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Sample records for mrna-binding proteins imps

  1. Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 3 (IMP3) is overexpressed in prostate cancer and correlates with higher Gleason scores

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The oncofetal protein insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 3 (IMP3) is an important factor for cell-migration and adhesion in malignancies. Recent studies have shown a remarkable overexpression of IMP3 in different human malignant neoplasms and also revealed it as an important prognostic marker in some tumor entities. To our knowledge, IMP3 expression has not been investigated in prostate carcinomas so far. Methods Immunohistochemical stainings for IMP3 were performed on tissue microarray (TMA) organized samples from 507 patients: 31 normal prostate tissues, 425 primary carcinomas and 51 prostate cancer metastases or castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPC). IMP3 immunoreactivity was semiquantitatively scored and correlated with clinical-pathologic parameters including survival. Results IMP3 is significantly stronger expressed in prostate carcinomas compared to normal prostate tissues (p < 0.0001), but did not show significant correlation with the pT-stage, the proliferation index (MIB1), preoperative serum PSA level and the margin status. Only a weak and slightly significant correlation was found with the Gleason score and IMP3 expression failed to show prognostic significance in clinico-pathological correlation-analyses. Conclusions Although IMP3 is overexpressed in a significant proportion of prostate cancer cases, which might be of importance for novel therapeutic approaches, it does not appear to possess any immediate diagnostic or prognostic value, limiting its potential as a tissue biomarker for prostate cancer. These results might be corroborated by the fact, that two independent tumor cohorts were separately reviewed. PMID:20591150

  2. Different forms of soluble cytoplasmic mRNA binding proteins and particles in Xenopus laevis oocytes and embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, M.T.; Krohne, G.; Franke, W.W. )

    1991-01-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms involved in the formation of maternally stored mRNPs during Xenopus laevis development, we searched for soluble cytoplasmic proteins of the oocyte that are able to selectively bind mRNAs, using as substrate radiolabeled mRNA. In vitro mRNP assembly in solution was followed by UV-cross-linking and RNase digestion, resulting in covalent tagging of polypeptides by nucleotide transfer. Five polypeptides of approximately 54, 56 60, 70, and 100 kD (p54, p56, p60, p70, and p100) have been found to selectively bind mRNA and assemble into mRNPs. These polypeptides, which correspond to previously described native mRNP components, occur in three different particle classes of approximately 4.5S, approximately 6S, and approximately 15S, as also determined by their reactions with antibodies against p54 and p56. Whereas the approximately 4.5S class contains p42, p60, and p70, probably each in the form of individual molecules or small complexes, the approximately 6S particles appears to consist only of p54 and p56, which occur in a near-stoichiometric ratio suggestive of a heterodimer complex. The approximately 15S particles contain, in addition to p54 and p56, p60 and p100 and this is the single occurring form of RNA-binding p100. We have also observed changes in the in vitro mRNA binding properties of these polypeptides during oogenesis and early embryonic development, in relation to their phosphorylation state and to the activity of an approximately 15S particle-associated protein kinase, suggesting that these proteins are involved in the developmental translational regulation of maternal mRNAs.

  3. Characterization of the Eimeria maxima sporozoite surface protein IMP1.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, M C; Fetterer, R; Miska, K; Tuo, W; Kwok, O; Dubey, J P

    2015-07-30

    The purpose of this study was to characterize Eimeria maxima immune-mapped protein 1 (IMP1) that is hypothesized to play a role in eliciting protective immunity against E. maxima infection in chickens. RT-PCR analysis of RNA from unsporulated and sporulating E. maxima oocysts revealed highest transcription levels at 6-12h of sporulation with a considerable downregulation thereafter. Alignment of IMP1 coding sequence from Houghton, Weybridge, and APU-1 strains of E. maxima revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms that in some instances led to amino acid changes in the encoded protein sequence. The E. maxima (APU-1) IMP1 cDNA sequence was cloned and expressed in 2 different polyHis Escherichia coli expression vectors. Regardless of expression vector, recombinant E. maxima IMP1 (rEmaxIMP1) was fairly unstable in non-denaturing buffer, which is consistent with stability analysis of the primary amino acid sequence. Antisera specific for rEmaxIMP1 identified a single 72 kDa protein or a 61 kDa protein by non-reducing or reducing SDS-PAGE/immunoblotting. Immunofluorescence staining with anti-rEmaxIMP1, revealed intense surface staining of E. maxima sporozoites, with negligible staining of merozoite stages. Immuno-histochemical staining of E. maxima-infected chicken intestinal tissue revealed staining of E. maxima developmental stages in the lamnia propia and crypts at both 24 and 48 h post-infection, and negligible staining thereafter. The expression of IMP1 during early stages of in vivo development and its location on the sporozoite surface may explain in part the immunoprotective effect of this protein against E. maxima infection. PMID:26012860

  4. Characterization of the Eimeria maxima sporozoite surface protein IMP1.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, M C; Fetterer, R; Miska, K; Tuo, W; Kwok, O; Dubey, J P

    2015-07-30

    The purpose of this study was to characterize Eimeria maxima immune-mapped protein 1 (IMP1) that is hypothesized to play a role in eliciting protective immunity against E. maxima infection in chickens. RT-PCR analysis of RNA from unsporulated and sporulating E. maxima oocysts revealed highest transcription levels at 6-12h of sporulation with a considerable downregulation thereafter. Alignment of IMP1 coding sequence from Houghton, Weybridge, and APU-1 strains of E. maxima revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms that in some instances led to amino acid changes in the encoded protein sequence. The E. maxima (APU-1) IMP1 cDNA sequence was cloned and expressed in 2 different polyHis Escherichia coli expression vectors. Regardless of expression vector, recombinant E. maxima IMP1 (rEmaxIMP1) was fairly unstable in non-denaturing buffer, which is consistent with stability analysis of the primary amino acid sequence. Antisera specific for rEmaxIMP1 identified a single 72 kDa protein or a 61 kDa protein by non-reducing or reducing SDS-PAGE/immunoblotting. Immunofluorescence staining with anti-rEmaxIMP1, revealed intense surface staining of E. maxima sporozoites, with negligible staining of merozoite stages. Immuno-histochemical staining of E. maxima-infected chicken intestinal tissue revealed staining of E. maxima developmental stages in the lamnia propia and crypts at both 24 and 48 h post-infection, and negligible staining thereafter. The expression of IMP1 during early stages of in vivo development and its location on the sporozoite surface may explain in part the immunoprotective effect of this protein against E. maxima infection.

  5. Tandem Phosphorylation of Serines 221 and 318 by Protein Kinase Cδ Coordinates mRNA Binding and Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of HuR▿

    PubMed Central

    Doller, Anke; Schlepckow, Kai; Schwalbe, Harald; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Stabilization of mRNA by the ubiquitous RNA binding protein human antigen R (HuR), a member of the embryonic lethal abnormal vision (ELAV) protein family, requires canonical binding to AU-rich element (ARE)-bearing target mRNA and export of nuclear HuR-mRNA complexes to the cytoplasm. In human mesangial cells (HMC) both processes are induced by angiotensin II (AngII) via protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ)-triggered serine phosphorylation of HuR. By testing different point-mutated Flag-tagged HuR proteins, we found that Ser 318 within RNA recognition motif 3 (RRM3) is essential for AngII-induced binding to ARE-bearing mRNA but irrelevant for nucleocytoplasmic HuR shuttling. Conversely, mutation at Ser 221 within the HuR hinge region prevents AngII-triggered HuR export without affecting mRNA binding of HuR. Using phosphorylation state-specific antibodies, we found a transient increase in HuR phosphorylation at both serines by AngII. Functionally, PKCδ mediates the AngII-induced stabilization of prominent HuR target mRNAs, including those of cyclin A, cyclin D1, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and is indispensable for AngII-triggered migration and wound healing of HMC. Our data suggest a regulatory paradigm wherein a simultaneous phosphorylation at different domains by PKCδ coordinates mRNA binding and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HuR, both of which events are essentially involved in the stabilization of HuR target mRNAs and relevant cell functions. PMID:20086103

  6. Sequence-specific binding of a hormonally regulated mRNA binding protein to cytidine-rich sequences in the lutropin receptor open reading frame.

    PubMed

    Kash, J C; Menon, K M

    1999-12-21

    In previous studies, a lutropin receptor mRNA binding protein implicated in the hormonal regulation of lutropin receptor mRNA stability was identified. This protein, termed LRBP-1, was shown by RNA gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay to specifically interact with lutropin receptor RNA sequences. The present studies have examined the specificity of lutropin receptor mRNA recognition by LRBP-1 and mapped the contact site by RNA footprinting and by site-directed mutagenesis. LRBP-1 was partially purified by cation-exchange chromatography, and the mRNA binding properties of the partially purified LRBP-1 were examined by RNA gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay and hydroxyl-radical RNA footprinting. These data showed that the LRBP-1 binding site is located between nucleotides 203 and 220 of the receptor open reading frame, and consists of the bipartite polypyrimidine sequence 5'-UCUC-X(7)-UCUCCCU-3'. Competition RNA gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that homoribopolymers of poly(rC) were effective RNA binding competitors, while poly(rA), poly(rG), and poly(rU) showed no effect. Mutagenesis of the cytidine residues contained within the LRBP-1 binding site demonstrated that all the cytidines in the bipartite sequence contribute to LRBP-1 binding specificity. Additionally, RNA gel electrophoretic mobility supershift analysis showed that LRBP-1 was not recognized by antibodies against two well-characterized poly(rC) RNA binding proteins, alphaCP-1 and alphaCP-2, implicated in the regulation of RNA stability of alpha-globin and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNAs. In summary, we show that partially purified LRBP-1 binds to a polypyrimidine sequence within nucleotides 203 and 220 of lutropin receptor mRNA with a high degree of specificity which is indicative of its role in posttranscriptional control of lutropin receptor expression.

  7. IMP3 protein promotes chemoresistance in breast cancer cells by regulating breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) expression.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Sanjoy; Pursell, Bryan; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2013-05-01

    IMP3, a member of a family of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNA-binding proteins (IMPs), is expressed preferentially in triple-negative breast cancers, which are resistant to many chemotherapeutics. However, the mechanisms by which it impacts breast cancer have not been elucidated. We hypothesized a role for IMP3 in chemoresistance based on these observations. Depletion of IMP3 expression in triple-negative breast cancer cells increased their sensitivity to doxorubicin and mitoxantrone significantly but not to taxol. Given that doxorubicin and mitoxantrone are effluxed by breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), we assessed whether IMP3 regulates BCRP. The data obtained demonstrate that IMP3 binds to BCRP mRNA and regulates BCRP expression. These findings are significant because they provide insight into the mechanism by which IMP3 contributes to aggressive cancers, and they highlight the potential for targeting this mRNA-binding protein for the clinical management of cancer.

  8. Enhanced IMP3 Expression Activates NF-кB Pathway and Promotes Renal Cell Carcinoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Xuelian; Li, Muhan; Zhan, Jun; Yu, Yu; Wei, Xiaofan; Guan, Lizhao; Aydin, Hakan; Elson, Paul; Zhou, Ming; He, Huiying; Zhang, Hongquan

    2015-01-01

    Background Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding protein 3 (IMP3) is expressed in metastatic and a subset of primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, the role of IMP3 in RCC progression was poorly understood. We aim to uncover the mechanism of IMP3 in regulating clear cell RCC (CCRCC) progression and validate the prognostic significance of IMP3 in localized CCRCC. Methods Caki-1 cells stably overexpressing IMP3 and Achn cells with knockdown of IMP3 were analyzed for cell migration and invasion by Transwell assay. RNA-seq was used to profile gene expression in IMP3-expressing Caki-1 cells. A cohort of 469 localized CCRCC patients were examined for IMP3 expression by immunohistochemistry using tumor tissue array. Results IMP3 promoted Caki-1 cell migration and invasion, whereas knockdown of IMP3 by RNAi inhibited Achn cell migration and invasion. Enhanced IMP3 expression activated NF-кB pathway and through which, it functioned in promoting the RCC cell migration. IMP3 expression in localized CCRCC was found to be associated with higher nuclear grade, higher T stage, necrosis and sarcomatoid differentiation (p< 0.001). Enhanced IMP3 expression was correlated with shorter recurrence-free and overall survivals. Multivariable analysis validated IMP3 as an independent prognostic factor for localized CCRCC patients. Conclusion IMP3 promotes RCC cell migration and invasion by activation of NF-кB pathway. IMP3 is validated to be an independent prognostic marker for localized CCRCC. PMID:25919292

  9. Imp (IGF-II mRNA-binding protein) is expressed during spermatogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, James J; Hickey, Christina A; Stabrawa, Cecylia; Meytes, Vadim; Hutter, Jessica A; Talbert, Caitlin; Regis, Nadine

    2008-01-01

    Drosophila spermatogenesis results in the production of sixty‑four ~2-mm spermatozoa from an individual founder cell. Little is known, however, about the elongation of spermatids to such an extraordinary length. In a partial screen of a GFP-tagged protein trap collection, four insertions were uncovered that exhibit expression toward the tail ends of spermatid cysts and within the apical tip of the testis, suggesting that these protein traps may represent genes involved in spermatid elongation and pre-meiotic spermatogenesis, respectively. Inverse PCR followed by cycle sequencing and BLAST revealed that all four protein traps represent insertions within Imp (IGF-IImRNA binding protein), a known translational regulator. Testis enhancer trap analysis also reveals Imp expression in the cells of the apical tip, suggesting transcription of Imp prior to the primary spermatocyte stage. Taken together, these results suggest a role for Imp in the male germline during both spermatid elongation and premeiotic spermatogenesis.

  10. CircRNA-protein complexes: IMP3 protein component defines subfamily of circRNPs

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Tim; Hung, Lee-Hsueh; Schreiner, Silke; Starke, Stefan; Eckhof , Heinrich; Rossbach, Oliver; Reich, Stefan; Medenbach, Jan; Bindereif , Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) constitute a new class of noncoding RNAs in higher eukaryotes generated from pre-mRNAs by alternative splicing. Here we investigated in mammalian cells the association of circRNAs with proteins. Using glycerol gradient centrifugation, we characterized in cell lysates circRNA-protein complexes (circRNPs) of distinct sizes. By polysome-gradient fractionation we found no evidence for efficient translation of a set of abundant circRNAs in HeLa cells. To identify circRNPs with a specific protein component, we focused on IMP3 (IGF2BP3, insulin-like growth factor 2 binding protein 3), a known tumor marker and RNA-binding protein. Combining RNA-seq analysis of IMP3-co-immunoprecipitated RNA and filtering for circular-junction reads identified a set of IMP3-associated circRNAs, which were validated and characterized. In sum, our data suggest that specific circRNP families exist defined by a common protein component. In addition, this provides a general approach to identify circRNPs with a given protein component. PMID:27510448

  11. CircRNA-protein complexes: IMP3 protein component defines subfamily of circRNPs.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Tim; Hung, Lee-Hsueh; Schreiner, Silke; Starke, Stefan; Eckhof, Heinrich; Rossbach, Oliver; Reich, Stefan; Medenbach, Jan; Bindereif, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) constitute a new class of noncoding RNAs in higher eukaryotes generated from pre-mRNAs by alternative splicing. Here we investigated in mammalian cells the association of circRNAs with proteins. Using glycerol gradient centrifugation, we characterized in cell lysates circRNA-protein complexes (circRNPs) of distinct sizes. By polysome-gradient fractionation we found no evidence for efficient translation of a set of abundant circRNAs in HeLa cells. To identify circRNPs with a specific protein component, we focused on IMP3 (IGF2BP3, insulin-like growth factor 2 binding protein 3), a known tumor marker and RNA-binding protein. Combining RNA-seq analysis of IMP3-co-immunoprecipitated RNA and filtering for circular-junction reads identified a set of IMP3-associated circRNAs, which were validated and characterized. In sum, our data suggest that specific circRNP families exist defined by a common protein component. In addition, this provides a general approach to identify circRNPs with a given protein component. PMID:27510448

  12. IMP3 Protein Promotes Chemoresistance in Breast Cancer Cells by Regulating Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (ABCG2) Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Sanjoy; Pursell, Bryan; Mercurio, Arthur M.

    2013-01-01

    IMP3, a member of a family of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNA-binding proteins (IMPs), is expressed preferentially in triple-negative breast cancers, which are resistant to many chemotherapeutics. However, the mechanisms by which it impacts breast cancer have not been elucidated. We hypothesized a role for IMP3 in chemoresistance based on these observations. Depletion of IMP3 expression in triple-negative breast cancer cells increased their sensitivity to doxorubicin and mitoxantrone significantly but not to taxol. Given that doxorubicin and mitoxantrone are effluxed by breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), we assessed whether IMP3 regulates BCRP. The data obtained demonstrate that IMP3 binds to BCRP mRNA and regulates BCRP expression. These findings are significant because they provide insight into the mechanism by which IMP3 contributes to aggressive cancers, and they highlight the potential for targeting this mRNA-binding protein for the clinical management of cancer. PMID:23539627

  13. The oncofetal protein IMP3 is an indicator of early recurrence and poor outcome in mucoepidermoid carcinoma of salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Elshafey, Mohamed R.; Ahmed, Rehab A.; Mourad, Mohamed I; Gaballah, Essam T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) is the most common primary malignancy of the salivary glands. Insulin-like growth factor-II mRNA-binding protein-3 (IMP3) is an important prognostic factor in some cancers and a tool that differentiates between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. This study aimed to identify a relationship between the expression of IMP3 and the outcome of salivary gland MEC, as well as to differentiate MEC from pleomorphic adenoma (PA). Methods:Tissue specimens from 70 cases of salivary gland MEC, 40 cases of PA, and 10 cases with normal salivary gland were examined immunohistochemically for IMP3. The association among the expression of IMP3, clinicopathological characteristics and patient's survival was assessed. Results:IMP3 was present in 51.4% of MEC but absent in PA and normal salivary gland tissues. IMP3 expression was associated with age > 60 years, submandibular gland tumors, tumor size > 4 cm, high-grade tumors, lymph node metastasis, involvement of surgical margins, perineural invasion, distant metastasis, advanced TNM stage, tumor relapse, and death ( P<0.05). Increased expression of IMP3, tumors of the submandibular gland, and lymph node metastasis were independent prognostic factors of -free survival (DFS). In addition, IMP3 was a strong predictor of overall survival (OS) together with distant metastasis and intermediate and high-grade tumors. Conclusions:IMP3 expression is highly important in evaluating the outcome of MEC. IMP3 can be used to differentiate MEC from PA of salivary glands. PMID:27458536

  14. Local requirement of the Drosophila insulin binding protein imp-L2 in coordinating developmental progression with nutritional conditions.

    PubMed

    Sarraf-Zadeh, Ladan; Christen, Stefan; Sauer, Uwe; Cognigni, Paola; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene; Stocker, Hugo; Köhler, Katja; Hafen, Ernst

    2013-09-01

    In Drosophila, growth takes place during the larval stages until the formation of the pupa. Starvation delays pupariation to allow prolonged feeding, ensuring that the animal reaches an appropriate size to form a fertile adult. Pupariation is induced by a peak of the steroid hormone ecdysone produced by the prothoracic gland (PG) after larvae have reached a certain body mass. Local downregulation of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) activity in the PG interferes with ecdysone production, indicating that IIS activity in the PG couples the nutritional state to development. However, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. In this study we show that the secreted Imaginal morphogenesis protein-Late 2 (Imp-L2), a growth inhibitor in Drosophila, is involved in this process. Imp-L2 inhibits the activity of the Drosophila insulin-like peptides by direct binding and is expressed by specific cells in the brain, the ring gland, the gut and the fat body. We demonstrate that Imp-L2 is required to regulate and adapt developmental timing to nutritional conditions by regulating IIS activity in the PG. Increasing Imp-L2 expression at its endogenous sites using an Imp-L2-Gal4 driver delays pupariation, while Imp-L2 mutants exhibit a slight acceleration of development. These effects are strongly enhanced by starvation and are accompanied by massive alterations of ecdysone production resulting most likely from increased Imp-L2 production by neurons directly contacting the PG and not from elevated Imp-L2 levels in the hemolymph. Taken together our results suggest that Imp-L2-expressing neurons sense the nutritional state of Drosophila larvae and coordinate dietary information and ecdysone production to adjust developmental timing under starvation conditions. PMID:23773803

  15. IGF2BP2/IMP2-Deficient mice resist obesity through enhanced translation of Ucp1 mRNA and Other mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ning; Zhao, Liping; Wrighting, Diedra; Krämer, Dana; Majithia, Amit; Wang, Yanqun; Cracan, Valentin; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Mootha, Vamsi K; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Thorburn, David R; Minichiello, Liliana; Altshuler, David; Avruch, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Although variants in the IGF2BP2/IMP2 gene confer risk for type 2 diabetes, IMP2, an RNA binding protein, is not known to regulate metabolism. Imp2(-/-) mice gain less lean mass after weaning and have increased lifespan. Imp2(-/-) mice are highly resistant to diet-induced obesity and fatty liver and display superior glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, increased energy expenditure, and better defense of core temperature on cold exposure. Imp2(-/-) brown fat and Imp2(-/-) brown adipocytes differentiated in vitro contain more UCP1 polypeptide than Imp2(+/+) despite similar levels of Ucp1 mRNA; the Imp2(-/-)adipocytes also exhibit greater uncoupled oxygen consumption. IMP2 binds the mRNAs encoding Ucp1 and other mitochondrial components, and most exhibit increased translational efficiency in the absence of IMP2. In vitro IMP2 inhibits translation of mRNAs bearing the Ucp1 untranslated segments. Thus IMP2 limits longevity and regulates nutrient and energy metabolism in the mouse by controlling the translation of its client mRNAs. PMID:25863250

  16. Dynamics of survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein interaction with the mRNA-binding protein IMP1 facilitates its trafficking into motor neuron axons

    PubMed Central

    Fallini, Claudia; Guo, Peng; Zhang, Honglai; Singer, Robert H.; Rossoll, Wilfried; Bassell, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a lethal neurodegenerative disease specifically affecting spinal motor neurons. SMA is caused by the homozygous deletion or mutation of the survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. The SMN protein plays an essential role in the assembly of spliceosomal ribonucleoproteins. However, it is still unclear how low levels of the ubiquitously expressed SMN protein lead to the selective degeneration of motor neurons. An additional role for SMN in the regulation of the axonal transport of mRNA-binding proteins (mRBPs) and their target mRNAs has been proposed. Indeed, several mRBPs have been shown to interact with SMN, and the axonal levels of few mRNAs, such as the β-actin mRNA, are reduced in SMA motor neurons. In this study we have identified the β-actin mRNA-binding protein IMP1/ZBP1 as a novel SMN-interacting protein. Using a combination of biochemical assays and quantitative imaging techniques in primary motor neurons, we show that IMP1 associates with SMN in individual granules that are actively transported in motor neuron axons. Furthermore, we demonstrate that IMP1 axonal localization depends on SMN levels, and that SMN deficiency in SMA motor neurons leads to a dramatic reduction of IMP1 protein levels. In contrast, no difference in IMP1 protein levels was detected in whole brain lysates from SMA mice, further suggesting neuron specific roles of SMN in IMP1 expression and localization. Taken together, our data support a role for SMN in the regulation of mRNA localization and axonal transport through its interaction with mRBPs such as IMP1. PMID:23897586

  17. Toward immunomodulation of witches broom disease of lime (WBDL) by targeting immunodominant membrane protein (IMP) of candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia.

    PubMed

    Shahryari, F; Safarnejad, M R; Shams-Bakhsh, M; Jouzani, G R Salehi

    2010-01-01

    The witches' broom disease of lime (WBDL) caused by Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia is the most devastating disease of acidian lime in southern part of Iran as it destroy thousands of trees yearly throughout these regions. Traditional methods such as eradication of infected trees and insect vector control have shown limited effect on this case. Therefore, alternative approaches such as plantibody-mediated resistance, have been considered. Throughout present study we prepared sufficient amount of antigen that is required for generation of specific monoclonal recombinant antibodies against Immunodominant membrane protein (IMP) which will be exploited for plantibody-mediated resistance approach. The gene encoding IMP protein was obtained by PCR amplification using specific primers and DNA extracted from the infected plants. Amplified fragment was then inserted into T/A cloning vector. Intact clones containing the right sequence was selected after digestion, PCR amplification and subsequent sequencing analysis. IMP encoding region having the right sequence was sub-cloned into pET28a bacterial expression vector. Large scale expression of His tagged recombinant protein was performed in the BL21-de3 strain of E. coli and purification under native conditions was carried out through immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) in a column containing Ni-NTA agarose beads. Successful expression and purification steps were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and western blotting analyses. The results obtained indicated the successful production of about 18 mg purified recombinant IMP protein with a low level of contamination in one liter cultured medium. Finally the purified protein was dialyzed in phosphate saline buffer and applied for immunization of mice.

  18. IMP mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The program requirements and operations requirements for the IMP mission are presented. The satellite configuration is described and the missions are analyzed. The support equipment, logistics, range facilities, and responsibilities of the launching organizations are defined. The systems for telemetry, communications, satellite tracking, and satellite control are identified.

  19. IMP-1 displays crosstalk with K-Ras and modulates colon cancer cell survival through the novel pro-apoptotic protein CYFIP2

    PubMed Central

    Mongroo, Perry S.; Noubissi, Felicite K.; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Kalabis, Jiri; King, Catrina E.; Johnstone, Cameron N.; Bowser, Mark J.; Castells, Antoni; Spiegelman, Vladimir S.; Rustgi, Anil K.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein-1 (IMP-1) is an oncofetal protein that binds directly to and stabilizes oncogenic c-Myc and regulates in turn its post-transcriptional expression and translation. In contrast to normal adult tissue, IMP-1 is re-expressed and/or overexpressed in human cancers. We demonstrate that knock-down of c-Myc in human colon cancer cell lines increases the expression of mature let-7 miRNA family members and downregulates several of its mRNA targets: IMP-1, Cdc34, and K-Ras. We further demonstrate that loss of IMP-1 inhibits Cdc34, Lin-28B, and K-Ras, and suppresses SW-480 cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth, and promotes caspase and lamin-mediated cell death. We also found that IMP-1 binds to the coding region and 3′UTR of K-Ras mRNA. RNA microarray profiling and validation by reverse transcription PCR reveals that the p53-inducible pro-apoptotic protein, CYFIP2, is upregulated in IMP-1 knock-down SW480 cells, a novel finding. We also show that overexpression of IMP-1 increases c-Myc and K-Ras expression, and LIM2405 cell proliferation. Furthermore, we show that loss of IMP-1 induces Caspase-3 and Parp–mediated apoptosis, and inhibits K-Ras expression in SW480 cells, which is rescued by CYFIP2 knock-down. Importantly, analysis of 228 patients with colon cancers reveals that IMP-1 is significantly upregulated in differentiated colon tumors (p ≤ 0.0001) and correlates with K-Ras expression (r=0.35, p ≤ 0.0001) relative to adjacent normal mucosa. These findings indicate that IMP-1, interrelated with c-myc, acts upstream of K-Ras to promote survival through a novel mechanism that may be important in colon cancer pathogenesis. PMID:21252116

  20. MART-1 peptide vaccination plus IMP321 (LAG-3Ig fusion protein) in patients receiving autologous PBMCs after lymphodepletion: results of a Phase I trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunotherapy offers a promising novel approach for the treatment of cancer and both adoptive T-cell transfer and immune modulation lead to regression of advanced melanoma. However, the potential synergy between these two strategies remains unclear. Methods We investigated in 12 patients with advanced stage IV melanoma the effect of multiple MART-1 analog peptide vaccinations with (n = 6) or without (n = 6) IMP321 (LAG-3Ig fusion protein) as an adjuvant in combination with lymphodepleting chemotherapy and adoptive transfer of autologous PBMCs at day (D) 0 (Trial registration No: NCT00324623). All patients were selected on the basis of ex vivo detectable MART-1-specific CD8 T-cell responses and immunized at D0, 8, 15, 22, 28, 52, and 74 post-reinfusion. Results After immunization, a significant expansion of MART-1-specific CD8 T cells was measured in 83% (n = 5/6) and 17% (n = 1/6) of patients from the IMP321 and control groups, respectively (P < 0.02). Compared to the control group, the mean fold increase of MART-1-specific CD8 T cells in the IMP321 group was respectively >2-, >4- and >6-fold higher at D15, D30 and D60 (P < 0.02). Long-lasting MART-1-specific CD8 T-cell responses were significantly associated with IMP321 (P < 0.02). At the peak of the response, MART-1-specific CD8 T cells contained higher proportions of effector (CCR7− CD45RA+/−) cells in the IMP321 group (P < 0.02) and showed no sign of exhaustion (i.e. were mostly PD1−CD160−TIM3−LAG3−2B4+/−). Moreover, IMP321 was associated with a significantly reduced expansion of regulatory T cells (P < 0.04); consistently, we observed a negative correlation between the relative expansion of MART-1-specific CD8 T cells and of regulatory T cells. Finally, although there were no confirmed responses as per RECIST criteria, a transient, 30-day partial response was observed in a patient from the IMP321 group. Conclusions Vaccination with IMP321 as an

  1. The RNA binding protein IMP3 facilitates tumor immune escape by downregulating the stress-induced ligands ULPB2 and MICB

    PubMed Central

    Schmiedel, Dominik; Tai, Julie; Yamin, Rachel; Berhani, Orit; Bauman, Yoav; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the stress-induced ligands MICA, MICB and ULBP 1–6 are up-regulated as a cellular response to DNA damage, excessive proliferation or viral infection; thereby, they enable recognition and annihilation by immune cells that express the powerful activating receptor NKG2D. This receptor is present not exclusively, but primarily on NK cells. Knowledge about the regulatory mechanisms controlling ULBP expression is still vague. In this study, we report a direct interaction of the oncogenic RNA binding protein (RBP) IMP3 with ULBP2 mRNA, leading to ULBP2 transcript destabilization and reduced ULBP2 surface expression in several human cell lines. We also discovered that IMP3 indirectly targets MICB with a mechanism functionally distinct from that of ULBP2. Importantly, IMP3-mediated regulation of stress-ligands leads to impaired NK cell recognition of transformed cells. Our findings shed new light on the regulation of NKG2D ligands and on the mechanism of action of a powerful oncogenic RBP, IMP3. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13426.001 PMID:26982091

  2. BRCA-mutated Invasive Breast Carcinomas: Immunohistochemical Analysis of Insulin-like Growth Factor II mRNA-binding Protein (IMP3), Cytokeratin 8/18, and Cytokeratin 14.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sambit K; Lai, Jin-Ping; Gordon, Ora K; Pradhan, Dinesh; Bose, Shikha; Dadmanesh, Farnaz

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the expression of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein (IMP3), CK8/18, and CK14 in BRCA mutated and sporadic invasive breast carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry for IMP3, CK8/18, and CK14 was performed on 39 cases of invasive breast carcinomas with BRCA mutation (24 BRCA1, 14 BRCA2, and 1 dual BRCA1/BRCA2) and 54 cases of sporadic invasive breast carcinomas. The relationship between the IMP3, CK8/18, and CK14 and the tumor grade and molecular phenotypes were analyzed. IMP3, CK8/18, and CK14 positivity were present in 20 (51%), 22 (56%), and 14 (36%) of 39 BRCA-mutated breast carcinomas, and 11 (20%), 53 (98%), and 24 (44%) of 54 sporadic breast carcinomas respectively. The rates of IMP3 expression and absence of CK8/18 (44% versus 2%) in BRCA-mutated breast carcinomas was significantly higher than the sporadic breast carcinomas (p = 0.002 and p < 0.001). No significant difference was observed for CK14 among the two groups (p = 0.408). No significant difference was observed among BRCA1-related and BRCA2-related breast carcinomas in the immunoprofile for IMP3, CK8/18, and CK14. No significant correlation was identified between the expression of IMP3 and CK8/18 and the tumor grade in both BRCA-mutated and sporadic breast carcinomas (p > 0.05). In cases with luminal A and B phenotypes, the rates of expression of IMP3 and loss of CK8/18 were significantly higher in BRCA-mutated as compared to sporadic breast carcinoma (p < 0.001). In cases with basal-like phenotype, the absence of CK8/18 expression was significantly higher in BRCA-mutated breast carcinomas (54% versus 0%, p = 0.001), while no difference was observed for IMP3 expression (p = 0.435). Regardless of mutation type, histologic grade, or molecular phenotype, the absence of CK8/18 expression and presence of IMP3 expression are seen at much higher rate in BRCA mutated breast carcinomas.

  3. IMP series report/bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1971-01-01

    The main characteristics of the IMP spacecraft and experiments are considered and the scientific knowledge gained is presented in the form of abstracts of scientific papers using IMP data. Spacecraft characteristics, including temporal and spatial coverages, are presented followed by an annotated bibliography. Experiments conducted on all IMP's (including prelaunch IMP's H and J) are described. Figures are presented showing the time histories, through the end of 1970, of magnetic field, plasma, and energetic particle experiments.

  4. IMP 2.0: a multi-species functional genomics portal for integration, visualization and prediction of protein functions and networks.

    PubMed

    Wong, Aaron K; Krishnan, Arjun; Yao, Victoria; Tadych, Alicja; Troyanskaya, Olga G

    2015-07-01

    IMP (Integrative Multi-species Prediction), originally released in 2012, is an interactive web server that enables molecular biologists to interpret experimental results and to generate hypotheses in the context of a large cross-organism compendium of functional predictions and networks. The system provides biologists with a framework to analyze their candidate gene sets in the context of functional networks, expanding or refining their sets using functional relationships predicted from integrated high-throughput data. IMP 2.0 integrates updated prior knowledge and data collections from the last three years in the seven supported organisms (Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and extends function prediction coverage to include human disease. IMP identifies homologs with conserved functional roles for disease knowledge transfer, allowing biologists to analyze disease contexts and predictions across all organisms. Additionally, IMP 2.0 implements a new flexible platform for experts to generate custom hypotheses about biological processes or diseases, making sophisticated data-driven methods easily accessible to researchers. IMP does not require any registration or installation and is freely available for use at http://imp.princeton.edu.

  5. Identification of a Male-Specific RNA Binding Protein That Regulates Sex-Specific Splicing of Bmdsx by Increasing RNA Binding Activity of BmPSI▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka G.; Imanishi, Shigeo; Dohmae, Naoshi; Asanuma, Miwako; Matsumoto, Shogo

    2010-01-01

    Bmdsx is a sex-determining gene in the silkworm and is alternatively spliced in males and females. CE1 is a splicing silencer element responsible for the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx. To identify sex-specific factors implicated in the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx, we performed RNA affinity chromatography using CE1 RNA as a ligand. We have identified BmIMP, a Bombyx homolog of IGF-II mRNA binding protein (IMP), as a male-specific factor that specifically binds to CE1. The gene encoding BmIMP is localized on the Z chromosome and is male-specifically expressed in various tissues. Antisense inhibition of BmIMP expression increased female-specific splicing of Bmdsx pre-mRNA. Coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown analyses demonstrated that BmIMP physically interacts with BmPSI, which has been identified as a factor implicated in the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx, through the KH domains of BmIMP. The functional consequence of this interaction was examined using RNA mobility shift analysis. BmIMP increased BmPSI-CE1 RNA binding activity by decreasing the rate of BmPSI dissociation from CE1 RNA. Truncation analysis of BmIMP suggested that the KH domains are responsible for enhancing BmPSI-CE1 RNA binding activity. These results suggest that BmIMP may enhance the male-specific splicing of Bmdsx pre-mRNA by increasing RNA binding activity of BmPSI. PMID:20956562

  6. IMP - INTEGRATED MISSION PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dauro, V. A.

    1994-01-01

    IMP is a simulation language that is used to model missions around the Earth, Moon, Mars, or other planets. It has been used to model missions for the Saturn Program, Apollo Program, Space Transportation System, Space Exploration Initiative, and Space Station Freedom. IMP allows a user to control the mission being simulated through a large event/maneuver menu. Up to three spacecraft may be used: a main, a target and an observer. The simulation may begin at liftoff, suborbital, or orbital. IMP incorporates a Fehlberg seventh order, thirteen evaluation Runge-Kutta integrator with error and step-size control to numerically integrate the equations of motion. The user may choose oblate or spherical gravity for the central body (Earth, Mars, Moon or other) while a spherical model is used for the gravity of an additional perturbing body. Sun gravity and pressure and Moon gravity effects are user-selectable. Earth/Mars atmospheric effects can be included. The optimum thrust guidance parameters are calculated automatically. Events/maneuvers may involve many velocity changes, and these velocity changes may be impulsive or of finite duration. Aerobraking to orbit is also an option. Other simulation options include line-of-sight communication guidelines, a choice of propulsion systems, a soft landing on the Earth or Mars, and rendezvous with a target vehicle. The input/output is in metric units, with the exception of thrust and weight which are in English units. Input is read from the user's input file to minimize real-time keyboard input. Output includes vehicle state, orbital and guide parameters, event and total velocity changes, and propellant usage. The main output is to the user defined print file, but during execution, part of the input/output is also displayed on the screen. An included FORTRAN program, TEKPLOT, will display plots on the VDT as well as generating a graphic file suitable for output on most laser printers. The code is double precision. IMP is written in

  7. Analysis of IMP3 expression in normal and neoplastic human pituitary tissues.

    PubMed

    Righi, Alberto; Zhang, Shuya; Jin, Long; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Kovacs, Kalman; Kovacs, Gabor; Goth, Miklos I; Korbonits, Marta; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2010-03-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 3 (IMP3) is an oncofetal protein highly expressed in fetal tissue and malignant tumors but rarely found in adult benign tissues. In various tumors, IMP3 expression is correlated with increased tumor aggressiveness and reduced overall survival. To our knowledge, IMP3 expression has not been investigated in pituitary tumors. We analyzed the immunohistochemical expression of IMP3 in five normal pituitary tissues and 75 pituitary tumors (64 adenomas and 11 carcinomas) to determine if specific tumor types expressed IMP3 and if there were differences in IMP3 expression between adenomas and carcinomas. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that IMP3 was positive in four (80%) normal pituitaries with focal stain in a subset of normal anterior pituitary cells. IMP3 was expressed in 31% (20/64) of adenomas and in 36% (4/11) of carcinomas. A slightly higher level of IMP3 expression was observed in PRL-GH-TSH adenomas compared to the other types of pituitary adenomas. Expression of IMP3 was not significantly higher in carcinomas than in adenomas (p = 0.737). RT-PCR and Western Blotting supported the heterogeneous expression of IMP3. These results indicate that IMP3 is expressed both in normal and in neoplastic pituitary gland tissues without significant differences in expression levels in pituitary carcinomas. PMID:19898970

  8. IMP3 expression is associated with poor survival in cervical squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingzhu; Yan, Jinhai; Fu, Bo; Liu, Jianghuan; Zhong, Ling; Yang, Qiao; Zhao, Tong

    2014-11-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II messenger RNA (mRNA)-binding protein 3 (IMP3) is an oncofetal protein that promotes tumor progression and metastasis in a number of malignancies. However, the clinical significance of IMP3 expression in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the uterine cervix is unclear. In this study, the correlation between IMP3 expression and cervical cancer progression and prognosis was assessed by immunohistochemistry. IMP3 expression was observed in a large number of tissue specimens from patients with normal cervical tissues, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) I, CIN II, CIN III, and SCC. IMP3 protein and mRNA expression was also determined in the SiHa and HeLa human cervical cancer cell lines. IMP3 expression was observed in 0 (0%) of 62 CIN I, 0 (0%) of 38 CIN II, and 9 (8.7%) of 104 CIN III specimens. Of the 96 SCC cases, IMP3 expression was detected in 54 cases (56.3%). Significant difference in IMP3 expression existed between all of the groups tested (P < .001). IMP3 protein and mRNA expressions in SiHa and HeLa cell lines were dramatically increased, as compared with normal tissue (P < .001). IMP3 expression was significantly related to age (P < .001), International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage (P < .001), and lymph node metastasis (P = .001). IMP3 expression was also shown to be an independent prognostic factor in SCC. In conclusion, these findings suggest that IMP3 expression may be a prognostic indicator of SCC.

  9. IMP3 as a supplemental diagnostic marker for Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hongping; Wei, Qingzhu; Ge, Juan; Jian, Wenjing; Liu, Jiangchuan; Zhong, Lin; Fu, Bo; Zhao, Tong

    2013-10-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 3 (IMP3) is ubiquitously expressed in embryos, mediating organogenesis, RNA trafficking, and cell growth, and is generally down-regulated in adult tissue. However, IMP3 has recently been shown to be overexpressed in some malignant epithelial neoplasms and to be a useful diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarker for several carcinomas. To determine whether IMP3 might also be an accurate biomarker of Hodgkin lymphoma, we examined 81 Hodgkin lymphomas for immunoreactivity to IMP3 as compared to commonly used markers such as CD30, CD15, PAX5, and MUM1. Consequently, in 98.8% (80/81) of Hodgkin lymphomas, the malignant Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells were selectively reactive for IMP3, with 72.8% (59/81) of the tumors showing strong, diffuse cytoplasmic staining. Positive staining of the Hodgkin lymphomas was also seen for CD30 (82.7%, 67/81), CD15 (65.4%, 53/81), PAX5 (84.0%, 68/81), and MUM1 85.2% (69/81), but significantly fewer cells showed strong staining intensity for CD30 (32.1%, 26/81), CD15 (17.3%, 14/81), PAX5 (12.3%, 10/81), and MUM1 (29.6%, 24/81). Furthermore, the IMP3 staining was selectively restricted to Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells, with a clearly negative background, and complementary to CD30 staining. Our findings show that IMP3 may be a useful diagnostic marker of Hodgkin lymphoma, helping to improve diagnostic accuracy for this malignancy. PMID:23845468

  10. IMP3 can predict aggressive behaviour of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lung cancer most often presents as an inoperable tumour and the diagnosis is usually performed on a small biopsy/cytology specimen. In the group of non small cell lung cancer - not otherwise specified, adenocarcinoma phenotype can be determined immunohistochemically using TTF-1 and Napsin A. Expression of oncofetal protein IMP3 in human cancer is associated with poor differentiation and aggressive behaviour. In the present study expression of IMP3 was correlated with expression of TTF-1 and Napsin A, histological subtype and clinical stage of lung adenocarcinoma. We were interested whether distant metastases are associated with IMP3 overexpression, regardless of the histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma. Methods In retrospective study, consecutive series of 105 patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma diagnosed from 2006 to 2009 in Clinical Hospital Center Split, Croatia, were analysed. Clinical data were collected from the Pulmology Department and time of death from the Mortality Registry. Paraffin blocks of bronchoscopic biopsies were collected from the Institute of Pathology and 15 cases excluded from the analysis due to insufficient material. Expression of IMP3, Napsin A and TTF-1 were analysed by indirect enzyme immunohistochemistry. Statistical analysis was performed and P values less than 0.05 considered significant. Results Of 90 patients, 71 (78%) were males and 19 (22%) females. Median age for males was 61.5 years (min-max 43–83) and for females 61 years (min-max 44–86). Pleural effusion was found in 15 (16.6%) and distant metastases in 45 (50%) cases. According to histological subtypes, there were 34 acinar, 2 lepidic, 2 papillary and 52 solid subtypes. IMP3 overexpression was found in 63 cases (70%) and was correlated with solid subtype (P = 0.002) and negative/weak Napsin A expression (P = 0.004). Strong Napsin A expression correlated with TTF-1 expression (P = 0.003) and lower histological grades (P = 0.031). Patients

  11. IMP I, H, and J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The schedule for the IMP project for the eighth, ninth, and tenth satellites of the series is presented. A description of the spacecraft and the weekly summaries of the operations performed on the spacecraft are provided. The project planning, project problems, recommendations, and reports of launch operations are described. Drawings of the satellite structures are included.

  12. First Report of bla(IMP-8) in Raoultella planticola.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Sung-Pin; Wang, Jann-Tay; Liang, Chih-Yuan; Lee, Pei-Shan; Chen, Yee-Chun; Lu, Po-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Two carbapenem-resistant Raoultella planticola clinical isolates were isolated from patients with pneumonia and Port-A catheter-related bacteremia, respectively, in Taiwan. These isolates remained susceptible to fluoroquinolone, aminoglycoside, and colistin. Though the two isolates had the same antibiogram, plasmidic carbapenemase blaIMP-8, class 1 integron cassette (dfrA12-orfF-aadA2), and qnrB2, they had different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, plasmid sizes, and outer membrane protein loss profiles. To our knowledge, this is the first report of blaIMP-8 found in R. planticola. Interestingly, blaIMP-8 is the most common carbapenemase found in Klebsiella pneumoniae in Taiwan. In the literature, carbapenemase genes in R. planticola in each country were also found in carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in the same country.

  13. Mature DIABLO/Smac Is Produced by the IMP Protease Complex on the Mitochondrial Inner Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Burri, Lena; Strahm, Yvan; Hawkins, Christine J.; Gentle, Ian E.; Puryer, Michelle A.; Verhagen, Anne; Callus, Bernard; Vaux, David; Lithgow, Trevor

    2005-01-01

    DIABLO/Smac is a mitochondrial protein that can promote apoptosis by promoting the release and activation of caspases. To do so, DIABLO/Smac must first be processed by a mitochondrial protease and then released into the cytosol, and we show this in an intact cellular system. We propose that the precursor form of DIABLO/Smac enters the mitochondria through a stop-transfer pathway and is processed to its active form by the inner membrane peptidase (IMP) complex. Catalytic subunits of the mammalian IMP complex were identified based on sequence conservation and functional complementation, and the novel sequence motif RX5P in Imp1 and NX5S in Imp2 distinguish the two catalytic subunits. DIABLO/Smac is one of only a few specific proteins identified as substrates for the IMP complex in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. PMID:15814844

  14. First Occurrence of an IMP Metallo-β-Lactamase in Aeromonas caviae: IMP-19 in an Isolate from France▿

    PubMed Central

    Neuwirth, Catherine; Siebor, Eliane; Robin, Frederic; Bonnet, Richard

    2007-01-01

    We describe the first IMP metallo-β-lactamase in Aeromonas caviae: IMP-19, which differed from IMP-2 by a single amino acid change (Arg to Ala at position 38). blaIMP-19 was found within a class 1 integron located on a 35-kb plasmid. This is also the first description of an IMP producer in France. PMID:17938180

  15. IMP1 suppresses breast tumor growth and metastasis through the regulation of its target mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Huang, Wenhe; Chen, Shaoying; Zhou, Yanchun; Li, Deling; Singer, Robert H.; Gu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported the ability of IMP1 in inhibiting proliferation and invasiveness of breast carcinoma cells in vitro. In the current study, we utilized a mouse xenograft model to further investigate the function of IMP1 in breast tumor progression and its underlying mechanism. We demonstrated that IMP1 expression significantly suppressed the growth of MDA231 cell-derived xenograft tumors and subsequent lung metastasis. Microarray analyses and differential gene expression identified handful mRNAs, many of which were involved in breast tumor-growth and metastasis. Further studies revealed that these mRNAs were directly interacted with the KH34 domain of IMP1 and this interaction post-transcriptionally regulated their corresponding protein expression. Either deletion of the KH34 domain of IMP1 or alteration of the expression of IMP1-bound mRNAs affected cell proliferation and tumor growth, producing the same phenotypes as IMP1 knockdown. Correlation of increased IMP1 expression with the reduced levels of its bound mRNAs, such as PTGS2, GDF15 and IGF-2 transcripts, was also observed in human breast tumors. Our studies provide insights into a molecular mechanism that the positive function of IMP1 to inhibit breast tumor growth and metastasis could be through the regulation of its target mRNAs. PMID:26910917

  16. Post-transcriptional regulation of cyclins D1, D3 and G1 and proliferation of human cancer cells depend on IMP-3 nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Rivera Vargas, T; Boudoukha, S; Simon, A; Souidi, M; Cuvellier, S; Pinna, G; Polesskaya, A

    2014-05-29

    RNA-binding proteins of the IMP family (insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) mRNA-binding proteins 1-3) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Multiple studies have linked high expression of IMP proteins, and especially of IMP-3, to an unfavorable prognosis in numerous types of cancer. The specific importance of IMP-3 for cancer transformation remains poorly understood. We here show that all three IMPs can directly bind the mRNAs of cyclins D1, D3 and G1 (CCND1, D3 and G1) in vivo and in vitro, and yet only IMP-3 regulates the expression of these cyclins in a significant manner in six human cancer cell lines of different origins. In the absence of IMP-3, the levels of CCND1, D3 and G1 proteins fall dramatically, and the cells accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, leading to almost complete proliferation arrest. Our results show that, compared with IMP-1 and IMP-2, IMP-3 is enriched in the nucleus, where it binds the transcripts of CCND1, D3 and G1. The nuclear localization of IMP-3 depends on its protein partner HNRNPM and is indispensable for the post-transcriptional regulation of expression of the cyclins. Cytoplasmic retention of IMP-3 and HNRNPM in human cancer cells leads to significant drop in proliferation. In conclusion, a nuclear IMP-3-HNRNPM complex is important for the efficient synthesis of CCND1, D3 and G1 and for the proliferation of human cancer cells.

  17. IMP-8. Volume 2: Scientific section. [Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Results of the analysis of the IMP-8 data, which was collected during the first six and one-half years after launch of the IMP-8 spacecraft are presented. The plasma wave experiment data were processed and are available in an easily accessible summary form. These data continue to provide a valuable source for comparative studies with plasma wave experiments on other spacecraft operating in the solar wind and within the Earth's magnetosphere.

  18. The diagnostic utility of combination of HMGA2 and IMP3 qRT-PCR testing in thyroid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Jin, Long; Lloyd, Ricardo V; Henry, Michael R; Erickson, Lori A; Sebo, Thomas J; Rumilla, Kandelaria M; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of malignant thyroid tumors in some cytologic and histologic specimens remains challenging. High-mobility group A2 (HMGA2) expression and insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein-3 (IMP3) expression were evaluated by relative quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the combination of HMGA2 and IMP3 qRT-PCR was diagnostically useful in differentiating benign from malignant thyroid neoplasms. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) specimens from 120 patients including 56 benign lesions and 64 carcinomas were used. The available 80 corresponding formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) thyroid tissues from 66 patients were also included in this study. HMGA2 and IMP3 expression levels were detected by qRT-PCR and reported as relative fold change after normalizing with a calibrator. The diagnostic utilities of HMGA2 and IMP3 qRT-PCR tests were evaluated individually and in combination. In FNA specimens, HMGA2 and IMP3 expression was consistently higher in thyroid malignancies compared with benign lesions in all subgroups except in Hürthle cell tumors. After exclusion of Hürthle cell tumors, the sensitivity was 90.2% for HMGA2, 88.2% for IMP3, and 98% for HMGA2+IMP3; the specificity was 97.1% for HMGA2, 79.4% for IMP3, and 79.4% for HMGA+IMP3. qRT-PCR data showed similar results in FFPE tissues: the sensitivity was 84.2% for HMGA2, 85.7% for IMP3, and 94.7% for HMGA2+IMP3; the specificity was 96.9% for HMGA2, 91.2% for IMP3, and 90.6% for HMGA2+IMP3. qRT-PCR data were concordant between FNA and FFPE samples for HMGA2 (97.4%) and IMP3 (96.9%). The results indicate that HMGA2 qRT-PCR with high specificity may be a useful ancillary technique to assist in the classification of difficult thyroid specimens, excluding Hürthle cell tumors. The HMGA2 and IMP3 qRT-PCR combination model with increased sensitivity and negative predictive value (96.4%) may be useful in screening thyroid

  19. Imp2 regulates GBM progression by activating IGF2/PI3K/Akt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Qingchun; Wang, Lijun; Yu, Fengbo; Gao, Haijun; Lei, Ting; Li, Peiwen; Liu, Pengfei; Zheng, Xu; Hu, Xitong; Chen, Yong; Jiang, Zhenfeng; Sayari, Arash J; Shen, Jia; Huang, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastomas multiforme (GBM) are the most frequently occurring malignant brain cancers. Treatment for GBM consists of surgical resection and subsequent adjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Despite this, GBM patient survival is limited to 12–15 months, and researchers are continually trying to develop improved therapy options. Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 2 (Imp2) is known to be upregulated in many cancers and is known to regulate the signaling activity of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2). However, relatively little is known about its role in malignant development of GBM. In this study, we first found Imp2 is upregulated in GBM tissues by using clinical samples and public database search. Studies with loss and gain of Imp2 expression in in vitro GBM cell culture system demonstrated the role of Imp2 in promoting GBM cell proliferation, migration, invasion and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Additionally, our results show that Imp2 regulates the activity of IGF2, which further activates PI3K/Akt signaling, thereby to promote GBM malignancy. Inhibition of Imp2 was also found to sensitize GBM to temozolomide treatment. These observations add to the current knowledge of GBM biology, and may prove useful in development of more effective GBM therapy. PMID:25719943

  20. Imp2, the PSTPIP homolog in fission yeast, affects sensitivity to the immunosuppressant FK506 and membrane trafficking in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Ayako; Higa, Mari; Doi, Akira; Satoh, Ryosuke; Sugiura, Reiko

    2015-02-13

    Cytokinesis is a highly ordered process that divides one cell into two cells, which is functionally linked to the dynamic remodeling of the plasma membrane coordinately with various events such as membrane trafficking. Calcineurin is a highly conserved serine/threonine protein phosphatase, which regulates multiple biological functions, such as membrane trafficking and cytokinesis. Here, we isolated imp2-c3, a mutant allele of the imp2{sup +} gene, encoding a homolog of the mouse PSTPIP1 (proline-serine-threonine phosphatase interacting protein 1), using a genetic screen for mutations that are synthetically lethal with calcineurin deletion in fission yeast. The imp2-c3 mutants showed a defect in cytokinesis with multi-septated phenotypes, which was further enhanced upon treatment with the calcineurin inhibitor FK506. Notably, electron micrographs revealed that the imp2-c3 mutant cells accumulated aberrant multi-lamella Golgi structures and putative post-Golgi secretory vesicles, and exhibited fragmented vacuoles in addition to thickened septa. Consistently, imp2-c3 mutants showed a reduced secretion of acid phosphatase and defects in vacuole fusion. The imp2-c3 mutant cells exhibited a weakened cell wall, similar to the membrane trafficking mutants identified in the same genetic screen such as ypt3-i5. These findings implicate the PSTPIP1 homolog Imp2 in Golgi/vacuole function, thereby affecting various cellular processes, including cytokinesis and cell integrity. - Highlights: • We isolated imp2-c3, in a synthetic lethal screen with calcineurin in fission yeast. • The imp2{sup +} gene encodes a component of the actin contractile ring similar to Cdc15. • The imp2-c3 mutants showed defects in cytokinesis, which were exacerbated by FK506. • The imp2-c3 mutants were defective in membrane trafficking and cell wall integrity. • Our study revealed a novel role for Imp2 in the Golgi/vacuolar membrane trafficking.

  1. IMP-32--An Interactive Management Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, L. Susan; Vogel, Judith A.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the development by Gould, Inc., S.E.L. Computer Systems Division, of an Information Management Package (IMP-32) for use in administration of the company's technical information center. Designing the system, the programs which are components of the system, and system functions are discussed. Included are eight figures illustrating system…

  2. Benchmark of different CFL conditions for IMPES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franc, Jacques; Horgue, Pierre; Guibert, Romain; Debenest, Gerald

    2016-10-01

    The IMplicit Pressure Explicit Saturation (IMPES) method is a prevalent way to simulate multiphase flows in porous media. The numerical stability of this sequential method implies limitations on the time step, which may depend on the flow regime studied. In this note, three stability criteria related to the IMPES method, that differ in their construction on the observed variables, are compared on homogeneous and heterogeneous configurations for different two-phase flow regimes (viscous/capillary/gravitational). This highlights that there is no single optimal criterion always ensuring stability and efficiency. For capillary dominated flows, the Todd's condition is the most efficient one, while the standard Coat condition should be preferred for viscous flows. When gravity effects are present, Coat's condition must be restricted, but remains more efficient than the Todd's condition. xml:lang="fr"

  3. Diagnostic value of IMP3 in pancreatic cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qianqian; Wang, Tao; Wang, Zhu; Zheng, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives: An increasing number of studies have examined the ability of IMP3 (insulin-like growth factor 2 messenger RNA binding protein 3) to be a marker for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (PCa). The exact role of IMP3 needs to be elucidated. The aim of this study is to determine the overall accuracy of IMP3 in PCa through a meta-analysis of published studies. Materials and methods: Publications addressing the accuracy of IMP3 in the diagnosis of PCa were selected from Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and The Chinese Journals Full-text Database (CNKI). The following indexes of test accuracy were computed for each study: sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR). The diagnostic threshold identified for each study was used to plot a summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve. Statistical analysis was performed by Meta-Disc 1.4 and STATA 12.0 software. Results: 10 studies met the inclusion criteria. The summary estimates for IMP3 in the diagnosis of PCa were: sensitivity 0.82 (95% CI, 0.78-0.85), specificity 0.87 (95% CI, 0.83-0.90), positive likelihood ratio (PLR) 15.04 (95% CI, 1.83-123.26), negative likelihood ratio (NLR) 0.21 (95% CI, 0.10-0.46) and diagnostic odds ratio 70.10 (95% CI, 16.74-293.56). The SROC curve indicated that the maximum joint sensitivity and specificity (Q-value) was 0.87; the area under the curve was 0.94. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that IMP3 may be a useful diagnostic adjunctive tool for confirming PCa. However, further large scale studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26379850

  4. Method To Identify Specific Inhibiutors Of Imp Dehydrogenase

    DOEpatents

    Collart, Frank R.; Huberman, Eliezer

    2000-11-28

    This invention relates to methods to identify specific inhibitors of the purine nucleotide synthesis enzyme, IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH). IMPDH is an essential enzyme found in all free-living organisms from humans to bacteria and is an important therapeutic target. The invention allows the identification of specific inhibitors of any IMPDH enzyme which can be expressed in a functional form in a recombinant host cell. A variety of eukaryotic or prokaryotic host systems commonly used for the expression of recombinant proteins are suitable for the practice of the invention. The methods are amenable to high throughput systems for the screening of inhibitors generated by combinatorial chemistry or other methods such as antisense molecule production. Utilization of exogenous guanosine as a control component of the methods allows for the identification of inhibitors specific for IMPDH rather than other causes of decreased cell proliferation.

  5. Energetic particle flux experiment (IMP-F and G)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    The technical aspects of the University of California IMP-F experiment aboard the Explorer-34 and the University of California IMP-G (S1) and (S2) experiments aboard the Explorer-41. The experiment detectors and electronics are discussed for each experiment as well as the fabrication, preflight and post-flight history. A description of the ground support equipment is also given for each experiment. These three experiments were essentially all different. The IMP-G experiment was essentially the IMP-F experiment with the addition of four Geiger-Mueller detectors. The IMP-G (S-2) was a supplementary experiment and differed completely from the IMP-F and IMP-G experiments. It was concluded that the ground support equipment approach used for the IMP-F and IMP-G experiments where emphasis was placed on a thorough exercise and monitoring of the experiment operation during various testing phases provided a high degree of confidence and reliability in these experiments. No known electronic failures have occurred during the spacecraft lifetime although some detector problems were experienced.

  6. Adaption of a corrector module to the IMP dynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The corrector module of the RAEIOS program and the IMP dynamics computer program were combined to achieve a date-fitting capability with the more general spacecraft dynamics models of the IMP program. The IMP dynamics program presents models of spacecraft dynamics for satellites with long, flexible booms. The properties of the corrector are discussed and a description is presented of the performance criteria and search logic for parameter estimation. A description is also given of the modifications made to add the corrector to the IMP program. This includes subroutine descriptions, common definitions, definition of input, and a description of output.

  7. Surface science capabilities from IMP spectral imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Robert B.

    1994-01-01

    The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) had a single 12-position filter wheel for one of its two 'eyes'. Originally eight, and then nine, of these filters were optimized for surface science, and three narrow-band filters for atmospheric science. Because of some design revisions we will now have filter wheels on both sides. The wheels for right and left eyes are identical, 12 filter positions each, and rigidly linked to the same rotation shaft. There are now 13 surface filters, in addition to 5 for atmospheric observations. Details of all the filter positions are tabulated and approximate gaussian bandpasses for the 13 surface filters are shown.

  8. The let-7-Imp axis regulates ageing of the Drosophila testis stem-cell niche.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Hila; D'Alterio, Cecilia; Czech, Benjamin; Levine, Erel; Jones, D Leanne

    2012-05-31

    Adult stem cells support tissue homeostasis and repair throughout the life of an individual. During ageing, numerous intrinsic and extrinsic changes occur that result in altered stem-cell behaviour and reduced tissue maintenance and regeneration. In the Drosophila testis, ageing results in a marked decrease in the self-renewal factor Unpaired (Upd), leading to a concomitant loss of germline stem cells. Here we demonstrate that IGF-II messenger RNA binding protein (Imp) counteracts endogenous small interfering RNAs to stabilize upd (also known as os) RNA. However, similar to upd, Imp expression decreases in the hub cells of older males, which is due to the targeting of Imp by the heterochronic microRNA let-7. In the absence of Imp, upd mRNA therefore becomes unprotected and susceptible to degradation. Understanding the mechanistic basis for ageing-related changes in stem-cell behaviour will lead to the development of strategies to treat age-onset diseases and facilitate stem-cell-based therapies in older individuals.

  9. Biomedical research with heavy ions at the IMP accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang

    The main ion-beam acceleration facilities and research activities at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences are briefly introduced. Some of the biomedical research with heavy ions such as heavy-ion biological effect, basic research related to heavy-ion cancer therapy and radiation breeding at the IMP accelerators are presented.

