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Sample records for mt blanc france

  1. Instability of a highly vulnerable high alpine rock ridge: the lower Arête des Cosmiques (Mont Blanc massif, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanel, L.; Deline, P.; Lambiel, C.; Vincent, C.

    2012-04-01

    Glacier retreat and permafrost degradation are actually more and more thought to explain the increasing instability of rock slopes and rock ridges in high mountain environments. Hot summers with numerous rockfalls we experienced over the last two decades in the Alps have indeed contributed to test/strengthen the hypothesis of a strong correlation between rockfalls and global warming through these two cryospheric factors. Rockfalls from recently deglaciated and/or thawing areas may have very important economic and social implications for high mountain infrastructures and be a fatal hazard for mountaineers. At high mountain sites characterized by infrastructures that can be affected by rockfalls, the monitoring of rock slopes, permafrost and glaciers is thus an essential element for the sustainability of the infrastructure and for the knowledge/management of risks. Our study focuses on a particularly active area of the Mont Blanc massif (France), the lower Arête des Cosmiques, on which is located the very popular Refuge des Cosmiques (3613 m a.s.l.). Since 1998, when a rockfall threatened a part of the refuge and forced to major stabilizing works, observations allowed to identify 10 detachments (20 m3 to > 1000 m3), especially on the SE face of the ridge. Since 2009, this face is yearly surveyed by terrestrial laser scanning to obtain high-resolution 3D models. Their diachronic comparison gives precise measurements of the evolution of the rock slope. Eight rock detachments have thus been documented (0.7 m3 to 256.2 m3). Rock temperature measurements at the ridge and the close Aiguille du Midi (3842 m a.s.l.), and observations of the evolution of the underlying Glacier du Géant have enable to better understand the origin of the strong dynamics of this highly vulnerable area: (i) rock temperature data suggest the presence of warm permafrost (i.e. close to 0°C) from the first meters to depth in the SE face, and cold permafrost in the NW face; (ii) as suggested by the

  2. Evolution of hut access facing glacier shrinkage in the Mer de Glace basin (Mont Blanc massif, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourey, Jacques; Ravanel, Ludovic

    2016-04-01

    Given the evolution of high mountain environment due to global warming, mountaineering routes and huts accesses are more and more strongly affected by glacial shrinkage and concomitant gravity processes, but almost no studies have been conducted on this relationship. The aim of this research is to describe and explain the evolution over the last century of the access to the five alpine huts around the Mer de Glace glacier (Mont Blanc massif), the larger French glacier (length = 11.5 km, area = 30 km²), a major place for Alpine tourism since 1741 and the birthplace of mountaineering, by using several methods (comparing photographs, surveying, collecting historical documents). While most of the 20th century shows no marked changes, loss of ice thickness and associated erosion of lateral moraines generate numerous and significant changes since the 1990s. Boulder falls, rockfalls and landslides are the main geomorphological processes that affect the access, while the glacier surface lowering makes access much longer and more unstable. The danger is then greatly increased and the access must be relocated and/or equipped more and more frequently (e.g. a total of 520 m of ladders has been added). This questions the future accessibility to the huts, jeopardizing an important part of mountaineering and its linked economy in the Mer de Glace area.

  3. Kinematics and thermal conditions in the permafrost-affected rockwalls of the Aiguille du Midi (3842 m a.s.l., Mont Blanc massif, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanel, Ludovic; Grangier, Germain; Weber, Samuel; Beutel, Jan; Magnin, Florence; Gruber, Stefan; Deline, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Processes that control climate-dependent rockfall from permafrost-affected rock slopes are still poorly understood. In this study, we present the results of a Wireless Sensor Network, integrated within the Swiss project PermaSense and developed in 2012, to measure rock temperature and geotechnical parameters in the steep rockwalls of the Aiguille du Midi (AdM, 3842 m a.s.l., Mont Blanc massif, France). Accessible year round by cable car, the AdM comprises two main peaks: (i) the Piton Nord with the cable car arrival station, where 4 crack-meters are placed on four major fractures, and (ii) the Piton Central with many touristic infrastructure, equipped with three 10-m-deep boreholes with 15 temperatures sensors since 2009, and where 2 crack-meters are installed along a major fracture. Three major kinematic regimes are observed: (i) opening of clefts when the rock temperature becomes positive, followed by closing during the cold period, (ii) summer opening continued by a winter opening, and (iii) closing during the warm period followed by opening in winter.

  4. GPS and TerraSAR-X time series measure temperate glacier flow in the Mont Blanc massif (France): the Argentière glacier test site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponton, F.; Walpersdorf, A.; Gay, M.; Trouvé, E.; Mugnier, J. L.; Fallourd, R.; Cotte, N.; Ott, L.; Serafini, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present measurements of the surface velocity of the Argentière glacier in the Mont Blanc massif, France, obtained by SAR and GPS observations. We produce surface velocity fields from several couples of descending and ascending TerraSAR-X acquisitions repeated at 11 days intervals in spring 2009, using the offset power tracking technique. Moreover, we dispose of four years of GPS data acquired continuously on the Argentière glacier. Our local permanent GPS network is composed of two stations on the glacier at altitudes of 2441 m and 2770 m, and two stations in static places, one in the valley of Chamonix at an altitude of 1121 m and the other on a rock outcrop near the glacier at the altitude of 2835 m. The measurements yield average displacement rates of about 13 cm/day for the upper glacier station (2770 m) and 17 cm/day for the lower site (2441 m). These in situ GPS results have been used already to validate the displacement rates of a corner reflector on the glacier measured by SAR interferometry. Here, we will use the GPS observations to validate longitudinal profiles of the surface velocity field obtained by offset power tracking. The combination of continuous GPS time series and successive TerraSAR-X images yield new information on temperate glacier dynamics, constraining an annual variability of the displacement rates of up to 28 %, with fastest flow in late summer, and a spatial variability of the displacement rates of up to 50%, with fastest flow at the bottom of the glacier. The continuous monitoring (in space and time) of the Argentière glacier flow over several annual cycles can be used to examine the correlation with climatological parameters such as temperature and cumulated precipitations and provides an exceptional data set for improving models of temperate glacier flow mechanisms.

  5. Surface-to-base transfer and subglacial hydrology controls on subglacial erosion evidenced from 7 years of hydro-sedimentary observations within Bossons glacier catchment (Mont-Blanc massif, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillon, Hervé; Mugnier, Jean-Louis; Buoncristiani, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    Continuous monitoring of sediment load in proglacial rivers allows to quantify the mass of sediment exported from a glaciated catchment toward the fluvial system. However, supraglacial, subglacial and proglacial sources contribute to this export and their specific roles are poorly understood. Our general intent in this study is to understand their respective contribution to the total exported load of suspended sediment. The catchment of the rapidly retreating Bossons glacier (Mont-Blanc massif, France) provides an ideal field laboratory to infer about the intensity of present-day erosion processes. On this glacier, two proglacial rivers were monitored : Crosette stream and Bossons stream. For Bossons stream, completing the initial 2009-2010 data, discharge and sediment load have been measured from 2011 to 2015 at a high time resolution (timestep from 15 to 2 min). Two stations acquired these data, upstream and downstream, respectively, from a valley sandur located at ˜1 km from the glacial tongue. Crosette stream was monitored directly at the exit of the subglacial system during 2013 and 2014. The combined dataset currently available from these 3 stations spans 7 years from 2009 to 2015, is not only limited to the melt season duration and is appreciably rich (4.3 millions raw data points). This tremendous data profusion allowed developping statistical methods. Multi-linear models were used to investigate sediment transfer processes in the proglacial area during the 2013 melt season. An original probabilistic approach provided critical information for every other years. Uncertainties on sediment masses were assessed by a careful propagation and by a Monte-Carlo method. Additionnaly, sediment transfer from supraglacial to subglacial position has been estimated for Crosette and Bossons streams. Applying the conclusions of these previous works on the 7 years dataset, we provide erosion rates for the supraglacial rockwalls, subglacial bedrock and proglacial area

  6. France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Every July, the world's best cyclists race more than 3500 km around France, and sometimes the surrounding countries, in the Tour de France. This image from the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) shows the varied terrain which challenges the riders. The race started in western France at Futuroscope, and headed toward Brittany. In these mostly flat 'stages' (as each day's race is called) sprinting specialists usually dash for the finish out of the main pack of riders. The race then moved to the Pyrenees mountains, in southern France along the border with Spain. Climbers and the overall favorites shine in the mountains, often gaining 10 minutes or more on their rivals. Only a few days after the Pyrenees climbs the race was again in the mountains. First Mont Ventoux, an extinct volcano in Provence, and then the massive Alps, with altitudes as high as 2,645 meters, challenged the racers. Finally the race headed toward Paris and a July 23rd finish in Paris. Go Lance! To learn more about MODIS, visit the MODIS web. Image by Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land group, NASA GSFC

  7. France.

    PubMed

    1987-09-01

    In 1986, France had a population of 55,493,000, with an annual growth rate of 0.4%. The infant mortality rate stood at 8.2/1000. Of the work force of 23.8 million, 8.3% were engaged in agriculture, 45.2% were in the industry and commerce sector, and 46.5% were engaged in services. The unemployment rate stood at 10.7%. The country's gross domestic product (GDP) was US$724 billion in 1986, with an average annual growth rate of 2.0%, and per capita income averaged $13,046. France has substantial agricultural resources, a diversified modern industrial system, and a highly skilled labor force. Following the return of a socialist majority in government in 1981, several large manufacturing firms were nationalized along with much of the commercial banking sector. Initial socialist policies were stimulative, relying partly on income redistribution and partly on increased government spending. However, the resultant increase in import demand was not offset by an increased demand French exports. In 1983, an economic stabilization plan of reductions in the budget deficit, involving spending cuts, increased taxes, and tighter monetary and credit policies, was successfully implemented. Although current economic policies should promote stronger growth over the medium to long term, trade competitiveness remains weak and high unemployment is a major social problem. PMID:12177959

  8. France.

    PubMed

    1987-09-01

    In 1986, France had a population of 55,493,000, with an annual growth rate of 0.4%. The infant mortality rate stood at 8.2/1000. Of the work force of 23.8 million, 8.3% were engaged in agriculture, 45.2% were in the industry and commerce sector, and 46.5% were engaged in services. The unemployment rate stood at 10.7%. The country's gross domestic product (GDP) was US$724 billion in 1986, with an average annual growth rate of 2.0%, and per capita income averaged $13,046. France has substantial agricultural resources, a diversified modern industrial system, and a highly skilled labor force. Following the return of a socialist majority in government in 1981, several large manufacturing firms were nationalized along with much of the commercial banking sector. Initial socialist policies were stimulative, relying partly on income redistribution and partly on increased government spending. However, the resultant increase in import demand was not offset by an increased demand French exports. In 1983, an economic stabilization plan of reductions in the budget deficit, involving spending cuts, increased taxes, and tighter monetary and credit policies, was successfully implemented. Although current economic policies should promote stronger growth over the medium to long term, trade competitiveness remains weak and high unemployment is a major social problem.

  9. The scientific observatories on Mont Blanc.

    PubMed

    Richalet, J P

    2001-01-01

    Since the first ascent of Mont Blanc by Jacques Balmat and Dr. Michel-Gabriel Paccard in 1786, numerous scientific events have taken place on the highest peak of Europe. Horace Benédict de Saussure, since his first ascent in 1787, made numerous observations on barometric pressure, temperature, geology, and mountain sickness on Mont Blanc. Over the next 100 years, scientists and physicians climbed Mont Blanc and made many interesting although anecdotal reports. Science on Mont Blanc exploded at the end of the 19th century. A major player at that time was Joseph Vallot (1854-1925), who constructed an observatory in 1890 at 4,358 m on the Rochers des Bosses and then moved it in 1898 to a better location at 4,350 m. There Vallot and invited scientists made observations over more than 30 years: studies in geology, glaciology, astronomy, cartography, meteorology, botany, physiology and medicine were performed and published in the seven volumes of the Annales de l'Observatoire du Mont Blanc, between 1893 and 1917, and in the Comptes Rendus de l'Académie des Sciences. While Jules Janssen and Xaver Imfeld were preparing the construction of the new observatory on the top of Mont Blanc, Dr. Jacottet died in 1891 at the Observatoire Vallot from a disease that was clearly attributed by Dr. Egli-Sinclair to the effect of high altitude. This was probably the first case of high altitude pulmonary edema documented by an autopsy and suspected to be directly due to high altitude. Extensive studies on ventilation were made from 1886 to 1900. Increase in ventilation with altitude was documented, with the phenomenon of "ventilatory acclimatization." Paul Bert's theories on the role of oxygen in acute mountain sickness were confirmed in 1903 and 1904 by studying the effects of oxygen inhalation. In 1913, Vallot documented for the first time the decrease in physical performance at the top of Mont Blanc using squirrels. After that pioneering era, few studies were done until 1984, when a

  10. Factors affecting a climber's ability to ascend Mont Blanc.

    PubMed

    Tsianos, G; Woolrich-Burt, L; Aitchison, T; Peacock, A; Watt, M; Montgomery, H; Watt, I; Grant, S

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the factors affecting a climber's ability to ascend Mont Blanc using a number of variables collected at the Gouter Hut (3,817 m) before and after an attempted ascent on the Mont Blanc summit. Subjects (n=285) were tested at 3,817 m prior to their ascent of Mont Blanc. Maximum height ascended in the last 14 days was recorded. End tidal CO2, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), heart rate and respiratory rate were measured using a Capnograph (Nellcor Patrick NPB75). Acute mountain sickness (AMS) was assessed using the Lake Louise scoring system. Summit information is available for 216 subjects. None of the subjects who attained 4,000 m in the previous 14 days failed to reach the summit (P=0.04). Previous recent exposure to an altitude of 4,000 m resulted in faster ascent times to the summit than those who had not been above 3,000 m in the previous 14 days (4.02+/-0.6 vs. 4.46+/-0.8 h, P=0.009), higher SaO2 on arrival at the Gouter Hut on day 1 (88.6+/-5 vs. 86.3+/-6%, P=0.004) and lower AMS scores upon arrival at the Gouter Hut after the attempted ascent to the summit 2.5+/-1.8 versus 4.7+/-2.5 U (P=0.001), respectively. It is concluded that recent exposure to 4,000 m confers an advantage to those who wish to ascend a 4,800 m peak. PMID:16235066

  11. Post-World War II uranium changes in dated Mont Blanc ice and snow.

    PubMed

    Barbante, C; Van De Velde, K; Cozzi, G; Capodaglio, G; Cescon, P; Planchon, F; Hong, S; Ferrari, C; Boutron, C

    2001-10-15

    Recent controversies concerning the possibility of environmental contamination due to the use of uranium in classical weaponry have led us to realize that there is a lack of time series for this metal from environmental archives. We have therefore performed analysis of a dated 140 m-long ice/snow core that was drilled in 1994 at a cold high altitude site (4250 m) near the summit of Mont Blanc in the French-Italian Alps. Ultraclean analytical procedures were employed in our analyses. Uranium concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry. In ice dating from before the 1940s, uranium concentrations are found to have remained fairly constant and can be explained simply by a crustal contribution. For the post-World War II layers, on the other hand, the data show large excesses above crustal contributions. These uranium excesses are attributed to tropospheric transport of dust emitted during extensive mining and milling operations which took place in the GDR and to a smaller extent in France at that time. There is no enhancement in uranium concentrations in the ice layer in which fallout from the 1986 Chernobyl accident was previously identified from a gross beta activity vs depth profile. PMID:11686362

  12. Comprehensive lipidome profiling of Sauvignon blanc grape juice.

    PubMed

    Tumanov, Sergey; Zubenko, Yuri; Greven, Marc; Greenwood, David R; Shmanai, Vadim; Villas-Boas, Silas G

    2015-08-01

    This study presents a comprehensive lipidome analysis of Sauvignon blanc grape juice by combining GC-MS based fatty acid profiling with shotgun lipidomics strategy. We observed that despite grape juice being a water based matrix it contains a diverse range of lipid species, including common saturated and unsaturated free and intact fatty acids as well as odd-numbered and hydroxy fatty acids. Based on GC-MS quantitative data, we found that the total lipid content of grape juice could be as high as 2.80 g/L. The majority of lipids were present in the form of complex lipids with relatively small amount of free fatty acids (<15%). Therefore we concluded that the lipidome should be considered an important component of grape juice with the potential to impact on fermentation processes as well as on the sensorial properties of fermented products. This work serves as a hypothesis generating tool, the results of which justify follow-up studies to explore the influence of the grape juice lipidome and lipid metabolism in yeast on the aroma profile of wine.

  13. Comprehensive lipidome profiling of Sauvignon blanc grape juice.

    PubMed

    Tumanov, Sergey; Zubenko, Yuri; Greven, Marc; Greenwood, David R; Shmanai, Vadim; Villas-Boas, Silas G

    2015-08-01

    This study presents a comprehensive lipidome analysis of Sauvignon blanc grape juice by combining GC-MS based fatty acid profiling with shotgun lipidomics strategy. We observed that despite grape juice being a water based matrix it contains a diverse range of lipid species, including common saturated and unsaturated free and intact fatty acids as well as odd-numbered and hydroxy fatty acids. Based on GC-MS quantitative data, we found that the total lipid content of grape juice could be as high as 2.80 g/L. The majority of lipids were present in the form of complex lipids with relatively small amount of free fatty acids (<15%). Therefore we concluded that the lipidome should be considered an important component of grape juice with the potential to impact on fermentation processes as well as on the sensorial properties of fermented products. This work serves as a hypothesis generating tool, the results of which justify follow-up studies to explore the influence of the grape juice lipidome and lipid metabolism in yeast on the aroma profile of wine. PMID:25766825

  14. Influence of harvesting technique and maceration process on aroma and phenolic attributes of Sauvignon blanc wine.

    PubMed

    Olejar, Kenneth J; Fedrizzi, Bruno; Kilmartin, Paul A

    2015-09-15

    Sauvignon blanc wines are characterised by their varietal aromas and low phenolic content. Mechanical harvesting has been shown to increase several varietal aromas. Likewise, maceration techniques have produced increases in phenolic content and antioxidant activity, but these can also alter tactile attributes and sensory profiles. Mechanical harvesting and cryogenic maceration were used in combination to produce a Sauvignon blanc wine with increased phenolic content and antioxidant activity, while showing a similar sensory profile to control wines. Phenolic profiles of the wines showed differences between the harvesting and maceration techniques. Mechanical harvesting contributed to decreases in phenolics through reaction with oxidative radicals. Cryogenic maceration increased phenolics and antioxidant activity. Cryogenic maceration also increased the levels of several varietal aromas, for Sauvignon blanc wines made from both hand-picked and from machine-harvested fruit. Furthermore, cryogenic treatment of hand-picked fruit increased varietal thiols to levels similar to machine-harvested control wines.

