Science.gov

Sample records for msp63 complexes induce

  1. Immunogenicity of the meningococcal stress protein MSP63 during natural infection.

    PubMed Central

    Pannekoek, Y; Schuurman, I G; Dankert, J; van Putten, J P

    1993-01-01

    Acute- and convalescent-phase sera from 40 patients with meningococcal disease were evaluated for immunoreactivity with the meningococcal member of the hsp60 stress protein family. The IgG response was measured by ELISA, using bacterial cell lysate of the corresponding patients' strain, and purified hsp60 proteins from Neisseria meningitidis (MSP63), Escherichia coli (GroEL) and Mycobacterium bovis BCG (65K) as antigens. Analysis of the antibody responses revealed that 24/35 patients (69%) with elevated anti-meningococcal titres, generated anti-MSP63 antibodies during the time course of infection. Twelve of these patients generated antibodies specific for MSP63, in six patients anti-MSP63 levels exceeded anti-GroEL/65K antibodies. In the remaining six patients, equal levels of anti-MSP63 and anti-GroEL/65K were measured. We conclude that MSP63 is expressed and immunogenic during natural meningococcal infection, and that individual subjects have a restricted response to the antigen, resulting in the recognition of Neisseria-specific hsp60 epitopes and/or cross-reactive hsp60 determinants. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8370163

  2. Cross-linking analysis of antigenic outer membrane protein complexes of Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Sandra; Abel, Ana; Arenas, Jesús; Criado, María Teresa; Ferreirós, Carlos M

    2006-03-01

    Polysaccharide-based approaches have not enabled the development of effective vaccines against meningococci of serogroup B, and the most promising current research is focused on the use of outer membrane vesicles. Due to the toxicity of the outer membrane oligosaccharides, new vaccines based on purified proteins are being sought, but despite the application of advanced techniques, they remain elusive, perhaps due to the fact that standard techniques for analysis of antigens overlook conformational epitopes located in membrane complexes. Membrane complex antigens have been analyzed in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and a study published on Neisseria meningitidis has reported the in vitro formation of 800-kD complexes by deposition of a purified protein (MSP63) onto synthetic lipid layers; however, no studies to date have attempted to identify membrane complexes present in vivo in N. meningitidis. In the present study, cross-linking with formaldehyde was used to identify outer membrane protein associations in various N. meningitidis and Neisseria lactamica strains. In N. meningitides, complexes of about 450 kD (also present in N. lactamica), 165 and 95 kD were detected and shown to be made up of the proteins MSP63, PorA/PorB/RmpM/FetA, and PorA/PorB/RmpM, respectively. In western blots, the 450-kD complex was identified by mouse antibodies raised against outer membrane vesicles, but not by antibodies raised against the purified complex, demonstrating the importance of conformational epitopes, and thus suggesting that the analysis of antigens in their native conformation may be useful or even essential for the design of effective vaccines against meningococci.

  3. Analysis of DNA-protein complexes induced by chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, M. )

    1990-11-01

    DNA-protein complexes induced in intact cells by chromate have been isolated and compared with those formed by other agents such as cis-platinum. Actin has been identified as one of the major proteins that is complexed to the DNA by chromate based upon a number of criteria including, a molecular weight and isoelectric point identical to actin, positive reaction with actin polyclonal antibody, and proteolytic mapping. Chromate and cis-platinum both complex proteins of very similar molecular weight and isoelectric points and these complexes can be disrupted by exposure to chelating or reducing agents. These results suggest that the metal itself is participating in rather than catalyzing the formation of a DNA-protein complex. An antiserum which was raised to chromate-induced DNA-protein complexes reacted primarily with a 97,000 protein that could not be detected by silver staining. Western blots and slot blots were utilized to detect p97 DNA-protein complexes formed by cis-platinum, UV, formaldehyde, and chromate. Other work in this area, involving studying whether DNA-protein complexes are formed in actively transcribed DNA compared with genetically inactive DNA, is discussed. Methods to detect DNA-protein complexes, the stability and repair of these lesions, and characterization of DNA-protein complexes are reviewed. Nuclear matrix proteins have been identified as a major substrate for the formation of DNA-protein complexes and these findings are also reviewed.

  4. Complexity induced solar wind turbulence and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T.

    2003-04-01

    "Complexity" has become a hot topic in nearly every field of modern physics. Solar wind plasmas are of no exception. Recently, Chang [2002], in analogy with theories developed for phenomena observed in the magnetotail and the auroral zone [Chang, 1999; 2001], demonstrated that the sporadic and localized interactions of magnetic coherent structures arising from plasma resonances could be the origin of "complexity" of nonresonant pseudo-2D spatiotemporal fluctuations in solar wind turbulence and in the coronal hole base. Such nonresonant fluctuations were shown to exist in the solar wind by Matthaeus et al. [1990] in terms of the two-dimensional correlation as a function of distance parallel and perpendicular to the mean magnetic field based on the ISEE-3 magnetometer data. Other evidences indicating the existence of such type of fluctuations in the solar wind have been reported by Tu et al. [1989], Tu and Marsch [1990, 1991], Bruno and Bavassano [1991], Bavassano and Bruno [1992], Bruno et al. [2001], and others. These results explain [Tu and Marsch, 1991] why the Alfvén ratio (a quantitative measure of Alfvénicity) is often found to be less than one in the solar wind [Belcher and Davis 1971, Solodyna et al., 1977, Bruno et al, 1985, Roberts et al., 1990], particularly for the space range farther than 0.3 AU. The above observational results are also consistent with the conclusions obtained from 2D MHD numerical simulations [Matthaeus and Larkin, 1986, Roberts and Goldstein, 1988, Goldstein et al., 1989, Roberts et al., 1991, and Roberts, 1992]. Such findings have led Chang [2002] to suggest the following evolutional scenario for the plasma turbulence in the generic fast solar wind. In and near the coronal hole base, the turbulent fluctuations are predominantly nonresonantly generated by pseudo-2D nonlinear interactions. As the fluctuations emerge from the coronal hole base, they propagate resonantly in the field-aligned direction primarily as Alfvén waves

  5. Inducible cadmium binding complexes of cabbage and tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, G.J.; Trotter, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    Cadmium complexes with apparent molecular weights of 10,000 were observed in aqueous extracts of Cd-treated cabbage (Brassica capitata L., cv. red danish) and tobacco (hybrid of Nicotiana glauca and N. langsdorffii) plants. The amount of complex (as Cd) recovered was found to be dependent on the concentration of the metal in the growth medium and the total time of exposure of plants to the metal. Induction of the complex at moderate levels of /sup 112/Cd exposure was monitored after labeling the complex with /sup 109/Cd in vitro. The constitutive nature of the ligand of the complex in cabbage and tobacco leaves was suggested when control plant extracts were exposed to /sup 109/Cd. Such extracts contained /sup 109/Cd, which eluted froom Sephadex G-50 in the region of Cd complex. Simultaneous labeling with /sup 112/Cd and /sup 35/S or /sup 32/P indicated that the complex contained sulfur but probably not phosphorus. The amount of /sup 35/S which eluted coincident with /sup 112/Cd complex increased during complex induction. No evidence was found for the presence of 10,000 molecular weight Cd complex in stem exudates (vascular sap) of Cd-treated plants. The results obtained are consistent with the presence in these tissues of a ligand which is both inducible and consitutive and binds Cd in mercaptide bonds. All of these properties and oters reported earlier, are characteristic of Cd-metallothionein formed in animals.

  6. Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements Induced in Vivo by Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Ando, K.; Furusawa, G.; Obe, G.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that the ratio complex/simple exchanges can be used as a biomarker of exposure to high-LET radiation. We tested this hypothesis in vivo, by considering data from several studies that measured complex exchanges in peripheral blood from humans exposed to mixed fields of low- and high-LET radiation. In particular, we studied data from astronauts involved in long-term missions in low-Earth-orbit, and uterus cancer patients treated with accelerated carbon ions. Data from two studies of chromosomal aberrations in astronauts used blood samples obtained before and after space flight, and a third study used blood samples from patients before and after radiotherapy course. Similar methods were used in each study, where lymphocytes were stimulated to grow in vitro, and collected after incubation in either colcemid or calyculin A. Slides were painted with whole-chromosome DNA fluorescent probes (FISH), and complex and simple chromosome exchanges in the painted genome were classified separately. Complex-type exchanges were observed at low frequencies in control subjects, and in our test subjects before the treatment. No statistically significant increase in the yield of complex-type exchanges was induced by the space flight. Radiation therapy induced a high fraction of complex exchanges, but no significant differences could be detected between patients treated with accelerated carbon ions or X-rays. Complex chromosomal rearrangements do not represent a practical biomarker of radiation quality in our test subjects. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Calculation of interaction-induced spectra using complex absorbing potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, Magnus; Antipov, Sergey V.

    2010-10-29

    A complex absorbing potential method is implemented for calculation of collision-induced spectra. The scheme provides a way to avoid the integration of the Schroedinger equation to very large separations of the collisional pair. The method is tested by reproducing a previously computed absorption spectrum for H-He at two different temperatures.

  8. Necroptosis-inducing rhenium(V) oxo complexes.

    PubMed

    Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Awuah, Samuel G; Bruno, Peter M; Johnstone, Timothy C; Wang, Fang; Lin, Wei; Zheng, Yao-Rong; Page, Julia E; Hemann, Michael T; Lippard, Stephen J

    2015-03-04

    Rhenium(V) oxo complexes of general formula [ReO(OMe)(N^N)Cl2], where N^N = 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline, 1, or 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline, 2, effectively kill cancer cells by triggering necroptosis, a non-apoptotic form of cell death. Both complexes evoke necrosome (RIP1-RIP3)-dependent intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and propidium iodide uptake. The complexes also induce mitochondrial membrane potential depletion, a possible downstream effect of ROS production. Apparently, 1 and 2 are the first rhenium complexes to evoke cellular events consistent with programmed necrosis in cancer cells. Furthermore, 1 and 2 display low acute toxicity in C57BL/6 mice and reasonable stability in fresh human blood.

  9. Penicillin-induced immunohemolytic anemia associated with circulating immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Funicella, T; Weinger, R S; Moake, J L; Spruell, M; Rossen, R D

    1977-01-01

    Eleven days after administration of multiple penicillin analogs, a 55-year-old female developed a Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. The patient's erythrocytes were coated with IgG, complement components (C4/C3) and her serum contained elevated 125I-Clq binding activity (a measure of the presence of immune complexes). Her serum, in the presence of fresh complement and penicillin, induced complement sensitization of normal erythrocytes. Immune complex-mediated complement activation and the haptene type of erythrocyte sensitization accounted for accelerated red blood cell destruction in this patient.

  10. DEMONSTRATION OF ELECTROCHEMICAL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES-INDUCED COMPLEXATION

    SciTech Connect

    Barry L. Burks

    2002-12-01

    The Project Team is submitting this Topical Report on the results of its bench-scale demonstration of ElectroChemical Remediation Technologies (ECRTs) and in particular the Induced Complexation (ECRTs-IC) process for remediation of mercury contaminated soils at DOE Complex sites. ECRTs is an innovative, in-situ, geophysically based soil remediation technology with over 50 successful commercial site applications involving remediation of over two million metric tons of contaminated soils. ECRTs-IC has been successfully used to remediate 220 cu m of mercury-contaminated sediments in the Union Canal, Scotland. In that operation, ECRTs-IC reduced sediment total mercury levels from an average of 243 mg/kg to 6 mg/kg in 26 days of operation. The clean up objective was to achieve an average total mercury level in the sediment of 20 mg/kg.

  11. Modeling complex neuropsychiatric disorders with human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Brian T D; Snyder, Evan Y; Nye, Jeffrey S

    2011-10-01

    Identifying the molecular and cellular basis of complex neuropsychiatric disorders (cNPDs) has been limited by the inaccessibility of central neurons, variability within broad diagnostic classifications, and the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Recent work utilizing neuronally differentiated human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from Mendelian and polygenic cNPDs is beginning to illuminate neuritic, synaptic or cell body variations accompanied by specific gene or protein expression alterations largely mimicking known pathology. In some cases, phenotypes have only emerged after application of cellular stress or long duration of differentiation. Pathological and cellular expression features are fully or partially responsive to pharmacological treatment highlighting the potential utility of differentiated hiPSCs for discovery of personalized therapeutics and for identifying pathogenetically relevant targets in subgroups of patients within a broad syndromic classification. Because of the inherent variability in developing and differentiating hiPSC lines and the multiple comparisons implicit in 'omics' technologies, rigorous algorithms for assuring statistical significance and independent confirmation of results, will be required for robust modeling of cNPDs.

  12. Three-dimensional induced polarization data inversion for complex resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Commer, M.; Newman, G.A.; Williams, K.H.; Hubbard, S.S.

    2011-03-15

    The conductive and capacitive material properties of the subsurface can be quantified through the frequency-dependent complex resistivity. However, the routine three-dimensional (3D) interpretation of voluminous induced polarization (IP) data sets still poses a challenge due to large computational demands and solution nonuniqueness. We have developed a flexible methodology for 3D (spectral) IP data inversion. Our inversion algorithm is adapted from a frequency-domain electromagnetic (EM) inversion method primarily developed for large-scale hydrocarbon and geothermal energy exploration purposes. The method has proven to be efficient by implementing the nonlinear conjugate gradient method with hierarchical parallelism and by using an optimal finite-difference forward modeling mesh design scheme. The method allows for a large range of survey scales, providing a tool for both exploration and environmental applications. We experimented with an image focusing technique to improve the poor depth resolution of surface data sets with small survey spreads. The algorithm's underlying forward modeling operator properly accounts for EM coupling effects; thus, traditionally used EM coupling correction procedures are not needed. The methodology was applied to both synthetic and field data. We tested the benefit of directly inverting EM coupling contaminated data using a synthetic large-scale exploration data set. Afterward, we further tested the monitoring capability of our method by inverting time-lapse data from an environmental remediation experiment near Rifle, Colorado. Similar trends observed in both our solution and another 2D inversion were in accordance with previous findings about the IP effects due to subsurface microbial activity.

  13. Luminescence modulations of rhenium tricarbonyl complexes induced by structural variations.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Hélène C; Clède, Sylvain; Guillot, Régis; Lambert, François; Policar, Clotilde

    2014-06-16

    Octahedral d(6) low-spin Re(I) tricarbonyl complexes are of considerable interest as noninvasive imaging probes and have been deeply studied owing to their biological stability, low toxicity, large Stokes shifts, and long luminescence lifetimes. We reported recently the bimodal IR and luminescence imaging of a Re(I) tricarbonyl complex with a Pyta ligand (4-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,3-triazole) in cells and labeled such metal-carbonyl complexes SCoMPIs for single-core multimodal probes for imaging. Re(I) tricarbonyl complexes have unique photophysical properties allowing for their unequivocal detection in cells but also present some weaknesses such as a very low luminescence quantum yield in aqueous medium. Further optimizations would thus be desirable. We therefore developed new Re(I) tricarbonyl complexes prepared from different ancillary ligands. Complexes with benzothiadiazole-triazole ligands show interesting luminescent quantum yields in acetonitrile and may constitute valuable luminescent metal complexes in organic media. A series of complexes with bidentate 1-(2-quinolinyl)-1,2,3-triazole (Taquin) and 1-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,3-triazole (Tapy) ligands bearing various 4-substituted alkyl side chains has been designed and synthesized with efficient procedures. Their photophysical properties have been characterized in acetonitrile and in a H2O/DMSO (98/2) mixture and compared with those of the parent Quinta- and Pyta-based complexes. Tapy complexes bearing long alkyl chains show impressive enhancement of their luminescent properties relative to the parent Pyta complex. Theoretical calculations have been performed to further characterize this new class of rhenium tricarbonyl complexes. Preliminary cellular imaging studies in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells reveal a strong increase in the luminescence signal in cells incubated with the Tapy complex substituted with a C12 alkyl chain. This study points out the interesting potential of the Tapy ligand in coordination chemistry

  14. Base-induced dehydrogenation of ruthenium hydrazine complexes.

    PubMed

    Field, Leslie D; Li, Hsiu L; Dalgarno, Scott J; McIntosh, Ruaraidh D

    2013-02-04

    Treatment of [RuCl(PP(3)(iPr))](+)Cl(-) (PP(3)(iPr) = P(CH(2)CH(2)P(i)Pr(2))(3)) with hydrazine, phenylhydrazine, and methylhydrazine afforded side-on bound hydrazine complexes [RuCl(η(2)-H(2)N-NH(2))(η(3)-PP(3)(iPr))](+), [RuCl(η(2)-H(2)N-NHPh)(η(3)-PP(3)(iPr))](+), and [RuCl(η(2)-H(2)N-NHMe)(η(3)-PP(3)(iPr))](+). The analogous reactions of [RuCl(2)(PP(3)(Ph))] (PP(3)(Ph) = P(CH(2)CH(2)PPh(2))(3)) with hydrazine, phenylhydrazine, and methylhydrazine afforded end-on bound hydrazine complexes [RuCl(η(1)-H(2)N-NH(2))(PP(3)(Ph))](+), [RuCl(η(1)-H(2)N-NHPh)(PP(3)(Ph))](+), and [RuCl(η(1)-H(2)N-NHMe)(PP(3)(Ph))](+). Treatment of parent hydrazine complex [RuCl(N(2)H(4))(PP(3)(iPr))](+) with strong base afforded the dinitrogen and dihydride complexes [Ru(N(2))(PP(3)(iPr))] and [RuH(2)(PP(3)(iPr))]. Treatment of phenylhydrazine complex [RuCl(NH(2)NHPh)(PP(3)(iPr))](+) with strong base afforded the hydrido ruthenaindazole complex [RuH(η(2)-NH═NC(6)H(4))(η(3)-PP(3)(iPr))] while similar treatment of methylhydrazine complex [RuCl(NH(2)NHMe)(PP(3)(iPr))](+) afforded the hydrido methylenehydrazide complex [RuH(NHN═CH(2))(PP(3)(iPr))]. Treatment of the hydrazine complexes [RuCl(NH(2)NHR)(PP(3)(Ph))](+) (R = H, Ph, Me) with strong base afforded the dinitrogen complex [Ru(N(2))(PP(3)(Ph))].

  15. Exciton coupling induces vibronic hyperchromism in light-harvesting complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Jan; Torbjörnsson, Magne; Kühn, Oliver; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2014-04-01

    The recently suggested possibility that weak vibronic transitions can be excitonically enhanced in light-harvesting complexes is studied in detail. A vibronic exciton dimer model that includes ground-state vibrations is investigated using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method with a parameter set typical to photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes. The absorption spectra are discussed based on the Coulomb coupling, the detuning of the site energies, and the number of vibrational modes. Fluorescence spectra calculations show that the spectral densities obtained from the low-temperature fluorescence line-narrowing measurements of light-harvesting systems need to be corrected for the effects of excitons. For the J-aggregate configuration, as in most light-harvesting complexes, the true spectral density has a larger amplitude than that obtained from the measurement.

  16. Apoptosis Induced by Metal Complexes and Interaction with Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Sun; Barros, José Carlos Almeida

    2002-01-01

    Apoptosis induced by rhodium II amidate, rhodium II propionate, cisplatin and interactions with dexamethaxone were studied on some human leukemia cell lines Raji, Jurkat and U937. Apoptosis was studied by flow cytometry, agarose gel electrophoresis and morphological analysis. Rhodium II propionate induced apoptosis in all the three cell lines, Rhodium II amidate, in the lymphoid cell lines Jurkat and Raji, and cisplatin, only in the Jurkat, a T lymphoid cell line. It has also been observed that the addition of dexamethasone enhances the apoptosis index only in U937, a monocytic line with a glucocorticoid receptor bearing. PMID:18476001

  17. Complexity estimates based on integral transforms induced by computational units.

    PubMed

    Kůrková, Věra

    2012-09-01

    Integral transforms with kernels corresponding to computational units are exploited to derive estimates of network complexity. The estimates are obtained by combining tools from nonlinear approximation theory and functional analysis together with representations of functions in the form of infinite neural networks. The results are applied to perceptron networks.

  18. Ruthenium complexes containing bis-benzimidazole derivatives as a new class of apoptosis inducers.

    PubMed

    Li, Linlin; Wong, Yum-Shing; Chen, Tianfeng; Fan, Cundong; Zheng, Wenjie

    2012-01-28

    A series of ruthenium complexes containing bis-benzimidazole derivatives have been synthesized and identified as able to target mitochondria and induce caspase-dependent apoptosis in cancer cells through superoxide overproduction.

  19. A complex social-ecological disaster: Environmentally induced forced migration

    PubMed Central

    Rechkemmer, Andreas; O'Connor, Ashley; Rai, Abha; Decker Sparks, Jessica L.; Mudliar, Pranietha; Shultz, James M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the 21st century, global issues are increasingly characterized by inter-connectedness and complexity. Global environmental change, and climate change in particular, has become a powerful driver and catalyst of forced migration and internal displacement of people. Environmental migrants may far outnumber any other group of displaced people and refugees in the years to come. Deeper scientific integration, especially across the social sciences, is a prerequisite to tackle this issue.

  20. A complex social-ecological disaster: Environmentally induced forced migration.

    PubMed

    Rechkemmer, Andreas; O'Connor, Ashley; Rai, Abha; Decker Sparks, Jessica L; Mudliar, Pranietha; Shultz, James M

    2016-01-01

    In the 21(st) century, global issues are increasingly characterized by inter-connectedness and complexity. Global environmental change, and climate change in particular, has become a powerful driver and catalyst of forced migration and internal displacement of people. Environmental migrants may far outnumber any other group of displaced people and refugees in the years to come. Deeper scientific integration, especially across the social sciences, is a prerequisite to tackle this issue.

  1. Calorimetric and laser induced fluorescence investigation of the complexation geometry of selected europium-gem-diphosphonate complexes in acidic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.; Rao, L.F.; Choppin, G.R.

    1995-05-10

    Details of the coordination chemistry of europium complexes with methanediphosphonic acid (MDPA), vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid (VDPA), and 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) in acidic aqueous solutions have been investigated by titration calorimetry and laser-induced fluorescence. For the 1:1 complexes, thermodynamic parameters and complex hydration are consistent with those previously reported for europium complexes with the carboxylate structural analog malonate. In the 1:2 complexes, markedly different thermodynamic parameters and cation dehydration are observed. The second diphosphonate ligand adds to the 1:1 complex displacing four additional water molecules from the primary coordination sphere (as compared with two for the addition of a second malonate). This reaction is also characterized by a nearly zero entropy change. The results are rationalized using molecular mechanics to suggest an unusual geometry in which the diphosphonate ligands and bound water molecules are appreciably segregated in the europium coordination sphere. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding and second hydration sphere ordering are suggested to explain the low complexation entropies.

  2. Trigeminal star-like platinum complexes induce cancer cell senescence through quadruplex-mediated telomere dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-Hui; Mu, Ge; Zhong, Yi-Fang; Zhang, Tian-Peng; Cao, Qian; Ji, Liang-Nian; Zhao, Yong; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-12-01

    Two trigeminal star-like platinum complexes were synthesized to induce the formation of human telomere G-quadruplex (hTel G4) with extremely high selectivity and affinity. The induced hTel G4 activates strong telomeric DNA damage response (TDDR), resulting in telomere dysfunction and cell senescence.

  3. Venipuncture Induced Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Presenting as Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pramod; Mittal, Manoj; Nair, Anugrah; Sultana, Waqia

    2016-01-01

    Venipuncture is one of the most commonly done medical procedures. We report a unique case of a 23-year-old young male who presented with features suggestive of inflammatory arthritis. The symptoms, which initially started on the right side, also involved the other side after a few weeks. Although the patient's symptoms and signs were simulating inflammatory arthritis, he had atypical features like poor response to anti-inflammatory medicines and normal laboratory parameters. His musculoskeletal ultrasonography was also not suggestive of arthritis. His history was reviewed and on direct questioning he revealed a history of venipuncture for blood sample withdrawal, done from right antecubital region for routine health check on the day prior to the onset of symptoms. Complex regional pain syndrome was suspected and triple-phase radioisotope bone scan was done which was highly suggestive of this diagnosis. The patient was managed with multidimensional approach and responded very well to the treatment. Complex regional pain syndrome is usually not thought of in the initial differential diagnosis of inflammatory arthritis. In this report we highlight the need to elicit the often overlooked history of trivial trauma like venipuncture, especially in atypical cases of arthritis. Also the role of newer diagnostic modalities in such cases is emphasized. PMID:27891152

  4. Flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Surabhi; Bandyopadhyay, Pintu; Sen, Abhijit

    2015-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of particle flow induced large amplitude shock waves in a dusty plasma. These dust acoustic shocks (DAS) are observed for strongly supersonic flows and have been studied in a U-shaped Dusty Plasma Experimental (DPEx) device for charged kaolin dust in a background of Argon plasma. The strong flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change of the dust density near the potential hill is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks. The dynamics of the shocks are captured by fast video pictures of the structures that are illuminated by a laser sheet beam. The physical characteristics of the shock are delineated from a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of plasma parameters and flow speeds. Details of these observations and a physical explanation based on model calculations will be presented.

  5. Complex nanoprecipitate structures induced by irradiation in immiscible alloy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Shipeng; Bellon, P.; Averback, R. S.

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the fundamentals of compositional patterning induced by energetic particle irradiation in model A-B substitutional binary alloys using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The study focuses on a type of nanostructure that was recently observed in dilute Cu-Fe and Cu-V alloys, where precipitates form within precipitates, a morphology that we term “cherry-pit” structures. The simulations show that the domain of stability of these cherry-pit structures depends on the thermodynamic and kinetic asymmetry between the A and B elements. In particular, both lower solubilities and diffusivities of A in B compared to those of B in A favor the stabilization of these cherry-pit structures for A-rich average compositions. The simulation results are rationalized by extending the analytic model introduced by Frost and Russell for irradiation-induced compositional patterning so as to include the possible formation of pits within precipitates. The simulations indicate also that the pits are dynamical structures that undergo nearly periodic cycles of nucleation, growth, and absorption by the matrix.

  6. Anion and solvent induced chirality inversion in macrocyclic lanthanide complexes.

    PubMed

    Gerus, Aleksandra; Slepokura, Katarzyna; Lisowski, Jerzy

    2013-11-04

    A series of the lanthanide(III) or yttrium(III) complexes of the type [LnL(NO3)(H2O)2](NO3)2, [LnL(NO3)(H2O)](NO3)2, [LnL(H2O)2](NO3)3, and [LnLCl(H2O)2]Cl2 where L is an all-R or all-S enantiomer (L(R) or L(S)) of the chiral hexaaza macrocycle, 2(R),7(R),18(R),23(R)- or 2(S),7(S),18(S),23(S)-1,8,15,17,24,31-hexaazatricyclo[25.3.1.1.0.0]-dotriaconta-10,12,14,26,28,30-hexaene, and Ln(III) = Sm(III), Tb(III), Ho(III), Er(III), Tm(III), Yb(III), Lu(III), or Y(III), have been synthesized and structurally characterized. The crystal structure of the free macrocycle shows a highly twisted molecule, preorganized for the formation of helical complexes. The crystal structures of the lanthanide(III) complexes show two different diastereomeric forms of the macrocycle with different configurations at the stereogenic amine nitrogen atoms: (RRRR) or (RSRS) (denoted as L(RI) and L(RII), respectively). The L(RI) diastereomeric form of the nitrate derivatives [LnL(NO3)(H2O)](NO3)2 (Ln = Ho, Er) and [LnL(H2O)2](NO3)3 (Ln = Tm, Yb, Lu) convert slowly to the L(RII) form in methanol or acetonitrile solutions, while this process is not observed for the L(RI) diastereomers of analogous chloride derivatives [LnL(H2O)2]Cl3 (Ln = Tm, Yb, Lu). On the other hand, the L(RI) → L(RII) conversion for these Tm(III), Yb(III), and Lu(III) chloride derivatives can be triggered by the addition of external nitrate anions. The circular dichroism (CD) and (1)H NMR data indicate initial fast exchange of axial chloride for axial nitrate ligand, followed by slow chirality inversion of the equatorial macrocyclic ligand.

  7. Complexity Induced Anisotropic Bimodal Intermittent Turbulence in Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tom; Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Wu, Cheng-Chin

    2004-01-01

    The "physics of complexity" in space plasmas is the central theme of this exposition. It is demonstrated that the sporadic and localized interactions of magnetic coherent structures arising from the plasma resonances can be the source for the coexistence of nonpropagating spatiotemporal fluctuations and propagating modes. Non-Gaussian probability distribution functions of the intermittent fluctuations from direct numerical simulations are obtained and discussed. Power spectra and local intermittency measures using the wavelet analyses are presented to display the spottiness of the small-scale turbulent fluctuations and the non-uniformity of coarse-grained dissipation that can lead to magnetic topological reconfigurations. The technique of the dynamic renormalization group is applied to the study of the scaling properties of such type of multiscale fluctuations. Charged particle interactions with both the propagating and nonpropagating portions of the intermittent turbulence are also described.

  8. Force-induced remodelling of proteins and their complexes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Radford, Sheena E; Brockwell, David J

    2015-01-01

    Force can drive conformational changes in proteins, as well as modulate their stability and the affinity of their complexes, allowing a mechanical input to be converted into a biochemical output. These properties have been utilised by nature and force is now recognised to be widely used at the cellular level. The effects of force on the biophysical properties of biological systems can be large and varied. As these effects are only apparent in the presence of force, studies on the same proteins using traditional ensemble biophysical methods can yield apparently conflicting results. Where appropriate, therefore, force measurements should be integrated with other experimental approaches to understand the physiological context of the system under study. PMID:25710390

  9. The complex Langevin analysis of spontaneous symmetry breaking induced by complex fermion determinant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Yuta; Nishimura, Jun

    2016-12-01

    In many interesting physical systems, the determinant which appears from integrating out fermions becomes complex, and its phase plays a crucial role in the deter-mination of the vacuum. An example of this is QCD at low temperature and high density, where various exotic fermion condensates are conjectured to form. Another example is the Euclidean version of the type IIB matrix model for 10d superstring theory, where spontaneous breaking of the SO(10) rotational symmetry down to SO(4) is expected to occur. When one applies the complex Langevin method to these systems, one encounters the singular-drift problem associated with the appearance of nearly zero eigenvalues of the Dirac operator. Here we propose to avoid this problem by deforming the action with a fermion bilinear term. The results for the original system are obtained by extrapolations with respect to the deformation parameter. We demonstrate the power of this approach by applying it to a simple matrix model, in which spontaneous symmetry breaking from SO(4) to SO(2) is expected to occur due to the phase of the complex fermion determinant. Unlike previous work based on a reweighting-type method, we are able to determine the true vacuum by calculating the order parameters, which agree with the prediction by the Gaussian expansion method.

  10. Application of Δ- and Λ-Isomerism of Octahedral Metal Complexes for Inducing Chiral Nematic Phases

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hisako; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    The Δ- and Λ-isomerism of octahedral metal complexes is employed as a source of chirality for inducing chiral nematic phases. By applying a wide range of chiral metal complexes as a dopant, it has been found that tris(β-diketonato)metal(III) complexes exhibit an extremely high value of helical twisting power. The mechanism of induction of the chiral nematic phase is postulated on the basis of a surface chirality model. The strategy for designing an efficient dopant is described, together with the results using a number of examples of Co(III), Cr(III) and Ru(III) complexes with C2 symmetry. The development of photo-responsive dopants to achieve the photo-induced structural change of liquid crystal by use of photo-isomerization of chiral metal complexes is also described. PMID:20057959

  11. Synthesis, Characterization, In Vitro Cytotoxicity, and Apoptosis-Inducing Properties of Ruthenium(II) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Zhong, Nan-Jing; Xie, Yang-Yin; Huang, Hong-Liang; Jiang, Guang-Bin; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Two new Ru(II) complexes, [Ru(bpy)2(FAMP)](ClO4)2 1 and 2, are synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, electrospray mass spectrometry, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance. The in vitro cytotoxicities and apoptosis-inducing properties of these complexes are extensively studied. Complexes 1 and 2 exhibit potent antiproliferative activities against a panel of human cancer cell lines. The cell cycle analysis shows that complexes 1 and 2 exhibit effective cell growth inhibition by triggering G0/G1 phase arrest and inducing apoptosis by mitochondrial dysfunction. The in vitro DNA binding properties of the two complexes are investigated by different spectrophotometric methods and viscosity measurements. PMID:24804832

  12. Growth-induced non-stoichiometry in complex oxide systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breckenfeld, Eric

    Complex perovskite oxides have been studied extensively over the past few decades due to their wide range of functional properties and relative ease of epitaxial synthesis. These two factors have allowed such oxide systems to see a multitude of applications including sensors, memory, thermal management, and energy harvesting. The ability to access so many different functionalities is owed largely to the chemical diversity available to the perovskite unit cell, opening the door for metal-insulator-transitions, ferroelectricity, and superconductivity, to name a few. However, the same chemical diversity that enables so many potential applications also opens the door for a myriad of chemistry-related defects. Separating out the relative contributions of such extrinsic (or defect-driven) effects from the intrinsic material properties is crucial to enabling the use of these materials in high-performance, next-generation devices. In this work, we examine several model systems in order to explore the relationship between the pulsed laser deposition growth process, the film chemistry, and the subsequent effects on the defect landscape and film properties. We show that small changes to the laser fluence can have a marked impact on the chemical composition of the film, leading to cation stoichiometry deviations as large as 10% in SrTiO3, LaAlO3, and NdNiO3 systems. We demonstrate that such chemical deviations can lead to significant changes in the bulk thermal and dielectric properties of SrTiO3 and LaAlO3 films. We have also investigated the interface between SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, which has been studied extensively over the past 8 years due to the supposed presence of a 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Our results indicate that the presence of cation defects in the LaAlO3 has a profound impact on the electronic properties of the 2DEG interface. Finally, we have similarly shown that cation non-stoichiometry can cause the metal-insulator-transition material NdNiO3 to behave

  13. Protective effects of HV-P411 complex against D-galactosamine-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Woo; Kim, Seok-Joo; Kim, Hyo-Yeon; Cho, Soon Hyun; Kim, Kyung Nam; Lee, Sin Gu; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the hepatoprotective effect of the HV-P411 complex, an herbal extract mixture from the seeds of Vitis vinifera, Schisandra chinensis and Taraxacum officinale, against D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-induced hepatitis. Hepatotoxicity was induced by D-GalN (700 mg/kg, i.p.), and the HV-P411 complex was administered orally 48, 24, and 2 h before and 6 h after D-GalN injection. Increases in serum aminotransferase activity and lipid peroxidation and a decrease in hepatic glutathione content were attenuated by the HV-P411 complex 24 h after D-GalN treatment. The HV-P411 complex attenuated the increases in serum tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6 level and cyclooxygenase-2 protein production and their mRNA expressions, while increases in serum IL-10 level and heme oxygenase-1 protein production and their mRNA expressions were augmented by the HV-P411 complex. The increased translocation of nuclear factor-κB and c-Jun phosphorylation were attenuated by treatment with the HV-P411 complex. Our results suggest that the HV-P411 complex prevents D-GalN-induced hepatotoxicity via antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities.

  14. Vacancy complexes induce long-range ferromagnetism in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhenkui; Schwingenschlögl, Udo E-mail: Iman.Roqan@kaust.edu.sa; Roqan, Iman S. E-mail: Iman.Roqan@kaust.edu.sa

    2014-11-14

    By means of density functional theory, we argue that ferromagnetism in GaN can be induced by vacancy complexes. Spin polarization originates from the charge compensation between neutral N and Ga vacancies. Defect formation energy calculations predict that a vacancy complex of two positively charged N vacancies and one doubly negative Ga vacancy is likely to form. This defect complex induces a net moment of 1 μ{sub B}, which is localized around the negative Ga center and exhibits pronounced in-plane ferromagnetic coupling. In contrast to simple Ga vacancy induced ferromagnetism, the proposed picture is in line with the fact that N vacancies have a low formation energy. Formation energies indicate mutual stabilization of the intrinsic defects in GaN.

  15. Lac repressor: Crystallization of intact tetramer and its complexes with inducer and operator DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, H.C.; Lu, P. ); Lewis, M. Smith Kline and French Labs., King of Prussia, PA )

    1990-03-01

    The intact lac repressor tetramer, which regulates expression of the lac operon in Escherichia coli, has been crystallized in the native form, with an inducer, and in a ternary complex with operator DNA and an anti-inducer. The crystals without DNA diffract to better than 3.5 {angstrom}. They belong to the monoclinic space group C2 and have cell dimensions a = 164.7 {angstrom}, b = 75.6 {angstrom}, and c = 161.2 {angstrom}, with {alpha} = {gamma} = 90{degree} and {beta} = 125.5{degree}. Cocrystals have been obtained with a number of different lac operator-related DNA fragments. The complex with a blunt-ended 16-base-pair strand yielded tetragonal bipyramids that diffract to 6.5 {angstrom}. These protein-DNA cocrystals crack upon exposure to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl {beta}-D-thiogalactoside, suggesting a conformational change in the repressor-operator complex.

  16. Infrared spectroscopic studies on reaction induced conformational changes in the NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I).

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Petra; Kriegel, Sébastien; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    Redox-dependent conformational changes are currently discussed to be a crucial part of the reaction mechanism of the respiratory complex I. Specialized difference Fourier transform infrared techniques allow the detection of side-chain movements and minute secondary structure changes. For complex I, (1)H/(2)H exchange kinetics of the amide modes revealed a better accessibility of the backbone in the presence of NADH and quinone. Interestingly, the presence of phospholipids, that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the isolated enzyme complex, changes the overall conformation. When comparing complex I samples from different species, very similar electrochemically induced FTIR difference spectra and very similar rearrangements are reported. Finally, the information obtained with variants and from Zn(2+) inhibited samples for the conformational reorganization of complex I upon electron transfer are discussed in this review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  17. Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated cell death via impairing electron transport chain complex III

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Seokheon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Hwang, Joohyun; Shin, Ki Soon; Kang, Shin Jung

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Heptachlor inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. •Heptachlor promoted generation of reactive oxygen species. •Heptachlor induced Bax activation. •Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis. -- Abstract: Environmental toxins like pesticides have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Epidemiological studies suggested that exposures to organochlorine pesticides have an association with an increased PD risk. In the present study, we examined the mechanism of toxicity induced by an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor. In a human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, heptachlor induced both morphological and functional damages in mitochondria. Interestingly, the compound inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. Rapid generation of reactive oxygen species and the activation of Bax were then detected. Subsequently, mitochondria-mediated, caspase-dependent apoptosis followed. Our results raise a possibility that an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor can act as a neurotoxicant associated with PD.

  18. The Shu complex promotes error-free tolerance of alkylation-induced base excision repair products

    PubMed Central

    Godin, Stephen K.; Zhang, Zhuying; Herken, Benjamin W.; Westmoreland, James W.; Lee, Alison G.; Mihalevic, Michael J.; Yu, Zhongxun; Sobol, Robert W.; Resnick, Michael A.; Bernstein, Kara A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate the role of the budding yeast Shu complex in promoting homologous recombination (HR) upon replication fork damage. We recently found that the Shu complex stimulates Rad51 filament formation during HR through its physical interactions with Rad55-Rad57. Unlike other HR factors, Shu complex mutants are primarily sensitive to replicative stress caused by MMS and not to more direct DNA breaks. Here, we uncover a novel role for the Shu complex in the repair of specific MMS-induced DNA lesions and elucidate the interplay between HR and translesion DNA synthesis. We find that the Shu complex promotes high-fidelity bypass of MMS-induced alkylation damage, such as N3-methyladenine, as well as bypassing the abasic sites generated after Mag1 removes N3-methyladenine lesions. Furthermore, we find that the Shu complex responds to ssDNA breaks generated in cells lacking the abasic site endonucleases. At each lesion, the Shu complex promotes Rad51-dependent HR as the primary repair/tolerance mechanism over error-prone translesion DNA polymerases. Together, our work demonstrates that the Shu complex's promotion of Rad51 pre-synaptic filaments is critical for high-fidelity bypass of multiple replication-blocking lesion. PMID:27298254

  19. A trap potential model investigation of the optical activity induced in dye-DNA intercalation complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Mamoru

    1988-02-01

    The fundamental features of the optical activity induced in dye-DNA intercalation complexes are studied by application of the trap potential model which is useful to evaluate the induced rotational strength without reference to detailed geometrical information about the intercalation complexes. The specific effect of the potential depth upon the induced optical activity is explained in terms of the relative magnitudes of the wave-phase and helix-phase variations in the path of an electron moving on a restricted helical segment just like an exciton trapped around the dye intercalation site. The parallel and perpendicular components of the induced rotational strength well reflect basic properties of the helicity effects about the longitudinal and tangential axes of the DNA helical cylinder. The trap potential model is applied to optimize the potential parameters so as to reproduce the ionic strength effect upon the optical activity induced to proflavine-DNA intercalation complexes. From relationships between the optimized potential parameters and ionic strengths, it is inferred that increase in the ionic strength contributes to the optical activity induced by the nearest-neighbour interaction between intercalated proflavine and DNA base pairs.

  20. Geomorphology and failure history of the earthquake-induced Farmington Siding landslide complex, Davis County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, M.; Harty, K.M. )

    1993-04-01

    The Farmington Siding landslide complex covers an area of 19.5 km[sup 2] in central Davis County. First identified and mapped in the 1970s, the feature was classified by previous researchers as a liquefaction-induced lateral spread based on surface geomorphology and exposures on the landslide complex. This was the first landslide in Utah to be attributed to earthquake-induced liquefaction. Geomorphic and geologic evidence indicate that the Farmington Sliding landslide complex likely consists of liquefaction-induced landslides that failed by means of both flow failure and lateral spreading. The landslide complex is located in an area underlain primarily by fine-grained deposits of Pleistocene Lake Bonneville and Holocene Great Salt Lake. Geomorphic features of the landslide complex include main and minor scarps, hummocks, closed depressions, and transverse lineaments. The main scarp consists mostly of a series of arcuate scallops near the left flank of the landslide, but it is a relatively linear, single scarp near the right flank of the landslide. Hummocks and closed depressions are most common near the head region of the landslide complex. Failure of the Farmington Sliding landslide complex has occurred at least twice. The older, distal portion of the landslide complex is cut by the Gilbert shoreline of the Bonneville lake cycle, indicating that landsliding occurred more than 10,000 years ago. In the younger portion of the landslide complex, landsliding has disrupted the Gilbert shoreline. Radiocarbon age estimates from trenches on a hummock near the main scarp of the younger landslide indicate that slope failure occurred sometime between about 2,730 [+-] 370 cal. yr B.P. and 4,530 [+-] 300 cal. yr B.P., possibly during the penultimate or antepenultimate surface-faulting earthquake on the Weber segment of the Wasatch fault zone.

  1. Nature of chiral-induced equilibrium shifts in racemic labile lanthanide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shuguang; Hilmes, G.L.; Riehl, J.P. )

    1989-03-23

    An analysis of the chiral-induced equilibrium shift of racemic D{sub 3} tris-terdendate complexes of lanthanides with 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylate is presented in terms of the associated/dissociated models of Schipper. Results are presented which indicate that the so-called Pfeiffer effect in these lanthanide complexes is best described by the dissociated model, as was determined for similar labile transition-metal complexes. The nature of the chiral discriminatory interaction is shown to be largely electrostatic by measurements in mixed solvents of varying dielectric constant.

  2. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying; Billiar, Timothy R

    2012-06-22

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF+ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found that cAMP exerts its affect at the proximal level of TNF signaling by inhibiting the formation of the DISC complex upon the binding of TNF to TNFR1. In conclusion, our study shows that cAMP prevents TNF+ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes by inhibiting DISC complex formation.

  3. Isoniazid-induced cell death is precipitated by underlying mitochondrial complex I dysfunction in mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Kwang; Fujimoto, Kazunori; Zhang, Carmen; Schwall, Christine T; Alder, Nathan N; Pinkert, Carl A; Krueger, Winfried; Rasmussen, Theodore; Boelsterli, Urs A

    2013-12-01

    Isoniazid (INH) is an antituberculosis drug that has been associated with idiosyncratic liver injury in susceptible patients. The underlying mechanisms are still unclear, but there is growing evidence that INH and/or its major metabolite, hydrazine, may interfere with mitochondrial function. However, hepatic mitochondria have a large reserve capacity, and minor disruption of energy homeostasis does not necessarily induce cell death. We explored whether pharmacologic or genetic impairment of mitochondrial complex I may amplify mitochondrial dysfunction and precipitate INH-induced hepatocellular injury. We found that INH (≤ 3000 μM) did not induce cell injury in cultured mouse hepatocytes, although it decreased hepatocellular respiration and ATP levels in a concentration-dependent fashion. However, coexposure of hepatocytes to INH and nontoxic concentrations of the complex I inhibitors rotenone (3 μM) or piericidin A (30 nM) resulted in massive ATP depletion and cell death. Although both rotenone and piericidin A increased MitoSox-reactive fluorescence, Mito-TEMPO or N-acetylcysteine did not attenuate the extent of cytotoxicity. However, preincubation of cells with the acylamidase inhibitor bis-p-nitrophenol phosphate provided protection from hepatocyte injury induced by rotenone/INH (but not rotenone/hydrazine), suggesting that hydrazine was the cell-damaging species. Indeed, we found that hydrazine directly inhibited the activity of solubilized complex II. Hepatocytes isolated from mutant Ndufs4(+/-) mice, although featuring moderately lower protein expression levels of this complex I subunit in liver mitochondria, exhibited unchanged hepatic complex I activity and were therefore not sensitized to INH. These data indicate that underlying inhibition of complex I, which alone is not acutely toxic, can trigger INH-induced hepatocellular injury.

  4. Three-Dimensional Topological Field Theory Induced from Generalized Complex Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Noriaki

    We construct a three-dimensional topological sigma model which is induced from a generalized complex structure on a target generalized complex manifold. This model is constructed from maps from a three-dimensional manifold X to an arbitrary generalized complex manifold M. The theory is invariant under the diffeomorphism on the worldvolume and the b-transformation on the generalized complex structure. Moreover the model is manifestly invariant under the mirror symmetry. We derive from this model the Zucchini's two-dimensional topological sigma model with a generalized complex structure as a boundary action on ∂X. As a special case, we obtain three-dimensional realization of a WZ-Poisson manifold.

  5. Negative regulation of NaF-induced apoptosis by Bad-CAII complex.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, S; Sugiyama, K; Amano, O; Yasui, T; Sakagami, H

    2011-09-05

    Fluoride is used to prevent caries in dentistry. However, its mechanism of cytotoxicity induction is unclear. This study was undertaken to determine whether sodium fluoride (NaF) induces apoptosis in human oral cells and if so, whether Bad protein is involved in the process. NaF showed higher cytotoxicity and apoptosis-inducing activity against human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells (HSC-2) than against human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Western blot analysis showed that NaF enhanced the expression and dephosphorylation of Bad protein. This study demonstrates for the first time that Bad protein forms a complex with carbonic anhydrase II (CAII), and NaF stimulates the detachment of CAII from the Bad-CAII complex and the replacement by the formation of Bad-Bcl-2 complex. Knockdown of Bad and CAII mRNA by siRNA inhibited and enhanced the NaF-induced caspase activation, respectively. The present study suggests that CAII negatively regulates the NaF-induced apoptosis by forming a complex with Bad.

  6. Cleavage enhancement of specific chemical bonds in DNA-Cisplatin complexes induced by X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Yao, Xiaobin; Luo, Xinglan; Fu, Xianzhi

    2014-04-01

    The chemical bond transformation of cisplatin-DNA complexes can be probed efficiently by XPS which provides a concomitant X-ray irradiation source as well. The presence to Pt could considerably increase formation of the SE induced by X-ray and that the further interaction of these LEE with DNA leads to the enhancement of bond cleavages.

  7. Identifying the magnetoconductance responses by the induced charge transfer complex states in pentacene-based diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Shun; Lee, Tsung-Hsun; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Huang, J. C. A.; Wen, Ten-Chin

    2012-07-01

    We investigate the magnetoconductance (MC) responses in photocurrent, unipolar injection, and bipolar injection regimes in pentacene-based diodes. Both photocurrent and bipolar injection contributed MC responses show large difference in MC line shape, which are attributed to triplet-polaron interaction modulated by the magnetic field dependent singlet fission and the intersystem crossing of the polaron pair, respectively. By blending 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane into pentacene, all the MC responses are suppressed but the MC response at unipolar injection regime is enhanced, which is attributed to the induced charge transfer complex states (CT complex states). This work identify the MC responses between single carrier contributed MC and exciton related MC by the induced CT complex states.

  8. Neuroprotective effects of three different sizes nanochelating based nano complexes in MPP(+) induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Maghsoudi, Amirhossein; Fakharzadeh, Saideh; Hafizi, Maryam; Abbasi, Maryam; Kohram, Fatemeh; Sardab, Shima; Tahzibi, Abbas; Kalanaky, Somayeh; Nazaran, Mohammad Hassan

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the world's second most common dementia, which the drugs available for its treatment have not had effects beyond slowing the disease process. Recently nanotechnology has induced the chance for designing and manufacturing new medicines for neurodegenerative disease. It is demonstrated that by tuning the size of a nanoparticle, the physiological effect of the nanoparticle can be controlled. Using novel nanochelating technology, three nano complexes: Pas (150 nm), Paf (100 nm) and Pac (40 nm) were designed and in the present study their neuroprotective effects were evaluated in PC12 cells treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridine ion (MPP (+)). PC12 cells were pre-treated with the Pas, Paf or Pac nano complexes, then they were subjected to 10 μM MPP (+). Subsequently, cell viability, intracellular free Calcium and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, mitochondrial membrane potential, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, Glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and Caspase 3 expression were evaluated. All three nano complexes, especially Pac, were able to increase cell viability, SOD and CAT activity, decreased Caspase 3 expression and prevented the generation of ROS and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential caused by MPP(+). Pre-treatment with Pac and Paf nano complexes lead to a decrease of intracellular free Calcium, but Pas nano complex could not decrease it. Only Pac nano complex decreased MDA levels and other nano complexes could not change this parameter compared to MPP(+) treated cells. Hence according to the results, all nanochelating based nano complexes induced neuroprotective effects in an experimental model of PD, but the smallest nano complex, Pac, showed the best results.

  9. Cannabinoid-Induced Changes in the Activity of Electron Transport Chain Complexes of Brain Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Hroudová, Jana; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the activity of individual mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (I, II/III, IV) and citrate synthase induced by pharmacologically different cannabinoids. In vitro effects of selected cannabinoids on mitochondrial enzymes were measured in crude mitochondrial fraction isolated from pig brain. Both cannabinoid receptor agonists, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, anandamide, and R-(+)-WIN55,212-2, and antagonist/inverse agonists of cannabinoid receptors, AM251, and cannabidiol were examined in pig brain mitochondria. Different effects of these cannabinoids on mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and citrate synthase were found. Citrate synthase activity was decreased only by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and AM251. Significant increase in the complex I activity was induced by anandamide. At micromolar concentration, all the tested cannabinoids inhibited the activity of electron transport chain complexes II/III and IV. Stimulatory effect of anandamide on activity of complex I may participate on distinct physiological effects of endocannabinoids compared to phytocannabinoids or synthetic cannabinoids. Common inhibitory effect of cannabinoids on activity of complex II/III and IV confirmed a non-receptor-mediated mechanism of cannabinoid action on individual components of system of oxidative phosphorylation.

  10. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks cell death induced by TNF and actinomycin D in cultured hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks NF-{kappa}B activation induced by TNF and actinomycin D. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks DISC formation following TNF and actinomycin D exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks TNF signaling at a proximal step. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found

  11. The L-Z complexity of exercise-induced muscle fatigue based on acoustic myographye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yijian, Min; Xinyuan, Liu; Tingting, Wang

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of exercise fatigue was investigated during exercise using L-Z complexity of non-linear analysis. Muscle fatigue was induced in the sitting position by lifting the heel under a load. An acoustic myogram of the gastrocnemius was obtained until exhaustion. The different modes of the speed responses were calculated using the L-Z complexity method, which analyzes muscle fibers participation, while the exercise is in progress. The L-Z complexity decreased incrementally with decreases in muscle strength, reaching a minimum value when the muscle was exhausted. Our data indicate that the L-Z complexity method is easy to use and effective at revealing the dynamic characteristics and variations of exercise fatigue. This method could be used to monitor sports training.

  12. Artificial Force Induced Reaction Method for Systematic Determination of Complex Reaction Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sameera, W M C; Kumar Sharma, Akhilesh; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays, computational studies are very important for the elucidation of reaction mechanisms and selectivity of complex reactions. However, traditional computational methods usually require an estimated reaction path, mainly driven by limited experimental implications, intuition, and assumptions of stationary points. However, the artificial force induced reaction (AFIR) method in the global reaction route mapping (GRRM) strategy can be used for unbiased and automatic reaction path searches for complex reactions. In this account, we highlight applications of the AFIR method to a variety of reactions (organic, organometallic, enzymatic, and photochemical) of complex molecular systems. In addition, the AFIR method has been successfully used to rationalise the origin of stereo- and regioselectivity. The AFIR method can be applied from small to large molecular systems, and will be a very useful tool for the study of complex molecular problems in many areas of chemistry, biology, and material sciences.

  13. Mitochondrial complex I dysfunction induced by cocaine and cocaine plus morphine in brain and liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Oliveira, Teresa; Silva, Lisbeth; Silva, Ana Maria; Moreno, António J; Oliveira, Catarina R; Santos, Maria S

    2013-06-07

    Mitochondrial function and energy metabolism are affected in brains of human cocaine abusers. Cocaine is known to induce mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac and hepatic tissues, but its effects on brain bioenergetics are less documented. Furthermore, the combination of cocaine and opioids (speedball) was also shown to induce mitochondrial dysfunction. In this work, we compared the effects of cocaine and/or morphine on the bioenergetics of isolated brain and liver mitochondria, to understand their specific effects in each tissue. Upon energization with complex I substrates, cocaine decreased state-3 respiration in brain (but not in liver) mitochondria and decreased uncoupled respiration and mitochondrial potential in both tissues, through a direct effect on complex I. Morphine presented only slight effects on brain and liver mitochondria, and the combination cocaine+morphine had similar effects to cocaine alone, except for a greater decrease in state-3 respiration. Brain and liver mitochondrial respirations were differentially affected, and liver mitochondria were more prone to proton leak caused by the drugs or their combination. This was possibly related with a different dependence on complex I in mitochondrial populations from these tissues. In summary, cocaine and cocaine+morphine induce mitochondrial complex I dysfunction in isolated brain and liver mitochondria, with specific effects in each tissue.

  14. Breast milk immune complexes are potent inducers of oral tolerance in neonates and prevent asthma development.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, E; Rekima, A; Seitz-Polski, B; Kanda, A; Fleury, S; Tissandie, E; Monteiro, R; Dombrowicz, D D; Julia, V; Glaichenhaus, N; Verhasselt, V

    2010-09-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic lung disease resulting from an inappropriate T helper (Th)-2 response to environmental antigens. Early tolerance induction is an attractive approach for primary prevention of asthma. Here, we found that breastfeeding by antigen-sensitized mothers exposed to antigen aerosols during lactation induced a robust and long-lasting antigen-specific protection from asthma. Protection was more profound and persistent than the one induced by antigen-exposed non-sensitized mothers. Milk from antigen-exposed sensitized mothers contained antigen-immunoglobulin (Ig) G immune complexes that were transferred to the newborn through the neonatal Fc receptor resulting in the induction of antigen-specific FoxP3(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells. The induction of oral tolerance by milk immune complexes did not require the presence of transforming growth factor-beta in milk in contrast to tolerance induced by milk-borne free antigen. Furthermore, neither the presence of IgA in milk nor the expression of the inhibitory FcgammaRIIb in the newborn was required for tolerance induction. This study provides new insights on the mechanisms of tolerance induction in neonates and highlights that IgG immune complexes found in breast milk are potent inducers of oral tolerance. These observations may pave the way for the identification of key factors for primary prevention of immune-mediated diseases such as asthma.

  15. Complex muscle vibration patterns to induce gait-like lower-limb movements: proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Duclos, Cyril; Kemlin, Claire; Lazert, David; Gagnon, Dany; Dyer, Joseph-Omer; Forget, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Muscle vibrations can induce motor responses and illusions of complex movements. However, inducing gait-like cyclical movements and illusions requires the application of multiple fast alternating vibrations to lower-limb muscles. The objectives were (1) to test the feasibility of delivering complex vibrations in a time-organized manner and (2) to illustrate the possibility of inducing alternate gait-in-place-like movements using these vibrations. Patterns of vibration, produced by 12 vibrators applied bilaterally on the flexor and extensor muscle groups of the lower limbs, were based on normal gait kinematics. We tested 1 s and 2 s cycle patterns of vibration. Vibrator responses were assessed using auto- and crosscorrelations and frequency analyses based on accelerometry measurements, and compared between patterns. High auto- (>0.8) and crosscorrelation (>0.6) coefficients demonstrated a good response by the vibrators to the control signal. Vibrations induced cyclical, low-amplitude stepping-in-place movements that mimicked alternate walking movements with both legs, with 1 s and 2 s cycle durations, in one nondisabled participant and one participant with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale B spinal cord injury standing, relaxed, with body-weight support. Electromechanical vibrators can deliver complex cyclical vibrations and trigger gait-like lower-limb movements. These results warrant the application of these vibration patterns on individuals with sensorimotor impairments to test their potential in gait rehabilitation.

  16. Chronic Repression of mTOR Complex 2 Induces Changes in the Gut Microbiota of Diet-induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Mi-Ja; Lee, Jina; Shin, Na-Ri; Kim, Min-Soo; Hyun, Dong-Wook; Yun, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Pil Soo; Whon, Tae Woong; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the gut microbiota play a crucial role in host physiology and metabolism; however, the molecular pathways underlying these changes in diet-induced obesity are unclear. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is associated with metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Therefore, we examined whether changes in the regulation of mTOR signaling induced by diet (a high-fat diet [HFD] or normal-chow diet) and/or therapeutics (resveratrol [a specific inhibitor of mTOR complex 1] or rapamycin [an inhibitor of both mTOR complex 1 and 2]) altered the composition of the gut microbiota in mice. Oral administration of resveratrol prevented glucose intolerance and fat accumulation in HFD-fed mice, whereas rapamycin significantly impaired glucose tolerance and exacerbated intestinal inflammation. The abundance of Lactococcus, Clostridium XI, Oscillibacter, and Hydrogenoanaerobacterium increased under the HFD condition; however, the abundance of these species declined after resveratrol treatment. Conversely, the abundance of unclassified Marinilabiliaceae and Turicibacter decreased in response to a HFD or rapamycin. Taken together, these results demonstrated that changes in the composition of intestinal microbiota induced by changes in mTOR activity correlate with obese and diabetic phenotypes. PMID:27471110

  17. Methamphetamine-induced inhibition of mitochondrial complex II: roles of glutamate and peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jeffrey M; Quinton, Maria S; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2005-10-01

    High-dose methamphetamine (METH) is associated with long-term deficits in dopaminergic systems. Although the mechanism(s) which contributes to these deficits is not known, glutamate and peroxynitrite are likely to play a role. These factors are hypothesized to inhibit mitochondrial function, increasing the free radical burden and decreasing neuronal energy supplies. Previous studies suggest a role for the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) in mediating toxicity of METH. The purpose of the present studies was to determine whether METH administration selectively inhibits complex II of the ETC in rats. High-dose METH administration (10 mg/kg every 2 h x 4) rapidly (within 1 h) decreased complex II (succinate dehydrogenase) activity by approximately 20-30%. In addition, decreased activity of complex II-III, but not complex I-III, of the mitochondrial ETC was also observed 24 h after METH. This inhibition was not due to direct inhibition by METH or METH-induced hyperthermia and was specific to striatal brain regions. METH-induced decreases in complex II-III were prevented by MK-801 and the peroxynitrite scavenger 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (2,4,6-trimethyl-3,5-sulphonatophenyl) porphinato iron III. These findings provide the first evidence that METH administration, via glutamate receptor activation and peroxynitrite formation, selectively alters a specific site of the ETC.

  18. Surface Induced Dissociation Yields Quaternary Substructure of Refractory Noncovalent Phosphorylase B and Glutamate Dehydrogenase Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xin; Zhou, Mowei; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2014-03-01

    Ion mobility (IM) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) coupled with native MS are useful for studying noncovalent protein complexes. Collision induced dissociation (CID) is the most common MS/MS dissociation method. However, some protein complexes, including glycogen phosphorylase B kinase (PHB) and L-glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) examined in this study, are resistant to dissociation by CID at the maximum collision energy available in the instrument. Surface induced dissociation (SID) was applied to dissociate the two refractory protein complexes. Different charge state precursor ions of the two complexes were examined by CID and SID. The PHB dimer was successfully dissociated to monomers and the GDH hexamer formed trimeric subcomplexes that are informative of its quaternary structure. The unfolding of the precursor and the percentages of the distinct products suggest that the dissociation pathways vary for different charge states. The precursors at lower charge states (+21 for PHB dimer and +27 for GDH hexamer) produce a higher percentage of folded fragments and dissociate more symmetrically than the precusors at higher charge states (+29 for PHB dimer and +39 for GDH hexamer). The precursors at lower charge state may be more native-like than the higher charge state because a higher percentage of folded fragments and a lower percentage of highly charged unfolded fragments are detected. The combination of SID and charge reduction is shown to be a powerful tool for quaternary structure analysis of refractory noncovalent protein complexes, as illustrated by the data for PHB dimer and GDH hexamer.

  19. Atomic description of the immune complex involved in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia

    DOE PAGES

    Cai, Zheng; Yarovoi, Serge V.; Zhu, Zhiqiang; ...

    2015-09-22

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an autoimmune thrombotic disorder caused by immune complexes containing platelet factor 4 (PF4), antibodies to PF4 and heparin or cellular glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Here we solve the crystal structures of the: (1) PF4 tetramer/fondaparinux complex, (2) PF4 tetramer/KKO-Fab complex (a murine monoclonal HIT-like antibody) and (3) PF4 monomer/RTO-Fab complex (a non-HIT anti-PF4 monoclonal antibody). Fondaparinux binds to the ‘closed’ end of the PF4 tetramer and stabilizes its conformation. This interaction in turn stabilizes the epitope for KKO on the ‘open’ end of the tetramer. Fondaparinux and KKO thereby collaborate to ‘stabilize’ the ternary pathogenic immune complex. Bindingmore » of RTO to PF4 monomers prevents PF4 tetramerization and inhibits KKO and human HIT IgG-induced platelet activation and platelet aggregation in vitro, and thrombus progression in vivo. Lastly, the atomic structures provide a basis to develop new diagnostics and non-anticoagulant therapeutics for HIT.« less

  20. Atomic description of the immune complex involved in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Zheng; Yarovoi, Serge V.; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Rauova, Lubica; Hayes, Vincent; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Liu, Qun; Poncz, Mortimer; Arepally, Gowthami; Cines, Douglas B.; Greene, Mark I.

    2015-09-22

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an autoimmune thrombotic disorder caused by immune complexes containing platelet factor 4 (PF4), antibodies to PF4 and heparin or cellular glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Here we solve the crystal structures of the: (1) PF4 tetramer/fondaparinux complex, (2) PF4 tetramer/KKO-Fab complex (a murine monoclonal HIT-like antibody) and (3) PF4 monomer/RTO-Fab complex (a non-HIT anti-PF4 monoclonal antibody). Fondaparinux binds to the ‘closed’ end of the PF4 tetramer and stabilizes its conformation. This interaction in turn stabilizes the epitope for KKO on the ‘open’ end of the tetramer. Fondaparinux and KKO thereby collaborate to ‘stabilize’ the ternary pathogenic immune complex. Binding of RTO to PF4 monomers prevents PF4 tetramerization and inhibits KKO and human HIT IgG-induced platelet activation and platelet aggregation in vitro, and thrombus progression in vivo. Lastly, the atomic structures provide a basis to develop new diagnostics and non-anticoagulant therapeutics for HIT.

  1. Dual Effect of Curcumin-Zinc Complex in Controlling Diabetes Mellitus in Experimentally Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Ali, Khalil; Abdel Fatah, Hala Salah; El-Badry, Yaser Abdel-Moemen

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound-assisted extraction of curcumin from Curcuma longa was performed in an ultrasonic bath at 30°C using ethanol for 40 min. A successful attempt has been made to prepare curcumin-zinc (Zn) complex using a simple chemical procedure. The complex formation and its stoichiometry were characterized using elemental analysis, Fourier transform (FT)-IR and UV spectroscopy which revealed the interaction of Zn(II) ion (M) with curcumin (ligand, L) to proceed via (ML) complex type formation. Oral administration of curcumin-Zn complex at a concentration of 150 mg/kg body weight/rat/d for 45 d in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats in comparison to curcumin and/or Zn administration exerted a hypoglycemic effect. A significant reduction in blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (Hb)A1c, and lipid profile parameters with an excellent improvement in plasma insulin levels have been attained. Also, the reduced activities of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), urea, and creatinine in the diabetic rats treated with the complex exhibited the non-toxic nature of the curcumin-Zn complex. Finally, the larger extent of the complex in hyperglycemic improvement in comparison to curcumin and/or Zn supplementation was interpreted by its dual action on glucose and insulin maintenance.

  2. Longitudinal study of circulating immune complexes in a patient with Staphylococcus albus-induced shunt nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Harkiss, G D; Brown, D L; Evans, D B

    1979-01-01

    The direct measurement and partial characterization of circulating immune complexes has been performed in a longitudinal study of a patient with Staphylococcus albus-induced shunt nephritis. The high levels of immune complexes were associated with cryoglobulinaemia and hypocomplementaemia. The activation of complement was found to be via the classical pathway, but the functioning of the alternative pathway may have been impaired in vivo due to very low levels of C3. The host response to the infection was also characterized by the production of a marked macroglobulinaemia, high titres of rheumatoid factor and a typical acute phase increase in the C-reactive protein level. Immune complex levels were persistently elevated many months after the removal of the focus of the infection. A possible explanation for this surprising finding may lie in the nature of the antigens in the immune complexes. It was found that the immune complexes contained both antibodies to and antigens from Staphlococcus albus. In particular, glycerol teichoic acid and staphylococcal nuclease were identified as components of the immune complexes present during the acute phase. Glycerol teichoic acid was also identified in the immune complexes found later although other Staphylococcus albus antigens as yet unidentified were also present and persisted in the circulation for several months. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:115626

  3. Induced circularly polarized luminescence arising from anion or protein binding to racemic emissive lanthanide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Rachel; Puckrin, Robert; McMahon, Brian K.; Pal, Robert; Parker, David; Pålsson, Lars-Olof

    2014-06-01

    A circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) spectrometer has been built and used to study the binding interaction of lactate and four different proteins with racemic EuIII and TbIII complexes in aqueous solution. Lactate binding gives rise to strong induced CPL spectra, and the observed emission dissymmetry factors vary linearly with enantiomeric composition. Particularly strong induced TbIII CPL also characterizes the binding interaction of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein with a dissociation constant, Kd, of 2.5 μM.

  4. Complexity.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, J Jaime

    2006-01-01

    It is difficult to define complexity in modeling. Complexity is often associated with uncertainty since modeling uncertainty is an intrinsically difficult task. However, modeling uncertainty does not require, necessarily, complex models, in the sense of a model requiring an unmanageable number of degrees of freedom to characterize the aquifer. The relationship between complexity, uncertainty, heterogeneity, and stochastic modeling is not simple. Aquifer models should be able to quantify the uncertainty of their predictions, which can be done using stochastic models that produce heterogeneous realizations of aquifer parameters. This is the type of complexity addressed in this article.

  5. Crystal Structure of the Lactose Operon Repressor and Its Complexes with DNA and Inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Mitchell; Chang, Geoffrey; Horton, Nancy C.; Kercher, Michele A.; Pace, Helen C.; Schumacher, Maria A.; Brennan, Richard G.; Lu, Ponzy

    1996-03-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli is the paradigm for gene regulation. Its key component is the lac repressor, a product of the lacI gene. The three-dimensional structures of the intact lac repressor, the lac repressor bound to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-β-D-1-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the lac repressor complexed with a 21-base pair symmetric operator DNA have been determined. These three structures show the conformation of the molecule in both the induced and repressed states and provide a framework for understanding a wealth of biochemical and genetic information. The DNA sequence of the lac operon has three lac repressor recognition sites in a stretch of 500 base pairs. The crystallographic structure of the complex with DNA suggests that the tetrameric repressor functions synergistically with catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) and participates in the quaternary formation of repression loops in which one tetrameric repressor interacts simultaneously with two sites on the genomic DNA.

  6. Sequential multiphoton absorption enhancement induced by zinc complexation in functionalized distyrylbenzene analogs.

    PubMed

    Fabbrini, Graziano; Riccò, Raffaele; Menna, Enzo; Maggini, Michele; Amendola, Vincenzo; Garbin, Mattia; Villano, Massimo; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2007-02-07

    Functionalized distyrylbenzene analogs and , bearing a tris-(2-pyridylmethyl)amine-based receptor for Zn(2+), were synthesized by a Horner-Emmons-Wittig coupling reaction. It has been found that Zn(2+) complexation induces changes in the linear absorption spectrum that enhance a nonlinear sequential two-photon absorption of nanosecond pulses at 532 nm. This absorption was also found to depend on the nature of the substituent at the side benzene ring of the styrylbenzene structure.

  7. Increased Resistance of Complex I Mutants to Phytosphingosine-induced Programmed Cell Death*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Ana; Lemos, Catarina; Falcão, Artur; Glass, N. Louise; Videira, Arnaldo

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the effects of phytosphingosine (PHS) on cells of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. Highly reduced viability, impairment of asexual spore germination, DNA condensation and fragmentation, and production of reactive oxygen species were observed in conidia treated with the drug, suggesting that PHS induces an apoptosis-like death in this fungus. Interestingly, we found that complex I mutants are more resistant to PHS treatment than the wild type strain. This effect appears to be specific because it was not observed in mutants defective in other components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, pointing to a particular involvement of complex I in cell death. The response of the mutant strains to PHS correlated with their response to hydrogen peroxide. The fact that complex I mutants generate fewer reactive oxygen species than the wild type strain when exposed to PHS likely explains the PHS-resistant phenotype. As compared with the wild type strain, we also found that a strain containing a deletion in the gene encoding an AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor)-like protein is more resistant to PHS and H2O2. In contrast, a strain containing a deletion in a gene encoding an AMID (AIF-homologous mitochondrion-associated inducer of death)-like polypeptide is more sensitive to both drugs. These results indicate that N. crassa has the potential to be a model organism to investigate the molecular basis of programmed cell death in eukaryotic species. PMID:18474589

  8. Increased resistance of complex I mutants to phytosphingosine-induced programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ana; Lemos, Catarina; Falcão, Artur; Glass, N Louise; Videira, Arnaldo

    2008-07-11

    We have studied the effects of phytosphingosine (PHS) on cells of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. Highly reduced viability, impairment of asexual spore germination, DNA condensation and fragmentation, and production of reactive oxygen species were observed in conidia treated with the drug, suggesting that PHS induces an apoptosis-like death in this fungus. Interestingly, we found that complex I mutants are more resistant to PHS treatment than the wild type strain. This effect appears to be specific because it was not observed in mutants defective in other components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, pointing to a particular involvement of complex I in cell death. The response of the mutant strains to PHS correlated with their response to hydrogen peroxide. The fact that complex I mutants generate fewer reactive oxygen species than the wild type strain when exposed to PHS likely explains the PHS-resistant phenotype. As compared with the wild type strain, we also found that a strain containing a deletion in the gene encoding an AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor)-like protein is more resistant to PHS and H2O2. In contrast, a strain containing a deletion in a gene encoding an AMID (AIF-homologous mitochondrion-associated inducer of death)-like polypeptide is more sensitive to both drugs. These results indicate that N. crassa has the potential to be a model organism to investigate the molecular basis of programmed cell death in eukaryotic species.

  9. A mouse model of mitochondrial complex III dysfunction induced by myxothiazol

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudi, Mina; Kallijärvi, Jukka; Marjavaara, Sanna; Kotarsky, Heike; Hansson, Eva; Levéen, Per; Fellman, Vineta

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Reversible chemical inhibition of complex III in wild type mouse. • Myxothiazol causes decreased complex III activity in mouse liver. • The model is useful for therapeutic trials to improve mitochondrial function. - Abstract: Myxothiazol is a respiratory chain complex III (CIII) inhibitor that binds to the ubiquinol oxidation site Qo of CIII. It blocks electron transfer from ubiquinol to cytochrome b and thus inhibits CIII activity. It has been utilized as a tool in studies of respiratory chain function in in vitro and cell culture models. We developed a mouse model of biochemically induced and reversible CIII inhibition using myxothiazol. We administered myxothiazol intraperitoneally at a dose of 0.56 mg/kg to C57Bl/J6 mice every 24 h and assessed CIII activity, histology, lipid content, supercomplex formation, and gene expression in the livers of the mice. A reversible CIII activity decrease to 50% of control value occurred at 2 h post-injection. At 74 h only minor histological changes in the liver were found, supercomplex formation was preserved and no significant changes in the expression of genes indicating hepatotoxicity or inflammation were found. Thus, myxothiazol-induced CIII inhibition can be induced in mice for four days in a row without overt hepatotoxicity or lethality. This model could be utilized in further studies of respiratory chain function and pharmacological approaches to mitochondrial hepatopathies.

  10. Metal induced folding: synthesis and conformational analysis of the lanthanide complexes of two 44-membered hydrazone macrocycles.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jörg M; Clegg, Jack K; Saggiomo, Vittorio; Reck, Lisa; Lüning, Ulrich; Sanders, Jeremy K M

    2012-04-07

    Six new lanthanide complexes of two 44-membered macrocycles have been prepared and characterised in solution. An analysis of the conformations of the free macrocycles and their lanthanide complexes both in solution (2D NMR) and in solid state (X-ray crystallography) demonstrate that the complexation induces changes in folding of the macrocycles.

  11. Parameter Fluctuation-Induced Pattern Transition in the Complex Ginzburg-Landau Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Ja, Ya; Tang, Jun; Chen, Yong

    Parameter fluctuation, which is often induced by the noise, temperature, deformation of the media etc., plays an important role in changing the dynamics of the system. In this paper, the problem of parameter fluctuation-induced pattern transition in the Complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (CGLE) is investigated. At first, the perpendicular-gradient initial values are used to generate spiral wave and spiral turbulence under appropriate parameters. At second, the parameter is perturbed with the periodical and/or random signal to simulate the parameter fluctuation, respectively. Then a class of linear error feedback is used to induce transition of the spiral wave and spiral turbulence. It is found that target waves can be induced by the complete feedback forcing, while the local feedback forcing seldom induce a target wave. In the case of spiral turbulence, spiral wave is generated and the spiral turbulence is removed by the new appeared spiral wave as the linear error feedback began to work on the whole media. Finally, the common negative feedback is also used to control the parameter-fluctuated CGLE, and the results are compared with the linear error feedback control, it is found that the whole system become homogeneous when the negative feedback is imposed on the whole media, and the local negative feedback can induce new target wave to remove the spiral wave while it is in vain to generate new target or spiral wave to overcome and eliminate the spiral turbulence.