  10. Synergistic effect of imp/ostA and msbA in hydrophobic drug resistance of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Contamination of endoscopy equipment by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) frequently occurs after endoscopic examination of H. pylori-infected patients. In the hospital, manual pre-cleaning and soaking in glutaraldehyde is an important process to disinfect endoscopes. However, this might not be sufficient to remove H. pylori completely, and some glutaraldehyde-resistant bacteria might survive and be passed to the next patient undergoing endoscopic examination through unidentified mechanisms. We identified an Imp/OstA protein associated with glutaraldehyde resistance in a clinical strain, NTUH-C1, from our previous study. To better understand and manage the problem of glutaraldehyde resistance, we further investigated its mechanism. Results The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of glutaraldehyde andexpression of imp/ostA RNA in 11 clinical isolates from the National Taiwan University Hospital were determined. After glutaraldehyde treatment, RNA expression in the strains with the MICs of 4–10 μg/ml was higher than that in strains with the MICs of 1–3 μg/ml. We examined the full-genome expression of strain NTUH-S1 after glutaraldehyde treatment using a microarray and found that 40 genes were upregulated and 31 genes were downregulated. Among the upregulated genes, imp/ostA and msbA, two putative lipopolysaccharide biogenesis genes, were selected for further characterization. The sensitivity to glutaraldehyde or hydrophobic drugs increased in both of imp/ostA and msbA single mutants. The imp/ostA and msbA double mutant was also hypersensitive to these chemicals. The lipopolysaccharide contents decreased in individual imp/ostA and msbA mutants and dramatically reduced in the imp/ostA and msbA double mutant. Outer membrane permeability assay demonstrated that the imp/ostA and msbA double mutation resulted in the increase of outer membrane permeability. Ethidium bromide accumulation assay demonstrated that MsbA was involved in efflux of hydrophobic

  11. Energetic particle flux experiment (IMP F and G)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, K. A.

    1973-01-01

    The data reduction procedures and programs for analysis of the IMP F and G energetic particle flux experiments are summarized. The IMP-F experiment contained two thin-window Geiger-Mueller detectors and an ionization chamber. There were two IMP-G experiments: one with six Geiger-Mueller detectors and an ionization chamber, and the other with two funnel mouthed channeltrons in a parallel plate electrostatic analyzer. These experiments measured particles in the energy range above 20 keV (IMP-F) and above approximately 5 keV (IMP-G). A bibliography is presented of papers containing the scientific results. These data were predominantly used for the study of low energy solar particles from flares.

  12. Dissemination of IMP-4-encoding pIMP-HZ1-related plasmids among Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Chinese teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Zhou, Dongsheng; Wang, Qian; Luo, Wenbo; Zhang, Defu; Sun, Qiang; Tong, Yigang; Chen, Weijun; Sun, Fengjun; Xia, Peiyuan

    2016-01-01

    A total of 26 blaIMP-4-carrying strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae were isolated from 2009 to 2013 in a Chinese teaching hospital, and these strains can be assigned into multiple sequence types or allelic profiles as determined by multilocus sequence typing. Of these strains, P. aeruginosa P378 and K. pneumoniae 1220 harbor the IMP-4-encoding plasmids pP378-IMP and p1220-IMP, respectively, whose complete nucleotide sequences are determined to be genetically closely related to the IncN1-type plasmid pIMP-HZ1. pP378-IMP/p1220-IMP-like plasmids are hinted to be present in all the other blaIMP-4-carrying strains, indicating the dissemination of pIMP-HZ1-related plasmids among K. pneumoniae or P. aeruginosa of different genotypes in this hospital. pP378-IMP carries two distinct accessory resistance regions, a blaIMP-4-carrying class 1 integron In823b, and a truncated Tn3-family unit transposon ΔTn6292-3' harboring the quinolone resistance gene qnrS1. Massive fragmentation and rearrangement of these accessory genetic contents occur among p1220-IMP and IMP-HZ1 relative to pP378-IMP. blaIMP-4 is also present in the In823b remnants from p1220-IMP and IMP-HZ1, while qnrS1 is located in a Tn6292-derive fragment from pIMP-HZ1 but not found in p1220-IMP. pP378-IMP represents the first fully sequenced IncN-type plasmid from P. aeruginosa. PMID:27641711

  13. Dissemination of IMP-4-encoding pIMP-HZ1-related plasmids among Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Chinese teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wei; Zhou, Dongsheng; Wang, Qian; Luo, Wenbo; Zhang, Defu; Sun, Qiang; Tong, Yigang; Chen, Weijun; Sun, Fengjun; Xia, Peiyuan

    2016-01-01

    A total of 26 blaIMP-4-carrying strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae were isolated from 2009 to 2013 in a Chinese teaching hospital, and these strains can be assigned into multiple sequence types or allelic profiles as determined by multilocus sequence typing. Of these strains, P. aeruginosa P378 and K. pneumoniae 1220 harbor the IMP-4-encoding plasmids pP378-IMP and p1220-IMP, respectively, whose complete nucleotide sequences are determined to be genetically closely related to the IncN1-type plasmid pIMP-HZ1. pP378-IMP/p1220-IMP-like plasmids are hinted to be present in all the other blaIMP-4-carrying strains, indicating the dissemination of pIMP-HZ1-related plasmids among K. pneumoniae or P. aeruginosa of different genotypes in this hospital. pP378-IMP carries two distinct accessory resistance regions, a blaIMP-4-carrying class 1 integron In823b, and a truncated Tn3-family unit transposon ΔTn6292-3′ harboring the quinolone resistance gene qnrS1. Massive fragmentation and rearrangement of these accessory genetic contents occur among p1220-IMP and IMP-HZ1 relative to pP378-IMP. blaIMP-4 is also present in the In823b remnants from p1220-IMP and IMP-HZ1, while qnrS1 is located in a Tn6292-derive fragment from pIMP-HZ1 but not found in p1220-IMP. pP378-IMP represents the first fully sequenced IncN-type plasmid from P. aeruginosa. PMID:27641711

  14. IMP2/p62 induces genomic instability and an aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kessler, S M; Laggai, S; Barghash, A; Schultheiss, C S; Lederer, E; Artl, M; Helms, V; Haybaeck, J; Kiemer, A K

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths and commonly develops in inflammatory environments. The IGF2 mRNA-binding protein IMP2-2/IGF2BP2-2/p62 was originally identified as an autoantigen in HCC. Aim of this study was to investigate a potential pathophysiological role of p62 in hepatocarcinogenesis. Human HCC tissue showed overexpression of IMP2, which strongly correlated with the fetal markers AFP and DLK1/Pref-1/FA-1 and was particularly elevated in tumors with stem-like features and hypervascularization. Molecular classification of IMP2-overexpressing tumors revealed an aggressive phenotype. Livers of mice overexpressing the IMP2 splice variant p62 highly expressed the stem cell marker DLK1 and secreted DLK1 into the blood. p62 was oncogenic: diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-treated p62 transgenic mice exhibited a higher tumor incidence and multiplicity than wild types. Tumors of transgenics showed a more aggressive and stem-like phenotype and displayed more oncogenic chromosomal aberrations determined with aCGH analysis. DEN-treated p62 transgenic mice exhibited distinct signs of inflammation, such as inflammatory cytokine expression and oxidative stress markers, that is, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) levels. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was elevated in HepG2 cells, which either overexpressed p62 or were treated with DLK1. p62 induced this ROS production by a DLK1-dependent induction and activation of the small Rho-GTPase RAC1, activating NADPH oxidase and being overexpressed in human HCC. Our data indicate that p62/IMP2 promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by an amplification of inflammation. PMID:26426686

  15. IMP2/p62 induces genomic instability and an aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, S M; Laggai, S; Barghash, A; Schultheiss, C S; Lederer, E; Artl, M; Helms, V; Haybaeck, J; Kiemer, A K

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths and commonly develops in inflammatory environments. The IGF2 mRNA-binding protein IMP2-2/IGF2BP2-2/p62 was originally identified as an autoantigen in HCC. Aim of this study was to investigate a potential pathophysiological role of p62 in hepatocarcinogenesis. Human HCC tissue showed overexpression of IMP2, which strongly correlated with the fetal markers AFP and DLK1/Pref-1/FA-1 and was particularly elevated in tumors with stem-like features and hypervascularization. Molecular classification of IMP2-overexpressing tumors revealed an aggressive phenotype. Livers of mice overexpressing the IMP2 splice variant p62 highly expressed the stem cell marker DLK1 and secreted DLK1 into the blood. p62 was oncogenic: diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-treated p62 transgenic mice exhibited a higher tumor incidence and multiplicity than wild types. Tumors of transgenics showed a more aggressive and stem-like phenotype and displayed more oncogenic chromosomal aberrations determined with aCGH analysis. DEN-treated p62 transgenic mice exhibited distinct signs of inflammation, such as inflammatory cytokine expression and oxidative stress markers, that is, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) levels. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was elevated in HepG2 cells, which either overexpressed p62 or were treated with DLK1. p62 induced this ROS production by a DLK1-dependent induction and activation of the small Rho-GTPase RAC1, activating NADPH oxidase and being overexpressed in human HCC. Our data indicate that p62/IMP2 promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by an amplification of inflammation. PMID:26426686

  16. DNA sequence analysis of the imp UV protection and mutation operon of the plasmid TP110: identification of a third gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lodwick, D; Owen, D; Strike, P

    1990-01-01

    The sequence of the imp operon of the plasmid TP110 (which belongs to the Incl1 incompatibility group) has been determined, and is shown to contain three open reading frames. This operon, involved in UV protection and mutation, is functionally analogous to the umuDC operon of E. coli and the mucAB operon of the plasmid pKM101, which belongs to the quite unrelated IncN incompatibility group. The umu and muc operons however contain only two open reading frames, coding for proteins of approximately 16kD and 46kD. The high degree of homology between the two 16kD proteins (UmuD and MucA) and between the two 46kD proteins (UmuC and MucB) clearly shows their relatedness. This is shown also to extend to the imp gene products, with ImpA sharing homology with UmuD and MucA, and ImpB sharing homology with UmuC and MucB. However, the two imp genes are preceded in the operon by a third gene, impC, which encodes a small protein of 9.5kD and which has no equivalent in the umu and muc operons. Images PMID:2129552

  17. Solar flare accelerated isotopes of hydrogen and helium. [observed by IMP-4 and IMP-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anglin, J. D.; Dietrich, W. F.; Simpson, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of solar flare hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, helium-3, and helium-4 in the energy range approximately 10 to 50 MeV per nucleon obtained with instrumentation on the IMP-4 and IMP-5 satellites are reported and studies based on these results which place several constraints on theories of solar flare particle acceleration are discussed. A brief review of previous work and the difficulties in studying the rare isotopes of hydrogen and helium is also included. Particular emphasis is placed on the fact that the information to be obtained from the solar flare products of high energy interactions is not available through either solar wind observations where both the acceleration mechanism and the coronal source of the nuclear species are different, or optical measurements of solar active regions.

  18. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2015-04-21

    Inosine 5´-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. Here, the structure of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5´-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with in vivo anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategymore » for the further optimization of C. parvum inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications.« less

  19. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R; Cuny, Gregory D; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2015-05-01

    Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. Here, the structure of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with in vivo anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategy for the further optimization of C. parvum inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications. PMID:25945705

  20. Wind and IMP 8 Solar Wind, Magnetosheath and Shock Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to provide the community access to magnetosheath data near Earth. We provided 27 years of IMP 8 magnetosheath proton velocities, densities, and temperatures with our best (usually 1-min.) time resolution. IMP 8 crosses the magnetosheath twice each 125 day orbit, and we provided magnetosheath data for the roughly 27 years of data for which magnetometer data are also available (which are needed to reliably pick boundaries). We provided this 27 years of IMP 8 magnetosheath data to the NSSDC; this data is now integrated with the IMP 8 solar wind data with flags indicating whether each data point is in the solar wind, magnetosheath, or at the boundary between the two regions. The plasma speed, density, and temperature are provided for each magnetosheath point. These data are also available on the MIT web site ftp://space .mit.edu/pub/plasma/imp/www/imp.html. We provide ASCII time-ordered rows of data giving the observation time, the spacecraft position in GSE, the velocity is GSE, the density and temperature for protons. We also have analyzed and archived on our web site the Wind magnetosheath plasma parameters. These consist of ascii files of the proton and alpha densities, speeds, and thermal speeds. These data are available at ftp://space.mit.edu/pub/plasma/wind/sheath These are the two products promised in the work statement and they have been completed in full.

  1. IMP-51, a Novel IMP-Type Metallo-β-Lactamase with Increased Doripenem- and Meropenem-Hydrolyzing Activities, in a Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Tatsuya; Nhung, Pham Hong; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Shimada, Kayo; Phuong, Doan Mai; Anh, Nguyen Quoc; Ohmagari, Norio

    2015-01-01

    A meropenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate was obtained from a patient in a medical setting in Hanoi, Vietnam. The isolate was found to have a novel IMP-type metallo-β-lactamase, IMP-51, which differed from IMP-7 by an amino acid substitution (Ser262Gly). Escherichia coli expressing blaIMP-51 showed greater resistance to cefoxitin, meropenem, and moxalactam than E. coli expressing blaIMP-7. The amino acid residue at position 262 was located near the active site, proximal to the H263 Zn(II) ligand. PMID:26282421

  2. The let-7–Imp axis regulates ageing of the Drosophila testis stem-cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Toledano, Hila; D’Alterio, Cecilia; Czech, Benjamin; Levine, Erel; Jones, D. Leanne

    2016-01-01

    Adult stem cells support tissue homeostasis and repair throughout the life of an individual. During ageing, numerous intrinsic and extrinsic changes occur that result in altered stem-cell behaviour and reduced tissue maintenance and regeneration. In the Drosophila testis, ageing results in a marked decrease in the self-renewal factor Unpaired (Upd), leading to a concomitant loss of germline stem cells. Here we demonstrate that IGF-II messenger RNA binding protein (Imp) counteracts endogenous small interfering RNAs to stabilize upd (also known as os) RNA. However, similar to upd, Imp expression decreases in the hub cells of older males, which is due to the targeting of Imp by the heterochronic microRNA let-7. In the absence of Imp, upd mRNA therefore becomes unprotected and susceptible to degradation. Understanding the mechanistic basis for ageing-related changes in stem-cell behaviour will lead to the development of strategies to treat age-onset diseases and facilitate stem-cell-based therapies in older individuals. PMID:22660319

  3. Extendible-retractable electric field measurement antenna for IMP J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larrick, W.

    1973-01-01

    An antenna dispenser mechanism for the IMP J spacecraft was designed, fabricated, and tested. Upon command the mechanism deploys or retracts a conductor for use as a receiving antenna for an electric field measurement experiment. Five identical units were fabricated and tested to the IMP H & J environmental test specification. Of these, four are designated for flight on the IMP J spacecraft and one as a prototype flight spare. The testing program was successfully completed although certain design modifications were required as problems were uncovered by the testing; particularly thermal vacuum operation. The antenna mechanism functions well under the expected environmental and loading conditions. The wear life and load capability of the dry molybdenum disulphide lubricant originally used on the heavily loaded worm and gear pair were disappointing and a substitute material was applied. The lubricant finally applied performed well; although other problems were generated.

  4. Crystal structure of Mil (Mth680): internal duplication and similarity between the Imp4/Brix domain and the anticodon-binding domain of class IIa aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chyan Leong; Waterman, David; Koonin, Eugene V; Antson, Alfred A; Ortiz-Lombardía, Miguel

    2005-01-01

    Proteins of the Imp4/Brix superfamily are involved in ribosomal RNA processing, an essential function in all cells. We report the first structure of an Imp4/Brix superfamily protein, the Mil (for Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus Imp4-like) protein (gene product Mth680), from the archaeon M. thermautotrophicus. The amino- and carboxy-terminal halves of Mil show significant structural similarity to one another, suggesting an origin by means of an ancestral duplication. Both halves show the same fold as the anticodon-binding domain of class IIa aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, with greater conservation seen in the N-terminal half. This structural similarity, together with the charge distribution in Mil, suggests that Imp4/Brix superfamily proteins could bind single-stranded segments of RNA along a concave surface formed by the N-terminal half of their β-sheet and a central α-helix. The crystal structure of Mil is incompatible with the presence, in the Imp4/Brix domain, of a helix–turn–helix motif that was proposed to comprise the RNA-binding moiety of the Imp4/Brix proteins. PMID:15654320

  5. Metabotropic glutamate receptors are involved in the detection of IMP and L-amino acids by mouse taste sensory cells.

    PubMed

    Pal Choudhuri, S; Delay, R J; Delay, E R

    2016-03-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors are thought to be involved in the detection of umami and L-amino acid taste. These include the heterodimer taste receptor type 1 member 1 (T1r1)+taste receptor type 1 member 3 (T1r3), taste and brain variants of mGluR4 and mGluR1, and calcium sensors. While several studies suggest T1r1+T1r3 is a broadly tuned lLamino acid receptor, little is known about the function of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in L-amino acid taste transduction. Calcium imaging of isolated taste sensory cells (TSCs) of T1r3-GFP and T1r3 knock-out (T1r3 KO) mice was performed using the ratiometric dye Fura 2 AM to investigate the role of different mGluRs in detecting various L-amino acids and inosine 5' monophosphate (IMP). Using agonists selective for various mGluRs such as (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) (an mGluR1 agonist) and L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (l-AP4) (an mGluR4 agonist), we evaluated TSCs to determine if they might respond to these agonists, IMP, and three L-amino acids (monopotassium L-glutamate, L-serine and L-arginine). Additionally, we used selective antagonists against different mGluRs such as (RS)-L-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA) (an mGluR1 antagonist), and (RS)-α-methylserine-O-phosphate (MSOP) (an mGluR4 antagonist) to determine if they can block responses elicited by these L-amino acids and IMP. We found that L-amino acid- and IMP-responsive cells also responded to each agonist. Antagonists for mGluR4 and mGluR1 significantly blocked the responses elicited by IMP and each of the L-amino acids. Collectively, these data provide evidence for the involvement of taste and brain variants of mGluR1 and mGluR4 in L-amino acid and IMP taste responses in mice, and support the concept that multiple receptors contribute to IMP and L-amino acid taste. PMID:26701297

  6. Metabotropic glutamate receptors are involved in the detection of IMP and L-amino acids by mouse taste sensory cells.

    PubMed

    Pal Choudhuri, S; Delay, R J; Delay, E R

    2016-03-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors are thought to be involved in the detection of umami and L-amino acid taste. These include the heterodimer taste receptor type 1 member 1 (T1r1)+taste receptor type 1 member 3 (T1r3), taste and brain variants of mGluR4 and mGluR1, and calcium sensors. While several studies suggest T1r1+T1r3 is a broadly tuned lLamino acid receptor, little is known about the function of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in L-amino acid taste transduction. Calcium imaging of isolated taste sensory cells (TSCs) of T1r3-GFP and T1r3 knock-out (T1r3 KO) mice was performed using the ratiometric dye Fura 2 AM to investigate the role of different mGluRs in detecting various L-amino acids and inosine 5' monophosphate (IMP). Using agonists selective for various mGluRs such as (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) (an mGluR1 agonist) and L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (l-AP4) (an mGluR4 agonist), we evaluated TSCs to determine if they might respond to these agonists, IMP, and three L-amino acids (monopotassium L-glutamate, L-serine and L-arginine). Additionally, we used selective antagonists against different mGluRs such as (RS)-L-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA) (an mGluR1 antagonist), and (RS)-α-methylserine-O-phosphate (MSOP) (an mGluR4 antagonist) to determine if they can block responses elicited by these L-amino acids and IMP. We found that L-amino acid- and IMP-responsive cells also responded to each agonist. Antagonists for mGluR4 and mGluR1 significantly blocked the responses elicited by IMP and each of the L-amino acids. Collectively, these data provide evidence for the involvement of taste and brain variants of mGluR1 and mGluR4 in L-amino acid and IMP taste responses in mice, and support the concept that multiple receptors contribute to IMP and L-amino acid taste.

  7. Delta-90 Interplanetary Monitoring Platform-H (IMP-H)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The operations summary for the IMP-H spacecraft is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) mission objective, (2) description of launch vehicle and spacecraft, (3) mission plan, (4) flight plan, and (5) post launch operations. Details of the mission are presented in drawings and tables of data.

  8. Hemimegalencephaly: Clinical, EEG, neuroimaging, and IMP-SPECT correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Konkol, R.J.; Maister, B.H.; Wells, R.G.; Sty, J.R. )

    1990-11-01

    Iofetamine-single photon emission computed tomography (IMP-SPECT) was performed on 2 girls (5 1/2 and 6 years of age) with histories of intractable seizures, developmental delay, and unilateral hemiparesis secondary to hemimegalencephaly. Electroencephalography (EEG) revealed frequent focal discharges in 1 patient, while a nearly continuous burst suppression pattern over the malformed hemisphere was recorded in the other. IMP-SPECT demonstrated a good correlation with neuroimaging studies. In spite of the different EEG patterns, which had been proposed to predict contrasting clinical outcomes, both IMP-SPECT scans disclosed a similar decrease in tracer uptake in the malformed hemisphere. These results are consistent with the pattern of decreased tracer uptake found in other interictal studies of focal seizures without cerebral malformations. In view of recent recommendations for hemispherectomy in these patients, we suggest that the IMP-SPECT scan be used to compliment EEG as a method to define the extent of abnormality which may be more relevant to long-term prognosis than EEG alone.

  9. Support of Data Access for the IMP-8 UMD Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    2002-01-01

    This grant report provides information on data from the Interplanetary Monitoring Platform-8 (IMP-8). Topics covered include: (1) the science involved in the project; (2) the collection of data; (3) the processing of data; (4) the submission of data to other facilities; (5) the availability of data on the world wide web (WWW). Graphs are also included of data on the interstellar medium.

  10. A novel metallo-β-lactamase, IMP-34, in Klebsiella isolates with decreased resistance to imipenem.

    PubMed

    Shigemoto, Norifumi; Kayama, Shizuo; Kuwahara, Ryuichi; Hisatsune, Junzo; Kato, Fuminori; Nishio, Hisaaki; Yamasaki, Katsutoshi; Wada, Yasunao; Sueda, Taijiro; Ohge, Hiroki; Sugai, Motoyuki

    2013-05-01

    We investigated 5 metallo-β-lactamase (MBL)-positive Klebsiella isolates from Japan showing intermediate resistance to imipenem. Sequencing of the MBL gene identified a novel variant of IMP-1 with a single amino acid substitution, Glu87Gly. This variant is designated as IMP-34 where blaIMP-34 is located on a transmissible plasmid.

  11. 7 CFR 772.11 - Transfer and assumption-IMP loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS SERVICING MINOR PROGRAM LOANS § 772.11 Transfer and assumption—IMP loans. Transfers and assumptions for IMP loans are processed in accordance with 7 CFR part 765. Any... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transfer and assumption-IMP loans. 772.11 Section...

  12. 7 CFR 772.11 - Transfer and assumption-IMP loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS SERVICING MINOR PROGRAM LOANS § 772.11 Transfer and assumption—IMP loans. Transfers and assumptions for IMP loans are processed in accordance with 7 CFR part 765. Any... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Transfer and assumption-IMP loans. 772.11 Section...

  13. Significance of IMP3, nucleophosmin, and Ki-67 expression in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yorukoglu, Aygun; Yalcin, Nagihan; Avci, Arzu; Cakalagaoglu, Fulya; Yaylali, Guzin; Akin, Fulya; Haciyanli, Mehmet; Ozden, Akin

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the diagnostic value of expression of IMP3, nucleophosmin, and correlation of these markers with Ki-67 proliferation index in papillary thyroid carcinoma and benign neoplasms of thyroid gland. The aim was also to investigate whether there is a difference between papillary and micropapillary carcinomas with regard to clinicopathologic parameters beside IMP3, nucleophosmin, and Ki-67 proliferation index. It was concluded that IMP3 and nucleophosmin cannot be a routine diagnostic marker for discrimination of papillary carcinomas and benign lesions. IMP3 positive staining was quite scarce in IMP3 positive papillary carcinomas although specifity of IMP3 is 100%. A statistically significant correlation was not detected between nucleophosmin, IMP-3, and Ki-67 proliferation index. A statistically significant correlation was found between tumor size, lymphovascular embolism, and Ki-67 proliferation index. There was also significant correlation between tumor size and lymphovascular embolism.

  14. Report on final recommendations for IMPS engineering-science payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, H. B.

    1984-01-01

    Six general categories of key scientific and engineering concerns for the interactions measurements payload for shuttle (IMPS) mission are addressed: (1) dielectric charging; (2) material property changes; (3) electromagnetic interference, plasma interactions, and plasma wake effects associated with high-voltage solar arrays and large space structures; (4) radio frequency distortion and nonlinearities due to the enhanced plasma in the shuttle ram/wake; (5) shuttle glow and contamination; and (6) plasma interactions with the space-based radar. Lesser concerns are the interactions associated with EVA; the radiation and SEU effects peculiar to the auroral/polar cap environments; and space debris. The measurements needed to address the concerns associated with the general categories are described and a list of generic investigations capable of making the required measurements, emphasizing the spectrum of measurements necessary to quantize the interactions in the auroral/polar environments are included. A suggested ground-test plan for the IMPS project, a description of proposed follow-on IMPS missions, and a detailed bibliography for each of the interactions discussed are included.

  15. Irregular Mare Patches (IMPs): 100 Ma or 3 Ga?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stopar, Julie; Robinson, Mark Southwick; van der Bogert, Carolyn H.; Giguere, Thomas; Lawrence, Samuel J.; Ostrach, Lillian Rose; Clegg-Watkins, Ryan N.

    2016-01-01

    IMPs exhibit a perplexing combination of characteristics that are consistent with either an approximately 100 Ma or 3 Ga formation. Dozens of small-area IMPs have crisp morphologies and crater size-frequency distributions (SFDs) that denote relatively recent geologic activity (less than 100 Ma); however, the apparently well-developed regolith on portions of the IMPs are in conflict with such a young age [1]. To test possible formation hypotheses (e.g., [1-5]), which range from ancient volcanism to contemporary outgassing, we examined IMP morphology at the meter-scale with LROC NAC images and derived elevation models. We focused on the largest IMPs (Ina, Sosigenes, Cauchy, Maskelyne, and Nubium), where contacts between deposits are best developed. Most of our observations are consistent with multiple generations of inflation and breakouts (or squeeze-ups) of basaltic lavas that were affected by local slopes. Some of the extrusions coalesced into larger mounds or filled pre-existing craters. We did not observe evidence of large-scale void space (e.g., fissures, fractures, linear depressions, or pits) within or beneath the mounds or rougher deposits (e.g., [5]). But, small-scale voids may be signified by isolated pitted textures. We also did not detect evidence of the cooling fractures or lava plates expected in young lava flows and observed in lunar impact melt deposits. The smooth texture of the mounds is enigmatic. Block-less craters suggest at least 5 m of friable or poorly-cohesive material (such as regolith), yet mound margins exhibit slopes greater than 30 deg requiring significant material strength. Blocks are not common on the mounds, but are sometimes excavated by impacts (usually excavated from beneath the mounds). The uneven deposits are equally enigmatic and texturally varied (blocky, pitted, and crenulated). They are deficient in superposed craters compared to the mounds. If the mounds are indeed of similar age to the rougher units, then their different

  16. A fine decision tree consisted of CK5/6, IMP3 and TTF1 for cytological diagnosis among reactive mesothelial cells, metastatic adenocarcinoma of lung and non-lung origin in pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jinhai; Wei, Qingzhu; Jian, Wenjing; Liu, Jianghuan; Tang, Hongping; Ge, Juan; Zhou, Jie; Zhao, Tong

    2014-01-01

    The utility of combination with CK5/6, IMP3 and TTF1 to differentiate among reactive mesothelial cells (RMs), metastatic adenocarcinoma of lung (LAC) and non-lung (NLAC) origin was investigated by using immunocytochemistry (ICC) and conventional PCR (C-PCR) in pleural effusion. A total of 108 cell blocks (32 RMs, 51 LAC and 25 NLAC were evaluated by ICC for CK5/6, IMP3 and TTF1 protein expression. In addition, we further performed C-PCR for amplification of CK5/6, IMP3 and TTF1 DNA from 28 specimens (9 MAC and 7 RMs, 6 LAC and 6 NLAC) for molecular diagnosis. CK5/6 staining was observed in the majority of reactive specimens (78.1%) and was rare in adenocarcinoma cells (14.5%), whereas the opposite was true for IMP3 and TTF1. We found a high frequency of TTF1 positivity (76.5%) in LAC, but not in NLAC (4.0%); while there was no significant difference of IMP3 expression in LAC (88.2%) and NLAC (88.0%). The 487 bp DNA fragments of IMP3 was expected to be amplified in 6/9 of adenocarcinoma cases showed negative in ICC; and the 394 bp DNA fragments of CK5/6 was also expected to be amplified in 4/7 of RMs cases showed negative in ICC. Consistent with ICC results, there was significant difference of TTF1 expression in the LAC and NLAC compared with IMP3 expression. The combination with CK5/6, IMP3 and TTF1 immunostaining appears to be useful to improve the accuracy of cytological diagnoses between RMs, metastatic adenocarcinoma of lung and non-lung origin in pleural effusion. In addition, C-PCR may act as a useful supplemental approach for ICC, especially negative cases in ICC for differential cytological diagnosis. PMID:25337222

  17. Different motif requirements for the localization zipcode element of β-actin mRNA binding by HuD and ZBP1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak Hee; Lee, Seung Joon; Gardiner, Amy S.; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I.; Yoo, Soonmoon

    2015-01-01

    Interactions of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) with their target transcripts are essential for regulating gene expression at the posttranscriptional level including mRNA export/localization, stability, and translation. ZBP1 and HuD are RBPs that play pivotal roles in mRNA transport and local translational control in neuronal processes. While HuD possesses three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs), ZBP1 contains two RRMs and four K homology (KH) domains that either increase target specificity or provide a multi-target binding capability. Here we used isolated cis-element sequences of the target mRNA to examine directly protein-RNA interactions in cell-free systems. We found that both ZBP1 and HuD bind the zipcode element in rat β-actin mRNA's 3′ UTR. Differences between HuD and ZBP1 were observed in their binding preference to the element. HuD showed a binding preference for U-rich sequence. In contrast, ZBP1 binding to the zipcode RNA depended more on the structural level, as it required the proper spatial organization of a stem-loop that is mainly determined by the U-rich element juxtaposed to the 3′ end of a 5′-ACACCC-3′ motif. On the basis of this work, we propose that ZBP1 and HuD bind to overlapping sites in the β-actin zipcode, but they recognize different features of this target sequence. PMID:26152301

  18. IMP-27, a Unique Metallo-β-Lactamase Identified in Geographically Distinct Isolates of Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Nyssa; Fowler, Randal C.; Yoshizumi, A.; Horiyama, Tsukasa; Ishii, Y.; Harrison, Lucas; Geyer, Chelsie N.; Moland, Ellen Smith; Thomson, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    A novel metallo-β-lactamase gene, blaIMP-27, was identified in unrelated Proteus mirabilis isolates from two geographically distinct locations in the United States. Both isolates harbor blaIMP-27 as part of the first gene cassette in a class 2 integron. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing indicated susceptibility to aztreonam, piperacillin-tazobactam, and ceftazidime but resistance to ertapenem. However, hydrolysis assays indicated that ceftazidime was a substrate for IMP-27. PMID:27503648

  19. An element in the 3' untranslated region of human LINE-1 retrotransposon mRNA binds NXF1(TAP) and can function as a nuclear export element.

    PubMed Central

    Lindtner, Susan; Felber, Barbara K; Kjems, Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    Export of unspliced mRNA to the cytoplasm is required for the replication of all retroviruses. In simian type D retroviruses, the RNA export is mediated by the constitutive transport element (CTE) that binds the cellular nuclear export factor 1, NXF1(TAP). To search for potential cellular RNA substrates for NXF1, we have set up an in vitro selection procedure, using an RNA library expressed from total human genomic DNA. A sequence that was isolated most frequently as independent clones exhibits extensive homology to the 3' untranslated region of expressed LINE1 (L1) retrotransposons. This region, termed L1-NXF1 binding element (L1-NBE) bears no structural resemblance to the viral CTE, but binds NXF1 as strongly as CTE, based on gel mobility shift competition assays. A deletion analysis of the NXF1 protein reveals that CTE and L1-NBE have different, but overlapping, binding domains on NXF1. Placed in an intron, L1-NBE is capable of mediating nuclear export of lariat RNA species in Xenopus laevis oocytes and of an unspliced HIV-1 derived RNA in human 293 cells, suggesting that it may function as a nuclear export element for the intronless L1 mRNA. PMID:12003494

  20. Thermal design of the IMP-I and H spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    A description of the thermal subsystem of the IMP-I and H spacecraft is presented. These two spacecraft were of a larger and more advanced type in the Explorer series and were successfully launched in March 1971 and September 1972. The thermal requirements, analysis, and design of each spacecraft are described including several specific designs for individual experiments. Techniques for obtaining varying degrees of thermal isolation and contact are presented. The thermal control coatings including the spaceflight performance of silver-coated FEP Teflon are discussed. Predicted performance is compared to measured flight data. The good agreement between them verifies the validity of the thermal model and the selection of coatings.

  1. IMP F and G phase 1 magnetic field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mish, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    The program developed to analyze magnetic field data from the magnetic field experiment flown in IMP F is reported. The analysis converts the raw X, Y, Z sensor data as received on the magnetic field experiment tape into vector measurements of the ambient magnetic field observed by the experiment. These data are computed for four frames of reference -- apparent, payload, solar ecliptic and solar magnetospheric. In addition 20.45 second statistics are computed for the last three coordinate systems. Finally, a summary tape is produced containing detailed data and sequence statistics as well as the output from the autocorrelation computer, trajectory data and identification information.

  2. Extraction, purification, identification and metabolism of 3',5'-cyclic UMP, 3',5'-cyclic IMP and 3',5'-cyclic dTMP from rat tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Newton, R P; Kingston, E E; Hakeem, N A; Salih, S G; Beynon, J H; Moyse, C D

    1986-01-01

    The large-scale extraction and partial purification of endogenous 3',5'-cyclic UMP, 3',5'-cyclic IMP and 3',5'-cyclic dTMP are described. Rat liver, kidney, heart, spleen and lung tissues were subjected to a sequential purification procedure involving freeze-clamping, perchlorate extraction, alumina and Sephadex ion-exchange chromatography and preparative electrophoresis. The samples thus obtained co-chromatographed with authentic cyclic UMP, cyclic IMP and cyclic dTMP on t.l.c. and h.p.l.c. and the u.v. spectra of the extracted samples were identical with those of the standards. Fast atom bombardment of the three cyclic nucleotide standards yielded mass spectra containing a molecular protonated ion in each case; mass-analysed ion kinetic-energy spectrometry ('m.i.k.e.s') of these ions produced a spectrum unique to the parent cyclic nucleotide. The extracted putative cyclic UMP, cyclic IMP and cyclic dTMP each produced a m.i.k.e.s. identical with that obtained with the corresponding cyclic nucleotide standard. Rat liver, heart, kidney, brain, intestine, spleen, testis and lung protein preparations were each found capable of the synthesis of cyclic UMP, cyclic IMP and cyclic dTMP from the corresponding nucleoside triphosphate, of the hydrolysis of these cyclic nucleotides and of their binding, with the exception that cyclic dTMP was not synthesized by the kidney preparation. PMID:3019316

  3. Reduction and analysis of data from the plasma wave instruments on the IMP-6 and IMP-8 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Anderson, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    The primary data reduction effort during the reporting period was to process summary plots of the IMP 8 plasma wave data and to submit these data to the National Space Science Data Center. Features of the electrostatic noise are compared with simultaneous observations of the magnetic field, plasma and energetic electrons. Spectral characteristics of the noise and the results of this comparison both suggest that in its high frequency part at least the noise does not belong to normal modes of plasma waves but represents either quasi-thermal noise in the non-Maxwellian plasma or artificial noise generated by spacecraft interaction with the medium.

  4. The first interdisciplinary experiments at the IMP high energy microbeam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Guanghua; Guo, Jinlong; Wu, Ruqun; Guo, Na; Liu, Wenjing; Ye, Fei; Sheng, Lina; Li, Qiang; Li, Huiyun

    2015-04-01

    The high energy beam of tens to hundred MeV/u ions possesses mm-to-cm penetration depth in materials and can be easily extracted into air without significant energy loss and beam scattering. Combination of high energy ions and microbeam technology facilitates the microprobe application to many practical studies in large scale samples. The IMP heavy ion microbeam facility has recently been integrated with microscopic positioning and targeting irradiation system. This paper introduced the first interdisciplinary experiments performed at the IMP microbeam facility using the beam of 80.5 MeV/u carbon ions. Bystander effect induction via medium transferring was not found in the micro-irradiation study using HeLa cells. The mouse irradiation experiment demonstrated that carbon irradiation of 10 Gy dose to its tuberomammillary nucleus did not impair the sleep nerve system. The fault injection attack on RSA (Rivest-Shamir-Adleman) decryption proved that the commercial field-programmable gate array chip is vulnerable in single event effect to low linear-energy-transfer carbon irradiation, and the attack can cause the leakage of RSA private key. This work demonstrates the potential of high energy microbeam in its application to biology, biomedical, radiation hardness, and information security studies.

  5. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression in solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Collart, F.R.; Chubb, C.B.; Mirkin, B.L.; Huberman, E.

    1992-07-10

    IMP dehydrogenase, a regulatory enzyme of guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, may play a role in cell proliferation and malignancy. To assess this possibility, we examined IMP dehydrogenase expression in a series of human solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines in comparison with their normal counterparts. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression was observed in brain tumors relative to normal brain tissue and in sarcoma cells relative to normal fibroblasts. Similarly, in several B- and T-lymphoid leukemia cell lines, elevated levels of IMP dehydrogenase mRNA and cellular enzyme were observed in comparison with the levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes. These results are consistent with an association between increased IMP dehydrogenase expression and either enhanced cell proliferation or malignant transformation.

  6. Quantitative iodine-123 IMP imaging of brain perfusion in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.B.; Lake, R.R.; Graham, L.S.; King, M.A.; Kling, A.S.; Fitten, L.J.; O'Rear, J.; Bronca, G.A.; Gan, M.; Servrin, R. )

    1989-10-01

    Decreased perfusion in the frontal lobes of patients with chronic schizophrenia has been reported by multiple observes using a variety of techniques. Other observers have been unable to confirm this finding using similar techniques. In this study quantitative single photon emission computed tomography brain imaging was performed using p,5n ({sup 123}I)IMP in five normal subjects and ten chronically medicated patients with schizophrenia. The acquisition data were preprocessed with an image dependent Metz filter and reconstructed using a ramp filtered back projection technique. The uptake in each of 50 regions of interest in each subject was normalized to the uptake in the cerebellum. There were no significant confirmed differences in the comparable ratios of normal subjects and patients with schizophrenia even at the p = 0.15 level. Hypofrontality was not observed.

  7. Studies of the interplanetary magnetic field: IMP's to Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, Norman F.

    1987-01-01

    During the last two decades, spacecraft projects and individual experiments for which Frank McDonald was a leader have contributed very significantly to the current understanding of the structure of interplanetary space and the correlation between solar and interplanetary disturbances. Studies on the IMP, HELIOS, and Pioneer spin-stabilized spacecraft and the larger attitude-stabilized Voyager spacecraft have provided data sets from which the modern view of the heliosphere has evolved. That concept in which the inner solar system is shown to be dominated by individual streams associated with specific source regions on the Sun is illustrated. As these high-speed streams overtake the preexisting solar plasma, they coalesce and modify the characteristics so that at larger heliocentric distances, these disturbances appear as radially propagating concentric shells of compressed magnetic fields and enhanced fluctuations

  8. Cloning of immunodominant membrane protein genes of phytoplasmas and their in planta expression.

    PubMed

    Kakizawa, Shigeyuki; Oshima, Kenro; Ishii, Yoshiko; Hoshi, Ayaka; Maejima, Kensaku; Jung, Hee-Young; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2009-04-01

    Phytoplasmas are plant pathogenic bacteria that cause devastating yield losses in diverse crops worldwide. Although the understanding of the pathogen biology is important in agriculture, the inability to culture phytoplasmas has hindered their full characterization. Previous studies demonstrated that immunodominant membrane proteins could be classified into three types, immunodominant membrane protein (Imp), immunodominant membrane protein A (IdpA), and antigenic membrane protein (Amp), and they are nonhomologous to each other. Here, cloning and sequencing of imp-containing genomic fragments were performed for several groups of phytoplasma including the aster yellows and rice yellow dwarf groups, for which an imp sequence has not previously been reported. Sequence comparison analysis revealed that Imps are highly variable among phytoplasmas, and clear positive selection was observed in several Imps, suggesting that Imp has important roles in host-phytoplasma interactions. As onion yellows (OY) phytoplasma was known to have Amp as the immunodominant membrane protein, the protein accumulation level of Imp in planta was measured compared with that of Amp. The resulting accumulation of Imp was calculated as approximately one-tenth that of Amp, being consistent with the immunodominant property of Amp in OY. It is suggested that an ancestral type of immunodominant membrane protein could be Imp, and subsequently the expression level of Amp or IdpA is increased in several phytoplasma groups. PMID:19222574

  9. Isolation and plasmid characterization of carbapenemase (IMP-4) producing Salmonella enterica Typhimurium from cats

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sam; O’Dea, Mark; Trott, Darren J.; Abraham, Rebecca J.; Hughes, David; Pang, Stanley; McKew, Genevieve; Cheong, Elaine Y. L.; Merlino, John; Saputra, Sugiyono; Malik, Richard; Gottlieb, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are a pressing public health issue due to limited therapeutic options to treat such infections. CREs have been predominantly isolated from humans and environmental samples and they are rarely reported among companion animals. In this study we report on the isolation and plasmid characterization of carbapenemase (IMP-4) producing Salmonella enterica Typhimurium from a companion animal. Carbapenemase-producing S. enterica Typhimurium carrying blaIMP-4 was identified from a systemically unwell (index) cat and three additional cats at an animal shelter. All isolates were identical and belonged to ST19. Genome sequencing revealed the acquisition of a multidrug-resistant IncHI2 plasmid (pIMP4-SEM1) that encoded resistance to nine antimicrobial classes including carbapenems and carried the blaIMP-4-qacG-aacA4-catB3 cassette array. The plasmid also encoded resistance to arsenic (MIC-150 mM). Comparative analysis revealed that the plasmid pIMP4-SEM1 showed greatest similarity to two blaIMP-8 carrying IncHI2 plasmids from Enterobacter spp. isolated from humans in China. This is the first report of CRE carrying a blaIMP-4 gene causing a clinical infection in a companion animal, with presumed nosocomial spread. This study illustrates the broader community risk entailed in escalating CRE transmission within a zoonotic species such as Salmonella, and in a cycle that encompasses humans, animals and the environment. PMID:27767038

  10. Mutagenesis of Zinc Ligand Residue Cys221 Reveals Plasticity in the IMP-1 Metallo-β-Lactamase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Lori B.; Shanker, Sreejesh; Mikulski, Rose; Brown, Nicholas G.; Phillips, Kevin J.; Lykissa, Ernest; Venkataram Prasad, B. V.

    2012-01-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases catalyze the hydrolysis of a broad range of β-lactam antibiotics and are a concern for the spread of drug resistance. To analyze the determinants of enzyme structure and function, the sequence requirements for the subclass B1 IMP-1 β-lactamase zinc binding residue Cys221 were tested by saturation mutagenesis and evaluated for protein expression, as well as hydrolysis of β-lactam substrates. The results indicated that most substitutions at position 221 destabilized the enzyme. Only the enzymes containing C221D and C221G substitutions were expressed well in Escherichia coli and exhibited catalytic activity toward β-lactam antibiotics. Despite the lack of a metal-chelating group at position 221, the C221G enzyme exhibited high levels of catalytic activity in the presence of exogenous zinc. Molecular modeling suggests the glycine substitution is unique among substitutions in that the complete removal of the cysteine side chain allows space for a water molecule to replace the thiol and coordinate zinc at the Zn2 zinc binding site to restore function. Multiple methods were used to estimate the C221G Zn2 binding constant to be 17 to 43 μM. Studies of enzyme function in vivo in E. coli grown on minimal medium showed that both IMP-1 and the C221G mutant exhibited compromised activity when zinc availability was low. Finally, substitutions at residue 121, which is the IMP-1 equivalent of the subclass B3 zinc-chelating position, failed to rescue C221G function, suggesting the coordination schemes of subclasses B1 and B3 are not interchangeable. PMID:22908171

  11. Emergence of Raoultella ornithinolytica coproducing IMP-4 and KPC-2 carbapenemases in China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Beiwen; Zhang, Jing; Ji, Jinru; Fang, Yunhui; Shen, Ping; Ying, Chaoqun; Lv, Jifang; Xiao, Yonghong; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-11-01

    We report here the emergence of seven IMP-4-producing Raoultella ornithinolytica isolates obtained from one patient. All isolates carried the blaIMP-4 carbapenemase gene, five isolates also carried blaSHV-12, four contained blaTEM-1, and one contained blaOXA-1. Notably, the R. ornithinolytica isolate Ro25724 also expressed Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-2. The blaKPC-2 gene was located on a Tn3-Tn4401 integration structure on a plasmid of ∼450 kb. This is the first description of the coexistence of blaKPC-2 and blaIMP-4 from the genus Raoultella.

  12. Emergence of Raoultella ornithinolytica Coproducing IMP-4 and KPC-2 Carbapenemases in China

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Beiwen; Zhang, Jing; Ji, Jinru; Fang, Yunhui; Shen, Ping; Ying, Chaoqun; Lv, Jifang

    2015-01-01

    We report here the emergence of seven IMP-4-producing Raoultella ornithinolytica isolates obtained from one patient. All isolates carried the blaIMP-4 carbapenemase gene, five isolates also carried blaSHV-12, four contained blaTEM-1, and one contained blaOXA-1. Notably, the R. ornithinolytica isolate Ro25724 also expressed Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-2. The blaKPC-2 gene was located on a Tn3-Tn4401 integration structure on a plasmid of ∼450 kb. This is the first description of the coexistence of blaKPC-2 and blaIMP-4 from the genus Raoultella. PMID:26282422

  13. IMP 7 (Explorer 47) trajectory, September 26, 1972 to September 25, 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, Pamela A.; Lazarus, Alan J.

    1988-01-01

    The trajectory plots for IMP 7 (Explorer 47) are contained. For each orbit the trajectory is shown in five panels on two pages; each panel is a different representation or projection. The trajectory parameters were obtained from the multi-coordinate ephemeris (MCE) tapes supplied to IMP experimenters by the IMP project. The plots on the right hand pages use a geocentric, solar-ecliptic coordinate system. Distances are in units of earth radii. The plots on the left hand pages use geocentric, solar magnetospheric coordinates with distances in earth radii.

  14. Nucleus-Specific Importin Alpha Proteins and Nucleoporins Regulate Protein Import and Nuclear Division in the Binucleate Tetrahymena thermophila▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Colin D.; Falkowska, Katarzyna A.; Li, Alanna Y.; Galanti, Sarah E.; Kanuru, Reshi C.; LaMont, Elizabeth G.; Mazzarella, Kate C.; Micev, Alan J.; Osman, Morwan M.; Piotrowski, Nicholas K.; Suszko, Jason W.; Timm, Adam C.; Xu, Ming-Ming; Liu, Lucy; Chalker, Douglas L.

    2008-01-01

    The ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, having both germ line micronuclei and somatic macronuclei, must possess a specialized nucleocytoplasmic transport system to import proteins into the correct nucleus. To understand how Tetrahymena can target proteins to distinct nuclei, we first characterized FG repeat-containing nucleoporins and found that micro- and macronuclei utilize unique subsets of these proteins. This finding implicates these proteins in the differential permeability of the two nuclei and implies that nuclear pores with discrete specificities are assembled within a single cell. To identify the import machineries that interact with these different pores, we characterized the large families of karyopherin homologs encoded within the genome. Localization studies of 13 putative importin (imp) α- and 11 imp β-like proteins revealed that imp α-like proteins are nucleus specific—nine localized to the germ line micronucleus—but that most imp β-like proteins localized to both types of nuclei. These data suggest that micronucleus-specific proteins are transported by specific imp α adapters. The different imp α proteins exhibit substantial sequence divergence and do not appear to be simply redundant in function. Disruption of the IMA10 gene encoding an imp α-like protein that accumulates in dividing micronuclei results in nuclear division defects and lethality. Thus, nucleus-specific protein import and nuclear function in Tetrahymena are regulated by diverse, specialized karyopherins. PMID:18676955

  15. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2015-04-21

    Inosine 5´-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. Here, the structure of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5´-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with in vivo anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategy for the further optimization of C. parvum inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications.

  16. Plasmid-Encoded Metallo-β-Lactamase (IMP-6) Conferring Resistance to Carbapenems, Especially Meropenem

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Hisakazu; Kuga, Akio; Okamoto, Ryoichi; Kitasato, Hidero; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu; Inoue, Matsuhisa

    2001-01-01

    In 1996, Serratia marcescens KU3838 was isolated from the urine of a patient with a urinary tract infection at a hospital in northern Japan and was found to contain the plasmid pKU501. Previously, we determined that pKU501 carries blaIMP and the genes for TEM-1-type β-lactamases as well as producing both types of β-lactamases (H. Yano, A. Kuga, K. Irinoda, R. Okamoto, T. Kobayashi, and M. Inoue, J. Antibiot. 52:1135–1139, 1999). pKU502 is a recombinant plasmid that contains a 1.5-kb DNA fragment, including the metallo-β-lactamase gene, and is obtained by PCR amplification of pKU501. The sequence of the metallo-β-lactamase gene in pKU502 was determined and revealed that this metallo-β-lactamase gene differed from the gene encoding IMP-1 by one point mutation, leading to one amino acid substitution: 640-A in the base sequence of the IMP-1 gene was replaced by G, and Ser-196 was replaced by Gly in the mature enzyme. This enzyme was designated IMP-6. The strains that produced IMP-6 were resistant to carbapenems. The MICs of panipenem and especially meropenem were higher than the MIC of imipenem for these strains. The kcat/Km value of IMP-6 was about sevenfold higher against meropenem than against imipenem, although the MIC of meropenem for KU1917, which produced IMP-1, was lower than that of imipenem, and the MIC of panipenem was equal to that of imipenem. These results support the hypothesis that IMP-6 has extended substrate profiles against carbapenems. However, the activity of IMP-6 was very low against penicillin G and piperacillin. These results suggest that IMP-6 acquired high activity against carbapenems, especially meropenem, via the point mutation but in the process lost activity against penicillins. Although IMP-6 has reduced activity against penicillins due to this point mutation, pKU501 confers resistance to a variety of antimicrobial agents because it also produces TEM-1-type enzyme. PMID:11302793

  17. Thermodynamic characterization of the exchange of detergents and amphipols at the surfaces of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Tribet, C; Diab, C; Dahmane, T; Zoonens, M; Popot, J-L; Winnik, F M

    2009-11-01

    The aggregation of integral membrane proteins (IMPs) in aqueous media is a significant concern for mechanistic investigations and pharmaceutical applications of this important class of proteins. Complexation of IMPs with amphiphiles, either detergents or short amphiphilic polymers known as amphipols (APols), renders IMPs water-soluble. It is common knowledge that IMP-detergent complexes are labile, while IMP-APol complexes are exceptionally stable and do not dissociate even under conditions of extreme dilution. To understand the thermodynamic origin of this difference in stability and to guide the design of new APols, we have studied by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) the heat exchanges during two reciprocal processes, the "trapping" of detergent-solubilized IMPs in APols and the "stripping" of IMP-APol complexes by detergents, using two IMPs (the transmembrane domain of porin OmpA from Escherichia coli and bacteriorhodopsin from Halobium salinarium), two APols [an anionic polymer derived from acrylic acid (A8-35) and a cationic phosphorylcholine-based polymer (C22-43)], and two neutral detergents [n-octyl thioglucoside (OTG) and n-octyltetraethylene glycol (C(8)E(4))]. In the presence of detergent, free APols and IMP-APol complexes form mixed particles, APol-detergent and IMP-APol-detergent, respectively, according to the regular mixing model. Diluting IMP-APol-detergent complexes below the critical micellar concentration (CMC) of the detergent triggers the dispersion of detergent molecules as monomers, a process characterized by an enthalpy of demicellization. The enthalpy of APol <--> detergent exchange on the hydrophobic surface of IMPs is negligibly small, an indication of the similarity of the molecular interactions of IMPs with the two types of amphiphiles. The enhanced stability against dilution of IMP-APol complexes, compared to IMP-detergent ones, originates from the difference in entropy gain achieved upon release in water of a few APol molecules

  18. Dominance of IMP-4-Producing Enterobacter cloacae among Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Townell, Nicola; Nimmo, Graeme R.; George, Narelle M.; Robson, Jennifer; Vohra, Renu; Davis, Louise; Heney, Claire; Paterson, David L.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) has been increasing worldwide. blaIMP has been reported to be the predominant carbapenemase-encoding gene within Enterobacteriaceae in Australia. However, there are limited data currently available on CPE from Queensland, Australia. A total of 58 CPE isolates were isolated between July 2009 and March 2014 from Queensland hospitals. The clonality of isolates was determined by Diversilab repetitive sequence-based PCR. The isolates were investigated for the resistance mechanisms carbapenemase, extended-spectrum β-lactamase, and AmpC β-lactamase and for aminoglycoside resistance and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes by PCR. The plasmid types associated with carbapenemase-encoding genes were characterized. The majority of the CPE were Enterobacter cloacae (n = 29). The majority of Queensland CPE isolates were IMP producers and comprised 11 species (n = 48). Nine NDM-producing Enterobacteriaceae were identified. One NDM-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate coproduced OXA-48. One K. pneumoniae isolate was an OXA-181 producer. The incidence of IMP producers increased significantly in 2013. blaIMP-4 was found in all IMP-producing isolates. blaTEM, qnrB, and aacA4 were common among IMP-4 producers. The HI2 (67%) and L/M (21%) replicons were associated with blaIMP-4. All HI2 plasmids were of sequence type 1 (ST1). All but one of the NDM producers possessed blaCTX-M-15. The 16S rRNA methylase genes found among NDM producers were armA, rmtB, rmtC, and rmtF. The substantial increase in the prevalence of CPE in Queensland has been associated mainly with the emergence E. cloacae strains possessing HI2 plasmids carrying blaIMP-4 over the past 2 years. The importation of NDM producers and/or OXA-48-like producers in patients also contributed to the increased emergence of CPE. PMID:25918153

  19. Integrated Micro-Power System (IMPS) Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, David; Hepp, Aloysius; Moran, Matt; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, David; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2003-01-01

    Glenn Research Center (GRC) has a long history of energy related technology developments for large space related power systems, including photovoltaics, thermo-mechanical energy conversion, electrochemical energy storage. mechanical energy storage, power management and distribution and power system design. Recently, many of these technologies have begun to be adapted for small, distributed power system applications or Integrated Micro-Power Systems (IMPS). This paper will describe the IMPS component and system demonstration efforts to date.

  20. Elucidating the Role of Residue 67 in IMP-Type Metallo-β-Lactamase Evolution

    PubMed Central

    LaCuran, Alecander E.; Pegg, Kevin M.; Liu, Eleanor M.; Bethel, Christopher R.; Ai, Ni; Welsh, William J.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria is ever changing and adapting, as once-novel β-lactam antibiotics are losing their efficacy, primarily due to the production of β-lactamases. Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) efficiently inactivate a broad range of β-lactam antibiotics, including carbapenems, and are often coexpressed with other antibacterial resistance factors. The rapid dissemination of MBLs and lack of novel antibacterials pose an imminent threat to global health. In an effort to better counter these resistance-conferring β-lactamases, an investigation of their natural evolution and resulting substrate specificity was employed. In this study, we elucidated the effects of different amino acid substitutions at position 67 in IMP-type MBLs on the ability to hydrolyze and confer resistance to a range of β-lactam antibiotics. Wild-type β-lactamases IMP-1 and IMP-10 and mutants IMP-1-V67A and IMP-1-V67I were characterized biophysically and biochemically, and MICs for Escherichia coli cells expressing these enzymes were determined. We found that all variants exhibited catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) equal to or higher than that of IMP-1 against all tested β-lactams except penicillins, against which IMP-1 and IMP-1-V67I showed the highest kcat/Km values. The substrate-specific effects of the different amino acid substitutions at position 67 are discussed in light of their side chain structures and possible interactions with the substrates. Docking calculations were employed to investigate interactions between different side chains and an inhibitor used as a β-lactam surrogate. The differences in binding affinities determined experimentally and computationally seem to be governed by hydrophobic interactions between residue 67 and the inhibitor and, by inference, the β-lactam substrates. PMID:26369960

  1. Intramembrane particles and the organization of lymphocyte membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kuby, J M; Wofsy, L

    1981-03-01

    An experimental system was developed in which the majority of all lymphocyte cell-surface proteins, regardless of antigenic specificity, could be cross-linked and redistributed in the membrane to determine whether this would induce a corresponding redistribution of intramembrane particles (IMP). Mouse spleen cells were treated with P-diazoniumphenyl- beta-D-lactoside (lac) to modify all exposed cell-surface proteins. Extensive azo- coupling was achieved without significantly reducing cell viability or compromising cellular function in mitogen- or antigen-stimulated cultures. When the lac-modified cell- surface proteins were capped with a sandwich of rabbit antilactoside antibody and fluorescein-goat anti-rabbit Ig, freeze-fracture preparations obtained from these cells revealed no obvious redistribution of IMP on the majority of fracture faces. However, detailed analysis showed a statistically significant 35 percent decrease (P less than 0.01) in average IMP density in the E face of the lac-capped spleen cells compared with control cells, whereas a few E-face micrographs showed intense IMP aggregation. In contrast, there was no significant alteration of P-face IMP densities or distribution. Apparently, the majority of E-face IMP and virtually all P-face IMP densities or distribution. Apparently, the majority of E-face IMP and virtually all P-face IMP do not present accessible antigenic sites on the lymphocyte surface and do not associate in a stable manner with surface protein antigens. This finding suggests that IMP, as observed in freeze-fracture analysis, may not comprise a representative reflection of lymphocyte transmembrane protein molecules and complexes because other evidence establishes: (a) that at least some common lymphocyte surface antigens are indeed exposed portions of transmembrane proteins and (b) that the aggregation of molecules of any surface antigen results in altered organization of contractile proteins at the cytoplasmic face of the membrane.

  2. A Link between Integral Membrane Protein Expression and Simulated Integration Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Stephen S; Niesen, Michiel J M; Müller, Axel; Tiemann, Katrin; Saladi, Shyam M; Galimidi, Rachel P; Zhang, Bin; Clemons, William M; Miller, Thomas F

    2016-08-23

    Integral membrane proteins (IMPs) control the flow of information and nutrients across cell membranes, yet IMP mechanistic studies are hindered by difficulties in expression. We investigate this issue by addressing the connection between IMP sequence and observed expression levels. For homologs of the IMP TatC, observed expression levels vary widely and are affected by small changes in protein sequence. The effect of sequence changes on experimentally observed expression levels strongly correlates with the simulated integration efficiency obtained from coarse-grained modeling, which is directly confirmed using an in vivo assay. Furthermore, mutations that improve the simulated integration efficiency likewise increase the experimentally observed expression levels. Demonstration of these trends in both Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis suggests that the results are general to other expression systems. This work suggests that IMP integration is a determinant for successful expression, raising the possibility of controlling IMP expression via rational design. PMID:27524616

  3. A Link Between Integral Membrane Protein Expression and Simulated Integration Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Axel; Tiemann, Katrin; Saladi, Shyam M.; Galimidi, Rachel P.; Zhang, Bin; Clemons, William M.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins (IMP) control the flow of information and nutrients across cell membranes, yet IMP mechanistic studies are hindered by difficulties in expression. We investigate this issue by addressing the connection between IMP sequence and observed expression levels. For homologs of the IMP TatC, observed expression levels widely vary and are affected by small changes in protein sequence. The effect of sequence changes on experimentally observed expression levels strongly correlates with the simulated integration efficiency obtained from coarse-grained modeling, which is directly confirmed using an in vivo assay. Furthermore, mutations that improve the simulated integration efficiency likewise increase the experimentally observed expression levels. Demonstration of these trends in both Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis suggests that the results are general to other expression systems. This work suggests that IMP integration is a determinant for successful expression, raising the possibility of controlling IMP expression via rational design. PMID:27524616

  4. Interplanetary Alfven waves and auroral (substorm) activity: IMP 8

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurutani, B.T.; Gould, T.; Goldstein, B.E. ); Gonzalez, W.D. ); Sugiura, Masahisa )

    1990-03-01

    Almost year of IMP 8 interplanetary magnetic field and plasma data (Days 1-312, 1979) have been examined to determine the interplanetary causes of geomagnetic AE activity. The nature of the interplanetary medium (Alfvenic or non-Alfvenic) and the B{sub 2} correlation with AE were examined over 12-hour increments throughout the study. It is found that Alfvenic wave intervals (defined as V{sub x}-B{sub x} cross-correlation coefficients of >0.6) are present over 60% of the time and the southward component of the Alfven waves is well correlated with AE (average peak correlation coefficient 0.62), with a median lag of 43 min. The most probable delay of AE from B{sub s} is considerably shorter, about 20-25 min. Southward magnetic fields during non-Alfvenic intervals (V{sub x}-B{sub x} cross-correlation coefficients of < 0.4) are equally effective in producing geomagnetic activity. Peak correlation coefficients and lags are similar to those of Alfvenic intervals. From this statistical study, no major differences in the magnetospheric response to Alfvenic and non-Alfvenic intervals were obvious. The high-intensity long-duration continuous AE activity (HILDCAA) events discussed previously by Tsurutani and Gonzalez (1987) are demosntrated to be caused by the southward components of the Alfven waves, presumably through the process of magnetic reconnection. The lag times of AE from B{sub s} were variable from event to event (and at different times within the Alfven wave train), ranging from 45 min to as little as 0 min. The cause of this variable delay is somewhat surprising and is not presently well understood.

  5. Importin β Can Bind Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein and Empty Core-Like Particles and Induce Structural Changes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Wang, Joseph Che-Yen; Pierson, Elizabeth E; Keifer, David Z; Delaleau, Mildred; Gallucci, Lara; Cazenave, Christian; Kann, Michael; Jarrold, Martin F; Zlotnick, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids are found in many forms: immature single-stranded RNA-filled cores, single-stranded DNA-filled replication intermediates, mature cores with relaxed circular double-stranded DNA, and empty capsids. A capsid, the protein shell of the core, is a complex of 240 copies of core protein. Mature cores are transported to the nucleus by a complex that includes both importin α and importin β (Impα and Impβ), which bind to the core protein's C-terminal domains (CTDs). Here we have investigated the interactions of HBV core protein with importins in vitro. Strikingly, empty capsids and free core protein can bind Impβ without Impα. Cryo-EM image reconstructions show that the CTDs, which are located inside the capsid, can extrude through the capsid to be bound by Impβ. Impβ density localized on the capsid exterior near the quasi-sixfold vertices, suggested a maximum of 30 Impβ per capsid. However, examination of complexes using single molecule charge-detection mass spectrometry indicate that some complexes include over 90 Impβ molecules. Cryo-EM of capsids incubated with excess Impβ shows a population of damaged particles and a population of "dark" particles with internal density, suggesting that Impβ is effectively swallowed by the capsids, which implies that the capsids transiently open and close and can be destabilized by Impβ. Though the in vitro complexes with great excess of Impβ are not biological, these results have implications for trafficking of empty capsids and free core protein; activities that affect the basis of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27518410

  6. Modification to the MED and LED source-encoding circuitry for the IMP H and J spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrahan, N. M.

