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Sample records for mrna blotting fluorescence

  1. Changes in rRNA levels during stress invalidates results from mRNA blotting: fluorescence in situ rRNA hybridization permits renormalization for estimation of cellular mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M C; Nielsen, A K; Molin, S; Hammer, K; Kilstrup, M

    2001-08-01

    Regulation of gene expression can be analyzed by a number of different techniques. Some techniques monitor the level of specific mRNA directly, and others monitor indirectly by determining the level of enzymes encoded by the mRNA. Each method has its own inherent way of normalization. When results obtained by these techniques are compared between experiments in which differences in growth rates, strains, or stress treatments occur, the normalization procedure may have a significant impact on the results. In this report we present a solution to the normalization problem in RNA slot blotting experiments, in which mRNA levels routinely are normalized to a fixed amount of extracted total RNA. The cellular levels of specific mRNA species were estimated using a renormalization with the total RNA content per cell. By a combination of fluorescence in situ rRNA hybridization, which estimates the relative level of rRNA per cell, and slot blotting to rRNA probes, which estimates the level of rRNA per extracted total RNA, the amount of RNA per cell was calculated in a series of heat shock experiments with the gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis. It was found that the level of rRNA per cell decreased to 30% in the course of the heat shock. This lowered ribosome level led to a decrease in the total RNA content, resulting in a gradually increasing overestimation of the mRNA levels throughout the experiment. Using renormalized cellular mRNA levels, the HrcA-mediated regulation of the genes in the hrcA-grpE-dnaK operon was analyzed. The hybridization data suggested a complex heat shock regulation indicating that the mRNA levels continued to rise after 30 min, but after renormalization the calculated average cellular levels exhibited a much simpler induction pattern, eventually attaining a moderately increased value.

  2. Quantitation of protein on gels and blots by infrared fluorescence of Coomassie blue and Fast Green.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shen; Wehr, Nancy B; Levine, Rodney L

    2006-03-15

    Coomassie blue staining of gels and blots is commonly employed for detection and quantitation of proteins by densitometry. We found that Coomassie blue or Fast Green FCF bound to protein fluoresces in the near infrared. We took advantage of this property to develop a rapid and sensitive method for detection and quantitation of proteins in gels and on blots. The fluorescence response is quantitative for protein content between 10 ng and 20 microg per band or spot. Staining and destaining require only 30 min, and the method is compatible with subsequent immunodetection.

  3. A guide to modern quantitative fluorescent western blotting with troubleshooting strategies.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Samantha L; Hurtado, Maica Llavero; Oldknow, Karla J; Graham, Laura C; Marchant, Thomas W; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Farquharson, Colin; Wishart, Thomas M

    2014-11-20

    The late 1970s saw the first publicly reported use of the western blot, a technique for assessing the presence and relative abundance of specific proteins within complex biological samples. Since then, western blotting methodology has become a common component of the molecular biologists experimental repertoire. A cursory search of PubMed using the term "western blot" suggests that in excess of two hundred and twenty thousand published manuscripts have made use of this technique by the year 2014. Importantly, the last ten years have seen technical imaging advances coupled with the development of sensitive fluorescent labels which have improved sensitivity and yielded even greater ranges of linear detection. The result is a now truly Quantifiable Fluorescence based Western Blot (QFWB) that allows biologists to carry out comparative expression analysis with greater sensitivity and accuracy than ever before. Many "optimized" western blotting methodologies exist and are utilized in different laboratories. These often prove difficult to implement due to the requirement of subtle but undocumented procedural amendments. This protocol provides a comprehensive description of an established and robust QFWB method, complete with troubleshooting strategies.

  4. A Guide to Modern Quantitative Fluorescent Western Blotting with Troubleshooting Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Samantha L.; Hurtado, Maica Llavero; Oldknow, Karla J.; Graham, Laura C.; Marchant, Thomas W.; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Farquharson, Colin; Wishart, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The late 1970s saw the first publicly reported use of the western blot, a technique for assessing the presence and relative abundance of specific proteins within complex biological samples. Since then, western blotting methodology has become a common component of the molecular biologists experimental repertoire. A cursory search of PubMed using the term “western blot” suggests that in excess of two hundred and twenty thousand published manuscripts have made use of this technique by the year 2014. Importantly, the last ten years have seen technical imaging advances coupled with the development of sensitive fluorescent labels which have improved sensitivity and yielded even greater ranges of linear detection. The result is a now truly Quantifiable Fluorescence based Western Blot (QFWB) that allows biologists to carry out comparative expression analysis with greater sensitivity and accuracy than ever before. Many “optimized” western blotting methodologies exist and are utilized in different laboratories. These often prove difficult to implement due to the requirement of subtle but undocumented procedural amendments. This protocol provides a comprehensive description of an established and robust QFWB method, complete with troubleshooting strategies. PMID:25490604

  5. Fluorescent Labeling of Proteins and Its Application to SDS-PAGE and Western Blotting.

    PubMed

    Alba, F Javier; Bartolomé, Salvador; Bermúdez, Antonio; Daban, Joan-Ramon

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes very simple fluorescent methods developed in our laboratory allowing the rapid monitoring of total protein patterns on both sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gels and western blots. The noncovalent dye Nile red (9-diethylamino-5H-benzo[α]phenoxazine-5-one) is used for the sensitive staining of proteins in SDS gels. This method is compatible with the electroblotting of protein bands and with the staining of the resulting blot with the covalent dye MDPF (2-methoxy-2,4-diphenyl-3(2H)-furanone). These staining procedures are applied sequentially; there is no need to run a duplicate unstained gel for protein blotting. Furthermore, since only the adduct formed by the reaction of MDPF with proteins is fluorescent, there is no need to destain the membrane after protein labeling. In addition, MDPF staining is compatible with further immunodetection of specific bands with polyclonal antibodies. Finally, using the adequate conditions described below, MDPF staining does not preclude the N-terminal sequence analysis of proteins in selected bands.

  6. Fluorescent detection of Southern blots and PCR-based genetic typing tests

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, E.S.; Worley, J.M.; Zimmerman, P.A.

    1994-09-01

    The Southern blot is used to study gene organization, to identify disease-causing genomic rearrangements, or for typing RFLP markers in forensic, paternity, or prenatal diagnostic testing. Fluorescence offers a much greater dynamic range and a more linear response than film used in radioactive or chemiluminescent detection of RFLPs. We therefore investigated using the Fluorimager{trademark} 575 (Molecular Dynamics, Inc.) for analyzing Southern blots. Using a single-locus probe to D2S44 (YNH24) (Promega Corp.), we detect as little as 100 ng (0.05 attomole) genomic DNA. The alkaline phosphatase-labeled probe is detected using AttoPhos (JBL Scientific), and the developed membrane is scanned with the Fluorimager. Biotinylated hybridization probes can also be developed using a streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate and AttoPhos. The instrument scan parameters can be adjusted to prevent overexposure and accompanying loss of resolution in images of blots, gels, or 96-well microplates. We have used these other sample formats in PCR-based genetic typing assays. We use FluorKit DQS (Molecular Dynamics) to accurately quantify PCR template DNA (1-500 ng) in 96-well microplates scanned using the same instrument. Mutation detection assays run include heteroduplex gels (5% polyacrylamide, 2.7 M urea), short tandem repeat (STR) markers, amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AmpFLP), competitive priming PCR, and allele-specific oligotyping. These assays are run using either 1- or 2-color labeling. We detect unlabeled PCR products, such as the AmpFLP marker D1S80 (Perkin-Elmer) by post-staining gels for 10 minutes with SYBR Green 1 (Molecular Probes) and scanning the wet gel. The Fluorimager scans a 20 x 25 cm sample within three minutes, allowing rapid optimization of fluorescent protocols and high sample throughput.

  7. Differential detection of cytoplasmic Wilms tumor 1 expression by immunohistochemistry, western blotting and mRNA quantification.

    PubMed

    Maki, Takehiro; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Kuroda, Aki; Kyogoku, Noriaki; Yamamura, Yoshiyuki; Tabata, Yukiko; Abiko, Takehiro; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Hida, Yasuhiro; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Eiichi; Kaga, Kichizo; Hatanaka, Kanako; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Imai, Naoko; Hirano, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) is considered to be a promising target of cancer treatment because it has been reported to be frequently expressed at high levels in various malignancies. Although WT1-targeted cancer treatment has been initiated, conclusive detection methods for WT1 are not established. The present study aimed to consolidate immunohistochemistry for WT1 with statistical basis. Transfected cells with forced WT1 expression yielded specific western blot bands and nuclear immunostaining; cytoplasmic immunostaining was not specifically recognized. Immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction were performed in 35 human cell lines using multiple WT1 antibodies and their results were quantified. Relationships among the quantified results were statistically analyzed; the nuclear immunostaining positively correlated with western blot bands and mRNA expression levels, whereas cytoplasmic immunostaining did not. These results indicate that nuclear immunostaining reflects WT1 expression but cytoplasmic immunostaining does not. The nuclear immunostaining was barely (3/541) observed in primary cancer of esophagus, bile duct, pancreas and lung. Although the present study has some limitations, the results indicate that the cytoplasmic immunostaining does not correlate with actual WT1 expression and prompts researchers to carefully evaluate target molecule expression in treatment of cancer.

  8. A total extract dot blot hybridization procedure for mRNA quantitation in small samples of tissues or cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Grimes, A; McArdle, H J; Mercer, J F

    1988-08-01

    A simple method for the estimation of specific mRNA concentrations in small tissue samples (as little as 1 mg) or cultured cells (lower limit 10(5) cells) is described. Guanidine hydrochloride extracts of whole cells or tissues are applied directly onto nitrocellulose and hybridized with the appropriate nick-translated probe. Loading according to DNA content allows expression of the result as concentration per cell. Hybridizing with a ribosomal RNA probe allows expression of results relative to rRNA and estimation of the RNA/DNA ratio in the sample. We describe the application of this procedure to the measurement of ceruloplasmin mRNA in tissues and cultured hepatocytes.

  9. Microinjection and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay for Studying mRNA Export in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Shi, Min; Cheng, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Microinjection and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) assay is a useful method for mRNA export studies, which can overcome the problems of traditional transfection in cells. Here, we describe the method of microinjection and FISH assay applied in investigation of mRNA export. By this method we can estimate the mRNA export kinetics, examining mRNA export in cells with low transfection efficiencies, and observing nuclear export of aberrant RNAs.

  10. Resolution and identification of major peanut allergens using a combination of fluorescence two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis, western blotting and Q-TOF mass spectrometry.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut allergy is triggered by several proteins known as allergens. The matching resolution and identification of major peanut allergens in 2D protein maps, was accomplished by the use of fluorescence two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE), Western blotting and quadrupole time-of...

  11. Fluorescent Labeling of Plasmid DNA and mRNA: Gains and Losses of Current Labeling Strategies.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, K; Braeckmans, K; Remaut, K

    2016-02-17

    Live-cell imaging has provided the life sciences with insights into the cell biology and dynamics. Fluorescent labeling of target molecules proves to be indispensable in this regard. In this Review, we focus on the current fluorescent labeling strategies for nucleic acids, and in particular mRNA (mRNA) and plasmid DNA (pDNA), which are of interest to a broad range of scientific fields. By giving a background of the available techniques and an evaluation of the pros and cons, we try to supply scientists with all the information needed to come to an informed choice of nucleic acid labeling strategy aimed at their particular needs.

  12. Nuclear export of single native mRNA molecules observed by light sheet fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Siebrasse, Jan Peter; Kaminski, Tim; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2012-06-12

    Nuclear export of mRNA is a key transport process in eukaryotic cells. To investigate it, we labeled native mRNP particles in living Chironomus tentans salivary gland cells with fluorescent hrp36, the hnRNP A1 homolog, and the nuclear envelope by fluorescent NTF2. Using light sheet microscopy, we traced single native mRNA particles across the nuclear envelope. The particles were observed to often probe nuclear pore complexes (NPC) at their nuclear face, and in only 25% of the cases yielded actual export. The complete export process took between 65 ms up to several seconds. A rate-limiting step was observed, which could be assigned to the nuclear basket of the pore and might correspond to a repositioning and unfolding of mRNPs before the actual translocation. Analysis of single fluorescent Dbp5 molecules, the RNA helicase essential for mRNA export, revealed that Dbp5 most often approached the cytoplasmic face of the NPC, and exhibited a binding duration of approximately 55 ms. Our results have allowed a refinement of the current models for mRNA export.

  13. Green/red dual fluorescence detection of total protein and alkaline phosphate-conjugated probes on blotting membranes.

    PubMed

    Top, K P; Hatleberg, G; Berggren, K N; Ryan, D; Kemper, C; Haugland, R P; Patton, W F

    2001-03-01

    A two-color fluorescence detection method is described based upon covalently coupling the succinimidyl ester of BODIPY FL-X to proteins immobilized on poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) membranes, followed by detection of target proteins using the fluorogenic substrate 9H-(1,3-dichloro-9,9-dimethylacridin-2-one-7-yl(DDAO)-phosphate in combination with alkaline-phosphatase-conjugated reporter molecules. This results in all proteins in the profile being visualized as green signal while those detected specifically with the alkaline-phosphatase conjugate appear as red signal. The dichromatic detection system is broadly compatible with a wide range of analytical imaging devices including UV epi- or transilluminators combined with photographic or charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras, xenon-arc sources equipped with appropriate excitation/emission filters, and dual laser gel scanners outfitted with a 473 nm second-harmonic generation or 488 nm argon-ion laser as well as a 633 nm helium-neon or 635 nm diode laser. The dichromatic detection method permits detection of low nanogram amounts of protein and allows for unambiguous identification of target proteins relative to the entire protein profile on a single electroblot, obviating the need to run replicate gels that would otherwise require visualization of total proteins by silver staining and subsequent alignment with chemiluminescent or colorimetric signals generated on electroblots.

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of fluorescent cap analogues for mRNA labelling

    PubMed Central

    Ziemniak, Marcin; Szabelski, Mariusz; Lukaszewicz, Maciej; Nowicka, Anna; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Rhoads, Robert E.; Wieczorek, Zbigniew; Jemielity, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    We describe the synthesis and properties of five dinucleotide fluorescent cap analogues labelled at the ribose of the 7-methylguanosine moiety with either anthraniloyl (Ant) or N-methylanthraniloyl (Mant), which have been designed for the preparation of fluorescent mRNAs via transcription in vitro. Two of the analogues bear a methylene modification in the triphosphate bridge, providing resistance against either the Dcp2 or DcpS decapping enzymes. All these compounds were prepared by ZnCl2-mediated coupling of a nucleotide P-imidazolide with a fluorescently labelled mononucleotide. To evaluate the utility of these compounds for studying interactions with cap-binding proteins and cap-related cellular processes, both biological and spectroscopic features of those compounds were determined. The results indicate acceptable quantum yields of fluorescence, pH independence, environmental sensitivity, and photostability. The cap analogues are incorporated by RNA polymerase into mRNA transcripts that are efficiently translated in vitro. Transcripts containing fluorescent caps but unmodified in the triphosphate chain are hydrolysed by Dcp2 whereas those containing a α-β methylene modification are resistant. Model studies exploiting sensitivity of Mant to changes of local environment demonstrated utility of the synthesized compounds for studying cap-related proteins. PMID:24273643

  15. Detection of Y chromosome sequences in a 45,X/46,XXq - patient by Southern blot analysis of PCR-amplified DNA and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Kocova, M.; Siegel, S.F.; Wenger, S.L.

    1995-02-13

    In some cases of gonadal dysgenesis, cytogenetic analysis seems to be discordant with the phenotype of the patients. We have applied techniques such as Southern blot analysis and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to resolve the phenotype/genotype discrepancy in a patient with ambiguous genitalia in whom the peripheral blood karotype was 45,X. Gonadectomy at age 7 months showed the gonadal tissue to be prepubertal testis on the left side and a streak gonad on the right. The karyotype obtained from the left gonad was 45,X/46,XXq- and that from the right gonad was 45,X. Three different techniques, PCR amplification, FISH, and chromosome painting for X and Y chromosomes, confirmed the presence of Y chromosome sequences. Five different tissues were evaluated. The highest percentage of Y chromosome positive cells were detected in the left gonad, followed by the peripheral blood lymphocytes, skin fibroblasts, and buccal mucosa. No Y chromosomal material could be identified in the right gonad. Since the Xq- chromosome is present in the left gonad (testis), it is likely that the Xq- contains Y chromosomal material. Sophisticated analysis in this patient showed that she has at least 2 cell lines, one of which contains Y chromosomal material. These techniques elucidated the molecular basis of the genital ambiguity for this patient. When Y chromosome sequences are present in patients with Ullrich-Turner syndrome or gonadal dysgenesis, the risk for gonadal malignancy is significantly increased. Hence, molecular diagnostic methods to ascertain for the presence of Y chromosome sequences may expedite the evaluation of patients with the ambiguous genitalia. 21 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Analyzing abundance of mRNA molecules with a near-infrared fluorescence technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Pan, Yan; Zhang, Beibei; Wang, Jinke

    2014-01-01

    This study describes a simple method for analyzing the abundance of mRNA molecules in a total DNA sample. Due to the dependence on the near-infrared fluorescence technique, this method is named near-infrared fluorescence gene expression detection (NIRF-GED). The procedure has three steps: (1) isolating total RNA from detected samples and reverse-transcription into cDNA with a biotin-labeled oligo dT; (2) hybridizing cDNA to oligonucleotide probes coupled to a 96-well microplate; and (3) detecting biotins with NIRF-labeled streptavidin. The method was evaluated by performing proof-in-concept detections of absolute and relative expressions of housekeeping and NF-κB target genes in HeLa cells. As a result, the absolute expression of three genes, Ccl20, Cxcl2, and Gapdh, in TNF-α-uninduced HeLa cells was determined with a standard curve constructed on the same microplate, and the relative expression of five genes, Ccl20, Cxcl2, Il-6, STAT5A, and Gapdh, in TNF-α-induced and -uninduced HeLa cells was measured by using NIRF-GED. The results were verified by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and DNA microarray detections. The biggest advantage of NIRF-GED over the current techniques lies in its independence of exponential or linear amplification of nucleic acids. Moreover, NIRF-GED also has several other benefits, including high sensitivity as low as several fmols, absolute quantification in the range of 9 to 147 fmols, low cDNA consumption similar to qPCR template, and the current medium throughput in 96-well microplate format and future high throughput in DNA microarray format. NIRF-GED thus provides a new tool for analyzing gene transcripts and other nucleic acid molecules.

  17. Testing UK blood donors for exposure to human parvovirus 4 using a time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay to screen sera and Western blot to confirm reactive samples.

    PubMed

    Maple, Peter A C; Beard, Stuart; Parry, Ruth P; Brown, Kevin E

    2013-10-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (ParV4), a newly described member of the family Parvoviridae, like B19V, has been found in pooled plasma preparations. The extent, and significance, of ParV4 exposure in UK blood donors remain to be determined and reliable detection of ParV4 immunoglobulin (Ig)G, using validated methods, is needed. With ParV4 virus-like particles a ParV4 IgG time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay (TRFIA) was developed. There is no gold standard or reference assay for measuring ParV4 IgG and the utility of the TRFIA was first examined using a panel of sera from people who inject drugs (PWIDS)--a high-prevalence population for ParV4 infection. Western blotting was used to confirm the specificity of TRFIA-reactive sera. Two cohorts of UK blood donor sera comprising 452 sera collected in 1999 and 156 sera collected in 2009 were tested for ParV4 IgG. Additional testing for B19V IgG, hepatitis C virus antibodies (anti-HCV), and ParV4 DNA was also undertaken. The rate of ParV4 IgG seroprevalence in PWIDS was 20.7% and ParV4 IgG was positively associated with the presence of anti-HCV with 68.4% ParV4 IgG-positive sera testing anti-HCV-positive versus 17.1% ParV4 IgG-negative sera. Overall seropositivity for ParV4 IgG, in 608 UK blood donors was 4.76%. The ParV4 IgG seropositivity for sera collected in 1999 was 5.08%, compared to 3.84% for sera collected in 2009. No ParV4 IgG-positive blood donor sera had detectable ParV4 DNA. ParV4 IgG has been found in UK blood donors and this finding needs further investigation. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  18. Identification of antisense nucleic acid hybridization sites in mRNA molecules with self-quenching fluorescent reporter molecules.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Lida K; Opalinska, Joanna B; Jordan, David; Pattanayak, Vikram; Greenham, Paul; Kalota, Anna; Robbins, Michelle; Vernovsky, Kathy; Rodriguez, Lesbeth C; Do, Bao T; Lu, Ponzy; Gewirtz, Alan M

    2005-02-17

    We describe a physical mRNA mapping strategy employing fluorescent self-quenching reporter molecules (SQRMs) that facilitates the identification of mRNA sequence accessible for hybridization with antisense nucleic acids in vitro and in vivo, real time. SQRMs are 20-30 base oligodeoxynucleotides with 5-6 bp complementary ends to which a 5' fluorophore and 3' quenching group are attached. Alone, the SQRM complementary ends form a stem that holds the fluorophore and quencher in contact. When the SQRM forms base pairs with its target, the structure separates the fluorophore from the quencher. This event can be reported by fluorescence emission when the fluorophore is excited. The stem-loop of the SQRM suggests that SQRM be made to target natural stem-loop structures formed during mRNA synthesis. The general utility of this method is demonstrated by SQRM identification of targetable sequence within c-myb and bcl-6 mRNA. Corresponding antisense oligonucleotides reduce these gene products in cells.

  19. Identification of antisense nucleic acid hybridization sites in mRNA molecules with self-quenching fluorescent reporter molecules

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Lida K.; Opalinska, Joanna B.; Jordan, David; Pattanayak, Vikram; Greenham, Paul; Kalota, Anna; Robbins, Michelle; Vernovsky, Kathy; Rodriguez, Lesbeth C.; Do, Bao T.; Lu, Ponzy; Gewirtz, Alan M.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a physical mRNA mapping strategy employing fluorescent self-quenching reporter molecules (SQRMs) that facilitates the identification of mRNA sequence accessible for hybridization with antisense nucleic acids in vitro and in vivo, real time. SQRMs are 20–30 base oligodeoxynucleotides with 5–6 bp complementary ends to which a 5′ fluorophore and 3′ quenching group are attached. Alone, the SQRM complementary ends form a stem that holds the fluorophore and quencher in contact. When the SQRM forms base pairs with its target, the structure separates the fluorophore from the quencher. This event can be reported by fluorescence emission when the fluorophore is excited. The stem–loop of the SQRM suggests that SQRM be made to target natural stem–loop structures formed during mRNA synthesis. The general utility of this method is demonstrated by SQRM identification of targetable sequence within c-myb and bcl-6 mRNA. Corresponding antisense oligonucleotides reduce these gene products in cells. PMID:15718294

  20. Detection of gamma-globin mRNA in fetal nucleated red blood cells by PNA fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Rasmus Dines; Schønau, Andreas; Thisted, Marianne; Petersen, Kenneth Heesche; Lohse, Jesper; Christensen, Britta; Philip, John; Pluzek, Karl-Johan

    2003-01-01

    Fetal nucleated red blood cells (NRBC) that enter the peripheral blood of the mother are suitable for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. The application of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for tyramide amplified flow fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) detection of gamma-globin mRNA in fixed fetal NRBC is investigated. Hemin-induced K562 cells or nucleated blood cells (NBC) from male cord blood were mixed with NBC from non-pregnant women and analysed using both slide and flow FISH protocols. Post-chorionic villus sampling (CVS) blood samples from pregnant females carrying male fetuses were flow-sorted (2 x 10(6) NBC/sample). Y chromosome-specific PNA FISH was used to confirm that the identified gamma-globin mRNA stained cells were of fetal origin. Flow FISH isolated gamma-globin mRNA positive NBCs showing characteristic cytoplasmic staining were all Y positive. The amplification system generated a population of false positive cells that were, however, easy to distinguish from the NRBCs in the microscope. The gamma-globin mRNA specific PNA probes can be used for detection and isolation of fetal NRBCs from maternal blood. The method has additional potential for the study of gamma-globin mRNA levels or the frequency of adult NRBC (F cells) in patients with hemoglobinopathies. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The western blot

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Western blotting is a technique that involves the separation of proteins by gel electrophoresis, their blotting or transfer to a membrane, and selective immunodetection of an immobilized antigen. This is an important and routine method for protein analysis that depends on the specificity of antibod...

  2. A Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Method To Quantify mRNA Translation by Visualizing Ribosome–mRNA Interactions in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH) is a simple and widely used method to measure mRNA transcript abundance and localization in single cells. A comparable single-molecule in situ method to measure mRNA translation would enable a more complete understanding of gene regulation. Here we describe a fluorescence assay to detect ribosome interactions with mRNA (FLARIM). The method adapts smFISH to visualize and characterize translation of single molecules of mRNA in fixed cells. To visualize ribosome–mRNA interactions, we use pairs of oligonucleotide probes that bind separately to ribosomes (via rRNA) and to the mRNA of interest, and that produce strong fluorescence signals via the hybridization chain reaction (HCR) when the probes are in close proximity. FLARIM does not require genetic manipulation, is applicable to practically any endogenous mRNA transcript, and provides both spatial and temporal information. We demonstrate that FLARIM is sensitive to changes in ribosome association with mRNA upon inhibition of global translation with puromycin. We also show that FLARIM detects changes in ribosome association with an mRNA whose translation is upregulated in response to increased concentrations of iron. PMID:28573204

  3. The Dot Blot ELISA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerbig, Donald G., Jr.; Fenk, Christopher J.; Goodhart, Amy S.

    2000-01-01

    Uses two laboratory techniques, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and Western Blot, to demonstrate antibody-antigen binding concepts. Includes a list of required materials and directions for the procedure, and makes suggestions for classroom applications. (Contains 13 references.) (YDS)

  4. The Dot Blot ELISA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerbig, Donald G., Jr.; Fenk, Christopher J.; Goodhart, Amy S.

    2000-01-01

    Uses two laboratory techniques, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and Western Blot, to demonstrate antibody-antigen binding concepts. Includes a list of required materials and directions for the procedure, and makes suggestions for classroom applications. (Contains 13 references.) (YDS)

  5. Western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Seishiro

    2012-01-01

    Electrophoresis and the following western blot analysis are indispensable to investigate biochemical changes in cells and tissues exposed to nanoparticles or nanomaterials. Proteins should be extracted from the cells and tissues using a proper method, especially when phosphorylated proteins are to be detected. It is important to select a good blocking agent and an appropriate pair of primary and peroxidase-tagged secondary antibodies to obtain good results in western blot analysis. One thing that may be specific to nanomaterials, and that you should keep in mind, is that some proteins may be adsorbed on the surface of particulate nanomaterials. In this chapter the whole process of western blot analysis, from sample preparation to quantitative measurement of target proteins, is described.

  6. Single-cell western blotting

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alex J.; Spelke, Dawn P.; Xu, Zhuchen; Kang, Chi-Chih; Schaffer, David V.; Herr, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    To measure cell-to-cell variation in protein-mediated functions — a hallmark of biological processes — we developed an approach to conduct ~103 concurrent single-cell western blots (scWesterns) in ~4 hours. A microscope slide supporting a 30 µm-thick photoactive polyacrylamide gel enables western blotting comprised of: settling of single cells into microwells, lysis in situ, gel electrophoresis, photoinitiated blotting to immobilize proteins, and antibody probing. We apply this scWestern to monitor single rat neural stem cell differentiation and responses to mitogen stimulation. The scWestern quantifies target proteins even with off-target antibody binding, multiplexes to 11 protein targets per single cell with detection thresholds of <30,000 molecules, and supports analyses of low starting cell numbers (~200) when integrated with fluorescence activated cell sorting. The scWestern thus overcomes limitations in single-cell protein analysis (i.e., antibody fidelity, sensitivity, and starting cell number) and constitutes a versatile tool for the study of complex cell populations at single-cell resolution. PMID:24880876

  7. The Western Blot.

    PubMed

    Hnasko, Thomas S; Hnasko, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Western blotting is a technique that involves the separation of proteins by gel electrophoresis, their blotting or transfer to a membrane, and selective immunodetection of an immobilized antigen. This is an important and routine method for protein analysis that depends on the specificity of antibody-antigen interaction and is useful for the qualitative or semiquantitative identification of specific proteins and their molecular weight from a complex mixture. This chapter will outline the requisite steps including gel electrophoresis of a protein sample, transfer of protein from a gel to a membrane support, and immunodetection of a target antigen.

  8. Measuring mRNA copy-number in individual Escherichia coli cells using single-molecule fluorescent in situ hybridization (smFISH)

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Samuel O.; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A.; Xu, Heng; Golding, Ido

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for measuring the absolute number of mRNA molecules from a gene of interest in individual, chemically fixed Escherichia coli cells. A set of fluorescently-labeled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the target mRNA, so that each mRNA molecule is decorated by a known number of fluorescent dyes. Cells are then imaged using fluorescence microscopy. The number of target mRNA is estimated from the total intensity of fluorescent foci in the cell, rather than from counting discrete “spots” as in other currently available protocols. Image analysis is performed using an automated algorithm. The measured mRNA copy-number distribution obtained from many individual cells can be used to extract the parameters of stochastic gene activity, namely the frequency and size of transcription bursts from the gene of interest. The experimental procedure takes 2 days, with another 2-3 days typically required for image and data analysis. PMID:23680982

  9. Detection of Proteins on Blot Membranes.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Aaron; Harper, Sandra; Speicher, David W

    2016-11-01

    Staining of blot membranes enables the visualization of bound proteins. Proteins are usually transferred to blot membranes by electroblotting, by direct spotting of protein solutions, or by contact blots. Staining allows the efficiency of transfer to the membrane to be monitored. This unit describes protocols for staining proteins after electroblotting from polyacrylamide gels to blot membranes such as polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF), nitrocellulose, or nylon membranes. The same methods can be used if proteins are directly spotted, either manually or using robotics. Protocols are included for seven general protein stains (amido black, Coomassie blue, Ponceau S, colloidal gold, colloidal silver, India ink, and MemCode) and three fluorescent protein stains (fluorescamine, IAEDANS, and SYPRO Ruby). Also included is an in-depth discussion of the different blot membrane types and the compatibility of different protein stains with downstream applications, such as immunoblotting or N-terminal Edman sequencing. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Monitoring mRNA Translation in Neuronal Processes Using Fluorescent Non-Canonical Amino Acid Tagging.

    PubMed

    Kos, Aron; Wanke, Kai A; Gioio, Anthony; Martens, Gerard J; Kaplan, Barry B; Aschrafi, Armaz

    2016-05-01

    A steady accumulation of experimental data argues that protein synthesis in neurons is not merely restricted to the somatic compartment, but also occurs in several discrete cellular micro-domains. Local protein synthesis is critical for the establishment of synaptic plasticity in mature dendrites and in directing the growth cones of immature axons, and has been associated with cognitive impairment in mice and humans. Although in recent years a number of important mechanisms governing this process have been described, it remains technically challenging to precisely monitor local protein synthesis in individual neuronal cell parts independent from the soma. This report presents the utility of employing microfluidic chambers for the isolation and treatment of single neuronal cellular compartments. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a protein synthesis assay, based on fluorescent non-canonical amino acid tagging (FUNCAT), can be combined with this cell culture system to label nascent proteins within a discrete structural and functional domain of the neuron. Together, these techniques could be employed for the detection of protein synthesis within developing and mature neurites, offering an effective approach to elucidate novel mechanisms controlling synaptic maintenance and plasticity. © 2016 The Histochemical Society.

  11. Western Blot Techniques.

    PubMed

    Kim, Brianna

    2017-01-01

    The Western blot is an important laboratory technique that allows for specific identification and characterization of proteins. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE)-separated proteins are electophoretically transferred to a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane which is then incubated with specific antibodies, then developed to show the protein of interest. Here, we describe the transfer and detection of Outer surface protein A (OspA), a protein only found on the surface of Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease.

  12. High-throughput fluorescence anisotropy screen for inhibitors of the oncogenic mRNA binding protein, IMP-1.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Lily; Mao, Chengjian; Andruska, Neal; Zhang, Chen; Shapiro, David J

    2014-03-01

    Cancer cell proliferation is regulated by oncogenes, such as c-Myc. An alternative approach to directly targeting individual oncogenes is to target IMP-1, an oncofetal protein that binds to and stabilizes messenger RNAs (mRNAs), leading to elevated expression of c-Myc and other oncogenes. Expression of IMP-1 is tightly correlated with a poor prognosis and reduced survival in ovarian, lung, and colon cancer. Small-molecule inhibitors of IMP-1 have not been reported. We established a fluorescence anisotropy/polarization microplate assay (FAMA) for analyzing binding of IMP-1 to a fluorescein-labeled 93 nucleotide c-Myc mRNA target (flMyc), developed the assay as a highly robust (Z' factor = 0.60) FAMA-based high-throughput screen for inhibitors of binding of IMP-1 to flMyc, and carried out a successful pilot screen of 17,600 small molecules. Our studies support rapidly filtering out toxic nonspecific inhibitors using an early cell-based assay in control cells lacking the target protein. The physiologic importance of verified hits from the in vitro high-throughput screen was demonstrated by identification of the first small-molecule IMP-1 inhibitor, a lead compound that selectively inhibits proliferation of IMP-1-positive cancer cells with very little or no effect on proliferation of IMP-1-negative cells.

  13. FISH-Flow, a protocol for the concurrent detection of mRNA and protein in single cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Arrigucci, Riccardo; Bushkin, Yuri; Radford, Felix; Lakehal, Karim; Vir, Pooja; Pine, Richard; Martin, December; Sugarman, Jeffrey; Zhao, Yanlin; Yap, George S; Lardizabal, Alfred A; Tyagi, Sanjay; Gennaro, Maria Laura

    2017-01-01

    We describe a flow-cytometry-based protocol for intracellular mRNA measurements in nonadherent mammalian cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. The method, which we call FISH-Flow, allows for high-throughput multiparametric measurements of gene expression, a task that was not feasible with earlier, microscopy-based approaches. The FISH-Flow protocol involves cell fixation, permeabilization and hybridization with a set of fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes. In this protocol, surface and intracellular protein markers can also be stained with fluorescently labeled antibodies for simultaneous protein and mRNA measurement. Moreover, a semiautomated, single-tube version of the protocol can be performed with a commercially available cell-wash device that reduces cell loss, operator time and interoperator variability. It takes ~30 h to perform this protocol. An example of FISH-Flow measurements of cytokine mRNA induction by ex vivo stimulation of primed T cells with specific antigens is described. PMID:28518171

  14. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-Based DNA Tetrahedron Nanotweezer for Highly Reliable Detection of Tumor-Related mRNA in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Lei; Lu, Dan-Qing; Liang, Hao; Xie, Sitao; Luo, Can; Hu, Miaomiao; Xu, Liujun; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2017-03-30

    Accurate detection and imaging of tumor-related mRNA in living cells hold great promise for early cancer detection. However, currently, most probes designed to image intracellular mRNA confront intrinsic interferences arising from complex biological matrices and resulting in inevitable false-positive signals. To circumvent this problem, an intracellular DNA nanoprobe, termed DNA tetrahedron nanotweezer (DTNT), was developed to reliably image tumor-related mRNA in living cells based on the FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) "off" to "on" signal readout mode. DTNT was self-assembled from four single-stranded DNAs. In the absence of target mRNA, the respectively labeled donor and acceptor fluorophores are separated, thus inducing low FRET efficiency. However, in the presence of target mRNA, DTNT alters its structure from the open to closed state, thus bringing the dual fluorophores into close proximity for high FRET efficiency. The DTNT exhibited high cellular permeability, fast response and excellent biocompatibility. Moreover, intracellular imaging experiments showed that DTNT could effectively distinguish cancer cells from normal cells and, moreover, distinguish among changes of mRNA expression levels in living cells. The DTNT nanoprobe also exhibits minimal effect of probe concentration, distribution and laser power as other ratiometric probe. More importantly, as a result of the FRET "off" to "on" signal readout mode, the DTNT nanoprobe almost entirely avoids false-positive signals due to intrinsic interferences, such as nuclease digestion, protein binding and thermodynamic fluctuations in complex biological matrices. This design blueprint can be applied to the development of powerful DNA nanomachines for biomedical research and clinical early diagnosis.

  15. Fluorescence detection of KRAS2 mRNA hybridization in lung cancer cells with PNA-peptides containing an internal thiazole orange.

    PubMed

    Sonar, Mahesh V; Wampole, Matthew E; Jin, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Chang-Po; Thakur, Mathew L; Wickstrom, Eric

    2014-09-17

    We previously developed reporter-peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-peptides for sequence-specific radioimaging and fluorescence imaging of particular mRNAs in cells and tumors. However, a direct test for PNA-peptide hybridization with RNA in the cytoplasm would be desirable. Thiazole orange (TO) dye at the 5' end of a hybridization agent shows a strong increase in fluorescence quantum yield when stacked upon a 5' terminal base pair, in solution and in cells. We hypothesized that hybridization agents with an internal TO could distinguish a single base mutation in RNA. Thus, we designed KRAS2 PNA-IGF1 tetrapeptide agents with an internal TO adjacent to the middle base of the 12th codon, a frequent site of cancer-initiating mutations. Our molecular dynamics calculations predicted a disordered bulge with weaker hybridization resulting from a single RNA mismatch. We observed that single-stranded PNA-IGF1 tetrapeptide agents with an internal TO showed low fluorescence, but fluorescence escalated 5-6-fold upon hybridization with KRAS2 RNA. Circular dichroism melting curves showed ∼10 °C higher Tm for fully complementary vs single base mismatch TO-PNA-peptide agent duplexes with KRAS2 RNA. Fluorescence measurements of treated human lung cancer cells similarly showed elevated cytoplasmic fluorescence intensity with fully complementary vs single base mismatch agents. Sequence-specific elevation of internal TO fluorescence is consistent with our hypothesis of detecting cytoplasmic PNA-peptide:RNA hybridization if a mutant agent encounters the corresponding mutant mRNA.

  16. Fluorescence Detection of KRAS2 mRNA Hybridization in Lung Cancer Cells with PNA-Peptides Containing an Internal Thiazole Orange

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We previously developed reporter-peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-peptides for sequence-specific radioimaging and fluorescence imaging of particular mRNAs in cells and tumors. However, a direct test for PNA-peptide hybridization with RNA in the cytoplasm would be desirable. Thiazole orange (TO) dye at the 5′ end of a hybridization agent shows a strong increase in fluorescence quantum yield when stacked upon a 5′ terminal base pair, in solution and in cells. We hypothesized that hybridization agents with an internal TO could distinguish a single base mutation in RNA. Thus, we designed KRAS2 PNA-IGF1 tetrapeptide agents with an internal TO adjacent to the middle base of the 12th codon, a frequent site of cancer-initiating mutations. Our molecular dynamics calculations predicted a disordered bulge with weaker hybridization resulting from a single RNA mismatch. We observed that single-stranded PNA-IGF1 tetrapeptide agents with an internal TO showed low fluorescence, but fluorescence escalated 5–6-fold upon hybridization with KRAS2 RNA. Circular dichroism melting curves showed ∼10 °C higher Tm for fully complementary vs single base mismatch TO-PNA-peptide agent duplexes with KRAS2 RNA. Fluorescence measurements of treated human lung cancer cells similarly showed elevated cytoplasmic fluorescence intensity with fully complementary vs single base mismatch agents. Sequence-specific elevation of internal TO fluorescence is consistent with our hypothesis of detecting cytoplasmic PNA-peptide:RNA hybridization if a mutant agent encounters the corresponding mutant mRNA. PMID:25180641

  17. Molecular beacon-decorated polymethylmethacrylate core-shell fluorescent nanoparticles for the detection of survivin mRNA in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Adinolfi, Barbara; Pellegrino, Mario; Giannetti, Ambra; Tombelli, Sara; Trono, Cosimo; Sotgiu, Giovanna; Varchi, Greta; Ballestri, Marco; Posati, Tamara; Carpi, Sara; Nieri, Paola; Baldini, Francesco

    2017-02-15

    One of the main goals of nanomedicine in cancer is the development of effective drug delivery systems, primarily nanoparticles. Survivin, an overexpressed anti-apoptotic protein in cancer, represents a pharmacological target for therapy and a Molecular Beacon (MB) specific for survivin mRNA is available. In this study, the ability of polymethylmethacrylate nanoparticles (PMMA-NPs) to promote survivin MB uptake in human A549 cells was investigated. Fluorescent and positively charged core PMMA-NPs of nearly 60nm, obtained through an emulsion co-polymerization reaction, and the MB alone were evaluated in solution, for their analytical characterization; then, the MB specificity and functionality were verified after adsorption onto the PMMA-NPs. The carrier ability of PMMA-NPs in A549 was examined by confocal microscopy. With the optimized protocol, a hardly detectable fluorescent signal was obtained after incubation of the cells with the MB alone (fluorescent spots per cell of 1.90±0.40 with a mean area of 1.04±0.20µm(2)), while bright fluorescent spots inside the cells were evident by using the MB loaded onto the PMMA-NPs. (27.50±2.30 fluorescent spots per cell with a mean area of 2.35±0.16µm(2)). These results demonstrate the ability of the PMMA-NPs to promote the survivin-MB internalization, suggesting that this complex might represent a promising strategy for intracellular sensing and for the reduction of cancer cell proliferation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Isolation of full-size mRNA from ethanol-fixed cells after cellular immunofluorescence staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, C.; Kremer, J.; Hundeiker, C.; Goettlinger, C.; Radbruch, A.

    1995-12-01

    Preparation of intact, full-size RNA from tissues or cells requires stringent precautions against ubiquitous and rather stable RNases. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) usually aims at the isolation of cells according to cell surface markers on living cells, from which RNA can be obtained by standard protocols. The separation of cells according to intracellular immunofluorescence markers, such as intranuclear, intracytoplasmic, or secreted molecules, requires permeation of the cell membrane for the staining antibodies, which is usually achieved by fixation. However, commonly used fixatives such as ethanol, methanol, or formaldehyde do not inactivate RNases completely, thereby hampering the analysis of complete RNA molecules from fixed cells. We report isolation of intact, full size RNA suitable for Northern blotting from cells that were fixed by 95% ethanol/5% acetic acid containing RNase inhibitors, stained intracellularly, and sorted by FACS. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. BLOT Ver. 1.65

    SciTech Connect

    MEYERS, RAY; GLICK, III, JOHN; FORSYTHE, CHRISTI; GILKEY, AMY; SJAARDEMA, GREGORY

    2009-03-24

    BLOT is a graphic program for post-processing finite element analyses output in the EXODUS II database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive graphics devices supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots of the analysis output variables including deformed mesh plots, line contours, filled (painted) contours, vector plots of two/three variables (velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (discrete cracks). Features include pathlines of analysis variables drawn on the mesh, element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. X-Y plots of the analysis variables include time vs. variable plots or variable vs. variable plots, and distance vs. variable plots at selected time steps where distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers. BLOT is written in as portable a form as possible. Fortran code is written in ANSI Standard FORTRAN-77. Machine-specific routines are limited in number and are grouped together to minimize the time required to adapt them to a new system. SEACAS codes have been ported to several Unix systems

  20. The design of a quantitative western blot experiment.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sean C; Posch, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Western blotting is a technique that has been in practice for more than three decades that began as a means of detecting a protein target in a complex sample. Although there have been significant advances in both the imaging and reagent technologies to improve sensitivity, dynamic range of detection, and the applicability of multiplexed target detection, the basic technique has remained essentially unchanged. In the past, western blotting was used simply to detect a specific target protein in a complex mixture, but now journal editors and reviewers are requesting the quantitative interpretation of western blot data in terms of fold changes in protein expression between samples. The calculations are based on the differential densitometry of the associated chemiluminescent and/or fluorescent signals from the blots and this now requires a fundamental shift in the experimental methodology, acquisition, and interpretation of the data. We have recently published an updated approach to produce quantitative densitometric data from western blots (Taylor et al., 2013) and here we summarize the complete western blot workflow with a focus on sample preparation and data analysis for quantitative western blotting.

  1. The Design of a Quantitative Western Blot Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sean C.; Posch, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Western blotting is a technique that has been in practice for more than three decades that began as a means of detecting a protein target in a complex sample. Although there have been significant advances in both the imaging and reagent technologies to improve sensitivity, dynamic range of detection, and the applicability of multiplexed target detection, the basic technique has remained essentially unchanged. In the past, western blotting was used simply to detect a specific target protein in a complex mixture, but now journal editors and reviewers are requesting the quantitative interpretation of western blot data in terms of fold changes in protein expression between samples. The calculations are based on the differential densitometry of the associated chemiluminescent and/or fluorescent signals from the blots and this now requires a fundamental shift in the experimental methodology, acquisition, and interpretation of the data. We have recently published an updated approach to produce quantitative densitometric data from western blots (Taylor et al., 2013) and here we summarize the complete western blot workflow with a focus on sample preparation and data analysis for quantitative western blotting. PMID:24738055

  2. Lectin-probed western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Lectin-probed western blot analysis, the so-called lectin blot analysis, is a useful method to yield basic information on the glycan structures of glycoproteins, based on the carbohydrate-binding specificities of lectins. By lectin blot analysis, researchers can directly analyze the glycan structures without releasing the glycans from glycoproteins. Here, the author describes protocols for standard analysis, and applies analysis in combination with glycosidase digestion of blot.

  3. Multiplexed miRNA northern blots via hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Maayan; Pierce, Niles A

    2016-09-06

    Northern blots enable detection of a target RNA of interest in a biological sample using standard benchtop equipment. miRNAs are the most challenging targets as they must be detected with a single short nucleic acid probe. With existing approaches, it is cumbersome to perform multiplexed blots in which several RNAs are detected simultaneously, impeding the study of interacting regulatory elements. Here, we address this shortcoming by demonstrating multiplexed northern blotting based on the mechanism of hybridization chain reaction (HCR). With this approach, nucleic acid probes complementary to RNA targets trigger chain reactions in which fluorophore-labeled DNA hairpins self-assemble into tethered fluorescent amplification polymers. The programmability of HCR allows multiple amplifiers to operate simultaneously and independently within a blot, enabling straightforward multiplexing. We demonstrate simultaneous detection of three endogenous miRNAs in total RNA extracted from 293T and HeLa cells. For a given target, HCR signal scales linearly with target abundance, enabling relative and absolute quantitation. Using non-radioactive HCR, sensitive and selective miRNA detection is achieved using 2'OMe-RNA probes. The HCR northern blot protocol takes ∼1.5 days independent of the number of target RNAs.

  4. Problem-Solving Test: Southwestern Blotting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberényi, József

    2014-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: Southern blotting, Western blotting, restriction endonucleases, agarose gel electrophoresis, nitrocellulose filter, molecular hybridization, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, proto-oncogene, c-abl, Src-homology domains, tyrosine protein kinase, nuclear localization signal, cDNA,…

  5. Problem-Solving Test: Southwestern Blotting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberényi, József

    2014-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: Southern blotting, Western blotting, restriction endonucleases, agarose gel electrophoresis, nitrocellulose filter, molecular hybridization, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, proto-oncogene, c-abl, Src-homology domains, tyrosine protein kinase, nuclear localization signal, cDNA,…

  6. Western blot: technique, theory, and trouble shooting.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Tahrin; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2012-09-01

    Western blotting is an important technique used in cell and molecular biology. By using a western blot, researchers are able to identify specific proteins from a complex mixture of proteins extracted from cells. The technique uses three elements to accomplish this task: (1) separation by size, (2) transfer to a solid support, and (3) marking target protein using a proper primary and secondary antibody to visualize. This paper will attempt to explain the technique and theory behind western blot, and offer some ways to troubleshoot.

  7. The fastest Western in town: a contemporary twist on the classic Western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jillian M; McMahon, Martin

    2014-02-05

    The Western blot techniques that were originally established in the late 1970s are still actively utilized today. However, this traditional method of Western blotting has several drawbacks that include low quality resolution, spurious bands, decreased sensitivity, and poor protein integrity. Recent advances have drastically improved numerous aspects of the standard Western blot protocol to produce higher qualitative and quantitative data. The Bis-Tris gel system, an alternative to the conventional Laemmli system, generates better protein separation and resolution, maintains protein integrity, and reduces electrophoresis to a 35 min run time. Moreover, the iBlot dry blotting system, dramatically improves the efficacy and speed of protein transfer to the membrane in 7 min, which is in contrast to the traditional protein transfer methods that are often more inefficient with lengthy transfer times. In combination with these highly innovative modifications, protein detection using infrared fluorescent imaging results in higher-quality, more accurate and consistent data compared to the standard Western blotting technique of chemiluminescence. This technology can simultaneously detect two different antigens on the same membrane by utilizing two-color near-infrared dyes that are visualized in different fluorescent channels. Furthermore, the linearity and broad dynamic range of fluorescent imaging allows for the precise quantification of both strong and weak protein bands. Thus, this protocol describes the key improvements to the classic Western blotting method, in which these advancements significantly increase the quality of data while greatly reducing the performance time of this experiment.

  8. In vitro gene expression and mRNA translocation from transformed walnut (Juglans regia) rootstocks expressing DsRED fluorescent protein to wild-type scions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaochen; Walawage, Sriema L; Leslie, Charles A; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Tricoli, David M; Hu, Hengkang; Huang, Youjun; Zhang, Jiaqi; Xv, Chuanmei; Huang, Jianqin; Zhang, Qixiang

    2017-06-01

    An in vitro grafting method was developed for examining gene translocation from rootstock to scion in walnut. Results showed the DsRED gene itself was not translocated but expressed mRNA was. Grafting is widely used in plants, especially in fruit and nut crops. Selected rootstocks can control scion growth and physiological traits, including shortening of the juvenile phase and controlling tree size. Rootstocks also can provide improved soil adaptation and pathogen resistance. Development of genetically modified (GM) fruit crops has progressed recently, but commercial cultivation is still limited due to the time required for evaluation and issues with deregulation. In this study, we evaluated the stability of DsRED marker gene expression in in vitro walnut shoots and examined translocation of the gene and its mRNA from transformed rootstock to wild-type scion. Results show that DsRED was expressed uniformly in transformed tissue-cultured shoots. When used as in vitro rootstocks, these had good graft affinity with wild-type control scion. PCR and qRT-PCR analysis showed that the DsRED gene was not transported from rootstock to scion, but the transcribed mRNA was translocated. This result provides further evidence of gene signal transport from rootstock to scion in fruit and nut crops.

  9. Studying protein-protein interactions via blot overlay/far western blot.

    PubMed

    Hall, Randy A

    2015-01-01

    Blot overlay is a useful method for studying protein-protein interactions. This technique involves fractionating proteins on SDS-PAGE, blotting to nitrocellulose or PVDF membrane, and then incubating with a probe of interest. The probe is typically a protein that is radiolabeled, biotinylated, or simply visualized with a specific antibody. When the probe is visualized via antibody detection, this technique is often referred to as "Far Western blot." Many different kinds of protein-protein interactions can be studied via blot overlay, and the method is applicable to screens for unknown protein-protein interactions as well as to the detailed characterization of known interactions.

  10. Streamlined Strategies to Better Visualize Southern Blotting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Derek M.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I describe an animated slideshow of Southern blotting that I have made freely available to other instructors. My hope is to provide a clear visualization of the logistics behind the technique so that instructors have a solid basis--as well as time freed up--to discuss its applications with students.

  11. Blot hybridisation analysis of genomic DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenplas, S; Wiid, I; Grobler-Rabie, A; Brebner, K; Ricketts, M; Wållis, G; Bester, A; Boyd, C; Måthew, C

    1984-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease analysis of specific gene sequences is proving to be a valuable technique for characterisation and diagnosis of inherited disorders. This paper describes detailed protocols for isolation, restriction, and blot hybridisation of genomic DNA. Problems and alternatives in the procedure are discussed and a troubleshooting guide has been provided to help rectify faults. Images PMID:6086927

  12. Streamlined Strategies to Better Visualize Southern Blotting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Derek M.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I describe an animated slideshow of Southern blotting that I have made freely available to other instructors. My hope is to provide a clear visualization of the logistics behind the technique so that instructors have a solid basis--as well as time freed up--to discuss its applications with students.

  13. Single cell–resolution western blotting

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chi-Chih; Yamauchi, Kevin A; Vlassakis, Julea; Sinkala, Elly; Duncombe, Todd A; Herr, Amy E

    2017-01-01

    This protocol describes how to perform western blotting on individual cells to measure cell-to-cell variation in protein expression levels and protein state. like conventional western blotting, single-cell western blotting (scWB) is particularly useful for protein targets that lack selective antibodies (e.g., isoforms) and in cases in which background signal from intact cells is confounding. scWB is performed on a microdevice that comprises an array of microwells molded in a thin layer of a polyacrylamide gel (PAG). the gel layer functions as both a molecular sieving matrix during PAGE and a blotting scaffold during immunoprobing. scWB involves five main stages: (i) gravity settling of cells into microwells; (ii) chemical lysis of cells in each microwell; (iii) PAGE of each single-cell lysate; (iv) exposure of the gel to UV light to blot (immobilize) proteins to the gel matrix; and (v) in-gel immunoprobing of immobilized proteins. Multiplexing can be achieved by probing with antibody cocktails and using antibody stripping/reprobing techniques, enabling detection of 10+ proteins in each cell. We also describe microdevice fabrication for both uniform and pore-gradient microgels. to extend in-gel immunoprobing to gels of small pore size, we describe an optional gel de-cross-linking protocol for more effective introduction of antibodies into the gel layer. once the microdevice has been fabricated, the assay can be completed in 4–6 h by microfluidic novices and it generates high-selectivity, multiplexed data from single cells. the technique is relevant when direct measurement of proteins in single cells is needed, with applications spanning the fundamental biosciences to applied biomedicine. PMID:27466711

  14. TLC-Blot (Far-Eastern Blot) and Its Application to Functional Lipidomics.

    PubMed

    Taki, Takao

    2015-01-01

    A simple method for transfer of lipids-including phospholipids, glycolipids, and neutral lipids-from a high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) plate to a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane, TLC-Blot (Far-Eastern Blot), and its biochemical applications are presented. This chapter presents the conventional procedures for separating lipid from tissue samples, cultured cells, and serum and the subsequent development of TLC. Individual lipids separated on an HPTLC plate can be transferred to the PVDF membrane quantitatively and also isolated from the lipid-blotted membrane by a one-step purification procedure. Immunodetection with monoclonal antibodies and treatment with lipid-metabolizing enzymes on the lipid-blotted membrane are possible. The method for identification of individual lipids transferred on the PVDF membrane using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TLC-Blot/MALDI-TOF MS) is shown as a functional lipidomics application.

  15. BLOT II Ver.1.39

    SciTech Connect

    2003-06-03

    BLOT II is a graphic program for post-processing finite element analyses output in the EXODUS II database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive graphics devices supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots of the analysis output variables including deformed mesh plots, line contours, filled (painted) contours, vector plots of two/three variables (velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (discrete cracks). Features include pathlines of analysis variables drawn on the mesh, element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. X-Y plots of the analysis variables include time vs. variable plots or variable vs. variable plots, and distance vs. variable plots at selected time stips where distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers.

  16. Western Blotting Inaccuracies with Unverified Antibodies: Need for a Western Blotting Minimal Reporting Standard (WBMRS)

    PubMed Central

    Gilda, Jennifer E.; Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Cheah, Jenice X.; West, Toni M.; Bodine, Sue C.; Gomes, Aldrin V.

    2015-01-01

    Western blotting is a commonly used technique in biological research. A major problem with Western blotting is not the method itself, but the use of poor quality antibodies as well as the use of different experimental conditions that affect the linearity and sensitivity of the Western blot. Investigation of some conditions that are commonly used and often modified in Western blotting, as well as some commercial antibodies, showed that published articles often fail to report critical parameters needed to reproduce the results. These parameters include the amount of protein loaded, the blocking solution and conditions used, the amount of primary and secondary antibodies used, the antibody incubation solutions, the detection method and the quantification method utilized. In the present study, comparison of ubiquitinated proteins in rat heart and liver samples showed different results depending on the antibody utilized. Validation of five commercial ubiquitin antibodies using purified ubiquitinated proteins, ubiquitin chains and free ubiquitin showed that these antibodies differ in their ability to detect free ubiquitin or ubiquitinated proteins. Investigating proteins modified with interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) in young and old rat hearts using six commercially available antibodies showed that most antibodies gave different semi-quantitative results, suggesting large variability among antibodies. Evidence showing the importance of the Western blot buffer and the concentration of antibody used is presented. Hence there is a critical need for comprehensive reporting of experimental conditions to improve the accuracy and reproducibility of Western blot analysis. A Western blotting minimal reporting standard (WBMRS) is suggested to improve the reproducibility of Western blot analysis. PMID:26287535

  17. Western Blotting Inaccuracies with Unverified Antibodies: Need for a Western Blotting Minimal Reporting Standard (WBMRS).

    PubMed

    Gilda, Jennifer E; Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Cheah, Jenice X; West, Toni M; Bodine, Sue C; Gomes, Aldrin V

    2015-01-01

    Western blotting is a commonly used technique in biological research. A major problem with Western blotting is not the method itself, but the use of poor quality antibodies as well as the use of different experimental conditions that affect the linearity and sensitivity of the Western blot. Investigation of some conditions that are commonly used and often modified in Western blotting, as well as some commercial antibodies, showed that published articles often fail to report critical parameters needed to reproduce the results. These parameters include the amount of protein loaded, the blocking solution and conditions used, the amount of primary and secondary antibodies used, the antibody incubation solutions, the detection method and the quantification method utilized. In the present study, comparison of ubiquitinated proteins in rat heart and liver samples showed different results depending on the antibody utilized. Validation of five commercial ubiquitin antibodies using purified ubiquitinated proteins, ubiquitin chains and free ubiquitin showed that these antibodies differ in their ability to detect free ubiquitin or ubiquitinated proteins. Investigating proteins modified with interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) in young and old rat hearts using six commercially available antibodies showed that most antibodies gave different semi-quantitative results, suggesting large variability among antibodies. Evidence showing the importance of the Western blot buffer and the concentration of antibody used is presented. Hence there is a critical need for comprehensive reporting of experimental conditions to improve the accuracy and reproducibility of Western blot analysis. A Western blotting minimal reporting standard (WBMRS) is suggested to improve the reproducibility of Western blot analysis.

  18. Line blot and western blot immunoassays for diagnosis of Mediterranean spotted fever.

    PubMed Central

    Raoult, D; Dasch, G A

    1989-01-01

    The line blot, a new immunoassay in which antigens are placed on nitrocellulose as narrow lines, was evaluated for its sensitivity and specificity relative to the microimmunofluorescence assay for the diagnosis of Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF). The line blot assay was only slightly less sensitive and less specific than the microimmunofluorescence assay for detection of immunoglobulin M (IgM) or IgG in 100 serum specimens from 42 patients with MSF. No line blot reactions were observed among 50 control serum specimens from febrile patients with other illnesses. The line blot assay was largely group reactive for spotted fever rickettsiae, but 26% of the positive serum specimens also cross-reacted by IgM with Rickettsia typhi. Western immunoblotting was used to characterize the antigenic components recognized by 19 MSF serum specimens. For both IgM and IgG, lipopolysaccharide was the cross-reactive group antigen, whereas the high-molecular-weight species-specific protein antigens (SPAs) were the only reactive proteins. Relative to the other nine rickettsiae, Rickettsia bellii was unique both in exhibiting no SPA reactions and in having a lipopolysaccharide with a predominantly high-molecular-weight distribution. Although most of the 19 MSF serum specimens examined by Western blotting exhibited preferential reactivity to SPAs of two strains of R. conorii and weaker reactions to the other rickettsiae, 2 serum specimens exhibited SPA reactions consistent with typhus infections. In comparison with other assays, the line blot and Western blot immunoassays have advantages which may permit an improvement in the general availability and commercialization of assays for the serodiagnosis of rickettsial infections. Images PMID:2506223

  19. Western blot analysis of adhesive interactions under fluid shear conditions: the blot rolling assay.

    PubMed

    Sackstein, Robert; Fuhlbrigge, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Western blotting has proven to be an important technique in the analysis of receptor-ligand interactions (i.e., by ligand blotting) and for identifying molecules mediating cell attachment (i.e., by cell blotting). Conventional ligand blotting and cell blotting methods employ non-dynamic (static) incubation conditions, whereby molecules or cells of interest are placed in suspension and overlaid on membranes. However, many cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesive interactions occur under fluid shear conditions, and shear stress itself mediates and/or facilitates the engagement of these physiologically appropriate receptors and ligands. Notably, shear forces critically influence the adhesion of circulating cells and platelets to vessel walls in physiologic cell migration and hemostasis, as well as in inflammatory and thrombotic disorders, cancer metastasis, and atherosclerosis. Use of non-dynamic blotting conditions to analyze such interactions can introduce bias, overtly missing relevant effectors and/or exaggerating the relative role(s) of non-physiologic adhesion molecules. To address this shortfall, we have developed a new technique for identifying binding interactions under fluid shear conditions, the "blot rolling assay." Using this method, molecules in a complex mixture are resolved by gel electrophoresis, transferred to a membrane that is rendered semitransparent, and the membrane is then incorporated into a parallel-plate flow chamber apparatus. Under controlled flow conditions, cells or particles bearing adhesion proteins of interest are then introduced into the chamber and interactions with individual immobilized molecules (bands) can be visualized in real time. The substrate molecule(s) supporting adhesion under fluid shear can then be identified by staining with specific antibodies or by excising the relevant band(s) and performing mass spectrometry or microsequencing of the isolated material. This method thus allows for the identification, within a complex

  20. Western blot analysis of adhesive interactions under fluid shear conditions: the blot rolling assay.

    PubMed

    Sackstein, Robert; Fuhlbrigge, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Western blotting has proven to be an important technique in analysis of receptor-ligand interactions (i.e., by ligand blotting) and for identifying molecules mediating cell attachment (i.e., by cell blotting). Conventional ligand blotting and cell blotting methods employ nondynamic (static) incubation conditions, whereby molecules or cells of interest are placed in suspension and overlaid on membranes. However, many cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesive interactions occur under fluid shear conditions, and shear stress itself mediates and/or facilitates the engagement of these physiologically appropriate receptors and ligands. Notably, shear forces critically influence the adhesion of circulating cells and platelets to vessel walls in physiologic cell migration and hemostasis, as well as in inflammatory and thrombotic disorders, cancer metastasis, and atherosclerosis. Use of nondynamic blotting conditions to analyze such interactions can introduce bias, overtly missing relevant effectors and/or exaggerating the relative role(s) of nonphysiologic adhesion molecules. To address this shortfall, we have developed a new technique for identifying binding interactions under fluid shear conditions, the "blot rolling assay." Using this method, molecules in a complex mixture are resolved by gel electrophoresis, transferred to a membrane that is rendered semi-transparent, and the membrane is then incorporated into a parallel-plate flow chamber apparatus. Under controlled flow conditions, cells or particles bearing adhesion proteins of interest are then introduced into the chamber and interactions with individual immobilized molecules (bands) can be visualized in real-time. The substrate molecule(s) supporting adhesion under fluid shear can then be identified by staining with specific antibodies or by excising the relevant band(s) and performing mass spectrometry or microsequencing of the isolated material. This method thus allows for the identification, within a complex mixture

  1. SDS -PAGE and Western Blotting Techniques.

    PubMed

    Blancher, C; Jones, A

    2001-01-01

    The goal of Western blotting, or more correctly, immunoblotting, is to identify with a specific antibody a particular antigen within a complex mixture of proteins that has been fractionated in a polyacrylamide gel and immobilized onto a membrane. Immunoblotting can be used to determine a number of important characteristics of protein antigens-the presence and quantity of an antigen, the relative molecular weight of the polypeptide chain, and the efficiency of extraction of the antigen.Immunoblotting occurs in six stages: (1) extraction and quantification of protein samples; (2) resolution of the protein sample in sodium dodecyl sulfatepolyacrylamide denaturing gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE); (3) transfer of the separated polypeptides to a membrane support; (4) blocking nonspecific binding sites on the membrane; (5) addition of antibodies; and (6) detection.Sample preparation is important for obtaining accurate separation of the proteins on the basis of molecular weight. Depending on whether an antigen is primarily extracellular, cytoplasmic, or membrane-associated different procedures might be required to prepare the sample initially. Although there are exceptions, many soluble nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins can be solubilized by lysis buffers that contain the nonionic detergent Nonidet P-40 (NP-40) and either no salt at all or relatively high concentrations of salt (e.g., 0.5 M NaCl). However, the efficiency of extraction is often greatly affected by pH of the buffer and the presence or absence of chelating agents such EDTA.

  2. Using a large area CMOS APS for direct chemiluminescence detection in Western blotting electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Michela; Newcombe, Jane; Anaxagoras, Thalis; Allinson, Nigel M.; Wells, Kevin

    2012-03-01

    Western blotting electrophoretic sequencing is an analytical technique widely used in Functional Proteomics to detect, recognize and quantify specific labelled proteins in biological samples. A commonly used label for western blotting is Enhanced ChemiLuminescence (ECL) reagents based on fluorescent light emission of Luminol at 425nm. Film emulsion is the conventional detection medium, but is characterized by non-linear response and limited dynamic range. Several western blotting digital imaging systems have being developed, mainly based on the use of cooled Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) and single avalanche diodes that address these issues. Even so these systems present key drawbacks, such as a low frame rate and require operation at low temperature. Direct optical detection using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Active Pixel Sensors (APS)could represent a suitable digital alternative for this application. In this paper the authors demonstrate the viability of direct chemiluminescent light detection in western blotting electrophoresis using a CMOS APS at room temperature. Furthermore, in recent years, improvements in fabrication techniques have made available reliable processes for very large imagers, which can be now scaled up to wafer size, allowing direct contact imaging of full size western blotting samples. We propose using a novel wafer scale APS (12.8 cm×13.2 cm), with an array architecture using two different pixel geometries that can deliver an inherently low noise and high dynamic range image at the same time representing a dramatic improvement with respect to the current western blotting imaging systems.

  3. Repeated probing of Southwestern blots using alkaline phosphatase stripping.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yinshan; Jiang, Daifeng; Jarrett, Harry W

    2010-11-05

    Southwestern blotting is when a DNA sequence is used to probe DNA-binding proteins on an electrophoretic gel blot. It would be highly desirable to be able to probe a blot repeatedly with different DNA sequences. Alkaline phosphatase can remove 5'-phosphoryl groups from DNA and radiolabeled 5'-(32)P-DNA probes are commonly used in Southwestern blotting. Here is shown that once probed, the radioisotope signal on the blot can be effectively removed by brief digestion with alkaline phosphatase, and the blot can then be repeatedly probed at least six times with different DNA probes. This exceeds the repetitions possible with another commonly used method using SDS. The technique can be used with either one-dimensional or multi-dimensional Southwestern blots and does not have a large effect on the phosphorylation state of the blotted proteins. An alternative method using T4 polynucleotide kinase stripping is also introduced but was less well characterized.

  4. Repeated probing of Southwestern blots using alkaline phosphatase stripping

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yinshan; Jiang, Daifeng; Jarrett, Harry W.

    2010-01-01

    Southwestern blotting is when a DNA sequence is used to probe DNA-binding proteins on an electrophoretic gel blot. It would be highly desirable to be able to probe a blot repeatedly with different DNA sequences. Alkaline phosphatase can remove 5′-phosphoryl groups from DNA and radiolabeled 5′-32P-DNA probes are commonly used in Southwestern blotting. Here is shown that once probed, the radioisotope signal on the blot can be effectively removed by brief digestion with alkaline phosphatase, and the blot can then be repeatedly probed at least six times with different DNA probes. This exceeds the repetitions possible with another commonly used method using SDS. The technique can be used with either one-dimensional or multi-dimensional Southwestern blots and does not have a large effect on the phosphorylation state of the blotted proteins. An alternative method using T4 polynucleotide kinase stripping is also introduced but was less well characterized. PMID:20926088

  5. Caveolin-1 isoforms are encoded by distinct mRNAs. Identification Of mouse caveolin-1 mRNA variants caused by alternative transcription initiation and splicing.

    PubMed

    Kogo, H; Fujimoto, T

    2000-01-14

    By searching the EST database with the known cDNA sequence encoding alpha-caveolin-1 (full-length: FL), we found a variant having a hitherto unknown sequence in place of the first exon (5'-end variant: 5'V). The expression level of 5'V mRNA was equivalent to that of FL mRNA. The entire sequences of FL and 5'V mRNA were determined by 3'- and 5'-RACE analysis; their sizes were 2484 bp and 2533 bp, respectively, and the sequences were identical except for the region of the first exon. By Northern blotting, FL and 5'V mRNAs showed the same tissue distribution, and were intensely expressed in the lung, heart, and skeletal muscle. Analyzing the protein production from these mRNAs using green fluorescent protein as a tag, we found FL mRNA to produce the alpha-isoform predominantly, but to form little beta-isoform. The production of the beta-isoform from 5'V mRNA was also demonstrated. By sequence analysis of the first intron of the caveolin-1 gene, a TATA box was found at 28 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site for 5'V mRNA. This is the first demonstration of caveolin-1 mRNA variants generated by alternative transcription initiation, and it indicates that the two isoforms of caveolin-1 are produced from two distinct mRNAs.

  6. Mapping Point Mutations in the Drosophila Rosy Locus Using Denaturing Gradient Gel Blots

    PubMed Central

    Gray, M.; Charpentier, A.; Walsh, K.; Wu, P.; Bender, W.

    1991-01-01

    Mutations within the rosy locus of Drosophila were mapped using blots of genomic DNA fragments separated on denaturing gradient gels. DNA sequence differences between otherwise identical small rosy DNA fragments were detected among the mutants as mobility shifts on the blots. Mutations were mapped to within a few hundred base pairs of rosy sequence in 100 of 130 mutants tested--a 77% detection rate. The sequence changes in 43 rosy mutations are presented; all but six of these were single base changes. Thirty-four of 36 sequenced mutations induced by the alkylating agents N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and ethyl methanesulfonate were transitions. All of the mutations mapped in the rosy transcription unit. Twenty-three of the 43 sequenced mutations change the predicted rosy gene polypeptide sequence; the remainder would interrupt protein translation (17), or disrupt mRNA processing (3). PMID:1901817

  7. Dealing with large sample sizes: comparison of a new one spot dot blot method to western blot.

    PubMed

    Putra, Sulistyo Emantoko Dwi; Tsuprykov, Oleg; Von Websky, Karoline; Ritter, Teresa; Reichetzeder, Christoph; Hocher, Berthold

    2014-01-01

    Western blot is the gold standard method to determine individual protein expression levels. However, western blot is technically difficult to perform in large sample sizes because it is a time consuming and labor intensive process. Dot blot is often used instead when dealing with large sample sizes, but the main disadvantage of the existing dot blot techniques, is the absence of signal normalization to a housekeeping protein. In this study we established a one dot two development signals (ODTDS) dot blot method employing two different signal development systems. The first signal from the protein of interest was detected by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The second signal, detecting the housekeeping protein, was obtained by using alkaline phosphatase (AP). Inter-assay results variations within ODTDS dot blot and western blot and intra-assay variations between both methods were low (1.04-5.71%) as assessed by coefficient of variation. ODTDS dot blot technique can be used instead of western blot when dealing with large sample sizes without a reduction in results accuracy.