  15. Microbiological fingerprint of African dust deposition in alpine snow pack, Mont Blanc summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvochina, Maria; Alekhina, Irina; Normand, Philippe; Petit, Jean-Robert; Bulat, Sergey

    2010-05-01

    The biogeochemical effect of African dust transport has been reported mostly with respect to nutrient budget change in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and global transport of microorganisms, including pathogens. However, its potential to seed or colonize the remote environments by transported microorganisms is poorly understood. This study has focused on bacterial content and diversity of Saharan dust deposition from 2006, 2008 and 2009 in snow pack of Mont Blanc (MtBl) glacier as well as recognition of bacteria which could be involved in establishing microbiota in this icy environment. Four snow samples recorded Saharan dust events from June 2006 (SDm06/2006 - 3,5 months aged), May and June 2008 (SDm05/2008 and SDm06/2008 - 1 month in between and 1 week aged each) and May 2009 (SDm05/2009 - 1 week aged) were collected at Col du Dome area (4250m a.s.l.). Bacterial community structure was assessed by ribotyping and subsequent sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. To exclude human-associated and laboratory contamination several controls were run in parallel updating our contaminant library. The obtained phylotypes were tested against this library keeping only those which successfully passed through this exam. Of 176 selected clones from four clone libraries 29.8% were met in our contaminant library. The ‘true' sequences were assigned to 57 phylotypes (>97.5% sequence similarity) originating mostly from soil. The prevalent phylotypes recovered were belonging to different bacterial divisions: Deinococcus-Thermus, Alpha-proteobacteria and CFB groups for SDm06/2006; Actinobacteria, Alpha-proteobacteria and CFB for SDm05/2008 and SDm06/2008; Actinobacteria and chloroplasts/plastids for SDm05/2009. Phylogenetic analysis of all phylotypes showed no shared species amongst all 4 dust layers in MtBl snow pack in 2006, 2008 and 2009. However, two phylotypes (Blastococcus saxobsidens sp. - 99%, Geodermatophilus obscurus sp. - 99%) were shared between 2008 and 2009

  16. France`s nuclear dilemmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    Ignoring worldwide protests, France conducted the first of several scheduled nuclear tests in September. The controversy has overshadowed France`s more important nuclear challenges: maintaining a strong deterrent under a test ban, moving ahead with its proposals for {open_quotes}Europeanization{close_quotes} of that deterrent, and developing a consensus on how nuclear threats should be used in response to those who would brandish other weapons of mass destruction. 1 fig.

  17. Microbial communities established on Mont Blanc summit with Saharan dust deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvochina, M.; Alekhina, I.; Normand, P.; Petit, J. R.; Bulat, S.

    2009-04-01

    Dust originating from the Sahara desert can be uplifted during storms, transported across the Mediterranean towards the Alpine region and deposited during snowfalls. The microbes associated with dust particles can be involved in establishing microbiota in icy environments as well as affect ecosystem and human health. Our objective was to use a culture-free DNA-based approach to assess bacterial content and diversity and furthermore, to identify ‘icy' microbes which could be brought on the Mont Blanc (MtBl) summit with Saharan dust and became living in the snow. Saharan dust fallout on MtBl summit from one event (MB5, event June 2006) vs. control libraries and that from another event (May 2008) were collected in Grenoble (SD, 200 m a.s.l.) and at Col du Dome (MB-SD, 4250 m a.s.l.). Soil from Ksar Ghilane (SS, Saharan desert, Tunisia, March 2008) was taken for overall comparison as a possible source population. Fresh snow falling in Grenoble (85) was collected as example of diversity in this area. To assess the microbial diversity 16S rRNA gene libraries (v3-v5 region) were constructed for corresponding dust-snow samples (MB5, SS, SD, 85 and MB-SD) along with clear snow samples and several controls. For both MB5 and MB-SD samples full-gene technique was evoked in attempt to differentiate reproduced bacteria from damaged DNA. Before sequencing the clones were rybotyped. All clone libraries were distinct in community composition except for some single phylotypes (or closely related groups) overlap. Thus, clone libraries from two different events that were collected at Col du Dome area within 2 year interval (MB5 and MB-SD) were different in community composition except one of the abundant phylotype from MB-SD library (Geodermatophilus sp.) which was shared (98% sequence similarity) with single representative from MB-5 library. These bacteria are pigmented and radiation-resistant, so it could be an indicator of desert origin for our sequences. For MB5 library two

  18. Drug Use on Mont Blanc: A Study Using Automated Urine Collection

    PubMed Central

    Robach, Paul; Trebes, Gilles; Lasne, Françoise; Buisson, Corinne; Méchin, Nathalie; Mazzarino, Monica; de la Torre, Xavier; Roustit, Matthieu; Kérivel, Patricia; Botré, Francesco; Bouzat, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Mont Blanc, the summit of Western Europe, is a popular but demanding high-altitude ascent. Drug use is thought to be widespread among climbers attempting this summit, not only to prevent altitude illnesses, but also to boost physical and/or psychological capacities. This practice may be unsafe in this remote alpine environment. However, robust data on medication during the ascent of Mont Blanc are lacking. Individual urine samples from male climbers using urinals in mountain refuges on access routes to Mont Blanc (Goûter and Cosmiques mountain huts) were blindly and anonymously collected using a hidden automatic sampler. Urine samples were screened for a wide range of drugs, including diuretics, glucocorticoids, stimulants, hypnotics and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors. Out of 430 samples analyzed from both huts, 35.8% contained at least one drug. Diuretics (22.7%) and hypnotics (12.9%) were the most frequently detected drugs, while glucocorticoids (3.5%) and stimulants (3.1%) were less commonly detected. None of the samples contained PDE-5 inhibitors. Two substances were predominant: the diuretic acetazolamide (20.6%) and the hypnotic zolpidem (8.4%). Thirty three samples were found positive for at least two substances, the most frequent combination being acetazolamide and a hypnotic (2.1%). Based on a novel sampling technique, we demonstrate that about one third of the urine samples collected from a random sample of male climbers contained one or several drugs, suggesting frequent drug use amongst climbers ascending Mont Blanc. Our data suggest that medication primarily aims at mitigating the symptoms of altitude illnesses, rather than enhancing performance. In this hazardous environment, the relatively high prevalence of hypnotics must be highlighted, since these molecules may alter vigilance. PMID:27253728

  19. Drug Use on Mont Blanc: A Study Using Automated Urine Collection.

    PubMed

    Robach, Paul; Trebes, Gilles; Lasne, Françoise; Buisson, Corinne; Méchin, Nathalie; Mazzarino, Monica; de la Torre, Xavier; Roustit, Matthieu; Kérivel, Patricia; Botré, Francesco; Bouzat, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Mont Blanc, the summit of Western Europe, is a popular but demanding high-altitude ascent. Drug use is thought to be widespread among climbers attempting this summit, not only to prevent altitude illnesses, but also to boost physical and/or psychological capacities. This practice may be unsafe in this remote alpine environment. However, robust data on medication during the ascent of Mont Blanc are lacking. Individual urine samples from male climbers using urinals in mountain refuges on access routes to Mont Blanc (Goûter and Cosmiques mountain huts) were blindly and anonymously collected using a hidden automatic sampler. Urine samples were screened for a wide range of drugs, including diuretics, glucocorticoids, stimulants, hypnotics and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors. Out of 430 samples analyzed from both huts, 35.8% contained at least one drug. Diuretics (22.7%) and hypnotics (12.9%) were the most frequently detected drugs, while glucocorticoids (3.5%) and stimulants (3.1%) were less commonly detected. None of the samples contained PDE-5 inhibitors. Two substances were predominant: the diuretic acetazolamide (20.6%) and the hypnotic zolpidem (8.4%). Thirty three samples were found positive for at least two substances, the most frequent combination being acetazolamide and a hypnotic (2.1%). Based on a novel sampling technique, we demonstrate that about one third of the urine samples collected from a random sample of male climbers contained one or several drugs, suggesting frequent drug use amongst climbers ascending Mont Blanc. Our data suggest that medication primarily aims at mitigating the symptoms of altitude illnesses, rather than enhancing performance. In this hazardous environment, the relatively high prevalence of hypnotics must be highlighted, since these molecules may alter vigilance. PMID:27253728

  20. The research program of the Liquid Scintillation Detector (LSD) in the Mont Blanc Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadykin, V. L.; Yakushev, V. F.; Korchagin, P. V.; Korchagin, V. B.; Malgin, A. S.; Ryassny, F. G.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Talochkin, V. P.; Zatsepin, G. T.; Badino, G.

    1985-01-01

    A massive (90 tons) liquid scintillation detector (LSD) has been running since October 1984 in the Mont Blanc Laboratory at a depth of 5,200 hg/sq cm of standard rock. The research program of the experiment covers a variety of topics in particle physics and astrophysics. The performance of the detector, the main fields of research are presented and the preliminary results are discussed.

  1. ALP-RISK, a smartphone app for collecting data on geomorphic phenomena at high altitude in the Mont Blanc region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanel, Ludovic; Deline, Philip

    2014-05-01

    A network of observers (mountain guides, hut keepers and mountaineers) has been created from 2005 for the Mont Blanc massif in order to acquire data on rockfall in permafrost-affected rock walls. This network, fully operational since 2007, is based on observation sheets or oral communications and has documented nearly 350 events with volume between 100 and 45,000 m3. Their analysis confirmed and helped to better understand the role of the permafrost degradation as main triggering factor. To i) reinforce this network, ii) facilitate its observation work and iii) develop it as well in space (the whole Mont Blanc region, or eventually the whole western Alps) as in a thematic point of view (all glacial and periglacial brutal phenomena), the Alp-Risk app has been created in the framework of the Alcotra PrévRisk Mont-Blanc project. The latter (2011-13) has been developed to improve the prevention of individual and collective natural hazards around the Mont Blanc massif. The app was created for I-Phones and Androids in three languages (French, English and Italian) and allows, as intuitively and quickly as possible, transmitting data on natural hazards in high mountain (snow and ice avalanche, landslides and rockfalls, landslides, moraine destabilization, water pocket outburst flood, torrential flood, and others) to both practitioners (observations available directly on the app via an interface web), scientists, and possibly local managers. Alp-Risk thus constitutes a new step for participatory science in the Mont Blanc region.

  2. Investigating K-feldspar Luminescence Thermochronometry for Application in the Mont Blanc Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, R.; King, G. E.; Herman, F.; Valla, P.

    2015-12-01

    Luminescence dating has the potential to quantify the recent exhumation history of mountain ranges as a low-temperature thermochronometer. During rock exhumation, electrons get trapped through exposure to ionizing radiation whilst elevated temperatures cause thermally stimulated detrapping. The resulting luminescence signals measured in the laboratory can be used to constrain rock thermal histories through modelling of the kinetic parameters of electron trapping and detrapping. Here, we investigate and model laboratory kinetic processes of the luminescence of K-feldspar and assess their extrapolation over geological timescales. Samples were taken from the actively eroding Mont Blanc massif in the European Alps, along a 12 km long tunnel with ambient temperatures of 10-35 °C. In this setting rapid exhumation rates have been found during the last 2 million years (up to ~2 km/Myr), however, we intend to increase the temporal resolution to sub-Quaternary timescales using luminescence thermochronometry. Infra-red stimulated luminescence signals at 50 °C (IR50) and at 225 °C (post-IR IRSL225) of K-feldspar extracted from Mont Blanc tunnel samples were measured and our first results reveal a thermal signature from which rock cooling rates can be derived. Isothermal decay experiments show non-exponential decay, but interestingly, experiments with a range of regenerative doses reveal first-order kinetics. The observed thermal decay pattern is well-described by a model based on a physically plausible distribution of the density of states. Ultimately, we intend to use the IR50 and post-IR IRSL225 signals of K-feldspar as dual thermochronometers to determine the late-Quaternary cooling history of the Mont Blanc massif. Moreover, the luminescence signals may give insights into local thermal field evolution, before the influence of postglacial hydrothermal flow.

  3. New radiocarbon chronology of a late Holocene landslide event in the Mont Blanc massif, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdas, Irka; Sojc, Ursula; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Akçar, Naki; Deline, Philip

    2016-04-01

    The Ferret valley Arp Nouva peat bog located in the Mont Blanc massif was critically evaluated since previously published radiocarbon dates have led to controversial conclusions on the formation of the swamp. Radiocarbon dating of roots from three pits of up to 1 m depth was applied to discuss the question whether the historical documented rock avalanche occurring in AD 1717 overran the peat bog or formed it at a later stage. Our results indicate that the rock avalanche formed the Arp Nouva peat bog by downstream blockage of the Bellecombe torrent. Furthermore, careful sample preparation with consequent separation of roots from the bulk peat sample provides possible explanation for the too old 14C ages of bulk peat samples dated previously (Deline and Kirkbride, 2009 and references therein). This work demonstrates that a combined geomorphological and geochronological approach is the most reliable way to reconstruct landscape evolution, especially in light of apparent chronological problems. The key to successful 14C dating is a careful sample selection and the identification of material that might be not ideal for chronological reconstructions. References Deline, Philip, and Martin P. Kirkbride. "Rock avalanches on a glacier and morainic complex in Haut Val Ferret (Mont Blanc Massif, Italy)".Geomorphology 103 (2009): 80-92.

  4. Italy: Mt. Etna

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Multi-angle Portrayals of Mt. Etna's Plume     View Larger Image ... (MISR) capture the energetic eruption of Sicily's Mount Etna volcano on October 29, 2002. Viewing Etna's eruptive activities at MISR's ...

  5. A re-analysis of 533 rockfalls occurred since 2003 in the Mont Blanc massif for the study of their relationship with permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanel, Ludovic; Magnin, Florence; Deline, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Rockfall is one of the main natural hazards in high mountain regions and its frequency is growing, especially since two decades. Collapses at high elevation are with an increasing certainty assumed to be a consequence of the climate change through the warming permafrost. In the Mont Blanc massif, data on present rockfalls (occurrence time when possible, accurate location, topographical and geological settings, volume, weather and snow conditions) were acquired for 2003 and for the period 2007-2014 thanks to a satellite image of the massif and a network of observers in the central part of the massif, respectively. The study of the 533 so-documented rockfalls shows a strong correlation at the year scale between air temperature and rockfall. Along with this data acquisition, a statistical model of the Mean Annual Rock Surface Temperature (MARST) for the 1961-1990 period has been implemented on a 4-m-resolution DEM of the Mont Blanc massif. The model runs with Potential Incoming Solar radiation (PISR) calculated with GIS tools and air temperature parameters computed from Chamonix Météo France records. We cross here the data on rockfalls with the permafrost distribution model to show that: (i) rockfall occurs mainly over modeled negative MARST (context of permafrost); (ii) simulated warm permafrost areas (> -2°C) are the most affected by instabilities; (iii) as the 1961-1990 period is supposed to be representative of the conditions at depth that are not affected by the climate warming during the two last decades, the latest results are mainly valuable for rockfalls related to pluri-decadal signal; and (iv) the higher (close to 0°C) the MARST, the deeper the detachment (possibly related to the deepening of the permafrost active layer). These results and field observations confirm that warming permafrost corresponds to the main required configuration for rockfall triggering at high elevation. In addition, we show that rockfalls for which ice observed in their scar

  6. Coso MT Site Locations

    SciTech Connect

    Doug Blankenship

    2011-05-04

    This data includes the locations of the MT data collected in and around the Coso Geothermal field that covered the West Flank area. These are the data that the 3D MT models were created from that were discussed in Phase 1 of the West Flank FORGE project. The projected coordinate system is NAD 1927 State Plane California IV FIPS 0404 and the Projection is Lambert Conformal Conic. Units are in feet.

  7. Offshore advection of particles within the Cape Blanc filament, Mauritania: Results from observational and modelling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, G.; Reuter, C.; Karakas, G.; Nowald, N.; Wefer, G.