  12. Signal-induced disassembly of the SCF ubiquitin ligase complex by Cdc48/p97

    PubMed Central

    Yen, James L.; Flick, Karin; Papagiannis, Christie V.; Mathur, Radhika; Tyrrell, An; Ouni, Ikram; Kaake, Robyn M.; Huang, Lan; Kaiser, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Summary A large group of E3 ubiquitin ligases is formed by the multisubunit SCF complex, whose core complex (Rbx1/Cul1-Cdc53/Skp1) binds one of many substrate recruiting F-box proteins to form an array of SCF ligases with diverse substrate specificities. It has long been thought that ubiquitylation by SCF ligases is regulated at the level of substrate binding. Here we describe an alternative mechanism of SCF regulation by active dissociation of the F-box subunit. We show that cadmium stress induces selective recruitment of the AAA+ ATPase Cdc48/p97 to catalyze dissociation of the F-box subunit from the yeast SCFMet30 ligase to block substrate ubiquitylation and trigger downstream events. Our results not only provide an additional layer of ubiquitin ligase regulation but also suggest that targeted, signal-dependent dissociation of multisubunit enzyme complexes is an important mechanism in control of enzyme function. PMID:23000173

  13. Structural basis for flg22-induced activation of the Arabidopsis FLS2-BAK1 immune complex.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yadong; Li, Lei; Macho, Alberto P; Han, Zhifu; Hu, Zehan; Zipfel, Cyril; Zhou, Jian-Min; Chai, Jijie

    2013-11-01

    Flagellin perception in Arabidopsis is through recognition of its highly conserved N-terminal epitope (flg22) by flagellin-sensitive 2 (FLS2). Flg22 binding induces FLS2 heteromerization with BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1-associated kinase 1 (BAK1) and their reciprocal activation followed by plant immunity. Here, we report the crystal structure of FLS2 and BAK1 ectodomains complexed with flg22 at 3.06 angstroms. A conserved and a nonconserved site from the inner surface of the FLS2 solenoid recognize the C- and N-terminal segment of flg22, respectively, without oligomerization or conformational changes in the FLS2 ectodomain. Besides directly interacting with FLS2, BAK1 acts as a co-receptor by recognizing the C terminus of the FLS2-bound flg22. Our data reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying FLS2-BAK1 complex recognition of flg22 and provide insight into the immune receptor complex activation.

  14. Kaleidoscopic imaging patterns of complex structures fabricated by laser-induced deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haoran; Yang, Fengyou; Dong, Jianjie; Du, Lena; Wang, Chuang; Zhang, Jianming; Guo, Chuan Fei; Liu, Qian

    2016-12-01

    Complex surface structures have stimulated a great deal of interests due to many potential applications in surface devices. However, in the fabrication of complex surface micro-/nanostructures, there are always great challenges in precise design, or good controllability, or low cost, or high throughput. Here, we present a route for the accurate design and highly controllable fabrication of surface quasi-three-dimensional (quasi-3D) structures based on a thermal deformation of simple two-dimensional laser-induced patterns. A complex quasi-3D structure, coaxially nested convex-concave microlens array, as an example, demonstrates our capability of design and fabrication of surface elements with this method. Moreover, by using only one relief mask with the convex-concave microlens structure, we have gotten hundreds of target patterns at different imaging planes, offering a cost-effective solution for mass production in lithography and imprinting, and portending a paradigm in quasi-3D manufacturing.

  15. Photo-induced reactions in the ion-molecule complex Mg+-OCNC2H5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ju-Long; Liu, Haichuan; Han, Ke-Li; Yang, Shihe

    2003-06-01

    Ion-molecule complexes of magnesium cation with ethyl isocyanate were produced in a laser-ablation supersonic expansion nozzle source. Photo-induced reactions in the 1:1 complexes have been studied in the spectral range of 230-410 nm. Photodissociation mass spectrometry revealed the persistent product Mg+ from nonreactive quenching throughout the entire wavelength range. As for the reactive channels, the photoproducts, Mg+OCN and C2H5+, were produced only in the blue absorption band of the complex with low yields. The action spectrum of Mg+(OCNC2H5) consists of two pronounced peaks on the red and blue sides of the Mg+ 32P←32S atomic transition. The ground state geometry of Mg+-OCNC2H5 was fully optimized at B3LYP/6-31+G** level by using GAUSSIAN 98 package. The calculated absorption spectrum of the complex using the optimized structure of its ground state agrees well with the observed action spectrum. Photofragment branching fractions of the products are almost independent of the photolysis photon energy for the 3Px,y,z excitations. The very low branching ratio of reactive products to nonreactive fragment suggests that evaporation is the main relaxation pathway in the photo-induced reactions of Mg+(OCNC2H5).

  16. Dynamic Figure Eight Chirality: Multifarious Inversions of a Helical Preference Induced by Complexation.

    PubMed

    Katoono, Ryo; Tanaka, Yuki; Kusaka, Keiichi; Fujiwara, Kenshu; Suzuki, Takanori

    2015-08-07

    We demonstrate two types of inversion of a helical preference upon the 1:1 complexation of a dynamic figure eight molecule with a guest molecule through the controlled transmission of point chirality. We designed a series of macrocycles that prefer a nonplanar conformation with figure eight chirality. These macrocycles are composed of a chirality-transferring unit (terephthalamide) and a structure-modifying unit (two o-phenylene rings spaced with a varying number of triple bonds). The former unit provides a binding site for capturing a guest molecule through the formation of hydrogen bonds. The attachment of chiral auxiliaries to the former unit induces a helical preference for a particular sense through the intramolecular transmission of point chirality. For relatively small-sized macrocycles, the preferred sense was reversed upon complexation with an achiral guest. Contrary preferences before and after complexation were both seen for chiral auxiliaries associated with a figure eight host through two-way intramolecular transmission of the single chiral source. Alternatively, the helical preference induced in relatively large-sized macrocycles was reversed only when a figure eight host formed a 1:1 complex with a particular enantiomeric guest through the supramolecular transmission of point chirality in the guest. This stereospecific inversion of a helical preference is rare.

  17. Statin-Induced Myopathy Is Associated with Mitochondrial Complex III Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Schirris, Tom J J; Renkema, G Herma; Ritschel, Tina; Voermans, Nicol C; Bilos, Albert; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Brandt, Ulrich; Koopman, Werner J H; Beyrath, Julien D; Rodenburg, Richard J; Willems, Peter H G M; Smeitink, Jan A M; Russel, Frans G M

    2015-09-01

    Cholesterol-lowering statins effectively reduce the risk of major cardiovascular events. Myopathy is the most important adverse effect, but its underlying mechanism remains enigmatic. In C2C12 myoblasts, several statin lactones reduced respiratory capacity and appeared to be strong inhibitors of mitochondrial complex III (CIII) activity, up to 84% inhibition. The lactones were in general three times more potent inducers of cytotoxicity than their corresponding acid forms. The Qo binding site of CIII was identified as off-target of the statin lactones. These findings could be confirmed in muscle tissue of patients suffering from statin-induced myopathies, in which CIII enzyme activity was reduced by 18%. Respiratory inhibition in C2C12 myoblasts could be attenuated by convergent electron flow into CIII, restoring respiration up to 89% of control. In conclusion, CIII inhibition was identified as a potential off-target mechanism associated with statin-induced myopathies.

  18. A novel complex I inhibitor protects against hypertension-induced left ventricular hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Nobutoshi; Robertson, Ian M; Hamza, Shereen M; Soltys, Carrie-Lynn M; Sung, Miranda M; Masson, Grant; Beker, Donna L; Dyck, Jason R B

    2017-03-01

    Since left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) increases the susceptibility for the development of other cardiac conditions, pharmacotherapy that mitigates pathological cardiac remodeling may prove to be beneficial in patients with LVH. Previous work has shown that the activation of the energy-sensing kinase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) can inhibit some of the molecular mechanisms that are involved in LVH. Of interest, metformin activates AMPK through its inhibition of mitochondrial complex I in the electron transport chain and can prevent LVH induced by pressure overload. However, metformin has additional cellular effects unrelated to AMPK activation, raising questions about whether mitochondrial complex I inhibition is sufficient to reduce LVH. Herein, we characterize the cardiac effects of a novel compound (R118), which is a more potent complex I inhibitor than metformin and is thus used at a much lower concentration. We show that R118 activates AMPK in the cardiomyocyte, inhibits multiple signaling pathways involved in LVH, and prevents Gq protein-coupled receptor agonist-induced prohypertrophic signaling. We also show that in vivo administration of R118 prevents LVH in a mouse model of hypertension, suggesting that R118 can directly modulate the response of the cardiomyocyte to stress. Of importance, we also show that while R118 treatment prevents adaptive remodelling in response to elevated afterload, it does so without compromising systolic function, improves myocardial energetics, and prevents a decline in diastolic function in hypertensive mice. Taken together, our data suggest that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I may be worthy of future investigation for the treatment of LVH.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by R118 reduces left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and improves myocardial energetics as well as diastolic function without compromising systolic function. Together, these effects demonstrate the therapeutic potential of

  19. Computation of Collision-Induced Absorption by Simple Molecular Complexes, for Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Martin; Frommhold, Lothar; Li, Xiaoping; Hunt, Katharine L. C.

    2012-06-01

    The interaction-induced absorption by collisional pairs of H{_2} molecules is an important opacity source in the atmospheres of various types of planets and cool stars, such as late stars, low-mass stars, brown dwarfs, cool white dwarf stars, the ambers of the smaller, burnt out main sequence stars, exoplanets, etc., and therefore of special astronomical interest The emission spectra of cool white dwarf stars differ significantly in the infrared from the expected blackbody spectra of their cores, which is largely due to absorption by collisional H{_2}-H{_2}, H{_2}-He, and H{_2}-H complexes in the stellar atmospheres. Using quantum-chemical methods we compute the atmospheric absorption from hundreds to thousands of kelvin. Laboratory measurements of interaction-induced absorption spectra by H{_2} pairs exist only at room temperature and below. We show that our results reproduce these measurements closely, so that our computational data permit reliable modeling of stellar atmosphere opacities even for the higher temperatures. First results for H_2-He complexes have already been applied to astrophysical models have shown great improvements in these models. L. Frommhold, Collision-Induced Absorption in Gases, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, New York, 1993 and 2006 X. Li, K. L. C. Hunt, F. Wang, M. Abel, and L. Frommhold, Collision-Induced Infrared Absorption by Molecular Hydrogen Pairs at Thousands of Kelvin, Int. J. of Spect., vol. 2010, Article ID 371201, 11 pages, 2010. doi: 10.1155/2010/371201 M. Abel, L. Frommhold, X. Li, and K. L. C. Hunt, Collision-induced absorption by H{_2} pairs: From hundreds to thousands of Kelvin, J. Phys. Chem. A, 115, 6805-6812, 2011} L. Frommhold, M. Abel, F. Wang, M. Gustafsson, X. Li, and K. L. C. Hunt, "Infrared atmospheric emission and absorption by simple molecular complexes, from first principles", Mol. Phys. 108, 2265, 2010 M. Abel, L. Frommhold, X. Li, and K. L. C. Hunt, Infrared absorption by collisional H_2-He complexes

  20. Leishmania pifanoi proteoglycolipid complex P8 induces macrophage cytokine production through Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Shanta M; Colmenares, Maria; Pestana, Karen Goldsmith; McMahon-Pratt, Diane

    2008-05-01

    The P8 proteoglycolipid complex (P8 PGLC) is a glyconjugate expressed by Leishmania mexicana complex parasites. We previously have shown that vaccination with P8 PGLC provides protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis in susceptible BALB/c mice. However, the biological importance of this complex remains unknown. Here we show that P8 PGLC localizes to the surface of Leishmania pifanoi amastigotes and that upon exposure to macrophages, P8 PGLC binds and induces inflammatory cytokine and chemokine mRNAs such as tumor necrosis factor alpha and RANTES early after stimulation. Our studies indicate that cytokine and chemokine induction is dependent upon Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Interestingly, key inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (such as interleukin-6 [IL-6], macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta, and beta interferon [IFN-beta]) that can be induced through TLR4 activation were not induced or only slightly upregulated by P8 PGLC. Activation by P8 PGLC does not occur in the presence of TLR4 alone and requires both CD14 and myeloid differentiation protein 2 for signaling; this requirement may be responsible for the limited TLR4 response. This is the first characterization of a TLR4 ligand for Leishmania. In vitro experiments indicate that L. pifanoi amastigotes induce lower levels of cytokines in macrophages in the absence of TLR4; however, notably higher IL-10/IFN-gamma ratios were found for TLR4-deficient mice than for BALB/c mice. Further, increased levels of parasites persist in BALB/c mice deficient in TLR4. Taken together, these results suggest that TLR4 recognition of Leishmania pifanoi amastigotes is important for the control of infection and that this is mediated, in part, through the P8 PGLC.

  1. Dietary arginine silicate inositol complex inhibits periodontal tissue loss in rats with ligature-induced periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Dundar, Serkan; Eltas, Abubekir; Hakki, Sema S; Malkoc, Sıddık; Uslu, M Ozay; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Komorowski, James; Ozercan, I Hanifi; Akdemir, Fatih; Sahin, Kazim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to induce experimental periodontitis in rats previously fed diets containing arginine silicate inositol (ASI) complex and examine the biochemical, immunological, and radiological effects. Fifty two 8-week-old female Sprague Dawley rats were equally divided into four groups. The control group included those fed a standard rat diet with no operation performed during the experiment. The periodontitis, ASI I, and ASI II groups were subjected to experimental periodontitis induction for 11 days after being fed a standard rat diet alone, a diet containing 1.81 g/kg ASI complex, or a diet containing 3.62 g/kg ASI complex, respectively, for 8 weeks. Throughout the 11-day duration of periodontitis induction, all rats were fed standard feed. The rats were euthanized on the eleventh day, and their tissue and blood samples were collected. In the periodontitis group, elevated tissue destruction parameters and reduced tissue formation parameters were found, as compared to the ASI groups. Levels of enzymes, cytokines, and mediators associated with periodontal tissue destruction were lower in rats fed a diet containing ASI complex after experimental periodontitis. These results indicate that ASI complex could be an alternative agent for host modulation. PMID:27895467

  2. Consciousness and Complexity during Unresponsiveness Induced by Propofol, Xenon, and Ketamine.

    PubMed

    Sarasso, Simone; Boly, Melanie; Napolitani, Martino; Gosseries, Olivia; Charland-Verville, Vanessa; Casarotto, Silvia; Rosanova, Mario; Casali, Adenauer Girardi; Brichant, Jean-Francois; Boveroux, Pierre; Rex, Steffen; Tononi, Giulio; Laureys, Steven; Massimini, Marcello

    2015-12-07

    A common endpoint of general anesthetics is behavioral unresponsiveness, which is commonly associated with loss of consciousness. However, subjects can become disconnected from the environment while still having conscious experiences, as demonstrated by sleep states associated with dreaming. Among anesthetics, ketamine is remarkable in that it induces profound unresponsiveness, but subjects often report "ketamine dreams" upon emergence from anesthesia. Here, we aimed at assessing consciousness during anesthesia with propofol, xenon, and ketamine, independent of behavioral responsiveness. To do so, in 18 healthy volunteers, we measured the complexity of the cortical response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)--an approach that has proven helpful in assessing objectively the level of consciousness irrespective of sensory processing and motor responses. In addition, upon emergence from anesthesia, we collected reports about conscious experiences during unresponsiveness. Both frontal and parietal TMS elicited a low-amplitude electroencephalographic (EEG) slow wave corresponding to a local pattern of cortical activation with low complexity during propofol anesthesia, a high-amplitude EEG slow wave corresponding to a global, stereotypical pattern of cortical activation with low complexity during xenon anesthesia, and a wakefulness-like, complex spatiotemporal activation pattern during ketamine anesthesia. Crucially, participants reported no conscious experience after emergence from propofol and xenon anesthesia, whereas after ketamine they reported long, vivid dreams unrelated to the external environment. These results are relevant because they suggest that brain complexity may be sensitive to the presence of disconnected consciousness in subjects who are considered unconscious based on behavioral responses.

  3. Independent complexity patterns in single neuron activity induced by static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Spasić, S; Nikolić, Lj; Mutavdžić, D; Saponjić, J

    2011-11-01

    We applied a combination of fractal analysis and Independent Component Analysis (ICA) method to detect the sources of fractal complexity in snail Br neuron activity induced by static magnetic field of 2.7 mT. The fractal complexity of Br neuron activity was analyzed before (Control), during (MF), and after (AMF) exposure to the static magnetic field in six experimental animals. We estimated the fractal dimension (FD) of electrophysiological signals using Higuchi's algorithm, and empirical FD distributions. By using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and FastICA algorithm we determined the number of components, and defined the statistically independent components (ICs) in the fractal complexity of signal waveforms. We have isolated two independent components of the empirical FD distributions for each of three groups of data by using FastICA algorithm. ICs represent the sources of fractal waveforms complexity of Br neuron activity in particular experimental conditions. Our main results have shown that there could be two opposite intrinsic mechanisms in single snail Br neuron response to static magnetic field stimulation. We named identified ICs that correspond to those mechanisms - the component of plasticity and the component of elasticity. We have shown that combination of fractal analysis with ICA method could be very useful for the decomposition and identification of the sources of fractal complexity of bursting neuronal activity waveforms.

  4. Complex I inhibition in the visual pathway induces disorganization of the node of Ranvier

    PubMed Central

    Marella, Mathieu; Patki, Gaurav; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial defects can have significant consequences on many aspects of neuronal physiology. In particular, deficiencies in the first enzyme complex of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (complex I) are considered to be involved in a number of human neurodegenerative diseases. The current work highlights a tight correlation between the inhibition of complex I and the state of axonal myelination of the optic nerve. Exposing the visual pathway of rats to rotenone, a complex I inhibitor, resulted in disorganization of the node of Ranvier. The structure and function of the node depends on specific cell adhesion molecules, among others, CASPR (contactin associated protein) and contactin. CASPR and contactin are both on the axonal surface and need to be associated to be able to anchor their myelin counter part. Here we show that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone in rats induces reactive oxygen species, disrupts the interaction of CASPR and contactin couple, and thus damages the organization and function of the node of Ranvier. Demyelination of the optic nerve occurs as a consequence which is accompanied by a loss of vision. The physiological impairment could be reversed by introducing an alternative NADH dehydrogenase to the mitochondria of the visual system. The restoration of the nodal structure was specifically correlated with visual recovery in the treated animal. PMID:23816754

  5. The TrxG Complex Mediates Cytokine Induced De Novo Enhancer Formation in Islets

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Peter; Dhillon, Jasmine; Gill, Amol; Whiting, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    To better understand how β-cells respond to proinflammatory cytokines we mapped the locations of histone 3 lysine 4 monomethylation (H3K4me1), a post-translational histone modification enriched at active and poised cis-regulatory regions, in IFNγ, Il-1β, and TNFα treated pancreatic islets. We identified 96,721 putative cis-regulatory loci, of which 3,590 were generated de novo, 3,204 had increased H3K4me1, and 5,354 had decreased H3K4me1 in IFNγ, Il-1β, and TNFα exposed islets. Roughly 10% of the de novo and increased regions were enriched for the repressive histone modification histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) in untreated cells, and these were frequently associated with chemokine genes. We show that IFNγ, Il-1β, and TNFα exposure overcomes this repression and induces chemokine gene activation in as little as three hours, and that this expression persists for days in absence of continued IFNγ, Il-1β, and TNFα exposure. We implicate trithorax group (TrxG) complexes as likely players in the conversion of these repressed loci to an active state. To block the activity of these complexes, we suppressed Wdr5, a core component of the TrxG complexes, and used the H3K27me3 demethylase inhibitor GSK-J4. We show that GSK-J4 is particularly effective in blunting IFNγ, Il-1β, and TNFα-induced chemokine gene expression in β-cells; however, it induced significant islet-cell apoptosis and β-cell dysfunction. Wdr5 suppression also reduced IFNγ, Il-1β, and TNFα induced chemokine gene expression in β-cells without affecting islet-cell survival or β-cell function after 48hrs, but did begin to increase islet-cell apoptosis and β-cell dysfunction after four days of treatment. Taken together these data suggest that the TrxG complex is potentially a viable target for preventing cytokine induced chemokine gene expression in β-cells. PMID:26505193

  6. Adaptation to Complex Pictures: Exposure to Emotional Valence Induces Assimilative Aftereffects

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Rocco; D’Ascenzo, Stefania; Quercia, Angelica; Tommasi, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Aftereffects have been documented for a variety of perceptual categories spanning from body gender to facial emotion, thus becoming an important tool in the study of high-level vision and its neural bases. We examined whether the perceived valence of a complex scene is subject to aftereffects, by observing the participants’ evaluation of the valence of a test picture preceded by a different picture. For this study, we employed an adaptation paradigm with positive and negative images used as adapters, and positive, negative, and neutral images used as tests. Our results show that adaptation to complex emotional pictures induces assimilative aftereffects: participants judged neutral tests more positively following positive adapters and more negatively following negative adapters. This depended on the prolonged adaptation phase (10 s), as the results of a second experiment, in which adapters lasted for 500 ms, did not show aftereffects. In addition, the results show that assimilative aftereffects of negative and positive adapters also manifested themselves on non-neutral (negative and positive) targets, providing evidence that the global emotional content of complex pictures is suitable to induce assimilative aftereffects. PMID:28194123

  7. Calcium release induced by 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone and its copper complex contributes to tumor cell death.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yun; Liu, Youxun; Wang, Jiangang; Li, Cuiping; Zhou, Sufeng; Yang, Yun; Zhou, Pingxin; Lu, Chengbiao; Li, Changzheng

    2017-03-01

    Thiosemicarbazones display significant antitumor activity and their copper complexes also exhibit enhanced biological activities in most situations, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Therefore, investigation of the mechanism involved in the change upon chelation is required to extend our understanding of the effects of thiosemicarbazones. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (PCT) and its copper complex (PCT-Cu) on cell proliferation was investigated. The copper chelate exhibited a 3- to 10-fold increase in antitumor activity (with an IC50 <5 µM). The results showed that both PCT and PCT-Cu induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in vitro and in vivo, caused cellular DNA fragmentation, depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and cell cycle arrest. Western blotting showed that both PCT and PCT-Cu induced apoptosis. Upregulation of GRP78 in HepG2 cells following treatment with the agents indicated that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress occurred. Furthermore calcium release was revealed in this study, suggesting that PCT and PCT-Cu disturbed calcium homeostasis. It was noted that PCT-Cu sensitized thapsigargin‑stimulated calcium release from the ER, which was correlated with the ROS level they induced, implying that the antitumor activity of PCT and PCT-Cu partly stemmed from calcium mobilization, a situation that was reported in few studies. Our findings may significantly contribute to the understanding of the anti‑proliferative effect of the derivatives of thiosemicarbazones along with their antitumor mechanism.

  8. Molecular Components of the Sporothrix schenckii Complex that Induce Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Alba-Fierro, Carlos A; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Toriello, Conchita; Romo-Lozano, Yolanda; López-Romero, Everardo; Ruiz-Baca, Estela

    2016-08-01

    Sporotrichosis is a fungal disease caused by the Sporothrix schenckii complex that includes species such as S. brasiliensis, S. schenckii sensu stricto, S. globosa, S. luriei, S. mexicana, and S. pallida, which exhibit different potentially antigenic molecular components. The immune response of susceptible hosts to control infection and disease caused by these fungi has been little studied. Besides, the fungus-host interaction induces the activation of different types of immune response. This mini-review analyzes and discusses existing reports on the identification and functional characterization of molecules from species of the S. schenckii complex with clinical relevance, and the mechanisms that mediate the type and magnitude of the immune response in experimental models in vivo and in vitro. This knowledge is expected to contribute to the development of protective and therapeutic strategies against sporotrichosis and other mycoses.

  9. A Mutant-p53/Smad complex opposes p63 to empower TGFbeta-induced metastasis.

    PubMed

    Adorno, Maddalena; Cordenonsi, Michelangelo; Montagner, Marco; Dupont, Sirio; Wong, Christine; Hann, Byron; Solari, Aldo; Bobisse, Sara; Rondina, Maria Beatrice; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Parenti, Anna R; Rosato, Antonio; Bicciato, Silvio; Balmain, Allan; Piccolo, Stefano

    2009-04-03

    TGFbeta ligands act as tumor suppressors in early stage tumors but are paradoxically diverted into potent prometastatic factors in advanced cancers. The molecular nature of this switch remains enigmatic. Here, we show that TGFbeta-dependent cell migration, invasion and metastasis are empowered by mutant-p53 and opposed by p63. Mechanistically, TGFbeta acts in concert with oncogenic Ras and mutant-p53 to induce the assembly of a mutant-p53/p63 protein complex in which Smads serve as essential platforms. Within this ternary complex, p63 functions are antagonized. Downstream of p63, we identified two candidate metastasis suppressor genes associated with metastasis risk in a large cohort of breast cancer patients. Thus, two common oncogenic lesions, mutant-p53 and Ras, selected in early neoplasms to promote growth and survival, also prefigure a cellular set-up with particular metastasis proclivity by TGFbeta-dependent inhibition of p63 function.

  10. Surface-induced dissociation of small molecules, peptides, and non-covalent protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Vicki H; Joyce, Karen E; Jones, Christopher M; Beardsley, Richard L

    2008-02-01

    This article provides a perspective on collisions of ions with surfaces, including surface-induced dissociation (SID) and reactive ion scattering spectrometry (RISS). The content is organized into sections on surface-induced dissociation of small ions, surface characterization of organic thin films by collision of well-characterized ions into surfaces, the use of SID to probe peptide fragmentation, and the dissociation of large non-covalent complexes by SID. Examples are given from the literature with a focus on experiments from the authors' laboratory. The article is not a comprehensive review but is designed to provide the reader with an overview of the types of results possible by collisions of ions into surfaces.

  11. Surface-Induced Dissociation of Small Molecules, Peptides, and Non-covalent Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Wysocki, Vicki H.; Joyce, Karen E.; Jones, Christopher M.; Beardsley, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a perspective on collisions of ions with surfaces, including surface-induced dissociation (SID) and reactive ion scattering spectrometry (RISS). The content is organized into sections on surface-induced dissociation of small ions, surface characterization of organic thin films by collision of well-characterized ions into surfaces, the use of SID to probe peptide fragmentation, and the dissociation of large non-covalent complexes by SID. Examples are given from the literature with a focus on experiments from the authors’ laboratory. The article is not a comprehensive review but is designed to provide the reader with an overview of the types of results possible by collisions of ions into surfaces. PMID:18191578

  12. Partial equilibrium approximations in apoptosis. II. The death-inducing signaling complex subsystem.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Jing; Hong, Liu; Yong, Wen-An

    2015-12-01

    This paper is a continuation of our previous work (Huang and Yong, 2013) for simplifying the Fas signaling-induced apoptotic pathway identified by Hua et al. (2005) for human tumor T cells. The previous paper studied the downstream intracelluar-signaling subsystem, while the present one is concerned with the upstream death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) subsystem. Under the assumption that the bind of Fas-associated death domains and FLICE-inhibitory proteins to the DISC is much faster than that of the initiator procaspases, we greatly simplify the upstream subsystem from 35 reactions with 26 species to 6 reactions with 9 species by adopting the classical and recently justified partial equilibrium approximation method. Numerical simulations show that the simplified model is in an excellent agreement with the original model. Most importantly, the simplified model clearly reveals the key reactants and dominated pathways in the Fas signaling process, and thus provides new insights into the apoptosis.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide-induced chlorophyll a bleaching in the cytochrome b6f complex: a simple and effective assay for stability of the complex in detergent solutions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Bo; Zhao, Xiao-Hui; Zhu, Yi; Gong, Yan-Dao; Li, Liang-Bi; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Kuang, Ting-Yun

    2006-12-01

    The instability of cytochrome b ( 6 ) f complex in detergent solutions is a well-known problem that has been studied extensively, but without finding a satisfactory solution. One of the important reasons can be short of the useful method to verify whether the complex suspended in different detergent is in an intact state or not. In this article, a simple and effective assay for stability of the complex was proposed based on the investigation on the different effects of the two detergents, n-octyl-beta-D: -glucopyranoside (OG) and dodecyl-beta-D: -maltoside (DDM), on the properties of the complex. DDM stabilizes the complex preparation more effectively whereas OG denatures the interactions of the heme groups and pigment molecules with the protein environment, leading to the bleaching of chlorophyll a induced by addition of hydrogen peroxide. The assay of the use of hydrogen peroxide to characterize the complex by studying the bleaching of chlorophyll induced by hydrogen peroxide and the peroxidase activity of the complex was discussed. This simple method will probably be useful to study the stability of the complex.

  14. A suspected case of rocuronium-sugammadex complex-induced anaphylactic shock after cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Masakazu; Deguchi, Miki; Ninomiya, Kiichiro; Kurasako, Toshiaki; Matsumoto, Mutsuko

    2017-02-01

    An anaphylactic reaction during a cesarean section occurs rarely, and rocuronium is thought to be one of the common agents causing perioperative anaphylaxis. Here we report an anaphylactic shock after cesarean section that is suggested to be induced by the rocuronium-sugammadex complex. A 36-year-old primigravida underwent an elective cesarean section under general anesthesia due to placenta previa. While the operation was completed uneventfully, she developed anaphylactic shock following sugammadex administration. She was successfully managed with rapid treatments. Serum tryptase level was significantly elevated. Although sugammadex was first suspected to be the causative agent, the result of intradermal skin tests with sugammadex were negative. Surprisingly, a subsequent intradermal test with undiluted rocuronium caused the patient to fall into a state of shock. Furthermore, a later skin-prick test with pre-mixed rocuronium-sugammadex complex also revealed a strong positive reaction, and a test with only rocuronium showed negative. We finally concluded that the rocuronium-sugammadex complex is the causative agent in this case. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report suggesting anaphylaxis caused by the rocuronium-sugammadex complex. This case highlights the importance of appropriate examinations to determinate the pathogenesis of anaphylaxis in order to establish risk reduction strategies.

  15. The myelin proteolipid plasmolipin forms oligomers and induces liquid-ordered membranes in the Golgi complex.

    PubMed

    Yaffe, Yakey; Hugger, Ilan; Yassaf, Inbar Nevo; Shepshelovitch, Jeanne; Sklan, Ella H; Elkabetz, Yechiel; Yeheskel, Adva; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Benzing, Carola; Macmillan, Alexander; Gaus, Katharina; Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Peles, Elior; Hirschberg, Koret

    2015-07-01

    Myelin comprises a compactly stacked massive surface area of protein-poor thick membrane that insulates axons to allow fast signal propagation. Increasing levels of the myelin protein plasmolipin (PLLP) were correlated with post-natal myelination; however, its function is unknown. Here, the intracellular localization and dynamics of PLLP were characterized in primary glial and cultured cells using fluorescently labeled PLLP and antibodies against PLLP. PLLP localized to and recycled between the plasma membrane and the Golgi complex. In the Golgi complex, PLLP forms oligomers based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analyses. PLLP oligomers blocked Golgi to plasma membrane transport of the secretory protein vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSVG), but not of a VSVG mutant with an elongated transmembrane domain. Laurdan staining analysis showed that this block is associated with PLLP-induced proliferation of liquid-ordered membranes. These findings show the capacity of PLLP to assemble potential myelin membrane precursor domains at the Golgi complex through its oligomerization and ability to attract liquid-ordered lipids. These data support a model in which PLLP functions in myelin biogenesis through organization of myelin liquid-ordered membranes in the Golgi complex.

  16. Thermal, anisotropic microhardness and laser induced surface damage studies on certain metal complexes of thiourea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanuskodi, S.; Sabari Girisun, T. C.

    2011-09-01

    Single crystals of thiourea metal complexes with selected group II metal ions, zinc and cadmium, have been grown by solvent evaporation technique and characterized by XRD studies. The thermal, mechanical and laser induced surface damage properties of thiourea and its metal complexes in (1 0 0) plane were studied. From the improved photopyroelectric technique the thermal properties of the metal complexes were evaluated. Due to larger heat capacity ZTS (382.4 J kg -1 K -1) has better thermal stability than BTCC (304.09 J kg -1 K -1), TTCS (293.5 J kg -1 K -1) and BTZC (255.24 J kg -1 K -1). Vickers hardness studies reveal that the materials have reverse indentation size effect and belong to soft material type. Elastic stiffness was found to be very large for ZTS (8.05) than TTCS (5.38), BTCC (1.57 GPa) and BTZC (0.76 GPa). Multi-shot laser damage studies reveal that ZTS (40 GW/cm 2) has higher laser damage threshold and the roles of the group II metal ions in improving the mechanical and thermal stability of the metal complexes are discussed.

  17. Analysis of HDACi-Induced Changes in Chromosomal Passenger Complex Localization.

    PubMed

    Unruhe-Knauf, Britta; Knauer, Shirley K

    2017-01-01

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) is a key regulator of cell division. Its proper localization during the different phases of mitosis and cytokinesis is crucial for the exertion of its various functions. HDACi treatment has been demonstrated to disturb the centromeric localization of the CPC in tumor cells, thus leading to severe mitotic defects often followed by apoptosis. In this chapter, we describe how HDACi-induced changes of the CPC localization can be analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence using CPC-specific primary and fluorophore-coupled secondary antibodies followed by confocal microscopy.

  18. Vibration-induced Kondo tunneling through metal-organic complexes with even electron occupation number.

    PubMed

    Kikoin, K; Kiselev, M N; Wegewijs, M R

    2006-05-05

    We investigate transport through a mononuclear transition-metal complex with strong tunnel coupling to two electrodes. The ground state of this molecule is a singlet, while the first excited state is a triplet. We show that a modulation of the tunnel-barrier due to a molecular distortion which couples to the tunneling induces a Kondo-effect, provided the discrete vibrational energy compensates the singlet-triplet gap. We discuss the single-phonon and two-phonon-assisted cotunneling and possible experimental realization of the theory.

  19. Efficient Charge Storage in Dual-Redox Electrochemical Capacitors through Reversible Counterion-Induced Solid Complexation.

    PubMed

    Evanko, Brian; Yoo, Seung Joon; Chun, Sang-Eun; Wang, Xingfeng; Ji, Xiulei; Boettcher, Shannon W; Stucky, Galen D

    2016-08-03

    The performance of redox-enhanced electrochemical capacitors (redox ECs) is substantially improved when oxidized catholyte (bromide) and reduced anolyte (viologen) are retained within the porous electrodes through reversible counterion-induced solid complexation. Investigation of the mechanism illustrates design principles and identifies pentyl viologen/bromide (PV/Br) as a new high-performance electrolyte. The symmetric PV/Br redox EC produces a specific energy of 48.5 W·h/kgdry at 0.5 A/gdry (0.44 kW/kgdry) with 99.7% Coulombic efficiency, maintains stability over 10 000 cycles, and functions identically when operated with reversed polarity.

  20. A MYB/ZML Complex Regulates Wound-Induced Lignin Genes in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Vélez-Bermúdez, Isabel-Cristina; Salazar-Henao, Jorge E.; Franco-Zorrilla, José-Manuel; Grotewold, Erich; Solano, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Lignin is an essential polymer in vascular plants that plays key structural roles in vessels and fibers. Lignification is induced by external inputs such as wounding, but the molecular mechanisms that link this stress to lignification remain largely unknown. In this work, we provide evidence that three maize (Zea mays) lignin repressors, MYB11, MYB31, and MYB42, participate in wound-induced lignification by interacting with ZML2, a protein belonging to the TIFY family. We determined that the three R2R3-MYB factors and ZML2 bind in vivo to AC-rich and GAT(A/C) cis-elements, respectively, present in a set of lignin genes. In particular, we show that MYB11 and ZML2 bind simultaneously to the AC-rich and GAT(A/C) cis-elements present in the promoter of the caffeic acid O-methyl transferase (comt) gene. We show that, like the R2R3-MYB factors, ZML2 also acts as a transcriptional repressor. We found that upon wounding and methyl jasmonate treatments, MYB11 and ZML2 proteins are degraded and comt transcription is induced. Based on these results, we propose a molecular regulatory mechanism involving a MYB/ZML complex in which wound-induced lignification can be achieved by the derepression of a set of lignin genes. PMID:26566917

  1. Levetiracetam Prevents Kindling-Induced Asymmetric Accumulation of Hippocampal 7S SNARE Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Matveeva, Elena A.; Vanaman, Thomas C.; Whiteheart, Sidney W.; Slevin, John T.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Purpose Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying epilepsy is crucial to designing novel therapeutic regimens. This report focuses on alterations in the secretory machinery responsible for neurotransmitter (NT) release. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide Sensitive Factor (NSF) Attachment Protein Receptor (SNARE) complexes mediate the fusion of synaptic vesicle and active zone membranes thus mediating NT secretion. SNARE regulators control where and when SNARE complexes are formed. Previous studies showed an asymmetric accumulation of SNARE complexes (7SC) in the ipsilateral hippocampus of kindled animals. The present studies probe the persistence of 7SC accumulation and the effect of the anticonvulsant, levetiracetam (LEV), on 7SC and SNARE regulators. Method Quantitative western blotting was used to monitor levels of 7SC and SNARE regulators in hippocampal synaptosomes from kindled animals both before and after LEV treatment. Results The asymmetric accumulation of 7SC is present one year post-amygdalar kindling. The synaptic vesicle protein, SV2, a primary LEV-binding protein, and the SNARE regulator Tomosyn increase whereas NSF decreases in association with this accumulation. Treatment with LEV prevented kindling-induced accumulation of SV2, but did not affect the transient increase of Tomosyn or the long-term decrease of NSF. LEV treatment retarded the electrical and behavioral concomitants of amygdalar kindling coincident with a decrease in accumulation of 7SC. Conclusions The ipsilateral hippocampal accumulation of SNARE complexes is an altered molecular process associated with kindling that appears permanent. Kindling epileptogenesis alters synaptosomal levels of the SNARE regulators, NSF, SV2, and Tomosyn. Concomitant treatment with LEV reverses the kindling-induced 7SC accumulation and increase of SV2. PMID:18513349

  2. Mechanisms of cell death pathway activation following drug-induced inhibition of mitochondrial complex I

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Naoki; Kwang Lee, Kang; Zhang, Carmen; Boelsterli, Urs A.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory complex I inhibition by drugs and other chemicals has been implicated as a frequent mode of mitochondria-mediated cell injury. However, the exact mechanisms leading to the activation of cell death pathways are incompletely understood. This study was designed to explore the relative contributions to cell injury of three distinct consequences of complex I inhibition, i.e., impairment of ATP biosynthesis, increased formation of superoxide and, hence, peroxynitrite, and inhibition of the mitochondrial protein deacetylase, Sirt3, due to imbalance of the NADH/NAD+ ratio. We used the antiviral drug efavirenz (EFV) to model drug-induced complex I inhibition. Exposure of cultured mouse hepatocytes to EFV resulted in a rapid onset of cell injury, featuring a no-effect level at 30 µM EFV and submaximal effects at 50 µM EFV. EFV caused a concentration-dependent decrease in cellular ATP levels. Furthermore, EFV resulted in increased formation of peroxynitrite and oxidation of mitochondrial protein thiols, including cyclophilin D (CypD). This was prevented by the superoxide scavenger, Fe-TCP, or the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, Fe-TMPyP. Both ferroporphyrins completely protected from EFV-induced cell injury, suggesting that peroxynitrite contributed to the cell injury. Finally, EFV increased the NADH/NAD+ ratio, inhibited Sirt3 activity, and led to hyperacetylated lysine residues, including those in CypD. However, hepatocytes isolated from Sirt3-null mice were protected against 40 µM EFV as compared to their wild-type controls. In conclusion, these data are compatible with the concept that chemical inhibition of complex I activates multiple pathways leading to cell injury; among these, peroxynitrite formation may be the most critical. PMID:25625582

  3. Interaction between hydrogen sulfide-induced sulfhydration and tyrosine nitration in the KATP channel complex

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Minho; Hashimoto, Atsushi; Gade, Aravind

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous mediator affecting many physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Enhanced expression of H2S and reactive nitrogen/oxygen species (RNS/ROS) during inflammation alters cellular excitability via modulation of ion channel function. Sulfhydration of cysteine residues and tyrosine nitration are the posttranslational modifications induced by H2S and RNS, respectively. The objective of this study was to define the interaction between tyrosine nitration and cysteine sulfhydration within the ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel complex, a significant target in experimental colitis. A modified biotin switch assay was performed to determine sulfhydration of the KATP channel subunits, Kir6.1, sulphonylurea 2B (SUR2B), and nitrotyrosine measured by immunoblot. NaHS (a donor of H2S) significantly enhanced sulfhydration of SUR2B but not Kir6.1 subunit. 3-Morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) (a donor of peroxynitrite) induced nitration of Kir6.1 subunit but not SUR2B. Pretreatment with NaHS reduced the nitration of Kir6.1 by SIN-1 in Chinese hamster ovary cells cotransfected with the two subunits, as well as in enteric glia. Two specific mutations within SUR2B, C24S, and C1455S prevented sulfhydration by NaHS, and these mutations prevented NaHS-induced reduction in tyrosine nitration of Kir6.1. NaHS also reversed peroxynitrite-induced inhibition of smooth muscle contraction. These studies suggest that posttranslational modifications of the two subunits of the KATP channel interact to alter channel function. The studies described herein demonstrate a unique mechanism by which sulfhydration of one subunit modifies tyrosine nitration of another subunit within the same channel complex. This interaction provides a mechanistic insight on the protective effects of H2S in inflammation. PMID:25552582

  4. Crystal structure of the lactose operon repressor and its complexes with DNA and inducer

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.; Chang, G.; Horton, N.C.

    1996-03-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli is the paradigm for gene regulation. Its key component is the lac repressor a product of the lacl gene. The three-dimensional structures of the intact lac repressor, the lac repressor bound to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-B-D-1thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the lac repressor complexed with a 21 base pair symmetric operator DNA have been determined. These three structures show the conformation of the molecule in both the induced and the repressed states and provide a framework for understanding a wealth of biochemical and genetic information. The DNA sequence of the lac operon has three lac repressor recognition sites in stretch of 500 base pairs. The crystallographic structure of the complex with DNA suggests that the tetrameric repressor functions synergistically with catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) and participates in the quarternary formation of repression loops in which one tetrameric repressor interacts simultaneously with two sites in the genomic DNA. 76 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Calix‐Like Metal–Organic Complex for High‐Sensitivity X‐Ray‐Induced Photochromism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Metal‐organic complexes (MOCs) as promising candidates for directly visual X‐ray detection at room temperature are rare and discovered unexpectedly, even though every crystalline material needs X‐ray diffraction studies. Here, we report a rational strategy of mimicking host‐guest system for developing high‐sensitive X‐ray‐induced photochromic materials. Two resulting calix‐like metal‐organic complexes (cMOC‐1 and cMOC‐2) were prepared by encapsulating the electron‐capturing “guest” into the cavity of calix‐like electron‐donating “host.” One of them (cMOC‐1) achieves instantaneous X‐ray‐induced photochromism and easy recovery by synergizing the aprotic matrix of MOC and similar host‐guest interaction. Their strikingly different response to X‐ray irradiation resulting from the structural difference demonstrates the feasibility and acceptability of our design strategy. This strategy may open new perspectives for developing high‐performance photo‐responsive functional materials. PMID:27774396

  6. Method and apparatus for enhanced sequencing of complex molecules using surface-induced dissociation in conjunction with mass spectrometric analysis

    DOEpatents

    Laskin, Julia [Richland, WA; Futrell, Jean H [Richland, WA

    2008-04-29

    The invention relates to a method and apparatus for enhanced sequencing of complex molecules using surface-induced dissociation (SID) in conjunction with mass spectrometric analysis. Results demonstrate formation of a wide distribution of structure-specific fragments having wide sequence coverage useful for sequencing and identifying the complex molecules.

  7. The linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex regulates TRAIL-induced gene activation and cell death.

    PubMed

    Lafont, Elodie; Kantari-Mimoun, Chahrazade; Draber, Peter; De Miguel, Diego; Hartwig, Torsten; Reichert, Matthias; Kupka, Sebastian; Shimizu, Yutaka; Taraborrelli, Lucia; Spit, Maureen; Sprick, Martin R; Walczak, Henning

    2017-03-03

    The linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) is the only known E3 ubiquitin ligase which catalyses the generation of linear ubiquitin linkages de novo LUBAC is a crucial component of various immune receptor signalling pathways. Here, we show that LUBAC forms part of the TRAIL-R-associated complex I as well as of the cytoplasmic TRAIL-induced complex II In both of these complexes, HOIP limits caspase-8 activity and, consequently, apoptosis whilst being itself cleaved in a caspase-8-dependent manner. Yet, by limiting the formation of a RIPK1/RIPK3/MLKL-containing complex, LUBAC also restricts TRAIL-induced necroptosis. We identify RIPK1 and caspase-8 as linearly ubiquitinated targets of LUBAC following TRAIL stimulation. Contrary to its role in preventing TRAIL-induced RIPK1-independent apoptosis, HOIP presence, but not its activity, is required for preventing necroptosis. By promoting recruitment of the IKK complex to complex I, LUBAC also promotes TRAIL-induced activation of NF-κB and, consequently, the production of cytokines, downstream of FADD, caspase-8 and cIAP1/2. Hence, LUBAC controls the TRAIL signalling outcome from complex I and II, two platforms which both trigger cell death and gene activation.

  8. Environmentally induced changes in correlated responses to selection reveal variable pleiotropy across a complex genetic network.

    PubMed

    Sikkink, Kristin L; Reynolds, Rose M; Cresko, William A; Phillips, Patrick C

    2015-05-01

    Selection in novel environments can lead to a coordinated evolutionary response across a suite of characters. Environmental conditions can also potentially induce changes in the genetic architecture of complex traits, which in turn could alter the pattern of the multivariate response to selection. We describe a factorial selection experiment using the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei in which two different stress-related phenotypes (heat and oxidative stress resistance) were selected under three different environmental conditions. The pattern of covariation in the evolutionary response between phenotypes or across environments differed depending on the environment in which selection occurred, including asymmetrical responses to selection in some cases. These results indicate that variation in pleiotropy across the stress response network is highly sensitive to the external environment. Our findings highlight the complexity of the interaction between genes and environment that influences the ability of organisms to acclimate to novel environments. They also make clear the need to identify the underlying genetic basis of genetic correlations in order understand how patterns of pleiotropy are distributed across complex genetic networks.

  9. Ligation of erythrocyte CR1 induces its clustering in complex with scaffolding protein FAP-1

    PubMed Central

    Glodek, Aleksandra M.; Weaver, Gregory; Klickstein, Lloyd B.; Nicholson-Weller, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The primary identified function of complement receptor 1 (CR1/CD35) on primate erythrocytes is to bind complement-tagged inflammatory particles including microbes and immune complexes. When erythrocytes circulate through liver and spleen, sinusoidal phagocytes remove CR1-adherent particles and erythrocytes return to the circulation. This process of immune adherence clearance is important for host defense and prevention of autoimmunity. CR1 was previously described as clustered in the human erythrocyte membrane, which was thought to be necessary for binding complement-opsonized particles. In contrast, we demonstrate that on erythrocytes CR1 is not clustered, but dispersed, and able to bind complement-tagged particles. When fresh erythrocytes are solubilized by nonionic detergent, CR1 partitions to the cytoskeleton fraction. Using a PDZ-peptide array, CR1's cytoplasmic tail, which contains 2 PDZ-motifs, binds PDZ domains 2, 3, and 5 of Fas-associated phosphatase 1 (FAP-1), a scaffolding protein. We show that FAP-1, not previously recognized as an erythroid protein, is expressed on circulating erythrocytes. CR1 and FAP-1 coimmunoprecipitate, which confirms their molecular association. Disperse CR1 on erythrocytes may be advantageous for capturing immune-complexes, while ligation-induced CR1 clustering may prevent ingestion of the erythrocyte during the immune-complex transfer to the macrophages by keeping the opsonic stimulus localized thus preventing phagocyosis. PMID:18684861

  10. Heat-induced reorganization of the structure of photosystem II membranes: role of oxygen evolving complex.

    PubMed

    Busheva, Mira; Tzonova, Iren; Stoitchkova, Katerina; Andreeva, Atanaska

    2012-12-05

    The sensitivity of the green plants' photosystem II (PSII) to high temperatures is investigated in PSII enriched membranes and in membranes, from which the oxygen evolving complex is removed. Using steady-state 77 K fluorescence and resonance Raman spectroscopy we analyze the interdependency between the temperature-driven changes in structure and energy distribution in the PSII supercomplex. The results show that the heat treatment induces different reduction of the 77 K fluorescence emission in both types of investigated membranes: (i) an additional considerable decrease of the overall fluorescence emission in Tris-washed membranes as compared to the native membranes; (ii) a transition point at 42°C(,) observed only in native membranes; (iii) a sharp reduction of the PSII core fluorescence in Tris-washed membranes at temperatures higher than 50°C; (iv) a 3 nm red-shift of F700 band's maximum in Tris-washed membranes already at 20°C and its further shift by 1 nm at temperature increase. Both treatments intensified their action by increasing the aggregation and dissociation of the peripheral light harvesting complexes. The oxygen-evolving complex, in addition to its main function to produce O(2), increases the thermal stability of PSII core by strengthening the connection between the core and the peripheral antenna proteins and by keeping their structural integrity.

  11. Role of thiol-complex formation in 2-hydroxyethyl- methacrylate-induced toxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Samuelsen, J T; Kopperud, H M; Holme, J A; Dragland, I S; Christensen, T; Dahl, J E

    2011-02-01

    Methacrylate monomers that are found to leach from cured resin-based dental materials induce biological effects in vitro. The underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated although involvement of increased cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA-damage has been suggested. In this in vitro study we have elucidated the impact of a commonly used methacrylate monomer, HEMA, on the level and oxidation state of cellular glutathione, intracellular ROS level, as well as the formation of complex between HEMA and glutathione. HEMA exposure rapidly led to increased level of ROS and reduced level of GSH (reduced form of glutathione). Antioxidants effectively counteracted the ROS increase, but had no effect on the GSH depletion. No change in glutathione-disulphide (GSSG; oxidized form of glutathione) concentration was detected in the HEMA treated cells, showing that oxidation of glutathione was not responsible for the reduced GSH concentration. Further we demonstrated spontaneous formation of a complex between HEMA and GSH. In conclusion, we showed that exposure to HEMA led to drop in cellular glutathione level probably caused by complex formation with HEMA. A similar covalent binding of HEMA to macromolecules combined with increased level of cellular ROS due to lower levels of GSH is suggested to be important factors triggering the toxic response.

  12. Vanillic Acid Ameliorates Cationic Bovine Serum Albumin Induced Immune Complex Glomerulonephritis in BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Motiram Kakalij, Rahul; Tejaswini, G; Patil, Madhoosudan A; Dinesh Kumar, B; Diwan, Prakash V

    2016-06-01

    Preclinical Research Vanillic acid (VA) is a dihydroxybenzoic acid derivative widely used as a flavoring agent. It has chemopreventive effects on experimentally-induced carcinogenesis and in ulcerative colitis. The object of the present study was to investigate the effects of VA, alone and in combination with methylprednisolone (MP), on cationic bovine serum albumin (cBSA induced immune-complex glomerulonephritis in female BALB/c mice. Pre-immunization was carried out with cBSA in BALB/c mice and repeated (cBSA, 13 mg/kg, 3 times/week, i.v.) for 6 weeks to induce glomerulonephritis which was confirmed by the presence of severe proteinuria. The effect of VA (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, p.o.) and its combination with MP (12.5 mg/kg, p.o.) was assessed in the nephrotic disease model. Treatment with VA decreased inflammatory nephrotic injury as evidenced by decreased proteinuria, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, serum IgG1 and TNF-α levels. Co-administration of VA with MP showed an improvement in the immunohistochemistry of glomerular nephrin and podocin. The present results indicate that VA has a nephroprotective effect in the management of autoimmune nephritis. Drug Dev Res 77 : 171-179, 2016.   © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Fatty acid nitroalkenes induce resistance to ischemic cardiac injury by modulating mitochondrial respiration at complex II

    PubMed Central

    Koenitzer, Jeffrey R.; Bonacci, Gustavo; Woodcock, Steven R.; Chen, Chen-Shan; Cantu-Medellin, Nadiezhda; Kelley, Eric E.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FA) are metabolic and inflammatory-derived electrophiles that mediate pleiotropic signaling actions. It was hypothesized that NO2-FA would impact mitochondrial redox reactions to induce tissue-protective metabolic shifts in cells. Nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) reversibly inhibited complex II-linked respiration in isolated rat heart mitochondria in a pH-dependent manner and suppressed superoxide formation. Nitroalkylation of Fp subunit was determined by BME capture and the site of modification by OA-NO2 defined by mass spectrometric analysis. These effects translated into reduced basal and maximal respiration and favored glycolytic metabolism in H9C2 cardiomyoblasts as assessed by extracellular H+ and O2 flux analysis. The perfusion of NO2-FA induced acute cardioprotection in an isolated perfused heart ischemia/reperfusion (IR) model as evidenced by significantly higher rate-pressure products. Together these findings indicate that NO2-FA can promote cardioprotection by inducing a shift from respiration to glycolysis and suppressing reactive species formation in the post-ischemic interval. PMID:26722838

  14. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-zinc(II) and -copper(II) complexes induce apoptosis in tumor cells by inhibiting the proteasomal activity

    SciTech Connect

    Milacic, Vesna; Chen Di; Giovagnini, Lorena; Diez, Alejandro; Fregona, Dolores; Dou, Q. Ping

    2008-08-15

    Zinc and copper are trace elements essential for proper folding, stabilization and catalytic activity of many metalloenzymes in living organisms. However, disturbed zinc and copper homeostasis is reported in many types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated that copper complexes induced proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in cultured human cancer cells. In the current study we hypothesized that zinc complexes could also inhibit the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity responsible for subsequent apoptosis induction. We first showed that zinc(II) chloride was able to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC{sub 50} value of 13.8 {mu}M, which was less potent than copper(II) chloride (IC{sub 50} 5.3 {mu}M). We then compared the potencies of a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PyDT)-zinc(II) complex and a PyDT-copper(II) complex to inhibit cellular proteasomal activity, suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in various human breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Consistently, zinc complex was less potent than copper complex in inhibiting the proteasome and inducing apoptosis. Additionally, zinc and copper complexes appear to use somewhat different mechanisms to kill tumor cells. Zinc complexes were able to activate calpain-, but not caspase-3-dependent pathway, while copper complexes were able to induce activation of both proteases. Furthermore, the potencies of these PyDT-metal complexes depend on the nature of metals and also on the ratio of PyDT to the metal ion within the complex, which probably affects their stability and availability for interacting with and inhibiting the proteasome in tumor cells.

  15. p53 dependent apoptosis and cell cycle delay induced by heteroleptic complexes in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gunjan; Rana, Nishant Kumar; Singh, Priya; Dubey, Pradeep; Pandey, Daya Shankar; Koch, Biplob

    2017-04-01

    We previously reported synthesis of novel arene ruthenium (Ru) complexes and evaluated their antitumor activity in murine lymphoma (DL) cells. In this present study we further investigated the mechanism of action of two ruthenium complexes [complex 1 (η6-arene)RuCl(2-pcdpm)] and complex 2 (η6-arene)RuCl(4-mtdpm)] in cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). Our studies demonstrate that anticancer property of these two complexes was due to induction of apoptosis through p53 mediated pathway as well as arrest of cells in G2/M phase of cell cycle. It is worth to note that the complexes did not cause any substantial cytotoxic effect on normal cells. Further in comprehensive studies, apoptosis inducing property of both complexes were established in accordance with array of morphological changes ranging from membrane blebbing to formation of apoptotic bodies and followed by DNA fragmentation assay. Furthermore, Flow cytometry by Annexin V/PI staining delineate that complex 1 and 2 have strident impact to induce apoptosis in HeLa cells. The complex 1 and 2 treated cells show increased level of intracellular ROS generation which was preceded by p53 activation. Apoptosis induced by 1 and 2 was preceded by mitochondrial aggregations which were monitored by mitotracker. In addition flow cytometry analysis showed that both complexes also effectively arrest cells at G2/M phase of cell cycle. Western blot, RT-PCR as well as Real Time analysis were used to further confirm that the complexes induced apoptosis in p53 dependent pathway. Thus, our promising results can contribute to the rational design of novel potential anticancer agents.

  16. Influence of pore fluid chemistry on the complex conductivity and induced polarization responses of Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesmes, David P.; Frye, Kevin M.

    2001-01-01

    The spectral induced-polarization (IP) response of rocks and soils is a complex function of pore solution chemistry, sample microgeometry, and surface chemical properties. We measure the complex conductivity and the time domain IP responses of Berea sandstone as a function of pore fluid ionic strength and pH. Complex conductivity is measured over the frequency range 10-3 to 106 Hz, and chargeability is computed using a time window of 0.16 to 1.74 s. The field IP parameters: phase, percent frequency effect, and chargeability are functions of both the surface and bulk electrical properties of the sample and are observed to decrease with increasing solution conductivity. Dividing these parameters by the sample resistivity yields normalized IP parameters (quadrature conductivity, metal factor, normalized chargeability) that are proportional to the imaginary component of the complex surface conductivity. Normalized IP parameters increase with ionic strength up to concentrations of 10-1 M NaCl and show a reduced response at pH 3, the point of zero charge for quartz-dominated systems. For concentrations >10-1 M NaCl, the normalized parameters decrease with increasing concentration. This decrease in surface polarization may indicate a decrease in the effective mobility of polarizing charges at high solution concentration. Our data indicate that normalized IP parameters are directly related to the physiochemical parameters that control the surface conductivity responses of rocks and soils. Normalization of IP measurements in environmental investigations should increase the effectiveness of IP surveys, especially in high-conductivity environments.

  17. Detecting drug-induced prolongation of the QRS complex: New insights for cardiac safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Cros, C.; Skinner, M.; Moors, J.; Lainee, P.; Valentin, J.P.

    2012-12-01

    Background: Drugs slowing the conduction of the cardiac action potential and prolonging QRS complex duration by blocking the sodium current (I{sub Na}) may carry pro-arrhythmic risks. Due to the frequency-dependent block of I{sub Na}, this study assesses whether activity-related spontaneous increases in heart rate (HR) occurring during standard dog telemetry studies can be used to optimise the detection of class I antiarrhythmic-induced QRS prolongation. Methods: Telemetered dogs were orally dosed with quinidine (class Ia), mexiletine (class Ib) or flecainide (class Ic). QRS duration was determined standardly (5 beats averaged at rest) but also prior to and at the plateau of each acute increase in HR (3 beats averaged at steady state), and averaged over 1 h period from 1 h pre-dose to 5 h post-dose. Results: Compared to time-matched vehicle, at rest, only quinidine and flecainide induced increases in QRS duration (E{sub max} 13% and 20% respectively, P < 0.01–0.001) whereas mexiletine had no effect. Importantly, the increase in QRS duration was enhanced at peak HR with an additional effect of + 0.7 ± 0.5 ms (quinidine, NS), + 1.8 ± 0.8 ms (mexiletine, P < 0.05) and + 2.8 ± 0.8 ms (flecainide, P < 0.01) (calculated as QRS at basal HR-QRS at high HR). Conclusion: Electrocardiogram recordings during elevated HR, not considered during routine analysis optimised for detecting QT prolongation, can be used to sensitise the detection of QRS prolongation. This could prove useful when borderline QRS effects are detected. Analysing during acute increases in HR could also be useful for detecting drug-induced effects on other aspects of cardiac function. -- Highlights: ► We aimed to improve detection of drug-induced QRS prolongation in safety screening. ► We used telemetered dogs to test class I antiarrhythmics at low and high heart rate. ► At low heart rate only quinidine and flecainide induced an increase in QRS duration. ► At high heart rate the effects of two

  18. Fluctuation analysis of nonselective cation currents induced by AIF complex in guinea-pig chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Inoue, M; Imanaga, I

    1996-11-11

    Properties of aluminium fluoride (AIF) complex-activated nonselective cation (NS) channels in guinea-pig chromaffin cells were investigated using the patch clamp technique. As the membrane potential was hyperpolarized from the holding potential of -55 mV, the AIF-induced nonselective cation current (INS) diminished progressively. With hyperpolarizations to -100 mV or more negative potentials, the AIF.INS almost instantaneously disappeared. The apparent unit conductance of AIF INS was estimated to be 3 pS by fluctuation analysis. The open state probability of AIF-activated NS channels became large with a decrease in concentration of free Mg2+ ions inside the cell and was less than 0.5 at 12 microM Mg2+. It is concluded that NS channels in the chromaffin cell apparently differ from those in smooth muscle cells.

  19. Standardized Whole-Blood Transcriptional Profiling Enables the Deconvolution of Complex Induced Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Alejandra; Duffy, Darragh; Rouilly, Vincent; Posseme, Céline; Djebali, Raouf; Illanes, Gabriel; Libri, Valentina; Albaud, Benoit; Gentien, David; Piasecka, Barbara; Hasan, Milena; Fontes, Magnus; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Albert, Matthew L

    2016-09-06

    Systems approaches for the study of immune signaling pathways have been traditionally based on purified cells or cultured lines. However, in vivo responses involve the coordinated action of multiple cell types, which interact to establish an inflammatory microenvironment. We employed standardized whole-blood stimulation systems to test the hypothesis that responses to Toll-like receptor ligands or whole microbes can be defined by the transcriptional signatures of key cytokines. We found 44 genes, identified using Support Vector Machine learning, that captured the diversity of complex innate immune responses with improved segregation between distinct stimuli. Furthermore, we used donor variability to identify shared inter-cellular pathways and trace cytokine loops involved in gene expression. This provides strategies for dimension reduction of large datasets and deconvolution of innate immune responses applicable for characterizing immunomodulatory molecules. Moreover, we provide an interactive R-Shiny application with healthy donor reference values for induced inflammatory genes.

  20. Transition Metal Chelator Induces Progesterone Production in Mouse Cumulus-Oocyte Complexes and Corpora Lutea.

    PubMed

    Tian, X; Anthony, K; Diaz, Francisco J

    2017-04-01

    Progesterone production is upregulated in granulosa cells (cumulus and mural) after the LH surge, but the intra-follicular mechanisms regulating this transition are not completely known. Recent findings show that the transition metal chelator, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl)-ethylenediamine (TPEN), impairs ovarian function. In this study, we provide evidence that chelating transition metals, including zinc, enhances progesterone production. The findings show that TPEN (transition metal chelator) increases abundance of Cyp11a1 and Star messenger RNA (mRNA) between 8- and 20-fold and progesterone production more than 3-fold in cultured cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC). Feeding a zinc-deficient diet for 10 days, but not 3 days, increased Star, Hsd3b, and prostaglandin F2 alpha receptor (Ptgfr) mRNA ~2.5-fold, suggesting that the effect of TPEN is through modulation of zinc availability. Progesterone from cumulus cells promotes oocyte developmental potential. Blocking progesterone production with epostane during maturation reduced subsequent blastocyst formation from 89 % in control to 18 % in epostane-treated complexes, but supplementation with progesterone restored blastocyst developmental potential to 94 %. Feeding a zinc-deficient diet for 5 days before ovulation did not affect the number of CL, STAR protein, or serum progesterone. However, incubating luteal tissue with TPEN increased abundance of Star, Hsd3b, and Ptgfr mRNA 2-3-fold and increased progesterone production 3-fold. TPEN is known to abolish SMAD2/3 signaling in cumulus cells. However, treatment of COC with the SMAD2/3 phosphorylation inhibitor, SB421542, did not by itself induce steroidogenic transcripts but did potentiate EGF-induced Star mRNA expression. Collectively, the results show that depletion of transition metals with TPEN acutely enhances progesterone biosynthesis in COC and luteal tissue.

  1. Inducing isolated-desynchronization states in complex network of coupled chaotic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Weijie; Li, Huiyan; Ying, Heping; Wang, Xingang

    2016-12-01

    In a recent study about chaos synchronization in complex networks [Nat. Commun. 5, 4079 (2014), 10.1038/ncomms5079], it is shown that a stable synchronous cluster may coexist with vast asynchronous nodes, resembling the phenomenon of a chimera state observed in a regular network of coupled periodic oscillators. Although of practical significance, this new type of state, namely, the isolated-desynchronization state, is hardly observed in practice due to its strict requirements on the network topology. Here, by the strategy of pinning coupling, we propose an effective method for inducing isolated-desynchronization states in symmetric networks of coupled chaotic oscillators. Theoretical analysis based on eigenvalue analysis shows that, by pinning a group of symmetric nodes in the network, there exists a critical pinning strength beyond which the group of pinned nodes can completely be synchronized while the unpinned nodes remain asynchronous. The feasibility and efficiency of the control method are verified by numerical simulations of both artificial and real-world complex networks with the numerical results in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  2. Divacancy complexes induced by Cu diffusion in Zn-doped GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Korff, B.; Ratschinski, I.; Leipner, H. S.

    2013-08-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was applied to investigate the nature and thermal behavior of defects induced by Cu diffusion in Zn-doped p-type GaAs crystals. Cu atoms were intentionally introduced in the GaAs lattice through thermally activated diffusion from a thin Cu capping layer at 1100 °C under defined arsenic vapor pressure. During isochronal annealing of the obtained Cu-diffused GaAs in the temperature range of 450-850 K, vacancy clusters were found to form, grow and finally disappear. We found that annealing at 650 K triggers the formation of divacancies, whereas further increasing in the annealing temperature up to 750 K leads to the formation of divacancy-copper complexes. The observations suggest that the formation of these vacancy-like defects in GaAs is related to the out-diffusion of Cu. Two kinds of acceptors are detected with a concentration of about 1016 - 1017 cm-3, negative ions and arsenic vacancy copper complexes. Transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of voids and Cu precipitates which are not observed by positron measurements. The positron binding energy to shallow traps is estimated using the positron trapping model. Coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy showed the presence of Cu in the immediate vicinity of the detected vacancies. Theoretical calculations suggested that the detected defect is VGaVAs-2CuGa.

  3. Supramolecular substitution reactions between hydrazide-based molecular duplex strands: complexation induced nonsymmetry and dynamic behavior.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Xiang, Jun-Feng; Xue, Min; Hu, Hai-Yu; Chen, Chuan-Feng

    2008-08-15

    Supramolecular substitution reactions between hydrazide-based oligomers 1a- c and 2a- c were systematically investigated. Each oligomer existed as hydrogen-bonding mediated molecular duplex strands or a polymeric zipper structure in apolar solvents. But when another oligomer with complementary hydrogen bonding sites was added, a heterodimer structure formed due to supramolecular substitution reaction driven by the formation of more hydrogen bonds, which was evidenced by NMR experiments, sometimes gel-sol transition. When a nonsymmetric oligomer and a symmetric oligomer were involved, complexation-induced nonsymmetry was observed. When two nonsymmetric oligomers were involved, two hydrogen-bonded isomers were observed in solution. Variable-temperature (1)H NMR experiments further revealed unique dynamic behavior for the individual oligomer and the complexes. When diacetyl-terminated oligomer 1c was involved, slides perpendicular to hydrogen bonds between two constituent molecules were observed, which led to complicated (1)H NMR spectra at lower temperature; otherwise, high selectivity was obtained. Combined with the results we reported previously, a detailed picture of the structure-property relationship for our hydrazide-based oligomers was depicted, which would provide guidelines for the design of hydrazide-based fine-tuning functional materials.

  4. Syncytial apoptosis signaling network induced by the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Nardacci, R; Perfettini, J-L; Grieco, L; Thieffry, D; Kroemer, G; Piacentini, M

    2015-01-01

    Infection by human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is associated with a progressive decrease in CD4 T-cell numbers and the consequent collapse of host immune defenses. The major pathogenic mechanism of AIDS is the massive apoptotic destruction of the immunocompetent cells, including uninfected cells. The latter process, also known as by-stander killing, operates by various mechanisms one of which involves the formation of syncytia which undergo cell death by following a complex pathway. We present here a detailed and curated map of the syncytial apoptosis signaling network, aimed at simplifying the whole mechanism that we have characterized at the molecular level in the last 15 years. The map was created using Systems Biology Graphical Notation language with the help of CellDesigner software and encompasses 36 components (proteins/genes) and 54 interactions. The simplification of this complex network paves the way for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to eradicate HIV-1 infection. Agents that induce the selective death of HIV-1-elicited syncytia might lead to the elimination of viral reservoirs and hence constitute an important complement to current antiretroviral therapies. PMID:26247731

  5. Signatures of complex magnetic topologies from multiple reconnection sites induced by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernisse, Y.; Lavraud, B.; Eriksson, S.; Gershman, D. J.; Dorelli, J.; Pollock, C.; Giles, B.; Aunai, N.; Avanov, L.; Burch, J.; Chandler, M.; Coffey, V.; Dargent, J.; Ergun, R. E.; Farrugia, C. J.; Génot, V.; Graham, D. B.; Hasegawa, H.; Jacquey, C.; Kacem, I.; Khotyaintsev, Y.; Li, W.; Magnes, W.; Marchaudon, A.; Moore, T.; Paterson, W.; Penou, E.; Phan, T. D.; Retino, A.; Russell, C. T.; Saito, Y.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Torbert, R.; Wilder, F. D.; Yokota, S.

    2016-10-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale mission has demonstrated the frequent presence of reconnection exhausts at thin current sheets within Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) waves at the flank magnetopause. Motivated by these recent observations, we performed a statistical analysis of the boundary layers on the magnetosheath side of all KH current sheets on 8 September 2015. We show 86% consistency between the exhaust flows and particle leakage in the magnetosheath boundary layers but further highlight the very frequent presence of additional boundary layer signatures that do not come from the locally observed reconnection exhausts. These additional electron and ion boundary layers, of various durations and at various positions with respect to the leading and trailing boundaries of the KH waves, signal connections to reconnection sites at other locations. Based on the directionality and extent of these layers, we provide an interpretation whereby complex magnetic topologies can arise within KH waves from the combination of reconnection in the equatorial plane and at midlatitudes in the Southern and Northern Hemispheres, where additional reconnection sites are expected to be triggered by the three-dimensional field lines interweaving induced by the KH waves at the flanks (owing to differential flow and magnetic field shear with latitude). The present event demonstrates that the three-dimensional development of KH waves can induce plasma entry (through reconnection at both midlatitude and equatorial regions) already sunward of the terminator where the instability remains in its linear stage.

  6. Trophic Complexity and the Adaptive Value of Damage-Induced Plant Volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Indirect plant defenses are those facilitating the action of carnivores in ridding plants of their herbivorous consumers, as opposed to directly poisoning or repelling them. Of the numerous and diverse indirect defensive strategies employed by plants, inducible volatile production has garnered the most fascination among plant-insect ecologists. These volatile chemicals are emitted in response to feeding by herbivorous arthropods and serve to guide predators and parasitic wasps to their prey. Implicit in virtually all discussions of plant volatile-carnivore interactions is the premise that plants “call for help” to bodyguards that serve to boost plant fitness by limiting herbivore damage. This, by necessity, assumes a three-trophic level food chain where carnivores benefit plants, a theoretical framework that is conceptually tractable and convenient, but poorly depicts the complexity of food-web dynamics occurring in real communities. Recent work suggests that hyperparasitoids, top consumers acting from the fourth trophic level, exploit the same plant volatile cues used by third trophic level carnivores. Further, hyperparasitoids shift their foraging preferences, specifically cueing in to the odor profile of a plant being damaged by a parasitized herbivore that contains their host compared with damage from an unparasitized herbivore. If this outcome is broadly representative of plant-insect food webs at large, it suggests that damage-induced volatiles may not always be beneficial to plants with major implications for the evolution of anti-herbivore defense and manipulating plant traits to improve biological control in agricultural crops. PMID:23209381

  7. Membrane-elasticity model of Coatless vesicle budding induced by ESCRT complexes.

    PubMed

    Różycki, Bartosz; Boura, Evzen; Hurley, James H; Hummer, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    The formation of vesicles is essential for many biological processes, in particular for the trafficking of membrane proteins within cells. The Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) directs membrane budding away from the cytosol. Unlike other vesicle formation pathways, the ESCRT-mediated budding occurs without a protein coat. Here, we propose a minimal model of ESCRT-induced vesicle budding. Our model is based on recent experimental observations from direct fluorescence microscopy imaging that show ESCRT proteins colocalized only in the neck region of membrane buds. The model, cast in the framework of membrane elasticity theory, reproduces the experimentally observed vesicle morphologies with physically meaningful parameters. In this parameter range, the minimum energy configurations of the membrane are coatless buds with ESCRTs localized in the bud neck, consistent with experiment. The minimum energy configurations agree with those seen in the fluorescence images, with respect to both bud shapes and ESCRT protein localization. On the basis of our model, we identify distinct mechanistic pathways for the ESCRT-mediated budding process. The bud size is determined by membrane material parameters, explaining the narrow yet different bud size distributions in vitro and in vivo. Our membrane elasticity model thus sheds light on the energetics and possible mechanisms of ESCRT-induced membrane budding.

  8. Experimental investigation of flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-08-01

    We report on experimental observations of flow induced large amplitude dust-acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma. The experiments have been carried out in a Π shaped direct current glow discharge experimental device using kaolin particles as the dust component in a background of Argon plasma. A strong supersonic flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change in the gas flow rate is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks whose dynamics are captured by fast video pictures of the evolving structures. The physical characteristics of these shocks are delineated through a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of flow speeds and potential hill heights. The observed evolution of the shock waves and their propagation characteristics are found to compare well with model numerical results based on a modified Korteweg-de-Vries-Burgers type equation.

  9. Surface induced dissociation: dissecting noncovalent protein complexes in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mowei; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2014-04-15

    when the gas-phase proteins are activated by collision with a surface. Subcomplexes released after surface collision are consistent with the native quaternary structure of several protein systems studied, even for a large chaperone protein, GroEL, that approaches megadalton mass. The unique and meaningful data generated from surface induced dissociation (SID) have been attributed to the fast and energetic activation process upon collision with a massive target, the surface. In this Account, we summarize our SID studies of protein complexes, with emphasis on the more recent work on the combination of ion mobility (IM) with SID. IM has gained popularity over the years not only as a gas-phase separation technique but also as a technique with the ability to measure the size and shape of the proteins in the gas phase. Incorporation of IM before SID allows different conformations of a protein to be separated and examined individually by SID for structural details. When IM is after SID, the cross sections of the SID products can be measured, providing insight on the dissociation pathways, which may mimic disassembly pathways. Furthermore, the separation by IM greatly reduces the peak overlapping (same m/z) and coalescence (merging) of SID products, improving the resolving power of the method. While there are still many unanswered questions on the fundamental properties of gas-phase proteins and a need for further research, our work has shown that SID can be a complementary gas-phase tool providing useful information for studying quaternary structures of noncovalent protein complexes.