  8. BLOTS AND ALL: A HISTORY OF THE RORSCHACH INK BLOT TEST IN BRITAIN.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Katherine; Hegarty, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Despite the easily recognizable nature of the Rorschach ink blot test very little is known about the history of the test in Britain. We attend to the oft-ignored history of the Rorschach test in Britain and compare it to its history in the US. Prior to the Second World War, Rorschach testing in Britain had attracted advocates and critiques. Afterward, the British Rorschach Forum, a network with a high proportion of women, developed around the Tavistock Institute in London and The Rorschach Newsletter. In 1968, the International Rorschach Congress was held in London but soon after the group became less exclusive, and fell into decline. A comparative account of the Rorschach in Britain demonstrates how different national institutions invested in the 'projective hypothesis' according to the influence of psychoanalysis, the adoption of a nationalized health system, and the social positioning of 'others' throughout the twentieth century. In comparing and contrasting the history of the Rorschach in Britain and the US, we decentralize and particularize the history of North American Psychology.

  9. A defined methodology for reliable quantification of Western blot data.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sean C; Berkelman, Thomas; Yadav, Geetha; Hammond, Matt

    2013-11-01

    Chemiluminescent western blotting has been in common practice for over three decades, but its use as a quantitative method for measuring the relative expression of the target proteins is still debatable. This is mainly due to the various steps, techniques, reagents, and detection methods that are used to obtain the associated data. In order to have confidence in densitometric data from western blots, researchers should be able to demonstrate statistically significant fold differences in protein expression. This entails a necessary evolution of the procedures, controls, and the analysis methods. We describe a methodology to obtain reliable quantitative data from chemiluminescent western blots using standardization procedures coupled with the updated reagents and detection methods.

  10. A simple DNA recombination screening method by RT-PCR as an alternative to Southern blot.

    PubMed

    Albers, Eliene; Sbroggiò, Mauro; Martin-Gonzalez, Javier; Avram, Alexandra; Munk, Stephanie; Lopez-Contreras, Andres J

    2017-01-19

    The generation of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs), including knock-out (KO) and knock-in (KI) models, often requires genomic screening of many mouse ES cell (mESC) clones by Southern blot. The use of large targeting constructs facilitates the recombination of exogenous DNA in a specific genomic locus, but limits the detection of its correct genomic integration by standard PCR methods. Genomic Long Range PCR (LR-PCR), using primers adjacent to the homology arms, has been used as an alternative to radioactive-based Southern blot screenings. However, LR-PCRs are often difficult and render many false positive and false negative results. Here, we propose an alternative screening method based on the detection of a genetic modification at the mRNA level, which we successfully optimized in two mouse models. This screening method consists of a reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) using primers that match exons flanking the targeting construct. The detection of the expected modification in this PCR product confirms the integration at the correct genomic location and shows that the mutant mRNA is expressed. This is a simple and sensitive strategy to screen locus-specific recombination of targeting constructs which can also be useful to screen KO and KI mutant mice or cell lines including those generated by CRISPR/Cas9.

  11. Interpretation criteria in Western blot diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Mavin, S; McDonagh, S; Evans, R; Milner, R M; Chatterton, J M W; Ho-Yen, D O

    2011-01-01

    This study reviews the Lyme borreliosis Western blot interpretation process, including what bands are classed as specific, the number of bands needed for a positive result, the role of band intensity and the use of clinical information. In 2008, 3688 patients (4223 serum samples) were tested by enzyme immunoassay (EIA), with 832 patients tested by confirmatory in-house IgG Western blot: 272 patients were Western blot-positive, 170 were weak positive, 156 were equivocal and 234 were negative. These results were assessed, and a review of interpretation criteria from both the USA and Europe was carried out. New interpretation criteria and a testing algorithm were developed. The revised criteria changed the results in 109/3688 (3%) patients and produced significantly more Western blot-positive and weak-positive patients than with the current criteria (485 vs. 442, P < 0.0001). In total, 76 patients who were negative/equivocal became positive, which may have led to a change in their management. Conversely, 33 patients who were weak-positive became equivocal but their management may not have been affected. The authors believe that the revised criteria have simplified blot interpretation and improved the sensitivity and robustness of their Western blot method. Using a protocol tailored to patients that incorporates clinical characteristics means that the entire process will be easier and will aid the management of patients.

  12. Skin blotting: a noninvasive technique for evaluating physiological skin status.

    PubMed

    Minematsu, Takeo; Horii, Motoko; Oe, Makoto; Sugama, Junko; Mugita, Yuko; Huang, Lijuan; Nakagami, Gojiro; Sanada, Hiromi

    2014-06-01

    The skin performs important structural and physiological functions, and skin assessment represents an important step in identifying skin problems. Although noninvasive techniques for assessing skin status exist, no such techniques for monitoring its physiological status are available. This study aimed to develop a novel skin-assessment technique known as skin blotting, based on the leakage of secreted proteins from inside the skin following overhydration in mice. The applicability of this technique was further investigated in a clinical setting. Skin blotting involves 2 steps: collecting proteins by attaching a damp nitrocellulose membrane to the surface of the skin, and immunostaining the collected proteins. The authors implanted fluorescein-conjugated dextran (F-DEX)-containing agarose gels into mice and detected the tissue distribution of F-DEX under different blotting conditions. They also analyzed the correlations between inflammatory cytokine secretion and leakage following ultraviolet irradiation in mice and in relation to body mass index in humans. The F-DEX in mice was distributed in the deeper and shallower layers of skin and leaked through the transfollicular and transepidermal routes, respectively. Ultraviolet irradiation induced tumor necrosis factor secretion in the epidermis in mice, which was detected by skin blotting, whereas follicular tumor necrosis factor was associated with body mass index in obese human subjects. These results support the applicability of skin blotting for skin assessment. Skin blotting represents a noninvasive technique for assessing skin physiology and has potential as a predictive and diagnostic tool for skin disorders.

  13. Mixed lubrication after rewetting of blotted pleural mesothelium.

    PubMed

    Bodega, Francesca; Sironi, Chiara; Porta, Cristina; Pecchiari, Matteo; Zocchi, Luciano; Agostoni, Emilio

    2013-01-15

    Coefficient of kinetic friction (μ) of pleural mesothelium blotted with filter paper, and rewetted with Ringer solution markedly increases; this increase is removed if a sufficient amount of sialomucin or hyaluronan is added to Ringer (Bodega et al., 2012. Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology 180, 34-39). In this research we found that μ of pleural mesothelium blotted, rewetted, and sliding at physiological velocities and loads, decreased with increase of velocity, mainly at low velocities. Despite this decrease, μ at highest velocity was still double that before blotting. With small concentration of sialomucin or hyaluronan μ was markedly smaller at each velocity, decreased less with increase of velocity, and at highest velocity approached preblotting value. These findings indicate a regime of mixed lubrication in post-blotting Ringer, at variance with boundary lubrication occurring before blotting or postblotting with sufficient macromolecule addition. Greater roughness of mesothelial surface, caused by blotting, likely induces zones of elastohydrodynamic lubrication, which increase with velocity, while contact area decreases.

  14. Analysis of Gene and Protein Expression in Atherosclerotic Mouse Aorta by Western Blot and Quantitative Real-Time PCR.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Torres, José

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis involves changes in gene and protein expression patterns in affected arteries. Quantification of these alterations is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathology. Western blot and real-time PCR-used to quantify protein and messenger RNA levels, respectively-are invaluable molecular biology tools, particularly when material is limited. The availability of many genetically modified mouse models of atherosclerosis makes the mouse aorta an ideal tissue in which to carry out these expression pattern analyses. In this chapter, protocols are presented for mRNA and protein extraction from mouse aorta and for the accurate quantification of mRNA expression by RT-PCR and of proteins by western blot.

  15. The line blot assay: problems with titrating first and second antibodies for Western blot and immunohistochemistry assays?

    PubMed

    Rojas-Espinosa, O; Silva-Miranda, M; Wek-Rodriguez, K; Arce-Paredes, P

    2006-01-01

    We describe a technique designed to assess the optimal dilution of primary and secondary antibodies, to be used in Western blot, dot blot, the multi-antigen print immunoassay (MAPIA) and immunohistochemistry assays. The method that we call "line blot" is not an alternative but a practical, complementary tool for the above techniques that assures definitive results are obtained from single assays, so there is no need to repeat the assay. As with most immunoenzymatic assays, the line blot assay is very sensitive, allowing the detection of absolute amounts of antigen as low as 2.5 ng in the 0.5 cm-long segment line (see Results), depending on the strength of the secondary, enzyme-labelled antibody.

  16. Western Blot of Stained Proteins from Dried Polyacrylamide Gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, Claudia; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    1996-01-01

    Western blotting of proteins is customarily performed following their separation on polyacrylamide gels, either prior to staining (1) or, as recently reported, following staining (2). We describe here Western blotting with stained gels, which had been dried and some of which had been stored for years. This procedure permits immunological analysis of proteins, to which antisera may have become available only later, or where the application of newly developed sensitive detection methods is desired. Once rehydration of the gels is achieved, proteins can be-transferred to blotting membranes by any appropriate protocol. Proteins stained with Coomassie Blue have to be detected with a non-chromogenic method, such as the film-based enhanced chemiluminescence (ECL)2) procedure (3). Silver stained proteins, which transfer in the colorless form, may be visualized by any detection method, although, because of the usually very low amounts of proteins, detection by ECL is preferable. Blotting of stained proteins from rehydrated gels is as rapid and as quantitative as from freshly prepared gels, in contrast to blotting from wet stained gels, which requires extensive washing and results in low transfer efficiency (2). Together with a photographic record of the gel pattern, unambiguous identification of immunoreactive proteins from complex mixtures is possible. Some further applications of this work are discussed.

  17. Use of bidirectional blots in differential display analysis.

    PubMed

    Kestler, D P; Hill, M; Agarwal, S; Hall, R E

    2000-05-01

    We have used bidirectional transfer methods in concert with SMART total cDNA complex probes to sequentially screen differential display arrays. In this report we show the utility of this methodology in examining a manganese superoxide dismutase cDNA fragment which we detected while evaluating the effects of the proinflammatory cytokines IL1-beta, TNF-alpha, and IL6 on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) gene expression. By using parallel hybridization of the bidirectional blots with SMART total cDNA (32)P probes derived from untreated or cytokine-treated HUVECs, differential expression between cell treatments can be clearly evaluated. Subsequent screening using this bidirectional blot method results in detection of modulated cDNA clones. Northern and total cDNA blot hybridization with the cDNA clonal fragment confirmed both modulated expression and the efficacy of this screening method. These procedures allow one to use bidirectional blots to evaluate band modulation on agarose gels which are initially run to evaluate the reamplification of display fragments or to confirm cloned cDNA fragments. Thus, bidirectional blot analysis using SMART total cDNA probes allows direct evaluation of differential display bands from the initial reamplification through plasmid insert cloning, increasing the investigator's ability to eliminate false-positive bands during each step of analysis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  18. Direct detection of idiotypic determinants on blotted monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Petit, C; Sauron, M E; Gilbert, M; Thèze, J

    1982-01-01

    The protein-blotting technique has been tested as a mean to study the expression of idiotypic determinants. A monoclonal BALB/c antipoly (Glu60-Ala30-Tyr10) GAT antibody (G5) was caused to migrate on SDS gel and transferred to a nitrocellulose filter. To facilitate the renaturation of the idiotypic determinants, the blotted proteins were incubated in NP40 buffer, immediately after the transfer. The ability of two anti-idiotypic sera to detect two defined idiotypic specificities of the blotted G5 molecules was investigated. When G5 was electrophoresed on SDS gel under non-reducing conditions, a specific detection of two idiotypic specificities of the G5-blotted molecules was obtained. On the other hand, when G5 was migrated under reducing conditions, none of the two antiidiotypic sera gave a staining of the heavy and the light chains. This result indicates that molecules expressing conformational idiotypic determinants can be detected by protein-blotting technique after migration on SDS gel. Moreover, this suggests the possible interest of this technique to analyse non-antibody molecules bearing idiotypic determinants.

  19. Blame it on Southern, but it's a western blot.

    PubMed

    Klionsky, Daniel J

    2017-01-02

    Edwin M. Southern is a professor emeritus at the University of Oxford. He is perhaps best known for development of the "Southern blot" (Dr. Southern was at the University of Edinburgh when he wrote his landmark paper). The Southern blot provided a scientific breakthrough by allowing scientists to detect a particular DNA sequence without first purifying it from the rest of the genome; the basic method involves the transfer of the DNA to a membrane, followed by detection with a specific probe. Although few people perform Southern blots as originally carried out by Southern, due in part to the more recent technique of the polymerase chain reaction, the basic concept continues to play an important role in molecular biology.

  20. Bioconjugation of quantum dot luminescent probes for Western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Makrides, Savvas C; Gasbarro, Christina; Bello, Job M

    2005-10-01

    Western blot analysis is a widely used technique for protein immunodetection. Its current format, however is unsuitable for multiplex detection of proteins, primarily due to intrinsic limitations of standard organic dyes employed as probes. Quantum dot (QD) semiconductor nanoparticles exhibit significant advantages over organic dyes, including their broad absorption bands, narrow, tunable, and symmetric emission spectra, large Stokes shifts, and excellent photostability. Here we describe a novel method for the functionalization of streptavidin-coated QDs with an in vivo biotinylated peptide (head-to-tail dimerized Z domain derived from protein A) that permits the facile conjugation of antibodies to QDs. In this study, we demonstrate the simultaneous detection of two different types of protein in a Western blot. The bioconjugation of QDs described here makes it possible to achieve multiplex detection of proteins in Western blot analysis in a more straightforward manner.

  1. Clinical, immunohistochemical, Western blot, and genetic analysis in dystrophinopathy.

    PubMed

    Na, Sang-Jun; Kim, Won-Joo; Kim, Seung Min; Lee, Kee Ook; Yoon, Bora; Choi, Young-Chul

    2013-08-01

    Dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophies (dystrophinopathies) are the most common form of muscular dystrophy, with variable clinical phenotypes ranging from the severe Duchenne (DMD) to the milder Becker (BMD) forms. In this study, we investigated the relationship between clinical characteristics, findings at immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blot, and the pattern of exon deletions in 24 male patients with dystrophinopathies. We retrospectively reviewed findings from clinical and laboratory examinations, IHC for dystrophin of muscle biopsy tissue, Western blot analysis, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) examination of genomic DNA. All tests were performed in every patient. PCR examination revealed exon deletions in 13 patients (54.2%). At Western blot analysis, 15 patients (62.5%) were negative at all three dystrophin domains. Most of these patients had a clinical presentation consistent with the DMD phenotype. Nine (37.5%) others were weakly positive at one or more domains. Most of these patients presented clinically as BMD phenotype. One patient whose clinical presentation was consistent with BMD phenotype had normal findings at IHC and was weakly positive at all three domains on Western blot analysis; however, with the exception of this patient, the findings at IHC and Western blot were consistent for individual patients. Based on these findings, we conclude that Western blot analysis appears useful for confirmation of dystrophinopathy in BMD patients with normal staining on IHC. Exon deletion analysis by multiplex PCR using peripheral blood is also a simple and useful test for the diagnosis of dystrophinopathy, although it has limited sensitivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Silver and gold nanoparticle coated membranes applied to protein dot blots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, F.; Drozdowicz-Tomsia, K.; Shtoyko, T.; Goldys, E. M.

    2011-02-01

    Detection and identification of low abundance biomarker proteins is frequently based on various types of membrane-based devices. Lowering of the protein detection limits is vital in commercial applications such as lateral flow assays and in Western blots widely used in proteomics. These currently suffer from insufficient detection sensitivity and low retention for small 2-5 kDa proteins. In this study, we report the deposition of two types of metal nanoparticles: gold colloids (50-95 nm diameter) and silver fractals onto a range of commonly used types of membranes including polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). Due to strong affinity of proteins to noble metals, such modified membranes have the potential to effectively capture trace proteins preventing their loss. The membranes modified by metal particles were characterized optically and by SEM. The membrane performance in protein dot blots was evaluated using the protein—fluorophore conjugates Deep Purple-bovine serum albumin and fluorescein—human serum albumin. We found that the metal nanoparticles increase light extinction by metals, which is balanced by increased fluorescence, so that the effective fluorescence signal is unchanged. This feature combined with the capture of proteins by the nanoparticles embedded in the membrane increases the detection limit of membrane assays.

  3. Application of Intermittent Microwave Irradiation to Western Blot Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ting; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    We established a shortened protocol for Western blot analysis using intermittent microwave irradiation. With this method, the procedure is completed within 1 h after applying the primary antibody, and thus greatly saves time. This procedure appears to be applicable to any antibody based on our experience of several years.

  4. Serological Differentiation of Murine Typhus and Epidemic Typhus Using Cross-Adsorption and Western Blotting

    PubMed Central

    La Scola, Bernard; Rydkina, Lena; Ndihokubwayo, Jean-Bosco; Vene, Sirkka; Raoult, Didier

    2000-01-01

    Differentiation of murine typhus due to Rickettsia typhi and epidemic typhus due to Rickettsia prowazekii is critical epidemiologically but difficult serologically. Using serological, epidemiological, and clinical criteria, we selected sera from 264 patients with epidemic typhus and from 44 patients with murine typhus among the 29,188 tested sera in our bank. These sera cross-reacted extensively in indirect fluorescent antibody assays (IFAs) against R. typhi and R. prowazekii, as 42% of the sera from patients with epidemic typhus and 34% of the sera from patients with murine typhus exhibited immunoglobulin M (IgM) and/or IgG titers against the homologous antigen (R. prowazekii and R. typhi, respectively) that were more than one dilution higher than those against the heterologous antigen. Serum cross-adsorption studies and Western blotting were performed on sera from 12 selected patients, 5 with murine typhus, 5 with epidemic typhus, and 2 suffering from typhus of undetermined etiology. Differences in IFA titers against R. typhi and R. prowazekii allowed the identification of the etiological agent in 8 of 12 patients. Western blot studies enabled the identification of the etiological agent in six patients. When the results of IFA and Western blot studies were considered in combination, identification of the etiological agent was possible for 10 of 12 patients. Serum cross-adsorption studies enabled the differentiation of the etiological agent in all patients. Our study indicates that when used together, Western blotting and IFA are useful serological tools to differentiate between R. prowazekii and R. typhi exposures. While a cross-adsorption study is the definitive technique to differentiate between infections with these agents, it was necessary in only 2 of 12 cases (16.7%), and the high costs of such a study limit its use. PMID:10882661

  5. Determining if an mRNA is a Substrate of Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Marcus J O

    2017-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a conserved eukaryotic quality control mechanism which triggers decay of mRNAs harboring premature translation termination codons. In this chapter, I describe methods for monitoring the influence of NMD on mRNA abundance and decay rates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The descriptions include detailed methods for growing yeast cells, total RNA isolation, and Northern blotting. Although the chapter focuses on NMD, the methods can be easily adapted to assess the effect of other mRNA decay pathways.

  6. Rapid diagnosis of rabies in humans and animals by a dot blot enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Madhusudana, Shampur Narayan; Paul, Joel Prem Vasanth; Abhilash, Venugopal Karavattu; Suja, Mooriyath Sukumaran

    2004-11-01

    The presently advocated tests for rapid diagnosis of rabies, such as the fluorescent antibody test (FAT) are expensive and require expertise to carry out and interpret the results. In this study, a simple direct dot blot enzyme immunoassay (DIA) has been developed and evaluated to detect the rabies antigen in brain specimens of animals and humans. The utility of this test in the ante-mortem diagnosis of human rabies has also been evaluated. Brain homogenates of suspected rabid animals (n = 250), humans (n = 16) and clinical samples like saliva (n = 12) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (n = 12) were directly spotted on polyvinylidene difluoride membrane (PVDF) and the absorbed rabies nucleoprotein antigen was detected using biotinylated antinucleoprotein antibody followed by treatment with streptavidin peroxidase conjugate and color development with diamino benzedine (DAB). Rabies-infected and normal mouse brain homogenates were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. The results of this test were evaluated with fluorescent antibody technique (for brain samples) and mouse inoculation test (for saliva and CSF samples). A distinct dark brown color was seen in the positive control and all positive samples, while there was no color development with either the negative control or the negative samples. The concordance between the fluorescent antibody test (FAT) and dot immunoassay was 98.4% for brain samples, 83.3% for saliva and 91.6% for CSF samples. The specificity of the test was found to be 100%. The dot blot enzyme immunoassay (DIA) test described here is a sensitive, specific and rapid test for the post-mortem diagnosis of rabies in animals and humans. The utility of this test for the ante-mortem diagnosis of rabies needs to be further evaluated.

  7. Detection of Long Noncoding RNA Expression by Nonradioactive Northern Blots.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaowen; Feng, Yi; Hu, Zhongyi; Zhang, Youyou; Yuan, Chao-Xing; Xu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    With the advances in sequencing technology and transcriptome analysis, it is estimated that up to 75 % of the human genome is transcribed into RNAs. This finding prompted intensive investigations on the biological functions of noncoding RNAs and led to very exciting discoveries of microRNAs as important players in disease pathogenesis and therapeutic applications. Research on long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) is in its infancy, yet a broad spectrum of biological regulations has been attributed to lncRNAs. As a novel class of RNA transcripts, the expression level and splicing variants of lncRNAs are various. Northern blot analysis can help us learn about the identity, size, and abundance of lncRNAs. Here we describe how to use northern blot to determine lncRNA abundance and identify different splicing variants of a given lncRNA.

  8. Coomassie staining as loading control in Western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Welinder, Charlotte; Ekblad, Lars

    2011-03-04

    In Western blotting, immunodetection of housekeeping proteins is routinely performed to detect differences in electrophoresis loading. The present work describes a much faster and simpler protein staining method, which is compatible with ordinary blocking conditions. In addition, the method can be used after immunodetection with superior linearity compared to ordinary staining methods. After immunoblotting and staining, protein bands can be further identified using peptide mass fingerprinting.

  9. Development of new staining technology "eastern blotting" using monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Morinaga, Osamu; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2011-03-01

    Ginsenosides contained in Panax species were separated by silica gel TLC blotted to a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane which was dipped in a sodium periodide (NaIO(4)) solution and reacted with protein, preparing a ginsenoside-protein conjugate for binding a ginsenoside on a PVDF membrane. The blotted spots were stained by anti-ginsenoside-Rb1 monoclonal antibody (MAb) and anti-ginsenoside-Rg1MAb, respectively. The newly established immunostaining method, eastern blotting was applied for the determination of ginsenosides possessing protopanaxadiol and/or protopanaxatriol. Double staining of eastern blotting for ginsenosides using anti-ginsenoside-Rb1 MAb and anti-ginsenoside-Rg1 MAb promoted complete identification of ginsenosides in Panax species. This technique has been devised for the chromatographic separation and identification of ginsenosides using polyethersulfone (PES) membrane. It caused an acceptable separation of ginsenoside-Rb1, -Rc and -Rd in various ginseng extracts. Newly developed technique is quite simple and applies for immunoassay system. Ginsenosides separated using a PES membrane were directly treated with a NaIO(4) solution and then reacted with bovine serum albumin (BSA) for making a ginsenoside-protein conjugate. After the blocking, anti-ginsenoside-Rb1 MAb recognized a ginsenoside on a PES membrane and then a sec-ond antibody labeled with enzyme reacted to the first antibody. Finally a substrate was oxidized with the enzyme and de-veloped the staining of ginsenosides. The staining spots of ginsenosides on membrane were quantitatively evaluated by NIH Image indicating at least 62.5 ng of each ginsenoside-Rb1, -Rc and -Rd were detected with clarity. The determination range of three ginsenosides was from 0.125 to 2.0 µg of direct amount on PES membrane.

  10. Validation of western blot for Histoplasma capsulatum antibody detection assay.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Marcos de Abreu; Pizzini, Cláudia Vera; Damasceno, Lisandra Serra; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Peralta, Regina Helena Saramago; Peralta, José Mauro; Oliveira, Raquel de Vasconcelos Carvalhaes; Vizzoni, Alexandre Gomes; de Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-02-24

    Histoplasmosis is worldwide systemic mycoses caused by the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. The isolation and identification of H. capsulatum in culture is the reference test for histoplasmosis diagnosis confirmation. However, in the absence of it, serology has been used as a presumptive diagnosis through antibody and antigen detection. The purpose of the present study was to validate an immunoassay method (western blot) for antibodies detection in the diagnosis of histoplasmosis. To validate the western blot (WB) a study was conducted using 118 serum samples from patients with histoplasmosis and 118 serum controls collected from January 2000 to December 2013 in residents of the Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Diagnostic validation parameters were calculated based on the categorization of results obtained in a 2 × 2 table and subjected to statistical analysis. In addition, the viability of deglycosylated histoplasmin antigen (ptHMIN) onto nitrocellulose membranes previously sensitized was evaluated during the same period. The WB test showed sensitivity of 94.9 %, specificity of 94.1 %, positive predictive value of 94.1 %, negative predictive value of 94.9 %, accuracy of 94.5 %, and almost perfect precision. Besides, the strips have proved to be viable for using at least 5 years after ptHMIN antigen sensitization. Western blot test using ptHMIN provides sensitive, specific, and faster results. Therefore, could be considered a useful tool in the diagnosis of histoplasmosis being used by public health system, even in situations where laboratory facilities are relatively limited.

  11. Lipid A binding proteins in macrophages detected by ligand blotting

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, R.Y.; Golenbock, D.T.; Raetz, C.R.H.

    1987-05-01

    Endotoxin (LPS) stimulates a variety of eukaryotic cells. These actions are involved in the pathogenesis of Gram-negative septicemia. The site of action of the LPS toxic moiety, lipid A (LA), is unclear. Their laboratory has previously identified a bioactive LA precursor lipid IV/sub A/, which can be enzymatically labeled with /sup 32/P/sub i/ (10/sup 9/ dpm/nmole) and purified (99%). They now show that this ligand binds to specific proteins immobilized on nitrocellulose (NC) from LPS-sensitive RAW 264.7 cultured macrophages. NC blots were incubated with (/sup 32/P)-IV/sub A/ in a buffer containing BSA, NaCl, polyethylene glycol, and azide. Binding was assessed using autoradiography or scintillation counting. Dot blot binding of the radioligand was inhibited by excess cold IV/sub A/, LA, or ReLPS but not by phosphatidylcholine, cardiolipin, phosphatidylinositol, or phosphatidic acid. Binding was trypsin-sensitive and dependent on protein concentration. Particulate macrophage proteins were subjected to SDS-PAGE and then electroblotted onto NC. Several discrete binding proteins were observed. Identical treatment of fetal bovine serum or molecular weight standards revealed no detectable binding. By avoiding high nonspecific binding of intact membranes, this ligand blotting assay may be useful in elucidating the molecular actions of LPS.

  12. Failure analysis of blots for diesel engine intercooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Ping; Li, Zongquan; Wu, Jiangfei; Guo, Yibin; Li, Wanyou

    2017-05-01

    In diesel generating sets, it will lead to the abominable working condition if the fault couldn’t be recovered when the bolt of intercooler cracks. This paper aims at the fault of the blots of diesel generator intercooler and completes the analysis of the static strength and fatigue strength. Static intensity is checked considering blot preload and thermal stress. In order to obtain the thermal stress of the blot, thermodynamic of intercooler is calculated according to the measured temperature. Based on the measured vibration response and the finite element model, using dynamic load identification technique, equivalent excitation force of unit was solved. In order to obtain the force of bolt, the excitation force is loaded into the finite element model. By considering the thermal stress and preload as the average stress while the mechanical stress as the wave stress, fatigue strength analysis has been accomplished. Procedure of diagnosis is proposed in this paper. Finally, according to the result of intensity verification the fatigue failure is validation. Thereby, further studies are necessary to verification the result of the intensity analysis and put forward some improvement suggestion.

  13. A smart ZnO@polydopamine-nucleic acid nanosystem for ultrasensitive live cell mRNA imaging by the target-triggered intracellular self-assembly of active DNAzyme nanostructures† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Oligonucleotide sequences, DLS and zeta potential measurements, TEM images, absorption and fluorescence spectra, cytotoxicity assay and CLSM images. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc04633a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    He, Dinggeng; He, Xing; Yang, Xue

    2017-01-01

    Efficient strategies for the ultrasensitive imaging of gene expression in living cells are essential in chemistry and cell biology. Here, we report a novel and efficient enzyme-free dual signal amplification strategy for live cell mRNA imaging by using a smart nucleic acid hairpin-based nanosystem. This nanosystem consists of a ZnO nanoparticle core, an interlayer of polydopamine and an outer layer of four hairpin DNA (hpDNA) probes. Such a core–shell nanosystem facilitates the cellular uptake of molecular hairpin payloads, protects them from nuclease digestion, and delivers them into the cytoplasm by the acid-triggered dissolution of the ZnO core. In the presence of target mRNA, the released hpDNA probes self-assemble via HCR into wire-shaped active DNAzymes that catalyze the generation of a fluorescence signal. The target-initiated HCR events and DNAzyme cascades offer efficient dual amplification and enable the ultrasensitive detection of mRNA with a femtomolar detection limit. Live cell assays show an intense fluorescence response from a tumor-related biomarker survivin mRNA only in tumor cells untreated with a survivin expression repressor YM155, but not in normal cells. The developed nanosystem provides a potential platform for the amplified imaging of low-abundance disease-related biomarkers in live cells. PMID:28553521

  14. Molecular Cloning, mRNA Expression, and Localization of the G-protein Subunit Galphaq in Sheep Testis and Epididymis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Lu, Jieli; Sun, Xiaowei; Pang, Quanhai; Zhao, Yiwen

    2016-01-01

    The reproductive function of G-protein subunit Galphaq (GNAQ), a member of the G protein alpha subunit family, has been extensively studied in humans and rats. However, no data is available on its status in ruminants. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the expression pattern of the GNAQ in the testis and epididymis of sheep by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The mRNA expression levels were detected by real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR, and cellular localization of GNAQ in the testis and epididymis was examined by immunohistochemistry. Additionally, GNAQ protein was qualitatively evaluated via western blot, with the results indicating that similarities between GNAQ mRNA levels from sheep was highly conserved with those observed in Bos taurus and Sus scrofa. Our results also indicated that GNAQ exists in the caput and cauda epididymis of sheep, while GNAQ in the testis and epididymis was localized to Leydig cells, spermatogonial stem cells, spermatocytes, Sertoli cells, spermatid, principal cells, and epididymis interstitial cells. The concentrations of GNAQ mRNA and protein in the caput and cauda epididymis were significantly greater than those observed in the corpus epididymis (p<0.01) and testis (p<0.05). Our results indicated that GNAQ exists at high concentrations in the caput and cauda epididymis of sheep, suggesting that GNAQ may play an important role in gonad development and sperm maturation. PMID:27004818

  15. Evaluating strategies to normalise biological replicates of Western blot data.

    PubMed

    Degasperi, Andrea; Birtwistle, Marc R; Volinsky, Natalia; Rauch, Jens; Kolch, Walter; Kholodenko, Boris N

    2014-01-01

    Western blot data are widely used in quantitative applications such as statistical testing and mathematical modelling. To ensure accurate quantitation and comparability between experiments, Western blot replicates must be normalised, but it is unclear how the available methods affect statistical properties of the data. Here we evaluate three commonly used normalisation strategies: (i) by fixed normalisation point or control; (ii) by sum of all data points in a replicate; and (iii) by optimal alignment of the replicates. We consider how these different strategies affect the coefficient of variation (CV) and the results of hypothesis testing with the normalised data. Normalisation by fixed point tends to increase the mean CV of normalised data in a manner that naturally depends on the choice of the normalisation point. Thus, in the context of hypothesis testing, normalisation by fixed point reduces false positives and increases false negatives. Analysis of published experimental data shows that choosing normalisation points with low quantified intensities results in a high normalised data CV and should thus be avoided. Normalisation by sum or by optimal alignment redistributes the raw data uncertainty in a mean-dependent manner, reducing the CV of high intensity points and increasing the CV of low intensity points. This causes the effect of normalisations by sum or optimal alignment on hypothesis testing to depend on the mean of the data tested; for high intensity points, false positives are increased and false negatives are decreased, while for low intensity points, false positives are decreased and false negatives are increased. These results will aid users of Western blotting to choose a suitable normalisation strategy and also understand the implications of this normalisation for subsequent hypothesis testing.

  16. Evaluating Strategies to Normalise Biological Replicates of Western Blot Data

    PubMed Central

    Degasperi, Andrea; Birtwistle, Marc R.; Volinsky, Natalia; Rauch, Jens; Kolch, Walter; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2014-01-01

    Western blot data are widely used in quantitative applications such as statistical testing and mathematical modelling. To ensure accurate quantitation and comparability between experiments, Western blot replicates must be normalised, but it is unclear how the available methods affect statistical properties of the data. Here we evaluate three commonly used normalisation strategies: (i) by fixed normalisation point or control; (ii) by sum of all data points in a replicate; and (iii) by optimal alignment of the replicates. We consider how these different strategies affect the coefficient of variation (CV) and the results of hypothesis testing with the normalised data. Normalisation by fixed point tends to increase the mean CV of normalised data in a manner that naturally depends on the choice of the normalisation point. Thus, in the context of hypothesis testing, normalisation by fixed point reduces false positives and increases false negatives. Analysis of published experimental data shows that choosing normalisation points with low quantified intensities results in a high normalised data CV and should thus be avoided. Normalisation by sum or by optimal alignment redistributes the raw data uncertainty in a mean-dependent manner, reducing the CV of high intensity points and increasing the CV of low intensity points. This causes the effect of normalisations by sum or optimal alignment on hypothesis testing to depend on the mean of the data tested; for high intensity points, false positives are increased and false negatives are decreased, while for low intensity points, false positives are decreased and false negatives are increased. These results will aid users of Western blotting to choose a suitable normalisation strategy and also understand the implications of this normalisation for subsequent hypothesis testing. PMID:24475266

  17. Protein detection by Western blot via coiled-coil interactions.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Cyril; St-Laurent, Gilles; Jolicoeur, Mario; Crescenzo, Gregory De; Durocher, Yves

    2010-04-01

    We propose an approach for the detection of proteins by Western blot that takes advantage of the high-affinity interaction occurring between two de novo designed peptides, the E and K coils. As a model system, K coil-tagged epidermal growth factor (EGF) was revealed with secreted alkaline phosphatase (SeAP) tagged with E coil (SeAP-Ecoil) as well as with biotinylated E coil. In that respect, we first produced purified SeAP-Ecoil and verified its ability to interact with K coil peptides by surface plasmon resonance biosensing. We demonstrated that protein detection with Ecoil-biotin was more specific than with SeAP-Ecoil. We then showed that our approach is as sensitive as conventional detection strategies relying on nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid-horseradish peroxidase (Ni-NTA-HRP), anti-His-HRP, or anti-EGF. Altogether, our results indicate that the E/K coiled-coil system is a good alternative for protein detection by Western blot. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Microfluidic Western Blotting of Low-Molecular-Mass Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe a microfluidic Western blot assay (μWestern) using a Tris tricine discontinuous buffer system suitable for analyses of a wide molecular mass range (6.5–116 kDa). The Tris tricine μWestern is completed in an enclosed, straight glass microfluidic channel housing a photopatterned polyacrylamide gel that incorporates a photoactive benzophenone methacrylamide monomer. Upon brief ultraviolet (UV) light exposure, the hydrogel toggles from molecular sieving for size-based separation to a covalent immobilization scaffold for in situ antibody probing. Electrophoresis controls all assay stages, affording purely electronic operation with no pumps or valves needed for fluid control. Electrophoretic introduction of antibody into and along the molecular sieving gel requires that the probe must traverse through (i) a discontinuous gel interface central to the transient isotachophoresis used to achieve high-performance separations and (ii) the full axial length of the separation gel. In-channel antibody probing of small molecular mass species is especially challenging, since the gel must effectively sieve small proteins while permitting effective probing with large-molecular-mass antibodies. To create a well-controlled gel interface, we introduce a fabrication method that relies on a hydrostatic pressure mismatch between the buffer and polymer precursor solution to eliminate the interfacial pore-size control issues that arise when a polymerizing polymer abuts a nonpolymerizing polymer solution. Combined with a new swept antibody probe plug delivery scheme, the Tris tricine μWestern blot enables 40% higher separation resolution as compared to a Tris glycine system, destacking of proteins down to 6.5 kDa, and a 100-fold better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for small pore gels, expanding the range of applicable biological targets. PMID:25268977

  19. Antibody performance in western blot applications is context-dependent.

    PubMed

    Algenäs, Cajsa; Agaton, Charlotta; Fagerberg, Linn; Asplund, Anna; Björling, Lisa; Björling, Erik; Kampf, Caroline; Lundberg, Emma; Nilsson, Peter; Persson, Anja; Wester, Kenneth; Pontén, Fredrik; Wernérus, Henrik; Uhlén, Mathias; Ottosson Takanen, Jenny; Hober, Sophia

    2014-03-01

    An important concern for the use of antibodies in various applications, such as western blot (WB) or immunohistochemistry (IHC), is specificity. This calls for systematic validations using well-designed conditions. Here, we have analyzed 13 000 antibodies using western blot with lysates from human cell lines, tissues, and plasma. Standardized stratification showed that 45% of the antibodies yielded supportive staining, and the rest either no staining (12%) or protein bands of wrong size (43%). A comparative study of WB and IHC showed that the performance of antibodies is application-specific, although a correlation between no WB staining and weak IHC staining could be seen. To investigate the influence of protein abundance on the apparent specificity of the antibody, new WB analyses were performed for 1369 genes that gave unsupportive WBs in the initial screening using cell lysates with overexpressed full-length proteins. Then, more than 82% of the antibodies yielded a specific band corresponding to the full-length protein. Hence, the vast majority of the antibodies (90%) used in this study specifically recognize the target protein when present at sufficiently high levels. This demonstrates the context- and application-dependence of antibody validation and emphasizes that caution is needed when annotating binding reagents as specific or cross-reactive. WB is one of the most commonly used methods for validation of antibodies. Our data implicate that solely using one platform for antibody validation might give misleading information and therefore at least one additional method should be used to verify the achieved data. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Detection of La/SS-B by western blot using nanogold-tagged antibodies and silver enhancement.

    PubMed

    Maier, Shannon; Hubbell, Sherry; Scofield, R Hal

    2009-01-01

    Immunogold staining with silver enhancement is a versatile, sensitive and specific method for immunodetection of diverse protein antigens separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transferred to nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene difluoride membranes. "Next-generation" antibodies tagged with nanogold particles have a wide scope of use including but not limited to immunohistochemistry, western blotting, electron microscopy, fluorescent activated cell sorting procedures, and cell isolation and migration studies. Herein, we describe the use of a nanogold-tagged anti-mouse IgG secondary antibody and silver enhancement methodologies coupled with antigen-specific unlabeled primary antibodies for the detection of the La/SS-B autoantigen by western blotting as a useful alternative to chemiluminescent and enzymatic detection methods.

  1. Serological Diagnosis of Paracoccidioidomycosis through a Western Blot Technique

    PubMed Central

    Perenha-Viana, M. C. Z.; Gonzales, I. A. A.; Brockelt, S. R.; Machado, L. N. C.

    2012-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a serious infectious disease that progresses toward death if untreated. Its confirmatory diagnosis is made by the detection of the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in a direct mycological examination or by histopathology. However, these techniques are of low sensitivity. Serological tests seem to be more promising. The objective of this study was to test Western blot (WB) analysis using sera from patients suspected of PCM to determine whether it represents a safe and sensitive serological technique for a rapid and effective diagnosis for this disease. Sera from 517 patients were analyzed through WB analysis and double-immunodiffusion (DID) techniques using a crude exoantigen of P. brasiliensis 339. DID gave positive reactions for 140 sera (27%) and WB for 250 sera (48.4%). All sera that had a positive reaction by DID also had a positive result with a 43-kDa glycoprotein by WB analysis. Among the 377 samples that were negative by DID, 29.1% were reactive in WB analysis. For the cutoff dilution used (1:400), a positive reaction was not observed with any of the 102 sera from patients with other diseases in regions where such diseases are endemic and 30 healthy individuals tested as negative controls. These results prove WB analysis to be a sensitive technique and suggest its inclusion among routine laboratory assays as a safe method for PCM diagnosis. PMID:22301695

  2. Cy5 total protein normalization in Western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Hagner-McWhirter, Åsa; Laurin, Ylva; Larsson, Anita; Bjerneld, Erik J; Rönn, Ola

    2015-10-01

    Western blotting is a widely used method for analyzing specific target proteins in complex protein samples. Housekeeping proteins are often used for normalization to correct for uneven sample loads, but these require careful validation since expression levels may vary with cell type and treatment. We present a new, more reliable method for normalization using Cy5-prelabeled total protein as a loading control. We used a prelabeling protocol based on Cy5 N-hydroxysuccinimide ester labeling that produces a linear signal response. We obtained a low coefficient of variation (CV) of 7% between the ratio of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) target to Cy5 total protein control signals over the whole loading range from 2.5 to 20.0μg of Chinese hamster ovary cell lysate protein. Corresponding experiments using actin or tubulin as controls for normalization resulted in CVs of 13 and 18%, respectively. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase did not produce a proportional signal and was not suitable for normalization in these cells. A comparison of ERK1/2 signals from labeled and unlabeled samples showed that Cy5 prelabeling did not affect antibody binding. By using total protein normalization we analyzed PP2A and Smad2/3 levels with high confidence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Expression of mRNA and protein of Klotho gene in placental tissue of macrosomia and its relationship with birth weight of neonates].

    PubMed

    Shao, W J; Wang, D X; Wan, Q Y; Zhang, M M; Chen, M M; Song, W W

    2016-06-25

    To explore the the expression of Klotho mRNA and protein in placenta of macrosomia and its relationship with the birth weight of neonates. The cases were from November 2014 to March 2015 in Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, divided into 4 groups: the gestational diabetes with macrosomia group (GM), the gestational diabetes with normal birth weight group (GN), the normal pregnancy with macrosomia group (NM) and the normal pregnancy with normal birth weight group (NN). Klotho mRNA and protein expression in the placenta were detected by immunohistochemistry SP method, real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR and western blot, respectively, and were compared among the 4 groups. (1) Immunohistochemical detection showed the positive rate of Klotho protein was significantly higher in the placenta of GM (93%,28/30) than in the GN (73%,22/30; P<0.05). The positive rate was significantly higher in the placenta of NM (97%,29/30) than in the NN (80%,24/30; P<0.05). (2) Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR showed the Klotho mRNA expression was significantly higher in the placenta of GM (4.3 ± 3.1) than in the GN (2.1 ± 2.4; P<0.05). The Klotho mRNA expression was also significantly higher in the placenta of NM (4.8± 3.4) than in the NN (2.6± 3.3; P<0.05). (3) Western blot showed the Klotho protein expression was significantly higher in the placenta of GM (1.27±0.90) than in the GN (0.64±0.24; P<0.05). It was also significantly higher in the placenta of NM (2.51±3.52) than in the NN (0.77±0.37; P<0.05). (4) There were no significant differences in the expression of Klotho mRNA and protein between GM and NM, GN and NN (P>0.05). The up-regulation of Klotho gene may be associated with macrosomia. The relationship is not affected by the complication of gestational diabetes.

  4. Comparisons of double immunodiffusion, ELISA, western blot and CAPE blot for the detection of anti-SSA antibody: study of anti-SSA prevalence in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Chretien, P; Soulie, E; Johanet, C; Abuaf, N

    1994-06-01

    The specificity and sensitivity of anti-SSA (Ro) antibody detection by double immunodiffusion, ELISA, western blot and a new method named CAPE blot were studied. Using 79 normal sera, 61 sera positive for anti-SSA (Ro) antibodies (double immunodiffusion), and 39 sera without anti-SSA (Ro) antibodies but containing anti-Sm, anti-RNP, anti-SSB (La), anti-Scl 70 and anti-PCNA antibodies, we compared ELISA, western blot and CAPE blot with the immunodiffusion assay. The sensitivities of the three methods were 100, 62 and 100%, respectively. Sera from 196 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were tested. The prevalence of anti-SSA (Ro) antibodies in this group was scored as 26% by double immunodiffusion, 47% by ELISA, 25% by western blot and 38% by CAPE blot.

  5. Heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) overexpression in transgenic mice downregulates insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 and -4 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Provenzano, Aaron P; Besner, Gail E; James, Paul F; Harding, Paul A

    2005-03-01

    An in vivo approach was taken to assess the biological significance of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) using transgenic mice. Transgenic mice were generated using the pIRES-EGFP vector expressing a bicistronic mRNA containing both human HB-EGF (hHB-EGF) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) coding sequences under the regulation of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early (CMV-IE) promoter. As a marker for transgene expression, EGFP fluorescence in 5 microm tissue sections was evaluated. To confirm HB-EGF expression in EGFP-containing tissues, HB-EGF mRNA was analyzed by RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis. Protein levels of HB-EGF and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), a molecule that stabilizes IGFs, which in turn helps to promote growth, were analyzed by Western blot. Also, the weights of transgenic mice were compared with the weights of wild type non-transgenic littermates over a 10-week period. EGFP fluorescence, RT-PCR and Northern analysis of a variety of tissues from hHB-EGF transgenic mice indicate recombinant EGFP/hHB-EGF mRNA expression in kidney, liver, lung and stomach. Western blot analysis confirmed that HB-EGF protein levels were greater in these tissues from hHB-EGF transgenic mice compared to wild type non-transgenic littermates. IGFBP-3 protein was absent in serum of transgenic mice prior to the onset of puberty, but indistinguishable from wild type non-transgenic mice after puberty. Furthermore, IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-4 mRNA were downregulated in the kidney, but not liver or lung of the transgenic mice. In accordance with reduced IGFBP-3 and -4 levels, hHB-EGF transgenic mice exhibited a 20% decrease in weight prior to 6 weeks of age compared to wild type non-transgenic littermates. Our laboratory has generated a biologically functional transgenic mouse model exhibiting increased expression of hHB-EGF in kidney, liver, lung and stomach. Overexpression of hHB-EGF affected the growth rate of these transgenic mice

  6. The mouse prostaglandin E receptor EP2 subtype: cloning, expression, and northern blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, M; Nishigaki, N; Sugimoto, Y; Morimoto, K; Negishi, M; Narumiya, S; Ichikawa, A

    1995-09-25

    A functional cDNA clone for the mouse prostaglandin (PG) E receptor EP2 subtype was isolated from a mouse cDNA library. The mouse EP2 receptor consists of 362 amino acid residues with seven putative transmembrane domains. [3H]PGE2 bound specifically to the membrane of Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the cloned receptor. This binding was displaced by unlabeled prostanoids in the order of PGE2 = PGE1 > iloprost, a stable PGI2 agonist > PGF2 alpha > PGD2. Binding was also inhibited by butaprost (an EP2 agonist) and to a lesser extent by M&B 28767 (an EP3 agonist), but not by sulprostone (an EP1 and EP3 agonist) or SC-19220 (an EP1 antagonist). PGE2 and butaprost increased the cAMP level in the Chinese hamster ovary cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Northern blot analysis revealed that EP2 mRNA is expressed most abundantly in the uterus, followed by the spleen, lung, thymus, ileum, liver, and stomach.

  7. Prediction of flocculation ability of brewing yeast inoculates by flow cytometry, proteome analysis, and mRNA profiling.

    PubMed

    Heine, Franziska; Stahl, Frank; Sträuber, Heike; Wiacek, Claudia; Benndorf, Dirk; Repenning, Cornelia; Schmidt, Frank; Scheper, Thomas; von Bergen, Martin; Harms, Hauke; Müller, Susann

    2009-02-01

    The ability of brewing yeast to flocculate is an important feature for brewing of qualitatively good beer. Flocculation involves two main cell wall structures, which are the flocculation proteins (flocculins) and mannans, to which these flocculins bind. Unfortunately, in practice, the flocculation ability may get lost after several repitches. Flow cytometry was employed to analyze glucose and mannose structures of the cell surface by application of fluorescent lectins. Validation of the expression of the flocculin genes Lg-FLO1, FLO1, FLO5, and FLO9 was carried out using microarray techniques. SDS-PAGE, western blot, and ESI-MS/MS analyses served to isolate and determine yeast cell flocculins. Mannose and glucose labeling with fluorescent lectins allowed differentiating powdery and flocculent yeast cells under laboratory conditions. Using microarray techniques and proteomics, the four flocculation genes Lg-FLO1, FLO1, FLO5, FLO9, and the protein Lg-Flo1p were identified as factors of major importance for flocculation. The expression of the genes was several times higher in flocculent yeast cells than in powdery ones. Flow cytometry is a fast and simple method to quantify the proportions of powdery and flocculent yeast cells in suspensions under defined cultivation conditions. However, differentiation under industrial conditions will require mRNA and protein expression profiling.

  8. Repeated stress increases catalytic TrkB mRNA in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Nibuya, M; Takahashi, M; Russell, D S; Duman, R S

    1999-05-28

    Northern blot analysis was utilized to distinguish between catalytic and truncated TrkB mRNA on the basis of transcript size. Repeated (10 days), but not acute, immobilization stress significantly increased levels of catalytic TrkB mRNA, but did not influence expression of truncated TrkB transcripts in rat hippocampus. Exposure to another paradigm, a combination of different, unpredictable stressors, also increased levels of catalytic, but not truncated, TrkB mRNA. In situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that chronic stress up-regulated TrkB mRNA in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal and dentate gyrus granule cells layers of hippocampus. As previously reported, both acute and chronic immobilization stress decreased expression of BDNF mRNA, suggesting that up-regulation of catalytic TrkB mRNA may be a compensatory adaptation to repeated stress.

  9. Integrated Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret (Inventor); Gruhlke, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A detection method is integrated with a filtering method and an enhancement method to create a fluorescence sensor that can be miniaturized. The fluorescence sensor comprises a thin film geometry including a waveguide layer, a metal film layer and sensor layer. The thin film geometry of the fluorescence sensor allows the detection of fluorescent radiation over a narrow wavelength interval. This enables wavelength discrimination and eliminates the detection of unwanted light from unknown or spurious sources.

  10. Localization and differential regulation of angiotensinogen mRNA expression in the vessel wall.

    PubMed Central

    Naftilan, A J; Zuo, W M; Inglefinger, J; Ryan, T J; Pratt, R E; Dzau, V J

    1991-01-01

    Recent data demonstrate the existence of a vascular renin angiotensin system. In this study we examine the localization of angiotensinogen mRNA in the blood vessel wall of two rat strains, the Wistar and Wistar Kyoto (WKY), as well as the regulation of vascular angiotensinogen mRNA expression by dietary sodium. Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization histochemistry demonstrate that in both strains angiotensinogen mRNA is detected in the aortic medial smooth muscle layer as well as the periaortic fat. In WKY rats fed a 1.6% sodium diet, angiotensinogen mRNA concentration is 2.6-fold higher in the periaortic fat than in the smooth muscle, as analyzed by quantitative slot blot hybridization. Angiotensinogen mRNA expression in the medial smooth muscle layer is sodium regulated. After 5 d of a low (0.02%) sodium diet, smooth muscle angiotensinogen mRNA levels increase 3.2-fold (P less than 0.005) as compared with the 1.6% sodium diet. In contrast, angiotensinogen mRNA level in the periaortic fat is not influenced by sodium diet. In summary, our data demonstrate regional (smooth muscle vs. periaortic fat) differential regulation of angiotensinogen mRNA levels in the blood vessel wall by sodium. This regional differential regulation by sodium may have important physiological implications. Images PMID:2010543

  11. Cell adhesion to proteins separated by lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and blotted onto a polyvinylidene difluoride membrane: a new cell-blotting technique.

    PubMed

    Seshi, B

    1994-12-02

    Cell blotting, although conceptually simple, has failed to achieve wide practical application. Described here is a new cell-blotting technique which involves cell adhesion to protein bands after separation by lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (LDS-PAGE) and blotting onto polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane at 4 degrees C. Cell bands adherent on PVDF are detected using hematoxylin, or propidium iodide (PI) staining followed by viewing under ultraviolet (UV) light. The technique allows quick microscopic visualization of adherent cells composing the bands, without requiring clearing of the membrane. Representative cell adhesion proteins from different sources, i.e., plant lectins (e.g., phytohemagglutinin, PHA; concanavalin A, ConA; and wheat germ agglutinin, WGA); extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins; and integral membrane proteins (e.g., recombinant soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, rs VCAM-1) were tested for cell binding by the new cell-blotting technique using human lymphoid progenitor (NALM-6) and myeloid progenitor (KG1a) cell lines. Cell adhesion proteins retained their adhesion function in all cases tested. Specificity of cell binding on PVDF blot was demonstrated by inhibition of cell adhesion to WGA protein bands using an appropriate sugar, i.e., N-acetyl D-glucosamine. The cell blotting assay was comparable in sensitivity to Coomassie blue staining of protein bands. The ability to conduct protein extraction, separation and blotting at low temperature avoids thermal denaturation, thereby preserving the adhesion properties of the proteins. The electrophoretic/blotting system has unique detergent removal/protein renaturation properties and the ability to preserve functionally active adhesion protein complexes. The cell-blotting technique described is sufficiently robust for routine application in the investigation of novel cell adhesion proteins.

  12. Immuno-Northern Blotting: Detection of RNA Modifications by Using Antibodies against Modified Nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Eikan; Jinno, Daisuke; Akiyama, Yasutoshi; Itoh, Kunihiko; Nankumo, Shinnosuke; Shima, Hisato; Kikuchi, Koichi; Takeuchi, Yoichi; Elkordy, Alaa; Suzuki, Takehiro; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Ito, Sadayoshi; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Abe, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    The biological roles of RNA modifications are still largely not understood. Thus, developing a method for detecting RNA modifications is important for further clarification. We developed a method for detecting RNA modifications called immuno-northern blotting (INB) analysis and herein introduce its various capabilities. This method involves the separation of RNAs using either polyacrylamide or agarose gel electrophoresis, followed by transfer onto a nylon membrane and subsequent immunoblotting using antibodies against modified nucleosides for the detection of specific modifications. We confirmed that INB with the antibodies for 1-methyladenosine (m1A), N6-methyladenosine (m6A), pseudouridine, and 5-methylcytidine (m5C) showed different modifications in a variety of RNAs from various species and organelles. INB with the anti-m5C antibody revealed that the antibody cross-reacted with another modification on DNA, suggesting the application of this method for characterization of the antibody for modified nucleosides. Additionally, using INB with the antibody for m1A, which is a highly specific modification in eukaryotic tRNA, we detected tRNA-derived fragments known as tiRNAs under the cellular stress response, suggesting the application for tracking target RNA containing specific modifications. INB with the anti-m6A antibody confirmed the demethylation of m6A by the specific demethylases fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO) and ALKBH5, suggesting its application for quantifying target modifications in separated RNAs. Furthermore, INB demonstrated that the knockdown of FTO and ALKBH5 increased the m6A modification in small RNAs as well as in mRNA. The INB method has high specificity, sensitivity, and quantitative capability, and it can be employed with conventional experimental apparatus. Therefore, this method would be useful for research on RNA modifications and metabolism.

  13. Immuno-Northern Blotting: Detection of RNA Modifications by Using Antibodies against Modified Nucleosides

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Yasutoshi; Itoh, Kunihiko; Nankumo, Shinnosuke; Shima, Hisato; Kikuchi, Koichi; Takeuchi, Yoichi; Elkordy, Alaa; Suzuki, Takehiro; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Ito, Sadayoshi; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Abe, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    The biological roles of RNA modifications are still largely not understood. Thus, developing a method for detecting RNA modifications is important for further clarification. We developed a method for detecting RNA modifications called immuno-northern blotting (INB) analysis and herein introduce its various capabilities. This method involves the separation of RNAs using either polyacrylamide or agarose gel electrophoresis, followed by transfer onto a nylon membrane and subsequent immunoblotting using antibodies against modified nucleosides for the detection of specific modifications. We confirmed that INB with the antibodies for 1-methyladenosine (m1A), N6-methyladenosine (m6A), pseudouridine, and 5-methylcytidine (m5C) showed different modifications in a variety of RNAs from various species and organelles. INB with the anti-m5C antibody revealed that the antibody cross-reacted with another modification on DNA, suggesting the application of this method for characterization of the antibody for modified nucleosides. Additionally, using INB with the antibody for m1A, which is a highly specific modification in eukaryotic tRNA, we detected tRNA-derived fragments known as tiRNAs under the cellular stress response, suggesting the application for tracking target RNA containing specific modifications. INB with the anti-m6A antibody confirmed the demethylation of m6A by the specific demethylases fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO) and ALKBH5, suggesting its application for quantifying target modifications in separated RNAs. Furthermore, INB demonstrated that the knockdown of FTO and ALKBH5 increased the m6A modification in small RNAs as well as in mRNA. The INB method has high specificity, sensitivity, and quantitative capability, and it can be employed with conventional experimental apparatus. Therefore, this method would be useful for research on RNA modifications and metabolism. PMID:26606401

  14. All-in-one detector of circulating mRNA based on a smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cmiel, Vratislav; Gumulec, Jaromir; Svoboda, Ondrej; Raudenska, Martina; Hudcova, Kristyna; Sekora, Jiri; Balogh, Jaroslav; Masarik, Michal; Provaznik, Ivo

    2016-03-01

    Metallothionein is significantly elevated in various tumors, notably in prostate cancer on both mRNA and protein level. We demonstrated a strong predictive potential of free circulating metallothionein 2A isoform mRNA for patients with this cancer. Circulating mRNA detection relies on expensive equipment and requires high level of expertise. In this work we developed compact "all-in-one" laboratory system which replace microvolume spectrophotometer, thermocycler and realtime PCR machines. We managed to design and construct a microprocessor controlled heating/cooling chamber that ensures required temperature gradient. The chamber includes implemented optical system to enable fluorescence excitation and fluorescence analysis using a smart-phone.

  15. Decreased albumin mRNA in immunodeficient wasted' mice

    SciTech Connect

    Libertin, C.R.; Buczek, N.; Weaver, P.; Mobarhan, S.; Woloschak, G.E. Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1991-03-15

    Mice bearing the autosomal recessive gene wst (wst/wst) develop a wasting syndrome' that leads to death by 28-32 days of age. These mice have faulty repair of damage induced by ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency at secretory sites, and neurologic abnormalities. In addition to a progressively more apparent wasted phenotype, wst/wst mice show other features of failure to thrive and malnutrition. Daily body weights of the animals revealed a loss in weight between 25 and 30 days of age, a time during which normal littermates were progressively and rapidly gaining weight. Albumin mRNA levels were measured by dilution dot blot hybridizations of liver-derived RNA preparations from wasted mice, littermates, and parental controls. In all wasted mice, albumin mRNA levels were reduced 5 to 10 fold compared to controls. Northern blots revealed that the albumin mRNA present in wasted mice was normal in length though reduced in amount. These results suggest there may be a relationship between low albumin synthesis and the wasting syndrome of the wst/wst mouse.

  16. Reversible Ponceau staining as a loading control alternative to actin in Western blots.

    PubMed

    Romero-Calvo, Isabel; Ocón, Borja; Martínez-Moya, Patricia; Suárez, María Dolores; Zarzuelo, Antonio; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; de Medina, Fermín Sánchez

    2010-06-15

    It is becoming standard practice to measure a housekeeping gene, typically actin, in Western blots, as it is the rule in RNA blots. We have applied reversible Ponceau staining to check equal loading of gels and measured actin in parallel under different conditions. Our results show that densitometric analysis is comparable with both techniques. Therefore, routine quantitation of Ponceau staining before antibody probing is validated as an alternative to actin blotting.

  17. Development of a dot blot assay using gene probes for the detection of enteroviruses in water

    SciTech Connect

    Margolin, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    Enteric viruses are viruses which replicate in the intestinal tract of man and animals. One mode of transmission for enteric viruses is the fecal-oral route. Drinking water which has been contaminated with sewage or sewage effluent has been implicated as a means for the spread of enteric viruses. Current methods for the detection of enteric viruses in water requires the use of animal cell culture. This technique has several drawbacks. More rapid techniques, such as fluorescent antibody or radioimmunoassay do not have the needed sensitivity to detect the low levels of virus found in contaminated water. An alternative technique for the detection of viruses in water was sought. Recent advances in recombinant DNA technology now makes it possible to detect viruses without the use of cell culture or antibodies. Gene probes that hybridize to the RNA of poliovirus and hepatitis A virus were tested for their ability to detect different enteric viruses. The probes were labeled with /sup 32/P dCTP and /sup 32/P dATP to a specific activity greater then 1.0 x 10/sup 9/ cpm/ug DNA. One infectious unit of poliovirus and hepatitis A virus was detected using labeled cDNA probes. Upon comparison, the dot blot assay was as sensitive as tissue culture for the detection of poliovirus in beef extract, secondary effluent, and tap water. Environmental samples, such as secondary effluent, reclaimed wastewater and unchlorinated drinking water were also assayed for poliovirus and hepatitis A virus with the use of gene probes. The results presented here offer an alternative method for screening water samples for the presence of enteric viruses.

  18. Effects of quercetin on CDK4 mRNA and protein expression in A549 cells infected by H1N1

    PubMed Central

    WAN, QIAOFENG; WANG, HAO; LIN, YUAN; GU, LIGANG; HAN, MEI; YANG, ZHIWEI; ZHANG, YANLI; MA, RUI; WANG, LI; WANG, ZHISHENG

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of quercetin on the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK4) mRNA and protein in A549 lung epithelial tumor cells infected by H1N1. First, the Thiazolyl Blue Tetrazolium Bromide (MTT) method was used to determine H1N1 virulence, quercetin cytotoxicity and inhibition of the cytopathic effect of H1N1 on A549 cells by quercetin. Subsequently, 100 TCID50 H1N1 was used to infect A549 cells for 2 h prior to culture in maintenance media containing 10 mg/l quercetin. After 4, 12, 24 and 48 h of culture, the cells were collected and total RNA and protein were extracted. Fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were then performed to assess the expression of CDK4 mRNA and protein. The experiment demonstrated that the TCID50 of H1N1 in A549 cells was 10−4.75, the maximum non-toxic concentration of quercetin in A549 cells was 30–60 mg/l and the minimum effective concentration of quercetin for the inhibition of the H1N1 cytopathic effect on A549 cells was 10 mg/l. The results indicated that quercetin may significantly inhibit CDK4 mRNA and protein overexpression caused by H1N1 within 4–48 h. In conclusion, quercetin may protect against H1N1 infection by effectively reducing the mRNA and protein expression of CDK4 caused by H1N1 infection. PMID:24649026

  19. A comparison of the Genie and western blot assays in confirmatory testing for HIV-1 antibody.

    PubMed

    Chan, E L; Sidaway, F; Horsman, G B

    1996-03-01

    The Genie HIV-1/2 kit (Sanofi Diagnostics Pasteur, Montreal, Quebec), a synthetic-peptide solid-phase enzyme immunoassay, was evaluated as a confirmatory assay for HIV-1 antibodies in comparison with Western blot (BioRad, Hercules, CA, USA) on 50 stored HIV-1 antibody-positive sera and the 137 sera yielding repeated positive results in the conventional EIA screen out of 13405 fresh patient sera from Saskatchewan in 1993. The stored HIV-1-positive sera were uniformly positive in the Genie test. Of the 137 EIA screen-positive sera, 33 were uniformly positive and 64 were uniformly negative in Genie and Western blot; 36 were Genie-negative and indeterminate by Western blot; and four were Genie indeterminate, of which one was negative and three were indeterminate by Western blot. All HIV-1 Western blot-indeterminate and Genie-interdeterminate sera were negative in radio-immunoprecipitation assay (RIPA) and Western blot for HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies performed by a reference laboratory. Genie gave an accurate definitive result for 97% of EIA positive sera compared with 71% for Western blot. There was excellent correlation between Genie, Western blot and RIPA results. However, the Genie assay was faster, less costly and yielded fewer indeterminate results than Western blot in confirmatory testing for HIV-1 antibodies.

  20. Cytochrome P450IA mRNA expression in feral Hudson River tomcod

    SciTech Connect

    Kreamer, G.L.; Squibb, K.; Gioeli, D.; Garte, S.J.; Wirgin, I. )

    1991-06-01

    The authors sought to determine if levels of cytochrome P450IA gene expression are environmentally induced in feral populations of Hudson River tomcod, a cancer prone fish, and whether laboratory exposure of tomcod to artificially spiked and naturally contaminated Hudson sediments can elicit a significant response. Using Northern blot analysis, they found levels of P450IA mRNA in tomcod collected from two Hudson River sites higher than those in tomcod from a river in Maine. Depuration of environmentally induced Hudson tomcod P450IA mRNA was rapid, with an initial detectable decline in P450 gene expression by 8 hr and basal levels reached by 5 days. Intraperitoneal injection of {beta}-napthoflavone in depurated Hudson tomcod resulted in a 15-fold induction of P450 gene expression within 26 hr. Exposure of depurated Hudson tomcod to natural sediment spiked with two PAHs resulted in a 7-fold induction of P450 gene expression. Exposure of depurated tomcod to sediment from a contaminated Hudson site also resulted in a 7- to 15-fold induction of P450IA mRNA expression. Northern blot analysis revealed a second polymorphic cytochrome P450IA mRNA band in some tomcod which was also detected by Southern blot analysis. Induction of cytochrome P450IA mRNA in Atlantic tomcod may provide a sensitive biomarker of environmentally relevant concentrations of some pollutants in the Hudson and other northeastern tidal rivers.

  1. Ontogeny of pituitary growth hormone and growth hormone mRNA in the chicken.

    PubMed

    McCann-Levorse, L M; Radecki, S V; Donoghue, D J; Malamed, S; Foster, D N; Scanes, C G

    1993-01-01

    The changes in pituitary growth hormone (GH) mRNA levels have been determined by Northern blot analysis and laser densitometry during embryonic development and posthatch growth of white Leghorn cockerels. Pituitary GH mRNA levels were observed to progressively increase between 18 days of embryonic development to a maximum at 4 weeks of age (posthatch). Subsequently, pituitary GH mRNA levels declined between 4 and 8 weeks of age, and between 12 weeks of age and adulthood. Pituitary GH contents showed increases during embryonic development and posthatch growth that paralleled the rise in GH mRNA. The decline in pituitary GH mRNA levels between 4 weeks of age and adulthood occurs when GH secretion has been observed previously to decline.

  2. Lectin staining and Western blot data showing differential sialylation of nutrient-deprived cancer cells to sialic acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Badr, Haitham A; AlSadek, Dina M M; Mathew, Mohit P; Li, Chen-Zhong; Djansugurova, Leyla B; Yarema, Kevin J; Ahmed, Hafiz

    2015-12-01

    This report provides data that are specifically related to the differential sialylation of nutrient deprived breast cancer cells to sialic acid supplementation in support of the research article entitled, "Nutrient-deprived cancer cells preferentially use sialic acid to maintain cell surface glycosylation" [1]. Particularly, breast cancer cells, when supplemented with sialic acid under nutrient deprivation, display sialylated glycans at the cell surface, but non-malignant mammary cells show sialylated glycans intracellularly. The impact of sialic acid supplementation under nutrient deprivation was demonstrated by measuring levels of expression and sialylation of two markers, EGFR1 and MUC1. This Data in Brief article complements the main manuscript by providing detailed instructions and representative results for cell-level imaging and Western blot analyses of changes in sialylation during nutrient deprivation and sialic acid supplementation. These methods can be readily generalized for the study of many types of glycosylation and various glycoprotein markers through the appropriate selection of fluorescently-labeled lectins.

  3. Parafilm-M®, An Available Cost-Effective Alternative for Immuno-blot Pouches.

    PubMed

    Quadri, Syed M S

    2015-01-01

    Commercially available standard immuno-blot pouches do play an efficient role in antibody incubation in performing an immuno-blot, but are not readily available in the laboratory and have to be specifically ordered. We have developed an equally efficient technique to make an immune-blot more cost-effective with more conservation of antibodies by using a common and readily available laboratory product Parafilm-M(®). Parafilm-M(®) which serves as a sealant for various items of laboratory equipment can be used for antibody incubation. Manually made Parafilm-M(®) pouch has a clear advantage over standard immuno-blot pouches in terms of availability, cost-effectiveness, and consumption of antibodies that ultimately reduces the cost of an immuno-blot. We have performed a series of experiments to check the efficacy of both the techniques. Samples with equal amount of protein were analyzed on separate SDS PAGE gels. The proteins were transferred electrophoretically to the nitrocellulose membrane using Trans-Blot(®) Turbo™ Mini Nitrocellulose Transfer Pack. Antibody incubation was done using standard immuno-blot pouch, standard container and Parafilm-M(®) sealed pouch. The expression of protein was determined and the results of immuno-blots were compared. We found that antibodies are binding the membrane in Parafilm-M(®) pouches as efficiently as in container method or in standard immuno-blot pouches. By restricting the membrane, the surface area of the manually made Parafilm-M(®) pouch can be reduced, less diluent is required to cover the membrane as a result less antibodies are consumed. We also calculated that each immuno-blot pouch cost around $0.1906, whereas the cost for Parafilm-M(®) pouch is 0.0695 which is almost one-third the price of an immuno-blot pouch. Thus, Parafilm-M(®) method distinctly provides a cost-effective solution for antibody incubation.

  4. Simple and Sensitive Detection of HBsAg by Using a Quantum Dots Nanobeads Based Dot-Blot Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengfei; Lu, Huiqi; Chen, Jia; Han, Huanxing; Ma, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Simple and sensitive detection of infectious disease at an affordable cost is urgently needed in developing nations. In this regard, the dot blot immunoassay has been used as a common protein detection method for detection of disease markers. However, the traditional signal reporting systems, such as those using enzymes or gold nanoparticles lack sensitivity and thus restrict the application of these methods for disease detection. In this study, we report a simple and sensitive detection method for the detection of infectious disease markers that couples the dot-blot immunoassay with quantum dots nanobeads (QDNBs) as a reporter. First, the QDNBs were prepared by an oil-in-water emulsion-evaporation technique. Because of the encapsulation of several QDs in one particle, the fluorescent signal of reporter can be amplified with QDNBs in a one-step test and be read using a UV lamp obviating the need for complicated instruments. Detection of disease-associated markers in complex mixture is possible, which demonstrates the potential of developing QDNBs into a sensitive diagnostic kit. PMID:24505238

  5. Quantum dot bio-conjugate: as a western blot probe for highly sensitive detection of cellular proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, Sonia; Kale, Anup; Gholap, Haribhau; Rana, Abhimanyu; Desai, Rama; Banpurkar, Arun; Ogale, Satishchandra; Shastry, Padma

    2012-03-01

    In the present study, we report a quantum dot (QD)-tailored western blot analysis for a sensitive, rapid and flexible detection of the nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. Highly luminescent CdTe and (CdTe)ZnS QDs are synthesized by aqueous method. High resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction are used to characterize the properties of the quantum dots. The QDs are functionalized with antibodies of prostate apoptosis response-4 (Par-4), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases and β actin to specifically bind with the proteins localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm of the cells, respectively. The QD-conjugated antibodies are used to overcome the limitations of conventional western blot technique. The sensitivity and rapidity of protein detection in QD-based approach is very high, with detection limits up to 10 pg of protein. In addition, these labels provide the capability of enhanced identification and localization of marker proteins in intact cells by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  6. A Laboratory Exercise Illustrating the Sensitivity and Specificity of Western Blot Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Ming-Mei; Lovett, Janice

    2011-01-01

    Western blot analysis, commonly known as "Western blotting," is a standard tool in every laboratory where proteins are analyzed. It involves the separation of polypeptides in polyacrylamide gels followed by the electrophoretic transfer of the separated polypeptides onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride membrane. A replica of the…

  7. Microfluidic integration of Western blotting is enabled by electrotransfer-assisted sodium dodecyl sulfate dilution.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chenlu; Herr, Amy E

    2013-01-07

    We integrate sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) with subsequent antibody probing in a single, monolithic microdevice to realize microfluidic Western blotting. A hurdle to successful on-chip Western blotting lies in restoring antibody recognition of previously sized (denatured, reduced) proteins. To surmount this hurdle, we locally dilute free SDS from SDS-protein complexes using differential electromigration of the species during electrotransfer between SDS-PAGE and blotting regions of a microchamber. Local dilution of SDS minimizes re-association of SDS with proteins offering means to restore antibody binding affinity to proteins after SDS-PAGE. To achieve automated, programmable operation in a single instrument, we utilize a 1 × 2 mm(2) glass microchamber photopatterned with spatially distinct, contiguous polyacrylamide regions for SDS-PAGE, electrotransfer, and antibody blotting. Optimization of both the SDS-PAGE and electrotransfer conditions yields transfer distances of <1 mm (40 s). The Western blot is completed in 180 s, with fully automated assay operation using programmable voltage control. After SDS-PAGE and electrotransfer, we observe ~80% capture of protein band mass on the blotting region for a model protein, C-reactive protein. This novel microfluidic Western blot approach introduces fine transport control for in-transit protein handling to form the basis for an automated, rapid alternative to conventional slab-gel Western blotting.