    2009-12-01

    This article will review major features of the ‘giant’ Cape Blanc filament off Mauritania with regard to the transport of chlorophyll and organic carbon from the shelf to the open ocean. Within the filament, chlorophyll is transported about 400 km offshore. Modelled particle distributions along a zonal transect at 21°N showed that particles with a sinking velocity of 5 m d -1 are advected offshore by up to 600 km in subsurface particle clouds generally located between 400 m and 800 m water depth, forming an Intermediate Nepheloid Layer (INL). It corresponds to the depth of the oxygen minimum zone. Heavier particles with a sinking velocity of 30 m d -1 are transported from the shelf within the Bottom Layer (BL) of more than 1000 m thickness, largely following the topography of the bottom slope. The particles advected within the BL contribute to the enhanced winter-spring mass fluxes collected at the open-ocean mesotrophic sediment trap site CB-13 (∼200 nm offshore), due to a long distance advection in deeper waters. The lateral contribution to the deep sediment trap in winter-spring is estimated to be 63% and 72% for organic carbon and total mass, respectively, whereas the lateral input for both components on an annual basis is estimated to be in the order of 15%. Biogenic opal increases almost fivefold from the upper to the lower mesotrophic CB-13 trap, also pointing to an additional source for biogenic silica from eutrophic coastal waters. Blooms obviously sink in smaller, probably mesoscale-sized patches with variable settling rates, depending on the type of aggregated particles and their ballast content. Generally, particle sinking rates are exceptionally high off NW Africa. Very high chlorophyll values and a large size of the Cape Blanc filament in 1998-1999 are also documented in enhanced total mass and organic carbon fluxes. An increasing trend in satellite chlorophyll concentrations and the size of the Cape Blanc filament between 1997 and 2008 as

  8. Inactive dry yeast application on grapes modify Sauvignon Blanc wine aroma.

    PubMed

    Šuklje, Katja; Antalick, Guillaume; Buica, Astrid; Coetzee, Zelmari A; Brand, Jeanne; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Vivier, Melané A

    2016-04-15

    This study investigated the potential to improve wine aroma by applying two inactive dry yeast products (IDYs) at the onset of ripening on Sauvignon Blanc grapes. Both products led to increased reduced glutathione concentrations in the grape juice and corresponding wines, as well as differences in individual higher alcohol acetates (HAAs) and ethyl esters of straight chain fatty acids (EEFAs) at the end of fermentation. After two months of storage, a significantly slower decrease of EEFAs and to a lesser extent of HAAs was found for wines made from grapes with IDY applications. These wines also resulted in significantly slower synthesis of ethyl esters of branched acids, whereas varietal thiols were altered in a product-specific manner. The modifications in the wine chemical composition were also sensorially corroborated. This study showed that vineyard additions of IDY products directly on the grapes at the onset of ripening have a subsequent benefit to the production and preservation of aroma in wines.

  9. Pre-fermentation fining effects on the aroma chemistry of Marlborough Sauvignon blanc press fractions.

    PubMed

    Parish, Katie J; Herbst-Johnstone, Mandy; Bouda, Flo; Klaere, Steffen; Fedrizzi, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    In the wine industry, fining agents are commonly used with many choices now commercially available. Here the influence of pre-fermentation fining on wine aroma chemistry has been explored. Free run and press fraction Sauvignon blanc juices from two vineyards were fined using gelatin, activated carbon, polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) and a combination agent which included bentonite, PVPP and isinglass. Over thirty aroma compounds were quantified in the experimental wines. Results showed that activated carbon fining led to a significant (p<0.05) concentration decrease of hexan-1-ol and linalool in the experimental wines when compared to a control, consistent across all vineyard and fraction combinations. Other aroma compounds were also influenced by fining agent, even if vineyards and press fractions played a crucial role. This study confirmed that fining agents used pre-fermentation can influence wine aroma profiles and therefore needs specific tailoring addressing style and origin of grape. PMID:27132857

  10. Grape cluster microclimate influences the aroma composition of Sauvignon blanc wine.

    PubMed

    Martin, Damian; Grose, Claire; Fedrizzi, Bruno; Stuart, Lily; Albright, Abby; McLachlan, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    New Zealand Sauvignon blanc (SB) wines are characterised by a distinctive combination of tropical-fruity and green-herbaceous aromatic compounds. The influence of sunlight exposure of grape clusters on juice and wine composition was investigated, with the aim of manipulating aromatic compounds in SB wine. In the absence of basal leaf removal SB clusters naturally exposed to sunlight were riper than shaded clusters, evidenced by higher total soluble solids (TSS) and proline, and lower malic acid, 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine (IBMP) and arginine. Volatile thiols in wines did not differ between shaded and exposed clusters. At equivalent TSS, cluster exposure had little or no effect on malic acid concentration. Conversely, wine from shaded clusters had almost double the IBMP concentration of wine from exposed clusters at equivalent TSS. The effects on SB juice and wine composition of natural variations in cluster microclimate are not comparable with the effects of cluster exposure created through leaf removal. PMID:27211692

  11. Regulated deficit irrigation (RDI) to save water and improve Sauvignon Blanc quality?

    PubMed

    Greven, M; Green, S; Neal, S; Clothier, B; Neal, M; Dryden, G; Davidson, P

    2005-01-01

    With a fast change of land use in Marlborough from extensive pastoral farming to intensive irrigated viticulture, a need has risen to investigate the sustainable use of the available water. In 2001 a 5 ha irrigation research project was installed in a Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc vineyard. Irrigation treatments installed were control (compensate 100% for crop evapotranspiration (ET(O)), 80%, 70% and 60% of ET(O). During the two years that the Regulated Deficit Irrigation (RDI) trial has run so far, very different climatic conditions created much greater differences in yield and vegetative growth, than up to 40% reduction in irrigation, none of which were significant. The use of sap flow in the vines has been fine-tuned and is now giving reliable results on which to base vine water need. PMID:15771094

  12. Mt. St. Helens Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Len

    1992-01-01

    Provides a personal account of one science teacher's participation in a teacher workshop in which teachers learned about volcanic development, types of eruption, geomorphology, plate tectonics, volcano monitoring, and hazards created by volcanoes by examining Mt. St. Helens. Provides a graphic identifying volcanoes active since 1975. (MDH)

  13. Italy: Mt. Etna

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... shook the eastern edge of Sicily and parts of mainland Italy during September and October. The eruption of Etna sent a thick blanket ... date:  Oct 27, 2002 Images:  Italy: Mt. Etna location:  Europe thumbnail:  ...

  14. The use of ground based photogrammetry for the monitoring of seasonal movement of a glacier: the case study of Planpincieux Glacier, Grandes Jorasses massif, Mont Blanc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordan, Daniele; Dell'Anese, Federico; Allasia, Paolo; Vagliasindi, Marco; Motta, Elena

    2016-04-01

    In September 2013, an experimental low cost monitoring station has been installed on the top of Mt. de La Saxe (Val Ferret, Aosta Valley, NW of Italy) to monitor the Planpincieux Glacier, located on the Italian side of Mont Blanc Massif. This system is based on two commercial APS-C DSLR cameras equipped with a 297 mm and 120 mm optical zoom respectively. Every hour cameras automatically acquire pictures of the lower part of the glacier, which showed to be the most active. The available dataset is analyzed using both change-detection and pixel-offset techniques, to detect the main surface changes over time, as well as to retrieve quantitative measurements of the glacier displacements. The system is able to work throughout the year. The available dataset has been used to analyze the daily evolution of the lower part of the glacier over the May-November period (when the glacier is free from snow) both in 2014 and 2015. The pixel-offset approach allows to measure the displacement of different parts of the glacier and to describe its seasonal evolution. Furthermore, change detection algorithm allows highlighting sudden changes of the scene, usually due to icefalls. The available dataset shows that the displacement rate of the glacier increases during the warm season, that in 2014 it was higher than in 2015, and that it was distributed in a different way. Actually, in 2015, the maximum rate was reached in August, whereas in 2014 the measured summer velocity was lower but it lasted over the months of July, August and September. The results have been validated using different ground based SARs, both in 2014 and 2015. Here we present the results of a three years monitoring, demonstrating the efficiency of pixel-offset and change-detection techniques for contactless monitoring of unreachable glacier surfaces. Furthermore, we present cross-analysis, considering displacements vs. weather measurements, in order to understand glaciers dynamics.

  15. Mt. Spurr's 1992 eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1993-01-01

    On 27 June, 1992, the Crater Peak vent on the south side of Mt. Spurr awoke from 39 years of dormancy and burst into sub-plinian eruption after 10 months of elevated seismicity. Two more eruptions followed in August and September. The volcano lies 125 km west of Anchorage, Alaska's largest city and an important international hub for air travel. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was able to warn communities and the aviation industry well in advance of these eruptions.

  16. High resolution profiles of vertical particulate organic matter export off Cape Blanc, Mauritania: Degradation processes and ballasting effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iversen, Morten Hvitfeldt; Nowald, Nicolas; Ploug, Helle; Jackson, George A.; Fischer, Gerhard

    2010-06-01

    Vertical carbon fluxes between the surface and 2500 m depth were estimated from in situ profiles of particle size distributions and abundances me/asured off Cape Blanc (Mauritania) related to deep ocean sediment traps. Vertical mass fluxes off Cape Blanc were significantly higher than recent global estimates in the open ocean. The aggregates off Cape Blanc contained high amounts of ballast material due to the presence of coccoliths and fine-grained dust from the Sahara desert, leading to a dominance of small and fast-settling aggregates. The largest changes in vertical fluxes were observed in the surface waters (<250 m), and, thus, showing this site to be the most important zone for aggregate formation and degradation. The degradation length scale ( L), i.e. the fractional degradation of aggregates per meter settled, was estimated from vertical fluxes derived from the particle size distribution through the water column. This was compared with fractional remineralization rate of aggregates per meter settled derived from direct ship-board measurements of sinking velocity and small-scale O 2 fluxes to aggregates measured by micro-sensors. Microbial respiration by attached bacteria alone could not explain the degradation of organic matter in the upper ocean. Instead, flux feeding from zooplankton organisms was indicated as the dominant degradation process of aggregated carbon in the surface ocean. Below the surface ocean, microbes became more important for the degradation as zooplankton was rare at these depths.

  17. Environmental factors controlling the seasonal variability in particle size distribution of modern Saharan dust deposited off Cape Blanc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friese, Carmen A.; van der Does, Michèlle; Merkel, Ute; Iversen, Morten H.; Fischer, Gerhard; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.

    2016-09-01

    The particle sizes of Saharan dust in marine sediment core records have been used frequently as a proxy for trade-wind speed. However, there are still large uncertainties with respect to the seasonality of the particle sizes of deposited Saharan dust off northwestern Africa and the factors influencing this seasonality. We investigated a three-year time-series of grain-size data from two sediment-trap moorings off Cape Blanc, Mauritania and compared them to observed wind-speed and precipitation as well as satellite images. Our results indicate a clear seasonality in the grain-size distributions: during summer the modal grain sizes were generally larger and the sorting was generally less pronounced compared to the winter season. Gravitational settling was the major deposition process during winter. We conclude that the following two mechanisms control the modal grain size of the collected dust during summer: (1) wet deposition causes increased deposition fluxes resulting in coarser modal grain sizes and (2) the development of cold fronts favors the emission and transport of coarse particles off Cape Blanc. Individual dust-storm events throughout the year could be recognized in the traps as anomalously coarse-grained samples. During winter and spring, intense cyclonic dust-storm events in the dust-source region explained the enhanced emission and transport of a larger component of coarse particles off Cape Blanc. The outcome of our study provides important implications for climate modellers and paleo-climatologists.

  18. Evolution of S-cysteinylated and S-glutathionylated thiol precursors during oxidation of Melon B. and Sauvignon blanc musts.

    PubMed

    Roland, Aurélie; Vialaret, Jérôme; Razungles, Alain; Rigou, Peggy; Schneider, Rémi

    2010-04-14

    Thiol precursor content in Melon B. and Sauvignon blanc grape juices obtained under vacuum was determined by quantifying cysteinylated and glutathionylated conjugates of 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol (3MH) and 4-methyl-4-mercaptopentan-2-one (4MMP). This characterization allowed the study of thiol precursor evolution during ripening of Sauvignon blanc grapes in several viticultural situations together with grape reaction product (GRP) and the main substrate of polyphenoloxidase, that is, caftaric acid. Concentration of precursors greatly increased during ripening except for the cysteinylated conjugate of 4MMP. Precursor evolution was also monitored during the oxidation of grape juice. Addition of oxygen to a grape juice set off the enzymatic oxidation of hydroxycinnamic acids but did not negatively affect precursor concentrations. Part of the glutathionylated precursor of the 3MH was produced during prefermentative operations (up to 140% in Sauvignon blanc). Consequently, this precursor naturally occurring in grapes was also formed during prefermentative operations. The proportion of biogenetic and prefermentary formation of the glutathionylated precursor of 3MH was different under industrial conditions depending on the grape variety considered. Addition of glutathione and hexenal in grape juices of Melon B. and Sauvignon induced an increase of the production of 3MH and consequently of its acetate in the resulting wines. Residual glutathione in must has to be preserved to enhance the aromatic potential of grapes. PMID:20199086

  19. Nitrogen and carbon assimilation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae during Sauvignon blanc juice fermentation.

    PubMed

    Pinu, Farhana R; Edwards, Patrick J B; Gardner, Richard C; Villas-Boas, Silas G

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the assimilation and production of juice metabolites by Saccharomyces cerevisiae during winemaking, we compared the metabolite profiles of 63 Sauvignon blanc (SB) grape juices collected over five harvesting seasons from different locations of New Zealand before and after fermentation by the commercial wine yeast strain EC1118 at 15 °C. Metabolite profiles were obtained using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance and the oenological parameters were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Our results revealed that the amino acids threonine and serine were the most consumed organic nitrogen sources, while proline and gamma-aminobutyric acid were the least consumed amino acids during SB juice fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolised some uncommon nitrogen sources (e.g. norleucine, norvaline and pyroglutamic acid) and several organic acids, including some fatty acids, most likely after fermenting the main juice sugars (glucose, fructose and mannose). However, consumption showed large variation between juices and in some cases between seasons. Our study clearly shows that preferred nitrogen and carbon sources were consumed by S. cerevisiae EC1118 independent of the juice fine composition, whilst the consumption of other nutrient sources mainly depended on the concentration of other juice metabolites, which explains the uniqueness of each barrel of wine.

  20. The effect of linoleic acid on the Sauvignon blanc fermentation by different wine yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Casu, Francesca; Pinu, Farhana R; Fedrizzi, Bruno; Greenwood, David R; Villas-Boas, Silas G

    2016-08-01

    The level of linoleic acid in the Sauvignon blanc (SB) grape juice affects the development of different aroma compounds during fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118, including key varietal thiols such as 3-mercaptohexanol (3MH) and 3-mercaptohexyl acetate (3MHA). However, it is still unknown if linoleic acid would affect in a similar way other commonly used S. cerevisiae wine strains. Here we investigated the effect of grape juice linoleic acid on the development of aroma compounds and other metabolites of SB wines using different wine yeast strains: EC1118, AWRI796 and VIN13. Linoleic acid clearly affected the levels of acetylated aroma compounds, several amino acids, and antioxidant molecules, independent of yeast strain, but the production of 3MH was affected by linoleic acid in a strain-specific manner. Moreover, the supplementation of deuterium-labelled 3MH also affected the production of varietal thiols in a strain-specific way. Linoleic acid reduced the acetylation process probably by inhibiting an acetyltransferase, an effect that was independent of the yeast strain. However, regulation of the 3MH biosynthesis is strain-specific, which suggests a mindful consideration not only towards the wine yeast but also to the linoleic acid concentration in the grape juice in order to obtain the desired wine aroma characteristics. PMID:27364827

  1. Calving processes and lake evolution at Miage glacier, Mont Blanc, Italian Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diolaiuti, G.; Kirkbride, M. P.; Smiraglia, C.; Benn, D. I.; D'Agata, C.; Nicholson, L.

    A marginal ice-contact lake at Miage glacier, Mont Blanc, Italian Alps, has been studied to reconstruct changes in lake area. Historical sources, comprising sketches, maps, photographs and scientific surveys, have been supplemented by recent field surveys. These include surveys of glacier surface velocity (which varied along the glacier tongue from 70 m a-1 in the upper part to about 6 m a-1 close to the snout, consistent with data in the literature, showing that velocity rates have remained constant during the last 40 years), volumetric ice-cliff loss (-92 000 ± 180 m3 in 2002 03), lake temperature and bathymetry, and qualitative observation of calving events, crevassing, and meltwater production. Results indicate that the lake has been stable for the last half-century following a period of enlargement due to ice-marginal retreat. The lake hydrology is complex, with possible reversals of englacial water flow causing infrequent emptying episodes. The debris cover on the glacier and ice-cliff surfaces seems to have played an important role in the ice-cliff evolution and the calving phenomena; calving is driven by undercutting at the water-line aided by the opening of water- and debris-filled crevasses in the glacier surface.

  2. Chemical and sensory effects of storing sauvignon Blanc wine in colored bottles under artificial light.

    PubMed

    Cáceres-Mella, Alejandro; Flores-Valdivia, Daniela; Laurie, V Felipe; López-Solís, Remigio; Peña-Neira, Álvaro

    2014-07-23

    The chemical and sensory effects of storing Sauvignon Blanc in colored bottles and exposing them to artificial light were examined. The colors of the bottles chosen were Dead Leaf Green, Antique Green, Amber, and Flint. The light was provided by fluorescent tubes with a regime of 16 h of exposure during 8 months of storage. The results indicated that the wine's chemical composition was affected by the type of bottle used. The Flint bottle presented the lowest concentration of total phenols. Yellow coloration was not dependent on the bottle color, as the wine in darker bottles (Amber, Antique Green, and Dead Leaf Green) had considerably more yellow color development than the wine in clear bottles. With regard to the sensory analyses performed, a trend showing an increase in color intensity and a decrease in overall aromas depending on the bottle color was observed. The wine's aromatic description changed significantly during its storage under artificial light conditions, demonstrating a decrease in vegetal aromas and an increase in citrus and tropical flavors that was dependent on the bottle color.

  3. Mt. St. Helens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Movie

    This 3-D anaglyph image of Mt. St. Helens volcano combines the nadir-looking and back-looking band 3 images of ASTER. To view the image in stereo, you will need blue-red glasses. Make sure to look through the red lens with your left eye. Figure 1: This ASTER image of Mt. St. Helens volcano in Washington was acquired on August 8, 2000 and covers an area of 37 by 51 km. Mount Saint Helens, a volcano in the Cascade Range of southwestern Washington that had been dormant since 1857, began to show signs of renewed activity in early 1980. On 18 May 1980, it erupted with such violence that the top of the mountain was blown off, spewing a cloud of ash and gases that rose to an altitude of 19 kilometers. The blast killed about 60 people and destroyed all life in an area of some 180 square kilometers (some 70 square miles), while a much larger area was covered with ash and debris. It continues to spit forth ash and steam intermittently. As a result of the eruption, the mountain's elevation decreased from 2,950 meters to 2,549 meters. The image is centered at 46.2 degrees north latitude, 122.2 degrees west longitude.