    1972-01-01

    The circuitry and fabrication changes made on the MED and LED electronics cards for the IMP H and J are reported. Except for the noted changes, the circuitry and module-matrix arrangement is essentially the same as the IMP-1 electronics cards described. In addition, analysis of the IMP-1 transmitted data indicated the desirability of incorporating additional coincident-event threshold detection levels to further discriminate between received particles.

  7. Importin β Can Bind Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein and Empty Core-Like Particles and Induce Structural Changes

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Elizabeth E.; Keifer, David Z.; Delaleau, Mildred; Gallucci, Lara; Cazenave, Christian; Kann, Michael; Jarrold, Martin F.; Zlotnick, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids are found in many forms: immature single-stranded RNA-filled cores, single-stranded DNA-filled replication intermediates, mature cores with relaxed circular double-stranded DNA, and empty capsids. A capsid, the protein shell of the core, is a complex of 240 copies of core protein. Mature cores are transported to the nucleus by a complex that includes both importin α and importin β (Impα and Impβ), which bind to the core protein’s C-terminal domains (CTDs). Here we have investigated the interactions of HBV core protein with importins in vitro. Strikingly, empty capsids and free core protein can bind Impβ without Impα. Cryo-EM image reconstructions show that the CTDs, which are located inside the capsid, can extrude through the capsid to be bound by Impβ. Impβ density localized on the capsid exterior near the quasi-sixfold vertices, suggested a maximum of 30 Impβ per capsid. However, examination of complexes using single molecule charge-detection mass spectrometry indicate that some complexes include over 90 Impβ molecules. Cryo-EM of capsids incubated with excess Impβ shows a population of damaged particles and a population of “dark” particles with internal density, suggesting that Impβ is effectively swallowed by the capsids, which implies that the capsids transiently open and close and can be destabilized by Impβ. Though the in vitro complexes with great excess of Impβ are not biological, these results have implications for trafficking of empty capsids and free core protein; activities that affect the basis of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27518410

  8. IMP: Using microsat technology to support engineering research inside of the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Kieran A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes an International Space Station (ISS) experiment-support facility being developed by Dynacon for the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), based on microsatellite technology. The facility is called the ``Intravehicular Maneuverable Platform,'' or IMP. The core of IMP is a small, free-floating platform (or ``bus'') deployed inside one of the pressurized crew modules of ISS. Exchangeable experimental payloads can then be mounted to the IMP bus, in order to carry out engineering development or demonstration tests, or microgravity science experiments: the bus provides these payloads with services typical of a standard satellite bus (power, attitude control, etc.). The IMP facility takes advantage of unique features of the ISS, such as the Shuttle-based logistics system and the continuous availability of crew members, to greatly reduce the expense of carrying out space engineering experiments. Further cost reduction has been made possible by incorporating technology that Dynacon has developed for use in a current microsatellite mission. Numerous potential payloads for IMP have been identified, and the first of these (a flexible satellite control experiment) is under development by Dynacon and the University of Toronto's Institute for Aerospace Studies, for the CSA. .

  9. Ciliary Entry of the Hedgehog Transcriptional Activator Gli2 Is Mediated by the Nuclear Import Machinery but Differs from Nuclear Transport in Being Imp-α/β1-Independent.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Belén; Graña, Martín; Badano, José L; Irigoín, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    Gli2 is the primary transcriptional activator of Hedgehog signalling in mammals. Upon stimulation of the pathway, Gli2 moves into the cilium before reaching the nucleus. However, the mechanisms underlying its entry into the cilium are not completely understood. Since several similarities have been reported between nuclear and ciliary import, we investigated if the nuclear import machinery participates in Gli2 ciliary entry. Here we show that while two conserved classical nuclear localization signals mediate Gli2 nuclear localization via importin (Imp)-α/β1, these sequences are not required for Gli2 ciliary import. However, blocking Imp-mediated transport through overexpression of GTP-locked Ran reduced the percentage of Gli2 positive cilia, an effect that was not explained by increased CRM1-dependent export of Gli2 from the cilium. We explored the participation of Imp-β2 in Gli2 ciliary traffic and observed that this transporter is involved in moving Gli2 into the cilium, as has been described for other ciliary proteins. In addition, our data indicate that Imp-β2 might also collaborate in Gli2 nuclear entry. How does Imp-β2 determine the final destination of a protein that can localize to two distinct subcellular compartments remains an open question. Therefore, our data shows that the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling machinery plays a critical role mediating the subcellular distribution of Gli2 and the activation of the pathway, but distinct importins likely play a differential role mediating its ciliary and nuclear translocation.

  10. Ciliary Entry of the Hedgehog Transcriptional Activator Gli2 Is Mediated by the Nuclear Import Machinery but Differs from Nuclear Transport in Being Imp-α/β1-Independent

    PubMed Central

    Torrado, Belén; Graña, Martín; Badano, José L.; Irigoín, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    Gli2 is the primary transcriptional activator of Hedgehog signalling in mammals. Upon stimulation of the pathway, Gli2 moves into the cilium before reaching the nucleus. However, the mechanisms underlying its entry into the cilium are not completely understood. Since several similarities have been reported between nuclear and ciliary import, we investigated if the nuclear import machinery participates in Gli2 ciliary entry. Here we show that while two conserved classical nuclear localization signals mediate Gli2 nuclear localization via importin (Imp)-α/β1, these sequences are not required for Gli2 ciliary import. However, blocking Imp-mediated transport through overexpression of GTP-locked Ran reduced the percentage of Gli2 positive cilia, an effect that was not explained by increased CRM1-dependent export of Gli2 from the cilium. We explored the participation of Imp-β2 in Gli2 ciliary traffic and observed that this transporter is involved in moving Gli2 into the cilium, as has been described for other ciliary proteins. In addition, our data indicate that Imp-β2 might also collaborate in Gli2 nuclear entry. How does Imp-β2 determine the final destination of a protein that can localize to two distinct subcellular compartments remains an open question. Therefore, our data shows that the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling machinery plays a critical role mediating the subcellular distribution of Gli2 and the activation of the pathway, but distinct importins likely play a differential role mediating its ciliary and nuclear translocation. PMID:27579771

  11. Ciliary Entry of the Hedgehog Transcriptional Activator Gli2 Is Mediated by the Nuclear Import Machinery but Differs from Nuclear Transport in Being Imp-α/β1-Independent.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Belén; Graña, Martín; Badano, José L; Irigoín, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    Gli2 is the primary transcriptional activator of Hedgehog signalling in mammals. Upon stimulation of the pathway, Gli2 moves into the cilium before reaching the nucleus. However, the mechanisms underlying its entry into the cilium are not completely understood. Since several similarities have been reported between nuclear and ciliary import, we investigated if the nuclear import machinery participates in Gli2 ciliary entry. Here we show that while two conserved classical nuclear localization signals mediate Gli2 nuclear localization via importin (Imp)-α/β1, these sequences are not required for Gli2 ciliary import. However, blocking Imp-mediated transport through overexpression of GTP-locked Ran reduced the percentage of Gli2 positive cilia, an effect that was not explained by increased CRM1-dependent export of Gli2 from the cilium. We explored the participation of Imp-β2 in Gli2 ciliary traffic and observed that this transporter is involved in moving Gli2 into the cilium, as has been described for other ciliary proteins. In addition, our data indicate that Imp-β2 might also collaborate in Gli2 nuclear entry. How does Imp-β2 determine the final destination of a protein that can localize to two distinct subcellular compartments remains an open question. Therefore, our data shows that the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling machinery plays a critical role mediating the subcellular distribution of Gli2 and the activation of the pathway, but distinct importins likely play a differential role mediating its ciliary and nuclear translocation. PMID:27579771

  12. Metabolic engineering of the purine biosynthetic pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum results in increased intracellular pool sizes of IMP and hypoxanthine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Purine nucleotides exhibit various functions in cellular metabolism. Besides serving as building blocks for nucleic acid synthesis, they participate in signaling pathways and energy metabolism. Further, IMP and GMP represent industrially relevant biotechnological products used as flavor enhancing additives in food industry. Therefore, this work aimed towards the accumulation of IMP applying targeted genetic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results Blocking of the degrading reactions towards AMP and GMP lead to a 45-fold increased intracellular IMP pool of 22 μmol gCDW-1. Deletion of the pgi gene encoding glucose 6-phosphate isomerase in combination with the deactivated AMP and GMP generating reactions, however, resulted in significantly decreased IMP pools (13 μmol gCDW-1). Targeted metabolite profiling of the purine biosynthetic pathway further revealed a metabolite shift towards the formation of the corresponding nucleobase hypoxanthine (102 μmol gCDW-1) derived from IMP degradation. Conclusions The purine biosynthetic pathway is strongly interconnected with various parts of the central metabolism and therefore tightly controlled. However, deleting degrading reactions from IMP to AMP and GMP significantly increased intracellular IMP levels. Due to the complexity of this pathway further degradation from IMP to the corresponding nucleobase drastically increased suggesting additional targets for future strain optimization. PMID:23092390

  13. Flexibility in targeting and insertion during bacterial membrane protein biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bloois, Edwin van; Hagen-Jongman, Corinne M. ten; Luirink, Joen

    2007-10-26

    The biogenesis of Escherichia coli inner membrane proteins (IMPs) is assisted by targeting and insertion factors such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the Sec-translocon and YidC with translocation of (large) periplasmic domains energized by SecA and the proton motive force (pmf). The use of these factors and forces is probably primarily determined by specific structural features of an IMP. To analyze these features we have engineered a set of model IMPs based on endogenous E. coli IMPs known to follow distinct targeting and insertion pathways. The modified model IMPs were analyzed for altered routing using an in vivo protease mapping approach. The data suggest a facultative use of different combinations of factors.

  14. Flexibility in targeting and insertion during bacterial membrane protein biogenesis.

    PubMed

    van Bloois, Edwin; ten Hagen-Jongman, Corinne M; Luirink, Joen

    2007-10-26

    The biogenesis of Escherichia coli inner membrane proteins (IMPs) is assisted by targeting and insertion factors such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the Sec-translocon and YidC with translocation of (large) periplasmic domains energized by SecA and the proton motive force (pmf). The use of these factors and forces is probably primarily determined by specific structural features of an IMP. To analyze these features we have engineered a set of model IMPs based on endogenous E. coli IMPs known to follow distinct targeting and insertion pathways. The modified model IMPs were analyzed for altered routing using an in vivo protease mapping approach. The data suggest a facultative use of different combinations of factors.

  15. Quantifying local cerebral blood flow by N-isopropyl-p-(123I)iodoamphetamine (IMP) tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.; Barrio, J.R.; Huang, S.C.; Selin, C.; Ackermann, R.F.; Lear, J.L.; Wu, J.L.; Lin, T.H.; Phelps, M.E.

    1982-03-01

    A model was validated wherein local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) in humans was quantified by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with intravenously injected N-isopropyl-p-(123I)iodoamphetamine (IMP) combined with a modification of the classic method of arterial input sampling. After intravenous injection of IMP in rat, autoradiograms of the brain showed activity distributions in the pattern of LCBF. IMP was nearly completely removed on first pass through monkey brain after intracarotid injection (CBF.33 ml/100 g/min) and washed out with a half-time of approximately 1 hr. When the modified method of arterial input and tissue-sample counting applied to dog brain, there was good correspondence between LCBF based on IMP and on that by microsphere injection over a wide flow range. In applying the method to human subjects using SPECT, whole-brain CBF measured 47.2 +/- 5.4 ml/100 g/min (mean +/- s.d., N.5), stable gray-white distinction persisted for over 1 hr, and the half-time for brain washout was approximately 1 hr. Perfusion deficits in patients were clearly demonstrated and quantified, comparing well with results now available from positron ECT.

  16. Therapeutic techniques applied in the heavy-ion therapy at IMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Sihver, Lembit

    2011-04-01

    Superficially-placed tumors have been treated with carbon ions at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), since November 2006. Up to now, 103 patients have been irradiated in the therapy terminal of the heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) at IMP, where carbon-ion beams with energies up to 100 MeV/u can be supplied and a passive beam delivery system has been developed and commissioned. A number of therapeutic and clinical experiences concerning heavy-ion therapy have been acquired at IMP. To extend the heavy-ion therapy project to deep-seated tumor treatment, a horizontal beam line dedicated to this has been constructed in the cooling storage ring (CSR), which is a synchrotron connected to the HIRFL as an injector, and is now in operation. Therapeutic high-energy carbon-ion beams, extracted from the HIRFL-CSR through slow extraction techniques, have been supplied in the deep-seated tumor therapy terminal. After the beam delivery, shaping and monitoring devices installed in the therapy terminal at HIRFL-CSR were validated through therapeutic beam tests, deep-seated tumor treatment with high-energy carbon ions started in March 2009. The therapeutic techniques in terms of beam delivery system, conformal irradiation method and treatment planning used at IMP are introduced in this paper.

  17. An Eimeria vaccine candidate based on Eimeria tenella immune mapped protein 1 and the TLR-5 agonist Salmonella typhimurium FliC flagellin

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Guangwen; Qin, Mei; Liu, Xianyong; Suo, Jingxia; Tang, Xinming; Tao, Geru; Han, Qian; Suo, Xun; Wu, Wenxue

    2013-10-25

    Highlights: •We found a new protective protein – (IMPI) in Eimeria tenella. •EtIMP1-flagellin fusion protein is an effective immunogen against Eimeria infection. •Flagellin can be as an apicomplexan parasite vaccine adjuvant in chickens. -- Abstract: Immune mapped protein-1 (IMP1) is a new protective protein in apicomplexan parasites, and exits in Eimeria tenella. But its structure and immunogenicity in E. tenella are still unknown. In this study, IMPI in E. tenella was predicted to be a membrane protein. To evaluate immunogenicity of IMPI in E. tenella, a chimeric subunit vaccine consisting of E. tenella IMP1 (EtIMP1) and a molecular adjuvant (a truncated flagellin, FliC) was constructed and over-expressed in Escherichia coli and its efficacy against E. tenella infection was evaluated. Three-week-old AA broiler chickens were vaccinated with the recombinant EtIMP1-truncated FliC without adjuvant or EtIMP1 with Freund’s Complete Adjuvant. Immunization of chickens with the recombinant EtIMP1-truncated FliC fusion protein resulted in stronger cellular immune responses than immunization with only recombinant EtIMP1 with adjuvant. The clinical effect of the EtIMP1-truncated FliC without adjuvant was also greater than that of the EtIMP1 with adjuvant, which was evidenced by the differences between the two groups in body weight gain, oocyst output and caecal lesions of E. tenella-challenged chickens. The results suggested that the EtIMP1-flagellin fusion protein can be used as an effective immunogen in the development of subunit vaccines against Eimeria infection. This is the first demonstration of antigen-specific protective immunity against avian coccidiosis using a recombinant flagellin as an apicomplexan parasite vaccine adjuvant in chickens.

  18. Complete sequence of pOZ176, a 500-kilobase IncP-2 plasmid encoding IMP-9-mediated carbapenem resistance, from outbreak isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa 96.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jianhui; Alexander, David C; Ma, Jennifer H; Déraspe, Maxime; Low, Donald E; Jamieson, Frances B; Roy, Paul H

    2013-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa 96 (PA96) was isolated during a multicenter surveillance study in Guangzhou, China, in 2000. Whole-genome sequencing of this outbreak strain facilitated analysis of its IncP-2 carbapenem-resistant plasmid, pOZ176. The plasmid had a length of 500,839 bp and an average percent G+C content of 57%. Of the 618 predicted open reading frames, 65% encode hypothetical proteins. The pOZ176 backbone is not closely related to any plasmids thus far sequenced, but some similarity to pQBR103 of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 was observed. Two multiresistant class 1 integrons and several insertion sequences were identified. The blaIMP-9-carrying integron contained aacA4 → bla(IMP-9) → aacA4, flanked upstream by Tn21 tnpMRA and downstream by a complete tni operon of Tn402 and a mer module, named Tn6016. The second integron carried aacA4 → catB8a → bla(OXA-10) and was flanked by Tn1403-like tnpRA and a sul1-type 3' conserved sequence (3'-CS), named Tn6217. Other features include three resistance genes similar to those of Tn5, a tellurite resistance operon, and two pil operons. The replication and maintenance systems exhibit similarity to a genomic island of Ralstonia solanacearum GM1000. Codon usage analysis suggests the recent acquisition of bla(IMP-9). The origins of the integrons on pOZ176 indicated separate horizontal gene transfer events driven by antibiotic selection. The novel mosaic structure of pOZ176 suggests that it is derived from environmental bacteria.

  19. Insulin-Like Growth Factor II mRNA-Binding Protein 3 Expression Correlates with Poor Prognosis in Acral Lentiginous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Yi-Shuan; Liao, Yi-Hua; Lin, Ming-Hsien; Chiu, Hsien-Ching; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Liau, Jau-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-II mRNA-binding protein 3 (IMP-3) is an RNA-binding protein expressed in multiple cancers, including melanomas. However, the expression of IMP-3 has not been investigated in acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM). This study sought to elucidate its prognostic value in ALMs. IMP-3 expression was studied in 93 patients diagnosed with ALM via immunohistochemistry. Univariate and multivariate analyses for survival were performed, according to clinical and histologic parameters, using the Cox proportional hazard model. Survival curves were graphed using the Kaplan-Meier method. IMP-3 was over-expressed in 70 out of 93 tumors (75.3%). IMP-3 expression correlated with thick and high-stage tumor and predicted poorer overall, melanoma-specific, recurrence-free and distant metastasis-free survivals (P = 0.002, 0.006, 0.008 and 0.012, respectively). Further analysis showed that patients with tumor thickness ≤ 4.0 mm and positive IMP-3 expression had a significantly worse melanoma-specific survival than those without IMP-3 expression (P = 0.048). IMP-3 (hazard ratio 3.67, 95% confidence intervals 1.35–9.97, P = 0.011) was confirmed to be an independent prognostic factor for melanoma-specific survival in multivariate survival analysis. Positive IMP-3 expression was an important prognostic factor for ALMs. PMID:26796627

  20. Radial evolution of the solar wind from IMP 8 to Voyager 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, John D.; Paularena, Karolen I.; Lazarus, Alan J.; Belcher, John W.

    1995-01-01

    Voyager 2 and Interplanetary Monitoring Platform (IMP) 8 data from 1977 through 1994 are presented and compared. Radial velocity and temperature structures remain intact over the distance from 1 to 43 AU, but density structures do not. Temperature and velocity changes are correlated and nearly in phase at 1 AU, but in the outer heliosphere temperature changes lead velocity changes by tens of days. Solar cycle variations are detected by both spacecraft, with minima in flux density and dynamic pressure near solar maxima. Differences between Voyager 2 and IMP 8 observations near the solar minimum in 1986-1987 are attributed to latitudinal gradients in solar wind properties. Solar rotation variations are often present even at 40 AU. The Voyager 2 temperature profile is best fit with a R(exp -0.49 +/- 0.01) decrease, much less steep than an adiabatic profile.

  1. IMS/Satellite Situation Center report: Predicted orbit plots for IMP-J-1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Predicted orbit plots for the IMP-J satellite were given for the time period January-December 1976. These plots are shown in three projections. The time period covered by each set of projections is 12 days and 6 hours, corresponding approximately to the period of IMP-J. The three coordinate systems used are the Geocentric Solar Ecliptic system (GSE), the Geocentric Solar Magnetospheric system (GSM), and the Solar Magnetic system (SM). For each of the three projections, time ticks and codes are given on the satellite trajectories. The codes are interpreted in the table at the base of each plot. Time is given in the table as year/day/decimal hour, and the total time covered by each plot is shown at the bottom of each table.

  2. Delta-90 Interplanetary Monitoring Platform-H (IMP-H) flash flight report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Delta-90 launch vehicle and the IMP-H spacecraft were successfully launched from Pad B, Complex 17, Cape Kennedy Air Force Station, Florida, at 2120:00.559 EDT on September 22, 1972. The countdown proceeded smoothly to liftoff with no major difficulties or unscheduled holds. The Delta-90/IMP-H were launched on a pad azimuth of 115 degrees, the vehicle ten rolled to 95 degrees from the north placing the spacecraft in a highly elliptical transfer orbit. Firing the spacecraft kickmotor at 1136 EDT, September 25, 1972, injected the spacecraft into its final desirable near-circular orbit approximately half way between the planet earth and its moon. Vehicle performance of all stages appeared nominal with all sequenced events occurring at the expected times. Data acquisition from all range stations was very good. Damage to the launch pad caused by liftoff was nominal.

  3. Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and multiple infarct dementia by tomographic imaging of iodine-123 IMP

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.B.; Graham, L.S.; Lake, R.; Metter, E.J.; Fitten, J.; Kulkarni, M.K.; Sevrin, R.; Yamada, L.; Chang, C.C.; Woodruff, N.

    1986-06-01

    Tomographic imaging of the brain was performed using a rotating slant hole collimator and (/sup 123/I)N-isopropyl p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) in normal subjects (n = 6) and patients with either Alzheimer's disease (n = 5) or multiple infarct dementia (n = 3). Four blinded observers were asked to make a diagnosis from the images. Normal subjects and patients with multiple infarct dementia were correctly identified. Alzheimer's disease was diagnosed in three of the five patients with this disease. One patient with early Alzheimer's disease was classified as normal by two of the four observers. Another patient with Alzheimer's disease had an asymmetric distribution of IMP and was incorrectly diagnosed as multiple infarct dementia by all four observers. Limited angle tomography of the cerebral distribution of /sup 123/I appears to be a useful technique for the evaluation of demented patients.

  4. Differential diagnosis of bilateral parietal abnormalities in I-123 IMP SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, Y.; Ichiya, Y.; Otsuka, M.; Tahara, T.; Fukumura, T.; Gunasekera, R.; Masuda, K. )

    1990-12-01

    This report discusses the clinical significance of bilateral parietal abnormalities on I-123 IMP SPECT imaging in 158 patients with cerebral disorders. This pattern was seen in 15 out of 21 patients with Alzheimer's disease; it was also seen in 4 out of 5 patients with Parkinson's disease with dementia, in 3 out of 17 patients with vascular dementia, in 1 out of 36 patients with cerebral infarction without dementia, in 1 out of 2 patients with hypoglycemia, and in 1 out of 2 patients with CO intoxication. Detection of bilateral parietal abnormalities is a useful finding in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, but one should keep in mind that other cerebral disorders may also show a similar pattern with I-123 IMP SPECT imaging.

  5. Template properties of oligocytidylates formed in the montmorillonite catalyzed condensation of ImpC. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.; Ertem, Goezen

    1994-01-01

    In an attempt to investigate the prebiotic formation of phosphodiester bond in RNA, we have studied the self condensation of 5'-phosphorimidazolide of adenosine (ImpA), in aqueous solutions containing 0.2 M sodium chloride and 0.075 M magnesium chloride at pH 8 using clay minerals as catalyst. In the presence of certain montmorillonites, oligomers containing up to ten monomer units in their chain were formed, while in control experiments, where no catalyst was added, the major product was 5',5'-diadenosine diphosphate, A(sup 5')ppA. In reactions carried out with ImpA: A(sup 5')ppA mixtures at 9:1 mole ratio, oligomers of the type A(sup 5')p(pA)(sub n) and (A(sup 5')p)(sub n)A(sup 5')ppA(pA)(sub n) formed at the expense of (pA)(sub n) type oligomers. Addition of A(sup 5')ppA to the reaction mixture increased the regiospecifity of 3',5'-link formation from 67% to 79%. The condensation of the 5'-phosphorimidazolide of cytidine, ImpC, was also carried out in the presence and absence of A(sup 5')ppA under the same conditions and oligomers containing up to twelve monomer units were obtained.

  6. A novel cofactor-binding mode in bacterial IMP dehydrogenases explains inhibitor selectivity

    DOE PAGES

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; et al

    2015-01-09

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD+, which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes withmore » different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD+ and XMP/NAD+. In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD+ adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD+-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD+-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. As a result, these findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization.« less

  7. Portosystemic shunting in portal hypertension: evaluation with portal scintigraphy with transrectally administered I-123 IMP

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwagi, T.; Azuma, M.; Ikawa, T.; Takehara, T.; Matsuda, H.; Yoshioka, H.; Mitsutani, N.; Koizumi, T.; Kimura, K.

    1988-10-01

    Portosystemic shunting was evaluated with rectal administration of iodine-123 iodoamphetamine (IMP) in seven patients without liver disease and 53 patients with liver cirrhosis. IMP (2-3 mCi (74-111 MBq)) was administered to the rectum through a catheter. Images of the chest and abdomen were obtained for up to 60 minutes with a scintillation camera interfaced with a computer. In all patients, images of the liver and/or lungs were observed within 5-10 minutes and became clear with time. In patients without liver disease, only liver images could be obtained, whereas the lung was visualized with or without the liver in all patients with liver cirrhosis. The portosystemic shunt index was calculated by dividing counts of lungs by counts of liver and lung. These values were significantly higher in liver cirrhosis, especially in the decompensated stage. Transrectal portal scintigraphy with IMP appears to be a useful method for noninvasive and quantitative evaluation of portosystemic shunting in portal hypertension.

  8. Quantitative I-123-IMP brain SPECT and neuropsychological testing in AIDS dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Kuni, C.C.; Rhame, F.S.; Meier, M.J.; Foehse, M.C.; Loewenson, R.B.; Lee, B.C.; Boudreau, R.J.; duCret, R.P. )

    1991-03-01

    We performed I-123-IMP SPECT brain imaging on seven mildly demented AIDS patients and seven normal subjects. In an attempt to detect and quantitate regions of decreased I-123-IMP uptake, pixel intensity histograms of normalized SPECT images at the basal ganglia level were analyzed for the fraction of pixels in the lowest quartile of the intensity range. This fraction (F) averaged 17.5% (S.D. = 4.6) in the AIDS group and 12.6% (S.D. = 5.1) in the normal group (p less than .05). Six of the AIDS patients underwent neuropsychological testing (NPT). NPT showed the patients to have a variety of mild abnormalities. Regression analysis of NPT scores versus F yielded a correlation coefficient of .80 (p less than .05). We conclude that analysis of I-123-IMP SPECT image pixel intensity distribution is potentially sensitive in detecting abnormalities associated with AIDS dementia and may correlate with the severity of dementia as measured by NPT.

  9. A Novel Cofactor-binding Mode in Bacterial IMP Dehydrogenases Explains Inhibitor Selectivity*

    PubMed Central

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD+, which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes with different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD+ and XMP/NAD+. In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD+ adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD+-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD+-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. These findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization. PMID:25572472

  10. Insulin-like growth factor II messenger RNA-binding protein-3 is an indicator of malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Katsumi; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Taguchi, Kenichi; Ohno, Shinji; Tokunaga, Eriko; Yamashita, Nami; Kubo, Makoto; Nakamura, Masafumi; Oda, Yoshinao

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the clinicopathological and prognostic significance of the expressions of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein-3 (IMP3) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in phyllodes tumors (PTs). Immunohistochemical staining for IMP3 and EGFR was performed in 130 cases of primary PTs (83 benign, 28 borderline, 19 malignant), 34 recurrent/metastatic PTs, and 26 fibroadenomas (FAs). Among the primary tumors, a high expression of IMP3 was significantly more frequently present in malignant PTs (17/19, 89%) than in the FAs (0/26, 0%), benign PTs (0/83, 0%) and borderline PTs (3/28, 11%). The recurrent and metastatic lesions of malignant PTs also showed high IMP3 expression (3/5 [60%] and 6/6 [100%], respectively). Most malignant PTs showed strong IMP3 expression at the interductal area or more diffusely, whereas weak and focal (low) expression of IMP3 was limited to the periductal area in FAs and benign PTs. EGFR overexpression was significantly correlated with tumor grade and high IMP3 expression. Overexpressions of IMP3 and EGFR were significantly associated with shorter periods of metastasis-free and disease-free survival. The results suggest that high expressions of IMP3 and EGFR with a characteristic staining pattern may be helpful for both identifying malignant PT and predicting the prognosis of these tumors. PMID:27137988

  11. Detergents in Membrane Protein Purification and Crystallisation.

    PubMed

    Anandan, Anandhi; Vrielink, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Detergents play a significant role in structural and functional characterisation of integral membrane proteins (IMPs). IMPs reside in the biological membranes and exhibit a great variation in their structural and physical properties. For in vitro biophysical studies, structural and functional analyses, IMPs need to be extracted from the membrane lipid bilayer environment in which they are found and purified to homogeneity while maintaining a folded and functionally active state. Detergents are capable of successfully solubilising and extracting the IMPs from the membrane bilayers. A number of detergents with varying structure and physicochemical properties are commercially available and can be applied for this purpose. Nevertheless, it is important to choose a detergent that is not only able to extract the membrane protein but also provide an optimal environment while retaining the correct structural and physical properties of the protein molecule. Choosing the best detergent for this task can be made possible by understanding the physical and chemical properties of the different detergents and their interaction with the IMPs. In addition, understanding the mechanism of membrane solubilisation and protein extraction along with crystallisation requirements, if crystallographic studies are going to be undertaken, can help in choosing the best detergent for the purpose. This chapter aims to present the fundamental properties of detergents and highlight information relevant to IMP crystallisation. The first section of the chapter reviews the physicochemical properties of detergents and parameters essential for predicting their behaviour in solution. The second section covers the interaction of detergents with the biologic membranes and proteins followed by their role in membrane protein crystallisation. The last section will briefly cover the types of detergent and their properties focusing on custom designed detergents for membrane protein studies.

  12. Detergents in Membrane Protein Purification and Crystallisation.

    PubMed

    Anandan, Anandhi; Vrielink, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Detergents play a significant role in structural and functional characterisation of integral membrane proteins (IMPs). IMPs reside in the biological membranes and exhibit a great variation in their structural and physical properties. For in vitro biophysical studies, structural and functional analyses, IMPs need to be extracted from the membrane lipid bilayer environment in which they are found and purified to homogeneity while maintaining a folded and functionally active state. Detergents are capable of successfully solubilising and extracting the IMPs from the membrane bilayers. A number of detergents with varying structure and physicochemical properties are commercially available and can be applied for this purpose. Nevertheless, it is important to choose a detergent that is not only able to extract the membrane protein but also provide an optimal environment while retaining the correct structural and physical properties of the protein molecule. Choosing the best detergent for this task can be made possible by understanding the physical and chemical properties of the different detergents and their interaction with the IMPs. In addition, understanding the mechanism of membrane solubilisation and protein extraction along with crystallisation requirements, if crystallographic studies are going to be undertaken, can help in choosing the best detergent for the purpose. This chapter aims to present the fundamental properties of detergents and highlight information relevant to IMP crystallisation. The first section of the chapter reviews the physicochemical properties of detergents and parameters essential for predicting their behaviour in solution. The second section covers the interaction of detergents with the biologic membranes and proteins followed by their role in membrane protein crystallisation. The last section will briefly cover the types of detergent and their properties focusing on custom designed detergents for membrane protein studies. PMID:27553232

  13. A Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolate Harboring Two Copies of blaIMP-34 Encoding a Metallo-β-Lactamase

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Shimada, Kayo; Shiroma, Akino; Nakano, Kazuma; Teruya, Kuniko; Satou, Kazuhito; Hirano, Takashi; Shimojima, Masahiro; Kirikae, Teruo

    2016-01-01

    A carbapenem-resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, NCGM1984, was isolated in 2012 from a hospitalized patient in Japan. Immunochromatographic assay showed that the isolate was positive for IMP-type metallo-β-lactamase. Complete genome sequencing revealed that NCGM1984 harbored two copies of blaIMP-34, located at different sites on the chromosome. Each blaIMP-34 was present in the same structures of the class 1 integrons, tnpA(ISPa7)-intI1-qacG-blaIMP-34-aac(6')-Ib-qacEdelta1-sul1-orf5-tniBdelta-tniA. The isolate belonged to multilocus sequence typing ST235, one of the international high-risk clones. IMP-34, with an amino acid substitution (Glu126Gly) compared with IMP-1, hydrolyzed all β-lactamases tested except aztreonam, and its catalytic activities were similar to IMP-1. This is the first report of a clinical isolate of an IMP-34-producing P. aeruginosa harboring two copies of blaIMP-34 on its chromosome. PMID:27055243

  14. A novel cofactor-binding mode in bacterial IMP dehydrogenases explains inhibitor selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-01-09

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD+, which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes with different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD+ and XMP/NAD+. In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD+ adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD+-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD+-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. As a result, these findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization.

  15. Intensity Oscillation of Low Energy Solar Particles Observed on the IMP 7 Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, C. Y.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.

    1973-01-01

    Solar flare particles in the energy range from 125 to 160 KeV per charge were detected and analyzed by an electrostatic deflection vs. energy instrument on board the Explorer 47 (IMP 7) satellite. A harmonic analysis of the counting rates shows that frequently, the fluctuation of the particle flux can be approximately represented by N(t) = f(t)sin 2 pi nu t where f(t) is a smoothly varying function of t. The oscillation frequency nu varies from flare to flare and is of the order of 2 x .001/sec. The physical implications of the finding are discussed.

  16. Intensity oscillation of low energy solar particles observed on the IMP 7 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, C. Y.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.

    1974-01-01

    Solar flare particles in the energy range from 125 to 160 KeV per charge were detected and analyzed by an electrostatic deflection vs energy instrument on board the Explorer 47 (IMP 7) satellite. On the basis of a harmonic analysis of the counting rates, an approximating formula is obtained for the fluctuation of the particle flux. The oscillation frequency varies from flare to flare and is of the order of approximately .002 per sec. The physical implications of the finding are discussed.

  17. Recent Results of Nuclear Mass Measurements at Storage Ring in IMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H. S.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2014-09-01

    Recent commissioning of the Cooler Storage Ring at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL-CSR) has allowed us for direct mass measurements at the Institute of Modern Physics in Lanzhou (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences. A series of isochronous mass measurements have been carried out in the past few years using 78Kr, 86Kr, 58Ni, and 112Sn beams. The main results and the present status are presented in this talk, and the implications of these results with respect to nuclear structures and nucleosynthesis in the rp-process of x-ray bursts are discussed.

  18. Reduction and analysis of data from experiment CAI on the IMP-8 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.; Mewaldt, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    The Caltech Electron/Isotope Spectrometer (EIS) on the Interplanetary Monitoring Platform 8 (IMP-8) has provided precise measurements of the energy spectra and time variations of low energy electrons (0.16 to 6 MeV), the isotopes of hydrogen and helium (approximately 2 to 40 MeV/nucleon), and the elements from lithium through oxygen (approximately 5 to 50 MeV/nucleon) in energetic particle fluxes of solar, galactic, interplanetary, and magnetospheric origin since 1973. The accomplishments that have resulted from EIS measurements during the period March 24, 1980 to December 31, 1984 are summarized.

  19. Mindful Parenting Assessed Further: Psychometric Properties of the Dutch Version of the Interpersonal Mindfulness in Parenting Scale (IM-P)

    PubMed Central

    Zijlstra, Bonne J. H.; Geurtzen, Naline; van Zundert, Rinka M. P.; van de Weijer-Bergsma, Eva; Hartman, Esther E.; Nieuwesteeg, Anke M.; Duncan, Larissa G.; Bögels, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the Interpersonal Mindfulness in Parenting Scale (IM-P) were studied in a general population sample of mothers of adolescents (n=866) (study 1). A six-factor structure (29 items) emerged using exploratory factor analysis. A main difference from the original IM-P was that aspects of compassion and emotional awareness were separated into different factors for the self and the child, instead of combined into one factor. In a second general population sample of mothers of adolescents (n=.99), the six-factor structure was confirmed using confirmatory factor analysis (study 2). The proposed 29-item version of the IM-P and its subscales were shown to have good internal consistencies, apart from the sixth factor. As expected, a high correlation was found with general mindfulness questionnaires (FFMQ and FMI). Furthermore, the IM-P correlated positively as expected with quality of life and optimism and negatively with depression and dysfunctional parenting styles. These expected indications of construct validity were found in study 2, as well as in mothers (n=112) of adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (study 3) which was added to examine whether the Dutch version of the IM-P was also valid in a pediatric population. Overall, these three studies present good psychometric properties of the Dutch translation of the first measure of mindful parenting. PMID:25126133

  20. Genetic polymorphisms of the AMPD1 gene and their correlations with IMP contents in Fast Partridge and Lingshan chickens.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jin; Yu, Ping; Ding, Xiaoling; Xu, Minglong; Guo, Baoping; Xu, Yinxue

    2015-12-15

    The object of this study was to evaluate associations between the adenosine monophosphate deaminase 1 (AMPD1) gene polymorphisms and inosine monophosphate acid (IMP) contents of chicken to provide a molecular marker for breeding. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), g.4064G/A, g.5573A/G and g.6805G/A were detected in exons IV, VI, and VIII of the AMPD1 gene in Fast Partridge and Lingshan chickens, respectively. All were purine conversion and caused no alteration in amino acid sequence. Statistical analysis revealed that Lingshan chicken with the homozygous genotype AA at position 4064 and 6805 had a significantly greater IMP content than those with the GG genotype (P<0.05). Fast Partridge chicken with the genotype GG at position 6805 had a significantly greater IMP content compared with those with the AA genotype (P<0.05). In conclusion, the polymorphism at g.6805A/G was correlated with IMP content (P<0.05) in both Fast Partridge and Lingshan chickens. The results in our study suggest that SNP 6805A/G can be used as a possible candidate marker of IMP content of chicken. PMID:26275943

  1. IMP improves water-holding capacity, physical and sensory properties of heat-induced gels from porcine meat.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yukinobu; Migita, Koshiro; Okitani, Akihiro; Matsuishi, Masanori

    2014-05-01

    Water-holding capacity (WHC) of heat-induced pork gels was examined. The heat-induced gels were obtained from meat homogenates prepared by adding nine volumes of 0.3-0.5 mol/L NaCl solutions containing 9-36 mmol/L disodium inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP) or 9 mmol/L tetrapotassium pyrophosphate (KPP) to minced pork. IMP at 36 mmol/L enhanced the WHC to the same level as attained by KPP. Physical and sensory properties of heat-induced gels were also examined. The heat-induced gels were prepared from porcine meat homogenates containing 0.3 mol/L NaCl and 9-36 mmol/L IMP or 9 mmol/L KPP. IMP at 36 mmol/L enhanced the values of hardness, cohesiveness, gumminess and springiness, measured with a Tensipresser, and several organoleptic scores to the same level as the score attained by KPP. Thus, it is concluded that IMP is expected to be a practical substitute for pyrophosphates to improve the quality of sausages.

  2. IMP improves water-holding capacity, physical and sensory properties of heat-induced gels from porcine meat.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yukinobu; Migita, Koshiro; Okitani, Akihiro; Matsuishi, Masanori

    2014-05-01

    Water-holding capacity (WHC) of heat-induced pork gels was examined. The heat-induced gels were obtained from meat homogenates prepared by adding nine volumes of 0.3-0.5 mol/L NaCl solutions containing 9-36 mmol/L disodium inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP) or 9 mmol/L tetrapotassium pyrophosphate (KPP) to minced pork. IMP at 36 mmol/L enhanced the WHC to the same level as attained by KPP. Physical and sensory properties of heat-induced gels were also examined. The heat-induced gels were prepared from porcine meat homogenates containing 0.3 mol/L NaCl and 9-36 mmol/L IMP or 9 mmol/L KPP. IMP at 36 mmol/L enhanced the values of hardness, cohesiveness, gumminess and springiness, measured with a Tensipresser, and several organoleptic scores to the same level as the score attained by KPP. Thus, it is concluded that IMP is expected to be a practical substitute for pyrophosphates to improve the quality of sausages. PMID:24428177

  3. Characterization of a novel Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 476 carrying both bla KPC-2 and bla IMP-4.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Cao, W; Zhu, X; Chen, Z; Li, L; Zhang, B; Wang, B; Tian, L; Wang, F; Liu, C; Sun, Z

    2012-08-01

    Carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae has recently spread rapidly throughout China. In this study, we characterized a carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae isolate that produced both KPC-2 and IMP-4 type carbapenemases. A clinical isolate of K. pneumoniae, resistant to both meropenem and imipenem, was recovered from a urine sample. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined using the broth microdilution method and Etest (bioMérieux, France). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used for gene type analysis. bla (KPC) and the encoding genes of ESBLs and plasmid-mediated AmpC enzymes were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified and sequenced. Plasmids were analyzed by transformation, enzyme restriction and Southern blot. PCR analysis revealed that the isolate was simultaneously carrying bla (KPC-2), bla (IMP-4), bla (TEM-1), and bla (OKP-B) genes. MLST assigned the isolate to a novel sequence type, ST476. bla (KPC-2)-harbouring plasmids of the isolate and comparative strains had similar EcoRI and HindIII restriction maps, while IMP-4-harbouring plasmids had variable HindIII restriction maps. Coexistence of bla (KPC-2) and bla (IMP-4) was probably due to bla (IMP-4)-harbouring plasmid transmission into KPC-2-producing K. pneumoniae (ST476). The concomitant presence of these genes is alarming and poses both therapeutic and infection control problems. PMID:22271301

  4. Mindful Parenting Assessed Further: Psychometric Properties of the Dutch Version of the Interpersonal Mindfulness in Parenting Scale (IM-P).

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Esther I; Zijlstra, Bonne J H; Geurtzen, Naline; van Zundert, Rinka M P; van de Weijer-Bergsma, Eva; Hartman, Esther E; Nieuwesteeg, Anke M; Duncan, Larissa G; Bögels, Susan M

    2014-04-01

    Psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the Interpersonal Mindfulness in Parenting Scale (IM-P) were studied in a general population sample of mothers of adolescents (n=866) (study 1). A six-factor structure (29 items) emerged using exploratory factor analysis. A main difference from the original IM-P was that aspects of compassion and emotional awareness were separated into different factors for the self and the child, instead of combined into one factor. In a second general population sample of mothers of adolescents (n=.99), the six-factor structure was confirmed using confirmatory factor analysis (study 2). The proposed 29-item version of the IM-P and its subscales were shown to have good internal consistencies, apart from the sixth factor. As expected, a high correlation was found with general mindfulness questionnaires (FFMQ and FMI). Furthermore, the IM-P correlated positively as expected with quality of life and optimism and negatively with depression and dysfunctional parenting styles. These expected indications of construct validity were found in study 2, as well as in mothers (n=112) of adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (study 3) which was added to examine whether the Dutch version of the IM-P was also valid in a pediatric population. Overall, these three studies present good psychometric properties of the Dutch translation of the first measure of mindful parenting. PMID:25126133

  5. Genetic polymorphisms of the AMPD1 gene and their correlations with IMP contents in Fast Partridge and Lingshan chickens.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jin; Yu, Ping; Ding, Xiaoling; Xu, Minglong; Guo, Baoping; Xu, Yinxue

    2015-12-15

    The object of this study was to evaluate associations between the adenosine monophosphate deaminase 1 (AMPD1) gene polymorphisms and inosine monophosphate acid (IMP) contents of chicken to provide a molecular marker for breeding. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), g.4064G/A, g.5573A/G and g.6805G/A were detected in exons IV, VI, and VIII of the AMPD1 gene in Fast Partridge and Lingshan chickens, respectively. All were purine conversion and caused no alteration in amino acid sequence. Statistical analysis revealed that Lingshan chicken with the homozygous genotype AA at position 4064 and 6805 had a significantly greater IMP content than those with the GG genotype (P<0.05). Fast Partridge chicken with the genotype GG at position 6805 had a significantly greater IMP content compared with those with the AA genotype (P<0.05). In conclusion, the polymorphism at g.6805A/G was correlated with IMP content (P<0.05) in both Fast Partridge and Lingshan chickens. The results in our study suggest that SNP 6805A/G can be used as a possible candidate marker of IMP content of chicken.

  6. Lessons Learned from the Design, Certification, and Operation of the Space Shuttle Integrated Main Propulsion System (IMPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Hugo E.; Albright, John D.; D'Amico, Stephen J.; Brewer, John M.; Melcher, John C., IV

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Integrated Main Propulsion System (IMPS) consists of the External Tank (ET), Orbiter Main Propulsion System (MPS), and Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs). The IMPS is tasked with the storage, conditioning, distribution, and combustion of cryogenic liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) propellants to provide first and second stage thrust for achieving orbital velocity. The design, certification, and operation of the associated IMPS hardware have produced many lessons learned over the course of the Space Shuttle Program (SSP). A subset of these items will be discussed in this paper for consideration when designing, building, and operating future spacecraft propulsion systems. This paper will focus on lessons learned related to Orbiter MPS and is the first of a planned series to address the subject matter.

  7. Regional cerebral blood flow study with 123I-IMP in patients with degenerative dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, T.; Hoshi, H.; Nagamachi, S.; Jinnouchi, S.; Futami, S.; Watanabe, K.; Mitsuyama, Y. )

    1991-05-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow was evaluated by single-photon emission CT (SPECT) with 123I-N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine (123I-IMP) in 11 patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type, three patients with progressive dementia and motor neuron disease, and eight healthy control subjects. Regional blood flow measurements in the bilateral frontal, parietal association, and temporal cortices were lower in the Alzheimer dementia patients than in controls. Flow deficits in the parietal association cortex were demonstrated in all patients with Alzheimer-type dementia; these deficits were correlated with the severity of disease. Lateral hemispheric asymmetry was seen in nine of 11 patients with Alzheimer-type dementia. In all three patients with progressive dementia and motor neuron disease, flow deficits were demonstrated in the bilateral frontal and temporal cortices, but no flow deficits were seen in the parietal association cortex. Brain SPECT with 123I-IMP may be useful in the differential diagnosis and evaluation of the severity of degenerative dementia.

  8. Inverse mirror plasma experimental device (IMPED) - a magnetized linear plasma device for wave studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Sayak; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Sengupta, S.; Saxena, Y. C.; Pal, R.

    2015-04-01

    In a quasineutral plasma, electrons undergo collective oscillations, known as plasma oscillations, when perturbed locally. The oscillations propagate due to finite temperature effects. However, the wave can lose the phase coherence between constituting oscillators in an inhomogeneous plasma (phase mixing) because of the dependence of plasma oscillation frequency on plasma density. The longitudinal electric field associated with the wave may be used to accelerate electrons to high energies by exciting large amplitude wave. However when the maximum amplitude of the wave is reached that plasma can sustain, the wave breaks. The phenomena of wave breaking and phase mixing have applications in plasma heating and particle acceleration. For detailed experimental investigation of these phenomena a new device, inverse mirror plasma experimental device (IMPED), has been designed and fabricated. The detailed considerations taken before designing the device, so that different aspects of these phenomena can be studied in a controlled manner, are described. Specifications of different components of the IMPED machine and their flexibility aspects in upgrading, if necessary, are discussed. Initial results meeting the prerequisite condition of the plasma for such study, such as a quiescent, collisionless and uniform plasma, are presented. The machine produces δnnoise/n <= 1%, Luniform ~ 120 cm at argon filling pressure of ~10-4 mbar and axial magnetic field of B = 1090 G.

  9. Energetic neutral atoms (E approximately 50 keV) from the ring current - IMP 7/8 and ISEE 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelof, E. C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Williams, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Energetic neutral atoms (ENA), emitted from the magnetosphere with energies of about 50 keV, have been measured with solid state detectors on the IMP 7/8 and ISEE 1 spacecraft; they are produced when singly charged trapped ions collide with the exosphere neutral hydrogen geocorona and the energetic ions are neutralized by charge exchange. ENA observations during the recovery phase of two moderate geomagnetic storms are analyzed: November 22-23, 1973, from IMP 8 at 33 earth radii and December 17, 1977, from ISEE 1 at 20 earth radii.

  10. Coproduction of KPC-2 and IMP-10 in Carbapenem-Resistant Serratia marcescens Isolates from an Outbreak in a Brazilian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Kesia Esther; Cayô, Rodrigo; Carvalhaes, Cecilia Godoy; Patussi Correia Sacchi, Flávia; Rodrigues-Costa, Fernanda; Ramos da Silva, Ana Carolina; Croda, Julio; Gales, Ana Cristina

    2015-01-01

    We describe an outbreak caused by KPC-2- and IMP-10-producing Serratia marcescens isolates in a Brazilian teaching hospital. Tigecycline was the only active antimicrobial agent tested. The blaIMP-10 gene was located in a new class 1 integron, named In990, carried by a nonconjugative plasmid, in contrast to blaKPC-2. PMID:25878341

  11. Coproduction of KPC-2 and IMP-10 in Carbapenem-Resistant Serratia marcescens Isolates from an Outbreak in a Brazilian Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Silva, Kesia Esther; Cayô, Rodrigo; Carvalhaes, Cecilia Godoy; Patussi Correia Sacchi, Flávia; Rodrigues-Costa, Fernanda; Ramos da Silva, Ana Carolina; Croda, Julio; Gales, Ana Cristina; Simionatto, Simone

    2015-07-01

    We describe an outbreak caused by KPC-2- and IMP-10-producing Serratia marcescens isolates in a Brazilian teaching hospital. Tigecycline was the only active antimicrobial agent tested. The blaIMP-10 gene was located in a new class 1 integron, named In990, carried by a nonconjugative plasmid, in contrast to blaKPC-2. PMID:25878341

  12. Coproduction of KPC-2 and IMP-10 in Carbapenem-Resistant Serratia marcescens Isolates from an Outbreak in a Brazilian Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Silva, Kesia Esther; Cayô, Rodrigo; Carvalhaes, Cecilia Godoy; Patussi Correia Sacchi, Flávia; Rodrigues-Costa, Fernanda; Ramos da Silva, Ana Carolina; Croda, Julio; Gales, Ana Cristina; Simionatto, Simone

    2015-07-01

    We describe an outbreak caused by KPC-2- and IMP-10-producing Serratia marcescens isolates in a Brazilian teaching hospital. Tigecycline was the only active antimicrobial agent tested. The blaIMP-10 gene was located in a new class 1 integron, named In990, carried by a nonconjugative plasmid, in contrast to blaKPC-2.

  13. Location of the binding site for the allosteric activator IMP in the COOH-terminal domain of Escherichia coli carbamyl phosphates synthetase.

    PubMed

    Bueso, J; Lusty, C J; Rubio, V

    1994-09-15

    Using UV-irradiation we cross-linked IMP, the allosteric activator of E. coli carbamyl phosphate synthetase (a heterodimer of 117.7 and 41.4 kDa subunits), to the large subunit of the enzyme. As in the native enzyme-IMP complex, the cross-linked complex was resistant to attack by trypsin. Thus, IMP is attached to its normal site and induces the normal conformational changes. Limited digestion of the [3H]IMP-labeled enzyme with V8 staphylococcal protease or with trypsin in the presence of SDS, and NH2-terminal sequencing, showed that [3H]IMP is cross-linked to the COOH-terminal 20 kDa domain of the large subunit, downstream of residue 912, supporting the proposal that this domain is specialized in effector binding and regulation. PMID:8093025

  14. The Twin Peaks in 3-D, as Viewed by the Mars Pathfinder IMP Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Twin Peaks are modest-size hills to the southwest of the Mars Pathfinder landing site. They were discovered on the first panoramas taken by the IMP camera on the 4th of July, 1997, and subsequently identified in Viking Orbiter images taken over 20 years ago. The peaks are approximately 30-35 meters (-100 feet) tall. North Twin is approximately 860 meters (2800 feet) from the lander, and South Twin is about a kilometer away (3300 feet). The scene includes bouldery ridges and swales or 'hummocks' of flood debris that range from a few tens of meters away from the lander to the distance of the South Twin Peak. The large rock at the right edge of the scene is nicknamed 'Hippo'. This rock is about a meter (3 feet) across and 25 meters (80 feet) distant.

    This view of the Twin Peaks was produced by combining 4 individual 'Superpan' scenes from the left and right eyes of the IMP camera to cover both peaks. Each frame consists of 8 individual frames (left eye) and 7 frames (right eye) taken with different color filters that were enlarged by 500% and then co-added using Adobe Photoshop to produce, in effect, a super-resolution pancromatic frame that is sharper than an individual frame would be.

    The anaglyph view of the Twin Peaks was produced by combining the left and right eye mosaics (above) by assigning the left eye view to the red color plane and the right eye view to the green and blue color planes (cyan), to produce a stereo anaglyph mosaic. This mosaic can be viewed in 3-D on your computer monitor or in color print form by wearing red-blue 3-D glasses.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary

  15. Formulation procedures, rationale, and preliminary IMP-H flight data for silicone paints with improved stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, J. B.; Shai, C. M.

    1973-01-01

    Results are given of a class of silicone paints undergoing space qualification on IMP-H. In addition to ultraviolet irradiation, samples are presently reclining about 10 to the 16th power solar wind protons per year. Preliminary data, covering the time span of the first anniversary, give incremental solar absorptances of 0.03 for two white paints, and 0.01 for leafing aluminum and a green tinted white paint. Complementing these data are complete descriptions of techniques used in making these paints, stabilizing the zinc oxide pigment, and choosing a solvent. Outgassing characteristics of finished coatings are also included. An attempt toward unification of these various aspects of the aerospace paint problem is provided through documented photochemical reactions, and a generalized band representation of the problem and its solutions.

  16. Brain imaging with sup 123 I-IMP-SPECT in migraine between attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Schlake, H.P.; Boettger, I.G.G.; Grotemeyer, K.H.; Husstedt, I.W.

    1989-06-01

    {sup 123}I-IMP-SPECT brain imaging was performed in patients with classic migraine (n = 5) and migraine accompagnee (n = 18) during the headache-free interval. A regional reduction of tracer uptake into brain was observed in all patients with migraine accompagnee, while in patients with classic migraine only one case showed an area of decreased activity. The most marked alteration was found in a patient with persisting neurological symptoms (complicated migraine). In most cases the areas of decreased tracer uptake corresponded to headache localization as well as to topography of neurologic symptoms during migraine attacks. It may be concluded that migraine attacks occur in connection with exacerbations of preexisting changes of cerebral autoregulation due to endogenous or exogenous factors.

  17. High prevalence of Salmonella and IMP-4-producing Enterobacteriaceae in the silver gull on Five Islands, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Dolejska, Monika; Masarikova, Martina; Dobiasova, Hana; Jamborova, Ivana; Karpiskova, Renata; Havlicek, Martin; Carlile, Nicholas; Priddel, David; Cizek, Alois; Literak, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the silver gull as an indicator of environmental contamination by salmonellae and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) in south-east Australia. Methods A total of 504 cloacal samples were collected from gull chicks at three nesting colonies in New South Wales, Australia [White Bay (n = 144), Five Islands (n = 200) and Montague Island (n = 160)] and were examined for salmonellae and CPE. Isolates were tested for carbapenemase genes and susceptibility to 14 antibiotics. Clonality was determined by PFGE and MLST. Genetic context and conjugative transfer of the carbapenemase gene were determined. Results A total of 120 CPE of 10 species, mainly Escherichia coli (n = 85), carrying the gene blaIMP-4, blaIMP-38 or blaIMP-26 were obtained from 80 (40%) gulls from Five Islands. Thirty percent of birds from this colony were colonized by salmonellae. Most isolates contained the gene within a class 1 integron showing a blaIMP-4-qacG-aacA4-catB3 array. The blaIMP gene was carried by conjugative plasmids of variable sizes (80–400 kb) and diverse replicons, including HI2-N (n = 30), HI2 (11), A/C (17), A/C-Y (2), L/M (5), I1 (1) and non-typeable (6). Despite the overall high genetic variability, common clones and plasmid types were shared by different birds and bacterial isolates, respectively. Conclusions Our data demonstrate a large-scale transmission of carbapenemase-producing bacteria into wildlife, likely as a result of the feeding habits of the birds at a local waste depot. The isolates from gulls showed significant similarities with clinical isolates from Australia, suggesting the human origin of the isolates. The sources of CPE for gulls on Five Islands should be explored and proper measures applied to stop the transmission into the environment. PMID:26472769

  18. First Report of blaIMP-14 on a Plasmid Harboring Multiple Drug Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Anna E.; Peirano, Gisele; Sebra, Robert P.; Lynch, Tarah; Anson, Luke W.; Kasarskis, Andrew; Motyl, Mary R.; Crook, Derrick W.; Pitout, Johann D.

    2016-01-01

    The blaIMP-14 carbapenem resistance gene has largely previously been observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. As part of global surveillance and sequencing of carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli, we identified a sequence type 131 strain harboring blaIMP-14 within a class 1 integron, itself nested within an ∼54-kb multidrug resistance region on an epidemic IncA/C2 plasmid. The emergence of blaIMP-14 in this context in the ST131 lineage is of potential clinical concern. PMID:27246777

  19. Magnetotail views at 33R{sub E}: IMP 8 magnetometer observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kaymaz, Z.; Siscoe, G.L.; Tsyganenko, N.A.

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents magnetic field vector (B) maps, electric current vector (curl B) maps, magnetic force (JxB) contour maps, and total field contour maps covering the full tail cross section in the yz plane. THe maps are based on 16 years of 5-min averages of IMP 8 magnetic field data. During this time, IMP 8 traversed the tail between {minus}25R{sub E} and {minus}40R{sub E} in the x direction. Its average x distance was {minus}33R{sub E}. For this average distance the authors show separate maps for low and high dipole tilts, corresponding to equinox and northern hemisphere summer seasons. The low-tilt (equinox) maps show symmetrical field and current patterns; the high-tilt (solstice) maps show the cross-tail current sheet arcing above the equatorial diagonal in the center and dipping below it on the flanks. The shape of warped current sheet fits Fairfield`s displaced ellipse model fairly well. The distance at which the current sheet is hinged to the magnetic equator is found to be 9.88R{sub E} and is independent of Kp. The z profile of current density shows a central peak, 3R{sub E} full width at half maximum, and smaller, flanking shoulders. A Harris sheet profile with a 7R{sub E} thickness fits the B{sub x} profile. Though these are magnetic field data, the JxB maps clearly outline the plasma sheet. This approach also gives a 7R{sub E} thickness. Many of the average field and current features inferred and demonstrated in earlier studies are confirmed here; some of them are seen for the first time in full cross-section view. Among new features revealed are a large current vortex in the winter hemisphere lobe, a dawn-dusk asymmetry in the JxB force in the plasma sheet (it is stronger on the duskside), and a separation of the cross-tail current sheet into core and wing parts. 27 refs., 24 refs.

  20. [Development Of 25-Year Imp 8 Bow Shock Crossing "List, Ingestion Of This List To Cdaweb, & Enhancement"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merka, J.; Szabo, A.; Narock, T. W.; King, J. H.; Paularena, K. I.; Richardson, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The MIT portion of this project was to use the plasma data from IMP 8 to identify bow shock crossings for construction of a bow shock data base. In collaboration with Goddard, we determined which shock parameters would be included in the catalog and developed a set of flags for characterizing the data. IMP 8 data from 1973-2001 were surveyed for bow shock crossings; the crossings apparent in the plasma data were compared to a list of crossing chosen in the magnetometer data by Goddard. Differences were reconciled to produce a single list. The data were then provided to the NSSDC for archiving. All the work ascribed to MIT in the proposal was completed.

  1. Empirical in operando analysis of the charge carrier dynamics in hematite photoanodes by PEIS, IMPS and IMVS.

    PubMed

    Klotz, Dino; Ellis, David Shai; Dotan, Hen; Rothschild, Avner

    2016-09-14

    In this Perspective, we introduce intensity modulated photocurrent/voltage spectroscopy (IMPS and IMVS) as powerful tools for the analysis of charge carrier dynamics in photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells for solar water splitting, taking hematite (α-Fe2O3) photoanodes as a case study. We complete the picture by including photoelectrochemical impedance spectroscopy (PEIS) and linking the trio of PEIS, IMPS and IMVS, introduced here as photoelectrochemical immittance triplets (PIT), both mathematically and phenomenologically, demonstrating what conclusions can be extracted from these measurements. A novel way of analyzing the results by an empirical approach with minimal presumptions is introduced, using the distribution of relaxation times (DRT) function. The DRT approach is compared to conventional analysis approaches that are based on physical models and therefore come with model presumptions. This work uses a thin film hematite photoanode as a model system, but the approach can be applied to other PEC systems as well. PMID:27524381

  2. Solubilization of native integral membrane proteins in aqueous buffer by non-covalent chelation with monomethoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG) polymers

    PubMed Central

    Janaratne, Thamara K.; Okach, Linda; Brock, Ansgar; Lesley, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Highly hydrophobic integral membrane proteins (IMPs) are typically purified in excess detergent media, often resulting in rapid inactivation and denaturation of the protein. One promising approach to solve this problem is to couple hydrophilic polymers, such as monomethoxypolyethylene glycol (mPEG) to IMPs under mild conditions in place of detergents. However, the broad application of this approach is hampered by poor reaction efficiencies, low tolerance of detergent stabilized membrane proteins to reaction conditions and a lack of proper site-specific reversible approaches. Here we have developed a straightforward, efficient and mild approach to site-specific non-covalent binding of long-chain polymers to recombinant IMPs. This method uses the hexa-histidine tag (His-Tag) often used for purification of recombinant proteins as an attachment site for mPEGs. Solubility studies performed using five different IMPs confirmed that all tested mPEG-bound IMPs were completely soluble and stable in detergent free aqueous buffer compared to their precipitated native proteins under the identical circumstances. Activity assays and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy confirmed the structural integrity of modified IMPs. PMID:21740061

  3. Mapping Rock and Soil Units in the MPF IMP SuperPan Using a Kohonen Self Organizing Map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrand, W.; Merenyi, E.; Murchie, S.; Barnouin-Jha, O.; Johnson, J.

