynthetic process that begins in the nucleolus and requires hundreds of cellular factors. Analysis of rRNA processing has been instrumental for studying the mechanisms of ribosome biogenesis and effects of stress conditions on the molecular milieu of the nucleolus. Here, we describe the quantitative analysis of the steady-state levels of rRNA precursors, applicable to studies in mammalian cells and other organisms. We include protocols for gel electrophoresis and northern blotting of rRNA precursors using procedures optimized for the large size of these RNAs. We also describe the ratio analysis of multiple precursors, a technique that facilitates the accurate assessment of changes in the efficiency of individual pre-rRNA processing steps. PMID:27576717

  5. The detection of DNA-binding proteins by protein blotting.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, B; Steinberg, J; Laemmli, U K; Weintraub, H

    1980-01-01

    A method, called "protein blotting," for the detection of DNA-binding proteins is described. Proteins are separated on an SDA-polyacrylamide gel. The gel is sandwiched between 2 nitrocellulose filters and the proteins allowed to diffuse out of the gel and onto the filters. The proteins are tightly bound to each filter, producing a replica of the original gel pattern. The replica is used to detect DNA-binding proteins, RNA-binding proteins or histone-binding proteins by incubation of the filter with [32P]DNA, [125I]RNA, or [125I] histone. Evidence is also presented that specific protein-DNA interactions may be detected by this technique; under appropriate conditions, the lac repressor binds only to DNA containing the lac operator. Strategies for the detection of specific protein-DNA interactions are discussed. Images PMID:6243775

  6. RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis in search for a putative Paramecium beta-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Płatek, A; Wiejak, J; Wyroba, E

    1999-01-01

    RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis were performed in order to search for a putative beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) in Paramecium using several beta2-adrenergic-specific molecular probes. Under strictly defined RT-PCR conditions DNA species of expected molecular size about 360 bp were generated with the primers corresponding to the universal mammalian beta2-AR sequence tagged sites (located within the 4th and the 6th transmembrane regions of the receptor). This RT-PCR product hybridized in Southern blot analysis with the oligonucleotide probe designed to the highly conservative beta2-AR region involved in G-proteins interaction and located within the amplified region. Northern hybridization was performed on Paramecium total RNA and mRNA with human beta2-AR cDNA and two oligonucleotide probes: the first included Phe 290 involved in agonist binding (Strader et al., 1995) and the second was the backward RT-PCR primer. All these probes revealed the presence of about 2 kb mRNA which is consistent with the size of beta2-AR transcripts found in higher eukaryotes.

  7. Characterization of Nora Virus Structural Proteins via Western Blot Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, Brad L.; Carlson, Darby J.

    2016-01-01

    Nora virus is a single stranded RNA picorna-like virus with four open reading frames (ORFs). The coding potentials of the ORFs are not fully characterized, but ORF3 and ORF4 are believed to encode the capsid proteins (VP3, VP4a, VP4b, and VP4c) comprising the virion. To determine the polypeptide composition of Nora virus virions, polypeptides from purified virus were compared to polypeptides detected in Nora virus infected Drosophila melanogaster. Nora virus was purified from infected flies and used to challenge mice for the production of antisera. ORF3, ORF4a, ORF4b, and ORF4c were individually cloned and expressed in E. coli; resultant recombinant proteins purified and were used to make monospecific antisera. Antisera were evaluated via Western blot against whole virus particles and Nora virus infected fly lysates. Viral purification yielded two particle types with densities of ~1.31 g/mL (empty particles) and ~1.33 g/mL (complete virions). Comparison of purified virus polypeptide composition to Nora virus infected D. melanogaster lysate showed the number of proteins in infected cell lysates is less than purified virus. Our results suggest the virion is composed of 6 polypeptides, VP3, VP4a, two forms of VP4b, and two forms of VP4c. This polypeptide composition is similar to other small RNA insect viruses. PMID:27298753

  8. Extraction of DNA from paraffin blocks for Southern blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Mies, C; Houldsworth, J; Chaganti, R S

    1991-02-01

    Tissues stored as paraffin blocks are a potential source of DNA for retrospective clinicogenetic analysis. To assess the feasibility of Southern blot analysis, DNA extracted from paraffin blocks was compared with DNA obtained from fresh-frozen controls of the same tissues. Sections 50-100 microns thick cut from paraffin blocks of 11 normal tissues, 18 lymphoid lesions, and 9 gastric carcinoma samples were deparaffinized and incubated at 45 degrees C for 48 to 72 h in a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)/proteinase K solution. Following organic extraction, alcohol precipitation, restriction endonuclease digestion, and gel electrophoresis, DNA was transferred to nylon membranes. 32P-labelled DNA probes for the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus and T-cell receptor beta-chain gene were hybridized to the normal tissue and lymphoid samples; the gastric cancers were probed for the HER-2/neu protooncogene. Intact DNA was obtained from the majority of formalin-fixed samples, yielding results qualitatively similar to those from fresh tissues. Degradation is the most significant problem in analyzing DNA extracted from paraffin blocks and compromises accurate quantitation. DNA analysis using paraffin-embedded tissue has potential clinical and research applications and may be a particularly useful way to study gene abnormalities in unusual tumors infrequently available as fresh specimens.

  9. Western blotting by thin-film direct coating.

    PubMed

    Yen, Yi-Kuang; Jiang, Yi-Wei; Chang, Shih-Chung; Wang, An-Bang

    2014-05-20

    A novel thin-film direct coating (TDC) technique was developed to markedly reduce the amount of antibody required for Western blotting (WB). Automatic application of the technique for a few seconds easily and homogeneously coats the specific primary antibody on the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane. While conventional WB requires 0.4 μg of the primary antibody, the proposed technique only uses 4 × 10(-2) μg, which can be reduced further to 4 × 10(-5) μg by reducing the coater width. Moreover, the proposed process reduces antibody probing times from 60 to 10 min. The quantification capability of TDC WB showed high linearity within a 4-log2 dynamic range for detecting target antigen glutathione-S-transferase. Furthermore, TDC WB can specifically detect the extrinsic glutathione-S-transferase added in the Escherichia coli or 293T cell lysate with better staining sensitivity than conventional WB. TDC WB can also clearly probe the intrinsic β-actin, α-tubulin, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which are usually used as control proteins in biological experiments. This novel technique has been shown to not only have valuable potential for increasing WB efficiency but also for providing significant material savings for future biomedical applications. PMID:24773468

  10. Mammalian. cap alpha. -polymerase: cloning of partial complementary DNA and immunobinding of catalytic subunit in crude homogenate protein blots

    SciTech Connect

    SenGupta, D.N.; Kumar, P.; Zmudzka, B.Z.; Coughlin, S.; Vishwanatha, J.K.; Robey, F.A.; Parrott, C.; Wilson, S.H.

    1987-02-10

    A new polyclonal antibody against the ..cap alpha..-polymerase catalytic polypeptide was prepared by using homogeneous HeLa cell..cap alpha..-polymerase. The antibody neutralized ..cap alpha..-polymerase activity and was strong and specific for the ..cap alpha..-polymerase catalytic polypeptide (M/sub r/ 183,000) in Western blot analysis of crude extracts of HeLa cells. The antibody was used to screen a cDNA library of newborn rat brain poly(A+) RNA in lambdagt11. A positive phage was identified and plaque purified. This phage, designated lambdapol..cap alpha..1.2, also was found to be positive with an antibody against Drosophila ..cap alpha..-polymerase. The insert in lambdapol..cap alpha..1.2 (1183 base pairs) contained a poly(A) sequence at the 3' terminus and a short in-phase open reading frame at the 5' terminus. A synthetic oligopeptide (eight amino acids) corresponding to the open reading frame was used to raise antiserum in rabbits. Antibody affinity purified from this serum was found to be immunoreactive against purified ..cap alpha..-polymerase by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and was capable of immunoprecipitating ..cap alpha..-polymerase. This indicated the lambdapol..cap alpha..1.2 insert encoded an ..cap alpha..-polymerase epitope and suggested that the cDNA corresponded to an ..cap alpha..-polymerase mRNA. This was confirmed in hybrid selection experiments using pUC9 containing the cDNA insert and poly(A+) RNA from newborn rat brain; the insert hybridized to mRNA capable of encoding ..cap alpha..-polymerase catalytic polypeptides. Northern blot analysis of rat brain poly(A+) RNA revealed that this mRNA is approx.5.4 kilobases.

  11. Localization of histidine decarboxylase mRNA in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Wang, Y M; Zahnow, C A; Joseph, D R; Millhorn, D E

    1990-08-01

    The recent cloning of a cDNA encoding fetal rat liver histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the synthesizing enzyme for histamine, allows the study of the central histaminergic system at the molecular level. To this end, Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses were used to determine the regional and cellular distribution of neurons which express HDC mRNA in rat brain. Three hybridizing species which migrate as 1.6-, 2.6-, and 3.5-kb RNA were identified with Northern blots. The major (2.6 kb) and minor (3.5 kb) species, characteristic of HDC mRNA in fetal liver, were expressed at high levels in diencephalon and at just detectable levels in hippocampus, but not in other brain regions. In contrast, the 1.6-kb species was present in all brain regions examined except the olfactory bulb. Cells which contain HDC mRNA were found by in situ hybridization in the hypothalamus; HDC mRNA-containing cells were not detected in other areas, including the hippocampus. Hypothalamic neurons which express HDC mRNA were localized to all aspects of the tuberomammillary nucleus, a result consistent with previous immunohistochemical findings. PMID:19912749

  12. Pairwise detection of site-specific receptor phosphorylations using single-molecule blotting

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Lock; Kim, Daehyung; Lee, Seongsil; Kim, Su-Jeong; Noh, Jung Eun; Kim, Joung-Hun; Chae, Young Chan; Lee, Jong-Bong; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) at the plasma membrane (PM) determine the signal transduction efficacy alone and in combination. However, current approaches to identify PTMs provide ensemble results, inherently overlooking combinatorial PTMs in a single polypeptide molecule. Here, we describe a single-molecule blotting (SiMBlot) assay that combines biotinylation of cell surface receptors with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. This method enables quantitative measurement of the phosphorylation status of individual membrane receptor molecules and colocalization analysis of multiple immunofluorescence signals to directly visualize pairwise site-specific phosphorylation patterns at the single-molecule level. Strikingly, application of SiMBlot to study ligand-dependent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation, which is widely thought to be multi-phosphorylated, reveals that EGFR on cell membranes is hardly multi-phosphorylated, unlike in vitro autophosphorylated EGFR. Therefore, we expect SiMBlot to aid understanding of vast combinatorial PTM patterns, which are concealed in ensemble methods, and to broaden knowledge of RTK signaling. PMID:27009355

  13. Multicenter evaluation of the novel ABN Western blot (immunoblot) system in comparison with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a different Western blot.

    PubMed

    Weber, B; Hess, G; Enzensberger, R; Harms, F; Evans, C J; Hamann, A; Doerr, H W

    1992-03-01

    A new, modular Western blot (immunoblot) system for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibodies (ABN WesPage; Wellcome) was compared with enzyme immunoassays (Wellcome, Behringwerke, and Abbott) and with a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-licensed Western blot (DuPont) in a multicenter study. A total of 649 serum samples from HIV patients at different stages of the disease, as well as from high-risk patients, from patients with conditions unrelated to AIDS, and from healthy blood donors, were used in the evaluation along with nine seroconversion panels. For evaluation of Western blot reactivity, both Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and FDA criteria were used. With the DuPont Western blot as the reference assay, the overall sensitivity and specificity of the ABN WesPage were 100 and 99.1%, respectively, when indeterminate results were not taken into account and when both tests were interpreted in accordance with CDC criteria. The DuPont Western blot detected significantly more antibodies to pol and gag gene products than the ABN WesPage. The ABN WesPage showed a higher positive rate of detection of viral envelope band gp160. When both Western blots were interpreted in accordance with CDC criteria, the ABN WesPage and the DuPont Western blot yielded 9.3 and 10.4% indeterminate results, respectively. When the DuPont Western blot was interpreted in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions (FDA criteria), 25.7% of the samples tested were regarded as indeterminate. The choice of interpretation criteria is of paramount importance for the evaluation of HIV Western blot patterns.

  14. Immuno-Northern Blotting: Detection of RNA Modifications by Using Antibodies against Modified Nucleosides

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Yasutoshi; Itoh, Kunihiko; Nankumo, Shinnosuke; Shima, Hisato; Kikuchi, Koichi; Takeuchi, Yoichi; Elkordy, Alaa; Suzuki, Takehiro; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Ito, Sadayoshi; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Abe, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    The biological roles of RNA modifications are still largely not understood. Thus, developing a method for detecting RNA modifications is important for further clarification. We developed a method for detecting RNA modifications called immuno-northern blotting (INB) analysis and herein introduce its various capabilities. This method involves the separation of RNAs using either polyacrylamide or agarose gel electrophoresis, followed by transfer onto a nylon membrane and subsequent immunoblotting using antibodies against modified nucleosides for the detection of specific modifications. We confirmed that INB with the antibodies for 1-methyladenosine (m1A), N6-methyladenosine (m6A), pseudouridine, and 5-methylcytidine (m5C) showed different modifications in a variety of RNAs from various species and organelles. INB with the anti-m5C antibody revealed that the antibody cross-reacted with another modification on DNA, suggesting the application of this method for characterization of the antibody for modified nucleosides. Additionally, using INB with the antibody for m1A, which is a highly specific modification in eukaryotic tRNA, we detected tRNA-derived fragments known as tiRNAs under the cellular stress response, suggesting the application for tracking target RNA containing specific modifications. INB with the anti-m6A antibody confirmed the demethylation of m6A by the specific demethylases fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO) and ALKBH5, suggesting its application for quantifying target modifications in separated RNAs. Furthermore, INB demonstrated that the knockdown of FTO and ALKBH5 increased the m6A modification in small RNAs as well as in mRNA. The INB method has high specificity, sensitivity, and quantitative capability, and it can be employed with conventional experimental apparatus. Therefore, this method would be useful for research on RNA modifications and metabolism. PMID:26606401

  15. Immuno-Northern Blotting: Detection of RNA Modifications by Using Antibodies against Modified Nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Eikan; Jinno, Daisuke; Akiyama, Yasutoshi; Itoh, Kunihiko; Nankumo, Shinnosuke; Shima, Hisato; Kikuchi, Koichi; Takeuchi, Yoichi; Elkordy, Alaa; Suzuki, Takehiro; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Ito, Sadayoshi; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Abe, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    The biological roles of RNA modifications are still largely not understood. Thus, developing a method for detecting RNA modifications is important for further clarification. We developed a method for detecting RNA modifications called immuno-northern blotting (INB) analysis and herein introduce its various capabilities. This method involves the separation of RNAs using either polyacrylamide or agarose gel electrophoresis, followed by transfer onto a nylon membrane and subsequent immunoblotting using antibodies against modified nucleosides for the detection of specific modifications. We confirmed that INB with the antibodies for 1-methyladenosine (m1A), N6-methyladenosine (m6A), pseudouridine, and 5-methylcytidine (m5C) showed different modifications in a variety of RNAs from various species and organelles. INB with the anti-m5C antibody revealed that the antibody cross-reacted with another modification on DNA, suggesting the application of this method for characterization of the antibody for modified nucleosides. Additionally, using INB with the antibody for m1A, which is a highly specific modification in eukaryotic tRNA, we detected tRNA-derived fragments known as tiRNAs under the cellular stress response, suggesting the application for tracking target RNA containing specific modifications. INB with the anti-m6A antibody confirmed the demethylation of m6A by the specific demethylases fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO) and ALKBH5, suggesting its application for quantifying target modifications in separated RNAs. Furthermore, INB demonstrated that the knockdown of FTO and ALKBH5 increased the m6A modification in small RNAs as well as in mRNA. The INB method has high specificity, sensitivity, and quantitative capability, and it can be employed with conventional experimental apparatus. Therefore, this method would be useful for research on RNA modifications and metabolism. PMID:26606401

  16. Development of a dot blot assay using gene probes for the detection of enteroviruses in water

    SciTech Connect

    Margolin, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    Enteric viruses are viruses which replicate in the intestinal tract of man and animals. One mode of transmission for enteric viruses is the fecal-oral route. Drinking water which has been contaminated with sewage or sewage effluent has been implicated as a means for the spread of enteric viruses. Current methods for the detection of enteric viruses in water requires the use of animal cell culture. This technique has several drawbacks. More rapid techniques, such as fluorescent antibody or radioimmunoassay do not have the needed sensitivity to detect the low levels of virus found in contaminated water. An alternative technique for the detection of viruses in water was sought. Recent advances in recombinant DNA technology now makes it possible to detect viruses without the use of cell culture or antibodies. Gene probes that hybridize to the RNA of poliovirus and hepatitis A virus were tested for their ability to detect different enteric viruses. The probes were labeled with /sup 32/P dCTP and /sup 32/P dATP to a specific activity greater then 1.0 x 10/sup 9/ cpm/ug DNA. One infectious unit of poliovirus and hepatitis A virus was detected using labeled cDNA probes. Upon comparison, the dot blot assay was as sensitive as tissue culture for the detection of poliovirus in beef extract, secondary effluent, and tap water. Environmental samples, such as secondary effluent, reclaimed wastewater and unchlorinated drinking water were also assayed for poliovirus and hepatitis A virus with the use of gene probes. The results presented here offer an alternative method for screening water samples for the presence of enteric viruses.

  17. Decreased albumin mRNA in immunodeficient wasted' mice

    SciTech Connect

    Libertin, C.R.; Buczek, N.; Weaver, P.; Mobarhan, S.; Woloschak, G.E. Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1991-03-15

    Mice bearing the autosomal recessive gene wst (wst/wst) develop a wasting syndrome' that leads to death by 28-32 days of age. These mice have faulty repair of damage induced by ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency at secretory sites, and neurologic abnormalities. In addition to a progressively more apparent wasted phenotype, wst/wst mice show other features of failure to thrive and malnutrition. Daily body weights of the animals revealed a loss in weight between 25 and 30 days of age, a time during which normal littermates were progressively and rapidly gaining weight. Albumin mRNA levels were measured by dilution dot blot hybridizations of liver-derived RNA preparations from wasted mice, littermates, and parental controls. In all wasted mice, albumin mRNA levels were reduced 5 to 10 fold compared to controls. Northern blots revealed that the albumin mRNA present in wasted mice was normal in length though reduced in amount. These results suggest there may be a relationship between low albumin synthesis and the wasting syndrome of the wst/wst mouse.

  18. A simple explanation for a case of incompatibility with the reading frame theory in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: failure to detect an aberrant restriction fragment in Southern blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Patria, S Y; Takeshima, Y; Suminaga, R; Nakamura, H; Iwasaki, R; Minagawa, T; Matsuo, M

    1999-09-01

    According to the translational reading frame theory, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients harbor out-of-frame deletion mutations in the dystrophin gene. We identified a Japanese DMD case who appeared to have an in-frame deletion of exons 46-54 that was disclosed by Southern blot analysis using a dystrophin cDNA as a probe. Analysis of dystrophin mRNA in skeletal muscle revealed the presence of an out-of-frame deletion of exons 46-53. In agreement with this result, the region encompassing exon 54 could be amplified from genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Furthermore, re-analysis by Southern blot using an exon specific probe disclosed that a HindIII fragment containing exon 54 was present at aberrant size, leading to the incorrect conclusion that exon 54 had been deleted. Thus, this particular DMD case does not constitute an exception to the reading frame theory.

  19. All-in-one detector of circulating mRNA based on a smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cmiel, Vratislav; Gumulec, Jaromir; Svoboda, Ondrej; Raudenska, Martina; Hudcova, Kristyna; Sekora, Jiri; Balogh, Jaroslav; Masarik, Michal; Provaznik, Ivo

    2016-03-01

    Metallothionein is significantly elevated in various tumors, notably in prostate cancer on both mRNA and protein level. We demonstrated a strong predictive potential of free circulating metallothionein 2A isoform mRNA for patients with this cancer. Circulating mRNA detection relies on expensive equipment and requires high level of expertise. In this work we developed compact "all-in-one" laboratory system which replace microvolume spectrophotometer, thermocycler and realtime PCR machines. We managed to design and construct a microprocessor controlled heating/cooling chamber that ensures required temperature gradient. The chamber includes implemented optical system to enable fluorescence excitation and fluorescence analysis using a smart-phone.

  20. Preparation of Cell Lysate from Mouse Oocytes for Western Blotting Analysis.

    PubMed

    Marangos, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Western Blotting has been used extensively for the identification of the protein factors that regulate mammalian oocyte meiosis. However, the limitations in collecting sufficient numbers of oocytes can hinder the efficiency of the technique. Here we provide a detailed protocol for the accurate preparation of mouse oocyte samples for Western Blotting analysis. PMID:27557583

  1. A Laboratory Exercise Illustrating the Sensitivity and Specificity of Western Blot Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Ming-Mei; Lovett, Janice

    2011-01-01

    Western blot analysis, commonly known as "Western blotting," is a standard tool in every laboratory where proteins are analyzed. It involves the separation of polypeptides in polyacrylamide gels followed by the electrophoretic transfer of the separated polypeptides onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride membrane. A replica of the…

  2. Microfluidic integration of Western blotting is enabled by electrotransfer-assisted sodium dodecyl sulfate dilution.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chenlu; Herr, Amy E

    2013-01-01

    We integrate sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) with subsequent antibody probing in a single, monolithic microdevice to realize microfluidic Western blotting. A hurdle to successful on-chip Western blotting lies in restoring antibody recognition of previously sized (denatured, reduced) proteins. To surmount this hurdle, we locally dilute free SDS from SDS-protein complexes using differential electromigration of the species during electrotransfer between SDS-PAGE and blotting regions of a microchamber. Local dilution of SDS minimizes re-association of SDS with proteins offering means to restore antibody binding affinity to proteins after SDS-PAGE. To achieve automated, programmable operation in a single instrument, we utilize a 1 × 2 mm(2) glass microchamber photopatterned with spatially distinct, contiguous polyacrylamide regions for SDS-PAGE, electrotransfer, and antibody blotting. Optimization of both the SDS-PAGE and electrotransfer conditions yields transfer distances of <1 mm (40 s). The Western blot is completed in 180 s, with fully automated assay operation using programmable voltage control. After SDS-PAGE and electrotransfer, we observe ~80% capture of protein band mass on the blotting region for a model protein, C-reactive protein. This novel microfluidic Western blot approach introduces fine transport control for in-transit protein handling to form the basis for an automated, rapid alternative to conventional slab-gel Western blotting. PMID:23042290

  3. Luminex xMAP combined with Western blot improves HIV diagnostic sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weiwei; Li, Yan; Cheng, Shaohui; Yan, Chen; An, Shiping; Dong, Zheng; Yan, Lina; Yuan, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    Currently, Western blot is used to confirm the initial serodiagnosis of HIV infection by antibody detection. However, a major deficiency of the Western blot relates to a lack of sufficient sensitivity in detecting HIV antibodies. This report describes a simple, sensitive and inexpensive bead-based assay for detection of early HIV infection. A panel of 138 positive specimens including 105 blood donors and 33 MSM with known Western blot results were evaluated using Luminex xMAP at Tianjin Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). We demonstrate a superior sensitivity of Luminex xMAP compared with Western blot. Of the 87 confirmed HIV positive blood donors, Western blot only confirmed 65 cases with 74.7% (65/87) sensitivity while Luminex xMAP identified 72 cases with 82.8% (72/87) sensitivity (p<0.05). Western blot and Luminex xMAP verified 13 and 19 of 33 MSM specimens, respectively. The sensitivity was 39.4% (13/33) for Western blot and 57.6% (19/33) for Luminex xMAP (p<0.1). Luminex xMAP combined with Western blot improves the diagnostic sensitivity of HIV infection at an early stage, and reduces the chances of missed diagnosis.

  4. Charge standards as reference points in two-dimensional western blot patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.S.; Tollaksen, S.L.; Giometti, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis can be used to separate hundreds or even thousands of proteins from complex mixtures. Specific proteins in 2DE patterns can be identified by using Western Blotting. Correlation between a single stained spot on a nitrocellulose blot and the same spot in a stained 2DE gel pattern can be difficult since no reference points are available on the blot. Inclusion of a protein or proteins to serve as reference or standard points in both the blotted pattern and the stained gel pattern would make pattern recognition much more rapid and reliable. In this paper the use of a commercial charge standard (carbamylated creatine phosphokinase mix) was used to produce reference points in both gel patterns and corresponding nitrocellulose blots to simplify recognition of individual protein spots in complicated gel patterns. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Molecular combing compared to Southern blot for measuring D4Z4 contractions in FSHD.

    PubMed

    Vasale, Jessica; Boyar, Fatih; Jocson, Michael; Sulcova, Vladimira; Chan, Patricia; Liaquat, Khalida; Hoffman, Carol; Meservey, Marc; Chang, Isabell; Tsao, David; Hensley, Kerri; Liu, Yan; Owen, Renius; Braastad, Corey; Sun, Weimin; Walrafen, Pierre; Komatsu, Jun; Wang, Jia-Chi; Bensimon, Aaron; Anguiano, Arturo; Jaremko, Malgorzata; Wang, Zhenyuan; Batish, Sat; Strom, Charles; Higgins, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    We compare molecular combing to Southern blot in the analysis of the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1 locus (FSHD1) on chromosome 4q35-qter (chr 4q) in genomic DNA specimens sent to a clinical laboratory for FSHD testing. A de-identified set of 87 genomic DNA specimens determined by Southern blot as normal (n = 71), abnormal with D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat array contractions (n = 7), indeterminate (n = 6), borderline (n = 2), or mosaic (n = 1) was independently re-analyzed by molecular combing in a blinded fashion. The molecular combing results were identical to the Southern blot results in 75 (86%) of cases. All contractions (n = 7) and mosaics (n = 1) detected by Southern blot were confirmed by molecular combing. Of the 71 samples with normal Southern blot results, 67 (94%) had concordant molecular combing results. The four discrepancies were either mosaic (n = 2), rearranged (n = 1), or borderline by molecular combing (n = 1). All indeterminate Southern blot results (n = 6) were resolved by molecular combing as either normal (n = 4), borderline (n = 1), or rearranged (n = 1). The two borderline Southern blot results showed a D4Z4 contraction on the chr 4qA allele and a normal result by molecular combing. Molecular combing overcomes a number of technical limitations of Southern blot by providing direct visualization of D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat arrays on specific chr 4q and chr 10q alleles and more precise D4Z4 repeat sizing. This study suggests that molecular combing has superior analytical validity compared to Southern blot for determining D4Z4 contraction size, detecting mosaicism, and resolving borderline and indeterminate Southern blot results. Further studies are needed to establish the clinical validity and diagnostic accuracy of these findings in FSHD. PMID:26420234

  6. Cytochrome P450IA mRNA expression in feral Hudson River tomcod

    SciTech Connect

    Kreamer, G.L.; Squibb, K.; Gioeli, D.; Garte, S.J.; Wirgin, I. )

    1991-06-01

    The authors sought to determine if levels of cytochrome P450IA gene expression are environmentally induced in feral populations of Hudson River tomcod, a cancer prone fish, and whether laboratory exposure of tomcod to artificially spiked and naturally contaminated Hudson sediments can elicit a significant response. Using Northern blot analysis, they found levels of P450IA mRNA in tomcod collected from two Hudson River sites higher than those in tomcod from a river in Maine. Depuration of environmentally induced Hudson tomcod P450IA mRNA was rapid, with an initial detectable decline in P450 gene expression by 8 hr and basal levels reached by 5 days. Intraperitoneal injection of {beta}-napthoflavone in depurated Hudson tomcod resulted in a 15-fold induction of P450 gene expression within 26 hr. Exposure of depurated Hudson tomcod to natural sediment spiked with two PAHs resulted in a 7-fold induction of P450 gene expression. Exposure of depurated tomcod to sediment from a contaminated Hudson site also resulted in a 7- to 15-fold induction of P450IA mRNA expression. Northern blot analysis revealed a second polymorphic cytochrome P450IA mRNA band in some tomcod which was also detected by Southern blot analysis. Induction of cytochrome P450IA mRNA in Atlantic tomcod may provide a sensitive biomarker of environmentally relevant concentrations of some pollutants in the Hudson and other northeastern tidal rivers.

  7. Cytochrome P450IA mRNA expression in feral Hudson River tomcod.

    PubMed

    Kreamer, G L; Squibb, K; Gioeli, D; Garte, S J; Wirgin, I

    1991-06-01

    We sought to determine if levels of cytochrome P450IA gene expression are environmentally induced in feral populations of Hudson River tomcod, a cancer prone fish, and whether laboratory exposure of tomcod to artificially spiked and naturally contaminated Hudson sediments can elicit a significant response. Using Northern blot analysis, we found levels of P450IA mRNA in tomcod collected from two Hudson River sites higher than those in tomcod from a river in Maine. Depuration of environmentally induced Hudson tomcod P450IA mRNA was rapid, with an initial detectable decline in P450 gene expression by 8 hr and basal levels reached by 5 days. Intraperitoneal injection of beta-napthoflavone in depurated Hudson tomcod resulted in a 15-fold induction of P450 gene expression within 26 hr. Exposure of depurated Hudson tomcod to natural sediment spiked with two PAHs resulted in a 7-fold induction of P450 gene expression. Exposure of depurated tomcod to sediment from a contaminated Hudson site also resulted in a 7- to 15-fold induction of P450IA mRNA expression. Northern blot analysis revealed a second polymorphic cytochrome P450IA mRNA band in some tomcod which was also detected by Southern blot analysis. Induction of cytochrome P450IA mRNA in Atlantic tomcod may provide a sensitive biomarker of environmentally relevant concentrations of some pollutants in the Hudson and other northeastern tidal rivers. PMID:1855491

  8. [PTK7 mRNA and protein expression level in serum of patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia and its clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guan-Ting; Zhang, Ai-Qin

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect the serum PTK7 level of patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia, and to reveal its clinical value for diagnosis of diseases. A total of 136 patients diagnosed as acute lymphocytic leukemia from May 2012 to April 2014 in our hospital were enroled in this study and were divided into the L1 group (n = 42), L2 (n = 45) and L3 group (n = 49) according cytomorphology, and 48 normal children were selected as control group. Fluorescence quantitative PCR was used to detect mRNA level of PTK7 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and Western blot was used to detect PTK7 protein expression. The results showed that the PTK7 mRNA level in L1 group was significantly higher than that in normal group (P = 0.000) . The PTK7 mRNA level in L2 group was significantly higher than that in the L1 group (P = 0.000). The PTK7 mRNA level in L3 group and L2 group had not significantly different between each other (P = 0.123). Serum PTK7 protein level in L1 group was very significantly higher than that in normal group (P = 0.000) . The serum PTK7 protein level in L2 group were very significantly higher than that in the L1 group (P = 0.003) and serum PTK7 protein level in L3 and L2 group had no significance difference (P = 0.312) . It is concluded that the expression level of serum PTK7 protein has a potential clinical value for the diagnosis of acute lymphocytic leukemia, but without specificity for ALL subsets.

  9. [Analysis of new criteria for increasing the specificity of commercial Western blots].

    PubMed

    Gershy-Damet, G M; Koffi, K; Soro, B; Sanon, S; Traore, M; Assoa, A; N'Goran, K; N'Gom, A

    1992-01-01

    We examined the frequency of serum cross-reactivity on Western blot for HIV1 and HIV2. 661 patients with tuberculosis in Abidjan, and 4,899 asymptomatic persons for HIV1 and HIV2 infections were tested. All specimens positive on ELISA for HIV1 or HIV2 were further characterized by synthetic peptide based tests. Confirmed positive samples were tested by HIV1 and HIV2 specific Western blot criteres utilisis. Dual serologic reactivity on synthetic peptide tests was significantly more frequent in HIV positive patients with tuberculosis than asymptomatic subjects. Positive HIV1 Western blots were seen in 61%-86% of specimens positive for HIV2 only on synthetic peptide tests. [Cross-reactivity, to HIV2 Western blots by HIV1 positive specimens was significantly more frequent in patients with tuberculosis than in asymptomatic subjects.] Using recently recommended criteria for HIV1 and HIV2 Western blot interpretation (presence of 2 env bands) reduced the overall proportion of HIV1 positive specimens having a positive HIV2 Western blot from 39% to 14% and HIV2 positive specimens having a positive HIV1 Western blot from 31% to 8%.

  10. Western blotting is useful in the salivary diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Ballam, L; Mendall, M; Asante, M; Morris, J; Strachan, D; Whincup, P; Cook, D

    2000-01-01

    Background—The salivary diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection offers attractive possibilities for the epidemiological study of infection in children. Salivary enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is less reliable then serum ELISA, owing to variable transudation of immunoglobulin. In addition, children are more difficult to study because of lower specific serum antibody concentrations to H pylori. The performance of salivary western blotting in comparison with serum western blotting and serum ELISA was investigated in school children. Subjects and methods—Paired serum and saliva specimens were obtained from 665 school children aged 9–11 in 10 British towns. All saliva and serum specimens were first analysed by ELISA; subsequently, western blotting of both specimens was performed on 31 and 34 specimens, respectively, to establish the criteria for positivity for western blotting. The remaining 121 specimens were then tested blindly and saliva was compared with the serum. Results—The sensitivity and specificity of salivary ELISA in the 665 specimens was 32 of 50 (64%) and 530 of 691 (87%), respectively, when compared with serum ELISA. The western blotting validation was performed on 28 subjects with positive serum and positive salivary ELISA, 28 saliva positives with negative serum, 16 saliva negatives with positive serum, and 50 doubly negative subjects. Compared with serum western blots, the sensitivity and specificity of salivary western blots was 38 of 47 (81%) and 68 of 75 (91%), respectively. Using serum ELISA as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity were 32 of 44 (73%) and 72 of 78 (92%), respectively, the specificity being significantly higher than salivary ELISA (p < 0.001). Conclusion—Salivary western blotting for IgG is useful in the diagnosis of H pylori infection and is superior to ELISA. It also permits the identification of pathogenic strains. Key Words: Helicobacter pylori • western blotting • enzyme linked

  11. Direct measurement of tubulin and bulk message distributions on polysomes of growing, starved and deciliated Tetrahymena using RNA gel blots of sucrose gradients containing acrylamide.

    PubMed

    Calzone, F J; Callahan, R; Gorovsky, M A

    1988-10-25

    A method was developed using sucrose gradients containing acrylamide which greatly simplifies the measurement of the polysomal distribution of messages. After centrifugation, the acrylamide was polymerized, forming a "polysome gel". RNA gel blots of polysome gels were used to determine the polysomal distributions of alpha-tubulin and total polyadenylated mRNA in growing, starved (nongrowing) and starved-deciliated Tetrahymena and the number of messages loaded onto polysomes was calculated. These measurements indicated that the translational efficiencies of alpha-tubulin mRNA and total polyadenylated mRNA are largely unaffected when the rates of tubulin and total protein synthesis vary dramatically. Thus, differential regulation of alpha-tubulin mRNA translation initiation does not contribute to the greater than 100-fold induction of tubulin synthesis observed during cilia regeneration and in growing cells. The major translation-level process regulating tubulin synthesis in Tetrahymena appears to be a change in message loading mediated by a non-specific message recruitment or unmasking factor.

  12. SDS-Polyacrylamide Electrophoresis and Western Blotting Applied to the Study of Asthma.

    PubMed

    García-Solaesa, Virginia; Abad, Sara Ciria

    2016-01-01

    Western blotting is used to analyze proteins after being separated by electrophoresis and subsequently electro-transferred to a membrane. Once immobilized, a specific protein can be identified through its reaction with a labeled antibody or antigen. It is a methodology commonly used in biomedical research such as asthma studies, to assess the pathways of inflammatory mediators involved in the disease.Here, we describe an example of western blotting to determine the factors involved in asthma. In this chapter, the methodology of western blotting is reviewed, paying attention on potential problems and giving interesting recommendations. PMID:27300534

  13. Integrated Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret (Inventor); Gruhlke, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A detection method is integrated with a filtering method and an enhancement method to create a fluorescence sensor that can be miniaturized. The fluorescence sensor comprises a thin film geometry including a waveguide layer, a metal film layer and sensor layer. The thin film geometry of the fluorescence sensor allows the detection of fluorescent radiation over a narrow wavelength interval. This enables wavelength discrimination and eliminates the detection of unwanted light from unknown or spurious sources.

  14. mRNA transcript therapy.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Drew

    2015-02-01

    mRNA is the central molecule of all forms of life. It is generally accepted that current life on Earth descended from an RNA world. mRNA, after its first therapeutic description in 1992, has recently come into increased focus as a method to deliver genetic information. The recent solution to the two main difficulties in using mRNA as a therapeutic, immune stimulation and potency, has provided the basis for a wide range of applications. While mRNA-based cancer immunotherapies have been in clinical trials for a few years, novel approaches; including, in vivo delivery of mRNA to replace or supplement proteins, mRNA-based generation of pluripotent stem cells, or genome engineering using mRNA-encoded meganucleases are beginning to be realized. This review presents the current state of mRNA drug technologies and potential applications, as well as discussing the challenges and prospects in mRNA development and drug discovery. PMID:25359562

  15. Molecular cloning of human ornithine aminotransferase mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Inana, G.; Totsuka, S.; Redmond, M.; Dougherty, T.; Nagle, J.; Shiono, T.; Ohura, T. Kominami, E.; Katunuma, N.

    1986-03-01

    The isolation and characterization of a cDNA clone for the mRNA of human ornithine aminotransferase (OATase; ornithine-oxo-acid aminotransferase; L-ornithine:2-oxo-acid aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.13), a nonabundant mitochondrial matrix enzyme that is severely deficient in a hereditary chorioretinal degenerative disease (gyrate atrophy), is described. Human liver, retina, and retinoblastoma (Y79) mRNAs were prepared and tested for the OATase mRNA content by in vitro translation, immunoprecipitation, and NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE. The retinoblastoma cells were found to be expressing this enzyme at a relatively high level. The primary translation product of the OATase mRNA is larger than the pure OATase protein on NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE. lambdagt11 cDNA libraries were prepared from the human mRNAs, and the recombinant clones were immunoscreened as plaques with two different preparations of rabbit anti-human OATase antibodies. The amino acid sequences of seven tryptic peptides (115 amino acid residues) of the pure human OATase were obtained by microsequencing. When the tryptic peptide and cDNA-derived amino acid sequences were compared, homologies in 111 of 115 residues, including a match of 20 consecutive residues, were observed. An RNA blot hybridization of /sup 32/P-labeled OATase cDNA to normal human retina and retinoblastoma mRNAs demonstrated an OATase mRNA species of approx. = 2.2 kilobases.

  16. Multiplexed microfluidic blotting of proteins and nucleic acids by parallel, serpentine microchannels.

    PubMed

    He, Sha; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Pei; Xu, Xingzhi; Zhu, Kui; Pan, Wenying; Liu, Wenwen; Cai, Kaiyong; Sun, Jiashu; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-01

    This work develops a high-throughput, high-efficiency and straightforward microfluidic blotting method for analyzing proteins and nucleic acids. Sample solutions containing antibodies (for protein detection) or hybridization probes (for nucleic acid detection) are introduced into the parallel, serpentine microchannels to specifically recognize the immobilized targets on the substrate, achieving the identification of multiple targets in multiple samples simultaneously. The loading control, molecular weight markers, and antigen/antibody titration are designed and integrated into the microfluidic chip, thus allowing for the quantification of proteins and nucleic acids. Importantly, we could easily distinguish the adjacent blotting bands inside parallel microchannels, which may be difficult to achieve in conventional blotting. The small dimensions of microfluidic channels also help to reduce the amount of probing molecules and to accelerate the biochemical reaction. Our microfluidic blotting could bypass the steps of blocking and washing, further reducing the operation time and complexity.

  17. Detection and quantification of protein-protein interactions by far-western blotting.

    PubMed

    Jadwin, Joshua A; Mayer, Bruce J; Machida, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Far-western blotting is a convenient method to characterize protein-protein interactions, in which protein samples of interest are immobilized on a membrane and then probed with a non-antibody protein. In contrast to western blotting, which uses specific antibodies to detect target proteins, far-western blotting detects proteins on the basis of the presence or absence of binding sites for the protein probe. When specific modular protein binding domains are used as probes, this approach allows characterization of protein-protein interactions involved in biological processes such as signal transduction, including interactions regulated by posttranslational modification. We here describe a rapid and simple protocol for far-western blotting, in which GST-tagged Src homology 2 (SH2) domains are used to probe cellular proteins in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We also present a batch quantification method that allows for the direct comparison of probe binding patterns.

  18. Automated capillary Western dot blot method for the identity of a 15-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Melissa; Ha, Sha; Rustandi, Richard R

    2015-06-01

    Simple Western is a new technology that allows for the separation, blotting, and detection of proteins similar to a traditional Western except in a capillary format. Traditionally, identity assays for biological products are performed using either an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or a manual dot blot Western. Both techniques are usually very tedious, labor-intensive, and complicated for multivalent vaccines, and they can be difficult to transfer to other laboratories. An advantage this capillary Western technique has over the traditional manual dot blot Western method is the speed and the automation of electrophoresis separation, blotting, and detection steps performed in 96 capillaries. This article describes details of the development of an automated identity assay for a 15-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, PCV15-CRM197, using capillary Western technology.

  19. Accuracy of Reverse Dot-Blot PCR in Detection of Different β-Globin Gene Mutations.

    PubMed

    El-Fadaly, N; Abd-Elhameed, A; Abd-Elbar, E; El-Shanshory, M

    2016-06-01

    Prevention programs for β-thalassemia based on molecular diagnosis of heterozygous carriers and/or patients require the use of reliable mutation screening methods. The aim of this study was to compare between direct DNA sequencing, and reverse dot-blot PCR in detection of different β-globin gene mutations in Egyptian children with β-thalassemia. Forty children with β-thalassemia were subjected to mutation analysis, performed by both direct DNA sequencing and β-globin Strip Assay MED™ (based on reverse dot-blot PCR). The most frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were; IVSI-110 G>A (31.25 %), IVS I-6 T > C (21.25 %), and IVS I-1 G>A (20 %). Relatively less frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were "IVSII-1 G>A (5 %), IVSII-745 C>G (5 %), IVSII-848 C>A (2.5 %), IVSI-5 G>C (2.5 %), -87 C>G(2.5 %), and cd39 C>T (2.5 %)", While the genotypes of three patients (6 alleles 7.5 %) were not detected by reverse dot-blot PCR. Mutant alleles detected by direct DNA sequencing were the same as reverse dot-blot PCR method except it revealed the genotypes of 3 undetected patients (one patient was homozygous IVSI-110 G>A, and two patients were homozygous IVS I-1 G>A. Sensitivity of the reverse dot-blot PCR was 92.5 % when compared to direct DNA sequencing for detecting β-thalassemia mutations. Our results therefore suggest that, direct DNA sequencing may be preferred over reverse dot-blot PCR in critical diagnostic situations like genetic counseling for prenatal diagnosis.

  20. Accuracy of Reverse Dot-Blot PCR in Detection of Different β-Globin Gene Mutations.

    PubMed

    El-Fadaly, N; Abd-Elhameed, A; Abd-Elbar, E; El-Shanshory, M

    2016-06-01

    Prevention programs for β-thalassemia based on molecular diagnosis of heterozygous carriers and/or patients require the use of reliable mutation screening methods. The aim of this study was to compare between direct DNA sequencing, and reverse dot-blot PCR in detection of different β-globin gene mutations in Egyptian children with β-thalassemia. Forty children with β-thalassemia were subjected to mutation analysis, performed by both direct DNA sequencing and β-globin Strip Assay MED™ (based on reverse dot-blot PCR). The most frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were; IVSI-110 G>A (31.25 %), IVS I-6 T > C (21.25 %), and IVS I-1 G>A (20 %). Relatively less frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were "IVSII-1 G>A (5 %), IVSII-745 C>G (5 %), IVSII-848 C>A (2.5 %), IVSI-5 G>C (2.5 %), -87 C>G(2.5 %), and cd39 C>T (2.5 %)", While the genotypes of three patients (6 alleles 7.5 %) were not detected by reverse dot-blot PCR. Mutant alleles detected by direct DNA sequencing were the same as reverse dot-blot PCR method except it revealed the genotypes of 3 undetected patients (one patient was homozygous IVSI-110 G>A, and two patients were homozygous IVS I-1 G>A. Sensitivity of the reverse dot-blot PCR was 92.5 % when compared to direct DNA sequencing for detecting β-thalassemia mutations. Our results therefore suggest that, direct DNA sequencing may be preferred over reverse dot-blot PCR in critical diagnostic situations like genetic counseling for prenatal diagnosis. PMID:27065589

  1. Androgen control of secretory component mRNA levels in the rat lacrimal gland.

    PubMed

    Gao, J; Lambert, R W; Wickham, L A; Banting, G; Sullivan, D A

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the known gender-related differences in, and the endocrine control of, the production of secretory component (SC) by the rat lacrimal gland are associated with alterations in SC mRNA content. Levels of SC mRNA were measured in lacrimal tissues of intact, sham-operated, castrated, hypophysectomized, and testosterone-treated male and female adult rats by Northern blot procedures, which utilized a specific, [alpha-32P]-labelled rat SC cDNA probe. For control purposes, SC mRNA amounts were standardized to the beta-actin content in experimental blots. The location of SC mRNA in lacrimal glands was evaluated by in situ hybridization techniques, which involved exposure of tissue sections to sense or anti-sense [35S]-labelled SC RNA probes. Our results demonstrate that: (1) lacrimal glands of male rats contain a significantly greater amount of SC mRNA than those of female rats, and that this difference co-exists with distinct, gender-associated variations in the distribution of SC mRNA in lacrimal tissue; (2) orchiectomy or hypophysectomy, but not ovariectomy or sham surgery, leads to a marked decline in the lacrimal SC mRNA content; and (3) testosterone, but not placebo, administration to castrated male and female rats induces a significant increase in the SC mRNA levels in lacrimal tissue. Overall, these findings show that gender, androgens and the hypothalamic-pituitary axis exert a considerable influence on the SC mRNA content in the rat lacrimal gland.

  2. Osteoblastic alkaline phosphatase mRNA is stabilized by binding to vimentin intermediary filaments.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Yvonne; Biniossek, Martin; Stark, G Björn; Finkenzeller, Günter; Simunovic, Filip

    2015-03-01

    Vascularization is essential in bone tissue engineering and recent research has focused on interactions between osteoblasts (hOBs) and endothelial cells (ECs). It was shown that cocultivation increases the stability of osteoblastic alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA. We investigated the mechanisms behind this observation, focusing on mRNA binding proteins. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we found that the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of ALP mRNA is necessary for human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC)-mediated stabilization of osteoblastic ALP mRNA. Using pulldown experiments and nanoflow-HPLC mass spectrometry, vimentin was identified to bind to the 3'-UTR of ALP mRNA. Validation was performed by Western blotting. Functional experiments inhibiting intermediate filaments with iminodipropionitrile and specific inhibition of vimentin by siRNA transfection showed reduced levels of ALP mRNA and protein. Therefore, ALP mRNA binds to and is stabilized by vimentin. This data add to the understanding of intracellular trafficking of ALP mRNA, its function, and have possible implications in tissue engineering applications.

  3. Blot-MS of Carbonylated Proteins: A Tool to Identify Oxidized Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rita; Domingues, Pedro; Amado, Francisco; Vitorino, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of proteostasis regulation declines during aging and the failure of protein homeostasis is common in age-related diseases. Protein oxidation is a major contributor to the loss of proteome homeostasis, also called "proteostasis," precluding protein misfolding and aggregation. So, the identification of the molecular pathways impaired by protein oxidation will increase the understanding of proteostasis and the pathophysiological conditions related to the loss of proteostasis. Sample derivatization with dinitrophenyl hydrazine and western blot immunoassay detection of carbonylated proteins (commonly known as Oxyblot™) coupled to mass spectrometry (blot-MS) is an attractive methodological approach to identify proteins that are more prone to carbonylation, a typical oxidative modification of amino acid residues. The integration of blot-MS data of carbonylated proteins with bioinformatics tools allows the identification of the biological processes more affected by protein oxidation and that, eventually, result in the loss of proteostasis.In this chapter, we describe a blot-MS methodology to identify the proteins more prone to oxidation in biological samples, as cell and tissue extracts, and biofluids. Analysis of mitochondria isolated from cardiac tissue is provided as an example. Bioinformatic strategy to deal with data retrieved from blot-MS experiments are proposed for the identification of relevant biological processes modulated by oxidative stress stimuli. PMID:27613049

  4. BLOT: A mesh and curve plot program for the output of a finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gilkey, A.P.; Glick, J.H.

    1989-06-01

    BLOT is a graphics program for post-processing of finite element analysis output that is presented in the EXODUS database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive any graphics device supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots with various representations of the analysis output variables. The major mesh plot capabilities are deformed mesh plots, line contours, banded contours, vector plots of two or three variables (e.g., velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (e.g., temperature). Pathlines of analysis variables can also be drawn on the mesh. BLOT's features include element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views for combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. BLOT can also produce X-Y curve plots of the analysis variables. BLOT generates time-versus-variable plots or variable-versus-variable plots. It also generates distance versus-variable plots at selected time steps where the distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers. 14 refs.

  5. Characterization of a biopharmaceutical protein and evaluation of its purification process using automated capillary Western blot.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong; Mane, Sarthak; Sosic, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the application of an automated size-based capillary Western blot system (Sally instrument) from ProteinSimple, Inc., for biopharmaceutical fusion-Fc protein characterization and evaluation of its purification process. The fusion-Fc protein column purification from an excess of single chain Fc polypeptide and removal of an enzyme coexpressed for protein maturation have been demonstrated using an automated capillary Western system. The clearance of a selected host cell protein (HCP) present in cell culture of fusion-Fc protein was also quantitatively monitored throughout the protein purification process. Additionally, the low levels of fusion-Fc product-related impurities detected by traditional slab gel Western blot were confirmed by the automated capillary Western system. Compared to the manual approach, the automated capillary Western blot provides the advantages of ease of operation, higher sample throughput, greater linearity range, and higher precision for protein quantitation.

  6. Investigation of immunofluorescence cross-reactions against Trichinella spiralis by western blot (immunoblot) analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Robert, F; Weil, B; Kassis, N; Dupouy-Camet, J

    1996-01-01

    Immunofluorescence cross-reactions in Trichinella spiralis serodiagnosis are sometimes difficult to identify. We compared the results of an indirect immunofluorescence assay and the profiles obtained by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis for three groups of patients: 10 T. spiralis-infected patients, 10 patients with autoimmune diseases, and 7 patients with parasitic diseases other than trichinellosis. The degree of immunofluorescence cross-reaction was variable. Western blotting allowed us to differentiate Trichinella infection from other parasitic diseases. In 3 of 10 serum samples from patients with autoimmune diseases, bands which had the same sizes as Trichinella bands were observed, and they could correspond to shared epitopes such as heat shock proteins. PMID:8877138

  7. A Streamlined Western Blot Exercise: An Efficient and Greener Approach in the Laboratory Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ness, Traci L.; Robinson, Rebekah L.; Mojadedi, Wais; Peavy, Lydia; Weiland, Mitch H.

    2015-01-01

    SDS-PAGE and western blotting are two commonly taught protein detection techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory classrooms. A pitfall associated with incorporating these techniques into the laboratory is the significant wait times that do not allow students to obtain timely results. The waiting associated with SDS-PAGE comes…

  8. Effects of Reusing Gel Electrophoresis and Electrotransfer Buffers on Western Blotting.

    PubMed

    Heda, Ghanshyam D; Omotola, Oluwabukola B; Heda, Rajiv P; Avery, Jamie

    2016-09-01

    SDS-PAGE and Western blotting are 2 of the most commonly used biochemical methods for protein analysis. Proteins are electrophoretically separated based on their MWs by SDS-PAGE and then electrotransferred to a solid membrane surface for subsequent protein-specific analysis by immunoblotting, a procedure commonly known as Western blotting. Both of these procedures use a salt-based buffer, with the latter procedure consisting of methanol as an additive known for its toxicity. Previous reports present a contradictory view in favor or against reusing electrotransfer buffer, also known as Towbin's transfer buffer (TTB), with an aim to reduce the toxic waste. In this report, we present a detailed analysis of not only reusing TTB but also gel electrophoresis buffer (EB) on proteins of low to high MW range. Our results suggest that EB can be reused for at least 5 times without compromising the electrophoretic separation of mixture of proteins in an MW standard, BSA, and crude cell lysates. Additionally, reuse of EB did not affect the quality of subsequent Western blots. Successive reuse of TTB, on the other hand, diminished the signal of proteins of different MWs in a protein standard and a high MW membrane protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane-conductance regulator (CFTR) in Western blotting. PMID:27582639

  9. Post-obstruction rat sperm autoantigens identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and western blotting.

    PubMed

    Flickinger, C J; Bush, L A; Williams, M V; Naaby-Hansen, S; Howards, S S; Herr, J C

    1999-05-01

    Although antisperm autoantibody responses to obstruction of the male reproductive system have been documented, information on the nature of the cognate sperm autoantigens has been limited. In the present study, the patterns of sperm autoantigens recognized by sera from rats after obstruction of the vas deferens or epididymis were studied by high resolution two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis and western blotting. Comparisons of patterns of autoantigens stained on 2-D western blots of sera from prepubertal vasectomy, prepubertal epididymal ligation and adult vasectomy groups revealed both similarities and differences. Sera from sham-operated animals showed no detectable reaction or much lighter staining of a small number of spots. Visualization of sperm autoantigens on 2-D western blots supported the hypothesis that there is a relatively small set of sperm proteins that can be regarded as dominant post-obstruction sperm autoantigens because they are recognized by multiple post-obstruction sera. The 2-D analysis revealed previously undetected distinctions in the autoantigens recognized after adult and prepubertal vasectomy, as well as variations with the site of obstruction. These differences in the response may be due in part to changes in antigens of spermatozoa in different parts of the tract and at different ages, as well as variations in exposure of sperm cell proteins to the immune system resulting from the sites of spermatic granulomas. Preparative 2-D gels and western blotting with post-obstruction sera are now being used to identify specific sperm autoantigens by microsequencing of selected proteins. PMID:10392780

  10. Effects of Reusing Gel Electrophoresis and Electrotransfer Buffers on Western Blotting

    PubMed Central

    Omotola, Oluwabukola B.; Heda, Rajiv P.; Avery, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    SDS-PAGE and Western blotting are 2 of the most commonly used biochemical methods for protein analysis. Proteins are electrophoretically separated based on their MWs by SDS-PAGE and then electrotransferred to a solid membrane surface for subsequent protein-specific analysis by immunoblotting, a procedure commonly known as Western blotting. Both of these procedures use a salt-based buffer, with the latter procedure consisting of methanol as an additive known for its toxicity. Previous reports present a contradictory view in favor or against reusing electrotransfer buffer, also known as Towbin’s transfer buffer (TTB), with an aim to reduce the toxic waste. In this report, we present a detailed analysis of not only reusing TTB but also gel electrophoresis buffer (EB) on proteins of low to high MW range. Our results suggest that EB can be reused for at least 5 times without compromising the electrophoretic separation of mixture of proteins in an MW standard, BSA, and crude cell lysates. Additionally, reuse of EB did not affect the quality of subsequent Western blots. Successive reuse of TTB, on the other hand, diminished the signal of proteins of different MWs in a protein standard and a high MW membrane protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane-conductance regulator (CFTR) in Western blotting. PMID:27582639

  11. Better management of Western blotting results using professional photo management software.

    PubMed

    Iorio-Morin, Christian; Germain, Pascale; Parent, Jean-Luc

    2013-04-01

    Western blotting is a proven technique essential to a significant proportion of molecular biology projects. However, as results accumulate over the years, managing data can become daunting. Recognizing that the needs of a scientist working with Western blotting results are conceptually the same as those of a professional photographer managing a summer's worth of wedding photos, we report here a new workflow for managing Western blotting results using professional photo management software. The workflow involves (i) scanning all film-based results; (ii) importing the scans into the software; (iii) processing the scans; (iv) tagging the files with metadata, and (v) creating appropriate "smart-albums." Advantages of this system include space savings (both on our hard drives and on our desks), safer archival, quicker access, and easier sharing of the results. In addition, metadata-based workflows improve cross-experiment discovery and enable questions like "show me all blots labelled with antibody X" or "show me all experiments featuring protein Y". As project size and breadth increase, workflows delegating results management to the computer will become more and more important so that scientists can keep focussing on science. PMID:23404762

  12. COMPARISONS OF ELISA AND WESTERN BLOT ASSAYS FOR DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM ANTIBODY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A seroprevalence survey was conducted using ELISA and Western blot (WB) assays for antibody to three Cryptosporidium antigens on 380 blood donors in Jackson County, Oregon. The purpose was to determine if either assay could detect serological evidence of an outbreak which occurre...

  13. Intermittent microwave irradiation facilitates antigen-antibody reaction in Western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ting; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2009-01-01

    We established a shortened protocol for western blot analysis using intermittent microwave irradiation. With this method, the procedure is completed within 1 h after applying the primary antibody, and thus greatly saves time. This procedure appears to be applicable to any antibody based on our experience of several years.

  14. A Study of Rubisco through Western Blotting and Tissue Printing Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Zhong; Cooper, Cynthia; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Janick-Buckner, Diane

    2009-01-01

    We describe a laboratory exercise developed for a cell biology course for second-year undergraduate biology majors. It was designed to introduce undergraduates to the basic molecular biology techniques of Western blotting and immunodetection coupled with the technique of tissue printing in detecting the presence, relative abundance, and…

  15. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, Richard I.; Edwards, Bradley C.; Buchwald, Melvin I.; Gosnell, Timothy R.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement.

  16. Real-time monitoring of intracellular mRNA hybridization inside single living cells.

    PubMed

    Perlette, J; Tan, W

    2001-11-15

    A molecular beacon, an oligonucleotide probe with inherent signal transduction mechanisms, is an optimal tool for visualizing real-time mRNA hybridization in single living cells. Each molecular beacon (MB) consists of a single-stranded DNA molecule in a stem-loop conformation with a fluorophore linked to the 5' end and a quencher at the 3' end. In this study, we demonstrate real-time monitoring of mRNA-DNA hybridization inside living cells using molecular beacons. A MB specific for beta-actin mRNA has been designed and synthesized. After microinjection into the cytoplasm of single living kangaroo rat kidney cells (PtK2 cells), the MB hybridizes with beta-actin mRNA as shown by fluorescence measurements over time. Hybridization dynamics have been followed. Strict control experiments have been carried out to confirm that the fluorescence signal increase is indeed due to the hybridization of mRNA inside single living cells. Variation in the MB/mRNA hybridization fluorescent signal has been observed for different PtK2 cells, which indicates the amount of mRNA in different cells is different. We have also monitored the beta-1 andrenergic receptor mRNA inside the PtK2 cells. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using MBs and the ultrasensitivity achieved in our fluorescence imaging system for real-time detection of mRNA hybridization and for the visualization of oligonucleotide/mRNA interactions inside single living cells.

  17. The squash blot technique and the detection of Leishmania major in Phlebotomus papatasi in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Esseghir, S; Ftaïti, A; Ready, P D; Khadraoui, B; Zaafouri, B; Dellagi, K; Ben Ismaïl, R

    1993-01-01

    This study describes the preliminary applications of the squash blot technique in Tunisia, to detect Leishmania major in naturally infected Phlebotomus papatasi. 309 P. papatasi among 364 female sandflies squashed on to nylon Gene Screen DNA transfer membranes, were identified using the 3.2 kb ribosomal P. papatasi specific DNA probe described by Ready et al. A second hybridization using the Taq1 DNA probe described by Smith et al. (1989) allowed the detection and identification of the parasite in 15 (4.9%) of these P. papatasi specimens. The dissection of P. papatasi females during the same period and from the same biotopes showed an infection rate of 7.9% (9 positives among 113 dissected). The t proportion comparison test indicated that there is no significant statistical difference between the dissection and the squash blot technique for the estimation of infection rates of P. papatasi.

  18. Nanogold Immunodetection Detection Systems for the Identification of Autoantigens by Western Blotting.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jacen S; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Nanogold-conjugated immunodetection systems are now widely and commercially available for use in a number of research applications including electron microscopy, light microscopy, and western blotting. Nanogold clusters are small, uniform in size, and stable, unlike gold colloids historically used in protein detection. Covalent linkage of nanogold particles to secondary antibodies prevents dissociation of the gold particles during the staining process, making protein detection reliable, antigen specific, and highly sensitive. Nanogold labeling is extremely versatile and can be used in conjunction with other staining methodologies including Alexa Fluor immunofluorescence detection to perform coupled staining procedures. Silver enhancement increases the limits of sensitivity for nanogold staining, thus improving detection signals for antigens with reduced expression levels. Herein, we describe the use of nanogold-silver detection as an immunodetection system for standard western blotting of autoantigens.