  10. Cytokinin delays dark-induced senescence in rice by maintaining the chlorophyll cycle and photosynthetic complexes.

    PubMed

    Talla, Sai Krishna; Panigrahy, Madhusmita; Kappara, Saivishnupriya; Nirosha, P; Neelamraju, Sarla; Ramanan, Rajeshwari

    2016-03-01

    The phytohormone cytokinin (CK) is known to delay senescence in plants. We studied the effect of a CK analog, 6-benzyl adenine (BA), on rice leaves to understand the possible mechanism by which CK delays senescence in a drought- and heat-tolerant rice cultivar Nagina22 (N22) using dark-induced senescence (DIS) as a surrogate for natural senescence of leaves. Leaves of N22-H-dgl162, a stay-green mutant of N22, and BA-treated N22 showed retention of chlorophyll (Chl) pigments, maintenance of the Chl a/b ratio, and delay in reduction of both photochemical efficiency and rate of oxygen evolution during DIS. HPLC analysis showed accumulation of 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll (HmChl) during DIS, and the kinetics of its accumulation correlated with progression of senescence. Transcriptome analysis revealed that several plastid-localized genes, specifically those associated with photosystem II (PSII), showed higher transcript levels in BA-treated N22 and the stay-green mutant leaves compared with naturally senescing N22 leaves. Real-time PCR analyses showed that genes coding for enzymes associated with Chl a/b interconversion and proteins associated with light-harvesting complexes maintained higher transcript levels up to 72h of DIS following BA treatment. The pigment-protein complexes analyzed by green gel remained intact in both N22-H-dgl162 and BA-treated N22 leaves even after 96h of DIS. Thus, CK delays senescence by accumulation of HmChl and up-regulating genes in the Chl cycle, thereby maintaining the Chl a/b ratio. Also, CK treatment retains higher transcript levels of PSII-related genes, resulting in the stability of photosynthetic pigment complexes and functional stay-greenness in rice.

  11. Theoretical studies on the binding of rhenium(I) complexes to inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Bruno L; Moreira, Irina S; Fernandes, Pedro A; Ramos, Maria J; Santos, Isabel; Correia, João D G

    2013-09-01

    Considering our interest in the design of innovative radiometal-based complexes for in vivo imaging of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), we have recently introduced a set of M(CO)3-complexes (M=(99m)Tc, Re) containing a pendant N(ω)-NO2-L-arginine moiety, a known inhibitor of the enzyme. Enzymatic assays with purified inducible NOS have shown that the non-radioactive surrogates with 3-(Re1; Ki=84 μM) or 6-carbon linkers (Re2; Ki=6 μM) are stronger inhibitors than the respective metal-free conjugates L1 (Ki=178 μM) and L2 (Ki=36 μM), with Re2 displaying the highest inhibitory potency. Aiming to rationalize the experimental results we have performed a molecular docking study combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and free energy perturbation (FEP) calculations. The higher inhibitory potency of Re2 arises from the stronger electrostatic interactions observed between the "Re(CO)3" core and the residues Arg260 and Arg382. This interaction is only possible due to the higher flexibility of its C6-carbon spacer, which links the N(ω)-NO2-L-arginine moiety and the "Re(CO)3" organometallic core. Furthermore, FEP calculations were carried out and the resultant relative binding energies (ΔΔGbind(calc)=0.690±0.028 kcal/mol,Re1/L1 and 1.825±0.318 kcal/mol, Re2/L2) are in accordance with the experimental results (ΔΔGbind(exp)=0.461±0.009 kcal/mol,Re1/L1 and 1.129±0.210 kcal/mol, Re2/L2); there is an energetic penalty for the transformation of the Re complexes into the ligands and this penalization is higher for the pair Re2/L2.

  12. Disruption of the ribosomal P complex leads to stress-induced autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Artero-Castro, Ana; Perez-Alea, Mileidys; Feliciano, Andrea; Leal, Jose A; Genestar, Mónica; Castellvi, Josep; Peg, Vicente; Ramón y Cajal, Santiago; LLeonart, Matilde E

    2015-01-01

    The human ribosomal P complex, which consists of the acidic ribosomal P proteins RPLP0, RPLP1, and RPLP2 (RPLP proteins), recruits translational factors, facilitating protein synthesis. Recently, we showed that overexpression of RPLP1 immortalizes primary cells and contributes to transformation. Moreover, RPLP proteins are overexpressed in human cancer, with the highest incidence in breast carcinomas. It is thought that disruption of the P complex would directly affect protein synthesis, causing cell growth arrest and eventually apoptosis. Here, we report a distinct mechanism by which cancer cells undergo cell cycle arrest and induced autophagy when RPLP proteins are downregulated. We found that absence of RPLP0, RPLP1, or RPLP2 resulted in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and MAPK1/ERK2 signaling pathway activation. Moreover, ROS generation led to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that involved the EIF2AK3/PERK-EIF2S1/eIF2α-EIF2S2-EIF2S3-ATF4/ATF-4- and ATF6/ATF-6-dependent arms of the unfolded protein response (UPR). RPLP protein-deficient cells treated with autophagy inhibitors experienced apoptotic cell death as an alternative to autophagy. Strikingly, antioxidant treatment prevented UPR activation and autophagy while restoring the proliferative capacity of these cells. Our results indicate that ROS are a critical signal generated by disruption of the P complex that causes a cellular response that follows a sequential order: first ROS, then ER stress/UPR activation, and finally autophagy. Importantly, inhibition of the first step alone is able to restore the proliferative capacity of the cells, preventing UPR activation and autophagy. Overall, our results support a role for autophagy as a survival mechanism in response to stress due to RPLP protein deficiency. PMID:26176264

  13. Disruption of the ribosomal P complex leads to stress-induced autophagy.

    PubMed

    Artero-Castro, Ana; Perez-Alea, Mileidys; Feliciano, Andrea; Leal, Jose A; Genestar, Mónica; Castellvi, Josep; Peg, Vicente; Ramón Y Cajal, Santiago; Lleonart, Matilde E L

    2015-01-01

    The human ribosomal P complex, which consists of the acidic ribosomal P proteins RPLP0, RPLP1, and RPLP2 (RPLP proteins), recruits translational factors, facilitating protein synthesis. Recently, we showed that overexpression of RPLP1 immortalizes primary cells and contributes to transformation. Moreover, RPLP proteins are overexpressed in human cancer, with the highest incidence in breast carcinomas. It is thought that disruption of the P complex would directly affect protein synthesis, causing cell growth arrest and eventually apoptosis. Here, we report a distinct mechanism by which cancer cells undergo cell cycle arrest and induced autophagy when RPLP proteins are downregulated. We found that absence of RPLP0, RPLP1, or RPLP2 resulted in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and MAPK1/ERK2 signaling pathway activation. Moreover, ROS generation led to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that involved the EIF2AK3/PERK-EIF2S1/eIF2α-EIF2S2-EIF2S3-ATF4/ATF-4- and ATF6/ATF-6-dependent arms of the unfolded protein response (UPR). RPLP protein-deficient cells treated with autophagy inhibitors experienced apoptotic cell death as an alternative to autophagy. Strikingly, antioxidant treatment prevented UPR activation and autophagy while restoring the proliferative capacity of these cells. Our results indicate that ROS are a critical signal generated by disruption of the P complex that causes a cellular response that follows a sequential order: first ROS, then ER stress/UPR activation, and finally autophagy. Importantly, inhibition of the first step alone is able to restore the proliferative capacity of the cells, preventing UPR activation and autophagy. Overall, our results support a role for autophagy as a survival mechanism in response to stress due to RPLP protein deficiency.

  14. Infrared laser induced conformational and structural changes of glycine and glycine·water complex in low-temperature matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coussan, Stéphane; Tarczay, György

    2016-01-01

    Conformational and structural changes of matrix-isolated glycine and glycine·water complexes induced by the selective MIR excitation of the fundamental OH and NH stretching vibrational modes were studied. The observed spectral changes are consistent with the former assignments based on matrix-isolation IR spectroscopy combined with NIR laser irradiation. Since fewer conformational barriers can be reached by MIR than by NIR excitations, fewer processes are promoted effectively by MIR radiation. The comparison of spectral changes induced by selective MIR and NIR excitations can facilitate the conformational analysis of complex molecular systems and it can also yield information on the barrier heights.

  15. Inducible Repression of Nuclear-Encoded Subunits of the Cytochrome b6f Complex in Tobacco Reveals an Extraordinarily Long Lifetime of the Complex1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hojka, Marta; Thiele, Wolfram; Tóth, Szilvia Z.; Lein, Wolfgang; Bock, Ralph; Schöttler, Mark Aurel

    2014-01-01

    The biogenesis of the cytochrome b6f complex in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) seems to be restricted to young leaves, suggesting a high lifetime of the complex. To directly determine its lifetime, we employed an ethanol-inducible RNA interference (RNAi) approach targeted against the essential nuclear-encoded Rieske protein (PetC) and the small M subunit (PetM), whose function in higher plants is unknown. Young expanding leaves of both PetM and PetC RNAi transformants bleached rapidly and developed necroses, while mature leaves, whose photosynthetic apparatus was fully assembled before RNAi induction, stayed green. In line with these phenotypes, cytochrome b6f complex accumulation and linear electron transport capacity were strongly repressed in young leaves of both RNAi transformants, showing that the M subunit is as essential for cytochrome b6f complex accumulation as the Rieske protein. In mature leaves, all photosynthetic parameters were indistinguishable from the wild type even after 14 d of induction. As RNAi repression of PetM and PetC was highly efficient in both young and mature leaves, these data indicate a lifetime of the cytochrome b6f complex of at least 1 week. The switch-off of cytochrome b6f complex biogenesis in mature leaves may represent part of the first dedicated step of the leaf senescence program. PMID:24963068

  16. Effect of CMC Molecular Weight on Acid-Induced Gelation of Heated WPI-CMC Soluble Complex.

    PubMed

    Huan, Yan; Zhang, Sha; Vardhanabhuti, Bongkosh

    2016-02-01

    Acid-induced gelation properties of heated whey protein isolate (WPI) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) soluble complex were investigated as a function of CMC molecular weight (270, 680, and 750 kDa) and concentrations (0% to 0.125%). Heated WPI-CMC soluble complex with 6% protein was made by heating biopolymers together at pH 7.0 and 85 °C for 30 min and diluted to 5% protein before acid-induced gelation. Acid-induced gel formed from heated WPI-CMC complexes exhibited increased hardness and decreased water holding capacity with increasing CMC concentrations but gel strength decreased at higher CMC content. The highest gel strength was observed with CMC 750 k at 0.05%. Gels with low CMC concentration showed homogenous microstructure which was independent of CMC molecular weight, while increasing CMC concentration led to microphase separation with higher CMC molecular weight showing more extensive phase separation. When heated WPI-CMC complexes were prepared at 9% protein the acid gels showed improved gel hardness and water holding capacity, which was supported by the more interconnected protein network with less porosity when compared to complexes heated at 6% protein. It is concluded that protein concentration and biopolymer ratio during complex formation are the major factors affecting gel properties while the effect of CMC molecular weight was less significant.

  17. Ligand-induced dynamics of heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptor-like kinase complexes

    PubMed Central

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Jones, Alan M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Arabidopsis, 7-transmembrane Regulator of G signaling protein 1 (AtRGS1) modulates canonical G protein signaling by promoting the inactive state of heterotrimeric G protein complex on the plasma membrane. It is known that plant leucine-rich repeat receptor–like kinases (LRR RLKs) phosphorylate AtRGS1 in vitro but little is known about the in vivo interaction, molecular dynamics, or the cellular consequences of this interaction. Methods Therefore, a subset of the known RLKs that phosphorylate AtRGS1 were selected for elucidation, namely, BAK1, BIR1, FLS2. Several microscopies for both static and dynamic protein-protein interactions were used to follow in vivo interactions between the RLKs and AtRGS1 after the presentation of the Pathogen-associated Molecular Pattern, Flagellin 22 (Flg22). These microscopies included Förster Resonance Energy Transfer, Bimolecular Fluoresence Complementation, and Cross Number and Brightness Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy. In addition, reactive oxygen species and calcium changes in living cells were quantitated using luminometry and R-GECO1 microscopy. Results The LRR RLKs BAK1 and BIR1, interact with AtRGS1 at the plasma membrane. The RLK ligand flg22 sets BAK1 in motion toward AtRGS1 and BIR1 away, both returning to the baseline orientations by 10 minutes. The C-terminal tail of AtRGS1 is important for the interaction with BAK1 and for the tempo of the AtRGS1/BIR1 dynamics. This window of time corresponds to the flg22-induced transient production of reactive oxygen species and calcium release which are both attenuated in the rgs1 and the bak1 null mutants. Conclusions A temporal model of these interactions is proposed. flg22 binding induces nearly instantaneous dimerization between FLS2 and BAK1. Phosphorylated BAK1 interacts with and enables AtRGS1 to move away from BIR1 and AtRGS1 becomes phosphorylated leading to its endocytosis thus leading to de-repression by permitting AtGPA1 to exchange GDP for GTP

  18. Immune-Complexed Adenovirus Induce AIM2-Mediated Pyroptosis in Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eichholz, Karsten; Bru, Thierry; Tran, Thi Thu Phuong; Fernandes, Paulo; Mennechet, Franck J. D.; Manel, Nicolas; Alves, Paula; Perreau, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are nonenveloped proteinaceous particles containing a linear double-stranded DNA genome. HAdVs cause a spectrum of pathologies in all populations regardless of health standards. Following repeat exposure to multiple HAdV types, we develop robust and long-lived humoral and cellular immune responses that provide life-long protection from de novo infections and persistent HAdV. How HAdVs, anti-HAdV antibodies and antigen presenting cells (APCs) interact to influence infection is still incompletely understood. In our study, we used physical, pharmacological, biochemical, fluorescence and electron microscopy, molecular and cell biology approaches to dissect the impact of immune-complexed HAdV (IC-HAdV) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). We show that IC-HAdV generate stabilized complexes of ~200 nm that are efficiently internalized by, and aggregate in, MoDCs. By comparing IC-HAdV, IC-empty capsid, IC-Ad2ts1 (a HAdV-C2 impaired in endosomal escape due to a mutation that impacts protease encapsidation) and IC-AdL40Q (a HAdV-C5 impaired in endosomal escape due to a mutation in protein VI), we demonstrate that protein VI-dependent endosomal escape is required for the HAdV genome to engage the DNA pattern recognition receptor AIM2 (absent in melanoma 2). AIM2 engagement induces pyroptotic MoDC death via ASC (apoptosis-associated speck protein containing a caspase activation/recruitment domain) aggregation, inflammasome formation, caspase 1 activation, and IL-1β and gasdermin D (GSDMD) cleavage. Our study provides mechanistic insight into how humoral immunity initiates an innate immune response to HAdV-C5 in human professional APCs. PMID:27636895

  19. Ligand-induced haptotropic rearrangements in bis(indenyl)zirconium sandwich complexes.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Christopher A; Lobkovsky, Emil; Keresztes, Ivan; Chirik, Paul J

    2005-07-27

    Addition of principally sigma-donating ligands such as THF, chelating diethers, or 1,2-bis(dimethyl)phosphinoethane to eta(9),eta(5)-bis(indenyl)zirconium sandwich complexes, (eta(9)-C(9)H(5)-1,3-R(2))(eta(5)-C(9)H(5)-1,3-R(2))Zr (R = alkyl or silyl), induces haptotropic rearrangement to afford (eta(6)-C(9)H(5)-1,3-R(2))(eta(5)-C(9)H(5)-1,3-R(2))ZrL adducts. Examples where L = THF and DME have been characterized by X-ray diffraction and revealed significant buckling of the eta(6) benzo ring, consistent with reduction of the arene, and highlight the importance of the zirconium(IV) canonical form. For the THF-induced haptotropic rearrangements, the thermodynamic driving force for ring migration has been measured as a function of indenyl substituent and demonstrates silylated sandwiches favor THF coordination and the eta(6),eta(5) bonding motif over their alkylated counterparts. In the case of chelating diethers, measurement of the corresponding equilibrium constants establish more stable eta(6),eta(5) adducts with five- over four-membered chelates and with smaller oxygen and carbon backbone substituents. Kinetic studies on both THF and DME addition to (eta(9)-C(9)H(5)-1,3-(SiMe(3))(2))(eta(5)-C(9)H(5)-1,3-(SiMe(3))(2))Zr established a first-order dependence on the incoming ligand, consistent with a mechanism involving direct attack of the incoming nucleophile on the eta(9),eta(5) sandwich. These results further highlight the ability of the indenyl ligand to smoothly adjust hapticity to meet the electronic requirements of the metal center.

  20. Changes in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity during and following severe insulin-induced hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Cardell, M; Siesjö, B K; Wieloch, T

    1991-01-01

    The effect of severe insulin-induced hypoglycemia on the activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex (PDHC) was investigated in homogenates of frozen rat cerebral cortex during burst suppression EEG, after 10, 30, and 60 min of isoelectric EEG, and after 30 and 180 min and 24 h of recovery following 30 min of hypoglycemic coma. Changes in PDHC activity were correlated to levels of labile organic phosphates and glycolytic metabolites. In cortex from control animals, the rate of [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation was 7.1 +/- 1.3 U/mg of protein, or 35% of the total PDHC activity. The activity was unchanged during burst suppression EEG whereas the active fraction increased to 81-87% during hypoglycemic coma. Thirty minutes after glucose-induced recovery, the PDHC activity had decreased by 33% compared to control levels, and remained significantly depressed after 3 h of recovery. This decrease in activity was not due to a decrease in the total PDHC activity. At 24 h of recovery, PDHC activity had returned to control levels. We conclude that the activation of PDHC during hypoglycemic coma is probably the result of an increased PDH phosphatase activity following depolarization and calcium influx, and allosteric inhibition of PDH kinase due to increased ADP/ATP ratio. The depression of PDHC activity following hypoglycemic coma is probably due to an increased phosphorylation of the enzyme, as a consequence of an imbalance between PDH phosphatase and kinase activities. Since some reduction of the ATP/ADP ratio persisted and since the lactate/pyruvate ratio had normalized by 3 h of recovery, the depression of PDHC most likely reflects a decrease in PDH phosphatase activity, probably due to a decrease in intramitochondrial Ca2+.

  1. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of complex silicate minerals--beryl.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Nancy J; McManus, Catherine E; Harmon, Russell S; De Lucia, Frank C; Miziolek, Andrzej W

    2006-05-01

    Beryl (Be3Al2Si6O18) is a chemically complex and highly compositionally variable gem-forming mineral found in a variety of geologic settings worldwide. A methodology and analytical protocol were developed for the analysis of beryl by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) that minimizes the coefficient of variance for multiple analyses of the same specimen. The parameters considered were laser energy/pulse, time delay and crystallographic orientation. Optimal analytical conditions are a laser energy/pulse of 102 mJ and a time delay of 2 micros. Beryl compositions measured parallel and perpendicular to the c axis were identical within analytical error. LIBS analysis of 96 beryls from 16 countries (Afghanistan, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, India, Ireland, Italy, Madagascar, Mexico, Mozambique, Namibia, Norway, Russia, Tanzania and United States), Antarctica, and ten US states (AZ, CA, CO, CT, ID, ME, NC, NH, NM and UT) were undertaken to determine whether or not LIBS analysis can be used to determine the provenance of gem beryl.

  2. Benzaldehyde Thiosemicarbazone Derived from Limonene Complexed with Copper Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Leishmania amazonensis

    PubMed Central

    Britta, Elizandra Aparecida; Barbosa Silva, Ana Paula; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Dias-Filho, Benedito Prado; Silva, Cleuza Conceição; Sernaglia, Rosana Lázara; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2012-01-01

    Background Leishmaniasis is a major health problem that affects more than 12 million people. Treatment presents several problems, including high toxicity and many adverse effects, leading to the discontinuation of treatment and emergence of resistant strains. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated the in vitro antileishmanial activity of benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone derived from limonene complexed with copper, termed BenzCo, against Leishmania amazonensis. BenzCo inhibited the growth of the promastigote and axenic amastigote forms, with IC50 concentrations of 3.8 and 9.5 µM, respectively, with 72 h of incubation. Intracellular amastigotes were inhibited by the compound, with an IC50 of 10.7 µM. BenzCo altered the shape, size, and ultrastructure of the parasites. Mitochondrial membrane depolarization was observed in protozoa treated with BenzCo but caused no alterations in the plasma membrane. Additionally, BenzCo induced lipoperoxidation and the production of mitochondrial superoxide anion radicals in promastigotes and axenic amastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis. Conclusion/Significance Our studies indicated that the antileishmania activity of BenzCo might be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage, leading to parasite death. PMID:22870222

  3. IgG-Immune Complexes Promote B Cell Memory by Inducing BAFF.

    PubMed

    Kang, SunAh; Keener, Amanda B; Jones, Shannon Z; Benschop, Robert J; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Rathmell, Jeffrey C; Clarke, Stephen H; Matsushima, Glenn K; Whitmire, Jason K; Vilen, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    Memory B cell responses are vital for protection against infections but must also be regulated to prevent autoimmunity. Cognate T cell help, somatic hypermutation, and affinity maturation within germinal centers (GCs) are required for high-affinity memory B cell formation; however, the signals that commit GC B cells to the memory pool remain unclear. In this study, we identify a role for IgG-immune complexes (ICs), FcγRs, and BAFF during the formation of memory B cells in mice. We found that early secretion of IgG in response to immunization with a T-dependent Ag leads to IC-FcγR interactions that induce dendritic cells to secrete BAFF, which acts at or upstream of Bcl-6 in activated B cells. Loss of CD16, hematopoietic cell-derived BAFF, or blocking IC:FcγR regions in vivo diminished the expression of Bcl-6, the frequency of GC and memory B cells, and secondary Ab responses. BAFF also contributed to the maintenance and/or expansion of the follicular helper T cell population, although it was dispensable for their formation. Thus, early Ab responses contribute to the optimal formation of B cell memory through IgG-ICs and BAFF. Our work defines a new role for FcγRs in GC and memory B cell responses.

  4. NMR of α-synuclein–polyamine complexes elucidates the mechanism and kinetics of induced aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Claudio O; Hoyer, Wolfgang; Zweckstetter, Markus; Jares-Erijman, Elizabeth A; Subramaniam, Vinod; Griesinger, Christian; Jovin, Thomas M

    2004-01-01

    The aggregation of α-synuclein is characteristic of Parkinson's disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative synucleinopathies. The 140-aa protein is natively unstructured; thus, ligands binding to the monomeric form are of therapeutic interest. Biogenic polyamines promote the aggregation of α-synuclein and may constitute endogenous agents modulating the pathogenesis of PD. We characterized the complexes of natural and synthetic polyamines with α-synuclein by NMR and assigned the binding site to C-terminal residues 109–140. Dissociation constants were derived from chemical shift perturbations. Greater polyamine charge (+2 → +5) correlated with increased affinity and enhancement of fibrillation, for which we propose a simple kinetic mechanism involving a dimeric nucleation center. According to the analysis, polyamines increase the extent of nucleation by ∼104 and the rate of monomer addition ∼40-fold. Significant secondary structure is not induced in monomeric α-synuclein by polyamines at 15°C. Instead, NMR reveals changes in a region (aa 22–93) far removed from the polyamine binding site and presumed to adopt the β-sheet conformation characteristic of fibrillar α-synuclein. We conclude that the C-terminal domain acts as a regulator of α-synuclein aggregation. PMID:15103328

  5. mTOR complex 1: a key player in neuroadaptations induced by drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Neasta, Jeremie; Barak, Segev; Hamida, Sami Ben; Ron, Dorit

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian (or mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) is a serine and threonine kinase that regulates cell growth, survival, and proliferation. mTORC1 is a master controller of the translation of a subset of mRNAs. In the central nervous system mTORC1 plays a crucial role in mechanisms underlying learning and memory by controlling synaptic protein synthesis. Here, we review recent evidence suggesting that the mTORC1 signaling pathway promotes neuroadaptations following exposure to a diverse group of drugs of abuse including stimulants, cannabinoids, opiates, and alcohol. We further describe potential molecular mechanisms by which drug-induced mTORC1 activation may alter brain functions. Finally, we propose that mTORC1 is a focal point shared by drugs of abuse to mediate drug-related behaviors such as reward seeking and excessive drug intake, and offer future directions to decipher the contribution of the kinase to mechanisms underlying addiction. Recent studies suggesting that exposure to diverse classes of drugs of abuse as well as exposure to drug-associated memories lead to mTORC1 kinase activation in the limbic system. In turn, mTORC1 controls the onset and the maintenance of pathological neuroadaptions that underlie several features of drug addiction such as drug seeking and relapse. Therefore, we propose that targeting mTORC1 and its effectors is a promising strategy to treat drug disorders.

  6. An Interfacial Europium Complex on SiO2 Nanoparticles: Reduction-Induced Blue Emission System

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Ayumi; Hasegawa, Miki

    2015-01-01

    In this study, Eu-coated SiO2 nanoparticles have been prepared, consisting of an interfacial complex of Eu and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) at the solid surfaces of the SiO2/Eu nanostructures. The as-prepared SiO2/Eu/phen nanoparticles exhibits sharp red emission via energy transfer from the phen to the EuIII. After sintering at 200 °C in air, the emission is tuned from red to blue. The blue emission is originated from EuII. This reduction-induced emissive phenomenon resulted from the electron-donating environment created by the surrounding phen and SiO2, which is the first reported fabrication of a stable EuII-based emissive material using mild conditions (reaction in air and at low temperature) and an organic-inorganic hybrid nanostructure. The existence of two different stable oxidation states with characteristic emissions, blue emissive EuII and red emissive EuIII, suggests significant potential applications as novel luminescent materials with inorganic-organic hybrid structures. PMID:26122318

  7. Beyond oxygen: complex regulation and activity of hypoxia inducible factors in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, K.G.; Kind, K.L.; Sferruzzi-Perri, A.N.; Thompson, J.G.; Roberts, C.T.

    2010-01-01

    In the first trimester the extravillous cytotrophoblast cells occlude the uterine spiral arterioles creating a low oxygen environment early in pregnancy, which is essential for pregnancy success. Paradoxically, shallow trophoblast invasion and defective vascular remodelling of the uterine spiral arteries in the first trimester may result in impaired placental perfusion and chronic placental ischemia and hypoxia later in gestation leading to adverse pregnancy outcomes. The hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) are key mediators of the response to low oxygen. We aimed to elucidate mechanisms of regulation of HIFs and the role these may play in the control of placental differentiation, growth and function in both normal and pathological pregnancies. The Pubmed database was consulted for identification of the most relevant published articles. Search terms used were oxygen, placenta, trophoblast, pregnancy, HIF and hypoxia. The HIFs are able to function throughout all aspects of normal and abnormal placental differentiation, growth and function; during the first trimester (physiologically low oxygen), during mid-late gestation (where there is adequate supply of blood and oxygen to the placenta) and in pathological pregnancies complicated by placental hypoxia/ischemia. During normal pregnancy HIFs may respond to complex alterations in oxygen, hormones, cytokines and growth factors to regulate placental invasion, differentiation, transport and vascularization. In the ever-changing environment created during pregnancy, the HIFs appear to act as key mediators of placental development and function and thereby are likely to be important contributors to both normal and adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:19926662

  8. The role of reactive oxygen intermediates in nonspecific monocyte cytotoxicity induced by immune complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Geffner, J R; Giordano, M; Serebrinsky, G; Isturiz, M

    1987-01-01

    Normal human monocytes were induced to lyse nonsensitized target cells when triggered by precipitating immune complexes (IC) or soluble heat-aggregated IgG (HAIgG). Catalase, azide, cyanide and three aminoacids employed as quenchers of ClO, significantly inhibited this nonspecific cytotoxicity (NSC), suggesting an important role for the myeloperoxidase (MPO) system. However, HO and/or 1O2 may also be involved in the lysis, since certain scavengers of these species such as mannitol, benzoate, ethanol and histidine, as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD), partially inhibited NSC. Moreover, cyanide and azide were unable to completely abrogate this lytic activity. When NSC was compared to antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), it was found that neither catalase nor oxygen-species scavengers affected ADCC while azide and cyanide significantly enhanced it. Antibody-coated target cells were also destroyed by IC-triggered monocytes. However, kinetic analysis and studies on the capacity of catalase to inhibit the lysis demonstrated that it was mediated through a NSC-like mechanism. The cytotoxic system described in this report offers a suitable model to study in vitro alternative lytic mechanisms triggered through monocyte receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (Fc gamma R). PMID:3038442

  9. Videogame training strategy-induced change in brain function during a complex visuomotor task.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunkyu; Voss, Michelle W; Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya; Boot, Walter R; Vo, Loan T K; Basak, Chandramallika; Vanpatter, Matt; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica; Kramer, Arthur F

    2012-07-01

    Although changes in brain function induced by cognitive training have been examined, functional plasticity associated with specific training strategies is still relatively unexplored. In this study, we examined changes in brain function during a complex visuomotor task following training using the Space Fortress video game. To assess brain function, participants completed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before and after 30 h of training with one of two training regimens: Hybrid Variable-Priority Training (HVT), with a focus on improving specific skills and managing task priority, or Full Emphasis Training (FET), in which participants simply practiced the game to obtain the highest overall score. Control participants received only 6 h of FET. Compared to FET, HVT learners reached higher performance on the game and showed less brain activation in areas related to visuo-spatial attention and goal-directed movement after training. Compared to the control group, HVT exhibited less brain activation in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), coupled with greater performance improvement. Region-of-interest analysis revealed that the reduction in brain activation was correlated with improved performance on the task. This study sheds light on the neurobiological mechanisms of improved learning from directed training (HVT) over non-directed training (FET), which is related to visuo-spatial attention and goal-directed motor planning, while separating the practice-based benefit, which is related to executive control and rule management.

  10. Amyloid-β-Acetylcholinesterase complexes potentiate neurodegenerative changes induced by the Aβ peptide. Implications for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The presence of amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits in selected brain regions is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The amyloid deposits have "chaperone molecules" which play critical roles in amyloid formation and toxicity. We report here that treatment of rat hippocampal neurons with Aβ-acetylcholinesterase (Aβ-AChE) complexes induced neurite network dystrophia and apoptosis. Moreover, the Aβ-AChE complexes induced a sustained increase in intracellular Ca2+ as well as a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. The Aβ-AChE oligomers complex also induced higher alteration of Ca2+ homeostasis compared with Aβ-AChE fibrillar complexes. These alterations in calcium homeostasis were reversed when the neurons were treated previously with lithium, a GSK-3β inhibitor; Wnt-7a ligand, an activator for Wnt Pathway; and an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist (MK-801), demonstrating protective roles for activation of the Wnt signaling pathway as well as for NMDA-receptor inhibition. Our results indicate that the Aβ-AChE complexes enhance Aβ-dependent deregulation of intracellular Ca2+ as well as mitochondrial dysfunction in hippocampal neurons, triggering an enhanced damage than Aβ alone. From a therapeutic point of view, activation of the Wnt signaling pathway, as well as NMDAR inhibition may be important factors to protect neurons under Aβ-AChE attack. PMID:20205793

  11. Molecular characterization of hap complex components responsible for methanol-inducible gene expression in the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii.

    PubMed

    Oda, Saori; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Nitta, Nobuhisa; Sasano, Yu; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2015-03-01

    We identified genes encoding components of the Hap complex, CbHAP2, CbHAP3, and CbHAP5, as transcription factors regulating methanol-inducible gene expression in the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii. We found that the Cbhap2Δ, Cbhap3Δ, and Cbhap5Δ gene-disrupted strains showed severe growth defects on methanol but not on glucose and nonfermentable carbon sources such as ethanol and glycerol. In these disruptants, the transcriptional activities of methanol-inducible promoters were significantly decreased compared to those of the wild-type strain, indicating that CbHap2p, CbHap3p, and CbHap5p play indispensable roles in methanol-inducible gene expression. Further molecular and biochemical analyses demonstrated that CbHap2p, CbHap3p, and CbHap5p localized to the nucleus and bound to the promoter regions of methanol-inducible genes regardless of the carbon source, and heterotrimer formation was suggested to be necessary for binding to DNA. Unexpectedly, distinct from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Hap complex functioned in methanol-specific induction rather than glucose derepression in C. boidinii. Our results shed light on a novel function of the Hap complex in methanol-inducible gene expression in methylotrophic yeasts.

  12. Molecular Characterization of Hap Complex Components Responsible for Methanol-Inducible Gene Expression in the Methylotrophic Yeast Candida boidinii

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Saori; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Nitta, Nobuhisa; Sasano, Yu

    2015-01-01

    We identified genes encoding components of the Hap complex, CbHAP2, CbHAP3, and CbHAP5, as transcription factors regulating methanol-inducible gene expression in the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii. We found that the Cbhap2Δ, Cbhap3Δ, and Cbhap5Δ gene-disrupted strains showed severe growth defects on methanol but not on glucose and nonfermentable carbon sources such as ethanol and glycerol. In these disruptants, the transcriptional activities of methanol-inducible promoters were significantly decreased compared to those of the wild-type strain, indicating that CbHap2p, CbHap3p, and CbHap5p play indispensable roles in methanol-inducible gene expression. Further molecular and biochemical analyses demonstrated that CbHap2p, CbHap3p, and CbHap5p localized to the nucleus and bound to the promoter regions of methanol-inducible genes regardless of the carbon source, and heterotrimer formation was suggested to be necessary for binding to DNA. Unexpectedly, distinct from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Hap complex functioned in methanol-specific induction rather than glucose derepression in C. boidinii. Our results shed light on a novel function of the Hap complex in methanol-inducible gene expression in methylotrophic yeasts. PMID:25595445

  13. Forced engagement of a RNA/protein complex by a chemical inducer of dimerization to modulate gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Isabelle; Garneau, Philippe; Pelletier, Jerry

    2002-02-01

    A general strategy is described for forcing the engagement of an RNA/protein complex by using small-molecule ligands. A bivalent molecule was created by linking a protein-binding ligand to an RNA-binding ligand. On presentation of the chemical inducer of dimerization to the RNA by the protein, cooperative binding ensued, resulting in higher-affinity complexes. When the chemical inducer of dimerization was used to target the protein to an mRNA template, the resulting RNA/protein complex was sufficiently stable to inhibit mRNA translation. This approach provides a logic to modulate gene expression by using small-molecule ligands to recruit protein surfaces to mRNAs.

  14. A platinum complex that binds non-covalently to DNA and induces cell death via a different mechanism than cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Mendoza, Oscar; Duarte, Alexandra A; Mann, David J; Vilar, Ramon

    2013-05-01

    Cisplatin and some of its derivatives have been shown to be very successful anticancer agents. Their main mode of action has been proposed to be via covalent binding to DNA. However, one of the limitations of these drugs is their poor activity against some tumours due to intrinsic or acquired resistance. Therefore, there is interest in developing complexes with different binding modes and mode of action. Herein we present a novel platinum(ii)-terpyridine complex (1) which interacts non-covalently with DNA and induces cell death via a different mechanism than cisplatin. The interaction of this complex with DNA was studied by UV/Vis spectroscopic titrations, fluorescent indicator displacement (FID) assays and circular dichroism (CD) titrations. In addition, computational docking studies were carried out with the aim of establishing the complex's binding mode. These experimental and computational studies showed the complex to have an affinity constant for DNA of ∼10(4) M(-1), a theoretical free energy of binding of -10.83 kcal mol(-1) and selectivity for the minor groove of DNA. Long-term studies indicated that 1 did not covalently bind (or nick) DNA. The cancer cell antiproliferative properties of this platinum(ii) complex were probed in vitro against human and murine cell lines. Encouragingly the platinum(ii) complex displayed selective toxicity for the cancerous (U2OS and SH-SY5Y) and proliferating NIH 3T3 cell lines. Further cell based studies were carried out to establish the mode of action. Cellular uptake studies demonstrated that the complex is able to penetrate the cell membrane and localize to the nucleus, implying that genomic DNA could be a cellular target. Detailed immunoblotting studies in combination with DNA-flow cytometry showed that the platinum(ii) complex induced cell death in a manner consistent with necrosis.

  15. Zinc Induces Dimerization of the Class II Major Histocompatibility Complex Molecule That Leads to Cooperative Binding to a Superantigen

    SciTech Connect

    Li,H.; Zhao, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Z.; Eislele, L.; Mourad, W.

    2007-01-01

    Dimerization of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays an important role in the MHC biological function. Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived mitogen (MAM) is a superantigen that can activate large fractions of T cells bearing specific T cell receptor V{beta} elements. Here we have used structural, sedimentation, and surface plasmon resonance detection approaches to investigate the molecular interactions between MAM and the class II MHC molecule HLA-DR1 in the context of a hemagglutinin peptide-(306-318) (HA). Our results revealed that zinc ion can efficiently induce the dimerization of the HLA-DR1/HA complex. Because the crystal structure of the MAM/HLA-DR1/hemagglutinin complex in the presence of EDTA is nearly identical to the structure of the complex crystallized in the presence of zinc ion, Zn{sup 2+} is evidently not directly involved in the binding between MAM and HLA-DR1. Sedimentation and surface plasmon resonance studies further revealed that MAM binds the HLA-DR1/HA complex with high affinity in a 1:1 stoichiometry, in the absence of Zn{sup 2+}. However, in the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, a dimerized MAM/HLA-DR1/HA complex can arise through the Zn{sup 2+}-induced DR1 dimer. In the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, cooperative binding of MAM to the DR1 dimer was also observed.

  16. A novel ruthenium(II)-polypyridyl complex inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell apoptosis by impairing DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingyuan; Zhang, Zhao; Mei, Wenjie; Sun, Fenyong

    2014-08-01

    Ruthenium complexes are widely recognized as one of the most promising DNA damaging chemotherapeutic drugs. The main goal of this study was to explore the anticancer activity and underlying mechanisms of [Ru(phen)(2)(p-BrPIP)](ClO(4))(2), a novel chemically synthesized ruthenium (Ru) complex. To this end, we employed MTT assays to determine the anticancer activity of the complex, and performed single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) and Western blotting to evaluate DNA damage. Our results showed that the Ru(II)-poly complex caused severe DNA damage, possibly by downregulating key factors involved in DNA repair pathways, such as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and ring finger protein 8 (RNF8). In addition, this complex induced cell apoptosis by upregulating both p21 and p53. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the Ru(II)-poly complex exhibits antitumour activity by inducing cell apoptosis, which results from the accumulation of large amounts of unrepaired DNA damage.

  17. Glutaredoxin 2 Prevents H2O2-Induced Cell Apoptosis by Protecting Complex I Activity in the Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hongli; Xing, Kuiyi; Lou, Marjorie F.

    2010-01-01

    Glutaredoxin 2 (Grx2) belongs to the oxidoreductase family and is an isozyme of glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1) present in the mitochondria, however its function is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential anti-apoptotic function of Grx2 by examining its ability to protect complex I in the mitochondrial electron transport system using human lens epithelial cells as a model. We found that cells treated with 200 μM hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for 24 h exhibited decreased viability and became apoptotic with corresponding Bax up-regulation, Bcl-2 down-regulation, caspase 3 activation and mitochondrial cytochrome c leakage. Grx2 over-expression (OE) could protect cells against H2O2-induced damage while Grx2 knockdown (KD) showed the opposite effect. Under the same conditions, H2O2 treatment caused 50% inactivation of complex I activity in control cells (vector only), 75% in Grx2 KD cells but only 20% in Grx2 OE cells. This antiapoptotic function of Grx2 is specific as rotenone, a complex I specific inhibitor, could block this Grx2-mediated protection of complex I activity. Immunoprecipitation study also revealed that Grx2 co-precipitated with complex I in the mitochondrial lysate. Thus, the mechanism of Grx2 protection against H2O2-induced apoptosis is likely associated with its ability to preserve complex I. PMID:20547138

  18. Design and characterization of a novel lipid-DNA complex that resists serum-induced destabilization.

    PubMed

    Lian, Tianshun; Ho, Rodney J Y

    2003-12-01

    Ineffectiveness of cationic lipids to enhance DNA transfection has been attributed to serum-mediated dissociation and perhaps complement activation of lipid-DNA complexes. To overcome these problems, we have developed a novel lipid-DNA complex that greatly reduces serum-mediated dissociation. The complexes were prepared by mixing cationic liposomes containing 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane and dioleoylphosphatidyl-ethanolamine and DNA in ethanolic (20% v/v ethanol) solution containing 5% sucrose followed by dehydration via rotating evaporation. Upon hydration in H(2)O, the lipid-DNA complexes [ethanol-dried lipid-DNA (EDL) complexes] were formed. The complexes exhibit a low positive zeta potential and enhanced transfection efficiency in contrast to the suppressed efficiency detected with admixed lipid-DNA complexes in the presence of serum across several cell lines. This result may be attributed to the inability of serum to dissociate DNA from lipids in EDL complexes. Using displacement of ethidium bromide intercalation analysis, we found that in serum, only 50% of DNA was exposed in the EDL complexes, compared with 100% in the admixed lipid-DNA complexes. The EDL complexes also showed increased resistance to DNase digestion in the presence of negatively charged lipid, while reducing complement activation in serum. The EDL complexes may improve the transfection activity of lipid-DNA complexes in serum and, perhaps, in vivo.

  19. PET imaging of ischemia-induced impairment of mitochondrial complex I function in monkey brain

    PubMed Central

    Tsukada, Hideo; Ohba, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Shingo; Kanazawa, Masakatsu; Kakiuchi, Takeharu; Harada, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    To assess the capability of 18F-2-tert-butyl-4-chloro-5-{6-[2-(2-fluoroethoxy)-ethoxy]-pyridin-3-ylmethoxy}-2H-pyridazin-3-one (18F-BCPP-EF), a novel positron emission tomography (PET) probe for mitochondrial complex I (MC-I) activity, as a specific marker of ischemia-induced neuronal death without being disturbed by inflammation, translational research was conducted using an animal PET in ischemic brains of Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). Focal ischemia was induced by the right middle cerebral artery occlusion for 3 hours, then PET scans were conducted at Day-7 with 15O-gases for regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and regional cerebral metabolism of oxygen (rCMRO2), and 18F-BCPP-EF for MC-I with arterial blood sampling. On Day-8, the additional PET scans conducted with 11C-flumazenil (11C-FMZ) for central-type benzodiazepine receptors, 11C-PBR28 for translocator protein, and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) for regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglc). The total distribution volume (VT) values of 18F-BCPP-EF showed the significant reduction in MC-I activity in the damaged area at Day-7. When correlated with rCBF and rCMRO2, the VT values of 18F-BCPP-EF provided better correlation with rCMRO2 than with rCBF. In the inflammatory regions (region of interest, ROIPBR) of the ischemic hemisphere detected with 11C-PBR28, higher 18F-FDG uptake and lower VT of 18F-BCPP-EF, 11C-FMZ, and rCMRO2 than those in normal contralateral hemisphere were observed. These results strongly suggested that 18F-BCPP-EF could discriminate the neuronal damaged areas with neuroinflammation, where 18F-FDG could not owing to its high uptake into the activated microglia. PMID:24447952

  20. Plant host and sugar alcohol induced exopolysaccharide biosynthesis in the Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    PubMed

    Bartholdson, S Josefin; Brown, Alan R; Mewburn, Ben R; Clarke, David J; Fry, Stephen C; Campopiano, Dominic J; Govan, John R W

    2008-08-01

    The species that presently constitute the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) have multiple roles; they include soil and water saprophytes, bioremediators, and plant, animal and human pathogens. Since the first description of pathogenicity in the Bcc was based on sour skin rot of onion bulbs, this study returned to this plant host to investigate the onion-associated phenotype of the Bcc. Many Bcc isolates, which were previously considered to be non-mucoid, produced copious amounts of exopolysaccharide (EPS) when onion tissue was provided as the sole nutrient. EPS production was not species-specific, was observed in isolates from both clinical and environmental sources, and did not correlate with the ability to cause maceration of onion tissue. Chemical analysis suggested that the onion components responsible for EPS induction were primarily the carbohydrates sucrose, fructose and fructans. Additional sugars were investigated, and all alcohol sugars tested were able to induce EPS production, in particular mannitol and glucitol. To investigate the molecular basis for EPS biosynthesis, we focused on the highly conserved bce gene cluster thought to be involved in cepacian biosynthesis. We demonstrated induction of the bce gene cluster by mannitol, and found a clear correlation between the inability of representatives of the Burkholderia cenocepacia ET12 lineage to produce EPS and the presence of an 11 bp deletion within the bceB gene, which encodes a glycosyltransferase. Insertional inactivation of bceB in Burkholderia ambifaria AMMD results in loss of EPS production on sugar alcohol media. These novel and surprising insights into EPS biosynthesis highlight the metabolic potential of the Bcc and show that a potential virulence factor may not be detected by routine laboratory culture. Our results also highlight a potential hazard in the use of inhaled mannitol as an osmolyte to improve mucociliary clearance in individuals with cystic fibrosis.

  1. Everolimus induces Met inactivation by disrupting the FKBP12/Met complex

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Lucia; D'Amato, Valentina; Servetto, Alberto; Rosa, Roberta; Marciano, Roberta; Formisano, Luigi; Mauro, Concetta Di; Orsini, Roberta Clara; Cascetta, Priscilla; Ciciola, Paola; De Maio, Ana Paula; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia; Cosconati, Sandro; Bruno, Agostino; Randazzo, Antonio; Napolitano, Filomena; Montuori, Nunzia; Veneziani, Bianca Maria; Placido, Sabino De; Bianco, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a promising treatment strategy for several cancer types. Rapamycin derivatives such as everolimus are allosteric mTOR inhibitors acting through interaction with the intracellular immunophilin FKBP12, a prolyl isomerase with different cellular functions. Although mTOR inhibitors have significantly improved survival of different cancer patients, resistance and lack of predictive factors of response remain unsolved issues. To elucidate the mechanisms of resistance to everolimus, we evaluated Met activation in everolimus-sensitive/resistant human cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Biochemical and computational analyses were performed. Everolimus-resistant cells were xenografted into mice (10/group) and studied for their response to everolimus and Met inhibitors. The statistical significance of the in vitro results was evaluated by Student's t test. Everolimus reduced Met phosphorylation in everolimus-sensitive cells. This event was mediated by the formation of a Met-FKBP12 complex, which in turn is disrupted by everolimus. Aberrant Met activation in everolimus-resistant cells and overexpression of wild-type/mutant Met caused everolimus resistance. Pharmacological inhibition and RNA silencing of Met are effective in condition of everolimus resistance (P<0.01). In mice xenografted with everolimus-resistant cells, the combination of everolimus with the Met inhibitor PHA665752 reduced tumor growth and induced a statistically significant survival advantage (combination vs control P=0.0005). FKBP12 binding is required for full Met activation and everolimus can inhibit Met. Persistent Met activation might sustain everolimus resistance. These results identify a novel everolimus mechanism of action and suggest the development of clinical strategies based on Met inhibitors in everolimus-resistant cancers. PMID:27223077

  2. Activation of the Human MT Complex by Motion in Depth Induced by a Moving Cast Shadow

    PubMed Central

    Katsuyama, Narumi; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A moving cast shadow is a powerful monocular depth cue for motion perception in depth. For example, when a cast shadow moves away from or toward an object in a two-dimensional plane, the object appears to move toward or away from the observer in depth, respectively, whereas the size and position of the object are constant. Although the cortical mechanisms underlying motion perception in depth by cast shadow are unknown, the human MT complex (hMT+) is likely involved in the process, as it is sensitive to motion in depth represented by binocular depth cues. In the present study, we examined this possibility by using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. First, we identified the cortical regions sensitive to the motion of a square in depth represented via binocular disparity. Consistent with previous studies, we observed significant activation in the bilateral hMT+, and defined functional regions of interest (ROIs) there. We then investigated the activity of the ROIs during observation of the following stimuli: 1) a central square that appeared to move back and forth via a moving cast shadow (mCS); 2) a segmented and scrambled cast shadow presented beside the square (sCS); and 3) no cast shadow (nCS). Participants perceived motion of the square in depth in the mCS condition only. The activity of the hMT+ was significantly higher in the mCS compared with the sCS and nCS conditions. Moreover, the hMT+ was activated equally in both hemispheres in the mCS condition, despite presentation of the cast shadow in the bottom-right quadrant of the stimulus. Perception of the square moving in depth across visual hemifields may be reflected in the bilateral activation of the hMT+. We concluded that the hMT+ is involved in motion perception in depth induced by moving cast shadow and by binocular disparity. PMID:27597999

  3. Activation of the Human MT Complex by Motion in Depth Induced by a Moving Cast Shadow.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Narumi; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A moving cast shadow is a powerful monocular depth cue for motion perception in depth. For example, when a cast shadow moves away from or toward an object in a two-dimensional plane, the object appears to move toward or away from the observer in depth, respectively, whereas the size and position of the object are constant. Although the cortical mechanisms underlying motion perception in depth by cast shadow are unknown, the human MT complex (hMT+) is likely involved in the process, as it is sensitive to motion in depth represented by binocular depth cues. In the present study, we examined this possibility by using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. First, we identified the cortical regions sensitive to the motion of a square in depth represented via binocular disparity. Consistent with previous studies, we observed significant activation in the bilateral hMT+, and defined functional regions of interest (ROIs) there. We then investigated the activity of the ROIs during observation of the following stimuli: 1) a central square that appeared to move back and forth via a moving cast shadow (mCS); 2) a segmented and scrambled cast shadow presented beside the square (sCS); and 3) no cast shadow (nCS). Participants perceived motion of the square in depth in the mCS condition only. The activity of the hMT+ was significantly higher in the mCS compared with the sCS and nCS conditions. Moreover, the hMT+ was activated equally in both hemispheres in the mCS condition, despite presentation of the cast shadow in the bottom-right quadrant of the stimulus. Perception of the square moving in depth across visual hemifields may be reflected in the bilateral activation of the hMT+. We concluded that the hMT+ is involved in motion perception in depth induced by moving cast shadow and by binocular disparity.

  4. Mitochondrial fragmentation is an important cellular event induced by ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes in osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Yanxin; Fu, Xiaoyan; Li, Hong; Chen, Bolai; Guo, Yuhai; Su, Guoyi; Zhang, Hu; Ning, Feipeng; Lin, Yongpeng; Mei, Wenjie; Chen, Tianfeng

    2014-04-01

    A series of ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes were synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro anticancer activities. The results showed that ruthenium polypyridyl complexes, especially [Ru(bpy)2 (p-tFPIP)](2+) (2 a; bpy=bipyridine, tFPIP=2-(2-trifluoromethane phenyl)imidazole[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline), exhibited novel anticancer activity against human cancer cell lines, but with less toxicity to a human normal cell line. The results of flow cytometry and caspase activities analysis indicated that the 2 a-induced growth inhibition against MG-63 osteosarcoma cells was mainly caused by mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. DNA fragmentation and nuclear condensation as detected by TUNEL-DAPI co-staining further confirmed 2 a-induced apoptotic cell death. Further, fluorescence imaging revealed that ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes could target mitochondria to induce mitochondrial fragmentation, accompanied by depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential. Taken together, these findings suggest a potential application of theses ruthenium(II) complexes in the treatment of cancers.

  5. GSK3 inactivation is involved in mitochondrial complex IV defect in transforming growth factor (TGF) {beta}1-induced senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Hae-Ok; Jung, Hyun-Jung; Seo, Yong-Hak; Lee, Young-Kyoung; Hwang, Sung-Chul; Seong Hwang, Eun; Yoon, Gyesoon

    2012-09-10

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF {beta}1) induces Mv1Lu cell senescence by persistently producing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) through decreased complex IV activity. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of TGF {beta}1 on mitochondrial complex IV activity. TGF {beta}1 progressively phosphorylated the negative regulatory sites of both glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) {alpha} and {beta}, corresponding well to the intracellular ROS generation profile. Pre-treatment of N-acetyl cysteine, an antioxidant, did not alter this GSK3 phosphorylation (inactivation), whereas pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 by SB415286 significantly increased mitochondrial ROS, implying that GSK3 phosphorylation is an upstream event of the ROS generation. GSK3 inhibition by SB415286 decreased complex IV activity and cellular O{sub 2} consumption rate and eventually induced senescence of Mv1Lu cell. Similar results were obtained with siRNA-mediated knockdown of GSK3. Moreover, we found that GSK3 not only exists in cytosol but also in mitochondria of Mv1Lu cell and the mitochondrial GSK3 binds complex IV subunit 6b which has no electron carrier and is topologically located in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Involvement of subunit 6b in controlling complex IV activity and overall respiration rate was proved with siRNA-mediated knockdown of subunit 6b. Finally, TGF {beta}1 treatment decreased the binding of the subunit 6b to GSK3 and subunit 6b phosphorylation. Taken together, our results suggest that GSK3 inactivation is importantly involved in TGF {beta}1-induced complex IV defects through decreasing phosphorylation of the subunit 6b, thereby contributing to senescence-associated mitochondrial ROS generation.

  6. Experimental elucidation of vacancy complexes associated with hydrogen ion-induced splitting of bulk GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutanabbir, O.; Scholz, R.; Gösele, U.; Guittoum, A.; Jungmann, M.; Butterling, M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Anwand, W.; Egger, W.; Sperr, P.

    2010-03-01

    We present a detailed study of the thermal evolution of H ion-induced vacancy related complexes and voids in bulk GaN implanted under ion-cut conditions. By using transmission electron microscopy, we found that the damage band in as-implanted GaN is decorated with a high density of nanobubbles of ˜1-2nm in diameter. Variable energy Doppler broadening spectroscopy showed that this band contains vacancy clusters and voids. In addition to vacancy clusters, the presence of VGa , VGa-H2 , and VGaVN complexes was evidenced by pulsed low-energy positron lifetime spectroscopy. Subtle changes upon annealing in these vacancy complexes were also investigated. As a general trend, a growth in open-volume defects is detected in parallel to an increase in both size and density of nanobubbles. The observed vacancy complexes appear to be stable during annealing. However, for temperatures above 450°C , unusually large lifetimes were measured. These lifetimes are attributed to the formation of positronium in GaN. Since the formation of positronium is not possible in a dense semiconductor, our finding demonstrates the presence of sufficiently large open-volume defects in this temperature range. Based on the Tao-Eldrup model, the average lattice opening during thermal annealing was quantified. We found that a void diameter of 0.4 nm is induced by annealing at 600°C . The role of these complexes in the subsurface microcracking is discussed.

  7. Barrier-Free Intermolecular Proton Transfer Induced by Excess Electron Attachment to the Complex of Alanine with Uracil

    SciTech Connect

    Dabkowska, Iwona; Rak, Janusz; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Nilles, J.M.; Stokes, Sarah; Bowen, Kit H.

    2004-04-01

    The photoelectron spectrum of the uracil-alanine anionic complex (UA)- has been recorded with 2.540 eV photons. This spectrum reveals a broad feature with a maximum between 1.6-2.1 eV. The vertical electron detachment energy is too large to be attributed to an (UA)- anionic complex in which an intact uracil anion is solvated by alanine, or vice versa. The neutral and anionic complexes of uracil and alanine were studied at the B3LYP and second order Moeller-Plesset level of theory with 6-31++G** basis sets. The neutral complexes form cyclic hydrogen bonds and the three most stable neutral complexes are bound by 0.72, 0.61 and 0.57 eV. The electron hole in complexes of uracil with alaninie is localized on uracil, but the formation of a complex with alanine strongly modulates the vertical ionization energy of uracil. The theoretical results indicate that the excess electron in (UA)- occupies a p* orbital localized on uracil. The excess electron attachment to the complex can induce a barrier-free proton transfer (BFPT) from the carboxylic group of alanine to the O8 atom of uracil. As a result, the four most stable structures of the uracil-alanine anionic complex can be characterized as the neutral radical of hydrogenated uracil solvated by the anion of deprotonated alanine. Our current results for the anionic complex of uracil with alanine are similar to our previous results for the anion of uracil with glycine [Eur. Phys. J. D 20, 431 (2002)], and together they indicate that the BFPT process is not very sensitive to the nature of the amino acid's hydrophobic residual group. The BFPT to the O8 atom of uracil may be relevant to the damage suffered by nucleic acid bases due to exposure to low energy electrons.

  8. Anion-induced exchange interactions in binuclear complexes of Cu(II) with flexible hexadentate bispicolylamidrazone ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshnikov, Gleb V.; Minaev, Boris F.; Baryshnikova, Alina A.; Ågren, Hans

    2016-09-01

    Two recently synthesized copper(II) complexes with spacer-armed bispicolylamidrazone ligands have been theoretically studied at the density functional theory (DFT) level accounting for empirical dispersion correction and intrinsic anionic environment by perchlorate ions. The exchange parameter between the open-shell singlet and triplet states of the studied complexes has been estimated by broken symmetry DFT calculations. The mechanism of spin-spin exchange interaction between the unpaired electrons via the σ-bond aliphatic chain (Gusev et al., 2015) is confirmed. Instead, a anion-induced mechanism is proposed which means that the anionic grid participates in the exchange interaction between the unpaired electrons.

  9. [The dose dependent effect of glycosaminoglycan peptide complex on corticosteroid-induced disordered metabolism in cartilage tissue of rats].

    PubMed

    Annefeld, M

    1989-01-01

    Systemic corticosteroid treatment induces morphological and functional changes in the articular cartilage similar to those in human osteoarthritis. In animal experiments the dexamethasone-induced inhibition of chondrocyte metabolism can be reduced in a dose-related manner by concomitant treatment with glycosaminoglycan-peptide complexes (GP-C)***). The metabolic changes in cartilage tissues of the joint and Processus Xiphoideus measured quantitatively by 35S-sulphate incorporation are comparable. The results indicate that GP-C could also have a dose-related effect on human osteoarthritic cartilage.

  10. Proton exchange in acid-base complexes induced by reaction coordinates with heavy atom motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Saman; Taghikhani, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    We extend previous work on nitric acid-ammonia and nitric acid-alkylamine complexes to illustrate that proton exchange reaction coordinates involve the rocking motion of the base moiety in many double hydrogen-bonded gas phase strong acid-strong base complexes. The complexes studied involve the biologically and atmospherically relevant glycine, formic, acetic, propionic, and sulfuric acids with ammonia/alkylamine bases. In these complexes, the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies associated with the proton exchange transition states are <400 cm-1. This contrasts with widely studied proton exchange reactions between symmetric carboxylic acid dimers or asymmetric DNA base pair and their analogs where the reaction coordinate is localized in proton motions and the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies for the transition states are >1100 cm-1. Calculations on complexes of these acids with water are performed for comparison. Variations of normal vibration modes along the reaction coordinate in the complexes are described.

  11. A novel insulin mimetic vanadium-flavonol complex: synthesis, characterization and in vivo evaluation in STZ-induced rats.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Subramanian Iyyam; Subramanian, Sorimuthu Pillai; Kandaswamy, Muthusamy

    2013-05-01

    Since 1985, when Heyliger et al., first demonstrated a serendipitous discovery that oral administration of 0.8 mg/ml of sodium orthovanadate in drinking water to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats resulted in normoglycemia, numerous extensive studies have been pursued on the anti-diabetic and insulinomimetic actions of vanadium. The acceptance of vanadium compounds as promising therapeutic antidiabetic agents has been slowed due to the concern for chronic toxicity associated with vanadium accumulation. In order to circumvent the toxic effects of vanadium, we have taken up a combinational approach wherein a novel vanadium-flavonol complex was synthesized, characterized and its toxic as well as insulin mimetic potential was evaluated in STZ-induced experimental diabetes in rats. The results indicate that the complex is non-toxic and possess anti-diabetic activity.

  12. Investigating Storm-Induced Total Water Levels on Complex Barred Beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, N.; Ruggiero, P.; Walstra, D.

    2013-12-01

    Water levels in coastal environments are not static, but rather vary from a range of factors including mean sea level, tides, storm surge, and wave runup. Cumulatively these superimposed factors determine the total water level (TWL), the extent of which has major implications for coastal erosion and inundation during periods of high energy. Storm-induced, super-elevated water levels pose a threat to low lying coastal regions, as clearly demonstrated by recent events such as Hurricanes Sandy and Katrina. For this reason, the ability to accurately predict the TWL is crucial for both emergency managers and coastal planners. While some components of TWL are well understood (e.g., tides) there is still significant uncertainty in predicting runup, a process that can be a major contributor to instantaneous TWLs. Traditionally, empirical relationships derived from observational field data have been used to estimate runup, including wave setup and both incident and infragravity swash (Stockdon et al., 2006). While these formulations have shown skill in predicting the runup extent on natural beaches, these equations consider only the most basic contributing factors - namely the mean foreshore beach slope, the offshore wave height, and offshore wave period. Not included in these empirical estimates is the role of nearshore morphology on TWLs. However, it has long been recognized that nearshore sandbars act as natural barriers to coastal erosion during storm events by dissipating wave energy far from the beach face. Nonetheless, the influence of nearshore morphology on inner surf zone processes, including wave runup, is poorly understood. Recent pioneering studies (eg., Soldini et al., 2013 and Stephens et al., 2011) have explored the role of simple nearshore features (single Gaussian bars) on swash processes. Many locations in the world, however, are characterized by more complex morphologies such as multiple barred systems. Further, in many such places, including Columbia

  13. Complex trajectories of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem shifts caused by multiple human-induced environmental stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Yu, Zicheng; Moeller, Robert E.; Bebout, Gray E.

    2008-09-01

    Large shifts in the isotopic compositions of organic matter (OM) in lake sediments, over the last few hundred years, are commonly interpreted as representing changes in photosynthetic productivity corresponding to eutrophication or in the input of terrestrial OM due to human disturbances. Based on multiple-proxy data (C:N ratio, δ 13C and δ 15N of OM, δ 13C of calcite, lithology and fossil pollen) from a 700-year sediment core at White Lake, New Jersey (USA), we propose a new explanation that relates these large shifts in OM δ 13C and δ 15N to human-induced changes in aquatic OM producers. Combined records of geochronology, fossil pollen and lithology from White Lake reveal that the upland forest was cleared by European settlers for farmland beginning around 1745 A.D. and has gradually reforested since 1930 after the abandonment of the farmlands. For the pre-agricultural period, OM had relatively constant but extremely low δ 13C VPDB (-35.8 to -34.5‰) and δ 15N Air (-3.5 to -2.5‰) and high atomic C:N ratios (13.7 to 16.7), indicating a stable anoxic lake environment with prominent microbial producers. Following the human disturbance (since 1745), high OM mass accumulation rates and abundances of the green alga Pediastrum indicate an increase in aquatic photosynthetic productivity due to enhanced nutrient input from disturbed uplands. However, carbonate δ 13C remains constant or even decreases during this period, implying that increasing productivity did not elevate the δ 13C of dissolved inorganic carbon and thus cannot explain the observed large increase in OM δ 13C (7.4‰) and δ 15N (5.8‰) over this period. Instead, δ 13C, δ 15N and C:N ratios of OM and differences in δ 13C between calcite and OM suggest that the large increase in OM δ 13C and δ 15N can be attributed to a human-induced ecological shift in the predominant organic source from anaerobic bacteria to autotrophic phytoplankton. During the post-agricultural period, mass

  14. Specific Genetic Immunotherapy Induced by Recombinant Vaccine Alpha-Fetoprotein-Heat Shock Protein 70 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Lin, Huanping; Wang, Qiaoxia

    Purposes: To construct a recombinant vaccine alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-heat shock protein (HSP70) complex, and study its ability to induce specific CTL response and its protective effect against AFP-producing tumor. Material/Methods: A recombinant vaccine was constructed by conjugating mouse alpha-fetoprotein to heat shock protein 70. By way of intracutaneous injection, mice were primed and boosted with recombinant vaccine mAFP/HSP70, whereas single mAFP or HSP70 injection as controls. The ELISPOT and ELISA were used to measure the frequency of cells producing the cytokine IFN-γ in splenocytes and the level of anti-AFP antibody of serum from immunized mice respectively. In vivo tumor challenge were carried out to assess the immune effect of the recombinant vaccine. Results: By recombinant mAFP/HSP70 vaccine immunization, the results of ELISPOT and ELISA showed that the number of splenic cells producing IFN-γ and the level of anti-AFP antibody of serum were significantly higher in mAFP/HSP70 group than those in mAFP and HSP70 groups (108.50±11.70 IFN-γ spots/106 cells vs 41.60±10.40 IFN-γ spots/106 cells, 7.32±3.14 IFN-γ spots/106 cells, P<0.01; 156.32±10.42 μg/mL vs 66.52±7.35 μg/mL, 5.73±2.89 μg/mL, P<0.01). The tumor volume in mAFP/HSP70 group was significantly smaller than that in mAFP and HSP70 groups (42.44±7.14 mm3 vs 392.23±12.46 mm3, 838.63±13.84 mm3, P<0.01). Conclusions: The study further confirmed the function of heat shock protein 70's immune adjuvant. Sequential immunization with recombinant mAFP/HSP70 vaccine could generate effective antitumor immunity on AFP-producing tumor. The recombined mAFP/HSP70 vaccine may be suitable for serving as an immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  15. Wave-induced upper-ocean mixing in a climate model of intermediate complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babanin, Alexander V.; Ganopolski, Andrey; Phillips, William R. C.

    Climate modelling, to a great extent, is based on simulating air-sea interactions at larger scales. Small-scale interactions and related phenomena, such as wind-generated waves and wave-induced turbulence are sub-grid processes for such models and therefore cannot be simulated explicitly. In the meantime, the waves play the principal role in the upper-ocean mixing. This role is usually parameterized, mostly to account for the wave-breaking turbulence and to describe downward diffusion of such turbulence. The main purpose of the paper is to demonstrate that an important physical mechanism, that is the ocean mixing due to waves, is presently missing in the climate models, whereas the effect of this mixing is significant. It is argued that the mixing role of the surface waves is not limited to the mere transfer of the wind stress and energy across the ocean interface by means of breaking and surface currents. The waves facilitate two processes in the upper-ocean which can deliver turbulence to the depths of the order of 100 m directly, rather than diffusing it from the surface. The first process is due to capacity of the waves to generate turbulence, unrelated to the wave breaking, at all depths where the wave orbital motion is significant. The second process is Langmuir circulation, triggered by the waves. Such wave-controlled mixing should cause seasonal variations of the mixed-layer depth, which regulates the thermodynamic balance between the ocean and atmosphere. In the present paper, these variations are parameterized in terms of the global winds. The variable mixed-layer depth is then introduced in the climate model of intermediated complexity CLIMBER-2 with a purpose of reproducing the pre-industrial climate. Comparisons are conducted with the NRL global atlas of the mixed layer, and performance of the wave-mixing parameterisations was found satisfactory in circumstances where the mixing is expected to be dominated by the wind-generated waves. It is shown that

  16. Atypical behavior in the electron capture induced dissociation of biologically relevant transition metal ion complexes of the peptide hormone oxytocin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinnijenhuis, Anne J.; Mihalca, Romulus; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2006-07-01

    Doubly protonated ions of the disulfide bond containing nonapeptide hormone oxytocin and oxytocin complexes with different transition metal ions, that have biological relevance under physiological conditions, were subjected to electron capture dissociation (ECD) to probe their structural features in the gas phase. Although, all the ECD spectra were strikingly different, typical ECD behavior was observed for complexes of the nonapeptide hormone oxytocin with Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+, i.e., abundant c/z' and a'/y backbone cleavages and ECD characteristic S-S and S-C bond cleavages were observed. We propose that, although in the oxytocin-transition metal ion complexes the metal ions serve as the main initial capture site, the captured electron is transferred to other sites in the complex to form a hydrogen radical, which drives the subsequent typical ECD fragmentations. The complex of oxytocin with Cu2+ displayed noticeably different ECD behavior. The fragment ions were similar to fragment ions typically observed with low-energy collision induced dissociation (CID). We propose that the electrons captured by the oxytocin-Cu2+ complex might be favorably involved in reducing the Cu2+ metal ion to Cu+. Subsequent energy redistribution would explain the observed low-energy CID-type fragmentations. Electron capture resulted also in quite different specific cleavage sites for the complexes of oxytocin with Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+. This is an indication for structural differences in these complexes possibly linked to their significantly different biological effects on oxytocin-receptor binding, and suggests that ECD may be used to study subtle structural differences in transition metal ion-peptide complexes.

  17. Self-induced "electroclick" immobilization of a copper complex onto self-assembled monolayers on a gold electrode.

    PubMed

    Gomila, Antoine; Le Poul, Nicolas; Cosquer, Nathalie; Kerbaol, Jean-Michel; Noël, Jean-Marc; Reddy, Madhusudana T; Jabin, Ivan; Reinaud, Olivia; Conan, Francoise; Le Mest, Yves

    2010-12-28

    We report the self-induced "electroclick" immobilization of the [Cu(II)(6-ethynyl-TMPA)(H(2)O)](2+) complex, by its simple electro-reduction, onto a mixed azidoundodecane-/decane-thiol modified gold electrode. The redox response of the grafted [Cu(II/I)(TMPA)] at the modified electrode is fully reversible indicating no Cu coordination change and a fast electron transfer.

  18. The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex regulates myocardin-induced smooth muscle-specific gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiliang; Zhang, Min; Fang, Hong; El-Mounayri, Omar; Rodenberg, Jennifer M.; Imbalzano, Anthony N.; Herring, B. Paul

    2009-01-01

    Objective Transcription regulatory complexes comprising myocardin and serum response factor (SRF) are critical for the transcriptional regulation of many smooth muscle-specific genes. However, little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate the activity of these complexes. In the current study, we investigated the role of SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes in regulating the myogenic activity of myocardin. Methods and Results We found that both Brg1 and Brm are required for maintaining expression of several smooth muscle-specific genes in primary cultures of aortic smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, the ability of myocardin to induce expression of smooth muscle-specific genes is abrogated in cells expressing dominant negative Brg1. In SW13 cells, that lack endogenous Brg1 and Brm1, myocardin is unable to induce expression of smooth muscle-specific genes. Whereas, reconstitution of wild type, or bromodomain mutant forms Brg1 or Brm1, into SW13 cells restored their responsiveness to myocardin. SWI/SNF complexes were found to be required for myocardin to increase SRF binding to the promoters of smooth muscle-specific genes. Brg1 and Brm directly bind to the N-terminus of myocardin, in vitro, through their ATPase domains and Brg1 forms a complex with SRF and myocardin in vivo in smooth muscle cells. Conclusion These data demonstrate that the ability of myocardin to induce smooth muscle-specific gene expression is dependent on its interaction with SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes. PMID:19342595

  19. DNA damage and replication stress induced transcription of RNR genes is dependent on the Ccr4–Not complex

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Klaas W.; Winkler, G. Sebastiaan; Timmers, H. Th. Marc

    2005-01-01

    Genetic experiments have indicated a role for the Ccr4–Not complex in the response to hydroxyurea (HU) induced replication stress and ionizing radiation in yeast. This response includes transcriptional induction of the four genes constituting the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) enzymatic complex, RNR1-4 and degradation of its inhibitor, Sml1p. The Ccr4–Not complex has originally been described as a negative regulator of RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcription, but it has also been implicated in mRNA turnover and protein ubiquitination. We investigated the mechanism of the HU sensitivity conferred by mutation of CCR4-NOT genes. We found that the ubiquitin protein ligase activity of Not4p does not play a role in HU induced Sml1p degradation. We show, however, that the HU sensitivity of ccr4-not mutant strains correlated very well with a defect in accumulation of RNR2, RNR3 and RNR4 mRNA after HU or methyl-methane sulfonate (MMS) treatment. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments show that TBP, pol II and Set1p recruitment to the activated RNR3 locus is defective in cells lacking NOT4. Moreover, RNR3-promoter activity is not induced by HU in these cells. Our experiments show that induction of RNR gene transcription is defective in ccr4-not mutant strains, providing an explanation for their sensitivity to HU. PMID:16275785

  20. Death receptor-induced apoptosis reveals a novel interplay between the chromosomal passenger complex and CENP-C during interphase.

    PubMed

    Faragher, Alison J; Sun, Xiao-Ming; Butterworth, Michael; Harper, Nick; Mulheran, Mike; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Earnshaw, William C; Cohen, Gerald M

    2007-04-01

    Despite the fact that the chromosomal passenger complex is well known to regulate kinetochore behavior in mitosis, no functional link has yet been established between the complex and kinetochore structure. In addition, remarkably little is known about how the complex targets to centromeres. Here, in a study of caspase-8 activation during death receptor-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, we have found that cleaved caspase-8 rapidly translocates to the nucleus and that this translocation is correlated with loss of the centromere protein (CENP)-C, resulting in extensive disruption of centromeres. Caspase-8 activates cytoplasmic caspase-7, which is likely to be the primary caspase responsible for cleavage of CENP-C and INCENP, a key chromosomal passenger protein. Caspase-mediated cleavage of CENP-C and INCENP results in their mislocalization and the subsequent mislocalization of Aurora B kinase. Our results demonstrate that the chromosomal passenger complex is displaced from centromeres as a result of caspase activation. Furthermore, mutation of the primary caspase cleavage sites of INCENP and CENP-C and expression of noncleavable CENP-C or INCENP prevent the mislocalization of the passenger complex after caspase activation. Our studies provide the first evidence for a functional interplay between the passenger complex and CENP-C.

  1. Discovery of a dual-targeting organometallic ruthenium complex with high activity inducing early stage apoptosis of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Jun; Zhang, Erlong; Zhao, Yao; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Yang; Lin, Yu; Wang, Zhaoying; Luo, Qun; Wu, Kui; Wang, Fuyi

    2015-12-01

    Ruthenium based complexes are promising antitumour candidates due to their lower toxicity and better water-solubility compared to the platinum antitumour complexes. An epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been found to be overexpressed in a large set of tumour cells. In this work, a series of organoruthenium complexes containing EGFR-inhibiting 4-anilinoquinazoline pharmacophores were synthesised and characterised. These complexes exhibited excellent inhibitory activity against EGFR and high affinity to interact with DNA via minor groove binding, featuring dual-targeting properties. In vitro screening demonstrated that the as-prepared ruthenium complexes are anti-proliferating towards a series of cancer cell lines, in particular the non-small-cell lung cancer cell line A549. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and fluorescence microscopy revealed that the most active complex 3 induced much more early-stage cell apoptosis than its cytotoxic arene ruthenium analogue and the EGFR-inhibiting 4-anilinoquinazolines, verifying the synergetic effect of the two mono-functional pharmacophores.

  2. Surface-Induced Dissociation of Protein Complexes in a Hybrid Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Zhou, Mowei; Gilbert, Joshua D; Wolff, Jeremy J; Somogyi, Árpád; Pedder, Randall E; Quintyn, Royston S; Morrison, Lindsay J; Easterling, Michael L; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2017-01-03

    Mass spectrometry continues to develop as a valuable tool in the analysis of proteins and protein complexes. In protein complex mass spectrometry studies, surface-induced dissociation (SID) has been successfully applied in quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) instruments. SID provides structural information on noncovalent protein complexes that is complementary to other techniques. However, the mass resolution of Q-TOF instruments can limit the information that can be obtained for protein complexes by SID. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) provides ultrahigh resolution and ultrahigh mass accuracy measurements. In this study, an SID device was designed and successfully installed in a hybrid FT-ICR instrument in place of the standard gas collision cell. The SID-FT-ICR platform has been tested with several protein complex systems (homooligomers, a heterooligomer, and a protein-ligand complex, ranging from 53 to 85 kDa), and the results are consistent with data previously acquired on Q-TOF platforms, matching predictions from known protein interface information. SID fragments with the same m/z but different charge states are well-resolved based on distinct spacing between adjacent isotope peaks, and the addition of metal cations and ligands can also be isotopically resolved with the ultrahigh mass resolution available in FT-ICR.