    2004-01-01

    The 1997 Mars Pathfinder mission provided information on a site in the Ares Vallis floodplain. Initial analysis of multispectral data from the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) indicated the presence of only a single rock type, the 'gray rock' spectral class and various coated variants thereof (e.g., 'maroon rock'). Continued analysis of the IMP 'SuperPan' mosaic has confirmed multiple examples of a second 'black rock' spectral class existing as small cobbles in the near field and as boulders in the far field. These results are consistent with recent analysis of MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data which indicates that there is likely a mix of both 'Surface Type 1' (ST1) and 'Surface Type 2' (ST2) spectral classes at the MPF landing site. Nominally, the black rock spectral class would correspond to ST1 (basalts) and 'gray rock' would correspond to ST2 (andesites). Orbital remote sensing has also revealed the pervasive presence of layering on Mars. Recently it was suggested that there are extensive outcrops of the black rock spectral class in the SuperPan far field on the flanks of the Twin Peaks and on the rim of Big Crater. These authors suggested that these exposures represented outcrops of black rock from beneath a surficial, flood deposited layer. In this work, we have reexamined the MPF IMP SuperPan mosaic using an artificial neural network self organizing map (SOM) processing architecture in order to classify the distribution of spectral classes within the SuperPan. In this paper, we present initial results from that work and draw specific attention to a subset of the identified spectral classes in order to address questions relating to whether there are extensive exposures of black rock in the IMP far field, what other materials might be exposed in the far field, and what evidence there is for subsurface layering at the MPF landing site.

  4. Emerging Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Carrying blaIMP Among Burn Patients in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Radan, Mohsen; Moniri, Rezvan; Khorshidi, Ahmad; Gilasi, Hamidreza; Norouzi, Zohreh; Beigi, Fahimeh; Dasteh Goli, Yasaman

    2016-01-01

    Background Metallo-β-lactamase (MBL)-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a significant pathogen in burn patients. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates, including those resistant to imipenemase (IMP), in a burn unit in Isfahan, Iran. Patients and Methods One hundred and fifty P. aeruginosa isolates from burn patients were tested for antibiotic susceptibility by the disc diffusion method in accordance with CLSI guidelines. Production of MBL was identified with the EDTA disk method. DNA was purified from the MBL-positive isolates, and detection of the blaIMP gene was performed with PCR. Results Fifty-seven out of 150 (38%) isolates were multi-drug resistant (MDR), and 93 (62%) were extensively-drug resistant (XDR). Among all isolates, the resistance rate to ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, imipenem, meropenem, amikacin, ceftazidime, and cefepime was higher than 90%, while the resistance rates to piperacillin/tazobactam and aztreonam were 70.7% and 86%, respectively. Colistin and polymyxin B remained the most effective studied antibiotics. All of the imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates were MBL-positive, and 107 out of 144 (74.3%) of the MBL isolates were positive for the blaIMP gene. Conclusions The results of this study show that the rate of P. aeruginosa-caused burn wound infections was very high, and many of the isolates were resistant to three or more classes of antimicrobials. Such extensive resistance to antimicrobial classes is important because few treatment options remain for patients with burn wound infections. blaIMP-producing P. aeruginosa isolates are a rising threat in burn-care units, and should be controlled by conducting infection-control assessments. PMID:27800466

  5. Amplification of the IMP dehydrogenase gene in Chinese hamster cells resistant to mycophenolic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Collart, F R; Huberman, E

    1987-01-01

    The regulation of IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH) was analyzed in Chinese hamster V79 cell variants that exhibit different degrees of resistance to the cytotoxic effect of mycophenolic acid, a specific inhibitor of IMPDH. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with an IMPDH antiserum revealed a 14- to 27-fold increase in the amount of enzyme in the mycophenolic acid-resistant cells. The antiserum was also used to screen for a phage containing the IMPDH cDNA sequence from a lambda gt11 expression library. Northern blot (RNA blot) analyses of total cellular and poly(A)+ RNA showed that an IMPDH cDNA probe hybridized to a 2.2-kilobase transcript, the amount of which was associated with increased resistance. Southern blotting with the probe indicated an amplification of the IMPDH gene in the mycophenolic acid-resistant cells. Our findings suggest that the acquired mycophenolic acid resistance of the V79 cell variants is associated with increases in the amount and activity of IMPDH and the number of IMPDH gene copies. Images PMID:2890098

  6. Studies on low energy beam transport for high intensity high charged ions at IMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Hu, Q.; Cao, Y.; Lu, W.; Feng, Y. C.; Fang, X.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2014-02-01

    Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an advanced fully superconducting ECR ion source at IMP designed to be operational at the microwave frequency of 18-24 GHz. The existing SECRAL beam transmission line is composed of a solenoid lens and a 110° analyzing magnet. Simulations of particle tracking with 3D space charge effect and realistic 3D magnetic fields through the line were performed using particle-in-cell code. The results of the beam dynamics show that such a low energy beam is very sensitive to the space charge effect and significantly suffers from the second-order aberration of the analyzing magnet resulting in large emittance. However, the second-order aberration could be reduced by adding compensating sextupole components in the beam line. On this basis, a new 110° analyzing magnet with relatively larger acceptance and smaller aberration is designed and will be used in the design of low energy beam transport line for a new superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL-II. The features of the analyzer and the corresponding beam trajectory calculation will be detailed and discussed in this paper.

  7. Improving Computational Performance through HPC Techniques: case study using DD3IMP in-house code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, L. F.; Neto, D. M.; Oliveira, M. C.; Alves, J. L.

    2011-05-01

    The computational efficiency of the FEA is strongly dependent on the algorithmic and numerical efficiency of the FE solver. This is particularly important in case of implicit FE codes, such as DD3IMP, the in-house static implicit FE solver under analysis in this work. This study describes the procedure adopted to identify the main computational bottlenecks of the FE solver in order to introduce the OpenMP directives and, consequently, to achieve a major speedup of the whole algorithm. The different parallelized branches of the code are tested using the well-known square cup deep drawing example, considering different FE discretizations. The analysis of the preliminary results, concerning the CPU wall time, allows to demonstrate that the adoption of HPC techniques, such as the abovementioned OpenMP directives, enables to: (i) achieve a speedup factor close to the number of cores (in a single computer); (ii) solve a problem in a shorter time; (iii) solve a bigger problem in the same amount of time and, thus, (iv) achieve a better solution in a given amount of time.

  8. Gas flow analysis during thermal vacuum test of a spacecraft. [self contamination of IMP spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    The self-contamination of the IMP-H spacecraft, while it was undergoing thermal and solar vacuum tests, has been investigated in conjunction with the outgassing evaluation and detection of molecular flow anomalies occurring in the test chamber. The pressures indicated by two tubulated ionization gauges were used to calculate flow kinetics in the vacuum chamber. The fluxes of emitted molecules and chamber wall reflected molecules were monitored during the entire test. Representative equations and graphs are presented. Test results indicate that from 3 to 9 of every 100 emitted molecules returned to the spacecraft surface; that self-contamination by noncondensable gases was more severe than that by condensable gases; and that outgassing of the spacecraft was approximately 1.18 x 0.01 g/s after 10 hours and 1.18 x 0.001 after 90 hours of vacuum exposure. Testing deficiencies have been identified, and the type and location of instruments required to measure the outgassing, the degree of contamination, and return flow are discussed.

  9. Regulation of IMP dehydrogenase gene expression by its end products, guanine nucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Glesne, D A; Collart, F R; Huberman, E

    1991-01-01

    To study the regulation of IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH), the rate-limiting enzyme of guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, we examined the effects of nucleosides, nucleotides, nucleotide analogs, or the IMPDH inhibitor mycophenolic acid (MPA) on the steady-state levels of IMPDH mRNA. The results indicated that IMPDH gene expression is regulated inversely by the intracellular level of guanine ribonucleotides. We have shown that treatment with guanosine increased the level of cellular guanine ribonucleotides and subsequently reduced IMPDH steady-state mRNA levels in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Conversely, MPA treatment diminished the level of guanine ribonucleotides and increased IMPDH mRNA levels. Both of these effects on the steady-state level of IMPDH mRNA could be negated by cotreatment with guanosine and MPA. The down regulation of IMPDH gene expression by guanosine or its up regulation by MPA was not due to major changes in transcriptional initiation and elongation or mRNA stability in the cytoplasm but rather was due to alterations in the levels of the IMPDH mRNA in the nucleus. These results suggest that IMPDH gene expression is regulated by a posttranscriptional, nuclear event in response to fluctuations in the intracellular level of guanine ribonucleotides. Images PMID:1717828

  10. Studies on low energy beam transport for high intensity high charged ions at IMP

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y. Lu, W.; Fang, X.; Sun, L. T.; Hu, Q.; Cao, Y.; Feng, Y. C.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2014-02-15

    Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an advanced fully superconducting ECR ion source at IMP designed to be operational at the microwave frequency of 18–24 GHz. The existing SECRAL beam transmission line is composed of a solenoid lens and a 110° analyzing magnet. Simulations of particle tracking with 3D space charge effect and realistic 3D magnetic fields through the line were performed using particle-in-cell code. The results of the beam dynamics show that such a low energy beam is very sensitive to the space charge effect and significantly suffers from the second-order aberration of the analyzing magnet resulting in large emittance. However, the second-order aberration could be reduced by adding compensating sextupole components in the beam line. On this basis, a new 110° analyzing magnet with relatively larger acceptance and smaller aberration is designed and will be used in the design of low energy beam transport line for a new superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL-II. The features of the analyzer and the corresponding beam trajectory calculation will be detailed and discussed in this paper.

  11. Metallo-β-Lactamase Gene blaIMP-15 in a Class 1 Integron, In95, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates from a Hospital in Mexico▿

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Ramos, U.; Morfin-Otero, R.; Sader, H. S.; Jones, R. N.; Hernández, E.; Rodriguez-Noriega, E.; Sanchez, A.; Carrillo, B.; Esparza-Ahumada, S.; Silva-Sanchez, J.

    2008-01-01

    During 2003, 40 carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates collected in a Mexican tertiary-care hospital were screened for metallo-β-lactamase production. Thirteen isolates produced IMP-15, and 12 had a single pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. The blaIMP-15 gene cassette was inserted in a plasmid-borne integron with a unique array of gene cassettes and was named In95. PMID:18490501

  12. Validation of IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors in a mouse model of cryptosporidiosis.

    PubMed

    Gorla, Suresh Kumar; McNair, Nina N; Yang, Guangyi; Gao, Song; Hu, Ming; Jala, Venkatakrishna R; Haribabu, Bodduluri; Striepen, Boris; Cuny, Gregory D; Mead, Jan R; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parasites are a major cause of diarrhea and malnutrition in the developing world, a frequent cause of waterborne disease in the developed world, and a potential bioterrorism agent. Currently, available treatment is limited, and Cryptosporidium drug discovery remains largely unsuccessful. As a result, the pharmacokinetic properties required for in vivo efficacy have not been established. We have been engaged in a Cryptosporidium drug discovery program targeting IMP dehydrogenase (CpIMPDH). Here, we report the activity of eight potent and selective inhibitors of CpIMPDH in the interleukin-12 (IL-12) knockout mouse model, which mimics acute human cryptosporidiosis. Two compounds displayed significant antiparasitic activity, validating CpIMPDH as a drug target. The best compound, P131 (250 mg/kg of body weight/day), performed equivalently to paromomycin (2,000 mg/kg/day) when administered in a single dose and better than paromomycin when administered in three daily doses. One compound, A110, appeared to promote Cryptosporidium infection. The pharmacokinetic, uptake, and permeability properties of the eight compounds were measured. P131 had the lowest systemic distribution but accumulated to high concentrations within intestinal cells. A110 had the highest systemic distribution. These observations suggest that systemic distribution is not required, and may be a liability, for in vivo antiparasitic activity. Intriguingly, A110 caused specific alterations in fecal microbiota that were not observed with P131 or vehicle alone. Such changes may explain how A110 promotes parasitemia. Collectively, these observations suggest a blueprint for the development of anticryptosporidial therapy.

  13. Studies using IMP, Voyager and Pioneer cosmic ray data to determine the size of the heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, John A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to use the cosmic ray data from the IMP, Voyager and Pioneer spacecraft in the heliosphere out to approximately 65 AU to estimate the size of the heliosphere. We used several techniques to develop a consistent picture of the size of the heliosphere. The first method used a response function approach which determined the intensity as a function of time by scaling the modulation effect as they move outward and eventually reach the boundary of the heliosphere. In this model the effects of transient cosmic ray disturbances is included. A second approach using the perturbation method in which drifts are considered as a perturbation to the standard diffusion-convection modulation models was not fully developed. In a third approach the location of the modulation boundary beyond the termination shock was estimated using observations of the intensity and radial gradients between Voyager 2 and Pioneer 10 along with new estimates of the interstellar intensity of more than 70 MeV galactic cosmic rays. Using this method we found that for 7 years, from 1983 to 1990, the modulation boundary remained constant at 83 +/- 5 AU. We infer from these studies that a modulation boundary can be estimated only by extrapolating the observed radial gradients when the solar magnetic field polarity is such that cosmic-ray particles are drifting in the heliosphere inward toward the Earth along the neutral sheet. The boundary distance is larger than the estimates of the location of the termination shock at 67 +/- 5 AU using the same method. Two other studies partially supported by this grant are attached. The first deals with the recovery period of the greater than 70 MeV cosmic rays in the outer heliosphere from 1992-1995. In the second paper we compare the rigidity dependence of the 11-year cosmic ray variation at the Earth in two cycles of opposite solar magnetic field polarity.

  14. Predicting pupylation sites in prokaryotic proteins using semi-supervised self-training support vector machine algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ju, Zhe; Gu, Hong

    2016-08-15

    As one important post-translational modification of prokaryotic proteins, pupylation plays a key role in regulating various biological processes. The accurate identification of pupylation sites is crucial for understanding the underlying mechanisms of pupylation. Although several computational methods have been developed for the identification of pupylation sites, the prediction accuracy of them is still unsatisfactory. Here, a novel bioinformatics tool named IMP-PUP is proposed to improve the prediction of pupylation sites. IMP-PUP is constructed on the composition of k-spaced amino acid pairs and trained with a modified semi-supervised self-training support vector machine (SVM) algorithm. The proposed algorithm iteratively trains a series of support vector machine classifiers on both annotated and non-annotated pupylated proteins. Computational results show that IMP-PUP achieves the area under receiver operating characteristic curves of 0.91, 0.73, and 0.75 on our training set, Tung's testing set, and our testing set, respectively, which are better than those of the different error costs SVM algorithm and the original self-training SVM algorithm. Independent tests also show that IMP-PUP significantly outperforms three other existing pupylation site predictors: GPS-PUP, iPUP, and pbPUP. Therefore, IMP-PUP can be a useful tool for accurate prediction of pupylation sites. A MATLAB software package for IMP-PUP is available at https://juzhe1120.github.io/. PMID:27197054

  15. Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein-3 as a marker for distinguishing between cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and keratoacanthoma

    PubMed Central

    KANZAKI, AKIKO; KUDO, MITSUHIRO; ANSAI, SHIN-ICHI; PENG, WEI-XIA; ISHINO, KOUSUKE; YAMAMOTO, TETSUSHI; WADA, RYUICHI; FUJII, TAKENORI; TEDUKA, KIYOSHI; KAWAHARA, KIYOKO; KAWAMOTO, YOKO; KITAMURA, TAEKO; KAWANA, SEIJI; SAEKI, HIDEHISA; NAITO, ZENYA

    2016-01-01

    In the histopathological diagnosis of cutaneous tumors, the differential diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) with crateriform architecture and keratoacanthoma (KA) is often difficult so an accurate understanding of the biological features and the identification of reliable markers of SCC and KA are crucial issues. Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein-3 (IGF2BP3, also known as IMP3) is thought of as a bona fide oncofetal protein, which is overexpressed and is involved in cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in several kinds of tumors. However, the role of IMP3 in cutaneous SCC and KA has not been well studied. Therefore, we focused on studying the biological functions of IMP3 in SCC and KA. In human skin SCC cell lines, HSC-1 and HSC-5, and the human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, IMP3 mRNA levels were significantly higher than that of normal human skin. The knockdown of IMP3 expression reduced the proliferation of HSC-1, and significantly reduced invasion by HSC-1 and HSC-5. In contrast, the knockdown of IMP3 did not significantly affect invasion by HaCaT cells. In immunohistochemical studies of SCC and KA tissues, the Ki-67 labeling index (LI) of the suprabasal cell layer was significantly higher in SCC, compared with KA tissues and the tumor-free margin (TFM) adjacent to SCC and KA. Most SCC tissues stained strongly positive for IMP3, but KA tissues and TFM were mostly negative for IMP3. The Ki-67 LI of the IMP3-positive group was significantly higher than that of the IMP3-negative group in the suprabasal cell layer of SCC. These results suggest that IMP3 plays an important role in proliferation and, more significantly, in the invasion of SCC, and may be a suitable marker for the histopathological diagnosis of SCC with a crateriform architecture and KA. Furthermore, IMP3 may potentially be a new therapeutic target for SCC. PMID:26782292

  16. A summary of the mechanical design, testing and performance of the IMP-H and J attitude control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The main aspects of the attitude control system used on both the IMP-H and J spacecraft are presented. The mechanical configuration is described. Information on all the specific components comprising the flight system is provided. The acceptance and qualification testing of both individual components and the installed system are summarized. Functional information regarding the operation and performance in relation to the orbiting spacecraft and its mission is included. Related topics which are discussed are: (1) safety requirements, (2) servicing procedures, (3) anomalous behavior, and (4) pyrotechnic devices.

  17. Dissemination in Japan of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates producing IMP-type metallo-β-lactamases and AAC(6')-Iae/AAC(6')-Ib.

    PubMed

    Tojo, Masayoshi; Tada, Tatsuya; Shimojima, Masahiro; Tanaka, Masashi; Narahara, Kenji; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kirikae, Teruo; Ohmagari, Norio

    2014-09-01

    The spread throughout Japan of antibiotic-resistance factors in multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates was investigated epidemiologically, using immunochromatographic assays specific for IMP-type metallo-β-lactamases (IMPs) and aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase [AAC(6')]-Iae and -Ib. Three hundred MDR P. aeruginosa isolates were obtained during each of two years, 2011 and 2012, from 190 hospitals in 39 prefectures in Japan. The percentage of P. aeruginosa isolates producing IMPs, AAC(6')-Iae or AAC(6')-Ib increased significantly from 170/300 (56.7%) in 2011 to 230/300 (76.7%) in 2012, with 134/170 (78.8%) in 2011 and 179/230 (77.8%) in 2012 producing both IMP and either AAC(6')-Iae or AAC(6')-Ib. The MICs of antibiotics, including cephalosporins and carbapenems, were markedly higher for isolates that did than did not produce these resistance factors. These results indicated that MDR P. aeruginosa producing IMPs, AAC(6')-Iae or AAC(6')-Ib have spread throughout Japan and that these antibiotic-resistance factors are useful markers for monitoring MDR P. aeruginosa in Japan.

  18. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  19. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  20. Differentially expressed myo-inositol monophosphatase gene (CaIMP) in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) encodes a lithium-sensitive phosphatase enzyme with broad substrate specificity and improves seed germination and seedling growth under abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Saurabh C; Salvi, Prafull; Kaur, Harmeet; Verma, Pooja; Petla, Bhanu Prakash; Rao, Venkateswara; Kamble, Nitin; Majee, Manoj

    2013-12-01

    myo-Inositol monophosphatase (IMP) is an essential enzyme in the myo-inositol metabolic pathway where it primarily dephosphorylates myo-inositol 1-phosphate to maintain the cellular inositol pool which is important for many metabolic and signalling pathways in plants. The stress-induced increased accumulation of inositol has been reported in a few plants including chickpea; however, the role and regulation of IMP is not well defined in response to stress. In this work, it has been shown that IMP activity is distributed in all organs in chickpea and was noticeably enhanced during environmental stresses. Subsequently, using degenerate oligonucleotides and RACE strategy, a full-length IMP cDNA (CaIMP) was cloned and sequenced. Biochemical study revealed that CaIMP encodes a lithium-sensitive phosphatase enzyme with broad substrate specificity, although maximum activity was observed with the myo-inositol 1-phosphate and l-galactose 1-phosphate substrates. Transcript analysis revealed that CaIMP is differentially expressed and regulated in different organs, stresses and phytohormones. Complementation analysis in Arabidopsis further confirmed the role of CaIMP in l-galactose 1-phosphate and myo-inositol 1-phosphate hydrolysis and its participation in myo-inositol and ascorbate biosynthesis. Moreover, Arabidopsis transgenic plants over-expressing CaIMP exhibited improved tolerance to stress during seed germination and seedling growth, while the VTC4/IMP loss-of-function mutants exhibited sensitivity to stress. Collectively, CaIMP links various metabolic pathways and plays an important role in improving seed germination and seedling growth, particularly under stressful environments.

  1. Differentially expressed myo-inositol monophosphatase gene (CaIMP) in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) encodes a lithium-sensitive phosphatase enzyme with broad substrate specificity and improves seed germination and seedling growth under abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Saurabh C; Salvi, Prafull; Kaur, Harmeet; Verma, Pooja; Petla, Bhanu Prakash; Rao, Venkateswara; Kamble, Nitin; Majee, Manoj

    2013-12-01

    myo-Inositol monophosphatase (IMP) is an essential enzyme in the myo-inositol metabolic pathway where it primarily dephosphorylates myo-inositol 1-phosphate to maintain the cellular inositol pool which is important for many metabolic and signalling pathways in plants. The stress-induced increased accumulation of inositol has been reported in a few plants including chickpea; however, the role and regulation of IMP is not well defined in response to stress. In this work, it has been shown that IMP activity is distributed in all organs in chickpea and was noticeably enhanced during environmental stresses. Subsequently, using degenerate oligonucleotides and RACE strategy, a full-length IMP cDNA (CaIMP) was cloned and sequenced. Biochemical study revealed that CaIMP encodes a lithium-sensitive phosphatase enzyme with broad substrate specificity, although maximum activity was observed with the myo-inositol 1-phosphate and l-galactose 1-phosphate substrates. Transcript analysis revealed that CaIMP is differentially expressed and regulated in different organs, stresses and phytohormones. Complementation analysis in Arabidopsis further confirmed the role of CaIMP in l-galactose 1-phosphate and myo-inositol 1-phosphate hydrolysis and its participation in myo-inositol and ascorbate biosynthesis. Moreover, Arabidopsis transgenic plants over-expressing CaIMP exhibited improved tolerance to stress during seed germination and seedling growth, while the VTC4/IMP loss-of-function mutants exhibited sensitivity to stress. Collectively, CaIMP links various metabolic pathways and plays an important role in improving seed germination and seedling growth, particularly under stressful environments. PMID:24123252

  2. Antibiotic resistance pattern and evaluation of metallo-beta lactamase genes (VIM and IMP) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing MBL enzyme, isolated from patients with secondary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Kiana; Ataei, Behrouz; Roshandel, Fardad

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the most common causes of hospital-acquired secondary infections in hospitalized patients is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of IMP and VIM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains (carbapenem resistant and producer MBL enzyme) in patients with secondary immunodeficiency. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study, 96 patients with secondary immunodeficiency hospitalized in the Al-Zahra hospital were selected. Carbapenem resistant strains isolated and modified Hodge test was performed in order to confirm the presence of the metallo carbapenemase enzyme. Under the standard conditions they were sent to the central laboratory for investigating nosocomial infection Multiplex PCR. Results: Of 96 samples 28.1% were IMP positive, 5.2% VIM positive and 3.1% both VIM and IMP positive. The prevalence of multidrug resistance in the IMP and/or VIM negative samples was 29%, while all 5 VIM positive samples have had multidrug resistance. Also the prevalence of multi-drug resistance in IMP positive samples were 96.3% and in IMP and VIM positive samples were 100%. According to Fisher’s test, the prevalence of multi-drug resistance based on gene expression has significant difference (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Based on the results of this study it can be concluded that, a significant percentage of patients with secondary immunodeficiency that suffer nosocomial infections with multidrug resistance, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are probably MBL-producing gene positive. Therefore the cause of infection should be considered in the hospital care system to identify their features, the presence of genes involved in the development of multi-drug resistance and antibiotic therapy. PMID:27563634

  3. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of the IncN Plasmid Encoding IMP-6 and CTX-M-2 from Emerging Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kayama, Shizuo; Shigemoto, Norifumi; Kuwahara, Ryuichi; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hirakawa, Hideki; Hisatsune, Junzo; Jové, Thomas; Nishio, Hisaaki; Yamasaki, Katsutoshi; Wada, Yasunao; Ueshimo, Takeshi; Miura, Tetsuya; Sueda, Taijiro; Onodera, Makoto; Yokozaki, Michiya; Hattori, Masahira; Ohge, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    We have determined the DNA sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae multidrug resistance plasmid pKPI-6, which is a self-transmissible IncN-type plasmid. pKPI-6 harboring blaIMP-6 and blaCTX-M-2 confers a stealth-type carbapenem resistance phenotype on members of the family Enterobacteriaceae that is not detectable with imipenem. pKPI-6 is already epidemic in Japan, favoring the dissemination of IMP-6 and CTX-M-2 in members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:25487806

  4. Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, Fred E.; Gooding, Karen M.

    Because of the complexity of cellular material and body fluids, it is seldom possible to analyze a natural product directly. Qualitative and quantitative analyses must often be preceded by some purification step that separates the molecular species being examined from interfering materials. In the case of proteins, column liquid chromatography has been used extensively for these fractionations. With the advent of gel permeation, cation exchange, anion exchange, hydrophobic, and affinity chromatography, it became possible to resolve proteins through their fundamental properties of size, charge, hydrophobicity, and biological affinity. The chromatographic separations used in the early isolation and characterization of many proteins later became analytical tools in their routine analysis. Unfortunately, these inherently simple and versatile column chromatographic techniques introduced in the 50s and 60s have a severe limitation in routine analysis-separation time. It is common to encounter 1-24 h separation times with the classical gel-type supports.

  5. The Wor1-like protein Fgp1 regulates pathogenicity, toxin synthesis and reproduction in the phytopathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    WOR1 is a gene for a conserved fungal regulatory protein controlling the dimorphic switch and pathogenicity in Candida albicans and its ortholog in the plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, called SGE1, is also required for pathogenicity and expression of plant effector proteins. F. graminearum, an imp...

  6. An Existence Proof: Successful Joint Implementation of the IMP Curriculum and a 4 x 4 Block Schedule at a Suburban U.S. High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Steven L.; Keller, Regina

    2008-01-01

    This "Brief Report" summarizes results from a study that investigated joint effects of two innovations adopted at a high school in an affluent suburban community in the northeast United States: 4 x 4 block scheduling and the "Standards"-based curriculum, the Interactive Mathematics Program (IMP).

  7. Observations of Solar Energetic Particle Events over the Polar Regions of the Sun at Solar Maximum with the Ulysses COSPIN High Energy Telescope and IMP-8*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKibben, R. B.; Lopate, C.; Zhang, M.

    2002-05-01

    The High Energy Telescope (HET) of the Ulysses COSPIN experi-ment measures intensities and spectra of solar energetic particles (SEPs) with good energy and charge resolution at energies above ~30 MeV/n. During the recent passes over the north and south polar re-gions of the sun, Ulysses observed a number of solar energetic particle events associated with solar activity at low latitudes. Where IMP-8 observations were available, all SEP events observed at proton energies >~30 MeV by Ulysses in the polar regions (solar latitudes above 70 degrees) were also observed at IMP-8. HOwever peak intensities were generally lower and the onsets and rises to maximum were in general significantly slower at Ulysses than at IMP. Anisotropies during the onsets of SEP events at Ulysses were in almost all cases directed outward along the nominal Parker spiral interplanetary magnetic field, implying that the source of the particles on the field lines connecting to Ulysses was inside the orbit of Ulysses. In the late stages of events, generally four to five days after onset, particle fluxes at IMP and Ulysses were approximately equal and remained so for the remainder of the decay phase. We will summarize these and other results from both the north and south polar passes and discuss their significance for models of the ac-celeration and propagation of solar energetic particles. * This work was supported in part by NASA Contract JPL-955432 and by NASA Grant NAG5-8032.

  8. IMS/Satellite Situation Center report. Predicted orbit plots for IMP-H-1976. [Explorer 47 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Predicted orbit plots are shown in three projections. The time period covered by each set of projections is 12 days 6 hours, corresponding approximately to the period of IMP-H satellite. The three coordinate systems used are the Geocentric Solar Ecliptic system (GSE), the Geocentric Solar Magnetospheric system (GSM), and the Solar Magnetic system (SM). For each of the three projections, time ticks and codes are given on the satellite trajectories. The codes are interpreted in the table at the base of each plot. Time is given in the table as year/day/decimal hour. The total time covered by each plot is shown at the bottom of each table. An additional variable is given in the table for each time tick. For the GSM and SM projection this variable is the geocentric distance to the satellite in earth radii, and for the GSE projection the variable is satellite ecliptic latitude in degrees.

  9. Thermal iron ions in high speed solar wind streams Detection by the IMP 7/8 energetic particle experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Roelof, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    The first measurements of the abundance of iron ions in high speed (greater than 600 km/s) solar wind streams have been made with the NOAA/JHU energetic particles experiments (EPE) on IMP 7/8. The identification of iron ions is quantitatively established using 4 years of observations and heavy ion accelerator calibrations of detectors similar to those flown on the spacecraft. Preliminary estimates of the Fe/H ratio are within a factor of 2 of the adopted coronal abundance (0.00005), and there is some evidence that Fe/H may remain approximately constant within a given stream. In the peaks of fast streams (700-800 km/s), about 50 iron ion counts are obtained every 20 s, offering the possibility of studying the Fe/H ratio with approximately 1 m time resolution in high speed streams throughout the decline of Solar Cycle 20 and the rise of Solar Cycle 21.

  10. Digital photogrammetric analysis of the IMP camera images: Mapping the Mars Pathfinder landing site in three dimensions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirk, R.L.; Howington-Kraus, E.; Hare, T.; Dorrer, E.; Cook, D.; Becker, K.; Thompson, K.; Redding, B.; Blue, J.; Galuszka, D.; Lee, E.M.; Gaddis, L.R.; Johnson, J. R.; Soderblom, L.A.; Ward, A.W.; Smith, P.H.; Britt, D.T.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes our photogrammetric analysis of the Imager for Mars Pathfinder data, part of a broader program of mapping the Mars Pathfinder landing site in support of geoscience investigations. This analysis, carried out primarily with a commercial digital photogrammetric system, supported by our in-house Integrated Software for Imagers and Spectrometers (ISIS), consists of three steps: (1) geometric control: simultaneous solution for refined estimates of camera positions and pointing plus three-dimensional (3-D) coordinates of ???103 features sitewide, based on the measured image coordinates of those features; (2) topographic modeling: identification of ???3 ?? 105 closely spaced points in the images and calculation (based on camera parameters from step 1) of their 3-D coordinates, yielding digital terrain models (DTMs); and (3) geometric manipulation of the data: combination of the DTMs from different stereo pairs into a sitewide model, and reprojection of image data to remove parallax between the different spectral filters in the two cameras and to provide an undistorted planimetric view of the site. These processes are described in detail and example products are shown. Plans for combining the photogrammetrically derived topographic data with spectrophotometry are also described. These include photometric modeling using surface orientations from the DTM to study surface microtextures and improve the accuracy of spectral measurements, and photoclinometry to refine the DTM to single-pixel resolution where photometric properties are sufficiently uniform. Finally, the inclusion of rover images in a joint photogrammetric analysis with IMP images is described. This challenging task will provide coverage of areas hidden to the IMP, but accurate ranging of distant features can be achieved only if the lander is also visible in the rover image used. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Emergence of a novel multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain producing IMP-type metallo-β-lactamases and AAC(6')-Iae in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kitao, Tomoe; Tada, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Masashi; Narahara, Kenji; Shimojima, Masahiro; Shimada, Kayo; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kirikae, Teruo

    2012-06-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates producing IMP-type metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) and aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase [AAC(6')-Iae] has become a serious problem in medical settings in Japan. A total of 217 MDR P. aeruginosa isolates were obtained from August 2009 to April 2010 from patients at 144 hospitals in Japan, of which 145 (66.8%) were positive for IMP-type MBLs and AAC(6')-Iae when tested with an immunochromatographic assay. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed that these isolates were also positive for blaIMP and aac(6')-Iae genes. When these IMP-type MBL- and AAC(6')-Iae-producing isolates were analysed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), two clusters (I and II) were detected. Most of the isolates (88.3%; 128/145) were grouped under cluster I and had multilocus sequence type ST235 and serotype O11, except for one isolate that was ST991 and serotype O3. The isolates were mainly isolated from the urinary tract (82/145; 56.6%) and respiratory tract (58/145; 40.0%). The epidemiological properties of the isolates belonging to cluster I were similar to those of MDR P. aeruginosa isolates that have been previously reported in Japan. The remaining 16 isolates belonged to cluster II, had identical PFGE patterns and were multilocus sequence type ST991 and serotype O18; all of these isolates were isolated from the respiratory tract. The properties of isolates belonging to cluster II have not been previously described, indicating that a novel IMP-type MBL- and AAC(6')-Iae producing P. aeruginosa strain is emerging in Japan. Isolates belonging to both clusters were isolated from different parts of the country.

  12. Evaluation of Zataria MultiFlora Boiss and Carum copticum antibacterial activity on IMP-type metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Fallah, F; Taherpour, A; Borhan, R S; Hashemi, A; Habibi, M; Sajadi Nia, R

    2013-12-31

    Carbapenem resistance due to acquired metallo-beta-lactamases (MBLs) is considered to be more serious than other resistance mechanisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of Zataria multiflora Boiss and Carum copticum plants on IMP-producing P.aeruginosa strains. This experimental study was carried out on hospitalized burn patients during 2011 and 2012. Antibiotics and extracts susceptibility tests were performed by disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods. MBL detection was performed by Combination Disk Diffusion Test (CDDT). The bla(VIM) and bla(IMP) genes were detected by PCR and sequencing methods. Using Combination Disk Diffusion test method, it was found that among 83 imipenem resistant P.aeruginosa strains, 48 (57.9%) were MBL producers. PCR and sequencing methods proved that these isolates were positive for blaIMP-1 genes, whereas none were positive for bla(VIM) genes. The mortality rate of hospitalized patients with MBL-producing Pseudomonas infection was 4/48 (8.3%). It was shown that Zataria multiflora and Carum copticum extracts had a high antibacterial effect on regular and IMP-producing P. aeruginosa strains in 6.25 mg/ml concentration. The incidence of MBL-producing P. aeruginosa in burn patients is very high. In our study, all MBL-producing isolates carry the blaIMP-1 gene. Therefore, detection of MBL-producing isolates is of great importance in identifying drug resistance patterns in P. aeruginosa, and in prevention and control of infections. In this study, it was shown that extracts of Z. multiflora and C. copticum have high antibacterial effects on ß-lactamase producing P. aeruginosa strains.

  13. Two-gigawatt burst-mode operation of the intense microwave prototype (IMP) free-electron laser (FEL) for the microwave tokamak experiment (MTX)

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, B.; Allen, S.; Bell, H.

    1993-10-06

    The MTX explored the plasma heating effects of 140 GHz microwaves from both Gyrotrons and from the IMP FEL wiggler. The Gyrotron was long pulse length (0.5 seconds maximum) and the FEL produced short-pulse length, high-peak power, single and burst modes of 140 GHZ microwaves. Full-power operations of the IMP FEL wiggler were commenced in April of 1992 and continued into October of 1992. The Experimental Test Accelerator H (ETA-II) provided a 50-nanosecond, 6-MeV, 2--3 kAmp electron beam that was introduced co-linear into the IMP FEL with a 140 GHz Gyrotron master oscillator (MO). The FEL was able to amplify the MO signal from approximately 7 kW to peaks consistently in the range of 1--2 GW. This microwave pulse was transmitted into the MTX and allowed the exploration of the linear and non-linear effects of short pulse, intense power in the MTX plasma. Single pulses were used to explore and gain operating experience in the parameter space of the IMP FEL, and finally evaluate transmission and absorption in the MTX. Single-pulse operations were repeatable. After the MTX was shut down burst-mode operations were successful at 2 kHz. This paper will describe the IMP FEL, Microwave Transmission System to MTX, the diagnostics used for calorimetric measurements, and the operations of the entire Microwave system. A discussion of correlated and uncorrelated errors that affect FEL performance will be made Linear and non-linear absorption data of the microwaves in the MTX plasma will be presented.

  14. Evaluation of Zataria MultiFlora Boiss and Carum copticum antibacterial activity on IMP-type metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Fallah, F; Taherpour, A; Borhan, R S; Hashemi, A; Habibi, M; Sajadi Nia, R

    2013-12-31

    Carbapenem resistance due to acquired metallo-beta-lactamases (MBLs) is considered to be more serious than other resistance mechanisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of Zataria multiflora Boiss and Carum copticum plants on IMP-producing P.aeruginosa strains. This experimental study was carried out on hospitalized burn patients during 2011 and 2012. Antibiotics and extracts susceptibility tests were performed by disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods. MBL detection was performed by Combination Disk Diffusion Test (CDDT). The bla(VIM) and bla(IMP) genes were detected by PCR and sequencing methods. Using Combination Disk Diffusion test method, it was found that among 83 imipenem resistant P.aeruginosa strains, 48 (57.9%) were MBL producers. PCR and sequencing methods proved that these isolates were positive for blaIMP-1 genes, whereas none were positive for bla(VIM) genes. The mortality rate of hospitalized patients with MBL-producing Pseudomonas infection was 4/48 (8.3%). It was shown that Zataria multiflora and Carum copticum extracts had a high antibacterial effect on regular and IMP-producing P. aeruginosa strains in 6.25 mg/ml concentration. The incidence of MBL-producing P. aeruginosa in burn patients is very high. In our study, all MBL-producing isolates carry the blaIMP-1 gene. Therefore, detection of MBL-producing isolates is of great importance in identifying drug resistance patterns in P. aeruginosa, and in prevention and control of infections. In this study, it was shown that extracts of Z. multiflora and C. copticum have high antibacterial effects on ß-lactamase producing P. aeruginosa strains. PMID:24799849

  15. Lipid-protein nanodiscs promote in vitro folding of transmembrane domains of multi-helical and multimeric membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Butenko, Ivan O; Petrovskaya, Lada E; Paramonov, Alexander S; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Nekrasova, Oksana V; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2013-02-01

    Production of helical integral membrane proteins (IMPs) in a folded state is a necessary prerequisite for their functional and structural studies. In many cases large-scale expression of IMPs in cell-based and cell-free systems results in misfolded proteins, which should be refolded in vitro. Here using examples of the bacteriorhodopsin ESR from Exiguobacterium sibiricum and full-length homotetrameric K(+) channel KcsA from Streptomyces lividans we found that the efficient in vitro folding of the transmembrane domains of the polytopic and multimeric IMPs could be achieved during the protein encapsulation into the reconstructed high-density lipoprotein particles, also known as lipid-protein nanodiscs. In this case the self-assembly of the IMP/nanodisc complexes from a mixture containing apolipoprotein, lipids and the partially denatured protein solubilized in a harsh detergent induces the folding of the transmembrane domains. The obtained folding yields showed significant dependence on the properties of lipids used for nanodisc formation. The largest recovery of the spectroscopically active ESR (~60%) from the sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was achieved in the nanodiscs containing anionic saturated lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPG) and was approximately twice lower in the zwitterionic DMPC lipid. The reassembly of tetrameric KcsA from the acid-dissociated monomer solubilized in SDS was the most efficient (~80%) in the nanodiscs containing zwitterionic unsaturated lipid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). The charged and saturated lipids provided lower tetramer quantities, and the lowest yield (<20%) was observed in DMPC. The overall yield of the ESR and KcsA folding was mainly restricted by the efficiency of the protein encapsulation into the nanodiscs.

  16. Quantifying regional cerebral blood flow by N-isopropyl-P-[I-123]iodoamphetamine (IMP) using a ring type single-photon emission computed tomography system

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, N.; Odano, I.; Ohkubo, M.

    1994-05-01

    We developed a more accurate quantitative measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with the microsphere model using N-isopropyl-p-[I-123] iodoamphetamine (IMP) and a ring type single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system. SPECT studies were performed in 17 patients with brain diseases. A dose of 222 MBq (6 mCi) of [I-123]IMP was injected i.v., at the same time a 5 min period of arterial blood withdrawal was begun. SPECT data were acquired from 25 min to 60 min after tracer injection. For obtaining the brain activity concentration at 5 min after IMP injection, total brain counts collections and one minute period short time SPECT studies were performed at 5, 20, and 60 min. Measurement of the values of rCBF was calculated using short time SPECT images at 5 min (rCBF), static SPECT images corrected with total cerebral counts (rCBF{sub Ct}.) and those corrected with reconstructed counts on short time SPECT images (rCBF{sub Cb}). There was a good relationship (r=0.69) between rCBF and rCBF{sub Ct}, however, rCBF{sub Ct} tends to be underestimated in high flow areas and overestimated in low flow areas. There was better relationship between rCBF and rCBF{sub Cb}(r=0.92). The overestimation and underestimation shown in rCBF{sub Ct} was considered to be due to the correction of reconstructed counts using a total cerebral time activity curve, because of the kinetic behavior of [I-123]IMP was different in each region. We concluded that more accurate rCBF values could be obtained using the regional time activity curves.

  17. 68Zn isotope exchange experiments reveal an unusual kinetic lability of the metal ions in the di-zinc form of IMP-1 metallo-beta-lactamase.

    PubMed

    Siemann, Stefan; Badiei, Hamid R; Karanassios, Vassili; Viswanatha, Thammaiah; Dmitrienko, Gary I

    2006-02-01

    The apparently paradoxical behaviour of facile exchange (kinetic lability) of tightly bound (thermodynamic stability) zinc ions in the enzyme IMP-1 metallo-beta-lactamase with Zn-68 and cadmium ions, as indicated by in-torch vaporization inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ITV-ICP-MS) and electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), is consistent with the involvement of a third metal ion in promoting Lewis acid/base type exchange processes.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of a Pseudomonas sp. Strain Carrying blaIMP-25 and blaVIM-2 Carbapenemase Genes from Hospital Sewage

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yiyi; Wu, Wenjing; Feng, Yu; Zhang, Xiaoxia

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas strain WCHP16 recovered from hospital sewage in West China Hospital, Chengdu, China was found to carry two carbapenemase genes blaIMP-25 and blaVIM-2. Here, we report its 5.7-Mb draft genome sequence, comprising 141 contigs and an average 59.53% G+C content. The genome contained 5,504 coding sequences and 67 tRNA genes. PMID:27795238

  19. Rapid detection of blaNDM, blaKPC, blaIMP, and blaVIM carbapenemase genes in bacteria by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cancan; Zheng, Fen; Rui, Yongyu

    2014-12-01

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed and evaluated for rapid detection of blaKPC, blaNDM, blaIMP, and blaVIM carbapenemase genes. Six oligonucleotides, including outer, inner, and loop primers, were designed for eight distinct regions in each target gene. Two qualitative criteria were used to evaluate LAMP reactions: visual inspection of color change and real-time detection of fluorescence change. The lower detection limit was 10 colony forming units (CFU) per reaction for real-time detection and 100 CFU per reaction for visual inspection for each gene. Two hundred twenty-two carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates (including 100 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 100 Acinetobacter sp., and 22 Enterobacteriaceae) were tested by LAMP assay. At the same time, these isolates were confirmed by conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing analysis. In these clinical isolates, the results of 11 strains with blaNDM, 11 strains with blaKPC, 11 strains with blaVIM, and 2 strains with blaIMP obtained using LAMP assays were concordant with conventional PCR. The LAMP method reported here may be a useful and powerful tool for rapid detection of blaNDM, blaKPC, blaIMP, and blaVIM carbapenemase genes in bacteria. PMID:25000338

  20. IMP-8 observations of the spectra, composition, and variability of solar heavy ions at high energies relevant to manned space missions.

    PubMed

    Tylka, A J; Dietrich, W F

    1999-06-01

    In more than 25 years of almost continuous observations, the University of Chicago's Cosmic Ray Telescope (CRT) on IMP-8 has amassed a unique database on high-energy solar heavy ions of potential relevance to manned spaceflight. In the very largest particle events, IMP-8/CRT has even observed solar Fe ions above the Galactic cosmic ray background up to approximately 800 MeV/nucleon, an energy sufficiently high to penetrate nearly 25 g/cm2 of shielding. IMP-8/CRT observations show that high-energy heavy-ion spectra are often surprisingly hard power laws, without the exponential roll-offs suggested by stochastic acceleration fits to lower energy measurements alone. Also, in many solar particle events the Fe/O ratio grows with increasing energy, contrary to the notion that ions with higher mass-to-charge ratios should be less abundant at higher energies. Previous studies of radiation hazards for manned spaceflight have often assumed heavy-ion composition and steeply-falling energy spectra inconsistent with these observations. Conclusions based on such studies should therefore be re-assessed. The significant event-to-event variability observed in the high-energy solar heavy ions also has important implications for strategies in building probabilistic models of solar particle radiation hazards. PMID:11543141

  1. Rapid detection of blaNDM, blaKPC, blaIMP, and blaVIM carbapenemase genes in bacteria by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cancan; Zheng, Fen; Rui, Yongyu

    2014-12-01

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed and evaluated for rapid detection of blaKPC, blaNDM, blaIMP, and blaVIM carbapenemase genes. Six oligonucleotides, including outer, inner, and loop primers, were designed for eight distinct regions in each target gene. Two qualitative criteria were used to evaluate LAMP reactions: visual inspection of color change and real-time detection of fluorescence change. The lower detection limit was 10 colony forming units (CFU) per reaction for real-time detection and 100 CFU per reaction for visual inspection for each gene. Two hundred twenty-two carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates (including 100 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 100 Acinetobacter sp., and 22 Enterobacteriaceae) were tested by LAMP assay. At the same time, these isolates were confirmed by conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing analysis. In these clinical isolates, the results of 11 strains with blaNDM, 11 strains with blaKPC, 11 strains with blaVIM, and 2 strains with blaIMP obtained using LAMP assays were concordant with conventional PCR. The LAMP method reported here may be a useful and powerful tool for rapid detection of blaNDM, blaKPC, blaIMP, and blaVIM carbapenemase genes in bacteria.

  2. Cloning, characterization, and regulation of the human type II IMP dehydrogenase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Glesne, D.A.; Huberman, E. |

    1997-01-01

    Human type II inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH, EC 1.1.1.205) is the rate-limiting enzyme in de novo guanine nucleotide biosynthesis. Regulated IMPDH activity is associated with cellular proliferation, transformation, and differentiation. The authors cloned and sequenced the entire gene for type II IMPDH and here provide details regarding the organization of the gene and the characterization of its promoter. The gene spans approximately 5 kb and is disrupted by 12 introns. The transcriptional start sites were determined by S1 nuclease mapping to be somewhat heterogeneous but predominated at 102 and 85 nucleotides from the translational initiation codon. Through the use of heterologous gene constructs and transient transfection assays, a minimal promoter from {minus}206 to {minus}85 was defined. This promoter is TATA-less and contains several transcription factor motifs including four potential Sp 1 binding sites. The minimal promoter is GC-rich (69%) and resembles a CpG island. Through the use of gel mobility shift assays, nuclear proteins were shown to specifically interact with this minimal promoter. Stable transfectants were used to demonstrate that the down-regulation of IMPDH gene expression in response to reduced cellular proliferation occurs by a transcriptional mechanism.

  3. Target selection by natural and redesigned PUF proteins

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Douglas F.; Koh, Yvonne Y.; VanVeller, Brett; Raines, Ronald T.; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA binding factor (PUF) proteins bind RNA with sequence specificity and modularity, and have become exemplary scaffolds in the reengineering of new RNA specificities. Here, we report the in vivo RNA binding sites of wild-type (WT) and reengineered forms of the PUF protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae Puf2p across the transcriptome. Puf2p defines an ancient protein family present throughout fungi, with divergent and distinctive PUF RNA binding domains, RNA-recognition motifs (RRMs), and prion regions. We identify sites in RNA bound to Puf2p in vivo by using two forms of UV cross-linking followed by immunopurification. The protein specifically binds more than 1,000 mRNAs, which contain multiple iterations of UAAU-binding elements. Regions outside the PUF domain, including the RRM, enhance discrimination among targets. Compensatory mutants reveal that one Puf2p molecule binds one UAAU sequence, and align the protein with the RNA site. Based on this architecture, we redesign Puf2p to bind UAAG and identify the targets of this reengineered PUF in vivo. The mutant protein finds its target site in 1,800 RNAs and yields a novel RNA network with a dramatic redistribution of binding elements. The mutant protein exhibits even greater RNA specificity than wild type. The redesigned protein decreases the abundance of RNAs in its redesigned network. These results suggest that reengineering using the PUF scaffold redirects and can even enhance specificity in vivo. PMID:26668354

  4. Target selection by natural and redesigned PUF proteins.

    PubMed

    Porter, Douglas F; Koh, Yvonne Y; VanVeller, Brett; Raines, Ronald T; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-12-29

    Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA binding factor (PUF) proteins bind RNA with sequence specificity and modularity, and have become exemplary scaffolds in the reengineering of new RNA specificities. Here, we report the in vivo RNA binding sites of wild-type (WT) and reengineered forms of the PUF protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae Puf2p across the transcriptome. Puf2p defines an ancient protein family present throughout fungi, with divergent and distinctive PUF RNA binding domains, RNA-recognition motifs (RRMs), and prion regions. We identify sites in RNA bound to Puf2p in vivo by using two forms of UV cross-linking followed by immunopurification. The protein specifically binds more than 1,000 mRNAs, which contain multiple iterations of UAAU-binding elements. Regions outside the PUF domain, including the RRM, enhance discrimination among targets. Compensatory mutants reveal that one Puf2p molecule binds one UAAU sequence, and align the protein with the RNA site. Based on this architecture, we redesign Puf2p to bind UAAG and identify the targets of this reengineered PUF in vivo. The mutant protein finds its target site in 1,800 RNAs and yields a novel RNA network with a dramatic redistribution of binding elements. The mutant protein exhibits even greater RNA specificity than wild type. The redesigned protein decreases the abundance of RNAs in its redesigned network. These results suggest that reengineering using the PUF scaffold redirects and can even enhance specificity in vivo. PMID:26668354

  5. Fully automatic input function determination program for simple noninvasive (123)I-IMP microsphere cerebral blood flow quantification method.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kosuke; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Ofuji, Asato; Mimura, Hiroaki; Okumiya, Shintaro; Takaki, Akihiro; Sone, Teruki; Ito, Shigeki

    2016-09-01

    We recently developed a simple noninvasive (123)I-IMP microsphere (SIMS) method using chest dynamic planar images and brain single photon emission computed tomography. The SIMS method is an automatic analysis method, except for the process of setting the region of interest (ROI) of the input function. If a fully automatic ROI setting algorithm can be developed to determine the input function for the SIMS method, repeatability and reproducibility of the analysis of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the SIMS method can be guaranteed. The purpose of this study is to develop a fully automatic input function determination program for the SIMS method and to confirm the clinical usefulness of this program. The automatic input function determination program consists of two ROI setting programs for the PA and lung regions, and it is developed using the image phase analysis of a chest RI angiogram. To confirm the clinical usefulness of this program, the rCBF in 34 patients measured using the automatic method were compared with the values obtained through the manual setting method. Input functions by the automatic and manual methods were approximately equal. A good correlation was observed between the rCBF values obtained by the automatic method and those obtained by the manual setting method (r=0.96, p<0.01). Further, the total time taken for the automatic SIMS analysis is 1-2min as compared to 20-30min for the current analysis, and therefore, this technique contributes to the improvement of the throughput of nuclear medical examinations. PMID:27601249

  6. General RNA binding proteins render translation cap dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Svitkin, Y V; Ovchinnikov, L P; Dreyfuss, G; Sonenberg, N

    1996-01-01

    Translation in rabbit reticulocyte lysate is relatively independent of the presence of the mRNA m7G cap structure and the cap binding protein, eIF-4E. In addition, initiation occurs frequently at spurious internal sites. Here we show that a critical parameter which contributes to cap-dependent translation is the amount of general RNA binding proteins in the extract. Addition of several general RNA binding proteins, such as hnRNP A1, La autoantigen, pyrimidine tract binding protein (hnRNP I/PTB) and the major core protein of cytoplasmic mRNP (p50), rendered translation in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate cap dependent. These proteins drastically inhibited the translation of an uncapped mRNA, but had no effect on translation of a capped mRNA. Based on these and other results, we suggest that one function of general mRNA binding proteins in the cytoplasm is to promote ribosome binding by a 5' end, cap-mediated mechanism, and prevent spurious initiations at aberrant translation start sites. Images PMID:9003790

  7. [Complex partial status epilepticus with recurrent episodes of complex visual hallucinations: study by using 123I-IMP-SPECT, brain MRI and EEG].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Masahide; Tomimoto, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    We report a 72-year-old woman with complex partial status epilepticus who showed recurrent episodes of complex visual hallucinations (CVH). Brain diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images revealed gyriform cortical hyperintensity in the right parietal, occipital and temporal lobes, and brain magnetic resonance angiograhy revealed a hyperintensity in the right dilated middle cerebral artery during ictal period. Ictal N-isopropyl-p-(iodine-123)-iodoamphetamine single photon emission computed tomography (123I-IMP-SPECT) with three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection (3D-SSP) 14 days after the onset of the first CVH revealed hyperperfusion in the right latero-inferior occipito-temporal region with relation to motion. CVH spontaneously subsided 17 days after the onset of the first CVH. CVH recurred one year after the first CVH. Ictal 123I-IMP-SPECT with 3D-SSP revealed marked hyperperfusion in the right lateral parietal region probably with relation to face and figure hallucinations. Ictal scalp EEGs revealed rhythmic polyspikes at 12 Hz with high amplitude (100-200 μV) in bilateral posterior occipital and temporal region with the right side dominance for 20 seconds and more in several occasions. Interictal 123I-IMP-SPECT with 3D-SSP 28 days after recurrence of CVH revealed marked hypoperfusion in the right lateral parietal region, and recovery of hypoperfusion in the right latero-inferior occipito-temporal region. These findings suggest that ictal CVH might be induced by the spread of epileptic discharges from the right parieto-occipito-temporal region with the old brain contusion (epileptogenic region) to the right latero-inferior occipito-temporal region and the right lateral parietal region (symptomatogenic regions). PMID:26050664

  8. [Complex partial status epilepticus with recurrent episodes of complex visual hallucinations: study by using 123I-IMP-SPECT, brain MRI and EEG].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Masahide; Tomimoto, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    We report a 72-year-old woman with complex partial status epilepticus who showed recurrent episodes of complex visual hallucinations (CVH). Brain diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images revealed gyriform cortical hyperintensity in the right parietal, occipital and temporal lobes, and brain magnetic resonance angiograhy revealed a hyperintensity in the right dilated middle cerebral artery during ictal period. Ictal N-isopropyl-p-(iodine-123)-iodoamphetamine single photon emission computed tomography (123I-IMP-SPECT) with three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection (3D-SSP) 14 days after the onset of the first CVH revealed hyperperfusion in the right latero-inferior occipito-temporal region with relation to motion. CVH spontaneously subsided 17 days after the onset of the first CVH. CVH recurred one year after the first CVH. Ictal 123I-IMP-SPECT with 3D-SSP revealed marked hyperperfusion in the right lateral parietal region probably with relation to face and figure hallucinations. Ictal scalp EEGs revealed rhythmic polyspikes at 12 Hz with high amplitude (100-200 μV) in bilateral posterior occipital and temporal region with the right side dominance for 20 seconds and more in several occasions. Interictal 123I-IMP-SPECT with 3D-SSP 28 days after recurrence of CVH revealed marked hypoperfusion in the right lateral parietal region, and recovery of hypoperfusion in the right latero-inferior occipito-temporal region. These findings suggest that ictal CVH might be induced by the spread of epileptic discharges from the right parieto-occipito-temporal region with the old brain contusion (epileptogenic region) to the right latero-inferior occipito-temporal region and the right lateral parietal region (symptomatogenic regions).

  9. Interplanetary particles and fields, November 22 to December 6, 1977 - Helios, Voyager and Imp observations between 0.6 and 1.6 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L.; Lepping, R.; Weber, R.; Armstrong, T.; Goodrich, C.; Sullivan, J.; Gurnett, D.; Kellogg, P.; Keppler, E.; Mariani, F.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents a wealth of data obtained at approximately 0.6, 1, and 1.6 AU by Helios 1 and 2, Voyager 1 and 2, and Imp 7 and 8, describing the evolution and interactions of particles, flows, and fields in the period 22 November to 6 December 1977. Three flow systems were observed in the period under consideration: (1) a corotating stream and a stream interface associated with a coronal hole; (2) a shock wave and an energetic particle event associated with a 2B flare; and (3) an isolated shock wave of uncertain origin. These phenomena are discussed in some detail.

  10. Beta-hydroxyphosphonate ribonucleoside analogues derived from 4-substituted-1,2,3-triazoles as IMP/GMP mimics: synthesis and biological evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen Van, Tai; Hospital, Audrey; Lionne, Corinne; Jordheim, Lars P; Dumontet, Charles; Périgaud, Christian; Chaloin, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Summary A series of seventeen β-hydroxyphosphonate ribonucleoside analogues containing 4-substituted-1,2,3-triazoles was synthesized and fully characterized. Such compounds were designed as potential inhibitors of the cytosolic 5’-nucleotidase II (cN-II), an enzyme involved in the regulation of purine nucleotide pools. NMR and molecular modelling studies showed that a few derivatives adopted similar structural features to IMP or GMP. Five derivatives were identified as modest inhibitors with 53 to 64% of cN-II inhibition at 1 mM. PMID:27559400

  11. Detection of blaIMP4 and blaNDM1 harboring Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in a university hospital in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Hamzan, Nurul Izzati; Yean, Chan Yean; Rahman, Rosliza Abdul; Hasan, Habsah; Rahman, Zaidah Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance among Enterobacteriaceae posts a great challenge to the health care service. The emergence of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) is attracting significant attention due to its rapid and global dissemination. The infection is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, thus creating challenges for infection control and managing teams to curb the infection. In Southeast Asia, there have been limited reports and subsequent research regarding CRKP infections. Thus, the study was conducted to characterize CRKP that has been isolated in our setting. Methods A total of 321 K. pneumoniae were included in the study. Each isolate went through an identification process using an automated identification system. Phenotypic characterization was determined using disk diffusion, modified Hodge test, Epsilometer test, and inhibitor combined disk test. Further detection of carbapenemase genes was carried out using polymerase chain reaction and confirmed by gene sequence analysis. Results All together, 13 isolates (4.05%) were CRKP and the majority of them were resistant to tested antibiotics except colistin and tigercycline. Among seven different carbapenemase genes studied (bla KPC, bla IMP, bla SME, bla NDM, bla IMI, bla VIM, and bla OXA), only two, bla IMP4 (1.87%) and bla NDM1 (2.18%), were detected in our setting. Conclusion Evidence suggests that the prevalence of CRKP in our setting is low, and knowledge of Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and CRKP has improved and become available among clinicians. PMID:25765342

  12. DAZ Family Proteins, Key Players for Germ Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xia-Fei; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Wang, Lin-Qing; Yin, Shen; De Felici, Massimo; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    DAZ family proteins are found almost exclusively in germ cells in distant animal species. Deletion or mutations of their encoding genes usually severely impair either oogenesis or spermatogenesis or both. The family includes Boule (or Boll), Dazl (or Dazla) and DAZ genes. Boule and Dazl are situated on autosomes while DAZ, exclusive of higher primates, is located on the Y chromosome. Deletion of DAZ gene is the most common causes of infertility in humans. These genes, encoding for RNA binding proteins, contain a highly conserved RNA recognition motif and at least one DAZ repeat encoding for a 24 amino acids sequence able to bind other mRNA binding proteins. Basically, Daz family proteins function as adaptors for target mRNA transport and activators of their translation. In some invertebrate species, BOULE protein play a pivotal role in germline specification and a conserved regulatory role in meiosis. Depending on the species, DAZL is expressed in primordial germ cells (PGCs) and/or pre-meiotic and meiotic germ cells of both sexes. Daz is found in fetal gonocytes, spermatogonia and spermatocytes of adult testes. Here we discuss DAZ family genes in a phylogenic perspective, focusing on the common and distinct features of these genes, and their pivotal roles during gametogenesis evolved during evolution. PMID:26327816

  13. Triton X-114 phase separation in the isolation and purification of mouse liver microsomal membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Rommel A; Chen, Yuan-Shou; Kapp, Eugene A; Greening, David W; Mathivanan, Suresh; Simpson, Richard J

    2011-08-01

    Integral membrane proteins (IMPs) mediate several cellular functions including cell adhesion, ion and nutrient transport, and cell signalling. IMPs are typically hard to isolate and purify due to their hydrophobic nature and low cellular abundance, however, microsomes are small lipid vesicles rich in IMPs, which form spontaneously when cells are mechanically disrupted. In this study, we have employed mouse liver microsomes as a model for optimising a method for IMP isolation and characterisation. Microsomes were collected by differential centrifugation, purified with sodium carbonate, and subjected to GeLC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 1124 proteins were identified in the microsome fraction, with 47% (524/1124) predicted by TMHMM to contain at least one transmembrane domain (TMD). The ability of phase partitioning using the detergent Triton X-114 (TX-114) to further enrich for membrane proteins was evaluated. Microsomes were subjected to successive rounds of solubility-based phase separation, with proteins partitioning into the aqueous phase, detergent phase, or TX-114-insoluble pellet fraction. GeLC-MS/MS analysis of the three TX-114 fractions identified 1212 proteins, of which 146 were not detected in the un-fractionated microsome sample. Conspicuously, IMPs partitioned to the detergent phase, with 56% (435/770) of proteins identified in that fraction containing at least one TMD. GO Slim characterisation of the microsome proteome revealed enrichment of proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, endosome, and cytoplasm. Further, enzymes including monooxygenases were well represented with 35 cytochrome P450 identifications (CYPs 1A2, 2A5, 2A12, 2B10, 2C29, 2C37, 2C39, 2C44, 2C50, 2C54. 2C67, 2C68, 2C70, 2D10, 2D11, 2D22, 2D26, 2D9, 2E1, 2F2, 2J5, 2U1, 3A11, 3A13, 3A25, 4A10, 4A12A, 4A12B, 4F13, 4F14, 4F15, 4V3, 51,7B1, and 8B1). Evaluation of biological processes showed enrichment of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and

  14. A Guide to Differential Scanning Calorimetry of Membrane and Soluble Proteins in Detergents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhengrong; Brouillette, Christie G

    2016-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) detects protein thermal unfolding by directly measuring the heat absorbed. Simple DSC experiments that require relatively small amounts of pure material can provide a wealth of information related to structure, especially with respect to domain architecture, without the need for a complete thermodynamic analysis. Thus, DSC is an ideal additional tool for membrane protein characterization and also offers several advantages over indirect thermal unfolding methods. Integral membrane proteins (IMPs) that comprise both large multitopic transmembrane domains (TMDs) and extramembranous domains (EMDs) are differentially affected by detergent interactions with both domains. In fact, in some cases, destabilization of the EMD by detergent may dominate overall IMP stability. This chapter will (1) provide a perspective on the advantages of DSC for membrane protein characterization and stability measurements, including numerous examples spanning decades of research; (2) introduce models for the interaction and destabilization of IMPs by detergents; (3) discuss two case studies from the authors' lab; and (4) offer practical advice for performing DSC in the presence of detergents.