  8. Luminex xMAP combined with Western blot improves HIV diagnostic sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weiwei; Li, Yan; Cheng, Shaohui; Yan, Chen; An, Shiping; Dong, Zheng; Yan, Lina; Yuan, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    Currently, Western blot is used to confirm the initial serodiagnosis of HIV infection by antibody detection. However, a major deficiency of the Western blot relates to a lack of sufficient sensitivity in detecting HIV antibodies. This report describes a simple, sensitive and inexpensive bead-based assay for detection of early HIV infection. A panel of 138 positive specimens including 105 blood donors and 33 MSM with known Western blot results were evaluated using Luminex xMAP at Tianjin Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). We demonstrate a superior sensitivity of Luminex xMAP compared with Western blot. Of the 87 confirmed HIV positive blood donors, Western blot only confirmed 65 cases with 74.7% (65/87) sensitivity while Luminex xMAP identified 72 cases with 82.8% (72/87) sensitivity (p<0.05). Western blot and Luminex xMAP verified 13 and 19 of 33 MSM specimens, respectively. The sensitivity was 39.4% (13/33) for Western blot and 57.6% (19/33) for Luminex xMAP (p<0.1). Luminex xMAP combined with Western blot improves the diagnostic sensitivity of HIV infection at an early stage, and reduces the chances of missed diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of immunodiagnostic antigens for cerebrospinal filariasis in horses by western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Takesue, Masataka; Osaka, Yuki; Muranaka, Masanori; Katayama, Yoshinari; Ikadai, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of horses diagnosed with Setaria digitata cerebrospinal filariasis were analyzed by western blot. The results revealed S. digitata protein bands measuring 65, 34, 22, and 18 kDa in molecular weight. In particular, the 18 kDa band is a possible candidate for clinical immunodiagnosis on the basis of western blot findings.

  10. A Laboratory Exercise Illustrating the Sensitivity and Specificity of Western Blot Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Ming-Mei; Lovett, Janice

    2011-01-01

    Western blot analysis, commonly known as "Western blotting," is a standard tool in every laboratory where proteins are analyzed. It involves the separation of polypeptides in polyacrylamide gels followed by the electrophoretic transfer of the separated polypeptides onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride membrane. A replica of the…

  11. A protocol for stripping and reprobing of Western blots originally developed with colorimetric substrate TMB.

    PubMed

    Kar, Parmita; Agnihotri, Saurabh Kumar; Sharma, Archana; Sachan, Rekha; Lal Bhatt, Madan; Sachdev, Monika

    2012-10-01

    Western blotting is a widely used analytical technique for detection of specific protein(s) in a given sample of tissue/cell homogenate or extract. Both chemiluminescence (CL) and colorimetric detections can be used for imaging Western blots. Colorimetric substrates offer background free, sensitive, and clean imaging results directly on the blotted membrane and provides more accurate profile with respect to prestained marker. However, blots stained with colorimetric substrates cannot be reused since no stripping protocols have been reported for such blots, thus limiting their reuse for detection of another protein. In the present study, for the first time, we report a novel method of stripping Western blots developed with the colorimetric substrate TMB for detection of a low-abundant protein and reprobing of these blots after stripping for detection of a more abundant protein through CL procedure. The stripping procedure utilizes a stripping buffer consisting of β-mercaptoethanol, SDS, and Tris-HCl and a washing buffer consisting of PBS added with 0.1% Tween-20 involves a series of steps and facilitates accurate detection of the second protein (i.e., more abundant protein) in the stripped blot through CL. The protocol is reproducible and facilitates saving of precious clinical samples, in addition to saving cost and time as compared to the existing procedures. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Sites of amyloid SAA mRNA production

    SciTech Connect

    Meek, R.L.; Benditt, E.P.

    1986-03-01

    To investigate possible extrahepatic sites of SAA production, male BALB/c mice were given a single 0.5 ml injection of either 10% casein or lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 mg/ml). Twenty hours after injection, RNA was extracted from liver, kidney, adrenal, testis, brain, spleen, skeletal muscle, heart, lung and small intestine. Northern blots of total RNA were hybridized with nick-translated /sup 32/P-labeled cDNA probes (length approximately 150 base pairs) corresponding to an homologous region of the three known SAA genes. Both casein and LPS elevated the mRNA in liver to about 200-fold above control levels; mRNA was elevated in adrenals from O to approximately 2% of liver. mRNA in some other tissues responded only to LPS injection: levels in kidney reached 15% of liver; pituitary, testis and brain reached 0.02 to 0.5% of liver; no apoSAA mRNA was detected in heart, skeletal muscle, lung, spleen or small intestine. Thus, some organs other than liver appear to have operational genes for apoSAA. The expression of apoSAA genes in different tissues is shared with other apoproteins; it remains to be seen whether all three or only selected genes are transcribed and translated in different tissues.

  13. Detection of antibodies to Hypoderma lineatum in cattle by Western blotting with recombinant hypodermin C antigen.

    PubMed

    Boldbaatar, D; Xuan, X; Kimbita, E; Huang, X; Igarashi, I; Byambaa, B; Battsetseg, B; Battur, B; Battsetseg, G; Batsukh, Z; Nagasawa, H; Fujisaki, K; Mikami, T

    2001-08-01

    The cDNA encoding the entire mature hypodermin C (HC) of Hypoderma lineatum was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein using pGEX vector. The recombinant HC protein (rHC) was tested by Western blotting to detect antibodies to H. lineatum in cattle. Western blotting with rHC as antigen clearly differentiated between H. lineatum-infested cattle sera and normal cattle sera. Forty-six out of forty-eight serum samples from cattle in Central Mongolia were positive, whereas all 30 serum samples from cows in Hokkaido, Japan, were negative by Western blotting. The result of Western blotting was identical to that of a previously developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These data demonstrated that Western blotting, with rHC expressed in E. coli, might be a useful method for the diagnosis of cattle hypodermosis.

  14. Charge standards as reference points in two-dimensional western blot patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.S.; Tollaksen, S.L.; Giometti, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis can be used to separate hundreds or even thousands of proteins from complex mixtures. Specific proteins in 2DE patterns can be identified by using Western Blotting. Correlation between a single stained spot on a nitrocellulose blot and the same spot in a stained 2DE gel pattern can be difficult since no reference points are available on the blot. Inclusion of a protein or proteins to serve as reference or standard points in both the blotted pattern and the stained gel pattern would make pattern recognition much more rapid and reliable. In this paper the use of a commercial charge standard (carbamylated creatine phosphokinase mix) was used to produce reference points in both gel patterns and corresponding nitrocellulose blots to simplify recognition of individual protein spots in complicated gel patterns. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Rift Valley fever virus NSS gene expression correlates with a defect in nuclear mRNA export.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Anna Maria; Van Deusen, Nicole M; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the localization of host mRNA during Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that infection with RVFV altered the localization of host mRNA. mRNA accumulated in the nuclei of RVFV-infected but not mock-infected cells. Further, overexpression of the NSS gene, but not the N, GN or NSM genes correlated with mRNA nuclear accumulation. Nuclear accumulation of host mRNA was not observed in cells infected with a strain of RVFV lacking the gene encoding NSS, confirming that expression of NSS is likely responsible for this phenomenon.

  16. Novel way of capping mRNA trimer and studies of its interaction with human nuclear cap-binding complex.

    PubMed

    Worch, Remigiusz; Stepinski, Janusz; Niedzwiecka, Anna; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena; Mazza, Catherine; Cusack, Stephen; Stolarski, Ryszard; Darzynkiewicz, Edward

    2005-01-01

    Binding of mRNA 5' cap by the nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC) is crucial for a wide variety of mRNA metabolic events. The interaction involving the CBP20 subunit of CBC is mediated by numerous hydrogen bonds and by stacking of the tyrosine sidechains with two first bases of the capped mRNA. To examine a possible role of a longer mRNA chain in the CBC-cap recognition, we have synthesized an mRNA tetramer using a novel way of capping an RNA trimer and determined its affinity for CBC by fluorescence titration.

  17. Analysis of solvent control and 1-nitrosopyrene-induced chinese hamster ovary cell mutants by southern and northern blots and the polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, R.K.; Mittelstaedt, R.A.; Heflich, R.H. )

    1992-01-01

    1-Nitrosopyrene, a metabolite of the tumorigenic environmental pollutant 1-nitropyrene, is a potent mutagen at the hprt locus in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. A single DNA adduct, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-l-aminopyrene, is produced in CHO cells treated with 1-nitrosopyrene, and this adduct is found in rats and mice exposed to 1-nitropyrene. In this study, the structure of the hprt gene and the structure and amount of hprt mRNA were analyzed in 43 CHO cell mutants (16 isolated from solvent control cultures and 27 isolated from 1-nitrosopyrene-treated cultures). PstI- and BamHI-digested DNA from the mutants were subjected to Southern blot analysis using a hamster hprt cDNA probe. None of the 1-nitrosopyrene-induced mutants and only one of the control mutants displayed hybridization patterns that were different from the parent CHO cells. Northern blot analysis revealed that two control mutants had truncated hprt mRNAs, while 56% of the control mutants and 78% of the induced mutants had reduced levels of hprt mRNA. Using polymerase chain reaction amplification of cDNA synthesized from RNA, the hprt protein-coding region could be amplified from 23 of the 1-nitrosopyrene-induced mutants and 11 of the control mutants. The amplification products from 3 of the control mutants and 5 of the induced mutants were smaller than that found with RNA from parental CHO cells. These results indicate that the mutagenic DNA damage produced by 1-nitrosopyrene in CHO cells does not cause major structural alterations in the hprt gene and suggest that 1-nitrosopyrene acts as a point mutagen. A large number of both control and 1-nitrosopyrene-induced mutants exhibited a marked reduction in hprt mRNA concentration or possessed truncated mRNA hprt protein coding sequences. These alterations may contribute to the 6-thioguanine-resistant phenotype.

  18. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, Richard I.; Edwards, Bradley C.; Buchwald, Melvin I.; Gosnell, Timothy R.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement.

  19. GTP-blot analysis of small GTP-binding proteins. The C-terminus is involved in renaturation of blotted proteins.

    PubMed

    Klinz, F J

    1994-10-01

    Recombinant c-Ha-ras, ralA and rap2, but not rap1A or rap1B proteins retained their ability to bind [alpha-32P]GTP after SDS/PAGE and transfer to nitrocellulose. Recombinant c-Has-ras missing the C-terminal 23 amino acid residues failed to bind [alpha-32P]GTP after the blot, and the ability of recombinant ralA missing the C-terminal 28 amino acid residues to bind [alpha-32P]GTP was decreased many-fold. The presence of nonionic detergents of the polyoxyethylene type such as Tween 20, Triton X-100, Nonidet P40 or Lubrol PX in the incubation buffer was necessary to induce renaturation of blotted recombinant c-Ha-ras protein, whereas other types of detergents were ineffective. We propose that detergents of the polyoxyethylene type induce the refolding of some types of blotted small GTP-binding proteins and that the C-terminus is involved in the refolding process. Membranes from NIH3T3 fibroblasts overexpressing c-Ha-ras protein showed much weaker binding of [alpha-32P]GTP as expected from the level of ras immunoreactivity. Treatment of fibroblasts with lovastatin, an inhibitor of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, caused the accumulation of the unfarnesylated form of c-Ha-ras in the cytosol. Examination of [alpha-32P]GTP-binding and immunoreactivity for cytosolic and membrane-bound c-Ha-ras revealed that binding of [alpha-32P]GTP to unprocessed c-Ha-ras was increased about threefold compared to the same amount of processed c-Ha-ras. Our results demonstrate that detection and quantification of small GTP-binding proteins in eukaryotic cells by GTP-blot analysis is hampered by the fact that these proteins differ strongly in their ability to renature after blotting to nitrocellulose.

  20. Application of SYPRO Ruby- and Flamingo-stained polyacrylamide gels to Western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Makoto; Kobayashi, Ken-Ichi; Tadokoro, Tadahiro; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2010-02-15

    Western blots are widely used for analysis of the expression levels of specific proteins. Blotting is conducted after sodium dodecyl sulfate or native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis without staining the gel. However, when it is necessary to analyze the gel, duplicate polyacrylamide gels (one of which is stained) usually must be prepared, leading to the consumption of precious sample. Thus, we have developed a convenient and efficient Western blot method using a stained gel. This simple modification should be beneficial for the analysis of samples that are limited in quantity and/or samples for which the stained gel serves as the loading control.

  1. Detection and quantitation of HPV DNA replication by Southern blotting and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Iain M; Taylor, Ewan R

    2005-01-01

    This provides a brief introduction into the mechanism of DNA replication by the E1 and E2 proteins and describes the traditional Southern blotting technique that is used to monitor E1- and E2-mediated DNA replication. It also includes a novel real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach for monitoring E1- and E2-mediated DNA replication that has enhanced sensitivity and quantitation compared with Southern blotting, and a discussion of when to use the Southern blotting and real-time PCR techniques.

  2. Analysis of the phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase mRNA in the rat spermatozoon and effect of selenium deficiency on the mRNA.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, K; Hirata, S; Hoshi, K; Shinohara, A; Chiba, M

    2000-04-01

    Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx) is a selenium (Se)-dependent glutathione peroxidase. It is reported that the relative PHGPx mRNA levels are much higher in the testis than in the other tissues. We have analyzed the existence and structure of the PHGPx mRNA in rat sperm and the changes in the level of the PHGPx mRNA after feeding with Se-deficient diets. We used 8-wk-old male Wistar strain rats given Se-adequate feed (control group, n = 5) and Se-deficient diets with marginal levels of Se (0.03 ppm or less) (Se-deficient group, n = 5) for 4 wk. The existence and level of the PHGPx mRNA in the cauda epididymal sperm, testis, and liver from the Se-adequate rats were analyzed by the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the Southern blotting method. As a result, the existence of the PHGPx mRNA was demonstrated in the cauda epididymal sperm as well as in the testis and liver. Moreover, the subtype of the PHGPx mRNA in the rat sperm was the mitochondrial-type mRNA, which included a region corresponding to the mitochondrial transfer leader sequence. These results imply that the intracellular localization of PHGPx may be regulated by the transcription level. On the other hand, there was no significant difference between the control group and the Se-deficient group in the Se level of the cauda epididymal sperm and the level of the PHGPx mRNA. In conclusion, it has been demonstrated that the PHGPx mRNA exists in rat sperm for the first time. The analysis of the PHGPx mRNA in the sperm would be a useful tool for investigating the disfunction caused by the disorder of the level or structure of the PHGPx in the sperm.

  3. Western blot analysis of BK channel β1-subunit expression should be interpreted cautiously when using commercially available antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Yogesh; Fernandes, Roxanne; Kadrofske, Mark M; Lockwood, Lizbeth R; Galligan, James J; Xu, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels consist of pore-forming α- and accessory β-subunits. There are four β-subunit subtypes (β1-β4), BK β1-subunit is specific for smooth muscle cells (SMC). Reduced BK β1-subunit expression is associated with SMC dysfunction in animal models of human disease, because downregulation of BK β1-subunit reduces channel activity and increases SMC contractility. Several anti-BK β1-subunit antibodies are commercially available; however, the specificity of most antibodies has not been tested or confirmed in the tissues from BK β1-subunit knockout (KO) mice. In this study, we tested the specificity and sensitivity of six commercially available antibodies from five manufacturers. We performed western blot analysis on BK β1-subunit enriched tissues (mesenteric arteries and colons) and non-SM tissue (cortex of kidney) from wild-type (WT) and BK β1-KO mice. We found that antibodies either detected protein bands of the appropriate molecular weight in tissues from both WT and BK β1-KO mice or failed to detect protein bands at the appropriate molecular weight in tissues from WT mice, suggesting that these antibodies may lack specificity for the BK β1-subunit. The absence of BK β1-subunit mRNA expression in arteries, colons, and kidneys from BK β1-KO mice was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. We conclude that these commercially available antibodies might not be reliable tools for studying BK β1-subunit expression in murine tissues under the denaturing conditions that we have used. Data obtained using commercially available antibodies should be interpreted cautiously. Our studies underscore the importance of proper negative controls in western blot analyses. © 2014 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  4. mRNA translocation occurs during the second step of ribosomal intersubunit rotation.

    PubMed

    Ermolenko, Dmitri N; Noller, Harry F

    2011-04-01

    During protein synthesis, mRNA and tRNA undergo coupled translocation through the ribosome in a process that is catalyzed by elongation factor G (EF-G). On the basis of cryo-EM reconstructions, counterclockwise and clockwise rotational movements between the large and small ribosomal subunits have been implicated in a proposed ratcheting mechanism to drive the unidirectional movement of translocation. We used a combination of two fluorescence-based approaches to study the timing of these events, intersubunit fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements to observe relative rotational movement of the subunits, and a fluorescence quenching assay to monitor translocation of mRNA. Binding of EF-G-GTP first induces rapid counterclockwise intersubunit rotation, followed by a slower, clockwise reversal of the rotational movement. We compared the rates of these movements and found that mRNA translocation occurs during the second, clockwise rotation event, corresponding to the transition from the hybrid state to the classical state.

  5. Sodium regulation of angiotensinogen mRNA expression in rat kidney cortex and medulla.

    PubMed Central

    Ingelfinger, J R; Pratt, R E; Ellison, K; Dzau, V J

    1986-01-01

    Rat liver angiotensinogen cDNA (pRang 3) and mouse renin cDNA (pDD-1D2) were used to identify angiotensinogen and renin mRNA sequences in rat kidney cortex and medulla in rats on high and low salt diet. Angiotensinogen mRNA sequences were present in renal cortex and medulla in apparently equal proportions, whereas renin mRNA sequences were found primarily in renal cortex. Average relative signal of rat liver to whole kidney angiotensinogen mRNA was 100:3. Densitometric analysis of Northern blots demonstrated that renal cortical angiotensinogen mRNA concentrations increased 3.5-fold (P less than 0.001) and medulla, 1.5-fold (P less than 0.005) on low sodium compared with high sodium diet, whereas renal cortex renin mRNA levels increased 6.8-fold (P less than 0.0005). Dietary sodium did not significantly influence liver angiotensinogen mRNA levels. These findings provide evidence for sodium regulation of renal renin and angiotensinogen mRNA expressions, which supports potential existence of an intrarenally regulated RAS and suggest that different factors regulate renal and hepatic angiotensinogen. Images PMID:3533999

  6. Osteoblastic alkaline phosphatase mRNA is stabilized by binding to vimentin intermediary filaments.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Yvonne; Biniossek, Martin; Stark, G Björn; Finkenzeller, Günter; Simunovic, Filip

    2015-03-01

    Vascularization is essential in bone tissue engineering and recent research has focused on interactions between osteoblasts (hOBs) and endothelial cells (ECs). It was shown that cocultivation increases the stability of osteoblastic alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA. We investigated the mechanisms behind this observation, focusing on mRNA binding proteins. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we found that the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of ALP mRNA is necessary for human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC)-mediated stabilization of osteoblastic ALP mRNA. Using pulldown experiments and nanoflow-HPLC mass spectrometry, vimentin was identified to bind to the 3'-UTR of ALP mRNA. Validation was performed by Western blotting. Functional experiments inhibiting intermediate filaments with iminodipropionitrile and specific inhibition of vimentin by siRNA transfection showed reduced levels of ALP mRNA and protein. Therefore, ALP mRNA binds to and is stabilized by vimentin. This data add to the understanding of intracellular trafficking of ALP mRNA, its function, and have possible implications in tissue engineering applications.

  7. Automated capillary Western dot blot method for the identity of a 15-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Melissa; Ha, Sha; Rustandi, Richard R

    2015-06-01

    Simple Western is a new technology that allows for the separation, blotting, and detection of proteins similar to a traditional Western except in a capillary format. Traditionally, identity assays for biological products are performed using either an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or a manual dot blot Western. Both techniques are usually very tedious, labor-intensive, and complicated for multivalent vaccines, and they can be difficult to transfer to other laboratories. An advantage this capillary Western technique has over the traditional manual dot blot Western method is the speed and the automation of electrophoresis separation, blotting, and detection steps performed in 96 capillaries. This article describes details of the development of an automated identity assay for a 15-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, PCV15-CRM197, using capillary Western technology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparisons of ELISA and Western blot assays for detection of autophagy flux.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sung-Hee; Choi, Yong-Bok; Kim, June-Hyun; Weihl, Conrad C; Ju, Jeong-Sun

    2017-08-01

    We analyzed autophagy/mitophagy flux in vitro (C2C12 myotubes) and in vivo (mouse skeletal muscle) following the treatments of autophagy inducers (starvation, rapamycin) and a mitophagy inducer (carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, CCCP) using two immunodetection methods, ELISA and Western blotting, and compared their working range, accuracy, and reliability. The ELISAs showed a broader working range than that of the LC3 Western blots (Table 1). Table 2 showed that data value distribution was tighter and the average standard error from the ELISA was much smaller than those of the Western blot, directly relating to the accuracy of the assay. Test-retest reliability analysis showed good reliability for three individual ELISAs (interclass correlation, ≥ 0.7), but poor reliability for three individual Western blots (interclass correlation, ≤ 0.4) (Table 3).

  9. Multiplexed microfluidic blotting of proteins and nucleic acids by parallel, serpentine microchannels.

    PubMed

    He, Sha; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Pei; Xu, Xingzhi; Zhu, Kui; Pan, Wenying; Liu, Wenwen; Cai, Kaiyong; Sun, Jiashu; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-07

    This work develops a high-throughput, high-efficiency and straightforward microfluidic blotting method for analyzing proteins and nucleic acids. Sample solutions containing antibodies (for protein detection) or hybridization probes (for nucleic acid detection) are introduced into the parallel, serpentine microchannels to specifically recognize the immobilized targets on the substrate, achieving the identification of multiple targets in multiple samples simultaneously. The loading control, molecular weight markers, and antigen/antibody titration are designed and integrated into the microfluidic chip, thus allowing for the quantification of proteins and nucleic acids. Importantly, we could easily distinguish the adjacent blotting bands inside parallel microchannels, which may be difficult to achieve in conventional blotting. The small dimensions of microfluidic channels also help to reduce the amount of probing molecules and to accelerate the biochemical reaction. Our microfluidic blotting could bypass the steps of blocking and washing, further reducing the operation time and complexity.

  10. Detection of Blotted Proteins on Nitrocellulose/PVDF Membranes by Alta.

    PubMed

    Pal, Jayanta K; Rao, Shilpa J; Godbole, Dhanashri J

    2015-01-01

    We describe here a simple method of staining nitrocellulose/PVDF blots by Alta. This red-colored stain which is used as a cosmetic contains Crocein scarlet and Rhodamine B as the principal components. It is very cheap, is available as a ready-to-use liquid, and is as sensitive as the most commonly used stain Ponceau Red S. We further demonstrate that Crocein scarlet (one of the principal components) alone can be used for staining the blots with equal efficiency as well. The stained protein profile can be detected on a white light plate and documented in the usual manner. Detailed analysis indicates that this stain does not interfere with subsequent immunoreactions. Moreover, Alta is almost 100 times cheaper to the routinely used stain Ponceau Red S, and thus is an ideal alternative to the Ponceau Red S for staining blots during western blot analysis.

  11. Identification of immunodiagnostic antigens for cerebrospinal filariasis in horses by western blot analysis

    PubMed Central

    TAKESUE, Masataka; OSAKA, Yuki; MURANAKA, Masanori; KATAYAMA, Yoshinari; IKADAI, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the present study, the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of horses diagnosed with Setaria digitata cerebrospinal filariasis were analyzed by western blot. The results revealed S. digitata protein bands measuring 65, 34, 22, and 18 kDa in molecular weight. In particular, the 18 kDa band is a possible candidate for clinical immunodiagnosis on the basis of western blot findings. PMID:27073332

  12. Accuracy of Reverse Dot-Blot PCR in Detection of Different β-Globin Gene Mutations.

    PubMed

    El-Fadaly, N; Abd-Elhameed, A; Abd-Elbar, E; El-Shanshory, M

    2016-06-01

    Prevention programs for β-thalassemia based on molecular diagnosis of heterozygous carriers and/or patients require the use of reliable mutation screening methods. The aim of this study was to compare between direct DNA sequencing, and reverse dot-blot PCR in detection of different β-globin gene mutations in Egyptian children with β-thalassemia. Forty children with β-thalassemia were subjected to mutation analysis, performed by both direct DNA sequencing and β-globin Strip Assay MED™ (based on reverse dot-blot PCR). The most frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were; IVSI-110 G>A (31.25 %), IVS I-6 T > C (21.25 %), and IVS I-1 G>A (20 %). Relatively less frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were "IVSII-1 G>A (5 %), IVSII-745 C>G (5 %), IVSII-848 C>A (2.5 %), IVSI-5 G>C (2.5 %), -87 C>G(2.5 %), and cd39 C>T (2.5 %)", While the genotypes of three patients (6 alleles 7.5 %) were not detected by reverse dot-blot PCR. Mutant alleles detected by direct DNA sequencing were the same as reverse dot-blot PCR method except it revealed the genotypes of 3 undetected patients (one patient was homozygous IVSI-110 G>A, and two patients were homozygous IVS I-1 G>A. Sensitivity of the reverse dot-blot PCR was 92.5 % when compared to direct DNA sequencing for detecting β-thalassemia mutations. Our results therefore suggest that, direct DNA sequencing may be preferred over reverse dot-blot PCR in critical diagnostic situations like genetic counseling for prenatal diagnosis.

  13. Low Incidence along with Low mRNA Levels of EGFR(vIII) in Prostate and Colorectal Cancers Compared to Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Peciak, Joanna; Stec, Wojciech J; Treda, Cezary; Ksiazkiewicz, Magdalena; Janik, Karolina; Popeda, Marta; Smolarz, Maciej; Rosiak, Kamila; Hulas-Bigoszewska, Krystyna; Och, Waldemar; Rieske, Piotr; Stoczynska-Fidelus, Ewelina

    2017-01-01

    Background: The presence as well as the potential role of EGFR(vIII) in tumors other than glioblastoma still remains a controversial subject with many contradictory data published. Previous analyses, however, did not consider the level of EGFR(vIII) mRNA expression in different tumor types. Methods: Appropriately designed protocol for Real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (Real-time qRT-PCR) was applied to analyze EGFR(vIII) and EGFR(WT) mRNA expression in 155 tumor specimens. Additionally, Western Blot (WB) analysis was performed for selected samples. Stable cell lines showing EGFR(vIII) expression (CAS-1 and DK-MG) were analyzed by means of WB, immunocytochemistry (ICC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Results: Our analyses revealed EGFR(vIII) expression in 27.59% of glioblastomas (8/29), 8.11% of colorectal cancers (3/37), 6.52% of prostate cancers (3/46) and none of breast cancers (0/43). Despite the average relative expression of EGFR(vIII) varying greatly among tumors of different tissues (approximately 800-fold) or even within the same tissue group (up to 8000-fold for GB), even the marginal expression of EGFR(vIII) mRNA can be detrimental to cancer progression, as determined by the analysis of stable cell lines endogenously expressing the oncogene. Conclusion: EGFR(vIII) plays an unquestionable role in glioblastomas with high expression of this oncogene. Our data suggests that EGFR(vIII) importance should not be underestimated even in tumors with relatively low expression of this oncogene.

  14. Low Incidence along with Low mRNA Levels of EGFRvIII in Prostate and Colorectal Cancers Compared to Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Peciak, Joanna; Stec, Wojciech J; Treda, Cezary; Ksiazkiewicz, Magdalena; Janik, Karolina; Popeda, Marta; Smolarz, Maciej; Rosiak, Kamila; Hulas-Bigoszewska, Krystyna; Och, Waldemar; Rieske, Piotr; Stoczynska-Fidelus, Ewelina

    2017-01-01

    Background: The presence as well as the potential role of EGFRvIII in tumors other than glioblastoma still remains a controversial subject with many contradictory data published. Previous analyses, however, did not consider the level of EGFRvIII mRNA expression in different tumor types. Methods: Appropriately designed protocol for Real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (Real-time qRT-PCR) was applied to analyze EGFRvIII and EGFRWT mRNA expression in 155 tumor specimens. Additionally, Western Blot (WB) analysis was performed for selected samples. Stable cell lines showing EGFRvIII expression (CAS-1 and DK-MG) were analyzed by means of WB, immunocytochemistry (ICC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Results: Our analyses revealed EGFRvIII expression in 27.59% of glioblastomas (8/29), 8.11% of colorectal cancers (3/37), 6.52% of prostate cancers (3/46) and none of breast cancers (0/43). Despite the average relative expression of EGFRvIII varying greatly among tumors of different tissues (approximately 800-fold) or even within the same tissue group (up to 8000-fold for GB), even the marginal expression of EGFRvIII mRNA can be detrimental to cancer progression, as determined by the analysis of stable cell lines endogenously expressing the oncogene. Conclusion: EGFRvIII plays an unquestionable role in glioblastomas with high expression of this oncogene. Our data suggests that EGFRvIII importance should not be underestimated even in tumors with relatively low expression of this oncogene. PMID:28123609

  15. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, R.I.; Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Gosnell, T.R.

    1995-09-05

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement. 6 figs.

  16. Immunoconfirmation of central nervous system tuberculosis by blotting: A study of 300 cases.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shripad; Giribhattanavar, Prashant; Patil, Madhusudan; Kumar, Kavitha

    2015-06-01

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is a serious form of disease of the central nervous system. Early and accurate diagnosis of the disease and effective treatment are key important factors to contain the disease. The disease presents as chronic meningitis where other partners such as fungal meningitis, neurosyphilis, cysticercal meningitis, carcinomatous meningitis and partially treated pyogenic meningitis share a similar clinical picture making the diagnosis complicated. Culturing of the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample has shown a poor response. The main immunological method for the immunodiagnosis of TBM is the detection of an antibody response in the CSF. In the present study, total MTB sonicated extract antigen was used for ELISA and Western blot. ELISA shows overall immune response of the test sample, whereas Western blotting reveals the specific reactivity to a particular molecular weight antigen. This would also reveal the immunodominant antigen. A total of 300 CSF samples were analyzed by both ELISA and Western blotting. Of the 240 clinically suspected TBM cases, 111 samples were positive by ELISA and 81 samples by Western blot. A total of 76 CSF samples were positive by both ELISA and Western blot. None of the control samples showed positivity either by ELISA or by Western blot. TBM patients revealed major antibody reactivity to 30-40 kD region, followed by 14 kD region. ELISA is sensitive with mild non-specific binding, but Western blot is specific in detecting the immune response. The findings will be useful in definitive immunodiagnosis of TBM.

  17. Fluorescent microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.

    1978-01-01

    Latex particles with attached antibodies have potential biochemical and environmental applications. Human red blood cells and lymphocytes have been labeled with fluorescent microspheres by either direct or indirect immunological technique. Immunolatex spheres can also be used for detecting and localizing specific cell surface receptors. Hormones and toxins may also be bondable.

  18. Magnetic Field-Activated Sensing of mRNA in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Saira F; Guz, Nataliia; Zakharchenko, Andrey; Deng, Han; Tumanov, Alexei V; Woodworth, Craig D; Minko, Sergiy; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M; Katz, Evgeny

    2017-08-25

    Detection of specific mRNA in living cells has attracted significant attention in the past decade. Probes that can be easily delivered into cells and activated at the desired time can contribute to understanding translation, trafficking and degradation of mRNA. Here we report a new strategy termed magnetic field-activated binary deoxyribozyme (MaBiDZ) sensor that enables both efficient delivery and temporal control of mRNA sensing by magnetic field. MaBiDZ uses two species of magnetic beads conjugated with different components of a multicomponent deoxyribozyme (DZ) sensor. The DZ sensor is activated only in the presence of a specific target mRNA and when a magnetic field is applied. Here we demonstrate that MaBiDZ sensor can be internalized in live MCF-7 breast cancer cells and activated by a magnetic field to fluorescently report the presence of specific mRNA, which are cancer biomarkers.

  19. Visualization of dynamics of single endogenous mRNA labeled in live mouse.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Yoon; Lim, Hyungsik; Yoon, Young J; Follenzi, Antonia; Nwokafor, Chiso; Lopez-Jones, Melissa; Meng, Xiuhua; Singer, Robert H

    2014-01-24

    The transcription and transport of messenger RNA (mRNA) are critical steps in regulating the spatial and temporal components of gene expression, but it has not been possible to observe the dynamics of endogenous mRNA in primary mammalian tissues. We have developed a transgenic mouse in which all β-actin mRNA is fluorescently labeled. We found that β-actin mRNA in primary fibroblasts localizes predominantly by diffusion and trapping as single mRNAs. In cultured neurons and acute brain slices, we found that multiple β-actin mRNAs can assemble together, travel by active transport, and disassemble upon depolarization by potassium chloride. Imaging of brain slices revealed immediate early induction of β-actin transcription after depolarization. Studying endogenous mRNA in live mouse tissues provides insight into its dynamic regulation within the context of the cellular and tissue microenvironment.

  20. HTLV-I/II seroindeterminate Western blot reactivity in a cohort of patients with neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Soldan, S S; Graf, M D; Waziri, A; Flerlage, A N; Robinson, S M; Kawanishi, T; Leist, T P; Lehky, T J; Levin, M C; Jacobson, S

    1999-09-01

    The human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is associated with a chronic, progressive neurological disease known as HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Screening for HTLV-I involves the detection of virus-specific serum antibodies by EIA and confirmation by Western blot. HTLV-I/II seroindeterminate Western blot patterns have been described worldwide. However, the significance of this blot pattern is unclear. We identified 8 patients with neurological disease and an HTLV-I/II seroindeterminate Western blot pattern, none of whom demonstrated increased spontaneous proliferation and HTLV-I-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity. However, HTLV-I tax sequence was amplified from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of 4 of them. These data suggest that patients with chronic progressive neurological disease and HTLV-I/II Western blot seroindeterminate reactivity may harbor either defective HTLV-I, novel retrovirus with partial homology to HTLV-I, or HTLV-I in low copy number.

  1. Protein analysis through Western blot of cells excised individually from human brain and muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Koob, A O; Bruns, L; Prassler, C; Masliah, E; Klopstock, T; Bender, A

    2012-06-15

    Comparing protein levels from single cells in tissue has not been achieved through Western blot. Laser capture microdissection allows for the ability to excise single cells from sectioned tissue and compile an aggregate of cells in lysis buffer. In this study we analyzed proteins from cells excised individually from brain and muscle tissue through Western blot. After we excised individual neurons from the substantia nigra of the brain, the accumulated surface area of the individual cells was 120,000, 24,000, 360,000, 480,000, 600,000 μm2. We used an optimized Western blot protocol to probe for tyrosine hydroxylase in this cell pool. We also took 360,000 μm2 of astrocytes (1700 cells) and analyzed the specificity of the method. In muscle we were able to analyze the proteins of the five complexes of the electron transport chain through Western blot from 200 human cells. With this method, we demonstrate the ability to compare cell-specific protein levels in the brain and muscle and describe for the first time how to visualize proteins through Western blot from cells captured individually. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Telomere length measurement by a novel Luminex-based assay: a blinded comparison to Southern blot.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Brandon L; Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Zhang, Chenan; Aviv, Abraham; Hunt, Steven C; Ahsan, Habibul; Kibriya, Muhammad G

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length (TL) is a potential biomarker of aging and age-related disease risk. We recently published a novel Luminex-based method for high-throughput, low-cost TL measurement. Here we describe a blinded comparison of the Luminex method to Southern blot, the most precise TL measurement method. Luminex and Southern blot measurements for the same 50 DNA samples were taken in two independent laboratories; each sample was measured twice, several months apart. The inter-assay CV for Luminex ranged from 5.5 to 9.1 (depending on CV estimation method), and Southern blot CV from 1.0 to 1.7. Both measures were inversely associated with age. The correlation between the repeated measurements was 0.66 for Luminex and 0.97 for Southern blot. The correlation between Southern blot and Luminex was 0.65 in round 1 and 0.75 in round 2, and the relationship showed no evidence of non-linearity. Our results demonstrate that the Luminex assay is a valid and reproducible method for high-throughput TL measurement. The Luminex assay involves no DNA amplification, which may make Luminex an attractive alternative to PCR-based TL measurement.

  3. Development and tissue distribution of sucrase-isomaltase mRNA in rats.

    PubMed

    Leeper, L L; Henning, S J

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies of sucrase-isomaltase (SI) activities have shown this complex to be absent in the suckling rat and to appear during the weaning period. We describe here the cloning of a heterologous SI cDNA and its use for the quantitation of SI mRNA as a first step toward understanding the molecular basis of SI development. A survey of RNA from 12 tissues of mature rats by Northern blot analysis showed a 6-kb band of SI mRNA only in the small intestine. Within the latter, both sucrase activity and SI mRNA peaked in the jejunum. Assay of jejunal tissue from developing rats showed sucrase activity and SI mRNA to be first detectable at 18 days, to rise in parallel through 24 days, and then to diverge a little (enzyme activity being lower) by 36 days. When glucocorticoid was administered to 10-day-old rats, neither sucrase activity nor SI mRNA was detectable 12 h later. Both parameters were readily detected 24 h postinjection, although the mRNA had risen relatively more than the enzyme activity. The two parameters increased in concert through 5 days postinjection and then plateaued. We conclude that, with respect to distribution along the intestine and to normal and precocious development, activities of SI in the rat are determined primarily by the abundance of its mRNA.

  4. Avoiding pitfalls of internal controls: validation of reference genes for analysis by qRT-PCR and Western blot throughout rat retinal development.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Martins, Maurício; Njaine, Brian; Silveira, Mariana S

    2012-01-01

    Housekeeping genes have been commonly used as reference to normalize gene expression and protein content data because of its presumed constitutive expression. In this paper, we challenge the consensual idea that housekeeping genes are reliable controls for expression studies in the retina through the investigation of a panel of reference genes potentially suitable for analysis of different stages of retinal development. We applied statistical tools on combinations of retinal developmental stages to assess the most stable internal controls for quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). The stability of expression of seven putative reference genes (Actb, B2m, Gapdh, Hprt1, Mapk1, Ppia and Rn18s) was analyzed using geNorm, BestKeeper and Normfinder software. In addition, several housekeeping genes were tested as loading controls for Western blot in the same sample panel, using Image J. Overall, for qRT-PCR the combination of Gapdh and Mapk1 showed the highest stability for most experimental sets. Actb was downregulated in more mature stages, while Rn18s and Hprt1 showed the highest variability. We normalized the expression of cyclin D1 using various reference genes and demonstrated that spurious results may result from blind selection of internal controls. For Western blot significant variation could be seen among four putative internal controls (β-actin, cyclophilin b, α-tubulin and lamin A/C), while MAPK1 was stably expressed. Putative housekeeping genes exhibit significant variation in both mRNA and protein content during retinal development. Our results showed that distinct combinations of internal controls fit for each experimental set in the case of qRT-PCR and that MAPK1 is a reliable loading control for Western blot. The results indicate that biased study outcomes may follow the use of reference genes without prior validation for qRT-PCR and Western blot.

  5. Avoiding Pitfalls of Internal Controls: Validation of Reference Genes for Analysis by qRT-PCR and Western Blot throughout Rat Retinal Development

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Martins, Maurício; Njaine, Brian; Silveira, Mariana S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Housekeeping genes have been commonly used as reference to normalize gene expression and protein content data because of its presumed constitutive expression. In this paper, we challenge the consensual idea that housekeeping genes are reliable controls for expression studies in the retina through the investigation of a panel of reference genes potentially suitable for analysis of different stages of retinal development. Methodology/Principal Findings We applied statistical tools on combinations of retinal developmental stages to assess the most stable internal controls for quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). The stability of expression of seven putative reference genes (Actb, B2m, Gapdh, Hprt1, Mapk1, Ppia and Rn18s) was analyzed using geNorm, BestKeeper and Normfinder software. In addition, several housekeeping genes were tested as loading controls for Western blot in the same sample panel, using Image J. Overall, for qRT-PCR the combination of Gapdh and Mapk1 showed the highest stability for most experimental sets. Actb was downregulated in more mature stages, while Rn18s and Hprt1 showed the highest variability. We normalized the expression of cyclin D1 using various reference genes and demonstrated that spurious results may result from blind selection of internal controls. For Western blot significant variation could be seen among four putative internal controls (β-actin, cyclophilin b, α-tubulin and lamin A/C), while MAPK1 was stably expressed. Conclusion Putative housekeeping genes exhibit significant variation in both mRNA and protein content during retinal development. Our results showed that distinct combinations of internal controls fit for each experimental set in the case of qRT-PCR and that MAPK1 is a reliable loading control for Western blot. The results indicate that biased study outcomes may follow the use of reference genes without prior validation for qRT-PCR and Western blot. PMID:22916200

  6. Value of Western blotting in the clinical follow-up of canine leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, F J; Méndez, S; de la Fuente, C; Cuquerella, M; Gómez, M T; Alunda, J M

    1999-03-01

    Specific serum antibody levels in Leishmania infantum-infected dogs treated with a combination of glucantime and allopurinol were estimated by indirect immunofluorescence and Western blotting. The sensitivity of Western blot was greater than that obtained with immunofluorescence titration. In general, both diagnostic methods concurred with the post-treatment clinical status of the animals. Clinical improvement of successfully treated dogs was related to lower immunofluorescence titers and simpler and/or less reactive immunodetection patterns in Western blotting. The recognition, by infected dogs, of certain low molecular weight antigens, particularly one of approximately 26 kDa, was restricted to pretreatment samples and a single animal in relapse thus apparently constituting an active infection marker.

  7. Quantum dot-based western blot for sensitive detection of pig serum antibody to actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cişmileanu, Ana; Sima, Cornelia; Grigoriu, Constantin

    2007-08-01

    A quantum dot - immunoglobulin conjugate specific for pig IgG, was obtained by carbodiimide chemistry. We used a Western blot technique for detecting specific antibodies against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (A. pp), which cause porcine pleuropneumonia. The antigen used in this technique was Apx haemolysin which is an important virulence factor of A. pp and it induces protective immunity in vaccined pigs. The detection on Western blot membrane was possible at 1/50 dilution of quantum dot conjugate at a dilution of pig serum till 1/6400. The results for pig serum demonstrated a higher sensitivity of QD-based Western blot technique for the presence of antibodies specific for Apx haemolysin in comparison with similar classical techniques (with coloured substrate for enzyme present in secondary antibody conjugate).

  8. Western blotting using in-gel protein labeling as a normalization control: stain-free technology.

    PubMed

    Gilda, Jennifer E; Gomes, Aldrin V

    2015-01-01

    Western blotting is a commonly used laboratory technique for semi-quantifying protein amounts. It is important when quantifying protein expression to account for differences in the amount of total protein loaded onto the gel using a loading control. Common loading controls include housekeeping proteins, such as β-actin or GAPDH, quantified by Western blot, or total protein, quantified using a stain such as Coomassie Brilliant Blue or Ponceau S. A more recently developed method for total protein quantification utilizes stain-free technology, which has a linear dynamic detection range and allows for protein detection on both gels and membranes. Here, we describe the theory and use of stain-free gels for total protein quantification and normalization of Western blots.

  9. Application of SYPRO Ruby- and Flamingo-stained polyacrylamide gels to Western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Makoto; Kobayashi, Ken-Ichi; Tadokoro, Tadahiro; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2009-06-15

    Western blot analysis has been a useful method for analysis of expression levels of specific proteins and is conducted after sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis without staining the gel. However, when it is necessary to analyze the gel, duplicate polyacrylamide gels usually must be prepared, one of which is stained, leading to the consumption of precious sample. Thus, we developed a convenient and efficient Western blotting method using a stained gel. This simple modification should be beneficial for analyzing samples that are limited in quantity and/or samples for which the stained gel serves as the loading control.

  10. Identification of claudins by western blot and immunofluorescence in different cell lines and tissues.

    PubMed

    González-Mariscal, Lorenza; Garay, Erika; Quirós, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Claudins are integral proteins of the TJ. Each epithelia in the organism expresses a unique set of claudins that determines the degree of sealing of the paracellular pathway and the ionic selectivity of the tissue. TJs are dynamic structures whose organization and composition change in response to alterations in the environment as well as under physiological and pathological conditions. Changes in claudin expression and subcellular distribution can be analyzed in western blot and immunofluorescence experiments, employing a wide array of available specific antibodies against claudins. In this chapter, we describe in detail protocols used for western blot and immunofluorescence detection of claudins in epithelial cell lines and in various tissue samples.

  11. Investigation of immunofluorescence cross-reactions against Trichinella spiralis by western blot (immunoblot) analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Robert, F; Weil, B; Kassis, N; Dupouy-Camet, J

    1996-01-01

    Immunofluorescence cross-reactions in Trichinella spiralis serodiagnosis are sometimes difficult to identify. We compared the results of an indirect immunofluorescence assay and the profiles obtained by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis for three groups of patients: 10 T. spiralis-infected patients, 10 patients with autoimmune diseases, and 7 patients with parasitic diseases other than trichinellosis. The degree of immunofluorescence cross-reaction was variable. Western blotting allowed us to differentiate Trichinella infection from other parasitic diseases. In 3 of 10 serum samples from patients with autoimmune diseases, bands which had the same sizes as Trichinella bands were observed, and they could correspond to shared epitopes such as heat shock proteins. PMID:8877138

  12. Optimization of mRNA design for protein expression in the crustacean Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Törner, Kerstin; Nakanishi, Takashi; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Kato, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hajime

    2014-08-01

    The water flea Daphnia is a new model organism for ecological, evolutionary, and toxicological genomics. Detailed functional analysis of genes newly discovered through genomic approaches often requires overexpression of the identified protein. In the present study, we report the microinjection of in vitro-synthesized RNAs into the eggs as a method for overexpressing ubiquitous proteins in Daphnia magna. We injected a 1.3-kb mRNA that coded for the red fluorescent protein (DsRed2) flanked by UTRs from the ubiquitously expressed elongation factor 1α-1 (EF1α-1) into D. magna embryos. DsRed2 fluorescence in the embryos was measured 24 h after microinjection. Unexpectedly, the reporter RNA containing the 522-bp full-length EF1α-1 3' UTR failed to induce fluorescence. To assess reporter expression, the length of the 3' UTR that potentially contained negative regulatory elements of protein expression, including AU-rich regions and Musashi binding elements, was serially reduced from the 3' end. Assessing all injected RNA alternatives, mRNA containing the first 60 bp of the 3' UTR gave rise to the highest fluorescence, 14 times the Daphnia auto-fluorescence. In contrast, mRNA lacking the entire 3' UTR hardly induced any change in fluorescence intensity. This is the first evaluation of UTRs of mRNAs delivered into Daphnia embryos by microinjection for overexpressing proteins. The mRNA with truncated 3' UTRs of Daphnia EF1α-1 will be useful not only for gain-of-function analyses but also for labeling proteins and organelles with fluorescent proteins in Daphnia.

  13. Biomarkers of endocrine disruption at the mRNA level

    SciTech Connect

    Denslow, N.D.; Bowman, C.J.; Robinson, G.; Lee, H.S.; Ferguson, R.J.; Hemmmer, M.J.; Folmar, L.C.

    1999-07-01

    A large number of estrogen-mimicking, anthropogenic chemicals capable of disrupting normal reproductive function have been identified. The ubiquitous distribution of these compounds, many as components of complex industrial or municipal waste, has spurred an effort to develop methods to screen for chemicals which disrupt normal endocrine regulation of reproduction. The authors have developed assays that both allow exposure of animals in vivo and measure the response at the level of gene activation. The authors have developed a probe for measuring the induction of vitellogenin mRNA by Northern Blot in livers of sheepshead minnows treated with 17-{beta}-estradiol. The authors have also developed a strategy for using Differential Display Polymerase Chain Reaction for determining gene induction profiles following exposure to estradiol. These methods should be adaptable to a variety of structurally diverse estrogen mimics.

  14. Quantitative Immunofluorescent Blotting of the Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein 2 (MRP2)

    PubMed Central

    Gerk, Phillip M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Quantitation of the expression levels of proteins involved in drug transport and disposition is needed to overcome limitations of film-based detection of chemiluminescent immunoblots. Purpose The purpose was to describe and validate a quantitative immunofluorescent blotting method for detection of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter Isoform C2/Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein 2 (ABCC2/MRP2). Methods Western blotting was performed by electrophoresis of membrane vesicle protein isolated from Sf9 cells overexpressing MRP2 subsequently blotting with infrared labeled secondary antibody. The bound complex was detected using the Odyssey Infrared Imaging System (Li-Cor; Lincoln, NE). The images were analyzed using the Odyssey Application Software to obtain the integrated intensities, followed by linear regression of the intensity data. Results The limits of quantitation for the time-insensitive technique described here were from 0.001μg to 0.5μg of total membrane protein, the coefficient of variation of the slope was 8.9%; r2 values were 0.986 ± 0.012. The utility and sensitivity of this technique was demonstrated in quantitating expression of MRP2 in human placental tissue samples, in which MRP2 was present in low abundance. Discussion The immunofluorescent blotting technique described provides sensitive, reproducible, and quantitative determinations of large, integral membrane proteins such as MRP2, all with potential long-term cost savings. PMID:21277982

  15. COMPARISONS OF ELISA AND WESTERN BLOT ASSAYS FOR DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM ANTIBODY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A seroprevalence survey was conducted using ELISA and Western blot (WB) assays for antibody to three Cryptosporidium antigens on 380 blood donors in Jackson County, Oregon. The purpose was to determine if either assay could detect serological evidence of an outbreak which occurre...

  16. Effects of Reusing Gel Electrophoresis and Electrotransfer Buffers on Western Blotting.

    PubMed

    Heda, Ghanshyam D; Omotola, Oluwabukola B; Heda, Rajiv P; Avery, Jamie

    2016-09-01

    SDS-PAGE and Western blotting are 2 of the most commonly used biochemical methods for protein analysis. Proteins are electrophoretically separated based on their MWs by SDS-PAGE and then electrotransferred to a solid membrane surface for subsequent protein-specific analysis by immunoblotting, a procedure commonly known as Western blotting. Both of these procedures use a salt-based buffer, with the latter procedure consisting of methanol as an additive known for its toxicity. Previous reports present a contradictory view in favor or against reusing electrotransfer buffer, also known as Towbin's transfer buffer (TTB), with an aim to reduce the toxic waste. In this report, we present a detailed analysis of not only reusing TTB but also gel electrophoresis buffer (EB) on proteins of low to high MW range. Our results suggest that EB can be reused for at least 5 times without compromising the electrophoretic separation of mixture of proteins in an MW standard, BSA, and crude cell lysates. Additionally, reuse of EB did not affect the quality of subsequent Western blots. Successive reuse of TTB, on the other hand, diminished the signal of proteins of different MWs in a protein standard and a high MW membrane protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane-conductance regulator (CFTR) in Western blotting.

  17. A Study of Rubisco through Western Blotting and Tissue Printing Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Zhong; Cooper, Cynthia; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Janick-Buckner, Diane

    2009-01-01

    We describe a laboratory exercise developed for a cell biology course for second-year undergraduate biology majors. It was designed to introduce undergraduates to the basic molecular biology techniques of Western blotting and immunodetection coupled with the technique of tissue printing in detecting the presence, relative abundance, and…

  18. COMPARISONS OF ELISA AND WESTERN BLOT ASSAYS FOR DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM ANTIBODY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A seroprevalence survey was conducted using ELISA and Western blot (WB) assays for antibody to three Cryptosporidium antigens on 380 blood donors in Jackson County, Oregon. The purpose was to determine if either assay could detect serological evidence of an outbreak which occurre...

  19. Two-dimensional gel-based protein standardization verified by western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Haniu, Hisao; Watanabe, Daisuke; Kawashima, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    In data presentation of biochemical investigation the amount of a target protein is shown in the y-axis against the x-axis representing time, concentrations of various agents, or other parameters. Western blot is a versatile and convenient tool in such an analysis to quantify and display the amount of proteins. In western blot, so-called housekeeping gene product(s), or "housekeeping proteins," are widely used as internal standards. The rationale of using housekeeping proteins for standardization of western blot is based on the assumption that the expression of chosen housekeeping gene is always constant, which could be false under certain physiological or pathological conditions. We have devised a two-dimensional gel-based standardization method in which the protein content of each sample is determined by scanning the total protein density of two-dimensional gels and the expression of each protein is quantified as the density ratio of each protein divided by the density of the total proteins on the two-dimensional gel. The advantage of this standardization method is that it is not based on any presumed "housekeeping proteins" that are supposed to be being expressed constantly under all physiological conditions. We will show that the total density of a two-dimensional gel can render a reliable protein standardization parameter by running western blot analysis on one of the proteins analyzed by two-dimensional gels.

  20. Use of Nonradioactive Detection Method for North- and South-Western Blot.

    PubMed

    Franke, Claudia; Gräfe, Daniel; Bartsch, Holger; Bachmann, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins bind to nucleic acids. For the first characterization of novel proteins, a fast and simple technique for testing their nucleic acid binding capabilities is desirable. Here we describe the use of a North-western and South-western blot protocol for the evaluation of the DNA and RNA binding abilities of a novel putative methyl transferase HSPC133 (METTL5).

  1. A Study of Rubisco through Western Blotting and Tissue Printing Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Zhong; Cooper, Cynthia; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Janick-Buckner, Diane

    2009-01-01

    We describe a laboratory exercise developed for a cell biology course for second-year undergraduate biology majors. It was designed to introduce undergraduates to the basic molecular biology techniques of Western blotting and immunodetection coupled with the technique of tissue printing in detecting the presence, relative abundance, and…

  2. A Streamlined Western Blot Exercise: An Efficient and Greener Approach in the Laboratory Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ness, Traci L.; Robinson, Rebekah L.; Mojadedi, Wais; Peavy, Lydia; Weiland, Mitch H.

    2015-01-01

    SDS-PAGE and western blotting are two commonly taught protein detection techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory classrooms. A pitfall associated with incorporating these techniques into the laboratory is the significant wait times that do not allow students to obtain timely results. The waiting associated with SDS-PAGE comes…

  3. A Streamlined Western Blot Exercise: An Efficient and Greener Approach in the Laboratory Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ness, Traci L.; Robinson, Rebekah L.; Mojadedi, Wais; Peavy, Lydia; Weiland, Mitch H.

    2015-01-01

    SDS-PAGE and western blotting are two commonly taught protein detection techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory classrooms. A pitfall associated with incorporating these techniques into the laboratory is the significant wait times that do not allow students to obtain timely results. The waiting associated with SDS-PAGE comes…

  4. Ferulic acid enhances IgE binding to peanut allergens in western blots.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phenolic compounds at high concentrations are known to form insoluble complexes with proteins. We hypothesized that this complex formation could interfere with Western blot and ELISA assays for peanut allergens. To verify this, three simple phenolic compounds (ferulic, caffeic, and chlorogenic acids...

  5. Ferulic acid enhances IgE binding to peanut allergens in western blots.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Because phenolic compounds can precipitate or complex with proteins, we postulated that interactions of phenolics with IgE antibodies help enhance IgE binding to peanut allergens in Western blots. Three different phenolics, such as, ferulic, caffeic and chlorogenic acids were examined. Each was mixe...

  6. Effects of Reusing Gel Electrophoresis and Electrotransfer Buffers on Western Blotting

    PubMed Central

    Omotola, Oluwabukola B.; Heda, Rajiv P.; Avery, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    SDS-PAGE and Western blotting are 2 of the most commonly used biochemical methods for protein analysis. Proteins are electrophoretically separated based on their MWs by SDS-PAGE and then electrotransferred to a solid membrane surface for subsequent protein-specific analysis by immunoblotting, a procedure commonly known as Western blotting. Both of these procedures use a salt-based buffer, with the latter procedure consisting of methanol as an additive known for its toxicity. Previous reports present a contradictory view in favor or against reusing electrotransfer buffer, also known as Towbin’s transfer buffer (TTB), with an aim to reduce the toxic waste. In this report, we present a detailed analysis of not only reusing TTB but also gel electrophoresis buffer (EB) on proteins of low to high MW range. Our results suggest that EB can be reused for at least 5 times without compromising the electrophoretic separation of mixture of proteins in an MW standard, BSA, and crude cell lysates. Additionally, reuse of EB did not affect the quality of subsequent Western blots. Successive reuse of TTB, on the other hand, diminished the signal of proteins of different MWs in a protein standard and a high MW membrane protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane-conductance regulator (CFTR) in Western blotting. PMID:27582639

  7. Biofilm detection by wound blotting can predict slough development in pressure ulcers: A prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Gojiro; Schultz, Gregory; Gibson, Daniel J; Phillips, Priscilla; Kitamura, Aya; Minematsu, Takeo; Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Hayashi, Akitatsu; Sasaki, Sanae; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2016-12-26

    Bacteria have been found to form multicellular aggregates which have collectively been termed "biofilms." It is hypothesized that biofilm formation is a means to protect bacterial cells including protection form the immune response of humans. This protective mechanism is believed to explain persistent chronic wound infections. At times, the biofilms are abundant enough to see, and remove by simple wiping. However, recent evidence has shown that the removal of these visible portions are not sufficient, and that biofilms can continue to form even with daily wiping. In this work, we tested an approach to detect the biofilms which are present after clinically wiping or sharp wound debridement. Our method is based on a variation of impression cytology in which a nitrocellulose membrane was used to collect surface biofilm components, which were then differentially stained. In this prospective study, members of an interdisciplinary pressure ulcer team at a university hospital tested our method's ability to predict the generation of wound slough in the week that followed each blotting. A total of 70 blots collected from 23 pressure ulcers produced 27 wounds negative for staining and 43 positive. In the negative blots 55.6% were found to have decreased wound slough, while 81.4% with positive staining had either increase or unchanged wound slough generation. These results lead to an odds ratio of positive blotting cases of 9.37 (95% confidence intervals: 2.47-35.5, p = 0.001) for slough formation; suggesting that the changes in wound slough formation can be predicted clinically using a non-invasive wound blotting method.

  8. mRNA stability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J

    1995-01-01

    This review concerns how cytoplasmic mRNA half-lives are regulated and how mRNA decay rates influence gene expression. mRNA stability influences gene expression in virtually all organisms, from bacteria to mammals, and the abundance of a particular mRNA can fluctuate manyfold following a change in the mRNA half-life, without any change in transcription. The processes that regulate mRNA half-lives can, in turn, affect how cells grow, differentiate, and respond to their environment. Three major questions are addressed. Which sequences in mRNAs determine their half-lives? Which enzymes degrade mRNAs? Which (trans-acting) factors regulate mRNA stability, and how do they function? The following specific topics are discussed: techniques for measuring eukaryotic mRNA stability and for calculating decay constants, mRNA decay pathways, mRNases, proteins that bind to sequences shared among many mRNAs [like poly(A)- and AU-rich-binding proteins] and proteins that bind to specific mRNAs (like the c-myc coding-region determinant-binding protein), how environmental factors like hormones and growth factors affect mRNA stability, and how translation and mRNA stability are linked. Some perspectives and predictions for future research directions are summarized at the end. PMID:7565413

  9. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeted to MAG mRNA profoundly alter BP and PLP mRNA expression in differentiating oligodendrocytes: a caution.

    PubMed

    Laszkiewicz, I; Wiggins, R C; Konat, G W

    1999-09-01

    The applicability of antisense technology to suppress the expression of myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in cultured oligodendrocytes was evaluated. Differentiating oligodendrocyte precursor cells obtained by the shake-off method were exposed to nine unmodified antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) targeted to the first seven exons of MAG mRNA. After four days, steady-state levels of MAG, proteolipid protein (PLP) and basic protein (BP) mRNAs were determined by Northern blot analysis. Only ODN annealing to 599-618 nt of the MAG mRNA (the junction of exon 5 and 6) resulted in a significant, 75% decrease in the MAG mRNA level. Unexpectedly, six other anti-MAG ODNs which had no significant effect on the MAG message, greatly increased the level of BP mRNA. The highest upregulation of approximately 12 fold was observed with ODN annealing to 139-168 nt (junction of exon 3 and 4). On the other hand, the 997-1016 ODN decreased the levels of BP and PLP messages by 70-80%. The 599-618 ODN also decreased the PLP mRNA by 85%. The results demonstrate that antisense ODNs targeted to one gene may profoundly alter the expression of other genes, and hence, complicate functional analysis of the targeted protein.

  10. Design, preparation and use of ligated phosphoproteins: a novel approach to study protein phosphatases by dot blot array, ELISA and Western blot assays.

    PubMed

    Sun, Luo; Ghosh, Inca; Barshevsky, Tanya; Kochinyan, Samvel; Xu, Ming-Qun

    2007-07-01

    The study of substrate specificity of protein phosphatases (PPs) is very challenging since it is difficult to prepare a suitable phosphorylated substrate. Phosphoproteins, phosphorylated by a protein kinase, or chemically synthesized phosphopeptides are commonly used substrates for PPs. Both types of these substrates have their advantages and limitations. Phosphoproteins mimic more closely the physiologically relevant PP substrates, but their preparation is technically demanding. Synthetic phosphopeptides present advantages over proteins because they can be easily produced in large quantity and their amino acid sequence can be designed to contain potential determinants of substrate specificity. However, short peptides are less optimal compared to in vivo PP substrates and often display poor and variable binding to different matrices, resulting in low sensitivity in analysis of PP activity on solid support. In this work we utilize the intein-mediated protein ligation (IPL) technique to generate substrates for PPs, combining the advantages of proteins and synthetic peptides in one molecule. The ligation of a synthetic phosphopeptide to an intein-generated carrier protein (CP) with a one-to-one stoichiometry results in the formation of a ligated phosphoprotein (LPP). Three widely used assays, dot blot array, Western blot and ELISA were employed to study the PP activity on LPP substrates. Dephosphorylation was measured by detection of the remaining phosphorylation, or lack of it, with a phospho-specific antibody. The data show the advantage of LPPs over free peptides in assays on solid supports. LPPs exhibited enhanced binding to the matrices used in the study, which significantly improved sensitivity and consistency of the assays. In addition, saturation of the signal was circumvented by serial dilution of the assay samples. This report describes detailed experimental procedures for preparation of LPP substrates and their use in PP assays based on immobilization on

  11. Applications of Hairpin DNA-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles for Imaging mRNA in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Jackson, S R; Wong, A C; Travis, A R; Catrina, I E; Bratu, D P; Wright, D W; Jayagopal, A

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging agents are useful for imaging molecular processes in living systems in order to elucidate the function of molecular mediators in health and disease. Here, we demonstrate a technique for the synthesis, characterization, and application of hairpin DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (hAuNPs) as fluorescent hybridization probes for imaging mRNA expression and spatiotemporal dynamics in living cells. These imaging probes feature gold colloids linked to fluorophores via engineered oligonucleotides to resemble a molecular beacon in which the gold colloid serves as the fluorescence quencher in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer system. Target-specific hybridization of the hairpin oligonucleotide enables fluorescence de-quenching and subsequent emission with high signal to noise ratios. hAuNPs exhibit high specificity without adverse toxicity or the need for transfection reagents. Furthermore, tunability of hAuNP emission profiles by selection of spectrally distinct fluorophores enables multiplexed mRNA imaging applications. Therefore, hAuNPs are promising tools for imaging gene expression in living cells. As a representative application of this technology, we discuss the design and applications of hAuNP targeted against distinct matrix metalloproteinase enzymes for the multiplexed detection of mRNA expression in live breast cancer cells using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Creatine kinase and alpha-actin mRNA levels decrease in diabetic rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Popovich, B.; Barrieux, A.; Dillmann, W.H.

    1987-05-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is associated with cardiac atrophy and isoenzyme redistribution. To determine if tissue specific changes occur in mRNAs coding for ..cap alpha..-actin and creatine kinase (CK), they performed RNA blot analysis. Total ventricular RNA from control (C) and 4 wk old diabetic (D) rats were hybridized with /sup 32/P cDNA probes for ..cap alpha..-actin and CK. A tissue independent cDNA probe, CHOA was also used. Signal intensity was quantified by photodensitometry. D CK mRNA was 47 +/- 16% lower in D vs C. Insulin increases CK mRNA by 20% at 1.5 hs, and completely reverses the deficit after 4 wks. D ..cap alpha..-actin mRNA is 66 +/- 18% lower in D vs C. Insulin normalized ..cap alpha..-actin mRNA by 5 hs. CHOA mRNA is unchanged in D vs C, but D + insulin CHOA mRNA is 30 +/- 2% lower than C. In rats with diabetic cardiomyopathy, muscle specific CK and ..cap alpha..-actin mRNAs are decreased. Insulin treatment reverses these changes.

  13. Molecular structure of the human argininosuccinate synthetase gene: Occurrence of alternative mRNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Freytag, S.O.; Beaudet, A.L.; Bock, H.G.O.; O'Brien, W.E.

    1984-10-01

    The human genome contains one expressed argininosuccinate synthetase gene and ca. 14 pseudogenes that are dispersed to at least 11 human chromosomes. Eleven clones isolated from a human genomic DNA library were characterized extensively by restriction mapping, Southern blotting, and nucleotide sequencing. These 11 clones represent the entire expressed argininosuccinate synthetase gene that spans 63 kilobases and contains at least 13 exons. The expressed gene codes for two mRNAs that differ in their 5' untranslated sequences and arise by alternative splicing involving the inclusion or deletion of an entire exon. In normal human liver and cultured fibroblasts, the predominant mature argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA lacks sequences encoded by exon 2 in the expressed gene. In contrast, the predominant argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA in baboon liver contains exon 2 sequences. A transformed canavanine-resistant human cell line in which argininosuccinate synthetase activity is 180-fold higher than that in wild-type cells contains abundant amounts of both forms of the argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA. The mRNA lacking exon 2 sequences is the more abundant mRNA species in the canavanine-resistant cells. These observations show that splicing of the argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA is species specific in primates and varies among different human cell types.

  14. Visual detection of Akt mRNA in living cell using gold nanoparticle beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yi; Tian, Caiping; Li, Siwen; Wang, Zhaohui; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    PI3K-Akt signaling pathway plays the key role in cell apoptosis and survival, and the components of PI3K /Akt signaling pathway are often abnormally expressed in human tumors. Therefore, determination of the Akt (protein kinase B, PKB) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression is significantly important in understanding the mechanism of tumor progression. In this study, we designed a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) functionalized with gold nanoparticles and fluorescein isothiocyanate(FITC) as a beacon for detecting human Akt mRNA. Spectrofluorometer was used to detect the fluorescence quenching and recovery of the beacons, and laser confocal scanning microscopy was adopted to image Akt mRNA in cells. The results showed that this beacon could sensitively and quantitatively measure the Akt mRNA in living cells . This strategy is potentially useful for the cellular imaging of RNA or protein expression in living cells.

  15. Nanogold Immunodetection Detection Systems for the Identification of Autoantigens by Western Blotting.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jacen S; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Nanogold-conjugated immunodetection systems are now widely and commercially available for use in a number of research applications including electron microscopy, light microscopy, and western blotting. Nanogold clusters are small, uniform in size, and stable, unlike gold colloids historically used in protein detection. Covalent linkage of nanogold particles to secondary antibodies prevents dissociation of the gold particles during the staining process, making protein detection reliable, antigen specific, and highly sensitive. Nanogold labeling is extremely versatile and can be used in conjunction with other staining methodologies including Alexa Fluor immunofluorescence detection to perform coupled staining procedures. Silver enhancement increases the limits of sensitivity for nanogold staining, thus improving detection signals for antigens with reduced expression levels. Herein, we describe the use of nanogold-silver detection as an immunodetection system for standard western blotting of autoantigens.

  16. Native Electrophoresis and Western Blot Analysis (NEWeB): Methods and Applications.

    PubMed

    Manoussopoulos, Ioannis N; Tsagris, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Native Electrophoresis and Western Blot Analysis (NEWeB) has been developed for the study of plant virus characteristics, among others, virus particle-protein interactions, electrophorotype formation, and strain separation. The method is based on the property of electrophoretic mobility of virus particles (VP) and proteins and combines the analytical capacity of electrophoresis with the specificity of western blot. One of its advantages is that it deals with entire VP that can be studied in cause and effect or in time-interval experiments. Some of the most interesting approaches include VP structural studies, VP interaction with host or viral proteins, and also the characterization of VP-protein complexes. In this protocol, NEWeB is used to demonstrate the interaction of Plum pox virus particles with the helper component, a virus encoded protein. It is expected that the method could be used in analogous studies of other viruses or large protein complexes, where similar principles apply.

  17. Direct detection of molluscum contagiosum virus in clinical specimens by dot blot hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, J W; Forghani, B; Chan, C S; Oshiro, L; Darai, G

    1991-01-01

    A dot blot hybridization protocol was developed for the direct detection of molluscum contagiosum virus (MCV) DNA in clinical specimens submitted for virus isolation. Samples were concentrated by high-speed centrifugation and treated with proteinase K; this was followed by a single phenol-chloroform extraction step. The DNA was denatured, and the entire volume was spotted onto a nitrocellulose membrane. A biotinylated DNA probe specific for the BamHI-C region of MCV type 1 was used for hybridization. Evidence of MCV DNA was visualized by using streptavidin alkaline phosphatase conjugate and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate-nitroblue tetrazolium as the substrate. Results showed that nonspecific hybridization does not occur with herpes simplex virus- or orf virus-infected clinical specimens and that dot blotting is more sensitive and reproducible than electron microscopy. Images PMID:1774321

  18. Mapping of radiolabeled peptides derived from proteolysis of polypeptides bound to nitrocellulose after Western blotting

    SciTech Connect

    Carrey, E.A.; Hardie, D.G.