  3. Characterisation of senescence-induced changes in light harvesting complex II and photosystem I complex of thylakoids of Cucumis sativus cotyledons: age induced association of LHCII with photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jogadhenu Syama Sundara; Baig, Masroor A; Bhagwat, Anil S; Mohanty, Prasanna

    2003-02-01

    Structure and function of chloroplasts are known to after during senescence. The senescence-induced specific changes in light harvesting antenna of photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI) were investigated in Cucumis cotyledons. Purified light harvesting complex II (LHCII) and photosystem I complex were isolated from 6-day non-senescing and 27-day senescing Cucumis cotyledons. The chlorophyll a/b ratio of LHCII obtained from 6-day-old control cotyledons and their absorption, chlorophyll a fluorescence emission and the circular dichroism (CD) spectral properties were comparable to the LHCII preparations from other plants such as pea and spinach. The purified LHCII obtained from 27-day senescing cotyledons had a Chl a/b ratio of 1.25 instead of 1.2 as with 6-day LHCII and also exhibited significant changes in the visible CD spectrum compared to that of 6-day LHCII, indicating some specific alterations in the organisation of chlorophylls of LHCII. The light harvesting antenna of photosystems are likely to be altered due to aging. The room temperature absorption spectrum of LHCII obtained from 27-day senescing cotyledons showed changes in the peak positions. Similarly, comparison of 77K chlorophyll a fluorescence emission characteristics of LHCII preparation from senescing cotyledons with that of control showed a small shift in the peak position and the alteration in the emission profile, which is suggestive of possible changes in energy transfer within LHCII chlorophylls. Further, the salt induced aggregation of LHCII samples was lower, resulting in lower yields of LHCII from 27-day cotyledons than from normal cotyledons. Moreover, the PSI preparations of 6-day cotyledons showed Chl a/b ratios of 5 to 5.5, where as the PSI sample of 27-day cotyledons had a Chl a/b ratio of 2.9 suggesting LHCII association with PSI. The absorption, fluorescence emission and visible CD spectral measurements as well as the polypeptide profiles of 27-day cotyledon-PSI complexes

  4. The Dictyostelium prestalk inducer differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) triggers unexpectedly complex global phosphorylation changes

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, Chris; Urbaniak, Michael D.; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Williams, Jeffrey G.

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) is a polyketide that induces Dictyostelium amoebae to differentiate as prestalk cells. We performed a global quantitative screen for phosphorylation changes that occur within the first minutes after addition of DIF-1, using a triple-label SILAC approach. This revealed a new world of DIF-1–controlled signaling, with changes in components of the MAPK and protein kinase B signaling pathways, components of the actinomyosin cytoskeletal signaling networks, and a broad range of small GTPases and their regulators. The results also provide evidence that the Ca2+/calmodulin–dependent phosphatase calcineurin plays a role in DIF-1 signaling to the DimB prestalk transcription factor. At the global level, DIF-1 causes a major shift in the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation equilibrium toward net dephosphorylation. Of interest, many of the sites that are dephosphorylated in response to DIF-1 are phosphorylated in response to extracellular cAMP signaling. This accords with studies that suggest an antagonism between the two inducers and also with the rapid dephosphorylation of the cAMP receptor that we observe in response to DIF-1 and with the known inhibitory effect of DIF-1 on chemotaxis to cAMP. All MS data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001555. PMID:25518940

  5. Xenon difluoride induced aryl iodide reductive elimination: a simple access to difluoropalladium(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Kaspi, Ariela W; Yahav-Levi, Anette; Goldberg, Israel; Vigalok, Arkadi

    2008-01-07

    Palladium(II) aryliodo complexes bearing chelating diphosphine ligands react with XeF2, giving iodoarene and rare palladium(II) difluoro complexes. The reaction is general with regard to the aryl group, with even C6F5-I undergoing facile reductive elimination from a Pd center.

  6. Having excess levels of PCSK9 is not sufficient to induce complex formation between PCSK9 and the LDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Catherine J; Adcock, Audrey F; Agina-Obu, DaTonye I; Lopez, Dayami

    2014-03-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin-9 (PCSK9) acts mainly by forming complexes with the LDL receptor at the cell surface, which are then degraded in the lysosome. Studies were performed to determine whether excess levels of PCSK9 was sufficient to induce PCSK9/LDL receptor complex formation in human hepatocyte-like C3A cells. It was demonstrated using ELISA that instead of considering the overall levels of PCSK9 protein that is produced in response to certain treatment, what is critical is how much PCSK9 is actually capable of forming complexes. Despite the high levels, most of the PCSK9 produced as a result of incubating cells with a medium supplemented with BD™ MITO+ serum extender (MITO+ medium) appeared to be inhibited by a secreted factor. Having lower levels of PCSK9/LDL receptor complexes did not prevent an increase in the degradation rate of LDL receptors in MITO+ medium as compared to fetal bovine serum (FBS) containing medium (Regular medium), an effect that did not correlate with an increase in protein levels of the inducible degrader of LDL receptors (IDOL), as demonstrated using Western blotting analysis. Additional studies are required to determine the exact mechanism(s) for the degradation of the LDL receptor and/or to identify the secreted inhibitor of PCSK9.

  7. Structures of DNA Polymerase Mispaired DNA Termini Transitioning to Pre-catalytic Complexes Support an Induced-Fit Fidelity Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Batra, Vinod K; Beard, William A; Pedersen, Lars C; Wilson, Samuel H

    2016-11-01

    High-fidelity DNA synthesis requires that polymerases display a strong preference for right nucleotide insertion. When the wrong nucleotide is inserted, the polymerase deters extension from the mismatched DNA terminus. Twenty-three crystallographic structures of DNA polymerase β with terminal template-primer mismatches were determined as binary DNA and ternary pre-catalytic substrate complexes. These structures indicate that the mismatched termini adopt various distorted conformations that attempt to satisfy stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions. The binary complex structures indicate an induced strain in the mismatched template nucleotide. Addition of a non-hydrolyzable incoming nucleotide stabilizes the templating nucleotide with concomitant strain in the primer terminus. Several dead-end ternary complex structures suggest that DNA synthesis might occur as the enzyme transitions from an open to a closed complex. The structures are consistent with an induced-fit mechanism where a mismatched terminus is misaligned relative to the correct incoming nucleotide to deter or delay further DNA synthesis.

  8. Zolpidem Induced Sleep-related Eating and Complex Behaviors in a Patient with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Min; Shin, Hyun-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Zolpidem-induced sleep-related complex behaviors (SRCB) with anterograde amnesia have been reported. We describe herein a case in which the development of zolpidem-induced sleep-related eating disorder (SRED) and SRCB was strongly suspected. A 71-year-old Korean male was admitted to the Department of Psychiatry due to his repetitive SRED and SRCB with anterograde amnesia, which he reported as having occurred since taking zolpidem. The patient also had restless legs syndrome (RLS) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). His baseline serum iron level was low at admission. Zolpidem discontinuation resulted in the immediate disappearance of his SRED, but did not affect his RLS symptoms. These symptoms rapidly improved after adding a single i.v. iron injection once daily, and so he was discharged to day-clinic treatment. These findings indicate that zolpidem can induce SRCB. Although the pathophysiology of zolpidem-induced SRED and other SRCB remains unclear, clinicians should carefully monitor for the potential induction of complex behaviors associated with zolpidem in patients with comorbid RLS or OSA. PMID:27489385

  9. Ror2/Frizzled Complex Mediates Wnt5a-Induced AP-1 Activation by Regulating Dishevelled Polymerization▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nishita, Michiru; Itsukushima, Sumiyo; Nomachi, Akira; Endo, Mitsuharu; Wang, ZhiChao; Inaba, Daisuke; Qiao, Sen; Takada, Shinji; Kikuchi, Akira; Minami, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase Ror2 acts as a receptor or coreceptor for Wnt5a to mediate Wnt5a-induced activation of the Wnt/JNK pathway and inhibition of the β-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt pathway. However, little is known about how Ror2 cooperates with another receptor component(s) to mediate Wnt5a signaling. We show here that Ror2 regulates Wnt5a-induced polymerization of Dishevelled (Dvl) and that this Ror2-mediated regulation of Dvl is independent of the cytoplasmic region of Ror2. Ror2 can associate with Frizzled7 (Fz7) via its extracellular cysteine-rich domain to form a receptor complex that is required for the regulation of Dvl and activation of the AP-1 promoter after Wnt5a stimulation. Suppressed expression of Fz7 indeed results in the inhibition of Wnt5a-induced polymerization of Dvl and AP-1 activation. Interestingly, both the DIX and the DEP domains of Dvl are indispensable for Dvl polymerization and subsequent AP-1 activation after Wnt5a stimulation. We further show that polymerized Dvl is colocalized with Rac1 and that suppressed expression of Rac1 inhibits Wnt5a-induced AP-1 activation. Collectively, our results indicate that Ror2/Fz receptor complex plays an important role in the Wnt5a/Rac1/AP-1 pathway by regulating the polymerization of Dvl. PMID:20457807

  10. Cysteine dietary supplementation reverses the decrease in mitochondrial ROS production at complex I induced by methionine restriction.

    PubMed

    Gomez, A; Gomez, J; Lopez Torres, M; Naudi, A; Mota-Martorell, N; Pamplona, R; Barja, G

    2015-06-01

    It has been described that dietary cysteine reverses many of the beneficial changes induced by methionine restriction in aging rodents. In this investigation male Wistar rats were subjected to diets low in methionine, supplemented with cysteine, or simultaneously low in methionine and supplemented with cysteine. The results obtained in liver showed that cysteine supplementation reverses the decrease in mitochondrial ROS generation induced by methionine restriction at complex I. Methionine restriction also decreased various markers of oxidative and non-oxidative stress on mitochondrial proteins which were not reversed by cysteine. Instead, cysteine supplementation also lowered protein damage in association with decreases in mTOR activation. The results of the present study add the decrease in mitochondrial ROS production to the various beneficial changes induced by methionine restriction that are reversed by cysteine dietary supplementation.

  11. Chemical Swarming: Depending on Concentration, an Amphiphilic Ruthenium Polypyridyl Complex Induces Cell Death via Two Different Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Siewert, Bianka; van Rixel, Vincent H. S.; van Rooden, Eva J.; Hopkins, Samantha L.; Moester, Miriam J. B.; Ariese, Freek; Siegler, Maxime A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The crystal structure and in vitro cytotoxicity of the amphiphilic ruthenium complex [3](PF6)2 are reported. Complex [3](PF6)2 contains a Ru−S bond that is stable in the dark in cell‐growing medium, but is photosensitive. Upon blue‐light irradiation, complex [3](PF6)2 releases the cholesterol–thioether ligand 2 and an aqua ruthenium complex [1](PF6)2. Although ligand 2 and complex [1](PF6)2 are by themselves not cytotoxic, complex [3](PF6)2 was unexpectedly found to be as cytotoxic as cisplatin in the dark, that is, with micromolar effective concentrations (EC50), against six human cancer cell lines (A375, A431, A549, MCF‐7, MDA‐MB‐231, and U87MG). Blue‐light irradiation (λ=450 nm, 6.3 J cm−2) had little influence on the cytotoxicity of [3](PF6)2 after 6 h of incubation time, but it increased the cytotoxicity of the complex by a factor 2 after longer (24 h) incubation. Exploring the unexpected biological activity of [3](PF6)2 in the dark elucidated an as‐yet unknown bifaceted mode of action that depended on concentration, and thus, on the aggregation state of the compound. At low concentration, it acts as a monomer, inserts into the membrane, and can deliver [1]2+ inside the cell upon blue‐light activation. At higher concentrations (>3–5 μm), complex [3](PF6)2 forms supramolecular aggregates that induce non‐apoptotic cell death by permeabilizing cell membranes and extracting lipids and membrane proteins. PMID:27373895

  12. Immune complex induced pancreatitis: effect of BN 52021, a selective antagonist of platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Jancar, S; De Giaccobi, G; Mariano, M; Mencia-Huerta, J M; Sirois, P; Braquet, P

    1988-05-01

    A model of acute pancreatitis was developed by induction of an immune complex mediated hypersensitivity reaction in rats. This acute inflammatory reaction was characterized by intense interstitial edema, neutrophil infiltration and margination, and congestion of small vessels whereas serum amylase levels remained unchanged. Microscopic examination of the pancreatic tissue revealed the presence of immune complex deposition around blood vessels and ducts. Vascular permeability, as measured by Evan's blue extravasation increased by 6 fold. In addition, circulating platelets dropped to 50% of normal levels. Injection of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the peritoneal cavity of rats also produced an increase in vascular permeability in the pancreas. A selective PAF-antagonist, BN 52021 reduced by approximately 50% the increase in vascular permeability produced by immune complex in the pancreas as well as that elicited by intraperitoneal injection of PAF. These results suggest that PAF plays a role in the pathological manifestations of immune complex-mediated pancreatitis.

  13. Leishmania pifanoi Proteoglycolipid Complex P8 Induces Macrophage Cytokine Production through Toll-Like Receptor 4▿

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Shanta M.; Colmenares, Maria; Pestana, Karen Goldsmith; McMahon-Pratt, Diane

    2008-01-01

    The P8 proteoglycolipid complex (P8 PGLC) is a glyconjugate expressed by Leishmania mexicana complex parasites. We previously have shown that vaccination with P8 PGLC provides protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis in susceptible BALB/c mice. However, the biological importance of this complex remains unknown. Here we show that P8 PGLC localizes to the surface of Leishmania pifanoi amastigotes and that upon exposure to macrophages, P8 PGLC binds and induces inflammatory cytokine and chemokine mRNAs such as tumor necrosis factor alpha and RANTES early after stimulation. Our studies indicate that cytokine and chemokine induction is dependent upon Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Interestingly, key inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (such as interleukin-6 [IL-6], macrophage inflammatory protein 1β, and beta interferon [IFN-β]) that can be induced through TLR4 activation were not induced or only slightly upregulated by P8 PGLC. Activation by P8 PGLC does not occur in the presence of TLR4 alone and requires both CD14 and myeloid differentiation protein 2 for signaling; this requirement may be responsible for the limited TLR4 response. This is the first characterization of a TLR4 ligand for Leishmania. In vitro experiments indicate that L. pifanoi amastigotes induce lower levels of cytokines in macrophages in the absence of TLR4; however, notably higher IL-10/IFN-γ ratios were found for TLR4-deficient mice than for BALB/c mice. Further, increased levels of parasites persist in BALB/c mice deficient in TLR4. Taken together, these results suggest that TLR4 recognition of Leishmania pifanoi amastigotes is important for the control of infection and that this is mediated, in part, through the P8 PGLC. PMID:18299340

  14. Demonstration of Heterogeneous Parahydrogen Induced Polarization Using Hyperpolarized Agent Migration from Dissolved Rh(I) Complex to Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Parahydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP) was used to demonstrate the concept that highly polarized, catalyst-free fluids can be obtained in a catalysis-free regime using a chemical reaction with molecular addition of parahydrogen to a water-soluble Rh(I) complex carrying a payload of compound with unsaturated (C=C) bonds. Hydrogenation of norbornadiene leads to formation of norbornene, which is eliminated from the Rh(I) complex and, therefore, leaves the aqueous phase and becomes a gaseous hyperpolarized molecule. The Rh(I) metal complex resides in the original liquid phase, while the product of hydrogen addition is found exclusively in the gaseous phase based on the affinity. Hyperpolarized norbornene 1H NMR signals observed in situ were enhanced by a factor of approximately 10 000 at a static field of 47.5 mT. High-resolution 1H NMR at a field of 9.4 T was used for ex situ detection of hyperpolarized norbornene in the gaseous phase, where a signal enhancement factor of approximately 160 was observed. This concept of stoichiometric as opposed to purely catalytic use of PHIP-available complexes with an unsaturated payload precursor molecule can be extended to other contrast agents for both homogeneous and heterogeneous PHIP. The Rh(I) complex was employed in aqueous medium suitable for production of hyperpolarized contrast agents for biomedical use. Detection of PHIP hyperpolarized gas by low-field NMR is demonstrated here for the first time. PMID:24918975

  15. Ru-TAP complexes and DNA: from photo-induced electron transfer to gene photo-silencing in living cells.

    PubMed

    Marcélis, Lionel; Moucheron, Cécile; Kirsch-De Mesmaeker, Andrée

    2013-07-28

    In this review, examples of applications of the photo-induced electron transfer (PET) process between photo-oxidizing Ru-TAP (TAP = 1,4,5,8-tetraazaphenanthrene) complexes and DNA or oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) are discussed. Applications using a free Ru-TAP complex (not chemically anchored to an ODN) are first considered. In this case, the PET gives rise to the production of an irreversible adduct of the Ru complex on a guanine (G) base, with formation of a covalent bond. After absorption of a second photon, this adduct can generate a bi-adduct, whereby the same complex binds to a second G moiety. These bi-adduct formations are responsible for photo-cross-linking between two strands of a duplex, each containing a G base, or between two G moieties of a single strand such as a telomeric sequence, as demonstrated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses or mass spectrometry. Scanning force microscopy also allows the detection of such photobridgings with plasmid DNA. Other applications, for example with Ru-ODN, i.e. ODN with chemically anchored Ru-TAP complexes, are also discussed. It is shown that such Ru-ODN probes containing a G base in their own sequences are capable of photo-cross-linking selectively with their targeted complementary sequences, and, in the absence of such targets, they self-photo-inhibit. Such processes are applied successfully in gene photo-silencing of human papillomavirus cancer cells.

  16. Demonstration of heterogeneous parahydrogen induced polarization using hyperpolarized agent migration from dissolved Rh(I) complex to gas phase.

    PubMed

    Kovtunov, Kirill V; Barskiy, Danila A; Shchepin, Roman V; Coffey, Aaron M; Waddell, Kevin W; Koptyug, Igor V; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-07-01

    Parahydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP) was used to demonstrate the concept that highly polarized, catalyst-free fluids can be obtained in a catalysis-free regime using a chemical reaction with molecular addition of parahydrogen to a water-soluble Rh(I) complex carrying a payload of compound with unsaturated (C═C) bonds. Hydrogenation of norbornadiene leads to formation of norbornene, which is eliminated from the Rh(I) complex and, therefore, leaves the aqueous phase and becomes a gaseous hyperpolarized molecule. The Rh(I) metal complex resides in the original liquid phase, while the product of hydrogen addition is found exclusively in the gaseous phase based on the affinity. Hyperpolarized norbornene (1)H NMR signals observed in situ were enhanced by a factor of approximately 10,000 at a static field of 47.5 mT. High-resolution (1)H NMR at a field of 9.4 T was used for ex situ detection of hyperpolarized norbornene in the gaseous phase, where a signal enhancement factor of approximately 160 was observed. This concept of stoichiometric as opposed to purely catalytic use of PHIP-available complexes with an unsaturated payload precursor molecule can be extended to other contrast agents for both homogeneous and heterogeneous PHIP. The Rh(I) complex was employed in aqueous medium suitable for production of hyperpolarized contrast agents for biomedical use. Detection of PHIP hyperpolarized gas by low-field NMR is demonstrated here for the first time.

  17. Xanthohumol induces generation of reactive oxygen species and triggers apoptosis through inhibition of mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Chu, Wei; Wei, Peng; Liu, Ying; Wei, Taotao

    2015-12-01

    Xanthohumol is a prenylflavonoid extracted from hops (Humulus lupulus). It possesses anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities in vitro and in vivo, and offers therapeutic benefits for treatment of metabolic syndromes. However, the precise mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects remain to be elucidated, together with its cellular target. Here, we provide evidence that xanthohumol directly interacts with the mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I (NADH dehydrogenase), inhibits the oxidative phosphorylation, triggers the production of reactive oxygen species, and induces apoptosis. In addition, we show that as a result of the inhibition of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, xanthohumol exposure causes a rapid decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Furthermore, we showed that xanthohumol up-regulates the glycolytic capacity in cells, and thus compensates cellular ATP generation. Dissection of the multiple steps of aerobic respiration by extracellular flux assays revealed that xanthohumol specifically inhibits the activity of mitochondrial complex I, but had little effect on that of complex II, III and IV. Inhibition of complex I by xanthohumol caused the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which are responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. We also found that isoxanthohumol, the structural isomer of xanthohumol, is inactive to cells, suggesting that the reactive 2-hydroxyl group of xanthohumol is crucial for its targeting to the mitochondrial complex I. Together, the remodeling of cell metabolism revealed here has therapeutic potential for the use of xanthohumol.

  18. Investigating anthropically induced effects in streamflow dynamics by using permutation entropy and statistical complexity analysis: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stosic, Tatijana; Telesca, Luciano; de Souza Ferreira, Diego Vicente; Stosic, Borko

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we investigated the influence of the construction of Sobradinho dam on daily streamflow of São Francisco river, Brazil, using permutation entropy method. We analyzed a long daily streamflow time series recorded during the period 1929-2010 encompassing the construction of Sobradinho dam between 1973 and 1979. We found that the original and deseasonalized streamflow time series are characterized by clear different complexity and entropy patterns before the construction of the dam; while, after it, their degree of randomness and complexity are nearly identical. Furthermore, investigating the oscillatory behavior of the entropy and complexity time variation, the periodicity of 3.67 years was identified, identical to one of the main periodicities revealed in the Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI). Such finding confirms the close relationship between streamflow dynamics and ENSO phenomenon. After the construction of the dam, the time variation of entropy and complexity changes almost abruptly toward stochastic regime characterized by higher entropy and lower complexity. Although the dam operations could be considered responsible for such abrupt dynamical change in the streamflow, we cannot exclude the presence of a co-induced ENSO effect; in fact, the analysis of MEI shows a strikingly similar and concomitant change in the long-term trend, identified by using the singular spectrum analysis.

  19. Protein adsorption induced bridging flocculation: the dominant entropic pathway for nano-bio complexation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eren, Necla Mine; Narsimhan, Ganesan; Campanella, Osvaldo H.

    2016-02-01

    Lysozyme-silica interactions and the resulting complexation were investigated through adsorption isotherms, dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering, circular dichroism (CD), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). A thermodynamic analysis of ITC data revealed the existence of two binding modes during protein-nanoparticle complexation. Both binding modes are driven by the cooperation of a favorable enthalpy in the presence of a dominating entropy gain. The first binding mode has a higher binding affinity, a lower equilibrium stoichiometry and is driven by a higher entropic contribution compared to the second type. The observed favorable enthalpy gain in both modes is attributed to non-covalent complexation whereas the entropy gain is associated with the re-organization of the silica surface including not only the solvent and counter ion release, but also the protein's conformational changes. Possible mechanisms are proposed to explain non-covalent complexations for each binding mode by relating the changes in the zeta potential and hydrodynamic radius to the obtained adsorption isotherms and calorimetry profile. Based on all these findings, it is proposed that lysozyme adsorption on nano-silica is the result of protein-nanoparticle and protein-protein interactions that further leads to spontaneous, non-directional and random complexation of silica through bridging flocculation.Lysozyme-silica interactions and the resulting complexation were investigated through adsorption isotherms, dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering, circular dichroism (CD), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). A thermodynamic analysis of ITC data revealed the existence of two binding modes during protein-nanoparticle complexation. Both binding modes are driven by the cooperation of a favorable enthalpy in the presence of a dominating entropy gain. The first binding mode has a higher binding affinity, a lower equilibrium stoichiometry and is driven by a higher entropic

  20. Experimental elucidation of vacancy complexes associated with hydrogen ion-induced splitting of bulk GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Moutanabbir, O.; Scholz, R.; Goesele, U.; Guittoum, A.; Jungmann, M.; Butterling, M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Anwand, W.; Egger, W.; Sperr, P.

    2010-03-15

    We present a detailed study of the thermal evolution of H ion-induced vacancy related complexes and voids in bulk GaN implanted under ion-cut conditions. By using transmission electron microscopy, we found that the damage band in as-implanted GaN is decorated with a high density of nanobubbles of approx1-2 nm in diameter. Variable energy Doppler broadening spectroscopy showed that this band contains vacancy clusters and voids. In addition to vacancy clusters, the presence of V{sub Ga}, V{sub Ga}-H{sub 2}, and V{sub Ga}V{sub N} complexes was evidenced by pulsed low-energy positron lifetime spectroscopy. Subtle changes upon annealing in these vacancy complexes were also investigated. As a general trend, a growth in open-volume defects is detected in parallel to an increase in both size and density of nanobubbles. The observed vacancy complexes appear to be stable during annealing. However, for temperatures above 450 deg. C, unusually large lifetimes were measured. These lifetimes are attributed to the formation of positronium in GaN. Since the formation of positronium is not possible in a dense semiconductor, our finding demonstrates the presence of sufficiently large open-volume defects in this temperature range. Based on the Tao-Eldrup model, the average lattice opening during thermal annealing was quantified. We found that a void diameter of 0.4 nm is induced by annealing at 600 deg. C. The role of these complexes in the subsurface microcracking is discussed.

  1. Collision-Induced Infrared Absorption by Collisional Complexes in Dense Hydrogen-Helium Gas Mixtures at Thousands of Kelvin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Martin; Frommhold, Lothar; Li, Xiaoping; Hunt, Katharine L. C.

    2011-06-01

    The interaction-induced absorption by collisional pairs of H{_2} molecules is an important opacity source in the atmospheres of the outer planets and cool stars. The emission spectra of cool white dwarf stars differ significantly in the infrared from the expected blackbody spectra of their cores, which is largely due to absorption by collisional H{_2}-H{_2}, H{_2}-He, and H{_2}-H complexes in the stellar atmospheres. Using quantum-chemical methods we compute the atmospheric absorption from hundreds to thousands of kelvin. Laboratory measurements of interaction-induced absorption spectra by H{_2} pairs exist only at room temperature and below. We show that our results reproduce these measurements closely, so that our computational data permit reliable modeling of stellar atmosphere opacities even for the higher temperatures. L. Frommhold, Collision-Induced Absorption in Gases, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, New York, 1993 and 2006 Xiaoping Li, Katharine L. C. Hunt, Fei Wang, Martin Abel, and Lothar Frommhold, "Collision-Induced Infrared Absorption by Molecular Hydrogen Pairs at Thousands of Kelvin", International Journal of Spectroscopy, vol. 2010, Article ID 371201, 11 pages, 2010. doi: 10.1155/2010/371201 M. Abel, L. Frommhold, X. Li, and K. L. C. Hunt, "Collision-induced absorption by H{_2} pairs: From hundreds to thousands of Kelvin," J. Phys. Chem. A, published online, DOI: 10.1021/jp109441f L. Frommhold, M. Abel, F. Wang, M. Gustafsson, X. Li, and K. L. C. Hunt, "Infrared atmospheric emission and absorption by simple molecular complexes, from first principles", Mol. Phys. 108, 2265, 2010

  2. Surface-induced dissociation of peptides and protein complexes in a quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Galhena, Asiri S; Dagan, Shai; Jones, Christopher M; Beardsley, Richard L; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2008-03-01

    A novel in-line surface-induced dissociation (SID) device was designed and implemented in a commercial QTOF instrument (Waters/Micromass QTOF II). This new setup allows efficient SID for a broad range of molecules. It also allows direct comparison with conventional collision-induced dissociation (CID) on the same instrument, taking advantage of the characteristics of QTOF instrumentation, including extended mass range, improved sensitivity, and better resolution compared with quadrupole analyzers and ion traps. Various peptides and a noncovalent protein complex have been electrosprayed and analyzed with the new SID setup. Here we present SID of leucine enkephalin, fibrinopeptide A, melittin, insulin chain-B, and a noncovalent protein complex from wheat, heat shock protein 16.9. The SID spectra were also compared to CID spectra. With the SID setup installed, ion transmission proved to be efficient. SID fragmentation patterns of peptides are, in general, similar to CID, with differences in the relative intensities of some peaks such as immonium ions, backbone cleavage b- versus y-type ions, and y- versus y-NH3 ions, suggesting enhanced accessibility to high-energy/secondary fragmentation channels with SID. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that the in-line SID setup is a valid substitute for CID, with potential advantages for activation of singly/multiply charged peptides and larger species such as noncovalent protein complexes.

  3. The biphosphinic paladacycle complex induces melanoma cell death through lysosomal-mitochondrial axis modulation and impaired autophagy.

    PubMed

    Gigli, Rafael; Pereira, Gustavo J S; Antunes, Fernanda; Bechara, Alexandre; Garcia, Daniel M; Spindola, Daniel G; Jasiulionis, Mirian G; Caires, Antonio C F; Smaili, Soraya S; Bincoletto, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Recently, palladium complexes have been extensively studied as cyclization of these complexes by cyclometallation reactions increased their stability making them promising antitumor compounds. In this study, we have investigated apoptosis induced by the Biphosphinic Paladacycle Complex (BPC11) and possible cross talk between apoptosis and autophagy in cell line models of metastatic (Tm5) and non-metastatic (4C11-) melanoma. The BPC11-induced cell death in melanoma involved the lysosomal-mitochondrial axis, which is characterized by LMP, CatB activation and increased Bax protein levels following its translocation to mitochondria. Mitochondrial hyperpolarization, followed by membrane potential dissipation and cleavage of caspase-3, also resulted in cell death after 24 h of incubation. We also found that BPC11-mediated LC3II formation and increased p62 protein levels, suggesting blocked autophagy, probably due to LMP. Interestingly, the treatment of Tm5 and 4C11(-) cells with 3-methyladenine (3-MA), an inhibitor of the initial stage of autophagy, potentiated the effects of BPC11. We conclude that BPC11 is an anti-melanoma agent and that autophagy may be acting as a mechanism of melanoma cells resistance. Also, these data highlight the importance of studies involving autophagy and apoptosis during pre-clinical studies of new drugs with anticancer properties.

  4. Aggregation of soy protein-isoflavone complexes and gel formation induced by glucono-δ-lactone in soymilk

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Sheng-Yang; Hsiao, Yu-Hsuan; Li, Wen-Tai; Hsieh, Jung-Feng

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the glucono-δ-lactone (GDL)-induced aggregation of isoflavones and soy proteins in soymilk. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated that isoflavones mixed with β-conglycinin (7S) and glycinin (11S) proteins formed 7S-isoflavone and 11S-isoflavone complexes in soymilk supernatant fraction (SSF). Most of the soy protein-isoflavone complexes then precipitated into the soymilk pellet fraction (SPF) following the addition of 4 mM GDL, whereupon the pH value of the soymilk dropped from 6.6 to 5.9. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and HPLC analysis suggest that the addition of 4 mM GDL induced the aggregation of most 7S (α’, α and β subunits), 11S acidic and 11S basic proteins as well as isoflavones, including most aglycones, including daidzein, glycitein, genistein and a portion of glucosides, including daidzin, glycitin, genistin, malonyldaidzin and malonylgenistin. These results provide an important reference pertaining to the effects of GDL on the aggregation of soy protein-isoflavone complexes and could benefit future research regarding the production of tofu from soymilk. PMID:27760990

  5. Fast cleavage of a diselenide induced by a platinum(II)-methionine complex and its biological implications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Wang, Xiaoyong; Yang, Xiaoliang; Liang, Xiao; Guo, Zijian

    2010-11-01

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs such as cisplatin induce increased oxidative stress and oxidative damage of DNA and other cellular components, while selenium plays an important role in the antioxidant defense system. In this study, the interaction between a platinum(II) methionine (Met) complex [Pt(Met)Cl(2)] and a diselenide compound selenocystine [(Sec)(2)] was studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that the diselenide bond in (Sec)(2) can readily and quickly be cleaved by the platinum complex. Formation of the selenocysteine (Sec) bridged dinuclear complex [Pt(2)(Met-S,N)(2)(μ-Sec-Se,Cl)](3+) and Sec chelated species [Pt(Met-S,N)(Sec-Se,N)](2+) was identified at neutral and acidic media, which seems to result from the intermediate [Pt(Met-S,N)(Sec-Se)Cl](+). An accelerated formation of S-Se and S-S bonds was also observed when (Sec)(2) reacted with excessive glutathione in the presence of [Pt(Met)Cl(2)]. These results imply that the mechanism of activity and toxicity of platinum drugs may be related to their fast reaction with seleno-containing biomolecules, and the chemoprotective property of selenium agents against cisplatin-induced toxicity could also be connected with such reactions.

  6. Intranasal Administration of Novel Chitosan Nanoparticle/DNA Complexes Induces Antibody Response to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lebre, F; Borchard, G; Faneca, H; Pedroso de Lima, M C; Borges, O

    2016-02-01

    The generation of strong pathogen-specific immune responses at mucosal surfaces where hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission can occur is still a major challenge. Therefore, new vaccines are urgently needed in order to overcome the limitations of existing parenteral ones. Recent studies show that this may be achieved by intranasal immunization. Chitosan has gained attention as a nonviral gene delivery system; however, its use in vivo is limited due to low transfection efficiency mostly related to strong interaction between the negatively charged DNA and the positively charged chitosan. We hypothesize that the adsorption of negatively charged human serum albumin (HSA) onto the surface of the chitosan particles would facilitate the intracellular release of DNA, enhancing transfection activity. Here, we demonstrate that a robust systemic immune response was induced after vaccination using HSA-loaded chitosan nanoparticle/DNA (HSA-CH NP/DNA) complexes. Furthermore, intranasal immunization with HSA-CH NP/DNA complexes induced HBV specific IgA in nasal and vaginal secretions; no systemic or mucosal responses were detected after immunization with DNA alone. Overall, our results show that chitosan-based DNA complexes elicited both humoral and mucosal immune response, making them an interesting and valuable gene delivery system for nasal vaccination against HBV.

  7. Aggregation of soy protein-isoflavone complexes and gel formation induced by glucono-δ-lactone in soymilk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsia, Sheng-Yang; Hsiao, Yu-Hsuan; Li, Wen-Tai; Hsieh, Jung-Feng

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the glucono-δ-lactone (GDL)-induced aggregation of isoflavones and soy proteins in soymilk. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated that isoflavones mixed with β-conglycinin (7S) and glycinin (11S) proteins formed 7S-isoflavone and 11S-isoflavone complexes in soymilk supernatant fraction (SSF). Most of the soy protein-isoflavone complexes then precipitated into the soymilk pellet fraction (SPF) following the addition of 4 mM GDL, whereupon the pH value of the soymilk dropped from 6.6 to 5.9. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and HPLC analysis suggest that the addition of 4 mM GDL induced the aggregation of most 7S (α’, α and β subunits), 11S acidic and 11S basic proteins as well as isoflavones, including most aglycones, including daidzein, glycitein, genistein and a portion of glucosides, including daidzin, glycitin, genistin, malonyldaidzin and malonylgenistin. These results provide an important reference pertaining to the effects of GDL on the aggregation of soy protein-isoflavone complexes and could benefit future research regarding the production of tofu from soymilk.

  8. A conserved virus-induced cytoplasmic TRAMP-like complex recruits the exosome to target viral RNA for degradation

    PubMed Central

    Molleston, Jerome M.; Sabin, Leah R.; Moy, Ryan H.; Menghani, Sanjay V.; Rausch, Keiko; Gordesky-Gold, Beth; Hopkins, Kaycie C.; Zhou, Rui; Jensen, Torben Heick; Wilusz, Jeremy E.; Cherry, Sara

    2016-01-01

    RNA degradation is tightly regulated to selectively target aberrant RNAs, including viral RNA, but this regulation is incompletely understood. Through RNAi screening in Drosophila cells, we identified the 3′-to-5′ RNA exosome and two components of the exosome cofactor TRAMP (Trf4/5–Air1/2–Mtr4 polyadenylation) complex, dMtr4 and dZcchc7, as antiviral against a panel of RNA viruses. We extended our studies to human orthologs and found that the exosome as well as TRAMP components hMTR4 and hZCCHC7 are antiviral. While hMTR4 and hZCCHC7 are normally nuclear, infection by cytoplasmic RNA viruses induces their export, forming a cytoplasmic complex that specifically recognizes and induces degradation of viral mRNAs. Furthermore, the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of bunyaviral mRNA is sufficient to confer virus-induced exosomal degradation. Altogether, our results reveal that signals from viral infection repurpose TRAMP components to a cytoplasmic surveillance role where they selectively engage viral RNAs for degradation to restrict a broad range of viruses. PMID:27474443

  9. Ruthenium (II) complexes interact with human serum albumin and induce apoptosis of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Huang, Yongchao; Zheng, Chuping; Zhou, Yanhui; Liu, Ying; Liu, Jie

    2015-02-01

    The interaction of ruthenium (II) complex [Ru(bpy)2(mal)](2+) (RBM) and [Ru(phen)2(mal)](2+) (RPM) (bpy = 2, 2-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, mal = malonyl carboxylate) with human serum albumin (HSA) has been investigated by using fluorescence, UV absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy approaches. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of complexes to HSA was observed and the quenching mechanism was suggested as static quenching according to the Stern-Volmer (S-V) equation. The number of binding sites n and observed binding constant Kb was measured by fluorescence quenching method. The thermodynamic parameters ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG at different temperatures were calculated and the results indicate the binding reaction is mainly entropy-driven and Vander Waals force played a major role in the reaction. The result of CD showed that the secondary structure of HSA molecules was changed in the presence of the ruthenium (II) complexes. Furthermore, the cell viability of ruthenium (II) complexes was evaluated by MTT and complex RPM has shown significant higher anticancer potency than RBM against all the cell lines screened. RPM showed a significant antitumor activity through induction of apoptosis in A549 cells.

  10. Cooperation-induced temporal complexity in networks of pulse-coupled units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geneston, Elvis; Grigolini, Paolo

    2012-02-01

    We study a network of stochastic pulse-coupled units generating bursts with the same size distribution as the neuronal avalanches in mature cultured neurons, recently revealed by the experimental observation. We prove that in addition to this form of complexity this model yields a form of phase transition generating also temporal complexity. This means that the distance from two consecutive bursts fits the prescription of a Mittag-Leffler (ML) function renewal theory. There exists a critical value of the cooperation parameter at which this description applies to the whole time regime. By increasing the cooperation parameter the ML theory breaks down and the sequence of bursts tend to become periodic with the same intensity. We make the conjecture that the analysis of this model may shed light into the theoretical foundation of neuronal burst leaders and that the recently discovered principle of complexity management may be conveniently applied to the neuro-physiological processes that are properly described by this model.

  11. DNA induces conformational changes in a recombinant human minichromosome maintenance complex.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Emma L; Parker-Manuel, Richard P; Chaban, Yuriy; Satti, Rabab; Coverley, Dawn; Orlova, Elena V; Chong, James P J

    2015-03-20

    ATP-dependent DNA unwinding activity has been demonstrated for recombinant archaeal homohexameric minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complexes and their yeast heterohexameric counterparts, but in higher eukaryotes such as Drosophila, MCM-associated DNA helicase activity has been observed only in the context of a co-purified Cdc45-MCM-GINS complex. Here, we describe the production of the recombinant human MCM (hMCM) complex in Escherichia coli. This protein displays ATP hydrolysis activity and is capable of unwinding duplex DNA. Using single-particle asymmetric EM reconstruction, we demonstrate that recombinant hMCM forms a hexamer that undergoes a conformational change when bound to DNA. Recombinant hMCM produced without post-translational modifications is functional in vitro and provides an important tool for biochemical reconstitution of the human replicative helicase.

  12. Lithium bromide-induced structural changes in a nickel bis-alkoxide complex.

    PubMed

    Ichiokai, Hiromi; Vicic, David A

    2013-01-01

    The bis-alkoxide [(DEAMP)2Ni] (1, DEAMP = 1-(diethylamino)-2-methylpropan-2-olate) was found to react with trace amounts of lithium bromide to afford the bis-LiBr adduct 2, in which the oxygens of the DEAMP ligand coordinate to lithium to form a chiral-at-metal complex. This new complex is five-coordinate at nickel, and contains nickel and oxygen atoms which are all chiral. One diastereomer precipitates from pentane solution. The two lithium ions rigidify the new structure in the solid state by coordinating to the oxygen and bromide atoms.

  13. Collision-Induced Absorption by Supermolecular Complexes from a New Potential Energy and Induced Dipole Surface, Suited for Calculations up to Thousands of Kelvin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Martin; Frommhold, Lothar; Wang, Fei; Gustafsson, Magnus; Li, Xiaoping; Hunt, Katharine L. C.

    2010-10-01

    Absorption by pairs of H2 molecules is an important opacity source in the atmospheres of the outer planets, and thus of special astronomical interest. The emission spectra of cool white dwarf stars differ significantly from the expected blackbody spectra, amongst other reasons due to absorption by H2-H2, H2-He, and H2-H collisional complexes in the stellar atmospheres. To model the radiative processes in these atmospheres, which have temperatures of several thousand kelvin, one needs accurate knowledge of the induced dipole (ID) and potential energy surfaces (PES) of such collisional complexes. These come from quantum-chemical calculations with the H2 bonds stretched or compressed far from equilibrium. Laboratory measurements of collision-induced (CI) absorption exist only at much lower temperature. For H2 pairs at room temperature, the calculated spectra of the rototranslational band, the fundamental band, and the first overtone match the experimental data very well. In addition, with the newly obtained IDS it became possible to reproduce the measurements in the far blue wing of the rototranslational spectrum of H2 at 77.5 K, as well as at 300 K. Similarly good agreement between theory and measurement is seen in the fundamental band of molecular deuterium at room temperature. Furthermore, we also show the calculated absorption spectra of H2-He at 600 K and of H2-H2 at 2,000 K, for which there are no experimental data for comparison.

  14. Collision-Induced Dissociation of Electrosprayed Protein Complexes: An All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Model with Mobile Protons.

    PubMed

    Popa, Vlad; Trecroce, Danielle A; McAllister, Robert G; Konermann, Lars

    2016-06-16

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has become an indispensable technique for examining noncovalent protein complexes. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of these multiply protonated gaseous ions usually culminates in ejection of a single subunit with a disproportionately large amount of charge. Experiments suggest that this process involves subunit unfolding prior to separation from the residual complex, as well as H(+) migration onto the unravelling chain. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are a promising avenue for gaining detailed insights into these CID events. Unfortunately, typical MD algorithms do not allow for mobile protons. Here we address this limitation by implementing a strategy that combines atomistic force fields (such as OPLS/AA and CHARMM36) with a proton hopping algorithm, focusing on the tetrameric complexes transthyretin and streptavidin. Protons are redistributed over all acidic and basic sites in 20 ps intervals, subject to an energy function that reflects electrostatic interactions and proton affinities. Our simulations predict that nativelike conformers at the onset of collisional heating contain multiple salt bridges. Collisional heating initially causes subtle structural changes that lead to a gradual decline of these zwitterionic patterns. Many of the MD runs show gradual unfolding of a single subunit in conjunction with H(+) migration, culminating in subunit separation from the complex. However, there are also instances where two or more chains start to unfold simultaneously, giving rise to charge competition. The scission point where the "winning" subunit separates from the complex can be attained for different degrees of unfolding, giving rise to product ions in various charge states. The simulated product ion distributions are in close agreement with experimental CID data. Proton enrichment in the departing subunit is driven by charge-charge repulsion, but the combination of salt bridge depletion, charge migration

  15. Light-induced dissociation of antenna complexes in the symbionts of scleractinian corals correlates with sensitivity to coral bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, R.; Larkum, A. W. D.; Prášil, O.; Kramer, D. M.; Szabó, M.; Kumar, V.; Ralph, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Elevated temperatures in combination with moderate to high irradiance are known to cause bleaching events in scleractinian corals, characterised by damage to photosystem II (PSII). Photoprotective mechanisms of the symbiont can reduce the excitation pressure impinging upon PSII. In the bleaching sensitive species, Acropora millepora and Pocillopora damicornis, high light alone induced photoprotection through the xanthophyll cycle, increased content of the antioxidant carotenoid, β-carotene, as well as the dissociation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll complexes. The evidence is compatible with either the membrane-bound chlorophyll a-chlorophyll c 2-peridinin-protein (acpPC) complex or the peripheral peridinin-chlorophyll-protein complex, or both, disconnecting from PSII under high light. The acpPC complex potentially showed a state transition response with redistribution towards photosystem I to reduce PSII over-excitation. This apparent acpPC dissociation/reassociation was promoted by the addition of the xanthophyll cycle inhibitor, dithiothreitol, under high irradiance. Exposure to thermal stress as well as high light promoted xanthophyll de-epoxidation and increased β-carotene content, although it did not influence light-harvesting chlorophyll complex (LHC) dissociation, indicating light, rather than temperature, controls LHC dissociation. Photoinhibition was avoided in the bleaching tolerant species, Pavona decussata, suggesting xanthophyll cycling along with LHC dissociation may have been sufficient to prevent photodamage to PSII. Symbionts of P. decussata also displayed the greatest detachment of antenna complexes, while the more thermally sensitive species, Pocillopora damicornis and A. millepora, showed less LHC dissociation, suggesting antenna movement influences bleaching susceptibility.

  16. Chiral mononuclear lanthanide complexes and the field-induced single-ion magnet behaviour of a Dy analogue.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuang-Yan; Wang, Chao; Zhao, Lang; Wu, Jianfeng; Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-07

    Three pairs of homochiral mononuclear lanthanide complexes, with the general formula [LnH4LRRRRRR/SSSSSS(SCN)2](SCN)2·xCH3OH·yH2O(Ln = Dy (R/S-Dy1), Ho (R/S-Ho1) and Er (R/S-Er1)), have been obtained via self-assembly between chiral macrocyclic ligands and the respective thiocyanates, all of which show a saddle-type conformation with seven-coordinated metal ions. Magnetic measurements revealed that the Dy complex shows field-induced single-ion magnet behaviour, which is rarely reported in a seven-coordinated lanthanide-based SIM encapsulated in a macrocyclic ligand. The absolute configuration of all enantiomers was determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography and confirmed by electronic CD and VCD spectra.

  17. Collision-Induced Infrared Absorption by Collisional Complexes in dense Hydrogen-Helium gas mixtures at Thousands of Kelvin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Martin; Frommhold, Lothar; Li, Xiaoping; Hunt, Katharine L. C.

    2011-03-01

    The interaction-induced absorption by collisional pairs of H2 molecules is an important opacity source in the atmospheres of the outer planets and cool stars. The emission spectra of cool white dwarf stars differ significantly in the infrared from the expected blackbody spectra of their cores, which is largely due to absorption by collisional H2 --H2 , H2 --He, and H2 --H complexes in the stellar atmospheres. Using quantum-chemical methods we compute the atmospheric absorption from hundreds to thousands of kelvin. Laboratory measurements of interaction-induced absorption spectra by H2 pairs exist only at room temperature and below. We show that our results reproduce these measurements closely, so that our computational data permit reliable modeling of stellar atmosphere opacities even for the higher temperatures. This work has been supported in part by the National Science Foundation through Grants AST-0709106 and AST-0708496.

  18. Surface-Induced Changes in the Thermochromic Transformation of an Ionic Liquid Cobalt Thiocyanate Complex

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate that a thermodynamic complex equilibrium within an ionic liquid film can be significantly influenced by the presence of the liquid–vacuum interface. Using surface-sensitive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we find that the temperature-driven transition from the blue-colored tetrahedral [Co(II) (NCS)4]2– to the red-colored octahedral [Co(II) (NCS)6]4– complex already occurs within the outermost nanometers at around +4 °C as compared with −25 °C in the bulk. This thermochromic transformation in the near-surface region goes along with a loss in preferential surface orientation of free [SCN]− anions and with a pronounced decrease in the complex density; both effects are attributed to the formation of a weakly bound solvation shell around the [Co(II) (NCS)6]4– anion, leading to an effective complex dilution. Our results are not only relevant for high-surface area thin film systems, such as in sensor and catalysis applications, but also shed light on the role of ionic liquid surfaces in particular and liquid surfaces in general. PMID:28212033

  19. Surface-Induced Changes in the Thermochromic Transformation of an Ionic Liquid Cobalt Thiocyanate Complex.

    PubMed

    May, Benjamin; Hönle, Michael; Heller, Bettina; Greco, Francesco; Bhuin, Radha; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Maier, Florian

    2017-02-23

    We demonstrate that a thermodynamic complex equilibrium within an ionic liquid film can be significantly influenced by the presence of the liquid-vacuum interface. Using surface-sensitive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we find that the temperature-driven transition from the blue-colored tetrahedral [Co(II) (NCS)4](2-) to the red-colored octahedral [Co(II) (NCS)6](4-) complex already occurs within the outermost nanometers at around +4 °C as compared with -25 °C in the bulk. This thermochromic transformation in the near-surface region goes along with a loss in preferential surface orientation of free [SCN](-) anions and with a pronounced decrease in the complex density; both effects are attributed to the formation of a weakly bound solvation shell around the [Co(II) (NCS)6](4-) anion, leading to an effective complex dilution. Our results are not only relevant for high-surface area thin film systems, such as in sensor and catalysis applications, but also shed light on the role of ionic liquid surfaces in particular and liquid surfaces in general.

  20. Inhibition Mechanism of Uranyl Reduction Induced by Calcium-Carbonato Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. E.; Bargar, J.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Uranium mobility in the subsurface is controlled by the redox state and chemical speciation, generally as minimally soluble U(IV) or soluble U(VI) species. In the presence of even low carbonate concentrations the uranyl-carbonato complex quickly becomes the dominant aqueous species; they are, in fact, the primary aqueous species in most groundwaters. Calcium in groundwater leads to ternary calcium-uranyl-carbonato complexes that limit the rate and extent of U(VI) reduction. This decrease in reduction rate has been attributed to surface processes, thermodynamic limitations, and kinetic factors. Here we present a new mechanism for the inhibition of ferrous iron reduction of uranyl-carbonato species in the presence of calcium. A series of experiments under variable Ca conditions were preformed to determine the role of Ca in the inhibition of U reduction by ferrous iron. Calcium ions in the Ca2UO2(CO3)3 complex sterically prevent the interaction of Fe(II) with U(VI), in turn preventing the Fe(II)-U(VI) distance required for electron transfer. The mechanism described here helps to predict U redox transformations in suboxic environments and clarifies the role of Ca in the fate and mobility of U. Electrochemical measurements further show the decrease of the U(VI) to U(V) redox potential of the uranyl-carbonato complex with decreasing pH suggesting the first electron transfer is critical determining the rate and extent of uranium reduction.

  1. Chronic systemic complex I inhibition induces a hypokinetic multisystem degeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Höglinger, Günter U; Féger, Jean; Prigent, Annick; Michel, Patrick P; Parain, Karine; Champy, Pierre; Ruberg, Merle; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Hirsch, Etienne C

    2003-02-01

    In Parkinson's disease, nigral dopaminergic neurones degenerate, whereas post-synaptic striatal target neurones are spared. In some atypical parkinsonian syndromes, both nigral and striatal neurones degenerate. Reduced activity of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain has been implicated in both conditions, but it remains unclear if this affects the whole organism or only the degenerating brain structures. We therefore investigated the differential vulnerability of various brain structures to generalized complex I inhibition. Male Lewis rats infused with rotenone, a lipophilic complex I inhibitor [2.5 mg/kg/day intraveneously (i.v.) for 28 days], were compared with vehicle-infused controls. They showed reduced locomotor activity and loss of striatal dopaminergic fibres (54%), nigral dopaminergic neurones (28.5%), striatal serotoninergic fibres (34%), striatal DARPP-32-positive projection neurones (26.5%), striatal cholinergic interneurones (22.1%), cholinergic neurones in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (23.7%) and noradrenergic neurones in the locus ceruleus (26.4%). Silver impregnation revealed pronounced degeneration in basal ganglia and brain stem nuclei, whereas the hippocampus, cerebellum and cerebral cortex were less affected. These data suggest that a generalized mitochondrial failure may be implicated in atypical parkinsonian syndromes but do not support the hypothesis that a generalized complex I inhibition results in the rather selective nigral lesion observed in Parkinson's disease.

  2. A Zinc Morpholine Complex Prevents HCl/Ethanol-Induced Gastric Ulcers in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Suzy M.; Gwaram, Nura Suleiman; AlRashdi, Ahmed S.; Khalifa, Shaden A. M.; Abdulla, Mahmood A.; Ali, Hapipah M.; El-Seedi, Hesham R.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is a naturally occurring element with roles in wound healing and rescuing tissue integrity, particularly in the gastrointestinal system, where it can be detected in the mucosal and submucosal layers. Zinc chelates are known to have beneficial effects on the gastrointestinal mucosa and in cases of gastric ulcer. We synthesized complexes of zinc featuring a heterocyclic amine binding amino acids then investigated their ability to enhance the gastric self-repair. Zinc-morpholine complex, Zn(L)SCN, namely showed strong free-radical scavenging, promotion of the DNA and RNA polymerases reconstruction and suppression of cell damage. The complex’s mode of action is proposed to involve hydrogen bond formation via its bis(thiocyanato-k)zinc moiety. Zn(L)SCN complex had potent effects on gastric enzymatic activity both in vitro and in vivo. The complex disrupted the ulcerative process as demonstrated by changes in the intermediate metabolites of the oxidative pathway – specifically, reduction in the MDA levels and elevation of reduced glutathione together with an attenuation of oxidative DNA damage. Additionally, Zn(L)SCN restored the gastric mucosa, inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF and the caspases), and preserved the gastric mucous balance. Zn(L)SCN thus exhibited anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities, all of which have cytoprotective effects on the gastric lining. PMID:27460157

  3. Subtle conformational changes induced in major histocompatibility complex class II molecules by binding peptides.

    PubMed

    Chervonsky, A V; Medzhitov, R M; Denzin, L K; Barlow, A K; Rudensky, A Y; Janeway, C A

    1998-08-18

    Intracellular trafficking of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules is characterized by passage through specialized endocytic compartment(s) where antigenic peptides replace invariant chain fragments in the presence of the DM protein. These changes are accompanied by structural transitions of the MHC molecules that can be visualized by formation of compact SDS-resistant dimers, by changes in binding of mAbs, and by changes in T cell responses. We have observed that a mAb (25-9-17) that is capable of staining I-Ab on the surface of normal B cells failed to interact with I-Ab complexes with a peptide derived from the Ealpha chain of the I-E molecule but bound a similar covalent complex of I-Ab with the class II binding fragment (class II-associated invariant chain peptides) of the invariant chain. Moreover, 25-9-17 blocked activation of several I-Ab-reactive T cell hybridomas but failed to block others, suggesting that numerous I-Ab-peptide complexes acquire the 25-9-17(+) or 25-9-17(-) conformation. Alloreactive T cells were also able to discriminate peptide-dependent variants of MHC class II molecules. Thus, peptides impose subtle structural transitions upon MHC class II molecules that affect T cell recognition and may thus be critical for T cell selection and autiommunity.

  4. In situ investigations of Fe3+ induced complexation of adsorbed Mefp-1 protein film on iron substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Sababi, Majid; Brinck, Tore; Persson, Dan; Pan, Jinshan; Claesson, Per M

    2013-08-15

    A range of in situ analytical techniques and theoretical calculations were applied to gain insights into the formation and properties of the Mefp-1 film on iron substrate, as well as the protein complexation with Fe(3+) ions. Adsorption kinetics of Mefp-1 and the complexation were investigated using QCM-D. The results suggest an initially fast adsorption, with the molecules oriented preferentially parallel to the surface, followed by a structural change within the film leading to molecules extending toward solution. Exposure to a diluted FeCl3 solution results in enhanced complexation within the adsorbed protein film, leading to water removal and film compaction. In situ Peak Force Tapping AFM was employed for determining morphology and nano-mechanical properties of the surface layer. The results, in agreement with the QCM-D observations, demonstrate that addition of Fe(3+) induces a transition from an extended and soft protein layer to a denser and stiffer one. Further, in situ ATR-FTIR and Confocal Raman Micro-spectroscopy (CRM) techniques were utilized to monitor compositional/structural changes in the surface layer due to addition of Fe(3+) ions. The spectroscopic analyses assisted by DFT calculations provide evidence for formation of tri-Fe(3+)/catechol complexes in the surface film, which is enhanced by Fe(3+) addition.

  5. The Adaptive Nature of the Bone-Periodontal Ligament-Cementum Complex in a Ligature-Induced Periodontitis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lin, Jeremy D.; Fong, Justine I.; Ryder, Mark I.; Ho, Sunita P.

    2013-01-01

    The novel aspect of this study involves illustrating significant adaptation of a functionally loaded bone-PDL-cementum complex in a ligature-induced periodontitis rat model. Following 4, 8, and 15 days of ligation, proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and RANKL), a mineral resorption indicator (TRAP), and a cell migration and adhesion molecule for tissue regeneration (fibronectin) within the complex were localized and correlated with changes in PDL-space (functional space). At 4 days of ligation, the functional space of the distal complex was widened compared to controls and was positively correlated with an increased expression of TNF-α. At 8 and 15 days, the number of RANKL(+) cells decreased near the mesial alveolar bone crest (ABC) but increased at the distal ABC. TRAP(+) cells on both sides of the complex significantly increased at 8 days. A gradual change in fibronectin expression from the distal PDL-secondary cementum interfaces through precementum layers was observed when compared to increased and abrupt changes at the mesial PDL-cementum and PDL-bone interfaces in ligated and control groups. Based on our results, we hypothesize that compromised strain fields can be created in a diseased periodontium, which in response to prolonged function can significantly alter the original bone and apical cementum formations. PMID:23936854

  6. Barrier-free intermolecular proton transfer in the uracil-glycine complex induced by excess electron attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutowski, M.; Dąbkowska, I.; Rak, J.; Xu, S.; Nilles, J. M.; Radisic, D.; Bowen, K. H., Jr.

    2002-09-01

    The photoelectron spectra (PES) of anions of uracil-glycine and uracil-phenylalanine complexes reveal broad features with maxima at 1.8 and 2.0 eV. The results of ab initio density functional B3LYP and second order Møller-Plesset theory calculations indicate that the excess electron occupies a π^* orbital localized on uracil. The excess electron attachment to the complex can induce a barrier-free proton transfer (BFPT) from the carboxylic group of glycine to the O8 atom of uracil. As a result, the four most stable structures of the anion of uracil-glycine complex can be characterized as the neutral radical of hydrogenated uracil solvated by the anion of deprotonated glycine. The similarity between the PES spectra for the uracil complexes with glycine and phenylalanine suggests that the BFPT is also operative in the case of the latter anionic species. The BFPT to the O8 atom of uracil may be related to the damage of nucleic acid bases by low energy electrons because the O8 atom is involved in a hydrogen bond with adenine in the standard Watson-Crick pairing scheme.

  7. The ROS production induced by a reverse-electron flux at respiratory-chain complex 1 is hampered by metformin.

    PubMed

    Batandier, Cécile; Guigas, Bruno; Detaille, Dominique; El-Mir, M-Yehia; Fontaine, Eric; Rigoulet, M; Leverve, Xavier M

    2006-02-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was investigated in mitochondria extracted from liver of rats treated with or without metformin, a mild inhibitor of respiratory chain complex 1 used in type 2 diabetes. A high rate of ROS production, fully suppressed by rotenone, was evidenced in non-phosphorylating mitochondria in the presence of succinate as a single complex 2 substrate. This ROS production was substantially lowered by metformin pretreatment and by any decrease in membrane potential (Delta Phi(m)), redox potential (NADH/NAD), or phosphate potential, as induced by malonate, 2,4-dinitrophenol, or ATP synthesis, respectively. ROS production in the presence of glutamate-malate plus succinate was lower than in the presence of succinate alone, but higher than in the presence of glutamate-malate. Moreover, while rotenone both increased and decreased ROS production at complex 1 depending on forward (glutamate-malate) or reverse (succinate) electron flux, no ROS overproduction was evidenced in the forward direction with metformin. Therefore, we propose that reverse electron flux through complex 1 is an alternative pathway, which leads to a specific metformin-sensitive ROS production.

  8. Locally induced surface air confluence by complex terrain and its effects on air pollution in the valley of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazcilevich, Aron D.; García, Agustín R.; Caetano, Ernesto

    Using a meteorological computational model it is shown how, in the Valley of Mexico, a high pressure system together with the complex orography of the region induce the formation of a local confluence line. With the aid of a prognostic air quality model it is shown that the maximum pollutant mixing ratios are placed on and follow the confluence line which crosses over the most populated areas of Mexico City. This phenomenon provides an explanation of why and when pollutants assume its geographical distribution in the valley during high mixing ratio episodes.

  9. Effects of compositional complexity on the ion-irradiation induced swelling and hardening in Ni-containing equiatomic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, K.; Lu, C.; Wang, L. M.; Qu, J.; Weber, W. J.; Zhang, Y.; Bei, H.

    2016-04-14

    The impact of compositional complexity on the ion-irradiation induced swelling and hardening is studied in Ni and six Ni-containing equiatomic alloys with face-centered cubic structure. The irradiation resistance at the temperature of 500 °C is improved by controlling the number and, especially, the type of alloying elements. Alloying with Fe and Mn has a stronger influence on swelling reduction than does alloying with Co and Cr. Lastly, the quinary alloy NiCoFeCrMn, with known excellent mechanical properties, has shown 40 times higher swelling tolerance than nickel.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy of topotecan-DNA complexes: Binding to DNA induces topotecan dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalov, K. E.; Strel'Tsov, S. A.; Ermishov, M. A.; Grokhovskii, S. L.; Zhuze, A. L.; Ustinova, O. A.; Sukhanova, A. V.; Nabiev, I. R.; Oleinikov, V. A.

    2002-09-01

    The interaction of topotecan (TPT), antitumor inhibitor of human DNA topoisomerase I, with calf thymus DNA was studied by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. The SERS spectra of TPT are found to depend on its concentration in solution, which is associated with the dimerization of TPT. The spectral signatures of dimerization are identified. It is shown that binding to DNA induces the formation of TPT dimers. The formation of DNA-TPT-TPT-DNA complexes is considered as one of the possible mechanisms of human DNA topoisomerase I inhibition.

  11. Suilysin-induced Platelet-Neutrophil Complexes Formation is Triggered by Pore Formation-dependent Calcium Influx

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shengwei; Zheng, Yuling; Chen, Shaolong; Huang, Shujing; Liu, Keke; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Yongqiang; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation and platelet–neutrophil interactions have been found to be involved in inflammation, organ failure and soft-tissue necrosis in bacterial infections. Streptococcus suis, an emerging human pathogen, can cause streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome (STSS) similarly to Streptococcus pyogenes. Currently, S. suis–platelet interactions are poorly understood. Here, we found that suilysin (SLY), the S. suis cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC), was the sole stimulus of S. suis that induced platelet-neutrophil complexes (PNC) formation. Furthermore, P-selectin released in α-granules mediated PNC formation. This process was triggered by the SLY-induced pore forming-dependent Ca2+ influx. Moreover, we demonstrated that the Ca2+ influx triggered an MLCK-dependent pathway playing critical roles in P-selectin activation and PNC formation, however, PLC-β-IP3/DAG-MLCK and Rho-ROCK-MLCK signalling were not involved. Additionally, the “outside-in” signalling had a smaller effect on the SLY-induced P-selectin release and PNC formation. Interestingly, other CDCs including pneumolysin and streptolysin O have also been found to induce PNC formation in a pore forming-dependent Ca2+ influx manner. It is possible that the bacterial CDC-mediated PNC formation is a similar response mechanism used by a wide range of bacteria. These findings may provide useful insight for discovering potential therapeutic targets for S. suis-associated STSS. PMID:27830834

  12. Carotenoid-induced cooperative formation of bacterial photosynthetic LH1 complex.

    PubMed

    Fiedor, Leszek; Akahane, Junji; Koyama, Yasushi

    2004-12-28

    A simple reconstitution technique has been developed and then applied to prepare a series of light-harvesting antenna 1 (LH1) complexes with a programmed carotenoid composition, not available from native photosynthetic membranes. The complexes were reconstituted with different C(40) carotenoids, having two structural parameters variable: the functional side groups and the number of conjugated C-C double bonds, systematically increasing from 9 to 13. The complexes, differing only in the type of carotenoid, bound to an otherwise identical bacteriochlorophyll-polypeptide matrix, can serve as a unique model system in which the relationship between the carotenoid character and the functioning of pigment-protein complexes can be investigated. The reconstituted LH1 complexes resemble the native antenna, isolated from wild-type Rhodospirillum rubrum, but their coloration is entirely determined by carotenoid. Along with the increase in its conjugation size, the carotenoid absorption transitions gradually shift to the red. Thus, the extension of the conjugation size of the antenna carotenoids provides a mechanism for the spectral tuning of light harvesting in the visible part of the spectrum. The carotenoids in the reconstitution system promote the LH1 formation and seem to bind and transfer the excitation energy specifically only to a species with characteristically red-shifted absorption and emission maxima, apparently, due to a cooperative effect. Monitoring the LH1 formation by steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies reveals that in the presence of carotenoids it proceeds without spectrally resolved intermediates, leading directly to B880. The effect of the carotenoid is enhanced when the pigment contains the hydroxy or methoxy side groups, implying that, in parallel to hydrophobic interactions and pi-pi stacking, other interactions are also involved in the formation and stabilization of LH1.

  13. Collision-Induced Infrared Absorption by Collisional Complexes in dense Hydrogen-Helium gas mixtures at Thousands of Kelvin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Martin; Frommhold, Lothar; Li, Xiaoping; Hunt, Katharine

    2011-05-01

    The interaction-induced absorption by collisional pairs of H2 molecules is an important opacity source in the atmospheres of the outer planets and cool stars. The emission spectra of cool white dwarf stars differ significantly in the infrared from the expected blackbody spectra of their cores, which is largely due to absorption by collisional H2-H2, H2-He, and H2-H complexes in the stellar atmospheres. Using quantum-chemical methods we compute the atmospheric absorption from hundreds to thousands of kelvin. Laboratory measurements of interaction-induced absorption spectra by H2 pairs exist only at room temperature and below. We show that our results reproduce these measurements closely, so that our computational data permit reliable modeling of stellar atmosphere opacities even for the higher temperatures. The interaction-induced absorption by collisional pairs of H2 molecules is an important opacity source in the atmospheres of the outer planets and cool stars. The emission spectra of cool white dwarf stars differ significantly in the infrared from the expected blackbody spectra of their cores, which is largely due to absorption by collisional H2-H2, H2-He, and H2-H complexes in the stellar atmospheres. Using quantum-chemical methods we compute the atmospheric absorption from hundreds to thousands of kelvin. Laboratory measurements of interaction-induced absorption spectra by H2 pairs exist only at room temperature and below. We show that our results reproduce these measurements closely, so that our computational data permit reliable modeling of stellar atmosphere opacities even for the higher temperatures. This work has been supported in part by the National Science Foundation through Grants AST-0709106 and AST-0708496.

  14. X-ray-induced cell death in the developing hippocampal complex involved neurons and requires protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, I.; Serrano, T.; Alcantara, S.; Tortosa, A.; Graus, F.

    1993-07-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats aged 1 or 15 days were irradiated with a single dose of 200 cGy X-rays and killed at different intervals from 3 to 48 hours (h). Dying cells were recognized by their shrunken and often fragmented nuclei and less damaged cytoplasm in the early stages. On the basis of immunocytochemical markers, dying cells probably represented a heterogeneous population which included neurons and immature cells. In rats aged 1 day the number of dying cells rapidly increased in the hippocampal complex with peak values 6 h after irradiation. This was following by a gentle decrease to reach normal values 48 h after irradiation. The most severely affected regions were the subplate and the cellular layer of the subiculum, gyrus dentatus and hilus, and the stratum oriens and pyramidale of the hippocampus (CA1 more affected than CA2, and this more affected than CA3). X-ray-induced cell death was abolished with an injection of cycloheximide (2 [mu]g/g i.p.) given at the time of irradiation. X-ray-induced cell death was not changed after the intraventicular administration of nerve growth factor (NGF; 10 [mu]g in saline) at the time of irradiation. Cell death was not induced by X-irradiation in rats aged 15 days. These results indicate that X-ray-induced cell death in the hippocampal complex of the developing rat is subjected to determinate temporal and regional patterns of vulnerability; it is an active process mediated by protein synthesis but probably not dependent on NGF. 60 refs., 5 figs.

  15. The Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 complex interacts with the mismatch repair system and contributes to temozolomide-induced G2 arrest and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Mirzoeva, Olga K; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Pieper, Russell O

    2006-11-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent temozolomide produces O(6)-methylguanine (O6MG) in DNA, which triggers futile DNA mismatch repair, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), G(2) arrest, and ultimately cell death. Because the protein complex consisting of Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN complex) plays a key role in DNA damage detection and signaling, we asked if this complex also played a role in the cellular response to temozolomide. Temozolomide exposure triggered the assembly of MRN complex into chromatin-associated nuclear foci. MRN foci formed significantly earlier than gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci that assembled in response to temozolomide-induced DNA DSBs. MRN foci formation was suppressed in cells that incurred lower levels of temozolomide-induced O6MG lesions and/or had decreased mismatch repair capabilities, suggesting that the MRN foci formed not in response to temozolomide-induced DSB but rather in response to mismatch repair processing of mispaired temozolomide-induced O6MG lesions. Consistent with this idea, the MRN foci colocalized with those of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (a component of the mismatch repair complex), and the MRN complex component Nbs1 coimmunoprecipitated with the mismatch repair protein Mlh1 specifically in response to temozolomide treatment. Furthermore, small inhibitory RNA-mediated suppression of Mre11 levels decreased temozolomide-induced G(2) arrest and cytotoxicity in a manner comparable to that achieved by suppression of mismatch repair. These data show that temozolomide-induced O6MG lesions, acted upon by the mismatch repair system, drive formation of the MRN complex foci and the interaction of this complex with the mismatch repair machinery. The MRN complex in turn contributes to the control of temozolomide-induced G(2) arrest and cytotoxicity, and as such is an additional determining factor in glioma sensitivity to DNA methylating chemotherapeutic drugs such as temozolomide.

  16. Ruthenium dihydroxybipyridine complexes are tumor activated prodrugs due to low pH and blue light induced ligand release.

    PubMed

    Hufziger, Kyle T; Thowfeik, Fathima Shazna; Charboneau, David J; Nieto, Ismael; Dougherty, William G; Kassel, W Scott; Dudley, Timothy J; Merino, Edward J; Papish, Elizabeth T; Paul, Jared J

    2014-01-01

    Ruthenium drugs are potent anti-cancer agents, but inducing drug selectivity and enhancing their modest activity remain challenging. Slow Ru ligand loss limits the formation of free sites and subsequent binding to DNA base pairs. Herein, we designed a ligand that rapidly dissociates upon irradiation at low pH. Activation at low pH can lead to cancer selectivity, since many cancer cells have higher metabolism (and thus lower pH) than non-cancerous cells. We have used the pH sensitive ligand, 6,6'-dihydroxy-2,2'-bipyridine (66'bpy(OH)2), to generate [Ru(bpy)2(66'(bpy(OH)2)](2+), which contains two acidic hydroxyl groups with pKa1=5.26 and pKa2=7.27. Irradiation when protonated leads to photo-dissociation of the 66'bpy(OH)2 ligand. An in-depth study of the structural and electronic properties of the complex was carried out using X-ray crystallography, electrochemistry, UV/visible spectroscopy, and computational techniques. Notably, RuN bond lengths in the 66'bpy(OH)2 complex are longer (by ~0.3Å) than in polypyridyl complexes that lack 6 and 6' substitution. Thus, the longer bond length predisposes the complex for photo-dissociation and leads to the anti-cancer activity. When the complex is deprotonated, the 66'bpy(O(-))2 ligand molecular orbitals mix heavily with the ruthenium orbitals, making new mixed metal-ligand orbitals that lead to a higher bond order. We investigated the anti-cancer activities of [Ru(bpy)2(66'(bpy(OH)2)](2+), [Ru(bpy)2(44'(bpy(OH)2)](2+), and [Ru(bpy)3](2+) (44'(bpy(OH)2=4,4'-dihydroxy-2,2'-bipyridine) in HeLa cells, which have a relatively low pH. It is found that [Ru(bpy)2(66'(bpy(OH)2)](2+) is more cytotoxic than the other ruthenium complexes studied. Thus, we have identified a pH sensitive ruthenium scaffold that can be exploited for photo-induced anti-cancer activity.

  17. Structural transitions and guest/host complexing of liquid crystal helical nanofilaments induced by nanoconfinement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hanim; Ryu, Seong Ho; Tuchband, Michael; Shin, Tae Joo; Korblova, Eva; Walba, David M; Clark, Noel A; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2017-02-01

    A lamellar liquid crystal (LC) phase of certain bent-core mesogenic molecules can be grown in a manner that generates a single chiral helical nanofilament in each of the cylindrical nanopores of an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane. By introducing guest molecules into the resulting composite chiral nanochannels, we explore the structures and functionality of the ordered guest/host LC complex, verifying the smectic-like positional order of the fluidic nematic LC phase, which is obtained by the combination of the LC organization and the nanoporous AAO superstructure. The guest nematic LC 4'-n-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl is found to form a distinctive fluid layered ordered LC complex at the nanofilament/guest interface with the host 1,3-phenylene bis[4-(4-nonyloxyphenyliminomethyl)benzoate], where this interface contacts the AAO cylinder wall. Filament growth form is strongly influenced by mixture parameters and pore dimensions.

  18. Structural transitions and guest/host complexing of liquid crystal helical nanofilaments induced by nanoconfinement

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hanim; Ryu, Seong Ho; Tuchband, Michael; Shin, Tae Joo; Korblova, Eva; Walba, David M.; Clark, Noel A.; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2017-01-01

    A lamellar liquid crystal (LC) phase of certain bent-core mesogenic molecules can be grown in a manner that generates a single chiral helical nanofilament in each of the cylindrical nanopores of an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane. By introducing guest molecules into the resulting composite chiral nanochannels, we explore the structures and functionality of the ordered guest/host LC complex, verifying the smectic-like positional order of the fluidic nematic LC phase, which is obtained by the combination of the LC organization and the nanoporous AAO superstructure. The guest nematic LC 4′-n-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl is found to form a distinctive fluid layered ordered LC complex at the nanofilament/guest interface with the host 1,3-phenylene bis[4-(4-nonyloxyphenyliminomethyl)benzoate], where this interface contacts the AAO cylinder wall. Filament growth form is strongly influenced by mixture parameters and pore dimensions. PMID:28246642

  19. EEG complexity drug-induced changes in disorders of consciousness: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Valenza, G; Carboncini, M C; Virgillito, A; Creatini, I; Bonfiglio, L; Rossi, B; Lanatà, A; Scilingo, E P

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to investigate EEG (ElectroEncephaloGram) dynamics after drug intake in patients being in states of Disorders Of Consciousness (DOC) after brain injury. Four patients were involved in the study. All the patients exhibit cerebral lesions located in the same anatomical region. Two nonlinear indexes, such as Lempel-Ziv Complexity (LZC) and Approximate Entropy (ApEn), along with power spectra, were calculated for EEG signals gathered from electrodes placed on both injured and non-injured regions. Experimental results show that after drug administration the two nonlinear indexes calculated from EEG taken from injured regions increase (p < 0.001) while power spectra decrease or remain unchanged. These results do not pretend to draw conclusions about consciousness level either suggest promising therapeutical treatments, but represent only an experimental evidence about the change in the EEG complexity after drug administration.

  20. Photoluminescence analysis of self induced planer alignment in azo dye dispersed nematic liquid crystal complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rishi Sood, Srishti Raina, K. K.

    2014-04-24

    We have developed azo dye doped nematic liquid crystal complex for advanced photonic liquid crystal display technology aspects. Disperse orange azo dye self introduced planer alignment in the nematic liquid crystal without any surface anchoring treatment. Planer alignment was characterized by optical polarizing microscopy. The electro-optical switching response of dye disperse planer aligned nematic cell was investigated as a function of applied voltage with the help of photoluminescence spectrophotometer for the tuning of photoluminescence contrast.