  19. Western Blotting using the Invitrogen NuPage Novex Bis Tris minigels.

    PubMed

    Penna, Aubin; Cahalan, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Western Blotting (or immunoblotting) is a standard laboratory procedure allowing investigators to verify the expression of a protein, determine the relative amount of the protein present in different samples, and analyze the results of co-immunoprecipitation experiments. In this method, a target protein is detected with a specific primary antibody in a given sample of tissue homogenate or extract. Protein separation according to molecular weight is achieved using denaturing SDS-PAGE. After transfer to a membrane, the target protein is probed with a specific primary antibody and detected by chemiluminescence. Since its first description, the western-blotting technique has undergone several improvements, including pre-cast gels and user-friendly equipment. In our laboratory, we have chosen to use the commercially available NuPAGE electrophoresis system from Invitrogen. It is an innovative neutral pH, discontinuous SDS-PAGE, pre-cast mini-gel system. This system presents several advantages over the traditional Laemmli technique including: i) a longer shelf life of the pre-cast gels ranging from 8 months to 1 year; ii) a broad separation range of molecular weights from 1 to 400 kDa depending of the type of gel used; and iii) greater versatility (range of acrylamide percentage, the type of gel, and the ionic composition of the running buffer). The procedure described in this video article utilizes the Bis-Tris discontinuous buffer system with 4-12% Bis-Tris gradient gels and MES running buffer, as an illustration of how to perform a western-blot using the Invitrogen NuPAGE electrophoresis system. In our laboratory, we have obtained good and reproducible results for various biochemical applications using this western-blotting method. PMID:18989435

  20. A streamlined Western blot exercise: An efficient and greener approach in the laboratory classroom.

    PubMed

    Ness, Traci L; Robinson, Rebekah L; Mojadedi, Wais; Peavy, Lydia; Weiland, Mitch H

    2015-01-01

    SDS-PAGE and western blotting are two commonly taught protein detection techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory classrooms. A pitfall associated with incorporating these techniques into the laboratory is the significant wait times that do not allow students to obtain timely results. The waiting associated with SDS-PAGE comes from staining and destaining, whereas with western blotting it is the times required for antibody incubations and the numerous wash steps. This laboratory exercise incorporates 2,2,2-trichloroethanol (TCE) into the SDS-PAGE gel allowing for visualization of migrated proteins in a matter of minutes, saving both the time and chemical waste associated with traditional Coomassie staining. Additionally, TCE staining does not affect protein transfer eliminating the requirement for duplicated gels for total protein and western analyses. Protein transfer can be confirmed immediately without the use of Ponceau S staining. Lastly, this western blot procedure has been further shortened by using an HRP-conjugated primary antibody, which eliminates the secondary antibody incubation and washes, and uses a colorimetric detection to allow for visualization by students without the need for specialized equipment. PMID:26153352

  1. Evaluating dot and Western blots using image analysis and pixel quantification of electronic images.

    PubMed

    Vierck, J L; Bryne, K M; Dodson, M V

    2000-01-01

    Inexpensive computer imaging technology was used to assess levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) on dot blots (DB) and alpha-Actinin on Western blots (WB). In the first procedure, known IGF-I samples were dotted on nitrocellulose membranes using a vacuum manifold. After the DB were developed and dried, the images were digitized using an HP Deskscan II flat bed scanner, exported into Image-Pro Plus and analyzed by taking the combined mean of 45 degrees and 135 degrees sample lines drawn through each dot. Dot blots corresponding to a linear concentration range from 10 to 300 ng IGF-I were assessed by this method. In the second procedure, WB were scanned with a ScanJet 3c flat bed scanner and their backgrounds were clarified using Image-Pro Plus. A second image analysis program, Alpha Imager 2000, was then used to define the boundaries of protein bands, assess pixel number and density, and to obtain final numerical data for quantifying alpha-Actinin on the WB. Collectively, the results of these two studies suggest that specific proteins may be evaluated by using relatively inexpensive image analysis software systems via pixel quantification of electronic images. PMID:11549944

  2. Use of a Western blot technique for the serodiagnosis of glanders

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The in vivo diagnosis of glanders relies on the highly sensitive complement fixation test (CFT). Frequently observed false positive results are troublesome for veterinary authorities and cause financial losses to animal owners. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop a test with high specificity. Hence, a Western blot assay making use of a partly purified lipopolysaccaride (LPS) containing antigen of three Burkholderia mallei strains was developed. The test was validated investigating a comprehensive set of positive and negative sera obtained from horses and mules from endemic and non endemic areas. Results The developed Western blot assay showed a markedly higher diagnostic specificity when compared to the prescribed CFT and therefore can be used as a confirmatory test. However, the CFT remains the test of choice for routine testing of glanders due to its high sensitivity, its feasibility using standard laboratory equipment and its worldwide distribution in diagnostic laboratories. Conclusions The CFT should be amended by the newly validated Western blot to increase the positive likelihood ratio of glanders serodiagnosis in non endemic areas or areas with low glanders prevalence. Its use for international trade of horses and mules should be implemented by the OIE. PMID:21247488

  3. Optimization of mRNA design for protein expression in the crustacean Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Törner, Kerstin; Nakanishi, Takashi; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Kato, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hajime

    2014-08-01

    The water flea Daphnia is a new model organism for ecological, evolutionary, and toxicological genomics. Detailed functional analysis of genes newly discovered through genomic approaches often requires overexpression of the identified protein. In the present study, we report the microinjection of in vitro-synthesized RNAs into the eggs as a method for overexpressing ubiquitous proteins in Daphnia magna. We injected a 1.3-kb mRNA that coded for the red fluorescent protein (DsRed2) flanked by UTRs from the ubiquitously expressed elongation factor 1α-1 (EF1α-1) into D. magna embryos. DsRed2 fluorescence in the embryos was measured 24 h after microinjection. Unexpectedly, the reporter RNA containing the 522-bp full-length EF1α-1 3' UTR failed to induce fluorescence. To assess reporter expression, the length of the 3' UTR that potentially contained negative regulatory elements of protein expression, including AU-rich regions and Musashi binding elements, was serially reduced from the 3' end. Assessing all injected RNA alternatives, mRNA containing the first 60 bp of the 3' UTR gave rise to the highest fluorescence, 14 times the Daphnia auto-fluorescence. In contrast, mRNA lacking the entire 3' UTR hardly induced any change in fluorescence intensity. This is the first evaluation of UTRs of mRNAs delivered into Daphnia embryos by microinjection for overexpressing proteins. The mRNA with truncated 3' UTRs of Daphnia EF1α-1 will be useful not only for gain-of-function analyses but also for labeling proteins and organelles with fluorescent proteins in Daphnia.

  4. Cannabinoid receptors in developing rats: detection of mRNA and receptor binding.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, C R; Martin, B R; Compton, D R; Abood, M E

    1994-08-01

    Despite a large body of research directed at assessing the effects of perinatal cannabinoid exposure, little is known about the development of the cannabinoid receptor. Recent advances, including the cloning of the cannabinoid receptor, have afforded us the opportunity to plot the postnatal ontogeny of the cannabinoid receptor and its mRNA in whole brain using the methods of receptor binding and RNA blot hybridization, respectively. Our results indicate that cannabinoid receptor mRNA is present at adult levels as early as postnatal day 3. The Bmax, on the other hand, increases almost fifty percent with increasing postnatal age, while the affinity does not change. The Hill coefficients for all ages studied were approximately 1. These findings suggest the possibility of a developmental progression for cannabinoid receptor development with receptor mRNA appearing first, followed by a period of rapid proliferation of the receptors themselves. PMID:7988356

  5. Creatine kinase and alpha-actin mRNA levels decrease in diabetic rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Popovich, B.; Barrieux, A.; Dillmann, W.H.

    1987-05-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is associated with cardiac atrophy and isoenzyme redistribution. To determine if tissue specific changes occur in mRNAs coding for ..cap alpha..-actin and creatine kinase (CK), they performed RNA blot analysis. Total ventricular RNA from control (C) and 4 wk old diabetic (D) rats were hybridized with /sup 32/P cDNA probes for ..cap alpha..-actin and CK. A tissue independent cDNA probe, CHOA was also used. Signal intensity was quantified by photodensitometry. D CK mRNA was 47 +/- 16% lower in D vs C. Insulin increases CK mRNA by 20% at 1.5 hs, and completely reverses the deficit after 4 wks. D ..cap alpha..-actin mRNA is 66 +/- 18% lower in D vs C. Insulin normalized ..cap alpha..-actin mRNA by 5 hs. CHOA mRNA is unchanged in D vs C, but D + insulin CHOA mRNA is 30 +/- 2% lower than C. In rats with diabetic cardiomyopathy, muscle specific CK and ..cap alpha..-actin mRNAs are decreased. Insulin treatment reverses these changes.

  6. mRNA stability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J

    1995-01-01

    This review concerns how cytoplasmic mRNA half-lives are regulated and how mRNA decay rates influence gene expression. mRNA stability influences gene expression in virtually all organisms, from bacteria to mammals, and the abundance of a particular mRNA can fluctuate manyfold following a change in the mRNA half-life, without any change in transcription. The processes that regulate mRNA half-lives can, in turn, affect how cells grow, differentiate, and respond to their environment. Three major questions are addressed. Which sequences in mRNAs determine their half-lives? Which enzymes degrade mRNAs? Which (trans-acting) factors regulate mRNA stability, and how do they function? The following specific topics are discussed: techniques for measuring eukaryotic mRNA stability and for calculating decay constants, mRNA decay pathways, mRNases, proteins that bind to sequences shared among many mRNAs [like poly(A)- and AU-rich-binding proteins] and proteins that bind to specific mRNAs (like the c-myc coding-region determinant-binding protein), how environmental factors like hormones and growth factors affect mRNA stability, and how translation and mRNA stability are linked. Some perspectives and predictions for future research directions are summarized at the end. PMID:7565413

  7. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, R.I.; Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Gosnell, T.R.

    1995-09-05

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement. 6 figs.

  8. Single-cell detection of mRNA expression using nanofountain-probe electroporated molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Giraldo-Vela, Juan P; Kang, Wonmo; McNaughton, Rebecca L; Zhang, Xuemei; Wile, Brian M; Tsourkas, Andrew; Bao, Gang; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2015-05-01

    New techniques for single-cell analysis enable new discoveries in gene expression and systems biology. Time-dependent measurements on individual cells are necessary, yet the common single-cell analysis techniques used today require lysing the cell, suspending the cell, or long incubation times for transfection, thereby interfering with the ability to track an individual cell over time. Here a method for detecting mRNA expression in live single cells using molecular beacons that are transfected into single cells by means of nanofountain probe electroporation (NFP-E) is presented. Molecular beacons are oligonucleotides that emit fluorescence upon binding to an mRNA target, rendering them useful for spatial and temporal studies of live cells. The NFP-E is used to transfect a DNA-based beacon that detects glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and an RNA-based beacon that detects a sequence cloned in the green fluorescence protein mRNA. It is shown that imaging analysis of transfection and mRNA detection can be performed within seconds after electroporation and without disturbing adhered cells. In addition, it is shown that time-dependent detection of mRNA expression is feasible by transfecting the same single cell at different time points. This technique will be particularly useful for studies of cell differentiation, where several measurements of mRNA expression are required over time.

  9. Applications of Hairpin DNA-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles for Imaging mRNA in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Jackson, S R; Wong, A C; Travis, A R; Catrina, I E; Bratu, D P; Wright, D W; Jayagopal, A

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging agents are useful for imaging molecular processes in living systems in order to elucidate the function of molecular mediators in health and disease. Here, we demonstrate a technique for the synthesis, characterization, and application of hairpin DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (hAuNPs) as fluorescent hybridization probes for imaging mRNA expression and spatiotemporal dynamics in living cells. These imaging probes feature gold colloids linked to fluorophores via engineered oligonucleotides to resemble a molecular beacon in which the gold colloid serves as the fluorescence quencher in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer system. Target-specific hybridization of the hairpin oligonucleotide enables fluorescence de-quenching and subsequent emission with high signal to noise ratios. hAuNPs exhibit high specificity without adverse toxicity or the need for transfection reagents. Furthermore, tunability of hAuNP emission profiles by selection of spectrally distinct fluorophores enables multiplexed mRNA imaging applications. Therefore, hAuNPs are promising tools for imaging gene expression in living cells. As a representative application of this technology, we discuss the design and applications of hAuNP targeted against distinct matrix metalloproteinase enzymes for the multiplexed detection of mRNA expression in live breast cancer cells using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. PMID:27241751

  10. Applications of Hairpin DNA-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles for Imaging mRNA in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Jackson, S R; Wong, A C; Travis, A R; Catrina, I E; Bratu, D P; Wright, D W; Jayagopal, A

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging agents are useful for imaging molecular processes in living systems in order to elucidate the function of molecular mediators in health and disease. Here, we demonstrate a technique for the synthesis, characterization, and application of hairpin DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (hAuNPs) as fluorescent hybridization probes for imaging mRNA expression and spatiotemporal dynamics in living cells. These imaging probes feature gold colloids linked to fluorophores via engineered oligonucleotides to resemble a molecular beacon in which the gold colloid serves as the fluorescence quencher in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer system. Target-specific hybridization of the hairpin oligonucleotide enables fluorescence de-quenching and subsequent emission with high signal to noise ratios. hAuNPs exhibit high specificity without adverse toxicity or the need for transfection reagents. Furthermore, tunability of hAuNP emission profiles by selection of spectrally distinct fluorophores enables multiplexed mRNA imaging applications. Therefore, hAuNPs are promising tools for imaging gene expression in living cells. As a representative application of this technology, we discuss the design and applications of hAuNP targeted against distinct matrix metalloproteinase enzymes for the multiplexed detection of mRNA expression in live breast cancer cells using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy.

  11. Identification of Reference Proteins for Western Blot Analyses in Mouse Model Systems of 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-P-Dioxin (TCDD) Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Prokopec, Stephenie D.; Watson, John D.; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Boutros, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Western blotting is a well-established, inexpensive and accurate way of measuring protein content. Because of technical variation between wells, normalization is required for valid interpretation of results across multiple samples. Typically this involves the use of one or more endogenous controls to adjust the measured levels of experimental molecules. Although some endogenous controls are widely used, validation is required for each experimental system. This is critical when studying transcriptional-modulators, such as toxicants like 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD).To address this issue, we examined hepatic tissue from 192 mice representing 47 unique combinations of strain, sex, Ahr-genotype, TCDD dose and treatment time. We examined 7 candidate reference proteins in each animal and assessed consistency of protein abundance through: 1) TCDD-induced fold-difference in protein content from basal levels, 2) inter- and intra- animal stability, and 3) the ability of each candidate to reduce instability of the other candidates. Univariate analyses identified HPRT as the most stable protein. Multivariate analysis indicated that stability generally increased with the number of proteins used, but gains from using >3 proteins were small. Lastly, by comparing these new data to our previous studies of mRNA controls on the same animals, we were able to show that the ideal mRNA and protein control-genes are distinct, and use of only 2–3 proteins provides strong stability, unlike in mRNA studies in the same cohort, where larger control-gene batteries were needed. PMID:25329058

  12. Restricted specificity of the autoantibody response in Goodpasture's syndrome demonstrated by two-dimensional western blotting.

    PubMed

    Derry, C J; Dunn, M J; Rees, A J; Pusey, C D

    1991-12-01

    The autoantigen in Goodpasture's syndrome is known to be contained within the non-collagenous (NC1) domain of type IV collagen. We have examined the specificity of autoantibodies to glomerular basement membrane (GBM) using the technique of 2-D electrophoresis followed by Western blotting. Protein stains of 2-D gels of collagenase-digested human GBM revealed extensive charge and size heterogeneity. Major components were of mol. wt 24-30 kD and 43-56 kD, corresponding to monomeric and dimeric subunits of NCl. Western blotting of 2-D gels with IgG from patients with anti-GBM disease demonstrated that the most antigenic components migrated as cationic 28-kD monomers (pI 10) and similarly charged dimers, although other components were recognized less strongly. The mobility of the strongly antigenic polypeptides was different to that of the known alpha 1 and alpha 2 chains of type IV collagen. Autoantibodies from all 20 patients studied showed the same pattern of reactivity, regardless of their clinical features (in particular, the presence or absence of pulmonary haemorrhage) or HLA type. A monoclonal antibody (P1) to human GBM bound in a similar pattern, particularly recognizing the cationic components. 2-D gels of affinity-purified GBM from a P1 column showed enrichment of the 28-kD monomers, which were recognized by human autoantibodies on Western blotting. These results demonstrate that the autoimmune response in Goodpasture's syndrome is of restricted specificity, and support the suggestion that the major autoantigenic determinant is present on the novel alpha 3 chain of type IV collagen. PMID:1747953

  13. Blotting Assisted by Heating and Solvent Extraction for DESI-MS Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Elaine C.; Mirabelli, Mario F.; Perez, Consuelo J.; Ifa, Demian R.

    2013-06-01

    Imprints of potato sprout ( Solanum tuberosum L.), gingko leaves (Gingko biloba L. ) and strawberries (Fragaria x ananassa Duch. ) were successfully imaged by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) on TLC plates through blotting assisted by heating and/or solvent extraction. Ion images showing the distribution of significant compounds such as glycoalkaloid toxins in potato sprout, ginkgolic acids and flavonoids in ginkgo leaves, and sugars and anthocyanidin in strawberry were obtained. Practical implications of this work include analysis of a wide range of irregular or soft materials by different imprinting conditions without requiring the addition of matrices or use of specific kinds of surfaces.

  14. Blotting assisted by heating and solvent extraction for DESI-MS imaging.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Elaine C; Mirabelli, Mario F; Perez, Consuelo J; Ifa, Demian R

    2013-06-01

    Imprints of potato sprout (Solanum tuberosum L.), gingko leaves (Gingko biloba L.) and strawberries (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) were successfully imaged by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) on TLC plates through blotting assisted by heating and/or solvent extraction. Ion images showing the distribution of significant compounds such as glycoalkaloid toxins in potato sprout, ginkgolic acids and flavonoids in ginkgo leaves, and sugars and anthocyanidin in strawberry were obtained. Practical implications of this work include analysis of a wide range of irregular or soft materials by different imprinting conditions without requiring the addition of matrices or use of specific kinds of surfaces. PMID:23605686

  15. Blotting assisted by heating and solvent extraction for DESI-MS imaging.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Elaine C; Mirabelli, Mario F; Perez, Consuelo J; Ifa, Demian R

    2013-06-01

    Imprints of potato sprout (Solanum tuberosum L.), gingko leaves (Gingko biloba L.) and strawberries (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) were successfully imaged by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) on TLC plates through blotting assisted by heating and/or solvent extraction. Ion images showing the distribution of significant compounds such as glycoalkaloid toxins in potato sprout, ginkgolic acids and flavonoids in ginkgo leaves, and sugars and anthocyanidin in strawberry were obtained. Practical implications of this work include analysis of a wide range of irregular or soft materials by different imprinting conditions without requiring the addition of matrices or use of specific kinds of surfaces.

  16. Synthetic mRNA: Production, Introduction into Cells, and Physiological Consequences.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances have made it possible to synthesize mRNA in vitro that is relatively stable when introduced into mammalian cells, has a diminished ability to activate the innate immune response against exogenous (virus-like) RNA, and can be efficiently translated into protein. Synthetic methods have also been developed to produce mRNA with unique investigational properties such as photo-cross-linking, fluorescence emission, and attachment of ligands through click chemistry. Synthetic mRNA has been proven effective in numerous applications beneficial for human health such as immunizing patients against cancer and infections diseases, alleviating diseases by restoring deficient proteins, converting somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells to use in regenerative medicine therapies, and engineering the genome by making specific alterations in DNA. This introductory chapter provides background information relevant to the following 20 chapters of this volume that present protocols for these applications of synthetic mRNA. PMID:27236789

  17. Visual detection of Akt mRNA in living cell using gold nanoparticle beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yi; Tian, Caiping; Li, Siwen; Wang, Zhaohui; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    PI3K-Akt signaling pathway plays the key role in cell apoptosis and survival, and the components of PI3K /Akt signaling pathway are often abnormally expressed in human tumors. Therefore, determination of the Akt (protein kinase B, PKB) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression is significantly important in understanding the mechanism of tumor progression. In this study, we designed a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) functionalized with gold nanoparticles and fluorescein isothiocyanate(FITC) as a beacon for detecting human Akt mRNA. Spectrofluorometer was used to detect the fluorescence quenching and recovery of the beacons, and laser confocal scanning microscopy was adopted to image Akt mRNA in cells. The results showed that this beacon could sensitively and quantitatively measure the Akt mRNA in living cells . This strategy is potentially useful for the cellular imaging of RNA or protein expression in living cells.

  18. Effective inhibition of mRNA accumulation and protein expression of H5N1 avian influenza virus NS1 gene in vitro by small interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Hanwei; Du, Li; Hao, Yongchang; Cheng, Ying; Luo, Jing; Kuang, Wenhua; Zhang, Donglin; Lei, Ming; Jia, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Xiaoru; Qi, Chao; He, Hongxuan; Wang, Fengyang

    2013-07-01

    Avian influenza has emerged as a devastating disease and may cross species barrier and adapt to a new host, causing enormous economic loss and great public health threats, and non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is a multifunctional non-structural protein of avian influenza virus (AIV) that counters cellular antiviral activities and is a virulence factor. RNA interference (RNAi) provides a powerful promising approach to inhibit viral infection specifically. To explore the possibility of using RNAi as a strategy against AIV infection, after the fusion protein expression plasmids pNS1-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), which contain the EGFP reporter gene and AIV NS1 as silencing target, were constructed and NS1-EGFP fusion protein expressing HEK293 cell lines were established, four small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting NS1 gene were designed, synthesized, and used to transfect the stable cell lines. Flow cytometry, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot were performed to assess the expression level of NS1. The results suggested that sequence-dependent specific siRNAs effectively inhibited mRNA accumulation and protein expression of AIV NS1 in vitro. These findings provide useful information for the development of RNAi-based prophylaxis and therapy for AIV infection.

  19. Early and late stimulation of ob mRNA expression in meal-fed and overfed rats.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, R B; Ramsay, T G; Smith, S R; Bruch, R C

    1996-01-01

    ob protein is hypothesized to be a circulating feedback signal in the regulation of energy balance. Obese, overfed rats have high levels of ob mRNA expression and suppressed voluntary food intake, indicating the presence of a potent satiety factor. The objectives of this experiment were to determine whether feeding rats their normal daily intake in three meals, compared with ad libitum feeding, increased ob mRNA expression and to determine the degree of obesity required to stimulate expression of ob mRNA. Rats were fed ad libitum, were tube-fed their normal intake in three meals a day, or were tube-fed twice normal intake, ob mRNA was measured by Northern blot analysis after 0, 2, 7, 14, 21, and 32 d of tube-feeding. After only 2 d ob mRNA was threefold higher in tube-fed animals than in ad libitum controls. By day 21 there was a further increase in ob mRNA expression in overfed rats which were at 130% control weight. These results suggest that a metabolic consequence of meal-feeding increases ob mRNA expression in the absence of increased food intake or weight gain. There is a further increase in ob mRNA expression once significant obesity is established. PMID:8621790

  20. Antisense Transcript and RNA Processing Alterations Suppress Instability of Polyadenylated mRNA in Chlamydomonas Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yoshiki; Kikis, Elise A.; Zimmer, Sara L.; Komine, Yutaka; Stern, David B.

    2004-01-01

    In chloroplasts, the control of mRNA stability is of critical importance for proper regulation of gene expression. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain Δ26pAtE is engineered such that the atpB mRNA terminates with an mRNA destabilizing polyadenylate tract, resulting in this strain being unable to conduct photosynthesis. A collection of photosynthetic revertants was obtained from Δ26pAtE, and gel blot hybridizations revealed RNA processing alterations in the majority of these suppressor of polyadenylation (spa) strains, resulting in a failure to expose the atpB mRNA 3′ poly(A) tail. Two exceptions were spa19 and spa23, which maintained unusual heteroplasmic chloroplast genomes. One genome type, termed PS+, conferred photosynthetic competence by contributing to the stability of atpB mRNA; the other, termed PS−, was required for viability but could not produce stable atpB transcripts. Based on strand-specific RT-PCR, S1 nuclease protection, and RNA gel blots, evidence was obtained that the PS+ genome stabilizes atpB mRNA by generating an atpB antisense transcript, which attenuates the degradation of the polyadenylated form. The accumulation of double-stranded RNA was confirmed by insensitivity of atpB mRNA from PS+ genome-containing cells to S1 nuclease digestion. To obtain additional evidence for antisense RNA function in chloroplasts, we used strain Δ26, in which atpB mRNA is unstable because of the lack of a 3′ stem-loop structure. In this context, when a 121-nucleotide segment of atpB antisense RNA was expressed from an ectopic site, an elevated accumulation of atpB mRNA resulted. Finally, when spa19 was placed in a genetic background in which expression of the chloroplast exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase was diminished, the PS+ genome and the antisense transcript were no longer required for photosynthesis. Taken together, our results suggest that antisense RNA in chloroplasts can protect otherwise unstable transcripts from 3′→5

  1. Target accessibility and signal specificity in live-cell detection of BMP-4 mRNA using molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Won Jong; Santangelo, Philip J; Jo, Hanjoong; Bao, Gang

    2008-03-01

    The ability to visualize mRNA in single living cells and monitor in real-time the changes of mRNA level and localization can provide unprecedented opportunities for biological and disease studies. However, the mRNA detection specificity and sensitivity are critically dependent on the selection of target sequences and their accessibility. We carried out an extensive study of the target accessibility of BMP-4 mRNA using 10 different designs of molecular beacons (MBs), and identified the optimal beacon design. Specifically, for MB design 1 and 8 (MB1 and MB8), the fluorescent intensities from BMP-4 mRNA correlated well with the GFP signal after upregulating BMP-4 and co-expressing GFP using adenovirus, and the knockdown of BMP-4 mRNA using siRNA significantly reduced the beacon signals, demonstrating detection specificity. The beacon specificity was further confirmed using blocking RNA and in situ hybridization. We found that fluorescence signal from MBs depends critically on target sequences; the target sequences corresponding to siRNA sites may not be good sites for beacon-based mRNA detection, and vice versa. Possible beacon design rules are identified and approaches for enhancing target accessibility are discussed. This has significant implications to MB design for live cell mRNA detection.

  2. Validation of Endothelin B Receptor Antibodies Reveals Two Distinct Receptor-related Bands on Western Blot

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Travis P.; Kornberg, Daniel; Montmayeur, Jean-Pierre; Long, Melinda; Reichheld, Stephen; Strichartz, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are important tools for the study of protein expression, but are often used without full validation. In this study, we use Western blots to characterize antibodies targeted to the N- (NT) or C-termini (CT) and the second (IL2) or third intracellular (IL3) loops of the endothelin B receptor (ETB). The IL2-targeted antibody accurately detected endogenous ETB expression in rat brain and cultured rat astrocytes by labeling a 50kD band, the expected weight of full-length ETB. However, this antibody failed to detect transfected ETB in HEK293 cultures. In contrast, the NT-targeted antibody accurately detected endogenous ETB in rat astrocyte cultures and transfected ETB in HEK293 cultures by labeling a 37 kD band, but failed to detect endogenous ETB in rat brain. Bands detected by the CT-targeted or IL3-targeted antibodies were found to be unrelated to ETB. Our findings show that functional ETB receptors can be detected at 50 kD or 37 kD on Western blot, with drastic differences in antibody affinity for these bands. The 37 kD band likely reflects ETB receptor processing, which appears to be dependent on cell type and/or culture condition. PMID:25232999

  3. Analysis of sperm antigens by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel/protein blot radioimmunobinding method

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.Y.G.; Huang, Y.S.; Hu, P.C.; Gomel, V.; Menge, A.C.

    1982-06-01

    A radioimmunobinding method based on the blotting of renatured proteins from sodium dodecyl sulfate gels on to nitrocellulose filter papers was developed to analyze the sperm antigens that elicit serum anti-sperm antibodies. In rabbits, serum anti-sperm antibodies were raised by immunization with homologous epididymal spermatozoa mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant. The raised antisera from either male or female rabbits were shown to react with three major sperm protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels with the corresponding molecular weights of about 70,000 +/- 5000, 14,000, and 13,000, respectively. In humans, the monoclonal antibodies against human sperm were raised by a hybridoma technique. Out of six independent hybrid cell lines that were generated, three of them were shown to secrete immunoglobulins that react with the same two protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, which have the approximate molecular weight of 10,000. The same procedure was also used to analyze human serum samples that were shown to contain anti-sperm antibodies by the known techniques. Unique sperm antigens that elicit anti-sperm antibodies in humans were identified and correlated. The results of this study suggest that sodium dodecyl sulfate gel/protein blot radioimmunobinding method may be a sensitive and useful tool for the study of sperm antigens that elicit autoimmune responses and their association with human infertility.

  4. Evaluating cytoplasmic and nuclear levels of inflammatory cytokines in cancer cells by western blotting.

    PubMed

    Gatla, Himavanth R; Singha, Bipradeb; Persaud, Valerie; Vancurova, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Increased expression and cellular release of inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-8 (IL-8; CXCL8), and high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) are associated with increased cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis during cancer progression. In prostate and ovarian cancer cells, increased levels of IL-8 and HMGB1 correlate with poor prognosis. We have recently shown that proteasome inhibition by bortezomib (BZ) specifically increases IL-8 release from metastatic prostate and ovarian cancer cells. In this chapter, we describe a protocol to analyze the cytoplasmic and nuclear levels of IL-8 and HMGB1 in prostate and ovarian cancer cells by western blotting. IL-8 is localized in the cytoplasm in both cell types, and its protein levels are significantly increased by BZ. In contrast, HMGB1 is localized in the nucleus, and BZ increases its nuclear levels only in ovarian cancer cells. The protocol includes isolation of cytoplasmic and nuclear extracts, followed by SDS electrophoresis and western blotting, and can be easily modified to analyze the cytoplasmic and nuclear cytokine levels in other cell types. PMID:24908314

  5. Validation of endothelin B receptor antibodies reveals two distinct receptor-related bands on Western blot.

    PubMed

    Barr, Travis P; Kornberg, Daniel; Montmayeur, Jean-Pierre; Long, Melinda; Reichheld, Stephen; Strichartz, Gary R

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are important tools for the study of protein expression but are often used without full validation. In this study, we used Western blots to characterize antibodies targeted to the N or C terminal (NT or CT, respectively) and the second or third intracellular loop (IL2 or IL3, respectively) of the endothelin B receptor (ETB). The IL2-targeted antibody accurately detected endogenous ETB expression in rat brain and cultured rat astrocytes by labeling a 50-kDa band, the expected weight of full-length ETB. However, this antibody failed to detect transfected ETB in HEK293 cultures. In contrast, the NT-targeted antibody accurately detected endogenous ETB in rat astrocyte cultures and transfected ETB in HEK293 cultures by labeling a 37-kDa band but failed to detect endogenous ETB in rat brain. Bands detected by the CT- or IL3-targeted antibody were found to be unrelated to ETB. Our findings show that functional ETB can be detected at 50 or 37kDa on Western blot, with drastic differences in antibody affinity for these bands. The 37-kDa band likely reflects ETB processing, which appears to be dependent on cell type and/or culture condition.

  6. A sensitive non-radioactive northern blot method to detect small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Woo; Li, Zhihua; Moore, Patrick S; Monaghan, A Paula; Chang, Yuan; Nichols, Mark; John, Bino

    2010-04-01

    The continuing discoveries of potentially active small RNAs at an unprecedented rate using high-throughput sequencing have raised the need for methods that can reliably detect and quantitate the expression levels of small RNAs. Currently, northern blot is the most widely used method for validating small RNAs that are identified by methods such as high-throughput sequencing. We describe a new northern blot-based protocol (LED) for small RNA (approximately 15-40 bases) detection using digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled oligonucleotide probes containing locked nucleic acids (LNA) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide for cross-linking the RNA to the membrane. LED generates clearly visible signals for RNA amounts as low as 0.05 fmol. This method requires as little as a few seconds of membrane exposure to outperform the signal intensity using overnight exposure of isotope-based methods, corresponding to approximately 1000-fold improvement in exposure-time. In contrast to commonly used radioisotope-based methods, which require freshly prepared and hazardous probes, LED probes can be stored for at least 6 months, facilitate faster and more cost-effective experiments, and are more environmentally friendly. A detailed protocol of LED is provided in the Supplementary Data. PMID:20081203

  7. Evaluating cytoplasmic and nuclear levels of inflammatory cytokines in cancer cells by western blotting.

    PubMed

    Gatla, Himavanth R; Singha, Bipradeb; Persaud, Valerie; Vancurova, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Increased expression and cellular release of inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-8 (IL-8; CXCL8), and high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) are associated with increased cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis during cancer progression. In prostate and ovarian cancer cells, increased levels of IL-8 and HMGB1 correlate with poor prognosis. We have recently shown that proteasome inhibition by bortezomib (BZ) specifically increases IL-8 release from metastatic prostate and ovarian cancer cells. In this chapter, we describe a protocol to analyze the cytoplasmic and nuclear levels of IL-8 and HMGB1 in prostate and ovarian cancer cells by western blotting. IL-8 is localized in the cytoplasm in both cell types, and its protein levels are significantly increased by BZ. In contrast, HMGB1 is localized in the nucleus, and BZ increases its nuclear levels only in ovarian cancer cells. The protocol includes isolation of cytoplasmic and nuclear extracts, followed by SDS electrophoresis and western blotting, and can be easily modified to analyze the cytoplasmic and nuclear cytokine levels in other cell types.

  8. DMISA (dissociated membrane immunosorbent assay), a new ELISA technique performed with blotted samples.

    PubMed

    Guérin-Marchand, C; Batard, T; Brodard, V; Desvaux, F X; Sénéchal, H; David, B; Peltre, G

    1994-01-01

    This study describes the use of electrophoretically purified antigens blotted onto nitrocellulose, as solid phase antigens for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. This procedure is called DMISA, for dissociated membrane immunosorbent assay. The method is illustrated using immunoblotted antigens of Dactylis glomerata grass pollen extract. The band of interest was located on a print of nitrocellulose by light staining (India ink), then the corresponding strip of nitrocellulose was cut out. Immediately after its solubilization in ethyleneglycol monomethyl ether, the antigen coated nitrocellulose was precipitated by the addition of buffer. In this way the bulk of the antigen remained bound to the membrane. The resulting suspension was carefully washed, and used as a solid phase antigen in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Two different electrophoretic methods were used to separate the Dactylis glomerata antigens. We compared the results obtained with classical immunoblot and with DMISA, for IgG4 and IgE quantification using sera from patients allergic to D. glomerata and purified blotted antigens present at the nanogram level.

  9. Selective analysis of lipids by thin-layer chromatography blot matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zaima, Nobuhiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Adachi, Kohsuke; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2011-01-01

    Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is an essential method for food composition analyses such as lipid nutrition analysis. TLC can be used to obtain information about the lipid composition of foods; however, it cannot be used for analyses at the molecular level. Recently we developed a new method that combines matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) with TLC-blotting (TLC-Blot-MALDI-IMS). The combination of MALDI-IMS and TLC blotting enabled detailed and sensitive analyses of lipids. In this study, we applied TLC-Blot-MALDI-IMS for analysis of major phospholipids extracted from bluefin tuna. We showed that TLC-Blot-MALDI-IMS analysis could visualize and identify major phospholipids such as phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylcholine, and sphingomyelin.

  10. Thyroid hormones regulate levels of thyrotropin-releasing-hormone mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Koller, K.J.; Wolff, R.S.; Warden, M.K.; Zoeller, R.T.

    1987-10-01

    Cellular levels of messenger RNA encoding thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) were measured in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the reticular nucleus of the thalamus in male rats after chemical thyroidectomy and thyroid hormone, replacement. TRH mRNA levels were measured by quantitative in situ hybridization histochemistry using a /sup 35/S-labeled synthetic 48-base oligodeoxynucleotide probe and quantitative autoradiography. Chemical thyroidectomy, produced by the administration of 6-(n-propyl)-2-thiouracil (PrSur), reduced plasma thyroxine below detection limits and significantly increased TRH mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus. Treatments with exogenous L-triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) reduced TRH mRNA to the same level in both hypothyroid and euthyroid animals. Neither PrSur treatment nor T/sub 3/ replacement influenced TRH mRNA levels in the reticular nucleus of the thalamus. Blot hybridization analysis of electrophoretically fractionated total RNA from pituitaries of these animals indicated that thyrotropin-..beta.. mRNA levels were elevated after thyroidectomy and reduced by T/sub 3/ treatment, showing that the pituitary-thyroid axis was indeed stimulated by PrSur treatment. These results suggest that thyroid hormones are involved, either directly or indirectly, in regulating the biosynthesis of TRH in the thyrotropic center of the hypothalamus.

  11. Imaging Single mRNA Dynamics in Live Neurons and Brains.

    PubMed

    Moon, H C; Park, H Y

    2016-01-01

    RNA is a key player in the process of gene expression. Whereas fluorescence in situ hybridization allows single mRNA imaging in fixed cells, the MS2-GFP labeling technique enables the observation of mRNA dynamics in living cells. Recently, two genetically engineered mouse models have been developed for the application of the MS2-GFP system in live animals. First, the Actb-MBS mouse was generated by knocking in 24 repeats of the MS2 stem-loop sequence in the 3' untranslated region of the β-actin gene. Second, the MCP mouse was made to express the NLS-HA-MCP-GFP transgene in all cell types. By crossing Actb-MBS and MCP mice, a double homozygous mouse line, MCP×MBS, was established to visualize endogenous β-actin mRNA labeled with multiple green fluorescent proteins. By imaging hippocampal neurons or brain slices from MCP×MBS mice, the dynamics of mRNA, such as transcription, transport, and localization, can be studied at single mRNA resolution. In this chapter, we explain the basics of MCP×MBS mice and describe methods for utilizing these animals. PMID:27241749

  12. Detection of IgA and IgM antibodies to HIV-1 in neonates by radioimmune western blotting.

    PubMed Central

    Portincasa, P.; Conti, G.; Re, M. C.; Chezzi, C.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To detect infection with HIV-1 by IgA and IgM response at birth in children born to HIV-1 seropositive mothers. DESIGN--Western blotting and radioimmune western blotting on stored sera from infected and uninfected babies born to HIV-1 seropositive mothers. Sera were pretreated to remove IgG. SETTING--Parma and Bologna, Italy. SUBJECTS--12 infected and five uninfected babies born to HIV-1 seropositive mothers and three babies born to seronegative mothers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Effectiveness of western blotting and radioimmune western blotting in detecting antibodies to HIV-1 gene products. RESULTS--With conventional western blotting we found IgA class antibodies to HIV-1 proteins in serum from three out of 12 infected children; in two of these three the serum was collected at age 3 months (positive controls). Radioimmune western blotting detected both IgA and IgM antibodies in serum from all infected children tested, whereas all serum from uninfected children born to seropositive and seronegative mothers showed no such antibodies. CONCLUSION--Although the technique should be tested on more patients, radioimmune western blotting seems to be a valuable tool for serological diagnosis of congenital HIV-1 infection at birth in neonates born to seropositive mothers. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 PMID:1628052

  13. Western Blot Detection of Human Anti-Chikungunya Virus Antibody with Recombinant Envelope 2 Protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoshou; Lee, Jihoo; Ahn, Hye-Jin; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Dias, Ronaldo F; Nam, Ho-Woo

    2016-04-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a tropical pathogen, has re-emerged and has massive outbreaks abruptly all over the world. Containing many dominant epitopes, the envelope E2 protein of CHIKV has been explored for the vaccination or diagnosis. In the present study, the antigenicity of a recombinant expressed intrinsically disorder domain (IUD) of E2 was tested for the detection of the antibody against CHIKV through western blot method. The gene of the IUD of E2 was inserted into 2 different vectors and expressed as recombinant GST-E2 and recombinant MBP-E2 fusion protein, respectively. Two kinds of fusion proteins were tested with 30 CHIKV patient sera and 30 normal sera, respectively. Both proteins were detected by 25 patients sera (83.3%) and 1 normal serum (3.3%). This test showed a relatively high sensitivity and very high specificity of the recombinant E2 proteins to be used as diagnostic antigens against CHIKV infection. PMID:27180586

  14. Restoration of antibody binding to blotted meningococcal outer membrane proteins using various detergents.

    PubMed

    Wedege, E; Bryn, K; Frøholm, L O

    1988-10-01

    Restoration of IgG antibody binding to heat-denatured meningococcal outer membrane proteins has been studied on immunoblots with a series of 14 detergents. Nitrocellulose strips with the blotted proteins were incubated with the detergents and sera from human volunteers vaccinated with meningococcal membrane proteins. Zwitterionic and ionic detergents, containing substituted quarternary ammonium or amino groups with a minimum of 10 C atoms in the alkyl chain, restored the antigenicity of the serotype-specific class 2 porin protein. The concentrations of the Zwittergent detergents necessary for activation decreased with increasing alkyl chain length of the homologues. Only zwitterionic detergents renatured the class 1 protein. Both proteins were weakly antigenic in the presence of the nonionic detergents Triton X-100 and Tween 20. Meningococcal lipopolysaccharide restored antibody binding to the porin, but not to the class 1 protein. Similar concentrations of lipopolysaccharides from two other gram-negative bacteria had no effect.

  15. Detection of Hypoderma actaeon infestation in Cervus elaphus with ELISA and western blotting.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Julia; Panadero, Rosario; de la Fuente-López, Concepción

    2010-07-01

    We used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blotting (WB) to evaluate the reactivity of first-stage larval extracts of Hypoderma lineatum with antibodies in sera from 76 red deer from an endemic area for Hypoderma actaeon. Antibodies in sera from deer infested with H. actaeon recognized hypodermin C from H. lineatum in both ELISA and WB assays. ELISA values were correlated with the epidemiology of the fly infestation in the area where the deer sera were collected. There was no clear relationship between anti-hypodermin C antibody levels and the age of the animals or the number of Hypoderma grubs found at necropsy in the hides of the deer. Our results suggest that first-instar antigens of H. lineatum can be used to diagnose natural infestations by H. actaeon by indicating the presence of first-stage larvae, which can help to accurately describe H. actaeon epidemiology. PMID:20688700

  16. Detection of Hypoderma actaeon infestation in Cervus elaphus with ELISA and western blotting.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Julia; Panadero, Rosario; de la Fuente-López, Concepción

    2010-07-01

    We used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blotting (WB) to evaluate the reactivity of first-stage larval extracts of Hypoderma lineatum with antibodies in sera from 76 red deer from an endemic area for Hypoderma actaeon. Antibodies in sera from deer infested with H. actaeon recognized hypodermin C from H. lineatum in both ELISA and WB assays. ELISA values were correlated with the epidemiology of the fly infestation in the area where the deer sera were collected. There was no clear relationship between anti-hypodermin C antibody levels and the age of the animals or the number of Hypoderma grubs found at necropsy in the hides of the deer. Our results suggest that first-instar antigens of H. lineatum can be used to diagnose natural infestations by H. actaeon by indicating the presence of first-stage larvae, which can help to accurately describe H. actaeon epidemiology.

  17. Western Blot Detection of Human Anti-Chikungunya Virus Antibody with Recombinant Envelope 2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhaoshou; Lee, Jihoo; Ahn, Hye-Jin; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Dias, Ronaldo F.; Nam, Ho-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a tropical pathogen, has re-emerged and has massive outbreaks abruptly all over the world. Containing many dominant epitopes, the envelope E2 protein of CHIKV has been explored for the vaccination or diagnosis. In the present study, the antigenicity of a recombinant expressed intrinsically disorder domain (IUD) of E2 was tested for the detection of the antibody against CHIKV through western blot method. The gene of the IUD of E2 was inserted into 2 different vectors and expressed as recombinant GST-E2 and recombinant MBP-E2 fusion protein, respectively. Two kinds of fusion proteins were tested with 30 CHIKV patient sera and 30 normal sera, respectively. Both proteins were detected by 25 patients sera (83.3%) and 1 normal serum (3.3%). This test showed a relatively high sensitivity and very high specificity of the recombinant E2 proteins to be used as diagnostic antigens against CHIKV infection. PMID:27180586

  18. Rotavirus detection by dot blot hybridization assay using a non-radioactive synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide probe.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, J.; Sandino, A.; Yudelevich, A.; Avendaño, L. F.; Venegas, A.; Hinrichsen, V.; Spencer, E.

    1992-01-01

    A synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide of 40 nucleotides corresponding to nucleotides 33-72 of the gene coding for the viral protein VP7 of rotavirus, was used as a nucleic acid probe to develop a non-radioactive hybridization method for rotavirus detection. The probe was labelled at the 3' end with biotin-7-dATP. The sensitivity and specificity of the dot blot hybridization assay for rotavirus detection was evaluated with 303 stool specimens. The results indicate that the hybridization assay has a higher sensitivity than both PAGE and EIA. Among the rotavirus strains tested 37 different electropherotypes were found. The results suggest that rotavirus diagnosis by dot hybridization using a non-radioactive probe may become routine laboratory procedure because it is simple, highly specific and very sensitive. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1312480

  19. Detection of yellowhead virus and Chinese baculovirus in penaeid shrimp by the Western blot technique.

    PubMed

    Nadala, E C; Tapay, L M; Cao, S; Loh, P C

    1997-12-01

    The continuing threat posed by viral diseases in cultured shrimp calls for the development of detection technologies for monitoring the animals, especially broodstock. Two of the most highly pathogenic viruses of penaeid shrimp are the yellow-head virus (YHV) and Chinese baculovirus (CBV, also called white spot baculovirus). A Western blot (WB) protocol capable of detecting YHV and CBV in the hemolymph of infected shrimp was developed. The use of the hemolymph as material for virus detection allowed for sample collection without sacrificing the animals. This protocol was highly specific, rapid, and sensitive enough to detect the presence of the viruses before the appearance of overt symptoms. It was also useful for demonstrating the growth of both viruses in primary shrimp lymphoid cell cultures.

  20. 2-D Western blotting for evaluation of antibodies developed for detection of host cell protein.

    PubMed

    Berkelman, Tom; Harbers, Adriana; Bandhakavi, Sricharan

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins generated for therapeutic use must be substantially free of residual host cell protein (HCP). The presence of host cell protein (HCP) is usually assayed by ELISA using a polyclonal antibody mixture raised against a population of proteins derived from the host cell background. This antibody should recognize as high a proportion as possible of the potential HCPs in a given sample. A recommended method for evaluating the assay involves two-dimensional electrophoretic separation followed by Western blotting.We present here a method using commercial anti-HCP antibody and samples derived from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. The 2-D electrophoresis procedure gives highly reproducible spot patterns and entire procedure can be completed in less than 2 days. Software analysis enables the straightforward generation of percent coverage values for the antibody when used to probe HCP-containing samples. PMID:25820736

  1. IgG-subclass-specific antibody reactivity to respiratory syncytial virus polypeptides investigated by western blot.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, M; Hornsleth, A; Olsen, P G

    1990-01-01

    IgG1 and IgG3 subclass-specific antibody reactivity (ABR) in serum samples obtained from infants and children in relation to acute lower respiratory disease caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection was investigated by Western blot. IgG1 ABR was directed against the nucleocapsid polypeptides VPN and VPP as well as against the glycoproteins GP48 (F1) and GP90. IgG3 ABR was directed only against VPN and VPP. In infants, a low IgG1 reactivity against glycoproteins was observed. When serum samples obtained in the early convalescent phase were tested, ABR against GP48 and GP90 as well as against VPP differed with respect to RSV subtypes A and B. IgG1 ABR increased in the late convalescent phase, while IgG3 ABR decreased during this phase when serum samples from primary infections were tested.

  2. Study of anti-dengue NS1 antibody by western blot.

    PubMed

    Kuno, G; Vorndam, A V; Gubler, D J; Gómez, I

    1990-10-01

    The presence of anti-nonstructural protein (NS1) antibody in natural dengue infections has been suspected to be associated with development of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). The Western blot technique was used to study the dynamics of the immune response to NS1 and to determine the frequency of anti-NS1 antibody among confirmed dengue patients in Indonesia, where DHF is common, and in Puerto Rico, where DHF is less frequently observed. Anti-NS1 antibody was rarely found in those with primary infections in either group. The antibody occurred at a significantly higher frequency in acute-phase serum samples from secondary infections in Indonesia than in those from Puerto Rico. No difference was observed, however, in Indonesian patients with secondary infection who had dengue fever or DHF.

  3. Reexamination of alcohol dehydrogenase structural mutants in Drosophila using protein blotting

    SciTech Connect

    Hollocher, H.; Place, A.R.

    1987-06-01

    Using protein blotting and an immuno-overlay procedure, the authors have reexamined the cross-reacting material produced by ADH null-activity mutants generated with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). Of the 13 mutants, 11 have an immunodetectable polypeptide of wild-type size. The native and urea denatured isoelectric points (pI) establish that 7 of 13 of the mutations have no effect on protein charge. The electrophoretic mobilities of each variant on increasing percent acrylamide gels (Ferguson analysis), reveal that 9 of the 11 immunodetectable mutations have retained the ability form dimers under native conditions. None of the inactive mutant proteins has the ability to form the adduct-bound isozyme. The authors have found no correlation between protein pI and i vivo stability. The observed frequencies of specific charge class alterations do not dispute the propensity of G:A transitions previously found for EMS mutagenesis.

  4. 2-D Western blotting for evaluation of antibodies developed for detection of host cell protein.

    PubMed

    Berkelman, Tom; Harbers, Adriana; Bandhakavi, Sricharan

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins generated for therapeutic use must be substantially free of residual host cell protein (HCP). The presence of host cell protein (HCP) is usually assayed by ELISA using a polyclonal antibody mixture raised against a population of proteins derived from the host cell background. This antibody should recognize as high a proportion as possible of the potential HCPs in a given sample. A recommended method for evaluating the assay involves two-dimensional electrophoretic separation followed by Western blotting.We present here a method using commercial anti-HCP antibody and samples derived from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. The 2-D electrophoresis procedure gives highly reproducible spot patterns and entire procedure can be completed in less than 2 days. Software analysis enables the straightforward generation of percent coverage values for the antibody when used to probe HCP-containing samples.

  5. PCR-Reverse Blot Hybridization Assay for Screening and Identification of Pathogens in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeonim; Wang, Hye-Young; Lee, Gyusang; Park, Soon-Deok; Jeon, Bo-Young; Uh, Young; Kim, Jong Bae

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of the pathogens involved in bloodstream infections is crucial for the prompt initiation of appropriate therapy, as this can decrease morbidity and mortality rates. A PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay for sepsis, the reverse blot hybridization assay (REBA) Sepsis-ID test, was developed; it uses pan-probes to distinguish Gram-positive and -negative bacteria and fungi. In addition, the assay was designed to identify bacteria and fungi using six genus-specific and 13 species-specific probes; it uses additional probes for antibiotic resistance genes, i.e., the mecA gene of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and the vanA and vanB genes of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). The REBA Sepsis-ID test successfully identified clinical isolates and blood culture samples as containing Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, or fungi. The results matched those obtained with conventional microbiological methods. For the REBA Sepsis-ID test, of the 115 blood culture samples tested, 47 (40.8%) and 49 (42.6%) samples were identified to the species and genus levels, respectively, and the remaining 19 samples (16.5%), which included five Gram-positive rods, were identified as Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, or fungi. The antibiotic resistances of the MRSA and VRE strains were identified using both conventional microbiological methods and the REBA Sepsis-ID test. In conclusion, the REBA Sepsis-ID test developed for this study is a fast and reliable test for the identification of Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, and antibiotic resistance genes (including mecA for MRSA and the vanA and vanB genes for VRE) in bloodstream infections. PMID:23447637

  6. Electrospun nitrocellulose and nylon: Design and fabrication of novel high performance platforms for protein blotting applications

    PubMed Central

    Manis, Ashley E; Bowman, James R; Bowlin, Gary L; Simpson, David G

    2007-01-01

    Background Electrospinning is a non-mechanical processing strategy that can be used to process a variety of native and synthetic polymers into highly porous materials composed of nano-scale to micron-scale diameter fibers. By nature, electrospun materials exhibit an extensive surface area and highly interconnected pore spaces. In this study we adopted a biological engineering approach to ask how the specific unique advantages of the electrospinning process might be exploited to produce a new class of research/diagnostic tools. Methods The electrospinning properties of nitrocellulose, charged nylon and blends of these materials are characterized. Results Nitrocellulose electrospun from a starting concentration of < 110 mg/ml acetone deposited as 4–8 μm diameter beads; at 110 mg/ml-to-140 mg/ml starting concentrations, this polymer deposited as 100–4000 nm diameter fibers. Nylon formed fibers when electrospun from 60–140 mg/ml HFIP, fibers ranged from 120 nm-6000 nm in diameter. Electrospun nitrocellulose exhibited superior protein retention and increased sensitivity in slot blot experiments with respect to the parent nitrocellulose material. Western immunoblot experiments using fibronectin as a model protein demonstrated that electrospun nylon exhibits increased protein binding and increased dynamic range in the chemiluminescence detection of antigens than sheets of the parent starting material. Composites of electrospun nitrocellulose and electrospun nylon exhibit high protein binding activity and provide increased sensitivity for the immuno-detection of antigens. Conclusion The flexibility afforded by electrospinning process makes it possible to tailor blotting membranes to specific applications. Electrospinning has a variety of potential applications in the clinical diagnostic field of use. PMID:18271978

  7. Single-cell Western blotting after whole-cell imaging to assess cancer chemotherapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chi-Chih; Lin, Jung-Ming G; Xu, Zhuchen; Kumar, Sanjay; Herr, Amy E

    2014-10-21

    Intratumor heterogeneity remains a major obstacle to effective cancer therapy and personalized medicine. Current understanding points to differential therapeutic response among subpopulations of tumor cells as a key challenge to successful treatment. To advance our understanding of how this heterogeneity is reflected in cell-to-cell variations in chemosensitivity and expression of drug-resistance proteins, we optimize and apply a new targeted proteomics modality, single-cell western blotting (scWestern), to a human glioblastoma cell line. To acquire both phenotypic and proteomic data on the same, single glioblastoma cells, we integrate high-content imaging prior to the scWestern assays. The scWestern technique supports thousands of concurrent single-cell western blots, with each assay comprised of chemical lysis of single cells seated in microwells, protein electrophoresis from those microwells into a supporting polyacrylamide (PA) gel layer, and in-gel antibody probing. We systematically optimize chemical lysis and subsequent polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of the single-cell lysate. The scWestern slides are stored for months then reprobed, thus allowing archiving and later analysis as relevant to sparingly limited, longitudinal cell specimens. Imaging and scWestern analysis of single glioblastoma cells dosed with the chemotherapeutic daunomycin showed both apoptotic (cleaved caspase 8- and annexin V-positive) and living cells. Intriguingly, living glioblastoma subpopulations show up-regulation of a multidrug resistant protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), suggesting an active drug efflux pump as a potential mechanism of drug resistance. Accordingly, linking of phenotype with targeted protein analysis with single-cell resolution may advance our understanding of drug response in inherently heterogeneous cell populations, such as those anticipated in tumors.

  8. HIV‑2 antibody detection after indeterminate or negative HIV‑1 Western blot in Cuba, 2005-2008.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Dervel F; Ortiz, Eva; Martín, Dayamí; Nibot, Carmen; Rizo, Adis; Silva, Eladio

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Differentiating between HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection is the first step to understanding HIV transmission, epidemiology and pathogenesis in geographical areas where both viruses circulate. In Cuba, positive results in mixed HIV-1/2 screening assays are confirmed by HIV-1 Western blot. Indeterminate results constitute the main limitation of this test and HIV-2 infection is among their possible causes; hence the importance of second-stage screening and confirmatory tests for HIV-2 infection. OBJECTIVE Investigate the contribution of HIV-2 antibodies to negative or indeterminate HIV-1 Western blot results in serum samples from 2005 through 2008 in Cuba. METHODS HIV-2 reactivity was studied using the ELISA DAVIH-VIH-2 diagnostic kit (Cuba) in 1723 serum samples with negative or indeterminate results for HIV-1 Western blot from January 2005 through December 2008. Duplicate sera reactive by ELISA were confirmed by HIV-2 Western blot, results interpreted according to WHO criteria. The epidemiological interview established by Cuba's National Program for Prevention and Control Sexually-Transmitted Diseases and HIV/AIDS was applied to HIV-2 Western blot-positive patients. RESULTS Among all sera studied, HIV-2 ELISA identified 12 reactive serum samples (0.70%) and 1711 non-reactive (99.30%). Western blot analysis of the 12 ELISA-reactive samples confirmed two positive samples (16.67%), 4 negative (33.33%) and 6 indeterminate (50%). Positive samples reacted against the p16, p26, gp36, p53, p56, p68 and gp105 proteins. All 12 ELISA-reactive samples belonged to the HIV-1 Western blot indeterminate group. The two HIV-2-positive samples showed well defined reactivity to gp160, p53, p55 and p34 of HIV-1. HIV-1 seroconversion was observed in all 10 remaining samples during serological followup. CONCLUSIONS Two new HIV-2 seropositive cases were diagnosed using DAVIH-VIH-2 and HIV-2 Western blot in indeterminate HIV-1 Western blot samples. Results support the recommendation

  9. Lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase mRNA tissue specific expression, developmental regulation, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Semenkovich, C F; Chen, S H; Wims, M; Luo, C C; Li, W H; Chan, L

    1989-03-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipase (HL) enzyme activities were previously reported to be regulated during development, but the underlying molecular events are unknown. In addition, little is known about LPL evolution. We cloned and sequenced a complete mouse LPL cDNA. Comparison of sequences from mouse, human, bovine, and guinea pig cDNAs indicated that the rates of evolution of mouse, human, and bovine LPL are quite low, but guinea pig LPL has evolved several times faster than the others. 32P-Labeled mouse LPL and rat HL cDNAs were used to study lipase mRNA tissue distribution and developmental regulation in the rat. Northern gel analysis revealed the presence of a single 1.87 kb HL mRNA species in liver, but not in other tissues including adrenal and ovary. A single 4.0 kb LPL mRNA species was detected in epididymal fat, heart, psoas muscle, lactating mammary gland, adrenal, lung, and ovary, but not in adult kidney, liver, intestine, or brain. Quantitative slot-blot hybridization analysis demonstrated the following relative amounts of LPL mRNA in rat tissues: adipose, 100%; heart, 94%; adrenal, 6.6%; muscle, 3.8%; lung, 3.0%; kidney, 0%; adult liver, 0%. The same quantitative analysis was used to study lipase mRNA levels during development. There was little postnatal variation in LPL mRNA in adipose tissue; maximal levels were detected at the earliest time points studied for both inguinal and epididymal fat. In heart, however, LPL mRNA was detected at low levels 6 days before birth and increased 278-fold as the animals grew to adulthood.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Detection and typing of human papillomavirus using the Vira Type "in situ" kit: comparison with a conventional dot blot technique.

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner-Jones, B E; Bellomarino, V M; Borg, A J; Orzeszko, K; Garland, S M

    1990-01-01

    A new commercial kit (Vira Type "in situ", Life Technologies, Inc., Molecular Diagnostics Division, Guithersburg, Maryland, USA) for the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33 and 35 in routinely processed human anogenital tissue was compared with a conventional dot blot assay for HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18. Both systems use double-stranded genomic DNA probes for the detection of type specific HPV DNA. The probes used on the dot blots were labelled with 32P and visualised autoradiographically. The Vira Type probes were labelled with biotin and visualised using a streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate with NBT-BCIP substrate. Biopsy specimens from the cervix, vagina, and vulva of 46 women were processed by both methods and compared. The histological diagnoses ranged from benign changes, to dysplasia, and invasive carcinoma. Overall, 50% of biopsy specimens were positive for HPV DNA by dot blot hybridisation; only 39% were positive by Vira Type in situ hybridisation. Three of the specimens positive by the Vira Type "in situ" kit showed no cross hybridisation and were the same HPV type as the dot blot. A further 13 showed hybridisation, but the showed cross hybridisation, but the to the dot blot results. One biopsy specimen was positive for different HPV types by the two tests and one was positive by Vira Type and negative by dot blot. Six biopsy specimens were negative by Vira Type but positive by dot blot. It is concluded that the Vira Type "in situ" kit has a similar specificity but lower sensitivity than the dot blot hybridisation method for the detection of HPV DNA. Images PMID:2175755

  11. Biomaterials for mRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K. G.; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R.; Zetter, Bruce R.; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  12. Biomaterials for mRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K G; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R; Zetter, Bruce R; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-12-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  13. [Measurement of antiganglioside autoantibodies by immunodot-blot assay: clinical importance in peripheral neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Caudie, C; Vial, C; Petiot, P; Bancel, J; Later, R; Gonnaud, P M

    1999-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated measurement data and clinical relevance of autoantibodies to gangliosides in peripheral neuropathies (PN). The IgG and IgM antiganglioside autoantibodies were determined by our own immunodot-blot assay on membrane and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Elisa) in sera of 1,342 patients with peripheral neuropathies. Anti-GM1 and anti-GD1b autoantibodies formed a part of the normal autoantibody repertoire and were common place in 12% of normal subjects and in 14% of disease control groups. Polyclonal IgM antiganglioside autoantibodies were detected in chronic PN, polyclonal IgG antiganglioside autoantibodies were detected in acute PN. Polyclonal IgM anti-GM1 and anti-GD1b autoantibodies were detected in 35 patients out of 48 with treatable multifocal motor neuropathy with persistent conduction blocks. These autoantibodies well discriminated between suspected motor peripheral neuropathies and motor neuron diseases (sensitivity 73%, specificity 83%, positive predictive value 60%, negative predictive value 91%). Monoclonal IgM autoantibodies reacted strongly with gangliosides in 15 patients out of 77 with M-IgM neuropathy (19%). M-IgM autoantibodies differed in their fine specificities with different principal target antigens as demonstrated with cross-reactivity. Such findings provide further evidence for a relationship between neurological syndromes and antiganglioside antibody profiles and also suggest that different gangliosides could be principal target antigens such as GM1, GD1b, GT1b, GD1a or GM2. Polyclonal IgG anti-GM1 and anti-GD1b autoantibodies were detected in 21 patients out of 22 with acute motor axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome with antecedent of infection by Campylobacter jejuni, polyclonal IgG anti-GQ1b autoantibodies in 9 patients out of 10 with Miller-Fisher syndrome. Detection of antiganglioside autoantibodies by immunodot-blot assay which is simple and quick in testing a large panel of gangliosides has become very

  14. V3 Stain-free Workflow for a Practical, Convenient, and Reliable Total Protein Loading Control in Western Blotting

    PubMed Central

    Posch, Anton; Kohn, Jonathan; Oh, Kenneth; Hammond, Matt; Liu, Ning

    2013-01-01

    The western blot is a very useful and widely adopted lab technique, but its execution is challenging. The workflow is often characterized as a "black box" because an experimentalist does not know if it has been performed successfully until the last of several steps. Moreover, the quality of western blot data is sometimes challenged due to a lack of effective quality control tools in place throughout the western blotting process. Here we describe the V3 western workflow, which applies stain-free technology to address the major concerns associated with the traditional western blot protocol. This workflow allows researchers: 1) to run a gel in about 20-30 min; 2) to visualize sample separation quality within 5 min after the gel run; 3) to transfer proteins in 3-10 min; 4) to verify transfer efficiency quantitatively; and most importantly 5) to validate changes in the level of the protein of interest using total protein loading control. This novel approach eliminates the need of stripping and reprobing the blot for housekeeping proteins such as β-actin, β-tubulin, GAPDH, etc. The V3 stain-free workflow makes the western blot process faster, transparent, more quantitative and reliable. PMID:24429481

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress increases AT1R mRNA expression via TIA-1-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Backlund, Michael; Paukku, Kirsi; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Lehtonen, Jukka Y.A.