    1986-11-01

    Sections of nitrocellulose containing bound /sup 32/P-labeled polypeptides were excised from Western blots and exhaustively digested by trypsin in order to analyze the distribution of phosphorylation sites between the products of limited proteolysis of the multifunctional protein CAD. Using the criterion of analytical isoelectric focusing, the /sup 32/P-peptides obtained by this method were found to be similar, although not identical, to peptides obtained by a more conventional digestion of trichloroacetic acid precipitates. Digestion on Western blots is more straightforward than electrophoretic elution of individual gel slices, gives better recoveries than direct digestion of gel slices, and is particularly suitable for peptide mapping of small peptides which bind to nitrocellulose but would diffuse out of polyacrylamide gels during the commonly used fixing and staining procedures.

  19. Detection of Long Non-coding RNA Expression by Non-radioactive Northern Blots

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaowen; Feng, Yi; Hu, Zhongyi; Zhang, Youyou; Yuan, Chao-Xing; Xu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    With the advances in sequencing technology and transcriptome analysis, it is estimated that up to 75% of the human genome is transcribed into RNAs. This finding prompted intensive investigations on the biological functions of non-coding RNAs and led to very exciting discoveries of microRNAs as important players in disease pathogenesis and therapeutic applications. Research on long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) is in its infancy, yet a broad spectrum of biological regulations has been attributed to lncRNAs. As a novel class of RNA transcripts, the expression level and splicing variants of lncRNAs are various. Northern blot analysis can help us learn about the identity, size, and abundance of lncRNAs. Here we describe how to use northern blot to determine lncRNA abundance and identify different splicing variants of a given lncRNA. PMID:26721491

  20. Western blot membrane composed of electrospun polyvinylidene fluoride nanofiber membrane and polyethylene terephthalate sheet.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eugene; Kim, Chan; Hwang, Cheol Ho; Chang, Duck Rye; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2013-06-01

    In a previous study, an electrospun polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) nanofiber membrane was developed for Western blotting. The membrane exhibited high sensitivity and high binding capacity for the detection of protein bands that was unlike that observed for conventional, microphase separation-based porous PVDF membranes. Nevertheless, the PVDF nanofiber membrane is quite expensive. The objective of this study was to develop an economical Western blot membrane using a hybrid electrospun PVDF nanofiber and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheet. The results showed that the detection sensitivity of the 4 gram per square meter (gsm) membrane was similar to those of the electrospun PVDF nanofiber membrane only, and the 7 gsm PVDF nanofiber membranes on a PET sheet and the electrospun PVDF nanofiber membrane. This means the protein detection sensitivity is not proportional to the thickness of the PVDF nanofiber membrane. The 4 gsm PVDF nanofiber membrane on a PET sheet can be used to detect proteins with high sensitivity and economic efficiency.

  1. Development and Evaluation of a Western Blot Kit for Diagnosis of Human Trichinellosis

    PubMed Central

    Yera, Hélène; Andiva, Shakir; Perret, Catherine; Limonne, Denis; Boireau, Pascal; Dupouy-Camet, Jean

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated industrially prepared Western blot strips designed to avoid the cross-reactions observed with indirect immunofluorescence and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays used for the serodiagnosis of trichinellosis. The antigen preparations were crude extracts of Trichinella spiralis. The Western blot profile characteristic of trichinellosis was characterized by comparing 60 sera from patients infected by Trichinella to 11 sera from healthy subjects, 51 sera from patients with other proven parasitic diseases (cysticercosis, schistosomiasis, strongyloidosis, fascioliasis, toxocariasis, liver amebiasis, anisakiasis, filariasis, toxoplasmosis, hydatidosis, or malaria), and 23 sera from patients with autoantibodies. Specific 43- to 44-kDa and 64-kDa bands were obtained with all of the sera from 51 patients with acute trichinellosis, in 4 out of 9 patients at the early stages of the disease, and in only 1 control patient, who had suspected anisakiasis and in whom trichinellosis could not be ruled out by muscle biopsy. PMID:12965906

  2. Analysis of differentially expressed genes in two immunologically distinct strains of Eimeria maxima using suppression subtractive hybridization and dot-blot hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well known that different Eimeria maxima strains exhibit significant antigenic variation. However, the genetic basis of these phenotypes remains unclear. Methods Total RNA and mRNA were isolated from unsporulated oocysts of E. maxima strains SH and NT, which were found to have significant differences in immunogenicity in our previous research. Two subtractive cDNA libraries were constructed using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and specific genes were further analyzed by dot-blot hybridization and qRT-PCR analysis. Results A total of 561 clones were selected from both cDNA libraries and the length of the inserted fragments was 0.25–1.0 kb. Dot-blot hybridization revealed a total of 86 differentially expressed clones (63 from strain SH and 23 from strain NT). Nucleotide sequencing analysis of these clones revealed ten specific contigs (six from strain SH and four from strain NT). Further analysis found that six contigs from strain SH and three from strain NT shared significant identities with previously reported proteins, and one contig was presumed to be novel. The specific differentially expressed genes were finally verified by RT-PCR and qRT-PCR analyses. Conclusions The data presented here suggest that specific genes identified between the two strains may be important molecules in the immunogenicity of E. maxima that may present potential new drug targets or vaccine candidates for coccidiosis. PMID:24894832

  3. PCR versus Southern blot detection of somatic mosaicism in fragile X syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, O.T.; Amar, M.J.A.; Gallardo, L.A.; Kousseff, B.G.

    1994-09-01

    The incidence of somatic mosaicism in males with fragile X syndrome has been reported to be as high as 17% of all clinically affected males. Mosaic cases usually do not show the cytogenetic fragile site at Xq27.3 and generally are fully affected according to the clinical criteria, although some subjects show somewhat milder symptoms. Detection of mosaicism relies on the identification of multiple distinct sizes of the CGG size anomaly in the 5{prime} untranslated exon of the FMR-1 gene. Some alleles identified are of a premutation size with trinucleotides numbering 50 to 80 X CGG. In addition, there is a greatly expanded allele with well over 200 copies of the CGG repeat detected. We screened 314 subjects for fragile X syndrome over a three year period. Cases were routinely screened by Southern blotting using the StB12.3 probe as well as by polymerase chain reaction. The PCR amplification products were electrophoresed in agarose, blotted and hybridized with a (CGG){sub 5} oligonucleotide followed by chemiluminescent detection. Seventeen males and 16 females were identified with a CGG expansion, including two males with premutations with repeat sizes of between 50 and 100 CGG trinucleotides and three cases exhibiting somatic mosaicism. The mosaic cases had both a premutation-sized allele and one or more expanded alleles of over 250 CGG copies. The mosaic cases were usually undetected with Southern blotting but easily identified with this PCR protocol. The relative proportion of the expanded allele as determined by scanning densitometry were 70%, 35%, and 5% in the three cases. All three cases were cytogenetically negative. The clinical severity of the mosaic cases was variable, with symptoms ranging from severe MR with most of the physical stigmata to mild learning disability. In our experience, Southern blotting allows more accurate sizing of the expanded allele; however, PCR is essential to identify cases that exhibit mosaicism.

  4. Indeterminate HIV-1 Western Blots: Etiology, Natural History and Psychological Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-24

    yes ;9=unk;.=ND ME.1A Allergies O=no;l=yes, not deseris 2=yes, desens ME.1B Surgery 0=no; l=yes ME.1C Hospitalizations 0-no, l=yes Specify...ioYDETERMINATE WESTERN BLOT PSYCHOLOGICAL QUESTIONNAIRE 0-prior to 1st visit; 1-initial; 3.3 mos; 6= Gmos ; 9=9mos 0-case; .. control 1 - AIDS

  5. Use of a Western blot technique for the serodiagnosis of glanders

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The in vivo diagnosis of glanders relies on the highly sensitive complement fixation test (CFT). Frequently observed false positive results are troublesome for veterinary authorities and cause financial losses to animal owners. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop a test with high specificity. Hence, a Western blot assay making use of a partly purified lipopolysaccaride (LPS) containing antigen of three Burkholderia mallei strains was developed. The test was validated investigating a comprehensive set of positive and negative sera obtained from horses and mules from endemic and non endemic areas. Results The developed Western blot assay showed a markedly higher diagnostic specificity when compared to the prescribed CFT and therefore can be used as a confirmatory test. However, the CFT remains the test of choice for routine testing of glanders due to its high sensitivity, its feasibility using standard laboratory equipment and its worldwide distribution in diagnostic laboratories. Conclusions The CFT should be amended by the newly validated Western blot to increase the positive likelihood ratio of glanders serodiagnosis in non endemic areas or areas with low glanders prevalence. Its use for international trade of horses and mules should be implemented by the OIE. PMID:21247488

  6. Differentiation of larva migrans caused by Baylisascaris procyonis and Toxocara species by Western blotting.

    PubMed

    Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Kazacos, Kevin R

    2009-11-01

    Baylisascaris procyonis and Toxocara species are two important causes of larva migrans in humans. Larva migrans caused by Toxocara spp. is well known and is diagnosed serologically by enzyme immunoassay. Over a dozen cases of larva migrans and associated eosinophilic encephalitis caused by B. procyonis have also been reported, and at least a dozen additional cases are known. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using the excretory-secretory (ES) antigen of B. procyonis larvae is currently being used in our laboratory as an aid in the diagnosis of this infection in humans. Clinically affected individuals show very high reactivity (measured as the optical density) on this ELISA; however, a one-way cross-reactivity with Toxocara spp. has been observed. As an approach to differentiate these two infections based on serology, we performed Western blots, wherein the B. procyonis ES antigen was reacted with serum samples from individuals known to be positive for either Toxocara spp. or B. procyonis larva migrans. Western blot results showed that B. procyonis antigens of between 30 and 45 kDa were specifically identified only by the sera from individuals with Baylisascaris larva migrans, thus allowing for differentiation between the two infections. This included human patient serum samples submitted for serologic testing, as well as sera from rabbits experimentally infected with B. procyonis. When used in conjunction with the ELISA, Western blotting could be an efficient tool for diagnosis of this infection in humans.

  7. Use of western blot to study Microsporum canis antigenic proteins in canine dermatophytosis.

    PubMed

    Peano, Andrea; Min, Annarita Molinar; Beccati, Massimo; Menzano, Arianna; Pasquetti, Mario; Gallo, Maria Grazia

    2011-05-01

    Western blotting was used to describe the Microsporum canis proteins with antigenic activity in dogs with dermatophytosis. Electrophoretic separation of whole fungal strain extract cultured from a cat was performed under denaturing conditions. The proteins were blotted onto nitrocellulose and probed with sera collected from 22 dogs with dermatophytosis (18 M. canis, 3 M. gypseum, 1 Trichophyton mentagrophytes; group A), 20 dogs with skin diseases other than dermatophytosis, and 22 dogs with no clinical cutaneous signs (group B, n = 42). Nine principal IgG-binding proteins with apparent molecular weights of 180, 144, 130, 120, 102, 96, 80, 68, and 48 kD were visualised on group A blots. For these proteins, serological cross-reactivity with different strains of M. canis may be indirectly confirmed, whereas additional proteins were found to react with sera from individual dogs. The proteins visualised in this study may represent diagnostic markers of dermatophyte infection. The proteins should be further evaluated for their role in the cellular immune response of dogs with dermatophytosis. © 2009 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. A streamlined Western blot exercise: An efficient and greener approach in the laboratory classroom.

    PubMed

    Ness, Traci L; Robinson, Rebekah L; Mojadedi, Wais; Peavy, Lydia; Weiland, Mitch H

    2015-01-01

    SDS-PAGE and western blotting are two commonly taught protein detection techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory classrooms. A pitfall associated with incorporating these techniques into the laboratory is the significant wait times that do not allow students to obtain timely results. The waiting associated with SDS-PAGE comes from staining and destaining, whereas with western blotting it is the times required for antibody incubations and the numerous wash steps. This laboratory exercise incorporates 2,2,2-trichloroethanol (TCE) into the SDS-PAGE gel allowing for visualization of migrated proteins in a matter of minutes, saving both the time and chemical waste associated with traditional Coomassie staining. Additionally, TCE staining does not affect protein transfer eliminating the requirement for duplicated gels for total protein and western analyses. Protein transfer can be confirmed immediately without the use of Ponceau S staining. Lastly, this western blot procedure has been further shortened by using an HRP-conjugated primary antibody, which eliminates the secondary antibody incubation and washes, and uses a colorimetric detection to allow for visualization by students without the need for specialized equipment. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  9. Imported intraocular gnathostomiasis with subretinal tracks confirmed by western blot assay.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji Ho; Kim, Moosang; Kim, Eung Suk; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Yu, Seung-Young; Kwak, Hyung-Woo

    2012-03-01

    We report a case of intraocular gnathostomiasis diagnosed by western blot assay in a patient with subretinal tracks. A 15-year-old male patient complained of blurred vision in the right eye, lasting for 2 weeks. Eight months earlier, he had traveled to Vietnam for 1 week and ate raw wild boar meat and lobster. His best-corrected visual acuity was 20/20 in both eyes and anterior chamber examination revealed no abnormalities. Fundus examination showed subretinal tracks in the right eye. Fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography showed linear hyperfluorescence of the subretinal lesion observed on fundus in the right eye. Ultrasound examination revealed no abnormalities. Blood tests indicated mild eosinophilia (7.5%), and there was no abnormality found by systemic examinations. Two years later, the patient visited our department again for ophthalmologic evaluation. Visual acuity remained 20/20 in both eyes and the subretinal tracks in the right eye had not changed since the previous examination. Serologic examination was performed to provide a more accurate diagnosis, and the patient's serum reacted strongly to the Gnathostoma nipponicum antigen by western blot assay, which led to a diagnosis of intraocular gnathostomiasis. This is the first reported case of intraocular gnathostomiasis with subretinal tracks confirmed serologically using western blot in Korea.

  10. Characterization of a biopharmaceutical protein and evaluation of its purification process using automated capillary Western blot.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong; Mane, Sarthak; Sosic, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the application of an automated size-based capillary Western blot system (Sally instrument) from ProteinSimple, Inc., for biopharmaceutical fusion-Fc protein characterization and evaluation of its purification process. The fusion-Fc protein column purification from an excess of single chain Fc polypeptide and removal of an enzyme coexpressed for protein maturation have been demonstrated using an automated capillary Western system. The clearance of a selected host cell protein (HCP) present in cell culture of fusion-Fc protein was also quantitatively monitored throughout the protein purification process. Additionally, the low levels of fusion-Fc product-related impurities detected by traditional slab gel Western blot were confirmed by the automated capillary Western system. Compared to the manual approach, the automated capillary Western blot provides the advantages of ease of operation, higher sample throughput, greater linearity range, and higher precision for protein quantitation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Direct Blue 71 staining as a destaining-free alternative loading control method for Western blotting.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Li; Guo, Jing; Xu, Hong-Bo; Huang, Rongzhong; Shao, Weihua; Yang, Liu; Wang, Mingju; Chen, Jianjun; Xie, Peng

    2013-08-01

    In Western blotting, a suitable loading control is indispensable for correcting errors in the total amount of loaded protein. Immunodetection of housekeeping proteins and total protein staining have traditionally been used as loading control methods. Direct Blue 71 (DB71) staining-a novel, sensitive, dye-binding staining method compatible with immunodetection-may offer advantages over these traditional loading control methods. Three common neuroscientific samples (human plasma, human oligodendrocytes, and rat brain) were employed to assess DB71 staining as a loading control method for Western blotting. DB71, CBB, one traditional housekeeping protein, and one protein of interest were comparatively assessed for reliability and repeatability and linear dynamic range over 2.5-40 μg of protein loaded. DB71's effect on the reliability and repeatability and linear dynamic range of immunoreaction were also assessed. Across all three sample types, DB71 was either equivalent or superior to CBB and housekeeping protein-based methods in terms of reliability and repeatability and linear dynamic range. Across all three sample types, DB71 staining did not impair the reliability and repeatability or linear dynamic range of immunoreaction. Our results demonstrate that the DB71 staining can be used as a destaining-free alternative loading control method for Western blotting. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Banding pattern indicative of echinococcosis in a commercial cysticercosis western blot

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective A commercial cysticercosis Western blot was evaluated for serological cross-reactivity of sera from patients with alveolar (AE) and cystic echinococcosis (CE). Methods A total of 161 sera were examined, including 31 sera from AE-patients, 11 sera from CE-patients, 9 sera from patients with other parasitic diseases and 109 sera from patients with unrelated medical conditions. All AE-and CE-sera were also examined by the echinococcosis Western blot. Results More sera from patients with AE than with CE showed cross-reactivity in the form of ladder-like patterns ("Mikado aspect") and untypical bands at 6-8 kDa (71% and 77.4% versus 27.3% and 45.5%, respectively). In contrast, triplets of bands in the area above 50 kDa and between 24 and 39-42 kDa were more frequent in CE than in AE sera. The fuzzy band at 50-55 kDa typical for cysticercosis was absent in all AE and CE sera. Conclusions Atypical banding patterns in the cysticercosis Western blot should raise the suspicion of a metacestode infection different from Taenia solium, i.e. Echinococcus multilocularis or E. granulosus, especially when the Mikado aspect and an altered 6-8 kDa band is visible in the absence of a fuzzy 50-55 kDa band. PMID:19748853

  13. Using genomic slot blot hybridization to assess intergeneric Saccharum x Erianthus hybrids (Andropogoneae - Saccharinae).

    PubMed

    Besse, P; McIntyre, C L; Burner, D M; Almeida, C G

    1997-08-01

    The use of genomic slot blot hybridization enabled the differentiation of hybrids from selfs in Saccharum x Erianthus intergeneric crosses in which Saccharum was used as the female parent. Based on the genomic in situ hybridization technique, slot blots of DNA from the parents and the progeny were blocked with the Saccharum parent DNA and hybridized with the labelled male Erianthus genomic DNA. This technique allowed a rapid screening for hybrids and was sensitive enough to detect a 1/20 dilution of Erianthus in Saccharum DNA, which should enable the detection of most partial hybrids. The genomic slot blot hybridization technique was shown to be potentially useful for assessing crosses involving Saccharum species with either Old World Erianthus section Ripidium or North American Erianthus (= Saccharum) species. The effectiveness of the technique was assessed on 144 progeny of a Saccharum officinarum x Erianthus arundinaceus cross, revealing that 43% of the progeny were selfs. The importance of this test as a tool to support intergeneric breeding programs is discussed.

  14. Bovine somatotropin increases hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Velez, J C; Donkin, S S

    2004-05-01

    Somatotropin (ST) increases milk production and through coordinated changes in hepatic glucose synthesis and amino acid metabolism in dairy cows. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of ST on hepatic mRNA expression for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and pyruvate carboxylase (PC), enzymes that are critical to the synthesis of glucose in liver and hepatic mRNA expression for carbamylphosphate synthetase I (CPS-I), argininosuccinate synthetase (AS), and ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC), critical enzymes of the urea cycle. Eighteen cows were randomly allocated to 2 treatment groups and received either recombinant bovine ST (Posilac; Monsanto, St. Louis, MO) or saline injections at 14-d intervals during a 42-d period. Expression of mRNA was determined using Northern blot analysis. Nuclei, isolated from liver biopsy samples, were used to determine effects of ST on transcription rate of PEPCK. Milk production was increased with ST (37.3 vs. 35.1+/-0.6 kg/ d). Plasma NEFA was increased with ST (299 vs. 156+/-34 microM). There were no differences in the expression of CPS-I, AS, and OTC mRNA with ST. Expression of PEPCK and IGF-I mRNA were increased with ST but PC mRNA was unchanged. The data indicate increased PEPCK mRNA in cows given ST and indicates a greater capacity for gluconeogenesis from gluconeogenic precursors that form oxaloacetate. The effects of ST to elevate PEPCK mRNA expression require chronic administration and involve increased transcription of the PEPCK gene.

  15. An improved method for Southern DNA and Northern RNA blotting using a Mupid-2 Mini-Gel electrophoresis unit.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Hirokazu; Yamada, Takeshi; Ikezoe, Koji; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Fukumaki, Yasuyuki; Fujii, Naoki

    2006-08-31

    An improved method for Southern DNA and Northern RNA blotting using the Mupid-2 Mini-Gel System is described. We get sharp and clear bands in Southern and Northern blotting after only 30 min short gel electrophoresis instead of the several hours large gel electrophoresis of conventional methods. The high electrical voltage with a pulse-like current of the Mupid-2 Mini-Gel System also allows reduction of the amount of formaldehyde, a harmful reagent, from the gel running buffer in RNA blotting. This minor modification of DNA and RNA blotting technique enables us to perform the complete experimental procedure more quickly economically in less space, than conventional Southern and Northern blotting, as well as using an extremely small amount of formaldehyde in RNA blotting.

  16. Simultaneous transport of different localized mRNA species revealed by live-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Lange, Susanne; Katayama, Yoshihiko; Schmid, Maria; Burkacky, Ondrej; Bräuchle, Christoph; Lamb, Don C; Jansen, Ralf-Peter

    2008-08-01

    Intracellular mRNA localization is a common mechanism to achieve asymmetric distributions of proteins. Previous studies have revealed that in a number of cell types, different mRNA species are localized by the same transport machinery. However, it has been unclear if these individual mRNA species are specifically sorted into separate or common ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles before or during transport. Using budding yeast as a model system, we analyzed the intracellular movement of individual pairs of localized mRNA in live cells. Yeast cells localize more than 20 different mRNAs to the bud with the help of the Myo4p/She3p/She2p protein complex. For live cell imaging, mRNA pairs were tagged with tandem repeats of either bacteriophage MS2 or lambda boxB RNA sequences and fluorescently labeled by fusion protein constructs that bind to the RNA tag sequences. Using three-dimensional, single-particle tracking with dual-color detection, we have tracked the transport of two different localized mRNA species in real time. Our observations show that different localized mRNAs are coassembled into common RNP particles and cotransported in a directional manner to the target site. Nonlocalized mRNAs or mutant mRNAs that lack functional localization signals form separate particles that are not transported to the bud. This study reveals a high degree of co-ordination of mRNA trafficking in budding yeast.

  17. Antisense Transcript and RNA Processing Alterations Suppress Instability of Polyadenylated mRNA in Chlamydomonas Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yoshiki; Kikis, Elise A.; Zimmer, Sara L.; Komine, Yutaka; Stern, David B.

    2004-01-01

    In chloroplasts, the control of mRNA stability is of critical importance for proper regulation of gene expression. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain Δ26pAtE is engineered such that the atpB mRNA terminates with an mRNA destabilizing polyadenylate tract, resulting in this strain being unable to conduct photosynthesis. A collection of photosynthetic revertants was obtained from Δ26pAtE, and gel blot hybridizations revealed RNA processing alterations in the majority of these suppressor of polyadenylation (spa) strains, resulting in a failure to expose the atpB mRNA 3′ poly(A) tail. Two exceptions were spa19 and spa23, which maintained unusual heteroplasmic chloroplast genomes. One genome type, termed PS+, conferred photosynthetic competence by contributing to the stability of atpB mRNA; the other, termed PS−, was required for viability but could not produce stable atpB transcripts. Based on strand-specific RT-PCR, S1 nuclease protection, and RNA gel blots, evidence was obtained that the PS+ genome stabilizes atpB mRNA by generating an atpB antisense transcript, which attenuates the degradation of the polyadenylated form. The accumulation of double-stranded RNA was confirmed by insensitivity of atpB mRNA from PS+ genome-containing cells to S1 nuclease digestion. To obtain additional evidence for antisense RNA function in chloroplasts, we used strain Δ26, in which atpB mRNA is unstable because of the lack of a 3′ stem-loop structure. In this context, when a 121-nucleotide segment of atpB antisense RNA was expressed from an ectopic site, an elevated accumulation of atpB mRNA resulted. Finally, when spa19 was placed in a genetic background in which expression of the chloroplast exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase was diminished, the PS+ genome and the antisense transcript were no longer required for photosynthesis. Taken together, our results suggest that antisense RNA in chloroplasts can protect otherwise unstable transcripts from 3′→5

  18. Specific Western Blot Bands Are Associated with Initial CD4+ Lymphocyte Counts in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Seroconverters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-30

    SPECIFIC WESTERN BLOT BANDS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH INITIAL CD4+ LYMPHOCYTE COUNTS IN HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS SEROCONVERTERS DTI C ELEkCTE AUG...NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT COMMAND BETHESDA, MARYLAND Specific Western Blot Bands Are Associated With Initial CD4+ Lymphocyte Counts in...and Ms. Susan Yu also provided - quality assurance review of Western blot results. Mr. Jerry Talicurian, Mr. Juan Jurado, Mr. David Morgan, and

  19. Fluorescence of dental porcelain.

    PubMed

    Monsénégo, G; Burdairon, G; Clerjaud, B

    1993-01-01

    This study of the fluorescence of natural enamel and of dental ceramics shows the fluorescence of ceramics not containing rare earths decreases when the color saturation increases; the fluorescence of samples of the same shade guide are not homogenous; some guides show a strong green fluorescence; and two shade guides of the same origin can present completely different fluorescence. The cementing medium can affect the fluorescence of a ceramic prosthesis.

  20. Combinatorial analysis of mRNA expression patterns in mouse embryos using hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Huss, David; Choi, Harry M T; Readhead, Carol; Fraser, Scott E; Pierce, Niles A; Lansford, Rusty

    2015-03-02

    Multiplexed fluorescent hybridization chain reaction (HCR) and advanced imaging techniques can be used to evaluate combinatorial gene expression patterns in whole mouse embryos with unprecedented spatial resolution. Using HCR, DNA probes complementary to mRNA targets trigger chain reactions in which metastable fluorophore-labeled DNA HCR hairpins self-assemble into tethered fluorescent amplification polymers. Each target mRNA is detected by a probe set containing one or more DNA probes, with each probe carrying two HCR initiators. For multiplexed experiments, probe sets for different target mRNAs carry orthogonal initiators that trigger orthogonal DNA HCR amplification cascades labeled by spectrally distinct fluorophores. As a result, in situ amplification is performed for all targets simultaneously, and the duration of the experiment is independent of the number of target mRNAs. We have used multiplexed fluorescent in situ HCR and advanced imaging technologies to address questions of cell heterogeneity and tissue complexity in craniofacial patterning and anterior neural development. In the sample protocol presented here, we detect three different mRNA targets: Tg(egfp), encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene (typically used as a control); Twist1, encoding a transcription factor involved in cell lineage determination and differentiation; and Pax2, encoding a transcription factor expressed in the mid-hindbrain region of the mouse embryo.

  1. Acute digoxin loading reduces ABCA8A mRNA expression in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Wakaumi, Michi; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Ando, Hitoshi; Kasanuki, Hiroshi; Tsuruoka, Shuichi

    2005-12-01

    Human ABCA8, a new member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, transports certain lipophilic drugs, such as digoxin. To investigate the roles of this transporter, we cloned a mouse homologue of ABCA8, from a mouse heart cDNA library, named ABCA8a. The deduced mouse ABCA8a protein is 66% identical with that of human ABCA8 and possesses features common to the ABC superfamily. It was found that ABCA8a was mainly expressed in the liver and heart, similar to human ABCA8. We further evaluated the effect of acute digoxin (a substrate for ABCA8) intoxication on the mRNA expression of ABCA8 using northern blotting with a 3' non-coding region as a probe to avoid cross-hybridization with other ABCA genes. Following acute digoxin infusion, the mRNA expression of ABCA8 was significantly reduced in the liver 12-24 h after injection (14.7% of vehicle treatment), but not in the heart and kidney. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed the reduction in ABCA8a mRNA. Similar reductions in ABCA5, ABCA7, ABCA8b and ABCA9 mRNA were also observed. A comparable amount of digitoxin did not affect ABCA8a mRNA expression in the liver. The results suggest that ABCA8 may play a role in digoxin metabolism in the liver.

  2. Autoantibody profiling of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis using a multiplexed line-blot assay.

    PubMed

    Villalta, Danilo; Sorrentino, Maria Concetta; Girolami, Elia; Tampoia, Marilina; Alessio, Maria Grazia; Brusca, Ignazio; Daves, Massimo; Porcelli, Brunetta; Barberio, Giuseppina; Bizzaro, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the autoantibody profile in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) using a new multiplexed line-blot assay specifically designed for the diagnosis of autoimmune liver diseases. Sera of 58 consecutive PBC patients and 191 disease controls (144 with autoimmune liver diseases other than PBC, and 67 with non-autoimmune chronic liver diseases) were tested by both the multiplexed line-blot Autoimmune Liver Disease Profile 2 (ALD2) and by IIF on HEp-2 cells and on rat kidney/liver/stomach tissues. ALD2 contains the following PBC-associated antigens: AMA-M2, natively purified from bovine heart; M2-E3, a recombinant fusion protein including the E2 subunits of PDC, BCOADC and OGDC; sp100, PML and gp210 recombinant proteins. With the ALD2 assay, a positive reaction to AMA-M2, M2-E3, sp100, PML and gp210 in PBC patients was observed in 77.6%, 84.5%, 34.5%, 15.1% and 18.9%, respectively, of the PBC sera. The overall sensitivity and specificity for PBC were 98.3% and 93.7%. Using IIF, positivity rates to AMA, and to antinuclear autoantibodies with membranous/rim-like and multiple nuclear dot patterns were 86.2%, 8.6% and 22.4%, respectively. The overall sensitivity and specificity for PBC of the IIF method were 86.2% and 97.9%, respectively. The ALD2 line-blot showed a good diagnostic accuracy for PBC and a higher sensitivity than the IIF method to detect sp100 and gp210 autoantibodies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanism of DNA (Southern) and protein (Western) blotting on cellulose nitrate and other membranes.

    PubMed

    Van Oss, C J; Good, R J; Chaudhury, M K

    1987-03-27

    The transfer of DNA fractions from hydrophilic gels to nitrocellulose membranes (Southern blotting) which was soon followed by the description of an analogous procedure for RNA (Northern blotting), and somewhat later for proteins (Western blotting), has rapidly become an important separation and characterization method in molecular biology, genetic engineering, and immunological detection. Surface tension measurements have shown that the interfacial attraction between DNA and cellulose esters (-delta G132) in aqueous media can be considerable. The weaker binding energy of proteins to cellulose nitrate and to cellulose acetate may be compared to hydrophobic interaction chromatography, as on account of the somewhat lower [-delta G132] values, it often is necessary to "fix" them more tightly onto nitrocellulose by using high salt concentrations. The binding energy of RNA to both cellulose esters also is rather low. In addition to the effect of high ionic strength, the effect of adding methanol, and the effects of denaturation, heating and drying on the energy of attachment of the biopolymers to cellulose esters, have been studied. Cationized nylon membranes have been advocated recently, especially for electrophoretic transfer of nucleic acids (in which process high salt concentrations cannot easily be used). With positively charged nylon membranes, the attachment mainly occurs through the electrostatic attraction between the strongly negatively charged nucleic acids (or proteins) and the positively charged membrane. Also, more apolar membranes (of polyvinyl difluoride) have been proposed, which manifest a strong interfacial (hydrophobic) attraction to all the above biopolymers (regardless of their electrostatic charge). However, with these two novel membrane types it is no longer possible to exploit the large difference in binding energy between DNA and RNA, which makes cellulose nitrate membranes so uniquely suited for RNA-DNA hybridization assays.

  4. FANCD2 Western blot as a diagnostic tool for Brazilian patients with Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Pilonetto, D V; Pereira, N F; Bitencourt, M A; Magdalena, N I R; Vieira, E R; Veiga, L B A; Cavalli, I J; Ribeiro, R C; Pasquini, R

    2009-03-01

    Fanconi anemia is a rare hereditary disease showing genetic heterogeneity due to a variety of mutations in genes involved in DNA repair pathways, which may lead to different clinical manifestations. Phenotypic variability makes diagnosis difficult based only on clinical manifestations, therefore laboratory tests are necessary. New advances in molecular pathogenesis of this disease led researchers to develop a diagnostic test based on Western blot for FANCD2. The objective of the present study was to determine the efficacy of this method for the diagnosis of 84 Brazilian patients with Fanconi anemia, all of whom tested positive for the diepoxybutane test, and 98 healthy controls. The FANCD2 monoubiquitinated isoform (FANCDS+/FANCD2L-) was not detected in 77 patients (91.7%). In 2 patients (2.4%), there was an absence of both the monoubiquitinated and the non-ubiquitinated proteins (FANCD2S-/FANCD2L-) and 5 patients (5.9%) had both isoforms (FANCD2S+/FANCD2L+). This last phenotype suggests downstream subtypes or mosaicism. All controls were diepoxybutane negative and were also negative on the FANCD2 Western blot. The Western blot for FANCD2 presented a sensitivity of 94% (79/84) and specificity of 100% (98/98). This method was confirmed as an efficient approach to screen Brazilian patients with deleterious mutations on FANCD2 (FANCD2S-/FANCD2L-) or other upstream genes of the FA/BRCA pathway (FANCDS+/FANCD2L-), to confirm the chromosome breakage test and to classify patients according to the level of FA/BRCA pathway defects. However, patients showing both FANCD2 isoforms (FANCD2S+/FANCD2L+) require additional studies to confirm mutations on downstream Fanconi anemia genes or the presence of mosaicism.

  5. Evaluation of SYPRO Ruby total protein stain for the normalization of two-dimensional Western blots.

    PubMed

    Steinberger, Birgit; Brem, Gottfried; Mayrhofer, Corina

    2015-05-01

    Due to post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, proteins exist as distinct charge variants. Two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis followed by immunoblotting enables the detection of these isoforms. For their accurate relative quantitation in different samples, a loading control is necessary to compensate for technical errors such as imprecise sample loading or transfer. The study reveals that the combinatory approach of SYPRO Ruby and chemiluminescence-based 2D Western blot analysis exhibits high linearity and excellent reproducibility and is applicable for limited sample amounts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Western Blot Protocol for Detection of Proteins Heterologously Expressed in Xenopus laevis Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2016-01-01

    Oocytes of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, are often used for expression and biochemical characterization of transporter proteins as the oocytes are particularly suitable for uptake assays and electrophysiological recordings. Assessment of the expression level of expressed transporters at the individual oocyte level is often desirable when comparing properties of wild type and mutant transporters. However, a large content of yolk platelets in the oocyte cytoplasm makes this a challenging task. Here we report a method for fast and easy, semiquantitative Western blot analysis of proteins heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

  7. Blotting Assisted by Heating and Solvent Extraction for DESI-MS Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Elaine C.; Mirabelli, Mario F.; Perez, Consuelo J.; Ifa, Demian R.

    2013-06-01

    Imprints of potato sprout ( Solanum tuberosum L.), gingko leaves (Gingko biloba L. ) and strawberries (Fragaria x ananassa Duch. ) were successfully imaged by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) on TLC plates through blotting assisted by heating and/or solvent extraction. Ion images showing the distribution of significant compounds such as glycoalkaloid toxins in potato sprout, ginkgolic acids and flavonoids in ginkgo leaves, and sugars and anthocyanidin in strawberry were obtained. Practical implications of this work include analysis of a wide range of irregular or soft materials by different imprinting conditions without requiring the addition of matrices or use of specific kinds of surfaces.

  8. Selection of DNA aptamers against VEGF165 using a protein competitor and the aptamer blotting method.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hijiri; Sode, Koji; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2008-05-01

    Two DNA aptamers against a tumor marker protein, human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF(165)) were identified. In the screening process, another protein was used as the competitor to isolate those aptamers that have high specificity for the target. In addition, we evaluated the affinities of the enriched library by means of aptamer blotting. The isolated aptamers bound to VEGF(165) with a K(d) value in the range of a few hundred nanomoles, and did not bind to the competitor. This selection method enabled us to efficiently select the specific aptamers against the target protein. These specific aptamers would be useful sensor elements for cancer diagnosis.

  9. Western Blotting Is an Efficient Tool for Differential Diagnosis of Paracoccidioidomycosis and Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bertoni, Thâmara Aline; Perenha-Viana, Maysa Cláudia Zolin; Patussi, Eliana Valéria; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti

    2012-01-01

    Sputum and sera from 134 patients screened for tuberculosis (TB) were analyzed to investigate TB and paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). Of these patients, 11 (8.2%) were confirmed to have TB, but six (4.5%) were positive only for PCM. All patients with PCM presented anti-43-kDa-component antibodies in Western blotting (WB) assays, while in the TB-positive patients these antibodies did not appear. This preliminary study suggests WB as a potential tool for differential laboratory diagnosis between TB and PCM. PMID:22971781

  10. Intracellular delivery of molecular beacons by PMMA nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes for mRNA sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannetti, A.; Tombelli, S.; Trono, C.; Ballestri, M.; Giambastiani, G.; Guerrini, A.; Sotgiu, G.; Tuci, G.; Varchi, G.; Baldini, F.

    2013-02-01

    We describe here the use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and polymeric nanoparticles made of a core of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) surrounded by a shell bearing cationic groups, as intracellular delivery tools of molecular beacons (MBs), particular fluorescent DNA probes, for the detection and localization of a specific mRNA. Survivin mRNA targeting MBs have been used with Atto647N and Blackberry 650 as fluorophore/quencher pair. The MB was anchored to the surface of CNTs and PMMA nanoparticles via a commercial sulfhydryl-reactive heterobifunctional crosslinker and the achieved nanomaterials were then characterized in vitro.

  11. Changes of splenocyte IFN-γ mRNA synthesis in rats infected with Paragonimus westermani

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jun Kyong; Kwon, Hye Soo; Joo, Kyoung Hwan; Lee, Joon Sang

    1999-01-01

    Changes in the expression level of splenocyte IFN-γ mRNA of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats infected with Paragonimus westermani were analyzed by competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) followed by southern blot. The template RNA was extracted from the splenocytes of rats infected with 20 metacercariae of P. westermani. The products of competitive RT-PCR were subjected to southern blot and enhanced chemiluminescence (ECL), and analyzed with a densitometer. In comparison with that of uninfected control rat splenocytes (value of 1), the levels of mRNA expression of IFN-γ had changed to 0.747 at 1 week post infection (PI), 0.00175 at 2 week PI, 0.0217 at 3 week PI, 0.194 at 4 week PI and then to 0.537 at 5 week PI. The level at 7 week PI had returned to 1.25, comparable with that of uninfected rats. These results show that, when infected with P. westermani, the levels of IFN-γ mRNA of SD rat splenocytes were remarkably reduced by more than 500 times at 2 week PI and restored to normal level at 7 week PI. PMID:10634046

  12. Quantitative analysis of gene expression by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Richards, Mark P; Poch, Stephen M

    2002-05-01

    There has been a dramatic expansion of DNA sequence information compiled over the past several years for a variety of eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes. Accompanying this increase in knowledge of genomic structure and organization has been a growing interest in studying the function of individual genes including regulation of their expression. A number of methods such as Northern blotting, ribonuclease protection assay, and hybridization arrays have been developed to analyze gene expression at the transcriptional (mRNA) level. Although quantitative estimates of mRNA transcripts can be obtained from each of these methods, oftentimes they lack sufficient sensitivity or the methodology is too costly or too labor-intensive to be applied to the analysis of a large number of samples. The most sensitive method for analyzing gene expression at the mRNA level involves the combination of reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). However, in order to provide accurate quantitative estimates of gene expression, a rapid and efficient method is required for separation and detection of the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) products of RT-PCR. Recent advances in capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE/LIF) have made this method suitable for the automated analysis of large numbers of RT-PCR samples. An overview of the application of CE/LIF to quantitative analysis of gene expression by RT-PCR is presented along with selected protocols and examples. Both relative-quantitative (RQ) and quantitative-competitive (QC) approaches to RT-PCR are discussed in conjunction with the use of CE/LIF for rapid and accurate quantitative analysis of PCR products.

  13. Loss of D2 receptors during aging is partially due to decreased levels of mRNA.

    PubMed

    Mesco, E R; Joseph, J A; Blake, M J; Roth, G S

    1991-04-05

    Corpora striata of old rats (24-25 months) contain only about half as much mRNA for D2 dopamine receptors as those of young (6 months) counterparts. This reduction can be observed by in situ hybridization of brain slices as well as with Northern and dot blot analyses of striatal extracts. Decreased levels of D2 receptor mRNA as described in this study are consistent with reductions in receptor containing neurons (20%) and receptor biosynthesis (40%), as previously observed in this and other laboratories. Thus, age related changes in D2 receptor gene expression appear to be partially responsible for loss of these receptors.

  14. Characterizing exogenous mRNA delivery, trafficking, cytoplasmic release and RNA-protein correlations at the level of single cells.

    PubMed

    Kirschman, Jonathan L; Bhosle, Sushma; Vanover, Daryll; Blanchard, Emmeline L; Loomis, Kristin H; Zurla, Chiara; Murray, Kathryn; Lam, Blaine C; Santangelo, Philip J

    2017-07-07

    The use of synthetic messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) to express specific proteins is a highly promising therapeutic and vaccine approach that avoids many safety issues associated with viral or DNA-based systems. However, in order to optimize mRNA designs and delivery, technology advancements are required to study fundamental mechanisms of mRNA uptake and localization at the single-cell and tissue level. Here, we present a single RNA sensitive fluorescent labeling method which allows us to label and visualize synthetic mRNA without significantly affecting function. This approach enabled single cell characterization of mRNA uptake and release kinetics from endocytic compartments, the measurement of mRNA/protein correlations, and motivated the investigation of mRNA induced cellular stress, all important mechanisms influencing protein production. In addition, we demonstrated this approach can facilitate near-infrared imaging of mRNA localization in vivo and in ex-vivo tissue sections, which will facilitate mRNA trafficking studies in pre-clinical models. Overall, we demonstrate the ability to study fundamental mechanisms necessary to optimize delivery and therapeutic strategies, in order to design the next generation of novel mRNA therapeutics and vaccines. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Neurofilament dot blot assays: novel means of assessing axon viability in culture.

    PubMed

    Hares, Kelly; Kemp, Kevin; Gray, Elizabeth; Scolding, Neil; Wilkins, Alastair

    2011-06-15

    Axonal structure and integrity are vital to overall neuronal maintenance and action potential propagation. Neurofilaments (NFs) are one of the main cytoskeletal components of axons and phosphorylation of NF subunits regulates speed of NF transport through axons and determines optimal axonal calibre required for signal propagation. Many previous studies of neuroprotective agents have focussed on neuronal viability in models of neurodegenerative disease, without specifically considering axon function as an indicator of neuronal damage. In this study, we have focused on developing novel assays for determining axon viability by measuring levels of neurofilament phosphorylation in cultured cortical neurons. The nitric oxide donor DETANONOate (NO) was used as an inflammatory insult and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were tested as potential axonal protective agents. Using 'dot blot' methodologies, we show a decrease in NF phosphorylation in cortical neurons exposed to NO-mediated cell toxicity and an attenuation of NO-mediated changes in NF phosphorylation associated with GDNF and SOD treatment. These results correlated well with immunocytochemical counts. We propose therefore that the dot blot assay is a novel method for assessing axonal integrity in vitro and may play a useful role in the future for testing the effects of agents on axonal viability, providing a reliable and reproducible screening method for potential therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A sensitive non-radioactive northern blot method to detect small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Woo; Li, Zhihua; Moore, Patrick S; Monaghan, A Paula; Chang, Yuan; Nichols, Mark; John, Bino

    2010-04-01

    The continuing discoveries of potentially active small RNAs at an unprecedented rate using high-throughput sequencing have raised the need for methods that can reliably detect and quantitate the expression levels of small RNAs. Currently, northern blot is the most widely used method for validating small RNAs that are identified by methods such as high-throughput sequencing. We describe a new northern blot-based protocol (LED) for small RNA (approximately 15-40 bases) detection using digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled oligonucleotide probes containing locked nucleic acids (LNA) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide for cross-linking the RNA to the membrane. LED generates clearly visible signals for RNA amounts as low as 0.05 fmol. This method requires as little as a few seconds of membrane exposure to outperform the signal intensity using overnight exposure of isotope-based methods, corresponding to approximately 1000-fold improvement in exposure-time. In contrast to commonly used radioisotope-based methods, which require freshly prepared and hazardous probes, LED probes can be stored for at least 6 months, facilitate faster and more cost-effective experiments, and are more environmentally friendly. A detailed protocol of LED is provided in the Supplementary Data.

  17. Analysis of sperm antigens by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel/protein blot radioimmunobinding method

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.Y.G.; Huang, Y.S.; Hu, P.C.; Gomel, V.; Menge, A.C.

    1982-06-01

    A radioimmunobinding method based on the blotting of renatured proteins from sodium dodecyl sulfate gels on to nitrocellulose filter papers was developed to analyze the sperm antigens that elicit serum anti-sperm antibodies. In rabbits, serum anti-sperm antibodies were raised by immunization with homologous epididymal spermatozoa mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant. The raised antisera from either male or female rabbits were shown to react with three major sperm protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels with the corresponding molecular weights of about 70,000 +/- 5000, 14,000, and 13,000, respectively. In humans, the monoclonal antibodies against human sperm were raised by a hybridoma technique. Out of six independent hybrid cell lines that were generated, three of them were shown to secrete immunoglobulins that react with the same two protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, which have the approximate molecular weight of 10,000. The same procedure was also used to analyze human serum samples that were shown to contain anti-sperm antibodies by the known techniques. Unique sperm antigens that elicit anti-sperm antibodies in humans were identified and correlated. The results of this study suggest that sodium dodecyl sulfate gel/protein blot radioimmunobinding method may be a sensitive and useful tool for the study of sperm antigens that elicit autoimmune responses and their association with human infertility.

  18. Validation of endothelin B receptor antibodies reveals two distinct receptor-related bands on Western blot.

    PubMed

    Barr, Travis P; Kornberg, Daniel; Montmayeur, Jean-Pierre; Long, Melinda; Reichheld, Stephen; Strichartz, Gary R

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are important tools for the study of protein expression but are often used without full validation. In this study, we used Western blots to characterize antibodies targeted to the N or C terminal (NT or CT, respectively) and the second or third intracellular loop (IL2 or IL3, respectively) of the endothelin B receptor (ETB). The IL2-targeted antibody accurately detected endogenous ETB expression in rat brain and cultured rat astrocytes by labeling a 50-kDa band, the expected weight of full-length ETB. However, this antibody failed to detect transfected ETB in HEK293 cultures. In contrast, the NT-targeted antibody accurately detected endogenous ETB in rat astrocyte cultures and transfected ETB in HEK293 cultures by labeling a 37-kDa band but failed to detect endogenous ETB in rat brain. Bands detected by the CT- or IL3-targeted antibody were found to be unrelated to ETB. Our findings show that functional ETB can be detected at 50 or 37kDa on Western blot, with drastic differences in antibody affinity for these bands. The 37-kDa band likely reflects ETB processing, which appears to be dependent on cell type and/or culture condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantitative dot blot analysis (QDB), a versatile high throughput immunoblot method.

    PubMed

    Tian, Geng; Tang, Fangrong; Yang, Chunhua; Zhang, Wenfeng; Bergquist, Jonas; Wang, Bin; Mi, Jia; Zhang, Jiandi

    2017-08-29

    Lacking access to an affordable method of high throughput immunoblot analysis for daily use remains a big challenge for scientists worldwide. We proposed here Quantitative Dot Blot analysis (QDB) to meet this demand. With the defined linear range, QDB analysis fundamentally transforms traditional immunoblot method into a true quantitative assay. Its convenience in analyzing large number of samples also enables bench scientists to examine protein expression levels from multiple parameters. In addition, the small amount of sample lysates needed for analysis means significant saving in research sources and efforts. This method was evaluated at both cellular and tissue levels with unexpected observations otherwise would be hard to achieve using conventional immunoblot methods like Western blot analysis. Using QDB technique, we were able to observed an age-dependent significant alteration of CAPG protein expression level in TRAMP mice. We believe that the adoption of QDB analysis would have immediate impact on biological and biomedical research to provide much needed high-throughput information at protein level in this "Big Data" era.

  20. Development and applications of simultaneous immunochemical staining and serial detection of overlapping proteins in blotting procedures.

    PubMed

    Kuczius, Thorsten; Hummel, Marlene; Böhler, Olga; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-12-14

    Immunoblotting techniques are widely used for specific protein identifications and characterizations. The specific bindings of antibodies to epitopes in a protein sequence permits determination of antigens and gives detailed information about protein compositions and expression levels in complex suspensions. However the techniques are mostly restricted to one specific antibody determination. Overlaying proteins are detected using numerous repeated gel runs. For multiple but specific protein determinations on one immunoblot, here we describe the detection of several antigens by simultaneous incubation of antibodies originated from different species followed by sequential addition of secondary antibodies labelled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and binding to analogous primary antibodies. Particular signals were visualized step by step using a HRP chemiluminescence substrate while enzymatic HRP reactions were meanwhile inactivated irreversibly by hydrogen peroxide incubation. We demonstrate flexible applications of multiple antigen detections using the Western blotting technique with determination of the CNS protein markers neuron specific enolase, glial fibrillary acid protein and the physiological prion protein (PrP(C)) in brains and in meats as food contaminations and with glycotyping of PrP(C) using antibodies binding to different epitopes. We showed the use of the dot blotting technique with serial determination of different antigens in complex protein suspensions. The method is easy to handle and is flexible and applicable in the fields of diagnostics and public health for detection of overlaying proteins on one immunoblot. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Gel electrophoresis of polyphenol oxidase with instant identification by in situ blotting.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tsai-Mu; Huang, Pei-Chen; Pan, Ju-Pin; Lin, Kuan-Yu; Mao, Simon J T

    2007-04-15

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) or tyrosinase is an important and ubiquitous enzyme responsible for browning in plants and melanization in animals. The molecular size of the plant PPO is varied among the species and its activity can be enhanced by a variety of anionic detergents. In the present study, we developed a simple method for the first-step identification of PPO in fruit and vegetable extracts. First, 3mm chromatographic paper was immersed in 0.5% (w/v) catechol solution as an immobilized PPO substrate. After running the extract with 10% sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), one side of the glass plate was removed. The plate was immediately laid on top of the dried catechol-paper. A dark-brown band corresponding to PPO was visualized within 1 min and was further confirmed by a conventional Western blot using an antibody prepared against mushroom PPO. It also reveals that some vegetation (such as tomato, radish, and oriental melon) with low or no detectable activity in a conventional enzyme assay actually possessed marked levels of PPO activity when assessed by PAGE-blot. We propose that an inhibitor is associated with PPO in some plants; the inhibitor, however, is dissociated during the electrophoresis. Therefore, in addition to identify the molecular form of PPO, the present technique may explore the existence of PPO inhibitor(s) in plants. The detail of the method with respect to its relevance for searching a natural PPO inhibitor is described and discussed.

  2. An overview of technical considerations for Western blotting applications to physiological research.

    PubMed

    Bass, J J; Wilkinson, D J; Rankin, D; Phillips, B E; Szewczyk, N J; Smith, K; Atherton, P J

    2017-01-01

    The applications of Western/immunoblotting (WB) techniques have reached multiple layers of the scientific community and are now considered routine procedures in the field of physiology. This is none more so than in relation to skeletal muscle physiology (i.e., resolving the mechanisms underpinning adaptations to exercise). Indeed, the inclusion of WB data is now considered an essential aspect of many such physiological publications to provide mechanistic insight into regulatory processes. Despite this popularity, and due to the ubiquitous and relatively inexpensive availability of WB equipment, the quality of WB in publications and subsequent analysis and interpretation of the data can be variable, perhaps resulting in spurious conclusions. This may be due to poor laboratory technique and/or lack of comprehension of the critical steps involved in WB and what quality control procedures should be in place to ensure robust data generation. The present review aims to provide a detailed description and critique of WB procedures and technicalities, from sample collection through preparation, blotting and detection, to analysis of the data collected. We aim to provide the reader with improved expertise to critically conduct, evaluate, and troubleshoot the WB process, to produce reproducible and reliable blots.

  3. Capillary blotting of glycosaminoglycans on nitrocellulose membranes after agarose-gel electrophoresis separation.

    PubMed

    Volpi, Nicola; Maccari, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    A method for the blotting and immobilizing of several nonsulfated and sulfated complex polysaccharides on membranes made hydrophilic and positively charged by cationic detergent after their separation by conventional agarose gel electrophoresis is illustrated. This new approach to the study of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) utilizes the capacity of agarose gel electrophoresis to separate single species of polysaccharides from mixtures and the membrane technology for further preparative and analytical uses.Nitrocellulose membranes are derivatized with the cationic detergent cetylpyridinium chloride and mixtures of GAGs are capillary blotted after their separation in agarose gel electrophoresis. Single purified species of variously sulfated polysaccharides are transferred on derivatized membranes with an efficiency of 100% and stained with alcian blue (irreversible staining) and toluidine blue (reversible staining). This enables a lower amount limit of detection of 0.1 microg. Nonsulfated polyanions, for example hyaluronic acid, may also be transferred to membranes with a limit of detection of approximately 0.1-0.5 microg after irreversible or reversible staining. The membranes may be stained with reversible staining and the same lanes are used for immunological detection or other applications.

  4. More specific bands in the IgG western blot in sera from Scottish patients with suspected Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Evans, Roger; Mavin, Sally; McDonagh, Susan; Chatterton, Jean M W; Milner, Rachel; Ho-Yen, Darrel O

    2010-08-01

    To identify further Western blot bands that may be specific in the diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis. The Borrelia burgdorferi antibody profiles of 270 western blot positive patients and 241 western blot negative patients from 2008 were examined. 27 different non-specific bands were detected in both groups. Six of 27 (22%) of the non-specific bands were detected significantly more in the western blot positive patients compared to the western blot negative patients (20 kDa, p<0.0001; 28 kDa, p<0.002; 36 kDa, p<0.002; 37 kDa, p<0.007; 48 kDa, p<0.023; 56 kDa, p<0.028; two-tailed F test). Results suggest that the 20, 28 and 48 kDa bands should be regarded as specific.

  5. Highly specific confirmatory western blot test for African swine fever virus antibody detection using the recombinant virus protein p54.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, C; Rodriguez, F; Oviedo, J M; Eiras, A; De Diego, M; Alonso, C; Escribano, J M

    1995-03-01

    A Western blot technique using a recombinant protein has been developed to confirm positive results obtained in African swine fever (ASF)-specific antibody detection by ELISA. The new confirmatory Western blot is based on the use of protein p54, one of the most antigenic ASF virus structural proteins, expressed in Escherichia coli fused to the N-terminus of MS2 polymerase. The recombinant Western blot assay was highly specific and equally sensitive for ASF virus-infected pigs detection as the conventional Western blot, which uses virus-induced proteins ranging in molecular weight between 23 and 35 kDa. The novel Western blot assay provides a simpler interpretation of the test, eliminates the possibility of false-positive reactions produced by cellular compounds that contaminate the antigen employed in the conventional technique, and avoids the use of live virus in antigen production.

  6. The diagnostic value of Western blot method in patients with cystic echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Mustafa; Yüksel, Pelin; Polat, Erdal; Cakan, Huseyin; Ergin, Sevgi; Öner, Y Ali; Zengin, Kagan; Arıkan, Soykan; Saribas, Suat; Torun, Muzeyyen Mamal; Kocazeybek, Bekir

    2011-04-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is the larval cystic stage (called echinococcal cysts) of a small taeniid-type tapeworm (Echinococcus granulosus). Carnivores such as dogs are usually definitive hosts. Intermediate hosts are typically herbivores such as sheep and cattle. CE can be detected using various imaging techniques such as ultrasonography or radiology. Moreover the primary diagnosis has to be confirmed by serological tests since the clinical signs of the disease are non-specific. This study examined the antigenic band patterns useful for serologic diagnosis of hydatidosis. We also report on the post-operative evolution of patients treated for this disease and also determined the diagnostic performance of Western blot IgG kit. Twenty-five (16 females and 9 males) non-operated patients with hydatid cysts (NOP) and 33 (21 females and 12 males) operated patients with hydatid cysts (OP) were included as study group and 22 healthy individuals (14 females and 8 males) with no known chronic diseases were included as a control group. The ages of the patients and control group individuals were between 16-83 years. Patient and control groups were matched for age and sex. Cyst hydatid IgG antibodies were detected in the sera from all patient groups but no antibodies were found in the sera from the control group using ELISA IgG method. Twenty-three (92%) non-operated patients and 18 (54.5%) operated patients exhibited positive results when Western blot IgG kit was used. The P7 band pattern was detected in the sera from all operated and non-operated patients. Twenty-seven of these positive cases had p7 and (p7+p16/18), (p7+p24/26) or (p7+p16/18+p24/26). No antibodies against p7, p16/18 ve p24/26 band patterns were seen in sera from the control group A statistically significant difference was detected between operated and nonoperated patients for Western blot positivity.(p<0.01). p: 0.018- X2=5,604- OR: 0.176- 95% CI: 0.037- 0.841. The sensitivity, specificity, positive

  7. Biomaterials for mRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K. G.; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R.; Zetter, Bruce R.; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  8. Changes in surfactant protein A mRNA levels in a rat model of insulin-treated diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Moglia, B B; Phelps, D S

    1996-02-01

    Maternal diabetes during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Previous studies using rat models for the diabetic pregnancy have documented decreased amounts of surfactant protein mRNA in the lungs of fetuses. In this study, we measured fetal lung surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) mRNA from diabetic rats treated with insulin by daily injection or osmotic pump. Lungs were taken from fetuses on gestational d 20, and RNA was isolated and subjected to Northern blotting and densitometry to quantify SP-A mRNA. Fetal lung SP-A mRNA from untreated diabetic pregnancies was 34 +/- 2.9% of control. Insulin treatment increased levels to 55 +/- 4.2% of control values. Fetal lung SP-A mRNA levels were affected by the timing, length, and effectiveness of insulin treatment. Although levels from all treatment groups were still less than control values, insulin treatment during the last 5 or 10 d of pregnancy resulted in a substantial increase in SP-A mRNA levels over those of from untreated diabetic pregnancies. However, fetuses from the group with insulin treatment for the entire pregnancy showed decreases in fetal SP-A mRNA levels. Although the mechanism(s) responsible for the effects of diabetes and its treatment on fetal SP-A expression remain unclear, it appears unlikely that hyperglycemia is the principal cause.

  9. Single-Molecule mRNA Detection in Live Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lenstra, Tineke L.

    2016-01-01

    Visualization of single RNA molecules in living cells has enabled the study of synthesis, movement, and localization of mRNAs and has provided insight into gene regulation with sub-second temporal resolution and nanometer spatial resolution. Following transcription in single cells indicates that gene activity is heterogeneous between cells and also exhibits random variability over time even within single cells. Studies of mRNAs in yeast can take advantage of the powerful genetics available in this model organism and allow mechanistic questions to be addressed. In this chapter, we describe an approach for visualizing mRNA and transcription in live yeast cells. The method is based on binding of fluorescently labeled MS2 and PP7 coat proteins to stem loops sequences that are introduced into the gene of interest. We give detailed protocols for the construction of the necessary yeast strains, for image acquisition, and for validation. PMID:27110320

  10. Gene expression profile of IGF1 and MSTN mRNA and their correlation with carcass traits in different breeds of geese at 70 d of age.

    PubMed

    Tang, Q; Song, C; Zhang, S; Hu, Y; Zhao, D; Zou, J

    2014-02-01

    1. The expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) and myostatin (MSTN) mRNA in breast and leg muscle was quantified in 70-d-old Taihu and Wanxi geese by using a Multiplex Competitive Fluorescent-PCR method and the correlations between mRNA levels and carcass traits were analysed. 2. IGF1 mRNA expression in breast muscle in Taihu geese was significantly higher than that in Wanxi geese and the MSTN mRNA level in leg muscle in Taihu geese was significantly higher than that in Wanxi geese. 3. There was no significant difference in breast muscle MSTN or leg muscle IGF1 mRNA expression between the two breeds. 4. Within the same breed, the IGF1 mRNA expression in leg muscle of male geese was significantly higher than that in female geese, and MSTN mRNA expression in leg muscle was significantly higher than that in breast muscle. 5. There was no difference in the IGF1 mRNA expression between tissues. 6. There was a positive correlation between IGF1 mRNA and MSTN mRNA and a negative correlation between IGF1 mRNA expression of breast muscle and leg muscle ratio. 7. In Wanxi geese, MSTN mRNA expression in leg muscle was negatively associated with body weight and leg muscle weight.

  11. Three-Dimensional Mapping of mRNA Export through the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Steven J; Ma, Jiong; Yang, Weidong

    2014-11-11

    The locations of transcription and translation of mRNA in eukaryotic cells are spatially separated by the nuclear envelope (NE). Plenty of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the NE function as the major gateway for the export of transcribed mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Whereas the NPC, perhaps one of the largest protein complexes, provides a relatively large channel for macromolecules to selectively pass through it in inherently three-dimensional (3D) movements, this channel is nonetheless below the diffraction limit of conventional light microscopy. A full understanding of the mRNA export mechanism urgently requires real-time mapping of the 3D dynamics of mRNA in the NPC of live cells with innovative imaging techniques breaking the diffraction limit of conventional light microscopy. Recently, super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and single-particle tracking (SPT) techniques have been applied to the study of nuclear export of mRNA in live cells. In this review, we emphasize the necessity of 3D mapping techniques in the study of mRNA export, briefly summarize the feasibility of current 3D imaging approaches, and highlight the new features of mRNA nuclear export elucidated with a newly developed 3D imaging approach combining SPT-based super-resolution imaging and 2D-to-3D deconvolution algorithms.

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum stress increases AT1R mRNA expression via TIA-1-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Backlund, Michael; Paukku, Kirsi; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Lehtonen, Jukka Y.A.

    2016-01-01

    As the formation of ribonucleoprotein complexes is a major mechanism of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) regulation, we sought to identify novel AT1R mRNA binding proteins. By affinity purification and mass spectroscopy, we identified TIA-1. This interaction was confirmed by colocalization of AT1R mRNA and TIA-1 by FISH and immunofluorescence microscopy. In immunoprecipitates of endogenous TIA- 1, reverse transcription-PCR amplified AT1R mRNA. TIA-1 has two binding sites within AT1R 3′-UTR. The binding site proximal to the coding region is glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)-dependent whereas the distal binding site is not. TIA-1 functions as a part of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response leading to stress granule (SG) formation and translational silencing. We and others have shown that AT1R expression is increased by ER stress-inducing factors. In unstressed cells, TIA-1 binds to AT1R mRNA and decreases AT1R protein expression. Fluorescence microscopy shows that ER stress induced by thapsigargin leads to the transfer of TIA-1 to SGs. In FISH analysis AT1R mRNA remains in the cytoplasm and no longer colocalizes with TIA-1. Thus, release of TIA-1-mediated suppression by ER stress increases AT1R protein expression. In conclusion, AT1R mRNA is regulated by TIA-1 in a ER stress-dependent manner. PMID:26681690

  13. Three-Dimensional Mapping of mRNA Export through the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Steven J.; Ma, Jiong; Yang, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    The locations of transcription and translation of mRNA in eukaryotic cells are spatially separated by the nuclear envelope (NE). Plenty of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the NE function as the major gateway for the export of transcribed mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Whereas the NPC, perhaps one of the largest protein complexes, provides a relatively large channel for macromolecules to selectively pass through it in inherently three-dimensional (3D) movements, this channel is nonetheless below the diffraction limit of conventional light microscopy. A full understanding of the mRNA export mechanism urgently requires real-time mapping of the 3D dynamics of mRNA in the NPC of live cells with innovative imaging techniques breaking the diffraction limit of conventional light microscopy. Recently, super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and single-particle tracking (SPT) techniques have been applied to the study of nuclear export of mRNA in live cells. In this review, we emphasize the necessity of 3D mapping techniques in the study of mRNA export, briefly summarize the feasibility of current 3D imaging approaches, and highlight the new features of mRNA nuclear export elucidated with a newly developed 3D imaging approach combining SPT-based super-resolution imaging and 2D-to-3D deconvolution algorithms. PMID:25393401

  14. Application of a Dot Blot Hybridization Platform to Assess Streptococcus uberis Population Structure in Dairy Herds

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Pedro; Ribeiro, Niza; Almeida, Alexandre; Panschin, Irena; Porfirio, Afonso; Vales, Marta; Diniz, Francisca; Madeira, Helena; Tavares, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus uberis is considered one of the most important pathogens associated with bovine mastitis. While traditionally acknowledged as an environmental pathogen, S. uberis has been shown to adopt a contagious epidemiological pattern in several dairy herds. Since different control strategies are employed depending on the mode of transmission, in-depth studies of S. uberis populations are essential to determine the best practices to control this pathogen. In this work, we optimized and validated a dot blot platform, combined with automatic image analysis, to rapidly assess the population structure of infective S. uberis, and evaluated its efficiency when compared to multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) genotyping. Two dairy herds with prevalent S. uberis infections were followed in a 6 month period, in order to collect and characterize isolates from cows with persistent infections. These herds, located in Portugal (Barcelos and Maia regions), had similar management practices, with the herd from Barcelos being smaller and having a better milking parlor management, since infected cow segregation was immediate. A total of 54 S. uberis isolates were obtained from 24 different cows from the two herds. To overcome operator-dependent analysis of the dot blots and increase the technique's consistency and reliability, the hybridization signals were converted into probability values, with average probabilities higher than 0.5 being considered positive results. These data allowed to confirm the isolates' identity as S. uberis using taxa-specific markers and to determine the presence of virulence- and antibiotic resistance-related genes. In addition, MLSA allowed to disclose the most prevalent S. uberis clonal lineages in both herds. Seven different clusters were identified, with Barcelos showing a high clonal diversity and Maia a dominant lineage infecting most cows, suggesting distinct epidemiological patterns, with S. uberis displaying an environmental or contagious

  15. Quantitation of proteoglycans as glycosaminoglycans in biological fluids using an alcian blue dot blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Björnsson, S

    1998-02-15

    A method for quantitation of intact proteoglycans as GAGs in biological fluids (blood plasma, synovial fluid) or 4 M guanidine extracts of tissues has been published previously (S. Björnsson, Anal. Biochem. 210, 282-291, 1993). The method is based on the specific interaction between sulfated polymers and the tetravalent cationic dye Alcian blue at pH 1.5 in 0.4 M guanidine-HCl and in the presence of 0.25% Triton. The absorbance assay has a measuring range of 1-20 microgram of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) which is not sensitive enough to measure the low contents of proteoglycans in blood plasma, urine, or wound fluid. A dot blot assay is now described in which the Alcian blue-GAG complexes are collected on a polyvinylidene fluoride membrane, by filtration in a dot blot apparatus, and the stain is quantitated as reflectance by scanning and densitometry. The assay requires 10 microliter of sample and has a measuring range of 10-800 ng of GAG, corresponding to a concentration of 1-80 mg/liter, suitable for proteoglycans in biological fluids. The procedures for chemistry, scanning, densitometry, and curve fitting were each evaluated separately. The error contributed by chemistry accounted for a minor portion of the imprecision. The imprecision contributed by scanning was the most important source of within-run and between-run imprecision, and was caused by inequalities of the charge-coupled device along the scanning arm. Unexpectedly, curve fitting was also a major source of total imprecision in dot blot quantitation and differed with the type of equation used. The between-run imprecision calculated as CV (SD/mean . 100) was 13.0% at 8 mg/liter. The response of the assay was identical for six different commercial preparations of GAGs (chondroitin-4-sulfate, chondroitin-6-sulfate, dermatan sulfate, keratan sulfate, heparan sulfate, and heparin) despite differences in degree of sulfation known to exist. There was no positive or negative interference by blood plasma, apart

  16. Expression and autoregulation of transforming growth factor beta receptor mRNA in small-cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Nørgaard, P.; Spang-Thomsen, M.; Poulsen, H. S.

    1996-01-01

    In small-cell lung cancer cell lines resistance to growth inhibition by transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1, was previously shown to correlate with lack of TGF-beta receptor I (RI) and II (RII) proteins. To further investigate the role of these receptors, the expression of mRNA for RI, RII and beta-glycan (RIII) was examined. The results showed that loss of RII mRNA correlated with TGF-beta 1 resistance. In contrast, RI-and beta-glycan mRNA was expressed by all cell lines, including those lacking expression of these proteins. According to Southern blot analysis, the loss of type II mRNA was not due to gross structural changes in the gene. The effect of TGF-beta 1 on expression of TGF-beta receptor mRNA (receptor autoregulation) was examined by quantitative Northern blotting in four cell lines with different expression of TGF-beta receptor proteins. In two cell lines expressing all three TGF-beta receptor proteins beta-glycan mRNA was rapidly down-regulated and this effect was sustained throughout the 24 h observation period. RI and RII mRNAs were slightly increased 24 h after treatment. In one cell line sensitive to growth inhibition by TGF-beta, 1 but lacking beta-glycan expression, and one cell line expressing only beta-glycan and thus TGF-beta 1 -resistant, no autoregulation of mRNA of either TGF-beta receptor was demonstrated. The results suggest that TGF-beta 1 regulates the expression of its receptors, in particular beta-glycan, and that this effect is dependent on co-expression of beta-glycan, RI and RII. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8624260

  17. Estrogen receptor mRNA in mineralized tissues of rainbow trout: calcium mobilization by estrogen.

    PubMed

    Armour, K J; Lehane, D B; Pakdel, F; Valotaire, Y; Graham, R; Russell, R G; Henderson, I W

    1997-07-07

    RT-PCR was undertaken on total RNA extracts from bone and scales of the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The rainbow trout estrogen receptor (ER)-specific primers used amplified a single product of expected size from each tissue which, using Southern blotting, strongly hybridized with a 32P-labelled rtER probe under stringent conditions. These data provide the first in vivo evidence of ER mRNA in bone and scale tissues of rainbow trout and suggest that the effects of estrogen observed in this study (increased bone mineral and decreased scale mineral contents, respectively) may be mediated directly through ER.

  18. Regulation of cytoplasmic mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Schoenberg, Daniel R.; Maquat, Lynne E.

    2012-01-01

    Discoveries made over the past 20 years highlight the importance of mRNA decay as a means to modulate gene expression and thereby protein production. Up until recently, studies focused largely on identifying cis-acting sequences that serve as mRNA stability or instability elements, the proteins that bind these elements, how the process of translation influences mRNA decay, and the ribonucleases that catalyze decay. Now, current studies have begun to elucidate how the decay process is regulated. This review examines our current understanding of how mammalian-cell mRNA decay is controlled by different signaling pathways and lays out a framework for future research. PMID:22392217

  19. Profiling protein expression in circulating tumour cells using microfluidic western blotting

    PubMed Central

    Sinkala, Elly; Sollier-Christen, Elodie; Renier, Corinne; Rosàs-Canyelles, Elisabet; Che, James; Heirich, Kyra; Duncombe, Todd A.; Vlassakis, Julea; Yamauchi, Kevin A.; Huang, Haiyan; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Herr, Amy E.

    2017-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are rare tumour cells found in the circulatory system of certain cancer patients. The clinical and functional significance of CTCs is still under investigation. Protein profiling of CTCs would complement the recent advances in enumeration, transcriptomic and genomic characterization of these rare cells and help define their characteristics. Here we describe a microfluidic western blot for an eight-plex protein panel for individual CTCs derived from estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer patients. The precision handling and analysis reveals a capacity to assay sparingly available patient-derived CTCs, a biophysical CTC phenotype more lysis-resistant than breast cancer cell lines, a capacity to report protein expression on a per CTC basis and two statistically distinct GAPDH subpopulations within the patient-derived CTCs. Targeted single-CTC proteomics with the capacity for archivable, multiplexed protein analysis offers a unique, complementary taxonomy for understanding CTC biology and ascertaining clinical impact. PMID:28332571

  20. Detection of multiple cystic fibrosis mutations by reverse dot blot hybridization: a technology for carrier screening.