    Movie: The simulated fly-over was produced by draping ASTER visible and near infrared image data over a digital topography model, created from ASTER's 3-D stereo bands. The color was computer enhanced to create a natural color image, where the vegetation appears green. The topography has been exaggerated 2 times to enhance the appearance of the relief.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Sauvignon Blanc Grape Skin, Pulp and Seed and Relative Quantification of Pathogenesis-Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bin; Harrison, Roland; Morton, James; Deb-Choudhury, Santanu

    2015-01-01

    Thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) and chitinases are the main constituents of so-called protein hazes which can form in finished white wine and which is a great concern of winemakers. These soluble pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins are extracted from grape berries. However, their distribution in different grape tissues is not well documented. In this study, proteins were first separately extracted from the skin, pulp and seed of Sauvignon Blanc grapes, followed by trypsin digestion and analysis by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Proteins identified included 75 proteins from Sauvignon Blanc grape skin, 63 from grape pulp and 35 from grape seed, mostly functionally classified as associated with metabolism and energy. Some were present exclusively in specific grape tissues; for example, proteins involved in photosynthesis were only detected in grape skin and proteins found in alcoholic fermentation were only detected in grape pulp. Moreover, proteins identified in grape seed were less diverse than those identified in grape skin and pulp. TLPs and chitinases were identified in both Sauvignon Blanc grape skin and pulp, but not in the seed. To relatively quantify the PR proteins, the protein extracts of grape tissues were seperated by HPLC first and then analysed by SDS-PAGE. The results showed that the protein fractions eluted at 9.3 min and 19.2 min under the chromatographic conditions of this study confirmed that these corresponded to TLPs and chitinases seperately. Thus, the relative quantification of TLPs and chitinases in protein extracts was carried out by comparing the area of corresponding peaks against the area of a thamautin standard. The results presented in this study clearly demonstrated the distribution of haze-forming PR proteins in grape berries, and the relative quantification of TLPs and chitinases could be applied in fast tracking of changes in PR proteins during grape growth and determination of PR

  5. Evidence of saxitoxin derivatives as causative agents in the 1997 mass mortality of monk seals in the Cape Blanc Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Reyero, M; Cacho, E; Martínez, A; Vázquez, J; Marina, A; Fraga, S; Franco, J M

    1999-01-01

    Monk seals in Cape Blanc (Western Sahara coast) suffered a mass mortality during May-July 1997 which was attributed to a morbillivirus. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis on tissues of seals killed during the outbreak and on related fauna showed peaks with retention times coincident with those of some saxitoxin derivatives but their identity was not proved. Here we present results of further HPLC analyses that unambiguously prove the identity of these toxins by mass spectrometry (MS), supporting the hypothesis that this mortality of monk seals was caused by biotoxins rather than by a morbillivirus. PMID:11122522

  6. Mt. Etna, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Sunday, November 3, 2002, Mt. Etna's ash-laden plume was imaged by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. The plume is seen blowing toward the south-southeast, over the city and airport of Catania, Sicily. The previous day, the plume was blowing toward the northwest, and posed no hazard to Catania. The current eruption of Mt. Etna, Europe's most active volcano, began on October 27. These sorts of observations from space may help civil defense authorities mitigate hazards from active eruptions. Space data may also help scientists evaluate the behavior and effects volcanic eruptions have on our global climate system.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science

  7. Community variability of bacteria in alpine snow (Mont Blanc) containing Saharan dust deposition and their snow colonisation potential.

    PubMed

    Chuvochina, Maria S; Marie, Dominique; Chevaillier, Servanne; Petit, Jean-Robert; Normand, Philippe; Alekhina, Irina A; Bulat, Sergey A

    2011-01-01

    Microorganisms uplifted during dust storms survive long-range transport in the atmosphere and could colonize high-altitude snow. Bacterial communities in alpine snow on a Mont Blanc glacier, associated with four depositions of Saharan dust during the period 2006-2009, were studied using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and flow cytometry. Also, sand from the Tunisian Sahara, Saharan dust collected in Grenoble and Mont Blanc snow containing no Saharan dust (one sample of each) were analyzed. The bacterial community composition varied significantly in snow containing four dust depositions over a 3-year period. Out of 61 phylotypes recovered from dusty snow, only three phylotypes were detected in more than one sample. Overall, 15 phylotypes were recognized as potential snow colonizers. For snow samples, these phylotypes belonged to Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria, while for Saharan sand/dust samples they belonged to Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Deinococcus-Thermus and Proteobacteria. Thus, regardless of the time-scale, Saharan dust events can bring different microbiota with no common species set to alpine glaciers. This seems to be defined more by event peculiarities and aeolian transport conditions than by the bacterial load from the original dust source.

  8. MT1 and MT2 Melatonin Receptors: A Therapeutic Perspective.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiabei; Clough, Shannon J; Hutchinson, Anthony J; Adamah-Biassi, Ekue B; Popovska-Gorevski, Marina; Dubocovich, Margarita L

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin, or 5-methoxy-N-acetyltryptamine, is synthesized and released by the pineal gland and locally in the retina following a circadian rhythm, with low levels during the day and elevated levels at night. Melatonin activates two high-affinity G protein-coupled receptors, termed MT1 and MT2, to exert beneficial actions in sleep and circadian abnormality, mood disorders, learning and memory, neuroprotection, drug abuse, and cancer. Progress in understanding the role of melatonin receptors in the modulation of sleep and circadian rhythms has led to the discovery of a novel class of melatonin agonists for treating insomnia, circadian rhythms, mood disorders, and cancer. This review describes the pharmacological properties of a slow-release melatonin preparation (i.e., Circadin®) and synthetic ligands (i.e., agomelatine, ramelteon, tasimelteon), with emphasis on identifying specific therapeutic effects mediated through MT1 and MT2 receptor activation. Discovery of selective ligands targeting the MT1 or the MT2 melatonin receptors may promote the development of novel and more efficacious therapeutic agents. PMID:26514204

  9. MT1 and MT2 Melatonin Receptors: A Therapeutic Perspective.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiabei; Clough, Shannon J; Hutchinson, Anthony J; Adamah-Biassi, Ekue B; Popovska-Gorevski, Marina; Dubocovich, Margarita L

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin, or 5-methoxy-N-acetyltryptamine, is synthesized and released by the pineal gland and locally in the retina following a circadian rhythm, with low levels during the day and elevated levels at night. Melatonin activates two high-affinity G protein-coupled receptors, termed MT1 and MT2, to exert beneficial actions in sleep and circadian abnormality, mood disorders, learning and memory, neuroprotection, drug abuse, and cancer. Progress in understanding the role of melatonin receptors in the modulation of sleep and circadian rhythms has led to the discovery of a novel class of melatonin agonists for treating insomnia, circadian rhythms, mood disorders, and cancer. This review describes the pharmacological properties of a slow-release melatonin preparation (i.e., Circadin®) and synthetic ligands (i.e., agomelatine, ramelteon, tasimelteon), with emphasis on identifying specific therapeutic effects mediated through MT1 and MT2 receptor activation. Discovery of selective ligands targeting the MT1 or the MT2 melatonin receptors may promote the development of novel and more efficacious therapeutic agents.

  10. MT1 and MT2 Melatonin Receptors: A Therapeutic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiabei; Clough, Shannon J.; Hutchinson, Anthony J.; Adamah-Biassi, Ekue B.; Popovska-Gorevski, Marina; Dubocovich, Margarita L.

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin, or 5-methoxy-N-acetyltryptamine, is synthesized and released by the pineal gland and locally in the retina following a circadian rhythm, with low levels during the day and elevated levels at night. Melatonin activates two high-affinity G protein–coupled receptors, termed MT1 and MT2, to exert beneficial actions in sleep and circadian abnormality, mood disorders, learning and memory, neuroprotection, drug abuse, and cancer. Progress in understanding the role of melatonin receptors in the modulation of sleep and circadian rhythms has led to the discovery of a novel class of melatonin agonists for treating insomnia, circadian rhythms, mood disorders, and cancer. This review describes the pharmacological properties of a slow-release melatonin preparation (i.e., Circadin®) and synthetic ligands (i.e., agomelatine, ramelteon, tasimelteon), with emphasis on identifying specific therapeutic effects mediated through MT1 and MT2 receptor activation. Discovery of selective ligands targeting the MT1 or the MT2 melatonin receptors may promote the development of novel and more efficacious therapeutic agents. PMID:26514204

  11. Hurricanes Frances and Ivan

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Cloud Height Maps for Hurricanes Frances and Ivan     ... predict the intensity and amount of rainfall associated with hurricanes still requires improvement, especially on the 24 to 48 hour ...

  12. Mt. SAC Research Briefs, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mt. SAC Research Briefs, 2000

    2000-01-01

    These Research Briefs examine Mt. San Antonio College District's (MSAC's) (California) enrollment trends. Over the last few years, the district has drawn a large number of students from surrounding areas; however, there are concerns as to whether this fact will remain the same as new forms of educational techniques such as distance education and…

  13. France declares energy independence

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, M.P.; Starr, R.

    1983-03-01

    France has adhered to its policy of pursuing nuclear energy, using the same pressurized light-water reactor technology developed in the US, and going beyond to develop an operating breeder reactor, the Phenix. Pride and pragmatism, of which France has a full share, and petroleum, of which she has none, are the combination which has made the French nuclear program successful. The major difference between the French and US nuclear programs is institutional and political. The author concludes from his comparison that the US approach of private development and regulation is not appropriate. (DCK)

  14. Ethics committees in France.

    PubMed

    Isambert, F A

    1989-08-01

    Leading biologists and physicians in France have been considering bioethical problems for several decades. In 1983 an important new forum for bioethical discussion in France was created, with the establishment of the Comité Consultatif National d'Ethique pour les Sciences de la Vie et de la Santé (C.C.N.E.). This committee has produced numerous important opinions and reports on such topics as research involving human subjects, fetal tissue research, and the new reproductive technologies. At the local level the discussion of bioethical questions is carried on by ethics committees, which are charged with the responsibility of reviewing research protocols.

  15. France. [CME Country Reports].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). Documentation Center for Education in Europe.

    In France, the 1882 Compulsory Education Act includes both French and foreign children. Since then, the need to go further than this general principle of non-discrimination and to undertake specific action for immigrants, both adults and children, has been recognized. Since 1970, the Ministry of Education has been directly responsible for this…

  16. Urban Sociology in France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amiot, Michel

    1986-01-01

    Divides the history of urban sociology in France into three periods: (1) functionalism, which lasted from 1910 until the 1960s, (2) neo-Marxist socioeconomics lasting from 1968 until 1979, and (3) anthropological approach which is still dominant. Reviews theoretical perspectives and research characteristic of each period. (JDH)

  17. Tidal Power in France

    SciTech Connect

    Frau, J.P. )

    1993-03-01

    This presentation discusses the tidal power resource of France and the successes of the La Rance Plant. The topics of the presentation include power generation, adaptation of output to grid requirements, plant installation, environmental factors, La Rance success, and a review of major world wide tidal energy projects in the UK, Canada, South Korea, India, and Argentina.

  18. Country Profiles. France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourgeois-Pichat, Jean

    A profile of France is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: (1) location and description of the country; (2) population--size, growth patterns, age structure, urban/rural distribution, ethnic and religious composition, education,…

  19. Chagas disease, France.

    PubMed

    Lescure, François-Xavier; Canestri, Ana; Melliez, Hugues; Jauréguiberry, Stéphane; Develoux, Michel; Dorent, Richard; Guiard-Schmid, Jean-Baptiste; Bonnard, Philippe; Ajana, Faïza; Rolla, Valeria; Carlier, Yves; Gay, Frederick; Elghouzzi, Marie-Hélène; Danis, Martin; Pialoux, Gilles

    2008-04-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is endemic to Latin America; its prevalence is highest in Bolivia. CD is sometimes seen in the United States and Canada among migrants from Latin America, whereas it is rare in Europe. We report 9 cases of imported CD in France from 2004 to 2006.

  20. Traveling in France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philyaw, Henry; And Others

    This minicourse guide for teachers of French is intended to help motivate and prepare students for travel in France. Activities are outlined in eleven related areas, including (1) planning for the trip, (2) currency, (3) going through customs, (4) tipping, (5) shopping, (6) guided tours, (7) touring on your own, (8) social life and entertainment,…

  1. Thermal and structural evolution of the external Western Alps: Insights from (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronology and RSCM thermometry in the Aiguilles Rouges/Mont Blanc massifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutoux, A.; Bellahsen, N.; Nanni, U.; Pik, R.; Verlaguet, A.; Rolland, Y.; Lacombe, O.

    2016-06-01

    In the Western Alps, the External Crystalline Massifs (ECM) are key places to investigate the kinematics and thermal structure of a collisional crustal wedge, as their paleo-brittle/ductile transition is now exhumed at the surface. New (U-Th-Sm)/He data on zircon and new Raman Spectroscopy on Carbonaceous Material (RSCM) data from the Aiguilles Rouges and the Mont Blanc massifs, coupled to HeFTy thermal modeling, constrain the thermal evolution and exhumation of the massifs. In the cover of the Aiguilles Rouges massif, we found that the maximal temperature was about 320 °C (+/- 25 °C), close to the maximal temperature reached in the cover of the Mont Blanc massif (~ 350 °C +/- 25 °C). We show that, after a fast heating period, the thermal peak lasted 10-15 Myrs in the Mont Blanc massif, and probably 5-10 Myrs in the Aiguilles Rouges massif. This thermal peak is synchronous with crustal shortening documented in the basement. (U-Th-Sm)/He data and thermal modeling point toward a coeval cooling of both massifs, like other ECM, at around 18 Ma +/- 1 Ma. This cooling was related to an exhumation due to the initiation of frontal crustal ramps below the ECM, quite synchronously along the Western Alps arc.

  2. Patterns in Seismicity at Mt St Helens and Mt Unzen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Oliver; De Angelis, Silvio; Lavallee, Yan

    2014-05-01

    Cyclic behaviour on a range of timescales is a well-documented feature of many dome-forming volcanoes. Previous work on Soufrière Hills volcano (Montserrat) and Volcán de Colima (Mexico) revealed broad-scale similarities in behaviour implying the potential to develop general physical models of sub-surface processes [1]. Using volcano-seismic data from Mt St Helens (USA) and Mt Unzen (Japan) this study explores parallels in long-term behaviour of seismicity at two dome-forming systems. Within the last twenty years both systems underwent extended dome-forming episodes accompanied by large Vulcanian explosions or dome collapses. This study uses a suite of quantitative and analytical techniques which can highlight differences or similarities in volcano seismic behaviour, and compare the behaviour to changes in activity during the eruptive episodes. Seismic events were automatically detected and characterized on a single short-period seismometer station located 1.5km from the 2004-2008 vent at Mt St Helens. A total of 714 826 individual events were identified from continuous recording of seismic data from 22 October 2004 to 28 February 2006 (average 60.2 events per hour) using a short-term/long-term average algorithm. An equivalent count will be produced from seismometer recordings over the later stages of the 1991-1995 eruption at MT Unzen. The event count time-series from Mt St Helens is then analysed using Multi-taper Method and the Short-Term Fourier Transform to explore temporal variations in activity. Preliminary analysis of seismicity from Mt St Helens suggests cyclic behaviour of subannual timescale, similar to that described at Volcán de Colima and Soufrière Hills volcano [1]. Frequency Index and waveform correlation tools will be implemented to analyse changes in the frequency content of the seismicity and to explore their relations to different phases of activity at the volcano. A single station approach is used to gain a fine-scale view of variations in

  3. Dynamic study of yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during the spontaneous fermentations of Muscat blanc in Jingyang, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Liu, Yanlin

    2013-04-01

    The evolution of yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae genotypes during spontaneous fermentations of Muscat blanc planted in 1957 in Jingyang region of China was followed in this study. Using a combination of colony morphology on Wallerstein Nutrient (WLN) medium, sequence analysis of the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain and 5.8S-ITS-RFLP analysis, a total of 686 isolates were identified at the species level. The six species identified were S. cerevisiae, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Hanseniaspora opuntiae, Issatchenkia terricola, Pichia kudriavzevii (Issatchenkia orientalis) and Trichosporon coremiiforme. This is the first report of T. coremiiforme as an inhabitant of grape must. Three new colony morphologies on WLN medium and one new 5.8S-ITS-RFLP profile are described. Species of non-Saccharomyces, predominantly H. opuntiae, were found in early stages of fermentation. Subsequently, S. cerevisiae prevailed followed by large numbers of P. kudriavzevii that dominated at the end of fermentations. Six native genotypes of S. cerevisiae were determined by interdelta sequence analysis. Genotypes III and IV were predominant. As a first step in exploring untapped yeast resources of the region, this study is important for monitoring the yeast ecology in native fermentations and screening indigenous yeasts that will produce wines with regional characteristics.

  4. From UVR8 to flavonol synthase: UV-B-induced gene expression in Sauvignon blanc grape berry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linlin; Gregan, Scott; Winefield, Chris; Jordan, Brian

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the effect of development and UV-B on flavonols and the regulation of gene activity in Vitis vinifera L. var. Sauvignon blanc grapes. Particular emphasis was placed on gene activity associated with the low and high fluence UV-B responses. Flavonols, particularly quercetin and kaempferol glycosides, increased substantially upon fruit exposure due to UV-B, with spatial analysis locating the changes to the berry skin. Of five VvFLS genes in grapes, two (VvFLS4 and 5) were found to be transcriptionally active, with VvFLS4 also being responsive to UV-B but VvFLS5 was not. Of the transcription factors known to regulate FLS (VvMYB12, VvMYCA1 and VvWDRs), only VvMYB12 was found to be responsive to UV-B. A number of candidate genes associated with the low and high UV-B fluence responses were also studied (VvUVR8, VvHY5, VvCOP1 and VvCHS; PR genes and VvMAPK3; respectively). The genes associated with the low fluence response exhibited transcriptional regulation in line with reports from other species, while the PR genes and VvMAPK3 only appeared to be responsive in a high UV-B fluence environment. Together, these data supports the view flavonol biosynthesis in grape is stimulated predominantly through the low fluence UV-B response pathway.