    2016-01-01

    As the formation of ribonucleoprotein complexes is a major mechanism of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) regulation, we sought to identify novel AT1R mRNA binding proteins. By affinity purification and mass spectroscopy, we identified TIA-1. This interaction was confirmed by colocalization of AT1R mRNA and TIA-1 by FISH and immunofluorescence microscopy. In immunoprecipitates of endogenous TIA- 1, reverse transcription-PCR amplified AT1R mRNA. TIA-1 has two binding sites within AT1R 3′-UTR. The binding site proximal to the coding region is glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)-dependent whereas the distal binding site is not. TIA-1 functions as a part of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response leading to stress granule (SG) formation and translational silencing. We and others have shown that AT1R expression is increased by ER stress-inducing factors. In unstressed cells, TIA-1 binds to AT1R mRNA and decreases AT1R protein expression. Fluorescence microscopy shows that ER stress induced by thapsigargin leads to the transfer of TIA-1 to SGs. In FISH analysis AT1R mRNA remains in the cytoplasm and no longer colocalizes with TIA-1. Thus, release of TIA-1-mediated suppression by ER stress increases AT1R protein expression. In conclusion, AT1R mRNA is regulated by TIA-1 in a ER stress-dependent manner. PMID:26681690

  16. Analysis of mRNA nuclear export kinetics in mammalian cells by microinjection.

    PubMed

    Gueroussov, Serge; Tarnawsky, Stefan P; Cui, Xianying A; Mahadevan, Kohila; Palazzo, Alexander F

    2010-12-04

    In eukaryotes, messenger RNA (mRNA) is transcribed in the nucleus and must be exported into the cytoplasm to access the translation machinery. Although the nuclear export of mRNA has been studied extensively in Xenopus oocytes and genetically tractable organisms such as yeast and the Drosophila derived S2 cell line, few studies had been conducted in mammalian cells. Furthermore the kinetics of mRNA export in mammalian somatic cells could only be inferred indirectly. In order to measure the nuclear export kinetics of mRNA in mammalian tissue culture cells, we have developed an assay that employs the power of microinjection coupled with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). These assays have been used to demonstrate that in mammalian cells, the majority of mRNAs are exported in a splicing dependent manner, or in manner that requires specific RNA sequences such as the signal sequence coding region (SSCR). In this assay, cells are microinjected with either in vitro synthesized mRNA or plasmid DNA containing the gene of interest. The microinjected cells are incubated for various time points then fixed and the sub-cellular localization of RNA is assessed using FISH. In contrast to transfection, where transcription occurs several hours after the addition of nucleic acids, microinjection of DNA or mRNA allows for rapid expression and allows for the generation of precise kinetic data.

  17. Differential mRNA display cloning and characterization of a Cryptosporidium parvum gene expressed during intracellular development.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, A A; Lawrence, C E; Abrahamsen, M S

    1999-04-01

    Differential mRNA display was used to detect differences in gene expression between mock-infected and Cryptosporidium parvum-infected human adenocarcinoma cells. A reproducible band present only in C. parvum-infected cells, ddHC-10 was isolated and cloned. Northern blot analysis was used to confirm the differential expression of the HC-10 mRNA. As differential mRNA display does not differentiate between parasite and host mRNAs, Southern blot analysis was used to demonstrate that ddHC-10 represented a C. parvum gene. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that HC-10 mRNA is expressed by sporozoites prior to invasion of host cells. Screening of a C. parvum genomic library identified 2 different genomic clones, HC-10-13C and HC-10-6C. The combined genomic sequence contained a predicted open reading frame of 2,952 base pairs (bp), coding for a protein of 984 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of approximately 106 kDa. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction mapping of the HC-10 transcript demonstrated that the HC-10 gene lacks introns, and the approximately 4,789-bp mRNA contains relatively large 5' (approximately 1,390-bp) and 3' (approximately 440-bp) untranslated regions. The predicted polypeptide contained a high proportion of polar amino acids, with the most abundant amino acids being serine (10.5%), threonine (9.8%), and cysteine (7.6%). The C-terminal region of the predicted polypeptide is characterized by a threonine-rich region containing multiple repeats of the sequence TTTTRP. This repeat motif is similar to that found in the mucin-like genes of vertebrates and lower eukaryotes that have been shown to play important roles in cell-cell interactions in multicellular organisms and invasion of host cells by unicellular parasites. PMID:10219298

  18. Monitoring mRNA and protein levels in bulk and in model vesicle-based artificial cells.

    PubMed

    van Nies, Pauline; Canton, Alicia Soler; Nourian, Zohreh; Danelon, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    With rising interest in utilizing cell-free gene expression systems in bottom-up synthetic biology projects, novel labeling tools need to be developed to accurately report the dynamics and performance of the biosynthesis machinery operating in various reaction conditions. Monitoring the transcription activity has been simplified by the Spinach technology, an RNA aptamer that emits fluorescence upon binding to a small organic dye. Recently, we tracked the fluorescence of Spinach-tagged messenger RNA (mRNA) and its translation product the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), both synthesized in the protein synthesis using recombinant elements system from a DNA template. Building on our previous study, we describe here an improved Spinach reporter with modified flanking sequences that confer higher propensity for aptamer folding and, thus, enhanced fluorescence brightness. Hence, the kinetics of mRNA and YFP production could be simultaneously monitored with unprecedented sensitivity. A combination of methodologies, comprising RNA gel analysis, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, absorbance measurements, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, was used to convert fluorescence intensity units into absolute concentrations of transcript and YFP translational product. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the new Spinach construct greatly enhanced mRNA detection when gene expression was confined inside self-assembled lipid vesicles. Therefore, we argue that this assay could be used to evaluate systematically the performance of transcription and translation in model vesicle-based artificial cells.

  19. Using Spinach aptamer to correlate mRNA and protein levels in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pothoulakis, Georgios; Ellis, Tom

    2015-01-01

    In vivo gene expression measurements have traditionally relied on fluorescent proteins such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) with the help of high-sensitivity equipment such as flow cytometers. However, fluorescent proteins report only on the protein level inside the cell without giving direct information about messenger RNA (mRNA) production. In 2011, an aptamer termed Spinach was presented that acts as an RNA mimic of GFP when produced in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells. It was later shown that coexpression of a red fluorescent protein (mRFP1) and the Spinach aptamer, when included into the same gene expression cassette, could be utilized for parallel in vivo measurements of mRNA and protein production. As accurate characterization of component biological parts is becoming increasingly important for fields such as synthetic biology, Spinach in combination with mRFP1 provide a great tool for the characterization of promoters and ribosome binding sites. In this chapter, we discuss how live-cell imaging and flow cytometry can be used to detect and measure fluorescence produced in E. coli cells by different constructs that contain the Spinach aptamer and the mRFP1 gene.

  20. mRNA 5'-cap binding activity in purified influenza virus detected by simple, rapid assay.

    PubMed Central

    Kroath, H; Shatkin, A J

    1982-01-01

    Reovirus mRNA 5'-terminal caps were 3'-radiolabeled with pCp and as affinity probes for proteins with cap binding activity. A rapid, simple, and sensitive blot assay was devised that could detect cellular cap binding protein in a complex polypeptide mixture. By using this method, cap binding activity was found in detergent-treated influenza virus but not in reovirus or vaccinia virus. Preincubation of capped reovirus mRNA with purified cellular cap binding protein reduced its primer effect on influenza transcriptase, whereas priming by ApG was not affected. The results indicate that influenza transcriptase complexes include cap-recognizing proteins that are involved in the formation of chimeric mRNAs. Images PMID:7097854

  1. Rapid detection of intestinal pathogens in fecal samples by an improved reverse dot blot method

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jian-Ming; Zhang, Su; Du, Ying; Bi, Dan; Yao, Li-Hui

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To develop a new, rapid and accurate reverse dot blot (RDB) method for the detection of intestinal pathogens in fecal samples. METHODS: The 12 intestinal pathogens tested were Salmonella spp., Brucella spp., Escherichia coli O157:H7, Clostridium botulinum, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Shigella spp., Yersinia enterocolitica, Vibrio cholerae, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. The two universal primers were designed to amplify two variable regions of bacterial 16S and 23S rDNA genes from all of the 12 bacterial species tested. Five hundred and forty fecal samples from the diarrhea patients were detected using the improved RDB assay. RESULTS: The methods could identify the 12 intestinal pathogens specifically, and the detection limit was as low as 103 CFUs. The consistent detection rate of the improved RDB assay compared with the traditional culture method was up to 88.75%. CONCLUSION: The hybridization results indicated that the improved RDB assay developed was a reliable method for the detection of intestinal pathogen in fecal samples. PMID:19469006

  2. Retrospective Study of Hemoparasites in Cattle in Southern Italy by Reverse Line Blot Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    CECI, Luigi; IARUSSI, Fabrizio; GRECO, Beatrice; LACINIO, Rosanna; FORNELLI, Stefania; CARELLI, Grazia

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tick-borne diseases are widespread in tropical and temperate regions and are responsible for important economic losses in those areas. In order to assess the presence and prevalence of various pathogens in southern Italy, we retrospectively analyzed cattle blood samples collected for a previous study in 2000 using reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization. The study had been carried out in three regions of southern Italy on 1,500 randomly selected and apparently healthy adult cattle. RLB showed that 43.7% of the cattle were positive for nine different species of hemoparasites with either a single infection or a mixed infection. Theileria buffeli was the most common species found, being present in 27.3% of the animals, followed by Anaplasma marginale in 18.1%, Anaplasma centrale in 13.8%, Babesia bigemina and Anaplasma bovis in 4.2%, Anaplasma phagocytophilum in 1.7%, Babesia bovis in 1.6%, Babesia major in 0.2% and Babesia divergens in 0.1%. Complete blood counts showed different degrees of anemia in 363 animals (24.2%) and of these, 169 were RLB-positive for at least one pathogen. Among the ticks that were collected from the cattle, the following species were identified: Rhipicephalus bursa, Ixodes ricinus, Hyalomma marginatum, Boophilus annulatus, Dermacentor marginatus and Haemaphysalis (sulcata, parva, inermis and punctata). The results obtained confirmed the spread of endemic tick-borne pathogens in the regions studied. PMID:24614604

  3. Lectin blot studies on proteins of Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Martin; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2005-07-18

    It is known that Myxobolus cerebralis antigens, both surficial and secreted, are key modulators for, or targets of, host immune system compounds. We undertook SDS-PAGE glycoprotein characterisation of M. cerebralis developmental stages isolated from infected rainbow trout and Western blot analyses using selected biotin-labelled plant lectins (GSA-I, PHA-E, SJA, GSA-II) and anti-triactinomyxon polyclonal antibodies. Glycoproteins were isolated with lectin-affinity chromatography, and prominent bands were characterised by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-mass spectrometry (MALDI/MS). We identified glycoproteins of M. cerebralis myxospores that contained carbohydrate motifs reactive with Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin (proteins 20 to 209 kDa, PHA-E), Sophora japonica agglutinin (proteins 7 to 70 kDa, SJA), Griffonia simplicifolia Agglutinin I (proteins 10 to 209 kDa, GSA-I) and G. simplicifolia Agglutinin II (proteins 5 to 40 kDa, GSA-II). Mcgp33, a glycoprotein isolated by lectin-affinity chromatography, was reactive with SJA (about 33 kDa). Antiserum produced against M. cerebralis triactinomyxons was found to have differences in the antigenicity of isolated glycoproteins from both M. cerebralis myxospores and actinospores. We also demonstrated modified antigen expression, especially involving the glycoprotein Mcgp33, in different developmental stages of M. cerebralis. PMID:16119891

  4. Strategies for laboratory HIV testing: an examination of alternative approaches not requiring Western blot.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, P. A.; Maskill, W. J.; Tamashiro, H.; Heymann, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Advances in laboratory tests for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have permitted the development of alternative HIV testing strategies that do not require use of the Western blot approach. Three strategies are proposed. In strategy I, sera are tested for HIV antibody using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)/rapid/simple (ERS) test; in strategy II, sera reactive in an initial ERS test are retested using a second ERS test; strategy III involves retesting with a third ERS test all sera reactive in two previous ERS tests. Where the objective is identification of asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals, strategy III is proposed where HIV prevalences in the study population are < or = 10%, and strategy II at prevalences > 10%. Strategy II is recommended where the diagnosis of HIV-related disease requires HIV testing. For serosurveillance, strategy II is recommended if the prevalence is < or = 10%, and strategy I if the prevalences are > 10%. Use of strategy I is recommended for transfusion and transplantation safety, at any prevalence. Lower-cost laboratory HIV testing will permit such testing to become more widely available. PMID:8131248

  5. Binding of 16S rRNA to chloroplast 30S ribosomal proteins blotted on nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Rozier, C; Mache, R

    1984-10-11

    Protein-RNA associations were studied by a method using proteins blotted on a nitrocellulose sheet. This method was assayed with Escherichia Coli 30S ribosomal components. In stringent conditions (300 mM NaCl or 20 degrees C) only 9 E. coli ribosomal proteins strongly bound to the 16S rRNA: S4, S5, S7, S9, S12, S13, S14, S19, S20. 8 of these proteins have been previously found to bind independently to the 16S rRNA. The same method was applied to determine protein-RNA interactions in spinach chloroplast 30S ribosomal subunits. A set of only 7 proteins was bound to chloroplast rRNA in stringent conditions: chloroplast S6, S10, S11, S14, S15, S17 and S22. They also bound to E. coli 16S rRNA. This set includes 4 chloroplast-synthesized proteins: S6, S11, S15 and S22. The core particles obtained after treatment by LiCl of chloroplast 30S ribosomal subunit contained 3 proteins (S6, S10 and S14) which are included in the set of 7 binding proteins. This set of proteins probably play a part in the early steps of the assembly of the chloroplast 30S ribosomal subunit.

  6. Reverse line blot macroarray for simultaneous detection and characterization of four biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Vanlalhmuaka; Thavachelvam, Kulanthaivel; Tuteja, Urmil; Sarika, Kumari; Nagendra, Suryanarayana; Kumar, Subodh

    2013-03-01

    The need for a rapid detection and characterization of biowarfare (BW) agents cannot be over emphasized. With diverse array of potential BW pathogen available presently, rapid identification of the pathogen is crucial, so that specific therapy and control measures can be initiated. We have developed a multiplex polymerase chain reaction based reverse line blot macroarray to simultaneously detect four pathogens of BW importance viz. Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Brucella melitensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei. The multiplex PCR utilizes 14 pairs of primers targeting 18 specific markers. These markers include genes which are genus specific, species-specific chromosomal sequences and virulence markers of plasmid origin. The assay was evaluated on various human, environment and animal isolates. The assay w successful in simultaneous detection and characterization of isolates of the four pathogens on as a single platform with sensitivity ranging from 0.3 pg to 0.3 ng of genomic DNA. The assay was able to detect 5 × 10(2) cfu/ml for B. anthracis, 8 × 10(2) cfu/ml for Yersinia sp., 1.4 × 10(2) cfu/ml for B. melitensis and 4 × 10(2) cfu/ml for B. pseudomallei.

  7. Analysis of common mitochondrial DNA mutations by allele-specific oligonucleotide and Southern blot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sha; Halberg, Michelle C; Floyd, Kristen C; Wang, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. There are a set of recurrent point mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) that are responsible for common mitochondrial diseases, including MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like episodes), MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibers), LHON (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy), NARP (neuropathy, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa), and Leigh syndrome. Most of the pathogenic mtDNA point mutations are present in the heteroplasmic state, meaning that the wild-type and mutant-containing mtDNA molecules are coexisting. Clinical heterogeneity may be due to the degree of mutant load (heteroplasmy) and distribution of heteroplasmic mutations in affected tissues. Additionally, Kearns-Sayre syndrome and Pearson syndrome are caused by large mtDNA deletions. In this chapter, we describe a multiplex PCR/allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization method for the screening of 13 common point mutations. This method allows the detection of low percentage of mutant heteroplasmy. In addition, a nonradioactive Southern blot hybridization protocol for the analysis of mtDNA large deletions is also described. PMID:22215554

  8. Identification of Yeast V-ATPase Mutants by Western Blots Analysis of Whole Cell Lysates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Belky, Karlett

    2002-11-01

    A biochemistry laboratory was designed for an undergraduate course to help students better understand the link between molecular engineering and biochemistry. Students identified unknown yeast strains with high specificity using SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis of whole cell lysates. This problem-solving exercise is a common application of biochemistry in biotechnology research. Three different strains were used: a wild-type and two mutants for the proton pump vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase). V-ATPases are multisubunit enzymes and the mutants used were deletion mutants; each lacked one structural gene of the complex. After three, three-hour labs, mutant strains were easily identified by the students and distinguished from wild-type cells analyzing the pattern of SDS-PAGE distribution of proteins. Identifying different subunits of one multimeric protein allowed for discussion of the structure and function of this metabolic enzyme, which captured the interest of the students. The experiment can be adapted to other multimeric protein complexes and shows improvement of the described methodology over previous reports, perhaps because the problem and its solution are representative of the type of techniques currently used in research labs.

  9. Glutathione depletion induces heme oxygenase-1 (HSP32) mRNA and protein in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ewing, J F; Maines, M D

    1993-04-01

    In mammalian systems, the heme oxygenase (HO) isozymes HO-1 (HSP32) and HO-2 oxidatively cleave the heme molecule to produce bile pigments and carbon monoxide. Although HO-1 is inducible by various chemicals in systemic organs and cell culture systems, this communication reports for the first time the induction of this stress protein and its transcript by a chemical in the brain. In addition, this study demonstrates expression of HO-1 in select populations of cells in the brain in response to GSH depletion. Specifically, treatment of adult rats with diethyl maleate (DEM; 4.7 mmol/kg) caused a pronounced decrease in brain GSH content within 1 h. GSH levels remained significantly depressed for at least 24 h postinjection. Northern blot analysis of brain poly(A)+ mRNA following DEM treatment revealed on the average a sixfold increase in the 1.8-kb HO-1 mRNA level compared with that of controls; concomitant with this change was a decrease in GSH levels. Total brain HO activity was not significantly altered along with the increase in HO-1 mRNA level. The increase in transcription of HO-1 was a direct response to GSH depletion, as judged by the observation that treatment of neonatal rats with L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) (3 mmol/kg, twice daily, for 2 days), a selective inhibitor of GSH synthesis, caused a marked depression in total brain GSH level and a concomitant increase in brain 1.8-kb HO-1 mRNA content. The magnitude of the increase was up to approximately 11.5-fold that of the control level, as evidenced by northern blot analysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. The vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tract is unusually long and increases during stimulation of vasopressin gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Carrazana, E J; Pasieka, K B; Majzoub, J A

    1988-01-01

    We developed a method, termed an H-blot, by which the poly(A) tract of any specific mRNA may be detected by RNA filter hybridization after its removal from the body of the mRNA by a RNase H-catalyzed endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region. Using this method, we studied the modulation of the length of the poly(A) tract of rat vasopressin mRNA in vivo during changes in the levels of this mRNA resulting from a physiologic stimulus, osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract of hypothalamic vasopressin mRNA in hydrated rats was, quite remarkably, approximately 250 nucleotides in length, in contrast to that of somatostatin mRNA, which was approximately 30 nucleotides long. Vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tail length increased progressively from approximately 250 to approximately 400 nucleotides with the application of the hyperosmotic stimulus and declined to base line after its removal; somatostatin mRNA poly(A) tail length did not change during osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract length of total hypothalamic mRNA was between 35 and 140 nucleotides and also did not change with osmotic stress. Modulation of poly(A) tract length of specific mRNAs during stimulation of gene expression may provide an additional level of genetic regulation. Images PMID:2841576

  11. The vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tract is unusually long and increases during stimulation of vasopressin gene expression in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Carrazana, E.J.; Pasieka, K.B.; Majzoub, J.A.

    1988-06-01

    The authors developed a method, termed an H-blot, by which the poly(A) tract of any specific mRNA may be detected by RNA filter hybridization after its removal from the body of the mRNA by a RNase H-catalyzed endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region. Using this method, they studied the modulation of the length of the poly(A) tract of rat vasopressin mRNA in vivo during changes in the levels of this mRNA resulting from a physiologic stimulus, osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract of hypothalamic vasopressin mRNA in hydrated rats was, quite remarkably, --250 nucleotides in length, in contrast to that of somatostatin mRNA, which was --30 nucleotides long. Vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tail length increased progressively from --250 to --400 nucleotides with the application of the hyperosmotic stimulus and declined to base line after its removal; somatostatin mRNA poly(A) tail length did not change during osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract length of total hypothalamic mRNA was between 35 and 140 nucleotides and also did not change with osmotic stress. Modulation of poly(A) tract length of specific mRNAs during stimulation of gene expression may provide an additional level of genetic regulation.

  12. Ascorbate free radical reductase mRNA levels are induced by wounding.

    PubMed Central

    Grantz, A A; Brummell, D A; Bennett, A B

    1995-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding ascorbate free radical (AFR) reductase (EC 1.6.5.4) was isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) and its mRNA levels were analyzed. The cDNA encoded a deduced protein of 433 amino acids and possessed amino acid domains characteristic of flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NAD(P)H-binding proteins but did not possess typical eukaryotic targeting sequences, suggesting that it encodes a cytosolic form of AFR reductase. Low-stringency genomic DNA gel blot analysis indicated that a single nuclear gene encoded this enzyme. Total ascorbate contents were greatest in leaves, with decreasing amounts in stems and roots and relatively constant levels in all stages of fruit. AFR reductase activity was inversely correlated with total ascorbate content, whereas the relative abundance of AFR reductase mRNA was directly correlated with enzyme activity in tissues examined. AFR reductase mRNA abundance increased dramatically in response to wounding, a treatment that is known to also induce ascorbate-dependent prolyl hydroxylation required for the accumulation of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins. In addition, AFR reductase may contribute to maintaining levels of ascorbic acid for protection against wound-induced free radical-mediated damage. Collectively, the results suggest that AFR reductase activity is regulated at the level of mRNA abundance by low ascorbate contents or by factors that promote ascorbate utilization. PMID:7784511

  13. Regulation of PDK mRNA by high fatty acid and glucose in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianxiang; Han, Junying; Epstein, Paul N; Liu, Ye Q

    2006-06-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) converts pyruvate to acetyl-CoA, links glycolysis to the Krebs cycle, and plays an important role in glucose metabolism and insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells. In beta cells from obese and Type 2 diabetic animals, PDH activity is significantly reduced. PDH is negatively regulated by multiple pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) isotypes (PDK subtypes 1-4). However, we do not know whether fatty acids or high glucose modulate PDKs in islets. To test this we determined PDH and PDK activities and PDK gene and protein expression in C57BL/6 mouse islets. Both high palmitate and high glucose reduced active PDH activity and increased PDK activity. The gene and protein for PDK3 were not expressed in islets. Palmitate up-regulated mRNA expression of PDK1 (2.9-fold), PDK2 (1.9-fold), and PDK4 (3.1-fold). High glucose increased PDK1 (1.8-fold) and PDK2 (2.7-fold) mRNA expression but reduced PDK4 mRNA expression by 40 percent in cultured islets. Changed PDK expression was confirmed by Western blotting. These results demonstrate that in islet cells both fat and glucose regulate PDK gene and protein expression and indicate that hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia contribute to the decline in diabetic islet PDH activity by increasing mRNA and protein expression of PDK. PMID:16631612

  14. Dual Posttranscriptional Regulation via a Cofactor-Responsive mRNA Leader

    PubMed Central

    Patterson-Fortin, Laura M.; Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Riboswitches are cis-acting mRNA elements that regulate gene expression in response to ligand binding. Recently, a class of riboswitches was proposed to respond to the molybdenum cofactor (Moco), which serves as a redox center for metabolic enzymes. The 5′ leader of the Escherichia coli moaABCDE transcript exemplifies this candidate riboswitch class. This mRNA encodes enzymes for Moco biosynthesis, and moaA expression is feedback inhibited by Moco. Previous RNA-seq analyses showed that moaA mRNA copurified with the RNA binding protein CsrA (carbon storage regulator), suggesting that CsrA binds to this RNA in vivo. Among its global regulatory roles, CsrA represses stationary phase metabolism and activates central carbon metabolism. Here, we used gel mobility shift analysis to determine that CsrA binds specifically and with high affinity to the moaA 5′ mRNA leader. Northern blotting and studies with a series of chromosomal lacZ reporter fusions showed that CsrA posttranscriptionally activates moaA expression without altering moaA mRNA levels, indicative of translation control. Deletion analyses, nucleotide replacement studies and footprinting with CsrA-FeBABE identified two sites for CsrA binding. Toeprinting assays suggested that CsrA binding causes changes in moaA RNA structure. We propose that the moaA mRNA leader forms an aptamer, which serves as a target of posttranscriptional regulation by at least two different factors, Moco and the protein CsrA. While we are not aware of similar dual posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms, additional examples are likely to emerge. PMID:23274138

  15. Molecular cloning of amyloid cDNA derived from mRNA of the Alzheimer disease brain: coding and noncoding regions of the fetal precursor mRNA are expressed in the cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Zain, S.B.; Salim, M.; Chou, W.G.; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E.M.; Majocha, R.E.; Marotta, C.A.

    1988-02-01

    To gain insight into factors associated with the excessive accumulation of ..beta..-amyloid in the Alzheimer disease (AD) brain, the present studies were initiated to distinguish between a unique primary structure of the AD-specific amyloid precursor mRNA vis a vis other determinants that may affect amyloid levels. Previous molecular cloning experiments focused on amyloid derived from sources other than AD cases. In the present work, the authors cloned and characterized amyloid cDNA derived directly from AD brain mRNA. Poly(A)/sup +/ RNA from AD cortices was used for the preparation of lambdagt11 recombinant cDNA libraries. An insert of 1564 nucleotides was isolated that included the ..beta..-amyloid domain and corresponded to 75% of the coding region and approx. = 70% of the 3'-noncoding region of the fetal precursor amyloid cDNA reported by others. On RNA blots, the AD amyloid mRNA consisted of a doublet of 3.2 and 3.4 kilobases. In control and AD cases, the amyloid mRNA levels were nonuniform and were independent of glial-specific mRNA levels. Based on the sequence analysis data, they conclude that a segment of the amyloid gene is expressed in the AD cortex as a high molecular weight precursor mRNA with major coding and 3'-noncoding regions that are identical to the fetal brain gene product.

  16. Molecular cloning of amyloid cDNA derived from mRNA of the Alzheimer disease brain: coding and noncoding regions of the fetal precursor mRNA are expressed in the cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Zain, S B; Salim, M; Chou, W G; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E M; Majocha, R E; Marotta, C A

    1988-01-01

    To gain insight into factors associated with the excessive accumulation of beta-amyloid in the Alzheimer disease (AD) brain, the present studies were initiated to distinguish between a unique primary structure of the AD-specific amyloid precursor mRNA vis a vis other determinants that may affect amyloid levels. Previous molecular cloning experiments focused on amyloid derived from sources other than AD cases. In the present work, we cloned and characterized amyloid cDNA derived directly from AD brain mRNA. Poly(A)+ RNA from AD cortices was used for the preparation of lambda gt11 recombinant cDNA libraries. An insert of 1564 nucleotides was isolated that included the beta-amyloid domain and corresponded to 75% of the coding region and approximately equal to 70% of the 3'-noncoding region of the fetal precursor amyloid cDNA reported by others. On RNA blots, the AD amyloid mRNA consisted of a doublet of 3.2 and 3.4 kilobases. In control and AD cases, the amyloid mRNA levels were nonuniform and were independent of glial-specific mRNA levels. Based on the sequence analysis data, we conclude that a segment of the amyloid gene is expressed in the AD cortex as a high molecular weight precursor mRNA with major coding and 3'-noncoding regions that are identical to the fetal brain gene product. Images PMID:2893379

  17. Fluorescence of dental porcelain.

    PubMed

    Monsénégo, G; Burdairon, G; Clerjaud, B

    1993-01-01

    This study of the fluorescence of natural enamel and of dental ceramics shows the fluorescence of ceramics not containing rare earths decreases when the color saturation increases; the fluorescence of samples of the same shade guide are not homogenous; some guides show a strong green fluorescence; and two shade guides of the same origin can present completely different fluorescence. The cementing medium can affect the fluorescence of a ceramic prosthesis. PMID:8455155

  18. Validity of the Enzyme-linked Immunoelectrotransfer Blot (EITB) for naturally acquired porcine cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Jayashi, César M; Gonzalez, Armando E; Castillo Neyra, Ricardo; Rodríguez, Silvia; García, Hector H; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2014-01-17

    The Enzyme-linked Immunoelectrotransfer Blot (EITB) has been used widely as a screening test for Taenia solium cysticercosis in swine. However, the relation between seropositivity and infection in pig populations from endemic areas has not been well defined. The aim of this study is to relate EITB seropositivity with infection and infection burden, analyse the trade-off between sensitivity and specificity with various cut-off points for the EITB assay, and finally describe the serology changes in a cohort of rural pigs raised under natural conditions. A group of 107 pigs that were used as controls during a vaccination field trial in Peru was our study population. The prevalence of porcine cysticercosis determined by necropsy examination was 16.82% (18/107) in these animals. Using EITB reactivity to ≥ 1 band as a cut-off point for the assay, the sensitivity was 88.89% (65.29-98.62, 95% CI) and the specificity was 48.31% (37.59-59.16, 95% CI). Comparing other cut-off points, involving up to as many as 7 reactive bands, a reactivity of ≥ 3 bands provided the best trade-offs in sensitivity and specificity. Using this cut-off point for the assay, the sensitivity was 77.77% (52.36-93.59, 95% CI) and the specificity was 76.40% (66.22-84.76, 95% CI). A significant association was found between cyst counts over 100 cysts and reactivity to ≥ 3 bands in the EITB assay (Fisher's exact test, p<0.05). The results of this study suggest that the use of the EITB assay to study porcine cysticercosis may require setting different cut-offs under field and experimental conditions, and depending upon the objective of the screening process.

  19. Evaluation of the Aspergillus Western Blot IgG Kit for Diagnosis of Chronic Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, A.; Flori, P.; Hennequin, C.; Dubus, J.-C.; Reynaud-Gaubert, M.; Charpin, D.; Vergnon, J. M.; Gay, P.; Colly, A.; Piarroux, R.; Pelloux, H.

    2014-01-01

    Immunoprecipitin detection (IPD) is the current reference confirmatory technique for anti-Aspergillus antibody detection; however, the lack of standardization is a critical drawback of this assay. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Aspergillus Western blot (Asp-WB) IgG kit (LDBio Diagnostics, Lyon, France), a recently commercialized immunoblot assay for the diagnosis of various clinical presentations of chronic aspergillosis. Three hundred eight serum samples from 158 patients with aspergillosis sensu lato (s.l.) were analyzed. More specifically, 267 serum samples were derived from patients with Aspergillus disease, including 89 cases of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis, 10 of aspergilloma, and 32 of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, while 41 samples were from patients with Aspergillus colonization, including 15 cystic fibrosis (CF) and 12 non-CF patients. For blood donor controls, the Asp-WB specificity was 94%, while the kit displayed a sensitivity for the aspergillosis s.l. diagnosis of 88.6%, with a diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of 119 (95% confidence interval [CI], 57 to 251). The DOR values were 185.22 (95% CI,78.79 to 435.45) and 43.74 (95% CI, 15.65 to 122.20) for the diagnosis of Aspergillus disease and Aspergillus colonization, respectively. Among the patients, the sensitivities of the Asp-WB in the diagnosis of Aspergillus colonization were 100% and 41.7% in CF and non-CF patients, respectively. The Asp-WB yielded fewer false-negative results than did IPD. In conclusion, the Asp-WB kit performed well for the diagnosis of various clinical presentations of aspergillosis in nonimmunocompromised patients, with an enhanced standardization and a higher sensitivity than with IPD, which is the current reference method. PMID:25392351

  20. Application of reverse dot blot hybridization to simultaneous detection and identification of harmful algae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guo Fu; Zhang, Chun Yun; Wang, Yuan Yuan; Chen, Wen

    2015-07-01

    Warning and monitoring projects of harmful algal blooms require simple and rapid methods for simultaneous and accurate detection and identification of causative algae present in the environmental samples. Here, reverse dot blot hybridization (RDBH) was employed to simultaneously detect several harmful algae by using five representative bloom-forming microalgae along the Chinese coast. A set of specific probes for RDBH were developed by PCR, cloning, and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS), alignment analysis, and probe design. Each probe was oligo (dT)-tailed and spotted onto positively charged nylon membrane to make up a low-density oligonucleotide array. Universal primers designed within the conserved regions were used to amplify the ITS sequences by using genomic DNA of target as templates. The digoxigenin (Dig)-labeled PCR products were denatured and then hybridized to the oligonucleotide array. The array produced a unique hybridization pattern for each target species differentiating them from each other. The preparations of oligonucleotide array and hybridization conditions were optimized. The developed RDBH demonstrated a detection limit up to 10 cells. The detection performance of RDBH was relatively stable and not affected by non-target species and the fixation time of target species over at least 30 days. The RDBH could recover all the target species from the simulated field samples and target species confirmed by the subsequent microscopy examination in the environmental samples. These results indicate that RDBH can be a new technical platform for parallel discrimination of harmful algae and is promising for environmental monitoring of these microorganisms.

  1. Evaluation of the Aspergillus Western blot IgG kit for diagnosis of chronic aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Oliva, A; Flori, P; Hennequin, C; Dubus, J-C; Reynaud-Gaubert, M; Charpin, D; Vergnon, J M; Gay, P; Colly, A; Piarroux, R; Pelloux, H; Ranque, S

    2015-01-01

    Immunoprecipitin detection (IPD) is the current reference confirmatory technique for anti-Aspergillus antibody detection; however, the lack of standardization is a critical drawback of this assay. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Aspergillus Western blot (Asp-WB) IgG kit (LDBio Diagnostics, Lyon, France), a recently commercialized immunoblot assay for the diagnosis of various clinical presentations of chronic aspergillosis. Three hundred eight serum samples from 158 patients with aspergillosis sensu lato (s.l.) were analyzed. More specifically, 267 serum samples were derived from patients with Aspergillus disease, including 89 cases of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis, 10 of aspergilloma, and 32 of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, while 41 samples were from patients with Aspergillus colonization, including 15 cystic fibrosis (CF) and 12 non-CF patients. For blood donor controls, the Asp-WB specificity was 94%, while the kit displayed a sensitivity for the aspergillosis s.l. diagnosis of 88.6%, with a diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of 119 (95% confidence interval [CI], 57 to 251). The DOR values were 185.22 (95% CI,78.79 to 435.45) and 43.74 (95% CI, 15.65 to 122.20) for the diagnosis of Aspergillus disease and Aspergillus colonization, respectively. Among the patients, the sensitivities of the Asp-WB in the diagnosis of Aspergillus colonization were 100% and 41.7% in CF and non-CF patients, respectively. The Asp-WB yielded fewer false-negative results than did IPD. In conclusion, the Asp-WB kit performed well for the diagnosis of various clinical presentations of aspergillosis in nonimmunocompromised patients, with an enhanced standardization and a higher sensitivity than with IPD, which is the current reference method.

  2. Evaluation of a Western Blot Test in an Outbreak of Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Pizzini, Claudia V.; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M.; Reiss, Errol; Hajjeh, Rana; Kaufman, Leo; Peralta, José Mauro

    1999-01-01

    A western blot (WB) test was evaluated for detection of antibodies against native glycosylated and chemically deglycosylated M and H antigens of Histoplasma capsulatum in serum obtained from patients during the acute phase of pulmonary histoplasmosis that occurred during an outbreak. Of 275 serum samples tested by immunodiffusion and complement fixation (CF) samples from 40 patients affected during this outbreak and from 37 negative controls were tested by WB test. A group of patients whose sera were negative for CF antibodies and precipitins early in the acute stage of histoplasmosis but who all seroconverted during convalescence 6 weeks later were tested with the WB test. Antibodies against untreated H and M antigens were detected at a 1:100 dilution by WB test in 45% of the 20 acute-phase serum samples and in all 20 of the convalescent-phase specimens. The WB test’s sensitivity for acute-phase specimens increased to 90% (18 of 20 specimens) when H and M antigens were treated by periodate oxidation to inactivate susceptible carbohydrate epitopes. When native glycosylated antigens were used in the WB test, positive reactions were observed in negative control serum specimens (3 of 37 specimens; 8%) and in serum specimens obtained from asymptomatic persons screened as part of the outbreak investigation (13 of 20 specimens; 65%). These positive reactions were also attributed to glycosidic epitopes since the specificity of the WB test increased from 78 to 100% when periodate-treated H and M antigens were used. WB test with deglycosylated H and M antigens of histoplasmin provides a rapid, sensitive, and specific test to diagnose acute pulmonary histoplasmosis before precipitins can be detected. PMID:9874658

  3. Application of reverse dot blot hybridization to simultaneous detection and identification of harmful algae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guo Fu; Zhang, Chun Yun; Wang, Yuan Yuan; Chen, Wen

    2015-07-01

    Warning and monitoring projects of harmful algal blooms require simple and rapid methods for simultaneous and accurate detection and identification of causative algae present in the environmental samples. Here, reverse dot blot hybridization (RDBH) was employed to simultaneously detect several harmful algae by using five representative bloom-forming microalgae along the Chinese coast. A set of specific probes for RDBH were developed by PCR, cloning, and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS), alignment analysis, and probe design. Each probe was oligo (dT)-tailed and spotted onto positively charged nylon membrane to make up a low-density oligonucleotide array. Universal primers designed within the conserved regions were used to amplify the ITS sequences by using genomic DNA of target as templates. The digoxigenin (Dig)-labeled PCR products were denatured and then hybridized to the oligonucleotide array. The array produced a unique hybridization pattern for each target species differentiating them from each other. The preparations of oligonucleotide array and hybridization conditions were optimized. The developed RDBH demonstrated a detection limit up to 10 cells. The detection performance of RDBH was relatively stable and not affected by non-target species and the fixation time of target species over at least 30 days. The RDBH could recover all the target species from the simulated field samples and target species confirmed by the subsequent microscopy examination in the environmental samples. These results indicate that RDBH can be a new technical platform for parallel discrimination of harmful algae and is promising for environmental monitoring of these microorganisms. PMID:25731086

  4. Performance of commercial reverse line blot assays for human papillomavirus genotyping.

    PubMed

    Steinau, Martin; Onyekwuluje, Juanita M; Scarbrough, Mariela Z; Unger, Elizabeth R; Dillner, Joakim; Zhou, Tiequn

    2012-05-01

    The performance of three line blot assays (LBAs), the Linear Array HPV genotyping assay (LA) (Roche Diagnostics), INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra (LiPA) (Innogenetics), and the reverse hybridization assay (RH) (Qiagen), was evaluated using quantitated whole genomic human papillomavirus (HPV) plasmids (types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, and 68b) as well as epidemiologic samples. In a plasmid titration series, LiPA and RH did not detect 50 international units (IU) of HPV type 18 (HPV18) in the presence of 5 × 10(4) IU or more of HPV16. HPV DNA (1 to 6 types) in the plasmid challenges at 50 IU or genome equivalents (GE) were identified with an accuracy of 99.9% by LA, 97.3% by LiPA, and 95.4% by RH, with positive reproducibility of 99.8% (kappa = 0.992), 88.2% (kappa = 0.928), and 88.1% (kappa = 0.926), respectively. Two instances of mistyping occurred with LiPA. Of the 120 epidemiologic samples, 76 were positive for high-risk types by LA, 90 by LiPA, and 69 by RH, with a positive reproducibility of 87.3% (kappa = 0.925), 83.9% (kappa = 0.899), and 90.2% (kappa = 0.942), respectively. Although the assays had good concordance in the clinical samples, the greater accuracy and specificity in the plasmid panel suggest that LA has an advantage for internationally comparable genotyping studies.

  5. UU/UA dinucleotide frequency reduction in coding regions results in increased mRNA stability and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Al-Saif, Maher; Khabar, Khalid S A

    2012-05-01

    UU and UA dinucleotides are rare in mammalian genes and may offer natural selection against endoribonuclease-mediated mRNA decay. This study hypothesized that reducing UU and UA (UW) dinucleotides in the mRNA-coding sequence, including the codons and the dicodon boundaries, may promote resistance to mRNA decay, thereby increasing protein production. Indeed, protein expression from UW-reduced coding regions of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), luciferase, interferon-α, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was higher when compared to the wild-type protein expression. The steady-state level of UW-reduced EGFP mRNA was higher and the mRNA half-life was also longer. Ectopic expression of the endoribonuclease, RNase L, did not reduce the wild type or UW-reduced mRNA. A mutant form of the mRNA decay-promoting protein, tristetraprolin (TTP/ZFP36), which has a point mutation in the zinc-finger domain (C124R), was used. The wild-type EGFP mRNA but not the UW-reduced mRNA responded to the dominant negative action of the C124R ZFP36/TTP mutant. The results indicate the efficacy of the described rational approach to formulate a general scheme for boosting recombinant protein production in mammalian cells.

  6. Expression of Src-like adapter protein mRNA is induced by all-trans retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, T; Hatake, K; Ikeda, M; Tomizuka, H; Terui, Y; Uwai, M; Miura, Y

    1997-01-01

    By using a differential display method, specific bands were selected from ladder PCR products derived from ATRA-dependent differentiated U937 cells, in comparison with those of untreated U937. By screening the cDNA library of ATRA-dependent differentiated U937 cells with one of the PCR products, we cloned the src-like adapter protein (SLAP). Northern blot analysis of U937 cells with or without ATRA treatment indicated that the SLAP mRNA was clearly induced by ATRA. The induction was inhibited by the addition of cycloheximide, indicating that ATRA acted indirectly through synthesis of other proteins. The SLAP mRNA was induced in HL60 and NB-4 but not in K562 or THP-1. Interestingly, these cells in which SLAP mRNA was induced by ATRA all showed ATRA-dependent cell differentiation. The relationship between SLAP and cell differentiation is unclear, but SLAP may transduce a signal for cell differentiation.

  7. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of Simon™, a new CE-based automated Western blot system as applied to vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Rustandi, Richard R; Loughney, John W; Hamm, Melissa; Hamm, Christopher; Lancaster, Catherine; Mach, Anna; Ha, Sha

    2012-09-01

    Many CE-based technologies such as imaged capillary IEF, CE-SDS, CZE, and MEKC are well established for analyzing proteins, viruses, or other biomolecules such as polysaccharides. For example, imaged capillary isoelectric focusing (charge-based protein separation) and CE-SDS (size-based protein separation) are standard replacement methods in biopharmaceutical industries for tedious and labor intensive IEF and SDS-PAGE methods, respectively. Another important analytical tool for protein characterization is a Western blot, where after size-based separation in SDS-PAGE the proteins are transferred to a membrane and blotted with specific monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies. Western blotting analysis is applied in many areas such as biomarker research, therapeutic target identification, and vaccine development. Currently, the procedure is very manual, laborious, and time consuming. Here, we evaluate a new technology called Simple Western™ (or Simon™) for performing automated Western analysis. This new technology is based on CE-SDS where the separated proteins are attached to the wall of capillary by a proprietary photo activated chemical crosslink. Subsequent blotting is done automatically by incubating and washing the capillary with primary and secondary antibodies conjugated with horseradish peroxidase and detected with chemiluminescence. Typically, Western blots are not quantitative, hence we also evaluated the quantitative aspect of this new technology. We demonstrate that Simon™ can quantitate specific components in one of our vaccine candidates and it provides good reproducibility and intermediate precision with CV <10%. PMID:22965727

  8. A DNA tetrahedron-based molecular beacon for tumor-related mRNA detection in living cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Nuli; Huang, Jin; Yang, Xiaohai; Yang, Yanjing; Quan, Ke; Wang, He; Ying, Le; Ou, Min; Wang, Kemin

    2016-02-01

    Due to its low cytotoxicity, high resistance to enzymatic degradation, and cellular permeability, a DNA tetrahedron-based molecular beacon (DTMB) is designed for tumor-related TK1 mRNA detection in living cells, where the target sequence can induce the tetrahedron from contraction to extension, resulting in fluorescence restoration.

  9. Variation in the amounts of hepatic copper, zinc and metallothionein mRNA during development in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, J F; Grimes, A

    1986-01-01

    Amounts of hepatic metallothionein mRNA were assessed in RNA from foetal and neonatal rat livers by using dot-blot hybridization. Metallothionein mRNA began to increase about day 15 of gestation and reached a foetal maximum of 5-fold higher than adult values between 18 and 21 days of gestation. The amounts fell significantly for the first 3 days after parturition, and rose again to 6-fold above adult values 6 days after birth. By 15 days after birth the metallothionein mRNA had declined to adult amounts. In comparison, amounts of ornithine transcarbamoylase mRNA did not vary greatly during development. Hepatic zinc concentrations increased from day 14 of gestation to a maximum just before birth, and remained above adult values until 30 days after birth. From 14 days of gestation to 8 days after birth, hepatic copper concentrations were about 4-fold higher than in the adult, but a substantial increase (to about 9-fold higher than in the adult) occurs between 10 and 15 days after birth. CdCl2 administered to pregnant rats on day 18 of gestation was shown to block placental transfer of zinc, and we found decreased foetal hepatic zinc concentration after the CdCl2 treatment, but this failed to cause a significant decrease in metallothionein mRNA, suggesting that zinc may not be the primary inducer of hepatic metallothionein mRNA during foetal life. PMID:3800934

  10. Zinc metallothionein (MT) induction by parenteral iron and endotoxin: A temporal analysis of hepatic MT mRNA changes

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, C.C. )

    1991-03-15

    The present study was undertaken to compare the temporal characteristics of iron-induced hepatic MT mRNA accumulation to that effected by endotoxin. Young chicks were given (ip) either endotoxin, ferrous gluconate or an equivalent volume of saline. At various times following injections, liver was obtained from 5 chicks per treatment for total RNA extraction. Equal amounts of total hepatic RNA from each chick were pooled and 10 {mu}g separated by denaturing agarose gel electrophoresis. Hepatic MT mRNA and albumin mRNA were analyzed by Northern blot analysis using synthetic oligonucleotides. The results indicated little temporal difference in the accumulation of hepatic MT mRNA as affected by either endotoxin or iron. In both treatments, MT mRNA was minimally affected at 3 hours post-injection. Maximum accumulation was achieved during a 6 h period from 6 to 12 hours post-injection. At 24 hours, MT mRNA was considerably higher in liver of endotoxin-injected chicks when compared to that of iron-injection chicks. Albumin expression appeared not to be substantially affected by either treatment. The results suggest that the induction of hepatic MT by iron injection is not substantially different than that observed following endotoxin administration. It would be speculative to suggest that the processes by which MT is induced under these conditions are also similar.

  11. Spectroscopic detection of fluorescent protein marker gene activity in genetically modified plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, O. W.; Chong, Jenny P. C.; Asundi, Anand K.

    2005-04-01

    This work focuses on developing a portable fibre optic fluorescence analyser for rapid identification of genetically modified plants tagged with a fluorescent marker gene. Independent transgenic tobacco plant lines expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene were regenerated following Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Molecular characterisation of these plant lines was carried out at the DNA level by PCR screening to confirm their transgenic status. Conventional transgene expression analysis was then carried out at the RNA level by RT-PCR and at the protein level by Western blotting using anti-GFP rabbit antiserum. The amount of plant-expressed EGFP on a Western blot was quantified against known amounts of purified EGFP by scanning densitometry. The expression level of EGFP in transformed plants was found to range from 0.1 - 0.6% of total extractable protein. A comparison between conventional western analysis of transformants and direct spectroscopic quantification using the fibre optic fluorescence analyser was made. The results showed that spectroscopic measurements of fluorescence emission from strong EGFP expressors correlated positively with Western blot data. However, the fluorescence analyser was also able to identify weakly expressing plant transformants below the detection limit of colorimetric Western blotting.

  12. Protein quantification by chemiluminescent Western blotting: elimination of the antibody factor by dilution series and calibration curve.

    PubMed

    Charette, Steve J; Lambert, Herman; Nadeau, Philippe J; Landry, Jacques

    2010-02-28

    Quantification of chemiluminescent signals from a Western blot is routinely used to determine the increase or the decrease in protein expression or modification in cell or tissue extracts. However, although scientists readily agree that such a procedure is not quantitative, it is nonetheless used quantitatively in most publications without appropriate controls that would increase the accuracy of the measurement. Here we reexamined this aspect and found that the primary antibody itself influences the relation between the Western blot signal and the protein amount on the membrane. This relation is non-linear and varies from one antibody to another. In that context, we strongly encourage researchers to use dilution series and calibration curve when quantifying protein by Western blot using chemiluminescent signal.

  13. Detection of enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens in spices used in Mexico by dot blotting using a DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Romo, L A; Heredia, N L; Labbé, R G; García-Alvarado, J S

    1998-02-01

    Several reports on the microbiology of spices and herbs indicate the presence of Clostridium perfringens, a spore-forming foodborne pathogen responsible for gastrointestinal disease. In the present study, a total of 380 samples of spices and herbs (cumin seed, black pepper, oregano, garlic powder, and bay leaves) widely used in Mexico were analyzed for the presence of C. perfringens, and the enterotoxigenicity of the isolates was determined by a dot-blot technique using an enterotoxin degoxigenin-labeled DNA probe. C. perfringens counts varied from <100 to 433 CFU/g in garlic powder, from <100 to 200 CFU/g in black pepper, from <100 to 433 CFU/g in cumin seed, from <100 to 340 CFU/g in oregano, and from < 100 to 450 CFU/g in bay leaves. The dot-blot technique detected the enterotoxin gene in 8 (4.25%) of 188 confirmed isolates of C. perfringens. dot-blot.

  14. HPTLC Plate Blotting for Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling Probe Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Analytes Separated on a Wettable Phase Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Walworth, Matthew J; Stankovich, Joseph J; Van Berkel, Gary J; Schulz, Michael; Minarik, susanne

    2012-01-01

    A blotting method that transfers analytes separated on wettable HPTLC plates to a hydrophobic reversed-phase C8 HPLTC plate suitable for analysis with a liquid microjunction surface sampling probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry system was described and demonstrated. The simple blotting procedure transfers the analyte from the wettable plate to the topmost surface of a rigidly backed, easy-to-mount hydrophobic substrate that already has been proven viable for analysis by this sampling probe/mass spectrometry system. The utility of the approach was demonstrated by the analysis of a four-component peptide mixture originally separated on a ProteoChrom HPTLC cellulose sheet and then blotted to the reversed phase HPTLC plate.

  15. Glucose-6-phosphatase mRNA and activity are increased to the same extent in kidney and liver of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Mithieux, G; Vidal, H; Zitoun, C; Bruni, N; Daniele, N; Minassian, C

    1996-07-01

    Using Northern blot with a specific glucose-6-phosphatase (Glc6Pase) cDNA probe and enzymatic activity determination, we studied the effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on Glc6Pase in rat gluconeogenic tissues. The Glc6Pase mRNA abundance was increased four to five times in both the liver and kidney of diabetic rats. This was correlated with a concomitant 130% increase in Glc6Pase catalytic subunit in both tissues. The elevated level of Glc6Pase mRNA was significantly corrected in both the liver and kidney of diabetic rats after a 12-h insulin treatment. We also studied Glc6Pase mRNA and activity in gluconeogenic tissues during the fed-fasted and fasted-refed transitions in normal rats. In the liver, the abundance of Glc6Pase mRNA was sharply increased about four times after 24 or 48 h of fasting. In the kidney, the Glc6Pase mRNA level was gradually increased some three and five times after 24 and 48 h of fasting, respectively. The increase of Glc6Pase mRNA in both organs was matched with a doubling of the activity of Glc6Pase catalytic subunit: rapid in the liver and gradual in the kidney. The liver Glc6Pase mRNA abundance in 48-h fasted rats was acutely and importantly decreased upon refeeding. The kidney Glc6Pase mRNA level was also significantly lowered under these conditions, albeit less rapidly. These data demonstrate that efficient control of Glc6Pase takes place in both gluconeogenic organs at the pretranslational level and suggest that insulin might play an important role in this control. In addition, using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Northern blot, we report that Glc6Pase mRNA is not detectable in several other tissues previously assumed to express the enzyme. PMID:8666139

  16. Interpretation criteria for standardized Western blots for three European species of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato.

    PubMed

    Hauser, U; Lehnert, G; Lobentanzer, R; Wilske, B

    1997-06-01

    Western blots (WBs; immunoblots) are a widely used tool for the serodiagnosis of Lyme borreliosis, but so far, no defined criteria for performance, analysis, and interpretation have been established in Europe. For the current study WBs were produced with strains PKa2 (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto), PKo (Borrelia afzelii), and PBi (Borrelia garinii). To improve resolution we used gels of 17 cm in length. In a first step, 13 immunodominant proteins were identified with monoclonal antibodies. Then, the apparent molecular masses of all visually distinguishable bands were determined densitometrically. Approximately 40 bands of between 14 and 100 kDa were differentiated for each strain. From a study with 330 serum samples (from 189 patients with Lyme borreliosis and 141 controls), all observed bands were documented. To establish criteria for a positive WB result, the discriminating ability of a series of band combinations (interpretation rules) were evaluated separately for each strain (for immunoglobulin G [IgG] WB, > 40 combinations; for IgM WB, > 15 combinations). The following interpretation criteria resulting in specificities of greater than 96% were recommended: for IgG WB, at least one band of p83/100, p58, p56, OspC, p21, and p17a for PKa2; at least two bands of p83/100, p58, p43, p39, p30, OspC, p21, p17, and p14 for PKo; and at least one band of p83/100, p39, OspC, p21, and p17b for PBi; for IgM WB, at least one band of p39, OspC, and p17a or a strong p41 band for PKa2; at least one band of p39, OspC, and p17 or a strong p41 band for PKo; and at least one band of p39 and OspC or a strong p41 band for PBi. The overall sensitivity was the highest for PKo WB, followed by PBi and PKa2 WB, in decreasing order. Standardization of WB assays is necessary for comparison of results from different laboratories.

  17. Coupling mRNA Synthesis and Decay

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    What has been will be again, what has been done will be done again; there is nothing new under the sun.—Ecclesiastes 1:9 (New International Version) Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression has an important role in defining the phenotypic characteristics of an organism. Well-defined steps in mRNA metabolism that occur in the nucleus—capping, splicing, and polyadenylation—are mechanistically linked to the process of transcription. Recent evidence suggests another link between RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and a posttranscriptional process that occurs in the cytoplasm—mRNA decay. This conclusion appears to represent a conundrum. How could mRNA synthesis in the nucleus and mRNA decay in the cytoplasm be mechanistically linked? After a brief overview of mRNA processing, we will review the recent evidence for transcription-coupled mRNA decay and the possible involvement of Snf1, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog of AMP-activated protein kinase, in this process. PMID:25154419

  18. Stain-Free total protein staining is a superior loading control to β-actin for Western blots.

    PubMed

    Gilda, Jennifer E; Gomes, Aldrin V

    2013-09-15

    Semi-quantification of proteins using Western blots typically involves normalization against housekeeping genes such as β-actin. More recently, Ponceau S and Coomassie blue staining have both been shown to be suitable alternatives to housekeeping genes as loading controls. Stain-Free total protein staining offers the advantage of no staining or destaining steps. Evaluation of the use of Stain-Free staining as an alternative to β-actin or the protein stain Ponceau S showed that Stain-Free staining was superior to β-actin and as good as or better than Ponceau S staining as a loading control for Western blots. PMID:23747530

  19. Regulation of mRNA export by the PI3 kinase/AKT signal transduction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Quaresma, Alexandre Jose Christino; Sievert, Rachel; Nickerson, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    UAP56, ALY/REF, and NXF1 are mRNA export factors that sequentially bind at the 5′ end of a nuclear mRNA but are also reported to associate with the exon junction complex (EJC). To screen for signal transduction pathways regulating mRNA export complex assembly, we used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to measure the binding of mRNA export and EJC core proteins in nuclear complexes. The fraction of UAP56, ALY/REF, and NXF1 tightly bound in complexes was reduced by drug inhibition of the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3 kinase)/AKT pathway, as was the tightly bound fraction of the core EJC proteins eIF4A3, MAGOH, and Y14. Inhibition of the mTOR mTORC1 pathway decreased the tight binding of MAGOH. Inhibition of the PI3 kinase/AKT pathway increased the export of poly(A) RNA and of a subset of candidate mRNAs. A similar effect of PI3 kinase/AKT inhibition was observed for mRNAs from both intron-containing and intronless histone genes. However, the nuclear export of mRNAs coding for proteins targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum or to mitochondria was not affected by the PI3 kinase/AKT pathway. These results show that the active PI3 kinase/AKT pathway can regulate mRNA export and promote the nuclear retention of some mRNAs. PMID:23427269

  20. Detection of MDR1 mRNA expression with optimized gold nanoparticle beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiumei; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-03-01

    MDR1 (multidrug resistance gene) mRNA expression is a promising biomarker for the prediction of doxorubicin resistance in clinic. However, the traditional technical process in clinic is complicated and cannot perform the real-time detection mRNA in living single cells. In this study, the expression of MDR1 mRNA was analyzed based on optimized gold nanoparticle beacon in tumor cells. Firstly, gold nanoparticle (AuNP) was modified by thiol-PEG, and the MDR1 beacon sequence was screened and optimized using a BLAST bioinformatics strategy. Then, optimized MDR1 molecular beacons were characterized by transmission electron microscope, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies. The cytotoxicity of MDR1 molecular beacon on L-02, K562 and K562/Adr cells were investigated by MTT assay, suggesting that MDR1 molecular beacon was low inherent cytotoxicity. Dark field microscope was used to investigate the cellular uptake of hDAuNP beacon assisted with ultrasound. Finally, laser scanning confocal microscope images showed that there was a significant difference in MDR1 mRNA expression in K562 and K562/Adr cells, which was consistent with the results of q-PCR measurement. In summary, optimized MDR1 molecular beacon designed in this study is a reliable strategy for detection MDR1 mRNA expression in living tumor cells, and will be a promising strategy for in guiding patient treatment and management in individualized medication.

  1. Hairpin DNA-functionalized gold colloids for the imaging of mRNA in live cells.

    PubMed

    Jayagopal, Ashwath; Halfpenny, Kristin C; Perez, Jonas W; Wright, David W

    2010-07-21

    A strategy is presented for the live cell imaging of messenger RNA using hairpin DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (hAuNP). hAuNP improve upon technologies for studying RNA trafficking by their efficient internalization within live cells without transfection reagents, improved resistance to DNase degradation, low cytotoxicity, and the incorporation of hairpin DNA molecular beacons to confer high specificity and sensitivity to the target mRNA sequence. Furthermore, the targeted nanoparticle-beacon construct, once bound to the target mRNA sequence, remains hybridized to the target, enabling spatial and temporal studies of RNA trafficking and downstream analysis. Targeted hAuNP exhibited high specificity for glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GADPH) mRNA in live normal HEp-2 cells and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) mRNA in live RSV-infected HEp-2 cells with high target to background ratios. Multiplexed fluorescence imaging of distinct mRNAs in live cells and simultaneous imaging of mRNAs with immunofluorescently stained protein targets in fixed cells was enabled by appropriate selection of molecular beacon fluorophores. Pharmacologic analysis suggested that hAuNP were internalized within cells via membrane-nanoparticle interactions. hAuNP are a promising approach for the real-time analysis of mRNA transport and processing in live cells for elucidation of biological processes and disease pathogenesis.

  2. Experimental procedure for the detection of a rare human mRNA with the DIG System.

    PubMed

    Rueger, B; Thalhammer, J; Obermaier, I; Gruenewald-Janho, S

    1997-02-15

    Newcomers to the DIG System often inquire about the possibility of performing Northern blot hybridizations with nonradioactive techniques. With the following examples, we would like to share our protocol for performing highly sensitive Northern blots. This procedure strictly adheres to the standard procedures detailed in our manuals and pack inserts, and there are no special "tricks" required. As a target, we have used total human skeletal muscle RNA (Clontech). We selected two probes: beta-actin and a probe comprising the cDNA of the transcription factor CTF1, which expresses a low abundant mRNA. We used in vitro transcribed RNAs exclusively as probes because, during the development of the DIG System, we have found that RNA probes exhibit a 10-100-fold higher sensitivity with RNA targets than do DNA probes. They are also less prone to background problems caused by probe concentrations that are too high. For DNA probes, we recommend an optimal probe concentration of 25 ng/ml. Using a probe concentration that is even slightly too high (e.g., 1.5 fold) will dramatically increase the background. For RNA probes, we recommend an optimal probe concentration of 100 ng/ml, which will not lead to background problems. In the following examples, we describe all experimental details, starting from the gel run for the blot. PMID:9159199

  3. Experimental procedure for the detection of a rare human mRNA with the DIG System.

    PubMed

    Rueger, B; Thalhammer, J; Obermaier, I; Gruenewald-Janho, S

    1997-02-15

    Newcomers to the DIG System often inquire about the possibility of performing Northern blot hybridizations with nonradioactive techniques. With the following examples, we would like to share our protocol for performing highly sensitive Northern blots. This procedure strictly adheres to the standard procedures detailed in our manuals and pack inserts, and there are no special "tricks" required. As a target, we have used total human skeletal muscle RNA (Clontech). We selected two probes: beta-actin and a probe comprising the cDNA of the transcription factor CTF1, which expresses a low abundant mRNA. We used in vitro transcribed RNAs exclusively as probes because, during the development of the DIG System, we have found that RNA probes exhibit a 10-100-fold higher sensitivity with RNA targets than do DNA probes. They are also less prone to background problems caused by probe concentrations that are too high. For DNA probes, we recommend an optimal probe concentration of 25 ng/ml. Using a probe concentration that is even slightly too high (e.g., 1.5 fold) will dramatically increase the background. For RNA probes, we recommend an optimal probe concentration of 100 ng/ml, which will not lead to background problems. In the following examples, we describe all experimental details, starting from the gel run for the blot.

  4. Self-amplifying mRNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luis A; Kommareddy, Sushma; Maione, Domenico; Uematsu, Yasushi; Giovani, Cinzia; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Otten, Gillis R; Yu, Dong; Mandl, Christian W; Mason, Peter W; Dormitzer, Philip R; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief introduction to nucleic acid-based vaccines and recent research in developing self-amplifying mRNA vaccines. These vaccines promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. The key to realizing the full potential of these vaccines is efficient delivery of nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can amplify and express the encoded antigenic protein. The hydrophilicity and strong net negative charge of RNA impedes cellular uptake. To overcome this limitation, electrostatic complexation with cationic lipids or polymers and physical delivery using electroporation or ballistic particles to improve cellular uptake has been evaluated. This chapter highlights the rapid progress made in using nonviral delivery systems for RNA-based vaccines. Initial preclinical testing of self-amplifying mRNA vaccines has shown nonviral delivery to be capable of producing potent and robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and nonhuman primates. Historically, the prospect of developing mRNA vaccines was uncertain due to concerns of mRNA instability and the feasibility of large-scale manufacturing. Today, these issues are no longer perceived as barriers in the widespread implementation of the technology. Currently, nonamplifying mRNA vaccines are under investigation in human clinical trials and can be produced at a sufficient quantity and quality to meet regulatory requirements. If the encouraging preclinical data with self-amplifying mRNA vaccines are matched by equivalently positive immunogenicity, potency, and tolerability in human trials, this platform could establish nucleic acid vaccines as a versatile new tool for human immunization.