  1. Iminophosphorane-organogold(III) complexes induce cell death through mitochondrial ROS production

    PubMed Central

    Vela, Laura; Contel, María; Palomera, Luis; Azaceta, Gemma; Marzo, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Gold compounds are being investigated as potential antitumor drugs. Some gold(III) derivatives have shown to induce cell death in solid tumors but their mechanism of action differs from that of cisplatin, since most of these compounds do not bind to DNA. We have explored cellular events triggered by three different iminophosphorane-organo gold(III) compounds in leukemia cells (a neutral compound with two chloride ligands [Au{κ2-C,N-C6H4(PPh2=N(C6H5)-2}Cl2] 1, and two cationic compounds with either a dithiocarbamate ligand [Au{κ2-C,N-C6H4(PPh2=N(C6H5)-2}(S2CN-Me2)]PF6 2, or a water-soluble phosphine and a chloride ligand [Au{κ2-C,N-C6H4(PPh2=N(C6H5)-2}(P{Cp(m-C6H4-SO3Na)2}3) Cl]PF6 3). All three compounds showed higher toxicity against leukemia cells when compared to normal T-lymphocytes. Compounds 1 and 2 induced both necrosis and apoptosis, while 3 was mainly apoptotic. Necrotic cell death induced by 1 and 2 was Bax/Bak- and caspase-independent, while apoptosis induced by 3 was Bax/Bak-dependent. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production at the mitochondrial level was a critical step in the antitumor effect of these compounds. PMID:21864808

  2. Exogenous enzyme complex prevents intestinal soybean meal-induced enteritis in Mugil liza (Valenciennes, 1836) juvenile.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Leonardo R V; Pedrosa, Virgínia F; Mori, Agnes; Andrade, Carlos F F DE; Romano, Luis A; Abreu, Paulo C; Tesser, Marcelo B

    2017-02-09

    Four soybean meal-based diets containing increasing levels of an enzyme complex (E50, E100, E150 and E200 at 50, 100, 150 and 200 g ton-1, respectively) and one soybean meal-based diet without the enzyme complex (E0) were fed in triplicate to M. liza juveniles in a semi-static flow system with 20 fish per tank for 75 days. There were no differences between the treatments for animal performance parameters, but fish fed the enzyme complex treatment exhibited significantly (P<0.05) higher values of calcium bone retention compared with control fish. Although there was no relationship between bacterial counts in different sections of the gastrointestinal tract or enzyme levels, filamentous bacteria were increased in E50 compared with E150. All of the treatments resulted in higher bacterial counts in the stomach than in intestinal segments. Histological screening showed serious to moderate infiltration of inflammatory cells, modification in villus morphology and necrosis in some cases in fish fed the E0 diet. In addition, fish from the E0 treatment exhibited significantly (P<0.05) lower lipid deposition in the peritoneal cavity. Therefore, the use of low levels of exogenous enzyme is recommended in diets for M. liza when soybean meal is used as the main source of protein.

  3. Proteomic response of β-lactamases-producing Enterobacter cloacae complex strain to cefotaxime-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Maravić, Ana; Cvjetan, Svjetlana; Konta, Marina; Ladouce, Romain; Martín, Fernando A

    2016-07-01

    Bacteria of the Enterobacter cloacae complex are among the ten most common pathogens causing nosocomial infections in the USA. Consequently, increased resistance to β-lactam antibiotics, particularly expanded-spectrum cephalosporins like cefotaxime (CTX), poses a serious threat. Differential In-Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE), followed by LC-MS/MS analysis and bioinformatics tools, was employed to investigate the survival mechanisms of a multidrug-resistant E. hormaechei subsp. steigerwaltii 51 carrying several β-lactamase-encoding genes, including the 'pandemic' blaCTX-M-15 After exposing the strain with sub-minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of CTX, a total of 1072 spots from the whole-cell proteome were detected, out of which 35 were differentially expressed (P ≤ 0.05, fold change ≥1.5). Almost 50% of these proteins were involved in cell metabolism and energy production, and then cell wall organization/virulence, stress response and transport. This is the first study investigating the whole-cell proteomic response related to the survival of β-lactamases-producing strain, belonging to the E. cloacae complex when exposed to β-lactam antibiotic. Our data support the theory of a multifactorial synergistic effect of diverse proteomic changes occurring in bacterial cells during antibiotic exposure, depicting the complexity of β-lactam resistance and giving us an insight in the key pathways mediating the antibiotic resistance in this emerging opportunistic pathogen.

  4. Interleukin-2/Anti-Interleukin-2 Immune Complex Expands Regulatory T Cells and Reduces Angiotensin II-Induced Aortic Stiffening

    PubMed Central

    Eberson, Lance S.; Secomb, Timothy W.; Larmonier, Nicolas; Larson, Douglas F.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive immune function is implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular disease. Inhibition of T-lymphocyte function has been shown to reduce hypertension, target-organ damage, and vascular stiffness. To study the role of immune inhibitory cells, CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), on vascular stiffness, we stimulated the proliferation of Treg lymphocytes in vivo using a novel cytokine immune complex of Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and anti-IL-2 monoclonal antibody clone JES6-1 (mAbCD25). Three-month-old male C57BL/6J mice were treated with IL-2/mAbCD25 concomitantly with continuous infusion of angiotensin type 1 receptor agonist, [Val5]angiotensin II. Our results indicate that the IL-2/mAbCD25 complex effectively induced Treg phenotype expansion by 5-fold in the spleens with minimal effects on total CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers. The IL-2/mAbCD25 complex inhibited angiotensin II-mediated aortic collagen remodeling and the resulting stiffening, analyzed with in vivo pulse wave velocity and effective Young's modulus. Furthermore, the IL-2/mAbCD25 complex suppressed angiotensin II-mediated Th17 responses in the lymphoid organs and reduced gene expression of IL-17 as well as T cell and macrophage infiltrates in the aortic tissue. This study provides data that support the protective roles of Tregs in vascular stiffening and highlights the use of the IL-2/mAbCD25 complex as a new potential therapy in angiotensin II-related vascular diseases. PMID:25258681

  5. Glycolic Acid Silences Inflammasome Complex Genes, NLRC4 and ASC, by Inducing DNA Methylation in HaCaT Cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sheau-Chung; Yeh, Jih-I; Hung, Sung-Jen; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Liu, Fu-Tong; Yang, Jen-Hung

    2016-03-01

    AHAs (α-hydroxy acids), including glycolic acid (GA), have been widely used in cosmetic products and superficial chemical peels. Inflammasome complex has been shown to play critical roles in inflammatory pathways in human keratinocytes. However, the anti-inflammatory mechanism of GA is still unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the expression of the inflammasome complex and epigenetic modification to elucidate the molecular mechanism of the anti-inflammatory effect of GA in HaCaT cells. We evaluated NLRP3, NLRC4, AIM2, and ASC inflammasome complex gene expression on real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Methylation changes were detected in these genes following treatment with DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza) with or without the addition of GA using methylation-specific PCR (MSP). GA inhibited the expressions of these inflammasome complex genes, and the decreases in the expressions of mRNA were reversed by 5-Aza treatment. Methylation was detected in NLRC4 and ASC on MSP, but not in NLRP3 or AIM2. GA decreased NLRC4 and ASC gene expression by increasing not only DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT-3B) protein level, but also total DNMT activity. Furthermore, silencing of DNMT-3B (shDNMT-3B) increased the expressions of NLRC4 and ASC. Our data demonstrated that GA treatment induces hypermethylation of promoters of NLRC4 and ASC genes, which may subsequently lead to the hindering of the assembly of the inflammasome complex in HaCaT cells. These results highlight the anti-inflammatory potential of GA-containing cosmetic agents in human skin cells and demonstrate for the first time the role of aberrant hypermethylation in this process.

  6. IL-7 Induces an Epitope Masking of γc Protein in IL-7 Receptor Signaling Complex

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Tae Sik; Jo, Yuna; Lee, Byunghyuk; Kim, Geona; Hwang, Hyunju; Ko, Eunhee; Kang, Seung Wan; Oh, Sae-Ock; Baek, Sun-Yong; Yoon, Sik; Lee, Jung Sub

    2017-01-01

    IL-7 signaling via IL-7Rα and common γ-chain (γc) is necessary for the development and homeostasis of T cells. Although the delicate mechanism in which IL-7Rα downregulation allows the homeostasis of T cell with limited IL-7 has been well known, the exact mechanism behind the interaction between IL-7Rα and γc in the absence or presence of IL-7 remains unclear. Additionally, we are still uncertain as to how only IL-7Rα is separately downregulated by the binding of IL-7 from the IL-7Rα/γc complex. We demonstrate here that 4G3, TUGm2, and 3E12 epitope masking of γc protein are induced in the presence of IL-7, indicating that the epitope alteration is induced by IL-7 binding to the preassembled receptor core. Moreover, the epitope masking of γc protein is inversely correlated with the expression of IL-7Rα upon IL-7 binding, implying that the structural alteration of γc might be involved in the regulation of IL-7Rα expression. The conformational change in γc upon IL-7 binding may contribute not only to forming the functional IL-7 signaling complex but also to optimally regulating the expression of IL-7Rα. PMID:28127156

  7. Charge Transfer Dissociation of Complex Oligosaccharides: Comparison with Collision-Induced Dissociation and Extreme Ultraviolet Dissociative Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ropartz, David; Li, Pengfei; Fanuel, Mathieu; Giuliani, Alexandre; Rogniaux, Hélène; Jackson, Glen P.

    2016-10-01

    The structural characterization of oligosaccharides still challenges the field of analytical chemistry. Tandem mass spectrometry offers many advantages toward this aim, although the generic fragmentation method (low-energy collision-induced dissociation) shows clear limitations and is often insufficient to retrieve some essential structural information on these molecules. In this work, we present the first application of helium charge transfer dissociation (He-CTD) to characterize the structure of complex oligosaccharides. We compare this method with low-energy collision-induced dissociation and extreme-ultraviolet dissociative photoionization (XUV-DPI), which was shown previously to ensure the successful characterization of complex glycans. Similarly to what could be obtained by XUV-DPI, He-CTD provides a complete description of the investigated structures by producing many informative cross-ring fragments and no ambiguous fragmentation. Unlike XUV-DPI, which is performed at a synchrotron source, He-CTD has the undeniable advantage of being implementable in a conventional benchtop ion trap in a conventional laboratory setting.

  8. Surface-induced dissociation of ion mobility-separated noncovalent complexes in a quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mowei; Huang, Chengsi; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2012-07-17

    A custom in-line surface-induced dissociation (SID) device has been incorporated into a commercial ion mobility quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometer in order to provide an alternative and potentially more informative activation method than the commonly used collision-induced dissociation (CID). Complicated sample mixtures can be fractionated by ion mobility (IM) and then dissociated by CID or SID for further structural analysis. Interpretation of SID spectra for cesium iodide clusters was greatly simplified with IM prior to dissociation because products originating from different precursors and overlapping in m/z but separated in drift time can be examined individually. Multiple conformations of two protein complexes, source-activated transthyretin tetramer and nativelike serum amyloid P decamer, were separated in ion mobility and subjected to CID and SID. CID spectra of the mobility separated conformations are similar. However, drastic differences can be observed for SID spectra of different conformations, implying different structures in the gas phase. This work highlights the potential of utilizing IM-SID to study quaternary structures of protein complexes and provides information that is complementary to our recently reported SID-IM approach.

  9. ERK phosphorylation of MED14 in promoter complexes during mitogen-induced gene activation by Elk-1.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, Matthew D; Saxton, Janice; Li, Li; Shelton, Samuel J; Zhang, Hongmei; Espinosa, Joaquin M; Shaw, Peter E

    2013-12-01

    The ETS domain transcription factor Elk-1 stimulates expression of immediate early genes (IEGs) in response to mitogens. These events require phosphorylation of Elk-1 by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphorylation-dependent interaction of Elk-1 with co-activators, including histone acetyltransferases and the Mediator complex. Elk-1 also recruits ERK to the promoters of its target genes, suggesting that ERK phosphorylates additional substrates in transcription complexes at mitogen-responsive promoters. Here we report that MED14, a core subunit of the Mediator, is a bona fide ERK substrate and identify serine 986 (S986) within a serine-proline rich region of MED14 as the major ERK phosphorylation site. Mitogens induced phosphorylation of MED14 on S986 at IEG promoters; RNAi knockdown of MED14 reduced CDK8 and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) recruitment, RNAPII C-terminal domain phosphorylation and impaired activation of IEG transcription. A single alanine substitution at S986 reduced activation of an E26 (ETS)-responsive reporter by oncogenic Ras and mitogen-induced, Elk-1-dependent transcription, whereas activities of other transcriptional activators were unaffected. We also demonstrate that Elk-1 can associate with MED14 independently of MED23, which may facilitate phosphorylation of MED14 by ERK to impart a positive and selective impact on mitogen-responsive gene expression.

  10. In vitro platelet activation, aggregation and platelet-granulocyte complex formation induced by surface modified single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Fent, János; Bihari, Péter; Vippola, Minnamari; Sarlin, Essi; Lakatos, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Surface modification of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) such as carboxylation, amidation, hydroxylation and pegylation is used to reduce the nanotube toxicity and render them more suitable for biomedical applications than their pristine counterparts. Toxicity can be manifested in platelet activation as it has been shown for SWCNTs. However, the effect of various surface modifications on the platelet activating potential of SWCNTs has not been tested yet. In vitro platelet activation (CD62P) as well as the platelet-granulocyte complex formation (CD15/CD41 double positivity) in human whole blood were measured by flow cytometry in the presence of 0.1mg/ml of pristine or various surface modified SWCNTs. The effect of various SWCNTs was tested by whole blood impedance aggregometry, too. All tested SWCNTs but the hydroxylated ones activate platelets and promote platelet-granulocyte complex formation in vitro. Carboxylated, pegylated and pristine SWCNTs induce whole blood aggregation as well. Although pegylation is preferred from biomedical point of view, among the samples tested by us pegylated SWCNTs induced far the most prominent activation and a well detectable aggregation of platelets in whole blood.

  11. pH-Regulated Reversible Transition Between Polyion Complexes (PIC) and Hydrogen-Bonding Complexes (HBC) with Tunable Aggregation-Induced Emission.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sidan; Liu, Guhuan; Wang, Xiaorui; Wu, Tao; Yang, Jinxian; Ye, Xiaodong; Zhang, Guoying; Hu, Jinming; Liu, Shiyong

    2016-02-17

    The mimicking of biological supramolecular interactions and their mutual transitions to fabricate intelligent artificial systems has been of increasing interest. Herein, we report the fabrication of supramolecular micellar nanoparticles consisting of quaternized poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PEO-b-PQDMA) and tetrakis(4-carboxylmethoxyphenyl)ethene (TPE-4COOH), which was capable of reversible transition between polyion complexes (PIC) and hydrogen bonding complexes (HBC) with tunable aggregation-induced emission (AIE) mediated by solution pH. At pH 8, TPE-4COOH chromophores can be directly dissolved in aqueous milieu without evident fluorescence emission. However, upon mixing with PEO-b-PQDMA, polyion complexes were formed by taking advantage of electrostatic interaction between carboxylate anions and quaternary ammonium cations and the most compact PIC micelles were achieved at the isoelectric point (i.e., [QDMA(+)]/[COO(-)] = 1), as confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement. Simultaneously, fluorescence spectroscopy revealed an evident emission turn-on and the maximum fluorescence intensity was observed near the isoelectric point due to the restriction of intramolecular rotation of TPE moieties within the PIC cores. The kinetic study supported a micelle fusion/fission mechanism on the formation of PIC micelles at varying charge ratios, exhibiting a quick time constant (τ1) relating to the formation of quasi-equilibrium micelles and a slow time constant (τ2) corresponding to the formation of final equilibrium micelles. Upon deceasing the pH of PIC micelles from 8 to 2 at the [QDMA(+)]/[COO(-)] molar ratio of 1, TPE-4COOH chromophores became gradually protonated and hydrophobic. The size of micellar nanoparticles underwent a remarkable decrease, whereas the fluorescence intensity exhibited a further increase by approximately 7.35-fold, presumably because of the formation of HBC micelles comprising cationic PQDMA

  12. A Role of Low-angle Thrust Fault for the Occurrence of rain-induced Rockslides in an Accretionary Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, N.; Chigira, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, extreme weather related to global warming occurs frequently all over the world; there have been many record-setting rainfall events. Accordingly, potential of rain-induced rockslides increases. Examples of recent rain-induced rock avalanches with tens or more than a hundred of fatalities are a rockslide in Shiaolin village, Taiwan by 2009 Typhoon Morakot, and rockslides induced by 2011 typhoon Talas in Japan. However, the method to predict potential sites of rockslides is not established. Geological causes of rockslides are site specific and they must be clarified for each case. 2011 Typhoon Talas induced more than 50 rockslides in the outer belt of the Southwest Japan, where is underlain by Cretaceous - lower Miocene accretionary complexes. We performed thorough geological mapping in the Akatani area, where two huge rockslides occurred with volumes of 2 million and 8 million m3 respectively. As a result, we found that these two rockslides had their sliding surfaces along a low-angle-thrust with a dip of 29°~40° extending more than 5 km, which fault we name Kawarabi-thrust. This thrust has a fracture zone of 6.0 m in the maximum width, composed of clayey fault breccia with a few layers of black gouges. These fault materials are very weak and impermeable, so the fracture zone is expected to prevent the groundwater filtration and build up the pore pressure. This thrust had been exposed along the riversides at the foot of the two rockslides, which suggests that the slopes on the thrust had been destabilized by the undercutting of long-term river incision. The destabilization induced gravitational slope deformation with small scarps before the catastrophic failure. Our finding suggests that locating a large-scale low-angle-thrust is essentially important to predict potential sites of catastrophic rockslides as well as interpreting the internal structure of gravitationally deformed slopes.

  13. Anti-diabetic properties of chromium citrate complex in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Wu, Xiangyang; Zhao, Ting; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Jiangli; Mao, Guanghua; Yang, Liuqing

    2011-12-01

    The chromium citrate complex [CrCIT] was synthesized and its structure was determined by infrared, UV-visible and atomic absorption spectroscopy, elemental and thermodynamic analysis. Anti-diabetic activity, oxidative DNA damage capacity and acute oral toxicity of [CrCIT] were investigated and compared with that of chromium trichloride hexahydrate. [CrCIT] was synthesized in a single step reaction by chelating chromium(III) with citric acid in aqueous solution. The molecular formula of [CrCIT] was inferred as CrC(6)H(5)O(7)·4H(2)O. The anti-diabetic activity of the complex [CrCIT] was assessed in alloxan-diabetic rats by daily oral gavage for 3 weeks. The biological activity results showed that the complex at the dose of 0.25-0.75 mg Cr/kg body weight could decrease the blood glucose level and increase liver glycogen level in alloxan-diabetic rats. [CrCIT] had more beneficial influences on the improvement of controlling blood glucose, serum lipid and liver glycogen levels compared with CrCl(3)·6H(2)O. Furthermore, [CrCIT] did not cause oxidative DNA damage under physiologically relevant conditions, and [CrCIT] did not produce any hazardous symptoms or deaths in acute oral toxicity test, showing the LD(50) value for female and male rats were higher than 15.1 g/kg body weight. The results suggested that [CrCIT] might represent a novel and proper chromium supplement with potential therapeutic value to control blood glucose in diabetes.

  14. Complex-periodic spiral waves in confluent cardiac cell cultures induced by localized inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seong-min; Kim, Tae Yun; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2005-07-01

    Spatiotemporal wave activities in excitable heart tissues have long been the subject of numerous studies because they underlie different forms of cardiac arrhythmias. In particular, understanding the dynamics and the instabilities of spiral waves have become very important because they can cause reentrant tachycardia and their subsequent transitions to fibrillation. Although many aspects of cardiac spiral waves have been investigated through experiments and model simulations, their complex properties are far from well understood. Here, we show that intriguing complex-periodic (such as period-2, period-3, period-4, or aperiodic) spiral wave states can arise in monolayer tissues of cardiac cell culture in vitro, and demonstrate that these different dynamic states can coexist with abrupt and spontaneous transitions among them without any change in system parameters; in other words, the medium supports multistability. Based on extensive image data analysis, we have confirmed that these spiral waves are driven by their tips tracing complex orbits whose unusual, meandering shapes are formed by delicate interplay between localized conduction blocks and nonlinear properties of the culture medium. Author contributions: S.-m.H. and K.J.L. designed research; S.-m.H. and T.Y.K. performed research; S.-m.H. contributed new reagents/analytic tools; S.-m.H., T.Y.K., and K.J.L. analyzed data; and S.-m.H. and K.J.L. wrote the paper.This paper was submitted directly (Track II) to the PNAS office.Abbreviations: IBI, interbeat interval; P-n, period-n.

  15. Collision-induced Raman spectra of Hg-rare gas Van der Waals complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borysow, A.; Grycuk, T.

    1982-10-01

    An absolute differential scattering cross section is calculated for the Hg-rare gas and pure Hg Van der Waals quasimolecules, taking into account both the free state and bound state contributions to the depolarized Raman spectra of these systems. The calculations are performed using the Maitland-Smith (MS) potential function fitted to available experimental data and assuming the simple dipole-induced dipole (DID) model of anisotropy of the polarizability tensor of a collisional atomic pair. The obtained cross sections are about 100 times greater than those for the pure rare gas calculated and measured by Frommhold et al.

  16. The Med1 Subunit of the Mediator Complex Induces Liver Cell Proliferation and Is Phosphorylated by AMP Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Viswakarma, Navin; Jia, Yuzhi; Bai, Liang; Gao, Qian; Lin, Bingliang; Zhang, Xiaohong; Misra, Parimal; Rana, Ajay; Jain, Sanjay; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Zhu, Yi-Jun; Thimmapaya, Bayar; Reddy, Janardan K.

    2013-01-01

    Mediator, a large multisubunit protein complex, plays a pivotal role in gene transcription by linking gene-specific transcription factors with the preinitiation complex and RNA polymerase II. In the liver, the key subunit of the Mediator complex, Med1, interacts with several nuclear receptors and transcription factors to direct gene-specific transcription. Conditional knock-out of Med1 in the liver showed that hepatocytes lacking Med1 did not regenerate following either partial hepatectomy or treatment with certain nuclear receptor activators and failed to give rise to tumors when challenged with carcinogens. We now report that the adenovirally driven overexpression of Med1 in mouse liver stimulates hepatocyte DNA synthesis with enhanced expression of DNA replication, cell cycle control, and liver-specific genes, indicating that Med1 alone is necessary and sufficient for liver cell proliferation. Importantly, we demonstrate that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important cellular energy sensor, interacts with, and directly phosphorylates, Med1 in vitro at serine 656, serine 756, and serine 796. AMPK also phosphorylates Med1 in vivo in mouse liver and in cultured primary hepatocytes and HEK293 and HeLa cells. In addition, we demonstrate that PPARα activators increase AMPK-mediated Med1 phosphorylation in vivo. Inhibition of AMPK by compound C decreased hepatocyte proliferation induced by Med1 and also by the PPARα activators fenofibrate and Wy-14,643. Co-treatment with compound C attenuated PPARα activator-inducible fatty acid β-oxidation in liver. Our results suggest that Med1 phosphorylation by its association with AMPK regulates liver cell proliferation and fatty acid oxidation, most likely as a downstream effector of PPARα and AMPK. PMID:23943624

  17. Nitric Oxide Induces Cardiac Protection by Preventing Extracellular Matrix Degradation through the Complex Caveolin-3/EMMPRIN in Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Irene; Castejon, Borja; Martin, Ana M; Saura, Marta; Reventun-Torralba, Paula; Zamorano, Jose Luis; Zaragoza, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of Extracellular Matrix degradation by nitric oxide (NO) induces cardiac protection against coronary ischemia/reperfusion (IR). Glycosylation of Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN) stimulates enzymatic activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the heart, although the mechanisms leading to EMMPRIN glycosylation are poorly understood. We sought to determine if NO may induce cardiac protection by preventing glycosylation of EMMPRIN in a mouse model of IR. Here we found that Caveolin-3 binds to low glycosylated EMMPRIN (LG-EMMPRIN) in cardiac cells and in the hearts of healthy mice, whereas IR disrupted the complex in nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) knockout (KO) mice. By contrast, the binding was partially restored when mice were fed with an NO donor (DEA-NO) in the drinking water, showing a significant reduction on infarct size (NOS2KO: 34.6±5 vs NOS2KO+DEA-NO: 20.7±9), in expression of matrix metalloproteinases, and cardiac performance was improved (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). NOS2KO: 31±4 vs NOS2KO+DEA-NO: 46±6). The role of Caveolin-3/EMMPRIN in NO-mediated cardiac protection was further assayed in Caveolin-3 KO mice, showing no significant improvement on infarct size (Caveolin-3 KO: 34.8±3 vs Caveolin-3 KO+DEA-NO:33.7±5), or in the expression of MMPs, suggesting that stabilization of the complex Caveolin-3/LG-EMMPRIN may play a significant role in the cardioprotective effect of NO against IR.

  18. Nitric Oxide Induces Cardiac Protection by Preventing Extracellular Matrix Degradation through the Complex Caveolin-3/EMMPRIN in Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado, Irene; Castejon, Borja; Martin, Ana M.; Saura, Marta; Reventun-Torralba, Paula; Zamorano, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of Extracellular Matrix degradation by nitric oxide (NO) induces cardiac protection against coronary ischemia/reperfusion (IR). Glycosylation of Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN) stimulates enzymatic activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the heart, although the mechanisms leading to EMMPRIN glycosylation are poorly understood. We sought to determine if NO may induce cardiac protection by preventing glycosylation of EMMPRIN in a mouse model of IR. Here we found that Caveolin-3 binds to low glycosylated EMMPRIN (LG-EMMPRIN) in cardiac cells and in the hearts of healthy mice, whereas IR disrupted the complex in nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) knockout (KO) mice. By contrast, the binding was partially restored when mice were fed with an NO donor (DEA-NO) in the drinking water, showing a significant reduction on infarct size (NOS2KO: 34.6±5 vs NOS2KO+DEA-NO: 20.7±9), in expression of matrix metalloproteinases, and cardiac performance was improved (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). NOS2KO: 31±4 vs NOS2KO+DEA-NO: 46±6). The role of Caveolin-3/EMMPRIN in NO-mediated cardiac protection was further assayed in Caveolin-3 KO mice, showing no significant improvement on infarct size (Caveolin-3 KO: 34.8±3 vs Caveolin-3 KO+DEA-NO:33.7±5), or in the expression of MMPs, suggesting that stabilization of the complex Caveolin-3/LG-EMMPRIN may play a significant role in the cardioprotective effect of NO against IR. PMID:27649573

  19. Essential role of D1R in the regulation of mTOR complex1 signaling induced by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Laurie P; Caron, Marc G

    2015-12-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that is involved in neuronal adaptions that underlie cocaine-induced sensitization and reward. mTOR exists in two functionally distinct multi-component complexes known as mTORC1 and mTORC2. In this study, we show that increased mTORC1 activity induced by cocaine is mediated by the dopamine D1 receptor (D1R). Specifically, cocaine treatment increased the phosphorylation on residues Thr2446 and Ser2481 but not on Ser2448 in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and that this increase in phosphorylated mTOR levels was also apparent when complexed with its binding partner Raptor. Furthermore, the increase in phosphorylated mTOR levels, as well as phosphorylated 4E-BP1 and S6K, downstream targets of mTORC1 were blocked with SCH23390 treatment. Similar results were also observed in the dopamine-transporter knockout mice as the increase in phosphorylated mTOR Thr2446 and Ser2481 was blocked by SCH23390 but not with raclopride. To further validate D1R role in mTORC1 signaling, decrease in phosphorylated mTOR levels were observed in D1R knockout mice, whereas administration of SKF81297 elevated phosphorylated mTOR in the NAc. Lastly deletion of mTOR or Raptor in D1R expressing neurons reduced cocaine-induced locomotor activity. Together, our data supports a mechanism whereby mTORC1 signaling is activated by cocaine administration through the stimulation of D1R.

  20. Forskolin-inducible cAMP pathway negatively regulates T-cell proliferation by uncoupling the interleukin-2 receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Georgialina; Ross, Jeremy A; Nagy, Zsuzsanna S; Kirken, Robert A

    2013-03-08

    Cytokine-mediated regulation of T-cell activity involves a complex interplay between key signal transduction pathways. Determining how these signaling pathways cross-talk is essential to understanding T-cell function and dysfunction. In this work, we provide evidence that cross-talk exists between at least two signaling pathways: the Jak3/Stat5 and cAMP-mediated cascades. The adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (Fsk) significantly increased intracellular cAMP levels and reduced proliferation of the human T-cells via inhibition of cell cycle regulatory genes but did not induce apoptosis. To determine this inhibitory mechanism, effects of Fsk on IL-2 signaling was investigated. Fsk treatment of MT-2 and Kit 225 T-cells inhibited IL-2-induced Stat5a/b tyrosine and serine phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and DNA binding activity. Fsk treatment also uncoupled IL-2 induced association of the IL-2Rβ and γc chain, consequently blocking Jak3 activation. Interestingly, phosphoamino acid analysis revealed that Fsk-treated cells resulted in elevated serine phosphorylation of Jak3 but not Stat5, suggesting that Fsk can negatively regulate Jak3 activity possibly mediated through PKA. Indeed, in vitro kinase assays and small molecule inhibition studies indicated that PKA can directly serine phosphorylate and functionally inactivate Jak3. Taken together, these findings suggest that Fsk activation of adenylate cyclase and PKA can negatively regulate IL-2 signaling at multiple levels that include IL-2R complex formation and Jak3/Stat5 activation.

  1. What musicians do to induce the sensation of groove in simple and complex melodies, and how listeners perceive it.

    PubMed

    Madison, Guy; Sioros, George

    2014-01-01

    Groove is the experience of wanting to move when hearing music, such as snapping fingers or tapping feet. This is a central aspect of much music, in particular of music intended for dancing. While previous research has found considerable consistency in ratings of groove across individuals, it remains unclear how groove is induced, that is, what are the physical properties of the acoustic signal that differ between more and less groove-inducing versions. Here, we examined this issue with a performance experiment, in which four musicians performed six simple and six complex melodies in two conditions with the intention of minimizing and maximizing groove. Analyses of rhythmical and temporal properties from the performances demonstrated some general effects. For example, more groove was associated with more notes on faster metrical levels and syncopation, and less groove was associated with deadpan timing and destruction of the regular pulse. We did not observe that deviations from the metrical grid [i.e., micro-timing (MT)] were a predictor of groove. A listener experiment confirmed that the musicians' manipulations had the intended effects on the experience of groove. A Brunswikian lens model was applied, which estimates the performer-perceiver communication across the two experiments. It showed that the communication achievement for simple melodies was 0.62, and that the matching of performers' and listeners' use of nine rhythmical cues was 0.83. For complex melodies with an already high level of groove, the corresponding values were 0.39 and 0.34, showing that it was much more difficult to "take out" groove from musical structures designed to induce groove.

  2. What musicians do to induce the sensation of groove in simple and complex melodies, and how listeners perceive it

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Guy; Sioros, George

    2014-01-01

    Groove is the experience of wanting to move when hearing music, such as snapping fingers or tapping feet. This is a central aspect of much music, in particular of music intended for dancing. While previous research has found considerable consistency in ratings of groove across individuals, it remains unclear how groove is induced, that is, what are the physical properties of the acoustic signal that differ between more and less groove-inducing versions. Here, we examined this issue with a performance experiment, in which four musicians performed six simple and six complex melodies in two conditions with the intention of minimizing and maximizing groove. Analyses of rhythmical and temporal properties from the performances demonstrated some general effects. For example, more groove was associated with more notes on faster metrical levels and syncopation, and less groove was associated with deadpan timing and destruction of the regular pulse. We did not observe that deviations from the metrical grid [i.e., micro-timing (MT)] were a predictor of groove. A listener experiment confirmed that the musicians' manipulations had the intended effects on the experience of groove. A Brunswikian lens model was applied, which estimates the performer-perceiver communication across the two experiments. It showed that the communication achievement for simple melodies was 0.62, and that the matching of performers' and listeners' use of nine rhythmical cues was 0.83. For complex melodies with an already high level of groove, the corresponding values were 0.39 and 0.34, showing that it was much more difficult to “take out” groove from musical structures designed to induce groove. PMID:25191286

  3. Retrolinkin recruits the WAVE1 protein complex to facilitate BDNF-induced TrkB endocytosis and dendrite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chenchang; Fu, Xiuping; Zhu, Shaoxia; Liu, Jia-Jia

    2016-01-01

    Retrolinkin, a neuronal membrane protein, coordinates with endophilin A1 and mediates early endocytic trafficking and signal transduction of the ligand–receptor complex formed between brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), in dendrites of CNS neurons. Here we report that retrolinkin interacts with the CYFIP1/2 subunit of the WAVE1 complex, a member of the WASP/WAVE family of nucleation-promoting factors that binds and activates the Arp2/3 complex to promote branched actin polymerization. WAVE1, not N-WASP, is required for BDNF-induced TrkB endocytosis and dendrite outgrowth. Disruption of the interaction between retrolinkin and CYFIP1/2 impairs recruitment of WAVE1 to neuronal plasma membrane upon BDNF addition and blocks internalization of activated TrkB. We also show that WAVE1-mediated endocytosis of BDNF-activated TrkB is actin dependent and clathrin independent. These results not only reveal the mechanistic role of retrolinkin in BDNF–TrkB endocytosis, but also indicate that WASP/WAVE-dependent actin polymerization during endocytosis is regulated by cell type–specific and cargo-specific modulators. PMID:27605705

  4. Phthalocyanine supported dinuclear Ln(III) complexes: the solvent-induced change of magnetic properties in dysprosium(iii) analogues.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jing-Yuan; Wang, Hai-Ying; Li, Jing; Xie, Jia-Ze; Song, You; Zuo, Jing-Lin

    2017-02-24

    Three dinuclear lanthanide complexes, [Ln2(thd)4Pc]·2C6H6 (Hthd = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylheptanedione, Ln = Sm (1), Tb (2), Dy (3)), have been synthesized based on phthalocyanine (Pc). They can be reversibly transformed into [Ln2(thd)4Pc] (Ln = Sm (1'), Tb (2'), Dy (3')) via desolvation and resolvation of the lattice benzene molecules. This change generates dramatic influences on the structural and magnetic properties of the dysprosium analogue. In complex 3, one crystallographically independent metal center is observed, and it exhibits a single relaxation process of magnetization with an energy barrier of 55.7 K. Upon desolvation, the resulting complex 3' contains two types of metal centers, and shows the field-induced single-molecule magnetic behavior with two thermally activated magnetic relaxation processes. The anisotropy barriers for 3' are as high as 63.3 K and 109.6 K, respectively. This work confirms that the solvated molecules can finely tune the magnetic relaxation mechanisms.

  5. ATF1 modulates the heat shock response by regulating the stress-inducible heat shock factor 1 transcription complex.

    PubMed

    Takii, Ryosuke; Fujimoto, Mitsuaki; Tan, Ke; Takaki, Eiichi; Hayashida, Naoki; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Nakai, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The heat shock response is an evolutionally conserved adaptive response to high temperatures that controls proteostasis capacity and is regulated mainly by an ancient heat shock factor (HSF). However, the regulation of target genes by the stress-inducible HSF1 transcription complex has not yet been examined in detail in mammalian cells. In the present study, we demonstrated that HSF1 interacted with members of the ATF1/CREB family involved in metabolic homeostasis and recruited them on the HSP70 promoter in response to heat shock. The HSF1 transcription complex, including the chromatin-remodeling factor BRG1 and lysine acetyltransferases p300 and CREB-binding protein (CBP), was formed in a manner that was dependent on the phosphorylation of ATF1. ATF1-BRG1 promoted the establishment of an active chromatin state and HSP70 expression during heat shock, whereas ATF1-p300/CBP accelerated the shutdown of HSF1 DNA-binding activity during recovery from acute stress, possibly through the acetylation of HSF1. Furthermore, ATF1 markedly affected the resistance to heat shock. These results revealed the unanticipated complexity of the primitive heat shock response mechanism, which is connected to metabolic adaptation.

  6. Optical alteration of complex organics induced by ion irradiation:. 1. Laboratory experiments suggest unusual space weathering trend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Lyuba; Baratta, Giuseppe; Strazzulla, Giovanni; Starukhina, Larissa; Dotto, Elisabetta; Barucci, Maria Antonietta; Arnold, Gabriele; Distefano, Elisa

    2004-07-01

    Most ion irradiation experiments relevant to primitive outer Solar System objects have been performed on ice and silicate targets. Here we present the first ion irradiation experiments performed on natural complex hydrocarbons (asphaltite and kerite). These materials are very dark in the visible and have red-sloped spectra in the visible and near-infrared. They may be comparable in composition and structure to refractory organic solids on the surfaces of primitive outer Solar System objects. We irradiated the samples with 15-400 keV H +, N +, Ar ++, and He + ions and measured their reflectance spectra in the range of 0.3-2.5 μm before ion implantation and after each irradiation step. The results show that irradiation-induced carbonization gradually neutralizes the spectral slopes of these red organic solids. This implies a similar space weathering trend for the surfaces of airless bodies optically dominated by spectrally red organic components. The reduction of spectral slope was observed in all experiments. Irradiation with 30 keV protons, which transfers energy to the target mostly via electronic (inelastic) collisions, showed lower efficiency than the heavier ions. We found that spectral alteration in our experiments increased with increasing contribution of nuclear versus electronic energy loss. This implies that nuclear (elastic) energy deposition plays an important role in changing the optical properties of irradiated refractory complex hydrocarbon materials. Finally, our results indicated that temperature variations from 40 K to room temperature did not influence the spectral properties of these complex hydrocarbon solids.

  7. Resveratrol protects against experimental induced Reye's syndrome by prohibition of oxidative stress and restoration of complex I activity.

    PubMed

    Abdin, Amany; Sarhan, Naglaa

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether resveratrol could provide protection against Reye's syndrome induced by 4-pentenoic acid in Wistar albino rats. Compared with rats with untreated Reye's syndrome, 1 h pretreatment by low dose resveratrol (10 mg/kg by oral gavage) resulted in marked amelioration in liver functions in the form of significant decrease in serum transaminases (AST, ALT) and plasma ammonia levels, shortening of prothrombin time, and increase in serum albumin levels. In addition, resveratrol prohibited oxidative stress markers, as indicated by a significant increase in GSH and decrease in MDA, with restoration of complex I activity in liver tissues. The classical histopathological presentation in Reye's syndrome of microvesicular steatosis by light microscope and mitochondria distortion by electron microscope has been improved by resveratrol pretreatment. The efficient protection by resveratrol was determined by normalization in serum levels of AST and albumin, as well as complex I activity, GSH, and MDA. In conclusion, pretreatment by resveratrol in low doses could protect against Reye's syndrome partially via prohibition of oxidative stress and restoration of complex I activity. This may provide the opportunity to reconsider aspirin therapy for infants and young children. However, the verification of such results in clinical practice remains a challenge.

  8. Solution or solid - it doesn't matter: visible light-induced CO release reactivity of zinc flavonolato complexes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stacey N; Larson, Michael T; Berreau, Lisa M

    2016-09-20

    Two types of zinc flavonolato complexes ([(6-Ph2TPA)Zn(flavonolato)]ClO4 and Zn(flavonolato)2) of four extended flavonols have been prepared, characterized, and evaluated for visible light-induced CO release reactivity. Zinc coordination of each flavonolato anion results in a red-shift of the lowest energy absorption feature and in some cases enhanced molar absorptivity relative to the free flavonol. The zinc-coordinated flavonolato ligands undergo visible light-induced CO release with enhanced reaction quantum yields relative to the neutral flavonols. Most notable is the discovery that both types of zinc flavonolato derivatives undergo similar visible light-induced CO release reactivity in solution and in the solid state. A solid film of a Zn(flavonolato)2 derivative was evaluated as an in situ CO release agent for aerobic oxidative palladium-catalyzed alkoxycarbonylation to produce esters in ethanol. The CO release product was found to undergo ester alcolysis under the conditions of the carbonylation reaction.

  9. TGF-β induces p53/Smads complex formation in the PAI-1 promoter to activate transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kawarada, Yuki; Inoue, Yasumichi; Kawasaki, Fumihiro; Fukuura, Keishi; Sato, Koichi; Tanaka, Takahito; Itoh, Yuka; Hayashi, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling facilitates tumor development during the advanced stages of tumorigenesis, but induces cell-cycle arrest for tumor suppression during the early stages. However, the mechanism of functional switching of TGF-β is still unknown, and it is unclear whether inhibition of TGF-β signaling results amelioration or exacerbation of cancers. Here we show that the tumor suppressor p53 cooperates with Smad proteins, which are TGF-β signal transducers, to selectively activate plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) transcription. p53 forms a complex with Smad2/3 in the PAI-1 promoter to recruit histone acetyltransferase CREB-binding protein (CBP) and enhance histone H3 acetylation, resulting in transcriptional activation of the PAI-1 gene. Importantly, p53 is required for TGF-β-induced cytostasis and PAI-1 is involved in the cytostatic activity of TGF-β in several cell lines. Our results suggest that p53 enhances TGF-β-induced cytostatic effects by activating PAI-1 transcription, and the functional switching of TGF-β is partially caused by p53 mutation or p53 inactivation during cancer progression. It is expected that these findings will contribute to optimization of TGF-β-targeting therapies for cancer. PMID:27759037

  10. Field induced modification of defect complexes in magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Nadège; Granzow, Torsten; Nataf, Guillaume F.

    2014-12-28

    Dielectric constant, thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDC), and conductivity of undoped and 5% Mg-doped LiNbO{sub 3} single crystals between −100 °C and 200 °C have been investigated. A Debye-like dielectric relaxation with an activation energy of 135 meV is observed in the Mg-doped material, but not in undoped crystals. On heating this relaxation disappears near 140 °C and does not reappear after cooling. Anomalies observed in TSDC around this temperature are attributed to the motion of lithium vacancies, in agreement with conductivity measurements. It is proposed that in thermal equilibrium the electrons from the Mg{sub Li}{sup •} donors are trapped in (4Mg{sub Li}{sup •}+4V{sub Li}{sup ′}) defect complexes. High-temperature poling breaks these defect complexes. The transition of the liberated electrons between the Mg{sub Li}{sup •} donor centers and the Nb{sub Nb} forming the conduction band gives rise to the observed dielectric relaxation.

  11. Cerebral blood flow during paroxysmal EEG activation induced by sleep in patients with complex partial seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Gozukirmizi, E.; Meyer, J.S.; Okabe, T.; Amano, T.; Mortel, K.; Karacan, I.

    1982-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements were combined with sleep polysomnography in nine patients with complex partial seizures. Two methods were used: the 133Xe method for measuring regional (rCBF) and the stable xenon CT method for local (LCBF). Compared to nonepileptic subjects, who show diffuse CBF decreases during stages I-II, non-REM sleep onset, patients with complex partial seizures show statistically significant increases in CBF which are maximal in regions where the EEG focus is localized and are predominantly seen in one temporal region but are also propagated to other cerebral areas. Both CBF methods gave comparable results, but greater statistical significance was achieved by stable xenon CT methodology. CBF increases are more diffuse than predicted by EEG paroxysmal activity recorded from scalp electrodes. An advantage of the 133Xe inhalation method was achievement of reliable data despite movement of the head. This was attributed to the use of a helmet which maintained the probes approximated to the scalp. Disadvantages were poor resolution (7 cm3) and two-dimensional information. The advantage of stable xenon CT method is excellent resolution (80 mm3) in three dimensions, but a disadvantage is that movement of the head in patients with seizure disorders may limit satisfactory measurements.

  12. Respiratory complex I deficiency induces drought tolerance by impacting leaf stomatal and hydraulic conductances.

    PubMed

    Djebbar, Reda; Rzigui, Touhami; Pétriacq, Pierre; Mauve, Caroline; Priault, Pierrick; Fresneau, Chantal; De Paepe, Marianne; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Benhassaine-Kesri, Ghouziel; Streb, Peter; Gakière, Bertrand; Cornic, Gabriel; De Paepe, Rosine

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the role of plant mitochondria in drought tolerance, the response to water deprivation was compared between Nicotiana sylvestris wild type (WT) plants and the CMSII respiratory complex I mutant, which has low-efficient respiration and photosynthesis, high levels of amino acids and pyridine nucleotides, and increased antioxidant capacity. We show that the delayed decrease in relative water content after water withholding in CMSII, as compared to WT leaves, is due to a lower stomatal conductance. The stomatal index and the abscisic acid (ABA) content were unaffected in well-watered mutant leaves, but the ABA/stomatal conductance relation was altered during drought, indicating that specific factors interact with ABA signalling. Leaf hydraulic conductance was lower in mutant leaves when compared to WT leaves and the role of oxidative aquaporin gating in attaining a maximum stomatal conductance is discussed. In addition, differences in leaf metabolic status between the mutant and the WT might contribute to the low stomatal conductance, as reported for TCA cycle-deficient plants. After withholding watering, TCA cycle derived organic acids declined more in CMSII leaves than in the WT, and ATP content decreased only in the CMSII. Moreover, in contrast to the WT, total free amino acid levels declined whilst soluble protein content increased in CMSII leaves, suggesting an accelerated amino acid remobilisation. We propose that oxidative and metabolic disturbances resulting from remodelled respiration in the absence of Complex I activity could be involved in bringing about the lower stomatal and hydraulic conductances.

  13. Redox-induced activation of the proton pump in the respiratory complex I

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vivek; Belevich, Galina; Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P.; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Verkhovskaya, Marina L.; Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R. I.

    2015-01-01

    Complex I functions as a redox-linked proton pump in the respiratory chains of mitochondria and bacteria, driven by the reduction of quinone (Q) by NADH. Remarkably, the distance between the Q reduction site and the most distant proton channels extends nearly 200 Å. To elucidate the molecular origin of this long-range coupling, we apply a combination of large-scale molecular simulations and a site-directed mutagenesis experiment of a key residue. In hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we observe that reduction of Q is coupled to its local protonation by the His-38/Asp-139 ion pair and Tyr-87 of subunit Nqo4. Atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations further suggest that formation of quinol (QH2) triggers rapid dissociation of the anionic Asp-139 toward the membrane domain that couples to conformational changes in a network of conserved charged residues. Site-directed mutagenesis data confirm the importance of Asp-139; upon mutation to asparagine the Q reductase activity is inhibited by 75%. The current results, together with earlier biochemical data, suggest that the proton pumping in complex I is activated by a unique combination of electrostatic and conformational transitions. PMID:26330610

  14. Antileishmanial Activity and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Activation by RuNO Complex

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Natalia Yoshie; Fortes dos Santos Thomazelli, Ana Paula; Tomiotto-Pellissier, Fernanda; Kian, Danielle; Megumi Yamauchi, Lucy; Gouveia Júnior, Florêncio S.; de França Lopes, Luiz Gonzaga; Cecchini, Rubens; Nazareth Costa, Idessânia; Jerley Nogueira da Silva, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Parasites of the genus Leishmania are capable of inhibiting effector functions of macrophages. These parasites have developed the adaptive ability to escape host defenses; for example, they inactivate the NF-κB complex and suppress iNOS expression in infected macrophages, which are responsible for the production of the major antileishmanial substance nitric oxide (NO), favoring then its replication and successful infection. Metal complexes with NO have been studied as potential compounds for the treatment of certain tropical diseases, such as ruthenium compounds, known to be exogenous NO donors. In the present work, the compound cis-[Ru(bpy)2SO3(NO)]PF6, or RuNO, showed leishmanicidal activity directly and indirectly on promastigote forms of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis. In addition, treatment with RuNO increased NO production by reversing the depletion of NO caused by Leishmania. We also found increased expression of Akt, iNOS, and NF-κB in infected and treated macrophages. These results demonstrated that RuNO was able to kill the parasite by NO release and modulate the transcriptional capacity of the cell. PMID:27795620

  15. Redox-induced activation of the proton pump in the respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek; Belevich, Galina; Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Verkhovskaya, Marina L; Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R I

    2015-09-15

    Complex I functions as a redox-linked proton pump in the respiratory chains of mitochondria and bacteria, driven by the reduction of quinone (Q) by NADH. Remarkably, the distance between the Q reduction site and the most distant proton channels extends nearly 200 Å. To elucidate the molecular origin of this long-range coupling, we apply a combination of large-scale molecular simulations and a site-directed mutagenesis experiment of a key residue. In hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we observe that reduction of Q is coupled to its local protonation by the His-38/Asp-139 ion pair and Tyr-87 of subunit Nqo4. Atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations further suggest that formation of quinol (QH2) triggers rapid dissociation of the anionic Asp-139 toward the membrane domain that couples to conformational changes in a network of conserved charged residues. Site-directed mutagenesis data confirm the importance of Asp-139; upon mutation to asparagine the Q reductase activity is inhibited by 75%. The current results, together with earlier biochemical data, suggest that the proton pumping in complex I is activated by a unique combination of electrostatic and conformational transitions.

  16. Evolution of phase and morphology of titanium dioxide induced from peroxo titanate complex aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jeong Ah; Vithal, Muga; Baek, In Chan; Seok, Sang Il

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the growth of anatase TiO2 in nanospheres and rutile TiO2 in nanorods, by the hydrolysis of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide at 100 degrees C using sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and surface area measurement techniques are used to characterize the phase and shape developments of TiO2 obtained from peroxo titanate complex in an aqueous solution at 100 degrees C. Peroxo titanate complexes were prepared by a reaction of titanium hydroxide, formed by hydrolysis of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP), and different amounts of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). TEM and XRD investigations reveal that the size of spheres (anatase) and rods (rutile) are about 8 nm (diameter) and about 13 x 29 nm approximately 20 x 75 nm (width x length) respectively. The influence of molar ratio of H2O2/TTIP on the phase and morphology of TiO2 is presented. A mixture of anatase spheres and short rutile rods are formed at low H2O2/TTIP ratio while predominantly rutile a quit long rods are formed at higher H2O2/TTIP ratio.

  17. Reversible Stiffening Transition in β-Hairpin Hydrogels Induced by Ion Complexation

    PubMed Central

    Ozbas, Bulent; Rajagopal, Karthikan; Haines-Butterick, Lisa; Schneider, Joel P.; Pochan, Darrin J.

    2009-01-01

    We have previously shown that properly designed lysine and valine-rich peptides undergo a random coil to β-hairpin transition followed by intermolecular self-assembly into a fibrillar hydrogel network only after the peptide solutions are heated above the intramolecular folding transition temperature. Here we report that these hydrogels also undergo a stiffening transition as they are cooled below a critical temperature only when boric acid is used to buffer the peptide solution. This stiffening transition is characterized by rheology, dynamic light scattering, and small angle neutron scattering. Rheological measurements show that the stiffening transition causes an increase in the hydrogel storage modulus (G′) by as much as 1 order of magnitude and is completely reversible on subsequently raising the temperature. Although this reversible transition exhibits rheological properties that are similar to polyol/borax solutions, the underlying mechanism does not involve hydroxyl–borate complexation. The stiffening transition is mainly caused by the interactions between lysine and boric acid/borate anion and is not driven by the changes in the secondary structure of the β-hairpin peptide. Addition of glucose to boric acid and peptide solution disrupts the stiffening transition due to competitive glucose–borate complexation. PMID:18044866

  18. Optimized Design and Use of Induced Complex Fractures in Horizontal Wellbores of Tight Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, F. H.; Guo, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    Multistage hydraulic fracturing is being increasing use in the establishment of horizontal wells in tight gas reservoirs. Connecting hydraulic fractures to natural and stress-induced fractures can further improve well productivity. This paper investigates the fracture treatment design issues involved in the establishment of horizontal wellbores, including the effects of geologic heterogeneity, perforation parameters, fracturing patterns, and construction parameters on stress anisotropy during hydraulic fracturing and on natural fractures during hydraulic fracture propagation. The extent of stress reversal and reorientation was calculated for fractures induced by the creation of one or more propped fractures. The effects of stress on alternate and sequential fracturing horizontal well and on the reservoir's mechanical properties, including the spatial extent of stress reorientation caused by the opening of fractures, were assessed and quantified. Alternate sequencing of transverse fractures was found to be an effective means of enhancing natural fracture stimulation by allowing fractures to undergo less stress contrast during propagation. The goal of this paper was to present a new approach to design that optimizes fracturing in a horizontal wellbore from the perspectives of both rock mechanics and fluid production. The new design is a modified version of alternate fracturing, where the fracture-initiation sequence was controlled by perforation parameters with a staggered pattern within a horizontal wellbore. Results demonstrated that the modified alternate fracturing performed better than original sequence fracturing and that this was because it increased the contact area and promoted more gas production in completed wells.

  19. A new murine model of stress-induced complex atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Amir H.; Aghili, Nima; Tilan, Justin U.; Andrews, James A.; Peng, XinZhi; Lassance-Soares, Roberta M.; Sood, Subeena; Alderman, Lee O.; Abe, Ken; Li, Lijun; Kolodgie, Frank D.; Virmani, Renu; Zukowska, Zofia; Epstein, Stephen E.; Burnett, Mary Susan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The primary purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ApoE−/− mice, when subjected to chronic stress, exhibit lesions characteristic of human vulnerable plaque and, if so, to determine the time course of such changes. We found that the lesions were remarkably similar to human vulnerable plaque, and that the time course of lesion progression raised interesting insights into the process of plaque development. Lard-fed mixed-background ApoE−/− mice exposed to chronic stress develop lesions with large necrotic core, thin fibrous cap and a high degree of inflammation. Neovascularization and intraplaque hemorrhage are observed in over 80% of stressed animals at 20 weeks of age. Previously described models report a prevalence of only 13% for neovascularization observed at a much later time point, between 36 and 60 weeks of age. Thus, our new stress-induced model of advanced atherosclerotic plaque provides an improvement over what is currently available. This model offers a tool to further investigate progression of plaque phenotype to a more vulnerable phenotype in humans. Our findings also suggest a possible use of this stress-induced model to determine whether therapeutic interventions have effects not only on plaque burden, but also, and importantly, on plaque vulnerability. PMID:23324329

  20. BDNF regulation in the rat dorsal vagal complex during stress-induced anorexia.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Céline; Chigr, Fatiha; Tardivel, Catherine; Mahaut, Stéphanie; Jean, André; Najimi, Mohamed; Moyse, Emmanuel

    2006-08-30

    The dorsal vagal complex (DVC) is the satiety reflex-integrating center of adult mammals. Immobilization stress (IS) is known to elicit anorexia and to up-regulate BDNF expression in adult rat forebrain; intra-DVC delivery of BDNF was shown to elicit anorexia. Therefore, we addressed here whether IS would increase BDNF signaling in rat DVC by using PCR and western-blot on microdissected tissue extracts. Significant variations of BDNF expression in DVC after IS include exon V mRNA increase at 3 h, decreases of both protein and exon III mRNA at 24 h, and exon I mRNA decrease at 72 h. At the receptor level, IS elicited a highly significant induction of both full-length and truncated-1 TrkB mRNAs at 24 h after IS. In vivo recruitment of BDNF signaling in DVC during stress thus differs from hypothalamus, the relevance of which to anorexia is discussed.

  1. Simulation of 125I induced DNA strand breaks in a CAP-DNA complex.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Friedland, W; Jacob, P; Paretzke, H G; Panyutin, I; Neumann, R D

    2002-01-01

    The E. coli catabolite gene activator protein (CAP)-DNA complex with 125I located at the position of the H5 atom of the cytosine near the centre was incorporated into the PARTRAC track structure code. DNA strand breaks due to irradiation were calculated by track structure and radical attack simulations; strand breaks due to neutralisation of the highly charged 125Te ion were derived from a semi-empirical distribution. According to the calculations, the neutralisation effect dominates the strand breakage frequency at 2 bases away from the 125I decay site on both strands. The first breakage distribution counted from a 32P labelled end on the strand with 125I agreed well with experimental data, but on the opposite strand, the calculated distribution is more concentrated around the decay site and its yield is about 20% larger than the measured data.

  2. Spectral diffusion induced by proton dynamics in pigment-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Marc; Studier, Hauke; Radics, Volker; Nieder, Jana B; Bittl, Robert

    2008-12-24

    The fluorescence emission of individual photosystem I complexes from Synechocystis PCC 6803 in protonated and deuterated buffer shows zero-phonon lines as well as broad intensity distributions. The number and the line width of the zero phonon lines depend strongly on the solvent (H(2)O/D(2)O). The spectral diffusion rate of the whole fluorescence emission from photosystem I is significantly reduced upon deuteration of the solvent. This leads to a substantial increase of well-resolved zero-phonon lines. Since the chlorophyll a chromophores lack exchangeable protons, these observed changes in the spectral diffusion have to be assigned to exchangeable protons at the amino acids and structural water molecules in the chromophore binding pocket.

  3. Plenary perspective: the complexity of constitutive and inducible gene expression in mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A

    2012-09-01

    Monocytes and macrophages differentiate from progenitor cells under the influence of colony-stimulating factors. Genome-scale data have enabled the identification of the set of genes that distinguishes macrophages from other cell types and the ways in which thousands of genes are regulated in response to pathogen challenge. Although there has been a focus on a small subset of lineage-enriched transcription factors, such as PU.1, more than one-half of the transcription factors in the genome can be expressed in macrophage lineage cells under some state of activation, and they interact in a complex network. The network architecture is conserved across species, but many of the target genes evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. The data and publication deluge related to macrophage biology require the development of new analytical tools and ways of presenting information in an accessible form.

  4. Decoherence induced by a chaotic enviroment: A quantum walker with a complex coin

    SciTech Connect

    Ermann, Leonardo; Paz, Juan Pablo; Saraceno, Marcos

    2006-01-15

    We study the differences between the processes of decoherence induced by chaotic and regular environments. For this we analyze a family of simple models that contain both regular and chaotic environments. In all cases the system of interest is a ''quantum walker,'' i.e., a quantum particle that can move on a lattice with a finite number of sites. The walker interacts with an environment which has a D-dimensional Hilbert space. The results we obtain suggest that regular and chaotic environments are not distinguishable from each other in a (short) time scale t*, which scales with the dimensionality of the environment as t*{proportional_to}log{sub 2}(D). However, chaotic environments continue to be effective over exponentially longer time scales while regular environments tend to reach saturation much sooner. We present both numerical and analytical results supporting this conclusion. The family of chaotic evolutions we consider includes the so-called quantum multibaker map as a particular case.

  5. Complexes of heparin and platelet factor 4 specifically stimulate T cells from patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia/thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bacsi, S; De Palma, R; Visentin, G P; Gorski, J; Aster, R H

    1999-07-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia with thrombosis (HITT) is associated with antibodies specific for complexes consisting of heparin and platelet factor 4 (PF4). Studies in individual patients with HITT have demonstrated immunoglobulin (Ig) class switching from IgM to the IgG or IgA isotypes. This transition is thought to require helper T cells, but no studies of the cellular or molecular basis of this process have yet been reported. To characterize T-cell involvement in HITT, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from two patients with classical HITT obtained shortly after the acute episode were restimulated with heparin:PF4 complexes, PF4 alone, heparin alone, and medium alone in the presence of autologous antigen-presenting cells (APC). Responding T cells were then examined using the technique of "spectratyping," in which sequences encoding CDR3 domains of individual V beta (BV) families are amplified and separated by gel electrophoresis. After 14 days in culture with antigen (heparin:PF4 complexes), but not after culture with PF4, heparin, or medium alone, patient cells, but not cells from normal subjects, preferentially expressed T-cell receptor (TCR)-containing beta chains of the BV 5.1 family. Nucleotide sequencing of BV 5.1 TCR CDR3 showed that each patient had a personal repertoire, but also shared a tetrapeptide motif (PGTG). These findings provide evidence that the humoral immune response associated with HITT is driven by helper T cells that presumably recognize peptides derived from PF4. Identification of a common beta-chain CDR3 motif in responding T cells from each of two patients suggests that a limited number of helper TCRs may be used to mount an antibody response to heparin:PF4 complexes. TCR spectratyping appears to offer a new way to examine the molecular basis of pathologic immune responses and may be useful in further studies of HITT and other immune-mediated hematologic disorders.

  6. Near-IR luminescence and field-induced single molecule magnet of four salen-type ytterbium complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian-Qi; Yan, Peng-Fei; Luan, Fang; Li, Yu-Xin; Sun, Jing-Wen; Chen, Chuan; Yang, Fan; Chen, Han; Zou, Xiao-Yan; Li, Guang-Ming

    2015-01-05

    A series of rigid hexadentate salen-type (H2L) ytterbium complexes, namely, [Yb2L3(CH3OH)]·3CH3CN (1), [Yb2LL'L″(CH3OH)(H2O)2](ClO4)2·CH3OH·H2O (2), [Yb2L(OAc)4(CH3OH)2]·2CH3OH (3), and {[Yb2L(OAc)4]·3H2O}n (4) (H2L = N,N'-bis(2-oxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)-1,2-phenylenediamine, HL' = 2-(2'-hydroxy-3'-methyloxy-phenyl)benzimidazole and HL" = 3-methoxysalicylaldehyde) have been synthesized by reactions of H2L with multifarious Yb(3+) salts. X-ray crystallographic analyses demonstrate that complex 1 is of a triple-decker sandwich-type Yb2L3 structure with a ratio of H2L/Yb = 3:2, 2 and 3 possess the unique Yb2 core with a ratio of H2L/Yb = 2:2 and 1:2, respectively, 4 exhibits one dimensional coordination polymers in which the polymeric structures are formed by acetate (OAc(-)) groups. All complexes 1-4 exhibit near-IR luminescence, which can be rationalized on the basis of the disparate structural effects. The magnetic analysis unveils that all complexes 1-4 are of field-induced single-molecule magnet behavior with the energy barriers (Ueff/kB) of 14.5, 2.0, 9.5, and 2.4 K at 3 kOe direct current fields, respectively.

  7. A novel manganese complex selectively induces malignant glioma cell death by targeting mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Geng, Ji; Li, Jing; Huang, Tao; Zhao, Kaidi; Chen, Qiuyun; Guo, Wenjie; Gao, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Despite advances in treatment, malignant glioma commonly exhibits recurrence, subsequently leading to a poor prognosis. As manganese (Mn) compounds can be transported by the transferrin‑transferrin receptor system, the present study synthesized and examined the potential use of Adpa‑Mn as a novel antitumor agent. Adpa‑Mn time and dose‑dependently inhibited U251 and C6 cell proliferation; however, it had little effect on normal astrocytes. Apoptosis was significantly elevated following treatment with Adpa‑Mn, as detected by chromatin condensation, Annexin V/propidium iodide staining, cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytoplasm, and the activation of caspases‑9, ‑7 and ‑3 and poly (ADP‑ribose) polymerase. In addition, Adpa‑Mn enhanced fluorescence intensity of monodansylcadaverine and elevated the expression levels of the autophagy‑related protein microtubule‑associated protein 1 light chain 3. Pretreatment with the autophagy inhibitors 3‑methyladenine and chloroquine enhanced Adpa‑Mn‑induced cell inhibition, thus indicating that autophagy has an essential role in this process. Furthermore, evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction was detected in the Adpa‑Mn‑treated group, including disrupted membrane potential, elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depleted adenosine triphosphate. Conversely, treatment with the mitochondrial permeability transition inhibitor cyclosporin A reversed Adpa‑Mn‑induced ROS production, mitochondrial damage and cell apoptosis, thus suggesting that Adpa‑Mn may target the mitochondria. Taken together, these data suggested that Adpa‑Mn may be considered for use as a novel anti‑glioma therapeutic option.

  8. Observations of blocking-induced convergence zones and effects on precipitation in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesley, Douglas A.; Pielke, Roger A.

    Through an extensive set of observations, including standard surface measurements, Doppler radar, routine National Weather Service radiosondes and special Cross-chain Loran Atmospheric Sounding System (CLASS) data, two case studies of wintertime storms on the east slopes of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado are presented (9-10 February 1988 and 30-31 March 1988). The emphases are the effects of blocking-induced convergence zones on snowfall distributions, snow crystal production mechanisms and banded reflectivity structure. As shown by the analysis of a typical Front Range storm, cold air damming can frequently lead to convergence zones and enhanced precipitation east of the mountains. The meso-fronts often form in place just east of the foothills, and are sensitive to the nature of the low-level synoptic easterly flow. For other upslope situations, the convergence zone does not appear as a meso-front, but as a less distinct area of convergence. Measured vertical profiles associated with the blocked surface patterns reveal a distincly layered temperature and wind structure. These soundings, along with surface measurements of wind, moisture and snow crystal types, enable some microphysical interpretation to be made concerning snowfall production in zones of ascent aloft, which are related to frontal surface as well as lifting at the top of the blocking-induced cold pool. Predominance of heavily rimed, dendritic aggregates implies lifting associated with the layered vertical structure in both storms. Bands of enhanced Doppler reflectivity exhibit significant correlation with snowfall intensity. The two case studies demonstrate that distinctly different patterns of blocking and convergence can appear in Colorado Front Range storms, each resulting in a unique snowfall distribution.

  9. Involvement of glutathione in β-cyclodextrin-hemin complex-induced lateral root formation in tomato seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Mei, Yudong; Shi, Yujian; Hu, Dekun; Ren, Yong; Gu, Quan; Shen, Wenbiao; Chen, Xin; Xu, Lingxi; Huang, Liqin

    2016-10-01

    β-cyclodextrin-hemin complex (β-CDH) was shown to induce lateral root (LR) formation in tomato. However, the molecular mechanism is still elusive. In this report, the role of reduced glutathione (GSH) in the induction of lateral root triggered by β-CDH was investigated. Similar to the responses of β-CDH, exogenously applied with 0.1 mΜ GSH not only increased endogenous GSH content determined by spectrophotography and the monochlorobimane (MCB)-dependent fluorescent analysis, but also induced, thereafter, LR formation. Meanwhile, both β-CDH- and GSH-induced lateral root primordia (LRP) exhibited a similar accelerated anatomic structure. Above inducible responses were blocked significantly when the L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), a potent and specific inhibitor of the enzyme catalyzing the first step of GSH biosynthesis, was separately applied. Upon β-CDH treatment, the changes of endogenous GSH content determined by spectrophotography and fluorescent analysis were consistent with the transcripts of two GSH synthetic genes, GSH1 and GSH2 encoding γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase and glutathione synthetase, respectively. Exogenously applied with β-CDH could rescue N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA; IAA depletion)-triggered inhibition of LR formation. Further molecular evidence revealed that both β-CDH and GSH modulated gene expression of cell cycle regulatory genes (CYCA2;1, CYCA3;1, CYCD3;1, and CDKA1) and auxin signaling genes (ARF7 and RSI-1), six marker genes responsible for LR formation. By contrast, above changes were sensitive to the co-treatment with BSO. All together, these results suggest a role for GSH in the regulation of tomato LR development triggered by β-CDH.

  10. HTLV-1 Tax Induces Formation of the Active Macromolecular IKK Complex by Generating Lys63- and Met1-Linked Hybrid Polyubiquitin Chains.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yuri; Tokunaga, Fuminori; Goto, Eiji; Komatsu, Ginga; Gohda, Jin; Saeki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Keiji; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Inoue, Satoshi; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Seya, Tsukasa; Nakano, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Jun-Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    The Tax protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is crucial for the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), a highly malignant CD4+ T cell neoplasm. Among the multiple aberrant Tax-induced effects on cellular processes, persistent activation of transcription factor NF-κB, which is activated only transiently upon physiological stimulation, is essential for leukemogenesis. We and others have shown that Tax induces activation of the IκB kinase (IKK) complex, which is a critical step in NF-κB activation, by generating Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains. However, the molecular mechanism underlying Tax-induced IKK activation is controversial and not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Tax recruits linear (Met1-linked) ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) to the IKK complex and that Tax fails to induce IKK activation in cells that lack LUBAC activity. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that both Lys63-linked and Met1-linked polyubiquitin chains are associated with the IKK complex. Furthermore, treatment of the IKK-associated polyubiquitin chains with Met1-linked-chain-specific deubiquitinase (OTULIN) resulted in the reduction of high molecular weight polyubiquitin chains and the generation of short Lys63-linked ubiquitin chains, indicating that Tax can induce the generation of Lys63- and Met1-linked hybrid polyubiquitin chains. We also demonstrate that Tax induces formation of the active macromolecular IKK complex and that the blocking of Tax-induced polyubiquitin chain synthesis inhibited formation of the macromolecular complex. Taken together, these results lead us to propose a novel model in which the hybrid-chain-dependent oligomerization of the IKK complex triggered by Tax leads to trans-autophosphorylation-mediated IKK activation.