  5. Dynamic study of yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during the spontaneous fermentations of Muscat blanc in Jingyang, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Liu, Yanlin

    2013-04-01

    The evolution of yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae genotypes during spontaneous fermentations of Muscat blanc planted in 1957 in Jingyang region of China was followed in this study. Using a combination of colony morphology on Wallerstein Nutrient (WLN) medium, sequence analysis of the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain and 5.8S-ITS-RFLP analysis, a total of 686 isolates were identified at the species level. The six species identified were S. cerevisiae, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Hanseniaspora opuntiae, Issatchenkia terricola, Pichia kudriavzevii (Issatchenkia orientalis) and Trichosporon coremiiforme. This is the first report of T. coremiiforme as an inhabitant of grape must. Three new colony morphologies on WLN medium and one new 5.8S-ITS-RFLP profile are described. Species of non-Saccharomyces, predominantly H. opuntiae, were found in early stages of fermentation. Subsequently, S. cerevisiae prevailed followed by large numbers of P. kudriavzevii that dominated at the end of fermentations. Six native genotypes of S. cerevisiae were determined by interdelta sequence analysis. Genotypes III and IV were predominant. As a first step in exploring untapped yeast resources of the region, this study is important for monitoring the yeast ecology in native fermentations and screening indigenous yeasts that will produce wines with regional characteristics. PMID:23200649

  6. Grapevine Plasticity in Response to an Altered Microclimate: Sauvignon Blanc Modulates Specific Metabolites in Response to Increased Berry Exposure.

    PubMed

    Young, Philip R; Eyeghe-Bickong, Hans A; du Plessis, Kari; Alexandersson, Erik; Jacobson, Dan A; Coetzee, Zelmari; Deloire, Alain; Vivier, Melané A

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the metabolic and physiological impacts of an altered microclimate on quality-associated primary and secondary metabolites in grape (Vitis vinifera) 'Sauvignon Blanc' berries was determined in a high-altitude vineyard. The leaf and lateral shoot removal in the bunch zones altered the microclimate by increasing the exposure of the berries. The physical parameters (berry diameter and weight), primary metabolites (sugars and organic acids), as well as bunch temperature and leaf water potential were predominantly not affected by the treatment. The increased exposure led to higher levels of specific carotenoids and volatile terpenoids in the exposed berries, with earlier berry stages reacting distinctly from the later developmental stages. Plastic/nonplastic metabolite responses could be further classified to identify metabolites that were developmentally controlled and/or responded to the treatment in a predictable fashion (assessed over two consecutive vintages). The study demonstrates that grapevine berries exhibit a degree of plasticity within their secondary metabolites and respond physiologically to the increased exposure by increasing metabolites with potential antioxidant activity. Taken together, the data provide evidence that the underlying physiological responses relate to the maintenance of stress pathways by modulating antioxidant molecules in the berries. PMID:26628747

  7. Report from France

    PubMed Central

    Régnier, François; Rouzioux, Jean-Marc

    1983-01-01

    The authors consider four aspects of contemporary medical ethics in France: abortion and contraception; artificial insemination; suicide and euthanasia, and drug trials on healthy human volunteers, and then outline the various ethical codes which apply to French doctors. Many in France who accept technological progress are unwilling or unable to acknowledge the impact upon medical ethics of this progress. The conflict is epitomised by the new role being demanded from the doctor. Where formerly he was regarded as the guardian of traditional values today he is urged to adapt, to change, to take account of the technological innovations in medicine. `In such a situation,' the authors ask, `how is it possible to avoid a feeling of uneasiness?' PMID:6352945

  8. [Primary care in France].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-01-01

    The poor planning of health care professionals in Spain has led to an exodus of doctors leaving the country. France is one of the chosen countries for Spanish doctors to develop their professional career. The French health care system belongs to the Bismarck model. In this model, health care system is financed jointly by workers and employers through payroll deduction. The right to health care is linked to the job, and provision of services is done by sickness-funds controlled by the Government. Primary care in France is quite different from Spanish primary care. General practitioners are independent workers who have the right to set up a practice anywhere in France. This lack of regulation has generated a great problem of "medical desertification" with problems of health care access and inequalities in health. French doctors do not want to work in rural areas or outside cities because "they are not value for money". Medical salary is linked to professional activity. The role of doctors is to give punctual care. Team work team does not exist, and coordination between primary and secondary care is lacking. Access to diagnostic tests, hospitals and specialists is unlimited. Duplicity of services, adverse events and inefficiencies are the norm. Patients can freely choose their doctor, and they have a co-payment for visits and hospital care settings. Two years training is required to become a general practitioner. After that, continuing medical education is compulsory, but it is not regulated. Although the French medical Health System was named by the WHO in 2000 as the best health care system in the world, is it not that good. While primary care in Spain has room for improvement, there is a long way for France to be like Spain.

  9. [Primary care in France].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-01-01

    The poor planning of health care professionals in Spain has led to an exodus of doctors leaving the country. France is one of the chosen countries for Spanish doctors to develop their professional career. The French health care system belongs to the Bismarck model. In this model, health care system is financed jointly by workers and employers through payroll deduction. The right to health care is linked to the job, and provision of services is done by sickness-funds controlled by the Government. Primary care in France is quite different from Spanish primary care. General practitioners are independent workers who have the right to set up a practice anywhere in France. This lack of regulation has generated a great problem of "medical desertification" with problems of health care access and inequalities in health. French doctors do not want to work in rural areas or outside cities because "they are not value for money". Medical salary is linked to professional activity. The role of doctors is to give punctual care. Team work team does not exist, and coordination between primary and secondary care is lacking. Access to diagnostic tests, hospitals and specialists is unlimited. Duplicity of services, adverse events and inefficiencies are the norm. Patients can freely choose their doctor, and they have a co-payment for visits and hospital care settings. Two years training is required to become a general practitioner. After that, continuing medical education is compulsory, but it is not regulated. Although the French medical Health System was named by the WHO in 2000 as the best health care system in the world, is it not that good. While primary care in Spain has room for improvement, there is a long way for France to be like Spain. PMID:26304179

  10. Pharmacy Education in France

    PubMed Central

    Bourdon, Olivier; Ekeland, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    In France, to practice as a pharmacist, one needs a “diplome d'état de Docteur en Pharmacie” This degree is awarded after 6 or 9 years of pharmacy studies, depending on the option chosen by the student. The degree is offered only at universities and is recognized in France as well as throughout the European Union. Each university in France is divided into faculties called Unité de Formation et de Recherche (UFR). There are 24 faculties of pharmacy or UFRs de pharmacie. A national committee develops a pharmacy education program at the national level and each faculty adapts this program according to its specific features and means (eg, faculty, buildings). The number of students accepted in the second year is determined each year by a Government decree (numerus clausus). Successive placements, totalling 62 weeks, progressively familiarize the student with professional practice, and enable him/her to acquire the required competencies, such as drug monitoring and educating and counselling patients. Challenges facing community pharmacies in the next 10 years are patient education, home health care, and orthopaedics; in hospital pharmacies, empowering pharmacists to supervise and validate all prescriptions; and finally, research in pharmacy practice. PMID:19325952

  11. Pharmacy education in France.

    PubMed

    Bourdon, Olivier; Ekeland, Catherine; Brion, Françoise

    2008-12-15

    In France, to practice as a pharmacist, one needs a "diplome d'état de Docteur en Pharmacie" This degree is awarded after 6 or 9 years of pharmacy studies, depending on the option chosen by the student. The degree is offered only at universities and is recognized in France as well as throughout the European Union. Each university in France is divided into faculties called Unité de Formation et de Recherche (UFR). There are 24 faculties of pharmacy or UFRs de pharmacie. A national committee develops a pharmacy education program at the national level and each faculty adapts this program according to its specific features and means (eg, faculty, buildings). The number of students accepted in the second year is determined each year by a Government decree (numerus clausus). Successive placements, totalling 62 weeks, progressively familiarize the student with professional practice, and enable him/her to acquire the required competencies, such as drug monitoring and educating and counselling patients. Challenges facing community pharmacies in the next 10 years are patient education, home health care, and orthopaedics; in hospital pharmacies, empowering pharmacists to supervise and validate all prescriptions; and finally, research in pharmacy practice.

  12. Onboard Photo of Mt. Everest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronaut Daniel W. Bursch, Expedition Four flight engineer, was delighted in capturing this image of Mt. Everest in the Himalayan Range from aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The mountain is near frame center. Because the photo was taken close to orbital sunrise, the low sun angle gave tremendous relief to the mountains. Named for Sir George Everest, the British surveyor-general of India, Mount Everest is the tallest point on earth. Standing 29,028 feet tall, it is 5 1/2 miles above sea level. Mount Everest is located half in Nepal and half in Tibet.

  13. Incineration of municipal and assimilated wastes in France: assessment of latest energy and material recovery performances.

    PubMed

    Autret, Erwan; Berthier, Francine; Luszezanec, Audrey; Nicolas, Florence

    2007-01-31

    Incineration has an important place in waste management in France. In 2003, around 130 incineration plants have treated 12.6 Mt of non-dangerous waste, mainly composed of household waste (10.8 Mt), non-dangerous waste from industry, business, services (1.0 Mt), sewage sludge (0.2 Mt) or clinical waste (0.1 Mt). The incineration of these wastes generated 3.0 Mt of bottom ash of which 2.3 Mt were used for roads construction and 0.2 Mt of ferrous and non-ferrous metal were recycled. It also produced 2,900,000 MWh of electricity, of which 2,200,000 MWh were sold to Electricité de France (EDF) and 9,100,000 MWh of heat, of which 7,200,000 MWh were sold to private or public users. These French incinerators of non-hazardous waste are currently being thoroughly modernized, thus making possible the consolidation and the enhancement of their environmental and energy performance. This process is related to the implementation of the European Directive 2000/76/CE whose expiration date is 28 December 2005. Upon request of ADEME, the engineering company GIRUS has realised the first technical and economical evaluation of works necessary to bring incinerators into compliance. The financial estimations, carried out in 30 June 2003, show that the investments to be devoted could reach 750 million euros. This assessment shed new light on the situation of non-hazardous waste incinerators, including an identification and a rank ordering for each incinerator of the most frequent and the most complex non-conformities to be solved in term of cost and delay. At last, this assessment gives the solutions for each non-compliance. PMID:16707217

  14. Vulnerability of settlements around Mt. Cameroon volcano, Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zogning, Appolinaire; Spinetti, Claudia; Ngouanet, Chretien; Tchoudam, David; Kouokam, Emmanuel; Thierry, Pierre; Bignami, Christian; Fabrizia Buongiorno, Maria; Ilaria Pannaccione Apa, Maria

    2010-05-01

    Located at the bottom of the Gulf of Guinea, Cameroon is exposed to a large variety of natural hazards, including volcanism. Most of the hazard are concentrated around the active volcano Mt. Cameroon which combines effusive and explosive types of activity. The threatened stakes are numerous and different exposed: people, settlements, industrial plantations, petrol refinery and many other factories and infrastructures. Until 2005, no risk management plans has been available. In 2006, the French Embassy in Cameroon, within the framework of a financial convention between Cameroon and France, put in place the GRINP (Management of Natural Risks and Civil Protection) project whose objective was to reinforce the capacity of Cameroon's civil protection department and thus, contribute to the improvement of the security of the population faced with catastrophes. The objective was to realize a Risk Prevention Plan at a local council scale, and taking into consideration the specific natural risks of each zone. The general objective of the RPP was to clearly draw land use maps for risks zones, showing the overlay of stakes with risk of different intensities. In 2008 European Commission funded the Mia-Vita project (Mitigating and Assessing Volcanic Impacts on Terrain and human Activities). The aim of the project is to improve the crisis management capabilities based on monitoring and early warning systems and secure communications; reduction of people's vulnerability and development of recovering capabilities after an event occurs for both local communities and ecological systems. Keyword: natural hazards, Mt. Cameroon, vulnerability, risk prevention plan

  15. Petroleum statistics in France

    SciTech Connect

    De Saint Germain, H.; Lamiraux, C.

    1995-08-01

    33 oil companies, including Elf, Exxon, Agip, Conoco as well as Coparex, Enron, Hadson, Midland, Hunt, Canyon and Union Texas are present in oil and gas exploration and production in France. The production of oil and gas in France amounts to some 60,000 bopd of oil and 350 MMcfpd of marketed natural gas each year, which still accounts for 3.5% and 10% for French domestic needs, respectively. To date, 166 fields have been discovered, representing a total reserve of 3 billion bbl of crude oil and 13 trillion cf of raw gas. These fields are concentrated in two major onshore sedimentary basins of Mesozoic age, which are the Aquitaine basin and the Paris basin. The Aquitaine basin should be subdivided into two distinct domains: The Parentis basin where the largest field Parentis was discovered in 1954 with still production of about 3700 bopd of oil and where Les Arbouslers field, discovered at the end of 1991, is currently producing about 10,000 bopd of oil. The northern Pyrenees and their foreland, where the Lacq field, discovered in 1951, has produced about 7.7 tcf of gas since 1957, and is still producing 138 MMcfpd. In the Paris basin, the two large oil fields are Villeperclue discovered in 1982 by Triton and Total, and Chaunoy, discovered in 1983 by Essorep, which are still producing about 10,000 and 15,000 bopd, respectively. The last significantly sized discovery occurred in 1990 with Itteville by Elf Aquitaine which is currently producing 4,200 bopd. The poster shows statistical data related to the past 20 years of oil and gas exploration and production in France.

  16. Medicolegal anthropology in France.

    PubMed

    Işcan, M Y; Quatrehomme, G

    1999-03-15

    Medicolegal anthropology has a very long history in France. Basic studies on human skeletal remains started as early as the 18th century. The 19th century produced many medical theses and research papers on age, sex, as well as stature estimation. The research proliferated in the first 60 years of the 20th century, much of which is still in use in France and abroad. The later half of the 20th century, however, was dormant in research on human skeletal biology at a time when forensic anthropology was becoming an active field worldwide. In the last decade, medicolegal anthropology took a different perspective, independent of its traditional roots. Research and practice have both been in the professional domain of forensic physicians unlike the situation in many other countries. Population based studies requiring large databases or skeletal collections have diminished considerably. Thus, most research has been on factors of individualization such as trauma, time since death, crime scene investigation, and facial reconstruction. It is suggested that there is a need for cooperation between the forensic physician and anthropologist to further research. This also encourages anthropologists to carry out research and practice that can fulfill the needs of the medicolegal system of the country. PMID:10356772

  17. Battle of France WWII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadhath, Arpitha Rao

    The purpose of this thesis is to build an interactive Geographical Information System (GIS) tool, relating to the series of events that occurred during the Battle of France World War II. The tool gives us an insight about the countries involved in the battle, their allies and their strategies. This tool was created to use it as a one stop source of information regarding all the important battles that took place, which lead to the fall of France. The tool brings together the maps of all the countries involved. Integrated with each map is the data relevant to that map. The data for each country includes the place of attack, the strategies used during the attack, and the kind of warfare. The tool also makes use of HTML files to give all the information, along with the images from the time of the war and a footage which explains everything about the particular battle. The tool was build using JAVA, along with the use of MOJO (Map Objects Java Objects) to develop Maps of each of the countries. MOJO is developed by ESRI (Environmental Science Research Institute) which makes it easier to add data to the maps. It also makes highlighting important information easier making use of pop-up windows, charts and infographics. HTML files were designed making use of the open-source template developed by Bootstrap. The tool is built in such a way that the interface is simple and easy for the user to use and understand.

  18. France: late abortion.

    PubMed

    Gaudry, D; Sadan, G

    1989-01-01

    In France, under the terms of a law passed by Parliament in 1975, a woman may have an abortion up to 12 weeks of pregnancy if she is a French resident and, in the event that she is a minor, she has parental consent. The woman must also have 2 medical consultations, a week apart. The woman is reimbursed by the state up to 70% of the cost of the abortion. After 12 weeks, abortion, except for therapeutic abortion, under the terms of Article 317 of the Criminal Code, is a crime, punishable by 6 months to 10 years in prison, a fine of between 1800 and 250,000 Francs, and loss of professional license. Moreover, Article 647 of the Health Code bans any advertising, incitement or propaganda for abortion or abortion-inducing products. Many French women go to Britain or Holland for abortions after 12 weeks, but they face the financial burden of traveling as well as the difficulties of getting help in a strange country and the stigma of having done something illegal. The Mouvement Francais pour le Planning Familial, which won the legalization of contraception in 1967, is now fighting for legal abortion as well as the distribution of information about sexuality, contraception, and abortion in the schools. 2 charges of incitement to abortion have been brought against the organization.