  5. Self-amplifying mRNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luis A; Kommareddy, Sushma; Maione, Domenico; Uematsu, Yasushi; Giovani, Cinzia; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Otten, Gillis R; Yu, Dong; Mandl, Christian W; Mason, Peter W; Dormitzer, Philip R; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief introduction to nucleic acid-based vaccines and recent research in developing self-amplifying mRNA vaccines. These vaccines promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. The key to realizing the full potential of these vaccines is efficient delivery of nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can amplify and express the encoded antigenic protein. The hydrophilicity and strong net negative charge of RNA impedes cellular uptake. To overcome this limitation, electrostatic complexation with cationic lipids or polymers and physical delivery using electroporation or ballistic particles to improve cellular uptake has been evaluated. This chapter highlights the rapid progress made in using nonviral delivery systems for RNA-based vaccines. Initial preclinical testing of self-amplifying mRNA vaccines has shown nonviral delivery to be capable of producing potent and robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and nonhuman primates. Historically, the prospect of developing mRNA vaccines was uncertain due to concerns of mRNA instability and the feasibility of large-scale manufacturing. Today, these issues are no longer perceived as barriers in the widespread implementation of the technology. Currently, nonamplifying mRNA vaccines are under investigation in human clinical trials and can be produced at a sufficient quantity and quality to meet regulatory requirements. If the encouraging preclinical data with self-amplifying mRNA vaccines are matched by equivalently positive immunogenicity, potency, and tolerability in human trials, this platform could establish nucleic acid vaccines as a versatile new tool for human immunization. PMID:25620012

  6. Self-Digitization Microfluidic Chip for Absolute Quantification of mRNA in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of mRNA in single cells provides direct insight into how intercellular heterogeneity plays a role in disease progression and outcomes. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), the current gold standard for evaluating gene expression, is insufficient for providing absolute measurement of single-cell mRNA transcript abundance. Challenges include difficulties in handling small sample volumes and the high variability in measurements. Microfluidic digital PCR provides far better sensitivity for minute quantities of genetic material, but the typical format of this assay does not allow for counting of the absolute number of mRNA transcripts samples taken from single cells. Furthermore, a large fraction of the sample is often lost during sample handling in microfluidic digital PCR. Here, we report the absolute quantification of single-cell mRNA transcripts by digital, one-step reverse transcription PCR in a simple microfluidic array device called the self-digitization (SD) chip. By performing the reverse transcription step in digitized volumes, we find that the assay exhibits a linear signal across a wide range of total RNA concentrations and agrees well with standard curve qPCR. The SD chip is found to digitize a high percentage (86.7%) of the sample for single-cell experiments. Moreover, quantification of transferrin receptor mRNA in single cells agrees well with single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments. The SD platform for absolute quantification of single-cell mRNA can be optimized for other genes and may be useful as an independent control method for the validation of mRNA quantification techniques. PMID:25390242

  7. Self-digitization microfluidic chip for absolute quantification of mRNA in single cells.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Alison M; Gansen, Alexander; Paguirigan, Amy L; Kreutz, Jason E; Radich, Jerald P; Chiu, Daniel T

    2014-12-16

    Quantification of mRNA in single cells provides direct insight into how intercellular heterogeneity plays a role in disease progression and outcomes. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), the current gold standard for evaluating gene expression, is insufficient for providing absolute measurement of single-cell mRNA transcript abundance. Challenges include difficulties in handling small sample volumes and the high variability in measurements. Microfluidic digital PCR provides far better sensitivity for minute quantities of genetic material, but the typical format of this assay does not allow for counting of the absolute number of mRNA transcripts samples taken from single cells. Furthermore, a large fraction of the sample is often lost during sample handling in microfluidic digital PCR. Here, we report the absolute quantification of single-cell mRNA transcripts by digital, one-step reverse transcription PCR in a simple microfluidic array device called the self-digitization (SD) chip. By performing the reverse transcription step in digitized volumes, we find that the assay exhibits a linear signal across a wide range of total RNA concentrations and agrees well with standard curve qPCR. The SD chip is found to digitize a high percentage (86.7%) of the sample for single-cell experiments. Moreover, quantification of transferrin receptor mRNA in single cells agrees well with single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments. The SD platform for absolute quantification of single-cell mRNA can be optimized for other genes and may be useful as an independent control method for the validation of mRNA quantification techniques.

  8. Identification, localization and developmental studies of rat prepro thyrotropin-releasing hormone mRNA in the testis.

    PubMed

    Feng, P; Gu, J; Kim, U J; Carnell, N E; Wilber, J F

    1993-02-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) plays the central regulatory role in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, but is also present in many extra-hypothalamic loci. The adult rat testis has been identified previously as a source of hypothalamic neuropeptides including TRH. To investigate whether the TRH gene is transcribed in testis, the identification and localization of prepro(pp) TRH mRNA and TRH were studied. Northern blot analyses of ppTRH mRNA in the adult rat testis showed a 2.0 kb band, hybridized with a ppTRH cRNA probe. This band was 0.4 kb greater than the 1.6 kb hypothalamic band. The concentration of ppTRH mRNA in the adult testis was approximately 13% of that found in the hypothalamus. Developmental studies of testicular ppTRH mRNA revealed that no ppTRH mRNA could be detected at the earliest stage (day 8). However, hybridization signals were detected on day 20 and increased progressively on days 35, 45 and 70 by 5.8, 6.4, and 9.8-fold, respectively. In addition, ppTRH mRNA was determined in Leydig cells by Northern analyses of elutriated testicular cell fractions. TRH was also measured in the rat testes at different developmental stages by RIA. TRH concentrations paralleled ppTRH mRNA during development. TRH was localized to Leydig cells by immunohistochemistry. These results indicate that ppTRH mRNA and TRH are present in the rat testis, especially in the Leydig cells. The changes of ppTRH gene expression and the concentration of TRH in the rat testis are developmentally dependent. TRH may function as a new paracrine or autocrine regulator of testicular function.

  9. Localization of vasopressin mRNA and immunoreactivity in pituicytes of pituitary stalk-transected rats after osmotic stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Pu, L P; Van Leeuwen, F W; Tracer, H L; Sonnemans, M A; Loh, Y P

    1995-01-01

    The presence of [arginine] vasopressin (AVP) mRNA and AVP immunoreactivity in pituicytes of the neural lobe (NL) of intact and pituitary stalk-transected rats, with and without osmotic stimulation, was examined. AVP mRNA was analyzed by Northern blotting, as well as by in situ hybridization in combination with immunocytochemistry using anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) as a marker for pituicytes. In intact rats, a poly(A) tail-truncated 0.62-kb AVP mRNA was detected in the NL and was found to increase 10-fold with 7 days of continuous salt loading. Morphological analysis of the NL of 7-day salt-loaded rats revealed the presence of AVP mRNA in a significant number of GFAP-positive pituicytes in the NL and in areas most probably containing nerve fibers. Eight days after pituitary stalk transection the NL AVP mRNA diminished in animals given water to drink, whereas in those given 2% saline for 18 h followed by 6 h of water, a treatment repeated on 6 successive days beginning 2 days after surgery, the 0.62-kb AVP mRNA was present. The AVP mRNA in the pituitary stalk-transected, salt-loaded rats showed an exclusive cellular distribution in the NL, indicative of localization in pituicytes. Immunoelectron microscopy showed the presence of AVP immunoreactivity in a subpopulation of pituicytes 7 and 10 days after pituitary stalk transection in salt-loaded animals, when almost all AVP fibers had disappeared from the NL. These data show that a subset of pituicytes in the NL is activated to synthesize AVP mRNA and AVP in response to osmotic stimulation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7479859

  10. Decrease in class pi glutathione transferase mRNA levels by ultraviolet irradiation of cultured rat keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Nakano, H; Kimura, J; Kumano, T; Hanada, K; Satoh, K; Hashimoto, I; Tsuchida, S

    1997-11-01

    The effect of ultraviolet (UV) B irradiation on pi class glutathione transferase (GST-P) gene expression was examined in cultured rat keratinocytes. Immunoblotting demonstrated GST-P to be the major GST form in the cells, and it was significantly decreased following irradiation. Northern blot analysis revealed that the mRNA decreased to 10-25% of the initial value 24 h after irradiation at a dose of 40 mJ/cm2. No remarkable changes were observed at earlier time points. Hydrogen peroxide treatment enhanced GST-P mRNA expression, with a 70% increase at 250 microM concentration. Alterations in possible trans-acting factors were examined to clarify the mechanism of repression by UV irradiation. c-Jun mRNA was induced 3.5-fold at 4 h after irradiation, but by 24 h fell to a lower level than that observed initially. c-Fos mRNA was increased 10-fold at 1 h but was completely suppressed at 12 and 24 h. Thus, the changes of c-Jun and c-Fos mRNA differed from that of GST-P mRNA. The level of mRNA for silencer factor-B was decreased to less than 10% at 12 h. UV irradiation of cells transfected with the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene containing enhancer (GPE I) or silencer regions of the GST-P gene did not suppress CAT activity. Although basal expression of the GST-P gene was mainly dependent on GPE I, altered expression of c-jun, c-fos and other genes coding for factors possibly trans-acting on GPE I did not appear to be responsible for the decreased GST-P mRNA levels.

  11. Dietary copper can regulate the level of mRNA for dopamine B-hydroxylase in rat adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Sabban, E.L.; Failla, M.L.; McMahon, A.; Seidel, K.E. Dept. of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD )

    1991-03-15

    Recent studies have shown that Cu deficiency markedly alters the levels of dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) in several peripheral tissues of rodents. Conversion of DA to NE is mediated by dopamine B-hydroxylase (DBM). Here the authors examined the effect of dietary Cu deficiency on the levels of DA, NE and DBM mRNA in rat adrenal gland. Severe Cu deficiency was induced by feeding low Cu diet to dams beginning at 17d gestation and weaning pups to the same diet. At 7 wks of age rats fed {minus}Cu diet were characterized by depressed growth, low tissue Cu, enlarged hearts and moderate anemia. Concentrations of DA were higher in adrenals and hearts of {minus}Cu rats compared to +Cu controls. While cardiac level of NE in {minus}Cu rats were reduced to 17% that of controls, adrenal NE was unchanged by Cu deficiency. To investigate possible mechanisms responsible for the response of adrenal gland to Cu deficiency, RNA was isolated and the levels of DBH mRNA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA were analyzed by Northern blots. Steady state levels of adrenal DBH mRNA was increased 2-3 fold in {minus}Cu rats, whereas TH mRNA were unchanged by dietary Cu status. Upon feeding the {minus}Cu rats the Cu adequate diet overnight, there was a further increase in DBH mRNA and a slight elevation of TH mRNA levels. The results indicate that dietary copper can markedly affect the level of DBH mRNA in rat adrenal gland.

  12. Identification of species in tribe Brassiceae by dot-blot hybridization using species-specific ITS1 probes.

    PubMed

    Tonosaki, K; Nishio, Takeshi

    2010-10-01

    Simple, reliable methods for identification of species are required for management of many species and lines in a plant gene bank. Species-specific probes were designed from published sequences of the ITS1 region in rDNA of 16 species in Brassica and its related genera, and used as probes for dot-blot hybridization with plant genomic DNA. All the probes detected species-specific signals at dot-blots of genomic DNAs of the 16 species in Brassica, Diplotaxis, Eruca, and Raphanus. Signals of the Brassica digenomic species in the U's triangle, i.e., B. napus, B. juncea, and B. carinata, were detected by the probes of their parental monogenomic species, i.e., B. rapa, B. nigra, and B. oleracea. The probe for B. oleracea showed signals of B. balearica, B. cretica, B. incana, B. insularis, and B. macrocarpa, which have the C genome as B. oleracea. Eruca vesicaria DNA was detected by the probe for E. sativa, which has been classified as a subspecies of E. vescaria. DNA of leaf tissue extracted by an alkaline solution and seed DNA prepared by the NaI method can be used directly for dot-blotting. Misidentification of species was revealed in 20 accessions in the Tohoku University Brassica Seed Bank. These results indicate dot-blot hybridization to be a simple and efficient technique for identification of plant species in a gene bank.

  13. Enrichment of PrPSc in Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded Tissues Prior to Analysis by Western Blot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diagnosis of prion disease is primarily through immunodetection of the infectious agent. Typically, 2 distinct procedures are recommended for a definitive diagnosis with immunohistochemistry and Western blot providing the most information as to the specific isolate in question. In the past these app...

  14. Mucin Agarose Gel Electrophoresis: Western Blotting for High-molecular-weight Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Kathryn A; Rushton, Zachary L; Ehre, Camille

    2016-06-14

    Mucins, the heavily-glycosylated proteins lining mucosal surfaces, have evolved as a key component of innate defense by protecting the epithelium against invading pathogens. The main role of these macromolecules is to facilitate particle trapping and clearance while promoting lubrication of the mucosa. During protein synthesis, mucins undergo intense O-glycosylation and multimerization, which dramatically increase the mass and size of these molecules. These post-translational modifications are critical for the viscoelastic properties of mucus. As a result of the complex biochemical and biophysical nature of these molecules, working with mucins provides many challenges that cannot be overcome by conventional protein analysis methods. For instance, their high-molecular-weight prevents electrophoretic migration via regular polyacrylamide gels and their sticky nature causes adhesion to experimental tubing. However, investigating the role of mucins in health (e.g., maintaining mucosal integrity) and disease (e.g., hyperconcentration, mucostasis, cancer) has recently gained interest and mucins are being investigated as a therapeutic target. A better understanding of the production and function of mucin macromolecules may lead to novel pharmaceutical approaches, e.g., inhibitors of mucin granule exocytosis and/or mucolytic agents. Therefore, consistent and reliable protocols to investigate mucin biology are critical for scientific advancement. Here, we describe conventional methods to separate mucin macromolecules by electrophoresis using an agarose gel, transfer protein into nitrocellulose membrane, and detect signal with mucin-specific antibodies as well as infrared fluorescent gel reader. These techniques are widely applicable to determine mucin quantitation, multimerization and to test the effects of pharmacological compounds on mucins.

  15. Imaging single mRNAs to study dynamics of mRNA export in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bensidoun, Pierre; Raymond, Pascal; Oeffinger, Marlene; Zenklusen, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Regulation of mRNA and protein expression occurs at many levels, initiated at transcription and followed by mRNA processing, export, localization, translation and mRNA degradation. The ability to study mRNAs in living cells has become a critical tool to study and analyze how the various steps of the gene expression pathway are carried out. Here we describe a detailed protocol for real time fluorescent RNA imaging using the PP7 bacteriophage coat protein, which allows mRNA detection with high spatial and temporal resolution in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and can be applied to study various stages of mRNA metabolism. We describe the different parameters required for quantitative single molecule imaging in yeast, including strategies for genomic integration, expression of a PP7 coat protein GFP fusion protein, microscope setup and analysis strategies. We illustrate the method's use by analyzing the behavior of nuclear mRNA in yeast and the role of the nuclear basket in mRNA export.

  16. Sensitivity of mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Poker, Gilad; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    Using the dynamic mean-field approximation of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), we investigate the effect of small changes in the initiation, elongation, and termination rates along the mRNA strand on the steady-state protein translation rate. We show that the sensitivity of mRNA translation is equal to the sensitivity of the maximal eigenvalue of a symmetric, nonnegative, tridiagonal, and irreducible matrix. This leads to new analytical results as well as efficient numerical schemes that are applicable for large-scale models. Our results show that in the usual endogenous case, when initiation is more rate-limiting than elongation, the sensitivity of the translation rate to small mutations rapidly increases towards the 5′ end of the ORF. When the initiation rate is high, as may be the case for highly expressed and/or heterologous optimized genes, the maximal sensitivity is with respect to the elongation rates at the middle of the mRNA strand. We also show that the maximal possible effect of a small increase/decrease in any of the rates along the mRNA is an increase/decrease of the same magnitude in the translation rate. These results are in agreement with previous molecular evolutionary and synthetic biology experimental studies. PMID:26238363

  17. Control of c-myc mRNA half-life in vitro by a protein capable of binding to a coding region stability determinant.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, P L; Herrick, D J; Prokipcak, R D; Ross, J

    1992-04-01

    Polysome-associated c-myc mRNA is degraded relatively rapidly in cells and in an in vitro mRNA decay system containing extracts from cultured mammalian cells. Using this system, a competition/screening assay was devised to search for factors that bind to specific regions of polysome-associated c-myc mRNA and thereby alter its half-life. mRNA stability was first assayed in reactions containing exogenous competitor RNAs corresponding to portions of c-myc mRNA itself. The addition of a 182-nucleotide sense strand fragment from the carboxy-terminal portion of the c-myc-coding region destabilized c-myc mRNA by at least eightfold. This RNA fragment had no effect on the stability of other mRNAs tested. Moreover, c-myc mRNA was not destabilized in reactions containing unrelated competitor RNAs or sense strand RNA from the c-myc 5' region. Polysome-associated globin mRNA containing the c-myc-coding region segment in-frame was also destabilized in vitro by the 182-nucleotide RNA. As determined by UV-cross-linking experiments, the 182-nucleotide RNA fragment was recognized by and bound to an approximately 75-kD polysome-associated protein. On the basis of these data plus Northern blotting analyses of c-myc mRNA decay products, we suggest that the approximately 75-kD protein is normally bound to a c-myc-coding region determinant and protects that region of the mRNA from endonuclease attack. Possible links between the protective protein, translation, ribosome pausing, and c-myc mRNA turnover are discussed.

  18. A transgenic-cloned pig model expressing non-fluorescent modified Plum

    PubMed Central

    NAGAYA, Masaki; WATANABE, Masahito; KOBAYASHI, Mirina; NAKANO, Kazuaki; ARAI, Yoshikazu; ASANO, Yoshinori; TAKEISHI, Toki; UMEKI, Ikuma; FUKUDA, Tooru; YASHIMA, Sayaka; TAKAYANAGI, Shuko; WATANABE, Nobuyuki; ONODERA, Masafumi; MATSUNARI, Hitomi; UMEYAMA, Kazuhiro; NAGASHIMA, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified pigs that express fluorescent proteins such as green and red fluorescent proteins have become indispensable biomedical research tools in recent years. Cell or tissue transplantation studies using fluorescent markers should be conducted, wherein the xeno-antigenicity of the fluorescent proteins does not affect engraftment or graft survival. Thus, we aimed to create a transgenic (Tg)-cloned pig that was immunologically tolerant to fluorescent protein antigens. In the present study, we generated a Tg-cloned pig harboring a derivative of Plum modified by a single amino acid substitution in the chromophore. The cells and tissues of this Tg-cloned pig expressing the modified Plum (mPlum) did not fluoresce. However, western blot and immunohistochemistry analyses clearly showed that the mPlum had the same antigenicity as Plum. Thus, we have obtained primary proof of principle for creating a cloned pig that is immunologically tolerant to fluorescent protein antigens. PMID:27396383

  19. Pressure overload stimulated cardiac hypertrophy leads to a rapid decrease in the mRNA for creatine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Boheler, K.; Popovich, B.; Dillmann, W.H.

    1987-05-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy (CH) leads to a decrease in creatine kinase (CK) enzymatic activity. To determine if the mRNA for CK also decreases with CH, they performed the following studies. Cardiac RNA was isolated from rats subjected to either abdominal aortic stenosis (AS) or sham surgery. Through Northern blot analysis, total cardiac RNA was quantitated with a CK specific /sup 32/P-labelled cDNA clone. At 3 and 8 days post-constriction, the mRNA for CK decreases by 54.6 +/- 7% and 65.3 +/- 18% respectively, whereas the heart weight increases by 19% and 37% relative to controls. Further studies indicate that CK mRNA also decreases by 41.8% in hypothyroid rats (Tx) but decreases by a total of 68.1% in Tx rats subjected to 8 days of AS. Pressure overload stimulated CH leads to a rapid decrease in CK mRNA in normal and Tx rats. This CK mRNA decrease may account for the decreased efficiency of contraction seen in CH.

  20. In vivo regulation of hepatic LDL receptor mRNA in the baboon. Differential effects of saturated and unsaturated fat.

    PubMed

    Fox, J C; McGill, H C; Carey, K D; Getz, G S

    1987-05-25

    The effects of diets enriched with cholesterol and different fats upon plasma lipoproteins and hepatic low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor mRNA levels were studied in a group of 18 normal baboons. Animals were fed diets containing 1% cholesterol and 25% fat as either coconut oil, peanut oil, or olive oil for a period of 20 weeks. Plasma total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, beta-lipoprotein (LDL + very low density lipoprotein) cholesterol, apolipoprotein B and apolipoprotein A-I were measured in samples obtained at 4-week intervals. All three diet groups demonstrated a statistically significant increase in plasma cholesterol as compared to base line throughout the experiment. Hepatic LDL receptor (LDL-R) mRNA levels were quantified by dot blot hybridization in serial liver biopsies. Animals fed saturated fat sustained a significant reduction in hepatic LDL-R mRNA as compared to those fed either monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fat. A strong negative correlation between LDL-R mRNA and plasma total cholesterol (r = -0.71), HDL cholesterol (r = -0.76), and plasma apo A-I (r = -0.77) was observed only in those animals fed coconut oil. Weak negative correlations between LDL-R mRNA and other plasma parameters did not achieve statistical significance. We conclude that saturated and unsaturated oils may influence plasma cholesterol levels in part through differential effects on LDL receptor biosynthesis in baboons.

  1. Apolipoprotein mRNA in liver and intestine of rats is affected by dietary beet fiber or cholestyramine.

    PubMed

    Sonoyama, K; Nishikawa, H; Kiriyama, S; Niki, R

    1995-01-01

    Rats were fed a cholesterol-free diet with no added fiber (fiber-free) or with 15 g/100 g beet fiber or 5 g/100 g cholestyramine for 14 d. Final plasma total cholesterol concentrations were significantly lower in rats fed beet fiber than in those fed fiber-free or cholestyramine diets. This difference was due mainly to lower HDL cholesterol concentrations. The group fed beet fiber also tended (P < 0.1) to have lower apolipoprotein A-I concentration in plasma. Northern blot analysis revealed that the relative concentrations of jejunal apolipoprotein A-I and A-IV mRNA were the same in all groups, whereas ileal apolipoprotein A-I and A-IV mRNA levels were significantly lower in rats fed beet fiber or cholestyramine than in those fed the fiber-free diet. Hepatic apolipoprotein E mRNA concentrations were the same in all groups, but apolipoprotein A-I mRNA levels were significantly lower in rats fed beet fiber than in those fed the other diets. Apolipoprotein A-IV mRNA tended (P < 0.1) to be lower in rats fed the beet fiber diet. These data suggest that the hypocholesterolemic effect of dietary beet fiber is associated with diminished expression of the hepatic apolipoprotein A-I gene.

  2. Kinetic Induction of Oat Shoot Pulvinus Invertase mRNA by Gravistimulation and Partial cDNA Cloning by the Polymerase Chain Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Liu-Lai; Song, Il; Karuppiah, Nadarajah; Kaufman, Peter B.

    1993-01-01

    An asymmetric (top vs. bottom halves of pulvini) induction of invertase mRNA by gravistimulation was analyzed in oat shoot pulvini. Total RNA and poly(A)(+) RNA, isolated from oat pulvini, and two oli-gonucleotide primers, corresponding to two conserved amino acid sequences (NDPNG and WECPD) found in invertase from other species, were used for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A partial length cDNA (550 bp) was obtained and characterized. A 62% nucleotide sequence homology and 58% deduced amino acid sequence homology, as compared to beta-fructosidase of carrot cell wall, was found. Northern blot analysis showed that there was an obviously transient induction of invertase mRNA by gravistimulation in the oat pulvinus system. The mRNA was rapidly induced to a maximum level at 1 hour after gravistimulation treatment and gradually decreased afterwards. The mRNA level in the bottom half of the oat pulvinus was significantly higher than that in the top half of the pulvinus tissue. The kinetic induction of invertase mRNA was consistent with the transient accumulation of invertase activity during the graviresponse of the pulvinus. This indicates that the expression of the invertase gene(s) could be regulated by gravistimulation at the transcriptional level. Southern blot analysis showed that there were two to three genomic DNA fragments which hybridized with the partial-length invertase cDNA.

  3. Downregulation of LH receptor mRNA in the rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Yoshimitsu; Kitahara, Yoshikazu; Nakamura, Kazuto; Minegishi, Takashi

    2012-05-01

    We detected luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) mRNA in the immature rat uterus by northern blotting and downregulation of this receptor mRNA after pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG)-human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) treatment. After administration of hCG, the mRNA levels in the rat uterus declined to an extremely low level from Days 1 to 3 and then rebounded and reached higher than pretreatment values at Day 4. At Day 5 the levels were 3-fold higher than the control levels. The cultured uterus displayed an hCG concentration-dependent increase in cAMP production in the medium. Immunohistochemical experiments showed that these receptor proteins were expressed in the epithelial cells of the endometrium. These results suggest that functional LHRs are present in the immature rat uterus and are downregulated by signals resulting from hCG treatment. These data may support the idea that LH acts on the uterus to inhibit contraction at ovulation. Although the precise role of the LHR in the uterus remains unknown, this study may provide a model with which to investigate the regulation of LHR.

  4. Expression of connexin 43 mRNA and protein in developing follicles of prepubertal porcine ovaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melton, C.M.; Zaunbrecher, G.M.; Yoshizaki, G.; Patio, R.; Whisnant, S.; Rendon, A.; Lee, V.H.

    2001-01-01

    A major form of cell-cell communication is mediated by gap junctions, aggregations of intercellular channels composed of connexins (Cxs), which are responsible for exchange of low molecular weight (< 1200 Da) cytosolic materials. These channels are a growing family of related proteins. This study was designed to determine the ontogeny of connexin 43 (Cx43) during early stages of follicular development in prepubertal porcine ovaries. A partial-length (412 base) cDNA clone was obtained from mature porcine ovaries and determined to have 98% identity with published porcine Cx43. Northern blot analysis demonstrated a 4.3-kb mRNA in total RNA isolated from prepubertal and adult porcine ovaries. In-situ hybridization revealed that Cx43 mRNA was detectable in granulosa cells of primary follicles but undetectable in dormant primordial follicles. The intensity of the signal increased with follicular growth and was greatest in the large antral follicles. Immunohistochemical evaluation indicated that Cx43 protein expression correlated with the presence of Cx43 mRNA. These results indicate that substantial amounts of Cx43 are first expressed in granulosa cells following activation of follicular development and that this expression increases throughout follicular growth and maturation. These findings suggest an association between the enhancement of intercellular gap-junctional communication and onset of follicular growth. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. VEGF mRNA and Protein Concentrations in the Developing Human Eye

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Irene T.; McConaghy, Suzanne; Namachivayam, Kopperuncholan; Halloran, Brian A.; Kurundkar, Ashish R.; MohanKumar, Krishnan; Maheshwari, Akhil; Ohls, Robin K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a well-characterized regulator of angiogenesis, has been mechanistically implicated in retinal neovascularization and in the pathogenesis of ROP. However, the ontogeny of VEGF expression in the human fetal retina is not well known. Because retinal vasculature grows with gestational maturation, we hypothesized that VEGF expression also increases in the midgestation human fetal eye as a function of gestational age. Methods To identify changes in VEGF gene expression during normal human development, we measured VEGF mRNA by quantitative PCR and measured VEGF protein by ELISA and western blots in 10-24 week gestation fetal vitreous, retina, and serum. Results VEGF mRNA expression in the retina increased with gestational age. VEGF isoform A, particularly its VEGF121 splice variant, contributed to this positive correlation. Consistent with these findings, we detected increasing VEGF121 protein concentrations in vitreous humor from fetuses of 10-24 weeks gestation, while VEGF concentrations decreased in fetal serum. Conclusions VEGF121 mRNA and protein concentrations increase with increasing gestational age in the developing human retina. We speculate that VEGF plays an important role in normal retinal vascular development, and that preterm delivery affects production of this vascular growth factor. PMID:25588190

  6. Tandem Spinach Array for mRNA Imaging in Living Bacterial Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jichuan; Fei, Jingyi; Leslie, Benjamin J; Han, Kyu Young; Kuhlman, Thomas E; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-11-27

    Live cell RNA imaging using genetically encoded fluorescent labels is an important tool for monitoring RNA activities. A recently reported RNA aptamer-fluorogen system, the Spinach, in which an RNA aptamer binds and induces the fluorescence of a GFP-like 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI) ligand, can be readily tagged to the RNA of interest. Although the aptamer-fluorogen system is sufficient for imaging highly abundant non-coding RNAs (tRNAs, rRNAs, etc.), it performs poorly for mRNA imaging due to low brightness. In addition, whether the aptamer-fluorogen system may perturb the native RNA characteristics has not been systematically characterized at the levels of RNA transcription, translation and degradation. To increase the brightness of these aptamer-fluorogen systems, we constructed and tested tandem arrays containing multiple Spinach aptamers (8-64 aptamer repeats). Such arrays enhanced the brightness of the tagged mRNA molecules by up to ~17 fold in living cells. Strong laser excitation with pulsed illumination further increased the imaging sensitivity of Spinach array-tagged RNAs. Moreover, transcriptional fusion to the Spinach array did not affect mRNA transcription, translation or degradation, indicating that aptamer arrays might be a generalizable labeling method for high-performance and low-perturbation live cell RNA imaging.

  7. Snapshot blotting: transfer of nucleic acids and nucleoprotein complexes from electrophoresis gels to grids for electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Jett, S D; Bear, D G

    1994-01-01

    We present a technique, "snapshot blotting," for the electrophoretic transfer of nucleic acids and nucleoprotein complexes in gel electrophoresis bands onto highly stable carbon film-coated grids for imaging by electron microscopy. The method permits structural analysis of macromolecular species that have been resolved by a gel mobility-shift assay. To demonstrate the efficiency and integrity of the transfer process for a multiprotein-DNA assembly, we have imaged various species of a prokaryotic transcription complex, using the cleavage-defective EcoRI(Q111) protein as an orientation marker and as a blockade of transcription elongation. Snapshot blotting should be of great utility in the structural characterization of nucleic acids and protein-nucleic acid interactions. Images PMID:8041711

  8. A Fluorescence Lecture Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzelli, Joseph W.; Kemp, Marwin

    1982-01-01

    Describes fluorescence demonstrations related to several aspects of molecular theory and quantitized energy levels. Demonstrations use fluorescent chemical solutions having luminescence properties spanning the visible spectrum. Also describes a demonstration of spontaneous combustion of familiar substances in chlorine. (JN)

  9. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  10. Densitometric analysis of Western blot (immunoblot) assays for human immunodeficiency virus antibodies and correlation with clinical status.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, G; Amiraian, K; Frey, H; Stevens, R W; Berns, D S

    1987-01-01

    Western blot assays for antibodies directed against components of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were examined with a densitometer and integrator. Antibody responses to seven HIV proteins were determined from the areas under the peaks of bands on blots from 430 seropositive individuals. Antibody responses corresponded qualitatively and quantitatively with clinical status. The Western blot assays examined were done on single specimens from individuals in one of four clinical states: asymptomatic with no risk factor identified, asymptomatic with risk factor(s) identified, AIDS-related complex, and AIDS. The ratios of gp41 antibody to p24 antibody and of gp41 antibody to total HIV antibodies increased, and the number of total HIV antibodies decreased progressively in these populations. Parameters were assigned to characterize the typical response found in AIDS: gp41 antibody/p24 antibody ratio, greater than or equal to 2.0; gp41 antibody/total HIV antibodies ratio, greater than or equal to 0.30; and number of total HIV antibodies, less than or equal to 25.0 signal units. Parameter match increased with progression of clinical status. These parameters were applied in a brief follow-up study of 34 HIV-infected asymptomatic individuals who developed AIDS-related complex or AIDS. Initial specimens showed a stronger correlation than our population data base had predicted, suggesting that the parameters have prognostic value. Densitometric analysis of antibody responses on Western blot assays of single or serial specimens should prove useful to physicians in staging and monitoring HIV-infected individuals and in predicting which individuals will progress to AIDS. Images PMID:2444624

  11. Differentiation of Enterococcus faecium from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus strains by PCR and dot-blot hybridisation.

    PubMed

    Langa, S; Fernández, A; Martín, R; Reviriego, C; Marín, M L; Fernández, L; Rodríguez, J M

    2003-12-01

    Variations in length and sequence of the 16S/23S spacer region of Enterococcus faecium provided the basis for development of simple PCR and dot-blot hybridisation assays that enabled the differentiation of potentially probiotic Enterococcus faecium strains from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. Such assays may be useful for differentiation of yoghurt starter cultures and enterococcal strains when they are simultaneously present in probiotic food products.

  12. Western Blot Assay Using Recombinant p26 Antigen for Detection of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus-Specific Antibodies▿

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, I.; Gutierrez, G.; Ostlund, E.; Barrandeguy, M.; Trono, K.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the performance of a single-band Western blot (WB) test using recombinant p26 (rp26) capsid protein of equine infectious anemia virus. According to the results obtained, the rp26 WB test is a reliable confirmatory diagnostic tool to be used as a complementary test after an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or agar gel immunodiffusion test yielding doubtful results. PMID:17959820

  13. Reduced XPC DNA repair gene mRNA levels in clinically normal parents of xeroderma pigmentosum patients.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sikandar G; Oh, Kyu-Seon; Shahlavi, Tala; Ueda, Takahiro; Busch, David B; Inui, Hiroki; Emmert, Steffen; Imoto, Kyoko; Muniz-Medina, Vanessa; Baker, Carl C; DiGiovanna, John J; Schmidt, Deborah; Khadavi, Arash; Metin, Ahmet; Gozukara, Engin; Slor, Hanoch; Sarasin, Alain; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2006-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XP-C) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. Patients with two mutant alleles of the XPC DNA repair gene have sun sensitivity and a 1000-fold increase in skin cancers. Clinically normal parents of XP-C patients have one mutant allele and one normal allele. As a step toward evaluating cancer risk in these XPC heterozygotes we characterized cells from 16 XP families. We identified 15 causative mutations (5 frameshift, 6 nonsense and 4 splicing) in the XPC gene in cells from 16 XP probands. All had premature termination codons (PTC) and absence of normal XPC protein on western blotting. The cell lines from 26 parents were heterozygous for the same mutations. We employed a real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR assay as a rapid and sensitive method to measure XPC mRNA levels. The mean XPC mRNA levels in the cell lines from the XP-C probands were 24% (P<10(-7)) of that in 10 normal controls. This reduced XPC mRNA level in cells from XP-C patients was caused by the PTC that induces nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. The mean XPC mRNA levels in cell lines from the heterozygous XP-C carriers were intermediate (59%, P=10(-4)) between the values for the XP patients and the normal controls. This study demonstrates reduced XPC mRNA levels in XP-C patients and heterozygotes. Thus, XPC mRNA levels may be evaluated as a marker of cancer susceptibility in carriers of mutations in the XPC gene. PMID:16081512

  14. Protein blot assays specific for the discrimination of the centromere autoantigen, CENP-A, from human cells.

    PubMed

    Billings, P B; Martinez, A; Haselby, J A; Hoch, S O

    1993-09-01

    The Western or protein blot has proven to be a valuable resource in detecting discrete, immunoreactive antigen targets associated with a variety of autoimmune diseases. As the roster of autoantigens has expanded, it has become increasingly common to tailor specific gel or blot conditions to a particular polypeptide antigen. Two such assays are reported here as applied to the fractionation and visualization of human centromere protein (CENP-A), a centromere autoantigen associated with the rheumatic disease, systemic sclerosis. The centromere antigens are effectively solubilized in the presence of 1 M MgCl2 to allow for further purification. CENP-A copurifies with the histone proteins, primarily H3 and H4. The two CENP-A-specific protein blot assays separate CENP-A from the histone proteins and enhance CENP-A immunoreactivity. The first assay is based on the use of acid-urea gels with a Triton X-100 concentration chosen to maximize separation of CENP-A from all the histones. The second assay is based on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to differentiate two very basic proteins of similar molecular weight, namely CENP-A and histone H3. For each gel system, a selective choice of associated immunoblot parameters allows for the reproducible discrimination of the CENP-A antigen. PMID:8223400

  15. Mechanism of Cytoplasmic mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a fundamental process in gene expression that depends upon the abundance and accessibility of the mRNA transcript as well as the activity of many protein and RNA-protein complexes. Here we focus on the intricate mechanics of mRNA translation in the cytoplasm of higher plants. This chapter includes an inventory of the plant translational apparatus and a detailed review of the translational processes of initiation, elongation, and termination. The majority of mechanistic studies of cytoplasmic translation have been carried out in yeast and mammalian systems. The factors and mechanisms of translation are for the most part conserved across eukaryotes; however, some distinctions are known to exist in plants. A comprehensive understanding of the complex translational apparatus and its regulation in plants is warranted, as the modulation of protein production is critical to development, environmental plasticity and biomass yield in diverse ecosystems and agricultural settings. PMID:26019692

  16. Direct observation of specific messenger RNA in a single living cell under a fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, A; Koshimoto, H; Sato, Y; Hirano, M; Sei-Iida, Y; Kondo, S; Ishibashi, K

    2000-01-01

    We observed the expression of human c-fos mRNA in a living transfected Cos7 cell under a fluorescence microscope by detecting hybrid formed with two fluorescently labeled oligodeoxynucleotides (oligoDNAs) and c-fos mRNA in the cytoplasm. Two fluorescent oligoDNAs were prepared, each labeled with a fluorescence molecule different from the other. When two oligoDNAs hybridized to an adjacent sequence on the target mRNA, the distance between the two fluorophores became very close and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurred, resulting in changes in fluorescence spectra. To find sequences of high accessibility of c-fos RNA to oligoDNAs, several sites that included loop structures on the simulated secondary structure were selected. Each site was divided into two halves, and the pair of fluorescent oligoDNAs complementary to the sequence was synthesized. Each site was examined for the efficiency of hybridization to c-fos RNA by measuring changes in fluorescence spectra when c-fos RNA was added to the pair of oligoDNAs in solution. A 40 mer specific site was found, and the pair of oligoDNAs for the site were microinjected into Cos7 cells that expressed c-fos mRNA. To block oligoDNAs from accumulating in the nucleus, oligoDNA was bound to a macromolecule (streptavidin) to prevent passage of nuclear pores. Hybridization of the pair of oligoDNAs to c-fos mRNA in the cytoplasm was detected in fluorescence images indicating FRET. PMID:10828002

  17. Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

  18. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Sue I.; Fergenson, David P.; Srivastava, Abneesh; Bogan, Michael J.; Riot, Vincent J.; Frank, Matthias

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  19. Predominant localization of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA in the periportal zone of rat liver parenchyma demonstrated by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Bartels, H; Linnemann, H; Jungermann, K

    1989-05-01

    In rat liver parenchyma, expression of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene was studied by Northern blot analysis with a biotinylated cRNA probe and the zonal localization of PEPCK mRNA was demonstrated by in situ hybridization with a radiolabelled cRNA probe. During the feeding period at night, overall PEPCK mRNA levels were low and PEPCK mRNA was detected only in small areas of the periportal zone. At the beginning of the light period (7 am) the overall PEPCK mRNA level began increasing and the periportal areas containing PEPCK mRNA broadened. The maximum of the total abundance and of the area with high levels of PEPCK mRNA was reached at noon. Fasting for 24-72 h did not cause further significant alterations in the level or localization of PEPCK mRNA. The present data are in line with previous findings of the predominant localization of PEPCK activity and enzyme protein in periportal hepatocytes. They suggest that the heterogeneous expression of the PEPCK gene in rat liver is regulated at the pretranslational level.

  20. Structure of an RNA dimer of a regulatory element from human thymidylate synthase mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Dibrov, Sergey; McLean, Jaime; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A sequence around the start codon of the mRNA of human thymidylate synthase (TS) folds into a secondary-structure motif in which the initiation site is sequestered in a metastable hairpin. Binding of the protein to its own mRNA at the hairpin prevents the production of TS through a translation-repression feedback mechanism. Stabilization of the mRNA hairpin by other ligands has been proposed as a strategy to reduce TS levels in anticancer therapy. Rapidly proliferating cells require high TS activity to maintain the production of thymidine as a building block for DNA synthesis. The crystal structure of a model oligonucleotide (TS1) that represents the TS-binding site of the mRNA has been determined. While fluorescence studies showed that the TS1 RNA preferentially adopts a hairpin structure in solution, even at high RNA concentrations, an asymmetric dimer of two hybridized TS1 strands was obtained in the crystal. The TS1 dimer contains an unusual S-­turn motif that also occurs in the ‘off’ state of the human ribosomal decoding site RNA. PMID:21245530

  1. Structure of an RNA dimer of a regulatory element from human thymidylate synthase mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey; McLean, Jaime; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-09-27

    A sequence around the start codon of the mRNA of human thymidylate synthase (TS) folds into a secondary-structure motif in which the initiation site is sequestered in a metastable hairpin. Binding of the protein to its own mRNA at the hairpin prevents the production of TS through a translation-repression feedback mechanism. Stabilization of the mRNA hairpin by other ligands has been proposed as a strategy to reduce TS levels in anticancer therapy. Rapidly proliferating cells require high TS activity to maintain the production of thymidine as a building block for DNA synthesis. The crystal structure of a model oligonucleotide (TS1) that represents the TS-binding site of the mRNA has been determined. While fluorescence studies showed that the TS1 RNA preferentially adopts a hairpin structure in solution, even at high RNA concentrations, an asymmetric dimer of two hybridized TS1 strands was obtained in the crystal. The TS1 dimer contains an unusual S-turn motif that also occurs in the 'off' state of the human ribosomal decoding site RNA.

  2. Fluorescence study of sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongjamroon, Sunida; Pattanaporkratana, Apichart

    2015-07-01

    We studied photoemission of monosaccharides and disaccharides using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. A 532- nm, 10 mW, laser was used to excite the samples and back-scattering signals were collected by a spectrometer. We found that most sugars show weak fluorescence in solid phase but do not fluoresce when dissolved in water solutions. The emission spectra show similar peak intensity at 590 nm, but they are different in emission intensities. We suggest that the fluorescence spectra may be used to differentiate sugar type, even though the origin of the fluorescence is unclear and needed further study.

  3. Analysis of myosin heavy chain mRNA expression by RT-PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C.; Haddad, F.; Qin, A. X.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1997-01-01

    An assay was developed for rapid and sensitive analysis of myosin heavy chain (MHC) mRNA expression in rodent skeletal muscle. Only 2 microg of total RNA were necessary for the simultaneous analysis of relative mRNA expression of six different MHC genes. We designed synthetic DNA fragments as internal standards, which contained the relevant primer sequences for the adult MHC mRNAs type I, IIa, IIx, IIb as well as the embryonic and neonatal MHC mRNAs. A known amount of the synthetic fragment was added to each polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and yielded a product of different size than the amplified MHC mRNA fragment. The ratio of amplified MHC fragment to synthetic fragment allowed us to calculate percentages of the gene expression of the different MHC genes in a given muscle sample. Comparison with the traditional Northern blot analysis demonstrated that our reverse transcriptase-PCR-based assay was reliable, fast, and quantitative over a wide range of relative MHC mRNA expression in a spectrum of adult and neonatal rat skeletal muscles. Furthermore, the high sensitivity of the assay made it very useful when only small quantities of tissue were available. Statistical analysis of the signals for each MHC isoform across the analyzed samples showed a highly significant correlation between the PCR and the Northern signals as Pearson correlation coefficients ranged between 0.77 and 0.96 (P < 0.005). This assay has potential use in analyzing small muscle samples such as biopsies and samples from pre- and/or neonatal stages of development.

  4. Detection of cyclin D1 mRNA by hybridization sensitive NIC-oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Kovaliov, Marina; Segal, Meirav; Kafri, Pinhas; Yavin, Eylon; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Fischer, Bilha

    2014-05-01

    A large group of fluorescent hybridization probes, includes intercalating dyes for example thiazole orange (TO). Usually TO is coupled to nucleic acids post-synthetically which severely limits its use. Here, we have developed a phosphoramidite monomer, 10, and prepared a 2'-OMe-RNA probe, labeled with 5-(trans-N-hexen-1-yl-)-TO-2'-deoxy-uridine nucleoside, dU(TO), (Nucleoside bearing an Inter-Calating moiety, NIC), for selective mRNA detection. We investigated a series of 15-mer 2'-OMe-RNA probes, targeting the cyclin D1 mRNA, containing one or several dU(TO) at various positions. dU(TO)-2'-OMe-RNA exhibited up to 7-fold enhancement of TO emission intensity upon hybridization with the complementary RNA versus that of the oligomer alone. This NIC-probe was applied for the specific detection of a very small amount of a breast cancer marker, cyclin D1 mRNA, in total RNA extract from cancerous cells (250 ng/μl). Furthermore, this NIC-probe was found to be superior to our related NIF (Nucleoside with Intrinsic Fluorescence)-probe which could detect cyclin D1 mRNA target only at high concentrations (1840 ng/μl). Additionally, dU(T) can be used as a monomer in solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis, thus avoiding the need for post-synthetic modification of oligonucleotide probes. Hence, we propose dU(TO) oligonucleotides, as hybridization probes for the detection of specific RNA in homogeneous solutions and for the diagnosis of breast cancer.

  5. Enhancement of XPG mRNA transcription by human interferon-beta in Cockayne syndrome cells with complementation group B.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Sugita, K; Suzuki, N; Kita, K; Higuchi, Y; Yamaura, A; Kohno, Y

    1999-01-01

    Human interferon-beta (HuIFN-beta) confers UV-refractoriness in association with increased DNA repair capacity to human cells. We examined the modulation of XPG gene expression by HuIFN-beta in UV-sensitive cells from Cockayne syndrome complementation B (CSB), xeroderma pigmentosum complementation A (XPA) and normal control cells. Northern blot analysis revealed that XPG mRNA was more extensively transcribed in CSB cells treated with HuIFN-beta than in those without HuIFN-beta treatment. XPG mRNA from XPA cells and normal control cells was not markedly transcribed by HuIFN-beta treatment compared to that from CSB cells. The findings suggested that different mechanisms of UV-refractoriness by HuIFN-beta exist between CS and XP. PMID:9864391

  6. Identification of endonucleolytic cleavage sites involved in decay of Escherichia coli trxA mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Arraiano, C; Yancey, S D; Kushner, S R

    1993-01-01

    The degradation of individual mRNAs in Escherichia coli has been studied through the use of a multiple mutant carrying the pnp-7 (polynucleotide phosphorylase), rnb-500 (RNase II), and rne-1 (RNase E) alleles. In this triple mutant, discrete mRNA breakdown products are stabilized in vivo at the nonpermissive temperature (Arraiano, C. M., S. D. Yancey, and S. R. Kushner, J. Bacteriol. 170:4625-4633, 1988). In the case of thioredoxin (trxA) mRNA decay, degradation fragments accumulated at early times after a shift to the nonpermissive temperature. Using Northern (RNA) blots, S1 nuclease analysis, and primer extensions, we identified a series of specific endonucleolytic cleavage sites that occur throughout the transcript in both the triple mutant and a wild-type control. The implications of the complex decay patterns observed are discussed. Images PMID:7679384

  7. The mRNA of L-Type Calcium Channel Elevated in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi-Tao; Nagaba, Yasushi; Cross, Heide S.; Wrba, Fritz; Zhang, Lin; Guggino, Sandra E.

    2000-01-01

    Previous reports indicate that the mRNA for the cardiac isoform of the voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (α1C) is elevated in colon cancer. The aim of these experiments was to verify that the mRNA for α1C was significantly increased in tumors of two separate populations of patients when compared to normal adjacent mucosa. The second aim was to measure the distribution of α1C using immunocytochemistry in normal human colon and in colon cancer and to determine what might regulate the channel expression. Biopsies were taken from patients with various stages of colon cancer and nearby normal mucosa were used as control. RNA was prepared and mRNA level measured by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The mRNA of the calcium channel was compared with other markers including β-actin. The mRNA for α1C was increased significantly in colon cancers compared to nearby adjacent mucosa. Using confocal microscopy α1C was localized mainly at the apical membrane in the surface epithelium of normal human colon with less distribution on the lateral and basal membranes. The channel was localized on the lateral and basal membranes in crypt cells. Calcium channel localization appeared to be nearer nuclei in colon cancer samples, in part because of the smaller size of the cells. Likewise, cultured Caco-2 and T84 cells showed a membrane distribution. Western blotting indicated that α1C protein was increased in nonconfluent cultures of colonic carcinoma cells compared to confluent cells and immunocytochemistry confirms that there is more calcium channel protein in cells that are nonconfluent. We conclude that the increase in mRNA of α1 subunit of the cardiac isoform of the L-type calcium channel may be a useful marker of colon cancer compared to other markers because the increase is large and this increase can be documented on small samples using a simple semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We found that α1C protein is

  8. Detection of Sleeping Beauty transposition in the genome of host cells by non-radioactive Southern blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Aravalli, Rajagopal N; Park, Chang W; Steer, Clifford J

    2016-08-26

    The Sleeping Beauty transposon (SB-Tn) system is being used widely as a DNA vector for the delivery of therapeutic transgenes, as well as a tool for the insertional mutagenesis in animal models. In order to accurately assess the insertional potential and properties related to the integration of SB it is essential to determine the copy number of SB-Tn in the host genome. Recently developed SB100X transposase has demonstrated an integration rate that was much higher than the original SB10 and that of other versions of hyperactive SB transposases, such as HSB3 or HSB17. In this study, we have constructed a series of SB vectors carrying either a DsRed or a human β-globin transgene that was encompassed by cHS4 insulator elements, and containing the SB100X transposase gene outside the SB-Tn unit within the same vector in cis configuration. These SB-Tn constructs were introduced into the K-562 erythroid cell line, and their presence in the genomes of host cells was analyzed by Southern blot analysis using non-radioactive probes. Many copies of SB-Tn insertions were detected in host cells regardless of transgene sequences or the presence of cHS4 insulator elements. Interestingly, the size difference of 2.4 kb between insulated SB and non-insulated controls did not reflect the proportional difference in copy numbers of inserted SB-Tns. We then attempted methylation-sensitive Southern blots to assess the potential influence of cHS4 insulator elements on the epigenetic modification of SB-Tn. Our results indicated that SB100X was able to integrate at multiple sites with the number of SB-Tn copies larger than 6 kb in size. In addition, the non-radioactive Southern blot protocols developed here will be useful to detect integrated SB-Tn copies in any mammalian cell type.

  9. Detection of Rickettsia in Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks and Ctenocephalides felis fleas from southeastern Tunisia by reverse line blot assay.

    PubMed

    Khrouf, Fatma; M'Ghirbi, Youmna; Znazen, Abir; Ben Jemaa, Mounir; Hammami, Adnene; Bouattour, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Ticks (n = 663) and fleas (n = 470) collected from domestic animals from southeastern Tunisia were screened for Rickettsia infection using reverse line blot assay. Evidence of spotted fever group Rickettsia was obtained. We detected Rickettsia felis in fleas, Rickettsia massiliae Bar 29 and the Rickettsia conorii Israeli spotted fever strain in ticks, and Rickettsia conorii subsp. conorii and Rickettsia spp. in both arthropods. The sensitivity of the adopted technique allowed the identification of a new association between fleas and R. conorii subsp. conorii species. The presence of these vector-borne Rickettsia infections should be considered when diagnosing this disease in humans in Tunisia.

  10. Interspecies sharing of two distinct nonstructural protein 1 alleles among human and animal rotaviruses as revealed by dot blot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Y; Nakagomi, O

    1997-10-01

    The distribution of the nonstructural protein 1 (NSP1) alleles from human strain AU-1 and canine strain K9 among rotaviruses of human, feline, canine, bovine, and simian origin was studied by a dot blot hybridization assay. Human and feline strains belonging to the AU-1 genogroup had the same NSP1 allele, while canine and feline strains belonging to the canine-feline genogroup shared another NSP1 allele. This canine-feline NSP1 allele had a significant level of homology with the NSP1 of rhesus rotavirus strain MMU18006. PMID:9316942

  11. A Candida albicans gene expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a distinct pattern of mRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Iborra, A; Sentandreu, R; Gozalbo, D

    1996-09-01

    Two plasmids (derived from YCplac22 and YEplac112) carrying a Candida albicans gene (including the 5' non-coding promoter sequences) coding for a 30 kDa membrane-bound protein, were used to transform Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. A 30 kDa protein was immunodetected by Western blot in the membrane fraction of transformants. Northern analysis showed the presence of three mRNA species (of about 1.1, 0.7 and 0.5 kb) hybridizing with the C. albicans gene as a probe. The same result was obtained using the 5' and 3' regions of the gene as probes, whereas only a 1.1 kb mRNA was found in C. albicans and none was detected in S. cerevisiae control transformants. Thus, heterologous expression of this gene in S. cerevisiae results in a distinct pattern of mRNA processing, either due to the location on plasmid vectors and/or to differences in the mRNA processing systems in the two microorganisms.

  12. Regulation of lysyl oxidase mRNA in dermal fibroblasts from normal donors and patients with inherited connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed

    Yeowell, H N; Marshall, M K; Walker, L C; Ha, V; Pinnell, S R

    1994-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LO) is an extracellular copper-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the initial reaction in the formation of lysine or hydroxylysine-derived crosslinks during collagen biosynthesis. We have isolated a cDNA for human LO from skin fibroblast poly(A+)RNA by PCR using primers based on the recently published sequence of human LO. This cDNA probe detects a major mRNA of 4.2 kb on Northern blots of RNA from normal fibroblasts. The level of LO mRNA was not significantly affected by cell density or by ascorbate treatment. Treatment of skin fibroblasts with hydralazine (50 microM), which increases the mRNAs for both the alpha and the beta subunits of prolyl hydroxylase (PH) and the mRNAs for lysyl hydroxylase, also increased LO mRNA by fourfold over a 72-h time course. In contrast, hydralazine dramatically decreased the mRNAs for alpha 1(I) collagen. Administration of minoxidil (500 microM), which specifically decreases LH activity without affecting PH activity or collagen biosynthesis in skin fibroblasts, stimulated the level of LO mRNA. Neither the administration of penicillamine (100 microM), which interferes with collagen cross-linking, nor the administration of beta-aminopropionitrile, which is a strong irreversible inhibitor of LO, to fibroblasts significantly changed the levels of LO mRNA over a 72-h time course. However, bleomycin (0.6 microgram/ml) significantly decreased the 4.2-kb LO mRNA in contrast to the levels of the alpha 1(I) collagen mRNAs, which were unchanged. No significant change was observed in the steady-state levels of LO mRNAs in fibroblasts isolated from patients with certain connective tissue disorders, including Marfan syndrome, Menkes disease, cutis laxa, and pseudoxanthoma elasticum. PMID:7508709

  13. Alteration of Na,K-ATPase subunit mRNA and protein levels in hypertrophied rat heart.

    PubMed

    Charlemagne, D; Orlowski, J; Oliviero, P; Rannou, F; Sainte Beuve, C; Swynghedauw, B; Lane, L K

    1994-01-14

    To determine if an altered expression of the Na,K-ATPase alpha isoform genes is responsible for an observed increase in cardiac glycoside sensitivity in compensatory hypertrophy, we performed Northern and slot blot analyses of RNA and specific immunological detection of Na,K-ATPase isoforms in rat hearts from normal and pressure overload-treated animals induced by abdominal aortic constriction. During the early phase of hypertrophy, the only alteration is a decrease in the alpha 2 mRNA isoform. In the compensated hypertrophied heart, the levels of the predominant alpha 1 isoform (mRNA and protein) and the beta 1 subunit mRNA are unchanged. In contrast, the alpha 2 isoform (mRNA and protein) is decreased by 35% and up to 61-64% in mild (< 55%) and severe (> 55%) hypertrophy, respectively. The alpha 3 isoform (mRNA and protein), which is extremely low in adult heart, is increased up to 2-fold during hypertrophy but accounts for only approximately equal to 5% of the total alpha isoform mRNA. These findings demonstrate that, in cardiac hypertrophy, the three alpha isoforms of the Na,K-ATPase are independently regulated and that regulation occurs at a pretranslational level. The pattern of expression in hypertrophied adult heart is similar to that of the neonatal heart where the inverse regulation between the alpha 2 and alpha 3 ouabain high affinity isoforms has been reported. This suggests that distinct regulatory mechanisms controlling Na,K-ATPase isoform expression may, at least in part, be involved in the sensitivity to cardiac glycosides. PMID:8288620

  14. MiR-506 suppresses liver cancer angiogenesis through targeting sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1) mRNA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhanping; Zhang, Weiying; Gao, Shan; Jiang, Qiulei; Xiao, Zelin; Ye, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaodong

    MicroRNAs acting as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes play crucial roles in human cancers. Sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1) and its metabolite sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) contribute to tumor angiogenesis. We have reported that the down-regulation of miR-506 targeting YAP mRNA results in the hepatocarcinogenesis. In the present study, we report a novel function of miR-506, which suppresses tumor angiogenesis through targeting SPHK1 mRNA in liver cancer. Bioinformatics analysis showed that miR-506 might target 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of SPHK1 mRNA. Then, we validated that by luciferase reporter gene assays. MiR-506 was able to reduce the expression of SPHK1 at the levels of mRNA and protein using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis in hepatoma HepG2 cells. Functionally, human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) tube formation assays demonstrated that the forced miR-506 expression remarkably inhibited the production of S1P in the supernatant of hepatoma cells. The supernatant resulted in the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Interestingly, the supernatant with overexpression of SPHK1 could rescue the inhibition of angiogenesis of liver cancer mediated by miR-506. Anti-miR-506 increased the production of S1P in the supernatant of hepatoma cells, but the supernatant with silencing of SPHK1 abolished anti-miR-506-induced acceleration of tumor angiogenesis. Clinically, we observed that the levels of miR-506 were negatively related to those of SPHK1 mRNA in liver cancer tissues. Thus, we conclude that miR-506 depresses the angiogenesis of liver cancer through targeting 3'UTR of SPHK1 mRNA. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism of tumor angiogenesis.

  15. Fluorescence Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio, and to provide a suitable environment for cells or tissues to replicate physiological cell dynamics. This chapter aims to give a general overview on microscope design choices critical for fluorescence live cell imaging that apply to most fluorescence microscopy modalities, and on environmental control with a focus on mammalian tissue culture cells. In addition, we provide guidance on how to design and evaluate fluorescent protein constructs by spinning disk confocal microscopy. PMID:24974023

  16. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-10-04

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  17. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  18. Triptolide inhibits COX-2 expression by regulating mRNA stability in TNF-{alpha}-treated A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Shuang; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Huang, Xin; Wang, Tao; Huang, Xiao; Li, Han; Zhang, Luyong

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triptolide inhibited COX-2 expression and the half-life of COX-2 mRNA is decreased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The HuR protein shuttling from nucleus to cytoplasm is inhibited by triptolide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triptolide inhibited 3 Prime -UTR fluorescence reporter gene activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer COX-2 mRNA binding to HuR is decreased by triptolide in pull-down experiments. -- Abstract: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) over-expression is frequently associated with human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and involved in tumor proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and resistance to apoptosis. In the present study, the effects of triptolide on COX-2 expression in A549 cells were investigated and triptolide was found to inhibit TNF-{alpha}-induced COX-2 expression. In our further studies, it was found that triptolide decreased the half-life of COX-2 mRNA dramatically and that it inhibited 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR) fluorescence reporter gene activity. Meanwhile, triptolide inhibited the HuR shuttling from nucleus to cytoplasm. After triptolide treatment, decreased COX-2 mRNA in pull-down experiments with anti-HuR antibodies was observed, indicating that the decreased cytoplasmic HuR is responsible for the decreased COX-2 mRNA. Taken together, our results provided evidence for the first time that triptolide inhibited COX-2 expression by COX-2 mRNA stability modulation and post-transcriptional regulation. These results provide a novel mechanism of action for triptolide which may be important in the treatment of lung cancer.

  19. Immunohistochemical and Western Blotting Analyses of Ganoine in the Ganoid Scales of Lepisosteus oculatus: an Actinopterygian Fish.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Ichiro; Oka, Shunya; Mikami, Masato; Yokosuka, Hiroyuki; Ishiyama, Mikio; Imai, Akane; Shimokawa, Hitoyata; Uchida, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    In order to compare its characteristics with those of jaw tooth collar enamel, normally developing and experimentally regenerating ganoine from ganoid scales of Lepisosteus oculatus (spotted gar), an actinopterygian fish species, was examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Amelogenin, a major enamel matrix protein (EMP), is widely found from sarcopterygian fish to mammals. Therefore, we used antimammalian amelogenin antibodies and antisera: an antibody against bovine amelogenin; antiserum against porcine amelogenin; and region-specific antibodies or antiserum against the C-terminus, middle region, or N-terminus of porcine amelogenin in this study. Positive immunoreactivity with the antibody against bovine amelogenin, antiserum against porcine amelogenin, and the middle and C-terminal region-specific antibodies was detected in both normally developing and regenerating ganoine matrix, as well as in granules found within inner ganoine epithelial cells. These immunohistochemical analyses indicated that the Lepisosteus ganoine matrix contains EMP-like proteins with epitopes similar to mammalian amelogenins. In Western blotting analyses of regenerating ganoid scales with the antibovine amelogenin antibody, two protein bands with molecular weights of approximately 78 and 65 kDa were detected, which were similar to those found in Lepisosteus tooth enamel. Our study suggests that in Lepisosteus, EMP-like proteins in the ganoine matrix corresponded to those in tooth enamel. However, it was revealed that the 78 and 65 kDa EMP-like proteins were different from 27 kDa bovine amelogenin. PMID:27139791

  20. Method for quantitative analysis of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay at the single cell level

    PubMed Central

    Pereverzev, Anton P.; Gurskaya, Nadya G.; Ermakova, Galina V.; Kudryavtseva, Elena I.; Markina, Nadezhda M.; Kotlobay, Alexey A.; Lukyanov, Sergey A.; Zaraisky, Andrey G.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.