  11. HTLV-1 Tax Induces Formation of the Active Macromolecular IKK Complex by Generating Lys63- and Met1-Linked Hybrid Polyubiquitin Chains

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, Fuminori; Goto, Eiji; Komatsu, Ginga; Saeki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Keiji; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Inoue, Satoshi; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Seya, Tsukasa; Nakano, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Iwai, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    The Tax protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is crucial for the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), a highly malignant CD4+ T cell neoplasm. Among the multiple aberrant Tax-induced effects on cellular processes, persistent activation of transcription factor NF-κB, which is activated only transiently upon physiological stimulation, is essential for leukemogenesis. We and others have shown that Tax induces activation of the IκB kinase (IKK) complex, which is a critical step in NF-κB activation, by generating Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains. However, the molecular mechanism underlying Tax-induced IKK activation is controversial and not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Tax recruits linear (Met1-linked) ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) to the IKK complex and that Tax fails to induce IKK activation in cells that lack LUBAC activity. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that both Lys63-linked and Met1-linked polyubiquitin chains are associated with the IKK complex. Furthermore, treatment of the IKK-associated polyubiquitin chains with Met1-linked-chain-specific deubiquitinase (OTULIN) resulted in the reduction of high molecular weight polyubiquitin chains and the generation of short Lys63-linked ubiquitin chains, indicating that Tax can induce the generation of Lys63- and Met1-linked hybrid polyubiquitin chains. We also demonstrate that Tax induces formation of the active macromolecular IKK complex and that the blocking of Tax-induced polyubiquitin chain synthesis inhibited formation of the macromolecular complex. Taken together, these results lead us to propose a novel model in which the hybrid-chain-dependent oligomerization of the IKK complex triggered by Tax leads to trans-autophosphorylation-mediated IKK activation. PMID:28103322

  12. Alcohol--Induced Polyelectrolyte-Surfactant Complex Coacervate Systems: Characterization and Applications in Enzyme and Protein Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejati Moshtaghin, Mahboubeh

    The focus of this thesis is to achieve a better understanding of the newly discovered surfactant-polyelectrolyte complex coacervate (SPCC) systems induced by fluoroalcohol/acid as well as short chain aliphatic alcohol; and to elucidate their applications in extraction and enrichment of proteins and enzyme. We have discovered that fluoroalcohols and --acids induce complex coacervation and phase separation in the aqueous mixtures of oppositely charged anionic polyelectrolytes; specifically, sodium salts of polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid and cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) over a broad range of concentrations of mole fractions of the oppositely charged amphiphiles. Accordingly, these new classes of coacervators will significantly broaden the scope and facilitate engineering of new coacervate phases. Toward these goals, we have inspected the formation of surfactant-polyelectrolyte complex coacervates in the presence of fluoroalcohols namely hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) and Trifluoroethanol (TFE). Furthermore, the extent of coacervation as a function of concentrations the system components, and charge ratios of the oppositely charged amphiphiles has been investigated. Polyelectrolytes are considered to be milder reagents, as compared to surfactants, regarding proteins denaturation. This highlights the importance of a detailed investigation of the efficiency of our coacervate systems for extraction and preconcentration of proteins and enzymes, especially, when the biological activity of the extracted proteins needs to be maintained based on the objectives mentioned above, the results of the investigations have been organized in four chapters. In Chapter II, the phase behavior of the FA-SPCC will be investigated. The objective is to examine the phase behavior and phase properties with respect to the extent of coacervation in different solution conditions. In particular, the effects of different solution variables such as concentration

  13. Dopaminergic inhibition by G9a/Glp complex on tyrosine hydroxylase in nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nan; Shen, Xiaofeng; Bao, Senzhu; Feng, Shan-Wu; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yusheng; Wang, Yiquan; Wang, Xian; Guo, Xirong; Shen, Rong; Wu, Haibo; Lei, Liming; Wang, Fuzhou

    2016-01-01

    The neural balance between facilitation and inhibition determines the final tendency of central sensitization. Nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity was considered as the results from the enhanced ascending facilitation and the diminished descending inhibition. The role of dopaminergic transmission in the descending inhibition has been well documented, but its underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. Previous studies demonstrated that the lysine dimethyltransferase G9a/G9a-like protein (Glp) complex plays a critical role in cocaine-induced central plasticity, and given cocaine’s role in the nerve system is relied on its function on dopamine system, we herein proposed that the reduced inhibition of dopaminergic transmission was from the downregulation of tyrosine hydroxylase expression by G9a/Glp complex through methylating its gene Th. After approval by the Animal Care and Use Committee, C57BL/6 mice were used for pain behavior using von Frey after spared nerve injury, and Th CpG islands methylation was measured using bisulfite sequencing at different nerve areas. The inhibitor of G9a/Glp, BIX 01294, was administered intraventricularly daily with bolus injection. The protein levels of G9a, Glp, and tyrosine hydroxylase were measured with immunoblotting. Dopamine levels were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography. The expression of G9a but not Glp was upregulated in ventral tegmental area at post-injury day 4 till day 49 (the last day of the behavioral test). Correspondingly, the Th CpG methylation is increased, but the tyrosine hydroxylase expression was downregulated and the dopamine level was decreased. After the intracerebroventriclar injection of BIX 01294 since the post-injury days 7 and 14 for consecutive three days, three weeks, and six weeks, the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase was upregulated with a significant decrease in Th methylation and increase in dopamine level. Moreover, the pain after G9a/Glp inhibitor was attenuated

  14. Graft-versus-host resistance induced by class II major histocompatibility complex-specific T cell clones

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of graft-vs.-host (GVH) resistance have been studied using a panel of seven class II major histocompatibility complex-specific T cell clones for elicitation and challenge. One clone recognized I-Ak,d,f, and expressed V beta 8.3 together with J beta 1.5. The remaining six clones were I-Ek specific and expressed V beta 15 rearranged to J beta 1.1 or J beta 1.3. The I-Ek-specific clones were also homologous to each other and different from the I-A-reactive one in the D and N regions. Four of the seven clones exhibited I-Ek- specific cytolytic activity. Each clone, when injected in sublethal numbers into appropriate recipients, could induce resistance to a subsequent lethal dose of any other clone in the panel. The resistance did not require sharing of either T cell receptor beta chains or antigen specificity, or MHC molecules by the eliciting and challenging clone. Cytolytic and noncytolytic clones were equally efficient in inducing GVH resistance. A prerequisite of resistance induction was the activation of eliciting clone subsequent to recognition of class II molecules in the host. Clones preactivated with high concentrations of recombinant interleukin 2, in vitro, could induce GVH resistance also in syngeneic hosts, suggesting that resistance induction was associated with the activated state of clone, rather than antigen recognition per se. In all instances of resistance, the challenging clones failed to induce vascular leakage, which was the cause of death in susceptible recipients (Lehmann, P. V., G. Schumm, D. Moon, U. Hurtenbach, F. Falcioni, S. Muller, and Z. A. Nagy. 1990. J. Exp. Med. 171:1485). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced resistance to vascular leakage did not provide crossresistance to GVH and vice versa, suggesting that interleukin 1 alpha and tumor necrosis factor alpha implicated in LPS resistance are not involved in GVH resistance. Although the mechanism remains unclear, the most likely explanation for GVH resistance in this

  15. The Stress-Induced Atf3-Gelsolin Cascade Underlies Dendritic Spine Deficits in Neuronal Models of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Duyu; Chen, Zehua; Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius; Di Nardo, Alessia; Julich, Kristina; Robson, Victoria K.; Cheng, Yung-Chih; Woolf, Clifford J.; Heiman, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactivation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase, as a result of loss-of-function mutations in tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1) or TSC2 genes, causes protein synthesis dysregulation, increased cell size, and aberrant neuronal connectivity. Dysregulated synthesis of synaptic proteins has been implicated in the pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) associated with TSC and fragile X syndrome. However, cell type-specific translational profiles in these disease models remain to be investigated. Here, we used high-fidelity and unbiased Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification (TRAP) methodology to purify ribosome-associated mRNAs and identified translational alterations in a rat neuronal culture model of TSC. We find that expression of many stress and/or activity-dependent proteins is highly induced while some synaptic proteins are repressed. Importantly, transcripts for the activating transcription factor-3 (Atf3) and mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 (Ucp2) are highly induced in Tsc2-deficient neurons, as well as in a neuron-specific Tsc1 conditional knock-out mouse model, and show differential responses to the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Gelsolin, a known target of Atf3 transcriptional activity, is also upregulated. shRNA-mediated block of Atf3 induction suppresses expression of gelsolin, an actin-severing protein, and rescues spine deficits found in Tsc2-deficient neurons. Together, our data demonstrate that a cell-autonomous program consisting of a stress-induced Atf3-gelsolin cascade affects the change in dendritic spine morphology following mTOR hyperactivation. This previously unidentified molecular cascade could be a therapeutic target for treating mTORopathies. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic disease associated with epilepsy and autism. Dysregulated protein synthesis has been implicated as a cause of this disease. However, cell type-specific translational profiles that are aberrant in this

  16. Curcuminoid-phospholipid complex induces apoptosis in mammary epithelial cells by STAT-3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cucuzza, Laura Starvaggi; Motta, Massimiliano; Miretti, Silvia; Accornero, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Curcumin (from the rhizome of Curcuma longa) is well documented for its medicinal properties in Indian and Chinese systems of medicine where it is widely used for the treatment of several diseases. Epidemiological observations are suggestive that curcumin consumption may reduce the risk of some form of cancers and provide other protective biological effects in humans. These biological properties have been attributed to curcuminoids that have been widely studied for their anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, antioxidant, wound healing and anti-cancer effects. In this study we have investigated on the effect of a curcumin phospholipid complex on mammary epithelial cell viability. HC11 and BME-UV cell lines, validated models to study biology of normal, not tumoral, mammary epithelial cells, were used to analyse these effects. We report that curcumin acts on STAT-3 signal pathway to reduce cell viability and increase apoptosis evaluated by the the amount of activated caspase 3. Further it reduces MAPK and AKT activations. JSI-124, a STAT-3 inhibitor (100 nM) was able to block the negative effect of curcumin on cell viability and caspase 3 activation. Finally the negative effect of cucumin on cell viability has been impaired in STAT-3i HC11, where STAT-3 protein was greatly reduced by shRNA-interference. These results indicate that curcumin presents a potential adverse effect to normal mammary epithelial cells and that it has a specific effect on signal trasduction in mammary epithelium. PMID:19116450

  17. Eosinophil granule lysis in vitro induced by soluble antigen antibody complexes

    PubMed Central

    Archer, G. T.; Nelson, Margaret; Johnston, Jill

    1969-01-01

    A simple test system is described, for the demonstration of antigen—antibody reactions capable of causing eosinophil granule lysis in vitro. The antigen preparations used were extracts of the nematode Amplicaecum robertsi and body fluid of Ascaris suum. Antisera were obtained from rats infested with Amplicaecum. Eosinophils were obtained from the peritoneal cavity of normal rats. Centrifugation of the cells to form a cell button was an essential step in the procedure. Lysis of eosinophils occurred with antiserum obtained from the animals between the 12th and 32nd days of infestation with Amplicaecum, and was accompanied by vacuole formation in macrophages and mast cell disruption. The reaction was most pronounced during the 3rd week. Serum from adrenalectomized infested animals caused the most marked changes in eosinophils. Serum from cortisonetreated infested animals failed to cause eosinophil changes. Attempts at purification of the antigen in Ascaris body fluid resulted in two fractions with marked activity in the test system. The same two fractions were found to form precipitin lines on agarose gel diffusion against rat antiserum. It is postulated that antigen—antibody complexes soluble in low concentration were responsible for the changes observed in the eosinophils, macrophages and mast cells. One or more labile factors in the serum were found to be necessary for eosinophil granule lysis. The evidence, though incomplete, would favour the suggestion that both labile antibody and complement were necessary. ImagesFIG. 2 PMID:4982023

  18. Plenary Perspective: The complexity of constitutive and inducible gene expression in mononuclear phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hume, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages differentiate from progenitor cells under the influence of colony-stimulating factors. Genome-scale data have enabled the identification of the set of genes that distinguishes macrophages from other cell types and the ways in which thousands of genes are regulated in response to pathogen challenge. Although there has been a focus on a small subset of lineage-enriched transcription factors, such as PU.1, more than one-half of the transcription factors in the genome can be expressed in macrophage lineage cells under some state of activation, and they interact in a complex network. The network architecture is conserved across species, but many of the target genes evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. The data and publication deluge related to macrophage biology require the development of new analytical tools and ways of presenting information in an accessible form. The website www.macrophages.com is a community website that partly fills this niche. PMID:22773680

  19. Somatic mosaicism and allele complexity induced by CRISPR/Cas9 RNA injections in mouse zygotes.

    PubMed

    Yen, Shuo-Ting; Zhang, Min; Deng, Jian Min; Usman, Shireen J; Smith, Chad N; Parker-Thornburg, Jan; Swinton, Paul G; Martin, James F; Behringer, Richard R

    2014-09-01

    Tyrosinase is the rate-limiting enzyme for the production of melanin pigmentation. In the mouse and other animals, homozygous null mutations in the Tyrosinase gene (Tyr) result in the absence of pigmentation, i.e. albinism. Here we used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate mono- and bi-allelic null mutations in the Tyr locus by zygote injection of two single-guide and Cas9 RNAs. Injection into C57BL/6N wild-type embryos resulted in one completely albino founder carrying two different Tyr mutations. In addition, three pigmentation mosaics and fully pigmented littermates were obtained that transmitted new mutant Tyr alleles to progeny in test crosses with albinos. Injection into Tyr heterozygous (B6CBAF1/J×FVB/NJ) zygotes resulted in the generation of numerous albinos and also mice with a graded range of albino mosaicism. Deep sequencing revealed that the majority of the albinos and the mosaics had more than two new mutant alleles. These visual phenotypes and molecular genotypes highlight the somatic mosaicism and allele complexity in founders that occurs for targeted genes during CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis by zygote injection in mice.

  20. The RNA-induced transcriptional silencing complex targets chromatin exclusively via interacting with nascent transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yukiko; Mohn, Fabio; Bühler, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs regulate chromatin modification and transcriptional gene silencing across the eukaryotic kingdom. Although these processes have been well studied, fundamental mechanistic aspects remain obscure. Specifically, it is unclear exactly how small RNA-loaded Argonaute protein complexes target chromatin to mediate silencing. Here, using fission yeast, we demonstrate that transcription of the target locus is essential for RNA-directed formation of heterochromatin. However, high transcriptional activity is inhibitory; thus, a transcriptional window exists that is optimal for silencing. We further found that pre-mRNA splicing is compatible with RNA-directed heterochromatin formation. However, the kinetics of pre-mRNA processing is critical. Introns close to the 5′ end of a transcript that are rapidly spliced result in a bistable response whereby the target either remains euchromatic or becomes fully silenced. Together, our results discount siRNA–DNA base pairing in RNA-mediated heterochromatin formation, and the mechanistic insights further reveal guiding paradigms for the design of small RNA-directed chromatin silencing studies in multicellular organisms. PMID:27941123

  1. Enhanced Direct Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Self-Antigen Presentation Induced by Chlamydia Infection.

    PubMed

    Cram, Erik D; Simmons, Ryan S; Palmer, Amy L; Hildebrand, William H; Rockey, Daniel D; Dolan, Brian P

    2015-11-23

    The direct major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway ensures intracellular peptides are displayed at the cellular surface for recognition of infected or transformed cells by CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular bacteria and, as such, should be targeted by CD8(+) T cells. It is likely that Chlamydia spp. have evolved mechanisms to avoid the CD8(+) killer T cell responses by interfering with MHC class I antigen presentation. Using a model system of self-peptide presentation which allows for posttranslational control of the model protein's stability, we tested the ability of various Chlamydia species to alter direct MHC class I antigen presentation. Infection of the JY lymphoblastoid cell line limited the accumulation of a model host protein and increased presentation of the model-protein-derived peptides. Enhanced self-peptide presentation was detected only when presentation was restricted to defective ribosomal products, or DRiPs, and total MHC class I levels remained unaltered. Skewed antigen presentation was dependent on a bacterial synthesized component, as evidenced by reversal of the observed phenotype upon preventing bacterial transcription, translation, and the inhibition of bacterial lipooligosaccharide synthesis. These data suggest that Chlamydia spp. have evolved to alter the host antigen presentation machinery to favor presentation of defective and rapidly degraded forms of self-antigen, possibly as a mechanism to diminish the presentation of peptides derived from bacterial proteins.

  2. Phenol Nitration Induced by an {Fe(NO)2}10 Dinitrosyl Iron Complex

    SciTech Connect

    N Tran; H Kalyvas; K Skodje; T Hayashi; P Moenne-Loccoz; P Callan; J Shearer; L Kirschenbaum; E Kim

    2011-12-31

    Cellular dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNICs) have long been considered NO carriers. Although other physiological roles of DNICs have been postulated, their chemical functionality outside of NO transfer has not been demonstrated thus far. Here we report the unprecedented dioxygen reactivity of a N-bound {l_brace}Fe(NO){sub 2}{r_brace}{sup 10} DNIC, [Fe(TMEDA)(NO){sub 2}] (1). In the presence of O{sub 2}, 1 becomes a nitrating agent that converts 2,4,-di-tert-butylphenol to 2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-nitrophenol via formation of a putative iron-peroxynitrite [Fe(TMEDA)(NO)(ONOO)] (2) that is stable below -80 C. Iron K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy on 2 supports a five-coordinated metal center with a bound peroxynitrite in a cyclic bidentate fashion. The peroxynitrite ligand of 2 readily decays at increased temperature or under illumination. These results suggest that DNICs could have multiple physiological or deleterious roles, including that of cellular nitrating agents.

  3. New Insights into Molecular Mechanisms of Immune Complex-Induced Injury in Lung

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Peter A.; Fattahi, Fatemeh; Bosmann, Markus

    2016-01-01

    While the phlogistic activities of IgM or IgG immune complexes (ICs) have been well established as complement-activating agents and seem likely to play important roles in humans with vasculitis, certain types of glomerulonephritis as well as in a variety of autoimmune diseases, the predominant clinical strategies have involved the use of immunosuppressive or anti-inflammatory drugs. Over the past decade, new insights into molecular events developing during IC models in rodents have identified new phlogistic products that may be candidates for therapeutic blockade. Extracellular histones, located in the web-like structures of neutrophil extracellular traps, are released from complement-activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) downstream of IC deposition. Extracellular histones appear to be a new class of highly tissue-damaging products derived from complement-activated PMNs. Histones have also been discovered in cell-free broncho-alveolar lavage fluids from humans with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Recent studies emphasize that in the setting of ARDS-like reactions in rodents, extracellular histones are released and are exceedingly proinflammatory, tissue damaging, and prothrombotic. Such studies suggest that in humans with ARDS, extracellular histones may represent therapeutic targets for blockade. PMID:27014266

  4. Enhanced Direct Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Self-Antigen Presentation Induced by Chlamydia Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cram, Erik D.; Simmons, Ryan S.; Palmer, Amy L.; Hildebrand, William H.; Rockey, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    The direct major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway ensures intracellular peptides are displayed at the cellular surface for recognition of infected or transformed cells by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular bacteria and, as such, should be targeted by CD8+ T cells. It is likely that Chlamydia spp. have evolved mechanisms to avoid the CD8+ killer T cell responses by interfering with MHC class I antigen presentation. Using a model system of self-peptide presentation which allows for posttranslational control of the model protein's stability, we tested the ability of various Chlamydia species to alter direct MHC class I antigen presentation. Infection of the JY lymphoblastoid cell line limited the accumulation of a model host protein and increased presentation of the model-protein-derived peptides. Enhanced self-peptide presentation was detected only when presentation was restricted to defective ribosomal products, or DRiPs, and total MHC class I levels remained unaltered. Skewed antigen presentation was dependent on a bacterial synthesized component, as evidenced by reversal of the observed phenotype upon preventing bacterial transcription, translation, and the inhibition of bacterial lipooligosaccharide synthesis. These data suggest that Chlamydia spp. have evolved to alter the host antigen presentation machinery to favor presentation of defective and rapidly degraded forms of self-antigen, possibly as a mechanism to diminish the presentation of peptides derived from bacterial proteins. PMID:26597986

  5. Tachycardiomyopathy Induced by Ventricular Premature Complexes: Complete Recovery after Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Kyoung-Hoon; Jung, Ju-Young; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Chae, Jei-Keon; Kim, Won-Ho; Ko, Jae-Ki

    2006-01-01

    Ventricular premature complexes (VPCs) are known to be one of the most benign cardiac arrhythmias when they occur in structurally normal hearts. We experienced a 32-year old man who presented with dyspnea, palpitations and very frequent VPCs (31% of the total heart beats). Echocardiography revealed a dilated left ventricle (LV 66 mm at end-diastole and 57 mm at end-systole) and a decreased ejection fraction (34%). Very frequent VPCs had been detected 10 years previously and he underwent a failed radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) procedure at that time. The patient had been treated with heart failure medications including betablockers, ACE inhibitors and spironolactone for the two most recent years. Six months after we eliminated these VPCs with a second RFCA procedure, the heart returned to normal function and size. Long standing and very frequent VPCs could be the cause of left ventricular dysfunction in a subset of patients who suffer with dilated cardiomyopathy, and RFCA should be the choice of therapy for these patients. PMID:17017676

  6. Coherence effects in the ultra-intense laser-induced ultrafast response of complex atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongqiang; Yuan, Jianmin

    2016-05-01

    Both coherent pumping and energy relaxation play important roles in understanding physical processes of ultra-intense coherent light-matter interactions. Here, using a large-scale quantum master equation approach, we describe dynamical processes of practical open quantum systems driven by both coherent and stochastic interactions. As examples, two typical cases of light-matter interactions are studied. First, we investigate coherent dynamics of inner-shell electrons of a neon gas irradiated by a high intensity X-ray laser along with vast number of decaying channels. In these single-photon dominated processes, we find that, due to coherence-induced Rabi oscillations and power broadening effects, the photon absorptions of a neon gas can be suppressed resulting in differences in ionization processes and final ion-stage distributions. Second, we take helium as an example of multi-photon and multichannel interference dominated electron dynamics, by investigating the transient absorption of an isolated atto-second pulse in the presence of a femto-second infrared laser pulse.

  7. Cholesterol stimulates and ceramide inhibits Sticholysin II-induced pore formation in complex bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Alm, Ida; García-Linares, Sara; Gavilanes, José G; Martínez-Del-Pozo, Álvaro; Slotte, J Peter

    2015-04-01

    The pore forming capacity of Sticholysin II (StnII; isolated from Stichodactyla helianthus) in bilayer membranes containing 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), palmitoylsphingomyelin (PSM) and either cholesterol or palmitoyl ceramide (PCer) has been examined. The aim of the study was to elucidate how the presence of differently ordered PSM domains affected StnII oligomerization and pore formation. Cholesterol is known to enhance pore formation by StnII, and our results confirmed this and provide kinetic information for the process. The effect of cholesterol on bilayer permeabilization kinetics was concentration-dependent. In the concentration regime used (2.5-10nmol cholesterol in POPC:PSM 80:20 by nmol), cholesterol also increased the acyl chain order in the fluid PSM domain and thus decreased bilayer fluidity, suggesting that fluidity per se was not responsible for cholesterol's effect. Addition of PCer (2.5-10nmol) to the POPC:PSM (80:20 by nmol) bilayers attenuated StnII-induced pore formation, again in a concentration-dependent fashion. This addition also led to the formation of a PCer-rich gel phase. Addition of cholesterol to PCer-containing membranes could partially reduce the inhibitory effect of PCer on StnII pore formation. We conclude that the physical state of PSM (as influenced by either cholesterol or PCer) affected StnII binding and pore formation under the conditions examined.

  8. Phase-induced amplitude apodization complex mask coronagraph mask fabrication, characterization, and modeling for WFIRST-AFTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Brian; Guyon, Olivier; Belikov, Ruslan; Wilson, Daniel; Muller, Richard; Sidick, Erkin; Balasubramanian, Bala; Krist, John; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Tang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the fabrication, characterization, and modeling of a second-generation occulting mask for a phase-induced amplitude apodization complex mask coronagraph, designed for use on the WFIRST-AFTA mission. The mask has many small features (˜micron lateral scales) and was fabricated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Microdevices Laboratory, then characterized using a scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, and optical interferometric microscope. The measured fabrication errors were then fed to a wavefront control model which predicts the contrast performance of a full coronagraph. The expected coronagraphic performance using this mask is consistent with observing ˜15 planetary targets with WFIRST-AFTA in a reasonable time (<1 day/target).

  9. HIV-1 Gag Blocks Selenite-Induced Stress Granule Assembly by Altering the mRNA Cap-Binding Complex

    PubMed Central

    Cinti, Alessandro; Le Sage, Valerie; Ghanem, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stress granules (SGs) are dynamic accumulations of stalled preinitiation complexes and translational machinery that assemble under stressful conditions. Sodium selenite (Se) induces the assembly of noncanonical type II SGs that differ in morphology, composition, and mechanism of assembly from canonical SGs. Se inhibits translation initiation by altering the cap-binding activity of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein 1 (4EBP1). In this work, we show that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag is able to block the assembly of type II noncanonical SGs to facilitate continued Gag protein synthesis. We demonstrate that expression of Gag reduces the amount of hypophosphorylated 4EBP1 associated with the 5′ cap potentially through an interaction with its target, eIF4E. These results suggest that the assembly of SGs is an important host antiviral defense that HIV-1 has evolved for inhibition through several distinct mechanisms. PMID:27025252

  10. Role of CDK5/cyclin complexes in ischemia-induced death and survival of renal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Tatiana; Sancho, Mónica; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Orzáez, Mar

    2014-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion processes induce damage in renal tubules and compromise the viability of kidney transplants. Understanding the molecular events responsible for tubule damage and recovery would help to develop new strategies for organ preservation. CDK5 has been traditionally considered a neuronal kinase with dual roles in cell death and survival. Here, we demonstrate that CDK5 and their regulators p35/p25 and cyclin I are also expressed in renal tubular cells. We show that treatment with CDK inhibitors promotes the formation of pro-survival CDK5/cyclin I complexes and enhances cell survival upon an ischemia reperfusion pro-apoptotic insult. These findings support the benefit of treating with CDK inhibitors for renal preservation, assisting renal tubule protection.

  11. Constitutive model for flake graphite cast iron automotive brake discs: induced anisotropic damage model under complex loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustins, L.; Billardon, R.; Hild, F.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper details an elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model for automotive brake discs made of flake graphite cast iron. In a companion paper (Augustins et al. in Contin Mech Thermodyn, 2015), the authors proposed a one-dimensional setting appropriate for representing the complex behavior of the material (i.e., asymmetry between tensile and compressive loadings) under anisothermal conditions. The generalization of this 1D model to 3D cases on a volume element and the associated challenges are addressed. A direct transposition is not possible, and an alternative solution without unilateral conditions is first proposed. Induced anisotropic damage and associated constitutive laws are then introduced. The transition from the volume element to the real structure and the numerical implementation require a specific basis change. Brake disc simulations with this constitutive model show that unilateral conditions are needed for the friction bands. A damage deactivation procedure is therefore defined.

  12. Laser-induced synthesis of a nanostructured polymer-like metal-carbon complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakelian, S.; Kutrovskaya, S.; Kucherik, A.; Osipov, A.; Povolotckaia, A.; Povolotskiy, A.; Manshina, A.

    2016-04-01

    Synthesis of nanotructured metal-carbon materials by laser irradiation is an actual branch of laser physics and nanotechnology. Laser sources with different pulse duration allow changing the heating rate with realization of different transition scenarios and synthesis materials with various physical properties. We study the process of the formation of nanostructured metal-clusters and complexes using laser irradiation of colloidal systems which were consisted of carbon micro- nanoparticles and nanoparticles of noble metals. For carbon nanoparticles synthesis we use the method of laser ablation in liquid. For the realization of different regimes of laser surface modification of the target (glassycarbon and shungite) and the formation of micro- nanoparticles in a liquid the YAG:Nd laser with a pulse duration from 0.5 ms up to 20 ms (pulse energy up to 50J) was applied. We have used the CW-laser with moderate intensity in liquid (water or ethanol) for nanoparticle of noble metals synthesis. Thus, colloidal systems were obtained by using CW-laser with λ = 1.06 μm, I ~ 105-6 W/cm2, and t = 10 min. The average size of resulting particles was approximately about 10 to 100 nm. The nanoparticle obtaining was provided in the colloidal solution with different laser parameters. In this work we have investigated the mechanism of the metal-carbon cluster formation during the process of irradiation of colloidal system which were consisted of separate carbon, silver and gold nanoparticles. This system was irradiated by nanosecond laser (100 ns) with average power up to 50W.

  13. Heart Failure Induces Significant Changes in Nuclear Pore Complex of Human Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tarazón, Estefanía; Rivera, Miguel; Roselló-Lletí, Esther; Molina-Navarro, Maria Micaela; Sánchez-Lázaro, Ignacio José; España, Francisco; Montero, José Anastasio; Lago, Francisca; González-Juanatey, José Ramón; Portolés, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Aims The objectives of this study were to analyse the effect of heart failure (HF) on several proteins of nuclear pore complex (NPC) and their relationship with the human ventricular function. Methods and Results A total of 88 human heart samples from ischemic (ICM, n = 52) and dilated (DCM, n = 36) patients undergoing heart transplant and control donors (CNT, n = 9) were analyzed by Western blot. Subcellular distribution of nucleoporins was analysed by fluorescence and immunocytochemistry. When we compared protein levels according to etiology, ICM showed significant higher levels of NDC1 (65%, p<0.0001), Nup160 (88%, p<0.0001) and Nup153 (137%, p = 0.004) than those of the CNT levels. Furthermore, DCM group showed significant differences for NDC1 (41%, p<0.0001), Nup160 (65%, p<0.0001), Nup153 (155%, p = 0.006) and Nup93 (88%, p<0.0001) compared with CNT. However, Nup155 and translocated promoter region (TPR) did not show significant differences in their levels in any etiology. Regarding the distribution of these proteins in cell nucleus, only NDC1 showed differences in HF. In addition, in the pathological group we obtained good relationship between the ventricular function parameters (LVEDD and LVESD) and Nup160 (r = −0382, p = 0.004; r = −0.290, p = 0.033; respectively). Conclusions This study shows alterations in specific proteins (NDC1, Nup160, Nup153 and Nup93) that compose NPC in ischaemic and dilated human heart. These changes, related to ventricular function, could be accompanied by alterations in the nucleocytoplasmic transport. Therefore, our findings may be the basis for a new approach to HF management. PMID:23152829

  14. Optical Estimation of Depth Induced Wave Breaking Distributions over Complex Bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, A. S.; Holman, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    Parametric depth-induced-breaking dissipation models have shown great skill at predicting time averaged wave heights across the surf zone. First proposed by Battjes & Janssen (1978), these models balance the incoming wave energy flux with a roller dissipation term. This roller dissipation term is estimated by calculating the dissipation for one characteristic broken wave and then multiplying this quantity by the fraction of broken waves. To describe the fraction of broken waves, a typical assumption asserts that wave heights are nearly Rayleigh distributed [Thornton & Guza (1983)] allowing a sea state to be described by only a few parameters. While many experiments have validated the cross shore wave height profiles, few field experiments have been performed to analyze the probability distribution of breaking wave heights over a barred beach profile. The goal of the present research is to determine the distribution of broken and unbroken wave heights across a natural barred beach profile. Field data collected during the Surf Zone Optics experiment (a Multi-disciplinary University Research Initiative) in Duck, North Carolina, consisted of an array of in-situ pressure sensors and optical remote sensing cameras. Sea surface elevation time series from the in-situ pressure sensors are used here to resolve wave height distributions at multiple locations across the surf zone. Breaking wave height distributions are resolved based upon a combination of the pressure sensor and optically based breaker detection algorithm. Since breaking is easily able to be tracked by video imaging, breaking waves are flagged in the sea surface elevation series and binned into a broken wave height distribution. Results of this analysis are compared with model predictions based upon the Battjes & Janssen (1978), Thornton & Guza (1983) and Janssen & Battjes (2007) models to assess the validity of each wave height distribution model.

  15. Reversible low-light induced photoswitching of crowned spiropyran-DO3A complexed with gadolinium(III) ions.

    PubMed

    Kruttwig, Klaus; Yankelevich, Diego R; Brueggemann, Chantal; Tu, Chuqiao; L'etoile, Noelle; Knoesen, André; Louie, Angelique Y

    2012-05-31

    Photoswitchable spiropyran has been conjugated to the crowned ring system DO3A, which improves its solubility in dipolar and polar media and stabilizes the merocyanine isomer. Adding the lanthanide ion gadolinium(III) to the macrocyclic ring system leads to a photoresponsive magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent that displays an increased spin-lattice relaxation time (T₁) upon visible light stimulation. In this work, the photoresponse of this photochromic molecule to weak light illumination using blue and green light emitting diodes was investigated, simulating the emission spectra from bioluminescent enzymes. Photon emission rate of the light emitting diodes was changed, from 1.75 × 10¹⁶ photons·s⁻¹ to 2.37 × 10¹² photons·s⁻¹. We observed a consistent visible light-induced isomerization of the merocyanine to the spiropyran form with photon fluxes as low as 2.37 × 10¹² photons·s⁻¹ resulting in a relaxivity change of the compound. This demonstrates the potential for use of the described imaging probes in low light level applications such as sensing bioluminescence enzyme activity. The isomerization behavior of gadolinium(III)-ion complexed and non-complexed spiropyran-DO3A was analyzed in water and ethanol solution in response to low light illumination and compared to the emitted photon emission rate from over-expressed Gaussia princeps luciferase.

  16. Clerocidin interacts with the cleavage complex of Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV to induce selective irreversible DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Richter, Sara N; Leo, Elisabetta; Giaretta, Giulia; Gatto, Barbara; Fisher, L Mark; Palumbo, Manlio

    2006-01-01

    Clerocidin (CL), a diterpenoid natural product, alkylates DNA through its epoxide moiety and exhibits both anticancer and antibacterial activities. We have examined CL action in the presence of topoisomerase IV from Streptococcus pneumoniae. CL promoted irreversible enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage leading to single- and double-stranded DNA breaks at specific sites. Reaction required the diterpenoid function: no cleavage was seen using a naphthalene-substituted analogue. Moreover, drug-induced DNA breakage was not observed using a mutant topoisomerase IV (ParC Y118F) unable to form a cleavage complex with DNA. Sequence analysis of 102 single-stranded DNA breaks and 79 double-stranded breaks revealed an overwhelming preference for G at the -1 position, i.e. immediately 5' of the enzyme DNA scission site. This specificity contrasts with that of topoisomerase IV cleavage with antibacterial quinolones. Indeed, CL stimulated DNA breakage by a quinolone-resistant topoisomerase IV (ParC S79F). Overall, the results indicate that topoisomerase IV facilitates selective irreversible CL attack at guanine and that its cleavage complex differs markedly from that of mammalian topoisomerase II which promotes both irreversible and reversible CL attack at guanine and cytosine, respectively. The unique ability to form exclusively irreversible DNA breaks suggests topoisomerase IV may be a key intracellular target of CL in bacteria.

  17. Spatiotemporal control of interferon-induced JAK/STAT signalling and gene transcription by the retromer complex

    PubMed Central

    Chmiest, Daniela; Sharma, Nanaocha; Zanin, Natacha; Viaris de Lesegno, Christine; Shafaq-Zadah, Massiullah; Sibut, Vonick; Dingli, Florent; Hupé, Philippe; Wilmes, Stephan; Piehler, Jacob; Loew, Damarys; Johannes, Ludger; Schreiber, Gideon; Lamaze, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Type-I interferons (IFNs) play a key role in the immune defences against viral and bacterial infections, and in cancer immunosurveillance. We have established that clathrin-dependent endocytosis of the type-I interferon (IFN-α/β) receptor (IFNAR) is required for JAK/STAT signalling. Here we show that the internalized IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 subunits of the IFNAR complex are differentially sorted by the retromer at the early endosome. Binding of the retromer VPS35 subunit to IFNAR2 results in IFNAR2 recycling to the plasma membrane, whereas IFNAR1 is sorted to the lysosome for degradation. Depletion of VPS35 leads to abnormally prolonged residency and association of the IFNAR subunits at the early endosome, resulting in increased activation of STAT1- and IFN-dependent gene transcription. These experimental data establish the retromer complex as a key spatiotemporal regulator of IFNAR endosomal sorting and a new factor in type-I IFN-induced JAK/STAT signalling and gene transcription. PMID:27917878

  18. Boronate Complex Formation with Dopa Containing Mussel Adhesive Protein Retards pH-Induced Oxidation and Enables Adhesion to Mica

    PubMed Central

    Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Chen, Yunfei; Waite, J. Herbert

    2014-01-01

    The biochemistry of mussel adhesion has inspired the design of surface primers, adhesives, coatings and gels for technological applications. These mussel-inspired systems often focus on incorporating the amino acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (Dopa) or a catecholic analog into a polymer. Unfortunately, effective use of Dopa is compromised by its susceptibility to auto-oxidation at neutral pH. Oxidation can lead to loss of adhesive function and undesired covalent cross-linking. Mussel foot protein 5 (Mfp-5), which contains ∼30 mole % Dopa, is a superb adhesive under reducing conditions but becomes nonadhesive after pH-induced oxidation. Here we report that the bidentate complexation of borate by Dopa to form a catecholato-boronate can be exploited to retard oxidation. Although exposure of Mfp-5 to neutral pH typically oxidizes Dopa, resulting in a>95% decrease in adhesion, inclusion of borate retards oxidation at the same pH. Remarkably, this Dopa-boronate complex dissociates upon contact with mica to allow for a reversible Dopa-mediated adhesion. The borate protection strategy allows for Dopa redox stability and maintained adhesive function in an otherwise oxidizing environment. PMID:25303409

  19. Photoswitchable stable charge-distributed states in a new cobalt complex exhibiting photo-induced valence tautomerism.

    PubMed

    Slota, Michael; Blankenhorn, Marian; Heintze, Eric; Vu, Minh; Hübner, Ralph; Bogani, Lapo

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis and magnetic and photomagnetic behaviour of a novel valence tautomeric cobalt complex, [Co(3,5-dbbq)2(μ-bpym)] (1) (3,5-dbbq = 3,5-di-tert-butyl-1,2-benzoquinone and μ-bpym = 2,2'-bipyrimidine). The synthesis is performed by reacting Co2(CO)8 and μ-bpym in the presence of the ligand 3,5-dbbq in a mixed solvent under inert atmosphere. The magnetic behavior clearly shows the presence of electron transfer from the catecholate ligand to the cobalt center, producing valence tautomers of [Co(II)(SQ)2] with a transition temperature (T1/2) of 215 K. Photomagnetic studies, performed via both SQUID magnetometry and X-band electron paramagnetic resonance, show the clear presence of photoinduced valence tautomerism, at temperatures considerably higher than previous systems. A metastable charge distribution is observed, strengthening previous investigations on the character of mixed valence ligands. Entropy-driven valence tautomeric interconversion is observed, and drives the transition to the most stable charge distribution. The complex has the ability to coordinate and can be used as a photoswitchable building block, with the photomagnetic characterisation evidencing a metastable state lifetime of the photo-induced valence tautomeric process of ca. 2.9 × 10(4) s below 20 K. The observed yields are higher than ones in similar systems, showing that tiny changes in the molecular structures may have a huge impact.

  20. A novel high light-inducible carotenoid-binding protein complex in the thylakoid membranes of Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Daddy, Soumana; Zhan, Jiao; Jantaro, Saowarath; He, Chenliu; He, Qingfang; Wang, Qiang

    2015-03-30

    Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is a model cyanobacterium extensively used to study photosynthesis. Here we reveal a novel high light-inducible carotenoid-binding protein complex (HLCC) in the thylakoid membranes of Synechocystis PCC 6803 cells exposed to high intensity light. Zeaxanthin and myxoxanthophyll accounted for 29.8% and 54.8%, respectively, of the carotenoids bound to the complex. Using Blue-Native PAGE followed by 2D SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry, we showed that the HLCC consisted of Slr1128, IsiA, PsaD, and HliA/B. We confirmed these findings by SEAD fluorescence cross-linking and anti-PsaD immuno-coprecipitation analyses. The expression of genes encoding the protein components of the HLCC was enhanced by high light illumination and artificial oxidative stress. Deletion of these proteins resulted in impaired state transition and increased sensitivity to oxidative and/or high light stress, as indicated by increased membrane peroxidation. Therefore, the HLCC protects thylakoid membranes from extensive photooxidative damage, likely via a mechanism involving state transition.

  1. Bond dissociation energies of solvated silver(I)-amide complexes: competitive threshold collision-induced dissociations and calculations.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Vladimir; Siu, Chi-Kit; Verkerk, Udo H; Hopkinson, Alan C; Siu, K W Michael

    2010-07-08

    Using competitive threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) measurements, experimental bond dissociation energies have been evaluated for the water, methanol, and acetonitrile adducts of silver(I)-amide complexes. The influence of the solvent molecules on the binding energy of silver(I) to acetamide, N-methylacetamide, and N,N-dimethylacetamide was investigated. Experimental results show that solvents decrease the amide binding energy by 4-6 kcal mol(-1). Using density functional theory (DFT), binding energies were evaluated using nine functionals, after full geometry optimizations with the ECP28MWB basis set for silver and the 6-311++G(2df,2pd) basis set for the other atomic constituents of the ligands. In addition, calculations employing the DZVP basis set for Ag and DZVP2 for C, H, N, and O atoms at the B3LYP and MP2 levels of theory were used to investigate the influence of the basis set on the theoretical bond energies. A comparison of the experimental and theoretical silver(I)-ligand bond dissociation energies enables an assessment of the limitations in the basis sets and functionals in describing the energetics of the metal-solvent interaction and the metal-amide interaction. No single functional/basis set combination was found capable of predicting binding energies with a sufficiently high level of accuracy for the silver(I)-amide solvent complexes.

  2. Aging-induced alterations in gene transcripts and functional activity of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complexes in the heart.

    PubMed

    Preston, Claudia C; Oberlin, Andrew S; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L; Gupta, Anu; Sagar, Sandeep; Syed, Rashad H Khazi; Siddiqui, Sabeeh A; Raghavakaimal, Sreekumar; Terzic, Andre; Jahangir, Arshad

    2008-06-01

    Aging is associated with progressive decline in energetic reserves compromising cardiac performance and tolerance to injury. Although deviations in mitochondrial functions have been documented in senescent heart, the molecular bases for the decline in energy metabolism are only partially understood. Here, high-throughput transcription profiles of genes coding for mitochondrial proteins in ventricles from adult (6-months) and aged (24-months) rats were compared using microarrays. Out of 614 genes encoding for mitochondrial proteins, 94 were differentially expressed with 95% downregulated in the aged. The majority of changes affected genes coding for proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation (39), substrate metabolism (14) and tricarboxylic acid cycle (6). Compared to adult, gene expression changes in aged hearts translated into a reduced mitochondrial functional capacity, with decreased NADH-dehydrogenase and F(0)F(1) ATPase complex activities and capacity for oxygen-utilization and ATP synthesis. Expression of genes coding for transcription co-activator factors involved in the regulation of mitochondrial metabolism and biogenesis were downregulated in aged ventricles without reduction in mitochondrial density. Thus, aging induces a selective decline in activities of oxidative phosphorylation complexes I and V within a broader transcriptional downregulation of mitochondrial genes, providing a substrate for reduced energetic efficiency associated with senescence.

  3. Aging-Induced Alterations in Gene Transcripts and Functional Activity of Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation Complexes in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Claudia C.; Oberlin, Andrew S.; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L.; Gupta, Anu; Sagar, Sandeep; Khazi Syed, Rashad H.; Siddiqui, Sabeeh; Raghavakaimal, Sreekumar; Terzic, Andre; Jahangir, Arshad

    2008-01-01

    Aging is associated with progressive decline in energetic reserves compromising cardiac performance and tolerance to injury. Although deviations in mitochondrial functions have been documented in senescent heart, the molecular bases for the decline in energy metabolism are only partially understood. Here, high-throughput transcription profiles of genes coding for mitochondrial proteins in ventricles from adult (6-months) and aged (24-months) rats were compared using microarrays. Out of 614 genes encoding for mitochondrial proteins, 94 were differentially expressed with 95% downregulated in the aged. The majority of changes affected genes coding for proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation (39), substrate metabolism (14) and tricarboxylic acid cycle (6). Compared to adult, gene expression changes in aged hearts translated into a reduced mitochondrial functional capacity, with decreased NADH-dehydrogenase and F0F1-ATPase complex activities and capacity for oxygen-utilization and ATP synthesis. Expression of genes coding for transcription co-activator factors involved in the regulation of mitochondrial metabolism and biogenesis were downregulated in aged ventricles without reduction in mitochondrial density. Thus, aging induces a selective decline in activities of oxidative phosphorylation complexes I and V within a broader transcriptional downregulation of mitochondrial genes, providing a substrate for reduced energetic efficiency associated with senescence. PMID:18400259

  4. A novel high light-inducible carotenoid-binding protein complex in the thylakoid membranes of Synechocystis PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Daddy, Soumana; Zhan, Jiao; Jantaro, Saowarath; He, Chenliu; He, Qingfang; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is a model cyanobacterium extensively used to study photosynthesis. Here we reveal a novel high light-inducible carotenoid-binding protein complex (HLCC) in the thylakoid membranes of Synechocystis PCC 6803 cells exposed to high intensity light. Zeaxanthin and myxoxanthophyll accounted for 29.8% and 54.8%, respectively, of the carotenoids bound to the complex. Using Blue-Native PAGE followed by 2D SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry, we showed that the HLCC consisted of Slr1128, IsiA, PsaD, and HliA/B. We confirmed these findings by SEAD fluorescence cross-linking and anti-PsaD immuno-coprecipitation analyses. The expression of genes encoding the protein components of the HLCC was enhanced by high light illumination and artificial oxidative stress. Deletion of these proteins resulted in impaired state transition and increased sensitivity to oxidative and/or high light stress, as indicated by increased membrane peroxidation. Therefore, the HLCC protects thylakoid membranes from extensive photooxidative damage, likely via a mechanism involving state transition. PMID:25820628

  5. Communication: Ultrafast time-resolved ion photofragmentation spectroscopy of photoionization-induced proton transfer in phenol-ammonia complex

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Ching-Chi; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Ho, Jr-Wei; Chen, Yi-Wei; Cheng, Po-Yuan

    2014-11-07

    Photoionization-induced proton transfer (PT) in phenol-ammonia (PhOH-NH{sub 3}) complex has been studied using ultrafast time-resolved ion photofragmentation spectroscopy. Neutral PhOH-NH{sub 3} complexes prepared in a free jet are photoionized by femtosecond [1+1] resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization via the S{sub 1} state, and the subsequent dynamics occurring in the cations is probed by delayed pulses that result in ion fragmentation. The observed temporal evolutions of the photofragmentation spectra are consistent with an intracomplex PT reaction. The experiments revealed that PT in [PhOH-NH{sub 3}]{sup +} cation proceeds in two distinct steps: an initial impulsive wave-packet motion in ∼70 fs followed by a slower relaxation of about 1 ps that stabilizes the system into the final PT configuration. These results indicate that for a barrierless PT system, even though the initial PT motions are impulsive and ultrafast, the reaction may take a much longer time scale to complete.

  6. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique for the determination of the chemical composition of complex inorganic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łazarek, Łukasz; Antończak, Arkadiusz J.; Wójcik, Michał R.; Kozioł, Paweł E.; Stepak, Bogusz; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2014-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a fast, fully optical method, that needs little or no sample preparation. In this technique qualitative and quantitative analysis is based on comparison. The determination of composition is generally based on the construction of a calibration curve namely the LIBS signal versus the concentration of the analyte. Typically, to calibrate the system, certified reference materials with known elemental composition are used. Nevertheless, such samples due to differences in the overall composition with respect to the used complex inorganic materials can influence significantly on the accuracy. There are also some intermediate factors which can cause imprecision in measurements, such as optical absorption, surface structure, thermal conductivity etc. This paper presents the calibration procedure performed with especially prepared pellets from the tested materials, which composition was previously defined. We also proposed methods of post-processing which allowed for mitigation of the matrix effects and for a reliable and accurate analysis. This technique was implemented for determination of trace elements in industrial copper concentrates standardized by conventional atomic absorption spectroscopy with a flame atomizer. A series of copper flotation concentrate samples was analyzed for contents of three elements, that is silver, cobalt and vanadium. It has been shown that the described technique can be used to qualitative and quantitative analyses of complex inorganic materials, such as copper flotation concentrates.

  7. Two Adjacent Trimeric Fas Ligands Are Required for Fas Signaling and Formation of a Death-Inducing Signaling Complex

    PubMed Central

    Holler, Nils; Tardivel, Aubry; Kovacsovics-Bankowski, Magdalena; Hertig, Sylvie; Gaide, Olivier; Martinon, Fabio; Tinel, Antoine; Deperthes, David; Calderara, Silvio; Schulthess, Therese; Engel, Jürgen; Schneider, Pascal; Tschopp, Jürg

    2003-01-01

    The membrane-bound form of Fas ligand (FasL) signals apoptosis in target cells through engagement of the death receptor Fas, whereas the proteolytically processed, soluble form of FasL does not induce cell death. However, soluble FasL can be rendered active upon cross-linking. Since the minimal extent of oligomerization of FasL that exerts cytotoxicity is unknown, we engineered hexameric proteins containing two trimers of FasL within the same molecule. This was achieved by fusing FasL to the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G1 or to the collagen domain of ACRP30/adiponectin. Trimeric FasL and hexameric FasL both bound to Fas, but only the hexameric forms were highly cytotoxic and competent to signal apoptosis via formation of a death-inducing signaling complex. Three sequential early events in Fas-mediated apoptosis could be dissected, namely, receptor binding, receptor activation, and recruitment of intracellular signaling molecules, each of which occurred independently of the subsequent one. These results demonstrate that the limited oligomerization of FasL, and most likely of some other tumor necrosis factor family ligands such as CD40L, is required for triggering of the signaling pathways. PMID:12556501

  8. NF-kB/NOS cross-talk induced by mitochondrial complex II inhibition: implications for Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Maddalena; Zei, Daniela; Centonze, Diego; Palermo, Rocco; Bernardi, Giorgio; Vacca, Alessandra; Calabresi, Paolo; Gulino, Alberto

    2008-04-04

    Nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) is a family of DNA-binding proteins that are important regulators involved in immune and inflammatory responses, as well as in cell survival and apoptosis. In the nervous system NF-kB is activated under physiological and pathological conditions including learning and memory mechanisms and neurodegenerative diseases. NF-kB is activated in neurons in response to excitotoxic, metabolic and oxidative stress and there is a body of evidence to suggest that glutamate induces NF-kB by the main ionotropic glutamate receptors. In the present study, 3 nitroproprionic acid (3NP), an irreversible inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase (SD, complex II) has been employed to provide an experimental model of Huntington's disease (HD). Specifically, we described 3NP-induced activation of NF-kB and of iNOS and nNOS genes in striatal treated slices. To aim to better understand the relationship between these identified dysregulated genes and mitochondrial dysfunction, we investigated in SK-N-MC human neuroblastoma cells following 3NP treatment, whether NF-kB nuclear translocation and activation might be involved in the mechanisms by which 3NP leads to transcriptional activation of NOS genes. These results are relevant to more precisely define the role of NF-kB in neuronal cells and better understand its putative involvement in neurodegeneration.

  9. G1 phase arrest induced by Wilms tumor protein WT1 is abrogated by cyclin/CDK complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Kudoh, T; Ishidate, T; Moriyama, M; Toyoshima, K; Akiyama, T

    1995-01-01

    WT1, the Wilms tumor-suppressor gene, maps to the human chromosomal region 11p13 and encodes a transcriptional repressor, WT1, implicated in controlling normal urogenital development. Microinjection of the WT1 cDNA into quiescent cells or cells in early to mid G1 phase blocked serum-induced cell cycle progression into S phase. The activity of WT1 varied significantly depending on the presence or absence of an alternatively spliced region located upstream of the zinc finger domain. The inhibitory activity of WT1 was abrogated by the overexpression of cyclin E/CDK2 as well as cyclin D1/CDK4. Furthermore, both CDK4- and CDK2-associated kinase activities were downregulated in cells overexpressing WT1, whereas the levels of CDK4, CDK2, and cyclin D1 expression were unchanged. These findings suggest that inhibition of the activity of cyclin/CDK complexes may be involved in mediating the WT1-induced cell cycle block. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7753836

  10. A dual-targeting, p53-independent, apoptosis-inducing platinum(II) anticancer complex, [Pt(BDI(QQ))]Cl.

    PubMed

    Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Wilson, Justin J; Lin, Wei; Lippard, Stephen J

    2014-03-01

    The therapeutic index and cellular mechanism of action of [Pt(BDI(QQ))]Cl, a monocationic, square-planar platinum(II) complex, are reported. [Pt(BDI(QQ))]Cl was used to treat several cell lines, including wild type and cisplatin-resistant ovarian carcinoma cells (A2780 and A2780CP70) and non-proliferating lung carcinoma cells (A549). [Pt(BDI(QQ))]Cl selectively kills cancer cells over healthy cells and exhibits no cross-resistance with cisplatin. The mechanism of cell killing was established through detailed cell-based assays. [Pt(BDI(QQ))]Cl exhibits dual-threat capabilities, targeting nuclear DNA and mitochondria simultaneously. [Pt(BDI(QQ))]Cl induces DNA damage, leading to p53 enrichment, mitochondrial membrane potential depolarisation, and caspase-mediated apoptosis. [Pt(BDI(QQ))]Cl also accumulates in the mitochondria, resulting in direct mitochondrial damage. Flow cytometric studies demonstrated that [Pt(BDI(QQ))]Cl has no significant effect on cell cycle progression. Remarkably, p53-status is a not a determinant of [Pt(BDI(QQ))]Cl activity. In p53-null cells, [Pt(BDI(QQ))]Cl induces cell death through mitochondrial dysfunction. Cancers with p53-null status could therefore be targeted using [Pt(BDI(QQ))]Cl.

  11. Acute myeloid leukemia induced by MLL-ENL is cured by oncogene ablation despite acquisition of complex genetic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Horton, Sarah J; Walf-Vorderwülbecke, Vanessa; Chatters, Steve J; Sebire, Neil J; de Boer, Jasper; Williams, Owen

    2009-05-14

    Chromosomal translocations involving 11q23 are frequent in infant acute leukemia and give rise to the formation of MLL fusion genes. The mechanism of leukemic transformation by these fusions has been the subject of numerous investigations. However, the dependence of acute leukemia on MLL fusion activity in vivo and the efficacy of targeting this activity to eliminate disease have not been established. We have developed a model for conditional expression of MLL-ENL in hematopoietic progenitor cells, in which expression of the fusion oncogene is turned off by doxycycline. Conditionally immortalized myeloblast cells derived from these progenitors were found to induce leukemia in vivo. Leukemic cells isolated from primary recipient mice were shown to have acquired additional genetic abnormalities and, when transplanted into secondary recipients, induced leukemia with shortened latencies. However, the leukemic cells remained dependent on MLL-ENL expression in vitro and in vivo, and its ablation resulted in regression of established leukemias. This study demonstrates that even genetically complex leukemias can be reversed on inactivation of the initiating MLL fusion and has important implications for the design of novel leukemia therapies.

  12. Sulfated polysaccharide-protein complex sensitizes doxorubicin-induced apoptosis of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Wu, Hua Jian; Zhou, Chao Zhu; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of sulfated polysaccharide-protein complex (SPPC) on the antitumor effect of doxorubicin (Dox) on MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. MTT and Annexin V/propidium iodide staining assays demonstrated that SPPC selectively sensitized MDA-MB-231 cells to Dox-induced cytotoxicity. The half maximal inhibitory concentration of Dox against MDA-MB-231 cells was decreased from 5.3 to 1.5 µM when it was used concomitantly with 5 µM SPPC. SPPC potentiated Dox-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells via the mitochondrial apoptosis signaling pathway by activating caspase-3 and caspase-9. Notably, the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk diminished the effect of SPPC on Dox-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, combination treatment with SPPC and Dox markedly reduced the growth of breast cancer xenografts in mice. The present study demonstrated that SPPC was able to enhance the antitumor effect of Dox on breast cancer cells, thus suggesting that SPCC may be used to reduce the cumulative dose of Dox and its associated toxicities in the chemotherapy of breast cancer and other types of cancer. PMID:27698706

  13. A non-hydrolyzable ATP derivative generates a stable complex in a light-inducible two-component system.

    PubMed

    Sharda, Shivani; Koay, Melissa S T; Kim, Young-Jun; Engelhard, Martin; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2009-12-04

    Isothermal calorimetry (ITC) measurements yielded the binding constants during complex formation of light-inducible histidine kinases (HK) and their cognate CheY-type response regulators (RR). HK-RR interactions represent the core function of the bacterial two-component system, which is also present in many bacterial phytochromes. Here, we have studied the recombinant forms of phytochromes CphA and CphB from the cyanobacterium Tolypothrix PCC7601 and their cognate RRs RcpA and RcpB. The interaction between the two reaction partners (HK and RR) was studied in the presence and absence of ATP. A complex formation was observable in the presence of ATP, but specific interactions were only found when a non-hydrolyzable ATP derivative was added to the mixture. Also, the incubation of the HK domain alone (expressed as a recombinant protein) with the RR did not yield specific interactions, indicating that the HK domain is only active as a component of the full-length phytochrome. Considering also previous studies on the same proteins (Hübschmann, T., Jorissen, H. J. M. M., Börner, T., Gärtner, W., and de Marsac, N. (2001) Eur. J. Biochem. 268, 3383-3389) we now conclude that the HK domains of these phytochromes are active only when the chromophore domain is in its Pr form. The formerly documented phosphate transfer between the HK domain and the RR takes place via a transiently formed protein-protein complex, which becomes detectable by ITC in the presence of a non-hydrolyzable ATP derivative. This finding is of interest also in relation to the function of some (blue light-sensitive) photoreceptors that carry the HK domain and the RR fused together in one single protein.

  14. Statins in lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Simvastatin and atorvastatin induce differential effects on tuberous sclerosis complex 2-null cell growth and signaling.

    PubMed

    Atochina-Vasserman, Elena N; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Volgina, Alla V; Milavec, Megan; James, Melane L; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2013-11-01

    Mutations of the tumor suppressor genes tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC)1 and TSC2 cause pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) and tuberous sclerosis (TS). Current rapamycin-based therapies for TS and LAM have a predominantly cytostatic effect, and disease progression resumes with therapy cessation. Evidence of RhoA GTPase activation in LAM-derived and human TSC2-null cells suggests that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor statins can be used as potential adjuvant agents. The goal of this study was to determine which statin (simvastatin or atorvastatin) is more effective in suppressing TSC2-null cell growth and signaling. Simvastatin, but not atorvastatin, showed a concentration-dependent (0.5-10 μM) inhibitory effect on mouse TSC2-null and human LAM-derived cell growth. Treatment with 10 μM simvastatin induced dramatic disruption of TSC2-null cell monolayer and cell rounding; in contrast, few changes were observed in cells treated with the same concentration of atorvastatin. Combined treatment of rapamycin with simvastatin but not with atorvastatin showed a synergistic growth-inhibitory effect on TSC2-null cells. Simvastatin, but not atorvastatin, inhibited the activity of prosurvival serine-threonine kinase Akt and induced marked up-regulation of cleaved caspase-3, a marker of cell apoptosis. Simvastatin, but not atorvastatin, also induced concentration-dependent inhibition of p42/p44 Erk and mTORC1. Thus, our data show growth-inhibitory and proapoptotic effects of simvastatin on TSC2-null cells compared with atorvastatin. These findings have translational significance for combinatorial therapeutic strategies of simvastatin to inhibit TSC2-null cell survival in TS and LAM.

  15. Inorganic Sn-X-complex-induced 1D, 2D, and 3D copper sulfide superstructures from anisotropic hexagonal nanoplate building blocks.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomin; Wang, Meijuan; Shen, Huaibin; Zhang, Yongguang; Wang, Hongzhe; Li, Lin Song

    2011-09-05

    A facile route was demonstrated for inorganic Sn-X-complex-induced syntheses of self-assembled 1D columnar, 2D raftlike, and 3D stratiform anisotropic Cu(2)S hexagonal nanoplates. The factors (reaction time, temperature, the concentration of Sn-X complex, and so on) that influence the size, phase, monodispersity, and self-assembly ability of the Cu(2)S hexagonal nanoplates were studied in detail. It was found that the Sn-X complex could inhibit the growth of the <001> direction of monoclinic Cu(2)S nanocrystals, which further induced the formation of the hexagonal lamellar structure. Furthermore, it revealed that the formation of the 1D arrangement was preferred as particles stacked in a face-to-face configuration by maximizing ligand-surface interactions. Then, high ligand density along the side of the 1D columnar arrangement induced well-defined 2D raftlike and 3D stratiform self-assembly.

  16. Dissociation of MIF-rpS3 complex and sequential NF-κB activation is involved in IR-induced metastatic conversion of NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Youn, HyeSook; Son, Beomseok; Kim, Wanyeon; Jun, Se Young; Lee, Jung Sub; Lee, Jae-Myung; Kang, ChulHee; Kim, Joon; Youn, BuHyun

    2015-11-01

    Frequent relapse and spreading of tumors during radiotherapy are principal obstacles to treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we aimed to investigate how macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) which is expressed at high levels in metastatic and primary lung cancer cells could regulate NSCLC metastasis in response to ionizing radiation (IR). The results indicated that MIF and ribosomal protein S3 (rpS3) were shown to be connected to inflammation, proliferation, and metastasis of NSCLC via IR-induced activation of the NF-κB pathway. Under unirradiated conditions, MIF physically established a complex with rpS3. MIF-rpS3 dissociation induced by IR activated NF-κB and made the expression of target genes of this factor transactivated in two NSCLC cell lines, A549, and NCI-H358. We also found that IR-induced dissociation of this complex led to increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and modulated the expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition marker proteins. Finally, the effects of IR-induced dissociation of the MIF-rpS3 complex on tumor metastasis were confirmed by in vivo xenograft studies. Taken together, the present study revealed that dissociation of the MIF-rpS3 complex and subsequent activation of NF-κB is a critical post-IR exposure event that accounts for IR-induced metastatic conversion of NSCLC.

  17. Stacking of Short DNA Induces the Gyroid Cubic-to-Inverted Hexagonal Phase Transition in Lipid–DNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Cecília; Ewert, Kai K.; Bouxsein, Nathan F.; Shirazi, Rahau S.; Li, Youli; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2012-01-01

    Lyotropic phases of amphiphiles are a prototypical example of self-assemblies. Their structure is generally determined by amphiphile shape and their phase transitions are primarily governed by composition. In this paper, we demonstrate a new paradigm for membrane shape control where the electrostatic coupling of charged membranes to short DNA (sDNA), with tunable temperature-dependent end-to-end stacking interactions, enables switching between the inverted gyroid cubic structure (QIIG) and the inverted hexagonal phase (HIIC). We investigated the structural shape transitions induced in the QIIG phase upon complexation with a series of sDNAs (5, 11, 24, and 48 bp) with three types of end structure (“sticky” adenine (A)–thymine (T) (dAdT) overhangs, no overhang (blunt), and “nonsticky” dTdT overhangs) using synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering. Very short 5 bp sDNA with dAdT overhangs and blunt ends induce coexistence of the QIIG and the HIIC phase, with the fraction of QIIG increasing with temperature. Phase coexistence for blunt 5 bp sDNA is observed from 27 °C to about 65 °C, where the HIIC phase disappears and the temperature dependence of the lattice spacing of the QIIG phase indicates that the sDNA duplexes melt into single strands. The only other sDNA for which melting is observed is 5 bp sDNA with dTdT overhangs, which forms the QIIG phase throughout the studied range of temperature (27 °C to 85.2 °C). The longer 11 bp sDNA forms coexisting QIIG and HIIC phases (with the fraction of QIIG again increasing with temperature) only for “nonsticky” dTdT overhangs, while dAdT overhangs and blunt ends exclusively template the HIIC phase. For 24 and 48 bp sDNAs the HIIC phase replaces the QIIG phase at all investigated temperatures, independent of sDNA end structure. Our work demonstrates how the combined effects of sDNA length and end structure (which determine the temperature-dependent stacking length) tune the phase behavior of the complexes

  18. Three-dimensional analysis of a viral RNA replication complex reveals a virus-induced mini-organelle.

    PubMed

    Kopek, Benjamin G; Perkins, Guy; Miller, David J; Ellisman, Mark H; Ahlquist, Paul

    2007-09-01

    Positive-strand RNA viruses are the largest genetic class of viruses and include many serious human pathogens. All positive-strand RNA viruses replicate their genomes in association with intracellular membrane rearrangements such as single- or double-membrane vesicles. However, the exact sites of RNA synthesis and crucial topological relationships between relevant membranes, vesicle interiors, surrounding lumens, and cytoplasm generally are poorly defined. We applied electron microscope tomography and complementary approaches to flock house virus (FHV)-infected Drosophila cells to provide the first 3-D analysis of such replication complexes. The sole FHV RNA replication factor, protein A, and FHV-specific 5-bromouridine 5'-triphosphate incorporation localized between inner and outer mitochondrial membranes inside approximately 50-nm vesicles (spherules), which thus are FHV-induced compartments for viral RNA synthesis. All such FHV spherules were outer mitochondrial membrane invaginations with interiors connected to the cytoplasm by a necked channel of approximately 10-nm diameter, which is sufficient for ribonucleotide import and product RNA export. Tomographic, biochemical, and other results imply that FHV spherules contain, on average, three RNA replication intermediates and an interior shell of approximately 100 membrane-spanning, self-interacting protein As. The results identify spherules as the site of protein A and nascent RNA accumulation and define spherule topology, dimensions, and stoichiometry to reveal the nature and many details of the organization and function of the FHV RNA replication complex. The resulting insights appear relevant to many other positive-strand RNA viruses and support recently proposed structural and likely evolutionary parallels with retrovirus and double-stranded RNA virus virions.

  19. Enhancement of radiation-induced cell kill by platinum complexes (carboplatin and iproplatin) in V79 cells

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J.A.; Douple, E.B.; Richmond, R.C.

    1986-08-01

    Two second generation platinum complexes currently undergoing clinical chemotherapeutic trials, carboplatin (CBDCA) and iproplatin (CHIP), were evaluated for their ability to alter the survival of cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells following irradiation. Two protocols were employed. In the first, the drug was added to preplated cells, some of which were subsequently made hypoxic with nitrogen gas. These hypoxic cells were irradiated following 1 hour exposure to drug and survival was assessed by standard colony forming unit (CFU) methods. Enhancement ratios (ER) of approximately 1.4 were obtained for irradiation under hypoxic conditions, if the cells were exposed to equitoxic doses of CBDCA (500 microM) CHIP (50 microM). In the second series of experiments, cells were treated with 10 Gy in air and then incubated for various times prior to trypsinization and serial dilution of single cell suspensions. Six hours after irradiation, cells treated with X rays alone had recovered to produce a surviving fraction twice that of cells trypsinized immediately after irradiation (not held). Post-irradiation administration of CBDCA (50 microM) or CHIP (20 microM), at a time when free radical-mediated radiosensitization would not be possible, operationally inhibited this recovery from radiation-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD). Inhibition, expressed as recovery inhibition factor (RIF) after 6 hr with drug, was 2.0 for CBDCA and 1.2 for CHIP. These results suggest that the rationale for designing clinical trials to exploit interactions between cisplatin and radiation might also extend to include combined modality therapy using radiation with either of these two platinum complexes.

  20. Reversible carbon-carbon bond formation induced by oxidation and reduction at a redox-active cobalt complex.

    PubMed

    Atienza, Crisita Carmen Hojilla; Milsmann, Carsten; Semproni, Scott P; Turner, Zoë R; Chirik, Paul J

    2013-05-06

    The electronic structure of the diamagnetic pyridine imine enamide cobalt dinitrogen complex, ((iPr)PIEA)CoN2 ((iPr)PIEA = 2-(2,6-(i)Pr2-C6H3N═CMe)-6-(2,6-(i)Pr2-C6H3NC═CH2)C5H3N), was determined and is best described as a low-spin cobalt(II) complex antiferromagnetically coupled to an imine radical anion. Addition of potential radical sources such as NO, PhSSPh, or Ph3Cl resulted in C-C coupling at the enamide positions to form bimetallic cobalt compounds. Treatment with the smaller halocarbon, PhCH2Cl, again induced C-C coupling to form a bimetallic bis(imino)pyridine cobalt chloride product but also yielded a monomeric cobalt chloride product where the benzyl group added to the enamide carbon. Similar cooperative metal-ligand addition was observed upon treatment of ((iPr)PIEA)CoN2 with CH2═CHCH2Br, which resulted in allylation of the enamide carbon. Reduction of Coupled-((iPr)PDI)CoCl (Coupled-((iPr)PDI)CoCl = [2-(2,6-(i)Pr2-C6H3N═CMe)-C5H3N-6-(2,6-(i)Pr2-C6H3N═CCH2-)CoCl]2) with NaBEt3H led to quantitative formation of ((iPr)PIEA)CoN2, demonstrating the reversibility of the C-C bond forming reactions. The electronic structures of each of the bimetallic cobalt products were also elucidated by a combination of experimental and computational methods.

  1. Fasting-induced FGF21 is repressed by LXR activation via recruitment of an HDAC3 corepressor complex in mice.

    PubMed

    Archer, Amena; Venteclef, Nicolas; Mode, Agneta; Pedrelli, Matteo; Gabbi, Chiara; Clément, Karine; Parini, Paolo; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Korach-André, Marion

    2012-12-01

    The liver plays a pivotal role in the physiological adaptation to fasting and a better understanding of the metabolic adaptive responses may give hints on new therapeutic strategies to control the metabolic diseases. The liver X receptors (LXRs) are well-established regulators of lipid and glucose metabolism. More recently fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) has emerged as an important regulator of energy homeostasis. We hypothesized that the LXR transcription factors could influence Fgf21 expression, which is induced in response to fasting. Wild-type, LXRα(-/-), and LXRβ(-/-) mice were treated for 3 d with vehicle or the LXR agonist GW3965 and fasted for 12 h prior to the killing of the animals. Interestingly, serum FGF21 levels were induced after fasting, but this increase was blunted when the mice were treated with GW3965 independently of genotypes. Compared with wild-type mice, GW3965-treated LXRα(-/-) and LXRβ(-/-) mice showed improved insulin sensitivity and enhanced ketogenic response at fasting. Of note is that during fasting, GW3965 treatment tended to reduce liver triglycerides as opposed to the effect of the agonist in the fed state. The LXR-dependent repression of Fgf21 seems to be mainly mediated by the recruitment of LXRβ onto the Fgf21 promoter upon GW3965 treatment. This repression by LXRβ occurs through the recruitment and stabilization of the repressor complex composed of retinoid-related orphan receptor-α/Rev-Erbα/histone deacetylase 3 onto the Fgf21 promoter. Our data clearly demonstrate that there is a cross talk between the LXR and FGF21 signaling pathways in the adaptive response to fasting.

  2. Methylcrotonoyl-CoA carboxylase 1 potentiates RLR-induced NF-κB signaling by targeting MAVS complex

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhongying; Xia, Zhangchuan; Zhou, Yaqin; Yang, Xiaodan; Hao, Hua; Peng, Nanfang; Liu, Shi; Zhu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    RNA virus infections are detected by the RIG-I family of receptors, which signal through the adaptor molecule mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS). MAVS then recruits the adaptor’s tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF) 3 and TRAF6, which in turn activate IRF3 and NF-κB, respectively, to induce interferons (IFNs) and inflammatory responses. Here we show that the biotin-containing enzyme methylcrotonoyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (MCCC1) enhances virus-induced, MAVS-mediated IFN and inflammatory cytokine expression through the NF-κB signaling pathway. MCCC1 knockdown strongly inhibits induction of IFNs and inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, MCCC1 shows extensive antiviral activity toward RNA viruses, including influenza A virus, human enterovirus 71, and vesicular stomatitis virus. Here, we have elucidated the mechanism underlying MCCC1-mediated inhibition of viral replication. MCCC1 interacts with MAVS and components of the MAVS signalosome and contributes to enhanced production of type I IFNs and pro-inflammatory cytokines by promoting phosphorylation of the IκB kinase (IKK) complex and NF-κB inhibitor-α (IκBα), as well as NF-κB nuclear translocation. This process leads to activation of IFNs and cytokine expression and subsequent activation of IFN-stimulated genes, including double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase PKR and myxovirus resistance protein 1. These findings demonstrate that MCCC1 plays an essential role in virus-triggered, MAVS-mediated activation of NF-κB signaling. PMID:27629939

  3. The complex interplay of iron metabolism, reactive oxygen species, and reactive nitrogen species: insights into the potential of various iron therapies to induce oxidative and nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    Koskenkorva-Frank, Taija S; Weiss, Günter; Koppenol, Willem H; Burckhardt, Susanna

    2013-12-01

    Production of minute concentrations of superoxide (O2(*-)) and nitrogen monoxide (nitric oxide, NO*) plays important roles in several aspects of cellular signaling and metabolic regulation. However, in an inflammatory environment, the concentrations of these radicals can drastically increase and the antioxidant defenses may become overwhelmed. Thus, biological damage may occur owing to redox imbalance-a condition called oxidative and/or nitrosative stress. A complex interplay exists between iron metabolism, O2(*-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and NO*. Iron is involved in both the formation and the scavenging of these species. Iron deficiency (anemia) (ID(A)) is associated with oxidative stress, but its role in the induction of nitrosative stress is largely unclear. Moreover, oral as well as intravenous (iv) iron preparations used for the treatment of ID(A) may also induce oxidative and/or nitrosative stress. Oral administration of ferrous salts may lead to high transferrin saturation levels and, thus, formation of non-transferrin-bound iron, a potentially toxic form of iron with a propensity to induce oxidative stress. One of the factors that determine the likelihood of oxidative and nitrosative stress induced upon administration of an iv iron complex is the amount of labile (or weakly-bound) iron present in the complex. Stable dextran-based iron complexes used for iv therapy, although they contain only negligible amounts of labile iron, can induce oxidative and/or nitrosative stress through so far unknown mechanisms. In this review, after summarizing the main features of iron metabolism and its complex interplay with O2(*-), H2O2, NO*, and other more reactive compounds derived from these species, the potential of various iron therapies to induce oxidative and nitrosative stress is discussed and possible underlying mechanisms are proposed. Understanding the mechanisms, by which various iron formulations may induce oxidative and nitrosative stress, will help us

  4. Design, synthesis and characterization of zinc-morin, a metal flavonol complex and evaluation of its antidiabetic potential in HFD-STZ induced type 2 diabetes in rats.

    PubMed

    Sendrayaperumal, V; Iyyam Pillai, S; Subramanian, S

    2014-08-05

    The present study deals with the synthesis, characterization of zinc-morin complex and evaluation of its antidiabetic efficacy in High Fat Diet (HFD)-fedStreptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. Oral administration of zinc-morin complex to diabetic rats (5mg/kg body weight/day) for a period of 30 days resulted in the decreased levels of blood glucose and HbA1c. Oral administrations of the zinc-morin complex for 30 days significantly improved hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. The elevated levels of lipid peroxides declined and the antioxidant competence was found to be improved in diabetic rats treated with the complex. The status of the lipid and lipoprotein profile in the serum was normalized upon treatment. Levels of TNFα decreased upon treatment with the complex. The altered levels of adipokines such as adiponectin and leptin were normalized upon treatment with the complex. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the zinc-morin complex possesses antidiabetic, antidyslipidemic and antioxidant potentials in HFD-fedSTZ induced diabetic rats.

  5. Resonant alteration of propagation in guiding structures with complex Robin parameter and its magnetic-field-induced restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Olendski, O.

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Solutions of the wave equation are analyzed for the confined circular geometry with complex Robin boundary conditions. > Sharp extremum is found in the energy dependence on the imaginary part of the extrapolation length. > Nonzero real part of the Robin length or/and magnetic field wipe out the resonance. - Abstract: Solutions of the scalar Helmholtz wave equation are derived for the analysis of the transport and thermodynamic properties of the two-dimensional disk and three-dimensional infinitely long straight wire in the external uniform longitudinal magnetic field B under the assumption that the Robin boundary condition contains extrapolation length {Lambda} with nonzero imaginary part {Lambda}{sub i}. As a result of this complexity, the self-adjointness of the Hamiltonian is lost, its eigenvalues E become complex too and the discrete bound states of the disk characteristic for the real {Lambda} turn into the corresponding quasibound states with their lifetime defined by the eigenenergies imaginary parts E{sub i}. Accordingly, the longitudinal flux undergoes an alteration as it flows along the wire with its attenuation/amplification being E{sub i}-dependent too. It is shown that, for zero magnetic field, the component E{sub i} as a function of the Robin imaginary part exhibits a pronounced sharp extremum with its magnitude being the largest for the zero real part {Lambda}{sub r} of the extrapolation length. Increasing magnitude of {Lambda}{sub r} quenches the E{sub i} - {Lambda}{sub i} resonance and at very large {Lambda}{sub r} the eigenenergies E approach the asymptotic real values independent of {Lambda}{sub i}. The extremum is also wiped out by the magnetic field when, for the large B, the energies tend to the Landau levels. Mathematical and physical interpretations of the obtained results are provided; in particular, it is shown that the finite lifetime of the disk quasibound states stems from the {Lambda}{sub i}-induced currents flowing

  6. Tetrapositive plutonium, neptunium, uranium, and thorium coordination complexes: chemistry revealed by electron transfer and collision induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng; Gibson, John K

    2014-04-17

    The Pu(4+), Np(4+), and U(4+) ions, which have large electron affinities of ∼34.6, ∼33.6, and ∼32.6 eV, respectively, were stabilized from solution to the gas phase upon coordination by three neutral tetramethyl-3-oxa-glutaramide ligands (TMOGA). Both collision induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of Pu(TMOGA)3(4+) reveal the propensity for reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III), by loss of TMOGA(+) in CID and by simple electron transfer in ETD. The reduction of Pu(IV) is in distinct contrast to retention of Th(IV) in both CID and ETD of Th(TMOGA)3(4+), where only the C-Oether bond cleavage product was observed. U(TMOGA)3(4+) behaves similarly to Th(TMOGA)3(4+) upon CID and ETD, while the fragmentation patterns of Np(TMOGA)3(4+) lie between those of Pu(TMOGA)3(4+) and U(TMOGA)3(4+). It is notable that the gas-phase fragmentation behaviors of these exceptional tetrapositive complexes parallel fundamental differences in condensed phase chemistry within the actinide series, specifically the tendency for reduction from the IV to III oxidation states.

  7. Single platelets seal neutrophil-induced vascular breaches via GPVI during immune-complex-mediated inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gros, Angèle; Syvannarath, Varouna; Lamrani, Lamia; Ollivier, Véronique; Loyau, Stéphane; Goerge, Tobias; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît

    2015-08-20

    Platelets protect vascular integrity during inflammation. Recent evidence suggests that this action is independent of thrombus formation and requires the engagement of glycoprotein VI (GPVI), but it remains unclear how platelets prevent inflammatory bleeding. We investigated whether platelets and GPVI act primarily by preventing detrimental effects of neutrophils using models of immune complex (IC)-mediated inflammation in mice immunodepleted in platelets and/or neutrophils or deficient in GPVI. Depletion of neutrophils prevented bleeding in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated dermatitis. GPVI deficiency did not modify neutrophil recruitment, which was reduced by thrombocytopenia. Neutrophil cytotoxic activities were reduced in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated inflammation. Intravital microscopy revealed that in this setting, intravascular binding sites for platelets were exposed by neutrophils, and GPVI supported the recruitment of individual platelets to these spots. Furthermore, the platelet secretory response accompanying IC-mediated inflammation was partly mediated by GPVI, and blocking of GPVI signaling impaired the vasculoprotective action of platelets. Together, our results show that GPVI plays a dual role in inflammation by enhancing neutrophil-damaging activities while supporting the activation and hemostatic adhesion of single platelets to neutrophil-induced vascular breaches.

  8. Major histocompatibility complex class I molecules protect motor neurons from astrocyte-induced toxicity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Song, SungWon; Miranda, Carlos J; Braun, Lyndsey; Meyer, Kathrin; Frakes, Ashley E; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Likhite, Shibi; Bevan, Adam K; Foust, Kevin D; McConnell, Michael J; Walker, Christopher M; Kaspar, Brian K

    2016-04-01

    Astrocytes isolated from individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are toxic to motor neurons (MNs) and play a non-cell autonomous role in disease pathogenesis. The mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of MNs to cell death remain unclear. Here we report that astrocytes derived from either mice bearing mutations in genes associated with ALS or human subjects with ALS reduce the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) molecules on MNs; reduced MHCI expression makes these MNs susceptible to astrocyte-induced cell death. Increasing MHCI expression on MNs increases survival and motor performance in a mouse model of ALS and protects MNs against astrocyte toxicity. Overexpression of a single MHCI molecule, HLA-F, protects human MNs from ALS astrocyte-mediated toxicity, whereas knockdown of its receptor, the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor KIR3DL2, on human astrocytes results in enhanced MN death. Thus, our data indicate that, in ALS, loss of MHCI expression on MNs renders them more vulnerable to astrocyte-mediated toxicity.