  15. Membrane protein stability can be compromised by detergent interactions with the extramembranous soluble domains.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhengrong; Wang, Chi; Zhou, Qingxian; An, Jianli; Hildebrandt, Ellen; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Kappes, John C; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Riordan, John R; Urbatsch, Ina L; Hunt, John F; Brouillette, Christie G

    2014-06-01

    Detergent interaction with extramembranous soluble domains (ESDs) is not commonly considered an important determinant of integral membrane protein (IMP) behavior during purification and crystallization, even though ESDs contribute to the stability of many IMPs. Here we demonstrate that some generally nondenaturing detergents critically destabilize a model ESD, the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) from the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a model IMP. Notably, the detergents show equivalent trends in their influence on the stability of isolated NBD1 and full-length CFTR. We used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to monitor changes in NBD1 stability and secondary structure, respectively, during titration with a series of detergents. Their effective harshness in these assays mirrors that widely accepted for their interaction with IMPs, i.e., anionic > zwitterionic > nonionic. It is noteworthy that including lipids or nonionic detergents is shown to mitigate detergent harshness, as will limiting contact time. We infer three thermodynamic mechanisms from the observed thermal destabilization by monomer or micelle: (i) binding to the unfolded state with no change in the native structure (all detergent classes); (ii) native state binding that alters thermodynamic properties and perhaps conformation (nonionic detergents); and (iii) detergent binding that directly leads to denaturation of the native state (anionic and zwitterionic). These results demonstrate that the accepted model for the harshness of detergents applies to their interaction with an ESD. It is concluded that destabilization of extramembranous soluble domains by specific detergents will influence the stability of some IMPs during purification.

  16. Membrane protein stability can be compromised by detergent interactions with the extramembranous soluble domains

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhengrong; Wang, Chi; Zhou, Qingxian; An, Jianli; Hildebrandt, Ellen; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Kappes, John C; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Riordan, John R; Urbatsch, Ina L; Hunt, John F; Brouillette, Christie G

    2014-01-01

    Detergent interaction with extramembranous soluble domains (ESDs) is not commonly considered an important determinant of integral membrane protein (IMP) behavior during purification and crystallization, even though ESDs contribute to the stability of many IMPs. Here we demonstrate that some generally nondenaturing detergents critically destabilize a model ESD, the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) from the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a model IMP. Notably, the detergents show equivalent trends in their influence on the stability of isolated NBD1 and full-length CFTR. We used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to monitor changes in NBD1 stability and secondary structure, respectively, during titration with a series of detergents. Their effective harshness in these assays mirrors that widely accepted for their interaction with IMPs, i.e., anionic > zwitterionic > nonionic. It is noteworthy that including lipids or nonionic detergents is shown to mitigate detergent harshness, as will limiting contact time. We infer three thermodynamic mechanisms from the observed thermal destabilization by monomer or micelle: (i) binding to the unfolded state with no change in the native structure (all detergent classes); (ii) native state binding that alters thermodynamic properties and perhaps conformation (nonionic detergents); and (iii) detergent binding that directly leads to denaturation of the native state (anionic and zwitterionic). These results demonstrate that the accepted model for the harshness of detergents applies to their interaction with an ESD. It is concluded that destabilization of extramembranous soluble domains by specific detergents will influence the stability of some IMPs during purification. PMID:24652590

  17. Immunostimulatory cellular responses of cured Leishmania-infected patients and hamsters against the integral membrane proteins and non-membranous soluble proteins of a recent clinical isolate of Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Garg, R; Gupta, S K; Tripathi, P; Naik, S; Sundar, S; Dube, A

    2005-01-01

    Development of an effective immunoprophylactic agent for visceral leishmaniasis (VL) has become imperative due to the increasing number of cases of drug resistance and relapse. Live and killed whole parasites as well as fractionated and recombinant preparations have been evaluated for vaccine potential. However, a successful vaccine against the disease has been elusive. Because protective immunity in human and experimental leishmaniasis is predominantly of the Th1 type, immunogens with Th1 stimulatory potential would make good vaccine candidates. In the present study, the integral membrane proteins (IMPs) and non-membranous soluble proteins (NSPs), purified from promastigotes of a recent field isolate, Leishmania donovani stain 2001, were evaluated for their ability to induce cellular responses in cured patients (n = 9), endemic controls (n = 5) of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and treated hamsters (n = 10). IMPs and NSPs induced significant proliferative responses (SI 6·3 ± 4·1 and 5·6 ± 2·3, respectively; P < 0·01) and IFN-γ production (356·3 ± 213·4 and 294·29 ± 107·6 pg/ml, respectively) in lymphocytes isolated from cured VL patients. Significant lymphoproliferative responses against IMPs and NSPs were also noticed in cured Leishmania animals (SI 7·2 ± 4·7 & 6·4 ± 4·1, respectively; P < 0·01). In addition, significant NO production in response both IMPs and NSPs was also noticed in macrophages of hamsters and different cell lines (J774A-1 and THP1). These results suggest that protective, immunostimulatory molecules are present in the IMP and NSP fractions, which may be exploited for development of a subunit vaccine for VL. PMID:15762886

  18. Investigation of Solar Wind Correlations and Solar Wind Modifications Near Earth by Multi-Spacecraft Observations: IMP 8, WIND and INTERBALL-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paularena, Karolen I.; Richardson, John D.; Zastenker, Georgy N.

    2002-01-01

    The foundation of this Project is use of the opportunity available during the ISTP (International Solar-Terrestrial Physics) era to compare solar wind measurements obtained simultaneously by three spacecraft - IMP 8, WIND and INTERBALL-1 at wide-separated points. Using these data allows us to study three important topics: (1) the size and dynamics of near-Earth mid-scale (with dimension about 1-10 million km) and small-scale (with dimension about 10-100 thousand km) solar wind structures; (2) the reliability of the common assumption that solar wind conditions at the upstream Lagrangian (L1) point accurately predict the conditions affecting Earth's magnetosphere; (3) modification of the solar wind plasma and magnetic field in the regions near the Earth magnetosphere, the foreshock and the magnetosheath. Our Project was dedicated to these problems. Our research has made substantial contributions to the field and has lead others to undertake similar work.

  19. A catalogue of solar cosmic ray events: IMPS 4 and 5, May 1967 - December 1972. [analysis of data acquired during operation of Explorer 34 and 41 satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhollebeke, M. A.; Wang, J. R.; Mcdonald, F. B.

    1974-01-01

    This catalogue of solar cosmic ray events has been prepared for the use of solar physicists and other interested scientists. It contains some 185 solar particle events detected by the Goddard Space Flight Center Cosmic Ray Experiments on IMP's IV and V (Explorer 34 and 41) for the period May 1967 - December 1972. The data is presented in the form of hourly averages for three proton energy intervals - 0.9 - 1.6 MeV; 6 - 20 MeV and 20 - 80 MeV. In addition the time histories of .5 - 1.1 MeV electrons are shown on a separate scale. To assist in the identification of related solar events, the onset time of the electron event is indicated. The details of the instrumentation and detector techniques are described. Further descriptions of data reduction procedure and on the time-history plots are given.

  20. Prevalence of bla NDM, bla PER, bla VEB, bla IMP, and bla VIM Genes among Acinetobacter baumannii Isolated from Two Hospitals of Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Fallah, Fatemeh; Noori, Maryam; Hashemi, Ali; Goudarzi, Hossein; Karimi, Abdollah; Erfanimanesh, Soroor; Alimehr, Shadi

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of bla NDM, bla PER, bla VEB, bla IMP, and bla VIM type genes among A. baumannii isolates from hospitalized patients in two hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Patients and Methods. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion and Broth microdilution methods. The frequency of MBL (metallo-beta-lactamase) and ESBL (extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase) producers was evaluated by CDDT. The β -lactamases genes were detected by PCR and sequencing methods. Results. The resistance of A. baumannii isolates against tested antibiotics was as follows: 103 (95.4%) to ceftazidime, 108 (100%) to cefotaxime, 105 (95.7%) to cefepime, 99 (91.7%) to imipenem, 99 (91.7%) to meropenem, 87 (80.6%) to amikacin, 105 (97.2%) to piperacillin, 100 (92.6%) to ciprofloxacin, 103 (95.4%) to piperacillin/tazobactam, 44 (40.7%) to gentamicin, 106 (98.1%) to ampicillin/sulbactam, 106 (98.1%) to co-trimoxazole, 87 (80.6%) to tetracycline, and 1 (1.8%) to colistin. Using combined disk diffusion test, 91 (84.2%) and 86 (86.86%) were ESBL and MBL producers, respectively. The prevalence of bla PER-1, bla VEB-1, bla IMP-1, and bla VIM-1 genes was 71 (78.03%), 36 (39.5%), 3 (3.48%), and 15 (17.44%), respectively. Conclusions. The prevalence of ESBLs and MBLs-producing A. baumannii strains detected in this study is a major concern and highlights the need of infection control measures.

  1. Interspecies Dissemination of a Mobilizable Plasmid Harboring blaIMP-19 and the Possibility of Horizontal Gene Transfer in a Single Patient.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masaki; Matsumura, Yasufumi; Gomi, Ryota; Matsuda, Tomonari; Tanaka, Michio; Nagao, Miki; Takakura, Shunji; Uemoto, Shinji; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    Carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacilli have been a global concern over the past 2 decades because these organisms can cause severe infections with high mortality rates. Carbapenemase genes are often carried by mobile genetic elements, and resistance plasmids can be transferred through conjugation. We conducted whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to demonstrate that the same plasmid harboring a metallo-β-lactamase gene was detected in two different species isolated from a single patient. Metallo-β-lactamase-producing Achromobacter xylosoxidans (KUN4507), non-metallo-β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KUN4843), and metallo-β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae (KUN5033) were sequentially isolated from a single patient and then analyzed in this study. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, molecular typing (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing), and conjugation analyses were performed by conventional methods. Phylogenetic and molecular clock analysis of K. pneumoniae isolates were performed with WGS, and the nucleotide sequences of plasmids detected from these isolates were determined using WGS. Conventional molecular typing revealed that KUN4843 and KUN5033 were identical, whereas the phylogenetic tree analysis revealed a slight difference. These two isolates were separated from the most recent common ancestor 0.74 years before they were isolated. The same resistance plasmid harboring blaIMP-19 was detected in metallo-β-lactamase-producing A. xylosoxidans and K. pneumoniae Although this plasmid was not self-transferable, the conjugation of this plasmid from A. xylosoxidans to non-metallo-β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae was successfully performed. The susceptibility patterns for metallo-β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae and the transconjugant were similar. These findings supported the possibility of the horizontal transfer of plasmid-borne blaIMP-19 from A. xylosoxidans to K. pneumoniae in a single patient. PMID:27381397

  2. Ulysses and IMP-8 Observations of Cosmic Rays and So-lar Energetic Particles from the South Pole to the North Pole of the Sun near Solar Maximum*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKibben, R. B.; Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.; Zhang, M.

    2001-12-01

    The High Energy Telescope (HET) of the Ulysses COSPIN experiment measures intensities of galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles (SEPs) with good energy and charge resolution at energies above about 30 MeV/n. Since passing over the South Polar regions of the Sun near solar maximum in late 2000 Ulysses has been rapidly traversing solar latitude in its so-called Fast Latitude Scan (FLS), passing through perihelion near the sun's equator in May 2001. Maximum northern latitude (80.2 deg N) will be reached in October 2001. HET observations since the onset of solar activity, including the South Polar pass and the first part of the FLS, show that SEPs from large events were commonly observed at both Ulysses and Earth (IMP-8) regardless of the radial, latitudinal, or longitudinal separations between Ulysses and Earth. During the decay phases of the events intensities were often almost equal at Ulysses and IMP, even when Ulysses was over the Sun's South Pole and the associated flare site was in the northern hemisphere. This suggests that propagation of particles across the average interplanetary magnetic field in the inner heliosphere is effective enough to relax longitudinal and latitudinal particle intensity gradients within a few days. For galactic cosmic rays, observations from the FLS so far show that latitudinal gradients resulting from solar modulation at solar maximum are <1%/degree, and are in fact consistent with zero to the accuracy of our measurements. The small gradients also suggest effective propagation in the latitudinal direction. We will report observations from the continuing FLS, give a first report of Ulysses observations over the sun's North Polar Regions, and discuss the significance of the results for models of energetic charged particle propagation through the heliosphere. * This work was supported in part by NASA Contract JPL-955432 and by NASA Grant NAG5-8032.

  3. Characterization of pKP-M1144, a Novel ColE1-Like Plasmid Encoding IMP-8, GES-5, and BEL-1 β-Lactamases, from a Klebsiella pneumoniae Sequence Type 252 Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Dolejska, Monika; Izdebski, Radoslaw; Dobiasova, Hana; Studentova, Vendula; Esteves, Francisco J.; Derde, Lennie P. G.; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Hrabák, Jaroslav; Gniadkowski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    IMP-8 metallo-β-lactamase was identified in Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 252 (ST252), isolated in a Portuguese hospital in 2009. blaIMP-8 was the first gene cassette of a novel class 3 integron, In1144, also carrying the blaGES-5, blaBEL-1, and aacA4 cassettes. In1144 was located on a ColE1-like plasmid, pKP-M1144 (12,029 bp), with a replication region of limited nucleotide similarity to those of other RNA-priming plasmids, such as pJHCMW1. In1144 and pKP-M1144 represent an interesting case of evolution of resistance determinants in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26033721

  4. The mechanism of high-level carbapenem resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae: underlying Ompk36-deficient strains represent a threat of emerging high-level carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae with IMP-1 β-lactamase production in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sho, Takehiko; Muratani, Tetsuro; Hamasuna, Ryoichi; Yakushiji, Hiroko; Fujimoto, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Tetsuro

    2013-08-01

    The mechanisms of high-level carbapenem resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated in Japan were investigated. High-level carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae Mkp4437 and a less carbapenem-sensitive K. pneumoniae strain, Mkp4365, were recovered from the same patient. These two strains were found to be homologous by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and both strains contained blaIMP-1, blaDHA-1, blaCTXM-14, blaTEM-1, and blaSHV-1. Based on the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis, the lack of Ompk36 was observed in Mkp4437. Direct sequencing of the ompK36 gene demonstrated that a new insertional sequence in the open reading frame of the ompK36 gene was found in Mkp4437. Three clinical isolates (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] 2-4 mg/L to imipenem) were identified upon screening the strains of K. pneumoniae isolated in the University hospital with MICs of ≥ 1 mg/L to imipenem. Interestingly, these three isolates all lacked OmpK36. Conjugation of the plasmid harboring IMP-1 to these three OmpK36-deficient strains led to the isolation of high-level carbapenem-resistant transconjugants. In conclusion, the mechanisms of high-level carbapenem resistance in K. pneumoniae entail not only the production of IMP-1 β-lactamase but also the lack of OmpK36. It is vital to monitor for the presence of less carbapenem-sensitive K. pneumoniae strains, which lack OmpK36, because blaIMP-1 transmission to these strains may result in isolates with a high-level carbapenem-resistant phenotype.

  5. Use of Imipenem To Detect KPC, NDM, OXA, IMP, and VIM Carbapenemase Activity from Gram-Negative Rods in 75 Minutes Using Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, M. V.; Zurita, A. N.; Pyka, J. S.; Murray, T. S.; Hodsdon, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to extended-spectrum β-lactam antibiotics has led to a greater reliance upon carbapenems, but the expression of carbapenemases threatens to limit the utility of these drugs. Current methods to detect carbapenemase activity are suboptimal, requiring prolonged incubations during which ineffective therapy may be prescribed. We previously described a sensitive and specific assay for the detection of carbapenemase activity using ertapenem and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, we assessed 402 Gram-negative rods, including both Enterobacteriaceae and non-Enterobacteriaceae expressing IMP, VIM, KPC, NDM, and/or OXA carbapenemases, by using imipenem, meropenem, and ertapenem with LC-MS/MS assays. LC-MS/MS methods for the detection of intact and hydrolyzed carbapenems from an enrichment broth were developed. No ion suppression was observed, and the limits of detection for all three drugs were below 0.04 μg/ml. The sensitivity and specificity of meropenem and ertapenem for carbapenemase activity among non-Enterobacteriaceae were low, but imipenem demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 96% and 95%, respectively, among all Gram-negative rods (GNR) tested, including both Enterobacteriaceae and non-Enterobacteriaceae. LC-MS/MS allows for the analysis of more complex matrices, and this LC-MS/MS assay could easily be adapted for use with primary specimens requiring growth enrichment. PMID:24789180

  6. A correlative study of simultaneously measured He(++) fluxes in the solar wind and in the magnetosphere utilizing Imp-1 and 1971-089A satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, E. G.

    1975-01-01

    Simultaneously measured He(++) fluxes in the solar wind and in the magnetosphere were studied using data from the plasma spectrometer on the Imp I satellite and the energetic ion mass spectrometer on the low altitude polar orbiting satellite 1971-89A. A detailed comparison of the He(++) energy spectra measured simultaneously in the solar wind and in the low altitude dayside polar cusp on March 7, 1972 was made. The energy-per-unit-charge range of the energetic ion mass spectrometer on board the polar orbiting satellite was 700 eV to 12 keV. Within this range there was a clear maximum in the He(++) energy spectrum at approximately 1.5 keV/nucleon. There was not a clearly defined maximum in the H(+) spectrum, but the data were consistent with a peak between 0.7 and 1.0 keV/nucleon. Both spectra could be reasonably well fit with a convecting Maxwellian plus a high energy tail; however, the mean velocity for He(++) distribution was significantly greater than that for the H(+) distribution. The simultaneous solar wind measurements showed the mean velocities for both ion species to be approximately 600 km/sec. The discrepancies between the relative velocity distributions in the low altitude cusp and those in the solar wind are consistent with a potential difference of approximately 1.4 kV along their flow direction between the two points of observation.

  7. Identification and Characterisation of Simiate, a Novel Protein Linked to the Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Derlig, Kristin; Gießl, Andreas; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut; Enz, Ralf; Dahlhaus, Regina

    2013-01-01

    A strict regulation of protein expression during developmental stages and in response to environmental signals is essential to every cell and organism. Recent research has shown that the mammalian brain is particularly sensitive to alterations in expression patterns of specific proteins and cognitive deficits as well as autistic behaviours have been linked to dysregulated protein expression. An intellectual disability characterised by changes in the expression of a variety of proteins is the fragile X syndrome. Due to the loss of a single mRNA binding protein, the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein FMRP, vast misregulation of the mRNA metabolism is taking place in the disease. Here, we present the identification and characterisation of a novel protein named Simiate, whose mRNA contains several FMRP recognition motifs and associates with FMRP upon co-precipitation. Sequence analysis revealed that the protein evolved app. 1.7 billion years ago when eukaryotes developed. Applying antibodies generated against Simiate, the protein is detected in a variety of tissues, including the mammalian brain. On the subcellular level, Simiate localises to somata and nuclear speckles. We show that Simiate and nuclear speckles experience specific alterations in FMR1-/- mice. An antibody-based block of endogenous Simiate revealed that the protein is essential for cell survival. These findings suggest not only an important role for Simiate in gene transcription and/or RNA splicing, but also provide evidence for a function of nuclear speckles in the fragile X syndrome. Indeed, transcription and splicing are two fundamental mechanisms to control protein expression, that underlie not only synaptic plasticity and memory formation, but are also affected in several diseases associated with mental disabilities. PMID:24349419

  8. Isolation of peptides from an enzymatic hydrolysate of food proteins and characterization of their taste properties.

    PubMed

    Maehashi, K; Matsuzaki, M; Yamamoto, Y; Udaka, S

    1999-03-01

    Soybean protein, casein, bonito protein and chicken protein, each as foodstuff protein, were hydrolyzed with four proteinases; namely, pepsin, trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin and bromelain. Since the chicken protein hydrolysate with bromelain possessed the most favorable umami taste, eleven peptides were isolated from the chicken protein hydrolysate by successive chromatography on ODS, Amberlite IR-120B, Amberlite IRA-410 and AG-50W; their structures were Asp-Ala, Asp-Val, Glu-Glu, Glu-Val, Ala-Asp-Glu, Ala-Glu-Asp, Asp-Glu-Glu, Asp-Glu-Ser, Glu-Glu-Asn, Ser-Pro-Glu, and Glu-Pro-Ala-Asp. Many of them did not show any umami taste by themselves, but Glu-Glu, Glu-Val, Ala-Asp-Glu, Ala-Glu-Asp, Asp-Glu-Glu, and Ser-Pro-Glu were recognized to enhance the umami taste of 0.02% 5'-inosine monophosphate (IMP). A combination of these peptides, especially 0.5% each of Glu-Glu, Glu-Val, Asp-Glu-Glu and Glu-Glu-Asn, with 0.02% IMP produced a delicious "full" umami taste. PMID:10227142

  9. GLANCE - calculatinG heaLth impActs of atmospheric pollutioN in a Changing climatE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Leif; Faria, Sérgio; Markandya, Anil

    2016-04-01

    Current annual global estimates of premature deaths from poor air quality are estimated in the range of 2.6-4.4 million, and 2050 projections are expected to double against 2010 levels. In Europe, annual economic burdens are estimated at around 750 bn €. Climate change will further exacerbate air pollution burdens; therefore, a better understanding of the economic impacts on human societies has become an area of intense investigation. European research efforts are being carried out within the MACC project series, which started in 2005. The outcome of this work has been integrated into a European capacity for Earth Observation, the Copernicus Atmospheric Monitoring Service (CAMS). In MACC/CAMS, key pollutant concentrations are computed at the European scale and globally by employing chemically-driven advanced transport models. The project GLANCE (calculatinG heaLth impActs of atmospheric pollutioN in a Changing climatE) aims at developing an integrated assessment model for calculating the health impacts and damage costs of air pollution at different physical scales. It combines MACC/CAMS (assimilated Earth Observations, an ensemble of chemical transport models and state of the art ECWMF weather forecasting) with downscaling based on in-situ network measurements. The strengthening of modelled projections through integration with empirical evidence reduces errors and uncertainties in the health impact projections and subsequent economic cost assessment. In addition, GLANCE will yield improved data accuracy at different time resolutions. This project is a multidisciplinary approach which brings together expertise from natural sciences and socio economic fields. Here, its general approach will be presented together with first results for the years 2007 - 2012 on the European scale. The results on health impacts and economic burdens are compared to existing assessments.

  10. Oxidative changes and weakened gelling ability of salt-extracted protein are responsible for textural losses in dumpling meat fillings during frozen storage.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Liu, Qian; Xia, Xiufang; Kong, Baohua; Xiong, Youling L

    2015-10-15

    The objective of the study was to investigate the contribution of oxidation and rheological behaviour of proteins present outside the meat particle (OMP) and those remaining inside the meat particle (IMP) in dumpling meat fillings. The -7 °C sample fillings stored for 180 d had a significantly lower breaking strength and water-holding capacity than those stored at -18 °C and -7 °C/-18 °C (P < 0.05). Microscopy of stained samples showed significant fat exudation in the high (-7 °C) and fluctuating (-7 °C/-18 °C) temperature treatments during storage, coinciding with decreased thermal stability of OMP. There was a more abundant carbonyl production in OMP than in IMP (P < 0.05). The storage modulus G' in OMP was significantly lower than that in IMP. Moreover, SDS-PAGE showed that -7 °C and -7 °C/-18 °C samples produced more insoluble protein aggregates. These findings indicate that oxidative damage and reduced gelling potential of OMP proteins led to reduced textural properties in frozen dumplings. PMID:25952894

  11. RNA--protein interactions within the internal translation initiation region of encephalomyocarditis virus RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Borovjagin, A V; Ezrokhi, M V; Rostapshov, V M; Ugarova TYu; Bystrova, T F; Shatsky, I N

    1991-01-01

    Various derivatives of the internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) RNA have been used to analyze by UV-cross-linking its interaction with mRNA binding proteins from ascites carcinoma Krebs-2 cells. A doublet of proteins with Mr 58 and 60 kD bound to two regions of the IRES. One site is centered at nt 420-421 of EMCV RNA whereas the other is located between nt 315-377. Both sites form hairpin structures, the loops of which contain UCUUU motif, conserved among cardio- and aphthoviruses. The interaction of p58 and p60 with IRES is affected by the integrity of the stem-loop structure proximal to the start AUG codon (nts 680-787), although, under similar conditions, cross-linking of these proteins to this region was not detected. Deletions in the main recognition site of p58 strongly reduce the initiation activity of the IRES in vitro. However, elimination of p58 (p60) binding by these mutations does not completely abolish the ability of the IRES to direct polypeptide synthesis starting from the authentic AUG codon. The IRES can be assembled in vitro from two covalently unlinked transcripts, one containing the target site for p58 and the other encompassing the remaining part of the IRES fused to a reporter gene, resulting in considerable restoration of its activity. Implications of these findings for the mechanism of initiation resulting from internal entry of ribosomes are discussed. Images PMID:1656384

  12. An intein-mediated modulation of protein stability system and its application to study human cytomegalovirus essential gene function

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Deng; Xuan, Baoqin; Sun, Yamei; Huang, Shaowu; Xie, Maorong; Bai, Yadan; Xu, Wenjia; Qian, Zhikang

    2016-01-01

    Functional analysis of the essential proteins encoded by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is hindered by the lack of complementing systems. To overcome this difficulty, we have established a novel approach, termed the intein-mediated modulation of protein stability (imPS), in which a destabilizing domain and part of a split intein are fused to the essential protein. The growth of the mutant virus can then be regulated by the degradation and splicing of the protein. We found that an ultrafast gp41-1 split intein was able to rescue or degrade the protein of interest (POI) by removing or adding a strong degron through protein splicing. As a result, the function of the POI was turned on or off during the process. Using HCMV essential gene IE1/IE2, we confirmed that imPS worked remarkably well in conditionally regulating protein stability during viral infection. This conditional approach is likely to be applicable for dissecting the gene functions of HCMV or other viruses. PMID:27188239

  13. Epidemiology of Rifampin ADP-Ribosyltransferase (arr-2) and Metallo-β-Lactamase (blaIMP-4) Gene Cassettes in Class 1 Integrons in Acinetobacter Strains Isolated from Blood Cultures in 1997 to 2000

    PubMed Central

    Houang, Elizabeth T. S.; Chu, Yiu-Wai; Lo, Wai-Sing; Chu, Ka-Yi; Cheng, Augustine F. B.

    2003-01-01

    We characterized two new gene cassettes in an Acinetobacter isolate: one harbored the metallo-β-lactamase (IMP-4) gene blaIMP-4, the other harbored the rifampin ADP-ribosyltransferase (ARR-2) gene arr-2, and both arrayed with the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase [AAC(6′)-Ib7] gene cassette aacA4 in two separate class 1 integrons. The epidemiology of these gene cassettes in isolates from blood cultures obtained from 1997 to 2000 was studied. Isolates bearing either the blaIMP-4 or the arr-2 gene cassette or both represented 17.5% (10 of 57) of isolates in 1997, 16.1% (10 of 62) in 1998, 2.5% (1 of 40) in 1999, and 0% (0 of 58) in 2000. These two gene cassettes, probably borne on two separate integrons, were found in at least three genomic DNA groups, with evidence of clonal dissemination in the intensive care unit during 1997 to 1998. Seventeen of the 52 Acinetobacter baumannii (genomic DNA group 2) isolates from 1997 to 2000 harbored intI1, but only one was positive for these gene cassettes, whereas 20 of the 21 intI1-positive isolates of all other genomic DNA groups were positive for either or both of them. Reduced susceptibility to imipenem and rifampin was seen only in isolates harboring the blaIMP-4 and arr-2 cassettes, respectively. The aminoglycoside phosphotransferase [APH(3′)-VIa] gene aph(3′)-VIa was detected in all 21 isolates for which the MIC of amikacin was ≥8 μg/ml, with or without aacA4, whereas aacA4 alone was found in isolates for which the MIC of amikacin was 0.5 to 2 μg/ml. Significant differences between the 17 intI1-positive and 47 intI1-negative isolates belonging to genomic DNA group 3 from 1997 to 1998 in the MICs of amikacin, gentamicin, imipenem, sulfamethoxazole, and ceftazidime were observed (Mann-Whitney test, P < 0.001 to 0.01).   PMID:12654674

  14. Inhibition of Protein Synthesis by Y Box-Binding Protein 1 Blocks Oncogenic Cell Transformation†

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Andreas G.; Vogt, Peter K.

    2005-01-01

    The multifunctional Y box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) is transcriptionally repressed by the oncogenic phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway (with P3K as an oncogenic homolog of the catalytic subunit) and, when reexpressed with the retroviral vector RCAS, interferes with P3K- and Akt-induced transformation of chicken embryo fibroblasts. Retrovirally expressed YB-1 binds to the cap of mRNAs and inhibits cap-dependent and cap-independent translation. To determine the requirements for the inhibitory role of YB-1 in P3K-induced transformation, we conducted a mutational analysis, measuring YB-1-induced interference with transformation, subcellular localization, cap binding, mRNA binding, homodimerization, and inhibition of translation. The results show that (i) interference with transformation requires RNA binding and a C-terminal domain that is distinct from the cytoplasmic retention domain, (ii) interference with transformation is tightly correlated with inhibition of translation, and (iii) masking of mRNAs by YB-1 is not sufficient to block transformation or to inhibit translation. We identified a noncanonical nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the C-terminal half of YB-1. A mutant lacking the NLS retains its ability to interfere with transformation, indicating that a nuclear function is not required. These results suggest that YB-1 interferes with P3K-induced transformation by a specific inhibition of translation through its RNA-binding domain and a region in the C-terminal domain. Potential functions of the C-terminal region are discussed. PMID:15743808

  15. Neuronal response of the hippocampal formation to injury: blood flow, glucose metabolism, and protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kameyama, M.; Wasterlain, C.G.; Ackermann, R.F.; Finch, D.; Lear, J.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1983-02-01

    The reaction of the hippocampal formation to entorhinal lesions was studied from the viewpoints of cerebral blood flow ((/sup 123/I)isopropyl-iodoamphetamine(IMP))-glucose utilization ((/sup 14/C)2-deoxyglucose), and protein synthesis ((/sup 14/C)leucine), using single- and double-label autoradiography. Researchers' studies showed decreased glucose utilization in the inner part, and increased glucose utilization in the outer part of the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus, starting 3 days after the lesion; increased uptake of (/sup 123/I)IMP around the lesion from 1 to 3 days postlesion; and starting 3 days after the lesion, marked decrease in (/sup 14/C)leucine incorporation into proteins and cell loss in the dorsal CA1 and dorsal subiculum in about one-half of the rats. These changes were present only in animals with lesions which invaded the ventral hippocampal formation in which axons of CA1 cells travel. By contrast, transsection of the 3rd and 4th cranial nerves resulted, 3 to 9 days after injury, in a striking increase in protein synthesis in the oculomotor and trochlear nuclei. These results raise the possibility that in some neurons the failure of central regeneration may result from the cell's inability to increase its rate of protein synthesis in response to axonal injury.

  16. Ribosome-associated pentatricopeptide repeat proteins function as translational activators in mitochondria of trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Aphasizheva, Inna; Maslov, Dmitri A.; Qian, Yu; Huang, Lan; Wang, Qi; Costello, Catherine E.; Aphasizhev, Ruslan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial ribosomes of Trypanosoma brucei are composed of 9S and 12S rRNAs, eubacterial-type ribosomal proteins, polypeptides lacking discernible motifs and approximately 20 pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) RNA binding proteins. Several PPRs also populate the polyadenylation complex; among these, KPAF1 and KPAF2 function as general mRNA 3′ adenylation/uridylation factors. The A/U-tail enables mRNA binding to the small ribosomal subunit and is essential for translation. The presence of A/U-tail also correlates with requirement for translation of certain mRNAs in mammalian and insect parasite stages. Here, we inquired whether additional PPRs activate translation of individual mRNAs. Proteomic analysis identified KRIPP1 and KRIPP8 as components of the small ribosomal subunit in mammalian and insect forms, but also revealed their association with the polyadenylation complex in the latter. RNAi knockdowns demonstrated essential functions of KRIPP1 and KRIPP8 in the actively respiring insect stage, but not in the mammalian stage. In the KRIPP1 knockdown, A/U-tailed mRNA encoding cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 declined concomitantly with the de novo synthesis of this subunit whereas polyadenylation and translation of cyb mRNA were unaffected. In contrast, the KRIPP8 knockdown inhibited A/U-tailing and translation of both CO1 and cyb mRNAs. Our findings indicate that ribosome-associated PPRs may selectively activate mRNAs for translation. PMID:26713541

  17. Ribosome-associated pentatricopeptide repeat proteins function as translational activators in mitochondria of trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Aphasizheva, Inna; Maslov, Dmitri A; Qian, Yu; Huang, Lan; Wang, Qi; Costello, Catherine E; Aphasizhev, Ruslan

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes of Trypanosoma brucei are composed of 9S and 12S rRNAs, eubacterial-type ribosomal proteins, polypeptides lacking discernible motifs and approximately 20 pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) RNA binding proteins. Several PPRs also populate the polyadenylation complex; among these, KPAF1 and KPAF2 function as general mRNA 3' adenylation/uridylation factors. The A/U-tail enables mRNA binding to the small ribosomal subunit and is essential for translation. The presence of A/U-tail also correlates with requirement for translation of certain mRNAs in mammalian and insect parasite stages. Here, we inquired whether additional PPRs activate translation of individual mRNAs. Proteomic analysis identified KRIPP1 and KRIPP8 as components of the small ribosomal subunit in mammalian and insect forms, but also revealed their association with the polyadenylation complex in the latter. RNAi knockdowns demonstrated essential functions of KRIPP1 and KRIPP8 in the actively respiring insect stage, but not in the mammalian stage. In the KRIPP1 knockdown, A/U-tailed mRNA encoding cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 declined concomitantly with the de novo synthesis of this subunit whereas polyadenylation and translation of cyb mRNA were unaffected. In contrast, the KRIPP8 knockdown inhibited A/U-tailing and translation of both CO1 and cyb mRNAs. Our findings indicate that ribosome-associated PPRs may selectively activate mRNAs for translation. PMID:26713541

  18. Effect of mitochondrial complex I inhibition on Fe-S cluster protein activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Natalia P.; Bulteau, Anne Laure; Salazar, Julio; Hirsch, Etienne C.; Nunez, Marco T.

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial complex I inhibition resulted in decreased activity of Fe-S containing enzymes mitochondrial aconitase and cytoplasmic aconitase and xanthine oxidase. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in the loss of Fe-S clusters in cytoplasmic aconitase and of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase. {yields} Consistent with loss of cytoplasmic aconitase activity, an increase in iron regulatory protein 1 activity was found. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in an increase in the labile cytoplasmic iron pool. -- Abstract: Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are small inorganic cofactors formed by tetrahedral coordination of iron atoms with sulfur groups. Present in numerous proteins, these clusters are involved in key biological processes such as electron transfer, metabolic and regulatory processes, DNA synthesis and repair and protein structure stabilization. Fe-S clusters are synthesized mainly in the mitochondrion, where they are directly incorporated into mitochondrial Fe-S cluster-containing proteins or exported for cytoplasmic and nuclear cluster-protein assembly. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone decreases Fe-S cluster synthesis and cluster content and activity of Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes. Inhibition of complex I resulted in decreased activity of three Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes: mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitases and xanthine oxidase. In addition, the Fe-S cluster content of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase and mitochondrial aconitase was dramatically decreased. The reduction in cytosolic aconitase activity was associated with an increase in iron regulatory protein (IRP) mRNA binding activity and with an increase in the cytoplasmic labile iron pool. Since IRP activity post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of iron import proteins, Fe-S cluster inhibition may result in a false iron deficiency signal. Given that

  19. eIF3 Peripheral Subunits Rearrangement after mRNA Binding and Start-Codon Recognition.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, Angelita; Brito Querido, Jailson; Myasnikov, Alexander G; Mancera-Martinez, Eder; Renaud, Adeline; Kuhn, Lauriane; Hashem, Yaser

    2016-07-21

    mRNA translation initiation in eukaryotes requires the cooperation of a dozen eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) forming several complexes, which leads to mRNA attachment to the small ribosomal 40S subunit, mRNA scanning for start codon, and accommodation of initiator tRNA at the 40S P site. eIF3, composed of 13 subunits, 8 core (a, c, e, f, h, l, k, and m) and 5 peripheral (b, d, g, i, and j), plays a central role during this process. Here we report a cryo-electron microscopy structure of a mammalian 48S initiation complex at 5.8 Å resolution. It shows the relocation of subunits eIF3i and eIF3g to the 40S intersubunit face on the GTPase binding site, at a late stage in initiation. On the basis of a previous study, we demonstrate the relocation of eIF3b to the 40S intersubunit face, binding below the eIF2-Met-tRNAi(Met) ternary complex upon mRNA attachment. Our analysis reveals the deep rearrangement of eIF3 and unravels the molecular mechanism underlying eIF3 function in mRNA scanning and timing of ribosomal subunit joining. PMID:27373335

  20. 14-3-3 protein binds to the low molecular weight neurofilament (NFL) mRNA 3' UTR.

    PubMed

    Ge, Wei-Wen; Volkening, Kathryn; Leystra-Lantz, Cheryl; Jaffe, Howard; Strong, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    We have previously reported that altered stability of low molecular weight neurofilament (NFL) mRNA in lumbar spinal cord homogenates in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is associated with altered expression of trans-acting 3' UTR mRNA binding proteins. We have identified two hexanucleotide motifs as the main cis elements and, using LC/MS/MS of peptide digests of NFL 3' UTR interacting proteins from human spinal cord, observed that 14-3-3 proteins interact with these motifs. 14-3-3 beta, zeta, tau, gamma, and eta isoforms were found to be expressed in human spinal cord. Each isoform was expressed in vitro and shown to interact with NFL 3' UTR mRNA. Mutation of one or both motifs resulted in decreased 14-3-3 interaction, changes in predicted mRNA structure or alteration in stability of the mRNA. These data show a novel interaction for 14-3-3 with NFL mRNA, and suggests that 14-3-3 may play a role in regulating NFL mRNA stability.

  1. Mapping the ribosomal protein S7 regulatory binding site on mRNA of the E. coli streptomycin operon.

    PubMed

    Surdina, A V; Rassokhin, T I; Golovin, A V; Spiridonova, V A; Kopylov, A M

    2010-07-01

    In this work it is shown by deletion analysis that an intercistronic region (ICR) approximately 80 nucleotides in length is necessary for interaction with recombinant E. coli S7 protein (r6hEcoS7). A model is proposed for the interaction of S7 with two ICR sites-region of hairpin bifurcations and Shine-Dalgarno sequence of cistron S7. A de novo RNA binding site for heterologous S7 protein of Thermus thermophilus (r6hTthS7) was constructed by selection of a combinatorial RNA library based on E. coli ICR: it has only a single supposed protein recognition site in the region of bifurcation. The SERW technique was used for selection of two intercistronic RNA libraries in which five nucleotides of a double-stranded region, adjacent to the bifurcation, had the randomized sequence. One library contained an authentic AG (-82/-20) pair, while in the other this pair was replaced by AU. A serwamer capable of specific binding to r6hTthS7 was selected; it appeared to be the RNA68 mutant with eight nucleotide mutations. The serwamer binds to r6hTthS7 with the same affinity as homologous authentic ICR of str mRNA binds to r6hEcoS7; apparent dissociation constants are 89 +/- 43 and 50 +/- 24 nM, respectively.

  2. The type VI protein secretion system contributes to biofilm formation and seed-to-seedling transmission of Acidovorax citrulli on melon.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yanli; Zhao, Yuqiang; Wu, Xinrong; Liu, Fengquan; Hu, Baishi; Walcott, Ronald R

    2015-01-01

    The type VI protein secretion system (T6SS) is essential for the virulence of several Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we identified a T6SS gene cluster in Acidovorax citrulli, a plant-pathogenic bacterium that causes bacterial fruit blotch (BFB) of cucurbits. One T6SS cluster, of approximately 25 kb in length and comprising 17 genes, was found in the A. citrulli AAC00-1 genome. Seventeen A. citrulli mutants were generated, each with a deletion of a single T6SS core gene. There were significant differences in BFB seed-to-seedling transmission between wild-type A. citrulli strain, xjl12, and ΔvasD, ΔimpK, ΔimpJ and ΔimpF mutants (71.71%, 9.83%, 8.41%, 7.15% and 5.99% BFB disease index, respectively). In addition, we observed that these four mutants were reduced in melon seed colonization and biofilm formation; however, they were not affected in virulence when infiltrated into melon seedling tissues. There were no significant differences in BFB seed-to-seedling transmission, melon tissue colonization and biofilm formation between xjl12 and the other 13 T6SS mutants. Overall, our results indicate that T6SS plays a role in seed-to-seedling transmission of BFB on melon.

  3. Analysis of differential protein expression in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.; Chubb, C.; Huberman, E.; Giometti, C.S.

    1997-07-01

    High resolution two dimensional get electrophoresis (2DE) and database analysis was used to establish protein expression patterns for cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells and thirteen breast cancer cell lines. The Human Breast Epithelial Cell database contains the 2DE protein patterns, including relative protein abundances, for each cell line, plus a composite pattern that contains all the common and specifically expressed proteins from all the cell lines. Significant differences in protein expression, both qualitative and quantitative, were observed not only between normal cells and tumor cells, but also among the tumor cell lines. Eight percent of the consistently detected proteins were found in significantly (P < 0.001) variable levels among the cell lines. Using a combination of immunostaining, comigration with purified protein, subcellular fractionation, and amino-terminal protein sequencing, we identified a subset of the differentially expressed proteins. These identified proteins include the cytoskeletal proteins actin, tubulin, vimentin, and cytokeratins. The cell lines can be classified into four distinct groups based on their intermediate filament protein profile. We also identified heat shock proteins; hsp27, hsp60, and hsp70 varied in abundance and in some cases in the relative phosphorylation levels among the cell lines. Finally, we identified IMP dehydrogenase in each of the cell lines, and found the levels of this enzyme in the tumor cell lines elevated 2- to 20-fold relative to the levels in normal cells.

  4. SVM based prediction of RNA-binding proteins using binding residues and evolutionary information.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Gromiha, M Michael; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2011-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play crucial role in transcription and gene-regulation. This paper describes a support vector machine (SVM) based method for discriminating and classifying RNA-binding and non-binding proteins using sequence features. With the threshold of 30% interacting residues, RNA-binding amino acid prediction method PPRINT achieved the Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.32. BLAST and PSI-BLAST identified RBPs with the coverage of 32.63 and 33.16%, respectively, at the e-value of 1e-4. The SVM models developed with amino acid, dipeptide and four-part amino acid compositions showed the MCC of 0.60, 0.46, and 0.53, respectively. This is the first study in which evolutionary information in form of position specific scoring matrix (PSSM) profile has been successfully used for predicting RBPs. We achieved the maximum MCC of 0.62 using SVM model based on PSSM called PSSM-400. Finally, we developed different hybrid approaches and achieved maximum MCC of 0.66. We also developed a method for predicting three subclasses of RNA binding proteins (e.g., rRNA, tRNA, mRNA binding proteins). The performance of the method was also evaluated on an independent dataset of 69 RBPs and 100 non-RBPs (NBPs). An additional benchmarking was also performed using gene ontology (GO) based annotation. Based on the hybrid approach a web-server RNApred has been developed for predicting RNA binding proteins from amino acid sequences (http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/rnapred/).

  5. Persistence and epidemic propagation of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa sequence type 235 clone harboring an IS26 composite transposon carrying the blaIMP-1 integron in Hiroshima, Japan, 2005 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Wataru; Kayama, Shizuo; Kouda, Shuntaro; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Kobayashi, Kanao; Shigemoto, Norifumi; Shimada, Norimitsu; Yano, Raita; Hisatsune, Junzo; Kato, Fuminori; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Sueda, Taijiro; Ohge, Hiroki; Sugai, Motoyuki

    2015-05-01

    A 9-year surveillance for multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the Hiroshima region showed that the number of isolates harboring the metallo-β-lactamase gene bla(IMP-1) abruptly increased after 2004, recorded the highest peak in 2006, and showed a tendency to decline afterwards, indicating a history of an epidemic. PCR mapping of the variable regions of the integrons showed that this epidemic was caused by the clonal persistence and propagation of an MDR P. aeruginosa strain harboring the bla(IMP-1) gene and an aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase gene, aac(6')-Iae in a class I integron (In113), whose integrase gene intl1 was disrupted by an IS26 insertion. Sequence analysis of the representative strain PA058447 resistance element containing the In113-derived gene cassette array showed that the element forms an IS26 transposon embedded in the chromosome. It has a Tn21 backbone and is composed of two segments sandwiched by three IS26s. In Japan, clonal nationwide expansion of an MDR P. aeruginosa NCGM2.S1 harboring chromosomally encoded In113 with intact intl1 is reported. Multilocus sequence typing and genomic comparison strongly suggest that PA058447 and NCGM2.S1 belong to the same clonal lineage. Moreover, the structures of the resistance element in the two strains are very similar, but the sites of insertion into the chromosome are different. Based on tagging information of the IS26 present in both resistance elements, we suggest that the MDR P. aeruginosa clone causing the epidemic in Hiroshima for the past 9 years originated from a common ancestor genome of PA058447 and NCGM2.S1 through an IS26 insertion into intl1 of In113 and through IS26-mediated genomic rearrangements.

  6. Persistence and Epidemic Propagation of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Sequence Type 235 Clone Harboring an IS26 Composite Transposon Carrying the blaIMP-1 Integron in Hiroshima, Japan, 2005 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Wataru; Kayama, Shizuo; Kouda, Shuntaro; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Kobayashi, Kanao; Shigemoto, Norifumi; Shimada, Norimitsu; Yano, Raita; Hisatsune, Junzo; Kato, Fuminori; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Sueda, Taijiro; Ohge, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    A 9-year surveillance for multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the Hiroshima region showed that the number of isolates harboring the metallo-β-lactamase gene blaIMP-1 abruptly increased after 2004, recorded the highest peak in 2006, and showed a tendency to decline afterwards, indicating a history of an epidemic. PCR mapping of the variable regions of the integrons showed that this epidemic was caused by the clonal persistence and propagation of an MDR P. aeruginosa strain harboring the blaIMP-1 gene and an aminoglycoside 6′-N-acetyltransferase gene, aac(6′)-Iae in a class I integron (In113), whose integrase gene intl1 was disrupted by an IS26 insertion. Sequence analysis of the representative strain PA058447 resistance element containing the In113-derived gene cassette array showed that the element forms an IS26 transposon embedded in the chromosome. It has a Tn21 backbone and is composed of two segments sandwiched by three IS26s. In Japan, clonal nationwide expansion of an MDR P. aeruginosa NCGM2.S1 harboring chromosomally encoded In113 with intact intl1 is reported. Multilocus sequence typing and genomic comparison strongly suggest that PA058447 and NCGM2.S1 belong to the same clonal lineage. Moreover, the structures of the resistance element in the two strains are very similar, but the sites of insertion into the chromosome are different. Based on tagging information of the IS26 present in both resistance elements, we suggest that the MDR P. aeruginosa clone causing the epidemic in Hiroshima for the past 9 years originated from a common ancestor genome of PA058447 and NCGM2.S1 through an IS26 insertion into intl1 of In113 and through IS26-mediated genomic rearrangements. PMID:25712351

  7. Direct binding of specific AUF1 isoforms to tandem zinc finger domains of tristetraprolin (TTP) family proteins.

    PubMed

    Kedar, Vishram P; Zucconi, Beth E; Wilson, Gerald M; Blackshear, Perry J

    2012-02-17

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is the prototype of a family of CCCH tandem zinc finger proteins that can bind to AU-rich elements in mRNAs and promote their decay. TTP binds to mRNA through its central tandem zinc finger domain; it then promotes mRNA deadenylation, considered to be the rate-limiting step in eukaryotic mRNA decay. We found that TTP and its related family members could bind to certain isoforms of another AU-rich element-binding protein, HNRNPD/AUF1, as well as a related protein, laAUF1. The interaction domain within AUF1p45 appeared to be a C-terminal "GY" region, and the interaction domain within TTP was the tandem zinc finger domain. Surprisingly, binding of AUF1p45 to TTP occurred even with TTP mutants that lacked RNA binding activity. In cell extracts, binding of AUF1p45 to TTP potentiated TTP binding to ARE-containing RNA probes, as determined by RNA gel shift assays; AUF1p45 did not bind to the RNA probes under these conditions. Using purified, recombinant proteins and a synthetic RNA target in FRET assays, we demonstrated that AUF1p45, but not AUF1p37, increased TTP binding affinity for RNA ∼5-fold. These data suggest that certain isoforms of AUF1 can serve as "co-activators" of TTP family protein binding to RNA. The results raise interesting questions about the ability of AUF1 isoforms to regulate the mRNA binding and decay-promoting activities of TTP and its family members as well as the ability of AUF1 proteins to serve as possible physical links between TTP and other mRNA decay proteins and structures.

  8. The STAR RNA binding proteins GLD-1, QKI, SAM68 and SLM-2 bind bipartite RNA motifs

    PubMed Central

    Galarneau, André; Richard, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    Background SAM68, SAM68-like mammalian protein 1 (SLM-1) and 2 (SLM-2) are members of the K homology (KH) and STAR (signal transduction activator of RNA metabolism) protein family. The function of these RNA binding proteins has been difficult to elucidate mainly because of lack of genetic data providing insights about their physiological RNA targets. In comparison, genetic studies in mice and C. elegans have provided evidence as to the physiological mRNA targets of QUAKING and GLD-1 proteins, two other members of the STAR protein family. The GLD-1 binding site is defined as a hexanucleotide sequence (NACUCA) that is found in many, but not all, physiological GLD-1 mRNA targets. Previously by using Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (SELEX), we defined the QUAKING binding site as a hexanucleotide sequence with an additional half-site (UAAY). This sequence was identified in QKI mRNA targets including the mRNAs for myelin basic proteins. Results Herein we report using SELEX the identification of the SLM-2 RNA binding site as direct U(U/A)AA repeats. The bipartite nature of the consensus sequence was essential for SLM-2 high affinity RNA binding. The identification of a bipartite mRNA binding site for QKI and now SLM-2 prompted us to determine whether SAM68 and GLD-1 also bind bipartite direct repeats. Indeed SAM68 bound the SLM-2 consensus and required both U(U/A)AA motifs. We also confirmed that GLD-1 also binds a bipartite RNA sequence in vitro with a short RNA sequence from its tra-2 physiological mRNA target. Conclusion These data demonstrate that the STAR proteins QKI, GLD-1, SAM68 and SLM-2 recognize RNA with direct repeats as bipartite motifs. This information should help identify binding sites within physiological RNA targets. PMID:19457263

  9. Neofunctionalization of zona pellucida proteins enhances freeze-prevention in the eggs of Antarctic notothenioids

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lixue; Huang, Qiao; Wu, Zhichao; Cao, Dong-dong; Ma, Zhanling; Xu, Qianghua; Hu, Peng; Fu, Yanxia; Shen, Yu; Chan, Jiulin; Zhou, Cong-zhao; Zhai, Wanying; Chen, Liangbiao

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the eggs of the Antarctic notothenioid fishes avoid freezing are not fully understood. Zona pellucida proteins (ZPs) are constituents of the chorion which forms a protective matrix surrounding the egg. Here we report occurrence of freezing temperature-related gene expansion and acquisition of unusual ice melting-promoting (IMP) activity in a family of Antarctic notothenioid ZPs (AnnotoZPs). Members of AnnotoZPs are shown to bind with ice and non-colligatively depress the melting point of a solution in a range of 0.26 to 0.65 °C at a moderate concentration. Eggs of zebrafishes expressing an AnnotoZP transgene show improved melting point depression and enhanced survival in freezing conditions. Mutational analyses in a representative AnnotoZP indicate the ZP domain and patches of acidic residues are essential structures for the IMP activity. AnnotoZPs, therefore, represent a group of macromolecules that prevent freezing by a unique ZP–ice interaction mechanism distinct from the known antifreeze proteins. PMID:27698404

  10. Neofunctionalization of zona pellucida proteins enhances freeze-prevention in the eggs of Antarctic notothenioids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lixue; Huang, Qiao; Wu, Zhichao; Cao, Dong-Dong; Ma, Zhanling; Xu, Qianghua; Hu, Peng; Fu, Yanxia; Shen, Yu; Chan, Jiulin; Zhou, Cong-Zhao; Zhai, Wanying; Chen, Liangbiao

    2016-10-01

    The mechanisms by which the eggs of the Antarctic notothenioid fishes avoid freezing are not fully understood. Zona pellucida proteins (ZPs) are constituents of the chorion which forms a protective matrix surrounding the egg. Here we report occurrence of freezing temperature-related gene expansion and acquisition of unusual ice melting-promoting (IMP) activity in a family of Antarctic notothenioid ZPs (AnnotoZPs). Members of AnnotoZPs are shown to bind with ice and non-colligatively depress the melting point of a solution in a range of 0.26 to 0.65 °C at a moderate concentration. Eggs of zebrafishes expressing an AnnotoZP transgene show improved melting point depression and enhanced survival in freezing conditions. Mutational analyses in a representative AnnotoZP indicate the ZP domain and patches of acidic residues are essential structures for the IMP activity. AnnotoZPs, therefore, represent a group of macromolecules that prevent freezing by a unique ZP-ice interaction mechanism distinct from the known antifreeze proteins.

  11. Identification of two proteins that bind to a pyrimidine-rich sequence in the 3'-untranslated region of GAP-43 mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, N; Baekelandt, V; Goritchenko, L; Benowitz, L I

    1997-01-01

    GAP-43 is a membrane phosphoprotein that is important for the development and plasticity of neural connections. In undifferentiated PC12 pheochromocytoma cells, GAP-43 mRNA degrades rapidly ( t = 5 h), but becomes stable when cells are treated with nerve growth factor. To identify trans- acting factors that may influence mRNA stability, we combined column chromatography and gel mobility shift assays to isolate GAP-43 mRNA binding proteins from neonatal bovine brain tissue. This resulted in the isolation of two proteins that bind specifically and competitively to a pyrimidine-rich sequence in the 3'-untranslated region of GAP-43 mRNA. Partial amino acid sequencing revealed that one of the RNA binding proteins coincides with FBP (far upstream element binding protein), previously characterized as a protein that resembles hnRNP K and which binds to a single-stranded, pyrimidine-rich DNA sequence upstream of the c -myc gene to activate its expression. The other binding protein shares sequence homology with PTB, a polypyrimidine tract binding protein implicated in RNA splicing and regulation of translation initiation. The two proteins bind to a 26 nt pyrimidine-rich sequence lying 300 nt downstream of the end of the coding region, in an area shown by others to confer instability on a reporter mRNA in transient transfection assays. We therefore propose that FBP and the PTB-like protein may compete for binding at the same site to influence the stability of GAP-43 mRNA. PMID:9092640

  12. Identification of an immunogenic protein of Actinobacillus seminis that is present in microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Actinobacillus seminis is a gram-negative bacterium of the Pasteurellaceae family that is involved in ovine epididymitis. Looking for a protein specific to this species, we determined the protein profile of subcellular fractions of A. seminis (American Type Culture Collection number 15768): proteins from the outer membrane (OMPs), inner membrane (IMPs), and cytoplasm (CPs). These profiles provide the first data, to our knowledge, regarding subcellular fractions of A. seminis. In the OMP fraction, we identified a protein with a molecular mass of 75 kDa that proved to be immunogenic and apparently specific for A. seminis. This conclusion was based on the reaction of hyperimmune serum of rabbits inoculated with whole cells of A. seminis that was tested against sonicated complete cells of reference strains and field isolates of Brucella ovis, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni. No protein of these bacteria cross-reacted with the 75-kDa protein of A. seminis. Furthermore, when each type of hyperimmune serum was tested against the sonicated cells and each of the subcellular fractions of A. seminis, it did not recognize the A. seminis 75-kDa protein. We also isolated and identified this protein in microvesicles released to the culture supernatant. The results suggest that the 75-kDa protein could be used to establish a diagnostic test specific for ovine epididymitis caused by A. seminis. PMID:16548331

  13. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2007-09-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  14. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2014-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  15. La-related Protein 1 (LARP1) Represses Terminal Oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNA Translation Downstream of mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1).

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Bruno D; Zakaria, Chadi; Jia, Jian-Jun; Graber, Tyson E; Svitkin, Yuri; Tahmasebi, Soroush; Healy, Danielle; Hoang, Huy-Dung; Jensen, Jacob M; Diao, Ilo T; Lussier, Alexandre; Dajadian, Christopher; Padmanabhan, Niranjan; Wang, Walter; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Hearnden, Jaclyn; Smith, Ewan M; Tsukumo, Yoshinori; Yanagiya, Akiko; Morita, Masahiro; Petroulakis, Emmanuel; González, Jose L; Hernández, Greco; Alain, Tommy; Damgaard, Christian K

    2015-06-26

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a critical regulator of protein synthesis. The best studied targets of mTORC1 in translation are the eukaryotic initiation factor-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1). In this study, we identify the La-related protein 1 (LARP1) as a key novel target of mTORC1 with a fundamental role in terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNA translation. Recent genome-wide studies indicate that TOP and TOP-like mRNAs compose a large portion of the mTORC1 translatome, but the mechanism by which mTORC1 controls TOP mRNA translation is incompletely understood. Here, we report that LARP1 functions as a key repressor of TOP mRNA translation downstream of mTORC1. Our data show the following: (i) LARP1 associates with mTORC1 via RAPTOR; (ii) LARP1 interacts with TOP mRNAs in an mTORC1-dependent manner; (iii) LARP1 binds the 5'TOP motif to repress TOP mRNA translation; and (iv) LARP1 competes with the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4G for TOP mRNA binding. Importantly, from a drug resistance standpoint, our data also show that reducing LARP1 protein levels by RNA interference attenuates the inhibitory effect of rapamycin, Torin1, and amino acid deprivation on TOP mRNA translation. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that LARP1 functions as an important repressor of TOP mRNA translation downstream of mTORC1. PMID:25940091

  16. La-related Protein 1 (LARP1) Represses Terminal Oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNA Translation Downstream of mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1)*

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Bruno D.; Zakaria, Chadi; Jia, Jian-Jun; Graber, Tyson E.; Svitkin, Yuri; Tahmasebi, Soroush; Healy, Danielle; Hoang, Huy-Dung; Jensen, Jacob M.; Diao, Ilo T.; Lussier, Alexandre; Dajadian, Christopher; Padmanabhan, Niranjan; Wang, Walter; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Hearnden, Jaclyn; Smith, Ewan M.; Tsukumo, Yoshinori; Yanagiya, Akiko; Morita, Masahiro; Petroulakis, Emmanuel; González, Jose L.; Hernández, Greco; Alain, Tommy; Damgaard, Christian K.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a critical regulator of protein synthesis. The best studied targets of mTORC1 in translation are the eukaryotic initiation factor-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1). In this study, we identify the La-related protein 1 (LARP1) as a key novel target of mTORC1 with a fundamental role in terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNA translation. Recent genome-wide studies indicate that TOP and TOP-like mRNAs compose a large portion of the mTORC1 translatome, but the mechanism by which mTORC1 controls TOP mRNA translation is incompletely understood. Here, we report that LARP1 functions as a key repressor of TOP mRNA translation downstream of mTORC1. Our data show the following: (i) LARP1 associates with mTORC1 via RAPTOR; (ii) LARP1 interacts with TOP mRNAs in an mTORC1-dependent manner; (iii) LARP1 binds the 5′TOP motif to repress TOP mRNA translation; and (iv) LARP1 competes with the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4G for TOP mRNA binding. Importantly, from a drug resistance standpoint, our data also show that reducing LARP1 protein levels by RNA interference attenuates the inhibitory effect of rapamycin, Torin1, and amino acid deprivation on TOP mRNA translation. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that LARP1 functions as an important repressor of TOP mRNA translation downstream of mTORC1. PMID:25940091

  17. A single missense mutation in a coiled-coil domain of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S2 confers a thermosensitive phenotype that can be suppressed by ribosomal protein S1.

    PubMed

    Aseev, Leonid V; Chugunov, Anton O; Efremov, Roman G; Boni, Irina V

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S2 is an essential component of translation machinery, and its viable mutated variants conferring distinct phenotypes serve as a valuable tool in studying the role of S2 in translation regulation. One of a few available rpsB mutants, rpsB1, shows thermosensitivity and ensures enhanced expression of leaderless mRNAs. In this study, we identified the nature of the rpsB1 mutation. Sequencing of the rpsB1 allele revealed a G-to-A transition in the part of the rpsB gene which encodes a coiled-coil domain of S2. The resulting E132K substitution resides in a highly conserved site, TKKE, a so-called N-terminal capping box, at the beginning of the second alpha helix. The protruding coiled-coil domain of S2 is known to provide binding with 16S rRNA in the head of the 30S subunit and, in addition, to interact with a key mRNA binding protein, S1. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed a detrimental impact of the E132K mutation on the coiled-coil structure and thereby on the interactions between S2 and 16S rRNA, providing a clue for the thermosensitivity of the rpsB1 mutant. Using a strain producing a leaderless lacZ transcript from the chromosomal lac promoter, we demonstrated that not only the rpsB1 mutation generating S2/S1-deficient ribosomes but also the rpsA::IS10 mutation leading to partial deficiency in S1 alone increased translation efficiency of the leaderless mRNA by about 10-fold. Moderate overexpression of S1 relieved all these effects and, moreover, suppressed the thermosensitive phenotype of rpsB1, indicating the role of S1 as an extragenic suppressor of the E132K mutation.

  18. Total protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  19. Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard-Blum, S.