    PubMed

    Chehab, F F; Wall, J

    1992-05-01

    We describe the implementation of a modified version of the reverse dot blot hybridization technology to detect eight cystic fibrosis mutations. The method is simple, quick, reliable, inexpensive, and nonradioactive and utilizes the sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction coupled with colored or chemiluminescent substrates for mutation detection. We have used this system in a clinical laboratory to identify the delta F508, G542X, G551D, R553X, 621 + 1G----T, W1282X, N1303K, and 1717G----A mutations. The technique is practical for genotyping individuals at many potential mutation sites, as in cystic fibrosis and beta-thalassemia, in which over 95 mutations can cause disease. This technology appears to be the method of choice for the widespread carrier screening of multiple cystic fibrosis mutations.

  1. Detection of Hypoderma actaeon infestation in Cervus elaphus with ELISA and western blotting.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Julia; Panadero, Rosario; de la Fuente-López, Concepción

    2010-07-01

    We used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blotting (WB) to evaluate the reactivity of first-stage larval extracts of Hypoderma lineatum with antibodies in sera from 76 red deer from an endemic area for Hypoderma actaeon. Antibodies in sera from deer infested with H. actaeon recognized hypodermin C from H. lineatum in both ELISA and WB assays. ELISA values were correlated with the epidemiology of the fly infestation in the area where the deer sera were collected. There was no clear relationship between anti-hypodermin C antibody levels and the age of the animals or the number of Hypoderma grubs found at necropsy in the hides of the deer. Our results suggest that first-instar antigens of H. lineatum can be used to diagnose natural infestations by H. actaeon by indicating the presence of first-stage larvae, which can help to accurately describe H. actaeon epidemiology.

  2. Reexamination of alcohol dehydrogenase structural mutants in Drosophila using protein blotting

    SciTech Connect

    Hollocher, H.; Place, A.R.

    1987-06-01

    Using protein blotting and an immuno-overlay procedure, the authors have reexamined the cross-reacting material produced by ADH null-activity mutants generated with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). Of the 13 mutants, 11 have an immunodetectable polypeptide of wild-type size. The native and urea denatured isoelectric points (pI) establish that 7 of 13 of the mutations have no effect on protein charge. The electrophoretic mobilities of each variant on increasing percent acrylamide gels (Ferguson analysis), reveal that 9 of the 11 immunodetectable mutations have retained the ability form dimers under native conditions. None of the inactive mutant proteins has the ability to form the adduct-bound isozyme. The authors have found no correlation between protein pI and i vivo stability. The observed frequencies of specific charge class alterations do not dispute the propensity of G:A transitions previously found for EMS mutagenesis.

  3. Western blot analysis of Src kinase assays using peptide substrates ligated to a carrier protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Sun, Luo; Ghosh, Inca; Xu, Ming-Qun

    2004-06-01

    We have applied intein-mediated peptide ligation (IPL) to the use of peptide substrates for kinase assays and subsequent Western blot analysis. IPL allows for the efficient ligation of a synthetic peptide with an N-terminal cysteine residue to an intein-generated carrier protein containing a cysteine reactive C-terminal thioester through a native peptide bond. A distinct advantage of this procedure is that each carrier protein molecule ligates only one peptide, ensuring that the ligation product forms a sharp band on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach by mutational analysis of peptide substrates derived from human cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdc2, which contains a phosphorylation site of human c-Src protein tyrosine kinase.

  4. Direct identification and characterization of llama (Lama glama L.) whey proteins by microsequencing after western blotting.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, A; Napolitano, L; Giuffrida, M G; Conti, A

    1990-01-01

    Amino acid sequence determination is the most reliable and powerful tool to identify a protein or to classify a new one by comparison of its primary structure with already known sequences. A rapid and simple purification procedure is an essential pre-requisite for routine sequence determination. Structural characterization of llama whey proteins was undertaken for evolutionary as well as economic purposes. N-terminal sequence analyses directly on an immobilon polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane, following Western blotting of both native and SDS-denatured llama whey proteins after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, revealed three different forms of glycosylated alpha-lactalbumin, and a protein with a high degree of homology with a camel whey protein of unknown function. Furthermore, by immunoblotting techniques, the electrophoretic band corresponding to serum albumin was identified.

  5. Western Blot Detection of Human Anti-Chikungunya Virus Antibody with Recombinant Envelope 2 Protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoshou; Lee, Jihoo; Ahn, Hye-Jin; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Dias, Ronaldo F; Nam, Ho-Woo

    2016-04-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a tropical pathogen, has re-emerged and has massive outbreaks abruptly all over the world. Containing many dominant epitopes, the envelope E2 protein of CHIKV has been explored for the vaccination or diagnosis. In the present study, the antigenicity of a recombinant expressed intrinsically disorder domain (IUD) of E2 was tested for the detection of the antibody against CHIKV through western blot method. The gene of the IUD of E2 was inserted into 2 different vectors and expressed as recombinant GST-E2 and recombinant MBP-E2 fusion protein, respectively. Two kinds of fusion proteins were tested with 30 CHIKV patient sera and 30 normal sera, respectively. Both proteins were detected by 25 patients sera (83.3%) and 1 normal serum (3.3%). This test showed a relatively high sensitivity and very high specificity of the recombinant E2 proteins to be used as diagnostic antigens against CHIKV infection.

  6. Western blot assay for quantitative and qualitative antigen detection in vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjai; Zheng, Hong; Mahajan, Babita; Kozakai, Yukiko; Morin, Merribeth; Locke, Emily

    2014-05-01

    Immunological methods for quantitative measurement, antigenic characterization, and monitoring the stability of active immunogenic component(s) are a critical need in the vaccine development process. This unit describes an enhanced chemiluminescence-based western blot for quantitative detection of Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP), a major malaria candidate vaccine antigen. The most salient features of this assay are its high sensitivity and reproducibility; it can reliably detect ∼5 to 10 pg PfCSP expressed on native parasites or recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. Although described for a specific vaccine antigen, this assay should be applicable for any antigen-antibody combination for which relevant detection reagents are available. Detailed stepwise experimental procedures and methods for data acquisition and analysis are described. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. Reverse line blot hybridization used to identify hemoprotozoa in Minorcan cattle.

    PubMed

    Almeria, Sonia; Castella, Joaquim; Ferrer, David; Gutierrez, Juan Francisco; Estrada-Pena, Agustin; Sparagano, Olivier

    2002-10-01

    Piroplasmosis, a tick-borne protozoal disease, is an important disease affecting domestic and wild animals. We performed PCR-based reverse line blot hybridization (RLB) assays on blood samples obtained from 133 cattle exposed to ticks in field conditions in Minorca (Balearic Islands, Spain) in three different seasons. The oligonucleotides used were those for Theileria annulata, T. buffeli, T. taurotragi, T. velifera, Babesia bigemina, B. bovis, B. divergens, and B. major. The RLB technique allowed the simultaneous identification of T. annulata, T. buffeli, B. bigemina, and B. bovis as the piroplasms present in cattle in Minorca. Of the 133 animals, only 4 were not infected by any of the studied parasites. The results indicated endemic piroplasm infection in cattle in Minorca; especially important was the presence of T. annulata. The RLB was highly sensitive and allowed the simultaneous detection and identification of the Theileria and Babesia species in carrier cattle, which cannot be achieved by classical identification methods.

  8. Recombinant Dense Granular Protein (GRA5) for Detection of Human Toxoplasmosis by Western Blot

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Xiao Teng; Lau, Yee Ling; Fong, Mun Yik; Nissapatorn, Veeranoot; Andiappan, Hemah

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infects all warm-blooded animals, including humans, causing serious public health problems and great economic loss for the food industry. Commonly used serological tests require costly and hazardous preparation of whole Toxoplasma lysate antigens from tachyzoites. Here, we have evaluated an alternative method for antigen production, which involved a prokaryotic expression system. Specifically, we expressed T. gondii dense granular protein-5 (GRA5) in Escherichia coli and isolated it by affinity purification. The serodiagnostic potential of the purified recombinant GRA5 (rGRA5) was tested through Western blot analysis against 212 human patient serum samples. We found that rGRA5 protein was 100% specific for analysis of toxoplasmosis-negative human sera. Also, rGRA5 was able to detect acute and chronic T. gondii infections (sensitivities of 46.8% and 61.2%, resp.). PMID:24987700

  9. Restoration of antibody binding to blotted meningococcal outer membrane proteins using various detergents.

    PubMed

    Wedege, E; Bryn, K; Frøholm, L O

    1988-10-04

    Restoration of IgG antibody binding to heat-denatured meningococcal outer membrane proteins has been studied on immunoblots with a series of 14 detergents. Nitrocellulose strips with the blotted proteins were incubated with the detergents and sera from human volunteers vaccinated with meningococcal membrane proteins. Zwitterionic and ionic detergents, containing substituted quarternary ammonium or amino groups with a minimum of 10 C atoms in the alkyl chain, restored the antigenicity of the serotype-specific class 2 porin protein. The concentrations of the Zwittergent detergents necessary for activation decreased with increasing alkyl chain length of the homologues. Only zwitterionic detergents renatured the class 1 protein. Both proteins were weakly antigenic in the presence of the nonionic detergents Triton X-100 and Tween 20. Meningococcal lipopolysaccharide restored antibody binding to the porin, but not to the class 1 protein. Similar concentrations of lipopolysaccharides from two other gram-negative bacteria had no effect.

  10. Contribution of a Comparative Western Blot Method to Early Postnatal Diagnosis of Congenital Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Foschi, Claudio; Capretti, Maria Grazia; Nardini, Paola; Compri, Monica; Corvaglia, Luigi Tommaso; Faldella, Giacomo; Cevenini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Serology has a pivotal role in the diagnosis of congenital syphilis (CS), but problems arise because of the passive transfer of IgG antibodies across the placenta. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of a comparative Western blot (WB) method finalized to match the IgG immunological profiles of mothers and their own babies at birth in order to differentiate between passively transmitted maternal antibodies and antibodies synthesized by the infants against Treponema pallidum. Thirty infants born to mothers with unknown or inadequate treatment for syphilis were entered in a retrospective study, conducted at St. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. All of the infants underwent clinical, instrumental, and laboratory examinations, including IgM WB testing. For the retrospective study, an IgG WB assay was performed by blotting T. pallidum antigens onto nitrocellulose sheets and incubating the strips with serum specimens from mother-child pairs. CS was diagnosed in 11 out of the 30 enrolled infants; 9/11 cases received the definitive diagnosis within the first week of life, whereas the remaining two were diagnosed later because of increasing serological test titers. The use of the comparative IgG WB testing performed with serum samples from mother-child pairs allowed a correct CS diagnosis in 10/11 cases. The CS diagnosis was improved by a strategy combining comparative IgG WB results with IgM WB results, leading to a sensitivity of 100%. The comparative IgG WB test is thus a welcome addition to the conventional laboratory methods used for CS diagnosis, allowing identification and adequate treatment of infected infants and avoiding unnecessary therapy of uninfected newborns. PMID:26961856

  11. Rapid detection and differentiation of important Campylobacter spp. in poultry samples by dot blot and PCR.

    PubMed

    Fontanot, Marco; Iacumin, Lucilla; Cecchini, Francesca; Comi, Giuseppe; Manzano, Marisa

    2014-10-01

    The detection of Campylobacter, the most commonly reported cause of foodborne gastroenteritis in the European Union, is very important for human health. The most commonly recognised risk factor for infection is the handling and/or consumption of undercooked poultry meat. The methods typically applied to evaluate the presence/absence of Campylobacter in food samples are direct plating and/or enrichment culture based on the Horizontal Method for Detection and Enumeration of Campylobacter spp. (ISO 10272-1B: 2006) and PCR. Molecular methods also allow for the detection of cells that are viable but cannot be cultivated on agar media and that decrease the time required for species identification. The current study proposes the use of two molecular methods for species identification: dot blot and PCR. The dot blot method had a sensitivity of 25 ng for detection of DNA extracted from a pure culture using a digoxigenin-labelled probe for hybridisation; the target DNA was extracted from the enrichment broth at 24 h. PCR was performed using a pair of sensitive and specific primers for the detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli after 24 h of enrichment in Preston broth. The initial samples were contaminated by 5 × 10 C. jejuni cells/g and 1.5 × 10(2)C. coli cells/g, thus the number of cells present in the enrichment broth at 0 h was 1 or 3 cell/g, respectively.

  12. Evaluation of the Western blotting method for the diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Capobiango, Jaqueline Dario; Monica, Thaís Cabral; Ferreira, Fernanda Pinto; Mitsuka-Breganó, Regina; Navarro, Italmar Teodorico; Garcia, João Luis; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci

    To evaluate the Western blotting method for the detection of IgG anti-Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) (IgG-WB) in the serum of children with suspected congenital toxoplasmosis. We accompanied 47 mothers with acquired toxoplasmosis in pregnancy and their children, between June of 2011 and June of 2014. The IgG-WB was done in house and the test was considered positive if the child had antibodies that recognized at least one band on IgG blots different from the mother's or with greater intensity than the corresponding maternal band, during the first three months of life. 15 children (15.1%) met the criteria for congenital toxoplasmosis and 32 (32.3%) had the diagnosis excluded. The symptoms were observed in 12 (80.0%) children and the most frequent were cerebral calcification in 9 (60.0%), chorioretinitis in 8 (53.3%), and hydrocephalus in 4 (26.6%). IgM antibodies anti-T. gondii detected by chemiluminescence (CL) were found in 6 (40.0%) children and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of T. gondii DNA was positive in 5 of 7 performed (71.4%). The sensitivity of IgG-WB was of 60.0% [95% confidence interval (CI) 32.3-83.7%] and specificity 43.7% (95% CI 26.7-62.3%). The sensitivity of IgG-WB increased to 76.0 and 89.1% when associated to the research of IgM anti-T. gondii or PCR, respectively. The IgG-WB showed greater sensitivity than the detection of IgM anti-T. gondii; therefore, it can be used for the diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis in association with other congenital infection markers. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative evaluation of western blotting in hepatic and pulmonary cystic echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Akisu, C; Delibas, S B; Bicmen, C; Ozkoc, S; Aksoy, U; Turgay, N

    2006-12-01

    Many serological tests are widely used in the diagnosis of cystic echinococcosis (CE), caused by the larval stages of Echinococcus granulosus. The present study was carried for differentiation between hepatic and pulmonary cystic echinococcosis by Western Blotting (WB). A total of 121 sera from patients with hepatic CE (37), pulmonary CE (31) and controls (53; consisting of six healthy, seven Hymenolepis nana infection, 20 hepatic and 20 pulmonary diseases other than CE) were examined. In all of the CE patients, E. gronulosus infection was confirmed by surgical intervention. Sera were previously tested using IHA and ELISA to detect the E. gronulosus specific antibodies. Sera from hepatic cases of CE reacted with 16 polypeptides of 6-116 kDa and sera from pulmonary cases of CE reacted with 14 polypeptides of 4-130 kDa by Western Blotting. The WB test enabled the detection of antibodies in the hepatic CE samples for proteins of 24, 32 34, 44-46 and 52-54 kDa in molecular weight in 78.4%, 75.7%, 78.4% and 89.2% of the patients, respectively. In the pulmonary CE samples sera WB test enabled the detection of antibodies 24, 44-46, 100, 110, 116 and 120 124 kDa in molecular weight in 81.3%, 75.0%, 87.5%, 71.9%, 84.4% and 65.6% of the patients, respectively. We indicated that the antigenic components of high molecular weight can be good candidates for differentiation of hepatic CE from pulmonary CE.

  14. Contribution of a Comparative Western Blot Method to Early Postnatal Diagnosis of Congenital Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, Antonella; Foschi, Claudio; Capretti, Maria Grazia; Nardini, Paola; Compri, Monica; Corvaglia, Luigi Tommaso; Faldella, Giacomo; Cevenini, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Serology has a pivotal role in the diagnosis of congenital syphilis (CS), but problems arise because of the passive transfer of IgG antibodies across the placenta. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of a comparative Western blot (WB) method finalized to match the IgG immunological profiles of mothers and their own babies at birth in order to differentiate between passively transmitted maternal antibodies and antibodies synthesized by the infants against Treponema pallidum Thirty infants born to mothers with unknown or inadequate treatment for syphilis were entered in a retrospective study, conducted at St. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. All of the infants underwent clinical, instrumental, and laboratory examinations, including IgM WB testing. For the retrospective study, an IgG WB assay was performed by blotting T. pallidum antigens onto nitrocellulose sheets and incubating the strips with serum specimens from mother-child pairs. CS was diagnosed in 11 out of the 30 enrolled infants; 9/11 cases received the definitive diagnosis within the first week of life, whereas the remaining two were diagnosed later because of increasing serological test titers. The use of the comparative IgG WB testing performed with serum samples from mother-child pairs allowed a correct CS diagnosis in 10/11 cases. The CS diagnosis was improved by a strategy combining comparative IgG WB results with IgM WB results, leading to a sensitivity of 100%. The comparative IgG WB test is thus a welcome addition to the conventional laboratory methods used for CS diagnosis, allowing identification and adequate treatment of infected infants and avoiding unnecessary therapy of uninfected newborns. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. TSE strain differentiation in mice by immunohistochemical PrP(Sc) profiles and triplex Western blot.

    PubMed

    van Keulen, Lucien J M; Langeveld, Jan P M; Dolstra, Corry H; Jacobs, Jorg; Bossers, Alex; van Zijderveld, Fred G

    2015-10-01

    TSE strains are routinely identified by their incubation period and vacuolation profile in the brain after intracerebral inoculation and serial passaging in inbred mouse lines. There are some major drawbacks to this method that are related to the variation in vacuolation that exists in the brains of mice infected with the same TSE strain and to variation between observers and laboratories in scoring vacuolation and determining the final incubation period. We investigated the potential of PrP(Sc) immunohistochemistry and triplex Western blotting as possible alternative methods to differentiate between TSE strains. TSE reference strains ME7, 87A/87V, 22A/22C, 79A/79V and 301C/301V were intracerebrally inoculated in RIII or VM inbred mice that differ in their PrP genotype. Immunohistochemical PrP(Sc) profiles were drawn up by scanning light microscopy both on coronal and sagittal sections. On the basis of the localization of PrP(Sc) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex and the overall type of PrP(Sc) staining, all TSE strains could be well differentiated from each other through their typical strain dependent characteristics. In addition, Western blot showed that the combination of glycosylation profile and 12B2 epitope content of PrP(Sc) allowed to distinguish between all reference strains except for ME7 and 22A in VM mice. TSE strains in mice can be identified on the basis of their PrP(Sc) profile alone. The potential to identify TSE strains in ruminants with these PrP(Sc) profiles after a single primary passage in mice will be the topic of future studies. © 2014 British Neuropathological Society.

  16. Optimization of dot blot method to detect bcr/abl transcripts in chronic myeloid leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Tharapel, S.A.; Zhao, J.

    1994-09-01

    Detection of abl-bcr fusion transcripts using molecular methodologies is becoming an attractive alternative (or supplement) to traditional cytogenetics in identifying the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. Among these methods, RT-PCR technique has provided an extremely powerful tool for improving the detection of bcr/abl translocations through enzymatic amplification of the reverse-transcribed cDNA. The analysis of PCR products can be accomplished by a number of techniques including dot blot following liquid-phase hybridization. In order to render the detection of PCR products more simple, accurate and efficient, and therefore more amenable for the clinical laboratory routine use, we optimized several parameters of the procedure. (1) We discovered that with the starting material of 1 ug of total RNA, the amount of the final PCR amplified products was linear to the PCR cycles between 20 to 30 cycles. Since the dot blot procedure does not separate the amplified products according to their sizes, increased background would increase the false positive rate. (2) If a detection sensitivity of 1 in 10{sup 3} cells is sufficient, then the nested or a second PCR amplification is not necessary. (3) Starting material more than 5 ug of total RNA would decrease the amplification efficiency and therefore compromise the sensitivity. (4) Ten minutes of hybridization gave equal signal intensity as 24 hours. (5) The ionic strength and temperature in the washing step were also tested. Upon optimization of each parameter, the detection procedure was tested on 18 clinical samples. Compared to the procedures that are currently available, our optimized procedure is less time consuming, has higher sensitivity and lower false positive rate. This method has the potential to be automated and therefore can be used as a screening method for Ph chromosome in high volume settings.

  17. Western blot diagnosis of vivax malaria with multiple stage-specific antigens of the parasite

    PubMed Central

    Son, Eui-Sun; Kim, Tong Soo

    2001-01-01

    Western blot analysis was performed to diagnose vivax malaria using stage-specific recombinant antigens. Genomic DNA from the whole blood of a malaria patient was used as templates to amplify the coding regions for the antigenic domains of circumsporozoite protein (CSP-1), merozoite surface protein (MSP-1), apical merozoite antigen (AMA-1), serine repeat antigen (SERA), and exported antigen (EXP-1) of Plasmodium vivax. Each amplified DNA fragment was inserted into a pGEX-4T plasmid to induce the expression of GST fusion protein in Escherichia coli by IPTG. The bacterial cell extracts were separated on 10% SDS-PAGE followed by western blot analysis with patient sera which was confirmed by blood smear examination. When applied with patient sera, 147 (91.9%) out of 160 vivax malaria, 12 (92.3%) out of 13 falciparum malaria, and all 9 vivax/falciparum mixed malaria reacted with at least one antigen, while no reactions occurred with 20 normal uninfected sera. In the case of vivax malaria, CSP-1 reacted with 128 (80.0%) sera, MSP-1 with 102 (63.8%), AMA-1 with 128 (80.0%), SERA with 115 (71.9%), and EXP-1 with 89 (55.6%), respectively. We obtained higher detection rates when using 5 antigens (91.9%) rather than using each antigen solely (55.6-80%), a combination of 2 (76.3-87.5%), 3 (85.6-90.6%), or 4 antigens (89.4-91.3%). This method can be applied to serological diagnosis, mass screening in endemic regions, or safety test in transfusion of prevalent vivax malaria. PMID:11441504

  18. Western blot diagnosis of vivax malaria with multiple stage-specific antigens of the parasite.

    PubMed

    Son, E S; Kim, T S; Nam, H W

    2001-06-01

    Western blot analysis was performed to diagnose vivax malaria using stage-specific recombinant antigens. Genomic DNA from the whole blood of a malaria patient was used as templates to amplify the coding regions for the antigenic domains of circumsporozoite protein (CSP-1), merozoite surface protein (MSP-1), apical merozoite antigen (AMA-1), serine repeat antigen (SERA), and exported antigen (EXP-1) of Plasmodium vivax. Each amplified DNA fragment was inserted into a pGEX-4T plasmid to induce the expression of GST fusion protein in Escherichia coli by IPTG. The bacterial cell extracts were separated on 10% SDS-PAGE followed by western blot analysis with patient sera which was confirmed by blood smear examination. When applied with patient sera, 147 (91.9%) out of 160 vivax malaria, 12 (92.3%) out of 13 falciparum malaria, and all 9 vivax/falciparum mixed malaria reacted with at least one antigen, while no reactions occurred with 20 normal uninfected sera. In the case of vivax malaria, CSP-1 reacted with 128 (80.0%) sera, MSP-1 with 102 (63.8%), AMA-1 with 128 (80.0%), SERA with 115 (71.9%), and EXP-1 with 89 (55.6%), respectively. We obtained higher detection rates when using 5 antigens (91.9%) rather than using each antigen solely (55.6-80%), a combination of 2 (76.3-87.5%), 3 (85.6-90.6%), or 4 antigens (89.4-91.3%). This method can be applied to serological diagnosis, mass screening in endemic regions, or safety test in transfusion of prevalent vivax malaria.

  19. Development of a monoclonal antibody-based colony blot immunoassay for detection of thermotolerant Campylobacter species.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongsheng; Phipps-Todd, Beverley; McMahon, Tanis; Elmgren, Catherine L; Lutze-Wallace, Cheryl; Todd, Zoe A; Garcia, Manuel M

    2016-11-01

    Campylobacter species, particularly thermotolerant Campylobacter spp., such as C. jejuni, are major human foodborne pathogens. Culture methods have been routinely used for the detection of this organism in various types of samples. An alternative, simple and rapid confirmation test(s) without further tedious biochemical tests would be useful. Meanwhile, Campylobacter-like colonies can be difficult to identify on agar plates overgrown with competitive bacteria, which can lead to false-negative results. This study was to develop a simple colony blot immunoassay using a new monoclonal antibody (Mab) produced in the present study for rapid screening, confirmation and quantification of campylobacters on culture agar plates. The procedure developed in this study was able to specifically detect thermotolerant Campylobacter spp., but not other non-thermotolerant Campylobacter and non-Campylobacter reference strains tested. This assay could detect 10(5) cells in a single dot. This assay showed 100% correlation with the culture method for the blotted membranes from 21 either chicken meat or vegetable samples experimentally inoculated with thermotolerant campylobacters. Among 101 natural samples of chicken meat (n=44), chicken feces (n=20) and vegetables (n=37), this assay also showed positive for 23 chicken meat and 14 fecal samples that were positive for thermotolerant campylobacters by culture method, and identified four additional suspects that were culture negative. Membranes stored at 4°C for at least 4years could also be used for this assay. The assay developed in this study can be used in quantitative study for immediate or archival usage, and for diagnostic test to preliminarily confirm the presence of thermotolerant Campylobacter on agar plates. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. COMBINING PROTEIN AND mRNA QUANTIFICATION TO DECIPHER TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Heng; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A.; Figard, Lauren; Sokac, Anna Marie; Golding, Ido

    2015-01-01

    We combine immunofluorescence and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH), followed by automated image analysis, to quantify the concentration of nuclear transcription factors, number of transcription factors bound, and number of nascent mRNAs synthesized at individual gene loci. A theoretical model is used to decipher how transcription-factor binding modulates the stochastic kinetics of mRNA production. We demonstrate this approach by examining the regulation of hunchback in the early Drosophila embryo. PMID:26098021

  1. Spectroscopic detection of fluorescent protein marker gene activity in genetically modified plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, O. W.; Chong, Jenny P. C.; Asundi, Anand K.

    2005-04-01

    This work focuses on developing a portable fibre optic fluorescence analyser for rapid identification of genetically modified plants tagged with a fluorescent marker gene. Independent transgenic tobacco plant lines expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene were regenerated following Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Molecular characterisation of these plant lines was carried out at the DNA level by PCR screening to confirm their transgenic status. Conventional transgene expression analysis was then carried out at the RNA level by RT-PCR and at the protein level by Western blotting using anti-GFP rabbit antiserum. The amount of plant-expressed EGFP on a Western blot was quantified against known amounts of purified EGFP by scanning densitometry. The expression level of EGFP in transformed plants was found to range from 0.1 - 0.6% of total extractable protein. A comparison between conventional western analysis of transformants and direct spectroscopic quantification using the fibre optic fluorescence analyser was made. The results showed that spectroscopic measurements of fluorescence emission from strong EGFP expressors correlated positively with Western blot data. However, the fluorescence analyser was also able to identify weakly expressing plant transformants below the detection limit of colorimetric Western blotting.

  2. Cytoplasmic mRNA turnover and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Borbolis, Fivos; Syntichaki, Popi

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) turnover that determines the lifetime of cytoplasmic mRNAs is a means to control gene expression under both normal and stress conditions, whereas its impact on ageing and age-related disorders has just become evident. Gene expression control is achieved at the level of the mRNA clearance as well as mRNA stability and accessibility to other molecules. All these processes are regulated by cis-acting motifs and trans-acting factors that determine the rates of translation and degradation of transcripts. Specific messenger RNA granules that harbor the mRNA decay machinery or various factors, involved in translational repression and transient storage of mRNAs, are also part of the mRNA fate regulation. Their assembly and function can be modulated to promote stress resistance to adverse conditions and over time affect the ageing process and the lifespan of the organism. Here, we provide insights into the complex relationships of ageing modulators and mRNA turnover mechanisms. PMID:26432921

  3. Choreography of molecular movements during ribosome progression along mRNA.

    PubMed

    Belardinelli, Riccardo; Sharma, Heena; Caliskan, Neva; Cunha, Carlos E; Peske, Frank; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V

    2016-04-01

    During translation elongation, ribosome translocation along an mRNA entails rotations of the ribosomal subunits, swiveling motions of the small subunit (SSU) head and stepwise movements of the tRNAs together with the mRNA. Here, we reconstructed the choreography of the collective motions of the Escherichia coli ribosome during translocation promoted by elongation factor EF-G, by recording the fluorescence signatures of nine different reporters placed on both ribosomal subunits, tRNA and mRNA. We captured an early forward swiveling of the SSU head taking place while the SSU body rotates in the opposite, clockwise direction. Backward swiveling of the SSU head starts upon tRNA translocation and continues until the post-translocation state is reached. This work places structures of translocation intermediates along a time axis and unravels principles of the motions of macromolecular machines.

  4. HIV‑2 antibody detection after indeterminate or negative HIV‑1 Western blot in Cuba, 2005-2008.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Dervel F; Ortiz, Eva; Martín, Dayamí; Nibot, Carmen; Rizo, Adis; Silva, Eladio

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Differentiating between HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection is the first step to understanding HIV transmission, epidemiology and pathogenesis in geographical areas where both viruses circulate. In Cuba, positive results in mixed HIV-1/2 screening assays are confirmed by HIV-1 Western blot. Indeterminate results constitute the main limitation of this test and HIV-2 infection is among their possible causes; hence the importance of second-stage screening and confirmatory tests for HIV-2 infection. OBJECTIVE Investigate the contribution of HIV-2 antibodies to negative or indeterminate HIV-1 Western blot results in serum samples from 2005 through 2008 in Cuba. METHODS HIV-2 reactivity was studied using the ELISA DAVIH-VIH-2 diagnostic kit (Cuba) in 1723 serum samples with negative or indeterminate results for HIV-1 Western blot from January 2005 through December 2008. Duplicate sera reactive by ELISA were confirmed by HIV-2 Western blot, results interpreted according to WHO criteria. The epidemiological interview established by Cuba's National Program for Prevention and Control Sexually-Transmitted Diseases and HIV/AIDS was applied to HIV-2 Western blot-positive patients. RESULTS Among all sera studied, HIV-2 ELISA identified 12 reactive serum samples (0.70%) and 1711 non-reactive (99.30%). Western blot analysis of the 12 ELISA-reactive samples confirmed two positive samples (16.67%), 4 negative (33.33%) and 6 indeterminate (50%). Positive samples reacted against the p16, p26, gp36, p53, p56, p68 and gp105 proteins. All 12 ELISA-reactive samples belonged to the HIV-1 Western blot indeterminate group. The two HIV-2-positive samples showed well defined reactivity to gp160, p53, p55 and p34 of HIV-1. HIV-1 seroconversion was observed in all 10 remaining samples during serological followup. CONCLUSIONS Two new HIV-2 seropositive cases were diagnosed using DAVIH-VIH-2 and HIV-2 Western blot in indeterminate HIV-1 Western blot samples. Results support the recommendation

  5. Effects of Electro-Acupuncture on Ovarian P450arom, P450c17α and mRNA Expression Induced by Letrozole in PCOS Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huangan; Zhao, Jimeng; Cui, Yunhua; Liu, Huirong; Wu, Lingxiang; Shi, Yin; Zhu, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Hyperandrogenism is a core factor in the series of reproductive and endocrine metabolic disorders involved in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Abnormalities in enzymatic activity and the expression of ovarian granular cell layer P450arom and theca cell P450c17α can lead to an atypical environment of local ovarian hormones, including excessive androgen levels. Rat models prepared with letrozole exhibit similar endocrine and histological changes to those that occur in human PCOS. We used such a model to study the role of electro-acupuncture (EA) in regulating ovarian P450arom and P450c17α enzymatic activity and mRNA expression in PCOS rats. Female Sprague Dawley (SD) rats aged 42 days were randomly divided into 3 groups (control, PCOS, and PCOS EA) consisting of 10 rats each. The PCOS and PCOS EA groups were administered a gavage of 1.0 mg/kg−1 of letrozole solution once daily for 21 consecutive days. Beginning in the ninth week, the PCOS EA group was administered low-frequency EA treatment daily for 14 consecutive days. After the treatment, we obtained the following results. The estrous cycles were restored in 8 of the 10 rats in the PCOS EA group, and their ovarian morphologies and ultrastructures normalized. The peripheral blood measurements (with ELISA) showed significantly decreased androgens (i.e., androstenedione and testosterone) with significantly increased estrogens (i.e., estrone, estradiol) and increased P450arom with decreased P450C17α. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting methods showed enhanced expression of ovarian granular cell layer P450arom as well as decreased expression of theca cell layer P450C17α. Fluorescence quantitative PCR methods showed enhanced expression of ovarian granular cell layer P450arom mRNA as well as decreased expression of theca cell layer P450C17α mRNA. These results may help explain the effects of electro-acupuncture in changing the local ovarian hyperandrogenic environment and improving reproductive and

  6. Quantitative Image Analysis of Single-Molecule mRNA Dynamics in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Rino, José; de Jesus, Ana C; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Single mRNA molecules can be imaged in living cells by a method that consists in genetically inserting binding sites for a bacteriophage protein in the gene of interest. The resulting reporter transgene is then integrated in the genome of cells that express the phage protein fused to a fluorescent tag. Upon transcription, binding of the fluorescent protein to its target sequence makes the RNA visible. With this approach it is possible to track, in real time, the life cycle of a precursor mRNA at the site of transcription in the nucleus and transport of mature mRNA to the cytoplasm. In order to measure the fluorescence associated with individual RNA molecules over time, we developed a semi-automated quantitative image analysis tool termed STaQTool. We describe in detail the implementation and application of the STaQTool software package, which is a generic tool able to process large 4D datasets allowing quantitative studies of different steps in gene expression.

  7. A DNA tetrahedron-based molecular beacon for tumor-related mRNA detection in living cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Nuli; Huang, Jin; Yang, Xiaohai; Yang, Yanjing; Quan, Ke; Wang, He; Ying, Le; Ou, Min; Wang, Kemin

    2016-02-07

    Due to its low cytotoxicity, high resistance to enzymatic degradation, and cellular permeability, a DNA tetrahedron-based molecular beacon (DTMB) is designed for tumor-related TK1 mRNA detection in living cells, where the target sequence can induce the tetrahedron from contraction to extension, resulting in fluorescence restoration.

  8. Rift Valley fever virus NS{sub S} gene expression correlates with a defect in nuclear mRNA export

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Anna Maria; Van Deusen, Nicole M.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.

    2015-12-15

    We investigated the localization of host mRNA during Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that infection with RVFV altered the localization of host mRNA. mRNA accumulated in the nuclei of RVFV-infected but not mock-infected cells. Further, overexpression of the NS{sub S} gene, but not the N, G{sub N} or NS{sub M} genes correlated with mRNA nuclear accumulation. Nuclear accumulation of host mRNA was not observed in cells infected with a strain of RVFV lacking the gene encoding NS{sub S}, confirming that expression of NS{sub S} is likely responsible for this phenomenon. - Highlights: • Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection alters the localization of host mRNA. • mRNA accumulates in the nuclei of RVFV-infected but not mock-infected cells. • NS{sub S} is likely responsible for mRNA relocalization to the nucleus.

  9. UU/UA dinucleotide frequency reduction in coding regions results in increased mRNA stability and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Al-Saif, Maher; Khabar, Khalid S A

    2012-05-01

    UU and UA dinucleotides are rare in mammalian genes and may offer natural selection against endoribonuclease-mediated mRNA decay. This study hypothesized that reducing UU and UA (UW) dinucleotides in the mRNA-coding sequence, including the codons and the dicodon boundaries, may promote resistance to mRNA decay, thereby increasing protein production. Indeed, protein expression from UW-reduced coding regions of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), luciferase, interferon-α, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was higher when compared to the wild-type protein expression. The steady-state level of UW-reduced EGFP mRNA was higher and the mRNA half-life was also longer. Ectopic expression of the endoribonuclease, RNase L, did not reduce the wild type or UW-reduced mRNA. A mutant form of the mRNA decay-promoting protein, tristetraprolin (TTP/ZFP36), which has a point mutation in the zinc-finger domain (C124R), was used. The wild-type EGFP mRNA but not the UW-reduced mRNA responded to the dominant negative action of the C124R ZFP36/TTP mutant. The results indicate the efficacy of the described rational approach to formulate a general scheme for boosting recombinant protein production in mammalian cells.

  10. Heterogeneous expression of protein and mRNA in pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, I D; Kerr, D S; Ho, L; Lusk, M M; Pepin, R A; Javed, A A; Mole, J E; Jesse, B W; Thekkumkara, T J; Pons, G

    1988-01-01

    Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase [pyruvate:lipoamide 2-oxidoreductase (decarboxylating and acceptor-acetylating), EC 1.2.4.1], the first component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, is associated with lactic acidosis and central nervous system dysfunction. Using both specific antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase and cDNAs coding for its two alpha and beta subunits, we characterized pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency in 11 patients. Three different patterns were found on immunologic and RNA blot analyses. (i) Seven patients had immunologically detectable crossreactive material for the alpha and beta proteins of pyruvate dehydrogenase. (ii) Two patients had no detectable crossreactive protein for either the alpha or beta subunit but had normal amounts of mRNA for both alpha and beta subunits. (iii) The remaining two patients also had no detectable crossreactive protein but had diminished amounts of mRNA for the alpha subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase only. These results indicate that loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity may be associated with either absent or catalytically inactive proteins, and in those cases in which this enzyme is absent, mRNA for one of the subunits may also be missing. When mRNA for one of the subunits is lacking, both protein subunits are absent, suggesting that a mutation affecting the expression of one of the subunit proteins causes the remaining uncomplexed subunit to be unstable. The results show that several different mutations account for the molecular heterogeneity of pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency. Images PMID:3140238

  11. Pattern of expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase mRNA in the developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bond, R W; Jansen, K R; Gottlieb, D I

    1988-05-01

    The time and pattern of appearance of glutamic acid decarboxylase (glutamate decarboxylase; EC 4.1.1.15) (GAD) mRNA during the development of the rat brain were analyzed. RNA transfer blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA from whole brain shows that a 3.7-kilobase transcript is the most abundant form of the message from embryonic day 15 (E15) through adulthood. By E15 this form is present at about 50% of its adult abundance relative to other poly(A)+ mRNA species. At birth the abundance is approximately the same as in the adult. In contrast, the enzyme activity level is only 8% of the adult level at birth and takes 3 weeks to reach adult levels. There are qualitative changes in GAD mRNA during development. Several large (7-9 kilobases) transcripts with strong homology to GAD are enriched in early developmental stages but are barely detectable in the adult. A nuclease protection assay shows a developmentally regulated heterogeneity in a coding portion of the mRNA.

  12. Molecular cloning of tomato fruit polygalacturonase: Analysis of polygalacturonase mRNA levels during ripening.

    PubMed

    Dellapenna, D; Alexander, D C; Bennett, A B

    1986-09-01

    The expression of a gene encoding the cell wall-degrading enzyme polygalacturonase [poly(1,4-alpha-D-galacturonide) glucanohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.15] was characterized during tomato fruit ripening. Polygalacturonase was purified from ripe tomato fruit and used to produce highly specific antiserum. Immunoblot analyses detected a 45- and a 46-kDa protein in ripe fruit but immunoprecipitation of in vitro translation products of mRNA from ripe tomato fruit yielded a single 54-kDa polypeptide, suggesting post-translational processing. A plasmid cDNA library was prepared from poly(A)(+) RNA isolated from ripe tomato fruit. The cDNA library was inserted into a lambda-based expression vector, and polygalacturonase cDNA clones were identified by immunological screening. Hybrid-select translation experiments indicated that the cDNAs encode a 54-kDa in vitro translation product that is specifically immunoprecipitated with polygalacturonase antiserum. RNA-blot analysis indicated that the 1.9-kilobase polygalacturonase mRNA was virtually absent from immature-green fruit, accumulated steadily during the ripening process, and was at its highest level in red-ripe fruit. There was at least a 2000-fold increase in the level of polygalacturonase mRNA between immature-green and red-ripe tomato fruit. These studies show that the levels of polygalacturonase mRNA are developmentally regulated during tomato fruit ripening.

  13. Molecular cloning of tomato fruit polygalacturonase: Analysis of polygalacturonase mRNA levels during ripening

    PubMed Central

    DellaPenna, Dean; Alexander, Danny C.; Bennett, Alan B.

    1986-01-01

    The expression of a gene encoding the cell wall-degrading enzyme polygalacturonase [poly(1,4-α-D-galacturonide) glucanohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.15] was characterized during tomato fruit ripening. Polygalacturonase was purified from ripe tomato fruit and used to produce highly specific antiserum. Immunoblot analyses detected a 45- and a 46-kDa protein in ripe fruit but immunoprecipitation of in vitro translation products of mRNA from ripe tomato fruit yielded a single 54-kDa polypeptide, suggesting post-translational processing. A plasmid cDNA library was prepared from poly(A)+ RNA isolated from ripe tomato fruit. The cDNA library was inserted into a λ-based expression vector, and polygalacturonase cDNA clones were identified by immunological screening. Hybrid-select translation experiments indicated that the cDNAs encode a 54-kDa in vitro translation product that is specifically immunoprecipitated with polygalacturonase antiserum. RNA-blot analysis indicated that the 1.9-kilobase polygalacturonase mRNA was virtually absent from immature-green fruit, accumulated steadily during the ripening process, and was at its highest level in red-ripe fruit. There was at least a 2000-fold increase in the level of polygalacturonase mRNA between immature-green and red-ripe tomato fruit. These studies show that the levels of polygalacturonase mRNA are developmentally regulated during tomato fruit ripening. Images PMID:16593752

  14. Dual posttranscriptional regulation via a cofactor-responsive mRNA leader.

    PubMed

    Patterson-Fortin, Laura M; Vakulskas, Christopher A; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2013-10-09

    Riboswitches are cis-acting mRNA elements that regulate gene expression in response to ligand binding. Recently, a class of riboswitches was proposed to respond to the molybdenum cofactor (Moco), which serves as a redox center for metabolic enzymes. The 5' leader of the Escherichia coli moaABCDE transcript exemplifies this candidate riboswitch class. This mRNA encodes enzymes for Moco biosynthesis, and moaA expression is feedback inhibited by Moco. Previous RNA-seq analyses showed that moaA mRNA copurified with the RNA binding protein CsrA (carbon storage regulator), suggesting that CsrA binds to this RNA in vivo. Among its global regulatory roles, CsrA represses stationary phase metabolism and activates central carbon metabolism. Here, we used gel mobility shift analysis to determine that CsrA binds specifically and with high affinity to the moaA 5' mRNA leader. Northern blotting and studies with a series of chromosomal lacZ reporter fusions showed that CsrA posttranscriptionally activates moaA expression without altering moaA mRNA levels, indicative of translation control. Deletion analyses, nucleotide replacement studies and footprinting with CsrA-FeBABE identified two sites for CsrA binding. Toeprinting assays suggested that CsrA binding causes changes in moaA RNA structure. We propose that the moaA mRNA leader forms an aptamer, which serves as a target of posttranscriptional regulation by at least two different factors, Moco and the protein CsrA. While we are not aware of similar dual posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms, additional examples are likely to emerge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dual Posttranscriptional Regulation via a Cofactor-Responsive mRNA Leader

    PubMed Central

    Patterson-Fortin, Laura M.; Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Riboswitches are cis-acting mRNA elements that regulate gene expression in response to ligand binding. Recently, a class of riboswitches was proposed to respond to the molybdenum cofactor (Moco), which serves as a redox center for metabolic enzymes. The 5′ leader of the Escherichia coli moaABCDE transcript exemplifies this candidate riboswitch class. This mRNA encodes enzymes for Moco biosynthesis, and moaA expression is feedback inhibited by Moco. Previous RNA-seq analyses showed that moaA mRNA copurified with the RNA binding protein CsrA (carbon storage regulator), suggesting that CsrA binds to this RNA in vivo. Among its global regulatory roles, CsrA represses stationary phase metabolism and activates central carbon metabolism. Here, we used gel mobility shift analysis to determine that CsrA binds specifically and with high affinity to the moaA 5′ mRNA leader. Northern blotting and studies with a series of chromosomal lacZ reporter fusions showed that CsrA posttranscriptionally activates moaA expression without altering moaA mRNA levels, indicative of translation control. Deletion analyses, nucleotide replacement studies and footprinting with CsrA-FeBABE identified two sites for CsrA binding. Toeprinting assays suggested that CsrA binding causes changes in moaA RNA structure. We propose that the moaA mRNA leader forms an aptamer, which serves as a target of posttranscriptional regulation by at least two different factors, Moco and the protein CsrA. While we are not aware of similar dual posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms, additional examples are likely to emerge. PMID:23274138

  16. Double-blotting: a solution to the problem of nonspecific binding of secondary antibodies in immunoblotting procedures.

    PubMed

    Lasne, Françoise

    2009-01-01

    Nonspecific interactions between blotted proteins and unrelated secondary antibodies generate false positives in immunoblotting techniques. Some procedures have been developed to reduce this adsorption but they may work in specific applications and be ineffective in other ones. "Double-blotting" has been developed to overcome this problem. It consists of interpolating a second blotting step between the usual probings of the blot membrane with the primary antibody and the secondary antibodies. This step, by isolating the primary antibody from the interfering proteins, guarantees the specificity of the probing with the secondary antibody. This method has been developed for the study of erythropoietin in concentrated urine since a strong nonspecific binding of biotinylated secondary antibodies to some urinary proteins is observed using classical immunoblotting protocols. However, its concept makes it usable in other applications that come up against this kind of problem. This method is expected to be especially useful for investigating proteins that are present in minute amounts in complex biological media.

  17. Double-blotting: a solution to the problem of nonspecific binding of secondary antibodies in immunoblotting procedures.

    PubMed

    Lasne, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Nonspecific interactions between blotted proteins and unrelated secondary antibodies generate false positives in immunoblotting techniques. Some procedures have been developed to reduce this adsorption, but they may work in specific applications and be ineffective in others. "Double-blotting" has been developed to overcome this problem. It consists of interpolating a second blotting step between the usual probings of the blot membrane with the primary antibody and the secondary antibodies. This step, by isolating the primary antibody from the interfering proteins, guarantees the specificity of the probing with the secondary antibody. This method has been developed for the study of erythropoietin in concentrated urine since a strong nonspecific binding of biotinylated secondary antibodies to some urinary proteins is observed using classical immunoblotting protocols. However, its concept makes it usable in other applications that come up against this kind of problem. This method is expected to be especially useful for investigating proteins that are present in minute amounts in complex biological media.

  18. Three gene products of a begomovirus-betasatellite complex restore expression of a transcriptionally silenced green fluorescent protein transgene in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Muhammad; Krczal, Gabi; Wassenegger, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Single-stranded DNA geminiviruses replicate via double-stranded DNA intermediates forming mini-chromosomes that are targets for transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) in plants. The ability of the cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus (CLCuKoV)-cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite (CLCuMuB) proteins, replication-associated protein (Rep), transcriptional activator protein (TrAP), C4, V2 and βC1, to suppress TGS was investigated by using the Nicotiana benthamiana line 16-TGS (16-TGS) harbouring a transcriptionally silenced green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene. Inoculation of 16-TGS plants with a recombinant potato virus X vector carrying Rep, TrAP or βC1 resulted in re-expression of GFP. Northern blot analysis confirmed that the observed GFP fluorescence was associated with GFP mRNA accumulation. These results indicated that Rep, TrAP and βC1 proteins of CLCuKoV-CLCuMuB can re-activate the expression of a transcriptionally silenced GFP transgene in N. benthamiana. Although Rep, TrAP, or βC1 proteins have, for other begomoviruses or begomoviruses-betasatellites, been previously shown to have TGS suppressor activity, this is the first report demonstrating that a single begomovirus-betasatellite complex encodes three suppressors of TGS.

  19. Effects of simulated weightlessness on liver Hsp70 and Hsp70mRNA expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yan; Zhou, Jinlian; Li, Chenglin; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Zipei; Yi, Yong; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2010-01-10

    Space flight is known to induce a number of hepatic physiological alterations. In this study, we investigated Hsp70 expressing features of rat liver under simulated weightlessness. Tail-suspension was used to simulate the weightlessness animal model. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 6 experimental groups and Hsp70 protein and mRNA expressions in the liver were detected by Western blot and RT-PCR respectively. The tail-suspension significantly increased Hsp70mRNA expression levels in rat liver (P<0.05). The semi-quantitative PCR showed that Hsp70mRNA was upregulated as early as 6 hours of suspension. Western blot analysis indicated that Hsp70 protein was significantly upregulated in the early stage of suspension as compared with controls (P<0.05). The results suggest that simulated weightlessness acts as a kind of stress to elevate liver Hsp70 expression both at protein and mRNA levels. This may be meaningful in astronaut's trainings by preadaptation to non-damaging stress exposures or other environmental factors to foster the astronaut's ability of weightless tolerance.

  20. Effects of simulated weightlessness on liver Hsp70 and Hsp70mRNA expression in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yan; Zhou, Jinlian; Li, Chenglin; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Zipei; Yi, Yong; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2010-01-01

    Space flight is known to induce a number of hepatic physiological alterations. In this study, we investigated Hsp70 expressing features of rat liver under simulated weightlessness. Tail-suspension was used to simulate the weightlessness animal model. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 6 experimental groups and Hsp70 protein and mRNA expressions in the liver were detected by Western blot and RT-PCR respectively. The tail-suspension significantly increased Hsp70mRNA expression levels in rat liver (P<0.05). The semi-quantitative PCR showed that Hsp70mRNA was upregulated as early as 6 hours of suspension. Western blot analysis indicated that Hsp70 protein was significantly upregulated in the early stage of suspension as compared with controls (P<0.05). The results suggest that simulated weightlessness acts as a kind of stress to elevate liver Hsp70 expression both at protein and mRNA levels. This may be meaningful in astronaut's trainings by preadaptation to non-damaging stress exposures or other environmental factors to foster the astronaut's ability of weightless tolerance. PMID:20369040

  1. Hormonal modulation of branchial Na+-K+-ATPase subunit mRNA in a marine teleost Sparus sarba.

    PubMed

    Deane, E E; Kelly, S P; Woo, N Y

    1999-01-01

    The effect of hormone treatment on the abundance of Na+-K+-ATPase alpha- and beta-subunit mRNA in Sparus sarba branchial tissue was investigated. Groups of seawater (33/1000) and hypo-osmotic (6/1000) acclimated fish were injected daily, with either saline, cortisol, recombinant bream growth hormone (rbGH) or ovine prolactin (oPRL). Total RNA from branchial tissue was analyzed by Northern blotting using PCR amplified Na+-K+-ATPase alpha- and beta-subunit cDNA clones. Na+-K+-ATPase alpha- and beta- subunit transcripts of 3.3kb and 2.4kb respectively, were detected and their abundance, after hormone treatment was assessed using RNA dot blots. The abundance of subunit mRNAs increased 1.4-1.9 fold, relative to controls, after cortisol treatment. The alpha:beta mRNA ratio also increased in cortisol treated seawater acclimated fish. Growth hormone treatment did not cause any significant changes in Na+-K+-ATPase subunit mRNA, whereas prolactin significantly reduced alpha-subunit mRNA levels by approximately 0.5 fold in both seawater and hypo-osmotic conditions. The data from this study add further support to the generally accepted roles that cortisol and prolactin have in the modulation of Na+-K+-ATPase activity. It can be concluded from this study that S. sarba branchial Na+-K+-ATPase subunit expression is multihormonally regulated.

  2. Suppression of prostaglandin E(2)-mediated c-fos mRNA induction by interleukin-4 in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, D; Kawajiri, H; Takahashi, Y; Yoshimoto, T

    2000-03-01

    When murine peritoneal macrophages were stimulated for 30 min with arachidonic acid, the growth-associated immediate early gene c-fos was induced in a concentration-dependent manner as assessed by Northern blot analysis. The arachidonic acid-induced c-fos mRNA expression was inhibited by a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, but not by a lipoxygenase inhibitor, nordihydroguaiaretic acid. Macrophages produced prostaglandin (PG) E(2) from arachidonic acid as determined by an enzyme immunoassay. Northern blot analysis revealed the expression of PGE receptor EP2 and EP4 subtypes, but not EP1 and EP3 in murine macrophages. PGE(2) brought about a marked elevation of cAMP, and c-fos mRNA expression was increased by PGE(2) and dibutyryl cAMP in these cells. These results suggest that arachidonic acid is transformed to PGE(2), which then binds to EP2 and EP4 receptors to increase intracellular cAMP and c-fos mRNA expression. Furthermore, the induction of c-fos by arachidonic acid, PGE(2), and cAMP was suppressed by pretreatment with interleukin (IL)-4. We also showed that the tyrosine phosphorylation of a Janus kinase, JAK3, is enhanced by IL-4 treatment, suggesting that the PGE(2)-mediated c-fos mRNA induction is inhibited by IL-4 through the tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK3.

  3. Quantitative assessment of hTERT mRNA expression in dysplastic nodules of HBV-related hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Bong-Kyeong; Kim, Young-Joo; Park, Young Nyun; Choi, Jinsub; Kim, Kyung Sik; Park, Chanil

    2006-04-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is the rate-limiting determinant of telomerase, which is critical for carcinogenesis. Dysplastic nodules (DNs) appear to be preneoplastic lesions of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). In this study, in order to characterize DNs, hTERT mRNA, hTERT gene dosage, and mRNA for c-myc, a transcriptional activator of hTERT were studied in human multi-step hepatocarcinogenesis. Fifty four hepatic nodules including 5 large regenerative nodules, 14 low-grade DNs, 7 high-grade DNs, 11 DNs with HCC foci and 17 HCCs, 23 livers with chronic hepatitis/cirrhosis, and 6 normal livers were examined. Transcript levels were measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR and gene dosages by real-time PCR and Southern blotting. The hTERT mRNA levels increased with the progression of hepatocarcinogenesis, and a significant induction in the transition between low- and high-grade DNs was seen. Most high-grade DNs strongly expressed hTERT mRNA at levels similar to those of HCCs. Twenty-one percent of low-grade DNs had high levels of hTERT mRNA, up to those of high-grade DNs and there was no difference in the pathological features between low-grade DNs with and without increased hTERT mRNA levels. No correlation was found between hTERT mRNA levels, hTERT gene dosage, and c-myc mRNA levels. These results suggest that the induction of hTERT mRNA is an important early event and that its measurement by real-time quantitative RT-PCR is a useful tool to detect premalignant/malignant tendencies in hepatic nodules. However, hTERT gene dosage and c-myc expression are not the main mechanisms regulating hTERT expression in hepatocarcinogenesis.

  4. β-actin as a loading control for plasma-based Western blot analysis of major depressive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rufang; Yang, Deyu; Zhou, Chanjuan; Cheng, Ke; Liu, Zhao; Chen, Liang; Fang, Liang; Xie, Peng

    2012-08-15

    Western blot analysis is a commonly used technique for determining specific protein levels in clinical samples. For normalization of protein levels in Western blot, a suitable loading control is required. On account of its relatively high and constant expression, β-actin has been widely employed in Western blot of cell cultures and tissue extracts. However, β-actin's presence in human plasma and this protein's putative role as a plasma-based loading control for Western blot analysis remain unknown. In this study, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine the concentration of β-actin in human plasma, which is 6.29±0.54 ng/ml. In addition, the linearity of β-actin immunostaining and loaded protein amount was evaluated by Western blot, and a fine linearity (R²=0.974±0.012) was observed. Furthermore, the expression of plasma β-actin in major depressive disorder subjects and healthy controls was compared. The data revealed no statistically significant difference between these two groups. Moreover, the total coefficient of variation for β-actin expression in the two groups was 9.2±1.2%. These findings demonstrate that β-actin is present in human plasma and may possibly be used as a suitable loading control for plasma-based Western blot analysis in major depressive disorder. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Polysome immunoprecipitation of phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA from rat liver and cloning of its cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Robson, K J; Chandra, T; MacGillivray, R T; Woo, S L

    1982-01-01

    The mRNA for phenylalanine hydroxylase (phenylalanine 4-monooxygenase, EC 1.14.16.1) has been purified from total rat liver mRNAs, of which it constitutes less than 0.25%, to greater than 10% purity in a single step by specific polysome immunoprecipitation. The purified mRNA was used for synthesis and cloning of its cDNA. Recombinant colonies containing phenylalanine hydroxylase DNA sequences were identified by differential hybridization, hybrid-selected translation, and blot hybridization analysis. The rat cDNA clone was capable of hybridizing with human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA, which will permit the isolation of the corresponding human gene for analysis of phenylketonuria, a hereditary disorder in phenylalanine metabolism that causes permanent mental retardation in humans. Images PMID:6750607

  6. Zinc metallothionein (MT) induction by parenteral iron and endotoxin: A temporal analysis of hepatic MT mRNA changes

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, C.C. )

    1991-03-15

    The present study was undertaken to compare the temporal characteristics of iron-induced hepatic MT mRNA accumulation to that effected by endotoxin. Young chicks were given (ip) either endotoxin, ferrous gluconate or an equivalent volume of saline. At various times following injections, liver was obtained from 5 chicks per treatment for total RNA extraction. Equal amounts of total hepatic RNA from each chick were pooled and 10 {mu}g separated by denaturing agarose gel electrophoresis. Hepatic MT mRNA and albumin mRNA were analyzed by Northern blot analysis using synthetic oligonucleotides. The results indicated little temporal difference in the accumulation of hepatic MT mRNA as affected by either endotoxin or iron. In both treatments, MT mRNA was minimally affected at 3 hours post-injection. Maximum accumulation was achieved during a 6 h period from 6 to 12 hours post-injection. At 24 hours, MT mRNA was considerably higher in liver of endotoxin-injected chicks when compared to that of iron-injection chicks. Albumin expression appeared not to be substantially affected by either treatment. The results suggest that the induction of hepatic MT by iron injection is not substantially different than that observed following endotoxin administration. It would be speculative to suggest that the processes by which MT is induced under these conditions are also similar.

  7. Alternative splicing of PSP94 (prostatic secretory protein of 94 amino acids) mRNA in prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    Xuan, J W; Chin, J L; Guo, Y; Chambers, A F; Finkelman, M A; Clarke, M W

    1995-09-21

    While performing reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of total mRNA from prostate cancer specimens, two forms of PSP94 cDNA were detected. RT-PCR products were analysed by Southern blotting and probing with exon-specific oligonucleotides. In the short form of PSP94 mRNA, designated as PSP57, exon III was found to be deleted. The two mRNA forms were confirmed by cloning and sequencing of the RT-PCR products and were found to result from alternative splicing. The alternatively spliced form, PSP57, was characterized by sequence analysis. PSP94 and PSP57 possess identical exons I and II, including identical secretion signal peptide and the 5' untranslated sequences. PSP57 has a frame-shifted exon IV and encodes a putative 57 amino acid protein with a novel, highly basic C-terminus of 41 amino acids. PSP57 mRNA was detected in other urogenital tissues (kidney, bladder) and in most tumor cell lines tested, but was not detectable in other tissues such as breast and lung. In prostate tumor cell lines, PSP57 mRNA was aberrantly spliced and localized in the nuclear fraction of the cell. Our results suggest the possible existence of a novel PSP protein that originates from alternative splicing of PSP94 mRNA in urogenital tissues.

  8. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  9. A Fluorescence Lecture Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzelli, Joseph W.; Kemp, Marwin

    1982-01-01

    Describes fluorescence demonstrations related to several aspects of molecular theory and quantitized energy levels. Demonstrations use fluorescent chemical solutions having luminescence properties spanning the visible spectrum. Also describes a demonstration of spontaneous combustion of familiar substances in chlorine. (JN)

  10. A Fluorescence Lecture Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzelli, Joseph W.; Kemp, Marwin

    1982-01-01

    Describes fluorescence demonstrations related to several aspects of molecular theory and quantitized energy levels. Demonstrations use fluorescent chemical solutions having luminescence properties spanning the visible spectrum. Also describes a demonstration of spontaneous combustion of familiar substances in chlorine. (JN)

  11. Interactions between the HIV-1 Unspliced mRNA and Host mRNA Decay Machineries

    PubMed Central

    Toro-Ascuy, Daniela; Rojas-Araya, Bárbara; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) unspliced transcript is used both as mRNA for the synthesis of structural proteins and as the packaged genome. Given the presence of retained introns and instability AU-rich sequences, this viral transcript is normally retained and degraded in the nucleus of host cells unless the viral protein REV is present. As such, the stability of the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA must be particularly controlled in the nucleus and the cytoplasm in order to ensure proper levels of this viral mRNA for translation and viral particle formation. During its journey, the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA assembles into highly specific messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) containing many different host proteins, amongst which are well-known regulators of cytoplasmic mRNA decay pathways such as up-frameshift suppressor 1 homolog (UPF1), Staufen double-stranded RNA binding protein 1/2 (STAU1/2), or components of miRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC) and processing bodies (PBs). More recently, the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA was shown to contain N6-methyladenosine (m6A), allowing the recruitment of YTH N6-methyladenosine RNA binding protein 2 (YTHDF2), an m6A reader host protein involved in mRNA decay. Interestingly, these host proteins involved in mRNA decay were shown to play positive roles in viral gene expression and viral particle assembly, suggesting that HIV-1 interacts with mRNA decay components to successfully accomplish viral replication. This review summarizes the state of the art in terms of the interactions between HIV-1 unspliced mRNA and components of different host mRNA decay machineries. PMID:27886048

  12. Interactions between the HIV-1 Unspliced mRNA and Host mRNA Decay Machineries.

    PubMed

    Toro-Ascuy, Daniela; Rojas-Araya, Bárbara; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo

    2016-11-23

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) unspliced transcript is used both as mRNA for the synthesis of structural proteins and as the packaged genome. Given the presence of retained introns and instability AU-rich sequences, this viral transcript is normally retained and degraded in the nucleus of host cells unless the viral protein REV is present. As such, the stability of the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA must be particularly controlled in the nucleus and the cytoplasm in order to ensure proper levels of this viral mRNA for translation and viral particle formation. During its journey, the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA assembles into highly specific messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) containing many different host proteins, amongst which are well-known regulators of cytoplasmic mRNA decay pathways such as up-frameshift suppressor 1 homolog (UPF1), Staufen double-stranded RNA binding protein 1/2 (STAU1/2), or components of miRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC) and processing bodies (PBs). More recently, the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA was shown to contain N⁶-methyladenosine (m⁶A), allowing the recruitment of YTH N⁶-methyladenosine RNA binding protein 2 (YTHDF2), an m⁶A reader host protein involved in mRNA decay. Interestingly, these host proteins involved in mRNA decay were shown to play positive roles in viral gene expression and viral particle assembly, suggesting that HIV-1 interacts with mRNA decay components to successfully accomplish viral replication. This review summarizes the state of the art in terms of the interactions between HIV-1 unspliced mRNA and components of different host mRNA decay machineries.

  13. Nucleotide sequence of medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase mRNA and its expression in enzyme-deficient human tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.P.; Kim, J.J.; Billadello, J.J.; Hainline, B.E.; Chu, T.W.; Strauss, A.W.

    1987-06-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase is one of three similar enzymes that catalyze the initial step of fatty acid ..beta..-oxidation. Definition of the primary structure of MCAD and the tissue distribution of its mRNA is of biochemical and clinical importance because of the recent recognition of inherited MCAD deficiency in humans. The MCAD mRNA nucleotide sequence was determined from two overlapping cDNA clones isolated from human liver and placental cDNA libraries, respectively. The MCAD mRNA includes a 1263-base-pair coding region and a 738-base-pair 3'-nontranslated region. A partial amino acid sequence (137 residues) determined on peptides derived from MCAD purified from porcine liver confirmed the identity of the cDNA clone. Comparison of the amino acid sequence predicted from the human MCAD cDNA with the partial protein sequence of the porcine MCAD revealed a high degree (88%) of interspecies sequence identity. RNA blot analysis shows that MCAD mRNA is expressed in a variety of rat (2.2 kilobases) and human (2.4 kilobases) tissues. Blot hybridization of RNA prepared from cultured skin fibroblasts from a patient with MCAD deficiency disclosed that mRNA was present and of similar size of MCAD mRNA derived from control fibroblasts. The isolation and characterization of MCAD cDNA is an important step in the definition of the defect underlying its metabolic consequences.

  14. The prevalence and significance of HTLV-I/II seroindeterminate Western blot patterns.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Anna; Akahata, Yoshimi; Jacobson, Steven

    2011-08-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) infects an estimated 15-20 million persons worldwide. A number of diseases have been associated with the virus including adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), HTLV-I uveitis, and HTLV-I-associated infective dermatitis. Once it was shown that there is an increased risk for developing HAM/TSP associated with blood transfusion, screening for HTLV-1 among blood banks was implemented in Japan, United States, France, and the Netherlands. This process includes detection by an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) followed by a confirmatory Western blot (WB) in which recombinant proteins specific for HTLV-I Env glycoproteins are incorporated into WB strips. HTLV-I seropositive results are defined by the presence of antibodies against either gp46 or gp62/68 (both Env protein bands) and either p19, p24, or p53 (one of the gag bands). HTLV-II seropositivity is confirmed by the presence of rgp46-II. However, numerous cases have been documented in which serum samples are reactive by EIA, but an incomplete banding pattern is displayed by subsequent confirmatory WB. Although the significance of these HTLV-I/II seroindeterminates is unclear, it may suggest a much higher incidence of exposure to HTLV-I/II than previously estimated.

  15. Evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot test for the confirmatory serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Roldán, William H; Espinoza, Yrma A

    2009-05-01

    To improve the serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis, a sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB-IgG) test was developed and evaluated using Toxocara canislarvae excretory-secretory antigens for detecting anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies. The EITB-IgG profile of toxocariasis was characterized by comparing 27 sera from patients with toxocariasis, 110 sera from healthy subjects and 186 sera from patients with other helminth diseases (ascariasis, ancylostomiasis, trichuriasis, enterobiasis, strongyloidiasis, hymenolepiasis, diphyllobothriasis, taeniasis, cysticercosis, hydatidosis and fascioliasis). Antigenic bands of 24, 28, 30, 35, 56, 117, 136 and 152 kDa were predominantly recognized in sera from all patients with toxocariasis. However, only bands of 24-35 kDa were highly specific for Toxocara infection (98.3%), whereas other antigenic bands observed displayed cross-reactivity. Additionally, when the results of the EITB-IgG test were compared to those of the ELISA-IgG test, a 100% concordance was observed for positive results in human toxocariasis cases. The concordance for negative results between the two tests for healthy subjects and patients with other helminth diseases were 96.3% and 53.7%, respectively, showing that the EITB-IgG test has a higher specificity than ELISA. In conclusion, the EITB-IgG test is a very useful tool to confirm the serological diagnosis of human toxocariasis.

  16. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: a universal internal control for Western blots in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yonghong; Wu, Min; He, Guowei; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Weiguang; Gao, Yan; Li, Zhihui; Wang, Zhaoyan; Zhang, Chenggang

    2012-04-01

    In the current study, we examined the expression level of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) protein in a number of organisms and the stability of GAPDH under various conditions. Our results revealed that GAPDH is present in multiple Escherichia coli strains, the yeast strain GS115, Caenorhabditis elegans, rat PC12 cells, and both mouse and rat brain. Furthermore, GAPDH was stably expressed under different concentrations of inducer and at different times of induction in E. coli (BL21) cells and yeast GS115 cells. Stable expression of GAPDH protein was also observed in C.elegans and PC12 cells that were treated with different concentrations of paraquat or sodium sulfite, respectively. In addition, we were able to detect and identify the endogenous gapA protein in E.coli via immunoprecipitation and MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. Endogenous gapA protein and exogenously expressed (subcloned) GAPDH proteins were detected in E. coli BL21 but not for gapC. With the exception of gapC in E. coli, the various isoforms of GAPDH possessed enzymatic activity. Finally, sequence analysis revealed that the GAPDH proteins were 76% identical, with the exception of E. coli gapC. Taken together, our results indicate that GAPDH could be universally used as an internal control for the Western blot analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic samples. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Western blot analysis of antibody response to pneumococcal protein antigens in a murine model of pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Mouneimne, H; Juvin, M; Beretti, J L; Azoulay-Dupuis, E; Vallee, E; Geslin, P; Petitpretz, P; Berche, P; Gaillard, J L

    1997-01-01

    To detect new antigen candidates for serological tests, we studied the antibody response to pneumococcal protein antigens in mice infected intratracheally with various Streptococcus pneumoniae strains. Sera were tested by Western blotting against whole-cell protein extracts. Mice developed a detectable immunoglobulin G-type response against a small number of polypeptides. The antibody response was strain dependent: sera from individuals infected with the same strain gave similar banding patterns on immunoblots. The banding patterns varied with the strain used for infection. However, a band at 36 to 38 kDa was recognized by all reactive sera. This band appeared to correspond to a polypeptide that was antigenically well conserved among the different S. pneumoniae serotypes. An antibody response to this antigen developed in mice irrespective of the capsular type, the virulence, and the susceptibility to penicillin G of the infecting strain. Thus, this 36- to 38-kDa protein antigen may be of value for the development of a serological test for humans. PMID:9384307

  18. Clinical usefulness of Western blotting and ELISA avidity for the diagnosis of human toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Rudzińska, M; Kowalewska, B; Sikorska, K

    2017-01-01

    The serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis is difficult. Specific IgGs detected routinely with ELISA based on Toxocara excretory-secretory (TES) antigens often persist for years at an elevated level, which does not allow either the differentiation between an active and persistent infection or monitoring of the effect of treatment. Additionally, false-positive results may occur in co-infections with other helminths due to cross-reactions. We evaluated the usefulness of an IgG avidity index (AI) and a Western blotting (WB) IgG in the diagnosis of patients suspected of Toxocara infection. We studied 138 subjects who were submitted to serological testing two or more times. Confirmation of an infection by WB was achieved in 73.2% of patients. A high AI was obtained in 89.1% of patients, and low AI and borderline AI were found in only 10.9%. Low and borderline values of AI remained at similar levels in subsequent studies over 2-3 years. The results showed the necessity of obligatory verification of all ELISA IgG positive and questionable results by WB. The index of IgG avidity may be helpful in excluding recent infection, but its usefulness in detecting an active phase of invasion requires further research.

  19. Identification of Yeast V-ATPase Mutants by Western Blots Analysis of Whole Cell Lysates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Belky, Karlett

    2002-11-01

    A biochemistry laboratory was designed for an undergraduate course to help students better understand the link between molecular engineering and biochemistry. Students identified unknown yeast strains with high specificity using SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis of whole cell lysates. This problem-solving exercise is a common application of biochemistry in biotechnology research. Three different strains were used: a wild-type and two mutants for the proton pump vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase). V-ATPases are multisubunit enzymes and the mutants used were deletion mutants; each lacked one structural gene of the complex. After three, three-hour labs, mutant strains were easily identified by the students and distinguished from wild-type cells analyzing the pattern of SDS-PAGE distribution of proteins. Identifying different subunits of one multimeric protein allowed for discussion of the structure and function of this metabolic enzyme, which captured the interest of the students. The experiment can be adapted to other multimeric protein complexes and shows improvement of the described methodology over previous reports, perhaps because the problem and its solution are representative of the type of techniques currently used in research labs.