  9. Induced pluripotent stem cell generation from a man carrying a complex chromosomal rearrangement as a genetic model for infertility studies

    PubMed Central

    Mouka, Aurélie; Izard, Vincent; Tachdjian, Gérard; Brisset, Sophie; Yates, Frank; Mayeur, Anne; Drévillon, Loïc; Jarray, Rafika; Leboulch, Philippe; Maouche-Chrétien, Leila; Tosca, Lucie

    2017-01-01

    Despite progress in human reproductive biology, the cause of male infertility often remains unknown, due to the lack of appropriate and convenient in vitro models of meiosis. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from the cells of infertile patients could provide a gold standard model for generating primordial germ cells and studying their development and the process of spermatogenesis. We report the characterization of a complex chromosomal rearrangement (CCR) in an azoospermic patient, and the successful generation of specific-iPSCs from PBMC-derived erythroblasts. The CCR was characterized by karyotype, fluorescence in situ hybridization and oligonucleotide-based array-comparative genomic hybridization. The CCR included five breakpoints and was caused by the inverted insertion of a chromosome 12 segment into the short arm of one chromosome 7 and a pericentric inversion of the structurally rearranged chromosome 12. Gene mapping of the breakpoints led to the identification of a candidate gene, SYCP3. Erythroblasts from the patient were reprogrammed with Sendai virus vectors to generate iPSCs. We assessed iPSC pluripotency by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence staining and teratoma induction. The generation of specific-iPSCs from patients with a CCR provides a valuable in vitro genetic model for studying the mechanisms by which chromosomal abnormalities alter meiosis and germ cell development. PMID:28045072

  10. Locating the barnacle settlement pheromone: spatial and ontogenetic expression of the settlement-inducing protein complex of Balanus amphitrite

    PubMed Central

    Dreanno, Catherine; Kirby, Richard R; Clare, Anthony S

    2006-01-01

    Barnacles are prominent members of hard substratum benthic communities and their study has been important to advances in experimental ecology and contemporary ecological theory. Having recently characterized the cue to gregarious settlement of Balanus amphitrite, the settlement-inducing protein complex (SIPC), we use two polyclonal antibodies to examine the tissue distribution and ontogenetic expression of this glycoprotein. These antibodies were raised against two separate peptides located near the N- and C-termini of the SIPC and were used to detect the glycoprotein by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. By in situ hybridization we also show that the SIPC mRNA co-occurs with the expressed glycoprotein in the cuticles of both nauplius and cypris larval stages and the adult. In the larvae, the SIPC is expressed most strongly in the mouthparts and the hindgut of the stage 2 nauplius and in the thoracopods, antennules and bivalved carapace of the cyprid. In adult B. amphitrite, the expressed SIPC is present in protein extracts of the shell and in all organs that are lined by cuticular tissues. We suggest that the SIPC is produced by the epidermal cells that secrete the cuticle and discuss these observations with regard to earlier studies and the role of the SIPC as a contact pheromone. PMID:17015319

  11. Increasing concentrations of prothrombin complex concentrate induce disseminated intravascular coagulation in a pig model of coagulopathy with blunt liver injury.

    PubMed

    Grottke, Oliver; Braunschweig, Till; Spronk, Henri M H; Esch, Stephanie; Rieg, Annette D; van Oerle, Rene; ten Cate, Hugo; Fitzner, Christina; Tolba, Rene; Rossaint, Rolf

    2011-08-18

    Despite increasing use of prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) to treat hemorrhage-associated coagulopathy, few studies have investigated PCC in trauma, and there is a particular lack of safety data. This study was performed to evaluate PCC therapy in a porcine model of coagulopathy with blunt liver injury. Coagulopathy was induced in 27 anesthetized pigs by replacing approximately 70% blood volume with hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 and Ringer's lactate solution; erythrocytes were collected and retransfused. Ten minutes after trauma, animals randomly received PCC (35 or 50 IU/kg) or saline. Coagulation parameters including thromboelastometry, thrombin generation, and blood loss were monitored for 2 hours. Internal organs were examined macroscopically and histologically to determine the presence of emboli and assess liver injury. Total blood loss was significantly lower and survival was higher in both PCC groups versus the control group (P < .05). These outcomes appeared to be dose-independent. Thromboembolism was found in all animals treated with 50 IU/kg PCC; 44% also showed signs of disseminated intravascular coagulation. Liver injury was similar in all animals. In conclusion, 35 IU/kg PCC safely improved coagulation and attenuated blood loss. However, the higher dose of PCC (50 IU/kg) appeared to increase the risk of thromboembolism and disseminated intravascular coagulation.

  12. Complexation-induced phase separation: preparation of composite membranes with a nanometer-thin dense skin loaded with metal ions.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Luis Francisco; Karunakaran, Madhavan; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2015-05-13

    We present the development of a facile phase-inversion method for forming asymmetric membranes with a precise high metal ion loading capacity in only the dense layer. The approach combines the use of macromolecule-metal intermolecular complexes to form the dense layer of asymmetric membranes with nonsolvent-induced phase separation to form the porous support. This allows the independent optimization of both the dense layer and porous support while maintaining the simplicity of a phase-inversion process. Moreover, it facilitates control over (i) the thickness of the dense layer throughout several orders of magnitude from less than 15 nm to more than 6 μm, (ii) the type and amount of metal ions loaded in the dense layer, (iii) the morphology of the membrane surface, and (iv) the porosity and structure of the support. This simple and scalable process provides a new platform for building multifunctional membranes with a high loading of well-dispersed metal ions in the dense layer.

  13. RANTES induces tyrosine kinase activity of stably complexed p125FAK and ZAP-70 in human T cells

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The chemokine RANTES is a chemoattractant and activating factor for T lymphocytes. Investigation of the signal transduction mechanisms induced by RANTES in T cells revealed tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple protein species with prominent bands at 70-85 and 120-130 kD. Immunoprecipitation and Western analyses revealed that a protein of 125 kD was identical to the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pp125FAK. RANTES stimulated phosphorylation of FAK as early as 30 seconds and immunoblots using antiphosphotyrosine monoclonal antibodies revealed that there was consistent phosphorylation of a 68-70 kD species in the pp125FAK immunoprecipitates. Immunoblotting and kinase assays showed this to be two separate proteins, the tyrosine kinase zeta-associated protein (ZAP) 70, and the focal adhesion protein paxillin. These results indicate a potentially important role for RANTES in the generation of T cell focal adhesions and subsequent cell activation via a molecular complex containing FAK, ZAP-70, and paxillin. PMID:9064347

  14. Possible conformational change within the desolvated and cationized sBBI/trypsin non-covalent complex during the collision-induced dissociation process.

    PubMed

    Darii, Ekaterina; Saravanamuthu, Gunalini; Afonso, Carlos; Alves, Sandra; Gut, Ivo; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2011-06-30

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has become an analytical technique widely used for the investigation of non-covalent protein-protein and protein-ligand complexes due to the soft desolvation conditions that preserve the stoichiometry of the interacting partners. Dissociation studies of solvated or desolvated complexes (in the source and in the collision cell, respectively) allow access to information on protein conformation and localization of the metal ions involved in protein structure stabilization and biological activity. The complex of bovine trypsin and small soybean Bowman-Birk inhibitor (sBBI) was studied by ESI-MS to determine changes occurring within the complex during its transfer from droplets to the gas phase independently of the ion polarity. Under collision-induced dissociation (CID) conditions, unexpected binding of the Ca(2+) ion (cofactor of native trypsin) to the inhibitor molecule was observed within the desolvated sBBI/trypsin/Ca(2+) complex (with a 1:1:1 stoichiometry). This formal gas-phase migration of the calcium ion from trypsin to the inhibitor may be related to conformational rearrangements in the solvent-free and likely collapsed complex. However, under conditions leading to the increase in complex charge state, the appearance of the cationized trypsin molecule was detected during complex dissociation, thus reflecting different pathways of the evolution of complex conformation.

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE25/PPE41 protein complex induces activation and maturation of dendritic cells and drives Th2-biased immune responses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Bao, Yige; Chen, Xuerong; Burton, Jeremy; Gong, Xueli; Gu, Dongqing; Mi, Youjun; Bao, Lang

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis evades innate host immune responses by parasitizing macrophages and causes significant morbidity and mortality around the world. A mycobacterial antigen that can activate dendritic cells (DCs) and elicit effective host innate immune responses will be vital to the development of an effective TB vaccine. The M. tuberculosis genes PE25/PPE41 encode proteins which have been associated with evasion of the host immune response. We constructed a PE25/PPE41 complex gene via splicing by overlapping extension and expressed it successfully in E. coli. We investigated whether this protein complex could interact with DCs to induce effective host immune responses. The PE25/PPE41 protein complex induced maturation of isolated mouse DCs in vitro, increasing expression of cell surface markers (CD80, CD86 and MHC-II), thereby promoting Th2 polarization via secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10. In addition, PE25/PPE41 protein complex-activated DCs induced proliferation of mouse CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and a strong humoral response in immunized mice. The sera of five TB patients were also highly reactive to this antigen. These findings suggest that interaction of the PE25/PPE41 protein complex with DCs may be of great immunological significance.

  16. DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation mediates low-dose X-ray irradiation (LDI)-induced Akt activation and osteoblast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yong; Fang, Shi-ji; Zhu, Li-juan; Zhu, Lun-qing; Zhou, Xiao-zhong

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • LDI increases ALP activity, promotes type I collagen (Col I)/Runx2 mRNA expression. • LDI induces DNA–PKcs activation, which is required for osteoblast differentiation. • Akt activation mediates LDI-induced ALP activity and Col I/Runx2 mRNA increase. • DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation mediates LDI-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation. • DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation is important for osteoblast differentiation. - Abstract: Low-dose irradiation (LDI) induces osteoblast differentiation, however the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we explored the potential role of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA–PKcs)–Akt signaling in LDI-induced osteoblast differentiation. We confirmed that LDI promoted mouse calvarial osteoblast differentiation, which was detected by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as well as mRNA expression of type I collagen (Col I) and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). In mouse osteoblasts, LDI (1 Gy) induced phosphorylation of DNA–PKcs and Akt (mainly at Ser-473). The kinase inhibitors against DNA–PKcs (NU-7026 and NU-7441) or Akt (LY294002, perifosine and MK-2206), as well as partial depletion of DNA–PKcs or Akt1 by targeted-shRNA, dramatically inhibited LDI-induced Akt activation and mouse osteoblast differentiation. Further, siRNA-knockdown of SIN1, a key component of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), also inhibited LDI-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation as well as ALP activity increase and Col I/Runx2 expression in mouse osteoblasts. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assay results demonstrated that LDI-induced DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation, which was inhibited by NU-7441 or SIN1 siRNA-knockdown in mouse osteoblasts. In summary, our data suggest that DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation-mediated Akt activation (Ser-473 phosphorylation) is required for mouse osteoblast differentiation.

  17. Mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes activate aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR and induce CYP1A genes expression in human hepatocytes and human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kubešová, Kateřina; Dořičáková, Aneta; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2016-07-25

    The effects of four copper(II) mixed-ligand complexes [Cu(qui1)(L)]NO3·H2O (1-3) and [Cu(qui2)(phen)]NO3 (4), where qui1=2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone, Hqui2=2-(4-amino-3,5-dichlorophenyl)-N-propyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone-7-carboxamide, L=1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (1), 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (mphen) (2), bathophenanthroline (bphen) (3), on transcriptional activities of steroid receptors, nuclear receptors and xenoreceptors have been studied. The complexes (1-4) did not influence basal or ligand-inducible activities of glucocorticoid receptor, androgen receptor, thyroid receptor, pregnane X receptor and vitamin D receptor, as revealed by gene reporter assays. The complexes 1 and 2 dose-dependently induced luciferase activity in stable gene reporter AZ-AhR cell line, and this induction was reverted by resveratrol, indicating involvement of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in the process. The complexes 1, 2 and 3 induced CYP1A1 mRNA in LS180 cells and CYP1A1/CYP1A2 in human hepatocytes through AhR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay EMSA showed that the complexes 1 and 2 transformed AhR in its DNA-binding form. Collectively, we demonstrate that the complexes 1 and 2 activate AhR and induce AhR-dependent genes in human hepatocytes and cancer cell lines. In conclusion, the data presented here might be of toxicological importance, regarding the multiple roles of AhR in human physiology and pathophysiology.

  18. Effect of curcumin and curcumin copper complex (1:1) on radiation-induced changes of anti-oxidant enzymes levels in the livers of Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Koiram, Prabhakar R; Veerapur, Veeresh P; Kunwar, Amit; Mishra, Beena; Barik, Atanu; Priyadarsini, Indira K; Mazhuvancherry, Unnikrishnan K

    2007-05-01

    The effect of mononuclear copper (II) complex of curcumin in 1:1 stoichiometry (hereafter referred to as complex) administered 30 min before gamma-irradiation (4.5 Gy) on alterations in antioxidant and Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels in livers was studied in comparison to curcumin at a dose of 50 mg/kg. The different antioxidants like GSH, GST, catalase, SOD, TBARS and total thiols were estimated in the liver homogenates excised at different time intervals (1, 2 and 4 h) post irradiation using colorimetric methods. There was a radiation-induced decrease in the levels of all the studied enzymes at 1 h post irradiation, while an increase was observed at later time points. Both curcumin and complex treatment in sham-irradiated mice decreased the levels of GSH and total thiols, whereas there was an increase in the levels of catalase, GST and SOD compared to normal control. Under the influence of irradiation, both curcumin and complex treatment protected the decline in the levels of GSH, GST, SOD, catalase and total thiols, and inhibited radiation-induced lipid peroxidation. Further, the complex was found to be more effective in protecting the enzymes at 1 h post irradiation compared to curcumin treated group. This may be due to the higher rate constants of the complex compared to curcumin for their reactions with various free radicals.

  19. ATM protein is indispensable to repair complex-type DNA double strand breaks induced by high LET heavy ion irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Fujimori, Akira; Anzai, Kazunori; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated) protein responsible for a rare genetic disease with hyperradiosensitivity, is the one of the earliest repair proteins sensing DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). ATM is known to phosphorylate DNA repair proteins such as MRN complex (Mre11, Rad50 and NBS1), 53BP1, Artemis, Brca1, gamma-H2AX, and MDC. We studied the interactions between ATM and DNA-PKcs, a crucial NHEJ repair protein, after cells exposure to high and low LET irradiation. Normal human (HFL III, MRC5VA) and AT homozygote (AT2KY, AT5BIVA, AT3BIVA) cells were irradiated with X-rays and high LET radiation (carbon ions: 290MeV/n initial energy at 70 keV/um, and iron ions: 500MeV/n initial energy at 200KeV/um), and several critical end points were examined. AT cells with high LET irradiation showed a significantly higher radiosensitivity when compared with normal cells. The behavior of DNA DSB repair was monitored by immuno-fluorescence techniques using DNA-PKcs (pThr2609, pSer2056) and ATM (pSer1981) antibodies. In normal cells, the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs was clearly detected after high LET irradiation, though the peak of phosphorylation was delayed when compared to X-irradiation. In contrast, almost no DNA-PKcs phosphorylation foci were detected in AT cells irradiated with high LET radiation. A similar result was also observed in normal cells treated with 10 uM ATM kinase specific inhibitor (KU55933) one hour before irradiation. These data suggest that the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs with low LET X-rays is mostly ATM-independent, and the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs with high LET radiation seems to require ATM probably due to its complex nature of DSB induced. Our study indicates that high LET heavy ion irradiation which we can observe in the space environment would provide a useful tool to study the fundamental mechanism associated with DNA DSB repair.

  20. Winter storm-induced hydrodynamics and morphological response of a shallow transgressive shoal complex: Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siadatmousavi, S. Mostafa; Jose, Felix

    2015-03-01

    Using extended deployments during seasons of low and high discharge from the Atchafalaya River, meteorological, hydrodynamic and bottom boundary layer parameters were monitored from Tiger and Trinity Shoal complex, off Louisiana coast, USA. During winter storms, the surface current speed measured at both shoals exceeded 0.5 m/s and the entire water column followed the prevailing wind direction. The current speed close to the bottom exceeded 0.3 m/s during high energy northerly winds. The mean water level in the shoal complex increased during southerly winds and decreased during northerly winds, such that the difference between wind set-up and set-down exceeded 0.7 m in Tiger Shoal and 0.6 m in Trinity Shoal during high energy frontal passages. The swell height was inversely correlated with mean water level, and increased during pre-frontal phase and decreased during post-frontal phase of winter storms. The sea (short waves) height responded quickly to wind direction and speed; and within a few hours after the wind shifted and blowing from the north, the sea height increased during both deployments. Bimodal wave frequency spectrum was observed during wind veering from southerly to northerly, when both sea and swell intensities were significant. The Tiger Shoal bed sediment texture transformed drastically, from mud to shell and shell hash assemblage, within a period of two weeks during the December 2008 deployment. Backscatter signal intensity from a Pulse Coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (PCADP) and its velocity estimates were used to determine the vertical extend and timing of mud resuspension and their eventual flushing out from the shoal environment, when exposed to high energy winter storm passages. The computed time frame for a total transformation of bottom sediment texture (from muddy bottom to shell and shell hash assemblage) was supported by the combined wave and bottom current induced shear stress at shoal bed. The bed samples collected from Tiger Shoal

  1. Fluid-induced dissolution breakdown of monazite from Tso Morari complex, NW Himalayas: evidence for immobility of trace elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Dewashish; Pruseth, Kamal Lochan

    2012-08-01

    Primary igneous monazite from the Polokongka La granite of the Tso Morari complex in the western Himalayas has been partially replaced by a three-layered corona of metamorphic fluor-apatite, allanite + U- and Th-bearing phases (huttonite + brabantite), and epidote. The alteration is related to high-pressure amphibolite-facies (10-11 kbar and 587-695 °C) fluid-induced retrogression of the ultra-high-pressure granite during exhumation after India-Asia collision. The corona textures can be explained by pseudomorphic partial replacement of the original monazite to apatite and allanite via a fluid-mediated coupled dissolution-reprecipitation process. Mass balance calculations using the volume proportions and compositions of coronal minerals show that the REE, U, Th, Pb, Ba and P were conserved and not transported outside the alteration corona. The formation of fluor-apatite, allanite, huttonite and coffinite from monazite and the immobility of REE, U and Th require an influx of alkali- and F-bearing, Ca-rich fluid having high Ca/Na into the corona. We are aware of only two other occurrences of such alteration textures, and these have several similarities in terms of geodynamic setting and P-T histories of the host rocks. We suggest that there may be a common mechanism of exhumation style, and source and composition of fluids during retrogression of granitoid rocks in collisional orogens and that such breakdown textures can be used to identify metagranites that have experienced high-P metamorphism in continental collision zones, which is otherwise difficult to constrain due to the high variance of the mineral assemblages in these rocks.

  2. Thiourea protects against copper-induced oxidative damage by formation of a redox-inactive thiourea-copper complex.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ben-Zhan; Antholine, William E; Frei, Balz

    2002-06-15

    Although thiourea has been used widely to study the role of hydroxyl radicals in metal-mediated biological damage, it is not a specific hydroxyl radical scavenger and may also exert antioxidant effects unrelated to hydroxyl radical scavenging. Thus, we investigated the effects of thiourea on copper-induced oxidative damage to bovine serum albumin (1 mg/ml) in three different copper-containing systems: Cu(II)/ascorbate, Cu(II)/H(2)O(2), and Cu(II)/H(2)O(2)/ascorbate [Cu(II), 0.1 mM; ascorbate, 1 mM; H(2)O(2), 1 mM]. Oxidative damage to albumin was measured as protein carbonyl formation. Thiourea (0.1-10 mM) provided marked and dose-dependent protection against protein oxidation in all three copper-containing systems. In contrast, only minor protection was observed with dimethyl sulfoxide and mannitol, even at concentrations as high as 100 mM. Strong protection was also observed with dimethylthiourea, but not with urea or dimethylurea. Thiourea also significantly inhibited copper-catalyzed oxidation of ascorbate, and competed effectively with histidine and 1,10-phenanthroline for binding of cuprous, but not cupric, copper, as demonstrated by both UV-visible and low temperature electron spin resonance measurements. We conclude that the protection by thiourea against copper-mediated protein oxidation is not through scavenging of hydroxyl radicals, but rather through the chelation of cuprous copper and the formation of a redox-inactive thiourea-copper complex.

  3. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Antibiotic-Induced Cell Death in Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Van Acker, Heleen; Gielis, Jan; Acke, Marloes; Cools, Freya; Cos, Paul; Coenye, Tom

    2016-01-01

    It was recently proposed that bactericidal antibiotics, besides through specific drug-target interactions, kill bacteria by a common mechanism involving the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, this mechanism involving the production of hydroxyl radicals has become the subject of a lot of debate. Since the contribution of ROS to antibiotic mediated killing most likely depends on the conditions, differences in experimental procedures are expected to be at the basis of the conflicting results. In the present study different methods (ROS specific stainings, gene-expression analyses, electron paramagnetic resonance, genetic and phenotypic experiments, detection of protein carbonylation and DNA oxidation) to measure the production of ROS upon antibiotic treatment in Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria were compared. Different classes of antibiotics (tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, meropenem) were included, and both planktonic and biofilm cultures were studied. Our results indicate that some of the methods investigated were not sensitive enough to measure antibiotic induced production of ROS, including the spectrophotometric detection of protein carbonylation. Secondly, other methods were found to be useful only in specific conditions. For example, an increase in the expression of OxyR was measured in Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2 after treatment with ciprofloxacin or meropenem (both in biofilms and planktonic cultures) but not after treatment with tobramycin. In addition results vary with the experimental conditions and the species tested. Nevertheless our data strongly suggest that ROS contribute to antibiotic mediated killing in Bcc species and that enhancing ROS production or interfering with the protection against ROS may form a novel strategy to improve antibiotic treatment.

  4. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Antibiotic-Induced Cell Death in Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Van Acker, Heleen; Gielis, Jan; Acke, Marloes; Cools, Freya; Cos, Paul

    2016-01-01

    It was recently proposed that bactericidal antibiotics, besides through specific drug-target interactions, kill bacteria by a common mechanism involving the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, this mechanism involving the production of hydroxyl radicals has become the subject of a lot of debate. Since the contribution of ROS to antibiotic mediated killing most likely depends on the conditions, differences in experimental procedures are expected to be at the basis of the conflicting results. In the present study different methods (ROS specific stainings, gene-expression analyses, electron paramagnetic resonance, genetic and phenotypic experiments, detection of protein carbonylation and DNA oxidation) to measure the production of ROS upon antibiotic treatment in Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria were compared. Different classes of antibiotics (tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, meropenem) were included, and both planktonic and biofilm cultures were studied. Our results indicate that some of the methods investigated were not sensitive enough to measure antibiotic induced production of ROS, including the spectrophotometric detection of protein carbonylation. Secondly, other methods were found to be useful only in specific conditions. For example, an increase in the expression of OxyR was measured in Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2 after treatment with ciprofloxacin or meropenem (both in biofilms and planktonic cultures) but not after treatment with tobramycin. In addition results vary with the experimental conditions and the species tested. Nevertheless our data strongly suggest that ROS contribute to antibiotic mediated killing in Bcc species and that enhancing ROS production or interfering with the protection against ROS may form a novel strategy to improve antibiotic treatment. PMID:27438061

  5. Nonesterified Fatty Acid-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Cattle Cumulus Oocyte Complexes Alters Cell Metabolism and Developmental Competence.

    PubMed

    Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L; Wu, Linda L Y; Purdey, Malcolm; Abell, Andrew D; Goldys, Ewa M; MacMillan, Keith L; Thompson, Jeremy G; Robker, Rebecca L

    2016-01-01

    Reduced oocyte quality has been associated with poor fertility of high-performance dairy cows during peak lactation, due to negative energy balance. We examined the role of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs), known to accumulate within follicular fluid during under- and overnutrition scenarios, in causing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress of in vitro maturated cattle cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). NEFA concentrations were: palmitic acid (150 μM), oleic acid (200 μM), and steric acid (75 μM). Abattoir-derived COCs were randomly matured for 24 h in the presence of NEFAs and/or an ER stress inhibitor, salubrinal. Total and hatched blastocyst yields were negatively impacted by NEFA treatment compared with controls, but this was reversed by salubrinal. ER stress markers, activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4) and heat shock protein 5 (Hspa5), but not Atf6, were significantly up-regulated by NEFA treatment within whole COCs but reversed by coincubation with salubrinal. Likewise, glucose uptake and lactate production, measured in spent medium samples, showed a similar pattern, suggesting that cumulus cell metabolism is sensitive to NEFAs via an ER stress-mediated process. In contrast, while mitochondrial DNA copy number was recovered in NEFA-treated oocytes, oocyte autofluorescence of the respiratory chain cofactor, FAD, was lower following NEFA treatment of COCs, and this was not reversed by salubrinal, suggesting the negative impact was via reduced mitochondrial function. These results reveal the significance of NEFA-induced ER stress on bovine COC developmental competence, revealing a potential therapeutic target for improving oocyte quality during peak lactation.

  6. Prognostic significance of exercise-induced premature ventricular complexes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Victor; Perera, Dhanuka; Lambiase, Pier

    2017-01-01

    Background Exercise-induced premature ventricular complexes (EI-PVCs) are common during exercise stress tests. Their optimal management and prognostic significance remain uncertain. Aim To perform meta-analysis of observational studies on the prognostic significance of EI-PVCs. Methods A search was conducted on Medline and Embase. Inclusion criteria were observational studies comparing the prognosis of patients with and without EI-PVCs whilst exclusion criteria were studies without confounder adjustment and studies with zero endpoints. Composite endpoints included all-cause mortality, cardiac mortality and cardiovascular events. Relative risk of endpoints were analysed with random effects model. Meta-regression and sensitivity analysis were performed. Results Ten studies were included. In asymptomatic patients who had no clinical evidence of heart disease, EI-PVCs were associated with a pooled risk ratio of 1.82 (95% CI 1.44 to 2.30) of developing adverse cardiovascular events over 16 years. The corresponding pooled RR for patients with symptomatic heart disease was 1.36 (95% CI 1.18 to 1.57) over 5.4 years. Sensitivity analysis: only EI-PVCs on the recovery phase of an exercise test, not during exercise, had adverse prognostic significance. Conclusions EI-PVCs are correlated with a higher risk of all cause death or cardiovascular events in the long term. This risk is elevated in asymptomatic patients without clinical heart disease and in patients with symptomatic heart disease. The fact that only EI-PVCs during recovery, and not during exercise, have poor prognostic value suggests that autonomic dysfunction may play a role in this association. Further studies are needed to see if autonomic manipulation by drugs or catheter-based methods can improve the poor prognosis associated with EI-PVCs. PMID:28123456

  7. Synchronization of Isolated Downstates (K-Complexes) May Be Caused by Cortically-Induced Disruption of Thalamic Spindling

    PubMed Central

    Mak-McCully, Rachel A.; Deiss, Stephen R.; Rosen, Burke Q.; Jung, Ki-Young; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Bastuji, Hélène; Rey, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Sleep spindles and K-complexes (KCs) define stage 2 NREM sleep (N2) in humans. We recently showed that KCs are isolated downstates characterized by widespread cortical silence. We demonstrate here that KCs can be quasi-synchronous across scalp EEG and across much of the cortex using electrocorticography (ECOG) and localized transcortical recordings (bipolar SEEG). We examine the mechanism of synchronous KC production by creating the first conductance based thalamocortical network model of N2 sleep to generate both spontaneous spindles and KCs. Spontaneous KCs are only observed when the model includes diffuse projections from restricted prefrontal areas to the thalamic reticular nucleus (RE), consistent with recent anatomical findings in rhesus monkeys. Modeled KCs begin with a spontaneous focal depolarization of the prefrontal neurons, followed by depolarization of the RE. Surprisingly, the RE depolarization leads to decreased firing due to disrupted spindling, which in turn is due to depolarization-induced inactivation of the low-threshold Ca2+ current (IT). Further, although the RE inhibits thalamocortical (TC) neurons, decreased RE firing causes decreased TC cell firing, again because of disrupted spindling. The resulting abrupt removal of excitatory input to cortical pyramidal neurons then leads to the downstate. Empirically, KCs may also be evoked by sensory stimuli while maintaining sleep. We reproduce this phenomenon in the model by depolarization of either the RE or the widely-projecting prefrontal neurons. Again, disruption of thalamic spindling plays a key role. Higher levels of RE stimulation also cause downstates, but by directly inhibiting the TC neurons. SEEG recordings from the thalamus and cortex in a single patient demonstrated the model prediction that thalamic spindling significantly decreases before KC onset. In conclusion, we show empirically that KCs can be widespread quasi-synchronous cortical downstates, and demonstrate with the first model

  8. Inhibition of the transcriptional repressor complex Bcl-6/BCoR induces endothelial sprouting but does not promote tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Buchberger, Elisabeth; Payrhuber, Dietmar; Harchi, Miriam El; Zagrapan, Branislav; Scheuba, Katharina; Zommer, Anna; Bugyik, Edina; Dome, Balazs; Kral, Julia Barbara; Schrottmaier, Waltraud Cornelia; Schabbauer, Gernot; Petzelbauer, Peter; Gröger, Marion; Bilban, Martin; Brostjan, Christine

    2017-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of the transcriptional repressor Bcl-6 (B-cell lymphoma 6) was originally discovered in non-Hodgkin patients and the soluble Bcl-6 inhibitor 79-6 was developed to treat diffuse large B-cell lymphomas with aberrant Bcl-6 expression. Since we found Bcl-6 and its co-repressor BCoR (Bcl-6 interacting co-repressor) to be regulated in human microvascular endothelium by colorectal cancer cells, we investigated their function in sprouting angiogenesis which is central to tumor growth. Based on Bcl-6/BCoR gene silencing we found that the transcriptional repressor complex in fact constitutes an endogenous inhibitor of vascular sprouting by supporting the stalk cell phenotype: control of Notch target genes (HES1, HEY1, DLL4) and cell cycle regulators (cyclin A and B1). Thus, when endothelial cells were transiently transfected with Bcl-6 and/or BCoR siRNA, vascular sprouting was prominently induced. Comparably, when the soluble Bcl-6 inhibitor 79-6 was applied in the mouse retina model of physiological angiogenesis, endothelial sprouting and branching were significantly enhanced. To address the question whether clinical treatment with 79-6 might therefore have detrimental therapeutic effects by promoting tumor angiogenesis, mouse xenograft models of colorectal cancer and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma were tested. Despite a tendency to increased tumor vessel density, 79-6 therapy did not enhance tumor expansion. In contrast, growth of colorectal carcinomas was significantly reduced which is likely due to a combined 79-6 effect on cancer cells and tumor stroma. These findings may provide valuable information regarding the future clinical development of Bcl-6 inhibitors. PMID:27880939

  9. 2, 4-Diamino-6- hydroxy pyrimidine inhibits NSAIDs induced nitrosyl-complex EPR signals and ulcer in rat jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, S; Simpson, R; Rafi, S; Shergill, JK; Bjarnason, I; Wrigglesworth, J

    2002-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that one aspect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs induced intestinal damage is due to either uncoupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation or inhibition of electron transport. We investigated the latter possibility using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results Electron paramagnetic studies of NSAIDS on sub-mitochondrial particles revealed that indomethacin, but not with nabumetone, bound to a site near to Complex I and ubiquinone to generate a radical species. Normal rats exhibited prominent [3Fe-4S]ox signals (g ~ 2.01) at 20 K. One hour after indomethacin there was a prominent, intense and broad absorption pattern at (g ~2.07) suggesting, appearance of radical species overlapping [3Fe-4S]ox and was unaffected by pretreatment with 2,4 diamino -6-hydroxy pyrimidine. At 24 hrs, when macroscopic ulcers were seen, there was a new signal due to a nitric oxide radical (NO•). In contrast, nabumetone and 2,4 diamino-6-hydroxy pyrimidine pre-treated animals receiving indomethacin exhibited electron paramagnetic resonance spectra identical to those of controls at 24 hrs and neither was associated with small intestinal ulcers. Indomethacin and 2,4 diamino hydroxy pyrimidine pre-treated rats, but not nabumetone, had increased intestinal permeability. Conclusion The results suggest that the in vivo effects of indomethacin modulate the mitochondrial respiratory chain directly at 1 h and 24 h through formation of nitric oxide. NO• appears to play an important role in the late pathogenic stages of NSAID enteropathy and may be the site for targeted treatment to reduce their toxicity. PMID:11960558

  10. The ribonucleotide reductase induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves minimally a complex of two polypeptides (136K and 38K).

    PubMed

    Frame, M C; Marsden, H S; Dutia, B M

    1985-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encodes a polypeptide of apparent mol. wt. 136 000 (Vmw136) known to be a component of the virus-specified ribonucleotide reductase. Monoclonal antibodies that precipitate this polypeptide also precipitate a polypeptide of mol. wt. 38 000 (Vmw38) from extracts of HSV-1-infected cells. The basis for this co-precipitation has been investigated using a monoclonal antibody directed against Vmw136 and an oligopeptide-induced antiserum directed against the carboxy terminus of Vmw38. We have also made use of a temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant of HSV-1 which maps within the sequences encoding Vmw136 and which induces a thermolabile ribonucleotide reductase. Our experiments show (i) Vmw136 and Vmw38 form a complex in infected cells and (ii) the mutation in the ts mutant results in the two polypeptides being unable to form the complex at the non-permissive temperature. We speculate that association of the two polypeptides is necessary for ribonucleotide reductase activity. No evidence was found for involvement of host proteins in the proposed virus-induced ribonucleotide reductase complex. The terms RR1 and RR2 are suggested for the large and small subunits of the HSV-induced enzyme.

  11. Glutamine supplementation attenuates ethanol-induced disruption of apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and ameliorates gut barrier dysfunction and fatty liver in mice.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit K; Shukla, Pradeep K; Mir, Hina; Manda, Bhargavi; Gangwar, Ruchika; Yadav, Nikki; McMullen, Megan; Nagy, Laura E; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies showed that glutamine (Gln) prevents acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers and human colonic mucosa. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Gln supplementation on ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction and liver injury in mice in vivo. Ethanol feeding caused a significant increase in inulin permeability in distal colon. Elevated permeability was associated with a redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins and depletion of detergent-insoluble fractions of these proteins, suggesting that ethanol disrupts apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and increases paracellular permeability. Ethanol-induced increase in colonic mucosal permeability and disruption of junctional complexes were most severe in mice fed Gln-free diet. Gln supplementation attenuated ethanol-induced mucosal permeability and disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in a dose-dependent manner, indicating the potential role of Gln in nutritional intervention to alcoholic tissue injury. Gln supplementation dose-dependently elevated reduced-protein thiols in colon without affecting the level of oxidized-protein thiols. Ethanol feeding depleted reduced protein thiols and elevated oxidized protein thiols. Ethanol-induced protein thiol oxidation was most severe in mice fed with Gln-free diet and absent in mice fed with Gln-supplemented diet, suggesting that antioxidant effect is one of the likely mechanisms involved in Gln-mediated amelioration of ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction. Ethanol feeding elevated plasma transaminase and liver triglyceride, which was accompanied by histopathologic lesions in the liver; ethanol-induced liver damage was attenuated by Gln supplementation. These results indicate that Gln supplementation ameliorates alcohol-induced gut and liver injury.

  12. Glutamine Supplementation Attenuates Ethanol-Induced Disruption of Apical Junctional Complexes in Colonic Epithelium and Ameliorates Gut Barrier Dysfunction and Fatty Liver in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit K.; Shukla, Pradeep K.; Mir, Hina; Manda, Bhargavi; Gangwar, Ruchika; Yadav, Nikki; McMullen, Megan; Nagy, Laura E.; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2015-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies showed that glutamine (Gln) prevents acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers and human colonic mucosa. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Gln supplementation on ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction and liver injury in mice in vivo. Ethanol feeding caused a significant increase in inulin permeability in distal colon. Elevated permeability was associated with a redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins and depletion of detergent-insoluble fractions of these proteins, suggesting that ethanol disrupts apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and increases paracellular permeability. Ethanol-induced increase in colonic mucosal permeability and disruption of junctional complexes were most severe in mice fed Gln-free diet. Gln supplementation attenuated ethanol-induced mucosal permeability and disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in a dose-dependent manner, indicating the potential role of glutamine in nutritional intervention to alcoholic tissue injury. Gln supplementation dose-dependently elevated reduced-protein thiols in colon without affecting the level of oxidized-protein thiols. Ethanol feeding depleted reduced protein thiols and elevated oxidized protein thiols. Ethanol-induced protein thiol oxidation was most severe in mice fed Gln-free diet and absent in mice fed Gln-supplemented diet, suggesting that antioxidant effect is one of the likely mechanisms involved in Gln-mediated amelioration of ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction. Ethanol feeding elevated plasma transaminase and liver triglyceride, which was accompanied by histopathologic lesions in the liver; ethanol-induced liver damage was attenuated by Gln supplementation. These results indicate that Gln supplementation ameliorates alcohol-induced gut and liver injury. PMID:26365579

  13. [Dynamics of the activity of cerebellar Purkinje cells induced by changes in the duration of complex spikes].

    PubMed

    Podladchikova, L N; Bondar', G G; Ivlev, S A; Tikidzhi-Khambur'ian, R A; Dunin-Barkovskiĭ, V L

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between complex and simple spikes of Purkinje cells from vermis cerebelli of guinea pigs has been investigated. The ratio of complex spikes innervated by the processes of one and the same liana-like fiber ("twins cells") has also been studied. Three types of complex spikes in each Purkinje cell from vermis cerebelli of guinea pigs (n = 44) have been differentiated, which differ in duration. It was found that long (10.28 +/- 0.27 ms) complex spikes in all cells lead to a more pronounced inhibition of simple spikes than complex spikes of short duration (6.08 +/- 0.25 ms). It was shown that the dynamics of duration of complex spikes coordinates with changes in the activity of some Purkinje cells and their local groups: (a) complex spikes generated before the onset of pauses of simple spikes are longer than complex spikes generated before the termination of pauses; (b) in "twins cells" innervated by one liana-like fiber, the properties of complex spikes change simultaneously; (c) The degree of synchronism of complex spikes in closely-spaced (to 150 microm) Purkinje cells receiving the inputs from different liana-like fibers increases with their duration. A possible functional role and the mechanisms of generation of complex spikes are discussed.

  14. A cyclopalladated complex interacts with mitochondrial membrane thiol-groups and induces the apoptotic intrinsic pathway in murine and cisplatin-resistant human tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Systemic therapy for cancer metastatic lesions is difficult and generally renders a poor clinical response. Structural analogs of cisplatin, the most widely used synthetic metal complexes, show toxic side-effects and tumor cell resistance. Recently, palladium complexes with increased stability are being investigated to circumvent these limitations, and a biphosphinic cyclopalladated complex {Pd2 [S(-)C2, N-dmpa]2 (μ-dppe)Cl2} named C7a efficiently controls the subcutaneous development of B16F10-Nex2 murine melanoma in syngeneic mice. Presently, we investigated the melanoma cell killing mechanism induced by C7a, and extended preclinical studies. Methods B16F10-Nex2 cells were treated in vitro with C7a in the presence/absence of DTT, and several parameters related to apoptosis induction were evaluated. Preclinical studies were performed, and mice were endovenously inoculated with B16F10-Nex2 cells, intraperitoneally treated with C7a, and lung metastatic nodules were counted. The cytotoxic effects and the respiratory metabolism were also determined in human tumor cell lines treated in vitro with C7a. Results Cyclopalladated complex interacts with thiol groups on the mitochondrial membrane proteins, causes dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and induces Bax translocation from the cytosol to mitochondria, colocalizing with a mitochondrial tracker. C7a also induced an increase in cytosolic calcium concentration, mainly from intracellular compartments, and a significant decrease in the ATP levels. Activation of effector caspases, chromatin condensation and DNA degradation, suggested that C7a activates the apoptotic intrinsic pathway in murine melanoma cells. In the preclinical studies, the C7a complex protected against murine metastatic melanoma and induced death in several human tumor cell lineages in vitro, including cisplatin-resistant ones. The mitochondria-dependent cell death was also induced by C7a in human tumor cells. Conclusions The

  15. Metal Complexes for Two‐Photon Photodynamic Therapy: A Cyclometallated Iridium Complex Induces Two‐Photon Photosensitization of Cancer Cells under Near‐IR Light

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Luke K.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; Baggaley, Elizabeth; Bonneau, Mickaële; Guerchais, Véronique; Williams, J. A. Gareth

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses photosensitizers (PS) which only become cytotoxic upon light‐irradiation. Transition‐metal complexes are highly promising PS due to long excited‐state lifetimes, and high photo‐stabilities. However, these complexes usually absorb higher‐energy UV/Vis light, whereas the optimal tissue transparency is in the lower‐energy NIR region. Two‐photon excitation (TPE) can overcome this dichotomy, with simultaneous absorption of two lower‐energy NIR‐photons populating the same PS‐active excited state as one higher‐energy photon. We introduce two low‐molecular weight, long‐lived and photo‐stable iridium complexes of the [Ir(N^C)2(N^N)]+ family with high TP‐absorption, which localise to mitochondria and lysosomal structures in live cells. The compounds are efficient PS under 1‐photon irradiation (405 nm) resulting in apoptotic cell death in diverse cancer cell lines at low light doses (3.6 J cm−2), low concentrations, and photo‐indexes greater than 555. Remarkably 1 also displays high PS activity killing cancer cells under NIR two‐photon excitation (760 nm), which along with its photo‐stability indicates potential future clinical application. PMID:27740703

  16. Cefepime, a fourth-generation cephalosporin, in complex with manganese, inhibits proteasome activity and induces the apoptosis of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Bi, Caifeng; Fan, Yuhua; Wang, Huannan; Bao, Yan

    2015-10-01

    Cefepime (FEP), which is a member of the fourth-generation cephalosporin class, has been extensively studied as a biochemical and antimicrobial reagent in recent years. Manganese (Mn) is important in the biochemical and physiological processes of many living organisms, and it is also high expressed in some tumor tissues. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the proteasome-inhibitory and anti-proliferative properties of 8 metal complexes (FEP‑Cu, FEP-Zn, FEP-Co, FEP-Ni, FEP-Cd, FEP-Cr, FEP-Fe, FEP-Mn) in MDA-MB‑231 human breast cancer cells. The FEP-Mn complex was found to be more potent in its ability to inhibit cell proliferation and proteasome activity than the other compounds tested. Moreover, the FEP-Mn complex inhibited proteasomal chymotrypsin-like (CT-like) activity and induced the apoptosis of breast cancer cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, the MCF-10A cells were much less sensitive to the FEP complexes compared with the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. These results demonstrated that the FEP-Mn(II) complex has the potential to act as a proteasome inhibitor and apoptosis inducer and therefore has possible future applications in cancer chemotherapy.

  17. The iron complex of Dp44mT is redox-active and induces hydroxyl radical formation: an EPR study.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Patric J; Hawkins, Clare L; Lovejoy, David B; Richardson, Des R

    2010-11-01

    Iron chelation therapy was initially designed to alleviate the toxic effects of excess iron evident in iron-overload diseases. However, some iron chelator-metal complexes have also gained interest due to their high redox activity and toxicological properties that have potential for cancer chemotherapy. This communication addresses the conflicting results published recently on the ability of the iron chelator, Dp44mT, to induce hydroxyl radical formation upon complexation with iron (B.B. Hasinoff and D. Patel, J Inorg. Biochem.103 (2009), 1093-1101). This previous study used EPR spin-trapping to show that Dp44mT-iron complexes were not able to generate hydroxyl radicals. Here, we demonstrate the opposite by using the same technique under very similar conditions to show the Dp44mT-iron complex is indeed redox-active and induces hydroxyl radical formation. This was studied directly in an iron(II)/H(2)O(2) reaction system or using a reducing iron(III)/ascorbate system implementing several different buffers at pH 7.4. The demonstration by EPR that the Dp44mT-iron complex is redox-active confirms our previous studies using cyclic voltammetry, ascorbate oxidation, benzoate hydroxylation and a plasmid DNA strand-break assay. We discuss the relevance of the redox activity to the biological effects of Dp44mT.

  18. Laser-induced liquid bead ion desorption-MS of protein complexes from blue-native gels, a sensitive top-down proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Lucie; Wittig, Ilka; Barth, Hans-Dieter; Schägger, Hermann; Brutschy, Bernhard; Brandt, Ulrich

    2010-04-01

    We have developed an experimental approach that combines two powerful methods for proteomic analysis of large membrane protein complexes: blue native electrophoresis (BNE or BN-PAGE) and laser-induced liquid bead ion desorption (LILBID) MS. Protein complexes were separated by BNE and eluted from the gel. The masses of the constituents of the multiprotein complexes were obtained by LILBID MS, a detergent-tolerant method that is especially suitable for the characterisation of membrane proteins. High sensitivity and small sample volumes required for LILBID MS resulted in low demands on sample quantity. Eluate from a single band allowed assessing the mass of an entire multiprotein complex and its subunits. The method was validated with mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone reductase from Yarrowia lipolytica. For this complex of 947 kDa, typically 30 microg or 32 pmol were sufficient to obtain spectra from which the subunit composition could be analysed. The resolution of this electrophoretic small-scale approach to the purification of native complexes was improved markedly by further separation on a second dimension of BNE. Starting from a subcellular fraction obtained by differential centrifugation, this allowed the purification and analysis of the constituents of a large multiprotein complex in a single LILBID spectrum.

  19. A copper complex supported by an N2S-tridentate ligand inducing efficient heterolytic O-O bond cleavage of alkylhydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Tano, Tetsuro; Mieda, Kaoru; Sugimoto, Hideki; Ogura, Takashi; Itoh, Shinobu

    2014-03-28

    We have recently reported a copper(II)-superoxide complex supported by an N3-tridentate ligand (L(N3)), which exhibits a similar structure and reactivity to those of a putative reactive intermediate involved in the catalytic reactions of copper monooxygenases such as peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) and dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM). In this study, we have synthesised and characterised copper complexes supported by a related sulphur-containing ligand (L(N2S)) to get insight into the notable electronic effect of the sulphur donor atom in the reaction with cumene hydroperoxide, inducing efficient heterolytic O-O bond cleavage.

  20. Dietary avocado oil supplementation attenuates the alterations induced by type I diabetes and oxidative stress in electron transfer at the complex II-complex III segment of the electron transport chain in rat kidney mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Sámano-García, Carlos Alberto; Calderón-Cortés, Elizabeth; Pérez-Hernández, Ismael H; Mejía-Zepeda, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Orozco, Alain R; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2013-06-01

    Impaired complex III activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in mitochondria have been identified as key events leading to renal damage during diabetes. Due to its high content of oleic acid and antioxidants, we aimed to test whether avocado oil may attenuate the alterations in electron transfer at complex III induced by diabetes by a mechanism related with increased resistance to lipid peroxidation. 90 days of avocado oil administration prevented the impairment in succinate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activity caused by streptozotocin-induced diabetes in kidney mitochondria. This was associated with a protection against decreased electron transfer through high potential chain in complex III related to cytochromes c + c1 loss. During Fe(2+)-induced oxidative stress, avocado oil improved the activities of complexes II and III and enhanced the protection conferred by a lipophilic antioxidant against damage by Fe(2+). Avocado oil also decreased ROS generation in Fe(2+)-damaged mitochondria. Alterations in the ratio of C20:4/C18:2 fatty acids were observed in mitochondria from diabetic animals that not were corrected by avocado oil treatment, which yielded lower peroxidizability indexes only in diabetic mitochondria although avocado oil caused an augment in the total content of monounsaturated fatty acids. Moreover, a protective effect of avocado oil against lipid peroxidation was observed consistently only in control mitochondria. Since the beneficial effects of avocado oil in diabetic mitochondria were not related to increased resistance to lipid peroxidation, these effects were discussed in terms of the antioxidant activity of both C18:1 and the carotenoids reported to be contained in avocado oil.

  1. Compartmentalized accumulation of cAMP near complexes of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) contributes to drug-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Ren, Aixia; Arora, Kavisha; Sinha, Chandrima; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Woodrooffe, Koryse; Schuetz, John D; Valasani, Koteswara Rao; de Jonge, Hugo R; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Shata, Mohamed Tarek M; Buddington, Randal K; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2015-05-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most common adverse side effects observed in ∼7% of individuals consuming Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. The mechanism of how these drugs alter fluid secretion in the gut and induce diarrhea is not clearly understood. Several drugs are either substrates or inhibitors of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), such as the anti-colon cancer drug irinotecan and an anti-retroviral used to treat HIV infection, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT). These drugs activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated fluid secretion by inhibiting MRP4-mediated cAMP efflux. Binding of drugs to MRP4 augments the formation of MRP4-CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes that is mediated via scaffolding protein PDZK1. Importantly, HIV patients on AZT treatment demonstrate augmented MRP4-CFTR complex formation in the colon, which defines a novel paradigm of drug-induced diarrhea.

  2. Two-dimensional laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of van der Waals complexes: fluorobenzene-Ar(n) (n = 1,2).

    PubMed

    Gascooke, Jason R; Alexander, Ula N; Lawrance, Warren D

    2012-04-07

    The technique of two-dimensional laser induced fluorescence (2D-LIF) spectroscopy has been used to observe the van der Waals complexes fluorobenzene-Ar and fluorobenzene-Ar(2) in the region of their S(1)-S(0) electronic origins. The 2D-LIF spectral images reveal a number of features assigned to the van der Waals vibrations in S(0) and S(1). An advantage of 2D-LIF spectroscopy is that the LIF spectrum associated with a particular species may be extracted from an image. This is illustrated for fluorobenzene-Ar. The S(1) van der Waals modes observed in this spectrum are consistent with previous observations using mass resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionisation techniques. For S(0), the two bending modes previously observed using a Raman technique were observed along with three new levels. These agree exceptionally well with ab initio calculations. The Fermi resonance between the stretch and bend overtone has been analysed in both the S(0) and S(1) states, revealing that the coupling is stronger in S(0) than in S(1). For fluorobenzene-Ar(2) the 2D-LIF spectral image reveals the S(0) symmetric stretch van der Waals vibration to be 35.0 cm(-1), closely matching the value predicted based on the fluorobenzene-Ar van der Waals stretch frequency. Rotational band contour analysis has been performed on the fluorobenzene-Ar 0(0)(0) transition to yield a set of S(1) rotational constants A' = 0.05871 ± 0.00014 cm(-1), B' = 0.03803 ± 0.00010 cm(-1), and C' = 0.03103 ± 0.00003 cm(-1). The rotational constants imply that in the S(1) 0(0) level the Ar is on average 3.488 Å from the fluorobenzene centre of mass and displaced from it towards the centre of the ring at an angle of ~6° to the normal. The rotational contour for fluorobenzene-Ar(2) was predicted using rotational constants calculated on the basis of the fluorobenzene-Ar geometry and compared with the experimental contour. The comparison is poor which, while due in part to expected saturation effects, suggests

  3. Nociceptive neuronal Fc-gamma receptor I is involved in IgG immune complex induced pain in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haowu; Shen, Xinhua; Chen, Zhiyong; Liu, Fan; Wang, Tao; Xie, Yikuan; Ma, Chao

    2017-03-02

    Antigen-specific immune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis are often accompanied by pain and hyperalgesia. Our previous studies have demonstrated that Fc-gamma-receptor type I (FcγRI) is expressed in a subpopulation of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and can be directly activated by IgG immune complex (IgG-IC). In this study we investigated whether neuronal FcγRI contributes to antigen-specific pain in the naïve and rheumatoid arthritis model rats. In vitro calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamp recordings in dissociated DRG neurons revealed that only the small-, but not medium- or large-sized DRG neurons responded to IgG-IC. Accordingly, in vivo electrophysiological recordings showed that intradermal injection of IgG-IC into the peripheral receptive field could sensitize only the C- (but not A-) type sensory neurons and evoke action potential discharges. Pain-related behavioral tests showed that intradermal injection of IgG-IC dose-dependently produced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in the hindpaw of rats. These behavioral effects could be alleviated by localized administration of non-specific IgG or an FcγRI antibody, but not by mast cell stabilizer or histamine antagonist. In a rat model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) produced by methylated bovine serum albumin, FcγRI were found upregulated exclusively in the small-sized DRG neurons. In vitro calcium imaging revealed that significantly more small-sized DRG neurons responded to IgG-IC in the AIA rats, although there was no significant difference between the AIA and control rats in the magnitude of calcium changes in the DRG neurons. Moreover, in vivo electrophysiological recordings showed that C-nociceptive neurons in the AIA rats exhibited a greater incidence of action potential discharges and stronger responses to mechanical stimuli after IgG-IC was injected to the receptive fields. These results suggest that FcγRI expressed in the peripheral nociceptors might be directly activated

  4. Two-dimensional laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of van der Waals complexes: Fluorobenzene-Arn (n = 1,2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascooke, Jason R.; Alexander, Ula N.; Lawrance, Warren D.

    2012-04-01

    The technique of two-dimensional laser induced fluorescence (2D-LIF) spectroscopy has been used to observe the van der Waals complexes fluorobenzene-Ar and fluorobenzene-Ar2 in the region of their S1-S0 electronic origins. The 2D-LIF spectral images reveal a number of features assigned to the van der Waals vibrations in S0 and S1. An advantage of 2D-LIF spectroscopy is that the LIF spectrum associated with a particular species may be extracted from an image. This is illustrated for fluorobenzene-Ar. The S1 van der Waals modes observed in this spectrum are consistent with previous observations using mass resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionisation techniques. For S0, the two bending modes previously observed using a Raman technique were observed along with three new levels. These agree exceptionally well with ab initio calculations. The Fermi resonance between the stretch and bend overtone has been analysed in both the S0 and S1 states, revealing that the coupling is stronger in S0 than in S1. For fluorobenzene-Ar2 the 2D-LIF spectral image reveals the S0 symmetric stretch van der Waals vibration to be 35.0 cm-1, closely matching the value predicted based on the fluorobenzene-Ar van der Waals stretch frequency. Rotational band contour analysis has been performed on the fluorobenzene-Ar overline {0_0^0 } transition to yield a set of S1 rotational constants A' = 0.05871 ± 0.00014 cm-1, B' = 0.03803 ± 0.00010 cm-1, and C' = 0.03103 ± 0.00003 cm-1. The rotational constants imply that in the S1 00 level the Ar is on average 3.488 Å from the fluorobenzene centre of mass and displaced from it towards the centre of the ring at an angle of ˜6° to the normal. The rotational contour for fluorobenzene-Ar2 was predicted using rotational constants calculated on the basis of the fluorobenzene-Ar geometry and compared with the experimental contour. The comparison is poor which, while due in part to expected saturation effects, suggests the presence of another band

  5. SIRT1 overexpression in skeletal muscle in vivo induces increased insulin sensitivity and enhanced complex I but not complex II-V functions in individual subsarcolemmal and intermyofibrillar mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao-Hao; Qin, Gui-Jun; Li, Xia-Lian; Zhang, Ying-Hui; Du, Pei-Jie; Zhang, Peng-Yu; Zhao, Yan-Yan; Wu, Jing

    2015-06-01

    SIRT1 is known to improve insulin resistance (IR), but whether this effect is direct or not is still unclear, and this question has not been addressed in vivo in the skeletal muscle. Therefore, we sought to test if acute overexpression of SIRT1 in skeletal muscle of high-fat diet (HFD) rats in vivo would affect subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondrial complexes I-V activities and antioxidant enzymes thereby improving insulin action. In vivo electrotransfer was used to overexpress SIRT1 in the skeletal muscle of rats fed HFD for 12 weeks. Skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity and downstream effects of SIRT1 on AMPK, SIRT3, and mitochondrial biogenesis were studied. Citrate synthase (CS), complexes I-V, oxidative stress, and antioxidant levels were assessed in SS and IMF mitochondria. HFD rats showed skeletal muscle IR as well as decreased SIRT1 and SIRT3 expressions, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and mitochondrial biogenesis (p < 0.05). SS and IMF mitochondria displayed lower CS, complexes I-V, and antioxidant enzyme activities (p < 0.05). By contrast, moderate (~2.5 folds) SIRT1 overexpression attenuated HFD-induced skeletal muscle IR. This improvement was associated with increased AMPK, PGC-1α, SIRT3, and mtDNA expressions as well as SS and IMF mitochondrial CS and complexes I-V activities. Importantly, SIRT1 overexpression largely restored antioxidant enzyme activities and enhanced complex I but not complexes II-V functions in individual SS and IMF mitochondria. This study suggests that SIRT1 overexpression improved IR at least partly by targeting complex I functions of SS and IMF mitochondria through the activation of SIRT1 and SIRT3.

  6. Immunization with antigenic peptides complexed with β-glucan induces potent cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity in combination with CpG-ODNs.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Shinichi; Morishita, Hiromi; Kobiyama, Kouji; Aoshi, Taiki; Ishii, Ken J; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2015-12-28

    The induction of antigen-specific immune responses requires immunization with not only antigens, but also adjuvants. CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODNs) are well-known ligands for Toll-like receptor 9 and a potent adjuvant that induces both Th1-type humoral and cellular immune responses including cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses. We previously demonstrated that β-glucan schizophyllan (SPG) can form complexes with CpG-ODNs with attached dA40 (CpG-dA/SPG), which can accumulate in macrophages in the draining inguinal lymph nodes and induce strong immune responses by co-administration of antigenic proteins, namely ovalbumin (OVA). Immunization with antigenic peptides, OVA257-264, did not induce these antigen-specific immune responses even in combination with CpG-dA/SPG, indicating that peptides require a carrier to antigen presenting cells. In this study, we prepared conjugates comprising OVA257-264 and dA40, and made complexes with SPG. Immunization with OVA257-264-dA/SPG induced peptide-specific immune responses in combination with CpG-dA regardless of complexation with SPG both in vitro and in vivo. When splenocytes from immunized mice were incubated with E.G7-OVA tumor model cells presenting OVA peptides, the number of cells drastically decreased after 24h. Furthermore, mice pre-immunized with OVA257-264-dA/SPG and CpG-ODNs exhibited a long delay in tumor growth after tumor inoculation. Therefore, these peptide-dA/SPG and CpG-dA/SPG complexes could be used as a potent vaccine for the treatment of cancers and infectious diseases.

  7. D-galactose induces a mitochondrial complex I deficiency in mouse skeletal muscle: potential benefits of nutrient combination in ameliorating muscle impairment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Liao; Liu, Xin; Liu, Jing; Li, Hua; Yang, Yanshen; Liu, Jia; Guo, Zihao; Xiao, Ke; Zhang, Chen; Liu, Jiankang; Zhao-Wilson, Xi; Long, Jiangang

    2014-03-01

    Accumulating research has shown that chronic D-galactose (D-gal) exposure induces symptoms similar to natural aging in animals. Therefore, rodents chronically exposed to D-gal are increasingly used as a model for aging and delay-of-aging pharmacological research. Mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to play a vital role in aging and age-related diseases; however, whether mitochondrial dysfunction plays a significant role in mice exposed to D-gal remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated cognitive dysfunction, locomotor activity, and mitochondrial dysfunction involved in D-gal exposure in mice. We found that D-gal exposure (125 mg/kg/day, 8 weeks) resulted in a serious impairment in grip strength in mice, whereas spatial memory and locomotor coordination remained intact. Interestingly, muscular mitochondrial complex I deficiency occurred in the skeletal muscle of mice exposed to D-gal. Mitochondrial ultrastructure abnormality was implicated as a contributing factor in D-gal-induced muscular impairment. Moreover, three combinations (A, B, and C) of nutrients applied in this study effectively reversed D-gal-induced muscular impairment. Nutrient formulas B and C were especially effective in reversing complex I dysfunction in both skeletal muscle and heart muscle. These findings suggest the following: (1) chronic exposure to D-gal first results in specific muscular impairment in mice, rather than causing general, premature aging; (2) poor skeletal muscle strength induced by D-gal might be due to the mitochondrial dysfunction caused by complex I deficiency; and (3) the nutrient complexes applied in the study attenuated the skeletal muscle impairment, most likely by improving mitochondrial function.

  8. Photoprotective Potential of Glycolic Acid by Reducing NLRC4 and AIM2 Inflammasome Complex Proteins in UVB Radiation-Induced Normal Human Epidermal Keratinocytes and Mice.

    PubMed

    Hung, Sung-Jen; Tang, Sheau-Chung; Liao, Pei-Yun; Ge, Jheng-Siang; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Yang, Jen-Hung

    2017-02-01

    Exposure to UVB radiation induces inflammation and free radical-mediated oxidative stress through reactive oxygen species (ROS) that play a crucial role in the induction of skin cancer. Glycolic acid (GA) is frequently used in cosmetics and dermatology. The aim of the study was to analyze the photoprotective mechanisms through which GA retards UVB-induced ROS accumulation and inflammation in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) and mice skin, respectively. NHEK cell line and C57BL/6J mice were treated with GA (0.1 or 5 mM) for 24 h followed by UVB irradiation. ROS accumulation, DNA damage, and expression of inflammasome complexes (NLRP3, NLRC4, ASC, and AIM2) were measured in vitro. Epidermal thickness and inflammasome complex proteins were analyzed in vivo. GA significantly prevented UVB-induced loss of skin cell viability, ROS formation, and DNA damage (single and double strands DNA break). GA suppressed the mRNA expression levels of NLRC4 and AIM2 among the inflammasome complexes. GA also blocked interleukin (IL)-1β by reducing the activity of caspase-1 in the NHEKs. Treatment with GA (2%) inhibited UVB-induced inflammation marker NLRC4 protein levels in mouse dorsal skin. The photoprotective activity of GA was ascribed to the inhibition of ROS formation and DNA damage, as well as a reduction in the activities of inflammasome complexes and IL-1β. We propose that GA has anti-inflammatory and photoprotective effects against UVB irradiation. GA is potentially beneficial to the protection of human skin from UV damage.

  9. Compartmentalized oxidative stress in dopaminergic cell death induced by pesticides and complex I inhibitors: Distinct roles of superoxide anion and superoxide dismutases

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Pickett, Chillian; Sumin, Li; Jones, Jocelyn; Chen, Han; Webb, Brian; Choi, Jae; Zhou, You; Zimmerman, Matthew C.; Franco, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    The loss of dopaminergic neurons induced by the parkinsonian toxins paraquat, rotenone and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) is associated with oxidative stress. However, controversial reports exist regarding the source/compartmentalization of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and its exact role in cell death. We aimed to determine in detail the role of superoxide anion (O2•−), oxidative stress and their subcellular compartmentalization in dopaminergic cell death induced by parkinsonian toxins. Oxidative stress and ROS formation was determined in the cytosol, intermembrane (IMS) and mitochondrial matrix compartments, using dihydroethidine derivatives, the redox sensor roGFP, as well as electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Paraquat induced an increase in ROS and oxidative stress in both the cytosol and mitochondrial matrix prior to cell death. MPP+ and rotenone primarily induced an increase in ROS and oxidative stress in the mitochondrial matrix. No oxidative stress was detected at the level of the IMS. In contrast to previous studies, overexpression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) or copper/zinc SOD (CuZnSOD) had no effect on ROS steady state levels, lipid peroxidation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and dopaminergic cell death induced by MPP+ or rotenone. In contrast, paraquat-induced oxidative stress and cell death were selectively reduced by MnSOD overexpression, but not by CuZnSOD or manganese-porphyrins. However, MnSOD also failed to prevent ΔΨm loss. Finally, paraquat, but not MPP+ or rotenone, induced the transcriptional activation the redox-sensitive antioxidant response elements (ARE) and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB). These results demonstrate a selective role of mitochondrial O2•− in dopaminergic cell death induced by paraquat, and show that toxicity induced by the complex I inhibitors rotenone and MPP+ does not depend directly on mitochondrial O2•− formation. PMID:23602909

  10. Redox induced electron transfer in doublet azo-anion diradical rhenium(II) complexes. Characterization of complete electron transfer series.

    PubMed

    Paul, Nandadulal; Samanta, Subhas; Goswami, Sreebrata

    2010-03-15

    Reactions of dirhenium decacarbonyl with the two azoaromatic ligands, L(a) = (2-phenylazo)pyridine and L(b) = (4-chloro-2-phenylazo)pyridine (general abbreviation of the ligands is L) afford paramagnetic rhenium(II) complexes, [Re(II)(L(*-))(2)(CO)(2)] (1) (S = 1/2 ground state) with two one-electron reduced azo-anion radical ligands in an octahedral geometrical arrangement. At room temperature (300 K) the complexes 1a-b, showed magnetic moments (mu(eff)) close to 1.94 mu(B), which is suggestive of the existence of strong antiferromagnetic interactions in the complexes. The results of magnetic measurements on one of the complexes, 1b, in the temperature range 2-300 K are reported. The above complexes showed two cathodic and two anodic responses in cyclic voltammetry where one-electron oxidation leads to an unusual redox event involving simultaneous reduction of the rhenium(II) and oxidation of the second ligand via intramolecular electron transfer. The oxidized complexes 1a(+) and 1b(+) are air stable and were isolated as crystalline solids as their tri-iodide (I(3)(-)) salts. The structures of the two representative complexes, 1b and [1b]I(3), as determined by X-ray crystallography, are compared. The anionic complexes, [1](-) and [1](2-) were characterized in solution by their spectral properties.

  11. A20 inhibits tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha-induced apoptosis by disrupting recruitment of TRADD and RIP to the TNF receptor 1 complex in Jurkat T cells.

    PubMed

    He, Kai-Li; Ting, Adrian T

    2002-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) can trigger distinct signaling pathways leading to either the activation of NF-kappaB transcription factors or apoptosis. NF-kappaB activation results in the expression of antiapoptotic genes that inhibit the apoptosis pathway that is activated in parallel. However, the molecular mechanism of this inhibition remains poorly characterized. We have isolated a Jurkat T-cell mutant that exhibits enhanced sensitivity to TNF-induced apoptosis as a result of a deficiency in I-kappaB kinase gamma (IKKgamma)/NEMO, an essential component of the IKK complex and NF-kappaB pathway. We show here that the zinc finger protein A20 is an NF-kappaB-inducible gene that can protect the IKKgamma-deficient cells from TNF-induced apoptosis by disrupting the recruitment of the death domain signaling molecules TRADD and RIP to the receptor signaling complex. Our study, together with reports on the role of other antiapoptotic proteins such as c-FLIP and c-IAP, suggests that, in order to ensure an effective shutdown of the apoptotic pathway, TNF induces multiple NF-kappaB-dependent genes that inhibit successive steps in the TNFR1 death signaling pathway.

  12. Gastroprotective and antidepressant effects of a new zinc(II)-curcumin complex in rodent models of gastric ulcer and depression induced by stresses.

    PubMed

    Mei, Xueting; Xu, Donghui; Xu, Sika; Zheng, Yanping; Xu, Shibo

    2011-07-01

    Curcumin, a yellow pigment found in the rhizome of Curcuma loga, has been used to treat a variety of digestive and neuropsychiatric disorders since ancient times in China. Curcumin can chelate various metal ions to form metallocomplexes of curcumin which show greater effects than curcumin alone. This study investigated the antiulcerogenic and antidepressant effects of a Zn(II)-curcumin complex on cold-restraint stress (CRS)-induced gastric ulcers in rats, and on the forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST) and 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan (5-HTP)-induced head twitch test in mice. CRS disrupted the rat mucosal barrier and induced gastric ulcers by decreasing the activities of the antioxidant enzymes, and increasing H(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) level. Pretreatment with Zn(II)-curcumin (12, 24, and 48mg/kg) dose-dependently reversed these trends, reduced gastric lesions and H(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, and increased antioxidant activities compared with control groups. Zn(II)-curcumin significantly increased HSP70 mRNA, and attenuated increased iNOS mRNA in the mucosa. Zn(II)-curcumin (17, 34, and 68mg/kg) also significantly decreased immobility time in the FST and TST, and enhanced 5-HTP-induced head twitches in mice. These results demonstrate that the Zn(II)-curcumin complex showed significant gastroprotective and antidepressant effects compared with curcumin alone via a synergistic effect between curcumin and zinc.

  13. NET formation induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis isolates measured as release of myeloperoxidase-DNA and neutrophil elastase-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dae-goon; Floyd, Madison; Winn, Matthew; Moskowitz, Samuel M; Rada, Balázs

    2014-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airway disease is characterized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and recruitment of neutrophil granulocytes. Neutrophil granule components (myeloperoxidase (MPO), human neutrophil elastase (HNE)), extracellular DNA and P. aeruginosa can all be found in the CF respiratory tract and have all been associated with worsening CF lung function. Pseudomonas-induced formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) offers a likely mechanism for release of MPO, HNE and DNA from neutrophils. NETs are composed of a DNA backbone decorated with granule proteins like MPO and HNE. Here we sought to examine whether CF clinical isolates of Pseudomonas are capable of inducing NET release from human neutrophil granulocytes. We used two methods to quantify NETs. We modified a previously employed ELISA that detects MPO-DNA complexes and established a new HNE-DNA ELISA. We show that these methods reliably quantify MPO-DNA and HNE-DNA complexes, measures of NET formation. We have found that CF isolates of P. aeruginosa stimulate robust respiratory burst and NET release in human neutrophils. By comparing paired "early" and "late" bacterial isolates obtained from the same CF patient we have found that early isolates induced significantly more NET release than late isolates. Our data support that Pseudomonas-induced NET release represents an important mechanism for release of neutrophil-derived CF inflammatory mediators, and confirm that decreased induction of NET formation is required for long-term adaptation of P. aeruginosa to CF airways.

  14. Repair pathways independent of the Fanconi anemia nuclear core complex play a predominant role in mitigating formaldehyde-induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Taichi; Takahashi, Akihisa; Kondo, Natsuko; Mori, Eiichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Ohnishi, Ken; Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z.; Thompson, Larry H.; Helleday, Thomas; Asada, Hideo; and others

    2011-01-07

    The role of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway for DNA damage induced by formaldehyde was examined in the work described here. The following cell types were used: mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-}, FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-}, FANCD2{sup -/-} and their parental cells, the Chinese hamster cell lines FANCD1 mutant (mt), FANCGmt, their revertant cells, and the corresponding wild-type (wt) cells. Cell survival rates were determined with colony formation assays after formaldehyde treatment. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were detected with an immunocytochemical {gamma}H2AX-staining assay. Although the sensitivity of FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-} and FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-} cells to formaldehyde was comparable to that of proficient cells, FANCD1mt, FANCGmt and FANCD2{sup -/-} cells were more sensitive to formaldehyde than the corresponding proficient cells. It was found that homologous recombination (HR) repair was induced by formaldehyde. In addition, {gamma}H2AX foci in FANCD1mt cells persisted for longer times than in FANCD1wt cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde-induced DSBs are repaired by HR through the FA repair pathway which is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. -- Research highlights: {yields} We examined to clarify the repair pathways of formaldehyde-induced DNA damage. Formaldehyde induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). {yields} DSBs are repaired through the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway. {yields} This pathway is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. {yields} We also found that homologous recombination repair was induced by formaldehyde.

  15. Neutron activation increases activity of ruthenium-based complexes and induces cell death in glioma cells independent of p53 tumor suppressor gene.

    PubMed

    Montel, Aline Monezi; Dos Santos, Raquel Gouvêa; da Costa, Pryscila Rodrigues; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela de Paula; Batista, Alzir Azevedo; Dos Santos, Wagner Gouvêa

    2017-04-01

    Novel metal complexes have received great attention in the last decades due to their potential anticancer activity. Notably, ruthenium-based complexes have emerged as good alternative to the currently used platinum-based drugs for cancer therapy, providing less toxicity and side effects to patients. Glioblastoma is an aggressive and invasive type of brain tumor and despite of advances is the field of neurooncology there is no effective treatment until now. Therefore, we sought to investigate the potential antiproliferative activity of phosphine-ruthenium-based complexes on human glioblastoma cell lines. Due to its octahedral structure as opposed to the square-planar geometry of platinum(II) compounds, ruthenium(II) complexes exhibit different structure-function relationship probably acting through a different mechanism from that of cisplatin beyond their ability to bind DNA. To better improve the pharmacological activity of metal complexes we hypothesized that neutron activation of ruthenium in the complexes would allow to decrease the effective concentration of the compound needed to kill tumor cells. Herein we report on the effect of unmodified and neutron activated phosphine ruthenium II complexes on glioblastoma cell lines carrying wild-type and mutated p53 tumor suppressor gene. Induction of apoptosis/authophagy as well as generation of reactive oxygen species were determined. The phosphine ruthenium II complexes tested were highly active against glioblastoma cell lines inducing cell death both through apoptosis and autophagy in a p53 independent fashion. Neutron activation of ruthenium compounds rendered them more active than their original counterparts suggesting a new strategy to improve the antitumor activity of these compounds.

  16. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits TF and TNF-α expression induced by the anti-β2GPI/β2GPI complex in human THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Zhou, Hong; Xie, Hongxiang; Mu, Yuan; Xu, Ya; Liu, Jingjing; Zhang, Xiaolei

    2014-04-01

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the major polyphenolic component of green tea. The aim of the current study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of EGCG on anti-β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI)/β2GPI-induced tissue factor (TF) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression in the human acute monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1, as well as the underlying mechanisms. Human THP-1 cells cultured in vitro were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 500 ng/ml) or with the anti-β2GPI (10 µg/ml)/β2GPI (100 µg/ml) complex following pre-treatment with or without EGCG (0-50 µg/ml). The expression levels of TF, TNF-α and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) were measured, and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) including p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway was determined by western blot analysis. The results revealed that the anti-β2GPI/β2GPI complex activated the THP-1 cells, resulting in the enhanced expression of the coagulation cytokine, TF, as well as that of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α; these levels were almost comparable to those induced by LPS. Pre-treatment with EGCG decreased the TF and TNF-α levels in the THP-1 cells treated with the anti-β2GPI/β2GPI complex in a dose-dependent manner and counteracted the upregulation of TLR4 expression (mRNA and protein) which was induced by the anti-β2GPI/β2GPI complex or LPS. Furthermore, EGCG suppressed the phosphorylation of p38, ERK1/2 and JNK and blocked the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway induced by the anti-β2GPI/β2GPI complex or LPS. In conclusion, our results indicate that EGCG decreases the anti-β2GPI/β2GPI-induced TF and TNF-α expression in THP-1 cells possibly through the inhibition of the intracellular signal transduction pathway of TLRs-MAPKs-NF-κB axis and may serve as a preventive and therapeutic agent for antiphospholipid syndrome (APS).

  17. β-diketone-cobalt complexes inhibit DNA synthesis and induce S-phase arrest in rat C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaizhi; Zhao, Xingli; Liu, Junzhi; Fang, Xiangyang; Wang, Xuepeng; Wang, Xiaohong; Li, Rui

    2014-03-01

    β-diketone-cobalt complexes, a family of newly synthesized non-platinum metal compounds, exhibit potential antitumor activity; however, the antitumor mechanism is unclear. The current study investigated the mechanism by which β-diketone-cobalt complexes inhibit rat C6 glioma cell proliferation. It was found that β-diketone-cobalt complexes suppress rat C6 glioma cell viability in a dose-dependent manner (3.125-100 μg/ml). In rat C6 glioma cells, the IC50 value of β-diketone-cobalt complexes was 24.7±3.395 μg/ml and the IC10 value was 4.37±1.53 μg/ml, indicating a strong inhibitory effect. Further investigation suggested that β-diketone-cobalt complexes inhibit rat C6 glioma cell proliferation, which is associated with S-phase arrest and DNA synthesis inhibition. During this process, β-diketone-cobalt complexes decreased cyclin A expression and increased cyclin E and p21 expression. In addition, β-diketone-cobalt complexes exhibit a stronger antitumor capability than the antineoplastic agent, 5-fluorouracil.