    2015-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a ubiquitous mechanism of degradation of transcripts with a premature termination codon. NMD eliminates aberrant mRNA species derived from sources of genetic variation such as gene mutations, alternative splicing and DNA rearrangements in immune cells. In addition, recent data suggest that NMD is an important mechanism of global gene expression regulation. Here, we describe new reporters to quantify NMD activity at the single cell level using fluorescent proteins of two colors: green TagGFP2 and far-red Katushka. TagGFP2 was encoded by mRNA targeted to either the splicing-dependent or the long 3'UTR-dependent NMD pathway. Katushka was used as an expression level control. Comparison of the fluorescence intensities of cells expressing these reporters and cells expressing TagGFP2 and Katushka from corresponding control NMD-independent vectors allowed for the assessment of NMD activity at the single cell level using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The proposed reporter system was successfully tested in several mammalian cell lines and in transgenic Xenopus embryos. PMID:25578556

  1. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  2. Cell tracking using a photoconvertible fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Kohei; Tsujii, Hitomi; Omura, Tomomi

    2006-01-01

    The tracking of cell fate, shape and migration is an essential component in the study of the development of multicellular organisms. Here we report a protocol that uses the protein Kaede, which is fluorescent green after synthesis but can be photoconverted red by violet or UV light. We have used Kaede along with confocal laser scanning microscopy to track labeled cells in a pattern of interest in zebrafish embryos. This technique allows the visualization of cell movements and the tracing of neuronal shapes. We provide illustrative examples of expression by mRNA injection, mosaic expression by DNA injection, and the creation of permanent transgenic fish with the UAS-Gal4 system to visualize morphogenetic processes such as neurulation, placode formation and navigation of early commissural axons in the hindbrain. The procedure can be adapted to other photoconvertible and reversible fluorescent molecules, including KikGR and Dronpa; these molecules can be used in combination with two-photon confocal microscopy to specifically highlight cells buried in tissues. The total time needed to carry out the protocol involving transient expression of Kaede by injection of mRNA or DNA, photoconversion and imaging is 2-8 d.

  3. Fluorescent reporter methods.

    PubMed

    Hutter, Harald

    2006-01-01

    The identification and cloning of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from jellyfish marks the beginning of a new era of fluorescent reporters. In Caenorhabditis elegans, genetically encoded markers like the fluorescent proteins of the GFP family became the reporter of choice for gene expression studies and protein localization. The small size and transparency of the worm allows the visualization of in vivo dynamics, which increases the number of potential applications for fluorescent reporters tremendously. In combination with subcellular tags, GFP can be used to label subcellular structures like synapses allowing novel approaches to study developmental processes like synapse formation. Other fluorescent labels like small organic dyes, which are in widespread use in cell culture systems, are rarely used in C. elegans owing to difficulties in applying these labels through the impenetrable cuticle or eggshell of the animal. A notable exception is the use of lipophilic dyes, which are taken up by certain sensory neurons in the intact animal and can be introduced into the embryo after puncturing of the egg shell. This chapter covers the use of fluorescent dyes and fluorescent proteins in C. elegans. Emphasis is placed on microscopic techniques including wide field and confocal microscopy as well as time-lapse recordings. The use of fluorescent proteins as transgenic markers and image processing of fluorescence images are briefly discussed.

  4. Monte Carlo fluorescence microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Alexander X.; Hofmann, Matthias C.; Cong, Wenxiang; Xu, Yong; Wang, Ge

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescence microscopy allows real-time monitoring of optical molecular probes for disease characterization, drug development, and tissue regeneration. However, when a biological sample is thicker than 1 mm, intense scattering of light would significantly degrade the spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. In this paper, we develop a fluorescence microtomography technique that utilizes the Monte Carlo method to image fluorescence reporters in thick biological samples. This approach is based on an l0-regularized tomography model and provides an excellent solution. Our studies on biomimetic tissue scaffolds have demonstrated that the proposed approach is capable of localizing and quantifying the distribution of optical molecular probe accurately and reliably.

  5. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  6. Gold nanoparticle-based beacon to detect STAT5b mRNA expression in living cells: a case optimized by bioinformatics screen.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dawei; Li, Yang; Xue, Jianpeng; Wang, Jie; Ai, Guanhua; Li, Xin; Gu, Yueqing

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA), a single-strand ribonucleic acid with functional gene information is usually abnormally expressed in cancer cells and has become a promising biomarker for the study of tumor progress. Hairpin DNA-coated gold nanoparticle (hDAuNP) beacon containing a bare gold nanoparticle (AuNP) as fluorescence quencher and thiol-terminated fluorescently labeled stem-loop-stem oligonucleotide sequences attached by Au-S bond is currently a new nanoscale biodiagnostic platform capable of mRNA detection, in which the design of the loop region sequence is crucial for hybridizing with the target mRNA. Hence, in this study, to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of hDAuNP beacon simultaneously, the loop region of hairpin DNA was screened by bioinformatics strategy. Here, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b) mRNA was selected and used as a practical example. The results from the combined characterizations using optical techniques, flow cytometry assay, and cell microscopic imaging showed that after optimization, the as-prepared hDAuNP beacon had higher selectivity and sensitivity for the detection of STAT5b mRNA in living cells, as compared with our previous beacon. Thus, the bioinformatics method may be a promising new strategy for assisting in the designing of the hDAuNP beacon, extending its application in the detection of mRNA expression and the resultant mRNA-based biological processes and disease pathogenesis.

  7. Analysis of the 3’ untranslated regions of α-tubulin and S-crystallin mRNA and the identification of CPEB in dark- and light-adapted octopus retinas

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Shannan; Yamamoto, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    Purpose We previously reported the differential expression and translation of mRNA and protein in dark- and light-adapted octopus retinas, which may result from cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE)–dependent mRNA masking and unmasking. Here we investigate the presence of CPEs in α-tubulin and S-crystallin mRNA and report the identification of cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein (CPEB) in light- and dark-adapted octopus retinas. Methods 3’-RACE and sequencing were used to isolate and analyze the 3’-UTRs of α-tubulin and S-crystallin mRNA. Total retinal protein isolated from light- and dark-adapted octopus retinas was subjected to western blot analysis followed by CPEB antibody detection, PEP-171 inhibition of CPEB, and dephosphorylation of CPEB. Results The following CPE-like sequence was detected in the 3’-UTR of isolated long S-crystallin mRNA variants: UUUAACA. No CPE or CPE-like sequences were detected in the 3’-UTRs of α-tubulin mRNA or of the short S-crystallin mRNA variants. Western blot analysis detected CPEB as two putative bands migrating between 60-80 kDa, while a third band migrated below 30 kDa in dark- and light-adapted retinas. Conclusions The detection of CPEB and the identification of the putative CPE-like sequences in the S-crystallin 3’-UTR suggest that CPEB may be involved in the activation of masked S-crystallin mRNA, but not in the regulation of α-tubulin mRNA, resulting in increased S-crystallin protein synthesis in dark-adapted octopus retinas. PMID:18682811

  8. Rapid Fluorescent Detection Assay for Human Parainfluenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Takano, Maiko; Kurebayashi, Yuuki; Agarikuchi, Takashi; Suzuki, Chihiro; Fukushima, Keijo; Takahashi, Shunsaku; Otsubo, Tadamune; Ikeda, Kiyoshi; Minami, Akira; Suzuki, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Human parainfluenza virus type 1 (hPIV1) does not form clear plaque by the conventional plaque formation assay because of slightly a cytopathic effects in many cell lines infected with hPIV1, thus making in virus titration, isolation and inhibitor evaluation difficult. We have succeeded in fluorescent histochemical visualization of sialidase activities of influenza A and B viruses, Newcastle disease virus and Sendai virus by using a novel fluorescent sialidase substrate, 2-(benzothiazol-2-yl)-4-bromophenyl 5-acetamido-3,5-dideoxy-α-D-glycero-D-galacto-2-nonulopyranosidonic acid (BTP3-Neu5Ac). In this study, we applied the BTP3-Neu5Ac assay for rapid detection of hPIV1 and hPIV type 3. The BTP3-Neu5Ac assay could histochemically visualize dot-blotted hPIVs on a membrane and hPIV-infected cells as local fluorescence under UV irradiation. We succeeded in distinct fluorescent visualization of hPIV1-infected cells in only 3 d using the BTP3-Neu5Ac assay. Due to there being no fixation, hPIV1 was isolated directly from fluorescent stained focus cells by the BTP3-Neu5Ac assay. Establishment of a sensitive, easy, and rapid fluorescent focus detection assay for hPIV, hPIV1 in particular will contribute greatly to progress in hPIV studies.

  9. The vitamin D receptor localization and mRNA expression in ram testis and epididymis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hui; Huang, Yang; Jin, Guang; Xue, Yanrong; Qin, Xiaowei; Yao, Xiaolei; Yue, Wenbing

    2015-02-01

    The objectives of present study were to investigate the presence of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in testis and epididymis of ram by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), to locate VDR in testis and epididymis by immunohistochemistry and to compare difference of VDR expression between testis and epididymis before and after sexual maturation by Real time-PCR and Western blot. The results showed that VDR exists in the testis and epididymis of ram while VDR protein in testis and epididymis was localized in Leydig cells, spermatogonial stem cells, spermatocytes, Sertoli cells and principal cells. For the adult ram, the amounts of VDR mRNA and VDR protein were less (p < 0.01) in testis than compared with caput, corpus and cauda epididymis. For prepubertal ram, the result showed the same trend (p < 0.01). However, the expression levels of VDR mRNA and VDR protein in caput, corpus, cauda epididymis and testis showed no significant difference (p > 0.05) between adult and prepubertal. In conclusion, VDR exists in testis and epididymis of ram, suggesting 1α,25-(OH)(2)VD(3) may play a role in ram reproduction.

  10. Detection of Sleeping Beauty transposition in the genome of host cells by non-radioactive Southern blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Aravalli, Rajagopal N; Park, Chang W; Steer, Clifford J

    2016-08-26

    The Sleeping Beauty transposon (SB-Tn) system is being used widely as a DNA vector for the delivery of therapeutic transgenes, as well as a tool for the insertional mutagenesis in animal models. In order to accurately assess the insertional potential and properties related to the integration of SB it is essential to determine the copy number of SB-Tn in the host genome. Recently developed SB100X transposase has demonstrated an integration rate that was much higher than the original SB10 and that of other versions of hyperactive SB transposases, such as HSB3 or HSB17. In this study, we have constructed a series of SB vectors carrying either a DsRed or a human β-globin transgene that was encompassed by cHS4 insulator elements, and containing the SB100X transposase gene outside the SB-Tn unit within the same vector in cis configuration. These SB-Tn constructs were introduced into the K-562 erythroid cell line, and their presence in the genomes of host cells was analyzed by Southern blot analysis using non-radioactive probes. Many copies of SB-Tn insertions were detected in host cells regardless of transgene sequences or the presence of cHS4 insulator elements. Interestingly, the size difference of 2.4 kb between insulated SB and non-insulated controls did not reflect the proportional difference in copy numbers of inserted SB-Tns. We then attempted methylation-sensitive Southern blots to assess the potential influence of cHS4 insulator elements on the epigenetic modification of SB-Tn. Our results indicated that SB100X was able to integrate at multiple sites with the number of SB-Tn copies larger than 6 kb in size. In addition, the non-radioactive Southern blot protocols developed here will be useful to detect integrated SB-Tn copies in any mammalian cell type. PMID:27329815

  11. [Effects of electroacupuncture on the expression of estrogen receptor protein and mRNA in rat brain].

    PubMed

    Chen, B Y; Cheng, L H; Gao, H; Ji, S Z

    1998-10-01

    In order to show some light on the possible molecular mechanism of the effects of acupuncture on the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axial function, radioimmunoassay (RIA), RNA dot blot and Northern blot, monoclonal antibody immuno-histochemistry and computer image analysis technique were used to study the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on the blood level of estradiol (E2) and the expression of estrogen receptor protein and mRNA in the ovariectomized rat brain. The results show that ovariectomy induced a decrease of blood E2 level and increase of the expression of estrogen receptor protein and mRNA in the brain. All these effects could be remarkably reversed by previous EA treatment of ovariectomized rats. EA in intact rat, however, had no effects on blood E2 and expression of estrogen receptor. The above results suggest that EA at some effective acupoints may activate the production of body estrogen, resulting in a long term increase or suppression at the level of gene(s) expression and consequent normalization on the dysfunction of hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis.

  12. Recent innovations in mRNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    Nucleic acid-based vaccines are being developed as a means to combine the positive attributes of both live-attenuated and subunit vaccines. Viral vectors and plasmid DNA vaccines have been extensively evaluated in human clinical trials and have been shown to be safe and immunogenic, although none have yet been licensed for human use. Recently, mRNA based vaccines have emerged as an alternative approach. They promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines, without the need for electroporation, but with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. In addition, they avoid the limitations of anti-vector immunity seen with viral vectors, and can be dosed repeatedly. This review highlights the key papers published over the past few years and summarizes prospects for the near future.

  13. Detection of endogenous K-ras mRNA in living cells at a single base resolution by a PNA molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Kam, Yossi; Rubinstein, Abraham; Nissan, Aviram; Halle, David; Yavin, Eylon

    2012-03-01

    Detection of mRNA alterations is a promising approach for identifying biomarkers as means of differentiating benign from malignant lesions. By choosing the KRAS oncogene as a target gene, two types of molecular beacons (MBs) based on either phosphothioated DNA (PS-DNA-MB) or peptide nucleic acid (TO-PNA-MB, where TO = thiazole orange) were synthesized and compared in vitro and in vivo. Their specificity was examined in wild-type KRAS (HT29) or codon 12 point mutation (Panc-1, SW480) cells. Incubation of both beacons with total RNA extracted from the Panc-1 cell line (fully complementary sequence) showed a fluorescent signal for both beacons. Major differences were observed, however, for single mismatch mRNA transcripts in cell lines HT29 and SW480. PS-DNA-MB weakly discriminated such single mismatches in comparison to TO-PNA-MB, which was profoundly more sensitive. Cell transfection of TO-PNA-MB with the aid of PEI resulted in fluorescence in cells expressing the fully complementary RNA transcript (Panc-1) but undetectable fluorescence in cells expressing the K-ras mRNA that has a single mismatch to the designed TO-PNA-MB (HT29). A weaker fluorescent signal was also detected in SW480 cells; however, these cells express approximately one-fifth of the target mRNA of the designed TO-PNA-MB. In contrast, PS-DNA-MB showed no fluorescence in all cell lines tested post PEI transfection. Based on the fast hybridization kinetics and on the single mismatch discrimination found for TO-PNA-MB we believe that such molecular beacons are promising for in vivo real-time imaging of endogenous mRNA with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) resolution.

  14. Fluorescence in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Victoria L.; Van Hooijdonk, Eloise; Intrater, Nurit; Vigneron, Jean-Pol

    2012-10-01

    Fluorescent molecules are much in demand for biosensors, solar cells, LEDs and VCSEL diodes, therefore, considerable efforts have been expended in designing and tailoring fluorescence to specific technical applications. However, naturally occurring fluorescence of diverse types has been reported from a wide array of living organisms: most famously, the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, but also in over 100 species of coral and in the cuticle of scorpions, where it is the rule, rather than the exception. Despite the plethora of known insect species, comparatively few quantitative studies have been made of insect fluorescence. Because of the potential applications of natural fluorescence, studies in this field have relevance to both physics and biology. Therefore, in this paper, we review the literature on insect fluorescence, before documenting its occurrence in the longhorn beetles Sternotomis virescens, Sternotomis variabilis var. semi rufescens, Anoplophora elegans and Stellognatha maculata, the tiger beetles Cicindela maritima and Cicindela germanica and the weevil Pachyrrhynchus gemmatus purpureus. Optical features of insect fluorescence, including emitted wavelength, molecular ageing and naturally occurring combinations of fluorescence with bioluminescence and colour-producing structures are discussed.

  15. Detection of anti-HIV-1 IgG antibodies in whole saliva by GACELISA and Western blot assays.

    PubMed

    Matee, M I; Lyamuya, E F; Simon, E; Mbena, E C; Kagoma, C; Samaranayake, L P; Scheutz, F

    1996-05-01

    The present study, based on 158 HIV seropositives and 167 HIV seronegatives, demonstrates that saliva collected with the Omni-SAL device and tested with GACELISA (an IgG antibody capture ELISA) is an effective non-invasive alternative to serum for anti-HIV IgG antibody screening. The study also shows that a conventional serum Western blot kit can be used, with slight modifications, for confirmatory testing of saliva specimens. Collecting saliva with the Omni-SAL device had a very good acceptance rate among Tanzanian subjects, and although this diagnostic method is not yet known by the general public, 65% of the study participants preferred to give saliva instead of blood for HIV testing.

  16. [THE SCREENING OF DIAGNOSTIC POTENTIAL OF NATIVE PROTEIN FRACTIONS OF MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS USING TECHNIQUE OF IMMUNE BLOTTING].

    PubMed

    Tsibulkin, A P; Khaertinova, I M; Urazov, N G; Khaertinov, K S

    2016-02-01

    The technique of immune blotting was used to analyze surface proteins obtained from cells M Tuberculosis exposed to partialmode of delipidization. At that, there were applied serums of patients with tuberculosis of lungs; HIV agents and patients with concomitant infection tuberculosis-AIDS and also HIV-negative patients without clinical signs of disease of lungs and with chronic diseases of lungs of other etiology The fractions oflow-molecular antigens with molecular mass 6.5-30 kilodaltons became diagnostically significant. To this fraction of antigens reacted serums of all patients with tuberculosis of lungs and serums of 91% of patients with concomitant tuberculosis-AIDS infection. The antigens of protein fractions with high (70-100 kilodaltons) and interim (30-69 kilodaltons) molecular mass became diagnostically insignificant. PMID:27455562

  17. Detection of human cytomegalovirus by slot-blot hybridization assay employing oligo-primed /sup 32/P-labelled probe

    SciTech Connect

    Agha, S.A.; Coleman, J.C.; Selwyn, S.; Mahmound, L.A.; Abd-Elaal, A.M.; Archard, L.C.

    1988-12-01

    A /sup 32/P-labelled Hind III-0 DNA fragment (nine Kilobases; Kb) from human cytomegalovirus AD-169 (HCMV) was used in slot-blot hybridization assay for the detection of HCMV in clinical samples. The results obtained with DNA hybridization assay (DNA HA) were compared with virus isolation using conventional tube cell culture (CTC) and centrifugation vial culture (CVC), immunofluorescence (IF), and complement fixation test (CFT). Of 15 CTC-positive samples, 13 were positive with DNA HA (sensitivity 86.7%). Also, 14 additional samples were DNA HA-positive but CTC-negative. CVC and/or IF confirmed the diagnosis in nine of 14; the remaining five samples were from three patients who showed fourfold rising antibody titre by CFT. Although DNA HA using /sup 32/P-labelled probes is relatively cumbersome and expensive, it is a valuable test for quantitation of viral shedding in patients with HCMV infections who may benefit from antiviral therapy.

  18. Preferential germline usage and VH/VL pairing observed in human antibodies selected by mRNA display.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Kutskova, Yuliya A; Hong, Feng; Memmott, John E; Zhong, Suju; Jenkinson, Megan D; Hsieh, Chung-Ming

    2015-10-01

    Since the invention of phage display, in vitro antibody display technologies have revolutionized the field of antibody discovery. In combination with antibody libraries constructed with sequences of human origin, such technologies enable accelerated therapeutic antibody discovery while bypassing the laborious animal immunization and hybridoma generation processes. Many in vitro display technologies developed since aim to differentiate from phage display by displaying full-length IgG proteins, utilizing eukaryotic translation system and codons, increasing library size or real-time kinetic selection by fluorescent activated cell sorting. We report here the development of an mRNA display technology and an accompanying HCDR3 size spectratyping monitor for human antibody discovery. Importantly, the mRNA display technology maintains a monovalent linkage between the mRNA (genotype) and display binding protein (phenotype), which minimizes avidity effect common in other display systems and allows for a stringent affinity and off-rate selection. The mRNA display technology successfully identified 100 human antibodies in 15 different selections against various targets from naïve human antibody libraries. These antibodies in general have high affinity and diversity. By analyzing the germline usage and combination of antibodies selected by the mRNA display technology, we identified trends and determined the productivity of each germline subgroup in the libraries that could serve as the knowledge base for constructing fully synthetic, next generation antibody libraries.

  19. Coupling of mRNA Structure Rearrangement to Ribosome Movement during Bypassing of Non-coding Regions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Coakley, Arthur; O'Connor, Michelle; Petrov, Alexey; O'Leary, Seán E; Atkins, John F; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2015-11-19

    Nearly half of the ribosomes translating a particular bacteriophage T4 mRNA bypass a region of 50 nt, resuming translation 3' of this gap. How this large-scale, specific hop occurs and what determines whether a ribosome bypasses remain unclear. We apply single-molecule fluorescence with zero-mode waveguides to track individual Escherichia coli ribosomes during translation of T4's gene 60 mRNA. Ribosomes that bypass are characterized by a 10- to 20-fold longer pause in a non-canonical rotated state at the take-off codon. During the pause, mRNA secondary structure rearrangements are coupled to ribosome forward movement, facilitated by nascent peptide interactions that disengage the ribosome anticodon-codon interactions for slippage. Close to the landing site, the ribosome then scans mRNA in search of optimal base-pairing interactions. Our results provide a mechanistic and conformational framework for bypassing, highlighting a non-canonical ribosomal state to allow for mRNA structure refolding to drive large-scale ribosome movements. PMID:26590426

  20. An analysis of beta-lactam-derived antigens on spleen cell and serum proteins by ELISA and Western blotting.

    PubMed

    Warbrick, E V; Thomas, A L; Stejskal, V; Coleman, J W

    1995-11-01

    Penicillins and related beta-lactam antibiotics are known to conjugate to proteins to generate potentially antigenic (haptenic) determinants. In the present study, we used a rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against benzylpenicillin (BP) to investigate the capacity of six penicillins and one cephalosporin to generate haptenic groups in vitro on cultured mouse spleen cells and on serum proteins in the culture medium. All of the drugs tested, namely, BP, amoxicillin (AMX), ampicillin (AMP), cephalothin (CEP), cloxacillin (CLX), flucloxacillin (FLX), and phenoxymethylpenicillin (PMP) generated antigens in a concentration-dependent manner on cell and serum proteins, which could be detected by ELISA, although antigens generated by BP, CEP, FLX, or PMP in either cell- or serum-conjugated form were more readily detected than those generated by AMX, AMP, or CLX. Western blot analysis revealed that BP-derived antigens were generated relatively slowly on cell proteins (maximum binding was not yet reached after 8 h), compared to serum proteins (maximum binding within 1 h). BP, CEP, and PMP all generated similar distinctive patterns of immunostaining of electrophoresed cell or serum proteins which did not reflect the relative abundance of different proteins as revealed by Coomassie brilliant blue staining. FLX, CLX, AMP, and AMX did not generate antigens that could be detected on Western blots. In conclusion, we have shown that various beta-lactam antibiotics generate antigens on cell and serum proteins that can be detected and characterized immunochemically with polyclonal antiserum. Further application of these methods may offer potential for further identification of immunologically relevant cellular and serum antigens generated by these drugs.

  1. Imprinting mutations in Angelman syndrome detected by Southern blotting using a probe containing exon {alpha} of SNRPN

    SciTech Connect

    Beuten, J.; Sutcliffe, J.S.; Nakao, M.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are associated with paternal and maternal deficiencies respectively, of gene expression within human chromosome 15q11-q13, and are caused by deletion, uniparental disomy (UPD), or other mutations. The SNRPN gene maps in this region, is paternally expressed, and is a candidate gene for PWS. Southern blotting using methylation-sensitive enzymes and a genomic DNA probe from the CpG island containing exon {alpha} of the SNRPN gene reveals methylation specific for the maternal allele. In cases of the usual deletions or UPD, the probe detects absence of an unmethylated allele in PWS and absence of a methylated allele in AS. We have analyzed 21 nondeletion/nonUPD AS patients with this probe and found evidence for an imprinting mutation (absence of a methylated allele) in 3 patients. Southern blotting with methylation-sensitive enzymes using the exon {alpha} probe, like use of the PW71 probe, should detect abnormalities in all known PWS cases and in 3 of the 4 forms of AS: deletion, UPD and imprinting mutations. This analysis provides a valuable diagnostic approach for PWS and AS. In efforts to localize the imprinting mutations in AS, one patient was found with failure to inherit a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism near probe 189-1 (D15S13). Analysis of this locus in AS families and CEPH families demonstrates a polymorphism that impairs amplification and a different polymorphism involving absence of hybridization to the 189-1 probe. The functional significance, if any, of deletion of the 189-1 region is unclear.

  2. Quantitative Western ligand blotting reveals common patterns and differential features of IGFBP-fingerprints in domestic ruminant breeds and species.

    PubMed

    Wirthgen, Elisa; Höflich, Christine; Spitschak, Marion; Helmer, Carina; Brand, Bodo; Langbein, Jan; Metzger, Friedrich; Hoeflich, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    The insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are determinants of local IGF-effects and thus have an impact on growth and metabolism in vertebrate species. In farm animals, IGFBPs are associated with traits such as growth rate, body composition, milk production, or fertility. It may be assumed, that selective breeding and characteristic phenotypes of breeds are related to differential expression of IGFBPs. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of selective breeding on blood IGFBP concentrations of farm animals. Breeds of the sheep, goat, and cattle species were investigated. IGFBP-3, -2, and -4 were analyzed with quantitative Western ligand blotting (qWLB), enabling comprehensive monitoring of intact IGFBPs with IGF-binding capacity. We show that in sera of all species and breeds investigated, IGFBP-3, -2, and -4 were simultaneously detectable by qWLB analysis. IGFBP-3 and the total amount of IGFBPs were significantly increased (P<0.05) in Cameroon sheep, if compared to 3 of 4 other sheep breeds, as well as in Dwarf goats versus Toggenburg and Boer goats (P<0.01). IGFBP-2 was elevated in Cameroon sheep and Boer goats, if compared to other breeds of these species (P<0.01), respectively. Holstein Friesian dairy cows had higher levels of IGFBP-4 (P<0.05), if compared to conventional crossbreeds of beef cattle. In Dwarf goats the ratio of IGFBP-3/IGFBP-2 was about 3-fold higher than in other goat breeds (P<0.001). The total IGFBP amount of Toggenburg goats was reduced (P<0.05), compared to the other goat breeds. In conclusion, our data indicate that common and specific features of IGFBP fingerprints are found in different ruminant species and breeds. Our findings may introduce quantitative Western ligand blotting as an attractive tool for biomarker development and molecular phenotyping in farm animal breeds. PMID:26597140

  3. Quantitative Western ligand blotting reveals common patterns and differential features of IGFBP-fingerprints in domestic ruminant breeds and species.

    PubMed

    Wirthgen, Elisa; Höflich, Christine; Spitschak, Marion; Helmer, Carina; Brand, Bodo; Langbein, Jan; Metzger, Friedrich; Hoeflich, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    The insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are determinants of local IGF-effects and thus have an impact on growth and metabolism in vertebrate species. In farm animals, IGFBPs are associated with traits such as growth rate, body composition, milk production, or fertility. It may be assumed, that selective breeding and characteristic phenotypes of breeds are related to differential expression of IGFBPs. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of selective breeding on blood IGFBP concentrations of farm animals. Breeds of the sheep, goat, and cattle species were investigated. IGFBP-3, -2, and -4 were analyzed with quantitative Western ligand blotting (qWLB), enabling comprehensive monitoring of intact IGFBPs with IGF-binding capacity. We show that in sera of all species and breeds investigated, IGFBP-3, -2, and -4 were simultaneously detectable by qWLB analysis. IGFBP-3 and the total amount of IGFBPs were significantly increased (P<0.05) in Cameroon sheep, if compared to 3 of 4 other sheep breeds, as well as in Dwarf goats versus Toggenburg and Boer goats (P<0.01). IGFBP-2 was elevated in Cameroon sheep and Boer goats, if compared to other breeds of these species (P<0.01), respectively. Holstein Friesian dairy cows had higher levels of IGFBP-4 (P<0.05), if compared to conventional crossbreeds of beef cattle. In Dwarf goats the ratio of IGFBP-3/IGFBP-2 was about 3-fold higher than in other goat breeds (P<0.001). The total IGFBP amount of Toggenburg goats was reduced (P<0.05), compared to the other goat breeds. In conclusion, our data indicate that common and specific features of IGFBP fingerprints are found in different ruminant species and breeds. Our findings may introduce quantitative Western ligand blotting as an attractive tool for biomarker development and molecular phenotyping in farm animal breeds.

  4. MDR-TB Antibody Response (Western Blot) to Fractions of Isoniazid and Rifampicin Resistant Antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hadizadeh Tasbiti, Alireza; Yari, Shamsi; Ghanei, Mostafa; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Bahrmand, Ahmadreza

    2015-12-01

    Drug-resistant TB poses a major threat to control of TB worldwide. Despite progress in the detection of Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) cases, a major diagnostic gap remains: 55% of reported TB patients estimated to have MDR-TB were not detected in 2013. MDR-TB antigens were conjugated to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. Specific polyclonal antibodies against MDR-TB Ags were prepared in rabbits using two boosted injections of the MDR-TB antigen. The antibodies were purified and treated with susceptible TB to remove any non-specific and cross-reactive antibodies. In the present study, comparative analysis of electrophoretic pattern of different antigens of INH/RIF-resistant TB were studied for identifying protein profiles. A RIF-resistant TB antigen was shown here to have different protein profiles from INH-resistant TB isolate. The results of Western blotting analysis showed that in the RIF- and INH-resistant antigenic fractions some bands of 14.4 and 45 kDa as immunogenic were common. Moreover, four bands of RIF-resistant TB antigen fractions (16, 19, 21, and 45 KDa) and one band of INH-resistant TB (about 26 KDa) were detected as diagnostic antigens. This study suggests that the Western blot is an accurate test to survey INH- and RIF-resistant TB antigens of M. tuberculosis infection. These findings indicate that MDR-TB diagnosis (based on Ag detection) could be useful in the identification of disease stages that precede symptomatic and microbiologically positive TB, such as subclinical and incipient TB.

  5. Engineering fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Atsushi; Nagai, Takeharu; Mizuno, Hideaki

    2005-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein from the jellyfish Aequorea victora (GFP) and GFP-like proteins from Anthozoa species encode light-absorbing chromophores intrinsically within their respective protein sequences. Recent studies have made progress in obtaining bright variants of these proteins which develop chromophores quickly and efficiently, as well as novel fluorescent proteins that photoactivate or photoconvert, i.e., become fluorescent or change colors upon illumination at specific wavelengths. Also, monomeric versions of these proteins have been engineered for fusion protein applications. Simple GFP variants and circularly permuted GFP variants have been used to develop fluorescent probes that sense physiological signals such as membrane potential and concentrations of free calcium. Further molecular characterization of the structure and maturation of these proteins is in progress, aimed at providing information for rational design of variants with desired fluorescence properties.

  6. Imaging of single mRNA molecules moving within a living cell nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Tadakuma, Hisashi; Ishihama, Yo; Shibuya, Toshiharu; Tani, Tokio; Funatsu, Takashi . E-mail: funatsu@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-06-09

    In eukaryotic cells, pre-mRNAs are transcribed in the nucleus, processed by 5' capping, 3'-polyadenylation, and splicing, and exported to the cytoplasm for translation. To examine the nuclear mRNA transport mechanism, intron-deficient mRNAs of truncated {beta}-globin and EGFP were synthesized, fluorescently labeled in vitro, and injected into the nucleus of living Xenopus A6 cells. The trajectories of single mRNA molecules in the nucleus were visualized using video-rate confocal microscopy. Approximately half the mRNAs moved by Brownian motion in the nucleoplasm, except the nucleoli, with an apparent diffusion coefficient of 0.2 {mu}m{sup 2}/s, about 1/150 of that in water. The slow diffusion could not be explained by simple diffusion obeying the Stokes-Einstein equation, suggesting interactions of the mRNAs with nuclear components. The remaining mRNAs were stationary with an average residence time of about 30 s, comparable to the time required for mRNA diffusion from the site of synthesis to nuclear pores.

  7. Dual FRET molecular beacons for mRNA detection in living cells.

    PubMed

    Santangelo, Philip J; Nix, Brent; Tsourkas, Andrew; Bao, Gang

    2004-01-01

    The ability to visualize in real-time the expression level and localization of specific endogenous RNAs in living cells can offer tremendous opportunities for biological and disease studies. Here we demonstrate such a capability using a pair of molecular beacons, one with a donor and the other with an acceptor fluorophore that hybridize to adjacent regions on the same mRNA target, resulting in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Detection of the FRET signal significantly reduced false positives, leading to sensitive imaging of K-ras and survivin mRNAs in live HDF and MIAPaCa-2 cells. FRET detection gave a ratio of 2.25 of K-ras mRNA expression in stimulated and unstimulated HDF, comparable to the ratio of 1.95 using RT-PCR, and in contrast to the single-beacon result of 1.2. We further revealed intriguing details of K-ras and survivin mRNA localization in living cells. The dual FRET molecular beacons approach provides a novel technique for sensitive RNA detection and quantification in living cells.

  8. Identification of an RNA-binding protein that is phosphorylated by PTH and potentially mediates PTH-induced destabilization of Npt2a mRNA.

    PubMed

    Murray, Rebecca D; Merchant, Michael L; Hardin, Ericka; Clark, Barbara; Khundmiri, Syed J; Lederer, Eleanor D

    2016-02-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a key regulator of the expression and function of the type IIa sodium-phosphate cotransporter (Npt2a), the protein responsible for regulated renal phosphate reabsorption. We previously showed that PTH induces rapid decay of Npt2a mRNA through posttranscriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that PTH-induced changes in RNA-binding protein (RBP) activity mediate the degradation of Npt2a mRNA. To address this aim, we treated opossum kidney (OK) cells, a PTH-sensitive proximal tubule cell culture model, with 100 nM PTH for 30 min and 2 h, followed by mass spectrometry characterization of the PTH-stimulated phosphoproteome. We identified 1,182 proteins differentially phosphorylated in response to PTH, including 68 RBPs. Preliminary analysis identified a phospho-RBP, hnRNPK-homology-type-splicing regulatory protein (KSRP), with predicted binding sites for the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of Npt2a mRNA. Western blot analysis confirmed expression of KSRP in OK cells and showed PTH-dependent translocation to the nucleus. Immunoprecipitation of KSRP from control and PTH-treated cells followed by RNA isolation and RT-quantitative PCR analysis identified Npt2a mRNA from both control and PTH-treated KSRP pulldowns. Knockdown of KSRP followed by PTH treatment showed that KSRP is required for mediating PTH-stimulated reduction in sodium/hydrogen exchanger 3 mRNA, but not Npt2a mRNA. We conclude that 1) PTH is a major regulator of both transcription and translation, and 2) KSRP binds Npt2a mRNA but its role in PTH regulation of Npt2a mRNA is not clear. PMID:26834145

  9. Identification of an RNA-binding protein that is phosphorylated by PTH and potentially mediates PTH-induced destabilization of Npt2a mRNA.

    PubMed

    Murray, Rebecca D; Merchant, Michael L; Hardin, Ericka; Clark, Barbara; Khundmiri, Syed J; Lederer, Eleanor D

    2016-02-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a key regulator of the expression and function of the type IIa sodium-phosphate cotransporter (Npt2a), the protein responsible for regulated renal phosphate reabsorption. We previously showed that PTH induces rapid decay of Npt2a mRNA through posttranscriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that PTH-induced changes in RNA-binding protein (RBP) activity mediate the degradation of Npt2a mRNA. To address this aim, we treated opossum kidney (OK) cells, a PTH-sensitive proximal tubule cell culture model, with 100 nM PTH for 30 min and 2 h, followed by mass spectrometry characterization of the PTH-stimulated phosphoproteome. We identified 1,182 proteins differentially phosphorylated in response to PTH, including 68 RBPs. Preliminary analysis identified a phospho-RBP, hnRNPK-homology-type-splicing regulatory protein (KSRP), with predicted binding sites for the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of Npt2a mRNA. Western blot analysis confirmed expression of KSRP in OK cells and showed PTH-dependent translocation to the nucleus. Immunoprecipitation of KSRP from control and PTH-treated cells followed by RNA isolation and RT-quantitative PCR analysis identified Npt2a mRNA from both control and PTH-treated KSRP pulldowns. Knockdown of KSRP followed by PTH treatment showed that KSRP is required for mediating PTH-stimulated reduction in sodium/hydrogen exchanger 3 mRNA, but not Npt2a mRNA. We conclude that 1) PTH is a major regulator of both transcription and translation, and 2) KSRP binds Npt2a mRNA but its role in PTH regulation of Npt2a mRNA is not clear.

  10. Interrogation of multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) expression in human pancreatic carcinoma cells: correlation of 99mTc-Sestamibi uptake with western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Harpstrite, Scott E; Gu, Hannah; Natarajan, Radhika; Sharma, Vijay

    2014-10-01

    Histopathological studies indicate that ∼63% of pancreatic tumors express multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and its polymorphic variants. However, Pgp expression detected at the mRNA or protein level does not always correlate with functional transport activity. Because Pgp transport activity is affected by specific mutations and the phosphorylation state of the protein, altered or less active forms of Pgp may also be detected by PCR or immunohistochemistry, which do not accurately reflect the status of tumor cell resistance. To interrogate the status of the functional expression of MDR1 Pgp in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, cellular transport studies using Tc-Sestamibi were performed and correlated with western blot analysis. Biochemical transport assays in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, human epidermal carcinoma drug-sensitive KB-3-1 cells, and human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells (negative controls), and human epidermal carcinoma drug-resistant KB-8-5 cells, human breast carcinoma stably transfected with Pgp MCF-7/MDR1Pgp cells, and liver carcinoma HepG2 cells (positive controls) were performed. Protein levels were determined using a monoclonal antibody C219. Tc-Sestamibi demonstrates accumulation in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Uptake profiles are not affected by treatment with LY335979, a Pgp inhibitor, and correlate with western blot analysis. These cellular transport studies indicate an absence of Pgp at a functional level in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Because major pancreatic tumors originate from the pancreatic duct and Tc-Sestamibi undergoes a dominant hepatobiliary mode of excretion, it would not be a sensitive probe for imaging pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Following interrogation of the functional status of Pgp in other pancreatic carcinoma cells, chemotherapeutic drugs that are also MDR1 substrates could offer alternative therapeutics for treating pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

  11. SNPs at miR-155 binding sites of TYRP1 explain discrepancy between mRNA and protein and refine TYRP1 prognostic value in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    El Hajj, P; Gilot, D; Migault, M; Theunis, A; van Kempen, L C; Salés, F; Fayyad-Kazan, H; Badran, B; Larsimont, D; Awada, A; Bachelot, L; Galibert, M-D; Ghanem, G; Journe, F

    2015-01-01

    Background: We previously demonstrated an inverse correlation between tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1) mRNA expression in melanoma metastases and patient survival. However, TYRP1 protein was not detected in half of tissues expressing mRNA and did not correlate with survival. Based on a study reporting that 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of TYRP1 mRNA contains two miR-155-5p (named miR-155) binding sites exhibiting single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that promote (matched miRNA–mRNA interaction) mRNA decay or not (mismatched), we aimed to investigate the role of miR-155 in the regulation of TYRP1 mRNA expression and protein translation accounting for these SNPs. Methods: The effect of miR-155 on TYRP1 mRNA/protein expression was evaluated in two melanoma cell lines harbouring matched or mismatched miR-155–TYRP1 mRNA interaction after transfection with pre-miR-155. In parallel, 192 skin and lymph node melanoma metastases were examined for TYRP1 mRNA/protein, miR-155 and SNPs and correlated with patient survival. TYRP1 mRNA, SNPs at its 3′UTR and miR-155 were analysed by RT–qPCR, whereas TYRP1 protein was evaluated by western blot in cell lines and by immunohistochemistry in metastatic tissues. Results: The miR-155 induced a dose-dependent TYRP1 mRNA decay and hampered its translation into protein in the line with the ‘match' genotype. In melanoma metastases, TYRP1 mRNA inversely correlated with miR-155 expression but not with TYRP1 protein in the ‘match' group, whereas it positively correlated with protein but not with miR-155 in the ‘mismatch' group. Consequently, in the latter group, TYRP1 protein inversely correlated with survival. Conclusion: Polymorphisms in 3′UTR of TYRP1 mRNA can affect TYRP1 mRNA regulation by miR-155 and its subsequent translation into protein. These SNPs can render TYRP1 mRNA and protein expression nonsusceptible to miR-155 activity and disclose a prognostic value for TYRP1 protein in a subgroup of melanoma patients

  12. Design and synthesis of caged fluorescent nucleotides and application to live-cell RNA imaging.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Shuji; Kubota, Takeshi; Wang, Dan Ohtan; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Umemoto, Tadashi; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2011-12-16

    A binary photocontrolled nucleic acid probe that contains a nucleotide modified with one photolabile nitrobenzyl unit and two hybridization-sensitive thiazole orange units has been designed for area-specific fluorescence imaging of RNA in a cell. The synthesized probe emitted very weak fluorescence regardless of the presence of the complementary RNA, whereas it showed hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission at 532 nm after photoirradiation at 360 or 405 nm for uncaging. Fluorescence suppression of the caged probe was attributed to a decrease in the duplex-formation ability. Caged fluorescent nucleotides with other emission wavelengths (622 and 724 nm) were also synthesized in this study; they were uncaged by 360 nm irradiation, and emitted fluorescence in the presence of the complementary RNA. Such probes were applied to area-specific RNA imaging in a cell. Only probes in the defined irradiation area were activated by uncaging irradiation, and subnuclear mRNA diffusion in a living cell was monitored.

  13. An expanding universe of mRNA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2015-01-01

    The fate of mRNA can be regulated by internal base modifications, with the currently known modified bases being N6-methyladenosine, 5-methylcytosine, and inosine. Three new studies show that yeast and human mRNA also contain pseudouridine residues and that pseudouridylation is induced in various stress states, hinting at a new pathway for post-transcriptional control of mRNA. PMID:25372308

  14. mRNA Localization and Translational Control in Drosophila Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lasko, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Localization of an mRNA species to a particular subcellular region can complement translational control mechanisms to produce a restricted spatial distribution of the protein it encodes. mRNA localization has been studied most in asymmetric cells such as budding yeast, early embryos, and neurons, but the process is likely to be more widespread. This article reviews the current state of knowledge about the mechanisms of mRNA localization and its functions in early embryonic development, focusing on Drosophila where the relevant knowledge is most advanced. Links between mRNA localization and translational control mechanisms also are examined. PMID:22865893

  15. Smart Magnetic Nanosensors Synthesized through Layer-by-Layer Deposition of Molecular Beacons for Noninvasive and Longitudinal Monitoring of Cellular mRNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Hou, Xiaochun; Wiraja, Christian; Sun, Libo; Xu, Zhichuan J; Xu, Chenjie

    2016-03-01

    Noninvasive and longitudinal monitoring of gene expression in living cells is essential for understanding and monitoring cellular activities. Herein, a smart magnetic nanosensor is constructed for the real-time, noninvasive, and longitudinal monitoring of cellular mRNA expression through the layer-by-layer deposition of molecular beacons (MBs) and polyethylenimine on the iron oxide nanoparticles. The loading of MBs, responsible for the signal intensity and the tracking time, was easily tuned with the number of layers incorporated. The idea was first demonstrated with the magnetic nanosensors for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) mRNA, which was efficiently internalized into the cells under the influence of magnetic field. This nanosensor allowed the continuous monitoring of the cellular GAPDH mRNA expression for 1 month. Then this platform was further utilized to incorporate two kinds of MBs for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and GAPDH mRNAs, respectively. The multifunctional nanosensors permitted the simultaneous monitoring of the reference gene (GAPDH mRNA) and the early osteogenic differentiation marker (ALP mRNA) expression. When the fluorescence signal ratio between ALP mRNA MBs and GAPDH mRNA MBs was taken, the dynamic osteogenic differentiation process of MSCs was accurately monitored. PMID:26878880

  16. Smart Magnetic Nanosensors Synthesized through Layer-by-Layer Deposition of Molecular Beacons for Noninvasive and Longitudinal Monitoring of Cellular mRNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Hou, Xiaochun; Wiraja, Christian; Sun, Libo; Xu, Zhichuan J; Xu, Chenjie

    2016-03-01

    Noninvasive and longitudinal monitoring of gene expression in living cells is essential for understanding and monitoring cellular activities. Herein, a smart magnetic nanosensor is constructed for the real-time, noninvasive, and longitudinal monitoring of cellular mRNA expression through the layer-by-layer deposition of molecular beacons (MBs) and polyethylenimine on the iron oxide nanoparticles. The loading of MBs, responsible for the signal intensity and the tracking time, was easily tuned with the number of layers incorporated. The idea was first demonstrated with the magnetic nanosensors for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) mRNA, which was efficiently internalized into the cells under the influence of magnetic field. This nanosensor allowed the continuous monitoring of the cellular GAPDH mRNA expression for 1 month. Then this platform was further utilized to incorporate two kinds of MBs for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and GAPDH mRNAs, respectively. The multifunctional nanosensors permitted the simultaneous monitoring of the reference gene (GAPDH mRNA) and the early osteogenic differentiation marker (ALP mRNA) expression. When the fluorescence signal ratio between ALP mRNA MBs and GAPDH mRNA MBs was taken, the dynamic osteogenic differentiation process of MSCs was accurately monitored.

  17. A eukaryotic-like 3′ untranslated region in Salmonella enterica hilD mRNA

    PubMed Central

    López-Garrido, Javier; Puerta-Fernández, Elena; Casadesús, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Long 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTRs) are common in eukaryotic mRNAs. In contrast, long 3′UTRs are rare in bacteria, and have not been characterized in detail. We describe a 3′UTR of 310 nucleotides in hilD mRNA, a transcript that encodes a transcriptional activator of Salmonella enterica pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). Deletion of the hilD 3′UTR increases the hilD mRNA level, suggesting that the hilD 3′UTR may play a role in hilD mRNA turnover. Cloning of the hilD 3′UTR downstream of the green fluorescent protein (gfp) gene decreases green fluorescent protein (GFP) activity in both Escherichia coli and S. enterica, indicating that the hilD 3′UTR can act as an independent module. S. enterica mutants lacking either ribonuclease E or polynucleotide phosphorylase contain similar amounts of hilD and hilD Δ3′UTR mRNAs, suggesting that the hilD 3′UTR is a target for hilD mRNA degradation by the degradosome. The hilD 3′UTR is also necessary for modulation of hilD and SPI-1 expression by the RNA chaperone Hfq. Overexpression of SPI-1 in the absence of the hilD 3′UTR retards Salmonella growth and causes uncontrolled invasion of epithelial cells. Based on these observations, we propose that the S. enterica hilD 3′UTR is a cis-acting element that contributes to cellular homeostasis by promoting hilD mRNA turnover. PMID:24682814

  18. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  19. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  20. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  1. Fluorescent discharge lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, E.; Otsuka, H.; Nomi, K.; Honmo, I.

    1982-01-01

    A rapidly illuminating fluorescent lamp 1,200 mm long and 32.5 mm in diameter with an interior conducting strip which is compatible with conventional fixtures and ballasts is described. The fluorescent lamp is composed of a linear glass tube, electrodes sealed at both ends, mercury and raregas sealed in the glass tube, a fluorescent substance clad on the inner walls of the glass tube, and a clad conducting strip extending the entire length of the glass tube in the axial direction on the inner surface of the tube.

  2. Super resolution fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo; Bates, Mark; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2010-01-01

    Achieving a spatial resolution that is not limited by the diffraction of light, recent developments of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques allow the observation of many biological structures not resolvable in conventional fluorescence microscopy. New advances in these techniques now give them the ability to image three-dimensional (3D) structures, measure interactions by multicolor colocalization, and record dynamic processes in living cells at the nanometer scale. It is anticipated that super-resolution fluorescence microscopy will become a widely used tool for cell and tissue imaging to provide previously unobserved details of biological structures and processes. PMID:19489737

  3. Second harmonic super-resolution microscopy for quantification of mRNA at single copy sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Cho, Il-Hoon; Cui, Yi; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-12-23

    Cell-specific information on the quantity and localization of key mRNAs at single copy sensitivity in single cells is critical for evaluating basic cellular process, disease risk, and efficacy of therapy. Quantification of overexpressed mRNAs beyond the diffraction limit is constrained by the optical property of the probes and microscopy techniques. In this report, nanosized barium titanium oxide (BaTiO3, BTO) crystals were utilized as probes for mRNA quantification by a second harmonic super-resolution microscopy (SHaSM). The SHaSM was able to detect a single copy of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) mRNA at a resolution of 55.6 nm with the ability to resolve multiple mRNA copies in a diffraction-limited spot. Her2 mRNA per cell was counted in SK-BR-3, MCF-7, and HeLa cell lines as 595±79.1, 38.9±8.26, and 1.5±2.8, respectively. Our single-cell quantification results were validated with the fluorescence in situ hybridization studies and quantitative PCR, showing better specificity and selectivity over current single-molecule approaches for transcript detection. The SHaSM is expected to have an upper limit of resolving ∼10(4) transcripts in a single cell with the ability to monitor intracellular transcriptional dynamics at video rate. The developed approach has strong potential in clinical research and in the early diagnosis of life-threatening diseases such as cancer.

  4. Candida, fluorescent stain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This microscopic film shows a fluorescent stain of Candida. Candida is a yeast (fungus) that causes mild disease, but in immunocompromised individuals it may cause life-threatening illness. (Image ...

  5. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Sun, Yiru; Giebink, Noel; Thompson, Mark E.

    2009-01-06

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  6. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen; Sun, Yiru; Giebink, Noel; Thompson, Mark E.

    2010-08-03

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  7. Atmospheric Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K.; Sokolsky, P.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric fluorescence from these showers. Accurate knowledge of the conversion from atmospheric fluorescence to energy loss by ionizing particles in the atmosphere is key to this technique. In this paper we discuss a small balloon-borne instrument to make the first in situ measurements versus altitude of the atmospheric fluorescence yield. The instrument can also be used in the lab to investigate the dependence of the fluorescence yield in air on temperature, pressure and the concentrations of other gases that present in the atmosphere. The results can be used to explore environmental effects on and improve the accuracy of cosmic ray energy measurements for existing ground-based experiments and future space-based experiments.

  8. Fluorescent eye test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The fluorescent eye test is useful in determining if there is a scratch or other problem with the surface ... has thoroughly covered the eye a cobalt blue light is then directed on the eye. The light ...

  9. Effects of the pesticides prochloraz and methiocarb on human estrogen receptor alpha and beta mRNA levels analyzed by on-line RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Hofmeister, M V; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, E C

    2004-08-01

    Exposure to endocrine disrupters such as dioxins, PCBs and certain pesticides are suspected to affect human reproductive health. We have analyzed the effect of the currently used pesticides prochloraz and methiocarb on the estrogen receptor (ER)alpha and beta mRNA levels in parallel with the natural ligand, 17beta-estradiol (E2). Using the highly sensitive on-line RT-PCR technique we were able to quantify the ERalpha and ERbeta mRNA levels in the human breast cancer cell line, MCF7-BUS. Upon exposure with E2 or prochloraz a down regulation of ERalpha and ERbeta mRNAs was observed after 48 h of treatment. Co-treatment with the ER antagonist ICI 182,780 abolished these mRNA down regulations. Western blot analyses elicited a decreased ER protein level after 3 h of exposure with prochloraz but after 24 h the ERalpha protein level had recovered to basal level. Methiocarb exposure had no effect on the ERalpha mRNA level, whereas an increase in the ERbeta mRNA level was observed after 3 h of exposure. Our study demonstrates that like E2, prochloraz had the potential to down regulate the expression of ERalpha and ERbeta mRNAs as well as the ERalpha protein level in MCF7-BUS cells.

  10. Fluorescent Applications to Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Achari, Aniruddha

    2006-01-01

    By covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or equal to 1%, of a macromolecule with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification, and tests with model proteins have shown that labeling u to 5 percent of the protein molecules does not affect the X-ray data quality obtained . The presence of the trace fluorescent label gives a number of advantages. Since the label is covalently attached to the protein molecules, it "tracks" the protein s response to the crystallization conditions. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination crystals show up as bright objects against a darker background. Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, do not show up under fluorescent illumination. Crystals have the highest protein concentration and are readily observed against less bright precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries as the protein or protein structures is all that shows up. Fluorescence intensity is a faster search parameter, whether visually or by automated methods, than looking for crystalline features. Preliminary tests, using model proteins, indicates that we can use high fluorescence intensity regions, in the absence of clear crystalline features or "hits", as a means for determining potential lead conditions. A working hypothesis is that more rapid amorphous precipitation kinetics may overwhelm and trap more slowly formed ordered assemblies, which subsequently show up as regions of brighter fluorescence intensity. Experiments are now being carried out to test this approach using a wider range, of proteins. The trace fluorescently labeled crystals will also

  11. Epi-Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Donna J.; Brown, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    Epi-fluorescence microscopy is available in most life sciences research laboratories, and when optimized can be a central laboratory tool. In this chapter, the epi-fluorescence light path is introduced and the various components are discussed in detail. Recommendations are made for incident lamp light sources, excitation and emission filters, dichroic mirrors, objective lenses, and charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras in order to obtain the most sensitive epi-fluorescence microscope. The even illumination of metal-halide lamps combined with new “hard” coated filters and mirrors, a high resolution monochrome CCD camera, and a high NA objective lens are all recommended for high resolution and high sensitivity fluorescence imaging. Recommendations are also made for multicolor imaging with the use of monochrome cameras, motorized filter turrets, individual filter cubes, and corresponding dyes that are the best choice for sensitive, high resolution multicolor imaging. Images should be collected using Nyquist sampling and should be corrected for background intensity contributions and nonuniform illumination across the field of view. Photostable fluorescent probes and proteins that absorb a lot of light (i.e., high extinction co-efficients) and generate a lot of fluorescence signal (i.e., high quantum yields) are optimal. A neuronal immune-fluorescence labeling protocol is also presented. Finally, in order to maximize the utility of sensitive wide-field microscopes and generate the highest resolution images with high signal-to-noise, advice for combining wide-field epi-fluorescence imaging with restorative image deconvolution is presented. PMID:23026996

  12. Differences in correlation of mRNA gene expression in mice sensitive and resistant to radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, C.J.; Piedboeuf, B.; Finkelstein, J.N.; Baggs, R.; Rubin, P.

    1995-05-01

    Fibrosis, characterized by the accumulation of collagen, is a late result of thoracic irradiation. The purpose of this study was to determine if extracellular matrix protein and transforming growth factor {beta} mRNA expression are altered late in the course of pulmonary fibrosis after irradiation, and then to determine if these changes differ between two strains of mice which vary in their sensitivity to radiation. Radiation-sensitive (C57BL/6) and radiation-resistant (C3H/HeJ) mice were irradiated with a single dose of 5 or 12.5 Gy to the thorax. Total lung RNA was prepared and immobilized by Northern and slot blotting and hybridized with radiolabeled cDNA probes for collagens I, III and IV, fibronectin, and transforming growth factor {beta}{sub 1} and {beta}{sub 3}. Autoradiographic data were quantified by video densitometry and results normalized to a control probe encoding for glyceralde-hyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Alterations in mRNA abundance were observed in the sensitive mice at all times, while levels in the resistant mice were unaffected until 26 weeks after irradiation. The relationship between extracellular matrix protein per se and increased mRNA abundance suggests that late matrix protein accumulation may be a function of gene expression. Differences in levels of transforming growth factor {beta}mRNA may lead to strain-dependent variation in fibrotic response and may also contribute to the radiation-induced component of pulmonary fibrosis. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  13. In situ assessment of mRNA accessibility in heterogeneous tissue samples using elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1 alpha).

    PubMed

    Gruber, A D; Levine, R A

    1997-05-01

    Elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) is an evolutionarily highly conserved universal cofactor of protein synthesis in all living cells. In this study, its use as a positive control in situ hybridization assays for specific detection of mRNA sequences was evaluated. Northern blot analysis of various non-neoplastic and neoplastic cultured cells of different stages of confluence, cell shape, and cell cycle status revealed that EF-1 alpha had a lower and more homogeneous expression than did beta-actin. In situ hybridization assays using digoxigenin-labeled riboprobes for the detection of EF-1 alpha mRNA in routinely formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections showed that EF-1 alpha is a suitable positive control in all types of cells. However, variation of protease pretreatments demonstrated distinct and sometimes mutually exclusive digestion conditions for different cell types within the same tissue sample. Our results indicate that detection of EF-1 alpha mRNA is an appropriate internal standard for in situ hybridization assays and that it is useful to control artifacts such as false negatives caused by inappropriate protease pretreatments. The observed variability of optimal protease pretreatments for different cell types within the same tissue section strengthens the importance of a positive control in in situ hybridization assays.

  14. Salt-induction of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase mRNA, protein, and enzymatic activity in sugar beet. [Beta vulgaris L

    SciTech Connect

    McCue, K.F.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    In Chenopodiaceae such as sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.), glycine betaine (betaine) accumulates in response to drought or salinity stress and functions in the cytoplasm as a compatible osmolyte. The last enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway, betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH), increases as much as 4-fold in response to rising salinity in the external medium. This increase is accompanied by an increase in both protein and mRNA levels. The steady state increases in BADH were examined at a series of NaCl concentrations from 100 to 500 mM NaCl. BADH protein levels were examined by native PAGE, and by western blot analysis using antibodies raised against BADH purified from spinach. mRNA levels were examined by northern plot analysis of total RNA isolated from the leaves and hybridized with a sugar beet BADH cDNA clone. The time course for BADH mRNA induction was determined in a salt shock experiment utilizing 400 mM NaCl added to the external growth medium. Disappearance of BADH was examined in a salt relief experiment using plants step-wise salinized to 500 mM NaCl and then returned to 0 mM NaCl.

  15. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay factor Upf2 exists in both the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Tatsuno, Takanori; Nakamura, Yuka; Ma, Shaofu; Tomosugi, Naohisa; Ishigaki, Yasuhito

    2016-07-01

    Upf2 protein predominantly localizes to the cytoplasmic fraction, and binds to the exon junction complex (EJC) on spliced mRNA. The present study aimed to determine the cellular site where the interaction between Upf2 and EJC occurs. First, the cell lysate was fractionated into the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm, and western blotting to detect levels of Upf2 protein was performed. Upf2 was clearly detected in the cytoplasm and in the nucleoplasm. Secondly, immunostaining was performed, and the majority of Upf2 was detected in the cytoplasmic perinuclear region; a small quantity of Upf2 was detected in the intranuclear region. RNase treatment of the cells reduced the Upf2 immunostained signal. The immunopurified fractions containing nuclear and cytoplasmic Upf2 also contained one of the EJC core factors, RBM8A. These results implied the existence of Upf2 in the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm, and it appeared to be involved in the construction of the mRNA complex. In order to verify the construction of Upf2‑binding EJC in the nucleoplasm, an in situ proximity ligation assay was performed with anti‑Upf2 and anti‑RBM8A antibodies. These results demonstrated that their interaction occurred not only in the cytoplasmic region, but also in the intranuclear region. Taken together, these results suggested that Upf2 combines with EJC in both the cytoplasmic and the intranuclear fractions, and that it is involved in mRNA metabolism in human cells. PMID:27221324

  16. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay factor Upf2 exists in both the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    TATSUNO, TAKANORI; NAKAMURA, YUKA; MA, SHAOFU; TOMOSUGI, NAOHISA; ISHIGAKI, YASUHITO

    2016-01-01

    Upf2 protein predominantly localizes to the cytoplasmic fraction, and binds to the exon junction complex (EJC) on spliced mRNA. The present study aimed to determine the cellular site where the interaction between Upf2 and EJC occurs. First, the cell lysate was fractionated into the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm, and western blotting to detect levels of Upf2 protein was performed. Upf2 was clearly detected in the cytoplasm and in the nucleoplasm. Secondly, immunostaining was performed, and the majority of Upf2 was detected in the cytoplasmic perinuclear region; a small quantity of Upf2 was detected in the intranuclear region. RNase treatment of the cells reduced the Upf2 immunostained signal. The immune-purified fractions containing nuclear and cytoplasmic Upf2 also contained one of the EJC core factors, RBM8A. These results implied the existence of Upf2 in the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm, and it appeared to be involved in the construction of the mRNA complex. In order to verify the construction of Upf2-binding EJC in the nucleoplasm, an in situ proximity ligation assay was performed with anti-Upf2 and anti-RBM8A antibodies. These results demonstrated that their interaction occurred not only in the cytoplasmic region, but also in the intranuclear region. Taken together, these results suggested that Upf2 combines with EJC in both the cytoplasmic and the intranuclear fractions, and that it is involved in mRNA metabolism in human cells. PMID:27221324

  17. Western blot analysis to illustrate relative control levels of the lac and ara promoters in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Brent L; Willis, Van C; Lin, Chin-Yo

    2007-03-01

    The lactose operon and its control is a fundamental transcriptional regulatory concept presented in introductory and many advanced molecular biology courses. Much is known about the positive and negative control mechanisms that govern levels of expression of this operon. One basic principle that is taught about the lac operon is that it is "leaky," meaning that the transcriptional control of the operon is not 100% efficient and that in wild-type cells, transcription from the promoter is never completely "off," but there is always some basal transcription. In contrast, the arabinose operon is often used as an example of a tightly controlled operon, and transcription from the ara promoter is very low in the absence of inducer. The relative levels of control of these two operons can be illustrated using Western blots of proteins expressed in the presence and absence of the appropriate inducers and antibodies against the gene products. Different times of growth and the addition of inducer can also be examined. The results are very dramatic and help to reinforce the principles of promoter control. PMID:21591073

  18. Simultaneous direct identification of genital microorganisms in voided urine using multiplex PCR-based reverse line blot assays.

    PubMed

    McKechnie, Michelle L; Kong, Fanrong; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to develop and evaluate sensitive methods that would allow simultaneous direct identification of multiple potential pathogens in clinical specimens for diagnosis and epidemiological studies, using a multiplex PCR-based reverse line blot assay. We have previously developed assays suitable for detection of bacterial respiratory and systemic pathogens. In this chapter we describe, in detail, a method developed to identify 14 genital microorganisms, for use in epidemiological studies of genital infection or colonization, using first voided urine specimens. The 14 urogenital pathogens or putative pathogens studied were Trichomonas vaginalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, N. meningitidis, Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma parvum, U. urealyticum, Mycoplasma hominis, M. genitalium, Gardnerella vaginalis, Haemophilus influenzae, herpes simplex virus 1 and 2, and adenovirus. Two species-specific primer pairs and probes were designed for each target. The method was validated using a reference strain or a well-characterized clinical isolate of each target organism. In a clinical study among men attending sexual health clinics in Sydney, we used the assay to compare rates of detection of the 14 organisms in men with urethritis with those in asymptomatic controls and found the method to be sensitive, specific, convenient, and relatively inexpensive.

  19. High resolution autoantibody detection by optimized protein G-horseradish peroxidase immunostaining in a western blotting assay.