    Proteins are key actors in the life of the cell, involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Since variations in the expression of messenger RNA are not systematically correlated with variations in the protein levels, the latter better reflect the way a cell functions. Protein microarrays thus supply complementary information to DNA chips. They are used in particular to analyse protein expression profiles, to detect proteins within complex biological media, and to study protein-protein interactions, which give information about the functions of those proteins [3-9]. They have the same advantages as DNA microarrays for high-throughput analysis, miniaturisation, and the possibility of automation. Section 18.1 gives a brief overview of proteins. Following this, Sect. 18.2 describes how protein microarrays can be made on flat supports, explaining how proteins can be produced and immobilised on a solid support, and discussing the different kinds of substrate and detection method. Section 18.3 discusses the particular format of protein microarrays in suspension. The diversity of protein microarrays and their applications are then reported in Sect. 18.4, with applications to therapeutics (protein-drug interactions) and diagnostics. The prospects for future developments of protein microarrays are then outlined in the conclusion. The bibliography provides an extensive list of reviews and detailed references for those readers who wish to go further in this area. Indeed, the aim of the present chapter is not to give an exhaustive or detailed analysis of the state of the art, but rather to provide the reader with the basic elements needed to understand how proteins are designed and used.

  20. Dietary Proteins

    MedlinePlus

    ... meat, dairy products, nuts, and certain grains and beans. Proteins from meat and other animal products are complete proteins. This means they supply all of the amino acids the body can't make on its own. Most plant proteins are incomplete. You should eat different types ...

  1. Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  2. Nuclear Trafficking of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist P-Protein Is Regulated by an Importin-Binding Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C-Terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Caitlin L; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Oksayan, Sibil; Glover, Dominic J; Jans, David A; Moseley, Gregory W

    2016-01-01

    Rabies virus P-protein is expressed as five isoforms (P1-P5) which undergo nucleocytoplasmic trafficking important to roles in immune evasion. Although nuclear import of P3 is known to be mediated by an importin (IMP)-recognised nuclear localization sequence in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), the mechanisms underlying nuclear import of other P isoforms in which the N-NLS is inactive or has been deleted have remained unresolved. Based on the previous observation that mutation of basic residues K214/R260 of the P-protein C-terminal domain (P-CTD) can result in nuclear exclusion of P3, we used live cell imaging, protein interaction analysis and in vitro nuclear transport assays to examine in detail the nuclear trafficking properties of this domain. We find that the effect of mutation of K214/R260 on P3 is largely dependent on nuclear export, suggesting that nuclear exclusion of mutated P3 involves the P-CTD-localized nuclear export sequence (C-NES). However, assays using cells in which nuclear export is pharmacologically inhibited indicate that these mutations significantly inhibit P3 nuclear accumulation and, importantly, prevent nuclear accumulation of P1, suggestive of effects on NLS-mediated import activity in these isoforms. Consistent with this, molecular binding and transport assays indicate that the P-CTD mediates IMPα2/IMPβ1-dependent nuclear import by conferring direct binding to the IMPα2/IMPβ1 heterodimer, as well as to a truncated form of IMPα2 lacking the IMPβ-binding autoinhibitory domain (ΔIBB-IMPα2), and IMPβ1 alone. These properties are all dependent on K214 and R260. This provides the first evidence that P-CTD contains a genuine IMP-binding NLS, and establishes the mechanism by which P-protein isoforms other than P3 can be imported to the nucleus. These data underpin a refined model for P-protein trafficking that involves the concerted action of multiple NESs and IMP-binding NLSs, and highlight the intricate regulation of P-protein

  3. Nuclear Trafficking of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist P-Protein Is Regulated by an Importin-Binding Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Caitlin L.; Wagstaff, Kylie M.; Oksayan, Sibil; Glover, Dominic J.

    2016-01-01

    Rabies virus P-protein is expressed as five isoforms (P1-P5) which undergo nucleocytoplasmic trafficking important to roles in immune evasion. Although nuclear import of P3 is known to be mediated by an importin (IMP)-recognised nuclear localization sequence in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), the mechanisms underlying nuclear import of other P isoforms in which the N-NLS is inactive or has been deleted have remained unresolved. Based on the previous observation that mutation of basic residues K214/R260 of the P-protein C-terminal domain (P-CTD) can result in nuclear exclusion of P3, we used live cell imaging, protein interaction analysis and in vitro nuclear transport assays to examine in detail the nuclear trafficking properties of this domain. We find that the effect of mutation of K214/R260 on P3 is largely dependent on nuclear export, suggesting that nuclear exclusion of mutated P3 involves the P-CTD-localized nuclear export sequence (C-NES). However, assays using cells in which nuclear export is pharmacologically inhibited indicate that these mutations significantly inhibit P3 nuclear accumulation and, importantly, prevent nuclear accumulation of P1, suggestive of effects on NLS-mediated import activity in these isoforms. Consistent with this, molecular binding and transport assays indicate that the P-CTD mediates IMPα2/IMPβ1-dependent nuclear import by conferring direct binding to the IMPα2/IMPβ1 heterodimer, as well as to a truncated form of IMPα2 lacking the IMPβ-binding autoinhibitory domain (ΔIBB-IMPα2), and IMPβ1 alone. These properties are all dependent on K214 and R260. This provides the first evidence that P-CTD contains a genuine IMP-binding NLS, and establishes the mechanism by which P-protein isoforms other than P3 can be imported to the nucleus. These data underpin a refined model for P-protein trafficking that involves the concerted action of multiple NESs and IMP-binding NLSs, and highlight the intricate regulation of P-protein

  4. Nuclear Trafficking of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist P-Protein Is Regulated by an Importin-Binding Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C-Terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Caitlin L; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Oksayan, Sibil; Glover, Dominic J; Jans, David A; Moseley, Gregory W

    2016-01-01

    Rabies virus P-protein is expressed as five isoforms (P1-P5) which undergo nucleocytoplasmic trafficking important to roles in immune evasion. Although nuclear import of P3 is known to be mediated by an importin (IMP)-recognised nuclear localization sequence in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), the mechanisms underlying nuclear import of other P isoforms in which the N-NLS is inactive or has been deleted have remained unresolved. Based on the previous observation that mutation of basic residues K214/R260 of the P-protein C-terminal domain (P-CTD) can result in nuclear exclusion of P3, we used live cell imaging, protein interaction analysis and in vitro nuclear transport assays to examine in detail the nuclear trafficking properties of this domain. We find that the effect of mutation of K214/R260 on P3 is largely dependent on nuclear export, suggesting that nuclear exclusion of mutated P3 involves the P-CTD-localized nuclear export sequence (C-NES). However, assays using cells in which nuclear export is pharmacologically inhibited indicate that these mutations significantly inhibit P3 nuclear accumulation and, importantly, prevent nuclear accumulation of P1, suggestive of effects on NLS-mediated import activity in these isoforms. Consistent with this, molecular binding and transport assays indicate that the P-CTD mediates IMPα2/IMPβ1-dependent nuclear import by conferring direct binding to the IMPα2/IMPβ1 heterodimer, as well as to a truncated form of IMPα2 lacking the IMPβ-binding autoinhibitory domain (ΔIBB-IMPα2), and IMPβ1 alone. These properties are all dependent on K214 and R260. This provides the first evidence that P-CTD contains a genuine IMP-binding NLS, and establishes the mechanism by which P-protein isoforms other than P3 can be imported to the nucleus. These data underpin a refined model for P-protein trafficking that involves the concerted action of multiple NESs and IMP-binding NLSs, and highlight the intricate regulation of P-protein

  5. IMP: The LRDC Integrated Macro Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzhugh, Robert J.; Chadwick, Martin M.

    The Learning Research and Development Center Time-Sharing System (LRDC/TSS) supports numerous non-standard devices and terminals and provides a variety of powerful programing options, enabling the researcher to maintain close control over the experimental environment. To achieve this degree of flexibility, it was necessary to write programs…

  6. Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) image calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, R.J.; Smith, P.H.; Lemmon, M.; Tanner, R.; Burkland, M.; Wegryn, E.; Weinberg, J.; Marcialis, R.; Britt, D.T.; Thomas, N.; Kramm, R.; Dummel, A.; Crowe, D.; Bos, B.J.; Bell, J.F.; Rueffer, P.; Gliem, F.; Johnson, J. R.; Maki, J.N.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Singer, Robert B.

    1999-01-01

    The Imager for Mars Pathfinder returned over 16,000 high-quality images from the surface of Mars. The camera was well-calibrated in the laboratory, with <5% radiometric uncertainty. The photometric properties of two radiometric targets were also measured with 3% uncertainty. Several data sets acquired during the cruise and on Mars confirm that the system operated nominally throughout the course of the mission. Image calibration algorithms were developed for landed operations to correct instrumental sources of noise and to calibrate images relative to observations of the radiometric targets. The uncertainties associated with these algorithms as well as current improvements to image calibration are discussed. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. IMPETUS III, OPERATION IMP-I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JOSEPH, JOSEPH M.

    A GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES AND SERVICES FOR A READING PROGRAM TAUGHT BY MEANS OF THE "TALKING TYPEWRITER" IS PRESENTED. THE TALKING TYPEWRITER IS LOCATED IN A SOUNDPROOF BOOTH. THE STUDENT SITS IN FRONT OF A TYPEWRITER AND RESPONDS, REACTS, AND INTERACTS TO DIRECTIONS VOICED BY A COMPUTERIZED, MAGNETIZED PROGRAMED SYSTEM. THE CRITERIA FOR…

  8. Developmentally regulated HEART STOPPER, a mitochondrially targeted L18 ribosomal protein gene, is required for cell division, differentiation, and seed development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Luo, Ming; Day, Robert C.; Talbot, Mark J.; Ivanova, Aneta; Ashton, Anthony R.; Chaudhury, Abed M.; Macknight, Richard C.; Hrmova, Maria; Koltunow, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the role of a mitochondrial ribosomal (mitoribosomal) L18 protein in cell division, differentiation, and seed development after the characterization of a recessive mutant, heart stopper (hes). The hes mutant produced uncellularized endosperm and embryos arrested at the late globular stage. The mutant embryos differentiated partially on rescue medium with some forming callus. HES (At1g08845) encodes a mitochondrially targeted member of a highly diverged L18 ribosomal protein family. The substitution of a conserved amino residue in the hes mutant potentially perturbs mitoribosomal function via altered binding of 5S rRNA and/or influences the stability of the 50S ribosomal subunit, affecting mRNA binding and translation. Consistent with this, marker genes for mitochondrial dysfunction were up-regulated in the mutant. The slow growth of the endosperm and embryo indicates a defect in cell cycle progression, which is evidenced by the down-regulation of cell cycle genes. The down-regulation of other genes such as EMBRYO DEFECTIVE genes links the mitochondria to the regulation of many aspects of seed development. HES expression is developmentally regulated, being preferentially expressed in tissues with active cell division and differentiation, including developing embryos and the root tips. The divergence of the L18 family, the tissue type restricted expression of HES, and the failure of other L18 members to complement the hes phenotype suggest that the L18 proteins are involved in modulating development. This is likely via heterogeneous mitoribosomes containing different L18 members, which may result in differential mitochondrial functions in response to different physiological situations during development. PMID:26105995

  9. Transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Jack D

    2013-04-16

    This Teaching Resource provides and describes two animated lessons that illustrate general properties of transport proteins. The lesson called "transport protein classes" depicts major classes and subclasses of transport proteins. The "transporters, mechanism of action" lesson explains how transporters and P class ATPase (adenosine triphosphatase) pumps function. These animations serve as valuable resources for any collegiate-level course that describes these important factors. Courses that might use them include introductory biology, biochemistry, cell biology, physiology, and biophysics.

  10. Proteins wriggle.

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Michael; Cahill, Sean; Cahill, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    We propose an algorithmic strategy for improving the efficiency of Monte Carlo searches for the low-energy states of proteins. Our strategy is motivated by a model of how proteins alter their shapes. In our model, when proteins fold under physiological conditions, their backbone dihedral angles change synchronously in groups of four or more to avoid steric clashes and respect the kinematic conservation laws. They wriggle; they do not thrash. We describe a simple algorithm that can be used to incorporate wriggling in Monte Carlo simulations of protein folding. We have tested this wriggling algorithm against a code in which the dihedral angles are varied independently (thrashing). Our standard of success is the average root-mean-square distance (rmsd) between the alpha-carbons of the folding protein and those of its native structure. After 100,000 Monte Carlo sweeps, the relative decrease in the mean rmsd, as one switches from thrashing to wriggling, rises from 11% for the protein 3LZM with 164 amino acids (aa) to 40% for the protein 1A1S with 313 aa and 47% for the protein 16PK with 415 aa. These results suggest that wriggling is useful and that its utility increases with the size of the protein. One may implement wriggling on a parallel computer or a computer farm. PMID:11964253

  11. An essential nuclear protein in trypanosomes is a component of mRNA transcription/export pathway.

    PubMed

    Serpeloni, Mariana; Moraes, Carolina Borsoi; Muniz, João Renato Carvalho; Motta, Maria Cristina Machado; Ramos, Augusto Savio Peixoto; Kessler, Rafael Luis; Inoue, Alexandre Haruo; daRocha, Wanderson Duarte; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Fragoso, Stenio Perdigão; Goldenberg, Samuel; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H; Avila, Andréa Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, different RNA species are exported from the nucleus via specialized pathways. The mRNA export machinery is highly integrated with mRNA processing, and includes a different set of nuclear transport adaptors as well as other mRNA binding proteins, RNA helicases, and NPC-associated proteins. The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease, a widespread and neglected human disease which is endemic to Latin America. Gene expression in Trypanosoma has unique characteristics, such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-encoding genes and mRNA processing by trans-splicing. In general, post-transcriptional events are the major points for regulation of gene expression in these parasites. However, the export pathway of mRNA from the nucleus is poorly understood. The present study investigated the function of TcSub2, which is a highly conserved protein ortholog to Sub2/ UAP56, a component of the Transcription/Export (TREX) multiprotein complex connecting transcription with mRNA export in yeast/human. Similar to its orthologs, TcSub2 is a nuclear protein, localized in dispersed foci all over the nuclei -except the fibrillar center of nucleolus- and at the interface between dense and non-dense chromatin areas, proposing the association of TcSub2 with transcription/processing sites. These findings were analyzed further by BrUTP incorporation assays and confirmed that TcSub2 is physically associated with active RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II), but not RNA polymerase I (RNA pol I) or Spliced Leader (SL) transcription, demonstrating participation particularly in nuclear mRNA metabolism in T. cruzi. The double knockout of the TcSub2 gene is lethal in T. cruzi, suggesting it has an essential function. Alternatively, RNA interference assays were performed in Trypanosoma brucei. It allowed demonstrating that besides being an essential protein, its knockdown causes mRNA accumulation in the nucleus and decrease of

  12. Elevated free cholesterol in a p62 overexpression model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Yvette; Kessler, Sonja M; Gemperlein, Katja; Bohle, Rainer M; Müller, Rolf; Haybaeck, Johannes; Kiemer, Alexandra K

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To characterize how insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) mRNA binding protein p62/IMP2-2 promotes steatohepatitis in the absence of dietary cholesterol. METHODS: Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) was induced in wild-type mice and in mice overexpressing p62 specifically in the liver by feeding the mice a methionine and choline deficient (MCD) diet for either two or four weeks. As a control, animals were fed a methionine and choline supplemented diet. Serum triglycerides, cholesterol, glucose, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine transaminase were determined by standard analytical techniques. Hepatic gene expression was determined by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Generation of reactive oxygen species in liver tissue was quantified as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances using a photometric assay and malondialdehyde as a standard. Tissue fatty acid profiles and cholesterol levels were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after hydrolysis. Hepatocellular iron accumulation was determined by Prussian blue staining in paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed tissue. Filipin staining on frozen liver tissue was used to quantify hepatic free cholesterol levels. Additionally, nuclear localization of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) subunit p65 was examined in frozen tissues. RESULTS: Liver-specific overexpression of the insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding protein 2-2 (IGF2BP2-2/IMP2-2/p62) induces steatosis with regular chow and amplifies NASH-induced fibrosis in the MCD mouse model. Activation of NF-κB and expression of NF-κB target genes suggested an increased inflammatory response in p62 transgenic animals. Analysis of hepatic lipid composition revealed an elevation of monounsaturated fatty acids as well as increased hepatic cholesterol. Moreover, serum cholesterol was significantly elevated in p62 transgenic mice. Dietary cholesterol represents a critical factor for the development of NASH from hepatic steatosis

  13. Autoantibodies to tumor-associated antigens as biomarkers in cancer immunodiagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weihong; Peng, Bo; Lu, Yumin; Xu, Weijia; Qian, Wei; Zhang, Jian-Ying

    2011-01-01

    Cancer sera contain antibodies that react with a unique group of autologous cellular antigens called tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), and therefore these autoantibodies can be considered as reporters from the immune system, to identify authentic TAAs involved in the malignant transformation. Once a TAA is identified, different approaches would be used to comprehensively characterize and validate the identified TAA/anti-TAA systems that are potential biomarkers in cancer immunodiagnosis. In this manner, several novel TAAs such as p62 and p90 have been identified in our previous studies. p62, a member of IGF-II mRNA binding proteins (IMPs), is an oncofetal protein absent in adult tissues, the presence of anti-p62 autoantibodies relates to abnormal expression of p62 in tumor cells. p90 was recently characterized as an inhibitor of the tumor suppressor PP2A (protein phosphatase 2A), and an autoantibody to p90 appears in high frequency in prostate cancer. The present review will focus on the recent advances in studies mainly associated with these two novel TAAs as biomarkers in cancer immunodiagnosis. PMID:21167321

  14. Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  15. In vivo versus in vitro protein abundance analysis of Shigella dysenteriae type 1 reveals changes in the expression of proteins involved in virulence, stress and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (SD1) causes the most severe form of epidemic bacillary dysentery. Quantitative proteome profiling of Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (SD1) in vitro (derived from LB cell cultures) and in vivo (derived from gnotobiotic piglets) was performed by 2D-LC-MS/MS and APEX, a label-free computationally modified spectral counting methodology. Results Overall, 1761 proteins were quantitated at a 5% FDR (false discovery rate), including 1480 and 1505 from in vitro and in vivo samples, respectively. Identification of 350 cytoplasmic membrane and outer membrane (OM) proteins (38% of in silico predicted SD1 membrane proteome) contributed to the most extensive survey of the Shigella membrane proteome reported so far. Differential protein abundance analysis using statistical tests revealed that SD1 cells switched to an anaerobic energy metabolism under in vivo conditions, resulting in an increase in fermentative, propanoate, butanoate and nitrate metabolism. Abundance increases of transcription activators FNR and Nar supported the notion of a switch from aerobic to anaerobic respiration in the host gut environment. High in vivo abundances of proteins involved in acid resistance (GadB, AdiA) and mixed acid fermentation (PflA/PflB) indicated bacterial survival responses to acid stress, while increased abundance of oxidative stress proteins (YfiD/YfiF/SodB) implied that defense mechanisms against oxygen radicals were mobilized. Proteins involved in peptidoglycan turnover (MurB) were increased, while β-barrel OM proteins (OmpA), OM lipoproteins (NlpD), chaperones involved in OM protein folding pathways (YraP, NlpB) and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis (Imp) were decreased, suggesting unexpected modulations of the outer membrane/peptidoglycan layers in vivo. Several virulence proteins of the Mxi-Spa type III secretion system and invasion plasmid antigens (Ipa proteins) required for invasion of colonic epithelial cells, and release of bacteria

  16. Evolution of the Global Aurora During Positive IMP Bz and Varying IMP By Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumnock, J. A.; Sharber, J. R.; Heelis. R. A.; Hairston, M. R.; Carven, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    The DE 1 imaging instrumentation provides a full view of the entire auroral oval every 12 min for several hours during each orbit. We examined five examples of global evolution of the aurora that occurred during the northern hemisphere winter of 1981-1982 when the z component of the interplanetary magnetic field was positive and the y component was changing sign. Evolution of an expanded auroral emission region into a theta aurora appears to require a change in the sign of By during northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Theta aurora are formed both from expanded duskside emission regions (By changes from positive to negative) and dawnside emission regions (By changes from negative to positive), however the dawnside-originating and duskside-originating evolutions are not mirror images. The persistence of a theta aurora after its formation suggests that there may be no clear relationship between the theta aurora pattern and the instantaneous configuration of the IMF.

  17. Bacteriophage protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Häuser, Roman; Blasche, Sonja; Dokland, Terje; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; von Brunn, Albrecht; Salas, Margarita; Casjens, Sherwood; Molineux, Ian; Uetz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages T7, λ, P22, and P2/P4 (from Escherichia coli), as well as ϕ29 (from Bacillus subtilis), are among the best-studied bacterial viruses. This chapter summarizes published protein interaction data of intraviral protein interactions, as well as known phage-host protein interactions of these phages retrieved from the literature. We also review the published results of comprehensive protein interaction analyses of Pneumococcus phages Dp-1 and Cp-1, as well as coliphages λ and T7. For example, the ≈55 proteins encoded by the T7 genome are connected by ≈43 interactions with another ≈15 between the phage and its host. The chapter compiles published interactions for the well-studied phages λ (33 intra-phage/22 phage-host), P22 (38/9), P2/P4 (14/3), and ϕ29 (20/2). We discuss whether different interaction patterns reflect different phage lifestyles or whether they may be artifacts of sampling. Phages that infect the same host can interact with different host target proteins, as exemplified by E. coli phage λ and T7. Despite decades of intensive investigation, only a fraction of these phage interactomes are known. Technical limitations and a lack of depth in many studies explain the gaps in our knowledge. Strategies to complete current interactome maps are described. Although limited space precludes detailed overviews of phage molecular biology, this compilation will allow future studies to put interaction data into the context of phage biology. PMID:22748812

  18. Recombinant protein production technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  19. The enzymatic activity of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/IMP cyclohydrolase is enhanced by NPM-ALK: new insights in ALK-mediated pathogenesis and the treatment of ALCL

    PubMed Central

    Boccalatte, Francesco E.; Voena, Claudia; Riganti, Chiara; Bosia, Amalia; D'Amico, Lucia; Riera, Ludovica; Cheng, Mangeng; Ruggeri, Bruce; Jensen, Ole N.; Goss, Valerie L.; Lee, Kimberly; Nardone, Julie; Rush, John; Polakiewicz, Roberto D.; Comb, Michael J.; Chiarle, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma represents a subset of neoplasms caused by translocations that juxtapose the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) to dimerization partners. The constitutive activation of ALK fusion proteins leads to cellular transformation through a complex signaling network. To elucidate the ALK pathways sustaining lymphomagenesis and tumor maintenance, we analyzed the tyrosine-kinase protein profiles of ALK-positive cell lines using 2 complementary proteomic-based approaches, taking advantage of a specific ALK RNA interference (RNAi) or cell-permeable inhibitors. A well-defined set of ALK-associated tyrosine phosphopeptides, including metabolic enzymes, kinases, ribosomal and cytoskeletal proteins, was identified. Validation studies confirmed that vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase (ATIC) associated with nucleophosmin (NPM)–ALK, and their phosphorylation required ALK activity. ATIC phosphorylation was documented in cell lines and primary tumors carrying ALK proteins and other tyrosine kinases, including TPR-Met and wild type c-Met. Functional analyses revealed that ALK-mediated ATIC phosphorylation enhanced its enzymatic activity, dampening the methotrexate-mediated transformylase activity inhibition. These findings demonstrate that proteomic approaches in well-controlled experimental settings allow the definition of informative proteomic profiles and the discovery of novel ALK downstream players that contribute to the maintenance of the neoplastic phenotype. Prediction of tumor responses to methotrexate may justify specific molecular-based chemotherapy. PMID:18845790

  20. PhyloDome--visualization of taxonomic distributions of domains occurring in eukaryote protein sequence sets.

    PubMed

    Novatchkova, Maria; Wildpaner, Michael; Schweizer, Dieter; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2005-07-01

    The analysis of taxonomic distribution and lineage-specific variation of domains and domain combinations is an important step in the assessment of their functional roles and potential interoperability. In the study of eukaryote sequence sets with many multi-domain proteins, it can become laborious to evaluate the phylogenetic context of the many occurring domains and their mutual relationships. PhyloDome is an answer to that problem. It provides a fast overview on the taxonomic spreading and potential interrelation of domains that are either given as a list of names and PFAM/SMART accessions or derived from a user-defined set of sequences. This taxonomic distribution analysis can be helpful in protein function and interaction assignment as the comparative study of potential Hedgehog pathway members in C.elegans shows. An implementation of PhyloDome is accessible for public use as a WWW-Service at http://mendel.imp.univie.ac.at/phylodome/. Software components are available on request.

  1. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    MedlinePlus

    ... of protein and fat, called lipoproteins (such as LDL cholesterol). ... globulin proteins may indicate: Abnormally low level of LDL cholesterol Malnutrition Increased gamma globulin proteins may indicate: Bone ...

  2. Protein sulfhydration.

    PubMed

    Paul, Bindu D; Snyder, Solomon H

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is one of the gasotransmitters that modulates various biological processes and participates in multiple signaling pathways. H2S signals by a process termed sulfhydration. Sulfhydration has recently been recognized as a posttranslational modification similar to nitrosylation. Sulfhydration occurs at reactive cysteine residues in proteins and results in the conversion of an -SH group of cysteine to an -SSH or a persulfide group. Sulfhydration is highly prevalent in vivo, and aberrant sulfhydration patterns have been observed under several pathological conditions ranging from heart disease to neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease. The biotin switch assay, originally developed to detect nitrosylation, has been modified to detect sulfhydration. In this chapter, we discuss the physiological roles of sulfhydration and the methodologies used to detect this modification.

  3. Fusion-protein-assisted protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Kobe, Bostjan; Ve, Thomas; Williams, Simon J

    2015-07-01

    Fusion proteins can be used directly in protein crystallization to assist crystallization in at least two different ways. In one approach, the `heterologous fusion-protein approach', the fusion partner can provide additional surface area to promote crystal contact formation. In another approach, the `fusion of interacting proteins approach', protein assemblies can be stabilized by covalently linking the interacting partners. The linker connecting the proteins plays different roles in the two applications: in the first approach a rigid linker is required to reduce conformational heterogeneity; in the second, conversely, a flexible linker is required that allows the native interaction between the fused proteins. The two approaches can also be combined. The recent applications of fusion-protein technology in protein crystallization from the work of our own and other laboratories are briefly reviewed.

  4. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  5. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  6. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  7. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  8. Modeling of proteins and their assemblies with the Integrative Modeling Platform.

    PubMed

    Webb, Benjamin; Lasker, Keren; Velázquez-Muriel, Javier; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Pellarin, Riccardo; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Greenberg, Charles; Raveh, Barak; Tjioe, Elina; Russel, Daniel; Sali, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    To understand the workings of the living cell, we need to characterize protein assemblies that constitute the cell (for example, the ribosome, 26S proteasome, and the nuclear pore complex). A reliable high-resolution structural characterization of these assemblies is frequently beyond the reach of current experimental methods, such as X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, electron microscopy, footprinting, chemical cross-linking, FRET spectroscopy, small angle X-ray scattering, and proteomics. However, the information garnered from different methods can be combined and used to build models of the assembly structures that are consistent with all of the available datasets, and therefore more accurate, precise, and complete. Here, we describe a protocol for this integration, whereby the information is converted to a set of spatial restraints and a variety of optimization procedures can be used to generate models that satisfy the restraints as well as possible. These generated models can then potentially inform about the precision and accuracy of structure determination, the accuracy of the input datasets, and further data generation. We also demonstrate the Integrative Modeling Platform (IMP) software, which provides the necessary computational framework to implement this protocol, and several applications for specific use cases. PMID:24203340

  9. Protein immobilization strategies for protein biochips.

    PubMed

    Rusmini, Federica; Zhong, Zhiyuan; Feijen, Jan

    2007-06-01

    In the past few years, protein biochips have emerged as promising proteomic and diagnostic tools for obtaining information about protein functions and interactions. Important technological innovations have been made. However, considerable development is still required, especially regarding protein immobilization, in order to fully realize the potential of protein biochips. In fact, protein immobilization is the key to the success of microarray technology. Proteins need to be immobilized onto surfaces with high density in order to allow the usage of small amount of sample solution. Nonspecific protein adsorption needs to be avoided or at least minimized in order to improve detection performances. Moreover, full retention of protein conformation and activity is a challenging task to be accomplished. Although a large number of review papers on protein biochips have been published in recent years, few have focused on protein immobilization technology. In this review, current protein immobilization strategies, including physical, covalent, and bioaffinity immobilization for the fabrication of protein biochips, are described. Particular consideration has been given to oriented immobilization, also referred to as site-specific immobilization, which is believed will improve homogeneous surface covering and accessibility of the active site.

  10. Protein-losing enteropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  11. Protein in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... basic structure of protein is a chain of amino acids. You need protein in your diet to help ... Protein foods are broken down into parts called amino acids during digestion. The human body needs a number ...

  12. Nanotechnologies in protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Krizkova, Sona; Heger, Zbynek; Zalewska, Marta; Moulick, Amitava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology became an important research tool for study and detection of proteins, protein-protein interactions and a number of other applications. The utilization of nanoparticle-based materials and nanotechnology-based techniques for immobilization allows us not only to extend the surface for biomolecule immobilization resulting in enhanced substrate binding properties, decreased background signals and enhanced reporter systems for more sensitive assays. Generally in contemporarily developed microarray systems, multiple nanotechnology-based techniques are combined. In this review, applications of nanoparticles and nanotechnologies in creating protein microarrays, proteins immobilization and detection are summarized. We anticipate that advanced nanotechnologies can be exploited to expand promising fields of proteins identification, monitoring of protein-protein or drug-protein interactions, or proteins structures. PMID:26039143

  13. Protein domain architectures.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Nicola J

    2010-01-01

    Proteins are composed of functional units, or domains, that can be found alone or in combination with other domains. Analysis of protein domain architectures and the movement of protein domains within and across different genomes provide clues about the evolution of protein function. The classification of proteins into families and domains is provided through publicly available tools and databases that use known protein domains to predict other members in new proteins sequences. Currently at least 80% of the main protein sequence databases can be classified using these tools, thus providing a large data set to work from for analyzing protein domain architectures. Each of the protein domain databases provide intuitive web interfaces for viewing and analyzing their domain classifications and provide their data freely for downloading. Some of the main protein family and domain databases are described here, along with their Web-based tools for analyzing domain architectures.

  14. PREFACE: Protein protein interactions: principles and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Tsai, Chung-Jung

    2005-06-01

    Proteins are the `workhorses' of the cell. Their roles span functions as diverse as being molecular machines and signalling. They carry out catalytic reactions, transport, form viral capsids, traverse membranes and form regulated channels, transmit information from DNA to RNA, making possible the synthesis of new proteins, and they are responsible for the degradation of unnecessary proteins and nucleic acids. They are the vehicles of the immune response and are responsible for viral entry into the cell. Given their importance, considerable effort has been centered on the prediction of protein function. A prime way to do this is through identification of binding partners. If the function of at least one of the components with which the protein interacts is known, that should let us assign its function(s) and the pathway(s) in which it plays a role. This holds since the vast majority of their chores in the living cell involve protein-protein interactions. Hence, through the intricate network of these interactions we can map cellular pathways, their interconnectivities and their dynamic regulation. Their identification is at the heart of functional genomics; their prediction is crucial for drug discovery. Knowledge of the pathway, its topology, length, and dynamics may provide useful information for forecasting side effects. The goal of predicting protein-protein interactions is daunting. Some associations are obligatory, others are continuously forming and dissociating. In principle, from the physical standpoint, any two proteins can interact, but under what conditions and at which strength? The principles of protein-protein interactions are general: the non-covalent interactions of two proteins are largely the outcome of the hydrophobic effect, which drives the interactions. In addition, hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions play important roles. Thus, many of the interactions observed in vitro are the outcome of experimental overexpression. Protein disorder

  15. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  16. Inferring Protein Associations Using Protein Pulldown Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, Julia L.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Borkowski, John J.; Cannon, William R.

    2007-02-01

    Background: One method to infer protein-protein associations is through a “bait-prey pulldown” assay using a protein affinity agent and an LC-MS (liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry)-based protein identification method. False positive and negative protein identifications are not uncommon, however, leading to incorrect inferences. Methods: A pulldown experiment generates a protein association matrix wherein each column represents a sample from one bait protein, each row represents one prey protein and each cell contains a presence/absence association indicator. Our method evaluates the presence/absence pattern across a prey protein (row) with a Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT), computing its p-value with simulated LRT test statistic distributions after a check with simulated binomial random variates disqualified the large sample 2 test. A pulldown experiment often involves hundreds of tests so we apply the false discovery rate method to control the false positive rate. Based on the p-value, each prey protein is assigned a category (specific association, non-specific association, or not associated) and appraised with respect to the pulldown experiment’s goal and design. The method is illustrated using a pulldown experiment investigating the protein complexes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Results: The Monte Carlo simulated LRT p-values objectively reveal specific and ubiquitous prey, as well as potential systematic errors. The example analysis shows the results to be biologically sensible and more realistic than the ad hoc screening methods previously utilized. Conclusions: The method presented appears to be informative for screening for protein-protein associations.

  17. Yeast ribosomal protein L7 and its homologue Rlp7 are simultaneously present at distinct sites on pre-60S ribosomal particles

    PubMed Central

    Babiano, Reyes; Badis, Gwenael; Saveanu, Cosmin; Namane, Abdelkader; Doyen, Antonia; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Jacquier, Alain; Fromont-Racine, Micheline; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis requires >300 assembly factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Ribosome assembly factors Imp3, Mrt4, Rlp7 and Rlp24 have sequence similarity to ribosomal proteins S9, P0, L7 and L24, suggesting that these pre-ribosomal factors could be placeholders that prevent premature assembly of the corresponding ribosomal proteins to nascent ribosomes. However, we found L7 to be a highly specific component of Rlp7-associated complexes, revealing that the two proteins can bind simultaneously to pre-ribosomal particles. Cross-linking and cDNA analysis experiments showed that Rlp7 binds to the ITS2 region of 27S pre-rRNAs, at two sites, in helix III and in a region adjacent to the pre-rRNA processing sites C1 and E. However, L7 binds to mature 25S and 5S rRNAs and cross-linked predominantly to helix ES7Lb within 25S rRNA. Thus, despite their predicted structural similarity, our data show that Rlp7 and L7 clearly bind at different positions on the same pre-60S particles. Our results also suggest that Rlp7 facilitates the formation of the hairpin structure of ITS2 during 60S ribosomal subunit maturation. PMID:23945946

  18. Mirror image proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Le; Lu, Wuyuan

    2014-10-01

    Proteins composed entirely of unnatural d-amino acids and the achiral amino acid glycine are mirror image forms of their native l-protein counterparts. Recent advances in chemical protein synthesis afford unique and facile synthetic access to domain-sized mirror image d-proteins, enabling protein research to be conducted through 'the looking glass' and in a way previously unattainable. d-Proteins can facilitate structure determination of their native l-forms that are difficult to crystallize (racemic X-ray crystallography); d-proteins can serve as the bait for library screening to ultimately yield pharmacologically superior d-peptide/d-protein therapeutics (mirror-image phage display); d-proteins can also be used as a powerful mechanistic tool for probing molecular events in biology. This review examines recent progress in the application of mirror image proteins to structural biology, drug discovery, and immunology.

  19. High-throughput and multiplexed protein array technology: protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Sakanyan, Vehary

    2005-02-01

    Miniaturized protein arrays address protein interactions with various types of molecules in a high-throughput and multiplexed fashion. This review focuses on achievements in the analysis of protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions. The technological feasibility of protein arrays depends on the different factors that enable the arrayed proteins to recognize molecular partners and on the specificity of the interactions involved. Proteome-scale studies of molecular interactions require high-throughput approaches for both the production and purification of functionally active proteins. Various solutions have been proposed to avoid non-specific protein interactions on array supports and to monitor low-abundance molecules. The data accumulated indicate that this emerging technology is perfectly suited to resolve networks of protein interactions involved in complex physiological and pathological phenomena in different organisms and to develop sensitive tools for biomedical applications.

  20. Merkel cell carcinoma expresses K homology domain-containing protein overexpressed in cancer similar to other high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Jennifer G; Simon, Rochelle A; Bourne, Patricia A; Spaulding, Betsy O; Scott, Glynis A; Xu, Haodong

    2009-02-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is an uncommon and aggressive primary cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma with a high rate of recurrence and metastasis. Optimal management is controversial; consequently, it is imperative to identify the signaling pathways involved in the pathogenesis of Merkel cell carcinoma so that effective therapeutic targeting agents can be developed. We previously reported that K homology domain-containing protein overexpressed in cancer is expressed in high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas of the lung and extrapulmonary small cell carcinomas. The K homology domain-containing protein overexpressed in cancer (KOC), also known as L523S and IMP-3, is an insulin-like growth factor II messenger RNA-binding protein that promotes tumor cell proliferation by enhancing insulin-like growth factor II protein expression. Expression of KOC in Merkel cell carcinoma has not been investigated. We studied 20 Merkel cell carcinomas by immunohistochemistry using a monoclonal antibody against L523S/KOC. Of 20 Merkel cell carcinomas, 18 (90%) overexpressed KOC, with 11 (55%) overexpressing KOC in greater than 90% of tumor cells, 3 (15%) overexpressing KOC in 50% to 90% of tumor cells, 3 (15%) overexpressing KOC in 10% to 50% of tumor cells, and 1 (5%) overexpressing KOC in less than 10% of tumor cells. The immunostaining intensity was variable, with moderate to strong staining in 14 cases and weak staining in the remaining 4. Extent of expression of K homology domain-containing protein overexpressed in cancer predicted metastasis (P = .04) and was weakly correlated with increased tumor size (P = .08). In conclusion, Merkel cell carcinoma expresses K homology domain-containing protein overexpressed in cancer with an expression pattern similar to high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas of the lung and extrapulmonary small cell carcinomas. We propose K homology domain-containing protein overexpressed in cancer as a potential target molecule for the treatment of high

  1. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  2. [Protein expression and purification].

    PubMed

    Růčková, E; Müller, P; Vojtěšek, B

    2014-01-01

    Production of recombinant proteins is essential for many applications in both basic research and also in medicine, where recombinant proteins are used as pharmaceuticals. This review summarizes procedures involved in recombinant protein expression and purification, including molecular cloning of target genes into expression vectors, selection of the appropriate expression system, and protein purification techniques. Recombinant DNA technology allows protein engineering to modify protein stability, activity and function or to facilitate protein purification by affinity tag fusions. A wide range of cloning systems enabling fast and effective design of expression vectors is currently available. A first choice of protein expression system is usually the bacteria Escherichia coli. The main advantages of this prokaryotic expression system are low cost and simplicity; on the other hand this system is often unsuitable for production of complex mammalian proteins. Protein expression mediated by eukaryotic cells (yeast, insect and mammalian cells) usually produces properly folded and posttranslationally modified proteins. How-ever, cultivation of insect and, especially, mammalian cells is time consuming and expensive. Affinity tagged recombinant proteins are purified efficiently using affinity chromatography. An affinity tag is a protein or peptide that mediates specific binding to a chromatography column, unbound proteins are removed during a washing step and pure protein is subsequently eluted. PMID:24945544

  3. Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: 24-Hour Urine Protein; Urine Total Protein; Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio; ...

  4. A New Membrane Protein Sbg1 Links the Contractile Ring Apparatus and Septum Synthesis Machinery in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Kriti; Palani, Saravanan; Cortés, Juan C. G.; Sato, Mamiko; Sevugan, Mayalagu; Ramos, Mariona; Vijaykumar, Shruthi; Osumi, Masako; Naqvi, Naweed I.; Ribas, Juan Carlos; Balasubramanian, Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis in many organisms requires a plasma membrane anchored actomyosin ring, whose contraction facilitates cell division. In yeast and fungi, actomyosin ring constriction is also coordinated with division septum assembly. How the actomyosin ring interacts with the plasma membrane and the plasma membrane-localized septum synthesizing machinery remains poorly understood. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, an attractive model organism to study cytokinesis, the β-1,3-glucan synthase Cps1p / Bgs1p, an integral membrane protein, localizes to the plasma membrane overlying the actomyosin ring and is required for primary septum synthesis. Through a high-dosage suppressor screen we identified an essential gene, sbg1+ (suppressor of beta glucan synthase 1), which suppressed the colony formation defect of Bgs1-defective cps1-191 mutant at higher temperatures. Sbg1p, an integral membrane protein, localizes to the cell ends and to the division site. Sbg1p and Bgs1p physically interact and are dependent on each other to localize to the division site. Loss of Sbg1p results in an unstable actomyosin ring that unravels and slides, leading to an inability to deposit a single contiguous division septum and an important reduction of the β-1,3-glucan proportion in the cell wall, coincident with that observed in the cps1-191 mutant. Sbg1p shows genetic and / or physical interaction with Rga7p, Imp2p, Cdc15p, and Pxl1p, proteins known to be required for actomyosin ring integrity and efficient septum synthesis. This study establishes Sbg1p as a key member of a group of proteins that link the plasma membrane, the actomyosin ring, and the division septum assembly machinery in fission yeast. PMID:27749909

  5. Designing Fluorinated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Marsh, E N G

    2016-01-01

    As methods to incorporate noncanonical amino acid residues into proteins have become more powerful, interest in their use to modify the physical and biological properties of proteins and enzymes has increased. This chapter discusses the use of highly fluorinated analogs of hydrophobic amino acids, for example, hexafluoroleucine, in protein design. In particular, fluorinated residues have proven to be generally effective in increasing the thermodynamic stability of proteins. The chapter provides an overview of the different fluorinated amino acids that have been used in protein design and the various methods available for producing fluorinated proteins. It discusses model proteins systems into which highly fluorinated amino acids have been introduced and the reasons why fluorinated residues are generally stabilizing, with particular reference to thermodynamic and structural studies from our laboratory. Lastly, details of the methodology we have developed to measure the thermodynamic stability of oligomeric fluorinated proteins are presented, as this may be generally applicable to many proteins. PMID:27586337

  6. DNA mimicry by proteins.

    PubMed

    Dryden, D T F; Tock, M R

    2006-04-01

    It has been discovered recently, via structural and biophysical analyses, that proteins can mimic DNA structures in order to inhibit proteins that would normally bind to DNA. Mimicry of the phosphate backbone of DNA, the hydrogen-bonding properties of the nucleotide bases and the bending and twisting of the DNA double helix are all present in the mimics discovered to date. These mimics target a range of proteins and enzymes such as DNA restriction enzymes, DNA repair enzymes, DNA gyrase and nucleosomal and nucleoid-associated proteins. The unusual properties of these protein DNA mimics may provide a foundation for the design of targeted inhibitors of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:16545103

  7. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2013-09-01

    Motor proteins are enzymatic molecules that transform chemical energy into mechanical motion and work. They are critically important for supporting various cellular activities and functions. In the last 15 years significant progress in understanding the functioning of motor proteins has been achieved due to revolutionary breakthroughs in single-molecule experimental techniques and strong advances in theoretical modelling. However, microscopic mechanisms of protein motility are still not well explained, and the collective efforts of many scientists are needed in order to solve these complex problems. In this special section the reader will find the latest advances on the difficult road to mapping motor proteins dynamics in various systems. Recent experimental developments have allowed researchers to monitor and to influence the activity of single motor proteins with a high spatial and temporal resolution. It has stimulated significant theoretical efforts to understand the non-equilibrium nature of protein motility phenomena. The latest results from all these advances are presented and discussed in this special section. We would like to thank the scientists from all over the world who have reported their latest research results for this special section. We are also grateful to the staff and editors of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for their invaluable help in handling all the administrative and refereeing activities. The field of motor proteins and protein motility is fast moving, and we hope that this collection of articles will be a useful source of information in this highly interdisciplinary area. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins contents Physics of protein motility and motor proteinsAnatoly B Kolomeisky Identification of unique interactions between the flexible linker and the RecA-like domains of DEAD-box helicase Mss116 Yuan Zhang, Mirkó Palla, Andrew Sun and Jung-Chi Liao The load dependence of the physical properties of a molecular motor

  8. Protein and protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Luc J C; Kies, Arie K; Saris, Wim H M

    2007-08-01

    With the increasing knowledge about the role of nutrition in increasing exercise performance, it has become clear over the last 2 decades that amino acids, protein, and protein hydrolysates can play an important role. Most of the attention has been focused on their effects at a muscular level. As these nutrients are ingested, however, it also means that gastrointestinal digestibility and absorption can modulate their efficacy significantly. Therefore, discussing the role of amino acids, protein, and protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition entails holding a discussion on all levels of the metabolic route. On May 28-29, 2007, a small group of researchers active in the field of exercise science and protein metabolism presented an overview of the different aspects of the application of protein and protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition. In addition, they were asked to share their opinions on the future progress in their fields of research. In this overview, an introduction to the workshop and a short summary of its outcome is provided.

  9. Engineering fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Atsushi; Nagai, Takeharu; Mizuno, Hideaki

    2005-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein from the jellyfish Aequorea victora (GFP) and GFP-like proteins from Anthozoa species encode light-absorbing chromophores intrinsically within their respective protein sequences. Recent studies have made progress in obtaining bright variants of these proteins which develop chromophores quickly and efficiently, as well as novel fluorescent proteins that photoactivate or photoconvert, i.e., become fluorescent or change colors upon illumination at specific wavelengths. Also, monomeric versions of these proteins have been engineered for fusion protein applications. Simple GFP variants and circularly permuted GFP variants have been used to develop fluorescent probes that sense physiological signals such as membrane potential and concentrations of free calcium. Further molecular characterization of the structure and maturation of these proteins is in progress, aimed at providing information for rational design of variants with desired fluorescence properties.

  10. Learning about Proteins

    MedlinePlus

    ... body, and protecting you from disease. All About Amino Acids When you eat foods that contain protein, the ... called amino (say: uh-MEE-no) acids. The amino acids then can be reused to make the proteins ...

  11. Protein S blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... a normal substance in your body that prevents blood clotting. A blood test can be done to see ... family history of blood clots. Protein S helps control blood clotting. A lack of this protein or problem with ...

  12. Protein C blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... a normal substance in the body that prevents blood clotting. A blood test can be done to see ... history of blood clots. Protein C helps control blood clotting. A lack of this protein or problem with ...

  13. [Protein-losing enteropathy].

    PubMed

    Amiot, A

    2015-07-01

    Protein-losing enteropathy is a rare syndrome of gastrointestinal protein loss. The primary causes can be classified into lymphatic leakage due to increased interstitial pressure and increased leakage of protein-rich fluids due to erosive or non-erosive gastrointestinal disorders. The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy should be considered in patients with chronic diarrhea and peripheral oedema. The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy is most commonly based on the determination of fecal alpha-1 antitrypsin clearance. Most protein-losing enteropathy cases are the result of either lymphatic obstruction or a variety of gastrointestinal disorders and cardiac diseases, while primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease) is less common. Treatment of protein-losing enteropathy targets the underlying disease but also includes dietary modification, such as high-protein and low-fat diet along with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation. PMID:25618488

  14. Protein and older adults.

    PubMed

    Chernoff, Ronni

    2004-12-01

    Body composition changes as people get older. One of the noteworthy alterations is the reduction in total body protein. A decrease in skeletal muscle is the most noticeable manifestation of this change but there is also a reduction in other physiologic proteins such as organ tissue, blood components, and immune bodies as well as declines in total body potassium and water. This contributes to impaired wound healing, loss of skin elasticity, and an inability to fight infection. The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for adults for protein is 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. Protein tissue accounts for 30% of whole-body protein turnover but that rate declines to 20% or less by age 70. The result of this phenomenon is that older adults require more protein/kilogram body weight than do younger adults. Recently, it has become clear that the requirement for exogenous protein is at least 1.0 gram/kilogram body weight. Adequate dietary intake of protein may be more difficult for older adults to obtain. Dietary animal protein is the primary source of high biological value protein, iron, vitamin B(12), folic acid, biotin and other essential nutrients. In fact, egg protein is the standard against which all other proteins are compared. Compared to other high-quality protein sources like meat, poultry and seafood, eggs are the least expensive. The importance of dietary protein cannot be underestimated in the diets of older adults; inadequate protein intake contributes to a decrease in reserve capacity, increased skin fragility, decreased immune function, poorer healing, and longer recuperation from illness.

  15. Texturized dairy proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy proteins are amenable to structural modifications induced by high temperature, shear and moisture; in particular, whey proteins can change conformation to new unfolded states. The change in protein state is a basis for creating new foods. The dairy products, nonfat dried milk (NDM), whey prote...

  16. Modeling Protein Self Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton Buck; Hull, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the structure and function of proteins is an important part of the standards-based science curriculum. Proteins serve vital roles within the cell and malfunctions in protein self assembly are implicated in degenerative diseases. Experience indicates that this topic is a difficult one for many students. We have found that the concept…

  17. Destabilized bioluminescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Michael S.; Rakesh, Gupta; Gary, Sayler S.

    2007-07-31

    Purified nucleic acids, vectors and cells containing a gene cassette encoding at least one modified bioluminescent protein, wherein the modification includes the addition of a peptide sequence. The duration of bioluminescence emitted by the modified bioluminescent protein is shorter than the duration of bioluminescence emitted by an unmodified form of the bioluminescent protein.

  18. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  19. CSF total protein

    MedlinePlus

    CSF total protein is a test to determine the amount of protein in your spinal fluid, also called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). ... The normal protein range varies from lab to lab, but is typically about 15 to 60 mg/dL. Note: mg/dL = ...

  20. IMF draping around the geotail - IMP 8 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Siscoe, George; Luhmann, Janet G.

    1992-01-01

    The draping pattern for the full range of IMF directions is mapped in the GSM yz-plane using a large data set for studying magnetic field draping around the tail. Based on the maps, it is concluded that the dominant pattern is draping as found by Ohtani and Kokubun (1991) and Sanchez and Siscoe (1990). A new finding is that the draping pattern is rotated relative to the plane formed by the IMF and the aberrated x-axis, with the degree of rotation varying from zero for strongly northward and southward IMF to a peak of 17 deg for moderately southward IMF. It is also found that the tail radius is bigger for southward IMF than for northward IMF.

  1. The antibiotic potential of prokaryotic IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Liechti, George; Goldberg, Joanna B.; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.

    2016-01-01

    Inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) catalyzes the first committed step of guanosine 5′-monophosphate (GMP) biosynthesis, and thus regulates the guanine nucleotide pool, which in turn governs proliferation. Human IMPDHs are validated targets for immunosuppressive, antiviral and anticancer drugs, but as yet microbial IMPDHs have not been exploited in antimicrobial chemotherapy. Selective inhibitors of IMPDH from Cryptosporidium parvum have recently been discovered that display anti-parasitic activity in cell culture models of infection. X-ray crystal structure and mutagenesis experiments identified the structural features that determine inhibitor susceptibility. These features are found in IMPDHs from a wide variety of pathogenic bacteria, including select agents and multiply drug resistant strains. A second generation inhibitor displays antibacterial activity against Helicobacter pylori, demonstrating the antibiotic potential of IMPDH inhibitors. PMID:21517780

  2. IMP Dehydrogenase: Structural Schizophrenia and an Unusual Base

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom,L.; Gan, L.

    2006-01-01

    Textbooks describe enzymes as relatively rigid templates for the transition state of a chemical reaction, and indeed an enzyme such as chymotrypsin, which catalyzes a relatively simple hydrolysis reaction, is reasonably well described by this model. Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) undergoes a remarkable array of conformational transitions in the course of a complicated catalytic cycle, offering a dramatic counterexample to this view. IMPDH displays several other unusual mechanistic features, including an Arg residue that may act as a general base catalyst and a dynamic monovalent cation site. Further, IMPDH appears to be involved in 'moon-lighting' functions that may require additional conformational states. How the balance between conformational states is maintained and how the various conformational states interconvert is only beginning to be understood.

  3. Simultaneous measurements of magnetotail dynamics by IMP spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Lepping, R. P.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Bame, S. J.; Asbridge, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Changes in tail energy density during substorms in the magnetotail are given. In addition to plasma sheet thinnings seen prior to substorm onsets, a gradual decrease in plasma beta was detected in the deep tail which precedes onset and the more prominent plasma disappearance that typically accompanies it. The frequency of thinnings and the regions over which they occurred indicate that drastic changes in plasma sheet thickness are common features of substorms which occur at all locations across the tail.

  4. Protopia: a protein-protein interaction tool

    PubMed Central

    Real-Chicharro, Alejandro; Ruiz-Mostazo, Iván; Navas-Delgado, Ismael; Kerzazi, Amine; Chniber, Othmane; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Medina, Miguel Ángel; Aldana-Montes, José F

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interactions can be considered the basic skeleton for living organism self-organization and homeostasis. Impressive quantities of experimental data are being obtained and computational tools are essential to integrate and to organize this information. This paper presents Protopia, a biological tool that offers a way of searching for proteins and their interactions in different Protein Interaction Web Databases, as a part of a multidisciplinary initiative of our institution for the integration of biological data . Results The tool accesses the different Databases (at present, the free version of Transfac, DIP, Hprd, Int-Act and iHop), and results are expressed with biological protein names or databases codes and can be depicted as a vector or a matrix. They can be represented and handled interactively as an organic graph. Comparison among databases is carried out using the Uniprot codes annotated for each protein. Conclusion The tool locates and integrates the current information stored in the aforementioned databases, and redundancies among them are detected. Results are compatible with the most important network analysers, so that they can be compared and analysed by other world-wide known tools and platforms. The visualization possibilities help to attain this goal and they are especially interesting for handling multiple-step or complex networks. PMID:19828077

  5. Viral complement regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Rosengard, A M; Ahearn, J M

    1999-05-01

    The inactivation of complement provides cells and tissues critical protection from complement-mediated attack and decreases the associated recruitment of other inflammatory mediators. In an attempt to evade the host immune response, viruses have evolved two mechanisms to acquire complement regulatory proteins. They can directly seize the host cell complement regulators onto their outer envelope and/or they can produce their own proteins which are either secreted into the neighboring intercellular space or expressed as membrane-bound proteins on the infected host cell. The following review will concentrate on the viral homologues of the mammalian complement regulatory proteins, specifically those containing complement control protein (CCP) repeats. PMID:10408371

  6. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  7. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  8. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  9. Selective Precipitation of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Matulis, Daumantas

    2016-01-01

    Selective precipitation of proteins can be used as a bulk method to recover the majority of proteins from a crude lysate, as a selective method to fractionate a subset of proteins from a protein solution, or as a very specific method to recover a single protein of interest from a purification step. This unit describes a number of methods suitable for selective precipitation. In each of the protocols that are outlined, the physical or chemical basis of the precipitation process, the parameters that can be varied for optimization, and the basic steps for developing an optimized precipitation are described.

  10. Protein crystallization with paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Miki; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Sano, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Masashi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Takano, Kazufumi

    2016-05-01

    We developed a new protein crystallization method that incorporates paper. A small piece of paper, such as facial tissue or KimWipes, was added to a drop of protein solution in the traditional sitting drop vapor diffusion technique, and protein crystals grew by incorporating paper. By this method, we achieved the growth of protein crystals with reducing osmotic shock. Because the technique is very simple and the materials are easy to obtain, this method will come into wide use for protein crystallization. In the future, it could be applied to nanoliter-scale crystallization screening on a paper sheet such as in inkjet printing.

  11. Forces stabilizing proteins.

    PubMed

    Nick Pace, C; Scholtz, J Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2014-06-27

    The goal of this article is to summarize what has been learned about the major forces stabilizing proteins since the late 1980s when site-directed mutagenesis became possible. The following conclusions are derived from experimental studies of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding variants. (1) Based on studies of 138 hydrophobic interaction variants in 11 proteins, burying a -CH2- group on folding contributes 1.1±0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. (2) The burial of non-polar side chains contributes to protein stability in two ways: first, a term that depends on the removal of the side chains from water and, more importantly, the enhanced London dispersion forces that result from the tight packing in the protein interior. (3) Based on studies of 151 hydrogen bonding variants in 15 proteins, forming a hydrogen bond on folding contributes 1.1±0.8 kcal/mol to protein stability. (4) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. (5) Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. (6) Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar group is not hydrogen bonded. (7) Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds both make large contributions to protein stability.

  12. Clinical protein mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scherl, Alexander

    2015-06-15

    Quantitative protein analysis is routinely performed in clinical chemistry laboratories for diagnosis, therapeutic monitoring, and prognosis. Today, protein assays are mostly performed either with non-specific detection methods or immunoassays. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a very specific analytical method potentially very well suited for clinical laboratories. Its unique advantage relies in the high specificity of the detection. Any protein sequence variant, the presence of a post-translational modification or degradation will differ in mass and structure, and these differences will appear in the mass spectrum of the protein. On the other hand, protein MS is a relatively young technique, demanding specialized personnel and expensive instrumentation. Many scientists and opinion leaders predict MS to replace immunoassays for routine protein analysis, but there are only few protein MS applications routinely used in clinical chemistry laboratories today. The present review consists of a didactical introduction summarizing the pros and cons of MS assays compared to immunoassays, the different instrumentations, and various MS protein assays that have been proposed and/or are used in clinical laboratories. An important distinction is made between full length protein analysis (top-down method) and peptide analysis after enzymatic digestion of the proteins (bottom-up method) and its implication for the protein assay. The document ends with an outlook on what type of analyses could be used in the future, and for what type of applications MS has a clear advantage compared to immunoassays.

  13. Forces Stabilizing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this article is to summarize what has been learned about the major forces stabilizing proteins since the late 1980s when site-directed mutagenesis became possible. The following conclusions are derived from experimental studies of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding variants. 1. Based on studies of 138 hydrophobic interaction variants in 11 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 2. The burial of nonpolar side chains contributes to protein stability in two ways: first, a term that depends on the removal of the side chains from water and, more importantly, the enhanced London dispersion forces that result from the tight packing in the protein interior. 3. Based on studies of 151 hydrogen bonding variants in 15 proteins, forming a hydrogen bond on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.8 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. 5. Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. 6. Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar group is not hydrogen bonded. 7. Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds both make large contributions to protein stability. PMID:24846139

  14. Protein Complexes in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Caufield, J. Harry; Abreu, Marco; Wimble, Christopher; Uetz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale analyses of protein complexes have recently become available for Escherichia coli and Mycoplasma pneumoniae, yielding 443 and 116 heteromultimeric soluble protein complexes, respectively. We have coupled the results of these mass spectrometry-characterized protein complexes with the 285 “gold standard” protein complexes identified by EcoCyc. A comparison with databases of gene orthology, conservation, and essentiality identified proteins conserved or lost in complexes of other species. For instance, of 285 “gold standard” protein complexes in E. coli, less than 10% are fully conserved among a set of 7 distantly-related bacterial “model” species. Complex conservation follows one of three models: well-conserved complexes, complexes with a conserved core, and complexes with partial conservation but no conserved core. Expanding the comparison to 894 distinct bacterial genomes illustrates fractional conservation and the limits of co-conservation among components of protein complexes: just 14 out of 285 model protein complexes are perfectly conserved across 95% of the genomes used, yet we predict more than 180 may be partially conserved across at least half of the genomes. No clear relationship between gene essentiality and protein complex conservation is observed, as even poorly conserved complexes contain a significant number of essential proteins. Finally, we identify 183 complexes containing well-conserved components and uncharacterized proteins which will be interesting targets for future experimental studies. PMID:25723151

  15. Protein solubility modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, S. M.; Pusey, M. L.; Bogle, I. D.

    1999-01-01

    A thermodynamic framework (UNIQUAC model with temperature dependent parameters) is applied to model the salt-induced protein crystallization equilibrium, i.e., protein solubility. The framework introduces a term for the solubility product describing protein transfer between the liquid and solid phase and a term for the solution behavior describing deviation from ideal solution. Protein solubility is modeled as a function of salt concentration and temperature for a four-component system consisting of a protein, pseudo solvent (water and buffer), cation, and anion (salt). Two different systems, lysozyme with sodium chloride and concanavalin A with ammonium sulfate, are investigated. Comparison of the modeled and experimental protein solubility data results in an average root mean square deviation of 5.8%, demonstrating that the model closely follows the experimental behavior. Model calculations and model parameters are reviewed to examine the model and protein crystallization process. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Protein and vegetarian diets.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Kate A; Munn, Elizabeth A; Baines, Surinder K

    2013-08-19

    A vegetarian diet can easily meet human dietary protein requirements as long as energy needs are met and a variety of foods are eaten. Vegetarians should obtain protein from a variety of plant sources, including legumes, soy products, grains, nuts and seeds. Eggs and dairy products also provide protein for those following a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet. There is no need to consciously combine different plant proteins at each meal as long as a variety of foods are eaten from day to day, because the human body maintains a pool of amino acids which can be used to complement dietary protein. The consumption of plant proteins rather than animal proteins by vegetarians may contribute to their reduced risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease.

  17. Racemic protein crystallography.

    PubMed

    Yeates, Todd O; Kent, Stephen B H

    2012-01-01

    Although natural proteins are chiral and are all of one "handedness," their mirror image forms can be prepared by chemical synthesis. This opens up new opportunities for protein crystallography. A racemic mixture of the enantiomeric forms of a protein molecule can crystallize in ways that natural proteins cannot. Recent experimental data support a theoretical prediction that this should make racemic protein mixtures highly amenable to crystallization. Crystals obtained from racemic mixtures also offer advantages in structure determination strategies. The relevance of these potential advantages is heightened by advances in synthetic methods, which are extending the size limit for proteins that can be prepared by chemical synthesis. Recent ideas and results in the area of racemic protein crystallography are reviewed.

  18. Pigment-protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Siegelman, H W

    1980-01-01

    The photosynthetically-active pigment protein complexes of procaryotes and eucaryotes include chlorophyll proteins, carotenochlorophyll proteins, and biliproteins. They are either integral components or attached to photosynthetic membranes. Detergents are frequently required to solubilize the pigment-protein complexes. The membrane localization and detergent solubilization strongly suggest that the pigment-protein complexes are bound to the membranes by hydrophobic interactions. Hydrophobic interactions of proteins are characterized by an increase in entropy. Their bonding energy is directly related to temperature and ionic strength. Hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, a relatively new separation procedure, can furnish an important method for the purification of pigment-protein complexes. Phycobilisome purification and properties provide an example of the need to maintain hydrophobic interactions to preserve structure and function.