  19. High morphogenic activity in the permafrost-affected rock walls of the Mont Blanc massif during the 2015 summer heat wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanel, Ludovic; Magnin, Florence; Deline, Philip

    2016-04-01

    In order to test the geomorphological hypothesis on the link between permafrost degradation and rock wall destabilisation, we survey all the rockfalls that occur in the central part of the Mont-Blanc massif using a network of observers since 2007. 511 rockfalls (100 < V < 45,000 m3) have been documented, year 2015 included. Between 2007 and 2014, the average number of destabilizations was 44 (from 17 in 2014 with a cold summer to 72 in 2009 with a relatively hot summer). In 2015, 160 events were recorded i.e. 4 times more than the annual average of the previous years. That makes the year 2015 similar to 2003 that was characterized by its summer heatwave triggering 152 rockfalls in the area currently covered by the network of observers, as shown by the analysis of a SPOT-5 image. Observations of 2015 are discussed and crossed with a statistical model of the Mean Annual Rock Surface Temperature (MARST) for the 1961-1990 period, implemented on a 4-m-resolution DEM of the Mont Blanc massif, and temperature measurements in three 10-m-deep boreholes at the Aiguille du Midi (3842 m a.s.l.), where the summer 2015 active layers have been the thickest since the start of measurements in 2009 (e.g. 3.6 m in the NE face against 2.9 m in average during the previous years). Before 2015, 90 % of the inventoried rockfalls occurred in areas where MARST is in the range -5 to 1°C, whereas only 50 % of the whole rock wall area above 2000 m a.s.l. covers this temperature range. With an air 0°C isotherm which sometimes exceeded the summit of Mont Blanc (4809 m a.s.l.) during the 2015 Summer, conditions were particularly unfavorable for mountaineering. Numerous rescues were carried out to climbers technically blocked by uncommon conditions or injured by rockfalls. On the normal route to the summit of Mont Blanc, two administrative closures of the Goûter hut (3835 m a.s.l.) were necessary to prevent climbers from the huge risk of rockfalls in the access couloir, known for its rockfall

  20. Chronic erosion in Wissant Bay coast, northern France - Causes and trials of management projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrati, M.; Anthony, E. J.

    2012-04-01

    Cape Gris Nez to the southwest and Cape Blanc Nez to the northeast limit's Wissant Bay. This extreme northern coast of France, facing the Dover Strait, is one of the most rapidly eroding sector of coast in France. Shoreline retreat has exceeded 250 m in the last fifty years in the central and western parts of the bay, while the eastern sector of the bay is now a zone of accretion, after being a sand-starved zone in the past, when the western sector was either stable or in accretion. The reasons for these changes are still not clear. They seem to involve interactions between a nearshore sand bank and the activity of current gyres related to the projecting headland of Cape Gris Nez, beach rotation processes and human activities, notably past aggregate extraction from the nearshore sand bank which acted hitherto as both a dissipater of incident storm wave energy and as a coastal sand source. The aim of this paper to contribute to the understanding of these long-term changes and investigate the mechanisms of this mildly embayed coast evolution. To this end, 10-years of topographic profile data throughout the bay were analysed and confronted with offshore wave data. This analysis complements a previous analytical effort that determined gross rates of annual shoreline retreat by time slices of several decades from the careful interpretation of long series of ortho-rectified aerial photographs. The overall data suggest chronic sand bleeding from the western sector of the beach and longshore transport to the east, within a framework of what appears to be an ongoing beach rotation process within a dominant longshore sediment transport cell between the headland of Cape Gris Nez and the bold chalk cliffs of Cape Blanc Nez. Retreat of the beach-dune barrier in the western sector of Wissant Bay poses a threat in the coming years as there is a likelihood of storm breaching of the narrow dune barrier. Face to this critical situation, a proper management strategy involving a good

  1. Women in physics in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierron-Bohnes, Véronique

    2015-12-01

    We present six associations and entities working in France on issues of women in physics: the Women and Physics Commission, French Physical Society; Women in Nuclear (WiN) France; Women and Science Association; Mission for the Place of Women at CNRS; Parity, Diversity, and Women Network, CEA; and the Network of University Equality-Diversity Representatives.

  2. Old Age Policy in France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillemard, Anne-Marie

    Old-age policy in France has evolved historically in three critical dimensions that also correspond generally to post-World War II developments in France: the right to retirement (pensions); improved living conditions (e.g., autonomy, housing); and continued participation in the labor force. The last focus is currently a controversial one, given…

  3. Women in physics in France

    SciTech Connect

    Pierron-Bohnes, Véronique

    2015-12-31

    We present six associations and entities working in France on issues of women in physics: the Women and Physics Commission, French Physical Society; Women in Nuclear (WiN) France; Women and Science Association; Mission for the Place of Women at CNRS; Parity, Diversity, and Women Network, CEA; and the Network of University Equality-Diversity Representatives.

  4. The role of MT2-MMP in cancer progression

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Emiko; Yana, Ikuo; Fujita, Chisato; Irifune, Aiko; Takeda, Maki; Madachi, Ayako; Mori, Seiji; Hamada, Yoshinosuke; Kawaguchi, Naomasa; Matsuura, Nariaki

    2010-03-05

    The role of MT2-MMP in cancer progression remains to be elucidated in spite of many reports on MT1-MMP. Using a human fibrosarcoma cell, HT1080 and a human gastric cancer cell, TMK-1, endogenous expression of MT1-MMP or MT2-MMP was suppressed by siRNA induction to examine the influence of cancer progression in vitro and in vivo. In HT1080 cells, positive both in MT1-MMP and MT2-MMP, the migration as well as the invasion was impaired by MT1-MMP or MT2-MMP suppression. Also cell proliferation in three dimensional (3D) condition was inhibited by MT1-MMP or MT2-MMP suppression and tumor growth in the nude mice transplanted with tumor cells were reduced either MT1-MMP or MT2-MMP suppression with a prolongation of survival time in vivo. MT2-MMP suppression induces more inhibitory effects on 3D proliferation and in vivo tumor growth than MT1-MMP. On the other hand, TMK-1 cells, negative in MT1-MMP and MMP-2 but positive in MT2-MMP, all the migratory, invasive, and 3D proliferative activities in TMK-1 are decreased only by MT2-MMP suppression. These results indicate MT2-MMP might be involved in the cancer progression more than or equal to MT1-MMP independently of MMP-2 and MT1-MMP.

  5. The Italian drilling project of the Mont Blanc road tunnel in the late fifties: an example of no geological care and lack of ethics in carrying out a big work.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosso, Guido; Croce, Giuseppe; Matteucci, Ruggero; Peppoloni, Silvia; Piacente, Sandra; Wasowski, Janusz

    2013-04-01

    In the first decade after the Second World War Italy was rushing to recover a positive role among European countries; basic needs as road communications with European neighbours became main priorities. The necessity of a rapid connection with South-eastern France, a subject already debated between the two nations over more than 50 years, appeared then on first line; the two countries convened on a joint investment for the construction of a tunnel across the international border of Mont Blanc, along the shortest track between Courmayeur and Chamonix. The political agreements were in favour of the quickest start of the drilling operations and such obligation imposed on the Italian side an impoverishment of the project content, specially concerning geological issues. No surveys were performed on fracture systems, cataclastic zones and faults, on the few rock ridges standing above the tunnel line and outcropping through thick talus cones, moraines, ice tongues and their related ice plateaus. Metasediments, migmatites and poorly foliated granites were to be drilled. Three Italian academics were allowed by the drilling company to track the working progress and collect rocks for comparison with other Alpine types; they mapped the lithology and the fault zonesall along the freshly excavated tunnel; the results of such survey appeared after the end of works. Geologists from Florence University published the surface granite faulting pattern 20 years after the road tunnel became operative. Such geological cares could have located the risky zones in time for the tunnel project, mitigating the catastrophic effects of sudden drainage of subglacial water from the Vallée Blanche ice plateau (Ghiacciaio del Gigante) at progression 3800m, that caused dramatic accidents and affected negatively the economy of the drilling. Also the wallrock temperature drops, measured during the drill, should have warned the company management on the location of dangerous fracture zones. Anxiety of

  6. Frances Mary hodgkins.

    PubMed

    Laurie, A J

    2001-01-01

    SUMMARY Frances Hodgkins was one of a number of expatriate New Zealanders during the early twentieth century who lived in Britain or Europe, where it was easier to find supportive friendship circles for their lives as artists or as people attracted to their own sex. In this article, I explore the primacy of women in Hodgkins' life and read this as lesbian and argue that many of these relationships were sexual, from the evidence of her letters, which suggest that she moved in lesbian worlds of work and friendship. I also discuss the financial and emotional support given by her male homosexual as well as her lesbian friends who made her life as an artist possible.

  7. Groundwater management in France

    SciTech Connect

    Margat, J. )

    1987-01-01

    Groundwater, like other extensive natural and renewable resources, easily accessible and, at the same time, vulnerable, has to be managed so as to reconcile the unique resource with its many users, and its long-term preservation with short-term utilization requirements. Under the natural, legal, and economic conditions prevailing in France, where groundwater constitutes a large part of water production and resources, where there are tens of thousands of economic developers and users of a few hundred natural groundwater management units, such management concerns these users as well as the public and collective authorities that control the users activities for the common present and future good at all. Legislative, financial, and educational means are applied simultaneously to preserve and protect the quality and quantity of the groundwater and at times to encourage its use and stimulate its development.

  8. ASTER Images Mt. Usu Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    On April 3, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra Satellite captured this image of the erupting Mt. Usu volcano in Hokkaido, Japan. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image the Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    This false color infrared image of Mt Usu volcano is dominated by Lake Toya, an ancient volcanic caldera. On the south shore is the active Usu volcano. On Friday, March 31, more than 11,000 people were evacuated by helicopter, truck and boat from the foot of Usu, that began erupting from the northwest flank, shooting debris and plumes of smoke streaked with blue lightning thousands of feet in the air. Although no lava gushed from the mountain, rocks and ash continued to fall after the eruption. The region was shaken by thousands of tremors before the eruption. People said they could taste grit from the ash that was spewed as high as 2,700 meters (8,850 ft) into the sky and fell to coat surrounding towns with ash. 'Mount Usu has had seven significant eruptions that we know of, and at no time has it ended quickly with only a small scale eruption,' said Yoshio Katsui, a professor at Hokkaido University. This was the seventh major eruption of Mount Usu in the past 300 years. Fifty people died when the volcano erupted in 1822, its worst known eruption.

    In the image, most of the land is covered by snow. Vegetation, appearing red in the false color composite, can be seen in the agricultural fields, and forests in the mountains. Mt. Usu is crossed by three dark streaks. These are the paths of ash deposits that rained out from eruption plumes two days earlier. The prevailing wind was from the northwest, carrying the ash away from the main city of Date. Ash deposited can be traced on the image as far away as 10 kilometers (16

  9. Methoxypyrazine Accumulation and O-Methyltransferase Gene Expression in Sauvignon blanc Grapes: The Role of Leaf Removal, Light Exposure, and Berry Development.

    PubMed

    Gregan, Scott M; Jordan, Brian

    2016-03-23

    Methoxypyrazines are present in the grapes of certain Vitis vinifera varieties including Sauvignon blanc and contribute herbaceous/green aromas to wine. Environmental factors such as light exposure and temperature can influence methoxypyrazine levels, and viticultural interventions such as canopy manipulation have the ability to reduce methoxypyrazine accumulation in grapes. We assessed methoxypyrazine levels and showed that leaf removal significantly reduces accumulation in Sauvignon blanc grapes. The main effect of reducing methoxypyrazines was preveraison, as postveraison treatments had no effect on concentrations at harvest. Methoxypyrazine concentrations in controls peaked preveraison and decreased through harvest. Dilution due to an increase in berry weight was found to be the major driver of decreasing concentrations, as methoxypyrazine levels on a per berry basis were found to increase through development in two of three seasons. In the one year of our study that showed contrasting results, analyses of weather data indicate that warmer than average temperatures appear to be the principal factor affecting the berries' ability to accumulate and retain methoxypyrazines. We also explored the expression of potential biosynthetic O-methyltransferase genes VvOMT1, VvOMT2, and VvOMT3; no significant differences were observed with respect to effect of leaf removal and light exposure. PMID:26923868

  10. Impact of oxygen dissolved at bottling and transmitted through closures on the composition and sensory properties of a Sauvignon Blanc wine during bottle storage.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Paulo; Silva, Maria A; Pons, Alexandre; Tominaga, Takatoshi; Lavigne, Valérie; Saucier, Cédric; Darriet, Philippe; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; Dubourdieu, Denis

    2009-11-11

    This work outlines the results from an investigation to determine the effect of the oxygen dissolved at bottling and the specific oxygen barrier properties of commercially available closures on the composition, color and sensory properties of a Bordeaux Sauvignon Blanc wine during two years of storage. The importance of oxygen for wine development after bottling was also assessed using an airtight bottle ampule. Wines were assessed for the antioxidants (SO(2) and ascorbic acid), varietal thiols (4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one, 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol), hydrogen sulfide and sotolon content, and color throughout 24 months of storage. In addition, the aroma and palate properties of wines were also assessed. The combination of oxygen dissolved at bottling and the oxygen transferred through closures has a significant effect on Sauvignon Blanc development after bottling. Wines highly exposed to oxygen at bottling and those sealed with a synthetic, Nomacorc classic closure, highly permeable to oxygen, were relatively oxidized in aroma, brown in color, and low in antioxidants and volatile compounds compared to wines sealed with other closures. Conversely, wines sealed under more airtight conditions, bottle ampule and screw cap Saran-tin, have the slowest rate of browning, and displayed the greatest contents of antioxidants and varietal thiols, but also high levels of H(2)S, which were responsible for the reduced dominating character found in these wines, while wines sealed with cork stoppers and screw cap Saranex presented negligible reduced and oxidized characters.

  11. 3D Detection, Quantification and Correlation of Slope Failures with Geologic Structure in the Mont Blanc massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Mark; Dunning, Stuart; Lim, Michael; Woodward, John

    2016-04-01

    A thorough understanding of supply from landslides and knowledge of their spatial distribution is of fundamental importance to high-mountain sediment budgets. Advances in 3D data acquisition techniques are heralding new opportunities to create high-resolution topographic models to aid our understanding of landscape change through time. In this study, we use a Structure-from-Motion Multi-View Stereo (SfM-MVS) approach to detect and quantify slope failures at selected sites in the Mont Blanc massif. Past and present glaciations along with its topographical characteristics have resulted in a high rate of geomorphological activity within the range. Data for SfM-MVS processing were captured across variable temporal scales to examine short-term (daily), seasonal and annual change from terrestrial, Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and helicopter perspectives. Variable spatial scales were also examined ranging from small focussed slopes (~0.01 km2) to large valley-scale surveys (~3 km2). Alignment and registration were conducted using a series of Ground Control Points (GCPs) across the surveyed slope at various heights and slope aspects. GCPs were also used to optimise data and reduce non-linear distortions. 3D differencing was performed using a multiscale model-to-model comparison algorithm (M3C2) which uses variable thresholding across each slope based on local surface roughness and model alignment quality. Detected change was correlated with local slope structure and 3D discontinuity analysis was undertaken using a plane-detection and clustering approach (DSE). Computation of joint spacing was performed using the classified data and normal distances. Structural analysis allowed us to assign a Slope Mass Rating (SMR) and assess the stability of each slope relative to the detected change and determine likely failure modes. We demonstrate an entirely 3D workflow which preserves the complexity of alpine slope topography to compute volumetric loss using a variable threshold. A

  12. The ascent of Mt. Everest.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, DeWitt C

    2010-01-01

    Earlier this Spring, I reread the account of the 1924 attempt of Mallory and Irvine to summit the highest mountain in the world, Mt. Everest. Apart from the recurring mystery of whether the English climbers actually achieved their goal before disappearing on the upper reaches of the mountain, what emerged for me were the many failed attempts (including two earlier ones of their own) before the summit was finally conquered by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay in 1953. This put me in mind of the current efforts to once more try to implement the concept of interprofessional education and teamwork in the solution to our many problems in delivering quality health care to all our citizens. The recurring calls in every recent report on health care by the Institute of Medicine and other national groups for greater implementation of collaborative practice models and interprofessional education (IPE) have reawakened the hope that this time, at last, we might succeed. But looming over the horizon, like the storm clouds constantly shrouding the summit of Everest, are the oft-dashed hopes that resurfaced throughout the last century; such that the course of IPE and IPP (interprofessional practice) often has been described as one of successive cycles of "boom and bust."

  13. The ascent of Mt. Everest.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, DeWitt C

    2010-01-01

    Earlier this Spring, I reread the account of the 1924 attempt of Mallory and Irvine to summit the highest mountain in the world, Mt. Everest. Apart from the recurring mystery of whether the English climbers actually achieved their goal before disappearing on the upper reaches of the mountain, what emerged for me were the many failed attempts (including two earlier ones of their own) before the summit was finally conquered by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay in 1953. This put me in mind of the current efforts to once more try to implement the concept of interprofessional education and teamwork in the solution to our many problems in delivering quality health care to all our citizens. The recurring calls in every recent report on health care by the Institute of Medicine and other national groups for greater implementation of collaborative practice models and interprofessional education (IPE) have reawakened the hope that this time, at last, we might succeed. But looming over the horizon, like the storm clouds constantly shrouding the summit of Everest, are the oft-dashed hopes that resurfaced throughout the last century; such that the course of IPE and IPP (interprofessional practice) often has been described as one of successive cycles of "boom and bust." PMID:21174038

  14. mtDNA analysis reveals a major late Paleolithic population expansion from southwestern to northeastern Europe.