    PubMed

    Hu, G R; Harrop, P; Warlow, R S; Gacis, M L; Walls, R S

    1997-03-28

    We report a procedure for optimisation of Western blotting using protein G-horseradish peroxidase (protein G-HRP) which avoids the false positive reactions often caused by second antibodies and increases the detection of autoantibodies by protein G conjugate. A number of modifications were investigated. Higher concentrations of serum and protein G-HRP at 1:5 to 1:10 and 1:100, respectively, increased the detection to the same order as that obtained with second antibody systems and gold staining with silver enhancement. The role of various detergents in the procedure was established. 3-[(3-Cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) in incubation with protein G-HRP increased the binding between protein G and immunoglobulin G. Addition of Tween-20 for blocking produced little background so that protein blockers could be avoided. Prolonged incubation with serum increased markedly the sensitivity of the procedure when compared with the recommended 2 h incubation period. Polyvinylidene difluoride membrane provided better transfer effect, lower background and higher mechanical strength than nitrocellulose membrane. The utilization of only one antibody-specific ligand increased the simplicity, reliability, economy, efficiency and specificity of the method. These modifications make this method significantly better for detection and screening for autoantibodies.

  20. A Southern Blot Assay for Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Covalently Closed Circular DNA from Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Dawei; Nie, Hui; Yan, Ran; Guo, Ju-Tao; Block, Timothy M.; Guo, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B remains a substantial public health burden affecting approximately 350 million people worldwide, causing cirrhosis and liver cancer, and about 1 million people die each year from hepatitis B and its complications. Hepatitis B is caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. As an essential component of the viral life cycle, HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) is synthesized and maintained at low copy numbers in the nucleus of infected hepatocytes, and serves as the transcription template for all viral RNAs. Therefore, cccDNA is responsible for the establishment of viral infection and persistence. The presence and longevity of cccDNA may also explain the limitations of current antiviral therapy for hepatitis B. Thus, understanding the mechanisms underlying cccDNA formation and regulation is critical in understanding the HBV pathogenesis and finding a cure for hepatitis B. Here we describe a protocol for HBV cccDNA extraction and detection in detail. The procedure includes two major steps: (1) HBV cccDNA extraction by Hirt protein-free DNA extraction method and (2) HBV cccDNA detection by Southern blot analysis. The method is straightforward and reliable for cccDNA assay with cell culture samples, and it is useful for both HBV molecular biology and antiviral research. PMID:23821267

  1. [Establishment of a method for HLA-DRB genotyping in cord blood by reverse dot-blot hybridization technique].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Ning; Liao, Can; Tang, Xue-Wei; Li, Yan; Xie, Xing-Mei; Zeng, Rui-Ping

    2002-04-01

    The HLA system was discovered by virtue of the fact that it was polymorphic. The impetus for its discovery was the search for polymorphic antigens to match for transplantation, by analogy with the human red cell blood groups. The most usually DNA method of HLA typing is sequence specific oligonucleotides (SSO) and PCR sequence specific primers (SSP). SSO technique is perfectly suited for analyzing large number of samples, it is not suitable for individual or small numbers. The SSP method is ideal for typing individual samples, but it is costly and requires high capacity thermal cycles for larger numbers of samples. To set up a simple, quick, cheap and high resolution DNA method, were collected sixty-three cord blood samples from Guangzhou Cord Blood Bank, got DNA from blood by the traditional guanidine hydrochloride distillation method. Each sample was simultaneously typed by SSOP, PCR-SSP and reverse dot-blot hybridization (RDB) methods. All of typed is success. The results of three DNA methods are consistent each other. 60 HLA-DRB1 alleles could be accurately distinguished with the RDB method. Our results show that RDB method is a simple, quick, cheap and high resolution method for HLA-DRB types. It can be used in any HLA typing.

  2. A Modified Quantum Dot-Based Dot Blot Assay for Rapid Detection of Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Xiao, Jingfan; Wang, Qiyao; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2016-08-28

    Vibrio anguillarum, a devastating pathogen causing vibriosis among marine fish, is prevailing in worldwide fishery industries and accounts for grievous economic losses. Therefore, a rapid on-site detection and diagnostic technique for this pathogen is in urgent need. In this study, two mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against V. anguillarum, 6B3-C5 and 8G3-B5, were generated by using hybridoma technology and their isotypes were characterized. MAb 6B3-C5 was chosen as the detector antibody and conjugated with quantum dots. Based on MAb 6B3- C5 labeled with quantum dots, a modified dot blot assay was developed for the on-site determination of V. anguillarum. It was found that the method had no cross-reactivity with other than V. anguillarum bacteria. The detection limit (LOD) for V. anguillarum was 1 × 10(3) CFU/ml in cultured bacterial suspension samples, which was a 100-fold higher sensitivity than the reported colloidal gold immunochromatographic test strip. When V. anguillarum was mixed with turbot tissue homogenates, the LOD was 1 × 10(3) CFU/ml, suggesting that tissue homogenates did not influence the detection capabilities. Preenrichment with the tissue homogenates for 12 h could raise the LOD up to 1 × 10(2) CFU/ml, confirming the reliability of the method.

  3. Development of rapid, sensitive and non-radioactive tissue-blot diagnostic method for the detection of citrus greening.

    PubMed

    Nageswara-Rao, Madhugiri; Miyata, Shin-Ichi; Ghosh, Dilip; Irey, Mike; Garnsey, Stephen M; Gowda, Siddarame

    2013-01-01

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB or citrus greening) is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus worldwide. The disease is caused by Gram-negative, phloem-limited α-proteobacterium, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', vectored by the psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama. Citrus plants infected by the HLB bacterium may not show visible symptoms sometimes for years following infection and non-uniform distribution within the tree makes the detection of the pathogen very difficult. Efficient management of HLB disease requires rapid and sensitive detection early in the infection followed by eradication of the source of pathogen and the vector. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based method is most commonly employed for screening the infected/suspected HLB plants and psyllids. This is time consuming, cumbersome and not practical for screening large number of samples in the field. To overcome this, we developed a simple, sensitive, non-radioactive, tissue-blot diagnostic method for early detection and screening of HLB disease. Digoxigenin labeled molecular probes specific to 'Ca. L. asiaticus' nucleotide sequences have been developed and used for the detection of the pathogen of the HLB disease. The copy number of the target genes was also assessed using real-time PCR experiments and the optimized real-time PCR protocol allowed positive 'Ca. L. asiaticus' detection in citrus samples infected with 'Ca. L. asiaticus' bacterium.

  4. Simultaneous direct identification of genital microorganisms in voided urine using multiplex PCR-based reverse line blot assays.

    PubMed

    McKechnie, Michelle L; Kong, Fanrong; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to develop and evaluate sensitive methods that would allow simultaneous direct identification of multiple potential pathogens in clinical specimens for diagnosis and epidemiological studies, using a multiplex PCR-based reverse line blot assay. We have previously developed assays suitable for detection of bacterial respiratory and systemic pathogens. In this chapter we describe, in detail, a method developed to identify 14 genital microorganisms, for use in epidemiological studies of genital infection or colonization, using first voided urine specimens. The 14 urogenital pathogens or putative pathogens studied were Trichomonas vaginalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, N. meningitidis, Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma parvum, U. urealyticum, Mycoplasma hominis, M. genitalium, Gardnerella vaginalis, Haemophilus influenzae, herpes simplex virus 1 and 2, and adenovirus. Two species-specific primer pairs and probes were designed for each target. The method was validated using a reference strain or a well-characterized clinical isolate of each target organism. In a clinical study among men attending sexual health clinics in Sydney, we used the assay to compare rates of detection of the 14 organisms in men with urethritis with those in asymptomatic controls and found the method to be sensitive, specific, convenient, and relatively inexpensive. PMID:23104293

  5. A Modified Quantum Dot-Based Dot Blot Assay for Rapid Detection of Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Xiao, Jingfan; Wang, Qiyao; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2016-08-28

    Vibrio anguillarum, a devastating pathogen causing vibriosis among marine fish, is prevailing in worldwide fishery industries and accounts for grievous economic losses. Therefore, a rapid on-site detection and diagnostic technique for this pathogen is in urgent need. In this study, two mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against V. anguillarum, 6B3-C5 and 8G3-B5, were generated by using hybridoma technology and their isotypes were characterized. MAb 6B3-C5 was chosen as the detector antibody and conjugated with quantum dots. Based on MAb 6B3- C5 labeled with quantum dots, a modified dot blot assay was developed for the on-site determination of V. anguillarum. It was found that the method had no cross-reactivity with other than V. anguillarum bacteria. The detection limit (LOD) for V. anguillarum was 1 × 10(3) CFU/ml in cultured bacterial suspension samples, which was a 100-fold higher sensitivity than the reported colloidal gold immunochromatographic test strip. When V. anguillarum was mixed with turbot tissue homogenates, the LOD was 1 × 10(3) CFU/ml, suggesting that tissue homogenates did not influence the detection capabilities. Preenrichment with the tissue homogenates for 12 h could raise the LOD up to 1 × 10(2) CFU/ml, confirming the reliability of the method. PMID:27116991

  6. A southern blot assay for detection of hepatitis B virus covalently closed circular DNA from cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Cai, Dawei; Nie, Hui; Yan, Ran; Guo, Ju-Tao; Block, Timothy M; Guo, Haitao

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B remains a substantial public health burden affecting approximately 350 million people worldwide, causing cirrhosis and liver cancer, and about 1 million people die each year from hepatitis B and its complications. Hepatitis B is caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. As an essential component of the viral life cycle, HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) is synthesized and maintained at low copy numbers in the nucleus of infected hepatocytes, and serves as the transcription template for all viral RNAs. Therefore, cccDNA is responsible for the establishment of viral infection and persistence. The presence and longevity of cccDNA may also explain the limitations of current antiviral therapy for hepatitis B. Thus, understanding the mechanisms underlying cccDNA formation and regulation is critical in understanding the HBV pathogenesis and finding a cure for hepatitis B. Here we describe a protocol for HBV cccDNA extraction and detection in detail. The procedure includes two major steps: (1) HBV cccDNA extraction by Hirt protein-free DNA extraction method and (2) HBV cccDNA detection by Southern blot analysis. The method is straightforward and reliable for cccDNA assay with cell culture samples, and it is useful for both HBV molecular biology and antiviral research. PMID:23821267

  7. Far-western blotting as a solution to the non-specificity of the anti-erythropoietin receptor antibody

    PubMed Central

    Fecková, Barbora; Kimáková, Patrícia; Ilkovičová, Lenka; Szentpéteriová, Erika; Debeljak, Nataša; Solárová, Zuzana; Sačková, Veronika; Šemeláková, Martina; Bhide, Mangesh; Solár, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is a member of the cytokine receptor family. The interaction between erythropoietin (Epo) and EpoR is important for the production and maturation of erythroid cells, resulting in the stimulation of hematopoiesis. The fact that EpoR was also detected in neoplastic cells has opened the question about the relevance of anemia treatment with recombinant Epo in cancer patients. Numerous studies have reported pro-stimulating and anti-apoptotic effects of Epo in cancer cells, thus demonstrating EpoR functionality in these cells. By contrast, a previous study claims the absence of EpoR in tumor cells. This apparent discrepancy is based, according to certain authors, on the use of non-specific anti-EpoR antibodies. With the aim of bypassing the direct detection of EpoR with an anti-EpoR antibody, the present authors propose a far-western blot methodology, which in addition, confirms the interaction of Epo with EpoR. Applying this technique, the presence of EpoR and its interaction with Epo in human ovarian adenocarcinoma A2780 and normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells was confirmed. Furthermore, modified immunoprecipitation of EpoR followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis confirmed a 57 kDa protein as a human Epo-interacting protein in both cell lines. PMID:27446474

  8. Functional Integration of mRNA Translational Control Programs.

    PubMed

    MacNicol, Melanie C; Cragle, Chad E; Arumugam, Karthik; Fosso, Bruno; Pesole, Graziano; MacNicol, Angus M

    2015-01-01

    Regulated mRNA translation plays a key role in control of cell cycle progression in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, including in the self-renewal and survival of stem cells and cancer stem cells. While targeting mRNA translation presents an attractive strategy for control of aberrant cell cycle progression, mRNA translation is an underdeveloped therapeutic target. Regulated mRNAs are typically controlled through interaction with multiple RNA binding proteins (RBPs) but the mechanisms by which the functions of distinct RBPs bound to a common target mRNA are coordinated are poorly understood. The challenge now is to gain insight into these mechanisms of coordination and to identify the molecular mediators that integrate multiple, often conflicting, inputs. A first step includes the identification of altered mRNA ribonucleoprotein complex components that assemble on mRNAs bound by multiple, distinct RBPs compared to those recruited by individual RBPs. This review builds upon our knowledge of combinatorial control of mRNA translation during the maturation of oocytes from Xenopus laevis, to address molecular strategies that may mediate RBP diplomacy and conflict resolution for coordinated control of mRNA translational output. Continued study of regulated ribonucleoprotein complex dynamics promises valuable new insights into mRNA translational control and may suggest novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of disease. PMID:26197342

  9. Sodium Channel Inhibitors Reduce DMPK mRNA and Protein.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, Luke; O'Reilly, Sean; Hadwen, Jeremiah; Tasnim, Nafisa; MacKenzie, Alex; Farooq, Faraz

    2015-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by an expanded trinucleotide (CTG)n tract in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene. This results in the aggregation of an expanded mRNA forming toxic intranuclear foci which sequester splicing factors. We believe down-regulation of DMPK mRNA represents a potential, and as yet unexplored, DM1 therapeutic avenue. Consequently, a computational screen for agents which down-regulate DMPK mRNA was undertaken, unexpectedly identifying the sodium channel blockers mexiletine, prilocaine, procainamide, and sparteine as effective suppressors of DMPK mRNA. Analysis of DMPK mRNA in C2C12 myoblasts following treatment with these agents revealed a reduction in the mRNA levels. In vivo analysis of CD1 mice also showed DMPK mRNA and protein down-regulation. The role of DMPK mRNA suppression in the documented efficacy of this class of compounds in DM1 is worthy of further investigation. PMID:26011798

  10. Functional Integration of mRNA Translational Control Programs.

    PubMed

    MacNicol, Melanie C; Cragle, Chad E; Arumugam, Karthik; Fosso, Bruno; Pesole, Graziano; MacNicol, Angus M

    2015-01-01

    Regulated mRNA translation plays a key role in control of cell cycle progression in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, including in the self-renewal and survival of stem cells and cancer stem cells. While targeting mRNA translation presents an attractive strategy for control of aberrant cell cycle progression, mRNA translation is an underdeveloped therapeutic target. Regulated mRNAs are typically controlled through interaction with multiple RNA binding proteins (RBPs) but the mechanisms by which the functions of distinct RBPs bound to a common target mRNA are coordinated are poorly understood. The challenge now is to gain insight into these mechanisms of coordination and to identify the molecular mediators that integrate multiple, often conflicting, inputs. A first step includes the identification of altered mRNA ribonucleoprotein complex components that assemble on mRNAs bound by multiple, distinct RBPs compared to those recruited by individual RBPs. This review builds upon our knowledge of combinatorial control of mRNA translation during the maturation of oocytes from Xenopus laevis, to address molecular strategies that may mediate RBP diplomacy and conflict resolution for coordinated control of mRNA translational output. Continued study of regulated ribonucleoprotein complex dynamics promises valuable new insights into mRNA translational control and may suggest novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of disease.

  11. Clinical performance of multiplex high-risk e6 mrna expression in comparison with hpv dna subtypes for the identification of women at risk of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chih-Ming; Pan, Kui-You; Chen, Yun-Yuan; Huang, Chia-Yen; Chen, Yu-Li; Chang, Shwu-Fen

    2015-08-01

    We compared multiplex E6 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) tests using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (PCR) with human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA subtypes using a MY11/GP6+ PCR-based reverse-blot assay to identify cervical intraepithelial neoplasias of grade 2 or worse (CIN2+). In total, 684 women were studied, of whom 377 (55%) were diagnosed with CIN2+ histologically. The specificity of HPV mRNA to predict histological CIN2+ was higher than that of HPV DNA (81.3% vs. 44.2%). The odds ratios (ORs) to predict histological CIN2+ in women with positive for type 16, 18, 31, and 45 E6 mRNA or by HPV DNA detection were 7.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.9-13.1) and 2.5 (95%CI 1.9-3.5), respectively, compared to those with negative for E6 mRNA or HPV DNA. The OR to predict histological CIN2+ in women with a cytological grade mRNA was 9.7 (95%CI 3.2-29.2), compared to those with a cytological grade mRNA (OR = 1), those with a cytological grade CIN2+, and negative for mRNA (OR = 6.9, 95%CI 4.4-10.8), and those with a cytological grade CIN2+ and positive for mRNA (OR = 28.0, 95%CI 9.8-79.6). As a HPV DNA positive triage, the OR to predict histological CIN2+ in women with a cytological grade mRNA was higher than those with negative for mRNA (OR:12.8 [95%CI 3.6-5.4] vs. OR:1.6 [95%CI 0.9-2.9]). In conclusion, multiplex HPV E6 mRNA detection can be used as a triage for women with cytological grade

  12. Clinical performance of multiplex high-risk e6 mrna expression in comparison with hpv dna subtypes for the identification of women at risk of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chih-Ming; Pan, Kui-You; Chen, Yun-Yuan; Huang, Chia-Yen; Chen, Yu-Li; Chang, Shwu-Fen

    2015-08-01

    We compared multiplex E6 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) tests using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (PCR) with human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA subtypes using a MY11/GP6+ PCR-based reverse-blot assay to identify cervical intraepithelial neoplasias of grade 2 or worse (CIN2+). In total, 684 women were studied, of whom 377 (55%) were diagnosed with CIN2+ histologically. The specificity of HPV mRNA to predict histological CIN2+ was higher than that of HPV DNA (81.3% vs. 44.2%). The odds ratios (ORs) to predict histological CIN2+ in women with positive for type 16, 18, 31, and 45 E6 mRNA or by HPV DNA detection were 7.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.9-13.1) and 2.5 (95%CI 1.9-3.5), respectively, compared to those with negative for E6 mRNA or HPV DNA. The OR to predict histological CIN2+ in women with a cytological grade mRNA was 9.7 (95%CI 3.2-29.2), compared to those with a cytological grade mRNA (OR = 1), those with a cytological grade CIN2+, and negative for mRNA (OR = 6.9, 95%CI 4.4-10.8), and those with a cytological grade CIN2+ and positive for mRNA (OR = 28.0, 95%CI 9.8-79.6). As a HPV DNA positive triage, the OR to predict histological CIN2+ in women with a cytological grade mRNA was higher than those with negative for mRNA (OR:12.8 [95%CI 3.6-5.4] vs. OR:1.6 [95%CI 0.9-2.9]). In conclusion, multiplex HPV E6 mRNA detection can be used as a triage for women with cytological grade

  13. Differential expression of melanopsin mRNA and protein in Brown Norwegian rats.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Jens; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Melanopsin is expressed in a subpopulation of retinal ganglion cells rendering these cells intrinsically photosensitive (ipRGCs). The ipRGCs are the primary RGCs mediating light entrainment of the circadian clock and control of the pupillary light reflex, light regulated melatonin secretion and negative masking behaviour. Previous studies have demonstrated that melanopsin expression in albino rats is regulated by light and darkness. The present study was undertaken to study the influence of light and darkness during the circadian day and after extended periods of constant light and darkness on melanopsin expression in the pigmented retina of the Brown Norwegian rat (Rattus norvegicus). The diurnal and circadian expressions were examined in retinal extracts from rats euthanized every 4 h during a 24 h light/dark (LD) and a 24 h dark cycle (DD) using quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting. To study whether light regulates melanopsin expression, rats were sacrificed after being placed in either constant light (LL) or darkness for 3 or 21 d. Flat mount retinas from animals kept during either LL or DD were also examined by immunohistochemistry. Melanopsin mRNA expression displayed a significant rhythmic change during the LD cycle with peak expression around dusk and nadir at dawn. Melanopsin protein also changed over the LD cycle with peak expression at the end of the night and nadir at dusk. Rhythmic expression of melanopsin mRNA but not melanopsin protein was found in constant darkness. After 3 or 21 d in either LL or DD melanopsin mRNA expression was unaltered. Melanopsin protein was at the same high level after 3 and 21 d in DD, whereas a significant decrease was found after prolonging the light period for 3 or 21 d. The change in melanopsin protein was primarily due to change in immunoreactivity in the dendritic processes. In conclusion we found that light and darkness are important for regulation of melanopsin protein expression whereas input from a

  14. Probing dimensionality beyond the linear sequence of mRNA.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Cristian; Ignatova, Zoya

    2016-05-01

    mRNA is a nexus entity between DNA and translating ribosomes. Recent developments in deep sequencing technologies coupled with structural probing have revealed new insights beyond the classic role of mRNA and place it more centrally as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation, cellular localization, and mRNA degradation. Here, we highlight emerging approaches to probe mRNA secondary structure on a global transcriptome-wide level and compare their potential and resolution. Combined approaches deliver a richer and more complex picture. While our understanding on the effect of secondary structure for various cellular processes is quite advanced, the next challenge is to unravel more complex mRNA architectures and tertiary interactions. PMID:26650615

  15. Dysregulation of carcinoembryonic antigen group members CGM2, CD66a (biliary glycoprotein), and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen in colorectal carcinomas. Comparative analysis by northern blot and in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Nollau, P.; Prall, F.; Helmchen, U.; Wagener, C.; Neumaier, M.

    1997-01-01

    Genes coding for CD66a (biliary glycoprotein), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) group member 2 (CGM2), and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) are members of the human CEA gene subgroup. We investigated a series of 11 colorectal carcinomas by Northern blot and isotopic in situ hybridization (ISH), demonstrating underexpression of CD66a and CGM2 in the majority of the carcinomas as compared with the normal mucosa, whereas NCA was overexpressed. ISH for CD66a and CGM2 mRNA revealed that large areas of the carcinomas remained without or with only faint hybridization signals. However, in every carcinoma, at least some positive foci were observed, indicating remaining cell populations that actively transcribe CD66a and CGM2. In contrast, ISH for NCA displayed strong and extensive autoradiographic signals. By analysis of step sections, foci of CD66a and CGM2 expression were shown to co-localize. Furthermore, these foci contained relatively few nuclei immunohistochemically positive for the proliferation-associated nuclear antigen Ki-67. Our data indicate a dysregulation of the three genes possibly with a common transcriptional control for CD66a and CGM2 and a different control for NCA. The focal expression of CD66a and CGM2 could be interpreted as due to a focal, incomplete, and abortive differentiation or, alternatively, as a consequence of genetic heterogeneity with foci of slow-proliferating subclones. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:9250164

  16. Evaluation of ELISA coupled with Western blot as a surveillance tool for Trichinella infection in wild boar (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Cuttell, Leigh; Gómez-Morales, Maria Angeles; Cookson, Beth; Adams, Peter J; Reid, Simon A; Vanderlinde, Paul B; Jackson, Louise A; Gray, C; Traub, Rebecca J

    2014-01-31

    Trichinella surveillance in wildlife relies on muscle digestion of large samples which are logistically difficult to store and transport in remote and tropical regions as well as labour-intensive to process. Serological methods such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) offer rapid, cost-effective alternatives for surveillance but should be paired with additional tests because of the high false-positive rates encountered in wildlife. We investigated the utility of ELISAs coupled with Western blot (WB) in providing evidence of Trichinella exposure or infection in wild boar. Serum samples were collected from 673 wild boar from a high- and low-risk region for Trichinella introduction within mainland Australia, which is considered Trichinella-free. Sera were examined using both an 'in-house' and a commercially available indirect-ELISA that used excretory-secretory (E/S) antigens. Cut-off values for positive results were determined using sera from the low-risk population. All wild boar from the high-risk region (352) and 139/321 (43.3%) of the wild boar from the low-risk region were tested by artificial digestion. Testing by Western blot using E/S antigens, and a Trichinella-specific real-time PCR was also carried out on all ELISA-positive samples. The two ELISAs correctly classified all positive controls as well as one naturally infected wild boar from Gabba Island in the Torres Strait. In both the high- and low-risk populations, the ELISA results showed substantial agreement (k-value=0.66) that increased to very good (k-value=0.82) when WB-positive only samples were compared. The results of testing sera collected from the Australian mainland showed the Trichinella seroprevalence was 3.5% (95% C.I. 0.0-8.0) and 2.3% (95% C.I. 0.0-5.6) using the in-house and commercial ELISA coupled with WB respectively. These estimates were significantly higher (P<0.05) than the artificial digestion estimate of 0.0% (95% C.I. 0.0-1.1). Real-time PCR testing of muscle from

  17. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses of collar enamel in the jaw teeth of gars, Lepisosteus oculatus, an actinopterygian fish.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Ichiro; Ishiyama, Mikio; Yokosuka, Hiroyuki; Mikami, Masato; Shimokawa, Hitoyata; Uchida, Takashi

    2014-06-01

    Although most fish have no enamel layer in their teeth, those belonging to Lepisosteus (gars), an extant actinopterygian fish genus, do and so can be used to study amelogenesis. In order to examine the collar enamel matrix in gar teeth, we subjected gar teeth to light and electron microscopic immunohistochemical examinations using an antibody against bovine amelogenin (27 kDa) and antiserum against porcine amelogenin (25 kDa), as well as region-specific antibodies and antiserum against the C-terminus and middle region, and N-terminus of porcine amelogenin, respectively. The enamel matrix exhibited intense immunoreactivity to the anti-bovine amelogenin antibody and the anti-porcine amelogenin antiserum in addition to the C-terminal and middle region-specific antibodies, but not to the N-terminal-specific antiserum. These results suggest that the collar enamel matrix of gar teeth contains amelogenin-like proteins and that these proteins possess domains that closely resemble the C-terminal and middle regions of porcine amelogenin. Western blot analyses of the tooth germs of Lepisosteus were also performed. As a result, protein bands with molecular weights of 78 kDa and 65 kDa were clearly stained by the anti-bovine amelogenin antibody as well as the antiserum against porcine amelogenin and the middle-region-specific antibody. It is likely that the amelogenin-like proteins present in Lepisosteus do not correspond to the amelogenins found in mammals, although they do possess domains that are shared with mammalian amelogenins.

  18. Detection of Babesia and Theileria species infection in cattle from Portugal using a reverse line blotting method.

    PubMed

    Silva, M G; Marques, P X; Oliva, A

    2010-12-15

    Babesiosis and Theileriosis are tick-borne diseases widespread in tropical and sub-tropical regions with high economic impact worldwide. In Portugal there are at least 4 tick vectors known to be competent for the transmission of Babesia and Theileria sp. identified: Rhipicephalus bursa, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus, Ixodes ricinus and Haemaphysalis punctata. All these potential Babesia and Theileria tick vectors are widely distributed in Portugal, although they are predominant in the Southern region. In this study, 1104 cattle blood samples were randomly collected from Central and Southern regions of Portugal and analyzed by PCR-reverse line blotting (RLB) for the detection of Babesia and Theileria sp. Testing indicated that 74.7% of the bovines tested were positive for either Babesia and/or Theileria sp. In addition, five different apicomplexan species, namely, Theileria buffeli, Theileria annulata, Babesia divergens, Babesia bovis, and Babesia bigemina were detected by RLB among the bovines tested. T. buffeli was the most frequently found species, being present in 69.9% of the positive samples either as single infections (52.4%), or as mixed infections (17.5%). The Babesia specie most frequently found was B. divergens, detected in 4.2% of the infected bovines. Overall, infected bovines were found in all regions tested; however the highest number of infected bovines was observed in Évora district (96.2%) and in cattle from Limousin breeds (81.7%). The results indicate widespread Babesia and Theileria infections in Portuguese bovines, suggesting the need for improved control of ticks and tick-borne diseases.

  19. Deep proteomic profiling of vasopressin-sensitive collecting duct cells. I. Virtual Western blots and molecular weight distributions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chin-Rang; Tongyoo, Pumipat; Emamian, Milad; Sandoval, Pablo C; Raghuram, Viswanathan; Knepper, Mark A

    2015-12-15

    The mouse mpkCCD cell line is a continuous cultured epithelial cell line with characteristics of renal collecting duct principal cells. This line is widely used to study epithelial transport and its regulation. To provide a data resource useful for experimental design and interpretation in studies using mpkCCD cells, we have carried out "deep" proteomic profiling of these cells using three levels of fractionation (differential centrifugation, SDS-PAGE, and HPLC) followed by tandem mass spectrometry to identify and quantify proteins. The analysis of all resulting samples generated 34.6 gigabytes of spectral data. As a result, we identified 6,766 proteins in mpkCCD cells at a high level of stringency. These proteins are expressed over eight orders of magnitude of protein abundance. The data are provided to users as a public data base (https://helixweb.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/mpkFractions/). The mass spectrometry data were mapped back to their gel slices to generate "virtual Western blots" for each protein. For most of the 6,766 proteins, the apparent molecular weight from SDS-PAGE agreed closely with the calculated molecular weight. However, a substantial fraction (>15%) of proteins was found to run aberrantly, with much higher or much lower mobilities than predicted. These proteins were analyzed to identify mechanisms responsible for altered mobility on SDS-PAGE, including high or low isoelectric point, high or low hydrophobicity, physiological cleavage, residence in the lysosome, posttranslational modifications, and expression of alternative isoforms due to alternative exon usage. Additionally, this analysis identified a previously unrecognized isoform of aquaporin-2 with apparent molecular mass <20 kDa.

  20. mRNA and Protein Levels for GABA[subscript A][alpha]4, [alpha]5, [beta]1 and GABA[subscript B]R1 Receptors are Altered in Brains from Subjects with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Rooney, Robert J.; Patel, Diven H.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    We have shown altered expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) and gamma-aminobutyric acid B (GABA[subscript B]) receptors in the brains of subjects with autism. In the current study, we sought to verify our western blotting data for GABBR1 via qRT-PCR and to expand our previous work to measure mRNA and protein levels of 3…

  1. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  2. Expression of bcr-abl mRNA in individual chronic myelogenous leukaemia cells as determined by in situ amplification.

    PubMed

    Pachmann, K; Zhao, S; Schenk, T; Kantarjian, H; El-Naggar, A K; Siciliano, M J; Guo, J Q; Arlinghaus, R B; Andreeff, M

    2001-03-01

    We present the results of a novel method developed for evaluation of in situ amplification, a molecular genetic method at the cellular level. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to study bcr-abl transcript levels in individual cells from patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML). After hybridizing a fluorochrome-labelled probe to the cell-bound RT-PCR product, bcr-abl mRNA-positive cells were determined using image analysis. A dilution series of bcr-abl-positive BV173 into normal cells showed a good correlation between expected and actual values. In 25 CML samples, the percentage of in situ PCR-positive cells showed an excellent correlation with cytogenetic results (r = 0.94, P < 0.0001), interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) (r = 0.95, P = 0.001) and hypermetaphase FISH (r = 0.81, P < 0.001). The fluorescence intensity was higher in residual CML cells after interferon (IFN) treatment than in newly diagnosed patients (P = 0.004), and was highest in late-stage CML resistant to IFN therapy and lowest in CML blast crisis (P = 0.001). Mean fluorescence values correlated with bcr-abl protein levels, as determined by Western blot analysis (r = 0.62). Laser scanning cytometry allowing automated analysis of large numbers of cells confirmed the results. Thus, fluorescence in situ PCR provides a novel and quantitative approach for monitoring tumour load and bcr-abl transcript levels in CML.

  3. Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, Franklin D.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

  4. Fluorescence analyzer for lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Berthold, J.W.; Malito, M.L.; Jeffers, L.

    1993-06-01

    An apparatus for measuring lignin concentration with time resolved fluorescence in an undiluted wood pulp or black liquor sample, on a real-time, in situ basis is described, comprising: light source means for applying excitation light pulses at a selected wavelength and at known time intervals to the undiluted sample for causing the lignin concentration to produce fluorescent emission light with a fluorescence intensity that monotonically decreases in a quenched fluorescence regime; light detector means for measuring the emission light at the known time intervals and establishing signals indicative thereof; switching means for turning said light detector means on at precise specified time intervals after each excitation light pulse; and signal processing means connected to the light source means and the light detector means for comparing intensities of the emission light from the lignin in the quenched fluorescence regime to the intensities of the excitation light pulses on a time resolved basis for providing a measurement of the lignin concentration in the undiluted sample as a function of the time resolved emission light intensity.

  5. Bovine milk exosomes contain microRNA and mRNA and are taken up by human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hirohisa; Tsuda, Muneya; Sato, Yohei; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Namba, Kazuyoshi; Takeda, Yasuhiro

    2015-05-01

    We reported previously that microRNA (miRNA) are present in whey fractions of human breast milk, bovine milk, and rat milk. Moreover, we also confirmed that so many mRNA species are present in rat milk whey. These RNA were resistant to acidic conditions and to RNase, but were degraded by detergent. Thus, these RNA are likely packaged in membrane vesicles such as exosomes. However, functional extracellular circulating RNA in bodily fluids, such as blood miRNA, are present in various forms. In the current study, we used bovine raw milk and total RNA purified from exosomes (prepared by ultracentrifugation) and ultracentrifuged supernatants, and analyzed them using miRNA and mRNA microarrays to clarify which miRNA and mRNA species are present in exosomes, and which species exist in other forms. Microarray analyses revealed that most mRNA in milk whey were present in exosomes, whereas miRNA in milk whey were present in supernatant as well as exosomes. The RNA in exosomes might exert functional effects because of their stability. Therefore, we also investigated whether bovine milk-derived exosomes could affect human cells using THP-1 cells. Flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy studies revealed that bovine milk exosomes were incorporated into differentiated THP-1 cells. These results suggest that bovine milk exosomes might have effects in human cells by containing RNA.

  6. Paraffin-embedded tissue blot as a sensitive method for discrimination between classical scrapie and experimental bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep.

    PubMed

    Webb, Paul R; Denyer, Margaret; Gough, Julie; Spiropoulos, John; Simmons, Marion M; Spencer, Yvonne I

    2011-05-01

    The paraffin-embedded tissue (PET) blot was modified for use as a tool to differentiate between classical scrapie and experimental bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep. Medulla (obex) from 21 cases of classical scrapie and 6 cases of experimental ovine BSE were used to develop the method such that it can be used as a tool to differentiate between BSE and scrapie in the same way that differential immunohistochemistry (IHC) has been used previously. The differential PET blot successfully differentiated between all of the scrapie and ovine BSE cases. Differentiation was permitted more easily with PET blot than by differential IHC, with accurate observations possible at the macroscopic level. At the microscopic level, sensitivity was such that discrimination by the differential PET blot could be made with more confidence than with differential IHC in cases where the immunohistochemical differences were subtle. The differential PET blot makes use of harsh epitope demasking conditions, and, because of the differences in the way prion protein is processed in different prion diseases, it can serve as a new, highly sensitive method to discriminate between classical scrapie and experimental BSE in sheep.

  7. Effects of DNA replication on mRNA noise

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Joseph R.; Cole, John A.; Fei, Jingyi; Ha, Taekjip; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida A.

    2015-01-01

    There are several sources of fluctuations in gene expression. Here we study the effects of time-dependent DNA replication, itself a tightly controlled process, on noise in mRNA levels. Stochastic simulations of constitutive and regulated gene expression are used to analyze the time-averaged mean and variation in each case. The simulations demonstrate that to capture mRNA distributions correctly, chromosome replication must be realistically modeled. Slow relaxation of mRNA from the low copy number steady state before gene replication to the high steady state after replication is set by the transcript’s half-life and contributes significantly to the shape of the mRNA distribution. Consequently both the intrinsic kinetics and the gene location play an important role in accounting for the mRNA average and variance. Exact analytic expressions for moments of the mRNA distributions that depend on the DNA copy number, gene location, cell doubling time, and the rates of transcription and degradation are derived for the case of constitutive expression and subsequently extended to provide approximate corrections for regulated expression and RNA polymerase variability. Comparisons of the simulated models and analytical expressions to experimentally measured mRNA distributions show that they better capture the physics of the system than previous theories. PMID:26669443

  8. Drosophila gurken (TGFalpha) mRNA localizes as particles that move within the oocyte in two dynein-dependent steps.

    PubMed

    MacDougall, Nina; Clark, Alejandra; MacDougall, Eilidh; Davis, Ilan

    2003-03-01

    In Drosophila oocytes, gurken mRNA localization orientates the TGF-alpha signal to establish the anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes. We have elucidated the path and mechanism of gurken mRNA localization by time-lapse cinematography of injected fluorescent transcripts in living oocytes. gurken RNA assembles into particles that move in two distinct steps, both requiring microtubules and cytoplasmic Dynein. gurken particles first move toward the anterior and then turn and move dorsally toward the oocyte nucleus. We present evidence suggesting that the two steps of gurken RNA transport occur on distinct arrays of microtubules. Such distinct microtubule networks could provide a general mechanism for one motor to transport different cargos to distinct subcellular destinations. PMID:12636913

  9. Fiberized fluorescent dye microtubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladev, Veselin; Eftimov, Tinko

    2013-03-01

    In the present work we study the effect of the length of fluorescent dye-filled micro-capillaries on the fluorescence spectra. Two types of micro-capillaries have been studied: a 100 μm inner diameter fused silica capillary with a transparent coating and one of the holes of a fiber optic glass ferrule with 125 μm inner diameter. The tubes were filled with solutions of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol and then in glycerin. Experimental data show that the maximum fluorescence and the largest spectral widths are observed for a sample length of about 0.25 mm for the used concentration. This results show that miniature tunable fiberized dye lasers can be developed using available standard micro-and fibre-optic components.

  10. Ultrasound guided fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baoqiang; Lesage, Frederic

    2012-10-01

    In this study, a hybrid-model imaging system combining fluorescence and ultrasound (US) was investigated with the motivation of providing structural priors towards improvement of fluorescence reconstruction. A single element transducer was scanned over the sample for anatomy. In the fluorescence part, a laser source was scanned over the sample with the emission received by an EMCCD camera. Synchronization was achieved by a pair of motorized linear stages. Structural information was derived from the US images and a profilometry and used to constrain reconstruction. In the reconstruction, we employed a GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation for forward modeling and a pattern-based method to take advantage of the huge dataset for the inverse problem. Performance of this system was validated with two phantoms with fluorophore inclusions. The results indicated that the fluorophore distribution could be accurately reconstructed. And the system has a potential for the future in-vivo study.

  11. Comparison of mRNA levels of three ethylene receptors in senescing flowers of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.).

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Kenichi; Nagata, Masayasu; Tanikawa, Natsu; Yoshioka, Toshihito; Hashiba, Teruyoshi; Satoh, Shigeru

    2002-03-01

    Three ethylene receptor genes, DC-ERS1, DC-ERS2 and DC-ETR1, were previously identified in carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.). Here, the presence of mRNAs for respective genes in flower tissues and their changes during flower senescence are investigated by Northern blot analysis. DC-ERS2 and DC-ETR1 mRNAs were present in considerable amounts in petals, ovaries and styles of the flower at the full-opening stage. In the petals the level of DC-ERS2 mRNA showed a decreasing trend toward the late stage of flower senescence, whereas it increased slightly in ovaries and was unchanged in styles throughout the senescence period. However, DC-ETR1 mRNA showed no or little changes in any of the tissues during senescence. Exogenously applied ethylene did not affect the levels of DC-ERS2 and DC-ETR1 mRNAs in petals. Ethylene production in the flowers was blocked by treatment with 1,1-dimethyl-4-(phenylsulphonyl)semicarbazide (DPSS), but the mRNA levels for DC-ERS2 and DC-ETR1 decreased in the petals. DC-ERS1 mRNA was not detected in any cases. These results indicate that DC-ERS2 and DC-ETR1 are ethylene receptor genes responsible for ethylene perception and that their expression is regulated in a tissue-specific manner and independently of ethylene in carnation flowers during senescence.

  12. Associations of MMP-2, BAX, and Bcl-2 mRNA and Protein Expressions with Development of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Shu-Ling; Xu, Hui-Pu; Zhang, Bei; Ma, Bao-Xin; Liu, Xian-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background To examine changes of mRNA and protein expressions of MMP-2, Bcl-2, and BAX in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients, and investigate the correlations among these 3 biomarkers. Material/Methods Rheumatic heart disease patients (n=158) undergoing cardiac surgical procedures for mitral valve repair or replacement were included as the AF group (n=123), containing paroxysmal AF (n=42), persistent AF (n=36), and permanent AF (n=45). Rheumatic heart disease patients with sinus rhythm (SR) (n=35) were enrolled as the SR group (control group). Immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were applied to detect the protein and mRNA expression levels of MMP-2, Bcl-2, and BAX. Apoptosis was observed with light and electron microscopes and detected by TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL). Results Compared with the SR group, the left atrial diameters (LADs), protein and mRNA expression levels of MMP-2 and BAX, apoptotic index (AI), and Bcl-2/BAX ratio were evidently increased in the 3 AF groups, but protein and mRNA expression levels of Bcl-2 decreased in the AF groups (all P<0.05). Correlation analysis found that MMP-2 protein expression levels was positively correlated with BAX expression, but negatively correlated with Bcl-2 expression levels. Conclusions Our study results suggest that elevated MMP-2 expression and disturbance balance of Bcl-2/BAX expressions may be associated with the development and maintenance of AF. MMP-2 may be involved in the development of AF through promoting BAX expressions and inhibiting Bcl-2. PMID:27141955

  13. Comparison of chemical assay, bioassay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and dot blot hybridization for detection of aerobactin in members of the family Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Le Roy, D; Bouchet, A; Saulnier, P; Pecquet, S; Andremont, A

    1993-01-01

    In order to determine the best strategy for detection of aerobactin in members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, we compared the results of three phenotypic assays, including a chemical assay, a cross-feeding bioassay, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with the results of a dot blot hybridization assay using a specific probe for the aerobactin genes. The sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA were better than those of the chemical and cross-feeding assays, but the results of dot blot hybridization were the most reproducible. However, none of the Serratia and Enterobacter cloacae strains which produced aerobactin hybridized with the probe. We concluded that the best strategy for aerobactin detection is a two-step procedure that combines screening by dot blot hybridization with an ELISA for negative strains. PMID:8481015

  14. Development of Double Eastern Blotting for Major Licorice Components, Glycyrrhizin and Liquiritin for Chemical Quality Control of Licorice Using anti-Glycyrrhizin and anti-Liquiritin Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shunsuke; Morinaga, Osamu; Uto, Takuhiro; Nomura, Shuichi; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2016-02-10

    Licorice is utilized in various food industries around the world for seasoning agents, confectioneries, drinks, and functional foods. Glycyrrhizin (GL) and liquiritin (Liq) are major quality control chemical markers of licorice that have multifunctional bioactivities. Chemical quality control of licorice is important because its component profiles change depending environmental factors (climate, soil condition, and water deficit) and differences between species. Double eastern blotting using anti-GL and anti-Liq monoclonal antibodies was developed for more convenient, rapid, and specific quality control analysis of GL and Liq, respectively. Moreover, double eastern blotting was applied to investigate the immunohistochemical distributions of GL and Liq in the root of fresh licorice; the localization of both components was then clarified visually. This double eastern blotting technique for GL and Liq may serve as a powerful approach for visually determining the chemical quality of licorice.

  15. Development of Double Eastern Blotting for Major Licorice Components, Glycyrrhizin and Liquiritin for Chemical Quality Control of Licorice Using anti-Glycyrrhizin and anti-Liquiritin Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shunsuke; Morinaga, Osamu; Uto, Takuhiro; Nomura, Shuichi; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2016-02-10

    Licorice is utilized in various food industries around the world for seasoning agents, confectioneries, drinks, and functional foods. Glycyrrhizin (GL) and liquiritin (Liq) are major quality control chemical markers of licorice that have multifunctional bioactivities. Chemical quality control of licorice is important because its component profiles change depending environmental factors (climate, soil condition, and water deficit) and differences between species. Double eastern blotting using anti-GL and anti-Liq monoclonal antibodies was developed for more convenient, rapid, and specific quality control analysis of GL and Liq, respectively. Moreover, double eastern blotting was applied to investigate the immunohistochemical distributions of GL and Liq in the root of fresh licorice; the localization of both components was then clarified visually. This double eastern blotting technique for GL and Liq may serve as a powerful approach for visually determining the chemical quality of licorice. PMID:26765784

  16. Smartphone fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hojoeng; Tan, Yafang; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the first use of smartphone spectrophotometry for readout of fluorescence-based biological assays. We evaluated the smartphone fluorimeter in the context of a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB) assay for detection of a specific nucleic acid sequences in a liquid test sample. The capability of distinguishing a one-point mismatch is also demonstrated by detecting single-base mutation in target nucleic acids. Our approach offers a route towards portable biomolecular assays for viral/bacterial pathogens, disease biomarkers, and toxins.

  17. Smartphone fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hojeong; Tan, Yafang; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the first use of smartphone spectrophotometry for readout of fluorescence-based biological assays. We evaluated the smartphone fluorimeter in the context of a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB) assay for detection of specific nucleic acid sequences in a liquid test sample and compared performance against a conventional laboratory fluorimeter. The capability of distinguishing a one-point mismatch is also demonstrated by detecting single-base mutation in target nucleic acids. Our approach offers a route toward portable biomolecular assays for viral/bacterial pathogens, disease biomarkers, and toxins.

  18. Nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovar, B.

    1985-03-01

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1984 Nuclear Science Symposium. Measuring systems for nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy using single-photon counting techniques are presented. These involve systems based on relaxation-type spark gap light pulser and synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. Furthermore, typical characteristics and optimization of operating conditions of the critical components responsible for the system time resolution are discussed. A short comparison of the most important deconvolution methods for numerical analysis of experimental data is given particularly with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescence signal. 22 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Primary structure of chicken muscle pyruvate kinase mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Lonberg, N; Gilbert, W

    1983-01-01

    We have determined the cDNA sequence corresponding to chicken muscle pyruvate kinase mRNA; the predicted coding region spans 529 amino acids and establishes the complete amino acid sequence for the vertebrate enzyme. We demonstrate that the level of mRNA for this enzyme is under developmental control and suggest a structural model for the protein kinase-mediated regulation of the mammalian liver isozyme. We report a method for the direct analysis of, and the preparation of cDNA probes from, mRNA which has been fractionated on methylmercury/agarose gels. Images PMID:6574503

  20. Expression of cytokine mRNA transcripts in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Olive, C; Cheung, C; Nicol, D; Falk, M C

    1998-08-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a solid tumour of the kidney and is the most common renal neoplasm. Despite the presence of tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in RCC, these tumours continue to progress in vivo suggesting a poor host immune response to the tumour, and the suppression of TIL effector function. Cytokines are key molecules that modulate the function of T cells. The possibility is investigated that the local production of cytokines in RCC contributes to immunosuppression of TIL. The expression of pro-inflammatory (IFN-gamma/IL-2) and immunosuppressive (IL-10/TGF-beta) cytokine mRNA transcripts was determined in RCC, normal kidney and peripheral blood of RCC patients using a semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with cytokine-specific primers. Following Southern blot hybridization of the PCR products with internal radiolabelled oligonucleotide probes, cytokine transcript levels were measured by densitometry and expressed relative to the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase densitometry score. With the exception of IL-10, there were no differences in expression of cytokine mRNA transcripts between the peripheral blood of patients and normal healthy individuals. It was found that TGF-beta transcripts were well represented in normal kidney and RCC. In contrast, the expression of IFN-gamma transcripts, while low in the majority of samples, was significantly increased in RCC when compared to normal kidney (P=0.05). The IL-2 and IL-10 transcripts showed a more variable expression in normal kidney and RCC, with no significant differences in expression between the sample groups. The data demonstrating pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive cytokine expression in RCC do not support a prominent immunosuppressive cytokine profile in these tumours. PMID:9723777

  1. Characterization of membrane steroid binding protein mRNA and protein in lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X L; Sexton, P S; Cenedella, R J

    2001-08-01

    Epithelial cells of the ocular lens contain a 28 kDa membrane protein which is proposed to mediate high affinity binding of steroid hormones and rapid non-genomic actions of steroid hormones. It has been named membrane steroid binding protein (MSBP). Our purpose was to further characterize this protein from cultured bovine lens epithelial cells (BLEC) and compare it to similar forms of the protein present in other species and tissues. The size of the protein's mRNA was examined by Northern blot analysis using a digoxigenin-labelled antisense riboprobe. The sequence of the mRNA was obtained by RT-PCR amplification of poly A+ RNA recovered from cultured BLEC. PCR amplification was conducted using three sets of nested sense and antisense primers, one set at a time. The amino acid sequence of the lens protein was deduced from the revealed cDNA sequence. The hydropathy of the protein was examined by Kyte-Doolittle plots. The sequence of the lens protein's cDNA (about 1.7 kb total) described an open reading frame of 582 residues which coded for a protein of 194 amino acids. The presence of a C-terminal isoprenylation motif suggested by earlier work was not found in the coding region. The deduced amino acid sequence of the lens protein was extremely similar to those of other species and tissues, being 95-98% homologous with that of the other members. All of the MSBPs apparently contain a single membrane spanning domain in the amino terminal. The highly conserved nature of this protein implies a useful function to the cell. We speculate that the protein is a receptor which mediates rapid actions of steroids on lens epithelial cells, such as calcium mobilization, and that the protein plays a role in the mechanism of steroid induced cataracts.

  2. Immunofluorescence, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, particle agglutination and western blot for the detection of antibody to human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Auwanit, W; Ayuthaya, P I; Balachandra, K; Jayavasu, C; Phanthumachinda, B; Ikuta, K; Yamanishi, K; Kanai, K

    1990-03-01

    Immunofluorescence assay (IFA) has been applied for detection of antibody to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). To compare the IFA with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and particle agglutination (PA), we examined the antibody response to HIV-1 in 475 sera from AIDS, PGL and ARC patients as well as several risk groups and healthy persons by three methods. The positive results by any methods were confirmed by western blot (WB). The results by all methods were well correlated on the sera from 45 asymptomatic male homosexuals and 70 female prostitutes. There were some false positive results by ELISA in the sera from prisoners and healthy persons. Four sera from drug abusers were positive only by PA and IFA and were negative by ELISA. All were WB-inconclusive. Particle agglutination and IFA results were compared with western blot analysis on 208 ELISA-positive sera. All IFA-strongly positive sera (84%) were positive by western blot. The sera with weakly positive, negative and inconclusive results by IFA (16%) were possibly any of positive, inconclusive or negative by western blot. By PA, 200 of 208 (97%) sera were PA-positive and 1% of these sera were WB-inconclusive while the PA-negative sera were either negative or inconclusive by western blot. These results suggested that PA is a simple and sensitive method for screening of HIV-1 antibody while IFA could be a primary confirmatory test and western blot would then be used for confirming any IFA-negative or inconclusive results.

  3. Molecular diagnosis of Theileria and Babesia species infecting cattle in Northern Spain using reverse line blot macroarrays

    PubMed Central

    García-Sanmartín, Josune; Nagore, Daniel; García-Pérez, Ana L; Juste, Ramón A; Hurtado, Ana

    2006-01-01

    Background Piroplasmosis in cattle is caused by tick-borne haemoprotozoan parasites of the genera Theileria and Babesia. Molecular detection techniques offer higher sensitivity and specificity than microscopy examination methods and serological tests. A reverse line blot (RLB) macroarray that included generic and species-specific probes for Theileria annulata, Theileria buffeli, Babesia bovis, Babesia bigemina, Babesia divergens and Babesia major was used to study the presence and identity of the piroplasm species infecting 263 bovine blood samples from 79 farms, most of them in Northern Spain. Microscopy examination of blood smears and haematology were also performed whenever possible to identify animals with parasitaemia. Results RLB hybridisation identified infection in 54.0% of the samples, whereas only 28.8% were positive by microscopy examination. The most frequently found species was T. buffeli, present in 42.6% of the samples. T. annulata was found in 22 samples (8.4%) from 12 farms, including 9 farms (14 samples) located in Northern Spain where presence of the vector is not very common. Babesia infections were less frequently detected: B. major was found in 3.0% of the samples, B. bigemina in 2.7%, B. bovis in 2.3% and B. divergens in 1.1%. Mixed infections were detected in 14 samples, accounting for six different combinations of species. Conclusion This is the first report in which B. major and B. divergens have been detected in Spain using molecular identification techniques and the first time that B. bovis has been detected in Northern Spain. The detection of T. annulata in Northern Spain suggests that the distribution of Mediterranean theileriosis might be changing. Samples with positive RLB hybridisation but negative microscopy had haematology values within the normal ranges suggesting that they corresponded to chronic carriers that may serve as reservoirs of the infection. In this sense, sensitive and specific laboratorial tests like RLB that clearly

  4. Evaluation of two sets of immunohistochemical and Western blot confirmatory methods in the detection of typical and atypical BSE cases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Three distinct forms of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), defined as classical (C-), low (L-) or high (H-) type, have been detected through ongoing active and passive surveillance systems for the disease. The aim of the present study was to compare the ability of two sets of immunohistochemical (IHC) and Western blot (WB) BSE confirmatory protocols to detect C- and atypical (L- and H-type) BSE forms. Obex samples from cases of United States and Italian C-type BSE, a U.S. H-type and an Italian L-type BSE case were tested in parallel using the two IHC sets and WB methods. Results The two IHC techniques proved equivalent in identifying and differentiating between C-type, L-type and H-type BSE. The IHC protocols appeared consistent in the identification of PrPSc distribution and deposition patterns in relation to the BSE type examined. Both IHC methods evidenced three distinct PrPSc phenotypes for each type of BSE: prevailing granular and linear tracts pattern in the C-type; intraglial and intraneuronal deposits in the H-type; plaques in the L-type. Also, the two techniques gave comparable results for PrPSc staining intensity on the C- and L-type BSE samples, whereas a higher amount of intraglial and intraneuronal PrPSc deposition on the H-type BSE case was revealed by the method based on a stronger demasking step. Both WB methods were consistent in identifying classical and atypical BSE forms and in differentiating the specific PrPSc molecular weight and glycoform ratios of each form. Conclusions The study showed that the IHC and WB BSE confirmatory methods were equally able to recognize C-, L- and H-type BSE forms and to discriminate between their different immunohistochemical and molecular phenotypes. Of note is that for the first time one of the two sets of BSE confirmatory protocols proved effective in identifying the L-type BSE form. This finding helps to validate the suitability of the BSE confirmatory tests for BSE surveillance currently in

  5. A mass screening survey of cystic echinococcosis by ultrasonography, Western blotting, and ELISA among university students in Manisa, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kilimcioğlu, Ali Ahmet; Girginkardeşler, Nogay; Korkmaz, Metin; Özkol, Mine; Düzgün, Fatih; Östan, Ipek; Pabuşcu, Yüksel; Dinç, Gönül; Ok, Ulgen Zeki

    2013-12-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is one of the most important zoonotic diseases in a wide geographic area, including Turkey. In the present project, a total of 4275 students from Celal Bayar University, Manisa, Turkey, were screened by ultrasonography (US) and specific antibodies for CE were examined by Western blotting (WB) and ELISA in finger prick blood samples of 2034 of 4275 volunteered students. We aimed to report the apparent prevalence of CE based on different diagnostic procedures and to compare WB and ELISA with US in diagnosis of CE in a mass screening setting. Six new cases were diagnosed as CE by US during the survey. In addition to these cases, three students were also detected to have been previously operated and pathologically confirmed for hepatic CE. US revealed parenchymal changes in these cases in concordance with their operation history; so, the prevalence of CE by US was calculated as 0.21% (9/4275) (95%CI, 0.11-0.39%) among university students in Manisa. Bands were detected at 8, 28, 32, 38, 42, 47, 70 and 90kDa by WB and the cases were considered to be positive for CE when at least three of the bands were seen together. Apparent prevalence of CE by ELISA and WB were found to be 2.11% (43/2034) (95%CI, 1.57-2.83%) and 0.25% (5/2034) (95%CI, 0.10-0.57%), respectively. Of the six US positive cases, WB was positive in only one case with two cysts in the liver. All of four cases with liver involvement were positive by ELISA. The high prevalence of CE among university students in Manisa indicated that CE is a major health problem in this area of Turkey. Our results supported that WB is rather difficult and not feasible as a mass screening test and may not be effective for confirmation especially in asymptomatic cases. As a result, we recommend US to be used initially in mass screening surveys for CE followed by confirmation by ELISA for suspected cases. Further examination primarily by chest X-ray followed by computed tomography and/or magnetic

  6. Identification of a 17-kilodalton Fasciola hepatica immunodiagnostic antigen by the enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot technique.

    PubMed Central

    Hillyer, G V; Soler de Galanes, M

    1988-01-01

    Sera obtained from human patients, calves, sheep, and rabbits infected with Fasciola hepatica were tested by the Falcon assay screening test enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (FAST-ELISA) and the enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB) techniques with Fasciola hepatica excretory-secretory antigens in order to evaluate their immunodiagnostic potential. The study included sera from 13 patients infected with F. hepatica or a history suggesting fascioliasis, 5 patients infected and treated with bithionol or praziquantel (3 were cured with bithionol), 10 patients infected with Schistosoma mansoni, 6 infected with Trichinella spiralis, and 13 controls and sera from calves, sheep, and rabbits with a primary F. hepatica infection. By FAST-ELISA with F. hepatica excretory-secretory antigens, the serum samples from fascioliasis patients gave the highest absorbance values, and the schistosomiasis patient sera gave intermediate values compared with a normal human serum control. Also by FAST-ELISA, the values for serum from patients with fascioliasis decreased steadily after cure, reaching normal levels 20 to 47 weeks postcure. In contrast, the serum from two patients who had been treated but were not yet cured had high levels of antibodies for up to 3 years of infection. By EITB, the serum samples from humans, rabbits, cattle, and sheep with fascioliasis recognized two antigenic polypeptides of 17 and 63 kilodaltons (kDa) in the form of sharp bands. For humans, this recognition lasted for at least 3 years of infection. Sera from individuals with schistosomiasis mansoni or trichinosis or from normal controls did not recognize the 17-kDa F. hepatica antigenic polypeptide. However, serum from one human with S. mansoni and one with T. spiralis infection has slight bands in the 63-kDa region, suggesting cross-reactivity. Reactivity to the 17-kDa polypeptide was absent in fascioliasis patients at 1 year postcure. Reactivity to the 63-kDa polypeptide was significantly

  7. Enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot analysis of a cryptosporidiosis outbreak on a United States Coast Guard cutter.

    PubMed

    Moss, D M; Bennett, S N; Arrowood, M J; Wahlquist, S P; Lammie, P J

    1998-01-01

    Symptoms consistent with an outbreak of cryptosporidiosis (diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, and abdominal cramps) occurred on a U.S. Coast Guard cutter within 0-18 days after the cutter filled its tanks with Milwaukee, Wisconsin city water in March 1993. At three-weeks postdocking (PD), the suspected water was removed, and serum samples and stool specimens were collected from 47 of the 58 crew members, as well as questionnaire data on their water consumption and symptoms aboard the cutter. At 10-weeks PD and/or at 28-weeks PD, additional serum specimens were collected. Intensitometric data from enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB) were obtained on IgA responses to a 17-kD antigen group, IgM responses to a 27-kD antigen group, and IgG responses to 27-, 17-, and 15-kD antigen groups extracted from oocysts. In addition, IgG responses to crude oocyst antigens were obtained by ELISA. Based on reported symptoms, EITB results, and stool examination, the crew members were classified as confirmed (10), probable (10), suspected (22), and noncases (16). Of the 10 confirmed cases (all symptomatic) and the 10 probable cases (eight symptomatic) whose stools were positive and negative, respectively, for Cryptosporidium oocysts by microscopy, all showed changes in EITB intensities to the antigen groups and were considered EITB positive. The remaining 38 crew members, 22 suspected cases (all symptomatic), and 16 noncases (all asymptomatic), if tested, had negative stool examinations and were considered EITB negative. Of the 10 confirmed cases, only four showed a significant change in IgG responses (P < 0.05) between three-weeks PD and follow-up serum specimens by ELISA. Crew members considered confirmed cases consumed significantly more water (P < or = 0.005) aboard the cutter than noncases. Crew members considered EITB positive consumed more water (P < or = 0.04) than crew members considered EITB negative while there was no significant difference in water consumption (P > or

  8. Validity of interpretation criteria for standardized Western blots (immunoblots) for serodiagnosis of Lyme borreliosis based on sera collected throughout Europe.

    PubMed

    Hauser, U; Lehnert, G; Wilske, B

    1999-07-01

    Western blotting (WB; immunoblotting) is a widely used tool for the serodiagnosis of Lyme borreliosis (LB), but so far, no generally accepted criteria for performance and interpretation have been established in Europe. The current study was preceeded by a detailed analysis of WB with whole-cell lysates of three species of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (U. Hauser, G. Lehnert, R. Lobentanzer, and B. Wilske, J. Clin. Microbiol. 35:1433-1444, 1997). In that study, interpretation criteria for a positive WB result were developed with the data for 330 serum samples (from patients with LB in different stages [n = 189] and from a control group [n = 141]) originating mostly from southern Germany. In the present work, the interpretation criteria for strains PKo (Borrelia afzelii) and PBi (Borrelia garinii) developed in the previous study were reevaluated with 224 serum samples (from patients with LB in different stages [n = 97] and from a control group [n = 127]) originating from throughout Europe that were provided by the European Union Concerted Action on Lyme Borreliosis (EUCALB). De novo criteria were developed on the basis of the reactivities of the EUCALB sera and were evaluated with the data for the samples from southern Germany. Comparison of all results led to the following recommendations: For WB for immunoglobulin G (IgG), at least two bands among p83/100, p58, p43, p39, p30, OspC, p21, p17, and p14 for PKo and at least one band among p83/100, p39, p30, OspC, p21, and p17b for PBi; for WB for IgM, at least one band among p39, OspC, and p17 or a strong p41 band for PKo and at least one band among p39 and OspC or a strong p41 band for PBi. WB with PKo was the most sensitive, and this strain is recommended for use in WB for the serodiagnosis of LB throughout Europe.

  9. Expression of platelet derived growth factor and platelet derived growth factor receptor mRNA in a glioblastoma from a patient with Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Guha, A; Glowacka, D; Carroll, R; Dashner, K; Black, P M; Stiles, C D

    1995-01-01

    Expression of platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and PDGF-receptor mRNA was examined from a glioblastoma taken from a patient with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridisation showed very high concentrations of both PDGF-A and PDGF alpha-receptor mRNA in the tumour. The overall pattern of PDGF expression was similar to those found in sporadic glioblastomas. Mutations in p53 has been implicated as an early pathogenic event leading to sporadic low grade astrocytomas, and is the third most common tumour type in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome, where they are predisposed due to a germline mutation in the p53 tumour suppressor gene. This study suggests that progression towards a glioblastoma in both the general population and in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome may involve potential autocrine and paracrine stimulation by growth factors such as PDGF. Images PMID:7608673

  10. Identification of recombinant human EPO variants in greyhound plasma and urine by ELISA, LC-MS/MS and western blotting: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Timms, Mark; Steel, Rohan; Vine, John

    2016-02-01

    The recombinant human erythropoietins epoetin alfa (Eprex®), darbepoetin (Aranesp®) and methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta (Mircera®) were administered to greyhounds for 7, 10 and 14 days respectively. Blood and urine samples were collected and analysed for erythropoietin by ELISA, LC-MS/MS and western blotting. Limits of confirmation in plasma for western blotting and LC-MS/MS methods ranged from a low of 2.5mIU/mL, and closely matched the sensitivity of ELISA screening. PMID:26290355

  11. Outbreak of larval Echinococcus multilocularis infection in Japanese monkey (Macaca fuscata) in a zoo, Hokkaido: western blotting patterns in the infected monkeys.