  19. MacB ABC transporter is a dimer whose ATPase activity and macrolide-binding capacity are regulated by the membrane fusion protein MacA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong Ting; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Barrera, Nelson P; Frankish, Helen M; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W; Robinson, Carol V; Borges-Walmsley, M Inês; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2009-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize specialized machinery to translocate drugs and protein toxins across the inner and outer membranes, consisting of a tripartite complex composed of an inner membrane secondary or primary active transporter (IMP), a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, and an outer membrane channel. We have investigated the assembly and function of the MacAB/TolC system that confers resistance to macrolides in Escherichia coli. The membrane fusion protein MacA not only stabilizes the tripartite assembly by interacting with both the inner membrane protein MacB and the outer membrane protein TolC, but also has a role in regulating the function of MacB, apparently increasing its affinity for both erythromycin and ATP. Analysis of the kinetic behavior of ATP hydrolysis indicated that MacA promotes and stabilizes the ATP-binding form of the MacB transporter. For the first time, we have established unambiguously the dimeric nature of a noncanonic ABC transporter, MacB that has an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain, by means of nondissociating mass spectrometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and atomic force microscopy. Structural studies of ABC transporters indicate that ATP is bound between a pair of nucleotide binding domains to stabilize a conformation in which the substrate-binding site is outward-facing. Consequently, our data suggest that in the presence of ATP the same conformation of MacB is promoted and stabilized by MacA. Thus, MacA would facilitate the delivery of drugs by MacB to TolC by enhancing the binding of drugs to it and inducing a conformation of MacB that is primed and competent for binding TolC. Our structural studies are an important first step in understanding how the tripartite complex is assembled.

  20. MacB ABC transporter is a dimer whose ATPase activity and macrolide-binding capacity are regulated by the membrane fusion protein MacA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong Ting; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Barrera, Nelson P; Frankish, Helen M; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W; Robinson, Carol V; Borges-Walmsley, M Inês; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2009-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize specialized machinery to translocate drugs and protein toxins across the inner and outer membranes, consisting of a tripartite complex composed of an inner membrane secondary or primary active transporter (IMP), a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, and an outer membrane channel. We have investigated the assembly and function of the MacAB/TolC system that confers resistance to macrolides in Escherichia coli. The membrane fusion protein MacA not only stabilizes the tripartite assembly by interacting with both the inner membrane protein MacB and the outer membrane protein TolC, but also has a role in regulating the function of MacB, apparently increasing its affinity for both erythromycin and ATP. Analysis of the kinetic behavior of ATP hydrolysis indicated that MacA promotes and stabilizes the ATP-binding form of the MacB transporter. For the first time, we have established unambiguously the dimeric nature of a noncanonic ABC transporter, MacB that has an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain, by means of nondissociating mass spectrometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and atomic force microscopy. Structural studies of ABC transporters indicate that ATP is bound between a pair of nucleotide binding domains to stabilize a conformation in which the substrate-binding site is outward-facing. Consequently, our data suggest that in the presence of ATP the same conformation of MacB is promoted and stabilized by MacA. Thus, MacA would facilitate the delivery of drugs by MacB to TolC by enhancing the binding of drugs to it and inducing a conformation of MacB that is primed and competent for binding TolC. Our structural studies are an important first step in understanding how the tripartite complex is assembled. PMID:18955484

  1. MacB ABC Transporter Is a Dimer Whose ATPase Activity and Macrolide-binding Capacity Are Regulated by the Membrane Fusion Protein MacA*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong Ting; Bavro, Vassiliy N.; Barrera, Nelson P.; Frankish, Helen M.; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W.; Robinson, Carol V.; Borges-Walmsley, M. Inês; Walmsley, Adrian R.

    2009-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize specialized machinery to translocate drugs and protein toxins across the inner and outer membranes, consisting of a tripartite complex composed of an inner membrane secondary or primary active transporter (IMP), a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, and an outer membrane channel. We have investigated the assembly and function of the MacAB/TolC system that confers resistance to macrolides in Escherichia coli. The membrane fusion protein MacA not only stabilizes the tripartite assembly by interacting with both the inner membrane protein MacB and the outer membrane protein TolC, but also has a role in regulating the function of MacB, apparently increasing its affinity for both erythromycin and ATP. Analysis of the kinetic behavior of ATP hydrolysis indicated that MacA promotes and stabilizes the ATP-binding form of the MacB transporter. For the first time, we have established unambiguously the dimeric nature of a noncanonic ABC transporter, MacB that has an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain, by means of nondissociating mass spectrometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and atomic force microscopy. Structural studies of ABC transporters indicate that ATP is bound between a pair of nucleotide binding domains to stabilize a conformation in which the substrate-binding site is outward-facing. Consequently, our data suggest that in the presence of ATP the same conformation of MacB is promoted and stabilized by MacA. Thus, MacA would facilitate the delivery of drugs by MacB to TolC by enhancing the binding of drugs to it and inducing a conformation of MacB that is primed and competent for binding TolC. Our structural studies are an important first step in understanding how the tripartite complex is assembled. PMID:18955484

  2. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  3. Toxic proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Dang, Liuyi; Van Damme, Els J M

    2015-09-01

    Plants have evolved to synthesize a variety of noxious compounds to cope with unfavorable circumstances, among which a large group of toxic proteins that play a critical role in plant defense against predators and microbes. Up to now, a wide range of harmful proteins have been discovered in different plants, including lectins, ribosome-inactivating proteins, protease inhibitors, ureases, arcelins, antimicrobial peptides and pore-forming toxins. To fulfill their role in plant defense, these proteins exhibit various degrees of toxicity towards animals, insects, bacteria or fungi. Numerous studies have been carried out to investigate the toxic effects and mode of action of these plant proteins in order to explore their possible applications. Indeed, because of their biological activities, toxic plant proteins are also considered as potentially useful tools in crop protection and in biomedical applications, such as cancer treatment. Genes encoding toxic plant proteins have been introduced into crop genomes using genetic engineering technology in order to increase the plant's resistance against pathogens and diseases. Despite the availability of ample information on toxic plant proteins, very few publications have attempted to summarize the research progress made during the last decades. This review focuses on the diversity of toxic plant proteins in view of their toxicity as well as their mode of action. Furthermore, an outlook towards the biological role(s) of these proteins and their potential applications is discussed.

  4. Modeling Protein Expression and Protein Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donatello; Müller, Peter; Kornblau, Steven M.; Suchard, Marc A.; Ji, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput functional proteomic technologies provide a way to quantify the expression of proteins of interest. Statistical inference centers on identifying the activation state of proteins and their patterns of molecular interaction formalized as dependence structure. Inference on dependence structure is particularly important when proteins are selected because they are part of a common molecular pathway. In that case, inference on dependence structure reveals properties of the underlying pathway. We propose a probability model that represents molecular interactions at the level of hidden binary latent variables that can be interpreted as indicators for active versus inactive states of the proteins. The proposed approach exploits available expert knowledge about the target pathway to define an informative prior on the hidden conditional dependence structure. An important feature of this prior is that it provides an instrument to explicitly anchor the model space to a set of interactions of interest, favoring a local search approach to model determination. We apply our model to reverse-phase protein array data from a study on acute myeloid leukemia. Our inference identifies relevant subpathways in relation to the unfolding of the biological process under study. PMID:26246646

  5. Energy design for protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ravikant, D. V. S.; Elber, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Proteins bind to other proteins efficiently and specifically to carry on many cell functions such as signaling, activation, transport, enzymatic reactions, and more. To determine the geometry and strength of binding of a protein pair, an energy function is required. An algorithm to design an optimal energy function, based on empirical data of protein complexes, is proposed and applied. Emphasis is made on negative design in which incorrect geometries are presented to the algorithm that learns to avoid them. For the docking problem the search for plausible geometries can be performed exhaustively. The possible geometries of the complex are generated on a grid with the help of a fast Fourier transform algorithm. A novel formulation of negative design makes it possible to investigate iteratively hundreds of millions of negative examples while monotonically improving the quality of the potential. Experimental structures for 640 protein complexes are used to generate positive and negative examples for learning parameters. The algorithm designed in this work finds the correct binding structure as the lowest energy minimum in 318 cases of the 640 examples. Further benchmarks on independent sets confirm the significant capacity of the scoring function to recognize correct modes of interactions. PMID:21842951

  6. Principles of Flexible Protein-Protein Docking

    PubMed Central

    Andrusier, Nelly; Mashiach, Efrat; Nussinov, Ruth; Wolfson, Haim J.

    2008-01-01

    Treating flexibility in molecular docking is a major challenge in cell biology research. Here we describe the background and the principles of existing flexible protein-protein docking methods, focusing on the algorithms and their rational. We describe how protein flexibility is treated in different stages of the docking process: in the preprocessing stage, rigid and flexible parts are identified and their possible conformations are modeled. This preprocessing provides information for the subsequent docking and refinement stages. In the docking stage, an ensemble of pre-generated conformations or the identified rigid domains may be docked separately. In the refinement stage, small-scale movements of the backbone and side-chains are modeled and the binding orientation is improved by rigid-body adjustments. For clarity of presentation, we divide the different methods into categories. This should allow the reader to focus on the most suitable method for a particular docking problem. PMID:18655061

  7. Antimicrobial proteins: From old proteins, new tricks.

    PubMed

    Smith, Valerie J; Dyrynda, Elisabeth A

    2015-12-01

    This review describes the main types of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) synthesised by crustaceans, primarily those identified in shrimp, crayfish, crab and lobster. It includes an overview of their range of microbicidal activities and the current landscape of our understanding of their gene expression patterns in different body tissues. It further summarises how their expression might change following various types of immune challenges. The review further considers proteins or protein fragments from crustaceans that have antimicrobial properties but are more usually associated with other biological functions, or are derived from such proteins. It discusses how these unconventional AMPs might be generated at, or delivered to, sites of infection and how they might contribute to crustacean host defence in vivo. It also highlights recent work that is starting to reveal the extent of multi-functionality displayed by some decapod AMPs, particularly their participation in other aspects of host protection. Examples of such activities include proteinase inhibition, phagocytosis, antiviral activity and haematopoiesis. PMID:26320628

  8. Electrophoretic separation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Chakavarti, Bulbul; Chakavarti, Deb

    2008-01-01

    Electrophoresis is used to separate complex mixtures of proteins (e.g., from cells, subcellular fractions, column fractions, or immunoprecipitates), to investigate subunit compositions, and to verify homogeneity of protein samples. It can also serve to purify proteins for use in further applications. In polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, proteins migrate in response to an electrical field through pores in a polyacrylamide gel matrix; pore size decreases with increasing acrylamide concentration. The combination of pore size and protein charge, size, and shape determines the migration rate of the protein. In this unit, the standard Laemmli method is described for discontinuous gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions, i.e., in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). PMID:19066548

  9. Functional Protein Microarray Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shaohui; Xie, Zhi; Qian, Jiang; Blackshaw, Seth; Zhu, Heng

    2010-01-01

    Functional protein microarrays are emerging as a promising new tool for large-scale and high-throughput studies. In this article, we will review their applications in basic proteomics research, where various types of assays have been developed to probe binding activities to other biomolecules, such as proteins, DNA, RNA, small molecules, and glycans. We will also report recent progress of using functional protein microarrays in profiling protein posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, acetylation, and nitrosylation. Finally, we will discuss potential of functional protein microarrays in biomarker identification and clinical diagnostics. We strongly believe that functional protein microarrays will soon become an indispensible and invaluable tool in proteomics research and systems biology. PMID:20872749

  10. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. In this chapter, we will review functions of matrix proteins in a selected set of microorganisms, studies of the matrix proteomes of Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and roles of outer membrane vesicles and of nucleoid-binding proteins in biofilm formation. PMID:26104709

  11. Protein Crystal Quality Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Eddie Snell, Post-Doctoral Fellow the National Research Council (NRC) uses a reciprocal space mapping diffractometer for macromolecular crystal quality studies. The diffractometer is used in mapping the structure of macromolecules such as proteins to determine their structure and thus understand how they function with other proteins in the body. This is one of several analytical tools used on proteins crystallized on Earth and in space experiments. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  12. Computer Models of Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Dr. Marc Pusey (seated) and Dr. Craig Kundrot use computers to analyze x-ray maps and generate three-dimensional models of protein structures. With this information, scientists at Marshall Space Flight Center can learn how proteins are made and how they work. The computer screen depicts a proten structure as a ball-and-stick model. Other models depict the actual volume occupied by the atoms, or the ribbon-like structures that are crucial to a protein's function.

  13. Protein oxidation and peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function. Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides inhibit these pathways and this may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in cells. Available evidence supports an association between protein oxidation and multiple human pathologies, but whether this link is causal remains to be established.

  14. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function. Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides inhibit these pathways and this may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in cells. Available evidence supports an association between protein oxidation and multiple human pathologies, but whether this link is causal remains to be established. PMID:27026395

  15. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  16. Protein-Losing Gastroenteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Pops, Martin A.

    1966-01-01

    In the past 10 years with the development of improved methods, particularly radioisotope techniques, it has been demonstrated that a number of patients with gastrointestinal disease and depletion of plasma proteins become hypoproteinemic because of actual leakage of albumin and other plasma proteins into the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract. The site of protein leakage is variable depending on the underlying pathological state but the loss of protein-containing lymph through the gastrointestinal lymphatic channels seems to be the major mechanism for hypoproteinemia. It has become apparent that there exists a normal mechanism for secretion of plasma proteins into the gastrointestinal tract as part of the overall metabolism of the plasma proteins. When the process is exaggerated so that resynthesis of plasma protein cannot keep pace with its degradation, sometimes severe hypoproteinemia is the result. Such a pathological process has now been described in approximately 40 disease states. A review of all the techniques which can demonstrate gastroenteric protein loss reveals that there are no widely available quantitative tests but that accurate quantitation is not necessary for the diagnosis of protein losing gastroenteropathy. PMID:18730025

  17. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  18. Acanthamoeba castellanii STAT protein.

    PubMed

    Kicinska, Anna; Leluk, Jacek; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) proteins are one of the important mediators of phosphotyrosine-regulated signaling in metazoan cells. We described the presence of STAT protein in a unicellular, free-living amoebae with a simple life cycle, Acanthamoeba castellanii. A. castellanii is the only, studied to date, Amoebozoan that does not belong to Mycetozoa but possesses STATs. A sequence of the A. castellanii STAT protein includes domains similar to those of the Dictyostelium STAT proteins: a coiled coil (characteristic for Dictyostelium STAT coiled coil), a STAT DNA-binding domain and a Src-homology domain. The search for protein sequences homologous to A. castellanii STAT revealed 17 additional sequences from lower eukaryotes. Interestingly, all of these sequences come from Amoebozoa organisms that belong to either Mycetozoa (slime molds) or Centramoebida. We showed that there are four separated clades within the slime mold STAT proteins. The A. castellanii STAT protein branches next to a group of STATc proteins from Mycetozoa. We also demonstrate that Amoebozoa form a distinct monophyletic lineage within the STAT protein world that is well separated from the other groups. PMID:25338074

  19. The Halophile protein database.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naveen; Farooqi, Mohammad Samir; Chaturvedi, Krishna Kumar; Lal, Shashi Bhushan; Grover, Monendra; Rai, Anil; Pandey, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Halophilic archaea/bacteria adapt to different salt concentration, namely extreme, moderate and low. These type of adaptations may occur as a result of modification of protein structure and other changes in different cell organelles. Thus proteins may play an important role in the adaptation of halophilic archaea/bacteria to saline conditions. The Halophile protein database (HProtDB) is a systematic attempt to document the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins from halophilic archaea/bacteria which may be involved in adaptation of these organisms to saline conditions. In this database, various physicochemical properties such as molecular weight, theoretical pI, amino acid composition, atomic composition, estimated half-life, instability index, aliphatic index and grand average of hydropathicity (Gravy) have been listed. These physicochemical properties play an important role in identifying the protein structure, bonding pattern and function of the specific proteins. This database is comprehensive, manually curated, non-redundant catalogue of proteins. The database currently contains 59 897 proteins properties extracted from 21 different strains of halophilic archaea/bacteria. The database can be accessed through link. Database URL: http://webapp.cabgrid.res.in/protein/

  20. Moonlighting proteins in cancer.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyung-Won; Lee, Seong-Ho; Baek, Seung Joon

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1980s, growing evidence suggested that the cellular localization of proteins determined their activity and biological functions. In a classical view, a protein is characterized by the single cellular compartment where it primarily resides and functions. It is now believed that when proteins appear in different subcellular locations, the cells surpass the expected activity of proteins given the same genomic information to fulfill complex biological behavior. Many proteins are recognized for having the potential to exist in multiple locations in cells. Dysregulation of translocation may cause cancer or contribute to poorer cancer prognosis. Thus, quantitative and comprehensive assessment of dynamic proteins and associated protein movements could be a promising indicator in determining cancer prognosis and efficiency of cancer treatment and therapy. This review will summarize these so-called moonlighting proteins, in terms of a coupled intracellular cancer signaling pathway. Determination of the detailed biological intracellular and extracellular transit and regulatory activity of moonlighting proteins permits a better understanding of cancer and identification of potential means of molecular intervention.

  1. Biomolecular membrane protein crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy Bolla, Jani; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W.

    2012-07-01

    Integral membrane proteins comprise approximately 30% of the sequenced genomes, and there is an immediate need for their high-resolution structural information. Currently, the most reliable approach to obtain these structures is X-ray crystallography. However, obtaining crystals of membrane proteins that diffract to high resolution appears to be quite challenging, and remains a major obstacle in structural determination. This brief review summarizes a variety of methodologies for use in crystallizing these membrane proteins. Hopefully, by introducing the available methods, techniques, and providing a general understanding of membrane proteins, a rational decision can be made about now to crystallize these complex materials.

  2. Glycolipid transfer proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rhoderick E.; Mattjus, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Glycolipid transfer proteins (GLTPs) are small (24 kD), soluble, ubiquitous proteins characterized by their ability to accelerate the intermembrane transfer of glycolipids in vitro. GLTP specificity encompasses both sphingoid- and glycerol-based glycolipids, but with a strict requirement that the initial sugar residue be beta-linked to the hydrophobic lipid backbone. The 3D protein structures of GLTP reveal liganded structures with unique lipid binding modes. The biochemical properties of GLTP action at the membrane surface have been studied rather comprehensively, but the biological role of GLTP remains enigmatic. What is clear is that GLTP differs distinctly from other known glycolipid-binding proteins, such as nonspecific lipid transfer proteins, lysosomal sphingolipid activator proteins, lectins, lung surfactant proteins as well as other lipid binding/transfer proteins. Based on the unique conformational architecture that targets GLTP to membranes and enables glycolipid binding, GLTP is now considered the prototypical and founding member of a new protein superfamily in eukaryotes. PMID:17320476

  3. Consensus protein design

    PubMed Central

    Porebski, Benjamin T.; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2016-01-01

    A popular and successful strategy in semi-rational design of protein stability is the use of evolutionary information encapsulated in homologous protein sequences. Consensus design is based on the hypothesis that at a given position, the respective consensus amino acid contributes more than average to the stability of the protein than non-conserved amino acids. Here, we review the consensus design approach, its theoretical underpinnings, successes, limitations and challenges, as well as providing a detailed guide to its application in protein engineering. PMID:27274091

  4. Chemical Synthesis of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Bradley L.; Soellner, Matthew B.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins have become accessible targets for chemical synthesis. The basic strategy is to use native chemical ligation, Staudinger ligation, or other orthogonal chemical reactions to couple synthetic peptides. The ligation reactions are compatible with a variety of solvents and proceed in solution or on a solid support. Chemical synthesis enables a level of control on protein composition that greatly exceeds that attainable with ribosome-mediated biosynthesis. Accordingly, the chemical synthesis of proteins is providing previously unattainable insight into the structure and function of proteins. PMID:15869385

  5. Self assembling proteins

    DOEpatents

    Yeates, Todd O.; Padilla, Jennifer; Colovos, Chris

    2004-06-29

    Novel fusion proteins capable of self-assembling into regular structures, as well as nucleic acids encoding the same, are provided. The subject fusion proteins comprise at least two oligomerization domains rigidly linked together, e.g. through an alpha helical linking group. Also provided are regular structures comprising a plurality of self-assembled fusion proteins of the subject invention, and methods for producing the same. The subject fusion proteins find use in the preparation of a variety of nanostructures, where such structures include: cages, shells, double-layer rings, two-dimensional layers, three-dimensional crystals, filaments, and tubes.

  6. The Insulin-Like Proteins dILPs-2/5 Determine Diapause Inducibility in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kyriacou, Charalambos P.; O’Connor, Michael B.; Costa, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Diapause is an actively induced dormancy that has evolved in Metazoa to resist environmental stresses. In temperate regions, many diapausing insects overwinter at low temperatures by blocking embryonic, larval or adult development. Despite its Afro-tropical origin, Drosophila melanogaster migrated to temperate regions of Asia and Europe where females overwinter as adults by arresting gonadal development (reproductive diapause) at temperatures <13°C. Recent work in D. melanogaster has implicated the developmental hormones dILPs-2 and/or dILP3, and dILP5, homologues of vertebrate insulin/insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), in reproductive arrest. However, polymorphisms in timeless (tim) and couch potato (cpo) dramatically affect diapause inducibility and these dILP experiments could not exclude this common genetic variation contributing to the diapause phenotype. Here, we apply an extensive genetic dissection of the insulin signaling pathway which allows us to see both enhancements and reductions in egg development that are independent of tim and cpo variations. We show that a number of manipulations dramatically enhance diapause to ~100%. These include ablating, or reducing the excitability of the insulin-producing cells (IPCs) that express dILPs-2,3,5 employing the dilp2,3,5-/- triple mutant, desensitizing insulin signaling using a chico mutation, or inhibiting dILP2 and 5 in the hemolymph by over-expressing Imaginal Morphogenesis Protein-Late 2 (Imp-L2). In addition, triple mutant dilp2,3,5-/- females maintain high levels of diapause even when temperatures are raised in adulthood to 19°C. However at 22°C, these females all show egg development revealing that the effects are conditional on temperature and not a general female sterility. In contrast, over-expression of dilps-2/5 or enhancing IPC excitability, led to levels of ovarian arrest that approached zero, underscoring dILPs-2 and 5 as key antagonists of diapause. PMID:27689881

  7. Protein metabolism and requirements.

    PubMed

    Biolo, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle adaptation to critical illness includes insulin resistance, accelerated proteolysis, and increased release of glutamine and the other amino acids. Such amino acid efflux from skeletal muscle provides precursors for protein synthesis and energy fuel to the liver and to the rapidly dividing cells of the intestinal mucosa and the immune system. From these adaptation mechanisms, severe muscle wasting, glutamine depletion, and hyperglycemia, with increased patient morbidity and mortality, may ensue. Protein/amino acid nutrition, through either enteral or parenteral routes, plays a pivotal role in treatment of metabolic abnormalities in critical illness. In contrast to energy requirement, which can be accurately assessed by indirect calorimetry, methods to determine individual protein/amino acid needs are not currently available. In critical illness, a decreased ability of protein/amino acid intake to promote body protein synthesis is defined as anabolic resistance. This abnormality leads to increased protein/amino acid requirement and relative inefficiency of nutritional interventions. In addition to stress mediators, immobility and physical inactivity are key determinants of anabolic resistance. The development of mobility protocols in the intensive care unit should be encouraged to enhance the efficacy of nutrition. In critical illness, protein/amino acid requirement has been defined as the intake level associated with the lowest rate of catabolism. The optimal protein-sparing effects in patients receiving adequate energy are achieved when protein/amino acids are administered at rates between 1.3 and 1.5 g/kg/day. Extra glutamine supplementation is required in conditions of severe systemic inflammatory response. Protein requirement increases during hypocaloric feeding and in patients with acute renal failure on continuous renal replacement therapy. Evidence suggests that receiving adequate protein/amino acid intake may be more important than achieving

  8. Human Plasma Protein C

    PubMed Central

    Kisiel, Walter

    1979-01-01

    Protein C is a vitamin K-dependent protein, which exists in bovine plasma as a precursor of a serine protease. In this study, protein C was isolated to homogeneity from human plasma by barium citrate adsorption and elution, ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sephadex chromatography, dextran sulfate agarose chromatography, and preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Human protein C (Mr = 62,000) contains 23% carbohydrate and is composed of a light chain (Mr = 21,000) and a heavy chain (Mr = 41,000) held together by a disulfide bond(s). The light chain has an amino-terminal sequence of Ala-Asn-Ser-Phe-Leu- and the heavy chain has an aminoterminal sequence of Asp-Pro-Glu-Asp-Gln. The residues that are identical to bovine protein C are underlined. Incubation of human protein C with human α-thrombin at an enzyme to substrate weight ratio of 1:50 resulted in the formation of activated protein C, an enzyme with serine amidase activity. In the activation reaction, the apparent molecular weight of the heavy chain decreased from 41,000 to 40,000 as determined by gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. No apparent change in the molecular weight of the light chain was observed in the activation process. The heavy chain of human activated protein C also contains the active-site serine residue as evidenced by its ability to react with radiolabeled diisopropyl fluorophosphate. Human activated protein C markedly prolongs the kaolin-cephalin clotting time of human plasma, but not that of bovine plasma. The amidolytic and anticoagulant activities of human activated protein C were completely obviated by prior incubation of the enzyme with diisopropyl fluorophosphate. These results indicate that human protein C, like its bovine counterpart, exists in plasma as a zymogen and is converted to a serine protease by limited proteolysis with attendant anticoagulant activity. Images PMID:468991

  9. Interolog interfaces in protein-protein docking.

    PubMed

    Alsop, James D; Mitchell, Julie C

    2015-11-01

    Proteins are essential elements of biological systems, and their function typically relies on their ability to successfully bind to specific partners. Recently, an emphasis of study into protein interactions has been on hot spots, or residues in the binding interface that make a significant contribution to the binding energetics. In this study, we investigate how conservation of hot spots can be used to guide docking prediction. We show that the use of evolutionary data combined with hot spot prediction highlights near-native structures across a range of benchmark examples. Our approach explores various strategies for using hot spots and evolutionary data to score protein complexes, using both absolute and chemical definitions of conservation along with refinements to these strategies that look at windowed conservation and filtering to ensure a minimum number of hot spots in each binding partner. Finally, structure-based models of orthologs were generated for comparison with sequence-based scoring. Using two data sets of 22 and 85 examples, a high rate of top 10 and top 1 predictions are observed, with up to 82% of examples returning a top 10 hit and 35% returning top 1 hit depending on the data set and strategy applied; upon inclusion of the native structure among the decoys, up to 55% of examples yielded a top 1 hit. The 20 common examples between data sets show that more carefully curated interolog data yields better predictions, particularly in achieving top 1 hits. Proteins 2015; 83:1940-1946. © 2015 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The folate binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Corrocher, R; Olivieri, O; Pacor, M L

    1991-01-01

    Folates are essential molecules for cell life and, not surprisingly, their transport in biological fluids and their transfer to cells are finely regulated. Folate binding proteins play a major role in this regulation. This paper will review our knowledge on these proteins and examine the most recent advances in this field. PMID:1820987

  11. Poxviral Ankyrin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Michael H.; Squire, Christopher J.; Mercer, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Multiple repeats of the ankyrin motif (ANK) are ubiquitous throughout the kingdoms of life but are absent from most viruses. The main exception to this is the poxvirus family, and specifically the chordopoxviruses, with ANK repeat proteins present in all but three species from separate genera. The poxviral ANK repeat proteins belong to distinct orthologue groups spread over different species, and align well with the phylogeny of their genera. This distribution throughout the chordopoxviruses indicates these proteins were present in an ancestral vertebrate poxvirus, and have since undergone numerous duplication events. Most poxviral ANK repeat proteins contain an unusual topology of multiple ANK motifs starting at the N-terminus with a C-terminal poxviral homologue of the cellular F-box enabling interaction with the cellular SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. The subtle variations between ANK repeat proteins of individual poxviruses suggest an array of different substrates may be bound by these protein-protein interaction domains and, via the F-box, potentially directed to cellular ubiquitination pathways and possible degradation. Known interaction partners of several of these proteins indicate that the NF-κB coordinated anti-viral response is a key target, whilst some poxviral ANK repeat domains also have an F-box independent affect on viral host-range. PMID:25690795

  12. Protein Unfolding and Alzheimer's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kelvin

    2012-10-01

    Early interaction events of beta-amyloid (Aβ) proteins with neurons have been associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Knowledge pertaining to the role of lipid molecules, particularly cholesterol, in modulating the single Aβ interactions with neurons at the atomic length and picosecond time resolutions, remains unclear. In our research, we have used atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to explore early molecular events including protein insertion kinetics, protein unfolding, and protein-induced membrane disruption of Aβ in lipid domains that mimic the nanoscopic raft and non-raft regions of the neural membrane. In this talk, I will summarize our current work on investigating the role of cholesterol in regulating the Aβ interaction events with membranes at the molecular level. I will also explain how our results will provide new insights into understanding the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease associated with the Aβ proteins.

  13. Structures of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R.; Henderson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In reviewing the structures of membrane proteins determined up to the end of 2009, we present in words and pictures the most informative examples from each family. We group the structures together according to their function and architecture to provide an overview of the major principles and variations on the most common themes. The first structures, determined 20 years ago, were those of naturally abundant proteins with limited conformational variability, and each membrane protein structure determined was a major landmark. With the advent of complete genome sequences and efficient expression systems, there has been an explosion in the rate of membrane protein structure determination, with many classes represented. New structures are published every month and more than 150 unique membrane protein structures have been determined. This review analyses the reasons for this success, discusses the challenges that still lie ahead, and presents a concise summary of the key achievements with illustrated examples selected from each class. PMID:20667175

  14. Protein disulfide engineering.

    PubMed

    Dombkowski, Alan A; Sultana, Kazi Zakia; Craig, Douglas B

    2014-01-21

    Improving the stability of proteins is an important goal in many biomedical and industrial applications. A logical approach is to emulate stabilizing molecular interactions found in nature. Disulfide bonds are covalent interactions that provide substantial stability to many proteins and conform to well-defined geometric conformations, thus making them appealing candidates in protein engineering efforts. Disulfide engineering is the directed design of novel disulfide bonds into target proteins. This important biotechnological tool has achieved considerable success in a wide range of applications, yet the rules that govern the stabilizing effects of disulfide bonds are not fully characterized. Contrary to expectations, many designed disulfide bonds have resulted in decreased stability of the modified protein. We review progress in disulfide engineering, with an emphasis on the issue of stability and computational methods that facilitate engineering efforts.

  15. Proteins, fluctuations and complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Frauenfelder, Hans; Chen, Guo; Fenimore, Paul W

    2008-01-01

    Glasses, supercooled liquids, and proteins share common properties, in particular the existence of two different types of fluctuations, {alpha} and {beta}. While the effect of the {alpha} fluctuations on proteins has been known for a few years, the effect of {beta} fluctuations has not been understood. By comparing neutron scattering data on the protein myoglobin with the {beta} fluctuations in the hydration shell measured by dielectric spectroscopy we show that the internal protein motions are slaved to these fluctuations. We also show that there is no 'dynamic transition' in proteins near 200 K. The rapid increase in the mean square displacement with temperature in many neutron scattering experiments is quantitatively predicted by the {beta} fluctuations in the hydration shell.

  16. Junin virus structural proteins.

    PubMed Central

    De Martínez Segovia, Z M; De Mitri, M I

    1977-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified Junin virus revealed six distinct structural polypeptides, two major and four minor ones. Four of these polypeptides appeared to be covalently linked with carbohydrate. The molecular weights of the six proteins, estimated by coelectrophoresis with marker proteins, ranged from 25,000 to 91,000. One of the two major components (number 3) was identified as a nucleoprotein and had a molecular weight of 64,000. It was the most prominent protein and was nonglycosylated. The other major protein (number 5), with a molecular weight of 38,000, was a glucoprotein and a component of the viral envelope. The location on the virion of three additional glycopeptides with molecular weights of 91,000, 72,000, and 52,000, together with a protein with a molecular weight of 25,000, was not well defined. PMID:189088

  17. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind the cell to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally “undruggable” regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein–protein, protein–lipid, and protein–nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art in high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  18. Proteins in unexpected locations.

    PubMed Central

    Smalheiser, N R

    1996-01-01

    Members of all classes of proteins--cytoskeletal components, secreted growth factors, glycolytic enzymes, kinases, transcription factors, chaperones, transmembrane proteins, and extracellular matrix proteins--have been identified in cellular compartments other than their conventional sites of action. Some of these proteins are expressed as distinct compartment-specific isoforms, have novel mechanisms for intercompartmental translocation, have distinct endogenous biological actions within each compartment, and are regulated in a compartment-specific manner as a function of physiologic state. The possibility that many, if not most, proteins have distinct roles in more than one cellular compartment has implications for the evolution of cell organization and may be important for understanding pathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and cancer. PMID:8862516

  19. Protein crystallization in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Aibara, S; Shibata, K; Morita, Y

    1997-12-01

    A space experiment involving protein crystallization was conducted in a microgravity environment using the space shuttle "Endeavour" of STS-47, on a 9-day mission from September 12th to 20th in 1992. The crystallization was carried out according to a batch method, and 5 proteins were selected as flight samples for crystallization. Two of these proteins: hen egg-white lysozyme and co-amino acid: pyruvate aminotransferase from Pseudomonas sp. F-126, were obtained as single crystals of good diffraction quality. Since 1992 we have carried out several space experiments for protein crystallization aboard space shuttles and the space station MIR. Our experimental results obtained mainly from hen egg-white lysozyme are described below, focusing on the effects of microgravity on protein crystal growth.

  20. Manipulating and Visualizing Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Horst D.

    2003-12-05

    ProteinShop Gives Researchers a Hands-On Tool for Manipulating, Visualizing Protein Structures. The Human Genome Project and other biological research efforts are creating an avalanche of new data about the chemical makeup and genetic codes of living organisms. But in order to make sense of this raw data, researchers need software tools which let them explore and model data in a more intuitive fashion. With this in mind, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Davis, have developed ProteinShop, a visualization and modeling program which allows researchers to manipulate protein structures with pinpoint control, guided in large part by their own biological and experimental instincts. Biologists have spent the last half century trying to unravel the ''protein folding problem,'' which refers to the way chains of amino acids physically fold themselves into three-dimensional proteins. This final shape, which resembles a crumpled ribbon or piece of origami, is what determines how the protein functions and translates genetic information. Understanding and modeling this geometrically complex formation is no easy matter. ProteinShop takes a given sequence of amino acids and uses visualization guides to help generate predictions about the secondary structures, identifying alpha helices and flat beta strands, and the coil regions that bind them. Once secondary structures are in place, researchers can twist and turn these pre-configurations until they come up with a number of possible tertiary structure conformations. In turn, these are fed into a computationally intensive optimization procedure that tries to find the final, three-dimensional protein structure. Most importantly, ProteinShop allows users to add human knowledge and intuition to the protein structure prediction process, thus bypassing bad configurations that would otherwise be fruitless for optimization. This saves compute cycles and accelerates the entire process, so

  1. Regulation of protein turnover by heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Bozaykut, Perinur; Ozer, Nesrin Kartal; Karademir, Betul

    2014-12-01

    Protein turnover reflects the balance between synthesis and degradation of proteins, and it is a crucial process for the maintenance of the cellular protein pool. The folding of proteins, refolding of misfolded proteins, and also degradation of misfolded and damaged proteins are involved in the protein quality control (PQC) system. Correct protein folding and degradation are controlled by many different factors, one of the most important of which is the heat shock protein family. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are in the class of molecular chaperones, which may prevent the inappropriate interaction of proteins and induce correct folding. On the other hand, these proteins play significant roles in the degradation pathways, including endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD), the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and autophagy. This review focuses on the emerging role of HSPs in the regulation of protein turnover; the effects of HSPs on the degradation machineries ERAD, autophagy, and proteasome; as well as the role of posttranslational modifications in the PQC system.

  2. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Proteins account for 50% or more of the dry weight of most living systems and play a crucial role in virtually all biological processes. Since the specific functions of essentially all biological molecules are determined by their three-dimensional structures, it is obvious that a detailed understanding of the structural makeup of a protein is essential to any systematic research pertaining to it. At the present time, protein crystallography has no substitute, it is the only technique available for elucidating the atomic arrangements within complicated biological molecules. Most macromolecules are extremely difficult to crystallize, and many otherwise exciting and promising projects have terminated at the crystal growth stage. There is a pressing need to better understand protein crystal growth, and to develop new techniques that can be used to enhance the size and quality of protein crystals. There are several aspects of microgravity that might be exploited to enhance protein crystal growth. The major factor that might be expected to alter crystal growth processes in space is the elimination of density-driven convective flow. Another factor that can be readily controlled in the absence of gravity is the sedimentation of growing crystal in a gravitational field. Another potential advantage of microgravity for protein crystal growth is the option of doing containerless crystal growth. One can readily understand why the microgravity environment established by Earth-orbiting vehicles is perceived to offer unique opportunities for the protein crystallographer. The near term objectives of the Protein Crystal Growth in a Microgravity Environment (PCG/ME) project is to continue to improve the techniques, procedures, and hardware systems used to grow protein crystals in Earth orbit.

  3. Protein Binding Pocket Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stank, Antonia; Kokh, Daria B; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-05-17

    The dynamics of protein binding pockets are crucial for their interaction specificity. Structural flexibility allows proteins to adapt to their individual molecular binding partners and facilitates the binding process. This implies the necessity to consider protein internal motion in determining and predicting binding properties and in designing new binders. Although accounting for protein dynamics presents a challenge for computational approaches, it expands the structural and physicochemical space for compound design and thus offers the prospect of improved binding specificity and selectivity. A cavity on the surface or in the interior of a protein that possesses suitable properties for binding a ligand is usually referred to as a binding pocket. The set of amino acid residues around a binding pocket determines its physicochemical characteristics and, together with its shape and location in a protein, defines its functionality. Residues outside the binding site can also have a long-range effect on the properties of the binding pocket. Cavities with similar functionalities are often conserved across protein families. For example, enzyme active sites are usually concave surfaces that present amino acid residues in a suitable configuration for binding low molecular weight compounds. Macromolecular binding pockets, on the other hand, are located on the protein surface and are often shallower. The mobility of proteins allows the opening, closing, and adaptation of binding pockets to regulate binding processes and specific protein functionalities. For example, channels and tunnels can exist permanently or transiently to transport compounds to and from a binding site. The influence of protein flexibility on binding pockets can vary from small changes to an already existent pocket to the formation of a completely new pocket. Here, we review recent developments in computational methods to detect and define binding pockets and to study pocket dynamics. We introduce five

  4. Protein Binding Pocket Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stank, Antonia; Kokh, Daria B; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-05-17

    The dynamics of protein binding pockets are crucial for their interaction specificity. Structural flexibility allows proteins to adapt to their individual molecular binding partners and facilitates the binding process. This implies the necessity to consider protein internal motion in determining and predicting binding properties and in designing new binders. Although accounting for protein dynamics presents a challenge for computational approaches, it expands the structural and physicochemical space for compound design and thus offers the prospect of improved binding specificity and selectivity. A cavity on the surface or in the interior of a protein that possesses suitable properties for binding a ligand is usually referred to as a binding pocket. The set of amino acid residues around a binding pocket determines its physicochemical characteristics and, together with its shape and location in a protein, defines its functionality. Residues outside the binding site can also have a long-range effect on the properties of the binding pocket. Cavities with similar functionalities are often conserved across protein families. For example, enzyme active sites are usually concave surfaces that present amino acid residues in a suitable configuration for binding low molecular weight compounds. Macromolecular binding pockets, on the other hand, are located on the protein surface and are often shallower. The mobility of proteins allows the opening, closing, and adaptation of binding pockets to regulate binding processes and specific protein functionalities. For example, channels and tunnels can exist permanently or transiently to transport compounds to and from a binding site. The influence of protein flexibility on binding pockets can vary from small changes to an already existent pocket to the formation of a completely new pocket. Here, we review recent developments in computational methods to detect and define binding pockets and to study pocket dynamics. We introduce five

  5. Fullerene sorting proteins.

    PubMed

    Calvaresi, Matteo; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2011-07-01

    Proteins bind fullerenes. Hydrophobic pockets can accommodate a carbon cage either in full or in part. However, the identification of proteins able to discriminate between different cages is an open issue. Prediction of candidates able to perform this function is desirable and is achieved with an inverse docking procedure that accurately accounts for (i) van der Waals interactions between the cage and the protein surface, (ii) desolvation free energy, (iii) shape complementarity, and (iv) minimization of the number of steric clashes through conformational variations. A set of more than 1000 protein structures is divided into four categories that either select C(60) or C(70) (p-C(60) or p-C(70)) and either accommodate the cages in the same pocket (homosaccic proteins, from σακκoζ meaning pocket) or in different pockets (heterosaccic proteins). In agreement with the experiments, the KcsA Potassium Channel is predicted to have one of the best performances for both cages. Possible ways to exploit the results and efficiently separate the two cages with proteins are also discussed.

  6. NMCP/LINC proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ciska, Malgorzata; Moreno Díaz de la Espina, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Lamins are the main components of the metazoan lamina, and while the organization of the nuclear lamina of metazoans and plants is similar, there are apparently no genes encoding lamins or most lamin-binding proteins in plants. Thus, the plant lamina is not lamin-based and the proteins that form this structure are still to be characterized. Members of the plant NMCP/LINC/CRWN protein family share the typical tripartite structure of lamins, although the 2 exhibit no sequence similarity. However, given the many similarities between NMCP/LINC/CRWN proteins and lamins (structural organization, position of conserved regions, sub-nuclear distribution, solubility, and pattern of expression), these proteins are good candidates to carry out the functions of lamins in plants. Moreover, functional analysis of NMCP/LINC mutants has revealed their involvement in maintaining nuclear size and shape, another activity fulfilled by lamins. This review summarizes the current understanding of NMCP/LINC proteins and discusses future studies that will be required to demonstrate definitively that these proteins are plant analogs of lamins. PMID:24128696

  7. PSC: protein surface classification.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yan Yuan; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2012-07-01

    We recently proposed to classify proteins by their functional surfaces. Using the structural attributes of functional surfaces, we inferred the pairwise relationships of proteins and constructed an expandable database of protein surface classification (PSC). As the functional surface(s) of a protein is the local region where the protein performs its function, our classification may reflect the functional relationships among proteins. Currently, PSC contains a library of 1974 surface types that include 25,857 functional surfaces identified from 24,170 bound structures. The search tool in PSC empowers users to explore related surfaces that share similar local structures and core functions. Each functional surface is characterized by structural attributes, which are geometric, physicochemical or evolutionary features. The attributes have been normalized as descriptors and integrated to produce a profile for each functional surface in PSC. In addition, binding ligands are recorded for comparisons among homologs. PSC allows users to exploit related binding surfaces to reveal the changes in functionally important residues on homologs that have led to functional divergence during evolution. The substitutions at the key residues of a spatial pattern may determine the functional evolution of a protein. In PSC (http://pocket.uchicago.edu/psc/), a pool of changes in residues on similar functional surfaces is provided.

  8. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lorv, Janet S. H.; Rose, David R.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

  9. Bacterial ice crystal controlling proteins.

    PubMed

    Lorv, Janet S H; Rose, David R; Glick, Bernard R

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

  10. Protein microarrays: prospects and problems.

    PubMed

    Kodadek, T

    2001-02-01

    Protein microarrays are potentially powerful tools in biochemistry and molecular biology. Two types of protein microarrays are defined. One, termed a protein function array, will consist of thousands of native proteins immobilized in a defined pattern. Such arrays can be utilized for massively parallel testing of protein function, hence the name. The other type is termed a protein-detecting array. This will consist of large numbers of arrayed protein-binding agents. These arrays will allow for expression profiling to be done at the protein level. In this article, some of the major technological challenges to the development of protein arrays are discussed, along with potential solutions.

  11. Phospholipid transfer proteins revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, K W

    1997-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PI-TP) and the non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsL-TP) (identical with sterol carrier protein 2) belong to the large and diverse family of intracellular lipid-binding proteins. Although these two proteins may express a comparable phospholipid transfer activity in vitro, recent studies in yeast and mammalian cells have indicated that they serve completely different functions. PI-TP (identical with yeast SEC14p) plays an important role in vesicle flow both in the budding reaction from the trans-Golgi network and in the fusion reaction with the plasma membrane. In yeast, vesicle budding is linked to PI-TP regulating Golgi phosphatidylcholine (PC) biosynthesis with the apparent purpose of maintaining an optimal PI/PC ratio of the Golgi complex. In mammalian cells, vesicle flow appears to be dependent on PI-TP stimulating phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) synthesis. This latter process may also be linked to the ability of PI-TP to reconstitute the receptor-controlled PIP2-specific phospholipase C activity. The nsL-TP is a peroxisomal protein which, by its ability to bind fatty acyl-CoAs, is most likely involved in the beta-oxidation of fatty acids in this organelle. This protein constitutes the N-terminus of the 58 kDa protein which is one of the peroxisomal 3-oxo-acyl-CoA thiolases. Further studies on these and other known phospholipid transfer proteins are bound to reveal new insights in their important role as mediators between lipid metabolism and cell functions. PMID:9182690

  12. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Canavalin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Canavalin. The major storage protein of leguminous plants and a major source of dietary protein for humans and domestic animals. It is studied in efforts to enhance nutritional value of proteins through protein engineerings. It is isolated from Jack Bean because of it's potential as a nutritional substance. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Alex McPherson.

  13. Structure Prediction of Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Brian; Weng, Zhiping

    Protein-protein interactions are critical for biological function. They directly and indirectly influence the biological systems of which they are a part. Antibodies bind with antigens to detect and stop viruses and other infectious agents. Cell signaling is performed in many cases through the interactions between proteins. Many diseases involve protein-protein interactions on some level, including cancer and prion diseases.

  14. Piezoelectric allostery of protein.

    PubMed

    Ohnuki, Jun; Sato, Takato; Takano, Mitsunori

    2016-07-01

    Allostery is indispensable for a protein to work, where a locally applied stimulus is transmitted to a distant part of the molecule. While the allostery due to chemical stimuli such as ligand binding has long been studied, the growing interest in mechanobiology prompts the study of the mechanically stimulated allostery, the physical mechanism of which has not been established. By molecular dynamics simulation of a motor protein myosin, we found that a locally applied mechanical stimulus induces electrostatic potential change at distant regions, just like the piezoelectricity. This novel allosteric mechanism, "piezoelectric allostery", should be of particularly high value for mechanosensor/transducer proteins. PMID:27575163

  15. Protein crystallography prescreen kit

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Krupka, Heike I.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2007-10-02

    A kit for prescreening protein concentration for crystallization includes a multiplicity of vials, a multiplicity of pre-selected reagents, and a multiplicity of sample plates. The reagents and a corresponding multiplicity of samples of the protein in solutions of varying concentrations are placed on sample plates. The sample plates containing the reagents and samples are incubated. After incubation the sample plates are examined to determine which of the sample concentrations are too low and which the sample concentrations are too high. The sample concentrations that are optimal for protein crystallization are selected and used.

  16. Protein crystallography prescreen kit

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Krupka, Heike I.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2005-07-12

    A kit for prescreening protein concentration for crystallization includes a multiplicity of vials, a multiplicity of pre-selected reagents, and a multiplicity of sample plates. The reagents and a corresponding multiplicity of samples of the protein in solutions of varying concentrations are placed on sample plates. The sample plates containing the reagents and samples are incubated. After incubation the sample plates are examined to determine which of the sample concentrations are too low and which the sample concentrations are too high. The sample concentrations that are optimal for protein crystallization are selected and used.

  17. Protein Crystal Malic Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Malic Enzyme is a target protein for drug design because it is a key protein in the life cycle of intestinal parasites. After 2 years of effort on Earth, investigators were unable to produce any crystals that were of high enough quality and for this reason the structure of this important protein could not be determined. Crystals obtained from one STS-50 were of superior quality allowing the structure to be determined. This is just one example why access to space is so vital for these studies. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  18. Protein Crystal Quality Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Eddie Snell (standing), Post-Doctoral Fellow the National Research Council (NRC),and Marc Pusey of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) use a reciprocal space mapping diffractometer for marcromolecular crystal quality studies. The diffractometer is used in mapping the structure of marcromolecules such as proteins to determine their structure and thus understand how they function with other proteins in the body. This is one of several analytical tools used on proteins crystalized on Earth and in space experiments. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  19. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  20. Amino acids and proteins.

    PubMed

    van Goudoever, Johannes B; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R D

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional requirements are not met, resulting in a postnatal growth restriction. However, current knowledge on adequate levels of both amino acid as well as protein intake can avoid under nutrition in the direct postnatal phase, avoid the need for subsequent catch-up growth and improve later outcome.

  1. Piezoelectric allostery of protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuki, Jun; Sato, Takato; Takano, Mitsunori

    2016-07-01

    Allostery is indispensable for a protein to work, where a locally applied stimulus is transmitted to a distant part of the molecule. While the allostery due to chemical stimuli such as ligand binding has long been studied, the growing interest in mechanobiology prompts the study of the mechanically stimulated allostery, the physical mechanism of which has not been established. By molecular dynamics simulation of a motor protein myosin, we found that a locally applied mechanical stimulus induces electrostatic potential change at distant regions, just like the piezoelectricity. This novel allosteric mechanism, "piezoelectric allostery", should be of particularly high value for mechanosensor/transducer proteins.

  2. The protein-protein interaction map of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Rain, J C; Selig, L; De Reuse, H; Battaglia, V; Reverdy, C; Simon, S; Lenzen, G; Petel, F; Wojcik, J; Schächter, V; Chemama, Y; Labigne, A; Legrain, P

    2001-01-11

    With the availability of complete DNA sequences for many prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, and soon for the human genome itself, it is important to develop reliable proteome-wide approaches for a better understanding of protein function. As elementary constituents of cellular protein complexes and pathways, protein-protein interactions are key determinants of protein function. Here we have built a large-scale protein-protein interaction map of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. We have used a high-throughput strategy of the yeast two-hybrid assay to screen 261 H. pylori proteins against a highly complex library of genome-encoded polypeptides. Over 1,200 interactions were identified between H. pylori proteins, connecting 46.6% of the proteome. The determination of a reliability score for every single protein-protein interaction and the identification of the actual interacting domains permitted the assignment of unannotated proteins to biological pathways.

  3. Dietary Proteins and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Miguel Ángel; Quesada, Ana R.

    2014-01-01

    Both defective and persistent angiogenesis are linked to pathological situations in the adult. Compounds able to modulate angiogenesis have a potential value for the treatment of such pathologies. Several small molecules present in the diet have been shown to have modulatory effects on angiogenesis. This review presents the current state of knowledge on the potential modulatory roles of dietary proteins on angiogenesis. There is currently limited available information on the topic. Milk contains at least three proteins for which modulatory effects on angiogenesis have been previously demonstrated. On the other hand, there is some scarce information on the potential of dietary lectins, edible plant proteins and high protein diets to modulate angiogenesis. PMID:24445377

  4. Plant protein glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an essential co- and post-translational modification of secretory and membrane proteins in all eukaryotes. The initial steps of N-glycosylation and N-glycan processing are highly conserved between plants, mammals and yeast. In contrast, late N-glycan maturation steps in the Golgi differ significantly in plants giving rise to complex N-glycans with β1,2-linked xylose, core α1,3-linked fucose and Lewis A-type structures. While the essential role of N-glycan modifications on distinct mammalian glycoproteins is already well documented, we have only begun to decipher the biological function of this ubiquitous protein modification in different plant species. In this review, I focus on the biosynthesis and function of different protein N-linked glycans in plants. Special emphasis is given on glycan-mediated quality control processes in the ER and on the biological role of characteristic complex N-glycan structures. PMID:26911286

  5. Densonucleosis virus structural proteins.

    PubMed

    Kelly, D C; Moore, N F; Spilling, C R; Barwise, A H; Walker, I O

    1980-10-01

    The protein coats of two densonucleosis viruses (types 1 and 2) were examined by a variety of biophysical, biochemical, and serological techniques. The viruses were 24 nm in diameter, contained at least four polypeptides, were remarkably stable to extremes of pH and denaturing agents, and were serologically closely related. The two viruses could, however, be distinguished serologically and by differences in migration of their structural polypeptides. For each virus the "top component" (i.e., the protein coat minus DNA, found occurring naturally in infections) appeared to have a composition identical to that of the coat of the virus and was a more stable structure. Electrometric titration curves of the virus particles and top components demonstrated that the DNA phosphate in densonucleosis virus particles was neutralized by cations other than basic amino acid side chains of the protein coat. Circular dichroism studies showed that there was a conformational difference between the protein coats of top components and virus particles.

  6. Protein fabrication automation

    PubMed Central

    Cox, J. Colin; Lape, Janel; Sayed, Mahmood A.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2007-01-01

    Facile “writing” of DNA fragments that encode entire gene sequences potentially has widespread applications in biological analysis and engineering. Rapid writing of open reading frames (ORFs) for expressed proteins could transform protein engineering and production for protein design, synthetic biology, and structural analysis. Here we present a process, protein fabrication automation (PFA), which facilitates the rapid de novo construction of any desired ORF from oligonucleotides with low effort, high speed, and little human interaction. PFA comprises software for sequence design, data management, and the generation of instruction sets for liquid-handling robotics, a liquid-handling robot, a robust PCR scheme for gene assembly from synthetic oligonucleotides, and a genetic selection system to enrich correctly assembled full-length synthetic ORFs. The process is robust and scalable. PMID:17242375

  7. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  8. C-reactive protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... body. It is one of a group of proteins called "acute phase reactants" that go up in response to inflammation. This article discusses the blood test done to measure the amount of CRP in your blood.

  9. Protein fabrication automation.

    PubMed

    Cox, J Colin; Lape, Janel; Sayed, Mahmood A; Hellinga, Homme W

    2007-03-01

    Facile "writing" of DNA fragments that encode entire gene sequences potentially has widespread applications in biological analysis and engineering. Rapid writing of open reading frames (ORFs) for expressed proteins could transform protein engineering and production for protein design, synthetic biology, and structural analysis. Here we present a process, protein fabrication automation (PFA), which facilitates the rapid de novo construction of any desired ORF from oligonucleotides with low effort, high speed, and little human interaction. PFA comprises software for sequence design, data management, and the generation of instruction sets for liquid-handling robotics, a liquid-handling robot, a robust PCR scheme for gene assembly from synthetic oligonucleotides, and a genetic selection system to enrich correctly assembled full-length synthetic ORFs. The process is robust and scalable.

  10. Protein conducting nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsman, Anke; Krüger, Vivien; Bartsch, Philipp; Honigmann, Alf; Schmidt, Oliver; Rao, Sanjana; Meisinger, Christof; Wagner, Richard

    2010-11-01

    About 50% of the cellular proteins have to be transported into or across cellular membranes. This transport is an essential step in the protein biosynthesis. In eukaryotic cells secretory proteins are transported into the endoplasmic reticulum before they are transported in vesicles to the plasma membrane. Almost all proteins of the endosymbiotic organelles chloroplasts and mitochondria are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and posttranslationally imported. Genetic, biochemical and biophysical approaches led to rather detailed knowledge on the composition of the translocon-complexes which catalyze the membrane transport of the preproteins. Comprehensive concepts on the targeting and membrane transport of polypeptides emerged, however little detail on the molecular nature and mechanisms of the protein translocation channels comprising nanopores has been achieved. In this paper we will highlight recent developments of the diverse protein translocation systems and focus particularly on the common biophysical properties and functions of the protein conducting nanopores. We also provide a first analysis of the interaction between the genuine protein conducting nanopore Tom40SC as well as a mutant Tom40SC (\\mathrm {S}_{54} \\to E ) containing an additional negative charge at the channel vestibule and one of its native substrates, CoxIV, a mitochondrial targeting peptide. The polypeptide induced a voltage-dependent increase in the frequency of channel closure of Tom40SC corresponding to a voltage-dependent association rate, which was even more pronounced for the Tom40SC S54E mutant. The corresponding dwelltime reflecting association/transport of the peptide could be determined with \\bar {t}_{\\mathrm {off}} \\cong 1.1 ms for the wildtype, whereas the mutant Tom40SC S54E displayed a biphasic dwelltime distribution (\\bar {t}_{\\mathrm {off}}^1 \\cong 0.4 ms \\bar {t}_{\\mathrm {off}}^2 \\cong 4.6 ms).

  11. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  12. Protein tyrosine nitration

    PubMed Central

    Chaki, Mounira; Leterrier, Marina; Barroso, Juan B

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide metabolism in plant cells has a relative short history. Nitration is a chemical process which consists of introducing a nitro group (-NO2) into a chemical compound. in biological systems, this process has been found in different molecules such as proteins, lipids and nucleic acids that can affect its function. This mini-review offers an overview of this process with special emphasis on protein tyrosine nitration in plants and its involvement in the process of nitrosative stress. PMID:19826215

  13. The Malignant Protein Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lary C; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    When most people hear the words malignant and brain, cancer immediately comes to mind. But our authors argue that proteins can be malignant too, and can spread harmfully through the brain in neurodegenerative diseases that include Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, CTE, and ALS. Studying how proteins such as PrP, amyloid beta, tau, and others aggregate and spread, and kill brain cells, represents a crucial new frontier in neuroscience. PMID:27408676

  14. Bence-Jones protein - quantitative

    MedlinePlus

    Immunoglobulin light chains - urine; Urine Bence-Jones protein ... Bence-Jones proteins are a part of regular antibodies called light chains. These proteins are not normally in urine. Sometimes, when ...

  15. Nuclear localization of the dystrophin-associated protein α-dystrobrevin through importin α2/β1 is critical for interaction with the nuclear lamina/maintenance of nuclear integrity.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Areli; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Suárez-Sánchez, Rocío; Zinker, Samuel; Jans, David A; Cisneros, Bulmaro

    2015-05-01

    Although α-dystrobrevin (DB) is assembled into the dystrophin-associated protein complex, which is central to cytoskeletal organization, it has also been found in the nucleus. Here we delineate the nuclear import pathway responsible for nuclear targeting of α-DB for the first time, together with the importance of nuclear α-DB in determining nuclear morphology. We map key residues of the nuclear localization signal of α-DB within the zinc finger domain (ZZ) using various truncated versions of the protein, and site-directed mutagenesis. Pulldown, immunoprecipitation, and AlphaScreen assays showed that the importin (IMP) α2/β1 heterodimer interacts with high affinity with the ZZ domain of α-DB. In vitro nuclear import assays using antibodies to specific importins, as well as in vivo studies using siRNA or a dominant negative importin construct, confirmed the key role of IMPα2/β1 in α-DB nuclear translocation. Knockdown of α-DB expression perturbed cell cycle progression in C2C12 myoblasts, with decreased accumulation of cells in S phase and, significantly, altered localization of lamins A/C, B1, and B2 with accompanying gross nuclear morphology defects. Because α-DB interacts specifically with lamin B1 in vivo and in vitro, nuclear α-DB would appear to play a key role in nuclear shape maintenance through association with the nuclear lamina.

  16. Disease specific protein corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2015-03-01

    It is now well accepted that upon their entrance into the biological environments, the surface of nanomaterials would be covered by various biomacromolecules (e.g., proteins and lipids). The absorption of these biomolecules, so called `protein corona', onto the surface of (nano)biomaterials confers them a new `biological identity'. Although the formation of protein coronas on the surface of nanoparticles has been widely investigated, there are few reports on the effect of various diseases on the biological identity of nanoparticles. As the type of diseases may tremendously changes the composition of the protein source (e.g., human plasma/serum), one can expect that amount and composition of associated proteins in the corona composition may be varied, in disease type manner. Here, we show that corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles (after interaction with in the plasma of the healthy individuals) could induce unfolding of fibrinogen, which promotes release of the inflammatory cytokines. However, no considerable releases of inflammatory cytokines were observed for corona coated graphene sheets. In contrast, the obtained corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles from the hypofibrinogenemia patients could not induce inflammatory cytokine release where graphene sheets do. Therefore, one can expect that disease-specific protein coronas can provide a novel approach for applying nanomedicine to personalized medicine, improving diagnosis and treatment of different diseases tailored to the specific conditions and circumstances.

  17. Cardiolipin Interactions with Proteins.

    PubMed

    Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Dwarakanath, Himal; Mohammadyani, Dariush; Yanamala, Naveena; Kagan, Valerian E; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2015-09-15

    Cardiolipins (CL) represent unique phospholipids of bacteria and eukaryotic mitochondria with four acyl chains and two phosphate groups that have been implicated in numerous functions from energy metabolism to apoptosis. Many proteins are known to interact with CL, and several cocrystal structures of protein-CL complexes exist. In this work, we describe the collection of the first systematic and, to the best of our knowledge, the comprehensive gold standard data set of all known CL-binding proteins. There are 62 proteins in this data set, 21 of which have nonredundant crystal structures with bound CL molecules available. Using binding patch analysis of amino acid frequencies, secondary structures and loop supersecondary structures considering phosphate and acyl chain binding regions together and separately, we gained a detailed understanding of the general structural and dynamic features involved in CL binding to proteins. Exhaustive docking of CL to all known structures of proteins experimentally shown to interact with CL demonstrated the validity of the docking approach, and provides a rich source of information for experimentalists who may wish to validate predictions.

  18. Cotton and Protein Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Edwards, J. V.; Rayburn, Alfred R.; Gaither, Kari A.; Castro, Nathan J.

    2006-06-30

    The adsorbent properties of important wound fluid proteins and cotton cellulose are reviewed. This review focuses on the adsorption of albumin to cotton-based wound dressings and some chemically modified derivatives targeted for chronic wounds. Adsorption of elastase in the presence of albumin was examined as a model to understand the interactive properties of these wound fluid components with cotton fibers. In the chronic non-healing wound, elastase appears to be over-expressed, and it digests tissue and growth factors, interfering with the normal healing process. Albumin is the most prevalent protein in wound fluid, and in highly to moderately exudative wounds, it may bind significantly to the fibers of wound dressings. Thus, the relative binding properties of both elastase and albumin to wound dressing fibers are of interest in the design of more effective wound dressings. The present work examines the binding of albumin to two different derivatives of cotton, and quantifies the elastase binding to the same derivatives following exposure of albumin to the fiber surface. An HPLC adsorption technique was employed coupled with a colorimetric enzyme assay to quantify the relative binding properties of albumin and elastase to cotton. The results of wound protein binding are discussed in relation to the porosity and surface chemistry interactions of cotton and wound proteins. Studies are directed to understanding the implications of protein adsorption phenomena in terms of fiber-protein models that have implications for rationally designing dressings for chronic wounds.