    PubMed Central

    Torroni, A; Bandelt, H J; D'Urbano, L; Lahermo, P; Moral, P; Sellitto, D; Rengo, C; Forster, P; Savontaus, M L; Bonné-Tamir, B; Scozzari, R

    1998-01-01

    mtDNA sequence variation was studied in 419 individuals from nine Eurasian populations, by high-resolution RFLP analysis, and it was followed by sequencing of the control region of a subset of these mtDNAs and a detailed survey of previously published data from numerous other European populations. This analysis revealed that a major Paleolithic population expansion from the "Atlantic zone" (southwestern Europe) occurred 10,000-15,000 years ago, after the Last Glacial Maximum. As an mtDNA marker for this expansion we identified haplogroup V, an autochthonous European haplogroup, which most likely originated in the northern Iberian peninsula or southwestern France at about the time of the Younger Dryas. Its sister haplogroup, H, which is distributed throughout the entire range of Caucasoid populations and which originated in the Near East approximately 25,000-30,000 years ago, also took part in this expansion, thus rendering it by far the most frequent (40%-60%) haplogroup in western Europe. Subsequent migrations after the Younger Dryas eventually carried those "Atlantic" mtDNAs into central and northern Europe. This scenario, already implied by archaeological records, is given overwhelming support from both the distribution of the autochthonous European Y chromosome type 15, as detected by the probes 49a/f, and the synthetic maps of nuclear data. PMID:9545392

  15. The "Casa" of Sevres, France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltuch, Margot

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the author's teaching experiences during the 1930s at "La Maison des Enfants," a Montessori school in Sevres, France. Provides photographs and descriptions of the school day, outdoor activities, gardening, cooking and eating, practical activities, and creative activities. (MDM)

  16. 75 FR 41557 - Montana Disaster #MT-00056

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Montana Disaster MT-00056 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is... completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement...

  17. Geomatics techniques applied to time series of aerial images for multitemporal geomorphological analysis of the Miage Glacier (Mont Blanc).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perotti, Luigi; Carletti, Roberto; Giardino, Marco; Mortara, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    The Miage glacier is the major one in the Italian side of the Mont Blanc Massif, the third by area and the first by longitudinal extent among Italian glaciers. It is a typical debris covered glacier, since the end of the L.I.A. The debris coverage reduces ablation, allowing a relative stability of the glacier terminus, which is characterized by a wide and articulated moraine apparatus. For its conservative landforms, the Miage Glacier has a great importance for the analysis of the geomorphological response to recent climatic changes. Thanks to an organized existing archive of multitemporal aerial images (1935 to present) a photogrammetric approach has been applied to detect recent geomorphological changes in the Miage glacial basin. The research team provided: a) to digitize all the available images (still in analogic form) through photogrammetric scanners (very low image distortions devices) taking care of correctly defining the resolution of the acquisition compared to the scale mapping images are suitable for; b) to import digitized images into an appropriate digital photogrammetry software environment; c) to manage images in order, where possible, to carried out the stereo models orientation necessary for 3D navigation and plotting of critical geometric features of the glacier. Recognized geometric feature, referring to different periods, can be transferred to vector layers and imported in a GIS for further comparisons and investigations; d) to produce multi-temporal Digital Elevation Models for glacier volume changes; e) to perform orthoprojection of such images to obtain multitemporal orthoimages useful for areal an planar terrain evaluation and thematic analysis; f) to evaluate both planimetric positioning and height determination accuracies reachable through the photogrammetric process. Users have to known reliability of the measures they can do over such products. This can drive them to define the applicable field of this approach and this can help them to

  18. 44 CFR 15.3 - Access to Mt. Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Access to Mt. Weather. 15.3... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CONDUCT AT THE MT. WEATHER EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE CENTER AND AT THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.3 Access to Mt. Weather. Mt. Weather contains classified material and...

  19. 44 CFR 15.3 - Access to Mt. Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Access to Mt. Weather. 15.3... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CONDUCT AT THE MT. WEATHER EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE CENTER AND AT THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.3 Access to Mt. Weather. Mt. Weather contains classified material and...

  20. 44 CFR 15.3 - Access to Mt. Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Access to Mt. Weather. 15.3... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CONDUCT AT THE MT. WEATHER EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE CENTER AND AT THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.3 Access to Mt. Weather. Mt. Weather contains classified material and...

  1. 44 CFR 15.3 - Access to Mt. Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Access to Mt. Weather. 15.3... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CONDUCT AT THE MT. WEATHER EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE CENTER AND AT THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.3 Access to Mt. Weather. Mt. Weather contains classified material and...

  2. 44 CFR 15.3 - Access to Mt. Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Access to Mt. Weather. 15.3... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CONDUCT AT THE MT. WEATHER EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE CENTER AND AT THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.3 Access to Mt. Weather. Mt. Weather contains classified material and...

  3. Decadal region-wide and glacier-wide mass balances derived from multi-temporal ASTER satellite digital elevation models. Validation over the Mont-Blanc area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthier, Etienne; Cabot, Vincent; Vincent, Christian; Six, Delphine

    2016-06-01

    Since 2000, a vast archive of stereo-images has been built by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection (ASTER) satellite. Several studies already extracted glacier mass balances from multi-temporal ASTER digital elevation models (DEMs) but they lacked accurate independent data for validation. Here, we apply a linear regression to a time series of 3D-coregistered ASTER DEMs to estimate the rate of surface elevation changes (dh/dtASTER) and geodetic mass balances of Mont-Blanc glaciers (155 km²) between 2000 and 2014. Validation using field and spaceborne geodetic measurements reveals large errors at the individual pixel level (> 1 m a-1) and an accuracy of 0.2-0.3 m a-1 for dh/dtASTER averaged over areas larger than 1 km². For all Mont-Blanc glaciers, the ASTER region-wide mass balance (-1.05±0.37 m water equivalent (w.e.) a-1) agrees remarkably with the one measured using Spot5 and Pléiades DEMs (-1.06±0.23 m w.e. a-1) over their common 2003-2012 period. This multi-temporal ASTER DEM strategy leads to smaller errors than the simple differencing of two ASTER DEMs. By extrapolating dh/dtASTER to mid-February 2000, we infer a mean penetration depth of about 9±3 m for the C-band Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) radar signal, with a strong altitudinal dependency (range 0-12 m). This methodology thus reveals the regional pattern of glacier surface elevation changes and improves our knowledge of the penetration of the radar signal into snow and ice.

  4. Beginning of viniculture in France

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Patrick E.; Luley, Benjamin P.; Rovira, Nuria; Mirzoian, Armen; Callahan, Michael P.; Smith, Karen E.; Hall, Gretchen R.; Davidson, Theodore; Henkin, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical analyses of ancient organic compounds absorbed into the pottery fabrics of imported Etruscan amphoras (ca. 500–475 B.C.) and into a limestone pressing platform (ca. 425–400 B.C.) at the ancient coastal port site of Lattara in southern France provide the earliest biomolecular archaeological evidence for grape wine and viniculture from this country, which is crucial to the later history of wine in Europe and the rest of the world. The data support the hypothesis that export of wine by ship from Etruria in central Italy to southern Mediterranean France fueled an ever-growing market and interest in wine there, which, in turn, as evidenced by the winepress, led to transplantation of the Eurasian grapevine and the beginning of a Celtic industry in France. Herbal and pine resin additives to the Etruscan wine point to the medicinal role of wine in antiquity, as well as a means of preserving it during marine transport. PMID:23733937

  5. Beginning of Viniculture in France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGovern, Patrick E.; Luley, Benjamin P.; Rovira, Nuria; Mirzoian, Armen; Callahan, Michael P.; Smith, Karen F.; Hall, Gretchen R.; Davidson, Theodore; Henkin, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical analyses of ancient organic compounds absorbed into the pottery fabrics of imported Etruscan amphoras (ca. 500-475 B.C.) and into a limestone pressing platform (ca. 425-400 B.C.) at the ancient coastal port site of Lattara in southern France provide the earliest biomolecular archaeological evidence for grape wine and viniculture from this country, which is crucial to the later history of wine in Europe and the rest of the world. The data support the hypothesis that export of wine by ship from Etruria in central Italy to southern Mediterranean France fueled an ever-growing market and interest in wine there, which, in turn, as evidenced by the winepress, led to transplantation of the Eurasian grapevine and the beginning of a Celtic industry in France. Herbal and pine resin additives to the Etruscan wine point to the medicinal role of wine in antiquity, as well as a means of preserving it during marine transport.

  6. Beginning of viniculture in France.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Patrick E; Luley, Benjamin P; Rovira, Nuria; Mirzoian, Armen; Callahan, Michael P; Smith, Karen E; Hall, Gretchen R; Davidson, Theodore; Henkin, Joshua M

    2013-06-18

    Chemical analyses of ancient organic compounds absorbed into the pottery fabrics of imported Etruscan amphoras (ca. 500-475 B.C.) and into a limestone pressing platform (ca. 425-400 B.C.) at the ancient coastal port site of Lattara in southern France provide the earliest biomolecular archaeological evidence for grape wine and viniculture from this country, which is crucial to the later history of wine in Europe and the rest of the world. The data support the hypothesis that export of wine by ship from Etruria in central Italy to southern Mediterranean France fueled an ever-growing market and interest in wine there, which, in turn, as evidenced by the winepress, led to transplantation of the Eurasian grapevine and the beginning of a Celtic industry in France. Herbal and pine resin additives to the Etruscan wine point to the medicinal role of wine in antiquity, as well as a means of preserving it during marine transport.

  7. Human Gastroenteropancreatic Expression of Melatonin and Its Receptors MT1 and MT2

    PubMed Central

    Söderquist, Fanny; Hellström, Per M.; Cunningham, Janet L.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim The largest source of melatonin, according to animal studies, is the gastrointestinal (GI) tract but this is not yet thoroughly characterized in humans. This study aims to map the expression of melatonin and its two receptors in human GI tract and pancreas using microarray analysis and immunohistochemistry. Method Gene expression data from normal intestine and pancreas and inflamed colon tissue due to ulcerative colitis were analyzed for expression of enzymes relevant for serotonin and melatonin production and their receptors. Sections from paraffin-embedded normal tissue from 42 individuals, representing the different parts of the GI tract (n=39) and pancreas (n=3) were studied with immunohistochemistry using antibodies with specificity for melatonin, MT1 and MT2 receptors and serotonin. Results Enzymes needed for production of melatonin are expressed in both GI tract and pancreas tissue. Strong melatonin immunoreactivity (IR) was seen in enterochromaffin (EC) cells partially co-localized with serotonin IR. Melatonin IR was also seen in pancreas islets. MT1 and MT2 IR were both found in the intestinal epithelium, in the submucosal and myenteric plexus, and in vessels in the GI tract as well as in pancreatic islets. MT1 and MT2 IR was strongest in the epithelium of the large intestine. In the other cell types, both MT2 gene expression and IR were generally elevated compared to MT1. Strong MT2, IR was noted in EC cells but not MT1 IR. Changes in gene expression that may result in reduced levels of melatonin were seen in relation to inflammation. Conclusion Widespread gastroenteropancreatic expression of melatonin and its receptors in the GI tract and pancreas is in agreement with the multiple roles ascribed to melatonin, which include regulation of gastrointestinal motility, epithelial permeability as well as enteropancreatic cross-talk with plausible impact on metabolic control. PMID:25822611

  8. Residence time analysis of photochemical buildup of ozone in central eastern China from surface observation at Mt. Tai, Mt. Hua, and Mt. Huang in 2004.

    PubMed

    Pochanart, Pakpong

    2015-09-01

    Using data from surface observation, backward trajectories, and residence time analysis, the amounts of regional photochemical ozone buildup due to the large-scale anthropogenic sources in central eastern China (CEC, 30.5-40.5 N, 112.5-122.5 E) at Mt. Tai, Mt. Hua, and Mt. Huang in 2004 were quantified. It was found that the CEC anthropogenic sources influenced the air masses and the associated ozone production most at Mt. Tai, located at the center of CEC domain. At Mt. Hua to the west of CEC domain and at Mt. Huang to the south of CEC domain, the air masses and the associated ozone production showed less CEC anthropogenic influences on a regional scale. At Mt. Tai and Mt. Huang, the ozone mixing ratios in the air masses that passed over polluted source regions in CEC increased during the first 40-70 h after arrival and showed the highest production rate of 31.2 and 12.2 ppb/day, respectively, in May and June. It was estimated that the CEC anthropogenic sources contributed 34-42% of ozone at Mt. Tai and 8-14% at Mt. Huang during this ozone peak season. The large contributions from CEC sources during fall season (Sep-Nov) were also estimated as 31-44 and 17-23% but with the lower ozone production rate of 22.6 and 8.4 ppb/day, respectively, for Mt. Tai and Mt. Huang.

  9. Earthworm Lumbricus rubellus MT-2: Metal Binding and Protein Folding of a True Cadmium-MT.

    PubMed

    Kowald, Gregory R; Stürzenbaum, Stephen R; Blindauer, Claudia A

    2016-01-05

    Earthworms express, as most animals, metallothioneins (MTs)-small, cysteine-rich proteins that bind d(10) metal ions (Zn(II), Cd(II), or Cu(I)) in clusters. Three MT homologues are known for Lumbricus rubellus, the common red earthworm, one of which, wMT-2, is strongly induced by exposure of worms to cadmium. This study concerns composition, metal binding affinity and metal-dependent protein folding of wMT-2 expressed recombinantly and purified in the presence of Cd(II) and Zn(II). Crucially, whilst a single Cd₇wMT-2 species was isolated from wMT-2-expressing E. coli cultures supplemented with Cd(II), expressions in the presence of Zn(II) yielded mixtures. The average affinities of wMT-2 determined for either Cd(II) or Zn(II) are both within normal ranges for MTs; hence, differential behaviour cannot be explained on the basis of overall affinity. Therefore, the protein folding properties of Cd- and Zn-wMT-2 were compared by ¹H NMR spectroscopy. This comparison revealed that the protein fold is better defined in the presence of cadmium than in the presence of zinc. These differences in folding and dynamics may be at the root of the differential behaviour of the cadmium- and zinc-bound protein in vitro, and may ultimately also help in distinguishing zinc and cadmium in the earthworm in vivo.

  10. Earthworm Lumbricus rubellus MT-2: Metal Binding and Protein Folding of a True Cadmium-MT

    PubMed Central

    Kowald, Gregory R.; Stürzenbaum, Stephen R.; Blindauer, Claudia A.

    2016-01-01

    Earthworms express, as most animals, metallothioneins (MTs)—small, cysteine-rich proteins that bind d10 metal ions (Zn(II), Cd(II), or Cu(I)) in clusters. Three MT homologues are known for Lumbricus rubellus, the common red earthworm, one of which, wMT-2, is strongly induced by exposure of worms to cadmium. This study concerns composition, metal binding affinity and metal-dependent protein folding of wMT-2 expressed recombinantly and purified in the presence of Cd(II) and Zn(II). Crucially, whilst a single Cd7wMT-2 species was isolated from wMT-2-expressing E. coli cultures supplemented with Cd(II), expressions in the presence of Zn(II) yielded mixtures. The average affinities of wMT-2 determined for either Cd(II) or Zn(II) are both within normal ranges for MTs; hence, differential behaviour cannot be explained on the basis of overall affinity. Therefore, the protein folding properties of Cd- and Zn-wMT-2 were compared by 1H NMR spectroscopy. This comparison revealed that the protein fold is better defined in the presence of cadmium than in the presence of zinc. These differences in folding and dynamics may be at the root of the differential behaviour of the cadmium- and zinc-bound protein in vitro, and may ultimately also help in distinguishing zinc and cadmium in the earthworm in vivo. PMID:26742040

  11. Pyemotes ventricosus Dermatitis, Southeastern France

    PubMed Central

    Blanc-Amrane, Véronique; Bahadoran, Philippe; Caumes, Eric; Marty, Pierre; Lazar, Mariléna; Boissy, Christian; Desruelles, François; Izri, Arezki; Ortonne, Jean-Paul; Counillon, Evelyne; Chosidow, Olivier; Delaunay, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    We investigated 42 patients who had unusual pruritic dermatitis associated with a specific clinical sign (comet sign) in 23 houses in southeastern France from May through September 2007. Pyemotes ventricosus, a parasite of the furniture beetle Anobium punctatum, was the cause of this condition. PMID:18976564

  12. Education in France: Number 41.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French Embassy, New York, NY. French Cultural Services.

    The history and modernization of the French nursery and elementary schools are the focal points of this review of educational trends in France. One major section discussed the "Ecole Maternelle", kindergarten, nursery schools, the "Jardin d'Enfants", and new math. Another section treats: (1) "Les Ecoles Primaires", (2) village schools, (3) the…

  13. 27 CFR 9.123 - Mt. Veeder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mt. Veeder. 9.123 Section 9.123 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.123...

  14. 76 FR 47637 - Montana Disaster #MT-00062

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... ADMINISTRATION Montana Disaster MT-00062 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Montana (FEMA..., Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance,...

  15. Bruce Medalists at the Mt. Wilson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, J. S.

    2004-12-01

    The institution which succeeded the Mt. Wilson Station of Yerkes Observatory in 1904 has had six names and three sites. From 1948-1980 it was united with Caltech's Palomar Observatory, and since then its main observatory has been in Chile, though still headquartered on Santa Barbara Street in Pasadena. For more than half of the twentieth century it was the leading observatory in the world. One bit of evidence for this is the amazing number of its staff members awarded the Bruce Medal. The Catherine Wolfe Bruce Gold Medal of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific has been awarded for lifetime contributions to astronomy since 1898. It is an international award. It wasn't until 1963 that the number of medalists who had worked primarily in the United States reached half the total. Yet fourteen of the first 87 medalists spent most of their careers at Mt. Wilson, including the period when it was Mt. Wilson and Palomar, and another three were Caltech observers who used the telescopes of the jointly operated observatory. Several more medalists made substantial use of the telescopes on Mt. Wilson and Palomar Mountain. We will discuss highlights of the careers of a number of these distinguished astronomers: directors George Ellery Hale, Walter Adams, Ira Bowen, and Horace Babcock; solar observer and satellite discoverer Seth Nicholson; instrument builder Harold Babcock; galactic and cosmological observers Frederick Seares, Edwin Hubble, Walter Baade, Rudolph Minkowski, and Allan Sandage; and spectroscopists Paul Merrill, Alfred Joy, Olin Wilson, Jesse Greenstein, Maarten Schmidt, and Wallace Sargent. We will touch briefly on others who used Mt. Wilson and/or Palomar, including Harlow Shapley, Joel Stebbins, Charlotte Moore Sitterly, Donald Osterbrock, and Albert Whitford.