  20. Serological diagnosis of North American Paragonimiasis by Western blot using Paragonimus kellicotti adult worm antigen.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter U; Curtis, Kurt C; Folk, Scott M; Wilkins, Patricia P; Marcos, Luis A; Weil, Gary J

    2013-06-01

    Abstract. We studied the value of an IgG Western blot (WB) with Paragonimus kellicotti (Pk) antigen for diagnosis of North American paragonimiasis. The test was evaluated with sera from patients with Pk and Paragonimus westermani infections, with control sera from patients with other helminth infections, and sera from healthy Americans. All 11 proven Pk infection sera and two samples from suspected cases that were negative by P. westermani WB at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) contained antibodies to antigens at 34 kDa and at 21/23 kDa. Seven of 7 P. westermani sera contained antibodies to the 34 kDa antigen, but only 2 recognized the 21/23 kDa doublet. No control samples were reactive with these antigens. Antibody reactivity declined after praziquantel treatment. Thus, the P. kellicotti WB appears to be superior to P. westermani WB for diagnosing Pk infections, and it may be useful for assessing responses to treatment.

  1. Serological Diagnosis of North American Paragonimiasis by Western Blot Using Paragonimus kellicotti Adult Worm Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Peter U.; Curtis, Kurt C.; Folk, Scott M.; Wilkins, Patricia P.; Marcos, Luis A.; Weil, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the value of an IgG Western blot (WB) with Paragonimus kellicotti (Pk) antigen for diagnosis of North American paragonimiasis. The test was evaluated with sera from patients with Pk and Paragonimus westermani infections, with control sera from patients with other helminth infections, and sera from healthy Americans. All 11 proven Pk infection sera and two samples from suspected cases that were negative by P. westermani WB at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) contained antibodies to antigens at 34 kDa and at 21/23 kDa. Seven of 7 P. westermani sera contained antibodies to the 34 kDa antigen, but only 2 recognized the 21/23 kDa doublet. No control samples were reactive with these antigens. Antibody reactivity declined after praziquantel treatment. Thus, the P. kellicotti WB appears to be superior to P. westermani WB for diagnosing Pk infections, and it may be useful for assessing responses to treatment. PMID:23589531

  2. HIV-1: absence of infection in subjects with indeterminate western blot.

    PubMed

    Migali, E; Mariotti, D; Lovari, A; Tenani, T; Imperiali, P; Ozzola, G

    1993-01-01

    The search for specific antibodies against the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (Ab anti HIV 1), using an immunoenzymatic test and a subsequent confirmation test (Western Blot-WB) in patients who were previously positive or borderline at the first test, singled out from about 12500 tested subjects, fifteen patients with indeterminate WB (WBi) for the presence of an abnormal band. The presence of p24 was predominant in those WBi (about 50%); generally p24 was the only band found. In all serum samples with WBi, the viral antigen p24 (Ag p24) was absent. In 3 subjects with WBi, after at least six months from the first test, not only did the same pattern persist but also the search for VIH-1 DNA sequence using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) gave a negative result. According to our experience and the literature on the subject, we suggest that patients with low risk of infection and whose WBi does not modify with time have a remote possibility of being infected by HIV.

  3. Genotype-specific RNA probes for direct identification of wild polioviruses by blot hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    De, L; Yang, C F; Da Silva, E; Boshell, J; Cáceres, P; Gómez, J R; Pallansch, M; Kew, O

    1997-01-01

    We have developed RNA probes for the direct identification of wild poliovirus isolates by blot hybridization. The probes are complementary to sequences of the first 30 to 32 codons of VP1, which evolve more extensively (approximately 1.5-fold) than the rest of VP1. To illustrate our general approach, we describe the design of probes specific to each of four major genotypes recently endemic (1981 to 1991) to the Americas: Andean type 1, Brazil type 1, Brazil type 3, and Central America-Mexico type 3. A wild isolate of each genotype was selected according to molecular and epidemiologic criteria to be representative of the principal lineages in circulation. Variable VP1 sequences of the representative isolates were amplified by the reverse transcriptase PCR and were inserted into a plasmid vector containing a T7 promoter. The in vitro transcripts, labeled with digoxigenin, served as probes. These formed stable hybrids only with RNAs of isolates of the corresponding genotypes. Hybrids were detected by a sensitive chemiluminescence assay, capable under normal diagnostic conditions of detecting specific wild poliovirus sequences in samples containing up to a 100-fold excess of Sabin vaccine strain-related sequences of the same serotype. PMID:9350743

  4. A new Western blot assay for the detection of porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV).

    PubMed

    Plotzki, Elena; Keller, Martina; Ivanusic, Daniel; Denner, Joachim

    2016-10-01

    Porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV) may be harmful for human recipients if xenotransplantation using pig cell, tissue or organ will be performed transmitting the virus from donor pigs to human recipients. PCMV is widespread in pigs and closely related to human pathogenic herpesviruses, however there are no data concerning infection of humans. In contrast, recently it had been shown that transplantation of organs from pigs infected with PCMV into non-human primate recipients resulted in a significant reduction of the survival time compared with the transplantation of organs from uninfected pigs. To prevent transmission of PCMV in future pig to human xenotransplantations, sensitive and specific detection methods should be used. Here a new Western blot assay using recombinant proteins corresponding to two domains of the glycoprotein gB of PCMV is described. With this assay, the presence of PCMV-specific antibodies in different pig breeds was analysed. Antibodies were detected in a high percentage of animals, in one breed up to 85%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. An alternative strategy to western blot as a confirmatory diagnostic test for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xia; Wang, Jibao; Gao, Zhiyun; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Ling; Chen, Huichao; Zhang, Tong; Xiao, Lin; Yao, Jun; Xing, Wenge; Qiu, Maofeng; Jiang, Yan

    2017-03-01

    In China, western blot (WB) is the recommended procedure for the diagnosis of HIV infection. However, this technique is time consuming and labor intensive, and its complexity restricts wide application in resource-limited regions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a dry blood spots (DBS)-urine paired enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test, instead of WB, for HIV antibody detection. Plasma, DBS, and urine samples were collected from 1213 subjects from different populations. Two diagnostic testing strategies were conducted in parallel. The equivalence of the paired ELISA and WB strategies was assessed. A diagnosis of HIV was determined in 250 subjects according to the paired ELISA test, and in 249 according to the WB strategy. The discordant case was judged HIV-positive during follow-up. In total, 18 subjects were diagnosed with possible HIV using the paired ELISA test, among whom, 11 subjects tested negative with WB, and one was confirmed to be HIV-positive during follow-up. For the remaining 945 subjects, both strategies indicated a negative result. The kappa test indicated good conformity (kappa=0.954) between the two diagnostic strategies. The DBS-urine paired ELISA could be applied as an alternative to WB in HIV diagnosis, which would be valuable in resource-limited regions owing to the associated affordability and ease of use. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Performance of PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay for detection of rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hye-young; Kim, Hyunjung; Kim, Yeun; Bang, Hyeeun; Kim, Jong-Pill; Hwang, Joo Hwan; Cho, Sang-Nae; Kim, Tae Ue; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2015-10-01

    Drug resistance in Mycobacterium leprae is a significant problem in countries where leprosy is endemic. A sensitive, specific, and high-throughput reverse blot hybridization assay (REBA) for the detection of genotypic resistance to rifampicin (RIF) was designed and evaluated. It has been shown that resistance to RIF in M. leprae involves mutations in the rpoB gene encoding the -subunit of the RNA polymerase. The PCR-REBA simultaneously detects both 6 wild-type regions and 5 different mutations (507 AGC, 513 GTG, 516 TAT, 531 ATG, and 531 TTC) including the most prevalent mutations at positions 507 and 531. Thirty-one clinical isolates provided by Korea Institute of Hansen-s Disease were analyzed by PCR-REBA with RIF resistance of rpoB gene. As a result, missense mutations at codons 507 AGC and 531 ATG with 2-nucleotide substitutions were found in one sample, and a missense mutation at codon 516 TAT and ΔWT6 (deletion of 530-534) was found in another sample. These cases were confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. This rapid, simple, and highly sensitive assay provides a practical alternative to sequencing for genotypic evaluation of RIF resistance in M. leprae.

  7. [Rapid diagnosis of non-deletion alpha-thalassemias by reverse dot blot].

    PubMed

    Li, Li-yan; Mo, Qiu-hua; Xu, Xiang-min

    2003-08-01

    To establish a rapid and convenient method of reverse dot blot (RDB) analysis for detecting the point mutations of non-deletion alpha-thalassemia in Chinese. Label biotin to primers and amplify human alpha2 globin gene selectively, then hybridize PCR products with a set of oligonucleotide probes immobilized on strips, and develop colour to detect non-deletion alpha-thalassemia defects. The PCR system using biotin-labeled primers could specifically amplify a 1085 bp fragment of human alpha2 globin gene which encompasses all six alpha-thalassemia mutations. After being hybridized with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes and colour development, it could simultaneously identify all six types of non-deletion alpha-thalassemias encountered in Chinese. This method does not need semi-nested PCR, and the products amplified by biotinylated primers can be used directly to hybridize with the probes on strips under the identical conditions of hybridization. So, it is a specific and multiplex detection assay for screening non-deletion alpha-thalassemia defects in Chinese.

  8. Digital chemiluminescence imaging of DNA sequencing blots using a charge-coupled device camera.

    PubMed Central

    Karger, A E; Weiss, R; Gesteland, R F

    1992-01-01

    Digital chemiluminescence imaging with a cryogenically cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is used to visualize DNA sequencing fragments covalently bound to a blotting membrane. The detection is based on DNA hybridization with an alkaline phosphatase(AP) labeled oligodeoxyribonucleotide probe and AP triggered chemiluminescence of the substrate 3-(2'-spiro-adamantane)-4-methoxy-4-(3"-phosphoryloxy)phenyl- 1,2-dioxetane (AMPPD). The detection using a direct AP-oligonucleotide conjugate is compared to the secondary detection of biotinylated oligonucleotides with respect to their sensitivity and nonspecific binding to the nylon membrane by quantitative imaging. Using the direct oligonucleotide-AP conjugate as a hybridization probe, sub-attomol (0.5 pg of 2.7 kb pUC plasmid DNA) quantities of membrane bound DNA are detectable with 30 min CCD exposures. Detection using the biotinylated probe in combination with streptavidin-AP was found to be background limited by nonspecific binding of streptavidin-AP and the oligo(biotin-11-dUTP) label in equal proportions. In contrast, the nonspecific background of AP-labeled oligonucleotide is indistinguishable from that seen with 5'-32P-label, in that respect making AP an ideal enzymatic label. The effect of hybridization time, probe concentration, and presence of luminescence enhancers on the detection of plasmid DNA were investigated. Images PMID:1480487

  9. Conservation of repetitive DNA sequences in deer species studied by southern blot transfer.

    PubMed

    Lima-de-Faria, A; Arnason, U; Widegren, B; Essen-Möller, J; Isaksson, M; Olsson, E; Jaworska, H

    1984-01-01

    The Cervidae show one of the largest variations in chromosome number found within a mammalian family. The five species of the deer family which are the subject of this study vary in chromosome number from 2n = 70 to 2n = 6. Digestion with the restriction enzymes EcoRI, HpaII, HaeIII and MspI reveals that there is a series of highly repetitive sequences forming similar band patterns in the different species. To obtain information on the degree of homology among these conserved sequences we isolated a HpaII restriction fragment of approximately 990 base pairs from reindeer DNA. This DNA sequence was 32P-labelled and hybridized by the Southern blot technique to DNAs cleaved with HpaII and HaeIII from the reindeer and four other Cervidae species. Hybridization to specific restriction fragments was recorded in all species. The patterns of hybridization showed a higher degree of similarity between reindeer, elk and roe deer than between reindeer and the Asiatic species (fallow deer and muntjac). Homologies are still present between the highly repetitive sequences of the five species despite the drastic reorganization that led to a change in chromosome number from 6 to 70.

  10. A simple dot-blot-Sirius red-based assay for collagen quantification.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Pilar; Arribas, Silvia M; de Pablo, Angel Luis López; González, M Carmen; Abderrahim, Fatima; Condezo-Hoyos, Luis

    2013-08-01

    The assessment of collagen content in tissues is important in biomedical research, since this protein is altered in numerous diseases. Hydroxyproline and Sirius red based assays are the most common methods for collagen quantification. However, these procedures have some pitfalls, such as the requirement of oxygen-free medium or expensive equipment and large sample size or being unsuitable for hydrolyzed collagen, respectively. Our objective was to develop a specific, versatile, and user-friendly quantitative method applicable to small tissue samples and extracts obtained from elastin purification, therefore, suitable for simultaneous quantification of elastin. This method is based on the binding of Sirius red to collagen present in a sample immobilized on a PVDF membrane, as in the dot-blot technique, and quantified by a scanner and image analysis software. Sample loading, Sirius red concentration, temperature and incubation time, type of standard substance, albumin interference, and quantification time are optimized. The method enabled the quantification of (1) intact collagen in several rat tissue homogenates, including small resistance-sized arteries, (2) partially hydrolyzed collagen obtained from NaOH extracts, compatible with elastin purification, and (3) for the detection of differences in collagen content between hypertensive and normotensive rats. We conclude that the developed technique can be widely used since it is versatile (quantifies intact and hydrolyzed collagen), requires small sample volumes, is user-friendly (low-cost, easy to use, minimum toxic materials, and reduced time of test), and is specific (minimal interference with serum albumin).

  11. Diagnosis of cutaneous tuberculosis in biopsy specimens by PCR and southern blotting.

    PubMed Central

    Quirós, E; Maroto, M C; Bettinardi, A; González, I; Piédrola, G

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the use of a gene amplification and hybridisation method for detecting mycobacterial nucleic acid as a possible diagnostic method for cutaneous tuberculosis infection. METHODS: Biopsy specimens from 20 patients with various skin conditions of possible tuberculous aetiology were studied. Six patients had ulcerative nodules, seven lupiform lesions, two non-necrotic granulomas, one scrofulous lichen, one impetigo, one erythematosus lesions, one warty lesions, and one suspected tuberculous lipoma. Biopsy specimens were stained using Ziehl-Neelsen stain and cultured in Lowenstein-Jensen medium. DNA was extracted and then amplified by PCR using primers specific for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Specificity was confirmed by Southern blotting. RESULTS: Of the specimens, 30% were positive for mycobacteria on staining with Ziehl-Neelsen stain, 60% were culture positive and 85% PCR positive. Only 35.2% of specimens were positive with all three techniques. A further 32.5% were both culture and PCR positive. All PCR negative samples were also negative when cultured or stained with Ziehl-Neelsen stain. Of the PCR positive specimens, 29.4% were negative when cultured or stained. CONCLUSIONS: PCR, using suitable primers, is an efficient and sensitive method for the diagnosis of cutaneous tuberculosis. PMID:8944606

  12. Characterization of excretory-secretory antigens of adult Toxocara canis by western blotting.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, N R; Samanta, S; Sahu, Shivani; Raina, O K; Gupta, S C; Goswami, T K; Lokesh, K M; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-06-01

    Toxocara canis is one of the most common helminth worm of dogs which continues to stimulate both public health concern alongside the higher scientific interest. It may cause visceral and ocular damage in humans especially in children. The identification of specific antigens of T. canis is important so as to develop better diagnostic techniques. Excretory-secretory (ES) antigens were prepared by culturing the adult T. canis worms in RPMI 1640 medium without serum supplementation followed by ammonium sulphate precipitation. These antigens were separated using sodium dodecyl sulphate-electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Recovered proteins ranged from 30 to 384 kDa. The specific reactivity of the T. canis excretory-secretory (TC-ES) proteins was checked by western blotting. The immuno-reactivity of the naturally infected dog sera with the TC-ES antigens showed five bands at 43, 57,105, 139 and 175 kDa. The immuno-reactivity of the hyper immune serum raised in rabbits against TC-ES antigens was observed with ten polypeptides of 21, 25, 30, 37, 45, 50, 57, 69, 77 and 105 kDa. Common antigens band were observed at 57 and 105 KDa. These antigens merit further evaluation as candidate for use in diagnosis of toxocariasis in humans and adult dogs.

  13. Renaturation of blotted allergens increases the sensitivity of specific IgE detection.

    PubMed

    Muro, M D; Fernández, C; Moneo, I

    1996-01-01

    Several authors have demonstrated that renaturation is an essential step for the appropriate recognition of blotted proteins. The use of nonionic detergents has been described as a useful alternative to enhance the antigenicity in immunoblotting, although elution from proteins by detergents has been observed. To measure the influence of different factors on the sensitivity of specific IgE by immunoblotting, we used twenty human sera from atopic patients who were allergic or nonallergic to a common, reliable allergen (grass pollen mixture). The use of Nonidet-P40 was found to be a useful alternative for the renaturation of the allergens. No elution from the membrane was found when employing this detergent, even at high concentrations (3%), and its use gave better sensitivity than methanol. On the other hand, we detected that methanol possessed renaturing properties. A transfer method using diffusion instead of electric transfer gave the best results and two membranes could be obtained from each gel. Using this method, we found that after NP-40 incubation of the membrane, the use of bovine albumin could be omitted as blocking agent and that its use had even deleterious effects.

  14. High-selectivity cytology via lab-on-a-disc western blotting of individual cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, John J; Sinkala, Elly; Herr, Amy E

    2017-02-28

    Cytology of sparingly available cell samples from both clinical and experimental settings would benefit from high-selectivity protein tools. To minimize cell handling losses in sparse samples, we design a multi-stage assay using a lab-on-a-disc that integrates cell handling and subsequent single-cell western blotting (scWestern). As the two-layer microfluidic device rotates, the induced centrifugal force directs dissociated cells to dams, which in turn localize the cells over microwells. Cells then sediment into the microwells, where the cells are lysed and subjected to scWestern. Taking into account cell losses from loading, centrifugation, and lysis-buffer exchange, our lab-on-a-disc device handles cell samples with as few as 200 cells with 75% cell settling efficiencies. Over 70% of microwells contain single cells after the centrifugation. In addition to cell settling efficiency, cell-size filtration from a mixed population of two cell lines is also realized by tuning the cell time-of-flight during centrifugation (58.4% settling efficiency with 6.4% impurity). Following the upstream cell handling, scWestern analysis detects four proteins (GFP, β-TUB, GAPDH, and STAT3) in a glioblastoma cell line. By integrating the lab-on-a-disc cell preparation and scWestern analysis, our platform measures proteins from sparse cell samples at single-cell resolution.

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi: variability of stocks from Colombia determined by molecular karyotype and minicircle Southern blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Triana, Omar; Ortiz, Sylvia; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Solari, Aldo

    2006-05-01

    Nineteen Trypanosoma cruzi stocks, most of them of wild origin, and four Trypanosoma rangeli stocks from Colombia were analysed by molecular karyotype analysis with cloned DNA cruzipain as the probe. Another 27 cloned stocks of T. cruzi from different geographic areas of South America were used as reference for T. cruzi lineages. Phenetic analysis of chromosome size polymorphism demonstrated a great variability of Colombian T. cruzi stocks, suggesting that most belong to lineage I, although two of them belong to lineage II. The 2 lineage II T. cruzi, 17 T. cruzi lineage I, and 3 T. rangeli stocks from Colombia were studied further by Southern blot analysis with a panel of kinetoplast DNA minicircle probes. Hybridisation results indicate that the two T. cruzi II stocks are genetically distant from each other and from T. cruzi lineages IIb, IId, and IIe from Chile. Finally, T. cruzi minicircle probes do not cross-hybridise in any stringency condition tested with T. rangeli minicircles, a clear indication that these parasites can be easily distinguished by this method.

  16. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Sue I.; Fergenson, David P.; Srivastava, Abneesh; Bogan, Michael J.; Riot, Vincent J.; Frank, Matthias

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  17. Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

  18. Synthesis of a fluorescent 7-methylguanosine analog and a fluorescence spectroscopic study of its reaction with wheatgerm cap binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ren, J; Goss, D J

    1996-01-01

    In the initiation of protein synthesis, the mRNA 5'-terminal 7-methylguanosine cap structure and several recognition proteins play a pivotal role. For the study of this cap binding reaction, one approach is to use fluorescence spectroscopy. A ribose diol-modified fluorescent cap analog, anthraniloyl-m7GTP (Ant-m7GTP), was designed and synthesized for this purpose. This fluorescent cap analog was found to have a high quantum yield, resistance to photobleaching and avoided overlap of excitation and emission wavelengths with those of proteins. The binding of Ant-m7GTP with wheatgerm initiation factors elF-4F and elF-(iso)4F was determined. The fluorescent cap analog and m7GTP had similar interactions with both cap binding proteins. Fluorescence quenching experiments showed that the microenvironment of Ant-m7GTP when bound to protein was hydrophobic. PMID:8836193

  19. Akt pathway activation and increased neuropeptide Y mRNA expression in the rat hippocampus: implications for seizure blockade.

    PubMed

    Goto, Eduardo M; Silva, Marcelo de Paula; Perosa, Sandra R; Argañaraz, Gustavo A; Pesquero, João B; Cavalheiro, Esper A; Naffah-Mazzacoratti, Maria G; Teixeira, Vicente P C; Silva, José A

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of survival-related molecules such Akt and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) to evaluate Akt pathway activation in epileptogenesis process. Furthermore, was also investigated the mRNA expression of neuropeptide Y, a considered antiepileptic neuropeptide, in the pilocarpine-induced epilepsy. Male Wistar rats were submitted to the pilocarpine model of epilepsy. Hippocampi were removed 6h (acute phase), 12h (late acute), 5d (silent) and 60d (chronic) after status epilepticus (SE) onset, and from animals that received pilocarpine but did not develop SE (partial group). Hippocampi collected were used to specify mRNA expression using Real-Time PCR. Immunohistochemistry assay was employed to place ILK distribution in the hippocampus and Western blot technique was used to determine Akt activation level. A decrease in ILK mRNA content was found during acute (0.39+/-0.03) and chronic (0.48+/-0.06) periods when compared to control group (0.87+/-0.10). Protein levels of ILK were also diminished during both periods. Partial group showed increased ILK mRNA expression (0.80+/-0.06) when compared with animals in the acute stage. Silent group had ILK mRNA and immunoreactivity similar to control group. Western blot assay showed an augmentation in Akt activation in silent period (0.52+/-0.03) in comparison with control group (0.44+/-0.01). Neuropeptide Y mRNA expression increased in the partial group (1.67+/-0.22) and in the silent phase (1.45+/-0.29) when compared to control group (0.36+/-0.12). Results suggest that neuropeptide Y (as anticonvulsant) might act in protective mechanisms occurred during epileptic phenomena. Together with ILK expression and Akt activation, these molecules could be involved in hippocampal neuroprotection in epilepsy. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A transgenic-cloned pig model expressing non-fluorescent modified Plum

    PubMed Central

    NAGAYA, Masaki; WATANABE, Masahito; KOBAYASHI, Mirina; NAKANO, Kazuaki; ARAI, Yoshikazu; ASANO, Yoshinori; TAKEISHI, Toki; UMEKI, Ikuma; FUKUDA, Tooru; YASHIMA, Sayaka; TAKAYANAGI, Shuko; WATANABE, Nobuyuki; ONODERA, Masafumi; MATSUNARI, Hitomi; UMEYAMA, Kazuhiro; NAGASHIMA, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified pigs that express fluorescent proteins such as green and red fluorescent proteins have become indispensable biomedical research tools in recent years. Cell or tissue transplantation studies using fluorescent markers should be conducted, wherein the xeno-antigenicity of the fluorescent proteins does not affect engraftment or graft survival. Thus, we aimed to create a transgenic (Tg)-cloned pig that was immunologically tolerant to fluorescent protein antigens. In the present study, we generated a Tg-cloned pig harboring a derivative of Plum modified by a single amino acid substitution in the chromophore. The cells and tissues of this Tg-cloned pig expressing the modified Plum (mPlum) did not fluoresce. However, western blot and immunohistochemistry analyses clearly showed that the mPlum had the same antigenicity as Plum. Thus, we have obtained primary proof of principle for creating a cloned pig that is immunologically tolerant to fluorescent protein antigens. PMID:27396383

  1. Binary function of mRNA.

    PubMed

    Kloc, Malgorzata; Foreman, Victor; Reddy, Sriyutha A

    2011-11-01

    Since the discovery of messenger RNA (mRNA) over half a century ago, the assumption has always been that the only function of mRNA is to make a protein. However, recent studies of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms unexpectedly show that some mRNAs may be functionally binary and have additional structural functions that are unrelated to their translation product. These findings imply that some of the phenotypic features of cells and organisms can also be binary, that is, they depend both on the function of a protein and the independent structural function of its mRNA. In this review, we will discuss this concept within the framework of multifunctional RNA molecules and the RNA World Hypothesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Detection of MDR1 mRNA expression with optimized gold nanoparticle beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiumei; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-03-01

    MDR1 (multidrug resistance gene) mRNA expression is a promising biomarker for the prediction of doxorubicin resistance in clinic. However, the traditional technical process in clinic is complicated and cannot perform the real-time detection mRNA in living single cells. In this study, the expression of MDR1 mRNA was analyzed based on optimized gold nanoparticle beacon in tumor cells. Firstly, gold nanoparticle (AuNP) was modified by thiol-PEG, and the MDR1 beacon sequence was screened and optimized using a BLAST bioinformatics strategy. Then, optimized MDR1 molecular beacons were characterized by transmission electron microscope, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies. The cytotoxicity of MDR1 molecular beacon on L-02, K562 and K562/Adr cells were investigated by MTT assay, suggesting that MDR1 molecular beacon was low inherent cytotoxicity. Dark field microscope was used to investigate the cellular uptake of hDAuNP beacon assisted with ultrasound. Finally, laser scanning confocal microscope images showed that there was a significant difference in MDR1 mRNA expression in K562 and K562/Adr cells, which was consistent with the results of q-PCR measurement. In summary, optimized MDR1 molecular beacon designed in this study is a reliable strategy for detection MDR1 mRNA expression in living tumor cells, and will be a promising strategy for in guiding patient treatment and management in individualized medication.

  3. Isolation and Translation of mRNA Encoded by a Specific Region of the Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Genome

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kevin P.; Holland, Louis E.; Gaylord, Beverley H.; Wagner, Edward K.

    1980-01-01

    We have examined in detail the major mRNA species encoded by the region of the herpes simplex virus type 1 genome encoded by HindIII fragment K (0.53-0.59 from the left end of the prototype arrangement of the genome) by using this restriction fragment bound to cellulose as a reagent for isolation of this mRNA. Before viral DNA replication in infected cells (early), a major species of viral mRNA 5.2 kilobases (kb) in length is abundant. After the onset of viral DNA replication (late), four mRNA species are abundant: 7, 5.2, 3.8, and 1.8 kb in size. We have used reverse transcriptase from avian myeloblastosis virus to make DNA complementary to these RNA species and their 3′ ends. We have shown by hybridization of this complementary DNA to Southern blots of herpes simplex virus type 1 DNA that the 7-, 5.2-, and 1.8-kb mRNA species have their 3′ ends to the right of 0.59 and are at least partially colinear. The 3.8-kb mRNA has a 3′ end mapping to the left of the 3′ ends of these other species. In vitro translation of HindIII fragment K-specific mRNA in a reticulocyte lysate system yielded three major polypeptide products: 140,000, 122,000, and 54,000 daltons (d). Less prominent species of 86,000 and 65,000 d also were produced. Translation of size-fractionated HindIII fragment K-specific mRNA showed that the 7-, 5.2-, and 3.8-kb mRNA's encoded the 54,000-, 140,000-, and 122,000-d polypeptides, respectively. The 140,000-d polypeptide was the major polypeptide translated using early HindIII fragment K-specific mRNA as a template. The 3.8-kb mRNA also encoded the 86,000-d polypeptide, whereas the 1.8-kb mRNA encoded a polypeptide that was indistinguishable from the 54,000-d polypeptide encoded by the 7-kb mRNA, in addition to the 65,000-d polypeptide. The implications of the data are discussed. Images PMID:6251246

  4. Self-amplifying mRNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luis A; Kommareddy, Sushma; Maione, Domenico; Uematsu, Yasushi; Giovani, Cinzia; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Otten, Gillis R; Yu, Dong; Mandl, Christian W; Mason, Peter W; Dormitzer, Philip R; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief introduction to nucleic acid-based vaccines and recent research in developing self-amplifying mRNA vaccines. These vaccines promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. The key to realizing the full potential of these vaccines is efficient delivery of nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can amplify and express the encoded antigenic protein. The hydrophilicity and strong net negative charge of RNA impedes cellular uptake. To overcome this limitation, electrostatic complexation with cationic lipids or polymers and physical delivery using electroporation or ballistic particles to improve cellular uptake has been evaluated. This chapter highlights the rapid progress made in using nonviral delivery systems for RNA-based vaccines. Initial preclinical testing of self-amplifying mRNA vaccines has shown nonviral delivery to be capable of producing potent and robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and nonhuman primates. Historically, the prospect of developing mRNA vaccines was uncertain due to concerns of mRNA instability and the feasibility of large-scale manufacturing. Today, these issues are no longer perceived as barriers in the widespread implementation of the technology. Currently, nonamplifying mRNA vaccines are under investigation in human clinical trials and can be produced at a sufficient quantity and quality to meet regulatory requirements. If the encouraging preclinical data with self-amplifying mRNA vaccines are matched by equivalently positive immunogenicity, potency, and tolerability in human trials, this platform could establish nucleic acid vaccines as a versatile new tool for human immunization.

  5. Lifetime fluorescence spectroscopy for in situ investigation of osteogenic differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, Laura; Elbarbary, Amir; Zuk, Patricia; De Ugarte, Daniel A.; Benhaim, Prosper; Kurt, Hamza; Hedrick, Marc H.; Ashjian, Peter

    2003-07-01

    Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) represents a potential tool for the in-situ characterization of bioengineered tissues. In this study, we evaluate the application of TR-LIFS to non-intrusive monitoring of matrix composition during osteogenetic differentiation. Human adipose-derived stem cells, harvested from 3 patients, were induced in osteogenic media for 3, 5, and 7 weeks. Samples were subsequently collected and probed for time-resolved fluorescence emission with a pulsed nitrogen laser. Fluorescence parameters, derived from both spectral- and time-domain, were used for sample characterization. The samples were further analyzed using Western blot analysis and computer-based densitometry. A significant change in the fluorescence parameters was detected for samples beyond 3 weeks of osteogenic differentiation. The spectroscopic observations: 1) show increase of collagen I when contrasted against the time-resolved fluorescence spectra of commercially available collagens; and 2) are in agreement with Western blot analysis that demonstrated significant increase in collagen I content between 3- vs. 5-weeks and 3- vs. 7-weeks and no changes for collagens III, IV, and V. Our results suggest that TR-LIFS can be used as a non-invasive means for the detection of specific collagens in maturing connective tissues.

  6. Self-digitization microfluidic chip for absolute quantification of mRNA in single cells.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Alison M; Gansen, Alexander; Paguirigan, Amy L; Kreutz, Jason E; Radich, Jerald P; Chiu, Daniel T

    2014-12-16

    Quantification of mRNA in single cells provides direct insight into how intercellular heterogeneity plays a role in disease progression and outcomes. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), the current gold standard for evaluating gene expression, is insufficient for providing absolute measurement of single-cell mRNA transcript abundance. Challenges include difficulties in handling small sample volumes and the high variability in measurements. Microfluidic digital PCR provides far better sensitivity for minute quantities of genetic material, but the typical format of this assay does not allow for counting of the absolute number of mRNA transcripts samples taken from single cells. Furthermore, a large fraction of the sample is often lost during sample handling in microfluidic digital PCR. Here, we report the absolute quantification of single-cell mRNA transcripts by digital, one-step reverse transcription PCR in a simple microfluidic array device called the self-digitization (SD) chip. By performing the reverse transcription step in digitized volumes, we find that the assay exhibits a linear signal across a wide range of total RNA concentrations and agrees well with standard curve qPCR. The SD chip is found to digitize a high percentage (86.7%) of the sample for single-cell experiments. Moreover, quantification of transferrin receptor mRNA in single cells agrees well with single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments. The SD platform for absolute quantification of single-cell mRNA can be optimized for other genes and may be useful as an independent control method for the validation of mRNA quantification techniques.

  7. Arc mRNA induction in striatal efferent neurons associated with response learning.

    PubMed

    Daberkow, D P; Riedy, M D; Kesner, R P; Keefe, K A

    2007-07-01

    The dorsal striatum is involved in motor-response learning, but the extent to which distinct populations of striatal efferent neurons are differentially involved in such learning is unknown. Activity-regulated, cytoskeleton-associated (Arc) protein is an effector immediate-early gene implicated in synaptic plasticity. We examined arc mRNA expression in striatopallidal vs. striatonigral efferent neurons in dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatum of rats engaged in reversal learning on a T-maze motor-response task. Male Sprague-Dawley rats learned to turn right or left for 3 days. Half of the rats then underwent reversal training. The remaining rats were yoked to rats undergoing reversal training, such that they ran the same number of trials but ran them as continued-acquisition trials. Brains were removed and processed using double-label fluorescent in situ hybridization for arc and preproenkephalin (PPE) mRNA. In the reversal, but not the continued-acquisition, group there was a significant relation between the overall arc mRNA signal in dorsomedial striatum and the number of trials run, with rats reaching criterion in fewer trials having higher levels of arc mRNA expression. A similar relation was seen between the numbers of PPE(+) and PPE(-) neurons in dorsomedial striatum with cytoplasmic arc mRNA expression. Interestingly, in behaviourally activated animals significantly more PPE(-) neurons had cytoplasmic arc mRNA expression. These data suggest that Arc in both striatonigral and striatopallidal efferent neurons is involved in striatal synaptic plasticity mediating motor-response learning in the T-maze and that there is differential processing of arc mRNA in distinct subpopulations of striatal efferent neurons.

  8. Fluorescence study of sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongjamroon, Sunida; Pattanaporkratana, Apichart

    2015-07-01

    We studied photoemission of monosaccharides and disaccharides using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. A 532- nm, 10 mW, laser was used to excite the samples and back-scattering signals were collected by a spectrometer. We found that most sugars show weak fluorescence in solid phase but do not fluoresce when dissolved in water solutions. The emission spectra show similar peak intensity at 590 nm, but they are different in emission intensities. We suggest that the fluorescence spectra may be used to differentiate sugar type, even though the origin of the fluorescence is unclear and needed further study.

  9. Organ specific expression of thyroid hormone receptor mRNA and protein in different human tissues.

    PubMed

    Shahrara, S; Drvota, V; Sylvén, C

    1999-10-01

    The major physiologic effect of thyroid hormone is thought to be initiated by the binding of T3 to the DNA binding thyroid hormone receptor (TR). The aim of this study has been to characterize the organ specific expression of thyroid hormone receptor mRNA, as well as its protein distribution and molecular weight in man. Determination of TRalpha1, alpha2, beta1 and beta2 mRNA molecular size was performed using Northern blot analysis in the human heart, brain, placenta, lung, liver, skeletal muscle, kidney and pancreas. TRalpha1, alpha2 and beta1 protein expression was characterized by Western blot analysis of human tissues. TRalpha1 mRNA of 4.9 kb was detected in all 8 tissues analyzed, with varying abundance in the various tissues. TRalpha2 mRNA was detected in 2 different sizes, with higher intensity at 5.7 and lower intensity at 3.2 kb. There were, however, multiple TRbeta1 mRNA of 8, 2 and 1 kb detected. TRbeta1 transcripts of 2 kb and 1 kb showed an organ specific pattern of expression. Multiple TRbeta2 mRNA of 6.6, 5.2, 2.5 and 2.4 kb were detected, as well as a unique 1 kb transcript, in the heart. TRbeta2 transcripts also displayed tissue specific expression. Western blot analysis displayed a single band of 48 kD for TRalpha1. The abundance of the TRalpha1 immunoreactive band was highest in the heart, brain, kidney and skeletal muscle, and lowest in the liver, placenta and lung, while no signals were detected in the spleen. The TRalpha2 specific antibody detected a band of 58 kD in all the tissues analyzed. The relative intensity of the immunoreactive TRalpha2 band detected was highest in the placenta and lung, with a medium concentration range in skeletal muscle, the heart and kidney. The TRalpha2 protein concentration was lowest in the spleen, liver and brain. Human TRbeta1 protein was detected as 55 and 52 kD bands, as well as a unique band of 45 kD in heart. The 52 kD band was detected in all tissues except the kidney and spleen. The 55 kD band was not

  10. Validity of the Enzyme-linked Immunoelectrotransfer Blot (EITB) for naturally acquired porcine cysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Jayashi, César M.; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Neyra, Ricardo Castillo; Rodríguez, Silvia; García, Hector H.; Lightowlers, Marshall W.

    2017-01-01

    The Enzyme-linked Immunoelectrotransfer Blot (EITB) has been used widely as a screening test for Taenia solium cysticercosis in swine. However, the relation between seropositivity and infection in pig populations from endemic areas has not been well defined. The aim of this study is to relate EITB seropositivity with infection and infection burden, analyse the trade-off between sensitivity and specificity with various cut-off points for the EITB assay, and finally describe the serology changes in a cohort of rural pigs raised under natural conditions. A group of 107 pigs that were used as controls during a vaccination field trial in Peru was our study population. The prevalence of porcine cysticercosis determined by necropsy examination was 16.82% (18/107) in these animals. Using EITB reactivity to ≥ 1 band as a cut-off point for the assay, the sensitivity was 88.89% (65.29-98.62, 95% CI) and the specificity was 48.31% (37.59-59.16, 95% CI). Comparing other cut-off points, involving up to as many as 7 reactive bands, a reactivity of ≥ 3 bands provided the best trade-offs in sensitivity and specificity. Using this cut-off point for the assay, the sensitivity was 77.77% (52.36 - 93.59, 95% CI) and the specificity was 76.40% (66.22 - 84.76, 95% CI). A significant association was found between cyst counts over 100 cysts and reactivity to ≥ 3 bands in the EITB assay (Fisher’s exact test, p<0.05). The results of this study suggest that the use of the EITB assay to study porcine cysticercosis may require setting different cut-offs under field and experimental conditions, and depending upon the objective of the screening process. PMID:24183647

  11. Antibody responses to Borrelia burgdorferi detected by western blot vary geographically in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Nicholas H.; Arsenault, Julie; Hatchette, Todd F.; Mechai, Samir; Lindsay, L. Robbin

    2017-01-01

    Lyme disease is emerging in eastern and central Canada, and most cases are diagnosed using the two-tier serological test (Enzyme Immuno Assay [EIA] followed by Western blot [WB]). Simplification of this algorithm would be advantageous unless it impacts test performance. In this study, accuracy of individual proteins of the IgG WB algorithm in predicting the overall test result in samples from Canadians was assessed. Because Borrelia burgdorferi strains vary geographically in Canada, geographic variations in serological responses were also explored. Metrics of relative sensitivity, specificity and the kappa statistic measure of concordance were used to assess the capacity of responses to individual proteins to predict the overall IgG WB result of 2524 EIA (C6)-positive samples from across Canada. Geographic and interannual variations in proportions of samples testing positive were explored by logistic regression. No one protein was highly concordant with the IgG WB result. Significant variations were found amongst years and geographic regions in the prevalence of samples testing positive using the overall IgG WB algorithm, and for individual proteins of the algorithm. In most cases the prevalence of samples testing positive were highest in Nova Scotia, and lower in samples from Manitoba westwards. These findings suggest that the current two tier test may not be simplified and continued use of the current two-tier test method and interpretation is recommended. Geographic and interannual variations in the prevalence of samples testing positive may be consistent with B. burgdorferi strain variation in Canada, and further studies are needed to explore this. PMID:28182723

  12. Epidemiology of Babesia, Anaplasma and Trypanosoma species using a new expanded reverse line blot hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    Paoletta, Martina Soledad; López Arias, Ludmila; de la Fournière, Sofía; Guillemi, Eliana Carolina; Luciani, Carlos; Sarmiento, Néstor Fabián; Mosqueda, Juan; Farber, Marisa Diana; Wilkowsky, Silvina Elizabeth

    2017-09-01

    Vector-borne hemoparasitic infections are a major problem that affects livestock industries worldwide, particularly in tropical and subtropical regions. In this work, a reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was developed for the simultaneous detection and identification of Anaplasma, Babesia and bovine trypanosomes, encompassing in this way the most relevant hemoparasites that affect cattle. A total of 186 bovine blood samples collected from two different ecoepidemiological regions of northeast Argentina, with and without tick control, were analyzed with this new RLB. High diversity of parasites, such as Babesia bovis, B. bigemina, Anaplasma marginale and three different Trypanosoma species, was found. High rates of coinfections were also detected, and significant differences were observed not only in the prevalence of parasites but also in the level of coinfections between the two analyzed areas. Regarding the Trypanosoma genus, we provide molecular evidence of the presence of T. vivax and T. theileri for the first time in Argentina. Besides, since the RLB is a prospective tool, it allowed the identification of a yet unknown bovine trypanosome which could not be assigned to any of the bovine species known so far. In the present study we provide new insights on the prevalence of several pathogens that directly impact on livestock production in Argentina. The RLB assay developed here allows to identify simultaneously numerous pathogenic species which can also be easily expanded to detect other blood borne pathogens. These characteristics make the RLB hybridization assay an essential tool for epidemiological survey of all vector-borne pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of immunodominant proteins of Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis cell wall by Western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Maryam; Madani, Rasool; Razmi, Nematollah

    2014-04-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) is a slow growing mycobactin, whose dependence on mycobacterial species is known to be the causative agent of Johne's disease (paratuberculosis) in all species of domestic ruminants worldwide. The organism is transmitted via close contact, ingestion, or transplacentally from mother to fetus and occurs commonly in grazing domestic animals. Johne's disease (JD) is characterized by gradual weight loss, decreased milk production, and diarrhea due to the chronic, progressive, granulomatous enteritis and lymphadenitis. The disease can cause serious economic damage to the dairy industry due to the loss of milk production and early culling of infected animals. In recent years, researchers have focused on the identification of a specific antigen of M. paratuberculosis to use in diagnosis test and preparation of effective vaccine. The goal of this study is evaluation of the immunodominant proteins of M. paratuberculosis cell wall. The amount of protein was determined with a Lowry assay (22.68 μg/100 μL). For production of polyclonal antibody against proteins of M. paratuberculosis cell wall, a New Zealand white rabbit was immunized with antigen and Freund's adjuvant. After immunization, the rabbit was bled to produce enriched serum. Antibodies were purified from serum with ion exchange chromatography. In the Ouchterlony test, the reactions between antigen and antibodies were seen in dilutions of one quarter for serum, one quarter for Ig, and one half for IgG by clear precipitation lines due to the well immunization of the rabbit. Electrophoresis and Western blot analysis were used and subsequently a sharp band appeared in nitrocellulose paper; these bands were about 25, 37, 50, 75, and 150 kDa molecular weight, which indicated immunodominant proteins.

  14. Evaluation of the Aspergillus Western Blot IgG Kit for Diagnosis of Chronic Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, A.; Flori, P.; Hennequin, C.; Dubus, J.-C.; Reynaud-Gaubert, M.; Charpin, D.; Vergnon, J. M.; Gay, P.; Colly, A.; Piarroux, R.; Pelloux, H.

    2014-01-01

    Immunoprecipitin detection (IPD) is the current reference confirmatory technique for anti-Aspergillus antibody detection; however, the lack of standardization is a critical drawback of this assay. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Aspergillus Western blot (Asp-WB) IgG kit (LDBio Diagnostics, Lyon, France), a recently commercialized immunoblot assay for the diagnosis of various clinical presentations of chronic aspergillosis. Three hundred eight serum samples from 158 patients with aspergillosis sensu lato (s.l.) were analyzed. More specifically, 267 serum samples were derived from patients with Aspergillus disease, including 89 cases of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis, 10 of aspergilloma, and 32 of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, while 41 samples were from patients with Aspergillus colonization, including 15 cystic fibrosis (CF) and 12 non-CF patients. For blood donor controls, the Asp-WB specificity was 94%, while the kit displayed a sensitivity for the aspergillosis s.l. diagnosis of 88.6%, with a diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of 119 (95% confidence interval [CI], 57 to 251). The DOR values were 185.22 (95% CI,78.79 to 435.45) and 43.74 (95% CI, 15.65 to 122.20) for the diagnosis of Aspergillus disease and Aspergillus colonization, respectively. Among the patients, the sensitivities of the Asp-WB in the diagnosis of Aspergillus colonization were 100% and 41.7% in CF and non-CF patients, respectively. The Asp-WB yielded fewer false-negative results than did IPD. In conclusion, the Asp-WB kit performed well for the diagnosis of various clinical presentations of aspergillosis in nonimmunocompromised patients, with an enhanced standardization and a higher sensitivity than with IPD, which is the current reference method. PMID:25392351

  15. Evaluation of a Western Blot Test in an Outbreak of Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Pizzini, Claudia V.; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M.; Reiss, Errol; Hajjeh, Rana; Kaufman, Leo; Peralta, José Mauro

    1999-01-01

    A western blot (WB) test was evaluated for detection of antibodies against native glycosylated and chemically deglycosylated M and H antigens of Histoplasma capsulatum in serum obtained from patients during the acute phase of pulmonary histoplasmosis that occurred during an outbreak. Of 275 serum samples tested by immunodiffusion and complement fixation (CF) samples from 40 patients affected during this outbreak and from 37 negative controls were tested by WB test. A group of patients whose sera were negative for CF antibodies and precipitins early in the acute stage of histoplasmosis but who all seroconverted during convalescence 6 weeks later were tested with the WB test. Antibodies against untreated H and M antigens were detected at a 1:100 dilution by WB test in 45% of the 20 acute-phase serum samples and in all 20 of the convalescent-phase specimens. The WB test’s sensitivity for acute-phase specimens increased to 90% (18 of 20 specimens) when H and M antigens were treated by periodate oxidation to inactivate susceptible carbohydrate epitopes. When native glycosylated antigens were used in the WB test, positive reactions were observed in negative control serum specimens (3 of 37 specimens; 8%) and in serum specimens obtained from asymptomatic persons screened as part of the outbreak investigation (13 of 20 specimens; 65%). These positive reactions were also attributed to glycosidic epitopes since the specificity of the WB test increased from 78 to 100% when periodate-treated H and M antigens were used. WB test with deglycosylated H and M antigens of histoplasmin provides a rapid, sensitive, and specific test to diagnose acute pulmonary histoplasmosis before precipitins can be detected. PMID:9874658

  16. Two-Phase Contiguous Supported Lipid Bilayer Model for Membrane Rafts via Polymer Blotting and Stenciling.

    PubMed

    Richards, Mark J; Daniel, Susan

    2017-02-07

    The supported lipid bilayer has been portrayed as a useful model of the cell membrane compatible with many biophysical tools and techniques that demonstrate its appeal in learning about the basic features of the plasma membrane. However, some of its potential has yet to be realized, particularly in the area of bilayer patterning and phase/composition heterogeneity. In this work, we generate contiguous bilayer patterns as a model system that captures the general features of membrane domains and lipid rafts. Micropatterned polymer templates of two types are investigated for generating patterned bilayer formation: polymer blotting and polymer lift-off stenciling. While these approaches have been used previously to create bilayer arrays by corralling bilayers patches with various types of boundaries impenetrable to bilayer diffusion, unique to the methods presented here, there are no physical barriers to diffusion. In this work, interfaces between contiguous lipid phases define the pattern shapes, with continuity between them allowing transfer of membrane-bound biomolecules between the phases. We examine effectors of membrane domain stability including temperature and cholesterol content to investigate domain dynamics. Contiguous patterning of supported bilayers as a model of lipid rafts expands the application of the SLB to an area with current appeal and brings with it a useful toolset for characterization and analysis. These combined tools should be helpful to researchers investigating lipid raft dynamics and function and biomolecule partitioning studies. Additionally, this patterning technique may be useful for applications such as bioseparations that exploit differences in lipid phase partitioning or creation of membranes that bind species like viruses preferentially at lipid phase boundaries, to name a few.

  17. Western blot analysis of sera from dogs with suspected food allergy.

    PubMed

    Favrot, Claude; Linek, Monika; Fontaine, Jacques; Beco, Luc; Rostaher, Ana; Fischer, Nina; Couturier, Nicolas; Jacquenet, Sandrine; Bihain, Bernard E

    2017-04-01

    Food allergy is often suspected in dogs with clinical signs of atopic dermatitis. This diagnosis is confirmed with an elimination diet and a subsequent challenge with regular food. Laboratory tests for the diagnosis of food allergy in dogs are unreliable and/or technically difficult. Cyno-DIAL(®) is a Western blot method that might assist with the selection of an appropriate elimination diet. To evaluate the performance of Cyno-DIAL(®) for the selection of an elimination diet and diagnosis of food allergy. Thirty eight dogs with atopic dermatitis completed an elimination diet. Combining the results of the diet trials and the challenges, 14 dogs were classified as food allergic (FA), 22 as nonfood-allergic and two as ambiguous cases. Amongst all dogs and amongst dogs with a clinical diagnosis of FA, 3% and 7% (respectively) were positive to Royal Canin Anallergenic(®) , Vet-Concept Kanguru(®) or Vet-Concept Dog Sana(®) ; 8% and 7% to Hill's d/d Duck and Rice(®) ; 8% and 21% to Hill's z/d Ultra Allergen Free(®) ; 53% and 64% to Eukanuba Dermatosis FP(®) ; and 32% and 43% to a home-cooked diet of horse meat, potatoes and zucchini. The specificity and sensitivity of Cyno-DIAL(®) for diagnosing food allergy were 73% and 71%, respectively. Although Cyno-DIAL(®) was considered potentially useful for identifying appropriate foods for elimination diet trials, it cannot be recommended for the diagnosis of food allergy. The Cyno-DIAL(®) test performed better than some previously evaluated ELISA-based tests. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  18. Antibody responses to Borrelia burgdorferi detected by western blot vary geographically in Canada.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Nicholas H; Arsenault, Julie; Hatchette, Todd F; Mechai, Samir; Lindsay, L Robbin

    2017-01-01

    Lyme disease is emerging in eastern and central Canada, and most cases are diagnosed using the two-tier serological test (Enzyme Immuno Assay [EIA] followed by Western blot [WB]). Simplification of this algorithm would be advantageous unless it impacts test performance. In this study, accuracy of individual proteins of the IgG WB algorithm in predicting the overall test result in samples from Canadians was assessed. Because Borrelia burgdorferi strains vary geographically in Canada, geographic variations in serological responses were also explored. Metrics of relative sensitivity, specificity and the kappa statistic measure of concordance were used to assess the capacity of responses to individual proteins to predict the overall IgG WB result of 2524 EIA (C6)-positive samples from across Canada. Geographic and interannual variations in proportions of samples testing positive were explored by logistic regression. No one protein was highly concordant with the IgG WB result. Significant variations were found amongst years and geographic regions in the prevalence of samples testing positive using the overall IgG WB algorithm, and for individual proteins of the algorithm. In most cases the prevalence of samples testing positive were highest in Nova Scotia, and lower in samples from Manitoba westwards. These findings suggest that the current two tier test may not be simplified and continued use of the current two-tier test method and interpretation is recommended. Geographic and interannual variations in the prevalence of samples testing positive may be consistent with B. burgdorferi strain variation in Canada, and further studies are needed to explore this.

  19. Validation of commercial Mas receptor antibodies for utilization in Western Blotting, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry studies.

    PubMed

    Burghi, Valeria; Fernández, Natalia Cristina; Gándola, Yamila Belén; Piazza, Verónica Gabriela; Quiroga, Diego Tomás; Guilhen Mario, Érica; Felix Braga, Janaína; Bader, Michael; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza; Dominici, Fernando Pablo; Muñoz, Marina Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Mas receptor (MasR) is a G protein-coupled receptor proposed as a candidate for mediating the angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme 2-Ang (1-7) protective axis of renin-angiotensin system. Because the role of this receptor is not definitively clarified, determination of MasR tissue distribution and expression levels constitutes a critical knowledge to fully understanding its function. Commercially available antibodies have been widely employed for MasR protein localization and quantification, but they have not been adequately validated. In this study, we carried on an exhaustive evaluation of four commercial MasR antibodies, following previously established criteria. Western Blotting (WB) and immunohistochemistry studies starting from hearts and kidneys from wild type (WT) mice revealed that antibodies raised against different MasR domains yielded different patterns of reactivity. Furthermore, staining patterns appeared identical in samples from MasR knockout (MasR-KO) mice. We verified by polymerase chain reaction analysis that the MasR-KO mice used were truly deficient in this receptor as MAS transcripts were undetectable in either heart or kidney from this animal model. In addition, we evaluated the ability of the antibodies to detect the human c-myc-tagged MasR overexpressed in human embryonic kidney cells. Three antibodies were capable of detecting the MasR either by WB or by immunofluorescence, reproducing the patterns obtained with an anti c-myc antibody. In conclusion, although three of the selected antibodies were able to detect MasR protein at high expression levels observed in a transfected cell line, they failed to detect this receptor in mice tissues at physiological expression levels. As a consequence, validated antibodies that can recognize and detect the MasR at physiological levels are still lacking.

  20. Evaluation of the Aspergillus Western blot IgG kit for diagnosis of chronic aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Oliva, A; Flori, P; Hennequin, C; Dubus, J-C; Reynaud-Gaubert, M; Charpin, D; Vergnon, J M; Gay, P; Colly, A; Piarroux, R; Pelloux, H; Ranque, S

    2015-01-01

    Immunoprecipitin detection (IPD) is the current reference confirmatory technique for anti-Aspergillus antibody detection; however, the lack of standardization is a critical drawback of this assay. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Aspergillus Western blot (Asp-WB) IgG kit (LDBio Diagnostics, Lyon, France), a recently commercialized immunoblot assay for the diagnosis of various clinical presentations of chronic aspergillosis. Three hundred eight serum samples from 158 patients with aspergillosis sensu lato (s.l.) were analyzed. More specifically, 267 serum samples were derived from patients with Aspergillus disease, including 89 cases of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis, 10 of aspergilloma, and 32 of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, while 41 samples were from patients with Aspergillus colonization, including 15 cystic fibrosis (CF) and 12 non-CF patients. For blood donor controls, the Asp-WB specificity was 94%, while the kit displayed a sensitivity for the aspergillosis s.l. diagnosis of 88.6%, with a diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of 119 (95% confidence interval [CI], 57 to 251). The DOR values were 185.22 (95% CI,78.79 to 435.45) and 43.74 (95% CI, 15.65 to 122.20) for the diagnosis of Aspergillus disease and Aspergillus colonization, respectively. Among the patients, the sensitivities of the Asp-WB in the diagnosis of Aspergillus colonization were 100% and 41.7% in CF and non-CF patients, respectively. The Asp-WB yielded fewer false-negative results than did IPD. In conclusion, the Asp-WB kit performed well for the diagnosis of various clinical presentations of aspergillosis in nonimmunocompromised patients, with an enhanced standardization and a higher sensitivity than with IPD, which is the current reference method.

  1. Validity of the Enzyme-linked Immunoelectrotransfer Blot (EITB) for naturally acquired porcine cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Jayashi, César M; Gonzalez, Armando E; Castillo Neyra, Ricardo; Rodríguez, Silvia; García, Hector H; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2014-01-17

    The Enzyme-linked Immunoelectrotransfer Blot (EITB) has been used widely as a screening test for Taenia solium cysticercosis in swine. However, the relation between seropositivity and infection in pig populations from endemic areas has not been well defined. The aim of this study is to relate EITB seropositivity with infection and infection burden, analyse the trade-off between sensitivity and specificity with various cut-off points for the EITB assay, and finally describe the serology changes in a cohort of rural pigs raised under natural conditions. A group of 107 pigs that were used as controls during a vaccination field trial in Peru was our study population. The prevalence of porcine cysticercosis determined by necropsy examination was 16.82% (18/107) in these animals. Using EITB reactivity to ≥ 1 band as a cut-off point for the assay, the sensitivity was 88.89% (65.29-98.62, 95% CI) and the specificity was 48.31% (37.59-59.16, 95% CI). Comparing other cut-off points, involving up to as many as 7 reactive bands, a reactivity of ≥ 3 bands provided the best trade-offs in sensitivity and specificity. Using this cut-off point for the assay, the sensitivity was 77.77% (52.36-93.59, 95% CI) and the specificity was 76.40% (66.22-84.76, 95% CI). A significant association was found between cyst counts over 100 cysts and reactivity to ≥ 3 bands in the EITB assay (Fisher's exact test, p<0.05). The results of this study suggest that the use of the EITB assay to study porcine cysticercosis may require setting different cut-offs under field and experimental conditions, and depending upon the objective of the screening process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Electrostatic protein immobilization using charged polyacrylamide gels and cationic detergent microfluidic Western blotting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dohyun; Karns, Kelly; Tia, Samuel Q; He, Mei; Herr, Amy E

    2012-03-06

    We report a novel protein immobilization matrix for fully integrated microfluidic Western blotting (WB). The electrostatic immobilization gel (EIG) enables immobilization of all proteins sized using cetyl trimethylammonium bromide polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (CTAB-PAGE), for subsequent electrophoretic probing with detection affinity reagents (e.g., labeled antibodies). The "pan-analyte" capture strategy introduced here uses polyacrylamide gel grafted with concentrated point charges (zwitterionic macromolecules), in contrast to existing microfluidic WB strategies that rely on a sandwich immunoassay format for analyte immobilization and detection. Sandwich approaches limit analyte immobilization to capture of only a priori known targets. A charge interaction mechanism study supports the hypothesis that electrostatic interaction plays a major role in analyte immobilization on the EIG. We note that protein capture efficiency depends on both the concentration of copolymerized charges and ionic strength of the gel buffer. We demonstrate pan-analyte immobilization of sized CTAB-laden model proteins (protein G, ovalbumin, bovine serum albumin, β-galactosidase, lactoferrin) on the EIG with initial capture efficiencies ranging from 21 to 100%. Target proteins fixed on the EIG (protein G, lactoferrin) are detected using antibody probes with signal-to-noise ratios of 34 to 275. The approach advances protein immunoblotting performance through 200× reduction on sample consumption, 12× reduction in assay duration, and automated assay operation, compared to slab-gel WB. Using the microfluidic WB assay, assessment of lactoferrin in human tear fluid is demonstrated with a goal of advancing toward nonbiopsy-based diagnosis of Sjögren's Syndrome, an autoimmune disease.

  3. A rapid chemiluminescent slot blot immunoassay for the detection and quantification of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type E, in cultures.

    PubMed

    Cadieux, Brigitte; Blanchfield, Burke; Smith, James P; Austin, John W

    2005-05-01

    A simple, rapid, cost-effective in vitro slot blot immunoassay was developed for the detection and quantification of botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E) in cultures. Culture supernatants of 36 strains of clostridia, including 12 strains of Clostridium botulinum type E, 12 strains of other C. botulinum neurotoxin serotypes, and 12 strains of other clostridial species were tested. Samples containing BoNT/E were detected using affinity-purified polyclonal rabbit antisera prepared against BoNT/E with subsequent detection of secondary antibodies using chemiluminescence. All strains of C. botulinum type E tested positive, while all non C. botulinum type E strains tested negative. The sensitivity of the slot blot immunoassay for detection of BoNT/E was approximately four mouse lethal doses (MLD). The intensity of chemiluminescence was directly correlated with the concentration of BoNT/E up to 128 MLD, allowing quantification of BoNT/E between 4 and 128 MLD. The slot blot immunoassay was compared to the mouse bioassay for detection of BoNT/E using cultures derived from fish samples inoculated with C. botulinum type E, and cultures derived from naturally contaminated environmental samples. A total of 120 primary enrichment cultures derived from fish samples, of which 103 were inoculated with C. botulinum type E, and 17 were uninoculated controls, were assayed. Of the 103 primary enrichment cultures derived from inoculated fish samples, all were positive by mouse bioassay, while 94 were also positive by slot blot immunoassay, resulting in a 7.5% false-negative rate. All 17 primary enrichment cultures derived from the uninoculated fish samples were negative by both mouse bioassay and slot blot immunoassay. A total of twenty-six primary enrichment cultures derived from environmental samples were tested by mouse bioassay and slot blot immunoassay. Of 13 primary enrichment cultures positive by mouse bioassay, 12 were also positive by slot blot immunoassay, resulting in a 3

  4. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of Simon™, a new CE-based automated Western blot system as applied to vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Rustandi, Richard R; Loughney, John W; Hamm, Melissa; Hamm, Christopher; Lancaster, Catherine; Mach, Anna; Ha, Sha

    2012-09-01

    Many CE-based technologies such as imaged capillary IEF, CE-SDS, CZE, and MEKC are well established for analyzing proteins, viruses, or other biomolecules such as polysaccharides. For example, imaged capillary isoelectric focusing (charge-based protein separation) and CE-SDS (size-based protein separation) are standard replacement methods in biopharmaceutical industries for tedious and labor intensive IEF and SDS-PAGE methods, respectively. Another important analytical tool for protein characterization is a Western blot, where after size-based separation in SDS-PAGE the proteins are transferred to a membrane and blotted with specific monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies. Western blotting analysis is applied in many areas such as biomarker research, therapeutic target identification, and vaccine development. Currently, the procedure is very manual, laborious, and time consuming. Here, we evaluate a new technology called Simple Western™ (or Simon™) for performing automated Western analysis. This new technology is based on CE-SDS where the separated proteins are attached to the wall of capillary by a proprietary photo activated chemical crosslink. Subsequent blotting is done automatically by incubating and washing the capillary with primary and secondary antibodies conjugated with horseradish peroxidase and detected with chemiluminescence. Typically, Western blots are not quantitative, hence we also evaluated the quantitative aspect of this new technology. We demonstrate that Simon™ can quantitate specific components in one of our vaccine candidates and it provides good reproducibility and intermediate precision with CV <10%. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Identification of α1-Antitrypsin as a Potential Candidate for Internal Control for Human Synovial Fluid in Western Blot.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaowei; Zhou, Jingming; Wei, Xiaochun; Li, Pengcui; Li, Kai; Wang, Dongming; Wei, Fangyuan; Zhang, Jianzhong; Wei, Lei

    Western blot of synovial fluid has been widely used for osteoarthritis (OA) research and diagnosis, but there is no ideal loading control for this purpose. Although β-actin is extensively used as loading control in western blot, it is not suitable for synovial fluid because it is not required in synovial fluid as a cytoskeletal protein. A good loading control for synovial fluid in OA studies should have unchanged content in synovial fluids from normal and OA groups, because synovial fluid protein content can vary with changes in synovial vascular permeability with OA onset. In this study, we explore the potential of using α1-antitripsin (A1AT) as loading control for OA synovial fluid in western blot. A1AT level is elevated in inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Unlike RA, OA is a non-inflammation disease, which does not induce A1AT. In this study, we identified A1AT as an abundant component of synovial fluid by Mass Spectrometry and confirmed that the level of A1AT is relative constant between human OA and normal synovial fluid by western blot and ELISA. Hence, we proposed that A1AT may be a good loading control for western blot in human OA synovial fluid studies provided that pathological conditions such as RA or A1AT deficiency associated liver or lung diseases are excluded.

  6. Isolation and molecular characterization of mRNA transport mutants in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Azad, A K; Tani, T; Shiki, N; Tsuneyoshi, S; Urushiyama, S; Ohshima, Y

    1997-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport of mRNA is essential for eukaryotic gene expression. However, how mRNA is exported from the nucleus is mostly unknown. To elucidate the mechanisms of mRNA transport, we took a genetic approach to identify genes, the products of which play a role in that process. From about 1000 temperature -sensitive (ts- or cs-) mutants, we identified five ts- mutants that are defective in poly(A)+ RNA transport by using a situ hybridization with an oligo(dT)50 as a probe. These mutants accumulate poly(A)+ RNA in the nuclei when shifted to a nonpermissive temperature. All five mutations are tightly linked to the ts- growth defects, are recessive, and fall into four different groups designated as ptr 1-4 (poly(A)+ RNA transport). Interestingly, each group of mutants has a differential localization pattern of poly(A)+ RNA in the nuclei at the nonpermissive temperature, suggesting that they have defects at different steps of the mRNA transport pathway. Localization of a nucleoplasmin-green fluorescent protein fusion suggests that ptr2 and ptr3 have defects also in nuclear protein import. Among the isolated mutants, only ptr2 showed a defect in pre-mRNA splicing. We cloned the ptr2+ and ptr3+ genes and found that they encode Schizosaccharomyces pombe homologues of the mammalian RCC1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for RAN/TC4, and the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 involved in ubiquitin conjugation, respectively. The ptr3+ gene is essential for cell viability, and Ptr3p tagged with green fluorescent protein was localized in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. This is the first report suggesting that the ubiquitin system plays a role in mRNA export. Images PMID:9168469

  7. Sensitivity of mRNA Translation.

    PubMed

    Poker, Gilad; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-08-04

    Using the dynamic mean-field approximation of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), we investigate the effect of small changes in the initiation, elongation, and termination rates along the mRNA strand on the steady-state protein translation rate. We show that the sensitivity of mRNA translation is equal to the sensitivity of the maximal eigenvalue of a symmetric, nonnegative, tridiagonal, and irreducible matrix. This leads to new analytical results as well as efficient numerical schemes that are applicable for large-scale models. Our results show that in the usual endogenous case, when initiation is more rate-limiting than elongation, the sensitivity of the translation rate to small mutations rapidly increases towards the 5' end of the ORF. When the initiation rate is high, as may be the case for highly expressed and/or heterologous optimized genes, the maximal sensitivity is with respect to the elongation rates at the middle of the mRNA strand. We also show that the maximal possible effect of a small increase/decrease in any of the rates along the mRNA is an increase/decrease of the same magnitude in the translation rate. These results are in agreement with previous molecular evolutionary and synthetic biology experimental studies.

  8. Sensitivity of mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Poker, Gilad; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    Using the dynamic mean-field approximation of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), we investigate the effect of small changes in the initiation, elongation, and termination rates along the mRNA strand on the steady-state protein translation rate. We show that the sensitivity of mRNA translation is equal to the sensitivity of the maximal eigenvalue of a symmetric, nonnegative, tridiagonal, and irreducible matrix. This leads to new analytical results as well as efficient numerical schemes that are applicable for large-scale models. Our results show that in the usual endogenous case, when initiation is more rate-limiting than elongation, the sensitivity of the translation rate to small mutations rapidly increases towards the 5′ end of the ORF. When the initiation rate is high, as may be the case for highly expressed and/or heterologous optimized genes, the maximal sensitivity is with respect to the elongation rates at the middle of the mRNA strand. We also show that the maximal possible effect of a small increase/decrease in any of the rates along the mRNA is an increase/decrease of the same magnitude in the translation rate. These results are in agreement with previous molecular evolutionary and synthetic biology experimental studies. PMID:26238363

  9. Dietary copper can regulate the level of mRNA for dopamine B-hydroxylase in rat adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Sabban, E.L.; Failla, M.L.; McMahon, A.; Seidel, K.E. Dept. of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD )

    1991-03-15

    Recent studies have shown that Cu deficiency markedly alters the levels of dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) in several peripheral tissues of rodents. Conversion of DA to NE is mediated by dopamine B-hydroxylase (DBM). Here the authors examined the effect of dietary Cu deficiency on the levels of DA, NE and DBM mRNA in rat adrenal gland. Severe Cu deficiency was induced by feeding low Cu diet to dams beginning at 17d gestation and weaning pups to the same diet. At 7 wks of age rats fed {minus}Cu diet were characterized by depressed growth, low tissue Cu, enlarged hearts and moderate anemia. Concentrations of DA were higher in adrenals and hearts of {minus}Cu rats compared to +Cu controls. While cardiac level of NE in {minus}Cu rats were reduced to 17% that of controls, adrenal NE was unchanged by Cu deficiency. To investigate possible mechanisms responsible for the response of adrenal gland to Cu deficiency, RNA was isolated and the levels of DBH mRNA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA were analyzed by Northern blots. Steady state levels of adrenal DBH mRNA was increased 2-3 fold in {minus}Cu rats, whereas TH mRNA were unchanged by dietary Cu status. Upon feeding the {minus}Cu rats the Cu adequate diet overnight, there was a further increase in DBH mRNA and a slight elevation of TH mRNA levels. The results indicate that dietary copper can markedly affect the level of DBH mRNA in rat adrenal gland.

  10. Pattern of expression of transforming growth factor-beta 4 mRNA and protein in the developing chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Jakowlew, S B; Ciment, G; Tuan, R S; Sporn, M B; Roberts, A B

    1992-12-01

    Expression of TGF-beta 4 mRNA and protein was studied in the developing chicken embryo using specific cDNA probes and antibodies for chicken TGF-beta 4. Expression of TGF-beta 4 mRNA was detected by day 4 of incubation (Hamburger and Hamilton stage 22, E4) by RNA Northern blot analysis and increased with developmental age until day 12 of incubation (stage 38, E12) where it was detected in every embryonic tissue examined, with expression being highest in smooth muscle and lowest in the kidney. The steady-state level of expression of TGF-beta 4 mRNA remained relatively constant in most embryonic tissues through day 19 (stage 45, E19). In situ hybridization analysis detected TGF-beta 4 mRNA as early as the "definitive primitive streak" stage (stage 4); during neurulation (stage 10), TGF-beta 4 mRNA was detected in all three germ layers, including neuroectoderm. Following neurulation, TGF-beta 4 mRNA was detected in the neural tube, notochord, ectoderm, endoderm, sclerotome, and myotome, but not dermotome at stage 16. By day 6 of incubation (stage 29, E6), TGF-beta 4 mRNA was localized in several tissues including heart, lung, and gizzard. Immunohistochemical staining analysis also showed expression of TGF-beta 4 protein in all three germ layers as early as stage 4 in various cell types in qualitatively similar locations as TGF-beta 4 mRNA. These results suggest that TGF-beta 4 may play an important role in the development of many tissues in the chicken.

  11. Imaging single mRNAs to study dynamics of mRNA export in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bensidoun, Pierre; Raymond, Pascal; Oeffinger, Marlene; Zenklusen, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Regulation of mRNA and protein expression occurs at many levels, initiated at transcription and followed by mRNA processing, export, localization, translation and mRNA degradation. The ability to study mRNAs in living cells has become a critical tool to study and analyze how the various steps of the gene expression pathway are carried out. Here we describe a detailed protocol for real time fluorescent RNA imaging using the PP7 bacteriophage coat protein, which allows mRNA detection with high spatial and temporal resolution in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and can be applied to study various stages of mRNA metabolism. We describe the different parameters required for quantitative single molecule imaging in yeast, including strategies for genomic integration, expression of a PP7 coat protein GFP fusion protein, microscope setup and analysis strategies. We illustrate the method's use by analyzing the behavior of nuclear mRNA in yeast and the role of the nuclear basket in mRNA export.