    PubMed

    Sato, Chiaki; Kawase, Shiro; Yano, Shoki; Nagano, Hideki; Fujimoto, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Miyahara, Kazuro; Yamada, Kazutaka; Sato, Motoyoshi; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu

    2005-01-01

    A high prevalence of larval Echinococcus multilocularis (Em) infection was found in zoo primates in Hokkaido, Japan. In October 1997, a Japanese monkey (Macaca fuscata) died and histopathologically diagnosed as alveolar hydatidosis. Serum samples were collected from the remaining Japanese monkeys and examined for antibodies against Em by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blotting. Serological tests showed 12 more animals of the remaining 57 monkeys were possibly infected. Ultrasonography revealed that nine of these 12 animals had a cystic lesion in the liver. The band patterns of western blotting in the monkeys were very similar to those in human.

  12. Relative performance of Organon kit in comparison to Du Pont for confirmatory serological testing of HIV infection by western blot test in sera from blood donors.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, R K; Chatterjee, R; Chattopadhya, D; Kumari, S

    1992-06-01

    A total of 32 specimens with different categories of reactivity by Du Pont Western Blot kit comprising of specimens showing full spectrum of HIV-I antigen specific bands, 19 specimens showing total absence of bands and four specimens showing non-specific bands (without any interpretative importance) were subjected to Western Blot testing by Organon test. Of the nine specimens showing full spectrum of bands by Du Pont the correlation with Organon kit was 100 per cent based on WHO criteria. Four specimens with non-specific indeterminate band pattern by Du Pont failed to show any band in Organon kit, indicating that latter to be more specific.

  13. Fluorescence labeling of short RNA by oxidation at the 3'-end.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chen; Liu, Wang-Yi; Xu, Yong-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    In RNA nanotechnology, construction of nanoparticles involves conjugation of functionalities, cross-linking of modules, labeling of RNA subunits, and chemical modification of nucleotides. Efficiency and sensitivity are important for the RNA labeling, which also can be used as probes in microarrays, Northern blotting, and gel-shift assays. Here, we describe a method for fluorescence labeling of short RNA at the 3'-end by oxidation. The 3'-terminus of in vitro-transcribed short RNA is oxidized by sodium periodate, and fluorescein-5-thiosemicarbazide is added after removal of excess oxidant. Purified short RNA with fluorescence is then applied for detection of RNA-protein interaction by gel-shift assay.

  14. mRNA and protein dataset of autophagy markers (LC3 and p62) in several cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Yakhine-Diop, Sokhna M.S.; Rodríguez-Arribas, Mario; Bravo-San Pedro, José M.; Martínez-Chacón, Guadalupe; Uribe-Carretero, Elisabet; Pinheiro de Castro, Diana C.J.; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Fuentes, José M.; González-Polo, Rosa A.

    2016-01-01

    We characterized the dynamics of autophagy in vitro using four different cell systems and analyzing markers widely used in this field, i.e. LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3; protein recruited from the cytosol (LC3-I) to the autophagosomal membrane where it is lipidated (LC3-II)) and p62/SQSTM1 (adaptor protein that serves as a link between LC3 and ubiquitinated substrates), (Klionsky et al., 2016) [1]. Data provided include analyses of protein levels of LC3 and p62 by Western-blotting and endogenous immunofluorescence experiments, but also p62 mRNA levels obtained by quantitative PCR (qPCR). To monitor the turnover of these autophagy markers and, thus, measure the flux of this pathway, cells were under starvation conditions and/or treated with bafilomycin A1 (Baf. A1) to block fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes. PMID:27054171

  15. Ethylene-Induced Increase in Glutamine Synthetase Activity and mRNA Levels in Hevea brasiliensis Latex Cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pujade-Renaud, V.; Clement, A.; Perrot-Rechenmann, C.; Prevot, J. C.; Chrestin, H.; Jacob, J. L.; Guern, J.

    1994-01-01

    Ethylene, used as a stimulant of latex production in Hevea brasiliensis, significantly activates the regenerating metabolism within the laticiferous cells. In this context, attention was focused on glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2), a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism. A specific and significant activation of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GScyt) in the laticiferous cells after ethylene treatment parallels the increase of latex yield. A marked accumulation of the corresponding mRNA was found, but in contrast, a slight and variable increase of the polypeptide level is at the limit of detection by western blotting. The GS response to ethylene might be mediated by ammonia that increases in latex cytosol following ethylene treatment. The physiological significance for such a regulation by ethylene of the GScyt is discussed in terms of the nitrogen requirement for protein synthesis associated with latex regeneration. PMID:12232192

  16. Studies on the role of NonA in mRNA biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlova, Natalia; Braga, Jose; Lundgren, Josefin; Rino, Jose; Young, Patrick; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria; Visa, Neus . E-mail: Neus.Visa@molbio.su.se

    2006-08-01

    The NonA protein of Drosophila melanogaster is an abundant nuclear protein that belongs to the DBHS (Drosophila behavior, human splicing) protein family. The DBHS proteins bind both DNA and RNA in vitro and have been involved in different aspects of gene expression, including pre-mRNA splicing, transcription regulation and nuclear retention of mRNA. We have used double-stranded RNA interference in Drosophila S2 cells to silence the expression of NonA and to investigate its role in mRNA biogenesis. We show that knockdown of NonA does not affect transcription nor splicing. We demonstrate that NonA forms a complex with the essential nuclear export factor NXF1 in an RNA-dependent manner. We have constructed stable S2 cell lines that express full-length and truncated NXF1 fused to GFP in order to perform fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. We show that knockdown of NonA reduces the intranuclear mobility of NXF1-GFP associated with poly(A){sup +} RNA in vivo, while the mobility of the truncated NXF1-GFP that does not bind RNA is not affected. Our data suggest that NonA facilitates the intranuclear mobility of mRNP particles.

  17. A mRNA and cognate microRNAs localize in the nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Gutierrez, Pablo; Ritland Politz, Joan C; Pederson, Thoru

    2014-01-01

    We previously discovered that a set of 5 microRNAs are concentrated in the nucleolus of rat myoblasts. We now report that several mRNAs are also localized in the nucleoli of these cells as determined by microarray analysis of RNA from purified nucleoli. Among the most abundant of these nucleolus-localized mRNAs is that encoding insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2), a regulator of myoblast proliferation and differentiation. The presence of IGF2 mRNA in nucleoli was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and RT-PCR experiments demonstrated that these nucleolar transcripts are spliced, thus arriving from the nucleoplasm. Bioinformatics analysis predicted canonically structured, highly thermodynamically stable interactions between IGF2 mRNA and all 5 of the nucleolus-localized microRNAs. These results raise the possibility that the nucleolus is a staging site for setting up particular mRNA-microRNA interactions prior to export to the cytoplasm.

  18. HIV-1 Vif binds to APOBEC3G mRNA and inhibits its translation.

    PubMed

    Mercenne, Gaëlle; Bernacchi, Serena; Richer, Delphine; Bec, Guillaume; Henriet, Simon; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2010-01-01

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) allows productive infection of non-permissive cells (including most natural HIV-1 targets) by counteracting the cellular cytosine deaminases APOBEC-3G (hA3G) and hA3F. The Vif-induced degradation of these restriction factors by the proteasome has been extensively studied, but little is known about the translational repression of hA3G and hA3F by Vif, which has also been proposed to participate in Vif function. Here, we studied Vif binding to hA3G mRNA and its role in translational repression. Filter binding assays and fluorescence titration curves revealed that Vif tightly binds to hA3G mRNA. Vif overall binding affinity was higher for the 3'UTR than for the 5'UTR, even though this region contained at least one high affinity Vif binding site (apparent K(d) = 27 +/- 6 nM). Several Vif binding sites were identified in 5' and 3'UTRs using RNase footprinting. In vitro translation evidenced that Vif inhibited hA3G translation by two mechanisms: a main time-independent process requiring the 5'UTR and an additional time-dependent, UTR-independent process. Results using a Vif protein mutated in the multimerization domain suggested that the molecular mechanism of translational control is more complicated than a simple physical blockage of scanning ribosomes.

  19. The Signal Sequence Coding Region Promotes Nuclear Export of mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Palazzo, Alexander F; Springer, Michael; Shibata, Yoko; Lee, Chung-Sheng; Dias, Anusha P; Rapoport, Tom A

    2007-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, most mRNAs are exported from the nucleus by the transcription export (TREX) complex, which is loaded onto mRNAs after their splicing and capping. We have studied in mammalian cells the nuclear export of mRNAs that code for secretory proteins, which are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane by hydrophobic signal sequences. The mRNAs were injected into the nucleus or synthesized from injected or transfected DNA, and their export was followed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. We made the surprising observation that the signal sequence coding region (SSCR) can serve as a nuclear export signal of an mRNA that lacks an intron or functional cap. Even the export of an intron-containing natural mRNA was enhanced by its SSCR. Like conventional export, the SSCR-dependent pathway required the factor TAP, but depletion of the TREX components had only moderate effects. The SSCR export signal appears to be characterized in vertebrates by a low content of adenines, as demonstrated by genome-wide sequence analysis and by the inhibitory effect of silent adenine mutations in SSCRs. The discovery of an SSCR-mediated pathway explains the previously noted amino acid bias in signal sequences and suggests a link between nuclear export and membrane targeting of mRNAs. PMID:18052610

  20. Signaling Pathways That Control mRNA Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa; Denmon, Andria P.

    2013-01-01

    Cells regulate their genomes mainly at the level of transcription and at the level of mRNA decay. While regulation at the level of transcription is clearly important, the regulation of mRNA turnover by signaling networks is essential for a rapid response to external stimuli. Signaling pathways result in posttranslational modification of RNA binding proteins by phosphorylation, ubiquitination, methylation, acetylation etc. These modifications are important for rapid remodeling of dynamic ribonucleoprotein complexes and triggering mRNA decay. Understanding how these posttranslational modifications alter gene expression is therefore a fundamental question in biology. In this review we highlight recent findings on how signaling pathways and cell cycle checkpoints involving phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and arginine methylation affect mRNA turnover. PMID:23602935

  1. Polyadenylation of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    1974-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) mRNA isolated from infected cell polysomes contains polyadenylic acid [poly(A)] sequences. Detergent-activated purified virions in vitro can transcribe complementary RNA, which has sedimentation properties similar to mRNA, and this RNA also contains poly(A) sequences. Digestion of virion RNA with U2 RNase under conditions where hydrolysis is specific for purine linkages leaves no sequences of polyuridylic acid corresponding in length to the poly(A) on the transcripts. Growth of infectious virus is not inhibited by 3-deoxyadenosine (cordycepin) under conditions in which it inhibits polyadenylation of cellular mRNA. The virus-specific mRNA produced in the presence of cordycepin has poly(A) sequences of the same size distribution as that synthesized in the absence of cordycepin. PMID:4363251

  2. Fluorescence Experiments with Quinine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, James E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a series of experiments which illustrate the analytical capabilities of fluorescence, and outlines two straightforward analyses involving real analyses. These experiments are suitable for an undergraduate instrumental analysis course and require approximately six to seven hours of laboratory time. (MLH)

  3. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, António J; Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-18

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  4. Fluorescence and Light Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Ronald J.; Oprysa, Anna

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the mentioned experiment is to aid students in developing tactics for distinguishing between signals originating from fluorescence and light scattering. Also, the experiment provides students with a deeper understanding of the physicochemical bases of each phenomenon and shows that the techniques are actually related.

  5. Ultraviolet fluorescence monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Preppernau, B.L.; Aragon, B.P.

    1997-05-01

    A multispectral ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence imaging fluorometer and a pulsed molecular beam laser fluorometer were developed to detect volatile organic compounds of interest in environmental monitoring and drug interdiction applications. The UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer is a relatively simple instrument which uses multiple excitation wavelengths to measure the excitation/emission matrix for irradiated samples. Detection limits in the high part-per-million to low part-per-million range were measured for a number of volatile organic vapors in the atmosphere. Detection limits in the low part-per-million range were obtained using cryogenic cooling to pre-concentrate unknown samples before introducing them into the imaging fluorometer. A multivariate analysis algorithm was developed to analyze the excitation/emission matrix and used to determine the relative concentrations of species in computer synthesized mixtures containing up to five organic compounds. Analysis results demonstrated the utility of multispectral UV fluorescence in analytical measurements. A transportable UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer was used in two field tests. Field test results demonstrated that detection limits in the part-per-billion range were needed to reliably identify volatile organic compounds in realistic field test measurements. The molecular beam laser fluorometer, a more complex instrument with detection limits in the part-per-billion to part-per-trillion range, was therefore developed to satisfy detection sensitivity requirements for field test measurements. High-resolution spectroscopic measurements made with the molecular beam laser fluorometer demonstrated its utility in identifying volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere.

  6. Fluorescent Gage Indication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barns, C. E.; Gilbaugh, B. L.; Gin, B.; Holt, W. L.; Lesak, P.; Mancini, R.; Spencer, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    Transfer of dye shows quality of contact between two mating parts. Mating parts checked for fit by spreading fluorescent dye on one, making brief light contact with other, and looking (under UV light) for transferred dye. Dye offers greater visibility under ultraviolet illumination, allowing better indication of how precisely parts match and what areas interfere.

  7. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  8. Molecular properties and regulation of mRNA expression for murine T cell-replacing factor/IL-5.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, A; Matsumoto, M; Harada, N; Takahashi, T; Kikuchi, Y; Takatsu, K

    1988-02-15

    We previously cloned cDNA for a T cell-replacing factor (TRF) that has been defined as a T cell-derived lymphokine that acts on activated B cells as a B cell growth and differentiation factor. Based on the diverse activities of rTRF on different target cells, we proposed that TRF be called IL-5. In this study, the molecular characteristics of TRF/IL-5 prepared by rDNA technology and TRF/IL-5 mRNA expression in various T cell lines and normal T cells have been studied. Specific immunoassay showed that rTRF/IL-5, which is transiently translated in vitro by rabbit reticulocyte lysate, has an apparent m.w. of 14,000. By contrast, active forms of rTRF/IL-5 translated in Xenopus oocytes has an apparent m.w. of 45,000 to 50,000 in the nonreducing condition and migrates to the m.w. of 25,000 to 30,000 under the reducing condition, indicating that active form of rTRF/IL-5 consists of dimer forms. The rTRF/IL-5 does not show detectable levels of IL-2, IL-3, and B-cell stimulatory factor 1 (IL-4) activities. Northern blot hybridization of poly (A)+ RNA from constitutively TRF-producing B151K12 T cell hybridoma revealed a single 1.7-kb band hybridizing to the cloned murine TRF/IL-5 cDNA. The expression of TRF/IL-5 mRNA in B151K12 was augmented by the stimulation with PMA plus calcium ionophore. In contrast, neither thymoma BW5147 nor IL-2-producing T cell hybridoma A55, both of which produced an undetectable level of TRF, expressed detectable levels of TRF/IL-5 mRNA. Stimulation of EL 4 and D9 cells with PMA and Con A, respectively, induced an increase in the levels of TRF/IL-5 mRNA expression accompanied by TRF/IL-5 production, whereas both cell lines did not show significant gene expression in the absence of the stimulation. In spleen cells from Mycobacterium tuberculosis-primed mice, significant expression of TRF/IL-5 mRNA was detected only when the cells were stimulated with relevant Ag, PPD. Normal spleen cells stimulated with Con A showed a significant, but approximately

  9. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Robert B.; Kimball, Alvin W.; Gesteland, Raymond F.; Ferguson, F. Mark; Dunn, Diane M.; Di Sera, Leonard J.; Cherry, Joshua L.

    1995-01-01

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, then an enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots.

  10. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, R.B.; Kimball, A.W.; Gesteland, R.F.; Ferguson, F.M.; Dunn, D.M.; Di Sera, L.J.; Cherry, J.L.

    1995-11-28

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, the enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots. 9 figs.

  11. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Katy A; O'Bryan, John P

    2011-01-01

    Defining the subcellular distribution of signaling complexes is imperative to understanding the output from that complex. Conventional methods such as immunoprecipitation do not provide information on the spatial localization of complexes. In contrast, BiFC monitors the interaction and subcellular compartmentalization of protein complexes. In this method, a fluororescent protein is split into amino- and carboxy-terminal non-fluorescent fragments which are then fused to two proteins of interest. Interaction of the proteins results in reconstitution of the fluorophore (Figure 1). A limitation of BiFC is that once the fragmented fluorophore is reconstituted the complex is irreversible. This limitation is advantageous in detecting transient or weak interactions, but precludes a kinetic analysis of complex dynamics. An additional caveat is that the reconstituted flourophore requires 30min to mature and fluoresce, again precluding the observation of real time interactions. BiFC is a specific example of the protein fragment complementation assay (PCA) which employs reporter proteins such as green fluorescent protein variants (BiFC), dihydrofolate reductase, b-lactamase, and luciferase to measure protein:protein interactions. Alternative methods to study protein:protein interactions in cells include fluorescence co-localization and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). For co-localization, two proteins are individually tagged either directly with a fluorophore or by indirect immunofluorescence. However, this approach leads to high background of non-interacting proteins making it difficult to interpret co-localization data. In addition, due to the limits of resolution of confocal microscopy, two proteins may appear co-localized without necessarily interacting. With BiFC, fluorescence is only observed when the two proteins of interest interact. FRET is another excellent method for studying protein:protein interactions, but can be technically challenging. FRET

  12. Efficient preparation and properties of mRNAs containing a fluorescent cap analog: Anthraniloyl-m7GpppG

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardana, Dilantha; Domashevskiy, Artem V; Gayler, Ken R; Goss, Dixie J

    2015-01-01

    A method has been developed for synthesising fluorescently labeled capped mRNA. The method incorporates a single fluorescent molecule as part of the 5′-mRNA or oligonucleotide cap site. The fluorescent molecule, Ant-m7GTP is specifically incorporated into the cap site to yield Ant-m7GpppG-capped mRNA or oligonucleotide. Efficient capping was observed with 60–100% of the RNA transcripts capped with the fluorescent molecule. The Ant-m7G derivative, which has been previously shown to interact with the eukaryotic cap binding protein eIF4E, is shown in this paper to be a substrate for the Vaccinia capping enzyme and the DCP2 decapping enzyme from Arabidopsis. Further, the Ant-m7GTP-capped RNA is readily translated. This Ant-m7GTP-capped RNA provides an important tool for monitoring capping reactions, translation, and biophysical studies. PMID:26779415

  13. Multiple crosstalks between mRNA biogenesis and SUMO.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Jérôme O; Geoffroy, Marie-Claude; Palancade, Benoit

    2013-10-01

    mRNA metabolism involves the orchestration of multiple nuclear events, including transcription, processing (e.g., capping, splicing, polyadenylation), and quality control. This leads to the accurate formation of messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs) that are finally exported to the cytoplasm for translation. The production of defined sets of mRNAs in given environmental or physiological situations relies on multiple regulatory mechanisms that target the mRNA biogenesis machineries. Among other regulations, post-translational modification by the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO, whose prominence in several cellular processes has been largely demonstrated, also plays a key role in mRNA biogenesis. Analysis of the multiple available SUMO proteomes and functional validations of an increasing number of sumoylated targets have revealed the key contribution of SUMO-dependent regulation in nuclear mRNA metabolism. While sumoylation of transcriptional activators and repressors is so far best documented, SUMO contribution to other stages of mRNA biogenesis is also emerging. Modification of mRNA metabolism factors by SUMO determine their subnuclear targeting and biological activity, notably by regulating their molecular interactions with nucleic acids or protein partners. In particular, sumoylation of DNA-bound transcriptional regulators interfere with their association to target sequences or chromatin modifiers. In addition, the recent identification of enzymes of the SUMO pathway within specialized mRNA biogenesis machineries may provide a further level of regulation to their specificity. These multiple crosstalks between mRNA metabolism and SUMO appear therefore as important players in cellular regulatory networks.

  14. Light-modulated abundance of an mRNA encoding a calmodulin-regulated, chromatin-associated NTPase in pea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, H. L.; Tong, C. G.; Thomas, C.; Roux, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    A CDNA encoding a 47 kDa nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) that is associated with the chromatin of pea nuclei has been cloned and sequenced. The translated sequence of the cDNA includes several domains predicted by known biochemical properties of the enzyme, including five motifs characteristic of the ATP-binding domain of many proteins, several potential casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, a helix-turn-helix region characteristic of DNA-binding proteins, and a potential calmodulin-binding domain. The deduced primary structure also includes an N-terminal sequence that is a predicted signal peptide and an internal sequence that could serve as a bipartite-type nuclear localization signal. Both in situ immunocytochemistry of pea plumules and immunoblots of purified cell fractions indicate that most of the immunodetectable NTPase is within the nucleus, a compartment proteins typically reach through nuclear pores rather than through the endoplasmic reticulum pathway. The translated sequence has some similarity to that of human lamin C, but not high enough to account for the earlier observation that IgG against human lamin C binds to the NTPase in immunoblots. Northern blot analysis shows that the NTPase MRNA is strongly expressed in etiolated plumules, but only poorly or not at all in the leaf and stem tissues of light-grown plants. Accumulation of NTPase mRNA in etiolated seedlings is stimulated by brief treatments with both red and far-red light, as is characteristic of very low-fluence phytochrome responses. Southern blotting with pea genomic DNA indicates the NTPase is likely to be encoded by a single gene.

  15. Messenger RNA (mRNA) Nanoparticle Tumour Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Kyle K.L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-01-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA’s biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research. PMID:24904987

  16. Mechanisms of endonuclease-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, Daniel R

    2011-01-01

    Endonuclease cleavage was one of the first identified mechanisms of mRNA decay but until recently it was thought to play a minor role to the better-known processes of deadenylation, decapping, and exonuclease-catalyzed decay. Most of the early examples of endonuclease decay came from studies of a particular mRNA whose turnover changed in response to hormone, cytokine, developmental, or nutritional stimuli. Only a few of these examples of endonuclease-mediated mRNA decay progressed to the point where the enzyme responsible for the initiating event was identified and studied in detail. The discovery of microRNAs and RISC-catalyzed endonuclease cleavage followed by the identification of PIN (pilT N-terminal) domains that impart endonuclease activity to a number of the proteins involved in mRNA decay has led to a resurgence of interest in endonuclease-mediated mRNA decay. PIN domains show no substrate selectivity and their involvement in a number of decay pathways highlights a recurring theme that the context in which an endonuclease function is a primary factor in determining whether any given mRNA will be targeted for decay by this or the default exonuclease-mediated decay processes.

  17. mRNA modifications: Dynamic regulators of gene expression?

    PubMed Central

    Hoernes, Thomas Philipp; Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Erlacher, Matthias David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The expression of a gene is a tightly regulated process and is exerted by a myriad of different mechanisms. Recently, RNA modifications located in coding sequences of mRNAs, have been identified as potential regulators of gene expression. N6-methyladenosine (m6A), 5-methylcytosine (m5C), pseudouridine (Ψ) and N1-methyladenosine (m1A) have been found within open reading frames of mRNAs. The presence of these mRNA modifications has been implicated to modulate the fate of an mRNA, ranging from maturation to its translation and even degradation. However, many aspects concerning the biological functions of mRNA modifications remain elusive. Recently, systematic in vitro studies allowed a first glimpse of the direct interplay of mRNA modifications and the efficiency and fidelity of ribosomal translation. It thereby became evident that the effects of mRNA modifications were, astonishingly versatile, depending on the type, position or sequence context. The incorporation of a single modification could either prematurely terminate protein synthesis, reduce the peptide yield or alter the amino acid sequence identity. These results implicate that mRNA modifications are a powerful mechanism to post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. PMID:27351916

  18. Conventional and unconventional mechanisms for capping viral mRNA.

    PubMed

    Decroly, Etienne; Ferron, François; Lescar, Julien; Canard, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell, capping of mRNA 5' ends is an essential structural modification that allows efficient mRNA translation, directs pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA export from the nucleus, limits mRNA degradation by cellular 5'-3' exonucleases and allows recognition of foreign RNAs (including viral transcripts) as 'non-self'. However, viruses have evolved mechanisms to protect their RNA 5' ends with either a covalently attached peptide or a cap moiety (7-methyl-Gppp, in which p is a phosphate group) that is indistinguishable from cellular mRNA cap structures. Viral RNA caps can be stolen from cellular mRNAs or synthesized using either a host- or virus-encoded capping apparatus, and these capping assemblies exhibit a wide diversity in organization, structure and mechanism. Here, we review the strategies used by viruses of eukaryotic cells to produce functional mRNA 5'-caps and escape innate immunity. PMID:22138959

  19. Thyroid hormone deiodinase type 2 mRNA levels in sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) are regulated during metamorphosis and in response to a thyroid challenge.

    PubMed

    Stilborn, S Salina M; Manzon, Lori A; Schauenberg, Jennifer D; Manzon, Richard G

    2013-03-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are crucial for normal vertebrate development and are the one obligate morphogen that drives amphibian metamorphosis. However, contrary to other metamorphosing vertebrates, lampreys exhibit a sharp drop in serum TH early in metamorphosis, and anti-thyroid agents such as potassium perchlorate (KClO(4)) induce metamorphosis. The type 2 deiodinase (D2) enzyme is a key regulator of TH availability during amphibian metamorphosis. We set out to determine how D2 may be involved in the regulation of lamprey metamorphosis and thyroid homeostasis. We cloned a 1.8Kb Petromyzon marinus D2 cDNA that includes the entire protein coding region and a selenocysteine (Sec) codon. Northern blotting indicated that the lamprey D2 mRNA is the longest reported to date (>9Kb). Using real-time PCR, we showed that intestinal and hepatic D2 mRNA levels were elevated prior to and during the early stages of metamorphosis and then declined dramatically to low levels that were sustained for the remainder of metamorphosis. These data are consistent with previously reported changes in serum TH levels and deiodinase activity. Treatment of larvae with either TH or KClO(4) significantly affected D2 mRNA levels in the intestine and liver. These D2 mRNA levels during metamorphosis and in response to thyroid challenges suggest that D2 may function in the regulation of TH levels during lamprey metamorphosis and the maintenance of TH homeostasis.

  20. Expression of apoptosis-related proteins and of mRNA for dopaminergic receptors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Marco; Colombo, Cristina; Mauri, Marco; Ferrari, Marco; Corbetta, Simona; Marino, Franca; Bono, Giorgio; Lecchini, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    In search for biomarkers of neurodegeneration, increasing attention has been focussed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In particular, PBMC from patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) have been suggested to carry apoptotic changes and alterations of neurotransmitter receptor expression, which may resemble those occurring in central nervous system neurons. We investigated the expression of apoptosis-related proteins Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3 and the levels of dopaminergic receptors (DR) D3 and D5 mRNA in PBMC from 17 AD patients and 11 age-matched healthy subjects. Apoptosis-related proteins were assayed by standard Western blotting analysis and DR mRNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction techniques. PBMC from healthy subjects and from AD patients expressed Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3 to about the same extent, and the Bcl-2/Bax ratio did not differ in the 2 groups. Levels of mRNA for DRD3 and DRD5 were similar in cells from healthy subjects and from AD patients. In conclusion, we found no evidence that PBMC from AD patients may express apoptosis-related proteins or DR mRNA to any different extent in comparison to cells from healthy subjects. These findings do not necessarily imply that immune cells cannot be exploited as biomarkers in AD (and in other central nervous system disorders). Future studies, however, should take into account the inherent complexity of the immune network.

  1. The absence of the long 3'-non-translated region in mRNA coding for eye lens alpha A2-crystallin of the frog (Rana temporaria).

    PubMed

    Tomarev, S I; Zinovieva, R D; Dolgilevich, S M; Krayev, A S; Skryabin, K G; Gause, G G

    1983-10-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a cloned cDNA (clone pRt(1)297; GENE (1982) 17, 131) coding for a 18 kDa polypeptide of the frog eye lens has been determined. The sequence, 791 nucleotide in length has only one long open reading frame (447 nucleotides). The derived amino acid sequence in this frame has greater than 90% homology with the region 25-173 of alpha A2-crystallin amino acid sequence from a related frog species Rana pipiens. The 5'-terminal part of mRNA corresponding to the first 24 amino acids of alpha A2-crystallin has been lost in cloning and substituted by an artefactual sequence. The 3'-terminal part appears to be intact as follows from the presence of the universal poly(A) addition site and poly(A) tract. The 3'-nontranslated region present in frog alpha A2-crystallin mRNA (130 nucleotides) is about 4-times shorter than in mammalian alpha A2-crystallin mRNA. Intact alpha A2-crystallin mRNA with a size of about 700 nucleotides as determined by Northern blot hybridization is about twice smaller than corresponding mammalian mRNAs.

  2. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  3. Direct Injection of CRISPR/Cas9-Related mRNA into Cytoplasm of Parthenogenetically Activated Porcine Oocytes Causes Frequent Mosaicism for Indel Mutations.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masahiro; Koriyama, Miyu; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ohtsuka, Masato; Sakurai, Takayuki; Inada, Emi; Saitoh, Issei; Nakamura, Shingo; Miyoshi, Kazuchika

    2015-01-01

    Some reports demonstrated successful genome editing in pigs by one-step zygote microinjection of mRNA of CRISPR/Cas9-related components. Given the relatively long gestation periods and the high cost of housing, the establishment of a single blastocyst-based assay for rapid optimization of the above system is required. As a proof-of-concept, we attempted to disrupt a gene (GGTA1) encoding the α-1,3-galactosyltransferase that synthesizes the α-Gal epitope using parthenogenetically activated porcine oocytes. The lack of α-Gal epitope expression can be monitored by staining with fluorescently labeled isolectin BS-I-B4 (IB4), which binds specifically to the α-Gal epitope. When oocytes were injected with guide RNA specific to GGTA1 together with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and human Cas9 mRNAs, 65% (24/37) of the developing blastocysts exhibited green fluorescence, although almost all (96%, 23/24) showed a mosaic fluorescent pattern. Staining with IB4 revealed that the green fluorescent area often had a reduced binding activity to IB4. Of the 16 samples tested, six (five fluorescent and one non-fluorescent blastocysts) had indel mutations, suggesting a correlation between EGFP expression and mutation induction. Furthermore, it is suggested that zygote microinjection of mRNAs might lead to the production of piglets with cells harboring various mutation types. PMID:26247938

  4. Testis-specific transcription initiation sites of rat farnesyl pyrophosphate synthetase mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Teruya, J H; Kutsunai, S Y; Spear, D H; Edwards, P A; Clarke, C F

    1990-01-01

    A variety of rat tissues were screened at low stringency with a rat farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) synthetase cDNA. In testis, an FPP synthetase-related RNA was detected that was larger than the liver FPP synthetase mRNA and was present at very high levels comparable with liver FPP synthetase RNA levels obtained from rats fed diets supplemented with cholestyramine and mevinolin. Sequence analysis of testis cDNA clones, together with primer extension and S1 nuclease experiments, indicated that testis FPP synthetase transcripts contain an extended 5' untranslated region. The 5' extension contained one or two out-of-frame upstream ATGs, depending on the site of transcription initiation. Protein in vitro translation studies indicated that the extended 5' untranslated region may play a role in regulating the translation of the FPP synthetase polypeptide in rat testis. Southern blot analysis with a probe containing both testis and liver 5' untranslated sequences provided evidence that both liver and testis transcripts derive from the same gene. The data suggest that an upstream testis-specific promoter results in the abundant production of FPP synthetase transcripts that are translated at low efficiency; another promoter functions in liver and other somatic tissues and directs the regulated synthesis of shorter discrete transcripts. Images PMID:2325654

  5. Dysferlin expression in monocytes: a source of mRNA for mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    De Luna, N; Freixas, A; Gallano, P; Caselles, L; Rojas-García, R; Paradas, C; Nogales, G; Dominguez-Perles, R; Gonzalez-Quereda, L; Vílchez, J J; Márquez, C; Bautista, J; Guerrero, A; Salazar, J A; Pou, A; Illa, I; Gallardo, E

    2007-01-01

    Dysferlin protein is expressed in peripheral blood monocytes. The genomic analysis of the DYSF gene has proved to be time consuming because it has 55 exons. We designed a mutational screening strategy based on cDNA from monocytes to find out whether the mutational analysis could be performed in mRNA from a source less invasive than the muscle biopsy. We studied 34 patients from 23 families diagnosed with dysferlinopathy. The diagnosis was based on clinical findings and on the absence of protein expression using either immunohistochemistry or Western blot of skeletal muscle and/or monocytes. We identified 28 different mutations, 13 of which were novel. The DYSF mutations in both alleles were found in 30 patients and only in one allele in four. The results were confirmed using genomic DNA in 26/34 patients. This is the first report to furnish evidence of reliable mutational analysis using monocytes cDNA and constitutes a good alternative to genomic DNA analysis.

  6. Isolation of genes involved in colorectal metastasis by differential display of mRNA species

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, C.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antalis, T.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic events that give rise to malignant colorectal tumors have been determined in some detail. Much less is known about the genes involved in metastasis of these neoplasms. A useful resource to study this process is the pair of cell lines, SW480 and SW620, which are derived from the primary and metastatic components, respectively, of the same colorectal tumor. We are using the method of differential display of mRNA species to isolate genes that are differentially expressed in these two cell lines. Differential display is carried out in triplicate, using three different RNA extractions from each cell line. Only fragments that are consistently up- or down-regulated in one cell line compared to another are examined further. Less than 1% of fragments are differentially expressed. These are cloned, sequenced, and used for Northern blot and reverse transcriptase-PCR in order to examine their differential expression further. The RNA sources for this expression analysis are (i) SW480 and SW620 cells, (ii) other pairs of primary and metastatic colorectal cell lines, (iii) primary and metastatic tissue from patients with colorectal cancer.

  7. Overlapping mRNA transcripts of photosynthesis gene operons in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Wellington, C L; Beatty, J T

    1991-01-01

    The crtEF, bchCA, and puf operons of the facultative phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus encode gene products that are necessary for the formation of various components of the photosynthetic apparatus. The crtEF operon encodes two enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of carotenoids, the bchCA operon codes for two enzymes of the bacteriochlorophyll biosynthetic pathway, and the puf operon encodes four pigment-binding polypeptides as well as two polypeptides with less well understood functions. These three operons are adjacent to one another on the chromosome and are transcribed in the same direction. We present the results of RNA blotting and S1 nuclease protection end-mapping experiments which provide direct evidence that the mRNA transcripts of these three operons overlap. Therefore, it is likely that the crtEF, bchCA, and puf operons can be expressed as a single transcriptional unit, although RNA polymerase may initiate transcription at any of several promoters. Images PMID:1995590

  8. Increased expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and decreased expression of thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase mRNA levels in the thyroids of iodide-treated BB/Wor rats.

    PubMed

    Mori, K; Mori, M; Stone, S; Braverman, L E; DeVito, W J

    1998-11-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) may contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disease. It is not known, however, whether increased thyroidal TNFalpha levels are associated with changes in thyroid function. The purpose of the present study was to utilize in situ hybridization histochemistry and immunohistochemistry to determine if the expression of TNF-alpha in the thyroid is associated with a decrease in thyroglobulin (Tg) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) mRNA levels. Lymphocytic thyroiditis was induced in BB/Wor rats by iodide administration, and thyroidal Tg and TPO mRNA levels were assessed by Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization, and TNFalpha expression by Northern blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Thyroids were obtained before and 1 and 2 months after iodide administration. Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed that there was a progressive increase in mononuclear cells in the thyroids of BB/Wor rats ingesting iodide for 1 and 2 months. Northern blot analysis revealed that during the same time course there was a progressive increase in TNFalpha mRNA levels and a progressive decrease in Tg and TPO mRNA levels in the thyroids. In situ hybridization histochemistry was performed to determine if the decrease in Tg and TPO mRNA levels was associated with thyroid follicular cells in contact with infiltrating mononuclear cells. In rats treated with iodide for 1 month, there was a modest decrease in Tg and TPO mRNA levels in follicular cells in contact with infiltrating mononuclear cells. After 2 months of iodide treatment there was clearly a localized decrease in Tg and TPO mRNA levels in follicular cells in contact with infiltrating mononuclear cells. Immunohistochemical analysis did not detect TNFalpha in the thyroids from control rats or from rats treated with iodide for 1 month. In contrast, after 2 months of treatment, TNFalpha was easily detected in infiltrating mononuclear cells and in some

  9. High throughput detection of miRNAs and gene-specific mRNA at the single-cell level by flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Porichis, Filippos; Hart, Meghan G.; Griesbeck, Morgane; Everett, Holly L.; Hassan, Muska; Baxter, Amy E.; Lindqvist, Madelene; Miller, Sara M.; Soghoian, Damien Z.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.; Reynolds, Susan; Norris, Brett; Mordecai, Scott K.; Nguyen, Quan; Lai, Chunfai; Kaufmann, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a method that uses fluorescent probes to detect specific nucleic acid sequences at the single cell level. Here we describe optimized protocols that exploit a highly sensitive FISH method based on branched DNA technology to detect mRNA and miRNA in human leukocytes. This technique can be multiplexed and combined with fluorescent antibody protein staining to addressa variety of questions in heterogeneous cell populations. We demonstrate antigen-specific upregulation of IFNγ and IL-2 mRNAs in HIV- and CMV-specific T cells. We show simultaneous detection of cytokine mRNA and corresponding protein in single cells. We apply this method to detect mRNAs for which flow antibodies against the corresponding proteins are poor or are not available. We use this technique to show modulation of a microRNA critical for T cell function, miR-155. We adapt this assay for simultaneous detection of mRNA and proteins by Image Stream technology. PMID:25472703

  10. High-throughput detection of miRNAs and gene-specific mRNA at the single-cell level by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Porichis, Filippos; Hart, Meghan G; Griesbeck, Morgane; Everett, Holly L; Hassan, Muska; Baxter, Amy E; Lindqvist, Madelene; Miller, Sara M; Soghoian, Damien Z; Kavanagh, Daniel G; Reynolds, Susan; Norris, Brett; Mordecai, Scott K; Nguyen, Quan; Lai, Chunfai; Kaufmann, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a method that uses fluorescent probes to detect specific nucleic acid sequences at the single-cell level. Here we describe optimized protocols that exploit a highly sensitive FISH method based on branched DNA technology to detect mRNA and miRNA in human leukocytes. This technique can be multiplexed and combined with fluorescent antibody protein staining to address a variety of questions in heterogeneous cell populations. We demonstrate antigen-specific upregulation of IFNγ and IL-2 mRNAs in HIV- and CMV-specific T cells. We show simultaneous detection of cytokine mRNA and corresponding protein in single cells. We apply this method to detect mRNAs for which flow antibodies against the corresponding proteins are poor or are not available. We use this technique to show modulation of a microRNA critical for T-cell function, miR-155. We adapt this assay for simultaneous detection of mRNA and proteins by ImageStream technology. PMID:25472703

  11. Fluorescent noble metal nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie

    Water-soluble fluorescent metallic clusters at sizes comparable to the Fermi wavelength of an electron (˜0.5 nm for gold and silver) were created and their photophysical properties were investigated at the bulk and single molecule levels. We employed biocompatible dendrimer and peptide to prepare a series of strong fluorescent gold and silver clusters with chemical or photo reduction methods. Facilitated by the well-defined dendrimer size, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry indicates that the fluorescent silver nanocluster size ranges from 2 to 8 Ag atoms. The correlation of emission energy with the number of atoms, N, in each gold nanocluster is quantitatively fit for the smallest nanoclusters with no adjustable parameters by the simple scaling relation of EFermi/N1/3, in which EFermi is the Fermi energy of bulk gold. The transition energy scaling inversely with cluster radius indicates that electronic structure can be well described with the spherical jellium model and further demonstrates that these nanomaterials are "multi-electron artificial atoms". Fluorescence from these small metal clusters can be considered protoplasmonic, molecular transitions of the free conduction electrons before the onset of collective dipole oscillations occurring when a continuous density of states is reached. In addition, very strong single molecular Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman enhancement by fluorescent silver clusters was observed. Pushing to larger sizes, we also created ˜2nm diameter glutathione encapsulated luminescent gold nanoparticles. Distinct from similarly sized but nonluminescent gold nanoparticles, these 2 nm gold nanoparticles show bright, long lifetime emission but no plasmon absorption. The emission might arise from charge transfer between gold atoms and the thiol ligand. Providing the "missing link" between atomic and nanoparticle behavior in noble metals, these highly fluorescent, water-soluble gold and silver nanoclusters offer complementary transition

  12. A novel mRNA 3' untranslated region translational control sequence regulates Xenopus Wee1 mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi Ying; Charlesworth, Amanda; Byrd, Shannon M; Gregerson, Robert; MacNicol, Melanie C; MacNicol, Angus M

    2008-05-15

    Cell cycle progression during oocyte maturation requires the strict temporal regulation of maternal mRNA translation. The intrinsic basis of this temporal control has not been fully elucidated but appears to involve distinct mRNA 3' UTR regulatory elements. In this study, we identify a novel translational control sequence (TCS) that exerts repression of target mRNAs in immature oocytes of the frog, Xenopus laevis, and can direct early cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translational activation during oocyte maturation. The TCS is functionally distinct from the previously characterized Musashi/polyadenylation response element (PRE) and the cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE). We report that TCS elements exert translational repression in both the Wee1 mRNA 3' UTR and the pericentriolar material-1 (Pcm-1) mRNA 3' UTR in immature oocytes. During oocyte maturation, TCS function directs the early translational activation of the Pcm-1 mRNA. By contrast, we demonstrate that CPE sequences flanking the TCS elements in the Wee1 3' UTR suppress the ability of the TCS to direct early translational activation. Our results indicate that a functional hierarchy exists between these distinct 3' UTR regulatory elements to control the timing of maternal mRNA translational activation during oocyte maturation.

  13. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of mitochondrial DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Alán, Lukáš; Zelenka, Jaroslav; Ježek, Jan; Dlasková, Andrea; Ježek, Petr

    2010-01-01

    To reveal nucleic acid localization in mitochondria, we designed molecular beacon fluorescent probes against: i) the light strand complementary to ND5 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene (annealing also to corresponding mRNA); ii) displacement (D) loop 7S DNA (annealing also to parallel heavy strand mtDNA and corresponding light strand transcript); iii) the proximal D-loop heavy strand displaced by the light strand promoter minor RNA. Confocal microscopy demonstrated ND5 probe spreading (less for other probes) in mitochondrial reticulum tubules but upon RNase A treatment all probes contoured mtDNA nucleoid localization. DNase I spread the signal over mitochondrial tubules. Future applications are discussed.

  14. Integrated fluorescence analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Buican, Tudor N.; Yoshida, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    An integrated fluorescence analysis system enables a component part of a sample to be virtually sorted within a sample volume after a spectrum of the component part has been identified from a fluorescence spectrum of the entire sample in a flow cytometer. Birefringent optics enables the entire spectrum to be resolved into a set of numbers representing the intensity of spectral components of the spectrum. One or more spectral components are selected to program a scanning laser microscope, preferably a confocal microscope, whereby the spectrum from individual pixels or voxels in the sample can be compared. Individual pixels or voxels containing the selected spectral components are identified and an image may be formed to show the morphology of the sample with respect to only those components having the selected spectral components. There is no need for any physical sorting of the sample components to obtain the morphological information.

  15. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    DOEpatents

    Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

    1983-12-29

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  16. A cellular high-throughput screening approach for therapeutic trans-cleaving ribozymes and RNAi against arbitrary mRNA disease targets.

    PubMed

    Yau, Edwin H; Butler, Mark C; Sullivan, Jack M

    2016-10-01

    Major bottlenecks in development of therapeutic post transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) agents (e.g. ribozymes, RNA interference, antisense) include the challenge of mapping rare accessible regions of the mRNA target that are open for annealing and cleavage, testing and optimization of agents in human cells to identify lead agents, testing for cellular toxicity, and preclinical evaluation in appropriate animal models of disease. Methods for rapid and reliable cellular testing of PTGS agents are needed to identify potent lead candidates for optimization. Our goal was to develop a means of rapid assessment of many RNA agents to identify a lead candidate for a given mRNA associated with a disease state. We developed a rapid human cell-based screening platform to test efficacy of hammerhead ribozyme (hhRz) or RNA interference (RNAi) constructs, using a model retinal degeneration target, human rod opsin (RHO) mRNA. The focus is on RNA Drug Discovery for diverse retinal degeneration targets. To validate the approach, candidate hhRzs were tested against NUH↓ cleavage sites (N = G,C,A,U; H = C,A,U) within the target mRNA of secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP), a model gene expression reporter, based upon in silico predictions of mRNA accessibility. HhRzs were embedded in a larger stable adenoviral VAI RNA scaffold for high cellular expression, cytoplasmic trafficking, and stability. Most hhRz expression plasmids exerted statistically significant knockdown of extracellular SEAP enzyme activity when readily assayed by a fluorescence enzyme assay intended for high throughput screening (HTS). Kinetics of PTGS knockdown of cellular targets is measureable in live cells with the SEAP reporter. The validated SEAP HTS platform was transposed to identify lead PTGS agents against a model hereditary retinal degeneration target, RHO mRNA. Two approaches were used to physically fuse the model retinal gene target mRNA to the SEAP reporter mRNA. The most expedient way to

  17. A cellular high-throughput screening approach for therapeutic trans-cleaving ribozymes and RNAi against arbitrary mRNA disease targets.

    PubMed

    Yau, Edwin H; Butler, Mark C; Sullivan, Jack M

    2016-10-01

    Major bottlenecks in development of therapeutic post transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) agents (e.g. ribozymes, RNA interference, antisense) include the challenge of mapping rare accessible regions of the mRNA target that are open for annealing and cleavage, testing and optimization of agents in human cells to identify lead agents, testing for cellular toxicity, and preclinical evaluation in appropriate animal models of disease. Methods for rapid and reliable cellular testing of PTGS agents are needed to identify potent lead candidates for optimization. Our goal was to develop a means of rapid assessment of many RNA agents to identify a lead candidate for a given mRNA associated with a disease state. We developed a rapid human cell-based screening platform to test efficacy of hammerhead ribozyme (hhRz) or RNA interference (RNAi) constructs, using a model retinal degeneration target, human rod opsin (RHO) mRNA. The focus is on RNA Drug Discovery for diverse retinal degeneration targets. To validate the approach, candidate hhRzs were tested against NUH↓ cleavage sites (N = G,C,A,U; H = C,A,U) within the target mRNA of secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP), a model gene expression reporter, based upon in silico predictions of mRNA accessibility. HhRzs were embedded in a larger stable adenoviral VAI RNA scaffold for high cellular expression, cytoplasmic trafficking, and stability. Most hhRz expression plasmids exerted statistically significant knockdown of extracellular SEAP enzyme activity when readily assayed by a fluorescence enzyme assay intended for high throughput screening (HTS). Kinetics of PTGS knockdown of cellular targets is measureable in live cells with the SEAP reporter. The validated SEAP HTS platform was transposed to identify lead PTGS agents against a model hereditary retinal degeneration target, RHO mRNA. Two approaches were used to physically fuse the model retinal gene target mRNA to the SEAP reporter mRNA. The most expedient way to

  18. Nebulisation of IVT mRNA Complexes for Intrapulmonary Administration

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Shan; Rosenecker, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    During the last years the potential role of in vitro transcribed (IVT) mRNA as a vehicle to deliver genetic information has come into focus. IVT mRNA could be used for anti-cancer therapies, vaccination purposes, generation of pluripotent stem cells and also for genome engineering or protein replacement. However, the administration of IVT mRNA into the target organ is still challenging. The lung with its large surface area is not only of interest for delivery of genetic information for treatment of e.g. for cystic fibrosis or alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, but also for vaccination purposes. Administration of IVT mRNA to the lung can be performed by direct intratracheal instillation or by aerosol inhalation/nebulisation. The latter approach shows a non-invasive tool, although it is not known, if IVT mRNA is resistant during the process of nebulisation. Therefore, we investigated the transfection efficiency of non-nebulised and nebulised IVT mRNA polyplexes and lipoplexes in human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE). A slight reduction in transfection efficiency was observed for lipoplexes (Lipofectamine 2000) in the nebulised part compared to the non-nebulised which can be overcome by increasing the amount of Lipofectamine. However, Lipofectamine was more than three times more efficient in transfecting 16HBE than DMRIE and linear PEI performed almost 10 times better than its branched derivative. By contrast, the nebulisation process did not affect the cationic polymer complexes. Furthermore, aerosolisation of IVT mRNA complexes did neither affect the protein duration nor the toxicity of the cationic complexes. Taken together, these data show that aerosolisation of cationic IVT mRNA complexes constitute a potentially powerful means to transfect cells in the lung with the purpose of protein replacement for genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis or alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency or for infectious disease vaccines, while bringing along the advantages of IVT mRNA as

  19. Stoichiometry and Change of the mRNA Closed-Loop Factors as Translating Ribosomes Transit from Initiation to Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Xi, Wen; Toomey, Shaun; Chiang, Yueh-Chin; Hasek, Jiri; Laue, Thomas M.; Denis, Clyde L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a highly efficient process and is under exacting control. Yet, the actual abundance of translation factors present in translating complexes and how these abundances change during the transit of a ribosome across an mRNA remains unknown. Using analytical ultracentrifugation with fluorescent detection we have determined the stoichiometry of the closed-loop translation factors for translating ribosomes. A variety of pools of translating polysomes and monosomes were identified, each containing different abundances of the closed-loop factors eIF4E, eIF4G, and PAB1 and that of the translational repressor, SBP1. We establish that closed-loop factors eIF4E/eIF4G dissociated both as ribosomes transited polyadenylated mRNA from initiation to elongation and as translation changed from the polysomal to monosomal state prior to cessation of translation. eIF4G was found to particularly dissociate from polyadenylated mRNA as polysomes moved to the monosomal state, suggesting an active role for translational repressors in this process. Consistent with this suggestion, translating complexes generally did not simultaneously contain eIF4E/eIF4G and SBP1, implying mutual exclusivity in such complexes. For substantially deadenylated mRNA, however, a second type of closed-loop structure was identified that contained just eIF4E and eIF4G. More than one eIF4G molecule per polysome appeared to be present in these complexes, supporting the importance of eIF4G interactions with the mRNA independent of PAB1. These latter closed-loop structures, which were particularly stable in polysomes, may be playing specific roles in both normal and disease states for specific mRNA that are deadenylated and/or lacking PAB1. These analyses establish a dynamic snapshot of molecular abundance changes during ribosomal transit across an mRNA in what are likely to be critical targets of regulation. PMID:26953568

  20. Stoichiometry and Change of the mRNA Closed-Loop Factors as Translating Ribosomes Transit from Initiation to Elongation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Xi, Wen; Toomey, Shaun; Chiang, Yueh-Chin; Hasek, Jiri; Laue, Thomas M; Denis, Clyde L

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a highly efficient process and is under exacting control. Yet, the actual abundance of translation factors present in translating complexes and how these abundances change during the transit of a ribosome across an mRNA remains unknown. Using analytical ultracentrifugation with fluorescent detection we have determined the stoichiometry of the closed-loop translation factors for translating ribosomes. A variety of pools of translating polysomes and monosomes were identified, each containing different abundances of the closed-loop factors eIF4E, eIF4G, and PAB1 and that of the translational repressor, SBP1. We establish that closed-loop factors eIF4E/eIF4G dissociated both as ribosomes transited polyadenylated mRNA from initiation to elongation and as translation changed from the polysomal to monosomal state prior to cessation of translation. eIF4G was found to particularly dissociate from polyadenylated mRNA as polysomes moved to the monosomal state, suggesting an active role for translational repressors in this process. Consistent with this suggestion, translating complexes generally did not simultaneously contain eIF4E/eIF4G and SBP1, implying mutual exclusivity in such complexes. For substantially deadenylated mRNA, however, a second type of closed-loop structure was identified that contained just eIF4E and eIF4G. More than one eIF4G molecule per polysome appeared to be present in these complexes, supporting the importance of eIF4G interactions with the mRNA independent of PAB1. These latter closed-loop structures, which were particularly stable in polysomes, may be playing specific roles in both normal and disease states for specific mRNA that are deadenylated and/or lacking PAB1. These analyses establish a dynamic snapshot of molecular abundance changes during ribosomal transit across an mRNA in what are likely to be critical targets of regulation. PMID:26953568

  1. Stoichiometry and Change of the mRNA Closed-Loop Factors as Translating Ribosomes Transit from Initiation to Elongation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Xi, Wen; Toomey, Shaun; Chiang, Yueh-Chin; Hasek, Jiri; Laue, Thomas M; Denis, Clyde L

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a highly efficient process and is under exacting control. Yet, the actual abundance of translation factors present in translating complexes and how these abundances change during the transit of a ribosome across an mRNA remains unknown. Using analytical ultracentrifugation with fluorescent detection we have determined the stoichiometry of the closed-loop translation factors for translating ribosomes. A variety of pools of translating polysomes and monosomes were identified, each containing different abundances of the closed-loop factors eIF4E, eIF4G, and PAB1 and that of the translational repressor, SBP1. We establish that closed-loop factors eIF4E/eIF4G dissociated both as ribosomes transited polyadenylated mRNA from initiation to elongation and as translation changed from the polysomal to monosomal state prior to cessation of translation. eIF4G was found to particularly dissociate from polyadenylated mRNA as polysomes moved to the monosomal state, suggesting an active role for translational repressors in this process. Consistent with this suggestion, translating complexes generally did not simultaneously contain eIF4E/eIF4G and SBP1, implying mutual exclusivity in such complexes. For substantially deadenylated mRNA, however, a second type of closed-loop structure was identified that contained just eIF4E and eIF4G. More than one eIF4G molecule per polysome appeared to be present in these complexes, supporting the importance of eIF4G interactions with the mRNA independent of PAB1. These latter closed-loop structures, which were particularly stable in polysomes, may be playing specific roles in both normal and disease states for specific mRNA that are deadenylated and/or lacking PAB1. These analyses establish a dynamic snapshot of molecular abundance changes during ribosomal transit across an mRNA in what are likely to be critical targets of regulation.

  2. Sepsis stimulates nonlysosomal, energy-dependent proteolysis and increases ubiquitin mRNA levels in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Tiao, G; Fagan, J M; Samuels, N; James, J H; Hudson, K; Lieberman, M; Fischer, J E; Hasselgren, P O

    1994-01-01

    We tested the role of different intracellular proteolytic pathways in sepsis-induced muscle proteolysis. Sepsis was induced in rats by cecal ligation and puncture; controls were sham operated. Total and myofibrillar proteolysis was determined in incubated extensor digitorum longus muscles as release of tyrosine and 3-methylhistidine, respectively. Lysosomal proteolysis was assessed by using the lysosomotropic agents NH4Cl, chloroquine, leupeptin, and methylamine. Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis was determined in the absence or presence of Ca2+ or by blocking the Ca(2+)-dependent proteases calpain I and II. Energy-dependent proteolysis was determined in muscles depleted of ATP by 2-deoxyglucose and 2.4-dinitrophenol. Muscle ubiquitin mRNA and the concentrations of free and conjugated ubiquitin were determined by Northern and Western blots, respectively, to assess the role of the ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway. Total and myofibrillar protein breakdown was increased during sepsis by 50 and 440%, respectively. Lysosomal and Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis was similar in control and septic rats. In contrast, energy-dependent total and myofibrillar protein breakdown was increased by 172% and more than fourfold, respectively, in septic muscle. Ubiquitin mRNA was increased severalfold in septic muscle. The results suggest that the increase in muscle proteolysis during sepsis is due to an increase in nonlysosomal energy-dependent protein breakdown, which may involve the ubiquitin system. Images PMID:7989581

  3. Evaluation of proopiomelanocortin mRNA in the peripheral blood from patients with Cushing's syndrome of different origin.

    PubMed

    Bondioni, S; Mantovani, G; Polentarutti, N; Ambrosi, B; Loli, P; Peverelli, E; Lania, A G; Beck-Peccoz, P; Spada, A

    2007-11-01

    ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome is due to ACTH overproduction originating from a pituitary corticotroph adenoma (Cushing's disease) or from ectopic tumors (ectopic ACTH syndrome). Due to difficulties in the differential diagnosis between these two forms of hypercortisolism it would be important to have molecular tools able to discriminate the two conditions. It is known that proopiomelanocortin (POMC) gene transcription can originate messengers of different length. ACTHomas show the normal 1072 nucleotides (nt) transcript, whereas ectopic tumors seem to be associated with a longer mRNA form (1450 nt). In order to analyse the presence of different POMC transcripts, we extracted total RNA from peripheral lymphocytes of 10 patients with Cushing's disease, 10 with ectopic Cushing syndrome, and 20 controls as well as from pituitary tissues (2 ACTH-omas and a normal pituitary polyA+ sample). Northern blot analysis correctly revealed a 1072 nt mRNA molecule in pituitary ACTH-oma and in the normal pituitary polyA+ RNA samples, whereas neither this molecule nor other alternative transcripts were detected in blood samples from patients and controls. These data were confirmed by the more sensitive RT-PCR technique. This study further underlines the need for alternative approaches in the diagnosis of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome. PMID:18075284

  4. Evaluation of proopiomelanocortin mRNA in the peripheral blood from patients with Cushing's syndrome of different origin.

    PubMed

    Bondioni, S; Mantovani, G; Polentarutti, N; Ambrosi, B; Loli, P; Peverelli, E; Lania, A G; Beck-Peccoz, P; Spada, A

    2007-11-01

    ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome is due to ACTH overproduction originating from a pituitary corticotroph adenoma (Cushing's disease) or from ectopic tumors (ectopic ACTH syndrome). Due to difficulties in the differential diagnosis between these two forms of hypercortisolism it would be important to have molecular tools able to discriminate the two conditions. It is known that proopiomelanocortin (POMC) gene transcription can originate messengers of different length. ACTHomas show the normal 1072 nucleotides (nt) transcript, whereas ectopic tumors seem to be associated with a longer mRNA form (1450 nt). In order to analyse the presence of different POMC transcripts, we extracted total RNA from peripheral lymphocytes of 10 patients with Cushing's disease, 10 with ectopic Cushing syndrome, and 20 controls as well as from pituitary tissues (2 ACTH-omas and a normal pituitary polyA+ sample). Northern blot analysis correctly revealed a 1072 nt mRNA molecule in pituitary ACTH-oma and in the normal pituitary polyA+ RNA samples, whereas neither this molecule nor other alternative transcripts were detected in blood samples from patients and controls. These data were confirmed by the more sensitive RT-PCR technique. This study further underlines the need for alternative approaches in the diagnosis of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome.

  5. cDNA sequence, mRNA expression and genomic DNA of trypsinogen from the indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y C; Oppert, B; Kramer, K J; McGaughey, W H; Dowdy, A K

    2000-02-01

    Trypsin-like enzymes are major insect gut enzymes that digest dietary proteins and proteolytically activate insecticidal proteins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Resistance to Bt in a strain of the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella, was linked to the absence of a major trypsin-like proteinase (Oppert et al., 1997). In this study, trypsin-like proteinases, cDNA sequences, mRNA expression levels and genomic DNAs from Bt-susceptible and -resistant strains of the Indianmeal moth were compared. Proteinase activity blots of gut extracts indicated that the susceptible strain had two major trypsin-like proteinases, whereas the resistant strain had only one. Several trypsinogen-like cDNA clones were isolated and sequenced from cDNA libraries of both strains using a probe deduced from a conserved sequence for a serine proteinase active site. cDNAs of 852 nucleotides from the susceptible strain and 848 nucleotides from the resistant strain contained an open reading frame of 783 nucleotides which encoded a 261-amino acid trypsinogen-like protein. There was a single silent nucleotide difference between the two cDNAs in the open reading frame and the predicted amino acid sequence from the cDNA clones was most similar to sequences of trypsin-like proteinases from the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana, and the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. The encoded protein included amino acid sequence motifs of serine proteinase active sites, conserved cysteine residues, and both zymogen activation and signal peptides. Northern blotting analysis showed no major difference between the two strains in mRNA expression in fourth-instar larvae, indicating that transcription was similar in the strains. Southern blotting analysis revealed that the restriction sites for the trypsinogen genes from the susceptible and resistant strains were different. Based on an enzyme size comparison, the cDNA isolated in this study corresponded to the gene for the smaller of two

  6. SURVIV for survival analysis of mRNA isoform variation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shihao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Chengyang; Wu, Ying Nian; Xing, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The rapid accumulation of clinical RNA-seq data sets has provided the opportunity to associate mRNA isoform variations to clinical outcomes. Here we report a statistical method SURVIV (Survival analysis of mRNA Isoform Variation), designed for identifying mRNA isoform variation associated with patient survival time. A unique feature and major strength of SURVIV is that it models the measurement uncertainty of mRNA isoform ratio in RNA-seq data. Simulation studies suggest that SURVIV outperforms the conventional Cox regression survival analysis, especially for data sets with modest sequencing depth. We applied SURVIV to TCGA RNA-seq data of invasive ductal carcinoma as well as five additional cancer types. Alternative splicing-based survival predictors consistently outperform gene expression-based survival predictors, and the integration of clinical, gene expression and alternative splicing profiles leads to the best survival prediction. We anticipate that SURVIV will have broad utilities for analysing diverse types of mRNA isoform variation in large-scale clinical RNA-seq projects. PMID:27279334

  7. Time-resolved fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Suhling, Klaus; French, Paul M W; Phillips, David

    2005-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy, the fluorescence emission can be characterised not only by intensity and position, but also by lifetime, polarization and wavelength. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) can report on photophysical events that are difficult or impossible to observe by fluorescence intensity imaging, and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy imaging (TR-FAIM) can measure the rotational mobility of a fluorophore in its environment. We compare different FLIM methods: a chief advantage of wide-field time-gating and phase modulation methods is the speed of acquisition whereas for time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) based confocal scanning it is accuracy in the fluorescence decay. FLIM has been used to image interactions between proteins such as receptor oligomerisation and to reveal protein phosphorylation by detecting fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In addition, FLIM can also probe the local environment of fluorophores, reporting, for example, on the local pH, refractive index, ion or oxygen concentration without the need for ratiometric measurements.