  18. Copper(II/I) Complexes of a Hexakis(bipyridyl)cyclotriveratrylene Ligand: A Redox-Induced Conformational Switch.

    PubMed

    Wytko, Jennifer A.; Boudon, Corinne; Weiss, Jean; Gross, Maurice

    1996-07-17

    A series of copper(II) and copper(I) complexes have been synthesized with ligands combining 6-methyl-2,2'-bipyridines with cyclotriveratrylene (CTV) (1) and with catechol (2). The electrochemical, (1)H NMR, and mass spectrometry characterizations of these complexes are described and discussed. The six pendant bipyridines of ligand 1 allow for the formation of two trinuclear copper(I) complexes [(1)Cu(3)](BF(4))(3) differing only in the conformation "vic" or "int" adopted by the ligand to fit the tetrahedral cuprous ions. Similarly, 1 generates two trinuclear copper(II) complexes in which the conformation of the ligand fits the square planar geometry of cupric ions. In both the cuprous and cupric complexes, a conformational equilibrium exists. Ligand 2 bearing two methylbipyridines has proven to be a useful model of the coordinating sites of ligand 1. In this case, two homologous copper(I) complexes are obtained, [(2)Cu]BF(4) and [(2)(2)Cu(2)](BF(4))(2), modeling respectively two possible coordination conformations of ligand 1. With copper(II), ligand 2 yields only one complex [(2)Cu](CF(3)SO(3))(2), which allows for the unambiguous identification of the conformations observed for ligand 1 complexes. The different coordinating modes of ligand 1 in the complexes mentioned are in exchange but exhibit different physical properties, thus representing a new bistable system based on conformational isomerism which exhibits an electrochemical potential hysteresis. An equilibrium constant and thermodynamic data were obtained for this system by variable-temperature cyclic voltammetry. The influence of coordinating vs noncoordinating solvents was also studied.

  19. Trichonomas vaginalis metalloproteinase induces apoptosis of SiHa cells through disrupting the Mcl-1/Bim and Bcl-xL/Bim complexes.

    PubMed

    Quan, Juan-Hua; Kang, Byung-Hun; Cha, Guang-Ho; Zhou, Wei; Koh, Young-Bok; Yang, Jung-Bo; Yoo, Heon-Jong; Lee, Min-A; Ryu, Jae-Sook; Noh, Heung-Tae; Kwon, Jaeyul; Lee, Young-Ha

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate the roles of metalloproteinases and the Bcl-2 family of proteins in Trichovaginalis. vaginalis-induced apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells (SiHa cells) and vaginal epithelial cells (MS74 cells), SiHa cells and MS74 cells were incubated with live T. vaginalis, T. vaginalis excretory and secretory products (ESP), and T. vaginalis lysates, either with or without the specific metalloproteinase inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline (1,10-PT), and examined apoptotic events and Bcl-2 signaling. The live T. vaginalis and the T. vaginalis ESP induced the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, and the cleavage of PARP. Additionally, the live T. vaginalis, but not the T. vaginalis lysate, induced the cleavage of the proapoptotic Bim protein. The live T. vaginalis and the T. vaginalis ESP, but not the T. vaginalis lysate, induced the dose-dependent cleavage of the antiapoptotic Bcl-xL and Mcl-1 proteins and decreased the association levels of Bcl-xL/Bim and Mcl-1/Bim complexes. We performed gelatin zymography and casein-hydrolysis assays on the live T. vaginalis and the T. vaginalis ESP to identify the apoptosis-inducing factor. Both the live T. vaginalis and the ESP contained high levels of metalloproteinases, of which activities were significantly inhibited by 1,10-PT treatment. Furthermore, the 1,10-PT blocked the cleavage of Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, PARP, caspase-3, and caspase-9, as well as the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, and it significantly increased the association levels of the Bcl-xL/Bim and Mcl-1/Bim protein complexes, returning them to normal levels. Our results demonstrate that T. vaginalis induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in SiHa cells through the dissociation of Bcl-xL/Bim and Mcl-1/Bim complexes and that the apoptosis is blocked by the metalloproteinase inhibitor 1,10-PT. These results expand our understanding of the role of metalloproteinases in T. vaginalis-induced apoptosis and the signaling

  20. The CD19/CD81 complex physically interacts with CD38 but is not required to induce proliferation in mouse B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Vences-Catalán, Felipe; Rajapaksa, Ranjani; Levy, Shoshana; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo

    2012-01-01

    In B lymphocytes, the cell surface receptor CD38 is involved in apoptosis of immature B cells, proliferation and differentiation of mature B cells. Although CD38 has been establish as a receptor, its signaling has been only partially characterized. As a result of the lack of signaling motifs in the cytoplasmic domain, CD38 must use a co-receptor to induce signaling within the cell. Accordingly, CD38 has been associated with different receptors such as the T-cell receptor/CD3 complex on T cells, CD16 on natural killer cells and MHC class II molecules on monocytes. The CD19/CD81 complex has been proposed as a co-receptor for CD38 in human B lymphocytes, but little or no characterization has been performed in mice. In this study the contribution of the CD19/CD81 complex in murine CD38 signaling was evaluated. Proliferation assays were performed using CD19−/− or CD81−/− deficient mice; CFSE-labeled B lymphocytes from wild-type mice and CD19−/−, CD81−/− and CD38−/− deficient mice were stimulated with agonistic antibodies against CD38. Immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence were also performed to detect protein–protein interactions. Our results indicate that the CD19/CD81 complex interacts with CD38 but this interaction is not required to induce proliferation in mouse B lymphocytes, suggesting that other receptors may contribute to the proliferation induced by CD38 in B lymphocytes. PMID:22564057

  1. Ligand-induced internalization, recycling, and resensitization of adrenomedullin receptors depend not on CLR or RAMP alone but on the receptor complex as a whole.

    PubMed

    Nag, Kakon; Sultana, Naznin; Kato, Akira; Dranik, Anna; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Kutsuzawa, Koichi; Hirose, Shigehisa; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2015-02-01

    Adrenomedullins (AM) is a multifaceted distinct subfamily of peptides that belongs to the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) superfamily. These peptides exert their functional activities via associations of calcitonin receptor-like receptors (CLRs) and receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) RAMP2 and RAMP3. Recent studies established that RAMPs and CLRs can modify biochemical properties such as trafficking and glycosylation of each other. However there is very little or no understanding regarding how RAMP or CLR influence ligand-induced events of AM-receptor complex. In this study, using pufferfish homologs of CLR (mfCLR1-3) and RAMP (mfRAMP2 and mfRAMP3), we revealed that all combinations of CLR and RAMP quickly underwent ligand-induced internalization; however, their recycling rates were different as follows: mfCLR1-mfRAMP3>mfCLR2-mfRAMP3>mfCLR3-mfRAMP3. Functional receptor assay confirmed that the recycled receptors were resensitized on the plasma membrane. In contrast, a negligible amount of mfCLR1-mfRAMP2 was recycled and reconstituted. Immunocytochemistry results indicated that the lower recovery rate of mfCLR3-mfRAMP3 and mfCLR1-mfRAMP2 was correlated with higher proportion of lysosomal localization of these receptor complexes compared to the other combinations. Collectively our results indicate, for the first time, that the ligand-induced internalization, recycling, and reconstitution properties of RAMP-CLR receptor complexes depend on the receptor-complex as a whole, and not on individual CLR or RAMP alone.

  2. Quantification of extracellular levels of corticosterone in the basolateral amygdaloid complex of freely-moving rats: a dialysis study of circadian variation and stress-induced modulation.

    PubMed

    Bouchez, Gaëlle; Millan, Mark J; Rivet, Jean-Michel; Billiras, Rodolphe; Boulanger, Raphaël; Gobert, Alain

    2012-05-03

    Corticosterone influences emotion and cognition via actions in a diversity of corticolimbic structures, including the amygdala. Since extracellular levels of corticosterone in brain have rarely been studied, we characterized a specific and sensitive enzymatic immunoassay for microdialysis quantification of corticosterone in the basolateral amygdaloid complex of freely-moving rats. Corticosterone levels showed marked diurnal variation with an evening (dark phase) peak and stable, low levels during the day (light phase). The "anxiogenic agents", FG7142 (20 mg/kg) and yohimbine (10 mg/kg), and an environmental stressor, 15-min forced-swim, induced marked and sustained (1-3 h) increases in dialysis levels of corticosterone in basolateral amygdaloid complex. They likewise increased dialysis levels of dopamine and noradrenaline, but not serotonin and GABA. As compared to basal corticosterone levels of ~200-300 pg/ml, the elevation provoked by forced-swim was ca. 20-fold and this increase was abolished by adrenalectomy. Interestingly, stress-induced rises of corticosterone levels in basolateral amygdaloid complex were abrogated by combined but not separate administration of the corticotrophin releasing factor(1) (CRF(1)) receptor antagonist, CP154,526, and the vasopressin(1b) (V(1b)) receptor antagonist, SSR149,415. Underpinning their specificity, they did not block forced-swim-induced elevations in dopamine and noradrenaline. In conclusion, extracellular levels of corticosterone in the basolateral amygdaloid complex display marked diurnal variation. Further, they are markedly elevated by acute stressors, the effects of which are mediated (in contrast to concomitant elevations in levels of monoamines) by co-joint recruitment of CRF(1) and V(1b) receptors.

  3. 1918 Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) and the viral RNA polymerase complex enhance viral pathogenicity, but only HA induces aberrant host responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tokiko; Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Tchitchek, Nicolas; Watanabe, Shinji; Benecke, Arndt G; Katze, Michael G; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2013-05-01

    The 1918 pandemic influenza virus was the most devastating infectious agent in human history, causing fatal pneumonia and an estimated 20 to 50 million deaths worldwide. Previous studies indicated a prominent role of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene in efficient replication and high virulence of the 1918 virus in mice. It is, however, still unclear whether the high replication ability or the 1918 influenza virus HA gene is required for 1918 virus to exhibit high virulence in mice. Here, we examined the biological properties of reassortant viruses between the 1918 virus and a contemporary human H1N1 virus (A/Kawasaki/173/2001 [K173]) in a mouse model. In addition to the 1918 influenza virus HA, we demonstrated the role of the viral RNA replication complex in efficient replication of viruses in mouse lungs, whereas only the HA gene is responsible for lethality in mice. Global gene expression profiling of infected mouse lungs revealed that the 1918 influenza virus HA was sufficient to induce transcriptional changes similar to those induced by the 1918 virus, despite difference in lymphocyte gene expression. Increased expression of genes associated with the acute-phase response and the protein ubiquitination pathway were enriched during infections with the 1918 and 1918HA/K173 viruses, whereas reassortant viruses bearing the 1918 viral RNA polymerase complex induced transcriptional changes similar to those seen with the K173 virus. Taken together, these data suggest that HA and the viral RNA polymerase complex are critical determinants of Spanish influenza pathogenesis, but only HA, and not the viral RNA polymerase complex and NP, is responsible for extreme host responses observed in mice infected with the 1918 influenza virus.

  4. Differential effects of buffer pH on Ca2+-induced ROS emission with inhibited mitochondrial complexes I and III

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Daniel P.; Camara, Amadou K. S.; Stowe, David F.; Lubbe, Ryan; Aldakkak, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Excessive mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) emission is a critical component in the etiology of ischemic injury. Complex I and complex III of the electron transport chain are considered the primary sources of ROS emission during cardiac ischemia and reperfusion (IR) injury. Several factors modulate ischemic ROS emission, such as an increase in extra-matrix Ca2+, a decrease in extra-matrix pH, and a change in substrate utilization. Here we examined the combined effects of these factors on ROS emission from respiratory complexes I and III under conditions of simulated IR injury. Guinea pig heart mitochondria were suspended in experimental buffer at a given pH and incubated with or without CaCl2. Mitochondria were then treated with either pyruvate, a complex I substrate, followed by rotenone, a complex I inhibitor, or succinate, a complex II substrate, followed by antimycin A, a complex III inhibitor. H2O2 release rate and matrix volume were compared with and without adding CaCl2 and at pH 7.15, 6.9, or 6.5 with pyruvate + rotenone or succinate + antimycin A to simulate conditions that may occur during in vivo cardiac IR injury. We found a large increase in H2O2 release with high [CaCl2] and pyruvate + rotenone at pH 6.9, but not at pHs 7.15 or 6.5. Large increases in H2O2 release rate also occurred at each pH with high [CaCl2] and succinate + antimycin A, with the highest levels observed at pH 7.15. The increases in H2O2 release were associated with significant mitochondrial swelling, and both H2O2 release and swelling were abolished by cyclosporine A, a desensitizer of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). These results indicate that ROS production by complex I and by complex III is differently affected by buffer pH and Ca2+ loading with mPTP opening. The study suggests that changes in the levels of cytosolic Ca2+ and pH during IR alter the relative amounts of ROS produced at mitochondrial respiratory complex I and complex III. PMID

  5. Protein complex formation by acetylcholinesterase and the neurotoxin fasciculin-2 appears to involve an induced-fit mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Jennifer M.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Specific, rapid association of protein complexes is essential for all forms of cellular existence. The initial association of two molecules in diffusion-controlled reactions is often influenced by the electrostatic potential. Yet, the detailed binding mechanisms of proteins highly depend on the particular system. A complete protein complex formation pathway has been delineated by using structural information sampled over the course of the transformation reaction. The pathway begins at an encounter complex that is formed by one of the apo forms of neurotoxin fasciculin-2 (FAS2) and its high-affinity binding protein, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), followed by rapid conformational rearrangements into an intermediate complex that subsequently converts to the final complex as observed in crystal structures. Formation of the intermediate complex has also been independently captured in a separate 20-ns molecular dynamics simulation of the encounter complex. Conformational transitions between the apo and liganded states of FAS2 in the presence and absence of AChE are described in terms of their relative free energy profiles that link these two states. The transitions of FAS2 after binding to AChE are significantly faster than in the absence of AChE; the energy barrier between the two conformational states is reduced by half. Conformational rearrangements of FAS2 to the final liganded form not only bring the FAS2/AChE complex to lower energy states, but by controlling transient motions that lead to opening or closing one of the alternative passages to the active site of the enzyme also maximize the ligand's inhibition of the enzyme. PMID:17021015

  6. Effect of structural parameters on the electron capture dissociation and collision-induced dissociation pathways of copper(II)-peptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangfeng; Wang, Ze; Li, Wan; Wong, Y L Elaine; Chan, T-W Dominic

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase dissociation pathways of proteins/peptides are usually affected by the nature of the charge carrier and the sequence of amino acid residues. The effects of peptide structural parameters, including peptide composition, chain length and amide hydrogen, on the gas-phase dissociation of Cu(II)-model peptide complexes were explored in this study. Polyglycine peptides with flexible frames were used as probes to reduce the complexity of the system and illustrate the mechanism. Results revealed that the types of fragment ions generated in the electron capture dissociation (ECD) of Cu(II)-adducted peptides changed according to the basic amino acid residue composition. Charged or neutral tryptophan side-chain losses were observed in the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of Cu(II)-peptide complexes. Internal electron transfer between tryptophan and metal ion within the complex occurred during the CID reaction, leaving the charge-reduced Cu(+) as a closed d-shell stable electron configuration. The choice of the reaction channel was then determined by the gas-phase basicity of the peptide. Amide hydrogen was critical in the formation of metalated b-/y-ions in the ECD process as determined through mutation of the backbone amide group. Increasing the chain length suppressed the ECD of Cu-metalated peptide species. Our results indicate that the structural parameters of peptides play important roles in the gas-phase dissociation processes of Cu-peptide complexes.

  7. Solvation-induced σ-complex structure formation in the gas phase: a revisit to the infrared spectroscopy of [C6H6-(CH3OH)2]+.

    PubMed

    Mizuse, Kenta; Suzuki, Yuta; Mikami, Naohiko; Fujii, Asuka

    2011-10-20

    Structures of the [C(6)H(6)-(CH(3)OH)(2)](+) cluster cation are investigated with infrared (IR) spectroscopy. While the noncovalent type structure has been confirmed for the n = 1 cluster of [C(6)H(6)-(CH(3)OH)(n)](+), only contradictory interpretations have been given for the spectra of n = 2, in which significant changes have been observed with the Ar tagging. In the present study, we revisit IR spectroscopy of the n = 2 cluster from the viewpoint of the σ-complex structure, which includes a covalent bond formation between the benzene and methanol moieties. The observed spectral range is extended to the lower-frequency region, and the spectrum is measured with and without Ar and N(2) tagging. A strongly hydrogen-bonded OH stretch band, which is characteristic to the σ-complex structure, is newly found with the tagging. The remarkable spectral changes with the tagging are interpreted by the competition between the σ-complex and noncovalent complex structures in the [C(6)H(6)-(CH(3)OH)(2)](+) system. This result shows that the microsolvation only with one methanol molecule can induce the σ-complex structure formation.

  8. RPA70 depletion induces hSSB1/2-INTS3 complex to initiate ATR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Ananya; Kaur, Manpreet; Ghosh, Tanushree; Khan, Md. Muntaz; Sharma, Aparna; Shekhar, Ritu; Varshney, Akhil; Saxena, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    The primary eukaryotic single-stranded DNA-binding protein, Replication protein A (RPA), binds to single-stranded DNA at the sites of DNA damage and recruits the apical checkpoint kinase, ATR via its partner protein, ATRIP. It has been demonstrated that absence of RPA incapacitates the ATR-mediated checkpoint response. We report that in the absence of RPA, human single-stranded DNA-binding protein 1 (hSSB1) and its partner protein INTS3 form sub-nuclear foci, associate with the ATR-ATRIP complex and recruit it to the sites of genomic stress. The ATRIP foci formed after RPA depletion are abrogated in the absence of INTS3, establishing that hSSB-INTS3 complex recruits the ATR-ATRIP checkpoint complex to the sites of genomic stress. Depletion of homologs hSSB1/2 and INTS3 in RPA-deficient cells attenuates Chk1 phosphorylation, indicating that the cells are debilitated in responding to stress. We have identified that TopBP1 and the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 complex are essential for the alternate mode of ATR activation. In summation, we report that the single-stranded DNA-binding protein complex, hSSB1/2-INTS3 can recruit the checkpoint complex to initiate ATR signaling. PMID:25916848

  9. Aggregation-induced white-light emission from the triple-stranded dinuclear Sm(iii) complex.

    PubMed

    Leng, Jiaqi; Li, Hongfeng; Chen, Peng; Sun, Wenbin; Gao, Ting; Yan, Pengfei

    2014-08-28

    A novel bis-β-diketone ligand, 4,4'-bis(4,4,4-trifluoro-1,3-dioxobutyl)(phenoxy)-1,1'-binaphthalene (BTPB), is designed for synthesis of a white light emissive lanthanide complex. The ligand bears two benzoyl β-diketonate sites linked by a 1,1'-binaphthoxy spacer. Reaction of the doubly negatively charged bis-bidentate ligand with lanthanide ions forms triple-stranded dinuclear complexes Sm2(BTPB)3(H2O)4 () and Gd2(BTPB)3(H2O)4 (), which have been fully characterized by various spectroscopic techniques. UV-Vis absorption and emission spectroscopic techniques are used to investigate photophysical properties of the ligand and its complexes in THF and CHCl3. In some cases aggregation of the ligand results in the appearance of a new luminescence band at about 510 nm in addition to the monomer fluorescence. In complex , partial energy transfer from BTPB results in Sm(iii)-based red light emission in addition to the BTPB-based blue/green emission. With the variation of the excited wavelength and concentration of the solution, complex shows a tunable white light emission with the balance of three primary colors. This is an unusual case of observation of white light emission from a single molecule Sm(iii) complex.

  10. Complexation- and ligand-induced metal release from 316L particles: importance of particle size and crystallographic structure.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Yolanda; Hedberg, Jonas; Liu, Yi; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall

    2011-12-01

    Iron, chromium, nickel, and manganese released from gas-atomized AISI 316L stainless steel powders (sized <45 and <4 μm) were investigated in artificial lysosomal fluid (ALF, pH 4.5) and in solutions of its individual inorganic and organic components to determine its most aggressive component, elucidate synergistic effects, and assess release mechanisms, in dependence of surface changes using atomic absorption spectroscopy, Raman, XPS, and voltammetry. Complexation is the main reason for metal release from 316L particles immersed in ALF. Iron was mainly released, while manganese was preferentially released as a consequence of the reduction of manganese oxide on the surface. These processes resulted in highly complexing media in a partial oxidation of trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium on the surface. The extent of metal release was partially controlled by surface properties (e.g., availability of elements on the surface and structure of the outermost surface) and partially by the complexation capacity of the different metals with the complexing agents of the different media. In general, compared to the coarse powder (<45 μm), the fine (<4 μm) powder displayed significantly higher released amounts of metals per surface area, increased with increased solution complexation capacity, while less amounts of metals were released into non-complexing solutions. Due to the ferritic structure of lower solubility for nickel of the fine powder, more nickel was released into all solutions compared with the coarser powder.

  11. In skeletal muscle advanced glycation end products (AGEs) inhibit insulin action and induce the formation of multimolecular complexes including the receptor for AGEs.

    PubMed

    Cassese, Angela; Esposito, Iolanda; Fiory, Francesca; Barbagallo, Alessia P M; Paturzo, Flora; Mirra, Paola; Ulianich, Luca; Giacco, Ferdinando; Iadicicco, Claudia; Lombardi, Angela; Oriente, Francesco; Van Obberghen, Emmanuel; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro; Miele, Claudia

    2008-12-26

    Chronic hyperglycemia promotes insulin resistance at least in part by increasing the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). We have previously shown that in L6 myotubes human glycated albumin (HGA) induces insulin resistance by activating protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha). Here we show that HGA-induced PKCalpha activation is mediated by Src. Coprecipitation experiments showed that Src interacts with both the receptor for AGE (RAGE) and PKCalpha in HGA-treated L6 cells. A direct interaction of PKCalpha with Src and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) has also been detected. In addition, silencing of IRS-1 expression abolished HGA-induced RAGE-PKCalpha co-precipitation. AGEs were able to induce insulin resistance also in vivo, as insulin tolerance tests revealed a significant impairment of insulin sensitivity in C57/BL6 mice fed a high AGEs diet (HAD). In tibialis muscle of HAD-fed mice, insulin-induced glucose uptake and protein kinase B phosphorylation were reduced. This was paralleled by a 2.5-fold increase in PKCalpha activity. Similarly to in vitro observations, Src phosphorylation was increased in tibialis muscle of HAD-fed mice, and co-precipitation experiments showed that Src interacts with both RAGE and PKCalpha. These results indicate that AGEs impairment of insulin action in the muscle might be mediated by the formation of a multimolecular complex including RAGE/IRS-1/Src and PKCalpha.

  12. Curcumin Pretreatment Prevents Potassium Dichromate-Induced Hepatotoxicity, Oxidative Stress, Decreased Respiratory Complex I Activity, and Membrane Permeability Transition Pore Opening

    PubMed Central

    García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Tapia, Edilia; Zazueta, Cecilia; Zatarain-Barrón, Zyanya Lucía; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Vega-García, Claudia Cecilia; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin is a polyphenol derived from turmeric with recognized antioxidant properties. Hexavalent chromium is an environmental toxic and carcinogen compound that induces oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential protective effect of curcumin on the hepatic damage generated by potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) in rats. Animals were pretreated daily by 9-10 days with curcumin (400 mg/kg b.w.) before the injection of a single intraperitoneal of K2Cr2O7 (15 mg/kg b.w.). Groups of animals were sacrificed 24 and 48 h later. K2Cr2O7-induced damage to the liver was evident by histological alterations and increase in the liver weight and in the activity of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and alkaline phosphatase in plasma. In addition, K2Cr2O7 induced oxidative damage in liver and isolated mitochondria, which was evident by the increase in the content of malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl and decrease in the glutathione content and in the activity of several antioxidant enzymes. Moreover, K2Cr2O7 induced decrease in mitochondrial oxygen consumption, in the activity of respiratory complex I, and permeability transition pore opening. All the above-mentioned alterations were prevented by curcumin pretreatment. The beneficial effects of curcumin against K2Cr2O7-induced liver oxidative damage were associated with prevention of mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23956771

  13. Novel metal-based pharmacologically dynamic agents of transition metal(II) complexes: Designing, synthesis, structural elucidation, DNA binding and photo-induced DNA cleavage activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Jeyamurugan, R.; Sakthivel, A.; Mitu, L.

    2010-01-01

    Novel Schiff base Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes have been designed and synthesized using the macrocyclic ligand derived from the condensation of diethylphthalate with Schiff base, obtained from benzene-1,2-diamine and 3-benzylidene-pentane-2,4-dione. The ligand and its complexes have been characterized by analytical and spectral techniques. DNA binding properties of these complexes have been investigated by UV-vis, viscosity measurements, cyclic voltammetric and differential pulse voltammogram studies. The intrinsic binding constants for Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes are 1.6 × 10 6, 1.8 × 10 6, 2.0 × 10 6 and 1.5 × 10 6 M -1 respectively which are obtained from electronic absorption experiment. Control DNA cleavage experiments using pUC19 supercoiled (SC) DNA and minor groove binder (distamycin) suggest the major groove binding tendency for the synthesized complexes. In the presence of a reducing agent like 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA), the synthesized complexes show chemical nuclease activity under dark reaction condition. The complexes also show efficient photo-induced DNA cleavage activity on irradiation with a monochromatic UV light of 360 nm in the presence of inhibitors. Control experiments show inhibition of cleavage in the presence of singlet oxygen quencher like sodium azide and enhancement of cleavage in D 2O, suggesting the formation of singlet oxygen as a reactive species in a type-II process.

  14. Curcumin prevents maleate-induced nephrotoxicity: relation to hemodynamic alterations, oxidative stress, mitochondrial oxygen consumption and activity of respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Tapia, E; Sánchez-Lozada, L G; García-Niño, W R; García, E; Cerecedo, A; García-Arroyo, F E; Osorio, H; Arellano, A; Cristóbal-García, M; Loredo, M L; Molina-Jijón, E; Hernández-Damián, J; Negrette-Guzmán, M; Zazueta, C; Huerta-Yepez, S; Reyes, J L; Madero, M; Pedraza-Chaverrí, J

    2014-11-01

    The potential protective effect of the dietary antioxidant curcumin (120 mg/Kg/day for 6 days) against the renal injury induced by maleate was evaluated. Tubular proteinuria and oxidative stress were induced by a single injection of maleate (400 mg/kg) in rats. Maleate-induced renal injury included increase in renal vascular resistance and in the urinary excretion of total protein, glucose, sodium, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and N-acetyl β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), upregulation of kidney injury molecule (KIM)-1, decrease in renal blood flow and claudin-2 expression besides of necrosis and apoptosis of tubular cells on 24 h. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring the oxidation of lipids and proteins and diminution in renal Nrf2 levels. Studies were also conducted in renal epithelial LLC-PK1 cells and in mitochondria isolated from kidneys of all the experimental groups. Maleate induced cell damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in LLC-PK1 cells in culture. In addition, maleate treatment reduced oxygen consumption in ADP-stimulated mitochondria and diminished respiratory control index when using malate/glutamate as substrate. The activities of both complex I and aconitase were also diminished. All the above-described alterations were prevented by curcumin. It is concluded that curcumin is able to attenuate in vivo maleate-induced nephropathy and in vitro cell damage. The in vivo protection was associated to the prevention of oxidative stress and preservation of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and activity of respiratory complex I, and the in vitro protection was associated to the prevention of ROS production.

  15. Leptin-induced Growth Stimulation of Breast Cancer Cells Involves Recruitment of Histone Acetyltransferases and Mediator Complex to CYCLIN D1 Promoter via Activation of Stat3*

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Neeraj K.; Vertino, Paula M.; Anania, Frank A.; Sharma, Dipali

    2010-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies documented that obesity is a risk factor for breast cancer development in postmenopausal women. Leptin, the key player in the regulation of energy balance and body weight control also acts as a growth factor on certain organs in both normal and disease state. In this study, we analyzed the role of leptin and the molecular mechanism(s) underlying its action in breast cancer cells that express both short and long isoforms of leptin receptor. Leptin increased MCF7 cell population in the S-phase of the cell cycle along with a robust increase in CYCLIN D1 expression. Also, leptin induced Stat3-phosphorylation-dependent proliferation of MCF7 cells as blocking Stat3 phosphorylation with a specific inhibitor, AG490, abolished leptin-induced proliferation. Using deletion constructs of CYCLIN D1 promoter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we show that leptin induced increase in CYCLIN D1 promoter activity is mediated through binding of activated Stat3 at the Stat binding sites and changes in histone acetylation and methylation. We also show specific involvement of coactivator molecules, histone acetyltransferase SRC1, and mediator complex in leptin-mediated regulation of CYCLIN D1 promoter. Importantly, silencing of SRC1 and Med1 abolished the leptin induced increase in CYCLIN D1 expression and MCF7 cell proliferation. Intriguingly, recruitment of both SRC1 and Med1 was dependent on phosphorylated Stat3 as AG490 treatment inhibited leptin-induced recruitment of these coactivators to CYCLIN D1 promoter. Our data suggest that CYCLIN D1 may be a target gene for leptin mediated growth stimulation of breast cancer cells and molecular mechanisms involve activated Stat3-mediated recruitment of distinct coactivator complexes. PMID:17344214

  16. Glucocorticoid-induced tethered transrepression requires SUMOylation of GR and formation of a SUMO-SMRT/NCoR1-HDAC3 repressing complex.

    PubMed

    Hua, Guoqiang; Ganti, Krishna Priya; Chambon, Pierre

    2016-02-02

    Upon binding of a glucocorticoid (GC), the GC receptor (GR) can exert one of three transcriptional regulatory functions. We recently reported that SUMOylation of the GR at position K293 in humans (K310 in mice) within the N-terminal domain is indispensable for GC-induced evolutionary conserved inverted repeated negative GC response element (IR nGRE)-mediated direct transrepression. We now demonstrate that the integrity of this GR SUMOylation site is mandatory for the formation of a GR-small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs)-SMRT/NCoR1-HDAC3 repressing complex, which is indispensable for NF-κB/AP1-mediated GC-induced tethered indirect transrepression in vitro. Using GR K310R mutant mice or mice containing the N-terminal truncated GR isoform GRα-D3 lacking the K310 SUMOylation site, revealed a more severe skin inflammation than in WT mice. Importantly, cotreatment with dexamethasone (Dex) could not efficiently suppress a 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced skin inflammation in these mutant mice, whereas it was clearly decreased in WT mice. In addition, in mice selectively ablated in skin keratinocytes for either nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1)/silencing mediator for retinoid or thyroid-hormone receptors (SMRT) corepressors or histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), Dex-induced tethered transrepression and the formation of a repressing complex on DNA-bound NF-κB/AP1 were impaired. We previously suggested that GR ligands that would lack both (+)GRE-mediated transactivation and IR nGRE-mediated direct transrepression activities of GCs may preferentially exert the therapeutically beneficial GC antiinflammatory properties. Interestingly, we now identified a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory selective GR agonist (SEGRA) that selectively lacks both Dex-induced (+)GRE-mediated transactivation and IR nGRE-mediated direct transrepression functions, while still exerting a tethered indirect transrepression activity and could therefore be clinically lesser

  17. Platinum(IV) complex LA-12 exerts higher ability than cisplatin to enhance TRAIL-induced cancer cell apoptosis via stimulation of mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Jelínková, Iva; Šafaříková, Barbora; Vondálová Blanářová, Olga; Skender, Belma; Hofmanová, Jiřina; Sova, Petr; Moyer, Mary Pat; Kozubík, Alois; Kolář, Zdeněk; Ehrmann, Jiří; Hyršlová Vaculová, Alena

    2014-12-01

    In search for novel strategies in colon cancer treatment, we investigated the unique ability of platinum(IV) complex LA-12 to efficiently enhance the killing effects of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), and compared it with the sensitizing action of cisplatin. We provide the first evidence that LA-12 primes human colon cancer cells for TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity by p53-independent activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. The cooperative action of LA-12 and TRAIL was associated with stimulation of Bax/Bak activation, drop of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-9 activation, and a shift of the balance among Bcl-2 family proteins in favor of the pro-apoptotic members. In contrast to cisplatin, LA-12 was a potent inducer of ERK-mediated Noxa and BimL protein upregulation, and more effectively enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis in the absence of Bax. The cooperative action of LA-12 and TRAIL was augmented following the siRNA-mediated silencing of Mcl-1 in both Bax proficient/deficient cells. We newly demonstrated that LA-12 induced ERK-mediated c-Myc upregulation, and proved that c-Myc silencing inhibited the mitochondrial activation and apoptosis in colon cancer cells treated with LA-12 and TRAIL. The LA-12-mediated sensitization to TRAIL-induced apoptosis was demonstrated in several colon cancer cell lines, further underscoring the general relevance of our findings. The selective action of LA-12 was documented by preferential priming of cancer but not normal colon cancer cells to TRAIL killing effects. Our work highlights the promising potential of LA-12 over cisplatin to enhance the colon cancer cell sensitivity to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, and provides new mechanistic insights into their cooperative action.

  18. Formation of a PKCζ/β-catenin complex in endothelial cells promotes angiopoietin-1–induced collective directional migration and angiogenic sprouting

    PubMed Central

    Oubaha, Malika; Lin, Michelle I.; Margaron, Yoran; Filion, Dominic; Price, Emily N.; Zon, Leonard I.; Côté, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenic sprouting requires that cell-cell contacts be maintained during migration of endothelial cells. Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor act oppositely on endothelial cell junctions. We found that Ang-1 promotes collective and directional migration and, in contrast to VEGF, induces the formation of a complex formed of atypical protein kinase C (PKC)-ζ and β-catenin at cell-cell junctions and at the leading edge of migrating endothelial cells. This complex brings Par3, Par6, and adherens junction proteins at the front of migrating cells to locally activate Rac1 in response to Ang-1. The colocalization of PKCζ and β-catenin at leading edge along with PKCζ-dependent stabilization of cell-cell contacts promotes directed and collective endothelial cell migration. Consistent with these results, down-regulation of PKCζ in endothelial cells alters Ang-1–induced sprouting in vitro and knockdown in developing zebrafish results in intersegmental vessel defects caused by a perturbed directionality of tip cells and by loss of cell contacts between tip and stalk cells. These results reveal that PKCζ and β-catenin function in a complex at adherens junctions and at the leading edge of migrating endothelial cells to modulate collective and directional migration during angiogenesis. PMID:22936663

  19. A High-Order Immersed Boundary Method for Acoustic Wave Scattering and Low-Mach Number Flow-Induced Sound in Complex Geometries.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jung Hee; Mittal, Rajat

    2011-02-20

    A new sharp-interface immersed boundary method based approach for the computation of low-Mach number flow-induced sound around complex geometries is described. The underlying approach is based on a hydrodynamic/acoustic splitting technique where the incompressible flow is first computed using a second-order accurate immersed boundary solver. This is followed by the computation of sound using the linearized perturbed compressible equations (LPCE). The primary contribution of the current work is the development of a versatile, high-order accurate immersed boundary method for solving the LPCE in complex domains. This new method applies the boundary condition on the immersed boundary to a high-order by combining the ghost-cell approach with a weighted least-squares error method based on a high-order approximating polynomial. The method is validated for canonical acoustic wave scattering and flow-induced noise problems. Applications of this technique to relatively complex cases of practical interest are also presented.

  20. A High-Order Immersed Boundary Method for Acoustic Wave Scattering and Low-Mach Number Flow-Induced Sound in Complex Geometries

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jung Hee; Mittal, Rajat

    2010-01-01

    A new sharp-interface immersed boundary method based approach for the computation of low-Mach number flow-induced sound around complex geometries is described. The underlying approach is based on a hydrodynamic/acoustic splitting technique where the incompressible flow is first computed using a second-order accurate immersed boundary solver. This is followed by the computation of sound using the linearized perturbed compressible equations (LPCE). The primary contribution of the current work is the development of a versatile, high-order accurate immersed boundary method for solving the LPCE in complex domains. This new method applies the boundary condition on the immersed boundary to a high-order by combining the ghost-cell approach with a weighted least-squares error method based on a high-order approximating polynomial. The method is validated for canonical acoustic wave scattering and flow-induced noise problems. Applications of this technique to relatively complex cases of practical interest are also presented. PMID:21318129

  1. Piezochromism: Pressure-induced rearrangements of thermochromic and related Cu(II) complexes containing asymmetrically substituted ethylenediamine

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, K.L.; Drickamer, H.G.; Schmitt, E.A.; Hendrickson, D.N. )

    1989-04-12

    The effects of high pressure on the thermochromic and related complexes (CuL{sub 2})X{sub 2} (L = N,N-diethylethylenediamine (dieten), X = BF{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, ClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, Cl{sup {minus}}; L = N,N-dimethylenediamine (dimeen), X = BF{sub 4}{sup {minus}}; L = ethylenediamine (en), X = BF{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) are described. Electronic and infrared spectroscopies indicate an increase in the interaction between anion and molecular CuN{sub 4} plane of all complexes with increasing pressure. For both the electronic and infrared spectra, the similarity between the high-pressure spectra of the dieten complexes and the low-pressure spectra of the en and dimeen complexes indicates that the former transform to a geometry similar to that of the latter with pressure. A color change is associated with the transformation. The short pressure range over which the rearrangement occurs in the crystal indicates that it is a highly cooperative process. Studies of some of the complexes in polymeric environments (sodium polystyrenesulfonate and/or poly(2-vinylpyridine)) show that the rearrangement occurs at lower pressure and is much less cooperative in the polymers.

  2. DNA binding, photo-induced DNA cleavage and cytotoxicity studies of lomefloxacin and its transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragheb, Mohamed A.; Eldesouki, Mohamed A.; Mohamed, Mervat S.

    2015-03-01

    This work was focused on a study of the DNA binding and cleavage properties of lomefloxacin (LMF) and its ternary transition metal complexes with glycine. The nature of the binding interactions between compounds and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was studied by electronic absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and thermal denaturation experiments. The obtained results revealed that LMF and its complexes could interact with CT-DNA via partial/moderate intercalative mode. Furthermore, the DNA cleavage activities of the compounds were investigated by gel electrophoresis. Mechanistic studies of DNA cleavage suggest that singlet oxygen (1O2) is likely to be the cleaving agent via an oxidative pathway, except for Cu(II) complex which proceeds via both oxidative and hydrolytic pathways. Antimicrobial and antitumor activities of the compounds were also studied against some kinds of bacteria, fungi and human cell lines.

  3. A study on the contribution of body vibrations to the vibratory sensation induced by high-level, complex low-frequency noise.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the contribution of body vibrations to the vibratory sensation induced by high-level, complex low-frequency noise, we conducted two experiments. In Experiment 1, eight male subjects were exposed to seven types of low-frequency noise stimuli: two pure tones [a 31.5-Hz, 100-dB(SPL) tone and a 50-Hz, 100-dB(SPL) tone] and five complex noises composed of the pure tones. For the complex noise stimuli, the sound pressure level of one tonal component was 100 dB(SPL) and that of another one was either 90, 95, or 100 dB(SPL). Vibration induced on the body surface was measured at five locations, and the correlation with the subjective rating of the vibratory sensation at each site of measurement was examined. In Experiment 2, the correlation between the body surface vibration and the vibratory sensation was similarly examined using seven types of noise stimuli composed of a 25-Hz tone and a 50-Hz tone. In both the experiments, we found that at the chest and the abdomen, the rating of the vibratory sensation was in close correlation with the vibration acceleration level (VAL) of the body surface vibration measured at each corresponding location. This was consistent with our previous results and suggested that at the trunk of the body (the chest and the abdomen), the mechanoreception of body vibrations plays an important role in the experience of the vibratory sensation in persons exposed to high-level low-frequency noise. At the head, however, no close correlation was found between the rating of the vibratory sensation and the VAL of body surface vibration. This suggested that at the head, the perceptual mechanisms of vibration induced by high-level low-frequency noise were different from those in the trunk of the body.

  4. Effect of radiation on cytotoxicity, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of human osteosarcoma MG-63 induced by a ruthenium(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Si-Hong; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Deng, Kun-Kang; Wu, Yong; Zhu, Jian-Wei; Liu, Qing-Hua; Xu, Hui-Hua; Wu, Hai-Feng; Li, Xin-Yan; Wang, Jian-Wei; Guo, Qi-Feng

    2015-04-05

    Radiation has large influence on the cytotoxicity, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. The bioactivity of ruthenium(II) complex [Ru(dmb)2(DBHIP)](ClO4)2 (Ru1) (DBHIP=2-(3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxylphenyl)imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline) was investigated in the absence and presence of radiation. The cytotoxicity of Ru1 against MG-63 cells was evaluated by CCK-8 method. Ru1 shows high cytotoxicity upon radiation. Radiation can enhance the cytotoxicity of Ru1 on MG-63 cells. The apoptosis was studied by Hoechst 33258 staining method and flow cytometry. The reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell cycle arrest and western blot analysis were investigated in detail. The complex induces the apoptosis in MG-63 cells through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway.

  5. Hepatitis B Virus-Induced Parkin-Dependent Recruitment of Linear Ubiquitin Assembly Complex (LUBAC) to Mitochondria and Attenuation of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohsin; Syed, Gulam Hussain; Kim, Seong-Jun; Siddiqui, Aleem

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) suppresses innate immune signaling to establish persistent infection. Although HBV is a DNA virus, its pre-genomic RNA (pgRNA) can be sensed by RIG-I and activates MAVS to mediate interferon (IFN) λ synthesis. Despite of the activation of RIG-I-MAVS axis by pgRNA, the underlying mechanism explaining how HBV infection fails to induce interferon-αβ (IFN) synthesis remained uncharacterized. We demonstrate that HBV induced parkin is able to recruit the linear ubiquitin assembly complex (LUBAC) to mitochondria and abrogates IFN β synthesis. Parkin interacts with MAVS, accumulates unanchored linear polyubiquitin chains on MAVS via LUBAC, to disrupt MAVS signalosome and attenuate IRF3 activation. This study highlights the novel role of parkin in antiviral signaling which involves LUBAC being recruited to the mitochondria. These results provide avenues of investigations on the role of mitochondrial dynamics in innate immunity. PMID:27348524

  6. Down-regulation of mediator complex subunit 19 (Med19) induces apoptosis in human laryngocarcinoma HEp2 cells in an Apaf-1-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Meng, Qingfeng; Gao, Xu; Zhang, Lihua; An, Lixin

    2017-01-01

    Mediator 19 (Med19) is a component of the mediator complex which is a co-activator for DNA-binding factors that activate transcription via RNA polymerase II. Accumulating evidence has shown that Med19 plays important roles in cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. The physiological mechanism by which Med19 exerts its promoting effects in laryngocarcinoma is not yet fully understood. Here, we found that the expression of Med19 was increased in laryngocarcinoma samples from patients compared to normal bone tissues. Med19 knockdown significantly induced growth inhibition and suppressed migration in the HEp2 cell lines. Med19 knockdown also induced apoptosis in HEp2 cells via activation of caspase-3, 9 and Apaf-1. In addition, The tumorigenicity of Med19 short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-expressing cells were decreased after inoculating into nude mice. Taken together, our data suggest that Med19 acts as an oncogene in laryngocarcinoma via a possible caspase modulation pathway.

  7. Aggregation-induced emission (AIE) behavior and thermochromic luminescence properties of a new gold(I) complex.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinhua; Chen, Zhao; Yin, Jun; Yu, Guang-Ao; Liu, Sheng Hua

    2013-05-04

    A new gold complex that shows the AIE effect as well as the thermochromic fluorescence switch is reported. This interesting phenomenon is attributed to changes in the intermolecular Au∙∙∙Au interactions and the formation of nano-aggregates.

  8. Ribosome-associated complex and Ssb are required for translational repression induced by polylysine segments within nascent chains.

    PubMed

    Chiabudini, Marco; Conz, Charlotte; Reckmann, Friederike; Rospert, Sabine

    2012-12-01

    When a polyadenylated nonstop transcript is fully translated, a complex consisting of the ribosome, the nonstop mRNA, and the C-terminally polylysine-tagged protein is generated. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a 3-step quality control system prevents formation of such dead-end complexes. Nonstop mRNA is rapidly degraded, translation of nonstop mRNA is repressed, and finally, nonstop proteins are cotranslationally degraded. Nonstop mRNA degradation depends on Ski7 and the exosome; nonstop protein degradation depends on the ribosome-bound E3 ligase Ltn1 and the proteasome. However, components which mediate translational repression of nonstop mRNA have previously not been identified. Here we show that the ribosome-bound chaperone system consisting of the ribosome-associated complex (RAC) and the Hsp70 homolog Ssb is required to stabilize translationally repressed ribosome-polylysine protein complexes, without affecting the folding or the degradation of polylysine proteins. As a consequence, in the absence of RAC/Ssb, polylysine proteins escaped translational repression and subsequently folded into their native conformation. This active role of RAC/Ssb in the quality control of polylysine proteins significantly contributed to the low level of expression of nonstop transcripts in vivo.

  9. Release of Cyt c from the model membrane due to conformational change induced by anticancer palladium complex.

    PubMed

    Emami, Sanaz; Ghourchian, Hedayatollah; Divsalar, Adeleh

    2011-03-01

    Cytochrome C (Cyt c) is an electron transporting protein that resides within the inter-membrane space of the mitochondria. It plays a critical role as an electron carrier in the process of oxidative phosphorylation and production of cellular ATP. Cyt c is also involved in the apoptosis process and functions as a death messenger. On the other hand, it is well known that the metallo-pharmaceuticals such as palladium complex offer potential as anti-tumor agents to fight cancer. In order to identify the role of anticancer Pd complex in release of Cyt c from the biological membrane, an artificial monolayer was assembled which is able to adsorb Cyt c. A monolayer containing a mixture of two long chain thiols (mercapto-undecanoic acid and mercapto-undecanol) was self-assembled on the surface of a gold electrode. Due to the existence of both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions between Cyt c and the assembled monolayer, this membrane could be considered as a rough analogue of the biological membrane to study the release of Cyt c by Pd complex. The electrochemical and spectroscopic studies showed that bounding of Pd complex to Cyt c causes a conformational change which leads to the release of Cyt c from the model membrane.

  10. Behavioural responses of prey fishes to habitat complexity and predation risk induce bias in minnow trap catches.

    PubMed

    Dupuch, A; Paradis, Y; Magnan, P

    2011-08-01

    The effects of predation risk and habitat complexity on the efficiency of minnow traps to catch northern redbelly dace Chrosomus eos in laboratory experiments were investigated. Trap efficiency significantly decreased in the presence of vegetation and predators. These results suggest that the various antipredator behaviours used by prey fishes can affect trap efficiency.

  11. Characterization of the Complex Regulation of AtALMT1 Expression in Response to Phytohormones and Other Inducers1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yasufumi; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Sugimoto, Miki; Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Iuchi, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Bais, Harsh P.; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), malate released into the rhizosphere has various roles, such as detoxifying rhizotoxic aluminum (Al) and recruiting beneficial rhizobacteria that induce plant immunity. ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 (AtALMT1) is a critical gene in these responses, but its regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. To explore the mechanism of the multiple responses of AtALMT1, we profiled its expression patterns in wild-type plants, in transgenic plants harboring various deleted promoter constructs, and in mutant plants with defects in signal transduction in response to various inducers. AtALMT1 transcription was clearly induced by indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), abscisic acid (ABA), low pH, and hydrogen peroxide, indicating that it was able to respond to multiple signals, while it was not induced by methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid. The IAA-signaling double mutant nonphototropic hypocotyls4-1; auxin-responsive factor19-1 and the ABA-signaling mutant aba insensitive1-1 did not respond to auxin and ABA, respectively, but both showed an Al response comparable to that of the wild type. A synthetic microbe-associated molecular pattern peptide, flagellin22 (flg22), induced AtALMT1 transcription but did not induce the transcription of IAA- and ABA-responsive biomarker genes, indicating that both Al and flg22 responses of AtALMT1 were independent of IAA and ABA signaling. An in planta β-glucuronidase reporter assay identified that the ABA response was regulated by a region upstream (−317 bp) from the first ATG codon, but other stress responses may share critical regulatory element(s) located between −292 and −317 bp. These results illustrate the complex regulation of AtALMT1 expression during the adaptation to abiotic and biotic stresses. PMID:23624855

  12. Novel monofunctional platinum (II) complex Mono-Pt induces apoptosis-independent autophagic cell death in human ovarian carcinoma cells, distinct from cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Yang-Miao; Zhang, Li; Huang, Bin; Tao, Fei-Fei; Chen, Wei; Guo, Zi-Jian; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang

    2013-07-01

    Failure to engage apoptosis appears to be a leading mechanism of resistance to traditional platinum drugs in patients with ovarian cancer. Therefore, an alternative strategy to induce cell death is needed for the chemotherapy of this apoptosis-resistant cancer. Here we report that autophagic cell death, distinct from cisplatin-induced apoptosis, is triggered by a novel monofunctional platinum (II) complex named Mono-Pt in human ovarian carcinoma cells. Mono-Pt-induced cell death has the following features: cytoplasmic vacuolation, caspase-independent, no nuclear fragmentation or chromatin condensation, and no apoptotic bodies. These characteristics integrally indicated that Mono-Pt, rather than cisplatin, initiated a nonapoptotic cell death in Caov-3 ovarian carcinoma cells. Furthermore, incubation of the cells with Mono-Pt but not with cisplatin produced an increasing punctate distribution of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), and an increasing ratio of LC3-II to LC3-I. Mono-Pt also caused the formation of autophagic vacuoles as revealed by monodansylcadaverine staining and transmission electron microscopy. In addition, Mono-Pt-induced cell death was significantly inhibited by the knockdown of either BECN1 or ATG7 gene expression, or by autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine, chloroquine and bafilomycin A 1. Moreover, the effect of Mono-Pt involved the AKT1-MTOR-RPS6KB1 pathway and MAPK1 (ERK2)/MAPK3 (ERK1) signaling, since the MTOR inhibitor rapamycin increased, while the MAPK1/3 inhibitor U0126 decreased Mono-Pt-induced autophagic cell death. Taken together, our results suggest that Mono-Pt exerts anticancer effect via autophagic cell death in apoptosis-resistant ovarian cancer. These findings lead to increased options for anticancer platinum drugs to induce cell death in cancer.

  13. Curve-fitting FTIR studies of loratadine/hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin inclusion complex induced by co-grinding process.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Hsu, Cheng-Hung; Sheu, Ming-Thau

    2010-11-02

    The formation steps of inclusion complex caused by co-grinding loratadine (LOR) and hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD) with a molar ratio of 1:1 or 1:2 were quantitatively investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with curve-fitting analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The phase solubility study and the co-evaporated solid products of the mixture of LOR and HP-beta-CD were also examined. The result indicates that the aqueous solubility of LOR was linearly increased with the increase of HP-beta-CD concentrations, in which the phase solubility diagram was classified as A(L) type. The higher apparent stability constant (2.22 x 10(4)M(-1)) reveals that the inclusion complex formed between LOR and HP-beta-CD was quite stable. The endothermic peak at 134.6 degrees C for the melting point of LOR gradually disappeared from DSC curves of LOR/HP-beta-CD coground mixtures by increasing the cogrinding time, as the disappearance of the co-evaporated solid products. The disappearance of this endothermic peak from LOR/HP-beta-CD coground mixture or the co-evaporated solid products was due to the inclusion complex formation between LOR and HP-beta-CD after cogrinding process or evaporation. Moreover, IR peaks at 1676 cm(-1) down-shifted from 1703 cm(-1) (CO stretching) and at 1235 cm(-1) upper-shifted from 1227 cm(-1) (C-O stretching) related to LOR in the inclusion complex were observed with the increase of cogrinding time, but the peak at 1646 cm(-1) due to O-H stretching of HP-beta-CD was shifted to 1640 cm(-1). The IR spectrum of 15 min-coground mixture was the same as the IR spectrum of the co-evaporated solid product, strongly indicating that the grinding process could cause the inclusion complex formation between LOR and HP-beta-CD. Three components (1700, 1676, and 1640 cm(-1)) and their compositions were certainly obtained in the 1740-1600 cm(-1) region of FTIR spectra for the LOR/HP-beta-CD coground mixture and the co

  14. Influence of Equilibration Time in Solution on the Inclusion/Exclusion Topology Ratio of Host-Guest Complexes Probed by Ion Mobility and Collision-Induced Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Carroy, Glenn; Daxhelet, Charlotte; Lemaur, Vincent; De Winter, Julien; De Pauw, Edwin; Cornil, Jérôme; Gerbaux, Pascal

    2016-03-18

    Host-guest complexes are formed by the creation of multiple noncovalent bonds between a large molecule (the host) and smaller molecule(s) or ion(s) (the guest(s)). Ion-mobility separation coupled with mass spectrometry nowadays represents an ideal tool to assess whether the host-guest complexes, when transferred to the gas phase upon electrospray ionization, possess an exclusion or inclusion nature. Nevertheless, the influence of the solution conditions on the nature of the observed gas-phase ions is often not considered. In the specific case of inclusion complexes, kinetic considerations must be taken into account beside thermodynamics; the guest ingression within the host cavity can be characterized by slow kinetics, which makes the complexation reaction kinetically driven on the timescale of the experiment. This is particularly the case for the cucurbituril family of macrocyclic host molecules. Herein, we selected para-phenylenediamine and cucurbit[6]uril as a model system to demonstrate, by means of ion mobility and collision-induced dissociation measurements, that the inclusion/exclusion topology ratio varies as a function of the equilibration time in solution prior to the electrospray process.

  15. Arene-Ru(II)-Chloroquine Complexes Interact With DNA, Induce Apoptosis on Human Lymphoid Cell Lines and Display Low Toxicity to Normal Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Alberto; Rajapakse, Chandima S.K.; Varela-Ramírez, Armando; Lema, Carolina; Aguilera, Renato J.; Sánchez-Delgado, Roberto A.

    2010-01-01

    The complexes [Ru(η6-p-cymene)(CQ)Cl2] (1), [Ru(η6-benzene)(CQ)Cl2] (2), [Ru(η6-p-cymene)(CQ)(H2O)2][BF4]2 (3), [Ru(η6- p-cymene)(en)(CQ)][PF6]2 (4), [Ru(η6-p-cymene)(η6-CQDP)][BF4]2 (5) (CQ = chloroquine base; CQDP = chloroquine diphosphate; en = ethylenediamine) interact with DNA to a comparable extent to that of CQ and in analogous intercalative manner with no evidence for any direct contribution of the metal, as shown by spectrophotometric and fluorimetric titrations, thermal denaturation measurements, circular dichroism spectroscopy and electrophoresis mobility shift assays. Complexes 1–5 induced cytotoxicity in Jurkat and SUP-T1 cancer cells primarily via apoptosis. Despite the similarities in the DNA binding behavior of complexes 1–5 with those of CQ the antitumor properties of the metal drugs do not correlate with those of CQ, indicating that DNA is not the principal target in the mechanism of cytotoxicity of these compounds. Importantly, the Ru-CQ complexes are generally less toxic toward normal mouse splenocytes and human foreskin fibroblast cells than the standard antimalarial drug CQDP and therefore this type of compound shows promise for drug development. PMID:20605217

  16. Cytoprotection of pancreatic β-cells and hypoglycemic effect of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin: sertraline complex in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Buko, Vyacheslav; Zavodnik, Ilya; Lukivskaya, Oxana; Naruta, Elena; Palecz, Bartlomiej; Belica-Pacha, Silwia; Belonovskaya, Elena; Kranc, Robert; Abakumov, Vladimir

    2016-01-25

    Sertraline, a selective inhibitor of serotonin reuptake, is widely used as antidepressant in diabetic patients for improvement of depression and glycemic control. Sertraline is poorly soluble in water, which limits its oral applicability. In this work we tried to improve the pharmaceutical properties of sertraline by complexation with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) and evaluated the efficacy of the HPβCD:sertraline complex in prevention of alloxan-induced lesions in rats. The solubility of sertraline increased in the presence of HPβCD and the association constant for sertraline and HPβCD was equal to 4000 ± 1000 M(-1). Two-week treatment of diabetic animals with the HPβCD:sertraline complex improved pancreatic islet morphology and β-cell survival, which, in turn, reduced the severity of diabetes, as evidenced by lowering of blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin contents as well as normalization of serum insulin level and insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IR). The effect of the HPβCD:sertraline complex was strongly expressed in comparison with the antidiabetic effect of both the monopreparations, HPβCD and sertraline. It is suggested that the cyclodextrin derivative increased the pharmacological effect of sertraline, probably due to enhanced drug bioavailability.

  17. Anion Binding Properties of Alkynylplatinum(II) Complexes with Amide-Functionalized Terpyridine: Host–Guest Interactions and Fluoride Ion-Induced Deprotonation**

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Margaret Ching-Lam; Chu, Ben Wai-Kin; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2014-01-01

    Molecular sensors able to detect ions are of interest due to their potential application in areas such as pollutant sequestration. Alkynylplatinum(II) terpyridine complexes with an amide-based receptor moiety have been synthesized and characterized. Their anion binding properties based on host–guest interactions have been examined with the use of UV-vis absorption and emission spectral titration studies. Spectral changes were observed for both complexes upon the addition of spherical and nonspherical anions. Their titration profiles were shown to be in good agreement with theoretical results predicting a 1:1 binding model, and the binding constants were determined from the experimental data. Drastic color changes from yellow to orange–red were observed for one of the complexes upon titration with fluoride (F−) ion in acetone. These changes were ascribed to the deprotonation of the amide functionalities induced by F− ion, and this was confirmed by the restoration of spectral changes upon addition of trifluoroacetic acid to the F− ion–complex mixture as well as by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) data. PMID:25478312

  18. Quantification of High-Molecular Weight Protein Platforms by AQUA Mass Spectrometry as Exemplified for the CD95 Death-Inducing Signaling Complex (DISC).

    PubMed

    Warnken, Uwe; Schleich, Kolja; Schnölzer, Martina; Lavrik, Inna

    2013-06-27

    Contemporary quantitative mass spectrometry provides fascinating opportunities in defining the stoichiometry of high-molecular weight complexes or multiprotein platforms. The composition stoichiometry of multiprotein platforms is a key to understand the regulation of complex signaling pathways and provides a basis for constructing models in systems biology. Here we present an improved AQUA technique workflow that we adapted for the quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of the stoichiometry of the CD95 (Fas/APO-1) death inducing signaling complex (DISC). The DISC is a high-molecular weight platform essential for the initiation of CD95-mediated apoptotic and non-apoptotic responses. For protein quantification, CD95 DISCs were immunoprecipitated and proteins in the immunoprecipitations were separated by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis, followed by protein quantification using the AQUA technique. We will discuss in detail AQUA analysis of the CD95 DISC focusing on the key issues of this methodology, i.e., selection and validation of AQUA peptides. The application of this powerful method allowed getting new insights into mechanisms of procaspase-8 activation at the DISC and apoptosis initiation [1]. Here we discuss the AQUA methodology adapted by us for the analysis of the CD95 DISC in more detail. This approach paves the way for the successful quantification of multiprotein complexes and thereby delineating the intrinsic details of molecular interactions.

  19. Illumination with ultraviolet or visible light induces chemical changes in the water-soluble manganese complex, [Mn(4)O(6)(bpea)(4)]Br(4).

    PubMed

    Antal, Taras K; Lo, Wayne; Armstrong, William H; Tyystjärvi, Esa

    2009-01-01

    We measured the photosensitivity of an artificial tetranuclear oxo-Mn(IV) complex, [Mn(4)O(6)(bpea)(4)]Br(4), which has an adamantane-shaped {Mn(4)O(6)}(4+) core. Illumination caused changes in the absorption spectrum of the compound consistent with a one-electron reduction in the compound. Bromide appears to be the most probable electron donor in the reaction system. Chemical modification of the cluster appears to destabilize it, predisposing it to reductive degradation. UV light was more efficient than visible light in causing the changes. The data support the suggestion that the natural oxygen-evolving Mn complex is photosensitive and can oxidize components of the oxygen-evolving complex in its excited state causing photoinhibition, and that photostability is an important issue in designing Mn complexes for artificial photosynthesis. Furthermore, light-induced oxidation of bromide by [Mn(4)O(6)(bpea)(4)](4+) may suggest that oxidation of chloride is involved in natural water splitting or has been involved during the evolution of the water-splitting enzyme.

  20. BRG1 and BRM chromatin-remodeling complexes regulate the hypoxia response by acting as coactivators for a subset of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor target genes.

    PubMed

    Sena, Johnny A; Wang, Liyi; Hu, Cheng-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Chromatin remodeling is an active process, which represses or enables the access of transcription machinery to genes in response to external stimuli, including hypoxia. However, in hypoxia, the specific requirement, as well as the molecular mechanism by which the chromatin-remodeling complexes regulate gene expression, remains unclear. In this study, we report that the Brahma (BRM) and Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1) ATPase-containing SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes promote the expression of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF1α) and HIF2α genes and also promote hypoxic induction of a subset of HIF1 and HIF2 target genes. We show that BRG1 or BRM knockdown in Hep3B and RCC4T cells reduces hypoxic induction of HIF target genes, while reexpression of BRG1 or BRM in BRG1/BRM-deficient SW13 cells increases HIF target gene activation. Mechanistically, HIF1 and HIF2 increase the hypoxic induction of HIF target genes by recruiting BRG1 complexes to HIF target gene promoters, which promotes nucleosome remodeling of HIF target gene promoters in a BRG1 ATPase-dependent manner. Importantly, we found that the function of BRG1 complexes in hypoxic SW13 and RCC4T cells is dictated by the HIF-mediated hypoxia response and could be opposite from their function in normoxic SW13 and RCC4T cells.

  1. Application of capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection for the determination of trace neodymium in spent nuclear fuel using complexation with an emissive macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylate probe.

    PubMed

    Haraga, Tomoko; Saito, Shingo; Sato, Yoshiyuki; Asai, Shiho; Hanzawa, Yukiko; Hoshino, Hitoshi; Shibukawa, Masami; Ishimori, Ken-ichiro; Takahashi, Kuniaki

    2014-01-01

    A simple and rapid method with low radiation exposure risk was developed for the determination of neodymium in spent nuclear fuel by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection using a fluorescent probe having a macrocyclic hexadentate polyaminocarboxylate structure. The concentration of Nd(III) in a spent nuclear fuel sample was determined with no interference from various matrix elements, including lanthanides and uranium (at a 200-fold excess), with 92 ± 3% recovery. This is due to high resolution based on establishing a ternary complex equilibrium during migration in which the hydroxyl ion plays an auxiliary role (log K(Ln-L-OH) = 3.9-5.3).

  2. The kinase LYK5 is a major chitin receptor in Arabidopsis and forms a chitin-induced complex with related kinase CERK1.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yangrong; Liang, Yan; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Nguyen, Cuong T; Jedrzejczak, Robert P; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Stacey, Gary

    2014-10-23

    Chitin is a fungal microbe-associated molecular pattern recognized in Arabidopsis by a lysin motif receptor kinase (LYK), AtCERK1. Previous research suggested that AtCERK1 is the major chitin receptor and mediates chitin-induced signaling through homodimerization and phosphorylation. However, the reported chitin binding affinity of AtCERK1 is quite low, suggesting another receptor with high chitin binding affinity might be present. Here, we propose that AtLYK5 is the primary chitin receptor in Arabidopsis. Mutations in AtLYK5 resulted in a significant reduction in chitin response. However, AtLYK5 shares overlapping function with AtLYK4 and, therefore, Atlyk4/Atlyk5-2 double mutants show a complete loss of chitin response. AtLYK5 interacts with AtCERK1 in a chitin-dependent manner. Chitin binding to AtLYK5 is indispensable for chitin-induced AtCERK1 phosphorylation. AtLYK5 binds chitin at a much higher affinity than AtCERK1. The data suggest that AtLYK5 is the primary receptor for chitin, forming a chitin inducible complex with AtCERK1 to induce plant immunity.

  3. The kinase LYK5 is a major chitin receptor in Arabidopsis and forms a chitin-induced complex with related kinase CERK1

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yangrong; Liang, Yan; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Nguyen, Cuong T.; Jedrzejczak, Robert P.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Stacey, Gary

    2014-10-23

    Chitin is a fungal microbe-associated molecular pattern recognized in Arabidopsis by a lysin motif receptor kinase (LYK), AtCERK1. Previous research suggested that AtCERK1 is the major chitin receptor and mediates chitin-induced signaling through homodimerization and phosphorylation. However, the reported chitin binding affinity of AtCERK1 is quite low, suggesting another receptor with high chitin binding affinity might be present. Here, we propose that AtLYK5 is the primary chitin receptor in Arabidopsis. Mutations in AtLYK5 resulted in a significant reduction in chitin response. AtLYK5 shares overlapping function with AtLYK4 and, therefore, Atlyk4/Atlyk5-2 double mutants show a complete loss of chitin response. AtLYK5 interacts with AtCERK1 in a chitin-dependent manner. Chitin binding to AtLYK5 is indispensable for chitin-induced AtCERK1 phosphorylation. AtLYK5 binds chitin at a much higher affinity than AtCERK1. The data suggest that AtLYK5 is the primary receptor for chitin, forming a chitin inducible complex with AtCERK1 to induce plant immunity.

  4. The kinase LYK5 is a major chitin receptor in Arabidopsis and forms a chitin-induced complex with related kinase CERK1

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, Yangrong; Liang, Yan; Tanaka, Kiwamu; ...

    2014-10-23

    Chitin is a fungal microbe-associated molecular pattern recognized in Arabidopsis by a lysin motif receptor kinase (LYK), AtCERK1. Previous research suggested that AtCERK1 is the major chitin receptor and mediates chitin-induced signaling through homodimerization and phosphorylation. However, the reported chitin binding affinity of AtCERK1 is quite low, suggesting another receptor with high chitin binding affinity might be present. Here, we propose that AtLYK5 is the primary chitin receptor in Arabidopsis. Mutations in AtLYK5 resulted in a significant reduction in chitin response. AtLYK5 shares overlapping function with AtLYK4 and, therefore, Atlyk4/Atlyk5-2 double mutants show a complete loss of chitin response. AtLYK5more » interacts with AtCERK1 in a chitin-dependent manner. Chitin binding to AtLYK5 is indispensable for chitin-induced AtCERK1 phosphorylation. AtLYK5 binds chitin at a much higher affinity than AtCERK1. The data suggest that AtLYK5 is the primary receptor for chitin, forming a chitin inducible complex with AtCERK1 to induce plant immunity.« less

  5. A proline-rich polypeptide complex (PRP) from ovine colostrum. Studies on the effect of PRP on nitric oxide (NO) production induced by LPS in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Mikulska, Joanna Elzbieta; Lisowski, Józef

    2003-11-01

    A proline-rich polypeptide complex (PRP) isolated from ovine colostrum shows immunoregulatory activity. Similar activity was observed when PRP was replaced with a nonapeptide (NP) isolated from chymotryptic digest of PRP. The polypeptide complex also shows procognitive activity. In the form of orally administered tablets called Colostrinin, containing 100 microg of PRP, it improves the outcome of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. The mechanism of action of PRP/Colostrinin in AD is not yet clarified. Microglial cells involvement in AD has been related to amyloid beta (Abeta) internalization, the release of inflammatory cytokines, overproduction of nitrogen oxide (NO) and superoxide anion (O2-), and the development of neuritic plaques. It has been previously found in our laboratory that PRP regulates the secretion of an array of cytokines. It also was shown, in preliminary experiments using human blood cells and murine macrophages, that PRP inhibits production of NO and O2- induced by LPS. In the present work, to study the effect of PRP and NP on the release of NO and O2-induced by LPS we applied THP-1 cells. The human monocyte/macrophage THP-1 cell line has been widely used as a model of human microglial cells. The results obtained showed that THP-1 cells release NO when activated with LPS. However, neither PRP nor NP induced production of NO. Although the nonapeptide, at higher concentration (100 microg/mL), showed an inhibitory activity on the release of NO induced by LPS, no inhibition was observed when PRP was used. THP-1 cells treated with LPS, PRP or NP did not release O2-.

  6. 25-hydroxycholesterol promotes RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis through coordinating NFATc1 and Sp1 complex in the transcription of miR-139-5p.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lishan; Lv, Yinping; Xian, Guozhe; Lin, Yanliang

    2017-04-15

    25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC) is implicated in many processes, including lipid metabolism and the immune response. However, the role of 25-HC in RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis remains largely unknown. Our results showed that 25-HC inhibited miR-139-5p expression in mouse bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) cultured in receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and monocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). Further investigation suggested that 25-HC promoted the expression of nuclear factor of activated T cell cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) and Sp1, especially in the presence of RANKL and M-CSF. Meanwhile, 25-HC induced nuclear translocation of NFATc1, resulting in the interaction between NFATc1 and Sp1 that was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay indicated that Sp1 could bind to miR-139-5p promoter, but NFATc1 had no binding capacity. Although forming NFATc1/Sp1 complex increased its binding to miR-139-5p promoter, the complex inhibited the transcriptional activity of Sp1. Inhibition of NFATc1 increase the expression of miR-139-5p, which might be due to the release of free Sp1 that could bind to the promoter of miR-139-5p. Enforced expression of miR-139-5p impaired osteoclastogenesis induced by co-treatment with 25-HC and RANKL. These results suggested that 25-HC induced the interaction between NFATc1 and Sp1, reducing the level of free Sp1 to inhibit miR-139-5p expression and promote osteoclastogenesis.

  7. The light-induced transcriptome of the zebrafish pineal gland reveals complex regulation of the circadian clockwork by light

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Moshe, Zohar; Alon, Shahar; Mracek, Philipp; Faigenbloom, Lior; Tovin, Adi; Vatine, Gad D.; Eisenberg, Eli; Foulkes, Nicholas S.; Gothilf, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    Light constitutes a primary signal whereby endogenous circadian clocks are synchronized (‘entrained’) with the day/night cycle. The molecular mechanisms underlying this vital process are known to require gene activation, yet are incompletely understood. Here, the light-induced transcriptome in the zebrafish central clock organ, the pineal gland, was characterized by messenger RNA (mRNA) sequencing (mRNA-seq) and microarray analyses, resulting in the identification of multiple light-induced mRNAs. Interestingly, a considerable portion of the molecular clock (14 genes) is light-induced in the pineal gland. Four of these genes, encoding the transcription factors dec1, reverbb1, e4bp4-5 and e4bp4-6, differentially affected clock- and light-regulated promoter activation, suggesting that light-input is conveyed to the core clock machinery via diverse mechanisms. Moreover, we show that dec1, as well as the core clock gene per2, is essential for light-entrainment of rhythmic locomotor activity in zebrafish larvae. Additionally, we used microRNA (miRNA) sequencing (miR-seq) and identified pineal-enhanced and light-induced miRNAs. One such miRNA, miR-183, is shown to downregulate e4bp4-6 mRNA through a 3′UTR target site, and importantly, to regulate the rhythmic mRNA levels of aanat2, the key enzyme in melatonin synthesis. Together, this genome-wide approach and functional characterization of light-induced factors indicate a multi-level regulation of the circadian clockwork by light. PMID:24423866

  8. The light-induced transcriptome of the zebrafish pineal gland reveals complex regulation of the circadian clockwork by light.

    PubMed

    Ben-Moshe, Zohar; Alon, Shahar; Mracek, Philipp; Faigenbloom, Lior; Tovin, Adi; Vatine, Gad D; Eisenberg, Eli; Foulkes, Nicholas S; Gothilf, Yoav

    2014-04-01

    Light constitutes a primary signal whereby endogenous circadian clocks are synchronized ('entrained') with the day/night cycle. The molecular mechanisms underlying this vital process are known to require gene activation, yet are incompletely understood. Here, the light-induced transcriptome in the zebrafish central clock organ, the pineal gland, was characterized by messenger RNA (mRNA) sequencing (mRNA-seq) and microarray analyses, resulting in the identification of multiple light-induced mRNAs. Interestingly, a considerable portion of the molecular clock (14 genes) is light-induced in the pineal gland. Four of these genes, encoding the transcription factors dec1, reverbb1, e4bp4-5 and e4bp4-6, differentially affected clock- and light-regulated promoter activation, suggesting that light-input is conveyed to the core clock machinery via diverse mechanisms. Moreover, we show that dec1, as well as the core clock gene per2, is essential for light-entrainment of rhythmic locomotor activity in zebrafish larvae. Additionally, we used microRNA (miRNA) sequencing (miR-seq) and identified pineal-enhanced and light-induced miRNAs. One such miRNA, miR-183, is shown to downregulate e4bp4-6 mRNA through a 3'UTR target site, and importantly, to regulate the rhythmic mRNA levels of aanat2, the key enzyme in melatonin synthesis. Together, this genome-wide approach and functional characterization of light-induced factors indicate a multi-level regulation of the circadian clockwork by light.

  9. MTI-101 (cyclized HYD1) binds a CD44 containing complex and induces necrotic cell death in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, Anthony W; Jain, Priyesh; Nair, Rajesh R; Emmons, Michael F; Argilagos, Raul F; Koomen, John M; McLaughlin, Mark L; Hazlehurst, Lori A

    2013-11-01

    Our laboratory recently reported that treatment with the d-amino acid containing peptide HYD1 induces necrotic cell death in multiple myeloma cell lines. Because of the intriguing biological activity and promising in vivo activity of HYD1, we pursued strategies for increasing the therapeutic efficacy of the linear peptide. These efforts led to a cyclized peptidomimetic, MTI-101, with increased in vitro activity and robust in vivo activity as a single agent using two myeloma models that consider the bone marrow microenvironment. MTI-101 treatment similar to HYD1 induced reactive oxygen species, depleted ATP levels, and failed to activate caspase-3. Moreover, MTI-101 is cross-resistant in H929 cells selected for acquired resistance to HYD1. Here, we pursued an unbiased chemical biology approach using biotinylated peptide affinity purification and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis to identify binding partners of MTI-101. Using this approach, CD44 was identified as a predominant binding partner. Reducing the expression of CD44 was sufficient to induce cell death in multiple myeloma cell lines, indicating that multiple myeloma cells require CD44 expression for survival. Ectopic expression of CD44s correlated with increased binding of the FAM-conjugated peptide. However, ectopic expression of CD44s was not sufficient to increase the sensitivity to MTI-101-induced cell death. Mechanistically, we show that MTI-101-induced cell death occurs via a Rip1-, Rip3-, or Drp1-dependent and -independent pathway. Finally, we show that MTI-101 has robust activity as a single agent in the SCID-Hu bone implant and 5TGM1 in vivo model of multiple myeloma.

  10. MTI-101 (cyclized HYD1) binds a CD44 containing complex and induces necrotic cell death in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Gebhard, Anthony W.; Jain, Priyesh; Nair, Rajesh R.; Emmons, Michael F.; Argilagos, Raul F.; Koomen, John M.; McLaughlin, Mark L.; Hazlehurst, Lori A.

    2013-01-01

    Our laboratory recently reported that treatment with the d-amino acid containing peptide HYD1 induces necrotic cell death in multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines. Due to the intriguing biological activity and promising in vivo activity of HYD1, we pursued strategies for increasing the therapeutic efficacy of the linear peptide. These efforts led to a cyclized peptidomimetic, MTI-101, with increased in vitro activity and robust in vivo activity as single agent using two myeloma models that consider the bone marrow microenvironment. MTI-101 treatment similar to HYD1 induced reactive oxygen species, depleted ATP levels and failed to activate caspase 3. Moreover, MTI-101 is cross-resistant in H929 cells selected for acquired resistance to HYD1. Here, we pursued an unbiased chemical biology approach using biotinylat