  12. Mammalian nonsense codons can be cis effectors of nuclear mRNA half-life.

    PubMed Central

    Belgrader, P; Cheng, J; Zhou, X; Stephenson, L S; Maquat, L E

    1994-01-01

    Frameshift and nonsense mutations within the gene for human triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) that generate a nonsense codon within the first three-fourths of the protein coding region have been found to reduce the abundance of the product mRNA that copurifies with nuclei. The cellular process and location of the nonsense codon-mediated reduction have proven difficult to elucidate for technical reasons. We show here, using electron microscopy to judge the purity of isolated nuclei, that the previously established reduction to 25% of the normal mRNA level is evident for nuclei that are free of detectable cytoplasmic contamination. Therefore, the reduction is likely to be characteristic of bona fide nuclear RNA. Fully spliced nuclear mRNA is identified by Northern (RNA) blot hybridization and a reverse transcription-PCR assay as the species that undergoes decay in experiments that used the human c-fos promoter to elicit a burst and subsequent shutoff of TPI gene transcription upon the addition of serum to serum-deprived cells. Finally, the finding that deletion of a 5' splice site of the TPI gene results predominantly but not exclusively in the removal by splicing (i.e., skipping) of the upstream exon as a part of the flanking introns has been used to demonstrate that decay is specific to those mRNA products that maintain the nonsense codon. This result, together with our previous results that implicate translation by ribosomes and charged tRNAs in the decay mechanism, indicate that nonsense codon recognition takes place after splicing and triggers decay solely in cis. The possibility that decay takes place during the process of mRNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is discussed. Images PMID:7969159

  13. Polynucleotide phosphorylase hinders mRNA degradation upon ribosomal protein S1 overexpression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Briani, Federica; Curti, Serena; Rossi, Francesca; Carzaniga, Thomas; Mauri, Pierluigi; Dehò, Gianni

    2008-01-01

    The exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase, encoded by pnp) is a major player in bacterial RNA decay. In Escherichia coli, PNPase expression is post-transcriptionally regulated at the level of mRNA stability. The primary transcript is very efficiently processed by the endonuclease RNase III at a specific site and the processed pnp mRNA is rapidly degraded in a PNPase-dependent manner. While investigating the PNPase autoregulation mechanism we found, by UV-cross-linking experiments, that the ribosomal protein S1 in crude extracts binds to the pnp-mRNA leader region. We assayed the potential role of S1 protein in pnp gene regulation by modulating S1 expression from depletion to overexpression. We found that S1 depletion led to a sharp decrease of the amount of pnp and other tested mRNAs, as detected by Northern blotting, whereas S1 overexpression caused a strong stabilization of pnp and the other transcripts. Surprisingly, mRNA stabilization depended on PNPase, as it was not observed in a pnp deletion strain. PNPase-dependent stabilization, however, was not detected by chemical decay assay of bulk mRNA. Overall, our data suggest that PNPase exonucleolytic activity may be modulated by the translation potential of the target mRNAs and that, upon ribosomal protein S1 overexpression, PNPase protects from degradation a set of full-length mRNAs. It thus appears that a single mRNA species may be differentially targeted to either decay or PNPase-dependent stabilization, thus preventing its depletion in conditions of fast turnover. PMID:18824515

  14. Polynucleotide phosphorylase hinders mRNA degradation upon ribosomal protein S1 overexpression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Briani, Federica; Curti, Serena; Rossi, Francesca; Carzaniga, Thomas; Mauri, Pierluigi; Dehò, Gianni

    2008-11-01

    The exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase, encoded by pnp) is a major player in bacterial RNA decay. In Escherichia coli, PNPase expression is post-transcriptionally regulated at the level of mRNA stability. The primary transcript is very efficiently processed by the endonuclease RNase III at a specific site and the processed pnp mRNA is rapidly degraded in a PNPase-dependent manner. While investigating the PNPase autoregulation mechanism we found, by UV-cross-linking experiments, that the ribosomal protein S1 in crude extracts binds to the pnp-mRNA leader region. We assayed the potential role of S1 protein in pnp gene regulation by modulating S1 expression from depletion to overexpression. We found that S1 depletion led to a sharp decrease of the amount of pnp and other tested mRNAs, as detected by Northern blotting, whereas S1 overexpression caused a strong stabilization of pnp and the other transcripts. Surprisingly, mRNA stabilization depended on PNPase, as it was not observed in a pnp deletion strain. PNPase-dependent stabilization, however, was not detected by chemical decay assay of bulk mRNA. Overall, our data suggest that PNPase exonucleolytic activity may be modulated by the translation potential of the target mRNAs and that, upon ribosomal protein S1 overexpression, PNPase protects from degradation a set of full-length mRNAs. It thus appears that a single mRNA species may be differentially targeted to either decay or PNPase-dependent stabilization, thus preventing its depletion in conditions of fast turnover.

  15. Testosterone Regulates NUCB2 mRNA Expression in Male Mouse Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland.

    PubMed

    Seon, Sojeong; Jeon, Daun; Kim, Heejeong; Chung, Yiwa; Choi, Narae; Yang, Hyunwon

    2017-03-01

    Nesfatin-1/NUCB2 is known to take part in the control of the appetite and energy metabolism. Recently, many reports have shown nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression and function in various organs. We previously demonstrated that nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression level is higher in the pituitary gland compared to other organs and its expression is regulated by 17β-estradiol and progesterone secreted from the ovary. However, currently no data exist on the expression of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 and its regulation mechanism in the pituitary of male mouse. Therefore, we examined whether nesfatin-1/NUCB2 is expressed in the male mouse pituitary and if its expression is regulated by testosterone. As a result of PCR and western blotting, we found that a large amount of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 was expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus. The NUCB2 mRNA expression level in the pituitary was decreased after castration, but not in the hypothalamus. In addition, its mRNA expression level in the pituitary was increased after testosterone treatment in the castrated mice, whereas, the expression level in the hypothalamus was significantly decreased after the treatment with testosterone. The in vitro experiment to elucidate the direct effect of testosterone on NUCB2 mRNA expression showed that NUCB2 mRNA expression was significantly decreased with testosterone in cultured hypothalamus tissue, but increased with testosterone in cultured pituitary gland. The present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1/NUCB2 was highly expressed in the male mouse pituitary and was regulated by testosterone. This data suggests that reproductive-endocrine regulation through hypothalamus-pituitary-testis axis may contribute to NUCB2 mRNA expression in the mouse hypothalamus and pituitary gland.

  16. Testosterone Regulates NUCB2 mRNA Expression in Male Mouse Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Seon, Sojeong; Jeon, Daun; Kim, Heejeong; Chung, Yiwa; Choi, Narae; Yang, Hyunwon

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nesfatin-1/NUCB2 is known to take part in the control of the appetite and energy metabolism. Recently, many reports have shown nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression and function in various organs. We previously demonstrated that nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression level is higher in the pituitary gland compared to other organs and its expression is regulated by 17β-estradiol and progesterone secreted from the ovary. However, currently no data exist on the expression of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 and its regulation mechanism in the pituitary of male mouse. Therefore, we examined whether nesfatin-1/NUCB2 is expressed in the male mouse pituitary and if its expression is regulated by testosterone. As a result of PCR and western blotting, we found that a large amount of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 was expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus. The NUCB2 mRNA expression level in the pituitary was decreased after castration, but not in the hypothalamus. In addition, its mRNA expression level in the pituitary was increased after testosterone treatment in the castrated mice, whereas, the expression level in the hypothalamus was significantly decreased after the treatment with testosterone. The in vitro experiment to elucidate the direct effect of testosterone on NUCB2 mRNA expression showed that NUCB2 mRNA expression was significantly decreased with testosterone in cultured hypothalamus tissue, but increased with testosterone in cultured pituitary gland. The present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1/NUCB2 was highly expressed in the male mouse pituitary and was regulated by testosterone. This data suggests that reproductive-endocrine regulation through hypothalamus-pituitary-testis axis may contribute to NUCB2 mRNA expression in the mouse hypothalamus and pituitary gland. PMID:28484746

  17. mRNA Distribution and Heterologous Expression of Orphan Cytochrome P450 20A1

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Katarina; Wu, Zhong-Liu; Bartleson, Cheryl J.; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) 20A1 is one of the so-called “orphan” P450s without assigned biological function. mRNA expression was detected in human liver and extrahepatic expression was noted in several human brain regions, including substantia nigra, hippocampus, and amygdala, using conventional polymerase chain reaction and RNA dot blot analysis. Adult human liver contained 3-fold higher overall mRNA levels than whole brain, although specific regions (i.e., hippocampus and substantia nigra) exhibited higher mRNA expression levels than liver. Orthologous full-length and truncated transcripts of P450 20A1 were transcribed and sequenced from rat liver, heart, and brain. In rat, the concentrations of full-length transcripts were 3–4 fold higher in brain and heart than liver. In situ hybridization of rat whole brain sections showed a similar mRNA expression pattern as observed for human P450 20A1, indicating expression in substantia nigra, hippocampus, and amygdala. A number of N-terminal modifications of the codon-optimized human P450 20A1 sequence were prepared and expressed in Escherichia coli, and two of the truncated derivatives showed characteristic P450 spectra (200–280 nmol P450/l). Although the recombinant enzyme system oxidized NADPH, no catalytic activity was observed with the heterologously expressed protein when a number of potential steroids and biogenic amines were surveyed as potential substrates. The function of P450 20A1 remains unknown; however, the sites of mRNA expression in human brain and the conservation among species may suggest possible neurophysiological function. PMID:18541694

  18. Enrichment of PrPSc in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues prior to analysis by Western blot.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Eric M

    2011-07-01

    Diagnosis of prion disease is primarily through immunodetection of the infectious agent. Typically, 2 distinct procedures are recommended for a definitive diagnosis, with immunohistochemistry and Western blot providing the most information as to the specific isolate in question. In the past, these approaches required formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue and fresh or frozen tissue, respectively; however, methods have been developed that allow for use of fixed tissue for Western blot. The present study describes a method of enriching PrP(Sc) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues prior to Western blot analysis for the detection of PrP(Sc). With this modified procedure, 5 times the previously reported sample size may be used for analysis, greatly enhancing the sensitivity of this procedure.

  19. Double-blotting: a solution to the problem of non-specific binding of secondary antibodies in immunoblotting procedures.

    PubMed

    Lasne, F

    2001-07-01

    "Double-blotting" (DB) was developed to overcome the problem of non-specific binding of secondary antibodies in immunoblotting (IB). After it had been probed by the primary antibody, the membrane with the blotted proteins was assembled with a second blank membrane and submitted to a second blotting under acidic conditions. The primary antibody molecules were thus desorbed from their corresponding antigen and transferred onto the second membrane, whereas the antigen and the interfering proteins remained bound to the first one. The second membrane could then be probed by the secondary antibodies without the risk of non-specific binding. This method was developed for the study of erythropoietin (EPO) in concentrated urine since a strong non-specific binding of biotinylated secondary antibodies to some urinary proteins had been observed using classical IB protocols.

  20. Double-blotting: a solution to the problem of nonspecific binding of secondary antibodies in immunoblotting procedures.

    PubMed

    Lasne, Françoise

    2003-05-01

    "Double-blotting" (DB) has been developed to overcome the problem of nonspecific binding of secondary antibodies in immunoblotting (IB). After it has been probed by the primary antibody, the membrane with the blotted proteins is assembled with a second blank membrane and submitted to a second blotting under acidic conditions. The primary antibody molecules are thus desorbed from their corresponding antigen and transferred onto the second membrane, whereas the antigen and the interfering proteins remain bound to the first one. The second membrane can then be probed by the secondary antibodies without the risk of nonspecific binding. This method has been developed for the study of erythropoietin (EPO) in concentrated urine since a strong nonspecific binding of biotinylated secondary antibodies to some urinary proteins is observed using classical IB protocols. However, its concept makes it usable in other applications that come up against this kind of problem.

  1. Detection of enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens in spices used in Mexico by dot blotting using a DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Romo, L A; Heredia, N L; Labbé, R G; García-Alvarado, J S

    1998-02-01

    Several reports on the microbiology of spices and herbs indicate the presence of Clostridium perfringens, a spore-forming foodborne pathogen responsible for gastrointestinal disease. In the present study, a total of 380 samples of spices and herbs (cumin seed, black pepper, oregano, garlic powder, and bay leaves) widely used in Mexico were analyzed for the presence of C. perfringens, and the enterotoxigenicity of the isolates was determined by a dot-blot technique using an enterotoxin degoxigenin-labeled DNA probe. C. perfringens counts varied from <100 to 433 CFU/g in garlic powder, from <100 to 200 CFU/g in black pepper, from <100 to 433 CFU/g in cumin seed, from <100 to 340 CFU/g in oregano, and from < 100 to 450 CFU/g in bay leaves. The dot-blot technique detected the enterotoxin gene in 8 (4.25%) of 188 confirmed isolates of C. perfringens. dot-blot.

  2. Product-selective blot: a technique for measuring enzyme activities in large numbers of samples and in native electrophoresis gels

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, G.A.; Davies, H.M.; McDonald, N.

    1985-08-01

    A method termed product-selective blotting has been developed for screening large numbers of samples for enzyme activity. The technique is particularly well suited to detection of enzymes in native electrophoresis gels. The principle of the method was demonstrated by blotting samples from glutaminase or glutamate synthase reactions into an agarose gel embedded with ion-exchange resin under conditions favoring binding of product (glutamate) over substrates and other substances in the reaction mixture. After washes to remove these unbound substances, the product was measured using either fluorometric staining or radiometric techniques. Glutaminase activity in native electrophoresis gels was visualized by a related procedure in which substrates and products from reactions run in the electrophoresis gel were blotted directly into a resin-containing image gel. Considering the selective-binding materials available for use in the image gel, along with the possible detection systems, this method has potentially broad application.

  3. Effect of electroacupuncture on the mRNA and protein expression of Rho-A and Rho-associated kinase II in spinal cord injury rats

    PubMed Central

    Min, You-jiang; Ding, Li-li-qiang; Cheng, Li-hong; Xiao, Wei-ping; He, Xing-wei; Zhang, Hui; Min, Zhi-yun; Pei, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Electroacupuncture is beneficial for the recovery of spinal cord injury, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. The Rho/Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway regulates the actin cytoskeleton by controlling the adhesive and migratory behaviors of cells that could inhibit neurite regrowth after neural injury and consequently hinder the recovery from spinal cord injury. Therefore, we hypothesized electroacupuncture could affect the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway to promote the recovery of spinal cord injury. In our experiments, the spinal cord injury in adult Sprague-Dawley rats was caused by an impact device. Those rats were subjected to electroacupuncture at Yaoyangguan (GV3), Dazhui (GV14), Zusanli (ST36) and Ciliao (BL32) and/or monosialoganglioside treatment. Behavioral scores revealed that the hindlimb motor functions improved with those treatments. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence in situ hybridization and western blot assay showed that electroacupuncture suppressed the mRNA and protein expression of Rho-A and Rho-associated kinase II (ROCKII) of injured spinal cord. Although monosialoganglioside promoted the recovery of hindlimb motor function, monosialoganglioside did not affect the expression of Rho-A and ROCKII. However, electroacupuncture combined with monosialoganglioside did not further improve the motor function or suppress the expression of Rho-A and ROCKII. Our data suggested that the electroacupuncture could specifically inhibit the activation of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway thus partially contributing to the repair of injured spinal cord. Monosialoganglioside could promote the motor function but did not suppress expression of RhoA and ROCKII. There was no synergistic effect of electroacupuncture combined with monosialoganglioside. PMID:28400811

  4. Nuclear Phosphoinositide-Specific Phospholipase C β1 Controls Cytoplasmic CCL2 mRNA Levels in HIV-1 gp120-Stimulated Primary Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Purificato, Cristina; Sabbatucci, Michela; Podo, Franca; Ramoni, Carlo; Gessani, Sandra; Fantuzzi, Laura

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 induces, independently of infection, the release of CCL2 from macrophages. In turn, this chemokine acts as an autocrine factor enhancing viral replication. In this study, we show for the first time that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) is required for the production of CCL2 triggered by gp120 in macrophages. Using a combination of confocal laser-scanner microscopy, pharmacologic inhibition, western blotting and fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis, we demonstrate that gp120 interaction with CCR5 leads to nuclear localization of the PI-PLC β1 isozyme mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK-1/2. Notably, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), previously reported to be required for NF-kB-mediated CCL2 production induced by gp120 in macrophages, drives both ERK1/2 activation and PI-PLC β1 nuclear localization induced by gp120. PI-PLC β1 activation through CCR5 is also triggered by the natural chemokine ligand CCL4, but independently of ERK1/2. Finally, PI-PLC inhibition neither blocks gp120-mediated NF-kB activation nor overall accumulation of CCL2 mRNA, whereas it decreases CCL2 transcript level in the cytoplasm. These results identify nuclear PI-PLC β1 as a new intermediate in the gp120-triggered PC-PLC-driven signal transduction pathway leading to CCL2 secretion in macrophages. The finding that a concerted gp120-mediated signaling involving both PC- and PI-specific PLCs is required for the expression of CCL2 in macrophages suggests that this signal transduction pathway may also be relevant for the modulation of viral replication in these cells. Thus, this study may contribute to identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention in HIV-1 infection. PMID:23555755

  5. Nuclear phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C β1 controls cytoplasmic CCL2 mRNA levels in HIV-1 gp120-stimulated primary human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, Francesca; Cecchetti, Serena; Purificato, Cristina; Sabbatucci, Michela; Podo, Franca; Ramoni, Carlo; Gessani, Sandra; Fantuzzi, Laura

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 induces, independently of infection, the release of CCL2 from macrophages. In turn, this chemokine acts as an autocrine factor enhancing viral replication. In this study, we show for the first time that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) is required for the production of CCL2 triggered by gp120 in macrophages. Using a combination of confocal laser-scanner microscopy, pharmacologic inhibition, western blotting and fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis, we demonstrate that gp120 interaction with CCR5 leads to nuclear localization of the PI-PLC β1 isozyme mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK-1/2. Notably, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), previously reported to be required for NF-kB-mediated CCL2 production induced by gp120 in macrophages, drives both ERK1/2 activation and PI-PLC β1 nuclear localization induced by gp120. PI-PLC β1 activation through CCR5 is also triggered by the natural chemokine ligand CCL4, but independently of ERK1/2. Finally, PI-PLC inhibition neither blocks gp120-mediated NF-kB activation nor overall accumulation of CCL2 mRNA, whereas it decreases CCL2 transcript level in the cytoplasm. These results identify nuclear PI-PLC β1 as a new intermediate in the gp120-triggered PC-PLC-driven signal transduction pathway leading to CCL2 secretion in macrophages. The finding that a concerted gp120-mediated signaling involving both PC- and PI-specific PLCs is required for the expression of CCL2 in macrophages suggests that this signal transduction pathway may also be relevant for the modulation of viral replication in these cells. Thus, this study may contribute to identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention in HIV-1 infection.

  6. GTP cyclohydrolase I mRNA: novel splice variants in the slime mould Physarum polycephalum and in human monocytes (THP-1) indicate conservation of mRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Golderer, G; Werner, E R; Heufler, C; Strohmaier, W; Gröbner, P; Werner-Felmayer, G

    2001-04-15

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (EC 3.5.4.16) is the first enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin [(6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin, H(4)-biopterin] in mammals and of folic acid in bacteria. Here we have characterized the GTP cyclohydrolase I gene structure and two mRNA species from Physarum polycephalum, an acellular slime mould that synthesizes H(4)-biopterin and metabolites of the folic acid biosynthetic pathway. Its GTP cyclohydrolase I gene consists of seven exons, and the two GTP cyclohydrolase I cDNA species isolated from Physarum encode for proteins with 228 (25.7 kDa) and 195 (22.1 kDa) amino acids. Furthermore, we identified two previously undescribed mRNA species in interferon-gamma-treated human myelomonocytoma cells (THP-1) in addition to the cDNA coding for the fully functional 250-residue (27.9 kDa) protein, which is identical with that in human phaeochromocytoma cells. One of the new splice variants codes for a 233-residue (25.7 kDa) protein, whereas the other codes for the full-length protein but is alternatively spliced within the 3'-untranslated region. In heterologous expression, the shorter proteins of Physarum as well as of THP-1 cells identified here are degraded by proteolysis. Accordingly, only the 27.9 kDa protein was detectable in Western blots from THP-1 cell extracts. Quantification of GTP cyclohydrolase I mRNA species in different human cell types with and without cytokine treatment showed that in addition to the correct mRNA the two splice variants isolated here, as well as the two splice variants known from human liver, are strongly induced by cytokines in cell types with inducible GTP cyclohydrolase I (THP-1, dermal fibroblasts), but not in cell types with constitutive GTP cyclohydrolase I expression (SK-N-SH, Hep-G2). As in human liver, splicing of the new mRNA variant found in THP-1 cells occurs at the boundary of exons 5 and 6. Strikingly, the 195-residue protein from Physarum is alternatively spliced at a homologous position

  7. GTP cyclohydrolase I mRNA: novel splice variants in the slime mould Physarum polycephalum and in human monocytes (THP-1) indicate conservation of mRNA processing.

    PubMed Central

    Golderer, G; Werner, E R; Heufler, C; Strohmaier, W; Gröbner, P; Werner-Felmayer, G

    2001-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (EC 3.5.4.16) is the first enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin [(6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin, H(4)-biopterin] in mammals and of folic acid in bacteria. Here we have characterized the GTP cyclohydrolase I gene structure and two mRNA species from Physarum polycephalum, an acellular slime mould that synthesizes H(4)-biopterin and metabolites of the folic acid biosynthetic pathway. Its GTP cyclohydrolase I gene consists of seven exons, and the two GTP cyclohydrolase I cDNA species isolated from Physarum encode for proteins with 228 (25.7 kDa) and 195 (22.1 kDa) amino acids. Furthermore, we identified two previously undescribed mRNA species in interferon-gamma-treated human myelomonocytoma cells (THP-1) in addition to the cDNA coding for the fully functional 250-residue (27.9 kDa) protein, which is identical with that in human phaeochromocytoma cells. One of the new splice variants codes for a 233-residue (25.7 kDa) protein, whereas the other codes for the full-length protein but is alternatively spliced within the 3'-untranslated region. In heterologous expression, the shorter proteins of Physarum as well as of THP-1 cells identified here are degraded by proteolysis. Accordingly, only the 27.9 kDa protein was detectable in Western blots from THP-1 cell extracts. Quantification of GTP cyclohydrolase I mRNA species in different human cell types with and without cytokine treatment showed that in addition to the correct mRNA the two splice variants isolated here, as well as the two splice variants known from human liver, are strongly induced by cytokines in cell types with inducible GTP cyclohydrolase I (THP-1, dermal fibroblasts), but not in cell types with constitutive GTP cyclohydrolase I expression (SK-N-SH, Hep-G2). As in human liver, splicing of the new mRNA variant found in THP-1 cells occurs at the boundary of exons 5 and 6. Strikingly, the 195-residue protein from Physarum is alternatively spliced at a homologous position

  8. Stain-free detection as loading control alternative to Ponceau and housekeeping protein immunodetection in Western blotting.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Gutiérrez, B; Anzola, A; Martínez-Augustin, O; de Medina, F Sánchez

    2014-12-15

    It is currently a routine practice to require a measurement of a housekeeping reference, including actin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, β-tubulin, among others, in Western blots, as it is the rule in RNA blots. Reversible Ponceau staining has been applied successfully to check equal loading of gels. Here we test a new technique, with the Stain-Free gels from Bio-Rad, against both Ponceau staining and housekeeping protein immunodetection under different conditions. Our results show that Stain-Free gels outperform Ponceau staining and that both are more consistent than housekeeping proteins as a loading control.

  9. Stain-Free total protein staining is a superior loading control to β-actin for Western blots.

    PubMed

    Gilda, Jennifer E; Gomes, Aldrin V

    2013-09-15

    Semi-quantification of proteins using Western blots typically involves normalization against housekeeping genes such as β-actin. More recently, Ponceau S and Coomassie blue staining have both been shown to be suitable alternatives to housekeeping genes as loading controls. Stain-Free total protein staining offers the advantage of no staining or destaining steps. Evaluation of the use of Stain-Free staining as an alternative to β-actin or the protein stain Ponceau S showed that Stain-Free staining was superior to β-actin and as good as or better than Ponceau S staining as a loading control for Western blots.

  10. Co-regulation of polar mRNA transport and lifespan in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Taranukha, Dmitri; Budovsky, Arie; Gobshtis, Nikolai; Braiman, Alex; Porat, Ziv; Aronov, Stella; Fraifeld, Vadim E

    2012-11-15

    Recent studies have uncovered the links between aging, rejuvenation and polar protein transport in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we examined a still unexplored possibility for co-regulation of polar mRNA transport and lifespan. To monitor the amount and distribution of mRNA-containing granules in mother and daughter cells, we used a fluorescent mRNA-labeling system, with MFA2 as a reporter gene. The results obtained showed that deletion of the selected longevity regulators in budding yeast had a significant impact on the polar mRNA transport. This included changes in the amount of mRNA-containing granules in cytoplasm, their aggregation and distribution between the mother and daughter cells. A significant negative correlation was found between strain-specific longevity, amount of granules and total fluorescent intensity both in mother and daughter cells. As indicated by the coefficient of determination, approximately 50-75% of variation in yeast lifespan could be attributed to the differences in polar mRNA transport.

  11. In vivo imaging of labelled endogenous β-actin mRNA during nucleocytoplasmic transport.

    PubMed

    Grünwald, David; Singer, Robert H

    2010-09-30

    Export of messenger RNA occurs via nuclear pores, which are large nanomachines with diameters of roughly 120 nm that are the only link between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Hence, mRNA export occurs over distances smaller than the optical resolution of conventional light microscopes. There is extensive knowledge on the physical structure and composition of the nuclear pore complex, but transport selectivity and the dynamics of mRNA export at nuclear pores remain unknown. Here we developed a super-registration approach using fluorescence microscopy that can overcome the current limitations of co-localization by means of measuring intermolecular distances of chromatically different fluorescent molecules with nanometre precision. With this method we achieve 20-ms time-precision and at least 26-nm spatial precision, enabling the capture of highly transient interactions in living cells. Using this approach we were able to spatially resolve the kinetics of mRNA transport in mammalian cells and present a three-step model consisting of docking (80 ms), transport (5-20 ms) and release (80 ms), totalling 180 ± 10 ms. Notably, the translocation through the channel was not the rate-limiting step, mRNAs can move bi-directionally in the pore complex and not all pores are equally active.

  12. Structure and expression of the guinea pig preproenkephalin gene: site-specific cleavage in the 3' untranslated region yields truncated mRNA transcripts in specific brain regions.

    PubMed Central

    LaForge, K S; Unterwald, E M; Kreek, M J

    1995-01-01

    We isolated the guinea pig preproenkephalin gene from a genomic library by hybridization to a rat cDNA probe. The entire nucleotide sequence of the gene was determined. Genomic Southern blot hybridization demonstrated that the gene exists in a single copy within the genome. On the basis of RNase protection transcript mapping and homology comparisons with known preproenkephalin sequences from other species and assuming a poly(A) tail length of 100 residues, we predicted an mRNA transcript of approximately 1,400 nucleotides encoded by three exons. Northern (RNA) blot analysis of total RNA from several brain regions showed high levels of preproenkephalin mRNA in the caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, and hypothalamus, with detectable levels in the amygdala, ventral tegmental area, and central gray and also in the pituitary. Unexpectedly, in several brain regions, the mRNA appeared not only in the 1,400-nucleotide length but also in a shorter length of approximately 1,130 bases. Significant amounts of the shorter mRNA were found in the caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala. The longer, but not the shorter, transcripts from the caudate putamen were found to be polyadenylated, but the difference in size was not due solely to the presence of poly(A) tails. Northern gel analysis of total RNA from the caudate putamen with probes from each exon, together with RNase protection mapping of the 3' end of the mRNA demonstrated that the 1,400-base preproenkephalin mRNA transcripts are cleaved in a site-specific manner in some brain regions, yielding a 1,130-base transcript and a 165-base polyadenylated fragment derived from the terminal end of the 3' untranslated region of the mRNA. This cleavage may serve as a preliminary step in RNA degradation and provide a mechanism for control of preproenkephalin mRNA abundance through selective degradation. PMID:7891703

  13. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-10-04

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  14. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  15. Holograms with fluorescent benzyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares-Pérez, A.; Toxqui-López, S.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.; Dorantes-Garcia, V.

    2011-02-01

    Behavior study of the diffraction efficiency parameter from holographic gratings, with fluorescents inks such as benzyls. We have been able to make holograms with substances such as fluorescence to blue laser to make transmissions holograms using ammonium dichromate as photo-sensibilizer and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as matrix. Ammonium dichromate inhibit the fluorescence propertied of inks, mixed in a (PVA) matrix, but we show the results of painting hologram method with fluorescents inks and describe how the diffraction efficiency parameter changes as a function of ink absorbed by the emulsion recorded with gratings with a He-Cd laser at 442nm and we later were painting with fluorescent ink, interesting fluorescence characteristic to the hologram.

  16. Fluorescence Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio, and to provide a suitable environment for cells or tissues to replicate physiological cell dynamics. This chapter aims to give a general overview on microscope design choices critical for fluorescence live cell imaging that apply to most fluorescence microscopy modalities, and on environmental control with a focus on mammalian tissue culture cells. In addition, we provide guidance on how to design and evaluate fluorescent protein constructs by spinning disk confocal microscopy. PMID:24974023

  17. Fluorescent hybridization probes for nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Ju, Jingyue; Turro, Nicholas J

    2012-04-01

    Due to their high sensitivity and selectivity, minimum interference with living biological systems, and ease of design and synthesis, fluorescent hybridization probes have been widely used to detect nucleic acids both in vivo and in vitro. Molecular beacons (MBs) and binary probes (BPs) are two very important hybridization probes that are designed based on well-established photophysical principles. These probes have shown particular applicability in a variety of studies, such as mRNA tracking, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) monitoring, and microorganism identification. Molecular beacons are hairpin oligonucleotide probes that present distinctive fluorescent signatures in the presence and absence of their target. Binary probes consist of two fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide strands that can hybridize to adjacent regions of their target and generate distinctive fluorescence signals. These probes have been extensively studied and modified for different applications by modulating their structures or using various combinations of fluorophores, excimer-forming molecules, and metal complexes. This review describes the applicability and advantages of various hybridization probes that utilize novel and creative design to enhance their target detection sensitivity and specificity.

  18. Pressure overload stimulated cardiac hypertrophy leads to a rapid decrease in the mRNA for creatine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Boheler, K.; Popovich, B.; Dillmann, W.H.

    1987-05-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy (CH) leads to a decrease in creatine kinase (CK) enzymatic activity. To determine if the mRNA for CK also decreases with CH, they performed the following studies. Cardiac RNA was isolated from rats subjected to either abdominal aortic stenosis (AS) or sham surgery. Through Northern blot analysis, total cardiac RNA was quantitated with a CK specific /sup 32/P-labelled cDNA clone. At 3 and 8 days post-constriction, the mRNA for CK decreases by 54.6 +/- 7% and 65.3 +/- 18% respectively, whereas the heart weight increases by 19% and 37% relative to controls. Further studies indicate that CK mRNA also decreases by 41.8% in hypothyroid rats (Tx) but decreases by a total of 68.1% in Tx rats subjected to 8 days of AS. Pressure overload stimulated CH leads to a rapid decrease in CK mRNA in normal and Tx rats. This CK mRNA decrease may account for the decreased efficiency of contraction seen in CH.

  19. Global changes in processing of mRNA 3' untranslated regions characterize clinically distinct cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priyam; Alley, Travis L; Wright, Sarah M; Kamdar, Sonya; Schott, William; Wilpan, Robert Y; Mills, Kevin D; Graber, Joel H

    2009-12-15

    Molecular cancer diagnostics are an important clinical advance in cancer management, but new methods are still needed. In this context, gene expression signatures obtained by microarray represent a useful molecular diagnostic. Here, we describe novel probe-level microarray analyses that reveal connections between mRNA processing and neoplasia in multiple tumor types, with diagnostic potential. We now show that characteristic differences in mRNA processing, primarily in the 3'-untranslated region, define molecular signatures that can distinguish similar tumor subtypes with different survival characteristics, with at least 74% accuracy. Using a mouse model of B-cell leukemia/lymphoma, we find that differences in transcript isoform abundance are likely due to both alternative polyadenylation (APA) and differential degradation. While truncation of the 3'-UTR is the most common observed pattern, genes with elongated transcripts were also observed, and distinct groups of affected genes are found in related but distinct tumor types. Genes with elongated transcripts are overrepresented in ontology categories related to cell-cell adhesion and morphology. Analysis of microarray data from human primary tumor samples revealed similar phenomena. Western blot analysis of selected proteins confirms that changes in the 3'-UTR can correlate with changes in protein expression. Our work suggests that alternative mRNA processing, particularly APA, can be a powerful molecular biomarker with prognostic potential. Finally, these findings provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of gene deregulation in tumorigenesis.

  20. Expression of connexin 43 mRNA and protein in developing follicles of prepubertal porcine ovaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melton, C.M.; Zaunbrecher, G.M.; Yoshizaki, G.; Patio, R.; Whisnant, S.; Rendon, A.; Lee, V.H.

    2001-01-01

    A major form of cell-cell communication is mediated by gap junctions, aggregations of intercellular channels composed of connexins (Cxs), which are responsible for exchange of low molecular weight (< 1200 Da) cytosolic materials. These channels are a growing family of related proteins. This study was designed to determine the ontogeny of connexin 43 (Cx43) during early stages of follicular development in prepubertal porcine ovaries. A partial-length (412 base) cDNA clone was obtained from mature porcine ovaries and determined to have 98% identity with published porcine Cx43. Northern blot analysis demonstrated a 4.3-kb mRNA in total RNA isolated from prepubertal and adult porcine ovaries. In-situ hybridization revealed that Cx43 mRNA was detectable in granulosa cells of primary follicles but undetectable in dormant primordial follicles. The intensity of the signal increased with follicular growth and was greatest in the large antral follicles. Immunohistochemical evaluation indicated that Cx43 protein expression correlated with the presence of Cx43 mRNA. These results indicate that substantial amounts of Cx43 are first expressed in granulosa cells following activation of follicular development and that this expression increases throughout follicular growth and maturation. These findings suggest an association between the enhancement of intercellular gap-junctional communication and onset of follicular growth. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  2. Kinetic Induction of Oat Shoot Pulvinus Invertase mRNA by Gravistimulation and Partial cDNA Cloning by the Polymerase Chain Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Liu-Lai; Song, Il; Karuppiah, Nadarajah; Kaufman, Peter B.

    1993-01-01

    An asymmetric (top vs. bottom halves of pulvini) induction of invertase mRNA by gravistimulation was analyzed in oat shoot pulvini. Total RNA and poly(A)(+) RNA, isolated from oat pulvini, and two oli-gonucleotide primers, corresponding to two conserved amino acid sequences (NDPNG and WECPD) found in invertase from other species, were used for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A partial length cDNA (550 bp) was obtained and characterized. A 62% nucleotide sequence homology and 58% deduced amino acid sequence homology, as compared to beta-fructosidase of carrot cell wall, was found. Northern blot analysis showed that there was an obviously transient induction of invertase mRNA by gravistimulation in the oat pulvinus system. The mRNA was rapidly induced to a maximum level at 1 hour after gravistimulation treatment and gradually decreased afterwards. The mRNA level in the bottom half of the oat pulvinus was significantly higher than that in the top half of the pulvinus tissue. The kinetic induction of invertase mRNA was consistent with the transient accumulation of invertase activity during the graviresponse of the pulvinus. This indicates that the expression of the invertase gene(s) could be regulated by gravistimulation at the transcriptional level. Southern blot analysis showed that there were two to three genomic DNA fragments which hybridized with the partial-length invertase cDNA.

  3. Monte Carlo fluorescence microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Alexander X.; Hofmann, Matthias C.; Cong, Wenxiang; Xu, Yong; Wang, Ge

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescence microscopy allows real-time monitoring of optical molecular probes for disease characterization, drug development, and tissue regeneration. However, when a biological sample is thicker than 1 mm, intense scattering of light would significantly degrade the spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. In this paper, we develop a fluorescence microtomography technique that utilizes the Monte Carlo method to image fluorescence reporters in thick biological samples. This approach is based on an l0-regularized tomography model and provides an excellent solution. Our studies on biomimetic tissue scaffolds have demonstrated that the proposed approach is capable of localizing and quantifying the distribution of optical molecular probe accurately and reliably.

  4. Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Dysli, Chantal; Wolf, Sebastian; Berezin, Mikhail Y; Sauer, Lydia; Hammer, Martin; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2017-09-01

    Imaging techniques based on retinal autofluorescence have found broad applications in ophthalmology because they are extremely sensitive and noninvasive. Conventional fundus autofluorescence imaging measures fluorescence intensity of endogenous retinal fluorophores. It mainly derives its signal from lipofuscin at the level of the retinal pigment epithelium. Fundus autofluorescence, however, can not only be characterized by the spatial distribution of the fluorescence intensity or emission spectrum, but also by a characteristic fluorescence lifetime function. The fluorescence lifetime is the average amount of time a fluorophore remains in the excited state following excitation. Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) is an emerging imaging modality for in vivo measurement of lifetimes of endogenous retinal fluorophores. Recent reports in this field have contributed to our understanding of the pathophysiology of various macular and retinal diseases. Within this review, the basic concept of fluorescence lifetime imaging is provided. It includes technical background information and correlation with in vitro measurements of individual retinal metabolites. In a second part, clinical applications of fluorescence lifetime imaging and fluorescence lifetime features of selected retinal diseases such as Stargardt disease, age-related macular degeneration, choroideremia, central serous chorioretinopathy, macular holes, diabetic retinopathy, and retinal artery occlusion are discussed. Potential areas of use for fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy will be outlined at the end of this review. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Mucin Agarose Gel Electrophoresis: Western Blotting for High-molecular-weight Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Kathryn A; Rushton, Zachary L; Ehre, Camille

    2016-06-14

    Mucins, the heavily-glycosylated proteins lining mucosal surfaces, have evolved as a key component of innate defense by protecting the epithelium against invading pathogens. The main role of these macromolecules is to facilitate particle trapping and clearance while promoting lubrication of the mucosa. During protein synthesis, mucins undergo intense O-glycosylation and multimerization, which dramatically increase the mass and size of these molecules. These post-translational modifications are critical for the viscoelastic properties of mucus. As a result of the complex biochemical and biophysical nature of these molecules, working with mucins provides many challenges that cannot be overcome by conventional protein analysis methods. For instance, their high-molecular-weight prevents electrophoretic migration via regular polyacrylamide gels and their sticky nature causes adhesion to experimental tubing. However, investigating the role of mucins in health (e.g., maintaining mucosal integrity) and disease (e.g., hyperconcentration, mucostasis, cancer) has recently gained interest and mucins are being investigated as a therapeutic target. A better understanding of the production and function of mucin macromolecules may lead to novel pharmaceutical approaches, e.g., inhibitors of mucin granule exocytosis and/or mucolytic agents. Therefore, consistent and reliable protocols to investigate mucin biology are critical for scientific advancement. Here, we describe conventional methods to separate mucin macromolecules by electrophoresis using an agarose gel, transfer protein into nitrocellulose membrane, and detect signal with mucin-specific antibodies as well as infrared fluorescent gel reader. These techniques are widely applicable to determine mucin quantitation, multimerization and to test the effects of pharmacological compounds on mucins.

  6. Mechanism of Cytoplasmic mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a fundamental process in gene expression that depends upon the abundance and accessibility of the mRNA transcript as well as the activity of many protein and RNA-protein complexes. Here we focus on the intricate mechanics of mRNA translation in the cytoplasm of higher plants. This chapter includes an inventory of the plant translational apparatus and a detailed review of the translational processes of initiation, elongation, and termination. The majority of mechanistic studies of cytoplasmic translation have been carried out in yeast and mammalian systems. The factors and mechanisms of translation are for the most part conserved across eukaryotes; however, some distinctions are known to exist in plants. A comprehensive understanding of the complex translational apparatus and its regulation in plants is warranted, as the modulation of protein production is critical to development, environmental plasticity and biomass yield in diverse ecosystems and agricultural settings. PMID:26019692

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum stress increases AT1R mRNA expression via TIA-1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Backlund, Michael; Paukku, Kirsi; Kontula, Kimmo K; Lehtonen, Jukka Y A

    2016-04-20

    As the formation of ribonucleoprotein complexes is a major mechanism of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) regulation, we sought to identify novel AT1R mRNA binding proteins. By affinity purification and mass spectroscopy, we identified TIA-1. This interaction was confirmed by colocalization of AT1R mRNA and TIA-1 by FISH and immunofluorescence microscopy. In immunoprecipitates of endogenous TIA- 1, reverse transcription-PCR amplified AT1R mRNA. TIA-1 has two binding sites within AT1R 3'-UTR. The binding site proximal to the coding region is glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)-dependent whereas the distal binding site is not. TIA-1 functions as a part of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response leading to stress granule (SG) formation and translational silencing. We and others have shown that AT1R expression is increased by ER stress-inducing factors. In unstressed cells, TIA-1 binds to AT1R mRNA and decreases AT1R protein expression. Fluorescence microscopy shows that ER stress induced by thapsigargin leads to the transfer of TIA-1 to SGs. In FISH analysis AT1R mRNA remains in the cytoplasm and no longer colocalizes with TIA-1. Thus, release of TIA-1-mediated suppression by ER stress increases AT1R protein expression. In conclusion, AT1R mRNA is regulated by TIA-1 in a ER stress-dependent manner. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Determinants that contribute to cytoplasmic stability of human c-fos and. beta. -globin mRNAs are located at several sites in each mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kabnick, K.S.; Housman, D.E.

    1988-08-01

    The authors have analyzed the contributions to cytoplasmic stability in an mRNA species with a very short half-life (human c-fos) and an mRNA species with a very long half-life (human ..beta..-globin). When the human c-fos promoter was used to drive the expression of human c-fos, ..beta..-globin, and chimeric DNAs between c-fos and ..beta..-globin in transfected cells, a pulse of mRNA synthesis was obtained following induction of transcription by refeeding quiescent cells with medium containing 15% calf serum. The mRNA half-life was determined by using Northern (RNA) blot analysis of mRNAs prepared at various times following the pulse of transcription. Under these conditions human c-fos mRNA exhibited a half-life of 6.6 min and human ..beta..-globin mRNA exhibited a half-life of 17.5 h. Replacement of the 3' end of the c-fos mRNA with the 3' end of the ..beta..-globin mRNA increased the half-life of the resultant RNA from 6.6 to 34 min. The reciprocal chimera had a half-life of 34.6 min compared with the 17.5-half-life of ..beta..-globin mRNA. These results suggest that sequences which make a major contribution to mRNA stability reside in the 3' end of either or both molecules. A chimera in which the 5' untranslated region of globin was replaced by part of the 5' untranslated region of fos led to destabilization of the encoded mRNA. This construct produced an mRNA with a half-life of 6.8 h instead of the 17.5-h half-life of globin. This result suggests that additional determinants of stability reside in the 5' end of these mRNA molecules. Substitution of part of the 5' untranslated region of fox by the 5' untranslated region of ..beta..-globin yielded an mRNA with stability similar to fos mRNA. These results suggest that interactions among sequences within each mRNA contribute to the stability of the respective molecules.

  9. Enrichment of PrPSc in Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded Tissues Prior to Analysis by Western Blot

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Diagnosis of prion disease is primarily through immunodetection of the infectious agent. Typically, 2 distinct procedures are recommended for a definitive diagnosis with immunohistochemistry and Western blot providing the most information as to the specific isolate in question. In the past these app...

  10. Novel chemiluminescent Western blot blocking and antibody incubation solution for enhanced antibody-antigen interaction and increased specificity.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Kimberly; Bochkariov, Dmitry

    2017-07-13

    Western blotting is a ubiquitous tool used in protein and molecular biology research, providing information about the presence, size, relative abundance, and state of a protein in a mixture. First, the proteins in a sample are separated by size using SDS-PAGE then transferred onto a membrane for detection with a set of primary and secondary antibodies. High-quality Western data requires high signal-to-noise ratios, which depend upon reduction of nonspecific antibody interactions. Blocking is a critical step in the Western blot method as it prevents the antibodies from binding nonspecifically to the membrane and irrelevant proteins. A solution of nonfat dry milk (NFDM) in physiological buffer is commonly used for this purpose, but does not perform well with every type of antibody and is not optimal for low-abundance proteins. We present a novel blocking solution for chemiluminescent Western blots, AdvanBlock™-chemi, which outperforms NFDM in experiments with 20 unique antibodies by increasing signal-to-noise ratios and minimizing nonspecific binding. This solution enhances protein detection by Western blot and provides consistent results for detection of low abundant and modified proteins. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Western blot assay using recombinant p26 antigen for detection of equine infectious anemia virus-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, I; Gutierrez, G; Ostlund, E; Barrandeguy, M; Trono, K

    2007-12-01

    We analyzed the performance of a single-band Western blot (WB) test using recombinant p26 (rp26) capsid protein of equine infectious anemia virus. According to the results obtained, the rp26 WB test is a reliable confirmatory diagnostic tool to be used as a complementary test after an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or agar gel immunodiffusion test yielding doubtful results.

  12. Proteomic analysis of human biopsy samples by single two-dimensional electrophoresis: Coomassie, silver, mass spectrometry, and Western blotting.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Jason L; Neverova, Irina; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2002-08-01

    Proteomic analysis of myocardial tissue from patient populations is critical to our understanding of cardiac disease, but has been limited until now by the small size of biopsies (approximately 20-50 microg), and complicated by the difference in relative abundance of contractile proteins over other cellular components. Here we describe an approach to analysis of myocardial biopsies from patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery. First, individual biopsies are selectively extracted, producing subfractions that correspond to the contractile proteins and the cytosolic proteins. Two-dimensional electrophoresis separated proteins are detected by first staining with Coomassie blue then silver, to permit a wider range of accurate quantification. Western blotting of two-dimensional separated samples, to validate peptide mass fingerprinting data, previously required additional gel separations for transfer since staining protocols are not compatible with transfer to membranes or immunoblotting. An existing silver destaining protocol was adapted to allow removal of silver from a whole gel, followed by transfer and Western blotting. An existing Coomassie blue removal protocol was also adapted to permit Western blotting of gels stained with Coomassie blue and silver. Together, these techniques permit peptide mass fingerprinting concurrent with Western blotting of a single protein spot from a single biopsy, eliminating the need for repeated gel separations, and improving spot alignment between immunoblots and stained gels. In the end, this approach may allow a more complete characterization of protein changes in small human biopsies, and also reduce the number of repeated gel separations necessary for a standard proteomic analysis.

  13. Detection of X chromosome aneuploidy using Southern blot analysis during routine population-based screening for fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Adir, Vardit; Shahak, Elena; Dar, Hanna; Borochowitz, Zvi U

    2003-01-01

    We report herein two cases where detection of X chromosome aneuploidy (cytogenetically proved 45,X/46XX and 47,XXX) was made possible by molecular diagnosis during population-based carrier screening for Fragile X syndrome, using Southern blot analysis. This study emphasizes the value of molecular analysis for gene dosage to suggest chromosomal aneuploidy.

  14. Staufen-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eonyoung; Maquat, Lynne E.

    2013-01-01

    Staufen1 (STAU1)-mediated mRNA decay (SMD) is an mRNA degradation process in mammalian cells that is mediated by the binding of STAU1 to a STAU1-binding site (SBS) within the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of target mRNAs. During SMD, STAU1, a double-stranded (ds) RNA-binding protein, recognizes dsRNA structures formed either by intramolecular base-pairing of 3'UTR sequences or by intermolecular base-pairing of 3'UTR sequences with a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) via partially complementary Alu elements. Recently, STAU2, a paralog of STAU1, has also been reported to mediate SMD. Both STAU1 and STAU2 interact directly with the ATP-dependent RNA helicase UPF1, a key SMD factor, enhancing its helicase activity to promote effective SMD. Moreover, STAU1 and STAU2 form homodimeric and heterodimeric interactions via domain-swapping. Since both SMD and the mechanistically related nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) employ UPF1, SMD and NMD are competitive pathways. Competition contributes to cellular differentiation processes, such as myogenesis and adipogenesis, placing SMD at the heart of various physiologically important mechanisms. PMID:23681777

  15. Soluble, highly fluorescent variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) for use in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Davis, S J; Vierstra, R D

    1998-03-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria has rapidly become a standard reporter in many biological systems. However, the use of GFP in higher plants has been limited by aberrant splicing of the corresponding mRNA and by protein insolubility. It has been shown that GFP can be expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana after altering the codon usage in the region that is incorrectly spliced, but the fluorescence signal is weak, possibly due to aggregation of the encoded protein. Through site-directed mutagenesis, we have generated a more soluble version of the codon-modified GFP called soluble-modified GFP (smGFP). The excitation and emission spectra for this protein are nearly identical to wild-type GFP. When introduced into A. thaliana, greater fluorescence was observed compared to the codon-modified GFP, implying that smGFP is 'brighter' because more of it is present in a soluble and functional form. Using the smGFP template, two spectral variants were created, a soluble-modified red-shifted GFP (smRS-GFP) and a soluble-modified blue-fluorescent protein (smBFP). The increased fluorescence output of smGFP will further the use of this reporter in higher plants. In addition, the distinct spectral characters of smRS-GFP and smBFP should allow for dual monitoring of gene expression, protein localization, and detection of in vivo protein-protein interactions.

  16. Temporal and spatial characterization of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Trcek, Tatjana; Sato, Hanae; Singer, Robert H; Maquat, Lynne E

    2013-03-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a quality control mechanism responsible for "surveying" mRNAs during translation and degrading those that harbor a premature termination codon (PTC). Currently the intracellular spatial location of NMD and the kinetics of its decay step in mammalian cells are under debate. To address these issues, we used single-RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and measured the NMD of PTC-containing β-globin mRNA in intact single cells after the induction of β-globin gene transcription. This approach preserves temporal and spatial information of the NMD process, both of which would be lost in an ensemble study. We determined that decay of the majority of PTC-containing β-globin mRNA occurs soon after its export into the cytoplasm, with a half-life of <1 min; the remainder is degraded with a half-life of >12 h, similar to the half-life of normal PTC-free β-globin mRNA, indicating that it had evaded NMD. Importantly, NMD does not occur within the nucleoplasm, thus countering the long-debated idea of nuclear degradation of PTC-containing transcripts. We provide a spatial and temporal model for the biphasic decay of NMD targets.

  17. Dynamics of translation by single ribosomes through mRNA secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunlai; Zhang, Haibo; Broitman, Steven L.; Reiche, Michael; Farrell, Ian; Cooperman, Barry S.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2013-01-01

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome translates nucleotide triplets in single-stranded mRNA into polypeptide sequences. Strong downstream mRNA secondary (2°) structures, which must be unfolded for translation, can slow or even halt protein synthesis. Here we employ single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to determine reaction rates for specific steps within the elongation cycle as the Escherichia coli ribosome encounters stem loop or pseudoknot mRNA 2° structures. Downstream stem-loops containing 100% G-C base pairs decrease the rates of both tRNA translocation within the ribosome and deacylated tRNA dissociation from the ribosomal exit (E) site. Downstream stem-loops or pseudoknots containing both G-C and A-U pairs also decrease the rate of tRNA dissociation, but they have little effect on tRNA translocation rate. Thus, somewhat surprisingly, unfolding of mRNA 2° structures is more closely coupled to E-site tRNA dissociation than to tRNA translocation. PMID:23542154

  18. Dynamics of translation by single ribosomes through mRNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunlai; Zhang, Haibo; Broitman, Steven L; Reiche, Michael; Farrell, Ian; Cooperman, Barry S; Goldman, Yale E

    2013-05-01

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome translates nucleotide triplets in single-stranded mRNA into polypeptide sequences. Strong downstream mRNA secondary structures, which must be unfolded for translation, can slow or even halt protein synthesis. Here we used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to determine reaction rates for specific steps within the elongation cycle as the Escherichia coli ribosome encounters stem-loop or pseudoknot mRNA secondary structures. Downstream stem-loops containing 100% GC base pairs decrease the rates of both tRNA translocation within the ribosome and deacylated tRNA dissociation from the ribosomal exit site (E site). Downstream stem-loops or pseudoknots containing both GC and AU pairs also decrease the rate of tRNA dissociation, but they have little effect on tRNA translocation rate. Thus, somewhat unexpectedly, unfolding of mRNA secondary structures is more closely coupled to E-site tRNA dissociation than to tRNA translocation.

  19. Structure of an RNA dimer of a regulatory element from human thymidylate synthase mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey; McLean, Jaime; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-09-27

    A sequence around the start codon of the mRNA of human thymidylate synthase (TS) folds into a secondary-structure motif in which the initiation site is sequestered in a metastable hairpin. Binding of the protein to its own mRNA at the hairpin prevents the production of TS through a translation-repression feedback mechanism. Stabilization of the mRNA hairpin by other ligands has been proposed as a strategy to reduce TS levels in anticancer therapy. Rapidly proliferating cells require high TS activity to maintain the production of thymidine as a building block for DNA synthesis. The crystal structure of a model oligonucleotide (TS1) that represents the TS-binding site of the mRNA has been determined. While fluorescence studies showed that the TS1 RNA preferentially adopts a hairpin structure in solution, even at high RNA concentrations, an asymmetric dimer of two hybridized TS1 strands was obtained in the crystal. The TS1 dimer contains an unusual S-turn motif that also occurs in the 'off' state of the human ribosomal decoding site RNA.

  20. Oligoadenylation of 3′ decay intermediates promotes cytoplasmic mRNA degradation in Drosophila cells

    PubMed Central

    Harnisch, Christiane; Cuzic-Feltens, Simona; Dohm, Juliane C.; Götze, Michael; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Wahle, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional 3′ end addition of nucleotides is important in a variety of RNA decay pathways. We have examined the 3′ end addition of nucleotides during the decay of the Hsp70 mRNA and a corresponding reporter RNA in Drosophila S2 cells by conventional sequencing of cDNAs obtained after mRNA circularization and by deep sequencing of dedicated libraries enriched for 3′ decay intermediates along the length of the mRNA. Approximately 5%–10% of 3′ decay intermediates carried nonencoded oligo(A) tails with a mean length of 2–3 nucleotides. RNAi experiments showed that the oligoadenylated RNA fragments were intermediates of exosomal decay and the noncanonical poly(A) polymerase Trf4-1 was mainly responsible for A addition. A hot spot of A addition corresponded to an intermediate of 3′ decay that accumulated upon inhibition of decapping, and knockdown of Trf4-1 increased the abundance of this intermediate, suggesting that oligoadenylation facilitates 3′ decay. Oligoadenylated 3′ decay intermediates were found in the cytoplasmic fraction in association with ribosomes, and fluorescence microscopy revealed a cytoplasmic localization of Trf4-1. Thus, oligoadenylation enhances exosomal mRNA degradation in the cytoplasm. PMID:26786835

  1. Oligoadenylation of 3' decay intermediates promotes cytoplasmic mRNA degradation in Drosophila cells.

    PubMed

    Harnisch, Christiane; Cuzic-Feltens, Simona; Dohm, Juliane C; Götze, Michael; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Wahle, Elmar

    2016-03-01

    Post-transcriptional 3' end addition of nucleotides is important in a variety of RNA decay pathways. We have examined the 3' end addition of nucleotides during the decay of the Hsp70 mRNA and a corresponding reporter RNA in Drosophila S2 cells by conventional sequencing of cDNAs obtained after mRNA circularization and by deep sequencing of dedicated libraries enriched for 3' decay intermediates along the length of the mRNA. Approximately 5%-10% of 3' decay intermediates carried nonencoded oligo(A) tails with a mean length of 2-3 nucleotides. RNAi experiments showed that the oligoadenylated RNA fragments were intermediates of exosomal decay and the noncanonical poly(A) polymerase Trf4-1 was mainly responsible for A addition. A hot spot of A addition corresponded to an intermediate of 3' decay that accumulated upon inhibition of decapping, and knockdown of Trf4-1 increased the abundance of this intermediate, suggesting that oligoadenylation facilitates 3' decay. Oligoadenylated 3' decay intermediates were found in the cytoplasmic fraction in association with ribosomes, and fluorescence microscopy revealed a cytoplasmic localization of Trf4-1. Thus, oligoadenylation enhances exosomal mRNA degradation in the cytoplasm. © 2016 Harnisch et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  2. Time-of-day regulates subcellular trafficking, tripartite synaptic localization and polyadenylation of the astrocytic Fabp7 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Gerstner, Jason R.; Vanderheyden, William M.; LaVaute, Timothy; Westmark, Cara J.; Rouhana, Labib; Pack, Allan I.; Wickens, Marv; Landry, Charles F.

    2012-01-01

    The astrocyte brain fatty acid binding protein (Fabp7) has previously been shown to have a coordinated diurnal regulation of mRNA and protein throughout mouse brain, and an age-dependent decline in protein expression within synaptoneurosomal fractions. Mechanisms that control time-of-day changes in expression and trafficking Fabp7 to the perisynaptic process are not known. In this study, we confirmed an enrichment of Fabp7 mRNA and protein in the astrocytic perisynaptic compartment, and observed a diurnal change in the intracellular distribution of Fabp7 mRNA in molecular layers of hippocampus. Northern blotting revealed a coordinated time-of-day dependent oscillation for the Fabp7 mRNA poly(A) tail throughout murine brain. Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-(CPE-) binding protein (CPEB1) regulates subcellular trafficking and translation of synaptic plasticity-related mRNAs. Here we show that Fabp7 mRNA co-immunoprecipitated with CPEB1 from primary mouse astrocyte extracts, and its 3′UTR contains phylogenetically conserved CPEs capable of regulating translation of reporter mRNAs during Xenopus oocyte maturation. Given that Fabp7 expression is confined to astrocytes and neural progenitors in adult mouse brain, the synchronized cycling pattern of Fabp7 mRNA is therefore novel of known CPE-regulated transcripts. These results implicate circadian, sleep and/or metabolic control of CPEB-mediated subcellular trafficking and localized translation of Fabp7 mRNA in the tripartite synapse of mammalian brain. PMID:22279223

  3. Cell tracking using a photoconvertible fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Kohei; Tsujii, Hitomi; Omura, Tomomi

    2006-01-01

    The tracking of cell fate, shape and migration is an essential component in the study of the development of multicellular organisms. Here we report a protocol that uses the protein Kaede, which is fluorescent green after synthesis but can be photoconverted red by violet or UV light. We have used Kaede along with confocal laser scanning microscopy to track labeled cells in a pattern of interest in zebrafish embryos. This technique allows the visualization of cell movements and the tracing of neuronal shapes. We provide illustrative examples of expression by mRNA injection, mosaic expression by DNA injection, and the creation of permanent transgenic fish with the UAS-Gal4 system to visualize morphogenetic processes such as neurulation, placode formation and navigation of early commissural axons in the hindbrain. The procedure can be adapted to other photoconvertible and reversible fluorescent molecules, including KikGR and Dronpa; these molecules can be used in combination with two-photon confocal microscopy to specifically highlight cells buried in tissues. The total time needed to carry out the protocol involving transient expression of Kaede by injection of mRNA or DNA, photoconversion and imaging is 2-8 d.

  4. Fluorescence in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Victoria L.; Van Hooijdonk, Eloise; Intrater, Nurit; Vigneron, Jean-Pol

    2012-10-01

    Fluorescent molecules are much in demand for biosensors, solar cells, LEDs and VCSEL diodes, therefore, considerable efforts have been expended in designing and tailoring fluorescence to specific technical applications. However, naturally occurring fluorescence of diverse types has been reported from a wide array of living organisms: most famously, the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, but also in over 100 species of coral and in the cuticle of scorpions, where it is the rule, rather than the exception. Despite the plethora of known insect species, comparatively few quantitative studies have been made of insect fluorescence. Because of the potential applications of natural fluorescence, studies in this field have relevance to both physics and biology. Therefore, in this paper, we review the literature on insect fluorescence, before documenting its occurrence in the longhorn beetles Sternotomis virescens, Sternotomis variabilis var. semi rufescens, Anoplophora elegans and Stellognatha maculata, the tiger beetles Cicindela maritima and Cicindela germanica and the weevil Pachyrrhynchus gemmatus purpureus. Optical features of insect fluorescence, including emitted wavelength, molecular ageing and naturally occurring combinations of fluorescence with bioluminescence and colour-producing structures are discussed.

  5. Fluorescent Detection of Flaws.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    In a method for detecting flaws in the surface of a workpiece, initially microcapsules containing a fluorescent dye are deposited on the surface...After removal of excess microcapsules from the surface in order to reduce background fluorescence, the surface is visually inspected under ultraviolet

  6. Production of green fluorescent protein in transgenic rice seeds.

    PubMed

    Li, Ding; Gao, Jing; Shen, Chunxiu; Fang, Zhen; Xia, Yumei; Yuan, Longping; Cao, Mengliang

    2013-03-01

    Immature embryos from immature seeds of rice (Oryza sativa L.) were transformed by biolistic bombardment with the plasmid carrying the coding region of the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene under the control of the 5' region of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the synthetic green fluorescence protein gene (sgfp) under the control of the maize ubiquitine promoter. Southern blot analysis confirmed the stable integration of hpt and sgfp genes in transformants. Subsequently leaves from regenerated plants were resistant to hygromycin, and microscopic observation of the green fluorescence and immunoblotting analysis revealed that green fluorescence protein was not only detected in the leaf and pollen of primary transformants but also in mature seeds. The results bear out the importance of the suitability of GFP as an in vivo marker to follow the processes of selection of somatic hybrid embryos and plants.

  7. Beta actin and its mRNA are localized at the plasma membrane and the regions of moving cytoplasm during the cellular response to injury

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Previous work in our laboratory has shown that microvascular pericytes sort muscle and nonmuscle actin isoforms into discrete cytoplasmic domains (Herman, I. M., and P. A. D'Amore. 1985. J. Cell Biol. 101:43- 52; DeNofrio, D.T.C. Hoock, and I. M. Herman. J. Cell. Biol. 109:191- 202). Specifically, muscle (alpha-smooth) actin is present on the stress fibers while nonmuscle actins (beta and gamma) are located on stress fibers and in regions of moving cytoplasm (e.g., ruffles, lamellae). To determine the form and function of beta actin in microvascular pericytes and endothelial cells recovering from injury, we prepared isoform-specific antibodies and cDNA probes for immunolocalization, Western and Northern blotting, as well as in situ hybridization. Anti-beta actin IgG was prepared by adsorption and release of beta actin-specific IgG from electrophoretically purified pericyte beta actin bound to nitrocellulose paper. Anti-beta actin IgGs prepared by this affinity selection procedure showed exclusive binding to beta actin present in crude cell lysates containing all three actin isoforms. For controls, we localized beta actin as a bright rim of staining beneath the erythrocyte plasma membrane. Anti-beta actin IgG, absorbed with beta actin bound to nitrocellulose, failed to stain erythrocytes. Simultaneous localization of beta actin with the entire F- actin pool was performed on microvascular pericytes or endothelial cells and 3T3 fibroblasts recovering from injury using anti-beta actin IgG in combination with fluorescent phalloidin. Results of these experiments revealed that pericyte beta actin is localized beneath the plasma membrane in association with filopods, pseudopods, and fan lamellae. Additionally, we observed bright focal fluorescence within fan lamellae and in association with the ends of stress fibers that are preferentially associated with the ventral plasmalemma. Whereas fluorescent phalloidin staining along the stress fibers is continuous, anti-beta actin

  8. Detection of cyclin D1 mRNA by hybridization sensitive NIC-oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Kovaliov, Marina; Segal, Meirav; Kafri, Pinhas; Yavin, Eylon; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Fischer, Bilha

    2014-05-01

    A large group of fluorescent hybridization probes, includes intercalating dyes for example thiazole orange (TO). Usually TO is coupled to nucleic acids post-synthetically which severely limits its use. Here, we have developed a phosphoramidite monomer, 10, and prepared a 2'-OMe-RNA probe, labeled with 5-(trans-N-hexen-1-yl-)-TO-2'-deoxy-uridine nucleoside, dU(TO), (Nucleoside bearing an Inter-Calating moiety, NIC), for selective mRNA detection. We investigated a series of 15-mer 2'-OMe-RNA probes, targeting the cyclin D1 mRNA, containing one or several dU(TO) at various positions. dU(TO)-2'-OMe-RNA exhibited up to 7-fold enhancement of TO emission intensity upon hybridization with the complementary RNA versus that of the oligomer alone. This NIC-probe was applied for the specific detection of a very small amount of a breast cancer marker, cyclin D1 mRNA, in total RNA extract from cancerous cells (250 ng/μl). Furthermore, this NIC-probe was found to be superior to our related NIF (Nucleoside with Intrinsic Fluorescence)-probe which could detect cyclin D1 mRNA target only at high concentrations (1840 ng/μl). Additionally, dU(T) can be used as a monomer in solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis, thus avoiding the need for post-synthetic modification of oligonucleotide probes. Hence, we propose dU(TO) oligonucleotides, as hybridization probes for the detection of specific RNA in homogeneous solutions and for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Real-time mRNA measurement during an in vitro transcription and translation reaction using binary probes.

    PubMed

    Niederholtmeyer, Henrike; Xu, Ling; Maerkl, Sebastian J

    2013-08-16

    In vitro transcription and translation reactions have become popular for a bottom-up approach to synthetic biology. Concentrations of the mRNA intermediate are rarely determined, although knowledge of synthesis and degradation rates could facilitate rational engineering of in vitro systems. We designed binary probes to measure mRNA dynamics during cell-free protein synthesis by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. We tested different mRNA variants and show that the location and sequence environment of the probe target sites are important parameters for probe association kinetics and output signal. Best suited for sensitive real-time quantitation of mRNA was a target site located in the 3' untranslated region, which we designed to reduce secondary structure. We used this probe-target pair to refine our knowledge of mRNA dynamics in the commercially available PURE cell-free protein synthesis system and characterized the effect of TetR repressor on mRNA synthesis rates from a T7 promoter.

  10. A Nonenzymatic Hairpin DNA Cascade Reaction Provides High Signal Gain of mRNA Imaging inside Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cuichen; Cansiz, Sena; Zhang, Liqin; Teng, I-Ting; Qiu, Liping; Li, Juan; Liu, Yuan; Zhou, Cuisong; Hu, Rong; Zhang, Tao; Cui, Cheng; Cui, Liang; Tan, Weihong

    2015-04-22

    Enzyme-free signal amplification has enabled sensitive in vitro detection of biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. However, monitoring targets of interest in live cells via enzyme-free amplification is still challenging, especially for analytes with low concentrations. To the best of our knowledge, this paper reports the first attempt to perform mRNA imaging inside live cells, using a nonenzymatic hairpin DNA cascade reaction for high signal gain, termed a hairpin DNA cascade amplifier (HDCA). In conventional nucleic acid probes, such as linear hybridization probes, mRNA target signaling occurs in an equivalent reaction ratio (1:1), whereas, in HDCA, one mRNA target is able to yield multiple signal outputs (1:m), thus achieving the goal of signal amplification for low-expression mRNA targets. Moreover, the recycled mRNA target in the HDCA serves as a catalyst for the assembly of multiple DNA duplexes, generating the fluorescent signal of reduced MnSOD mRNA expression, thus indicating amplified intracellular imaging. This programmable cascade reaction presents a simple and modular amplification mechanism for intracellular biomarkers of interest, providing a significant boost to the search for clues leading to the accurate identification and effective treatment of cancers.

  11. Analysis of myosin heavy chain mRNA expression by RT-PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C.; Haddad, F.; Qin, A. X.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1997-01-01

    An assay was developed for rapid and sensitive analysis of myosin heavy chain (MHC) mRNA expression in rodent skeletal muscle. Only 2 microg of total RNA were necessary for the simultaneous analysis of relative mRNA expression of six different MHC genes. We designed synthetic DNA fragments as internal standards, which contained the relevant primer sequences for the adult MHC mRNAs type I, IIa, IIx, IIb as well as the embryonic and neonatal MHC mRNAs. A known amount of the synthetic fragment was added to each polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and yielded a product of different size than the amplified MHC mRNA fragment. The ratio of amplified MHC fragment to synthetic fragment allowed us to calculate percentages of the gene expression of the different MHC genes in a given muscle sample. Comparison with the traditional Northern blot analysis demonstrated that our reverse transcriptase-PCR-based assay was reliable, fast, and quantitative over a wide range of relative MHC mRNA expression in a spectrum of adult and neonatal rat skeletal muscles. Furthermore, the high sensitivity of the assay made it very useful when only small quantities of tissue were available. Statistical analysis of the signals for each MHC isoform across the analyzed samples showed a highly significant correlation between the PCR and the Northern signals as Pearson correlation coefficients ranged between 0.77 and 0.96 (P < 0.005). This assay has potential use in analyzing small muscle samples such as biopsies and samples from pre- and/or neonatal stages of development.

  12. Analysis of myosin heavy chain mRNA expression by RT-PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C.; Haddad, F.; Qin, A. X.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1997-01-01

    An assay was developed for rapid and sensitive analysis of myosin heavy chain (MHC) mRNA expression in rodent skeletal muscle. Only 2 microg of total RNA were necessary for the simultaneous analysis of relative mRNA expression of six different MHC genes. We designed synthetic DNA fragments as internal standards, which contained the relevant primer sequences for the adult MHC mRNAs type I, IIa, IIx, IIb as well as the embryonic and neonatal MHC mRNAs. A known amount of the synthetic fragment was added to each polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and yielded a product of different size than the amplified MHC mRNA fragment. The ratio of amplified MHC fragment to synthetic fragment allowed us to calculate percentages of the gene expression of the different MHC genes in a given muscle sample. Comparison with the traditional Northern blot analysis demonstrated that our reverse transcriptase-PCR-based assay was reliable, fast, and quantitative over a wide range of relative MHC mRNA expression in a spectrum of adult and neonatal rat skeletal muscles. Furthermore, the high sensitivity of the assay made it very useful when only small quantities of tissue were available. Statistical analysis of the signals for each MHC isoform across the analyzed samples showed a highly significant correlation between the PCR and the Northern signals as Pearson correlation coefficients ranged between 0.77 and 0.96 (P < 0.005). This assay has potential use in analyzing small muscle samples such as biopsies and samples from pre- and/or neonatal stages of development.

  13. Rapid and long-lasting increase in galanin mRNA levels in rat adrenal medulla following insulin-induced reflex splanchnic nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Anouar, Y; Eiden, L E

    1995-12-01

    Expression of the neuropeptide galanin in the adrenal gland is rapidly induced by reflex stimulation of the splanchnic nerve following insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Here, we examine the cellular localization and mechanism of galanin mRNA upregulation in the adrenal gland after insulin administration, by Northern blot and in situ histochemical hybridization analysis. A 5- to 16-fold increase in galanin mRNA levels, measured by Northern blot hybridization using a rat galanin cRNA probe, was observed after insulin-induced hypoglycemia. An increase in galanin mRNA levels could be detected as early as two hours after administration of a single dose (10 U/kg) of insulin (Iletin II), consistent with the increase in galanin peptide levels in the adrenal gland within 24 h of insulin shock. Insulin-induced galanin mRNA upregulation was confined to the rat adrenal: neither hypothalamic nor pituitary levels of GAL mRNA were altered by insulin treatment. Adrenal galanin mRNA levels were maximally increased by 4 h, remained maximally elevated for at least 48 h, and had returned to baseline 6 days after insulin administration. In situ hybridization analysis localized galanin mRNA induction to scattered groups of chromaffin cells throughout the medulla. These data demonstrate that regulation of GAL biosynthesis in the adrenal medulla occurs at a pretranslational level, and in a subpopulation of chromaffin cells. Rapid and robust upregulation of galanin biosynthesis in chromaffin cells upon insulin-induced splanchnic nerve stimulation suggests a hormonal or paracrine role for galanin in the adrenomedullary response to hypoglycemic shock.