  8. Fluorescent ligands for adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Eszter; Jayasekara, P Suresh; Squarcialupi, Lucia; Paoletta, Silvia; Moro, Stefano; Federico, Stephanie; Spalluto, Giampiero; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    Interest is increasing in developing fluorescent ligands for characterization of adenosine receptors (ARs), which hold a promise of usefulness in the drug discovery process. The size of a strategically labeled AR ligand can be greatly increased after the attachment of a fluorophore. The choice of dye moiety (e.g. Alexa Fluor 488), attachment point and linker length can alter the selectivity and potency of the parent molecule. Fluorescent derivatives of adenosine agonists and antagonists (e.g. XAC and other heterocyclic antagonist scaffolds) have been synthesized and characterized pharmacologically. Some are useful AR probes for flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and scanning confocal microscopy. Thus, the approach of fluorescent labeled GPCR ligands, including those for ARs, is a growing dynamic research field.

  9. Fluorescence photodiagnosis in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Moghissi, K; Stringer, M R; Dixon, Kate

    2008-12-01

    Fluorescence diagnosis has become an important method of investigation in clinical practice particularly in identification and localisation of pre and early cancerous lesions as well as image guided therapy. The method relies on the principle of differential fluorescence emission between abnormal and normal tissues in response to excitation by a specific wavelength of light within the visible spectrum range. In clinical practice two types of fluorescence diagnostic methods are used, namely autofluorescence and drug-induced fluorescence. The former relies on the differential fluorescence of "native" fluorophores whereas the latter requires a photosensitiser which enhances the differential fluorescence emission of the normal versus the abnormal tissues. Development and advances in fibreoptic, endoscopic instrumentation currently permit fluorescence endoscopy to be carried out in a number of situations. PMID:19356662

  10. Transcription Factor Proteomics: Identification by a Novel Gel Mobility Shift-Three-Dimensional Electrophoresis Method Coupled with Southwestern Blot and HPLC-Electrospray-Mass Spectrometry Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Daifeng; Jia, Yinshan; Jarrett, Harry W.

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) purification and identification is an important step in elucidating gene regulatory mechanisms. In this study, we present two new electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA)-based multi-dimensional electrophoresis approaches to isolate and characterize TFs, using detection with either southwestern or western blotting and HPLC-nanoESI-MS/MS analysis for identification. These new techniques involve several major steps. First, EMSA is performed with agents that diminish non-specific DNA-binding and the DNA-protein complex is separated by native PAGE gel. The gel is then electrotransferred to PVDF membrane and visualized by autoradiography. Next, the DNA-protein complex, which has been transferred onto the blot, is extracted using a detergent-containing elution buffer. Following detergent removal, concentrated extract is separated by SDS-PAGE (EMSA-2DE), followed by in-gel trypsin digestion and HPLC-nanoESI-MS/MS analysis, or the concentrated extract is separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis EMSA-3DE), followed by southwestern or western blot analysis to localize DNA binding proteins on blot which are further identified by on-blot trypsin digestion and HPLC-nanoESI-MS/MS analysis. Finally, the identified DNA binding proteins are further validated by EMSA-immunoblotting or EMSA antibody supershift assay. This approach is used to purify and identify GFP-C/EBP fusion protein from bacterial crude extract, as well as purifying AP1 and CEBP DNA binding proteins from a human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293) nuclear extract. AP1 components, c-Jun, Jun-D, c-Fos, CREB, ATF1 and ATF2 were successfully identified from 1.5 mg of nuclear extract (equivalent to 3 ×107 HEK293 cells) with AP1 binding activity of 750 fmol. In conclusion, this new strategy of combining EMSA with additional dimensions of electrophoresis and using southwestern blotting for detection proves to be a valuable approach in the identification of transcriptional complexes

  11. CaMKIIalpha 3' untranslated region-directed mRNA translocation in living neurons: visualization by GFP linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rook, M. S.; Lu, M.; Kosik, K. S.

    2000-01-01

    The CaMKIIalpha mRNA extends into distal hippocampal dendrites, and the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) is sufficient to mediate this localization. We labeled the 3'UTR of the CaMKIIalpha mRNA in hippocampal cultures by using a green fluorescent protein (GFP)/MS2 bacteriophage tagging system. The CaMKIIalpha 3'UTR formed discrete granules throughout the dendrites of transfected cells. The identity of the fluorescent granules was verified by in situ hybridization. Over 30 min time periods these granules redistributed without a net increase in granule number; with depolarization there is a tendency toward increased numbers of granules in the dendrites. These observations suggest that finer time resolution of granule motility might reveal changes in the motility characteristics of granules after depolarization. So that motile granules could be tracked, shorter periods of observation were required. The movements of motile granules can be categorized as oscillatory, unidirectional anterograde, or unidirectional retrograde. Colocalization of CaMKIIalpha 3'UTR granules and synapses suggested that oscillatory movements allowed the granules to sample several local synapses. Neuronal depolarization increased the number of granules in the anterograde motile pool. Based on the time frame over which the granule number increased, the translocation of granules may serve to prepare the dendrite for mounting an adequate local translation response to future stimuli. Although the resident pool of granules can respond to signals that induce local translation, the number of granules in a dendrite might reflect its activation history.

  12. Molecular beacons can assess changes in expression and 3'-polyadenylation of human eNOS mRNA.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rachel; Baker, Meredith B; Weber, Martina; Harrison, David G; Bao, Gang; Searles, Charles D

    2009-03-01

    The endothelium plays an essential role in maintaining vascular homeostasis, and it fulfills this role by modulating intracellular signaling and gene expression in response to chemical and mechanical stimuli. Assessing changes in endothelial gene expression is essential to understanding how physiological and pathophysiological processes modulate vascular homeostasis. Here we describe the use of molecular beacons to rapidly and quantitatively assess expression and 3'-polyadenylation of a gene that is important for vascular homeostasis, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Single- and dual-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) molecular beacon hybridization assays were developed to measure changes in mRNA levels and 3'-polyadenylation, respectively, in primary human endothelial cell cultures subjected to laminar shear stress or statin treatment. Optimized beacon hybridization assays took approximately 15 min to perform, and eNOS mRNA levels were validated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Competitive inhibition assays and posttranscriptional silencing of eNOS expression were used to verify the specificity of molecular beacon fluorescence. Finally, the dual-FRET method was used to assess eNOS polyadenylation in tissues isolated from mice subjected to exercise training. These data demonstrate that molecular beacons can be used to rapidly and efficiently measure endothelial gene expression and 3'-polyadenylation. This approach could easily be adapted for studies of other endothelial genes and has promise for applications in live endothelial cells.

  13. Peptide-linked molecular beacons for efficient delivery and rapid mRNA detection in living cells.

    PubMed

    Nitin, Nitin; Santangelo, Philip J; Kim, Gloria; Nie, Shuming; Bao, Gang

    2004-01-01

    Real-time visualization of specific endogenous mRNA expression in vivo has the potential to revolutionize medical diagnosis, drug discovery, developmental and molecular biology. However, conventional liposome- or dendrimer-based cellular delivery of molecular probes is inefficient, slow, and often detrimental to the probes. Here we demonstrate the rapid and sensitive detection of RNA in living cells using peptide-linked molecular beacons that possess self-delivery, targeting and reporting functions. We conjugated the TAT peptide to molecular beacons using three different linkages and demonstrated that, at relatively low concentrations, these molecular beacon constructs were internalized into living cells within 30 min with nearly 100% efficiency. Further, peptide-based delivery did not interfere with either specific targeting by or hybridization-induced fluorescence of the probes. We could therefore detect human GAPDH and survivin mRNAs in living cells fluorescently, revealing intriguing intracellular localization patterns of mRNA. We clearly demonstrated that cellular delivery of molecular beacons using the peptide-based approach has far better performance compared with conventional transfection methods. The peptide-linked molecular beacons approach promises to open new and exciting opportunities in sensitive gene detection and quantification in vivo.

  14. A nucleic acid strand displacement system for the multiplexed detection of tuberculosis-specific mRNA using quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliddon, H. D.; Howes, P. D.; Kaforou, M.; Levin, M.; Stevens, M. M.

    2016-05-01

    The development of rapid, robust and high performance point-of-care diagnostics relies on the advancement and combination of various areas of research. We have developed an assay for the detection of multiple mRNA molecules that combines DNA nanotechnology with fluorescent nanomaterials. The core switching mechanism is toehold-mediated strand displacement. We have used fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) as signal transducers in this assay, as they bring many benefits including bright fluorescence and multiplexing abilities. The resulting assay is capable of multiplexed detection of long RNA targets against a high concentration of background non-target RNA, with high sensitivity and specificity and limits of detection in the nanomolar range using only a standard laboratory plate reader. We demonstrate the utility of our QD-based system for the detection of two genes selected from a microarray-derived tuberculosis-specific gene expression signature. Levels of up- and downregulated gene transcripts comprising this signature can be combined to give a disease risk score, making the signature more amenable for use as a diagnostic marker. Our QD-based approach to detect these transcripts could pave the way for novel diagnostic assays for tuberculosis.The development of rapid, robust and high performance point-of-care diagnostics relies on the advancement and combination of various areas of research. We have developed an assay for the detection of multiple mRNA molecules that combines DNA nanotechnology with fluorescent nanomaterials. The core switching mechanism is toehold-mediated strand displacement. We have used fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) as signal transducers in this assay, as they bring many benefits including bright fluorescence and multiplexing abilities. The resulting assay is capable of multiplexed detection of long RNA targets against a high concentration of background non-target RNA, with high sensitivity and specificity and limits of detection in the nanomolar

  15. Boron-Dependent Degradation of NIP5;1 mRNA for Acclimation to Excess Boron Conditions in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Mayuki; Takano, Junpei; Chiba, Yukako; Lombardo, Fabien; Ogasawara, Yuki; Onouchi, Hitoshi; Naito, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Toru

    2011-01-01

    Boron (B) is an essential plant micronutrient that is toxic at higher levels. NIP5;1 is a boric acid channel required for B uptake and growth under B deficiency. Accumulation of the NIP5;1 transcript is upregulated under B deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. To elucidate the mechanism of regulation, the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of NIP5;1 was tested for its ability to confer B-dependent regulation using β-glucuronidase and green fluorescent protein as reporters. This analysis showed that the 5′ UTR was involved in NIP5;1 transcript accumulation in response to B conditions. We also found that high-B conditions trigger NIP5;1 mRNA degradation and that the sequence from +182 to +200 bp in the 5′ UTR is required for this mRNA destabilization. In the nip5;1-1 mutant background, a NIP5;1 complementation construct without the 5′ UTR produced high levels of mRNA accumulation, increased B concentrations in tissues, and reduced growth under high-B conditions. These data suggest that the 5′ UTR controls B-dependent NIP5;1 mRNA degradation and that NIP5;1 mRNA degradation is important for plant acclimation to high-B conditions. PMID:21908722

  16. Mitogen-regulated protein/proliferin mRNA induction following single applications of tumor promoters to murine skin.

    PubMed

    Parfett, Craig L J

    2005-07-01

    Mitogen-regulated protein/proliferin (mrp/plf) gene family transcripts rise in abundance as a response to diverse chemical and physical agents that promote morphological transformation in the murine C3H/10T1/2 cultured cell model of multi-step carcinogenesis. To determine if proliferin genes respond to tumor promoters in vivo, RNA was extracted from the whole skin of SENCAR mice after single applications of 2 or 20 microg 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA); 3.2 or 32 nmole), 20 or 40 mg benzoyl peroxide (BPO; 83, 165 micromole), or acetone vehicle alone (2.72 mmole). RNA samples were prepared from treated skin areas, 2-48 h after painting. Mrp/plf-mRNA was not detected in Northern blot hybridizations, but large increases in mRNAs for ornithine decarboxylase gene and mRNA (odc), v-jun oncogene-related transcription factor gene and mRNA (junB), egr1 (early growth response protein gene and mRNA) were measured relative to beta 2 microglobulin gene and mRNA (b2m) mRNA in response to TPA. BPO induced small relative changes in these mRNAs. Reverse transcriptase (RT)-polymerase chain reactions (PCR) detected fully-processed MRP/plf-mRNA 16-48 h after TPA treatments in five of six animals, and in three of six BPO-treated animals. The MRP/plf-mRNA species expressed in the skin were predominantly plf1 and mrp3 as determined by gene-specific restriction enzyme sites within the RT-PCR products. Expression was either undetectable or found at low levels in acetone-painted controls and was not detected during the anagen phase of the normal hair growth cycle in unpainted animals. These results demonstrate that mrp/plf-mRNA is differentially expressed in murine skin in response to mechanistically distinct tumor promoters and has potential utility as a short-term biomarker for tumor promoting effects in chemical carcinogenesis.

  17. Effect of ribosome shielding on mRNA stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneke, Carlus; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Valleriani, Angelo

    2013-08-01

    Based on the experimental evidence that translating ribosomes stabilize the mRNAs, we introduce and study a theoretical model for the dynamic shielding of mRNA by ribosomes. We present an improved fitting of published decay assay data in E. coli and show that only one third of the decay patterns are exponential. Our new transcriptome-wide estimate of the average lifetimes and mRNA half-lives shows that these timescales are considerably shorter than previous estimates. We also explain why there is a negative correlation between mRNA length and average lifetime when the mRNAs are subdivided in classes sharing the same degradation parameters. As a by-product, our model indicates that co-transcriptional translation in E. coli may be less common than previously believed.

  18. mRNA stability and control of cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, Cristina; Falcone, Claudio

    2011-10-01

    Most of the studies on cell proliferation examine the control of gene expression by specific transcription factors that act on transcriptional initiation. In the last few years, it became evident that mRNA stability/turnover provides an important mechanism for post-transcriptional control of gene expression. In eukaryotes, mRNAs are mainly degraded after deadenylation by decapping and exosome pathways. Mechanisms of mRNA surveillance comprise deadenylation-independent pathways such as NMD (nonsense-mediated decay), when mRNAs harbour a PTC (premature termination codon), NSD (non-stop decay, when mRNAs lack a termination codon, and NGD (no-go decay), when mRNA translation elongation stalls. Many proteins involved in these processes are conserved from bacteria to yeast and humans. Recent papers showed the involvement of proteins deputed to decapping in controlling cell proliferation, virus replication and cell death. In this paper, we will review the newest findings in this field.

  19. Na(+):K(+):ATPase mRNA expression in the kidney during adaptation to sodium intake and furosemide treatment.

    PubMed

    Merino, A; Moreno, G; Mercado, A; Bobadilla, N A; Gamba, G

    2000-01-01

    Nephron tubular epithelium possesses the capacity of adaptation to any salt ingestion condition. The mechanism of adaptation is due in part to an increase in the activity of Na(+):K(+):ATPase at the basolateral membrane. The goal of the present study was to analyze the long-term regulation of the Na(+):K(+):ATPase alpha(1)-subunit mRNA expression during changes in NaCl metabolism. Male Wistar rats given a normal, high, or low NaCl diet, and intraperitoneal administration of the loop diuretic furosemide from 12 h to 7 days were studied. Rats were kept in metabolic cages 4 days before and throughout the study to determine daily urinary electrolyte excretion and osmolarity. At the end of each experimental period, creatinine clearance and serum electrolytes were also measured. Total RNA was extracted from each individual cortex or outer medulla and from pooled inner medullas using the guanidine/cesium chloride method. Na(+):K(+):ATPase alpha(1)-subunit mRNA expression was assessed by nonradioactive dot-blot analysis. Experimental maneuvers were well tolerated and all groups developed the appropriate renal response to each experimental condition. Urinary sodium excretion was significantly higher in rats administered a high sodium diet or furosemide and lower in rats treated with a low sodium diet after 7 days of treatment. Glomerular filtration rate was similar among all groups. However, the level of expression of the Na(+):K(+):ATPase alpha(1)-subunit did not change in any model. Nephron adaptation to the modification in NaCl intake or furosemide administration over 7 days did not include changes in Na(+):K(+):ATPase alpha(1)-subunit mRNA levels.

  20. Mitochondrial mRNA stability and polyadenylation during anoxia-induced quiescence in the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana.

    PubMed

    Eads, Brian D; Hand, Steven C

    2003-10-01

    Polyadenylation of messenger RNA is known to be an important mechanism for regulating mRNA stability in a variety of systems, including bacteria, chloroplasts and plant mitochondria. By comparison, little is known about the role played by polyadenylation in animal mitochondrial gene expression. We have used embryos of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana to test hypotheses regarding message stability and polyadenylation under conditions simulating anoxia-induced quiescence. In response to anoxia, these embryos undergo a profound and acute metabolic downregulation, characterized by a steep drop in intracellular pH (pH(i)) and ATP levels. Using dot blots of total mitochondrial RNA, we show that during in organello incubations both O(2) deprivation and acidic pH (pH 6.4) elicit increases in half-lives of selected mitochondrial transcripts on the order of five- to tenfold or more, relative to normoxic controls at pH 7.8. Polyadenylation of these transcripts was measured under the same incubation conditions using a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based assay. The results demonstrate that low pH and anoxia promote significant deadenylation of the stabilized transcripts in several cases, measured either as change over time in the amount of polyadenylation within a given size class of poly(A)(+) tail, or as the total amount of polyadenylation at the endpoint of the incubation. This study is the first direct demonstration that for a metazoan mitochondrion, polyadenylation is associated with destabilized mRNA. This pattern has also been demonstrated in bacteria, chloroplasts and plant mitochondria and may indicate a conserved mechanism for regulating message half-life that differs from the paradigm for eukaryotic cytoplasm, where increased mRNA stability is associated with polyadenylation. PMID:12966060

  1. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay - mechanisms of substrate mRNA recognition and degradation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Schweingruber, Christoph; Rufener, Simone C; Zünd, David; Yamashita, Akio; Mühlemann, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway is well known as a translation-coupled quality control system that recognizes and degrades aberrant mRNAs with truncated open reading frames (ORF) due to the presence of a premature termination codon (PTC). However, a more general role of NMD in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression is indicated by transcriptome-wide mRNA profilings that identified a plethora of physiological mRNAs as NMD targets. In this review, we focus on mechanistic aspects of target mRNA identification and degradation in mammalian cells, based on the available biochemical and genetic data, and point out knowledge gaps. Translation termination in a messenger ribonucleoprotein particle (mRNP) environment lacking necessary factors for proper translation termination emerges as a key determinant for subjecting an mRNA to NMD, and we therefore review recent structural and mechanistic insight into translation termination. In addition, the central role of UPF1, its crucial phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle and dynamic interactions with other NMD factors are discussed. Moreover, we address the role of exon junction complexes (EJCs) in NMD and summarize the functions of SMG5, SMG6 and SMG7 in promoting mRNA decay through different routes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA Decay mechanisms.

  2. Post-transcriptional regulation tends to attenuate the mRNA noise and to increase the mRNA gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Changhong; Wang, Shuqiang; Zhou, Tianshou; Jiang, Yiguo

    2015-10-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation is ubiquitous in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, but how it impacts gene expression remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze a simple gene model in which we assume that mRNAs are produced in a constitutive manner but are regulated post-transcriptionally by a decapping enzyme that switches between the active state and the inactive state. We derive the analytical mRNA distribution governed by a chemical master equation, which can be well used to analyze the mechanism of how post-transcription regulation influences the mRNA expression level including the mRNA noise. We demonstrate that the mean mRNA level in the stochastic case is always higher than that in the deterministic case due to the stochastic effect of the enzyme, but the size of the increased part depends mainly on the switching rates between two enzyme states. More interesting is that we find that in contrast to transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional regulation tends to attenuate noise in mRNA. Our results provide insight into the role of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling the transcriptional noise.

  3. A modified ELISA and western blot accurately determine anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibodies in oral fluids obtained with a special collecting device.

    PubMed

    Emmons, W W; Paparello, S F; Decker, C F; Sheffield, J M; Lowe-Bey, F H

    1995-06-01

    Serum and saliva from 195 known human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive patients and 198 military personnel undergoing annual HIV serologic testing were evaluated in a prospective, blinded fashion for anti-HIV-1 antibodies. Oral specimens, collected with a device designed to concentrate oral mucosal transudate from whole saliva, were tested by a modified ELISA and by Western blot. Serum was tested in a standard manner. All 195 HIV-1-seropositive subjects had detectable anti-HIV-1 antibodies in their saliva by ELISA; 190 saliva samples were positive by Western blot and 5 were indeterminate. None of the 198 military personnel were positive by ELISA of serum or oral fluid. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for ELISA of saliva were each 100%. The serologic testing of oral mucosal transudate appears to be a simple, safe, sensitive, and specific method for detecting anti-HIV-1 antibodies.

  4. Comparison of Southern blot analysis with isotopic and nonisotopic in situ hybridization for the detection of human papillomavirus sequences in invasive carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, L; Pilotti, S; Rotola, A; Di Luca, D; Cassai, E; Rilke, F

    1992-03-01

    To compare the efficiency of hybridization methods for the detection of HPV genome, 22 cases of invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix were analyzed by Southern blot analysis and in situ hybridization carried out with 35S- and biotin-labeled probes. These cases contained from less than one to as many as 50 copies per cell of HPV 16 and 18 types. To increase the sensitivity of biotinylated probes, a silver enhancement procedure of the peroxidase reaction product was applied. Results showed that in situ hybridization performed with isotopic probes is as sensitive as Southern blot analysis and is more sensitive than that performed with biotin-labeled probe. However, the application of the silver enhancement procedure increases the percentage of HPV-positive cases from 27 to 50%.

  5. Thioflavin T as an efficient fluorescence sensor for selective recognition of RNA G-quadruplexes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shujuan; Li, Qian; Xiang, Junfeng; Yang, Qianfan; Sun, Hongxia; Guan, Aijiao; Wang, Lixia; Liu, Yan; Yu, Lijia; Shi, Yunhua; Chen, Hongbo; Tang, Yalin

    2016-01-01

    RNA G-quadruplexes (G4s) play important roles in translational regulation, mRNA processing events and gene expression. Therefore, a fluorescent probe that is capable of efficiently recognizing RNA G-quadruplex structures among other RNA forms is highly desirable. In this study, a water-soluble fluorogenic dye (i.e., Thioflavin T (ThT)) was employed to recognize RNA G-quadruplex structures using UV–Vis absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and emission lifetime experiments. By stacking on the G-tetrad, the ThT probe exhibited highly specific recognition of RNA G-quadruplex structures with striking fluorescence enhancement compared with other RNA forms. The specific binding demonstrates that ThT is an efficient fluorescence sensor that can distinguish G4 and non-G4 RNA structures. PMID:27098781

  6. Mycoplasma agassizii Strain Variation and Distinct Host Antibody Responses Explain Differences between Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays and Western Blot Assays ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wendland, Lori D.; Klein, Paul A.; Jacobson, Elliott R.; Brown, Mary B.

    2010-01-01

    The precarious status of desert (Gopherus agassizii) and gopher (G. polyphemus) tortoises has resulted in conservation efforts that now include health assessment as an important component of management decision-making. Mycoplasmal upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) is one of very few diseases in chelonians for which comprehensive and rigorously validated diagnostic tests exist. In this study, serum samples obtained from eight Gopherus tortoises documented at necropsy to (i) be enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) seropositive using the PS6 antigen, (ii) be infected with Mycoplasma agassizii as indicated by direct isolation of the pathogen from the respiratory surfaces, and (iii) have histological lesions of mycoplasmal URTD were used to evaluate four distinct clinical isolates of M. agassizii as antigens for ELISA and Western blot analyses. Each animal sample reacted in the Western blot with its homologous M. agassizii strain, but recognition of heterologous M. agassizii strains was variable. Further, individual animals varied significantly with respect to the specific proteins recognized by the humoral immune response. An additional 114 Gopherus serum samples were evaluated using ELISA antigens prepared from the four distinct M. agassizii strains; A405 values were significantly correlated (r2 goodness of fit range, 0.708 to 0.771; P < 0.0001) for all antigens tested. The results confirm that strain variation is responsible for the observed differences between Western blot binding patterns. Thus, reliance on a single M. agassizii strain as an antigen in Western blot assays may provide false-negative results. This could have adverse consequences for the well-being of these environmentally sensitive hosts if false-negative animals were relocated to sites consisting of true-negative populations. PMID:20810678

  7. Identification of Xanthomonas fragariae, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli, and Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans with novel markers and using a dot blot platform coupled with automatic data analysis.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Pedro; Caridade, Cristina M R; Marcal, Andre R S; Cruz, Joana; Cruz, Leonor; Santos, Catarina L; Mendes, Marta V; Tavares, Fernando

    2011-08-15

    Phytosanitary regulations and the provision of plant health certificates still rely mainly on long and laborious culture-based methods of diagnosis, which are frequently inconclusive. DNA-based methods of detection can circumvent many of the limitations of currently used screening methods, allowing a fast and accurate monitoring of samples. The genus Xanthomonas includes 13 phytopathogenic quarantine organisms for which improved methods of diagnosis are needed. In this work, we propose 21 new Xanthomonas-specific molecular markers, within loci coding for Xanthomonas-specific protein domains, useful for DNA-based methods of identification of xanthomonads. The specificity of these markers was assessed by a dot blot hybridization array using 23 non-Xanthomonas species, mostly soil dwelling and/or phytopathogens for the same host plants. In addition, the validation of these markers on 15 Xanthomonas spp. suggested species-specific hybridization patterns, which allowed discrimination among the different Xanthomonas species. Having in mind that DNA-based methods of diagnosis are particularly hampered for unsequenced species, namely, Xanthomonas fragariae, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli, and Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans, for which comparative genomics tools to search for DNA signatures are not yet applicable, emphasis was given to the selection of informative markers able to identify X. fragariae, X. axonopodis pv. phaseoli, and X. fuscans subsp. fuscans strains. In order to avoid inconsistencies due to operator-dependent interpretation of dot blot data, an image-processing algorithm was developed to analyze automatically the dot blot patterns. Ultimately, the proposed markers and the dot blot platform, coupled with automatic data analyses, have the potential to foster a thorough monitoring of phytopathogenic xanthomonads. PMID:21705524

  8. Clinical Application of a Dot Blot Test for Diagnosis of Enteric Fever Due to Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi in Patients with Typhoid Fever from Colombia and Peru

    PubMed Central

    Cardona-Castro, Nora; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Rodriguez, Monica; Guerra, Humberto

    2000-01-01

    Clinical application of a dot blot test to detect immunoglobulin G (IgG) (88% sensitivity and specificity) and IgM (12.1% sensitivity and 97% specificity) against flagellar antigen from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi was performed in Peruvian and Colombian patients with typhoid fever. This test can be used as a good predictor of serovar Typhi infection in regions lacking laboratory facilities and in field studies. PMID:10702512

  9. Use of an AC electric field in galvanotactic on/off switching of the motion of a microstructure blotted by Serratia marcescens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Trung-Hieu; Hyung Kim, Dal; Kim, Jihoon; Jun Kim, Min; Byun, Doyoung

    2011-08-01

    In this study, we manipulated the swimming direction of bacteria and controlled the switching off movement by using dc and ac galvanotaxis. The microstructures blotted by Serratia marcescens could be spontaneously manipulated and switched off at the desired position. The optimum ac frequency for switching off the microstructural motion was 7 Hz. We built a mathematical model to analyze and understand the oscillating motion of microstructure.

  10. Human inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression depends on chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1)- and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (elF4E)-mediated nucleocytoplasmic mRNA transport.

    PubMed

    Bollmann, Franziska; Fechir, Katrin; Nowag, Sebastian; Koch, Kathrin; Art, Julia; Kleinert, Hartmut; Pautz, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    Human inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is regulated on the expressional level mostly by post-transcriptional mechanisms modulating the mRNA stability. Another important step in the control of eukaryotic gene expression is the nucleocytoplasmic mRNA transport. Most cellular mRNAs are exported via the TAP/Nxt complex of proteins. However, some mRNAs are transported by a different mechanism involving the nuclear export receptor CRM1. Treatment of DLD-1 cells with the CRM1 inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB) or anti-CRM1 siRNAs reduced cytokine-induced iNOS expression. We could demonstrate that the iNOS mRNA is exported from the nucleus in a CRM1-dependent manner. Since CRM1 itself does not possess any RNA binding affinity, an adapter protein is needed to mediate CRM1-dependent mRNA export. Western blot experiments showed that the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E is retained in the nucleus after LMB treatment. Blockade of eIF4E by ribavirin or overexpression of the promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) decreased iNOS expression due to reduced iNOS mRNA export from the nucleus. Transfection experiments provide evidence that the 3'-untranslated region of the iNOS mRNA is involved in eIF4E-mediated iNOS mRNA transport. In summary, CRM1 and eIF4E seem to play an important role in the nucleocytoplasmic export of human iNOS mRNA.

  11. Fluorescent microthermographic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    In the early days of microelectronics, design rules and feature sizes were large enough that sub-micron spatial resolution was not needed. Infrared or IR thermal techniques were available that calculated the object`s temperature from infrared emission. There is a fundamental spatial resolution limitation dependent on the wavelengths of light being used in the image formation process. As the integrated circuit feature sizes began to shrink toward the one micron level, the limitations imposed on IR thermal systems became more pronounced. Something else was needed to overcome this limitation. Liquid crystals have been used with great success, but they lack the temperature measurement capabilities of other techniques. The fluorescent microthermographic imaging technique (FMI) was developed to meet this need. This technique offers better than 0.01{degrees}C temperature resolution and is diffraction limited to 0.3 {mu}m spatial resolution. While the temperature resolution is comparable to that available on IR systems, the spatial resolution is much better. The FMI technique provides better spatial resolution by using a temperature dependent fluorescent film that emits light at 612 nm instead of the 1.5 {mu}m to 12 {mu}m range used by IR techniques. This tutorial starts with a review of blackbody radiation physics, the process by which all heated objects emit radiation to their surroundings, in order to understand the sources of information that are available to characterize an object`s surface temperature. The processes used in infrared thermal imaging are then detailed to point out the limitations of the technique but also to contrast it with the FMI process. The FMI technique is then described in detail, starting with the fluorescent film physics and ending with a series of examples of past applications of FMI.

  12. Western blot analysis of a limited number of cells: a valuable adjunct to proteome analysis of paraffin wax-embedded, alcohol-fixed tissue after laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Martinet, Wim; Abbeloos, Vanessa; Van Acker, Nathalie; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Herman, Arnold G; Kockx, Mark M

    2004-03-01

    In recent years, laser capture microdissection (LCM) has been used successfully to obtain distinct populations of cells for subsequent molecular analysis. Because of the limited sample availability and the absence of in vitro amplification steps for proteins, the use of LCM for proteome analysis largely depends on highly sensitive protein detection methods. In this study, a western blot protocol was developed and validated for the detection of beta-actin and the moderately expressed cell death protein caspase-3 in small numbers of cells. Initially, cultured human U937 monocytes and whole sections of paraffin wax-embedded, alcohol-fixed human tonsils were used to optimize protein electrophoresis and western blotting conditions. High-performance NuPAGE Bis-Tris gels in combination with high-quality transfer membranes, optimized antibody concentrations, and a sensitive chemiluminescent substrate provided a strong signal for beta-actin with approximately 500 U937 cells. In the same way, procaspase-3 could be identified with approximately 1000 cells. Similar results were obtained with germinal centre cells that were procured from paraffin wax-embedded, alcohol-fixed human tonsils by LCM. Treatment of U937 cells with etoposide rapidly induced cell death and allowed the detection of active caspase-3 with approximately 2500 cells (0.8 pg of protein). The findings of this study suggest that western blotting is a valuable adjunct to proteome analysis of LCM procured cells.

  13. The seroprevalence of Taenia solium cysticercosis among epileptic patients in León, Nicaragua, as evaluated by ELISA and western blotting.

    PubMed

    Bucardo, F; Meza-Lucas, A; Espinoza, F; García-Jerónimo, R C; García-Rodea, R; Correa, D

    2005-01-01

    The Taenia solium taeniasis/cysticercosis complex is an important public-health problem in several countries, where many epileptic seizures appear to be associated with neurocysticercosis. As few data on this problem in Nicaragua exist, the seroprevalence of antibodies reacting with antigens from T. solium cysticerci was investigated among 88 Nicaraguan epileptics (45 males and 43 females, aged 6-53 years). In questionnaire-based interviews, each adult subject and a caregiver of each child investigated were asked about potential risk factors for taeniasis/cysticercosis. When a serum sample from each subject was then checked for anti-cysticercus antibodies, 8.0% of the subjects were found seropositive by ELISA and 14.8% by western blotting. Five samples (all from individuals who had been epileptic for > 5 years) were positive in both tests. When the level of association between each potential risk factor and seropositivity (in ELISA or by blotting) was evaluated, the only statistically significant association detected was that between a positive ELISA and the subject living in a household where pigs were raised (odds ratio = 5.18; 95% confidence interval = 0.8-41.6; P = 0.05). The bands most frequently recognized in the western blots (of 50, 42-39, 24 and 14 kDa) were those previously reported. The results indicate that, in the city of Léon, cysticercosis may be endemic and the cause of a significant proportion of the epilepsy recorded.

  14. Glycosylated VCAM-1 isoforms revealed in 2D western blots of HUVECs treated with tumoral soluble factors of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Several common aspects of endothelial phenotype, such as the expression of cell adhesion molecules, are shared between metastasis and inflammation. Here, we analyzed VCAM-1 variants as biological markers of these two types of endothelial cell activation. With the combination of 2-DE and western blot techniques and the aid of tunicamycin, we analyzed N-glycosylation variants of VCAM-1 in primary human endothelial cells stimulated with either TNF or tumoral soluble factors (TSF's) derived from the human breast cancer cell line ZR75.30. Results Treatments induced a pro-adhesive endothelial phenotype. 2D western blots analysis of cells subjected to both treatments revealed the expression of the two known VCAM-1 isoforms and of previously unknown isoforms. In particular TSFZR75.30 induced an isoform with a relative molecular mass (Mr) and isoelectric point (pI) of 75-77 kDa and 5.0, respectively. Conclusion The unknown isoforms of VCAM-1 that were found to be overexpressed after treatment with TSF's compared with TNF, could serve as biomarkers to discriminate between inflammation and metastasis. 2D western blots revealed three new VCAM-1 isoforms expressed in primary human endothelial cells in response to TSF stimulation. Each of these isoforms varies in Mr and pI and could be the result of differential glycosylation states. PMID:19930605

  15. Anti-RAINBOW dye-specific antibodies as universal tools for the visualization of prestained protein molecular weight markers in Western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Schüchner, Stefan; Andorfer, Peter; Mudrak, Ingrid; Ogris, Egon

    2016-01-01

    Western blotting is one of the most widely used techniques in molecular biology and biochemistry. Prestained proteins are used as molecular weight standards in protein electrophoresis. In the chemiluminescent Western blot analysis, however, these colored protein markers are invisible leaving researchers with the unsatisfying situation that the signal for the protein of interest and the signal for the markers are not captured simultaneously and have to be merged in an error-prone step. To allow the simultaneous detection of marker proteins we generated monoclonal antibodies specific for the protein dyes. To elicit a dye rather than protein specific immune response we immunized mice sequentially with dye-carrier protein complexes, in which a new carrier protein was used for each subsequent immunization. Moreover, by sequentially immunizing with dye-carrier protein complexes, in which different but structurally related dyes were used, we could also generate an antibody, termed anti-RAINBOW, that cross-reacted even with structurally related dyes not used in the immunizations. Our novel antibodies represent convenient tools for the simultaneous Western blot detection of commercially available prestained marker proteins in combination with the detection of any specific protein of interest. These antibodies will render obsolete the anachronistic tradition of manually charting marker bands on film. PMID:27531616

  16. Anti-RAINBOW dye-specific antibodies as universal tools for the visualization of prestained protein molecular weight markers in Western blot analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schüchner, Stefan; Andorfer, Peter; Mudrak, Ingrid; Ogris, Egon

    2016-01-01

    Western blotting is one of the most widely used techniques in molecular biology and biochemistry. Prestained proteins are used as molecular weight standards in protein electrophoresis. In the chemiluminescent Western blot analysis, however, these colored protein markers are invisible leaving researchers with the unsatisfying situation that the signal for the protein of interest and the signal for the markers are not captured simultaneously and have to be merged in an error-prone step. To allow the simultaneous detection of marker proteins we generated monoclonal antibodies specific for the protein dyes. To elicit a dye rather than protein specific immune response we immunized mice sequentially with dye-carrier protein complexes, in which a new carrier protein was used for each subsequent immunization. Moreover, by sequentially immunizing with dye-carrier protein complexes, in which different but structurally related dyes were used, we could also generate an antibody, termed anti-RAINBOW, that cross-reacted even with structurally related dyes not used in the immunizations. Our novel antibodies represent convenient tools for the simultaneous Western blot detection of commercially available prestained marker proteins in combination with the detection of any specific protein of interest. These antibodies will render obsolete the anachronistic tradition of manually charting marker bands on film. PMID:27531616

  17. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  18. Fluorescence in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Henrik

    Following the initial detection by Bowen in 1934 of the strong O III lines being due to accidental resonance with strong He II radiation, many strong spectral emission lines are explained as produced by fluorescence. Many of these are Fe II lines pumped by H Lyα, as a consequence of strong radiation from hydrogen and a favorable energy level structure for Fe II. The lines are observed in many types of objects with low density plasma components. The Weigelt condensations in the vicinity of the massive star Eta Carinae is one location where these lines are observed and can be studied in detail, as well as been used for diagnostics.

  19. Fluorescence analyzer for lignin

    DOEpatents

    Berthold, John W.; Malito, Michael L.; Jeffers, Larry

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring lignin concentration in a sample of wood pulp or black liquor comprises a light emitting arrangement for emitting an excitation light through optical fiber bundles into a probe which has an undiluted sensing end facing the sample. The excitation light causes the lignin concentration to produce fluorescent emission light which is then conveyed through the probe to analyzing equipment which measures the intensity of the emission light. Measures a This invention was made with Government support under Contract Number DOE: DE-FC05-90CE40905 awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  20. Fluorescent penetrant inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastri, Sankar

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to familiarize the student with fluorescent penetrant inspection and to relate it to classification of various defects. The penetrant method of nondestructive testing is a method for finding discontinuities open to the surface in solids and essentially nonporous bodies. The method employs a penetrating liquid which is applied over the surface and enters the discontinuity or crack. After the excess of penetrant has been cleaned from the surface, the penetrant which exudes or is drawn back out of the crack indicates the presence and location of a discontinuity. The experimental procedure is described.

  1. Direct detection of green fluorescent protein messenger RNA expressed in Escherichia coli by rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Matsumoto, Atsuko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Kobori, Toshiro

    2010-06-15

    Prevailing conventional microbial detection methods depend largely on microbial cultivation in selective media that requires several days. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods, including quantitative reverse transcription PCR, are also rapid and useful methods for identification of target microbes, although for practical use they still suffer from disadvantages such as contamination problems and cost. Here we demonstrate that RNA-primed rolling circle amplification (RPRCA) using phi29 DNA polymerase, a precircularized probe, and SYBR Green II achieved real-time detection of specific messenger RNA (mRNA) from living microbes. The precircularized DNA probe was prepared by intramolecular ligation using CircLigase and treated by exonuclease I to eliminate uncircularized oligonucleotide, thereby significantly reducing potential noise by nonspecific amplified DNA by-products that affect successive RPRCA. When in vitro transcribed green fluorescent protein (GFP) mRNA was used as a primer, RPRCA could specifically detect at least 1 fmol of this mRNA in the presence of a precircularized probe that had a sequence complementary to the 3' terminus of mRNA without reverse transcription. This method could also detect expressed GFP mRNA present in 10 ng of total RNA isolated from Escherichia coli without DNase treatment. These data suggest that RPRCA has the potential to be a direct, rapid, and convenient method for detecting microbial mRNA.

  2. Calbindin-D9k mRNA expression in the rat uterus following exposure to methoxychlor: a comparison of oral and subcutaneous exposure.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae-Ho; Moon, Hyun Ju; Kang, Il Hyun; Kim, Tae Sung; Lee, Su Jung; Oh, Ji Young; Lee, Young Joo; Hong, Eui-Ju; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Han, Soon-Young

    2007-04-01

    Calbindin-D(9k) (CaBP-9k) is a cytosolic calcium-binding protein that is induced by estrogenic compounds possibly through estrogen receptors. We compared CaBP-9k mRNA expression in the uterus with uterotrophic response in immature rats exposed to methoxychlor (MC), an environmental chemical with estrogenic activity. MC was orally or subcutaneously administered to 3-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats for 3 days. The weights of the uterus and vagina significantly increased in the oral treatment group at a dose of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, but those of the subcutaneous (SC) treatment group only increased at 200 mg/kg. Northern blot analysis showed that CaBP-9k mRNA expression was significantly induced in a dose-dependent manner at doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg/day in the oral treatment group. SC administration of MC induced significant expression at only a dose of 200 mg/kg/day; this was similar to the uterotrophic response. MC has an estrogenic effect on the uterus as shown by the increase in weight and induction of CaBP-9k mRNA expression, which were much greater following exposure via oral gavage than via the SC route. The strong correlation between the results of in vivo uterotrophic assay and CaBP-9k mRNA expression suggests that CaBP-9k mRNA expression in the rat uterus may be used as an early gene marker for detection of the estrogenic effects of putative environmental chemicals.

  3. Real-time fluorescence ligase chain reaction for sensitive detection of single nucleotide polymorphism based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yueying; Lu, Xiaohui; Su, Fengxia; Wang, Limei; Liu, Chenghui; Duan, Xinrui; Li, Zhengping

    2015-12-15

    Most of practical methods for detection of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) need at least two steps: amplification (usually by PCR) and detection of SNP by using the amplification products. Ligase chain reaction (LCR) can integrate the amplification and allele discrimination in one step. However, the detection of LCR products still remains a great challenge for highly sensitive and quantitative SNP detection. Herein, a simple but robust strategy for real-time fluorescence LCR has been developed for highly sensitive and quantitative SNP detection. A pair of LCR probes are firstly labeled with a fluorophore and a quencher, respectively. When the pair of LCR probes are ligated in LCR, the fluorophore will be brought close to the quencher, and thus, the fluorescence will be specifically quenched by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The decrease of fluorescence intensity resulted from FRET can be real-time monitored in the LCR process. With the proposed real-time fluorescence LCR assay, 10 aM DNA targets or 100 pg genomic DNA can be accurately determined and as low as 0.1% mutant DNA can be detected in the presence of a large excess of wild-type DNA, indicating the high sensitivity and specificity. The real-time measuring does not require the detection step after LCR and gives a wide dynamic range for detection of DNA targets (from 10 aM to 1 pM). As LCR has been widely used for detection of SNP, DNA methylation, mRNA and microRNA, the real-time fluorescence LCR assay shows great potential for various genetic analysis.

  4. mRNA stability changes precede changes in steady-state mRNA amounts during hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Molin, Claes; Jauhiainen, Alexandra; Warringer, Jonas; Nerman, Olle; Sunnerhagen, Per

    2009-04-01

    Under stress, cells need to optimize the activity of a wide range of gene products during the response phases: shock, adaptation, and recovery. This requires coordination of several levels of regulation, including turnover and translation efficiencies of mRNAs. Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways are implicated in many aspects of the environmental stress response, including initiation of transcription, translation efficiency, and mRNA turnover. In this study, we analyze mRNA turnover rates and mRNA steady-state levels at different time points following mild hyperosmotic shock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The regulation of mRNA stability is transient and affects most genes for which there is a change in transcript level. These changes precede and prepare for the changes in steady-state levels, both regarding the initial increase and the later decline of stress-induced mRNAs. The inverse is true for stress-repressed genes, which become stabilized during hyperosmotic stress in preparation of an increase as the cells recover. The MAP kinase Hog1 affects both steady-state levels and stability of stress-responsive transcripts, whereas the Hog1-activated kinase Rck2 influences steady-state levels without a major effect on stability. Regulation of mRNA stability is a wide-spread, but not universal, effect on stress-responsive transcripts during transient hyperosmotic stress. By destabilizing stress-induced mRNAs when their steady-state levels have reached a maximum, the cell prepares for the subsequent recovery phase when these transcripts are to return to normal levels. Conversely, stabilization of stress-repressed mRNAs permits their rapid accumulation in the recovery phase. Our results show that mRNA turnover is coordinated with transcriptional induction.

  5. Dual fluorescence of syringaldazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendiran, N.; Balasubramanian, T.

    2007-11-01

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of syringaldazine (SYAZ) has been recorded in solvents of different polarity, pH and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and compared with syringaldehyde (SYAL). The inclusion complex of SYAZ with β-CD is investigated by UV-vis, fluorimetry, AM 1, FT-IR, 1H NMR and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Δ G value suggests the inclusion process is an exothermic and spontaneous. In all solvents a dual fluorescence is observed for SYAZ, whereas, SYAL shows a dual luminescence only in polar solvents. The excitation spectra for the 410 nm is different from 340 nm indicate two different species present in this molecule. In pH solutions: (i) a large red shifted maxima is observed in the dianion and is due to large interactions between the aromatic ring and (ii) the large blue shift at pH ˜4.5, is due to dissociation of azine group and formation of aldehyde. β-CD studies reveal that, SYAZ forms a 1:2 complex from 1:1 complex with β-CD.

  6. The TALE Fluorescence Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jui, Charles

    2009-05-01

    The TALE fluorescence detectors are designed to extend the threshold for fluorescence observation by TA down to 3x10^16 eV. It will comprise two main components. The first is a set of 24 telescopes working in stereo, with an existing TA FD station at ˜6 km separation. These will cover between 3-31 degrees in elevation and have azimuthal coverage maximizing the stereo aperture in the 10^18-10^19 eV energy range. The second component consists of 15 telescopes equipped with 4m diameter mirrors and covering the sky between 31 and 73 degrees in elevation. The larger mirror size pushes the physics threshold down to 3x10^16 eV, and provides view of the shower maximum for the lower energy events. The Tower detector will cover one quadrant in azimuth and operate in hybrid mode with the TALE infill array to provide redundant composition measurements from both shower maximum information and muon-to-electron ratio.

  7. Fluorescence-Based Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, Guillermo

    The natural luminescent phenomena (from the Latin words "lumen" and "essentia", i.e., "made of light") such as northern lights (aurora borealis), marine brightness, glow-worms, shining putrid fish scales, "bluish"- appearing water when contained in certain wooden cups (quinine fluorescence), some stones heated at high temperatures with reducing agents (BaS phosphorescence), or light emitted while crushing sugar (triboluminescence) already fascinated our ancestors. Nowadays we understand that ultraviolet and visible emission of light originates from a competitive deactivation pathway of the lowest electronic excited state of atoms and molecules that produces the so called luminescence (the sub-terms fluorescence and phosphorescence just designate whether the return of the excited to the ground state is an "allowed" or "forbidden" process, namely it is fast or slow, the loosely-defined border between them being a 1-μs-1 rate constant). Actually, luminescence is the only method to generate light in the known Universe regardless it is powered by the nuclear reactions in the stars, the ohmical heating in bulbs, an electric discharge, the absorption of light or a (bio)chemical reaction (chemiluminescence).

  8. Contribution of hepatic cytochrome CYP1A and metallothionein mRNA abundance to biomonitoring-A case study with European flounder (Platichthys flesus) from the Gulf of Gdańsk.

    PubMed

    Kopecka-Pilarczyk, Justyna; Schirmer, Kristin

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the research was to explore the contribution of hepatic cytochrome CYP1A and metallothionein (MT) mRNA expression to biological effect monitoring. The study was conducted in the European flounder (Platichthys flesus) from the Gulf of Gdańsk. mRNA abundance was measured using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in liver RNA of fish sampled from three coastal stations and from one offshore station in the inner Gulf. The contribution of the mRNA-based biomarkers to the assessment of the environment was determined in conjunction with a selection of commonly applied biochemical markers: 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT), metallothioneins (MT), fluorescent aromatic compounds (FACs), all measured in the same individual fish. The mRNA biomarkers contributed to the separation between the sampling sites, but no correlations between CYP1A mRNA and EROD nor between MT mRNA and MT proteins were found, which should be attributed to the different levels these biomarkers correspond to and to the differences in factors that may affect them. One case of strong correlation between CYP1A mRNA and FACs was encountered. The overall results of this study suggest that biomarkers measured at the mRNA abundance level constitute a valuable addition to biomonitoring studies by providing additional information and contributing to the differentiation of results. PMID:27276230

  9. Development of a fluorescent cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Epstein, R.I.; Gosnell, T.R.; Mungan, C.E.

    1995-10-01

    Recent work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated the physical principles for a new type of solid-state cryocooler based on anti-Stokes fluorescence. Design studies indicate that a vibration-free, low-mass ``fluorescent cryocooler`` could operate for years with efficiencies and cooling powers comparable to current commercial systems. This paper presents concepts for a fluorescent cryocooler, design considerations and expected performance.

  10. Glucocorticoids enhance stability of human growth hormone mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Paek, I; Axel, R

    1987-01-01

    We have studied the control of expression of the human growth hormone (hGH) gene introduced into the chromosomes of mouse fibroblasts. Cell lines transformed with the hGH gene expressed low levels of intact hGH mRNA and secreted hGH protein into the medium. Although the level of expression of hGH mRNA was low, the gene remained responsive to induction by glucocorticoid hormones. To localize the sequences responsible for induction and to determine the mechanism by which these cis-acting sequences enhance gene expression, we have constructed a series of fusion genes between the hGH gene and the herpes simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (tk) gene. We have demonstrated that a fusion gene in which hGH cDNA is flanked at its 5' terminus by an HSV tk promoter and is flanked at its 3' terminus by 3' HSV tk DNA remains inducible by glucocorticoids. Our studies indicate that the hGH exons contain sequences which are responsible for glucocorticoid hormone induction. Pulse-chase experiments, in vitro nuclear transcription, and approach to steady-state measurements indicate that the mechanisms responsible for induction of the hGH cDNA fusion gene operate posttranscriptionally to enhance the stability of hGH mRNA. Moreover, this increased stability was associated with an increase in the length of the 3' poly(A) tail on hGH mRNA. Images PMID:3037323

  11. Influenza virus mRNA trafficking through host nuclear speckles.

    PubMed

    Mor, Amir; White, Alexander; Zhang, Ke; Thompson, Matthew; Esparza, Matthew; Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel; Koide, Kazunori; Lynch, Kristen W; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a human pathogen with a genome composed of eight viral RNA segments that replicate in the nucleus. Two viral mRNAs are alternatively spliced. The unspliced M1 mRNA is translated into the matrix M1 protein, while the ion channel M2 protein is generated after alternative splicing. These proteins are critical mediators of viral trafficking and budding. We show that the influenza virus uses nuclear speckles to promote post-transcriptional splicing of its M1 mRNA. We assign previously unknown roles for the viral NS1 protein and cellular factors to an intranuclear trafficking pathway that targets the viral M1 mRNA to nuclear speckles, mediates splicing at these nuclear bodies and exports the spliced M2 mRNA from the nucleus. Given that nuclear speckles are storage sites for splicing factors, which leave these sites to splice cellular pre-mRNAs at transcribing genes, we reveal a functional subversion of nuclear speckles to promote viral gene expression. PMID:27572970

  12. Influenza virus mRNA trafficking through host nuclear speckles.

    PubMed

    Mor, Amir; White, Alexander; Zhang, Ke; Thompson, Matthew; Esparza, Matthew; Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel; Koide, Kazunori; Lynch, Kristen W; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a human pathogen with a genome composed of eight viral RNA segments that replicate in the nucleus. Two viral mRNAs are alternatively spliced. The unspliced M1 mRNA is translated into the matrix M1 protein, while the ion channel M2 protein is generated after alternative splicing. These proteins are critical mediators of viral trafficking and budding. We show that the influenza virus uses nuclear speckles to promote post-transcriptional splicing of its M1 mRNA. We assign previously unknown roles for the viral NS1 protein and cellular factors to an intranuclear trafficking pathway that targets the viral M1 mRNA to nuclear speckles, mediates splicing at these nuclear bodies and exports the spliced M2 mRNA from the nucleus. Given that nuclear speckles are storage sites for splicing factors, which leave these sites to splice cellular pre-mRNAs at transcribing genes, we reveal a functional subversion of nuclear speckles to promote viral gene expression.

  13. Regulation of mRNA trafficking by nuclear pore complexes.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Amandine; Palancade, Benoit

    2014-09-02

    Over the last two decades, multiple studies have explored the mechanisms governing mRNA export out of the nucleus, a crucial step in eukaryotic gene expression. During transcription and processing, mRNAs are assembled into messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs). mRNPs are then exported through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), which are large multiprotein assemblies made of several copies of a limited number of nucleoporins. A considerable effort has been put into the dissection of mRNA export through NPCs at both cellular and molecular levels, revealing the conserved contributions of a subset of nucleoporins in this process, from yeast to vertebrates. Several reports have also demonstrated the ability of NPCs to sort out properly-processed mRNPs for entry into the nuclear export pathway. Importantly, changes in mRNA export have been associated with post-translational modifications of nucleoporins or changes in NPC composition, depending on cell cycle progression, development or exposure to stress. How NPC modifications also impact on cellular mRNA export in disease situations, notably upon viral infection, is discussed.

  14. Regulation of mRNA Trafficking by Nuclear Pore Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Amandine; Palancade, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades, multiple studies have explored the mechanisms governing mRNA export out of the nucleus, a crucial step in eukaryotic gene expression. During transcription and processing, mRNAs are assembled into messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs). mRNPs are then exported through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), which are large multiprotein assemblies made of several copies of a limited number of nucleoporins. A considerable effort has been put into the dissection of mRNA export through NPCs at both cellular and molecular levels, revealing the conserved contributions of a subset of nucleoporins in this process, from yeast to vertebrates. Several reports have also demonstrated the ability of NPCs to sort out properly-processed mRNPs for entry into the nuclear export pathway. Importantly, changes in mRNA export have been associated with post-translational modifications of nucleoporins or changes in NPC composition, depending on cell cycle progression, development or exposure to stress. How NPC modifications also impact on cellular mRNA export in disease situations, notably upon viral infection, is discussed. PMID:25184662

  15. A rapid real-time qRT-PCR assay for ovine beta-actin mRNA.

    PubMed

    Bjarnadottir, Helga; Jonsson, Jon J

    2005-05-01

    Beta-Actin mRNA is often used for normalization in gene expression experiments. We describe a sensitive, rapid and specific quantitative assay for the cytoplasmic ovine beta-actin mRNA. The assay was based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements to amplify cDNA products reverse transcribed from mRNA. A part of the ovine beta-actin sequence was amplified from cDNA from fetal ovine synovial (FOS) cells with mRNA-specific primers and cloned into a plasmid clone. The assay standard curve was constructed with dilutions of this plasmid. The assay was linear over five orders of magnitude and detected down to 600 copies per reaction of target DNA. Intraassay coefficient of variation was 12%. Detection of the beta-actin gene was eliminated by designing FRET probes at splice junctions and detection of putative processed pseudogenes was minimized by using FRET assay design with four oligonucleotides. We measured 0.2 copies per cell in RNA preparations without reverse transcription and DNase digestion. This might represent processed pseudogenes. In constrast, we measured 1400 beta-actin mRNA copies per cell in RNA preparations after the RT and DNase steps. The assay should, therefore, be sensitive enough to measure beta-actin from a single individual cell. Dilution of target DNA in murine RNA or ovine cDNA preparations did not effect efficiency of PCR or linearity of the assay. The quantitative assay described in this work can be used to correct for variations in various real-time qRT-PCR experiments in ovine cells with diverse goals, including gene expression studies, quantitation of viral load in infected cells and in various gene therapy experiments measuring vector load and expression in transduced cells. PMID:15823406

  16. The antiviral drug ribavirin does not mimic the 7-methylguanosine moiety of the mRNA cap structure in vitro.

    PubMed

    Westman, Belinda; Beeren, Lisa; Grudzien, Ewa; Stepinski, Janusz; Worch, Remigiusz; Zuberek, Joanna; Jemielity, Jacek; Stolarski, Ryszard; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Rhoads, Robert E; Preiss, Thomas

    2005-10-01

    The eukaryotic initiation factor eIF4E binds the mRNA 5' cap structure and has a central role during translational initiation. eIF4E and the mechanisms to control its activity have oncogenic properties and thus have become targets for anticancer drug development. A recent study (Kentsis et al. 2004) presented evidence that the antiviral nucleoside ribavirin and its phosphorylated derivatives were structural mimics of the mRNA cap, high-affinity ligands for eIF4E, and potent repressors of eIF4E-mediated cell transformation and tumor growth. Based on these findings, we tested ribavirin, ribavirin triphosphate (RTP), and the dinucleotide RpppG for their ability to inhibit translation in vitro. Surprisingly, the ribavirin-based compounds did not affect translation at concentrations where canonical cap analogs efficiently block cap-dependent translation. Using a set of reporter mRNAs that are translated via either cap-dependent or viral internal ribosome entry sites (IRES)-dependent initiation, we found that these ribavirin-containing compounds did inhibit translation at high (millimolar) concentrations, but there was no correlation of this inhibition with an eIF4E requirement for translation. The addition of a ribavirin-containing cap to mRNA did not stimulate translation. Fluorescence titration experiments with eIF4E and the nuclear cap-binding complex CBC indicated affinities for RTP and RpppG that were two to four orders of magnitude lower than those of m(7)GTP and m(7)GpppG. We conclude that, at least with respect to translation, ribavirin does not act in vitro as a functional mimic of the mRNA cap.

  17. Gad1 mRNA as a reliable indicator of altered GABA release from orexigenic neurons in the hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Dicken, Matthew S.; Hughes, Alexander R.; Hentges, Shane T.

    2016-01-01

    The strength of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated inhibitory synaptic input is a principle determinant of neuronal activity. However, because of differences in the number of GABA afferent inputs and the sites of synapses, it is difficult to directly assay for altered GABA transmission between specific cells. The present study tested the hypothesis that the level of mRNA for the GABA synthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can provide a reliable proxy for GABA release. This was tested in a mouse hypothalamic circuit important in the regulation of energy balance. Fluorescent in situ hybridization results show that the expression of Gad1 mRNA (encoding the GAD67 enzyme) was increased in hypothalamic neuropeptide Y/agouti-related peptide (NPY/AgRP) neurons after an overnight fast, consistent with the ability of GABA from these neurons to stimulate food intake. Optogenetic studies confirmed that the observed increase in Gad1 mRNA correlated with an increase in the probability of GABA release from NPY/AgRP neurons onto downstream proopiomelanocortin neurons. Likewise, there was an increase in the readily releasable pool of GABA in NPY/AgRP neurons. Selective inhibition of GAD activity in NPY/AgRP neurons decreased GABA release, indicating that GAD67 activity, which is largely dictated by expression level, is a key determinant of GABA release. Altogether, it appears that Gad expression may be a reliable proxy of altered GABAergic transmission. Examining changes in Gad mRNA as a proxy for GABA release may be particularly helpful when the downstream targets are not known or when limited tools exist for detecting GABA release at a particular synapse. PMID:26370162

  18. The antiviral drug ribavirin does not mimic the 7-methylguanosine moiety of the mRNA cap structure in vitro

    PubMed Central

    WESTMAN, BELINDA; BEEREN, LISA; GRUDZIEN, EWA; STEPINSKI, JANUSZ; WORCH, REMIGIUSZ; ZUBEREK, JOANNA; JEMIELITY, JACEK; STOLARSKI, RYSZARD; DARZYNKIEWICZ, EDWARD; RHOADS, ROBERT E.; PREISS, THOMAS

    2005-01-01

    The eukaryotic initiation factor eIF4E binds the mRNA 5′ cap structure and has a central role during translational initiation. eIF4E and the mechanisms to control its activity have oncogenic properties and thus have become targets for anticancer drug development. A recent study (Kentsis et al. 2004) presented evidence that the antiviral nucleoside ribavirin and its phosphorylated derivatives were structural mimics of the mRNA cap, high-affinity ligands for eIF4E, and potent repressors of eIF4E-mediated cell transformation and tumor growth. Based on these findings, we tested ribavirin, ribavirin triphosphate (RTP), and the dinucleotide RpppG for their ability to inhibit translation in vitro. Surprisingly, the ribavirin-based compounds did not affect translation at concentrations where canonical cap analogs efficiently block cap-dependent translation. Using a set of reporter mRNAs that are translated via either cap-dependent or viral internal ribosome entry sites (IRES)-dependent initiation, we found that these ribavirin-containing compounds did inhibit translation at high (millimolar) concentrations, but there was no correlation of this inhibition with an eIF4E requirement for translation. The addition of a ribavirin-containing cap to mRNA did not stimulate translation. Fluorescence titration experiments with eIF4E and the nuclear cap-binding complex CBC indicated affinities for RTP and RpppG that were two to four orders of magnitude lower than those of m7GTP and m7GpppG. We conclude that, at least with respect to translation, ribavirin does not act in vitro as a functional mimic of the mRNA cap. PMID:16131589

  19. Reversible fluorescence photoswitching in DNA.

    PubMed

    Smith, Darren A; Holliger, Philipp; Flors, Cristina

    2012-08-30

    We describe the engineering of reversible fluorescence photoswitching in DNA with high-density substitution, and its applications in advanced fluorescence microscopy methods. High-density labeling of DNA with cyanine dyes can be achieved by polymerase chain reaction using a modified DNA polymerase that has been evolved to efficiently incorporate Cy3- and Cy5-labeled cytosine base analogues into double-stranded DNA. The resulting biopolymer, "CyDNA", displays hundreds of fluorophores per DNA strand and is strongly colored and highly fluorescent, although previous observations suggest that fluorescence quenching at such high density might be a concern, especially for Cy5. Herein, we first investigate the mechanisms of fluorescence quenching in CyDNA and we suggest that two different mechanisms, aggregate formation and resonance energy transfer, are responsible for fluorescence quenching at high labeling densities. Moreover, we have been able to re-engineer CyDNA into a reversible fluorescence photoswitchable biopolymer by using the properties of the Cy3-Cy5 pair. This novel biopolymer constitutes a new class of photoactive DNA-based nanomaterial and is of great interest for advanced microscopy applications. We show that reversible fluorescence photoswitching in CyDNA can be exploited in optical lock-in detection imaging. It also lays the foundations for improved and sequence-specific super-resolution fluorescence microscopy of DNA. PMID:22861666

  20. Fluorescence of ceramic color standards.

    PubMed

    Koo, Annette; Clare, John F; Nield, Kathryn M; Deadman, Andrew; Usadi, Eric

    2010-04-20

    Fluorescence has been found in color standards available for use in calibration and verification of color measuring instruments. The fluorescence is excited at wavelengths below about 600?nm and emitted above 700?nm, within the response range of silicon photodiodes, but at the edge of the response of most photomultipliers and outside the range commonly scanned in commercial colorimeters. The degree of fluorescence on two of a set of 12 glossy ceramic tiles is enough to introduce significant error when those tiles have been calibrated in one mode of measurement and are used in another. We report the nature of the fluorescence and the implications for color measurement.