  19. Fast protein folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  20. Membrane protein secretases.

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, N M; Karran, E H; Turner, A J

    1997-01-01

    A diverse range of membrane proteins of Type 1 or Type II topology also occur as a circulating, soluble form. These soluble forms are often derived from the membrane form by proteolysis by a group of enzymes referred to collectively as 'secretases' or 'sheddases'. The cleavage generally occurs close to the extracellular face of the membrane, releasing physiologically active protein. This secretion process also provides a mechanism for down-regulating the protein at the cell surface. Examples of such post-translational proteolysis are seen in the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein, the vasoregulatory enzyme angiotensin converting enzyme, transforming growth factor-alpha, the tumour necrosis factor ligand and receptor superfamilies, certain cytokine receptors, and others. Since the proteins concerned are involved in pathophysiological processes such as neurodegeneration, apoptosis, oncogenesis and inflammation, the secretases could provide novel therapeutic targets. Recent characterization of these individual secretases has revealed common features, particularly sensitivity to certain metalloprotease inhibitors and upregulation of activity by phorbol esters. It is therefore likely that a closely related family of metallosecretases controls the surface expression of multiple integral membrane proteins. Current knowledge of the various secretases are compared in this Review, and strategies for cell-free assays of such proteases are outlined as a prelude to their ultimate purification and cloning. PMID:9020855

  1. Cardiolipin Interactions with Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Dwarakanath, Himal; Mohammadyani, Dariush; Yanamala, Naveena; Kagan, Valerian E.; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Cardiolipins (CL) represent unique phospholipids of bacteria and eukaryotic mitochondria with four acyl chains and two phosphate groups that have been implicated in numerous functions from energy metabolism to apoptosis. Many proteins are known to interact with CL, and several cocrystal structures of protein-CL complexes exist. In this work, we describe the collection of the first systematic and, to the best of our knowledge, the comprehensive gold standard data set of all known CL-binding proteins. There are 62 proteins in this data set, 21 of which have nonredundant crystal structures with bound CL molecules available. Using binding patch analysis of amino acid frequencies, secondary structures and loop supersecondary structures considering phosphate and acyl chain binding regions together and separately, we gained a detailed understanding of the general structural and dynamic features involved in CL binding to proteins. Exhaustive docking of CL to all known structures of proteins experimentally shown to interact with CL demonstrated the validity of the docking approach, and provides a rich source of information for experimentalists who may wish to validate predictions. PMID:26300339

  2. Multifunctional protein: cardiac ankyrin repeat protein*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Xie, Xiao-jie; Wang, Jian-an

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP) not only serves as an important component of muscle sarcomere in the cytoplasm, but also acts as a transcription co-factor in the nucleus. Previous studies have demonstrated that CARP is up-regulated in some cardiovascular disorders and muscle diseases; however, its role in these diseases remains controversial now. In this review, we will discuss the continued progress in the research related to CARP, including its discovery, structure, and the role it plays in cardiac development and heart diseases. PMID:27143260

  3. Use of protein-protein interactions in affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Muronetz, V I; Sholukh, M; Korpela, T

    2001-10-30

    Biospecific recognition between proteins is a phenomenon that can be exploited for designing affinity-chromatographic purification systems for proteins. In principle, the approach is straightforward, and there are usually many alternative ways, since a protein can be always found which binds specifically enough to the desired protein. Routine immunoaffinity chromatography utilizes the recognition of antigenic epitopes by antibodies. However, forces involved in protein-protein interactions as well the forces keeping the three-dimensional structures of proteins intact are complicated, and proteins are easily unfolded by various factors with unpredictable results. Because of this and because of the generally high association strength between proteins, the correct adjustment of binding forces between an immobilized protein and the protein to be purified as well as the release of bound proteins in biologically active form from affinity complexes are the main problem. Affinity systems involving interactions like enzyme-enzyme, subunit-oligomer, protein-antibody, protein-chaperone and the specific features involved in each case are presented as examples. This article also aims to sketch prospects for further development of the use of protein-protein interactions for the purification of proteins. PMID:11694271

  4. Protein crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, C. E.; Clifford, D. W.

    1987-01-01

    The advantages of protein crystallization in space, and the applications of protein crystallography to drug design, protein engineering, and the design of synthetic vaccines are examined. The steps involved in using protein crystallography to determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein are discussed. The growth chamber design and the hand-held apparatus developed for protein crystal growth by vapor diffusion techniques (hanging-drop method) are described; the experimental data from the four Shuttle missions are utilized to develop hardware for protein crystal growth in space and to evaluate the effects of gravity on protein crystal growth.

  5. [Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome with a Pro102Leu mutation in the prion protein gene and atypical MRI findings, hyperthermia, tachycardia, and hyperhidrosis].

    PubMed

    Imaiso, Y; Mitsuo, K

    1998-01-01

    A 64-year-old Japanese woman with Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS) is reported. She was admitted to our hospital for progressive amnesia, twitching of the right upper limb, and difficulty in speaking and walking for 5 months. Physical examination revealed a fever, tachycardia, and hyperhidrosis without any evidence of inflammation or infection. Neurological examinations demonstrated dementia, frontal lobe signs, and spontaneous myoclonus. She developed akinetic mutism 4 months later. The levels of neuron-specific enolase and 14-3-3 protein were elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid, and serial EEG showed periodic synchronous discharges. DNA analysis of the prion protein gene revealed a Pro102Leu mutation and therefore she was diagnosed as GSS102. Head MRI showed abnormal high signal intensity by T2 weighted image in bilateral caudate nuclei, putamen, frontal lobes, and white matter around the posterior horn of lateral ventricles at admission, and extension to global cerebral cortex and diffuse deep white matter with marked atrophy of bilateral frontal and cerebellar cortices 4 months later. In 123I-IMP SPECT study, uptake of RI decreased slightly only in left frontal region at admission, but decreased markedly in bilateral frontal region 4 months later. Analysis of autonomic function (analysis of noradrenarine in plasma and urine, coefficient of variation of R-R intervals before and after giving atenolol, Aschner's eyeball pressure test, intracutaneous atropine and adrenaline injection test) revealed sympathetic hyperactivity but normal parasympathetic activity. This is a very rare case of GSS102 with atypical MRI findings and clinical features like Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease rather than GSS102, presenting hyperthermia, tachycardia, and hyperhidrosis caused presumably by sympathetic hyperactivity as well as fatal familial insomnia. Therefore it is suggested that some factors besides the codon mutation in the prion protein gene may influence clinical

  6. Modeling Mercury in Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeremy C; Parks, Jerry M

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively non-toxic, other forms such as Hg2+ and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg2+ can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg2+ to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intra-protein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confers mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multi-scale model of environmental mercury cycling.

  7. Bioinformatics and Moonlighting Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Sergio; Franco, Luís; Calvo, Alejandra; Ferragut, Gabriela; Hermoso, Antoni; Amela, Isaac; Gómez, Antonio; Querol, Enrique; Cedano, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Multitasking or moonlighting is the capability of some proteins to execute two or more biochemical functions. Usually, moonlighting proteins are experimentally revealed by serendipity. For this reason, it would be helpful that Bioinformatics could predict this multifunctionality, especially because of the large amounts of sequences from genome projects. In the present work, we analyze and describe several approaches that use sequences, structures, interactomics, and current bioinformatics algorithms and programs to try to overcome this problem. Among these approaches are (a) remote homology searches using Psi-Blast, (b) detection of functional motifs and domains, (c) analysis of data from protein-protein interaction databases (PPIs), (d) match the query protein sequence to 3D databases (i.e., algorithms as PISITE), and (e) mutation correlation analysis between amino acids by algorithms as MISTIC. Programs designed to identify functional motif/domains detect mainly the canonical function but usually fail in the detection of the moonlighting one, Pfam and ProDom being the best methods. Remote homology search by Psi-Blast combined with data from interactomics databases (PPIs) has the best performance. Structural information and mutation correlation analysis can help us to map the functional sites. Mutation correlation analysis can only be used in very specific situations - it requires the existence of multialigned family protein sequences - but can suggest how the evolutionary process of second function acquisition took place. The multitasking protein database MultitaskProtDB (http://wallace.uab.es/multitask/), previously published by our group, has been used as a benchmark for the all of the analyses. PMID:26157797

  8. The Hedgehog protein family.

    PubMed

    Bürglin, Thomas R

    2008-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is one of the fundamental signal transduction pathways in animal development and is also involved in stem-cell maintenance and carcinogenesis. The hedgehog (hh) gene was first discovered in Drosophila, and members of the family have since been found in most metazoa. Hh proteins are composed of two domains, an amino-terminal domain HhN, which has the biological signal activity, and a carboxy-terminal autocatalytic domain HhC, which cleaves Hh into two parts in an intramolecular reaction and adds a cholesterol moiety to HhN. HhC has sequence similarity to the self-splicing inteins, and the shared region is termed Hint. New classes of proteins containing the Hint domain have been discovered recently in bacteria and eukaryotes, and the Hog class, of which Hh proteins comprise one family, is widespread throughout eukaryotes. The non-Hh Hog proteins have carboxy-terminal domains (the Hog domain) highly similar to HhC, although they lack the HhN domain, and instead have other amino-terminal domains. Hog proteins are found in many protists, but the Hh family emerged only in early metazoan evolution. HhN is modified by cholesterol at its carboxyl terminus and by palmitate at its amino terminus in both flies and mammals. The modified HhN is released from the cell and travels through the extracellular space. On binding its receptor Patched, it relieves the inhibition that Patched exerts on Smoothened, a G-protein-coupled receptor. The resulting signaling cascade converges on the transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci), or its mammalian counterparts, the Gli proteins, which activate or repress target genes.

  9. Self-Assembling Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Niroshan; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Eisenstein, Samuel; Rosen, Benjamin; Lau, Albert Y.; C. Walter, Johannes; LaBaer, Joshua

    2004-07-01

    Protein microarrays provide a powerful tool for the study of protein function. However, they are not widely used, in part because of the challenges in producing proteins to spot on the arrays. We generated protein microarrays by printing complementary DNAs onto glass slides and then translating target proteins with mammalian reticulocyte lysate. Epitope tags fused to the proteins allowed them to be immobilized in situ. This obviated the need to purify proteins, avoided protein stability problems during storage, and captured sufficient protein for functional studies. We used the technology to map pairwise interactions among 29 human DNA replication initiation proteins, recapitulate the regulation of Cdt1 binding to select replication proteins, and map its geminin-binding domain.

  10. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2001-07-03

    The present invention relates to purine analogs that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such purine analogs to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  11. Benchtop Detection of Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Varaljay, Vanessa

    2007-01-01

    A process, and a benchtop-scale apparatus for implementing the process, have been developed to detect proteins associated with specific microbes in water. The process and apparatus may also be useful for detection of proteins in other, more complex liquids. There may be numerous potential applications, including monitoring lakes and streams for contamination, testing of blood and other bodily fluids in medical laboratories, and testing for microbial contamination of liquids in restaurants and industrial food-processing facilities. A sample can be prepared and analyzed by use of this process and apparatus within minutes, whereas an equivalent analysis performed by use of other processes and equipment can often take hours to days. The process begins with the conjugation of near-infrared-fluorescent dyes to antibodies that are specific to a particular protein. Initially, the research has focused on using near-infrared dyes to detect antigens or associated proteins in solution, which has proven successful vs. microbial cells, and streamlining the technique in use for surface protein detection on microbes would theoretically render similar results. However, it is noted that additional work is needed to transition protein-based techniques to microbial cell detection. Consequently, multiple such dye/antibody pairs could be prepared to enable detection of multiple selected microbial species, using a different dye for each species. When excited by near-infrared light of a suitable wavelength, each dye fluoresces at a unique longer wavelength that differs from those of the other dyes, enabling discrimination among the various species. In initial tests, the dye/antibody pairs are mixed into a solution suspected of containing the selected proteins, causing the binding of the dye/antibody pairs to such suspect proteins that may be present. The solution is then run through a microcentrifuge that includes a membrane that acts as a filter in that it retains the dye/antibody/protein

  12. Heat Capacity in Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Ninad V.; Sharp, Kim A.

    2005-05-01

    Heat capacity (Cp) is one of several major thermodynamic quantities commonly measured in proteins. With more than half a dozen definitions, it is the hardest of these quantities to understand in physical terms, but the richest in insight. There are many ramifications of observed Cp changes: The sign distinguishes apolar from polar solvation. It imparts a temperature (T) dependence to entropy and enthalpy that may change their signs and which of them dominate. Protein unfolding usually has a positive ΔCp, producing a maximum in stability and sometimes cold denaturation. There are two heat capacity contributions, from hydration and protein-protein interactions; which dominates in folding and binding is an open question. Theoretical work to date has dealt mostly with the hydration term and can account, at least semiquantitatively, for the major Cp-related features: the positive and negative Cp of hydration for apolar and polar groups, respectively; the convergence of apolar group hydration entropy at T ≈ 112°C; the decrease in apolar hydration Cp with increasing T; and the T-maximum in protein stability and cold denaturation.

  13. Electrochemical nanomoulding through proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, Daniel B.

    The continued improvements in performance of modern electronic devices are directly related to the manufacturing of smaller, denser features on surfaces. Electrochemical fabrication has played a large role in continuing this trend due to its low cost and ease of scaleability toward ever smaller dimensions. This work introduces the concept of using proteins, essentially monodisperse complex polymers whose three-dimensional structures are fixed by their encoded amino acid sequences, as "moulds" around which nanostructures can be built by electrochemical fabrication. Bacterial cell-surface layer proteins, or "S-layer" proteins, from two organisms---Deinococcus radiodurans and Sporosarcina ureae---were used as the "moulds" for electrochemical fabrication. The proteins are easily purified as micron-sized sheets of periodic molecular complexes with 18-nm hexagonal and 13-nm square unit cell lattices, respectively. Direct imaging by transmission electron microscopy on ultrathin noble metal films without sample preparation eliminates potential artifacts to the high surface energy substrates necessary for high nucleation densities. Characterization involved imaging, electron diffraction, spectroscopy, and three-dimensional reconstruction. The S-layer protein of D. radiodurans was further subjected to an atomic force microscope based assay to determine the integrity of its structure and long-range order and was found to be useful for fabrication from around pH 3 to 12.

  14. Nanophotonics of protein amyloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Mily; Mukhopadhyay, Samrat

    2014-04-01

    Technological breakthroughs in the super-resolution optical imaging techniques have enriched our current understanding of a range of biological systems and biomolecular processes at the nanoscopic spatial resolution. Protein amyloids are an important class of ordered protein assemblies consisting of misfolded proteins that are implicated in a wide range of devastating human diseases. In order to decipher the structural basis of the supramolecular protein assembly in amyloids and their detrimental interactions with the cell membranes, it is important to employ high-resolution optical imaging techniques. Additionally, amyloids could serve as novel biological nanomaterials for a variety of potential applications. In this review, we summarize a few examples of the utility of near-field scanning optical imaging methodologies to obtain a wealth of structural information into the nanoscale amyloid assembly. Although the near-field technologies were developed several decades ago, it is only recently that these methodologies are being applied and adapted for amyloid research to yield novel information pertaining to the exciting nanoscopic world of protein aggregates. We believe that the account on the nanophotonics of amyloids described in this review will be useful for the future studies on the biophysics of amyloids.

  15. Protein Crowding Is a Determinant of Lipid Droplet Protein Composition.

    PubMed

    Kory, Nora; Thiam, Abdou-Rachid; Farese, Robert V; Walther, Tobias C

    2015-08-10

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are lipid storage organelles that grow or shrink, depending on the availability of metabolic energy. Proteins recruited to LDs mediate many metabolic functions, including phosphatidylcholine and triglyceride synthesis. How the LD protein composition is tuned to the supply and demand for lipids remains unclear. We show that LDs, in contrast to other organelles, have limited capacity for protein binding. Consequently, macromolecular crowding plays a major role in determining LD protein composition. During lipolysis, when LDs and their surfaces shrink, some, but not all, proteins become displaced. In vitro studies show that macromolecular crowding, rather than changes in monolayer lipid composition, causes proteins to fall off the LD surface. As predicted by a crowding model, proteins compete for binding to the surfaces of LDs. Moreover, the LD binding affinity determines protein localization during lipolysis. Our findings identify protein crowding as an important principle in determining LD protein composition. PMID:26212136

  16. The detection of DNA-binding proteins by protein blotting.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, B; Steinberg, J; Laemmli, U K; Weintraub, H

    1980-01-01

    A method, called "protein blotting," for the detection of DNA-binding proteins is described. Proteins are separated on an SDA-polyacrylamide gel. The gel is sandwiched between 2 nitrocellulose filters and the proteins allowed to diffuse out of the gel and onto the filters. The proteins are tightly bound to each filter, producing a replica of the original gel pattern. The replica is used to detect DNA-binding proteins, RNA-binding proteins or histone-binding proteins by incubation of the filter with [32P]DNA, [125I]RNA, or [125I] histone. Evidence is also presented that specific protein-DNA interactions may be detected by this technique; under appropriate conditions, the lac repressor binds only to DNA containing the lac operator. Strategies for the detection of specific protein-DNA interactions are discussed. Images PMID:6243775

  17. Plant protein kinase substrates identification using protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shisong; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases regulate signaling pathways by phosphorylating their targets. They play critical roles in plant signaling networks. Although many important protein kinases have been identified in plants, their substrates are largely unknown. We have developed and produced plant protein microarrays with more than 15,000 purified plant proteins. Here, we describe a detailed protocol to use these microarrays to identify plant protein kinase substrates via in vitro phosphorylation assays on these arrays. PMID:25930701

  18. Advanced protein formulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei

    2015-07-01

    It is well recognized that protein product development is far more challenging than that for small-molecule drugs. The major challenges include inherent sensitivity to different types of stresses during the drug product manufacturing process, high rate of physical and chemical degradation during long-term storage, and enhanced aggregation and/or viscosity at high protein concentrations. In the past decade, many novel formulation concepts and technologies have been or are being developed to address these product development challenges for proteins. These concepts and technologies include use of uncommon/combination of formulation stabilizers, conjugation or fusion with potential stabilizers, site-specific mutagenesis, and preparation of nontraditional types of dosage forms-semiaqueous solutions, nonfreeze-dried solid formulations, suspensions, and other emerging concepts. No one technology appears to be mature, ideal, and/or adequate to address all the challenges. These gaps will likely remain in the foreseeable future and need significant efforts for ultimate resolution.

  19. Protein Crystal Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    As the most abundant protein in the circulatory system albumin contributes 80% to colloid osmotic blood pressure. Albumin is also chiefly responsible for the maintenance of blood pH. It is located in every tissue and bodily secretion, with extracellular protein comprising 60% of total albumin. Perhaps the most outstanding property of albumin is its ability to bind reversibly to an incredible variety of ligands. It is widely accepted in the pharmaceutical industry that the overall distribution, metabolism, and efficiency of many drugs are rendered ineffective because of their unusually high affinity for this abundant protein. An understanding of the chemistry of the various classes of pharmaceutical interactions with albumin can suggest new approaches to drug therapy and design. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter/New Century Pharmaceuticals

  20. Targeted antithrombotic protein micelles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wookhyun; Haller, Carolyn; Dai, Erbin; Wang, Xiowei; Hagemeyer, Christoph E; Liu, David R; Peter, Karlheinz; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2015-01-26

    Activated platelets provide a promising target for imaging inflammatory and thrombotic events along with site-specific delivery of a variety of therapeutic agents. Multifunctional protein micelles bearing targeting and therapeutic proteins were now obtained by one-pot transpeptidation using an evolved sortase A. Conjugation to the corona of a single-chain antibody (scFv), which binds to the ligand-induced binding site (LIBS) of activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors, enabled the efficient detection of thrombi. The inhibition of thrombus formation was subsequently accomplished by incorporating the catalytically active domain of thrombomodulin (TM) onto the micelle corona for the local generation of activated protein C, which inhibits the formation of thrombin. An effective strategy has been developed for the preparation of protein micelles that can be targeted to sites of activated platelets with broad potential for treatment of acute thrombotic events. PMID:25504546

  1. Protein crystallization studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyne, James Evans

    1996-01-01

    The Structural Biology laboratory at NASA Marshall Spaceflight Center uses x-ray crystallographic techniques to conduct research into the three-dimensional structure of a wide variety of proteins. A major effort in the laboratory involves an ongoing study of human serum albumin (the principal protein in human plasma) and its interaction with various endogenous substances and pharmaceutical agents. Another focus is on antigenic and functional proteins from several pathogenic organisms including the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the widespread parasitic genus, Schistosoma. My efforts this summer have been twofold: first, to identify clinically significant drug interactions involving albumin binding displacement and to initiate studies of the three-dimensional structure of albumin complexed with these agents, and secondly, to establish collaborative efforts to extend the lab's work on human pathogens.

  2. Advanced protein formulations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    It is well recognized that protein product development is far more challenging than that for small-molecule drugs. The major challenges include inherent sensitivity to different types of stresses during the drug product manufacturing process, high rate of physical and chemical degradation during long-term storage, and enhanced aggregation and/or viscosity at high protein concentrations. In the past decade, many novel formulation concepts and technologies have been or are being developed to address these product development challenges for proteins. These concepts and technologies include use of uncommon/combination of formulation stabilizers, conjugation or fusion with potential stabilizers, site-specific mutagenesis, and preparation of nontraditional types of dosage forms—semiaqueous solutions, nonfreeze-dried solid formulations, suspensions, and other emerging concepts. No one technology appears to be mature, ideal, and/or adequate to address all the challenges. These gaps will likely remain in the foreseeable future and need significant efforts for ultimate resolution. PMID:25858529

  3. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  4. Matricellular proteins and biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Aaron H.; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials are essential to modern medicine as components of reconstructive implants, implantable sensors, and vehicles for localized drug delivery. Advances in biomaterials have led to progression from simply making implants that are nontoxic to making implants that are specifically designed to elicit particular functions within the host. The interaction of implants and the extracellular matrix during the foreign body response is a growing area of concern for the field of biomaterials, because it can lead to implant failure. Expression of matricellular proteins is modulated during the foreign body response and these proteins interact with biomaterials. The design of biomaterials to specifically alter the levels of matricellular proteins surrounding implants provides a new avenue for the design and fabrication of biomimetic biomaterials. PMID:24657843

  5. Matricellular proteins and biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Morris, Aaron H; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2014-07-01

    Biomaterials are essential to modern medicine as components of reconstructive implants, implantable sensors, and vehicles for localized drug delivery. Advances in biomaterials have led to progression from simply making implants that are nontoxic to making implants that are specifically designed to elicit particular functions within the host. The interaction of implants and the extracellular matrix during the foreign body response is a growing area of concern for the field of biomaterials, because it can lead to implant failure. Expression of matricellular proteins is modulated during the foreign body response and these proteins interact with biomaterials. The design of biomaterials to specifically alter the levels of matricellular proteins surrounding implants provides a new avenue for the design and fabrication of biomimetic biomaterials.

  6. How to Study Protein-protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Podobnik, Marjetka; Kraševec, Nada; Bedina Zavec, Apolonija; Naneh, Omar; Flašker, Ajda; Caserman, Simon; Hodnik, Vesna; Anderluh, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Physical and functional interactions between molecules in living systems are central to all biological processes. Identification of protein complexes therefore is becoming increasingly important to gain a molecular understanding of cells and organisms. Several powerful methodologies and techniques have been developed to study molecular interactions and thus help elucidate their nature and role in biology as well as potential ways how to interfere with them. All different techniques used in these studies have their strengths and weaknesses and since they are mostly employed in in vitro conditions, a single approach can hardly accurately reproduce interactions that happen under physiological conditions. However, complementary usage of as many as possible available techniques can lead to relatively realistic picture of the biological process. Here we describe several proteomic, biophysical and structural tools that help us understand the nature and mechanism of these interactions. PMID:27640371

  7. Discovery of binding proteins for a protein target using protein-protein docking-based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changsheng; Tang, Bo; Wang, Qian; Lai, Luhua

    2014-10-01

    Target structure-based virtual screening, which employs protein-small molecule docking to identify potential ligands, has been widely used in small-molecule drug discovery. In the present study, we used a protein-protein docking program to identify proteins that bind to a specific target protein. In the testing phase, an all-to-all protein-protein docking run on a large dataset was performed. The three-dimensional rigid docking program SDOCK was used to examine protein-protein docking on all protein pairs in the dataset. Both the binding affinity and features of the binding energy landscape were considered in the scoring function in order to distinguish positive binding pairs from negative binding pairs. Thus, the lowest docking score, the average Z-score, and convergency of the low-score solutions were incorporated in the analysis. The hybrid scoring function was optimized in the all-to-all docking test. The docking method and the hybrid scoring function were then used to screen for proteins that bind to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), which is a well-known therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. A protein library containing 677 proteins was used for the screen. Proteins with scores among the top 20% were further examined. Sixteen proteins from the top-ranking 67 proteins were selected for experimental study. Two of these proteins showed significant binding to TNFα in an in vitro binding study. The results of the present study demonstrate the power and potential application of protein-protein docking for the discovery of novel binding proteins for specific protein targets.

  8. Modeling Mercury in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Parks, J M; Smith, J C

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively nontoxic, other forms such as Hg(2+) and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg(2+) can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg(2+) to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed molecular picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here, we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intraprotein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand-binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confer mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multiscale model of environmental mercury cycling.

  9. Modeling Mercury in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Parks, J M; Smith, J C

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively nontoxic, other forms such as Hg(2+) and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg(2+) can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg(2+) to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed molecular picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here, we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intraprotein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand-binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confer mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multiscale model of environmental mercury cycling. PMID:27497164

  10. FLOW BEHAVIOR OF PROTEIN BLENDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blending proteins can increase textural strength or enhance taste or mouth feel, such as blending soy with whey to improve taste. In this study, we measured the viscosity of various combinations of six proteins (whey protein isolates, calcium caseinate, soy protein isolates, wheat gluten, egg album...

  11. DELIVERY OF THERAPEUTIC PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Pisal, Dipak S.; Kosloski, Matthew P.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2009-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of protein therapeutics are limited by three interrelated pharmaceutical issues, in vitro and in vivo instability, immunogenicity and shorter half-lives. Novel drug modifications for overcoming these issues are under investigation and include covalent attachment of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), polysialic acid, or glycolic acid, as well as developing new formulations containing nanoparticulate or colloidal systems (e.g. liposomes, polymeric microspheres, polymeric nanoparticles). Such strategies have the potential to develop as next generation protein therapeutics. This review includes a general discussion on these delivery approaches. PMID:20049941

  12. Kinetics of protein aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Tuomas

    2015-03-01

    Aggregation into linear nanostructures, notably amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils, is a common form of behaviour exhibited by a range of peptides and proteins. This process was initially discovered in the context of the aetiology of a range of neurodegenerative diseases, but has recently been recognised to of general significance and has been found at the origin of a number of beneficial functional roles in nature, including as catalytic scaffolds and functional components in biofilms. This talk discusses our ongoing efforts to study the kinetics of linear protein self-assembly by using master equation approaches combined with global analysis of experimental data.

  13. Lipid-transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Ye, Xiujuan

    2012-01-01

    Lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs) are basic proteins found in abundance in higher plants. LTPs play lots of roles in plants such as participation in cutin formation, embryogenesis, defense reactions against phytopathogens, symbiosis, and the adaptation of plants to various environmental conditions. In addition, LTPs from field mustard and Chinese daffodil exhibit antiproliferative activity against human cancer cells. LTPs from chili pepper and coffee manifest inhibitory activity against fungi pathogenic to humans such as Candida species. The intent of this article is to review LTPs in the plant kingdom. PMID:23193591

  14. Coupled transport protein systems.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Jack D

    2013-04-16

    This set of animated lessons provides examples of how transport proteins interact in coupled systems to produce physiologic effects. The gastric pumps animation depicts the secretion of hydrochloric acid into the gastric lumen. The animation called glucose absorption depicts glucose absorption by intestinal epithelial cells. The CFTR animation explains how the cystic fibrosis conductance transmembrane regulator (CFTR) functions as a key component of a coupled system of transport proteins that clears the pulmonary system of mucus and inhaled particulates. These animations serve as valuable resources for any collegiate-level course that describes these processes. Courses that might use them include introductory biology, biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, pharmacology, and physiology.

  15. Protein production and purification

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In selecting a method to produce a recombinant protein, a researcher is faced with a bewildering array of choices as to where to start. To facilitate decision-making, we describe a consensus ‘what to try first’ strategy based on our collective analysis of the expression and purification of over 10,000 different proteins. This review presents methods that could be applied at the outset of any project, a prioritized list of alternate strategies and a list of pitfalls that trip many new investigators. PMID:18235434

  16. Protein energy malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Grover, Zubin; Ee, Looi C

    2009-10-01

    Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) is a common problem worldwide and occurs in both developing and industrialized nations. In the developing world, it is frequently a result of socioeconomic, political, or environmental factors. In contrast, protein energy malnutrition in the developed world usually occurs in the context of chronic disease. There remains much variation in the criteria used to define malnutrition, with each method having its own limitations. Early recognition, prompt management, and robust follow up are critical for best outcomes in preventing and treating PEM.

  17. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Reyes, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate at the onset of seed desiccation and in response to water deficit in vegetative plant tissues. The typical LEA proteins are highly hydrophilic and intrinsically unstructured. They have been classified in different families, each one showing distinctive conserved motifs. In this manuscript we present and discuss some of the recent findings regarding their role in plant adaptation to water deficit, as well as those concerning to their possible function, and how it can be related to their intrinsic structural flexibility. PMID:21447997

  18. Protein Bodies of the Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Tombs, M. P.

    1967-01-01

    Some microscope observations of the protein bodies of the cotyledon cells of the soybean (Glycine max) are described, together with changes in their appearance which occur on germination. Density gradient centrifugation permits the isolation of protein bodies from soymeal. They contain about 70% of the protein of the bean. Only 1 protein could be detected in them: glycinin, the major soybean protein. The protein bodies were fractionated to light and heavy fractions. The former contained 97.5% protein, the latter 78.5%. RNA, phytic acid and lipids were also present. The 2 fractions probably differ only in the extent of contamination by other cell fragments. Images PMID:16656574

  19. NextGen protein design

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Protein engineering is at an exciting stage because designed protein–protein interactions are being used in many applications. For instance, three designed proteins are now in clinical trials. Although there have been many successes over the last decade, protein engineering still faces numerous challenges. Often, designs do not work as anticipated and they still require substantial redesign. The present review focuses on the successes, the challenges and the limitations of rational protein design today. PMID:24059497

  20. Accessory proteins for heterotrimeric G-proteins in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Park, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins play a fundamentally important role in regulating signal transduction pathways in the kidney. Accessory proteins are being identified as direct binding partners for heterotrimeric G-protein α or βγ subunits to promote more diverse mechanisms by which G-protein signaling is controlled. In some instances, accessory proteins can modulate the signaling magnitude, localization, and duration following the activation of cell membrane-associated receptors. Alternatively, accessory proteins complexed with their G-protein α or βγ subunits can promote non-canonical models of signaling activity within the cell. In this review, we will highlight the expression profile, localization and functional importance of these newly identified accessory proteins to control the function of select G-protein subunits under normal and various disease conditions observed in the kidney. PMID:26300785

  1. Protein-protein interactions: methods for detection and analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Phizicky, E M; Fields, S

    1995-01-01

    The function and activity of a protein are often modulated by other proteins with which it interacts. This review is intended as a practical guide to the analysis of such protein-protein interactions. We discuss biochemical methods such as protein affinity chromatography, affinity blotting, coimmunoprecipitation, and cross-linking; molecular biological methods such as protein probing, the two-hybrid system, and phage display: and genetic methods such as the isolation of extragenic suppressors, synthetic mutants, and unlinked noncomplementing mutants. We next describe how binding affinities can be evaluated by techniques including protein affinity chromatography, sedimentation, gel filtration, fluorescence methods, solid-phase sampling of equilibrium solutions, and surface plasmon resonance. Finally, three examples of well-characterized domains involved in multiple protein-protein interactions are examined. The emphasis of the discussion is on variations in the approaches, concerns in evaluating the results, and advantages and disadvantages of the techniques. PMID:7708014

  2. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities) in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1) using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR) as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2) revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3) prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4) obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  3. Regulators of G-protein-signaling proteins: negative modulators of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Geoffrey E; Jardín, Isaac; Berna-Erro, A; Salido, Gines M; Rosado, Juan A

    2015-01-01

    Regulators of G-protein-signaling (RGS) proteins are a category of intracellular proteins that have an inhibitory effect on the intracellular signaling produced by G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). RGS along with RGS-like proteins switch on through direct contact G-alpha subunits providing a variety of intracellular functions through intracellular signaling. RGS proteins have a common RGS domain that binds to G alpha. RGS proteins accelerate GTPase and thus enhance guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis through the alpha subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins. As a result, they inactivate the G protein and quickly turn off GPCR signaling thus terminating the resulting downstream signals. Activity and subcellular localization of RGS proteins can be changed through covalent molecular changes to the enzyme, differential gene splicing, and processing of the protein. Other roles of RGS proteins have shown them to not be solely committed to being inhibitors but behave more as modulators and integrators of signaling. RGS proteins modulate the duration and kinetics of slow calcium oscillations and rapid phototransduction and ion signaling events. In other cases, RGS proteins integrate G proteins with signaling pathways linked to such diverse cellular responses as cell growth and differentiation, cell motility, and intracellular trafficking. Human and animal studies have revealed that RGS proteins play a vital role in physiology and can be ideal targets for diseases such as those related to addiction where receptor signaling seems continuously switched on.

  4. Protein Crystal Bovine Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Bovine Insulin space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). Facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  5. Protein nano-crystallogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kuil, Maxim E; Bodenstaff, E Rene; Hoedemaeker, Flip J; Abrahams, Jan Pieter

    2002-03-13

    We demonstrate the feasibility of growing crystals of protein in volumes as small as 1 nanoliter. Advances in the handling of very small volumes (i.e. through inkjet and other technologies) open the way towards fully automated systems. The rationale for these experiments is the desire to develop a system that speeds up the structure determination of proteins by crystallographic techniques, where most of the precious protein sample is wasted for the identification of the ideal crystallisation conditions. An additional potential benefit of crystallisation in very small volumes is the potential improvement of the crystal quality through reduced convection during crystal growth. Furthermore, in such small volumes even very highly supersaturated conditions can be stable for prolonged periods, allowing additional regions of phase-space to be prospected for elusive crystallisation conditions. A massive improvement in the efficiency of protein crystallogenesis will cause a paradigm shift in the biomolecular sciences and will have a major impact in product development in (for example) the pharmaceutical industry.

  6. Preparing Protein Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Cindy Barnes of University Space Research Association (USRA) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center pipettes a protein solution in preparation to grow crystals as part of NASA's structural biology program. Research on Earth helps scientists define conditions and specimens they will use in space experiments.

  7. The Protein Ensemble Database.

    PubMed

    Varadi, Mihaly; Tompa, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The scientific community's major conceptual notion of structural biology has recently shifted in emphasis from the classical structure-function paradigm due to the emergence of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). As opposed to their folded cousins, these proteins are defined by the lack of a stable 3D fold and a high degree of inherent structural heterogeneity that is closely tied to their function. Due to their flexible nature, solution techniques such as small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are particularly well-suited for characterizing their biophysical properties. Computationally derived structural ensembles based on such experimental measurements provide models of the conformational sampling displayed by these proteins, and they may offer valuable insights into the functional consequences of inherent flexibility. The Protein Ensemble Database (http://pedb.vib.be) is the first openly accessible, manually curated online resource storing the ensemble models, protocols used during the calculation procedure, and underlying primary experimental data derived from SAXS and/or NMR measurements. By making this previously inaccessible data freely available to researchers, this novel resource is expected to promote the development of more advanced modelling methodologies, facilitate the design of standardized calculation protocols, and consequently lead to a better understanding of how function arises from the disordered state.

  8. Protein specific polymeric immunomicrospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Small, round, bio-compatible microspheres capable of covalently bonding proteins and having a uniform diameter below about 3500 A are prepared by substantially instantaneously initiating polymerization of an aqueous emulsion containing no more than 35% total monomer including an acrylic monomer substituted with a covalently bondable group such as hydroxyl, amino or carboxyl and a minor amount of a cross-linking agent.

  9. Tuber Storage Proteins

    PubMed Central

    SHEWRY, PETER R.

    2003-01-01

    A wide range of plants are grown for their edible tubers, but five species together account for almost 90 % of the total world production. These are potato (Solanum tuberosum), cassava (Manihot esculenta), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatus), yams (Dioscorea spp.) and taro (Colocasia, Cyrtosperma and Xanthosoma spp.). All of these, except cassava, contain groups of storage proteins, but these differ in the biological properties and evolutionary relationships. Thus, patatin from potato exhibits activity as an acylhydrolase and esterase, sporamin from sweet potato is an inhibitor of trypsin, and dioscorin from yam is a carbonic anhydrase. Both sporamin and dioscorin also exhibit antioxidant and radical scavenging activity. Taro differs from the other three crops in that it contains two major types of storage protein: a trypsin inhibitor related to sporamin and a mannose‐binding lectin. These characteristics indicate that tuber storage proteins have evolved independently in different species, which contrasts with the highly conserved families of storage proteins present in seeds. Furthermore, all exhibit biological activities which could contribute to resistance to pests, pathogens or abiotic stresses, indicating that they may have dual roles in the tubers. PMID:12730067

  10. Protein states and proteinquakes.

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, A; Berendzen, J; Bowne, S F; Frauenfelder, H; Iben, I E; Sauke, T B; Shyamsunder, E; Young, R D

    1985-01-01

    After photodissociation of carbon monoxide bound to myoglobin, the protein relaxes to the deoxy equilibrium structure in a quake-like motion. Investigation of the proteinquake and of related intramolecular equilibrium motions shows that states and motions have a hierarchical glass-like structure. PMID:3860839

  11. Protein Requirements during Aging.

    PubMed

    Courtney-Martin, Glenda; Ball, Ronald O; Pencharz, Paul B; Elango, Rajavel

    2016-01-01

    Protein recommendations for elderly, both men and women, are based on nitrogen balance studies. They are set at 0.66 and 0.8 g/kg/day as the estimated average requirement (EAR) and recommended dietary allowance (RDA), respectively, similar to young adults. This recommendation is based on single linear regression of available nitrogen balance data obtained at test protein intakes close to or below zero balance. Using the indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) method, we estimated the protein requirement in young adults and in both elderly men and women to be 0.9 and 1.2 g/kg/day as the EAR and RDA, respectively. This suggests that there is no difference in requirement on a gender basis or on a per kg body weight basis between younger and older adults. The requirement estimates however are ~40% higher than the current protein recommendations on a body weight basis. They are also 40% higher than our estimates in young men when calculated on the basis of fat free mass. Thus, current recommendations may need to be re-assessed. Potential rationale for this difference includes a decreased sensitivity to dietary amino acids and increased insulin resistance in the elderly compared with younger individuals. PMID:27529275

  12. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy uses laser technology to reveal a defect, a double-screw dislocation, on the surface of this crystal of canavalin, a major source of dietary protein for humans and domestic animals. When a crystal grows, attachment kinetics and transport kinetics are competing for control of the molecules. As a molecule gets close to the crystal surface, it has to attach properly for the crystal to be usable. NASA has funded investigators to look at those attachment kinetics from a theoretical standpoint and an experimental standpoint. Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine, is one of those investigators. He uses X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy in his laboratory to answer some of the many questions about how protein crystals grow. Atomic force microscopy provides a means of looking at how individual molecules are added to the surface of growing protein crystals. This helps McPherson understand the kinetics of protein crystal growth. McPherson asks, How fast do crystals grow? What are the forces involved? Investigators funded by NASA have clearly shown that such factors as the level of supersaturation and the rate of growth all affect the habit [characteristic arrangement of facets] of the crystal and the defects that occur in the crystal.

  13. Ribosome-inactivating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Matthew J; Dodd, Jennifer E; Hautbergue, Guillaume M

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were first isolated over a century ago and have been shown to be catalytic toxins that irreversibly inactivate protein synthesis. Elucidation of atomic structures and molecular mechanism has revealed these proteins to be a diverse group subdivided into two classes. RIPs have been shown to exhibit RNA N-glycosidase activity and depurinate the 28S rRNA of the eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit. In this review, we compare archetypal RIP family members with other potent toxins that abolish protein synthesis: the fungal ribotoxins which directly cleave the 28S rRNA and the newly discovered Burkholderia lethal factor 1 (BLF1). BLF1 presents additional challenges to the current classification system since, like the ribotoxins, it does not possess RNA N-glycosidase activity but does irreversibly inactivate ribosomes. We further discuss whether the RIP classification should be broadened to include toxins achieving irreversible ribosome inactivation with similar turnovers to RIPs, but through different enzymatic mechanisms. PMID:24071927

  14. Tuber storage proteins.

    PubMed

    Shewry, Peter R

    2003-06-01

    A wide range of plants are grown for their edible tubers, but five species together account for almost 90 % of the total world production. These are potato (Solanum tuberosum), cassava (Manihot esculenta), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatus), yams (Dioscorea spp.) and taro (Colocasia, Cyrtosperma and Xanthosoma spp.). All of these, except cassava, contain groups of storage proteins, but these differ in the biological properties and evolutionary relationships. Thus, patatin from potato exhibits activity as an acylhydrolase and esterase, sporamin from sweet potato is an inhibitor of trypsin, and dioscorin from yam is a carbonic anhydrase. Both sporamin and dioscorin also exhibit antioxidant and radical scavenging activity. Taro differs from the other three crops in that it contains two major types of storage protein: a trypsin inhibitor related to sporamin and a mannose-binding lectin. These characteristics indicate that tuber storage proteins have evolved independently in different species, which contrasts with the highly conserved families of storage proteins present in seeds. Furthermore, all exhibit biological activities which could contribute to resistance to pests, pathogens or abiotic stresses, indicating that they may have dual roles in the tubers.

  15. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  16. Protein Requirements during Aging

    PubMed Central

    Courtney-Martin, Glenda; Ball, Ronald O.; Pencharz, Paul B.; Elango, Rajavel

    2016-01-01

    Protein recommendations for elderly, both men and women, are based on nitrogen balance studies. They are set at 0.66 and 0.8 g/kg/day as the estimated average requirement (EAR) and recommended dietary allowance (RDA), respectively, similar to young adults. This recommendation is based on single linear regression of available nitrogen balance data obtained at test protein intakes close to or below zero balance. Using the indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) method, we estimated the protein requirement in young adults and in both elderly men and women to be 0.9 and 1.2 g/kg/day as the EAR and RDA, respectively. This suggests that there is no difference in requirement on a gender basis or on a per kg body weight basis between younger and older adults. The requirement estimates however are ~40% higher than the current protein recommendations on a body weight basis. They are also 40% higher than our estimates in young men when calculated on the basis of fat free mass. Thus, current recommendations may need to be re-assessed. Potential rationale for this difference includes a decreased sensitivity to dietary amino acids and increased insulin resistance in the elderly compared with younger individuals. PMID:27529275

  17. Dynamics of protein conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Maria

    2010-10-01

    A novel theoretical methodology is introduced to identify dynamic structural domains and analyze local flexibility in proteins. The methodology employs a multiscale approach combining identification of essential collective coordinates based on the covariance analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories, construction of the Mori projection operator with these essential coordinates, and analysis of the corresponding generalized Langevin equations [M.Stepanova, Phys.Rev.E 76(2007)051918]. Because the approach employs a rigorous theory, the outcomes are physically transparent: the dynamic domains are associated with regions of relative rigidity in the protein, whereas off-domain regions are relatively soft. This also allows scoring the flexibility in the macromolecule with atomic-level resolution [N.Blinov, M.Berjanskii, D.S.Wishart, and M.Stepanova, Biochemistry, 48(2009)1488]. The applications include the domain coarse-graining and characterization of conformational stability in protein G and prion proteins. The results are compared with published NMR experiments. Potential applications for structural biology, bioinformatics, and drug design are discussed.

  18. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  19. [ALR, the multifunctional protein].

    PubMed

    Balogh, Tibor; Szarka, András

    2015-03-29

    ALR is a mystic protein. It has a so called "long" 22 kDa and a "short" 15 kDa forms. It has been described after partial hepatectomy and it has just been considered as a key protein of liver regeneration. At the beginning of the 21st century it has been revealed that the "long" form is localized in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and it is an element of the mitochondrial protein import and disulphide relay system. Several proteins of the substrates of the mitochondrial disulphide relay system are necessary for the proper function of the mitochondria, thus any mutation of the ALR gene leads to mitochondrial diseases. The "short" form of ALR functions as a secreted extracellular growth factor and it promotes the protection, regeneration and proliferation of hepatocytes. The results gained on the recently generated conditional ALR mutant mice suggest that ALR can play an important role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic and non-alcoholic steatosis. Since the serum level of ALR is modified in several liver diseases it can be a promising marker molecule in laboratory diagnostics. PMID:25796277

  20. Chaos in protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Braxenthaler, M; Unger, R; Auerbach, D; Given, J A; Moult, J

    1997-12-01

    MD simulations, currently the most detailed description of the dynamic evolution of proteins, are based on the repeated solution of a set of differential equations implementing Newton's second law. Many such systems are known to exhibit chaotic behavior, i.e., very small changes in initial conditions are amplified exponentially and lead to vastly different, inherently unpredictable behavior. We have investigated the response of a protein fragment in an explicit solvent environment to very small perturbations of the atomic positions (10(-3)-10(-9) A). Independent of the starting conformation (native-like, compact, extended), perturbed dynamics trajectories deviated rapidly, leading to conformations that differ by approximately 1 A RMSD within 1-2 ps. Furthermore, introducing the perturbation more than 1-2 ps before a significant conformational transition leads to a loss of the transition in the perturbed trajectories. We present evidence that the observed chaotic behavior reflects physical properties of the system rather than numerical instabilities of the calculation and discuss the implications for models of protein folding and the use of MD as a tool to analyze protein folding pathways.

  1. Protein stability in ice.

    PubMed

    Strambini, Giovanni B; Gonnelli, Margherita

    2007-03-15

    This study presents an experimental approach, based on the change of Trp fluorescence between native and denatured states of proteins, which permits to monitor unfolding equilibria and the thermodynamic stability (DeltaG degrees ) of these macromolecules in frozen aqueous solutions. The results obtained by guanidinium chloride denaturation of the azurin mutant C112S from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in the temperature range from -8 to -16 degrees C, demonstrate that the stability of the native fold may be significantly perturbed in ice depending mainly on the size of the liquid water pool (V(L)) in equilibrium with the solid phase. The data establish a threshold, around V(L)=1.5%, below which in ice DeltaG degrees decreases progressively relative to liquid state, up to 3 kcal/mole for V(L)=0.285%. The sharp dependence of DeltaG degrees on V(L) is consistent with a mechanism based on adsorption of the protein to the ice surface. The reduction in DeltaG degrees is accompanied by a corresponding decrease in m-value indicating that protein-ice interactions increase the solvent accessible surface area of the native fold or reduce that of the denatured state, or both. The method opens the possibility for examining in a more quantitative fashion the influence of various experimental conditions on the ice perturbation and in particular to test the effectiveness of numerous additives used in formulations to preserve labile pharmaco proteins.

  2. Weakly Stable Regions and Protein-Protein Interactions in Beta-Barrel Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Naveed, Hammad; Liang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    We briefly discuss recent progress in computational characterization of the sequence and structural properties of β-barrel membrane properties. We discuss the emerging concept of weakly stable regions in β-barrel membrane proteins, computational methods to identify these regions and mechanisms adopted by β-barrel membrane proteins in nature to stabilize them. We further discuss computational methods to identify protein-protein interactions in β-barrel membrane proteins and recent experimental studies that aim at altering the biophysical properties including oligomerization state and stability of β-barrel membrane proteins based on the emerging organization principles of these proteins from recent computational studies. PMID:23713778

  3. Protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Salaski, Edward J

    2002-05-01

    Specific mutations in the ras gene impair the guanosine triphophatase (GTPase) activity of Ras proteins, which play a fundamental role in the signaling cascade, leading to uninterrupted growth signals and to the transformation of normal cells into malignant phenotypes. It has been shown that normal cells transfected with mutant ras gene become cancerous and that unfarnesylated, cytosolic mutant Ras protein does not anchor onto cell membranes and cannot induce this transformation. Posttranslational modification and plasma membrane association of mutant Ras is necessary for this transforming activity. Since its identification, the enzyme protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) that catalyzes the first and essential step of the three Ras-processing steps has emerged as the most promising target for therapeutic intervention. FTase has been implicated as a potential target in inhibiting the prenylation of a variety of proteins, thus in controlling varied disease states (e.g. cancer, neurofibromatosis, restenosis, viral hepatitis, bone resorption, parasitic infections, corneal inflammations, and diabetes) associated with prenyl modifications of Ras and other proteins. Furthermore, it has been suggested that FTase inhibitors indirectly help in inhibiting tumors via suppression of angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis. Major milestones have been achieved with small-molecule FTase inhibitors that show efficacy without toxicity in vitro, as well as in mouse models bearing ras-dependent tumors. With the determination of the crystal structure of mammalian FTase, existent leads have been fine-tuned and new potent molecules of diverse structural classes have been designed. A few of these molecules are currently in the clinic, with at least three drug candidates in Phase II studies and one in Phase III. This article will review the progress that has been reported with FTase inhibitors in drug discovery and in the clinic. PMID:12733981

  4. Bayesian Estimator of Protein-Protein Association Probabilities

    2008-05-28

    The Bayesian Estimator of Protein-Protein Association Probabilities (BEPro3) is a software tool for estimating probabilities of protein-protein association between bait and prey protein pairs using data from multiple-bait, multiple-replicate, protein LC-MS/MS affinity isolation experiments. BEPro3 is public domain software, has been tested on Windows XP and version 10.4 or newer of the Mac OS 10.4, and is freely available. A user guide, example dataset with analysis and additional documentation are included with the BEPro3 download.

  5. Direct Probing of Protein-Protein Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Noy, A; Sulchek, T A; Friddle, R W

    2005-03-10

    This project aimed to establish feasibility of using experimental techniques based on direct measurements of interaction forces on the single molecule scale to characterize equilibrium interaction potentials between individual biological molecules. Such capability will impact several research areas, ranging from rapid interaction screening capabilities to providing verifiable inputs for computational models. It should be one of the enabling technologies for modern proteomics research. This study used a combination of Monte-Carlo simulations, theoretical considerations, and direct experimental measurements to investigate two model systems that represented typical experimental situations: force-induced melting of DNA rigidly attached to the tip, and force-induced unbinding of a protein-antibody pair connected to flexible tethers. Our results establish that for both systems researchers can use force spectroscopy measurements to extract reliable information about equilibrium interaction potentials. However, the approaches necessary to extract these potentials in each case--Jarzynski reconstruction and Dynamic Force Spectroscopy--are very different. We also show how the thermodynamics and kinetics of unbinding process dictates the choice between in each case.

  6. Protein-protein interaction databases: keeping up with growing interactomes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Over the past few years, the number of known protein-protein interactions has increased substantially. To make this information more readily available, a number of publicly available databases have set out to collect and store protein-protein interaction data. Protein-protein interactions have been retrieved from six major databases, integrated and the results compared. The six databases (the Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets [BioGRID], the Molecular INTeraction database [MINT], the Biomolecular Interaction Network Database [BIND], the Database of Interacting Proteins [DIP], the IntAct molecular interaction database [IntAct] and the Human Protein Reference Database [HPRD]) differ in scope and content; integration of all datasets is non-trivial owing to differences in data annotation. With respect to human protein-protein interaction data, HPRD seems to be the most comprehensive. To obtain a complete dataset, however, interactions from all six databases have to be combined. To overcome this limitation, meta-databases such as the Agile Protein Interaction Database (APID) offer access to integrated protein-protein interaction datasets, although these also currently have certain restrictions. PMID:19403463

  7. Identifying the hub proteins from complicated membrane protein network systems.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi-Zhen; Ding, Yong-Sheng; Gu, Quan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2010-05-01

    The so-called "hub proteins" are those proteins in a protein-protein interaction network system that have remarkably higher interaction relations (or degrees) than the others. Therefore, the information of hub proteins can provide very useful insights for selecting or prioritizing targets during drug development. In this paper, by combining the multi-agent-based method with the graphical spectrum analysis and immune-genetic algorithm, a novel simulator for identifying the hub proteins from membrane protein interaction networks is proposed. As a demonstration of using the simulator, two hub membrane proteins, YPL227C and YIL147C, were identified from a complicated network system consisting of 1500 membrane proteins. Meanwhile, along with the two identified hub proteins, their molecular functions, biological processes, and cellular components were also revealed. It is anticipated that the hub-protein-simulator may become a very useful tool for system biology and drug development, particularly in deciphering unknown protein functions, determining protein complexes, and in identifying the key targets from a complicated disease system. PMID:20507268

  8. Molecular simulations of lipid-mediated protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    de Meyer, Frédérick Jean-Marie; Venturoli, Maddalena; Smit, Berend

    2008-08-01

    Recent experimental results revealed that lipid-mediated interactions due to hydrophobic forces may be important in determining the protein topology after insertion in the membrane, in regulating the protein activity, in protein aggregation and in signal transduction. To gain insight into the lipid-mediated interactions between two intrinsic membrane proteins, we developed a mesoscopic model of a lipid bilayer with embedded proteins, which we studied with dissipative particle dynamics. Our calculations of the potential of mean force between transmembrane proteins show that hydrophobic forces drive long-range protein-protein interactions and that the nature of these interactions depends on the length of the protein hydrophobic segment, on the three-dimensional structure of the protein and on the properties of the lipid bilayer. To understand the nature of the computed potentials of mean force, the concept of hydrophilic shielding is introduced. The observed protein interactions are interpreted as resulting from the dynamic reorganization of the system to maintain an optimal hydrophilic shielding of the protein and lipid hydrophobic parts, within the constraint of the flexibility of the components. Our results could lead to a better understanding of several membrane processes in which protein interactions are involved. PMID:18487292

  9. Redox control of protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Pajares, Marta; Jiménez-Moreno, Natalia; Dias, Irundika H.K.; Debelec, Bilge; Vucetic, Milica; Fladmark, Kari E.; Basaga, Huveyda; Ribaric, Samo; Milisav, Irina; Cuadrado, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular proteolysis is critical to maintain timely degradation of altered proteins including oxidized proteins. This review attempts to summarize the most relevant findings about oxidant protein modification, as well as the impact of reactive oxygen species on the proteolytic systems that regulate cell response to an oxidant environment: the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), autophagy and the unfolded protein response (UPR). In the presence of an oxidant environment, these systems are critical to ensure proteostasis and cell survival. An example of altered degradation of oxidized proteins in pathology is provided for neurodegenerative diseases. Future work will determine if protein oxidation is a valid target to combat proteinopathies. PMID:26381917

  10. Hydrogels Constructed from Engineered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbin; Kong, Na; Laver, Bryce; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-02-24

    Due to their various potential biomedical applications, hydrogels based on engineered proteins have attracted considerable interest. Benefitting from significant progress in recombinant DNA technology and protein engineering/design techniques, the field of protein hydrogels has made amazing progress. The latest progress of hydrogels constructed from engineered recombinant proteins are presented, mainly focused on biorecognition-driven physical hydrogels as well as chemically crosslinked hydrogels. The various bio-recognition based physical crosslinking strategies are discussed, as well as chemical crosslinking chemistries used to engineer protein hydrogels, and protein hydrogels' various biomedical applications. The future perspectives of this fast evolving field of biomaterials are also discussed. PMID:26707834

  11. Hydrogels Constructed from Engineered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbin; Kong, Na; Laver, Bryce; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-02-24

    Due to their various potential biomedical applications, hydrogels based on engineered proteins have attracted considerable interest. Benefitting from significant progress in recombinant DNA technology and protein engineering/design techniques, the field of protein hydrogels has made amazing progress. The latest progress of hydrogels constructed from engineered recombinant proteins are presented, mainly focused on biorecognition-driven physical hydrogels as well as chemically crosslinked hydrogels. The various bio-recognition based physical crosslinking strategies are discussed, as well as chemical crosslinking chemistries used to engineer protein hydrogels, and protein hydrogels' various biomedical applications. The future perspectives of this fast evolving field of biomaterials are also discussed.

  12. Motif-Driven Design of Protein-Protein Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Correia, Bruno E; Procko, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interfaces regulate many critical processes for cellular function. The ability to accurately control and regulate these molecular interactions is of major interest for biomedical and synthetic biology applications, as well as to address fundamental biological questions. In recent years, computational protein design has emerged as a tool for designing novel protein-protein interactions with functional relevance. Although attractive, these computational tools carry a steep learning curve. In order to make some of these methods more accessible, we present detailed descriptions and examples of ROSETTA computational protocols for the design of functional protein binders using seeded protein interface design. In these protocols, a motif of known structure that interacts with the target site is grafted into a scaffold protein, followed by design of the surrounding interaction surface. PMID:27094298

  13. How do oncoprotein mutations rewire protein-protein interaction networks?

    PubMed

    Bowler, Emily H; Wang, Zhenghe; Ewing, Rob M

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition of mutations that activate oncogenes or inactivate tumor suppressors is a primary feature of most cancers. Mutations that directly alter protein sequence and structure drive the development of tumors through aberrant expression and modification of proteins, in many cases directly impacting components of signal transduction pathways and cellular architecture. Cancer-associated mutations may have direct or indirect effects on proteins and their interactions and while the effects of mutations on signaling pathways have been widely studied, how mutations alter underlying protein-protein interaction networks is much less well understood. Systematic mapping of oncoprotein protein interactions using proteomics techniques as well as computational network analyses is revealing how oncoprotein mutations perturb protein-protein interaction networks and drive the cancer phenotype. PMID:26325016

  14. Functionalizing Microporous Membranes for Protein Purification and Protein Digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jinlan; Bruening, Merlin L.

    2015-07-01

    This review examines advances in the functionalization of microporous membranes for protein purification and the development of protease-containing membranes for controlled protein digestion prior to mass spectrometry analysis. Recent studies confirm that membranes are superior to bead-based columns for rapid protein capture, presumably because convective mass transport in membrane pores rapidly brings proteins to binding sites. Modification of porous membranes with functional polymeric films or TiO2 nanoparticles yields materials that selectively capture species ranging from phosphopeptides to His-tagged proteins, and protein-binding capacities often exceed those of commercial beads. Thin membranes also provide a convenient framework for creating enzyme-containing reactors that afford control over residence times. With millisecond residence times, reactors with immobilized proteases limit protein digestion to increase sequence coverage in mass spectrometry analysis and facilitate elucidation of protein structures. This review emphasizes the advantages of membrane-based techniques and concludes with some challenges for their practical application.

  15. Electron flow through proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Harry B.; Winkler, Jay R.

    2009-11-01

    Electron transfers in photosynthesis and respiration commonly occur between metal-containing cofactors that are separated by large molecular distances. Employing laser flash-quench triggering methods, we have shown that 20-Å, coupling-limited Fe II-Ru III and Cu I-Ru III electron tunneling in Ru-modified cytochromes and blue copper proteins can occur on the microsecond timescale both in solutions and crystals. Redox equivalents can be transferred even longer distances by multistep tunneling, often called hopping, through intervening amino acid side chains. Our work has established that 20-Å hole hopping through an intervening tryptophan is two orders of magnitude faster than single-step electron tunneling in a Re-modified blue copper protein.

  16. A magnetic protein biocompass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Siying; Yin, Hang; Yang, Celi; Dou, Yunfeng; Liu, Zhongmin; Zhang, Peng; Yu, He; Huang, Yulong; Feng, Jing; Hao, Junfeng; Hao, Jia; Deng, Lizong; Yan, Xiyun; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhao, Zhongxian; Jiang, Taijiao; Wang, Hong-Wei; Luo, Shu-Jin; Xie, Can

    2016-02-01

    The notion that animals can detect the Earth’s magnetic field was once ridiculed, but is now well established. Yet the biological nature of such magnetosensing phenomenon remains unknown. Here, we report a putative magnetic receptor (Drosophila CG8198, here named MagR) and a multimeric magnetosensing rod-like protein complex, identified by theoretical postulation and genome-wide screening, and validated with cellular, biochemical, structural and biophysical methods. The magnetosensing complex consists of the identified putative magnetoreceptor and known magnetoreception-related photoreceptor cryptochromes (Cry), has the attributes of both Cry- and iron-based systems, and exhibits spontaneous alignment in magnetic fields, including that of the Earth. Such a protein complex may form the basis of magnetoreception in animals, and may lead to applications across multiple fields.

  17. Protein Structure Databases.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Roman A

    2016-01-01

    Web-based protein structure databases come in a wide variety of types and levels of information content. Those having the most general interest are the various atlases that describe each experimentally determined protein structure and provide useful links, analyses, and schematic diagrams relating to its 3D structure and biological function. Also of great interest are the databases that classify 3D structures by their folds as these can reveal evolutionary relationships which may be hard to detect from sequence comparison alone. Related to these are the numerous servers that compare folds-particularly useful for newly solved structures, and especially those of unknown function. Beyond these are a vast number of databases for the more specialized user, dealing with specific families, diseases, structural features, and so on. PMID:27115626

  18. Cow's Milk Protein Allergy.

    PubMed

    Mousan, Grace; Kamat, Deepak

    2016-10-01

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) is a common condition encountered in children with incidence estimated as 2% to 7.5% in the first year of life. Formula and breast-fed babies can present with symptoms of CMPA. It is important to accurately diagnose CMPA to avoid the consequences of either under- or overdiagnosis. CMPA is classically categorized into immunoglobulin E (IgE)- or non-IgE-mediated reaction that vary in clinical manifestations, diagnostic evaluation, and prognosis. The most commonly involved systems in patients with CMPA are gastrointestinal, skin, and respiratory. Evaluation of CMPA starts with good data gathering followed by testing if indicated. Treatment is simply by avoidance of cow's milk protein (CMP) in the child's or mother's diet, if exclusively breast-feeding. This article reviews the definition, epidemiology, risk factors, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, evaluation, management, and prognosis of CMPA and provides an overview of different options for formulas and their indication in the treatment of CMPA.

  19. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2004-10-12

    The present invention relates to 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  20. Protein-protein fusion catalyzed by sortase A.

    PubMed

    Levary, David A; Parthasarathy, Ranganath; Boder, Eric T; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2011-04-06

    Chimeric proteins boast widespread use in areas ranging from cell biology to drug delivery. Post-translational protein fusion using the bacterial transpeptidase sortase A provides an attractive alternative when traditional gene fusion fails. We describe use of this enzyme for in vitro protein ligation and report the successful fusion of 10 pairs of protein domains with preserved functionality--demonstrating the robust and facile nature of this reaction.