  14. Standard loading controls are not reliable for Western blot quantification across brain development or in pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Goasdoue, Kate; Awabdy, Doreen; Bjorkman, Stella Tracey; Miller, Stephanie

    2016-02-01

    A frequently utilized method of data quantification in Western blot analysis is comparison of the protein of interest with a house keeping gene or control protein. Commonly used proteins include β-actin, glyceraldehyde 3 phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and α-tubulin. Various reliability issues have been raised when using this technique for data analysis-particularly when investigating protein expression changes during development and in disease states. In this study, we have demonstrated that β-actin, GAPDH, and α-tubulin are not appropriate controls in the study of development and hypoxic-ischemic induced damage in the piglet brain. We have also shown that using an in-house pooled standard, loaded on all blots is a reliable method for controlling interassay variability and data normalization in protein expression analysis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Rapid Screening of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Phosphosignaling Pathway via Microplate-Based Dot Blot Assays

    PubMed Central

    Cappione, Amedeo; Smith, Janet; Mabuchi, Masaharu; Nadler, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Expression profiling on a large scale, as is the case in drug discovery, is often accomplished through use of sophisticated solid-phase protein microarrays or multiplex bead technologies. While offering both high-throughput and high-content analysis, these platforms are often too cost prohibitive or technically challenging for many research settings. Capitalizing on the favorable attributes of the standard ELISA and slot blotting techniques, we developed a modified dot blot assay that provides a simple cost-effective alternative for semiquantitative expression analysis of multiple proteins across multiple samples. Similar in protocol to an ELISA, but based in a membrane bound 96-well microplate, the assay takes advantage of vacuum filtration to expedite the tedious process of washing in between binding steps. We report on the optimization of the assay and demonstrate its use in profiling temporal changes in phosphorylation events in the well-characterized EGF-induced signaling cascade of A431 cells. PMID:22934183

  16. Snapshot blotting: transfer of nucleic acids and nucleoprotein complexes from electrophoresis gels to grids for electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Jett, S D; Bear, D G

    1994-01-01

    We present a technique, "snapshot blotting," for the electrophoretic transfer of nucleic acids and nucleoprotein complexes in gel electrophoresis bands onto highly stable carbon film-coated grids for imaging by electron microscopy. The method permits structural analysis of macromolecular species that have been resolved by a gel mobility-shift assay. To demonstrate the efficiency and integrity of the transfer process for a multiprotein-DNA assembly, we have imaged various species of a prokaryotic transcription complex, using the cleavage-defective EcoRI(Q111) protein as an orientation marker and as a blockade of transcription elongation. Snapshot blotting should be of great utility in the structural characterization of nucleic acids and protein-nucleic acid interactions. Images PMID:8041711

  17. A single-step simultaneous protein staining procedure for polyacrylamide gels and nitrocellulose membranes by Alta during western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Pal, Jayanta K; Berwal, Sunil K; Soni, Rupali N

    2012-01-01

    A simple method for staining of proteins simultaneously on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gels and nitrocellulose membranes by Alta during western blot analysis is described. A 5% solution of Alta, a commercially available cosmetic preparation, is added in the upper tank buffer during electrophoresis. On completion of electrophoresis, the gel is washed in distilled water and viewed on a white light plate and a transilluminator to photograph the protein profiles. The gel is processed for western blot transfer of proteins onto a nitrocellulose membrane, and upon completion, the protein profiles on the membrane are viewed and photographed as stated above. The membrane can then be processed for immunostaining as per the standard procedure. Thus, the staining procedure using Alta is simple, rapid (without any need of destaining), and cost-effective.

  18. Differentiation of Enterococcus faecium from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus strains by PCR and dot-blot hybridisation.

    PubMed

    Langa, S; Fernández, A; Martín, R; Reviriego, C; Marín, M L; Fernández, L; Rodríguez, J M

    2003-12-01

    Variations in length and sequence of the 16S/23S spacer region of Enterococcus faecium provided the basis for development of simple PCR and dot-blot hybridisation assays that enabled the differentiation of potentially probiotic Enterococcus faecium strains from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. Such assays may be useful for differentiation of yoghurt starter cultures and enterococcal strains when they are simultaneously present in probiotic food products.

  19. Investigation of telomerase activity and apoptosis on invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast using immunohistochemical and Western blot methods.

    PubMed

    Simsek, B C; Turk, B A; Ozen, F; Tuzcu, M; Kanter, M

    2015-08-01

    Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) comprises the largest group of breast cancers. This study aimed to investigate telomerase activity and apoptosis using immunohistochemical and Western blot methods. In total, 75 cases that had been diagnosed as IDC and 20 cases that had undergone a freezing procedure were included. The histological sections were stained with Bax, Bcl-2, hTERT and BNIP3. The ages of the patients, as well as their hormonal status and tumour sizes and grades were evaluated, as well as the staining characteristics of the antibodies in question. A decrease in Bcl-2 positivity and an increase in Bax positivity were found immunohistochemically with increasing tumour grades. The data obtained by western blot method showed that Bcl-2 was highest in grade 1 tumours although these results were not statistically significant. The relationship between estrogen and progesterone receptor positivity and Bcl-2 was statistically significant, suggesting there is hormonal control through apoptosis. BNIP3 was found to be decreased with increasing tumour grades. Similarly, BNIP3 was found to be having the lowest value in grade 3 tumours by western blot method. Furthermore, hTERT was found to be increased with increasing tumour grades. In the western blot method, hTERT increased nearly four-fold compared to the control. In addition, hTERT, which was seen in very high levels in tumours, may be a helpful cancer marker. Both hTERT and BNIP3 are important markers that can provide information about prognosis. Big improvements can be achieved in tumour progression control with new treatment modalities that stop telomerase activity and hypoxic cell death.

  20. Stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in buffer containing cobalt chloride for Western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sathyanarayanan; Dunn, Jeff F

    2011-09-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is a widely studied protein with significant biomedical impact. Care is needed to stabilize HIF-1α protein during sample preparation for Western blot analysis due to its rapid degradation in the presence of oxygen. Enzyme inhibitor cocktails can be complex and expensive. We present a protease inhibitor-free buffer, containing cobalt chloride, which is effective at stabilizing HIF-1α, while being inexpensive, straightforward, and convenient, and has potential for widespread application.

  1. Western Blot Assay Using Recombinant p26 Antigen for Detection of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus-Specific Antibodies▿

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, I.; Gutierrez, G.; Ostlund, E.; Barrandeguy, M.; Trono, K.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the performance of a single-band Western blot (WB) test using recombinant p26 (rp26) capsid protein of equine infectious anemia virus. According to the results obtained, the rp26 WB test is a reliable confirmatory diagnostic tool to be used as a complementary test after an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or agar gel immunodiffusion test yielding doubtful results. PMID:17959820

  2. Glucocorticoid receptor mRNA and protein isoform alterations in the orbitofrontal cortex in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) may play a role in the pathogenesis of psychiatric illnesses such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, in which hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis abnormalities are observed and stress has been implicated. A critical component of the HPA axis which mediates cellular stress responses in the OFC, and has been implicated in psychiatric illness, is the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Methods In the lateral OFC, we employed quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting to investigate GR mRNA and protein expression in 34 bipolar disorder cases, 35 schizophrenia cases and 35 controls. Genotype data for eleven GR gene (NR3C1) polymorphisms was also used to explore possible effects of NR3C1 sequence variation on GR mRNA and protein expression in the lateral OFC. Results We found no diagnostic differences in pan GR, GR-1C or GR-1F mRNA expression. However, the GR-1B mRNA transcript variant was decreased (14.3%) in bipolar disorder cases relative to controls (p < 0.05), while GR-1H mRNA was decreased (22.0%) in schizophrenia cases relative to controls (p < 0.005). By western blotting, there were significant increases in abundance of a truncated GRα isoform, putative GRα-D1, in bipolar disorder (56.1%, p < 0.005) and schizophrenia (31.5% p < 0.05). Using genotype data for eleven NR3C1 polymorphisms, we found no evidence of effects of NR3C1 genotype on GR mRNA or GRα protein expression in the OFC. Conclusions These findings reveal selective abnormalities of GR mRNA expression in the lateral OFC in psychiatric illness, which are more specific and may be less influenced by NR3C1 genotype than those of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex reported previously. Our results suggest that the GRα-D1 protein isoform may be up-regulated widely across the frontal cortex in psychiatric illness. PMID:22812453

  3. Tau mRNA is present in axonal RNA granules and is associated with elongation factor 1A.

    PubMed

    Malmqvist, Tony; Anthony, Karen; Gallo, Jean-Marc

    2014-10-10

    The microtubule-associated protein tau is predominantly localized in the axonal compartment over the entire length of the axon in neurons. The mechanisms responsible for the localization of tau in axons at long distance from the cell body are not properly understood. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we show that tau mRNA is present in the central and distal parts of the axons of cultured rat cortical neurons. Axonal tau mRNA is associated with granules which are distributed throughout the entire length of the axon, including the growth cone. We also show that tau mRNA-containing axonal particles are associated with elongation factor 1A, a component of the protein translation machinery. The presence of tau mRNA in axons might be at least part of the process by which tau is localized to distal axons.

  4. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  5. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  6. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  7. Super resolution fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo; Bates, Mark; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2010-01-01

    Achieving a spatial resolution that is not limited by the diffraction of light, recent developments of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques allow the observation of many biological structures not resolvable in conventional fluorescence microscopy. New advances in these techniques now give them the ability to image three-dimensional (3D) structures, measure interactions by multicolor colocalization, and record dynamic processes in living cells at the nanometer scale. It is anticipated that super-resolution fluorescence microscopy will become a widely used tool for cell and tissue imaging to provide previously unobserved details of biological structures and processes. PMID:19489737

  8. Fluorescent discharge lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, E.; Otsuka, H.; Nomi, K.; Honmo, I.

    1982-01-01

    A rapidly illuminating fluorescent lamp 1,200 mm long and 32.5 mm in diameter with an interior conducting strip which is compatible with conventional fixtures and ballasts is described. The fluorescent lamp is composed of a linear glass tube, electrodes sealed at both ends, mercury and raregas sealed in the glass tube, a fluorescent substance clad on the inner walls of the glass tube, and a clad conducting strip extending the entire length of the glass tube in the axial direction on the inner surface of the tube.

  9. Investigation of Anti-Toxocara Antibodies in Epileptic Patients and Comparison of Two Methods: ELISA and Western Blotting

    PubMed Central

    Zibaei, Mohammad; Firoozeh, Farzaneh; Bahrami, Parviz; Sadjjadi, Seyed Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between Toxocara infection and epilepsy was previously demonstrated by several case-control studies and case reports. These previous studies were often based on the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using Toxocara excretory-secretory antigens, which are not specific due to cross-reactivity with other parasitic infections such as ascariasis, trichuriasis, and anisakiasis. An immunoblot analysis is highly specific and can detect low levels of Toxocara antibodies. Therefore, this assay may be useful in the identification of toxocariasis in epileptic patients. We examined patients who had epilepsy and healthy subjects for seropositivity for Toxocara infection by ELISA and Western blotting. Out of 85 epileptic patients, 10 (11.8%) and 3 (3.5%) persons exhibited Toxocara immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies responses by ELISA and by both techniques, respectively. Moreover, in the healthy group (n = 85), 3 (3.5%) persons were positive by ELISA, but none was detected by Western blotting. This study indicates that Toxocara infection is a risk factor for epilepsy in Iran. These findings strongly suggest the need to perform Western blotting immunodiagnosis, as well as the ELISA using Toxocara excretory-secretory antigens, to improve diagnosis of human toxocariasis in patients with epilepsy. PMID:23710354

  10. Western blot confirmation of the H+/K+-ATPase proton pump in the human larynx and submandibular gland.

    PubMed

    Altman, Kenneth W; Kinoshita, Yayoi; Tan, Melin; Burstein, David; Radosevich, James A

    2011-11-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated the H(+)/K(+)-ATPase (proton pump) in human larynx and lung glands via immunohistochemistry (IHC). The present hypothesis is that the proton pump is expressed in other seromucinous glands of the digestive tract that can be confirmed by IHC and Western blot analysis. Prospective controlled tissue analysis study. Academic medical institution. Ten anonymous fresh-frozen donor specimens were obtained, comprising 3 submandibular glands, 4 larynges, and 3 normal stomach specimens for control. Submandibular gland sections were immunostained with 2 monoclonal antibodies selectively reactive with α or β subunits of the H(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Western blot analysis was performed on all specimens. Consistent IHC staining was observed in the submandibular gland specimens for both α and β subunits. Western blot analysis revealed very strong expression for the stomach at 100 kDa, corresponding to the α protein, and weak but notable banding for all larynx and submandibular gland specimens. Similar findings were noted for the 60- to 80-kDa glycosylated β subunit protein, as well as the 52-kDa β subunit precursor for all specimens. The H(+)/K(+)-ATPase (proton) pump is present in the human larynx and submandibular gland although in much lower concentrations than in the stomach. Proton pump involvement in human aerodigestive seromucinous glands may have a role in protecting mucosa from acid environments (local or systemic), explain heightened laryngeal sensitivity in those patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux, and be a site of action for proton pump inhibitor pharmacotherapy.

  11. Development of PCR/dot blot assay for specific detection and differentiation of taeniid cestode eggs in canids.

    PubMed

    Armua-Fernandez, Maria Teresa; Nonaka, Nariaki; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Seita; Gottstein, Bruno; Deplazes, Peter; Phiri, Isaac G K; Katakura, Ken; Oku, Yuzaburo

    2011-01-01

    We report the development of a colourimetric PCR/dot blot assay targeting the mitochondrial gene NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) for differential diagnosis of taeniid eggs. Partial sequences of the cestode nad1 gene were aligned and new primers were designed based on conserved regions. Species-specific oligonucleotide probes (S-SONP) for canine taeniid cestodes were then designed manually based on the variable region between the conserved primers. Specifically, S-SONP were designed for the Taenia crassiceps, T. hydatigena, T. multiceps, T. ovis, T. taeniaeformis, Echinococcus granulosus (genotype 1), E. multilocularis and E. vogeli. Each probe showed high specificity as no cross-hybridisation with any amplified nad1 fragment was observed. We evaluated the assay using 49 taeniid egg-positive samples collected from dogs in Zambia. DNA from 5 to 10 eggs was extracted in each sample. Using the PCR/dot blot assay, the probes successfully detected PCR products from T. hydatigena in 42 samples, T. multiceps in 3 samples, and both species (mixed infection) in the remaining 4 samples. The results indicate that the PCR/dot blot assay is a reliable alternative for differential diagnosis of taeniid eggs in faecal samples.

  12. Definition of antigen specificity for antimitochondrial proteins detected by Western blotting using native mitochondrial proteins in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, H; Kawaguchi, N; Kikuchi, K; Fujikawa, H; Kitazawa, E; Matsushita, M

    2001-10-01

    The major autoantigens to anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA) in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) have previously been identified to be PDC-E2, BCOADC-E2, and OGDC-E2. However, analysis of these autoantigens to AMA cannot be examined using the two routine assays; immmunofluorescence and ELISA. Moreover, there are some problems in specificity and sensitivity in these routine assays. So, analysis with Western blotting using native mitochondrial protein as the antigen is required; it allows the identification of the molecular weights for the proteins which react with AMA in patients' sera. However, since the antigen-proteins used are not unified, molecular weights of AMA corresponding proteins vary among laboratories. In the present study, as the first step to help address this issue, we investigated the antigen specificity of protein bands detected by Western blotting using our in-house bovine and porcine heart mitochondrial proteins. Three major recombinant mitochondrial proteins were prepared. The antigen specificity was examined by the absorption tests preincubated with the three recombinant mitochondrial proteins. The molecular weights of developing our bovine and porcine heart mitochondrial proteins using SDS-PAGE were multiple protein bands including 74, 52, 50, and 43 kDa protein bands. Of them, the 74, 50, and 43 kDa protein bands were absorbed with preincubations of recombinant PDC-E2, BCOADC-E2, and OGDC-E2 protein, respectively. AMA specificity of these three major proteins with our Western blotting was confirmed.

  13. Vitellogenin mRNA expression in Cherax quadricarinatus during secondary vitellogenic at first maturation females.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Pinto, Vania; Landais, Igor; Ogliastro, Marie-Helene; Gutiérrez-Ayala, Meliza; Mejía-Ruíz, Humberto; Villarreal-Colmenares, Humberto; García-Gasca, Alejandra; Vázquez-Boucard, Celia

    2004-09-01

    PCR products of 1.1 and 0.9 kb were generated using Cherax quadricarinatus genomic DNA in the first case, and hepatopancreas and ovary cDNAs in the second case. These PCR products were cloned and analyzed for nucleotide sequences. The 1.1 kb fragment was used as a probe for Northern hybridization, revealing a transcript of approximately 8 kb in both tissues. Results from both Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses showed that the mRNA enconding the 3' end of the vitellogenin cDNA was present simultaneously in both hepatopancreas and ovary tissues in secondary vitellogenic at first maturation females, but was not detected in male hepatopancreas. The deduced amino acid sequences of Vitellogenin (Vg) cDNAs from ovary and hepatopancreas confirmed the existence at least two different Vg genes, and two different sites of synthesis.

  14. Divergent expression patterns of SATB1 mRNA and SATB1 protein in colorectal cancer and normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Anna E; Godlewski, Janusz; Krazinski, Bartlomiej E; Kiewisz, Jolanta; Sliwinska-Jewsiewicka, Agnieszka; Kwiatkowski, Przemyslaw; Pula, Bartosz; Dziegiel, Piotr; Janiszewski, Jacek; Wierzbicki, Piotr M; Kmiec, Zbigniew

    2015-06-01

    Special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 1 (SATB1) is a 'genome organizer,' and it has been proposed as a factor that affects the development and progression of various human neoplasms, including colorectal cancer (CRC). This study aimed to compare SATB1 expression in a group of CRC patients and healthy subjects at the mRNA and protein levels. We collected paired tumor tissue and unchanged mucosa of the large intestine from 102 CRC patients as well as 53 biopsies of normal colon mucosa obtained from healthy patients during screening colonoscopy. Tissue samples were quantified for SATB1 mRNA by quantitative PCR, while SATB1 protein expression was determined by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. SATB1 mRNA level in tumor tissues was over twofolds lower than in samples of corresponding unchanged tissues and fourfolds lower than in biopsies of healthy colon mucosa. Western blotting analysis revealed that SATB1 protein content in tumor and unchanged tissues of CRC patients was over sixfold and fivefolds higher than in biopsies of healthy colon mucosa, respectively. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated higher nuclear and cytoplasmic SATB1 reactivity in the tumor tissue compared to unchanged mucosa of CRC patients. Despite these differences, SATB1 mRNA, protein, and immunoreactivity levels did not correlate with patients' clinicopathological data and their overall survival, but the latter analysis was limited by a relatively short period of follow-up. In conclusion, we suggest that some as yet unidentified posttranscriptional mechanisms that regulate SATB1 expression may be altered in the CRC tissue.

  15. Triptolide inhibits COX-2 expression by regulating mRNA stability in TNF-{alpha}-treated A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Shuang; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Huang, Xin; Wang, Tao; Huang, Xiao; Li, Han; Zhang, Luyong

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triptolide inhibited COX-2 expression and the half-life of COX-2 mRNA is decreased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The HuR protein shuttling from nucleus to cytoplasm is inhibited by triptolide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triptolide inhibited 3 Prime -UTR fluorescence reporter gene activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer COX-2 mRNA binding to HuR is decreased by triptolide in pull-down experiments. -- Abstract: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) over-expression is frequently associated with human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and involved in tumor proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and resistance to apoptosis. In the present study, the effects of triptolide on COX-2 expression in A549 cells were investigated and triptolide was found to inhibit TNF-{alpha}-induced COX-2 expression. In our further studies, it was found that triptolide decreased the half-life of COX-2 mRNA dramatically and that it inhibited 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR) fluorescence reporter gene activity. Meanwhile, triptolide inhibited the HuR shuttling from nucleus to cytoplasm. After triptolide treatment, decreased COX-2 mRNA in pull-down experiments with anti-HuR antibodies was observed, indicating that the decreased cytoplasmic HuR is responsible for the decreased COX-2 mRNA. Taken together, our results provided evidence for the first time that triptolide inhibited COX-2 expression by COX-2 mRNA stability modulation and post-transcriptional regulation. These results provide a novel mechanism of action for triptolide which may be important in the treatment of lung cancer.

  16. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Smith, K D; Burt, W L

    1992-11-01

    By inserting an Erreger 485 exciter filter into the operating microscope, translucent yellow Healon (sodium hyaluronate) transforms into a brilliant opaque green viscoelastic. We have developed this technique and termed it "fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement." Using the technique, we demonstrated that the time required to remove Healon from the anterior chamber after intraocular lens insertion varies. Healon is usually aspirated quickly, in less than 17 seconds. Otherwise it traps behind the intraocular lens and requires more time for irrigation/aspiration (I/A) and manipulation of the I/A tip. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement minimized I/A time, reducing excess turbulence and manipulation in the anterior chamber, and thus may reduce corneal endothelial cell loss. This study also demonstrated that fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement prevented postoperative intraocular pressure rise, compared to the conventional removal of clear Healon. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement assures the surgeon that a large amount of Healon is not left behind.

  17. Fluorescent radiation converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A fluorescence radiation converter is described which includes a substantially undoped optically transparent substrate and a waveshifter coating deposited on at least one portion of the substrate for absorption of radiation and conversion of fluorescent radiation. The coating is formed to substantially 1000 g/liter of a solvent, 70 to 200 g/liter of an organic polymer, and 0.2 to 25 g/liter of at least one organic fluorescent dye. The incoming incident radiation impinges on the coating. Radiation is absorbed by the fluorescent dye and is re-emitted as a longer wavelength radiation. Radiation is trapped within the substrate and is totally internally reflected by the boundary surface. Emitted radiation leaves the substrate ends to be detected.

  18. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen; Sun, Yiru; Giebink, Noel; Thompson, Mark E.

    2010-08-03

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  19. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R [Princeton, NJ; Sun, Yiru [Princeton, NJ; Giebink, Noel [Princeton, NJ; Thompson, Mark E [Anaheim Hills, CA

    2009-01-06

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  20. Candida, fluorescent stain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This microscopic film shows a fluorescent stain of Candida. Candida is a yeast (fungus) that causes mild disease, but in immunocompromised individuals it may cause life-threatening illness. (Image ...

  1. Atmospheric Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K.; Sokolsky, P.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric fluorescence from these showers. Accurate knowledge of the conversion from atmospheric fluorescence to energy loss by ionizing particles in the atmosphere is key to this technique. In this paper we discuss a small balloon-borne instrument to make the first in situ measurements versus altitude of the atmospheric fluorescence yield. The instrument can also be used in the lab to investigate the dependence of the fluorescence yield in air on temperature, pressure and the concentrations of other gases that present in the atmosphere. The results can be used to explore environmental effects on and improve the accuracy of cosmic ray energy measurements for existing ground-based experiments and future space-based experiments.

  2. Type VII and XVII Collagen mRNA Expressions in Regenerated Epidermal Laminae in Chronic Equine Laminitis.

    PubMed

    Kuwano, Atsutoshi; Hasegawa, Telhisa; Arai, Katsuhiko

    2008-01-01

    To confirm ability forming the basement membrane of the regenerated laminar epidermis (rLE) in chronic laminitis, expression of type VII and type XVII collagen mRNAs in the rLE was studied applying sequences of two type of murine collagens. On northern blot analysis, complement DNA (cDNA) probes adjusted from the murine type VII and type XVII collagen could hybridize with the equine mRNAs, and each signal was detected as single-bands at approximately 9.5 kb and 5.6 kb, respectively. Contrasting with the expression level of equine glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenease mRNA, the band of type VII collagen mRNA in laminitis was stronger than normal, but the type XVII collagen mRNA in laminitis was less than normal. By in situ hybridization, positive signals in response to the murine type VII and type XVII collagen mRNA probes could be detected in the equine laminitic rLE region. From these results, it is concluded that the keratinocytes constructing the rLE in chronic stage of laminitis can express type VII and type XVII collagen mRNAs and these expression patterns were different from the normal.

  3. cDNA cloning and mRNA expression of neuropeptide Y in orange spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Li, Wensheng; Lin, Haoran

    2005-09-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding the neuropeptide Y (NPY) was cloned from the hypothalamus of orange spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) by rapid amplification of cDNA ends approaches. The NPY cDNA sequence is 688 bp long and has an open reading frame of 300 bp encoding prepro-NPY with 99 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequences contain a 28-amino-acids signal peptide followed by a 36-amino-acids mature NPY peptide. mRNA expression of NPY was determined using semi-quantitative RT-PCR followed by Southern blot analysis. NPY mRNA was expressed in olfactory bulb, telencephalon, pituitary, hypothalamus, optic tectum-thalamus, medulla oblongata, cerebellum and spinal cord. Low levels of NPY mRNA expression were found in retina, ovary and stomach, while much lower levels of expression were detected in liver, heart, gill, skin, anterior intestine, thymus and blood. No NPY mRNA expression was observed in unfertilized eggs, newly fertilized eggs, 16-cells stage and morula stage of the embryo and lower levels of expression were detected in the blastula, gastrula and neurula stages. It was highly expressed from lens formation stage to 52-day-old larval stage. NPY might be involved in the late embryonic and larval development of the orange spotted grouper.

  4. A Candida albicans gene expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a distinct pattern of mRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Iborra, A; Sentandreu, R; Gozalbo, D

    1996-09-01

    Two plasmids (derived from YCplac22 and YEplac112) carrying a Candida albicans gene (including the 5' non-coding promoter sequences) coding for a 30 kDa membrane-bound protein, were used to transform Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. A 30 kDa protein was immunodetected by Western blot in the membrane fraction of transformants. Northern analysis showed the presence of three mRNA species (of about 1.1, 0.7 and 0.5 kb) hybridizing with the C. albicans gene as a probe. The same result was obtained using the 5' and 3' regions of the gene as probes, whereas only a 1.1 kb mRNA was found in C. albicans and none was detected in S. cerevisiae control transformants. Thus, heterologous expression of this gene in S. cerevisiae results in a distinct pattern of mRNA processing, either due to the location on plasmid vectors and/or to differences in the mRNA processing systems in the two microorganisms.

  5. Upregulation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mRNA and protein in adrenal medulla of water-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Lai, Feng-Jie; Huang, Shiue-Shin; Hsieh, Ming-Chia; Hsin, Shih-Chie; Wu, Chin-Han; Hsin, Ya-Chieh; Shin, Shyi-Jang

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate whether adrenal neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) mRNA and protein expression are responsive to alterations in body volume. Using an RT-PCR technique, the relative quantities of nNOS mRNA as well as the tyrosine hydroxylase and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase mRNA in the adrenals of water-deprived rats significantly increased from 12 hr to 4 days. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical study showed that water deprivation activated nNOS mRNA and protein expression in the adrenal medulla. Four days after water deprivation, nNOS protein expression determined by Western blot significantly increased in the adrenal gland. Our results are the first to demonstrate that nNOS syntheses in the adrenal medulla are markedly increased in water-deprived rats. This study also indicates that the upregulation of nNOS synthesis of the adrenal medulla is associated with the activation of adrenal medullary function in the face of volume depletion.

  6. Estrogen regulates the development of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA and protein in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Solum, Derek T; Handa, Robert J

    2002-04-01

    During development, estrogen has a variety of effects on morphological and electrophysiological properties of hippocampal neurons. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) also plays an important role in the survival and differentiation of neurons during development. We examined the effects of gonadectomy with and without estrogen replacement on the mRNA and protein of BDNF and its receptor, trkB, during early postnatal development of the rat hippocampus. We used immunocytochemistry to demonstrate that estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and BDNF were localized to the same cells within the developing hippocampus. BDNF and ERalpha were colocalized in pyramidal cells of the CA3 subregion and to a lesser extent in CA1. To determine whether BDNF mRNA was regulated by estrogen during development, we gonadectomized male rat pups at postnatal day 0 (P0) and examined mRNA and protein levels from P0 to P25 using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis. After gonadectomy, BDNF mRNA levels are significantly reduced on P7, but after treatment of gonadectomized animals with estradiol benzoate on P0, levels at all ages were similar to those in intact animals. BDNF mRNA changes after gonadectomy are accompanied by an increase in the levels of BDNF protein, which were reduced by estrogen treatment at P0. We also examined the effect of postnatal estrogen treatment on trkB. There were no significant changes in trkB mRNA or protein in gonadectomized or estrogen-replaced animals. These results suggest that a direct interaction may exist between ERalpha and BDNF to alter hippocampal physiology during development in the rat.

  7. The RNA-binding protein HuR regulates DNA methylation through stabilization of DNMT3b mRNA.

    PubMed

    López de Silanes, Isabel; Gorospe, Myriam; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Srikantan, Subramanya; Alaminos, Miguel; Berdasco, María; Urdinguio, Rocío G; Fraga, Mario F; Jacinto, Filipe V; Esteller, Manel

    2009-05-01

    The molecular basis underlying the aberrant DNA-methylation patterns in human cancer is largely unknown. Altered DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity is believed to contribute, as DNMT expression levels increase during tumorigenesis. Here, we present evidence that the expression of DNMT3b is post-transcriptionally regulated by HuR, an RNA-binding protein that stabilizes and/or modulates the translation of target mRNAs. The presence of a putative HuR-recognition motif in the DNMT3b 3'UTR prompted studies to investigate if this transcript associated with HuR. The interaction between HuR and DNMT3b mRNA was studied by immunoprecipitation of endogenous HuR ribonucleoprotein complexes followed by RT-qPCR detection of DNMT3b mRNA, and by in vitro pulldown of biotinylated DNMT3b RNAs followed by western blotting detection of HuR. These studies revealed that binding of HuR stabilized the DNMT3b mRNA and increased DNMT3b expression. Unexpectedly, cisplatin treatment triggered the dissociation of the [HuR-DNMT3b mRNA] complex, in turn promoting DNMT3b mRNA decay, decreasing DNMT3b abundance, and lowering the methylation of repeated sequences and global DNA methylation. In summary, our data identify DNMT3b mRNA as a novel HuR target, present evidence that HuR affects DNMT3b expression levels post-transcriptionally, and reveal the functional consequences of the HuR-regulated DNMT3b upon DNA methylation patterns.

  8. MiR-506 suppresses liver cancer angiogenesis through targeting sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1) mRNA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhanping; Zhang, Weiying; Gao, Shan; Jiang, Qiulei; Xiao, Zelin; Ye, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaodong

    MicroRNAs acting as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes play crucial roles in human cancers. Sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1) and its metabolite sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) contribute to tumor angiogenesis. We have reported that the down-regulation of miR-506 targeting YAP mRNA results in the hepatocarcinogenesis. In the present study, we report a novel function of miR-506, which suppresses tumor angiogenesis through targeting SPHK1 mRNA in liver cancer. Bioinformatics analysis showed that miR-506 might target 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of SPHK1 mRNA. Then, we validated that by luciferase reporter gene assays. MiR-506 was able to reduce the expression of SPHK1 at the levels of mRNA and protein using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis in hepatoma HepG2 cells. Functionally, human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) tube formation assays demonstrated that the forced miR-506 expression remarkably inhibited the production of S1P in the supernatant of hepatoma cells. The supernatant resulted in the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Interestingly, the supernatant with overexpression of SPHK1 could rescue the inhibition of angiogenesis of liver cancer mediated by miR-506. Anti-miR-506 increased the production of S1P in the supernatant of hepatoma cells, but the supernatant with silencing of SPHK1 abolished anti-miR-506-induced acceleration of tumor angiogenesis. Clinically, we observed that the levels of miR-506 were negatively related to those of SPHK1 mRNA in liver cancer tissues. Thus, we conclude that miR-506 depresses the angiogenesis of liver cancer through targeting 3'UTR of SPHK1 mRNA. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism of tumor angiogenesis.

  9. Laser fluorescence diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V. K.; Krasilnikov, D. M.; Turkin, V. V.

    1995-01-01

    This paper descsribes the development of an apparatus, method, and practical recommendation on using fluorescence diagnostics in alimentary-intestinal tract surgery and analyses of blood serum and plasma for investigating influence of various drug preparations on a human organism. The report of the firm Israel Aircraft Industries on the high efficiency of using fluorescent analysis in early diagnostics of rectum, lung, and breast cancer has stimulated our publication.

  10. Phase-Conjugated Fluorescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    reverse if necessary and identify by block number)FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP PHASE-CONJUGATED FLUORESCENCE EMITTED POWER FOUR -WAVE MIXING THREE CONTRIBUTIONS...atom near a phase conjugator (PC) based on four -wave mixing is studied from first principles. The MaxwellLeisenberg equations are solved for the...Fronczak Hall State University of New York at Buffalo Buffalo, New York 14260 Fluorescent emission by an atom near a phase conjugator (PC) based on four -wave

  11. Epi-Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Donna J.; Brown, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    Epi-fluorescence microscopy is available in most life sciences research laboratories, and when optimized can be a central laboratory tool. In this chapter, the epi-fluorescence light path is introduced and the various components are discussed in detail. Recommendations are made for incident lamp light sources, excitation and emission filters, dichroic mirrors, objective lenses, and charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras in order to obtain the most sensitive epi-fluorescence microscope. The even illumination of metal-halide lamps combined with new “hard” coated filters and mirrors, a high resolution monochrome CCD camera, and a high NA objective lens are all recommended for high resolution and high sensitivity fluorescence imaging. Recommendations are also made for multicolor imaging with the use of monochrome cameras, motorized filter turrets, individual filter cubes, and corresponding dyes that are the best choice for sensitive, high resolution multicolor imaging. Images should be collected using Nyquist sampling and should be corrected for background intensity contributions and nonuniform illumination across the field of view. Photostable fluorescent probes and proteins that absorb a lot of light (i.e., high extinction co-efficients) and generate a lot of fluorescence signal (i.e., high quantum yields) are optimal. A neuronal immune-fluorescence labeling protocol is also presented. Finally, in order to maximize the utility of sensitive wide-field microscopes and generate the highest resolution images with high signal-to-noise, advice for combining wide-field epi-fluorescence imaging with restorative image deconvolution is presented. PMID:23026996

  12. Fluorescence (Multiwave) Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Welzel, J; Kästle, Raphaela; Sattler, Elke C

    2016-10-01

    In addition to reflectance confocal microscopy, multiwave confocal microscopes with different laser wavelengths in combination with exogenous fluorophores allow fluorescence mode confocal microscopy in vivo and ex vivo. Fluorescence mode confocal microscopy improves the contrast between the epithelium and the surrounding soft tissue and allows the depiction of certain structures, like epithelial tumors, nerves, and glands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fluorescent Applications to Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Achari, Aniruddha

    2006-01-01

    By covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or equal to 1%, of a macromolecule with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification, and tests with model proteins have shown that labeling u to 5 percent of the protein molecules does not affect the X-ray data quality obtained . The presence of the trace fluorescent label gives a number of advantages. Since the label is covalently attached to the protein molecules, it "tracks" the protein s response to the crystallization conditions. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination crystals show up as bright objects against a darker background. Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, do not show up under fluorescent illumination. Crystals have the highest protein concentration and are readily observed against less bright precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries as the protein or protein structures is all that shows up. Fluorescence intensity is a faster search parameter, whether visually or by automated methods, than looking for crystalline features. Preliminary tests, using model proteins, indicates that we can use high fluorescence intensity regions, in the absence of clear crystalline features or "hits", as a means for determining potential lead conditions. A working hypothesis is that more rapid amorphous precipitation kinetics may overwhelm and trap more slowly formed ordered assemblies, which subsequently show up as regions of brighter fluorescence intensity. Experiments are now being carried out to test this approach using a wider range, of proteins. The trace fluorescently labeled crystals will also

  14. Plasmon-controlled fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Chowdhury, Mustafa H.; Ray, Krishanu; Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Badugu, Ramachandram; Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Nowaczyk, Kazimierz; Szmacinski, Henryk; Aslan, Kadir; Geddes, Chris D.

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence is widely used in biological research. Future advances in biology and medicine often depend on the advances in the capabilities of fluorescence measurements. In this overview paper we describe how a combination of fluorescence, and plasmonics, and nanofabrication can fundamentally change and increase the capabilities of fluorescence technology. This change will be based on the use of surface plasmons which are collective oscillations of free electrons in metallic surfaces and particles. Surface plasmon resonance is now used to measure bioaffinity reactions. However, the uses of surface plasmons in biology are not limited to their optical absorption or extinction. We have shown that fluorophores in the excited state can create plasmons which radiate into the far field; additionally fluorophores in the ground state can interact with and be excited by surface plasmons. These interactions suggest that the novel optical absorption and scattering properties of metallic nanostructures can be used to control the decay rates, location and direction of fluorophore emission. We refer to this technology as plasmon-controlled fluorescence. We predict that plasmon-controlled fluorescence (PCF) will result in a new generation of probes and devices. PCF is likely to allow design of structures which enhance emission at specific wavelengths and the creation of new devices which control and transport the energy from excited fluorophores in the form of plasmons, and then convert the plasmons back to light. PMID:20953312

  15. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  16. Gold nanoparticle-based beacon to detect STAT5b mRNA expression in living cells: a case optimized by bioinformatics screen.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dawei; Li, Yang; Xue, Jianpeng; Wang, Jie; Ai, Guanhua; Li, Xin; Gu, Yueqing

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA), a single-strand ribonucleic acid with functional gene information is usually abnormally expressed in cancer cells and has become a promising biomarker for the study of tumor progress. Hairpin DNA-coated gold nanoparticle (hDAuNP) beacon containing a bare gold nanoparticle (AuNP) as fluorescence quencher and thiol-terminated fluorescently labeled stem-loop-stem oligonucleotide sequences attached by Au-S bond is currently a new nanoscale biodiagnostic platform capable of mRNA detection, in which the design of the loop region sequence is crucial for hybridizing with the target mRNA. Hence, in this study, to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of hDAuNP beacon simultaneously, the loop region of hairpin DNA was screened by bioinformatics strategy. Here, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b) mRNA was selected and used as a practical example. The results from the combined characterizations using optical techniques, flow cytometry assay, and cell microscopic imaging showed that after optimization, the as-prepared hDAuNP beacon had higher selectivity and sensitivity for the detection of STAT5b mRNA in living cells, as compared with our previous beacon. Thus, the bioinformatics method may be a promising new strategy for assisting in the designing of the hDAuNP beacon, extending its application in the detection of mRNA expression and the resultant mRNA-based biological processes and disease pathogenesis.

  17. [Effects of seven RNA silencing suppressors on heterologous expression of green fluorescence protein expression mediated by a plant virus-based system in Nicotiana benthamiana].

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Dong, Jie; Cao, Min; Mu, Hongzhen; Ding, Guoping; Zhang, Hong

    2012-11-01

    To test the effects of 7 virus-encoded RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs) for enhancement of a plant virus-based vector system-mediated heterologous expression of green fluorescence protein (GFP) in Nicotiana benthamiana. Seven transient expression vectors for the 7 RSSs were constructed and co-inoculated on the leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana with PVXdt-GFP vector, a novel Potato virus X-based plant expression vector, through agroinfiltration. The protein and mRNA expression levels of the reporter gene GFP in the co-inoculated Nicotiana leaves were examined by Western blotting, ELISA and RT-qPCR to assess the effect of the RSSs for GFP expression enhancement. The 7 RSSs differed in the degree and duration of enhancement of heterologous GFP expression, and the p19 protein of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) induced the highest expression of GFP. African cassava mosaic virus AC2 protein and Rice yellow mettle virus P1 protein produced no obvious enhancement GFP expression. Transient co-expression of RSSs suppresses host silencing response to allow high-level and long-term expression of heterologous genes in plant, but the optimal RSS has to be identified for each plant virus-based expression vector system.

  18. Alternative polyadenylation of mRNA precursors

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bin; Manley, James L.

    2017-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is an RNA-processing mechanism that generates distinct 3′ termini on mRNAs and other RNA polymerase II transcripts. It is widespread across all eukaryotic species and is recognized as a major mechanism of gene regulation. APA exhibits tissue specificity and is important for cell proliferation and differentiation. In this Review, we discuss the roles of APA in diverse cellular processes, including mRNA metabolism, protein diversification and protein localization, and more generally in gene regulation. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying APA, such as variation in the concentration of core processing factors and RNA-binding proteins, as well as transcription-based regulation. PMID:27677860

  19. Stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase enzyme activity and mRNA levels are not different in subcutaneous adipose tissue from Angus and American Wagyu steers.

    PubMed

    Cameron, P J; Rogers, M; Oman, J; May, S G; Lunt, D K; Smith, S B

    1994-10-01

    We proposed that greater stearoyl coenzyme A (CoA) desaturase enzyme activity caused the elevated monounsaturated fatty acids observed in American Wagyu adipose tissue. Stearoyl CoA desaturase mRNA concentrations and enzyme activities were measured in subcutaneous adipose samples from Angus (n = 5) and American Wagyu (n = 5), fed to the Japanese market end point. A rat liver stearoyl CoA desaturase cDNA clone was used to measure the relative amounts of stearoyl CoA desaturase mRNA. Enzyme activities and mRNA concentrations, as measured by laser densitometry of slot-blot autoradiograms, were not significantly different between the two breeds at this stage of growth. This investigation has demonstrated that, at this stage of maturity, differences in fatty acid composition between Angus and American Wagyu steers cannot be attributed to differences in stearoyl CoA desaturase enzyme activity.

  20. Up-regulation of sigma(1) receptor mRNA in rat brain by a putative atypical antipsychotic and sigma receptor ligand.

    PubMed

    Zamanillo, D; Andreu, F; Ovalle, S; Pérez, M P; Romero, G; Farré, A J; Guitart, X

    2000-03-24

    Sigma(1) (sigma(1)) receptor mRNA expression was studied in the prefrontal cortex, striatum, hippocampus and cerebellum of rat brain by northern blot and in situ hybridization. The effects of a chronic treatment with antipsychotic drugs (haloperidol and clozapine), and with E-5842, a sigma(1) receptor ligand and putative atypical antipsychotic on sigma(1) receptor expression were examined. A significant increase in the levels of sigma(1) receptor mRNA in the prefrontal cortex and striatum after E-5842 administration was observed, while no apparent changes were seen with either haloperidol or clozapine. Our results suggest a long-term adaptation of the sigma(1) receptor at the level of mRNA expression in specific areas of the brain as a response to a sustained treatment with E-5842.

  1. Fluorescence of Melanin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallas, James Martin

    1981-06-01

    Optical fluorescence in aqueous suspensions of synthetic dopa melanin has been detected and investigated. A fluorescence lifetime of 8.3 ns was measured in pulsed laser experiments. Fluorescence was observed for excitation between 290 and 420 nm. The emission as a function of wavelength displayed a single broad maximum falling between 440 and 480 nm, depending on excitation wavelength. The dependence of the quantum efficiency for fluorescence on parameters such as solution temperature, viscosity, pH, and concentration of metal ion, such as copper, has been investigated. The emission intensity decreased at both high and low values of pH, with increasing temperatures, and with increasing metal ion concentration, and decreasing viscosity. The pH dependence of the fluorescence can be related to changes in the ionization state of the various ionizable groups attached to the fluorophores. A self consistent model was developed in which proton transfer from these groups was fast compared with fluorescence rates for one type of fluorophore and slow compared with those for another type. The fluorescence dependence on copper ion concentration is explained in terms of a model invoking a reaction between melanin fluorophores and copper ions leading to the formation of a melanin-copper complex which is itself fluorescent. A model incorporating diffusion controlled chemical reactions between fluorescents groups and quencher groups on the melanin polymer is developed and used to explain the observed dependence of melanin fluorescence on solvent viscosity. Over the temperature range 20(DEGREES)C-70(DEGREES)C, an Arrhenius type behavior was found with an activation enthalpy of 1.3 Kcal/mole. Using the temperature dependence of the viscous quenching model as well as the temperature dependence of the fluorophore-radical equilibrium concentration leads to a temperature dependence which is in reasonable agreement with the observed behavior. Many aspects of the experimental results

  2. Single cell genomic quantification by non-fluorescence nonlinear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, Divya; Liu, Jing

    2017-02-01

    Human epidermal growth receptor 2 (Her2) is a gene which plays a major role in breast cancer development. The quantification of Her2 expression in single cells is limited by several drawbacks in existing fluorescence-based single molecule techniques, such as low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), strong autofluorescence and background signals from biological components. For rigorous genomic quantification, a robust method of orthogonal detection is highly desirable and we demonstrated it by two non-fluorescent imaging techniques -transient absorption microscopy (TAM) and second harmonic generation (SHG). In TAM, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are chosen as an orthogonal probes for detection of single molecules which gives background-free quantifications of single mRNA transcript. In SHG, emission from barium titanium oxide (BTO) nanoprobes was demonstrated which allows stable signal beyond the autofluorescence window. Her2 mRNA was specifically labeled with nanoprobes which are conjugated with antibodies or oligonucleotides and quantified at single copy sensitivity in the cancer cells and tissues. Furthermore, a non-fluorescent super-resolution concept, named as second harmonic super-resolution microscopy (SHaSM), was proposed to quantify individual Her2 transcripts in cancer cells beyond the diffraction limit. These non-fluorescent imaging modalities will provide new dimensions in biomarker quantification at single molecule sensitivity in turbid biological samples, offering a strong cross-platform strategy for clinical monitoring at single cell resolution.

  3. A 27-mer oligonucleotide probe for the detection and measurement of the mRNA for uncoupling protein in brown adipose tissue of different species.

    PubMed

    Brander, F; Keith, J S; Trayhurn, P

    1993-01-01

    1. Data from rats, cattle, mice, rabbits and humans indicate considerable species heterogeneity in the sequence of the gene coding for the mitochondrial uncoupling protein (UCP) in brown adipose tissue. A 27-base sequence of an exon region of the gene is, however, identical in rats and cattle; in mice, rabbits, and humans this same region shows only a single base difference from the sequence in rats and cattle. 2. A 27-mer oligonucleotide (3'-TGGAAGGGCGACCTGTGGCGGTTTCAG-5') complementary to the conserved region of the rat and cattle UCP genes has been synthesized as a potential probe for UCP mRNA in widely differing species. 3. Northern blots of RNA from rat brown fat showed that the oligonucleotide hybridized with a 1.5 kbase mRNA, indicative of UCP mRNA. No hybridization was observed with RNA from white fat (subcutaneous, internal), liver, kidney, skeletal muscle, heart and brain. Acute cold-exposure of rats and mice led to an increase in UCP mRNA level, while streptozotocin-induced diabetes resulted in a decrease. 4. The oligonucleotide hybridized with a 1.5 (or 1.9) kbase mRNA from brown fat of rats, mice, golden hamsters, Djungarian hamsters, and newborn rabbits, pipistrelle bats, lambs, goats and red deer. 5. The 27-mer oligonucleotide provides a simple probe for UCP mRNA across a wide range of mammals, obviating any need to obtain species-specific cDNAs.

  4. Post-transcriptional regulation of coumarin 7-hydroxylase (P450coh) induction by xenobiotics in mouse liver: mRNA stabilization by pyrazole

    SciTech Connect

    Aida, K.; Negishi, M. )

    1991-03-15

    The induction mechanism by pyrazole or phenobarbital of coumarin 7-hydroxylase was investigated in DBA/2J male mice. The P450coh mRNA in the pyrazole-induced mice was increased gradually to a 20-fold higher level within 48 hr, yet transcription of the P450coh gene was not affected. The half-life of P450coh mRNA, on the other hand, was at least 4-fold longer in the pyrazole-induced DBA2J than in control DBA/2J male mice. The stabilization of P450coh mRNA, therefore, is the primary mechanism for the induction by pyrazole of coumarin 7-hydroxylase. Phenobarbital, on the other hand, regulates the induction translationally or post-translationally. This drug affected neither the P450coh mRNA nor the P450coh gene's transcription levels in the DBA/2J male mice, although Western blots showed a 2- to 3-fold increase of the P450coh protein in the liver microsomes of the drug-treated mice. The results indicate, therefore, that both phenobarbital and pyrazole regulate the P450coh induction post-transcriptional efficiency of P450coh mRNA or alters the degradation rate of P450coh protein, while the latter stabilizes P450coh mRNA.

  5. Blot-based detection of dehydroalanine-containing glutathione peroxidase with the use of biotin-conjugated cysteamine.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Sue Goo; Cho, Chun-Seok

    2010-01-01

    Dehydroalanine (DHA), alpha,beta-unsaturated amino acid, is found in the position corresponding to the serine, cysteine, and selenocysteine (Sec) residues of various proteins. Proteinaceous Sec is readily oxidized and subsequently undergoes beta-elimination to produce DHA. Glutathione peroxidase (GPx), which contains a Sec at the active site, is irreversibly inactivated by its own substrate as the result of the oxidation of selenium atom followed by the conversion of oxidized Sec to DHA. We developed a convenient method for estimation of the amount of DHA-GPx1 in cell homogenates. This blot-based method depends on specific addition of biotin-conjugated cysteamine to the DHA residue followed by detection of biotinylated protein based on its interaction with streptavidin. The method required an immunoprecipitation of GPx1 before labeling with the cysteamine derivative because many other proteins contain DHA. With the use of this method, we found that conversion of the Sec residue at the active site of GPx1 to DHA occurred during aging of red blood cells (RBCs) in vivo as well as in RBCs exposed to H(2)O(2) generated either externally by glucose oxidase or internally as a result of aniline-induced Hb autoxidation. Accordingly, the content of DHA-GPx1 in each RBC likely reflects total oxidative stress experienced by the cell during its lifetime of 120 days. Previous studies suggested that the activity of GPx1 in RBCs is most influenced by lifestyle and environmental factors such as the use of dietary supplements and smoking habit. Therefore, DHA-GPx1 in RBCs might be a suitable surrogate marker for evaluation of oxidative stress in the body. Our blot-based method for the detection of DHA-GPx1 will be very useful for evaluation of such stress. In addition, similar blot detection method can be devised for other proteins for which immunoprecipitating antibodies are available.

  6. Western blot patterns of serum autoantibodies against optic nerve antigens in dogs with goniodysgenesis-related glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Pumphrey, Stephanie A.; Pizzirani, Stefano; Pirie, Christopher G.; Anwer, M. Sawkat; Logvinenko, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether differences existed between clinically normal dogs and dogs with goniodysgenesis-related glaucoma (GDRG) in serum autoantibodies against optic nerve antigens. Animals 16 dogs with GDRG, 17 healthy dogs with unremarkable pectinate ligament and iridocorneal angle morphology, and 13 euthanized dogs with no major ocular abnormalities or underlying diseases. Procedures Western blotting was performed with optic nerve extracts from the euthanized dogs as an antigen source and serum from clinically normal dogs and dogs with GDRG as a primary antibody (autoantibody) source. Blots were evaluated for presence and density of bands. Results Multiple bands were identified on western blots from all dogs with GDRG and all clinically normal dogs, with a high degree of variability among individual dogs. Dogs with GDRG were significantly more likely than healthy dogs to have bands present at 38, 40, and 68 kDa. Dogs with GDRG had significant increases in autoreactivity at 40 and 53 kDa and a significant decrease in autoreactivity at 48 kDa. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Significant differences in serum autoantibodies against optic nerve antigens were found in dogs with versus without GDRG. Although it remains unclear whether these differences were part of the pathogenesis of disease or were sequelae to glaucomatous changes, these findings provide support for the hypothesis that immune-mediated mechanisms play a role in the development or progression of GDRG. However, the high degree of variability among individual dogs and the considerable overlap between groups suggest that the clinical usefulness of this technique for distinguishing dogs with GDRG from clinically normal dogs is likely limited. PMID:23531071

  7. Affinity and Western blotting reveal homologies between ovine intervertebral disc serine proteinase inhibitory proteins and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Melrose, J; Shen, B; Ghosh, P

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess any similarities between ovine intervertebral disc (IVD) serine proteinase inhibitory proteins (SPIs) and known mammalian IVD SPIs. Ovine IVDs were dissected into the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus and the tissue finely diced then extracted with 4 M guanidine hydrochloride. The tissue extracts were subjected to caesium chloride density gradient ultracentrifugation to separate the large high buoyant density (rho > 1.5 g/mL) proteoglycans from the SPI proteins of low buoyant density (rho < 1.33 g/mL). The top two ultracentrifuge fractions containing the SPIs of interest were subjected to enzyme linked immunosorbent analysis (ELISA) and also examined by Western and Affinity blotting using an antibody to bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and biotinylated trypsin respectively for detection and an alkaline phosphatase 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate/nitro blue tetrazolium system for visualisation. The major SPI proteins present in the Western and Affinity blots were 34-36 kDa species, minor 12 and 16, and 85 and 120 kDa species were also present. Qualitatively similar results were obtained for each respective tissue zone of the lumbar and lumbosacral disc specimens examined. Densitometric analysis of the major 34-36 kDa SPI bands visualised on Western and Affinity blots using NIH 1.61.1 image analysis software indicated that lumbar IVD samples contained higher levels of this SPI species than lumbosacral IVD samples. ELISA confirmed that lumbar IVD extracts contained quantitatively higher levels of BPTI equivalents per g of tissue extracted than lumbosacral IVDs. This study therefore has demonstrated that the ovine disc contains a range of SPI species which share some homology with bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and in this respect are similar to SPIs previously demonstrated in canine IVDs.

  8. Detection of Sleeping Beauty transposition in the genome of host cells by non-radioactive Southern blot analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Aravalli, Rajagopal N.; Park, Chang W.; Steer, Clifford J.

    2016-08-26

    The Sleeping Beauty transposon (SB-Tn) system is being used widely as a DNA vector for the delivery of therapeutic transgenes, as well as a tool for the insertional mutagenesis in animal models. In order to accurately assess the insertional potential and properties related to the integration of SB it is essential to determine the copy number of SB-Tn in the host genome. Recently developed SB100X transposase has demonstrated an integration rate that was much higher than the original SB10 and that of other versions of hyperactive SB transposases, such as HSB3 or HSB17. In this study, we have constructed a series of SB vectors carrying either a DsRed or a human β-globin transgene that was encompassed by cHS4 insulator elements, and containing the SB100X transposase gene outside the SB-Tn unit within the same vector in cis configuration. These SB-Tn constructs were introduced into the K-562 erythroid cell line, and their presence in the genomes of host cells was analyzed by Southern blot analysis using non-radioactive probes. Many copies of SB-Tn insertions were detected in host cells regardless of transgene sequences or the presence of cHS4 insulator elements. Interestingly, the size difference of 2.4 kb between insulated SB and non-insulated controls did not reflect the proportional difference in copy numbers of inserted SB-Tns. We then attempted methylation-sensitive Southern blots to assess the potential influence of cHS4 insulator elements on the epigenetic modification of SB-Tn. Our results indicated that SB100X was able to integrate at multiple sites with the number of SB-Tn copies larger than 6 kb in size. In addition, the non-radioactive Southern blot protocols developed here will be useful to detect integrated SB-Tn copies in any mammalian cell type.

  9. Expression and clinicopathological significance of Mel-18 mRNA in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ji; Liu, Yan-Long; Zhang, Gan; Ma, Yu-Yan; Cui, Bin-Bin; Yang, Yan-Mei

    2014-10-01

    Mel-18 is a member of the polycomb group (PcG) of proteins, which are chromatin regulatory factors that play an important role in oncogenesis. This study was designed to investigate the clinical and prognostic significance of Mel-18 in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. For this purpose, expression of Mel-18 mRNA was evaluated in 82 primary CRC and paired noncancerous mucosa samples by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. We found that overall Mel-18 mRNA expression in the CRC tissue was significantly lower than in the noncancerous mucosal tissue (p = 0.007, Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test). Mel-18 was conversely correlated with the pathological classifications (p = 0.003 for T, p < 0.001 for N, and p = 0.015 for M classifications, respectively) and clinical AJCC stage (p < 0.001). Furthermore, CRC patients with a higher level of Mel-18 showed prolonged disease-free survivals (DFS) (p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the diminished Mel-18 expression may be a risk factor for the patients' 3-year DFS (HR = 1.895; 95 % CI 1.032, 3.477; p = 0.039). It was therefore concluded that the lower Mel-18 expression might contribute to the CRC development/progression.

  10. Keratin14 mRNA expression in human pneumocytes during quiescence, repair and disease

    PubMed Central

    Confalonieri, Marco; Buratti, Emanuele; Grassi, Gabriele; Bussani, Rossana; Chilosi, Marco; Farra, Rossella; Abrami, Michela; Stuani, Cristiana; Salton, Francesco; Ficial, Miriam; Confalonieri, Paola; Zandonà, Lorenzo; Romano, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    The lung alveoli slowly self-renew pneumocytes, but their facultative regeneration capacity is rapidly efficient after an injury, so fibrosis infrequently occurs. We recently observed Keratin 14 (KRT14) expression during diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), but not in controls. We wonder if KRT14 may be a marker of pneumocyte transition from quiescence to regeneration. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analyses highlighted the presence of KRT14 (mRNA and protein) only in human lung samples with DAD or interstitial lung disease (ILD). In the exponentially growing cell lines A549 and H441, the mRNA and protein levels of KRT14 peaked at day one after cell seeding and decreased at day two, opposite to what observed for the proliferation marker E2F1. The inverse relation of KRT14 versus E2F1 expression holds true also for other proliferative markers, such as cyclin E1 and cyclin D1. Of interest, we also found that E2F1 silencing caused cell cycle arrest and increased KRT14 expression, whilst E2F1 stimulation induced cell cycle progression and decreased KRT14. KRT14 also increased in proliferative pneumocytes (HPAEpiC) just before transdifferentiation. Overall, our results suggest that KRT14 is a viable biomarker of pneumocyte activation, and repair/regeneration. The involvement of KRT14 in regenerative process may suggest a novel pharmaceutical target to accelerate lung repair. PMID:28199407

  11. Phenobarbital specifically reduces gap junction protein mRNA level in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Mesnil, M; Fitzgerald, D J; Yamasaki, H

    1988-01-01

    The gene expression of liver major gap junction (GJ) protein was studied in rats systemically administered phenobarbital, a rat liver tumor promoter. Using a GJ protein cDNA and northern blot analysis, the level of GJ protein mRNA in liver was observed to be markedly reduced at 4 and 11 wk of phenobarbital exposure (0.1% in drinking water). However, the level of GJ protein mRNA was not altered in kidney at 11 wk of exposure. In liver, phenobarbital did not induce expression of the neoplasm-associated marker genes glutathione S-transferase (placental form) and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, while in kidney the observed expression of these genes was not changed. These in vivo results indicate that phenobarbital reduces GJ protein gene expression specifically in rat liver without altering expression of genes often altered during liver carcinogenesis, and they support assigning a role for the impairment of gap junctional intercellular communication in phenobarbital-mediated liver tumor promotion.

  12. The vitamin D receptor localization and mRNA expression in ram testis and epididymis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hui; Huang, Yang; Jin, Guang; Xue, Yanrong; Qin, Xiaowei; Yao, Xiaolei; Yue, Wenbing

    2015-02-01

    The objectives of present study were to investigate the presence of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in testis and epididymis of ram by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), to locate VDR in testis and epididymis by immunohistochemistry and to compare difference of VDR expression between testis and epididymis before and after sexual maturation by Real time-PCR and Western blot. The results showed that VDR exists in the testis and epididymis of ram while VDR protein in testis and epididymis was localized in Leydig cells, spermatogonial stem cells, spermatocytes, Sertoli cells and principal cells. For the adult ram, the amounts of VDR mRNA and VDR protein were less (p < 0.01) in testis than compared with caput, corpus and cauda epididymis. For prepubertal ram, the result showed the same trend (p < 0.01). However, the expression levels of VDR mRNA and VDR protein in caput, corpus, cauda epididymis and testis showed no significant difference (p > 0.05) between adult and prepubertal. In conclusion, VDR exists in testis and epididymis of ram, suggesting 1α,25-(OH)(2)VD(3) may play a role in ram reproduction.

  13. Detection of vitronectin mRNA in tissues and cells of the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Seiffert, D; Keeton, M; Eguchi, Y; Sawdey, M; Loskutoff, D J

    1991-01-01

    Mouse vitronectin (Vn) was isolated from serum by heparin affinity chromatography. The purified protein (Mr 71,000) supported adhesion of mouse and human cells in an Arg-Gly-Asp-dependent manner and bound to type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor with kinetics similar to those observed using human and bovine Vn. To further characterize murine Vn and its biosynthesis in vivo, a mouse Vn cDNA was isolated from a liver cDNA library. The amino acid sequence of mouse Vn was deduced from the cDNA and was aligned with that of human Vn. Based on this alignment, mouse Vn was inferred to be 457 amino acids long and to have extensive (82%) homology with human Vn. Northern blot hybridization analysis of RNA from mouse tissues, using the mouse Vn cDNA as a hybridization probe, revealed the presence of a single transcript of 1.7 kilobases in mouse liver. Vn mRNA was not detectable in heart, lung, kidney, spleen, muscle, brain, thymus, testes, uterus, skin, adipose tissue, and aorta. The cellular localization of liver Vn mRNA was studied by in situ hybridization. Strong staining was observed only in hepatocytes, suggesting that these cells are the primary source of Vn in vivo. Images PMID:1719529

  14. Analysis of the sequence and embryonic expression of chicken neurofibromin mRNA.

    PubMed

    Schafer, G L; Ciment, G; Stocker, K M; Baizer, L

    1993-04-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common inherited disorder that primarily affects tissues derived from the neural crest. Recent identification and characterization of the human NF1 gene has revealed that it encodes a protein (now called neurofibromin) that is similar in sequence to the ras-GTPase activator protein (or ras-GAP), suggesting that neurofibromin may be a component of cellular signal transduction pathways regulating cellular proliferation and/or differentiation. To initiate investigations on the role of the NF1 gene product in embryonic development, we have isolated a partial cDNA for chicken neurofibromin. Sequence analysis reveals that the predicted amino acid sequence is highly conserved between chick and human. The chicken cDNA hybridizes to a 12.5-kb transcript on RNA blots, a mol wt similar to that reported for the human and murine mRNAs. Ribonuclease protection assays indicate that NF1 mRNA is expressed in a variety of tissues in the chick embryo; this is confirmed by in situ hybridization analysis. NF1 mRNA expression is detectable as early as embryonic stage 18 in the neural plate. This pattern of expression may suggest a role for neurofibromin during normal development, including that of the nervous system.

  15. Virus-Like Particles of mRNA with Artificial Minimal Coat Proteins: Particle Formation, Stability, and Transfection Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Jekhmane, Shehrazade; de Haas, Rob; Paulino da Silva Filho, Omar; van Asbeck, Alexander H; Favretto, Marco Emanuele; Hernandez Garcia, Armando; Brock, Roland; de Vries, Renko

    2017-06-01

    RNA has enormous potential as a therapeutic, yet, the successful application depends on efficient delivery strategies. In this study, we demonstrate that a designed artificial viral coat protein, which self-assembles with DNA to form rod-shaped virus-like particles (VLPs), also encapsulates and protects mRNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and luciferase, and yields cellular expression of these proteins. The artificial viral coat protein consists of an oligolysine (K12) for binding to the oligonucleotide, a silk protein-like midblock S10 = (GAGAGAGQ)10 that self-assembles into stiff rods, and a long hydrophilic random coil block C that shields the nucleic acid cargo from its environment. With mRNA, the C-S10-K12 protein coassembles to form rod-shaped VLPs each encapsulating about one to five mRNA molecules. Inside the rod-shaped VLPs, the mRNAs are protected against degradation by RNAses, and VLPs also maintain their shape following incubation with serum. Despite the lack of cationic surface charge, the mRNA VLPs transfect cells with both EGFP and luciferase, although with a much lower efficiency than obtained by a lipoplex transfection reagent. The VLPs have a negligible toxicity and minimal hemolytic activity. Our results demonstrate that VLPs yield efficient packaging and shielding of mRNA and create the basis for implementation of additional virus-like functionalities to improve transfection and cell specificity, such as targeting functionalities.

  16. Preferential germline usage and VH/VL pairing observed in human antibodies selected by mRNA display.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Kutskova, Yuliya A; Hong, Feng; Memmott, John E; Zhong, Suju; Jenkinson, Megan D; Hsieh, Chung-Ming

    2015-10-01

    Since the invention of phage display, in vitro antibody display technologies have revolutionized the field of antibody discovery. In combination with antibody libraries constructed with sequences of human origin, such technologies enable accelerated therapeutic antibody discovery while bypassing the laborious animal immunization and hybridoma generation processes. Many in vitro display technologies developed since aim to differentiate from phage display by displaying full-length IgG proteins, utilizing eukaryotic translation system and codons, increasing library size or real-time kinetic selection by fluorescent activated cell sorting. We report here the development of an mRNA display technology and an accompanying HCDR3 size spectratyping monitor for human antibody discovery. Importantly, the mRNA display technology maintains a monovalent linkage between the mRNA (genotype) and display binding protein (phenotype), which minimizes avidity effect common in other display systems and allows for a stringent affinity and off-rate selection. The mRNA display technology successfully identified 100 human antibodies in 15 different selections against various targets from naïve human antibody libraries. These antibodies in general have high affinity and diversity. By analyzing the germline usage and combination of antibodies selected by the mRNA display technology, we identified trends and determined the productivity of each germline subgroup in the libraries that could serve as the knowledge base for constructing fully synthetic, next generation antibody libraries.

  17. Stem-loop RNA labeling can affect nuclear and cytoplasmic mRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Stephanie; Sidler, Corinne L; Azzalin, Claus M; Weis, Karsten

    2017-02-01

    The binding of sequence-specific RNA-interacting proteins, such as the bacteriophage MS2 or PP7 coat proteins, to their corresponding target sequences has been extremely useful and widely used to visualize single mRNAs in vivo. However, introduction of MS2 stem-loops into yeast mRNAs has recently been shown to lead to the accumulation of RNA fragments, suggesting that the loops impair mRNA decay. This result was questioned, because fragment occurrence was mainly assessed using ensemble methods, and their cellular localization and its implications had not been addressed on a single transcript level. Here, we demonstrate that the introduction of either MS2 stem-loops (MS2SL) or PP7 stem-loops (PP7SL) can affect the processing and subcellular localization of mRNA. We use single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH) to determine the localization of three independent mRNAs tagged with the stem-loop labeling systems in glucose-rich and glucose starvation conditions. Transcripts containing MS2SL or PP7SL display aberrant localization in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. These defects are most prominent in glucose starvation conditions, with nuclear mRNA processing being altered and stem-loop fragments abnormally enriching in processing bodies (PBs). The mislocalization of SL-containing RNAs is independent of the presence of the MS2 or PP7 coat protein (MCP or PCP).

  18. CD44 in canine leukemia: analysis of mRNA and protein expression in peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Gelain, M E; Martini, V; Giantin, M; Aricò, A; Poggi, A; Aresu, L; Riondato, F; Dacasto, M; Comazzi, S

    2014-05-15

    Hyaluronan receptor CD44 mediates interaction between cells and extracellular matrix. The expression of standard form and its variants is dysregulated in human leukemias and is associated with metastasis and prognosis. The aim of this work is the evaluation of CD44 mRNA and protein expression in canine leukemia. Peripheral blood from 20 acute leukemias (AL) (10 acute lymphoblastic, 6 acute myeloid and 4 acute undifferentiated leukemias), 21 chronic lymphocytic leukemias (CLL) and thirteen healthy dogs were collected. The mRNA expression of all CD44 variants presenting exons 1-5 and/or 16-20 (CD44_ex1-5 and CD44_ex16-20) and CD44 protein were determined by real-time RT-PCR and flow cytometry, using the mean fluorescent index (MFI), respectively. CD44 MFI was significantly higher in leukemic samples compared to controls and a higher expression was found in AL in respect with CLL. No significant differences were found when considering different phenotypic subtypes of AL and CLL. CD44_ex1-5 mRNA expression was significantly higher in AL compared to controls, whereas there was no difference in CLL compared to controls and AL. CD44_es16-20 showed the same trend, but without differences among groups. The high CD44 expression found in canine leukemias could be considered a step toward the definition of their molecular features. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Imaging of single mRNA molecules moving within a living cell nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Tadakuma, Hisashi; Ishihama, Yo; Shibuya, Toshiharu; Tani, Tokio; Funatsu, Takashi . E-mail: funatsu@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-06-09

    In eukaryotic cells, pre-mRNAs are transcribed in the nucleus, processed by 5' capping, 3'-polyadenylation, and splicing, and exported to the cytoplasm for translation. To examine the nuclear mRNA transport mechanism, intron-deficient mRNAs of truncated {beta}-globin and EGFP were synthesized, fluorescently labeled in vitro, and injected into the nucleus of living Xenopus A6 cells. The trajectories of single mRNA molecules in the nucleus were visualized using video-rate confocal microscopy. Approximately half the mRNAs moved by Brownian motion in the nucleoplasm, except the nucleoli, with an apparent diffusion coefficient of 0.2 {mu}m{sup 2}/s, about 1/150 of that in water. The slow diffusion could not be explained by simple diffusion obeying the Stokes-Einstein equation, suggesting interactions of the mRNAs with nuclear components. The remaining mRNAs were stationary with an average residence time of about 30 s, comparable to the time required for mRNA diffusion from the site of synthesis to nuclear pores.

  20. Single-cell mRNA profiling reveals transcriptional heterogeneity among pancreatic circulating tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Lapin, Morten; Tjensvoll, Kjersti; Oltedal, Satu; Javle, Milind; Smaaland, Rune; Gilje, Bjørnar; Nordgård, Oddmund

    2017-05-31

    Single-cell mRNA profiling of circulating tumour cells may contribute to a better understanding of the biology of these cells and their role in the metastatic process. In addition, such analyses may reveal new knowledge about the mechanisms underlying chemotherapy resistance and tumour progression in patients with cancer. Single circulating tumour cells were isolated from patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer with immuno-magnetic depletion and immuno-fluorescence microscopy. mRNA expression was analysed with single-cell multiplex RT-qPCR. Hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis were performed to identify expression patterns. Circulating tumour cells were detected in 33 of 56 (59%) examined blood samples. Single-cell mRNA profiling of intact isolated circulating tumour cells revealed both epithelial-like and mesenchymal-like subpopulations, which were distinct from leucocytes. The profiled circulating tumour cells also expressed elevated levels of stem cell markers, and the extracellular matrix protein, SPARC. The expression of SPARC might correspond to an epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic circulating tumour cells. The analysis of single pancreatic circulating tumour cells identified distinct subpopulations and revealed elevated expression of transcripts relevant to the dissemination of circulating tumour cells to distant organ sites.