  16. Improving the Terrain-Based Parameter for the Assessment of Snow Redistribution in the Col du Lac Blanc Area and Comparisons with TLS Snow Depth Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schön, Peter; Prokop, Alexander; Naaim-Bouvet, Florence; Nishimura, Kouichi; Vionnet, Vincent; Guyomarc'h, Gilbert

    2014-05-01

    Wind and the associated snow drift are dominating factors determining the snow distribution and accumulation in alpine areas, resulting in a high spatial variability of snow depth that is difficult to evaluate and quantify. The terrain-based parameter Sx characterizes the degree of shelter or exposure of a grid point provided by the upwind terrain, without the computational complexity of numerical wind field models. The parameter has shown to qualitatively predict snow redistribution with good reproduction of spatial patterns, but has failed to quantitatively describe the snow redistribution, and correlations with measured snow heights were poor. The objective of our research was to a) identify the sources of poor correlations between predicted and measured snow re-distribution and b) improve the parameters ability to qualitatively and quantitatively describe snow redistribution in our research area, the Col du Lac Blanc in the French Alps. The area is at an elevation of 2700 m and particularly suited for our study due to its constant wind direction and the availability of data from a meteorological station. Our work focused on areas with terrain edges of approximately 10 m height, and we worked with 1-2 m resolution digital terrain and snow surface data. We first compared the results of the terrain-based parameter calculations to measured snow-depths, obtained by high-accuracy terrestrial laser scan measurements. The results were similar to previous studies: The parameter was able to reproduce observed patterns in snow distribution, but regression analyses showed poor correlations between terrain-based parameter and measured snow-depths. We demonstrate how the correlations between measured and calculated snow heights improve if the parameter is calculated based on a snow surface model instead of a digital terrain model. We show how changing the parameter's search distance and how raster re-sampling and raster smoothing improve the results. To improve the parameter

  17. Merging a Terrain-Based Parameter and Snow Particle Counter Data for the Assessment of Snow Redistribution in the Col du Lac Blanc Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schön, Peter; Prokop, Alexander; Naaim-Bouvet, Florence; Vionnet, Vincent; Guyomarc'h, Gilbert; Heiser, Micha; Nishimura, Kouichi

    2015-04-01

    Wind and the associated snow drift are dominating factors determining the snow distribution and accumulation in alpine areas, resulting in a high spatial variability of snow depth that is difficult to evaluate and quantify. The terrain-based parameter Sx characterizes the degree of shelter or exposure of a grid point provided by the upwind terrain, without the computational complexity of numerical wind field models. The parameter has shown to qualitatively predict snow redistribution with good reproduction of spatial patterns. It does not, however, provide a quantitative estimate of changes in snow depths. The objective of our research was to introduce a new parameter to quantify changes in snow depths in our research area, the Col du Lac Blanc in the French Alps. The area is at an elevation of 2700 m and particularly suited for our study due to its consistently bi-modal wind directions. Our work focused on two pronounced, approximately 10 m high terrain breaks, and we worked with 1 m resolution digital snow surface models (DSM). The DSM and measured changes in snow depths were obtained with high-accuracy terrestrial laser scan (TLS) measurements. First we calculated the terrain-based parameter Sx on a digital snow surface model and correlated Sx with measured changes in snow-depths (Δ SH). Results showed that Δ SH can be approximated by Δ SHestimated = α * Sx, where α is a newly introduced parameter. The parameter α has shown to be linked to the amount of snow deposited influenced by blowing snow flux. At the Col du Lac Blanc test side, blowing snow flux is recorded with snow particle counters (SPC). Snow flux is the number of drifting snow particles per time and area. Hence, the SPC provide data about the duration and intensity of drifting snow events, two important factors not accounted for by the terrain parameter Sx. We analyse how the SPC snow flux data can be used to estimate the magnitude of the new variable parameter α . To simulate the development

  18. Field transplantation of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea along a polymetallic contamination gradient (River Lot, France): 2. Metallothionein response to metal exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Baudrimont, M.; Andres, S.; Metivaud, J.; Lapaquellerie, Y.; Ribeyre, F.; Maillet, N.; Latouche, C.; Boudou, A.

    1999-11-01

    Specimens of the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea were transplanted from a clean lacustrine site to four stations along a polymetallic pollution gradient in the river Lot, France, downstream from an old Zn ore treatment facility (see Part 1). From April to September 1996, the authors studied Cd and Zn bioaccumulation and the metallothionein-like metal-binding protein (MT) concentrations by subsampling the ages at t = 0, 21, 49, 85, 120, and 150 d. Marked differences were observed among the four stations. At the most polluted station Riou-Mort, MT concentrations did not increase despite very rapid metal accumulation; all mollusks died between days 49 and 85, suggesting that the metal detoxification mechanisms were overwhelmed at this station. At the next station downstream, the final levels of bioaccumulated metal after 150 d were as high as those at the Riou-Mort station, but in this case the MT concentrations also increased progressively with positive correlations between MT and metal concentrations; no mortality was observed, but a significant growth inhibition was revealed in comparison to the reference site, with a lack of correlation between MT and reduced growth. Subcellular metal partitioning, as determined by size-exclusion chromatography, revealed that most of the Cd was sequestered by MT. In contrast, most of the Zn was bound to low molecular weight proteins, the MT fraction representing only 12% of cytosolic zn. These data show the marked role of MT toward Cd bioaccumulation and toxic effects on this freshwater bivalve species.

  19. MT1-MMP dependent repression of the tumor suppressor SPRY4 contributes to MT1-MMP driven melanoma cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Shaverdashvili, Khvaramze; Zhang, Keman; Osman, Iman; Honda, Kord; Jobava, Rauli; Bedogni, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is the deadliest of all skin cancers. Despite progress in diagnostics and treatment of melanoma, the prognosis for metastatic patients remains poor. We previously showed that Membrane-type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is one of the drivers of melanoma metastasis. Classically, MT1-MMP regulates a verity of cellular functions including cell-to-cell interaction and cell-to-matrix communication. Recently, MT1-MMP has been found to also modulate gene expression. To specifically assess MT1-MMP dependent gene regulation in melanoma, microarray gene expression analysis was performed in a melanoma cell line whose metastatic properties depend on the activity of MT1-MMP. We identified the tumor suppressor gene SPRY4 as a new transcriptional target of MT1-MMP that is negatively regulated by the protease. Knockdown of MT1-MMP enhances SPRY4 expression at the mRNA and protein level. SPRY4 expression inversely correlates with that of MT1-MMP in melanoma samples and importantly, correlates with melanoma patient survival. SPRY4 modulates MT1-MMP dependent cell migration such that inhibition of SPRY4 rescues cell migration that has been impaired by MT1-MMP knock down. MT1-MMP decreases SPRY4 in part through an MMP2/RAC1 axis we previously show promotes cell motility downstream of MT1-MMP. These results identify the tumor suppressor SPRY4 as a novel molecular effector of MT1-MMP affecting melanoma cell motility. PMID:26392417

  20. [End of life in France].

    PubMed

    Vacheron, André

    2013-01-01

    Two major changes in end-of-life management have occured in recent decades: first, because of the increase in life expectancy and the resulting aging of the population, most deaths now involve old or very old people; second, more than two-thirds of deaths occur in a hospital or an institution. Our fellow citizens are afraid of suffering and death. They wish for a peaceful death, as rapid as possible and, in recent surveys, say they favour euthanasia. Yet euthanasia is illegal in France and in most other Western countries (with the exception of the Benelux nations). Palliative care ensures dignity in death, without anxiety of suffering, and is expanding rapidly in France. Léonetti's law of 22 April 2005 ensures the protection of the weakest, who should never be considered unworthy of life, yet is poorly known to the public and even to physicians. It now needs to be applied in practice. PMID:25518160

  1. "Franklin: Science, Politics and France"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, James E., III

    2003-04-01

    This presentation traces Benjamin Franklin's career as a "civic scientist" in Old-Regime France. It outlines the initial - and not always positive - reception of Franklin's work on electricity by the community of French scientists in the 1750s. It sketches Franklin's subsequent elevation into the pantheon of French Enlightenment heros, and it details his work as a "civic scientist" while American envoy to France in the 1770s and 1780s, notably his service on the government-sponsored commissions that repudiated the scientific and medical claims of Franz Anton Mesmer. This presentation concludes by examining a few features of Franklin's career that are not completely congruent with our notion of what a "civic scientist" might be, a contrast that is intended to illuminate both Franklin and the concept of "civic scientist."

  2. 76 FR 35967 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bozeman, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... designated as an extension to Class D surface area at Bozeman, Gallatin Field Airport, Bozeman, MT... geographic coordinates of the airport for Class D airspace, Class E surface area airspace, and Class E... 6002 Class E airspace designated as surface areas. * * * * * ANM MT E2 Bozeman, MT Bozeman,...

  3. Mt. St. Helens and Spirit Lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    high resolution 1000 pixel-wide image Snow still covered the peaks of the Cascade Ranges in mid-June when the STS-111 crew photographed Mt. St. Helens from the Space Shuttle Endeavour. From their vantage point, the crew observed blast zone from the 1980 eruption of the volcano, the mud-choked North Fork of the Toutle River, and fallen timber that still floats in rafts of logs on Spirit Lake. Continued imagery of the region will document the slow regrowth of the forests. Today, the volcano and surrounding region comprise the Mt. St. Helens National Volcanic Monument which is dedicated to research, education and recreation. For more information visit: Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument. Astronaut photograph STS111-371-3 was provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  4. Mt. Pinatubo Volcano - Post Eruption, Luzon, Philippines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Mt. Pinatubo on the island of Luzon (15.0N, 120.5E) erupted catastrophically in June 1991 after over 600 years of inactivity. Even in this cloudy view, the full extent of the eruption is obvious. Thick layers of ash completely surrounds the crater and the effect of mudflows in this previously heavily forested and agricultural region can be traced as ribbons flowing downhill. Clark AFB, once the crossroads of the SW Pacific can only partially be seen.

  5. Mt. Pinatubo Volcano - Post Eruption, Luzon, Philippines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Mt. Pinatubo on the island of Luzon (15.0N, 120.0E) erupted catastrophically in June 1991 after over 600 years of inactivity. In this vertical view, the full extent of the eruption is obvious. Thick layers of ash completely surrounds the crater and the effect of mudflows in this previously heavily forested and agricultural region can be traced as ribbons flowing downhill. Clark AFB, once the crossroads of the SW Pacific can only partially be seen.

  6. Developing Mt. Hope: The megawatt line

    SciTech Connect

    Rodzianko, P.; Fisher, F.S.

    1992-12-01

    After facing numerous obstacles, including opposition and competition, the Mt. Hope pumped-storage project in New Jersey has been licensed by FERC. That license will allow a former iron ore mine site to be used in producing a new resource-hydroelectricity. In early August 1992, after more than seven years of effort, the 2,000-MW Mt. Hope Waterpower Project was licensed by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). Getting the $1.8 billion pumped-storage project licensed was not an easy task. It involved 54 submittals to FERC, six public meetings, and costs of more than $12 million. Along the way, the project has withstood competing applications, community opposition, and legal battles. Getting a project of this magnitude off the ground is a challenge for even the most experienced developer. The effort was especially challenging for the Halecrest Company, a local family-owned and operated firm with no previous experience in hydroelectric development. When financing became tight, creative ways were found to raise seed capital for the project. When hydroelectric experience was needed, the company developed a world-class corporate team that carried Mt. Hope through the complexities of the licensing process and beyond. With license now in hand, the project developers are ready to move forward with negotiating power sales contracts and securing construction financing. The resulting project will be the second largest pumped-storage facility in the country-second only to the 2,100-MW Bath County project in Virginia. Mt. Hope will take six years to construct and is scheduled to be phased into operation beginning in 1999.

  7. Post Eruption Hazards at Mt. Pinatubo, Philippines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    Our project focused on the investigation of the post-eruption hazards at Mt. Pinatubo (Philippines) using remote sensing data, and field observations of the 1991 eruption deposits. Through the use of multiple satellite images, field work, and the 1996/2000 PacRim data sets, we conducted studies of the co- and post-eruption hazards of the volcano due to erosion and re-deposition of the extensive pyroclastic flow deposits. A major part of this project was the assembly and analysis of a database of over 50 high resolution (1 - 50 m/pixel) images that will facilitate this study. We collected Ikonos, SPOT, SIR-C/X-SAR, Landsat, ERS, RADARSAT, and ASTER images of the area around Mt. Pinatubo. An example of the changes that could be seen in these data is shown. Our investigation focused on a retrospective analysis of the erosion, redeposition, and re-vegetation of the 1991 pyroclastic flow deposits of Mt. Pinatubo. The primary geologic goal of our work was the analysis of the spatial distribution and volume change of the sources and sinks of materials associated with mudflow ('lahar') events. This included the measurement of river valley gradients and cross-sections using TOPSAR digital elevation data, as we are participating in the PacRim 2000 deployment to the Philippines specifically so that we can collect a second set of TOPSAR data that can then be used to create a topographic difference image of the volcano. The main results from this multi-sensor study have been published as Torres et al.. A discussion of the methodology that we used to assemble an appropriate database was included in Mouginis-Mark and Domergue-Schmidt. As part of an educational outreach effort, we also helped the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) in the Philippines to use NASA data to study Mt. Pinatubo and other Filipino volcanoes.

  8. Graphs for Isotopes of 109-Mt (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides a graphic representation of nucleon separation energies and residual interaction parameters for isotopes of the chemical element 109-Mt (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109).

  9. Identification of S-3-(hexanal)-glutathione and its bisulfite adduct in grape juice from Vitis vinifera L. cv. Sauvignon blanc as new potential precursors of 3SH.

    PubMed

    Thibon, Cécile; Böcker, Caroline; Shinkaruk, Svitlana; Moine, Virginie; Darriet, Philippe; Dubourdieu, Denis

    2016-05-15

    Two main precursors (S-3-(hexan-1-ol)-l-cysteine and S-3-(hexan-1-ol)-l-glutathione) of 3-sulfanylhexanol (3SH, formerly named 3-mercaptohexanol) have been identified so far in grape juice but a correlation between precursor concentrations in grape juices and 3SH concentrations in wines is not always observed. This suggests that there may be other compounds associated with the aromatic potential. In this work, S-3-(hexanal)-glutathione (Glut-3SH-Al) and its bisulfite (Glut-3SH-SO3) adduct were identified in Sauvignon blanc grape juice by liquid chromatography coupled to Fourier transform mass spectrometry experiments. A partial purification of the compounds was carried out by Medium Pressure Liquid Chromatography (MPLC) on the reverse phase using 5L of grape juice. The addition of synthetized Glut-3SH-Al and Glut-3SH-SO3 in the synthetic medium induced a significant release of 3SH after fermentation. Moreover, we demonstrate that Glut-3SH-Al and its bisulfite adduct are present in grape juice and could be considered as new direct 3SH precursors with molar conversion yields close to 0.4%.

  10. Odor potency of aroma compounds in Riesling and Vidal blanc table wines and icewines by gas chromatography-olfactometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Amy J; Reynolds, Andrew G

    2012-03-21

    This study aimed to elucidate the odor potency of aroma compounds in Riesling and Vidal blanc (syn. Vidal) table wines and icewines from the Niagara Peninsula using stir bar sorptive extraction-gas chromatography-olfactometry-mass spectrometry. Dilution analysis determined the most odor-potent compounds in Vidal and Riesling icewines (n = 2) and table wines (n = 2) from a commercial producer. The top 15 odor-potent compounds in each wine were identified and quantified, resulting in 23 and 24 compounds for Riesling and Vidal, respectively. The most odor-potent compounds were β-damascenone, decanal, 1-hexanol, 1-octen-3-ol, 4-vinylguaiacol, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl 3-methylbutyrate. In general, icewines had higher concentrations of most aroma compounds compared to table wines. Through computation of odor activity values, the compounds with the highest odor activity for the icewines were β-damascenone, 1-octen-3-ol, ethyl octanoate, cis-rose oxide, and ethyl hexanoate. In table wines the highest odor activity values were found for ethyl octanoate, β-damascenone, ethyl hexanoate, cis-rose oxide, ethyl 3-methylbutyrate, and 4-vinylguaiacol. These findings provide a foundation to determine impact odorants in icewines and the effects of viticultural and enological practices on wine aroma volatile composition. PMID:22324474

  11. Odor potency of aroma compounds in Riesling and Vidal blanc table wines and icewines by gas chromatography-olfactometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Amy J; Reynolds, Andrew G

    2012-03-21

    This study aimed to elucidate the odor potency of aroma compounds in Riesling and Vidal blanc (syn. Vidal) table wines and icewines from the Niagara Peninsula using stir bar sorptive extraction-gas chromatography-olfactometry-mass spectrometry. Dilution analysis determined the most odor-potent compounds in Vidal and Riesling icewines (n = 2) and table wines (n = 2) from a commercial producer. The top 15 odor-potent compounds in each wine were identified and quantified, resulting in 23 and 24 compounds for Riesling and Vidal, respectively. The most odor-potent compounds were β-damascenone, decanal, 1-hexanol, 1-octen-3-ol, 4-vinylguaiacol, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl 3-methylbutyrate. In general, icewines had higher concentrations of most aroma compounds compared to table wines. Through computation of odor activity values, the compounds with the highest odor activity for the icewines were β-damascenone, 1-octen-3-ol, ethyl octanoate, cis-rose oxide, and ethyl hexanoate. In table wines the highest odor activity values were found for ethyl octanoate, β-damascenone, ethyl hexanoate, cis-rose oxide, ethyl 3-methylbutyrate, and 4-vinylguaiacol. These findings provide a foundation to determine impact odorants in icewines and the effects of viticultural and enological practices on wine aroma volatile composition.

  12. MtDNA COI-COII marker and drone congregation area: an efficient method to establish and monitor honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) conservation centres.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Bénédicte; Alburaki, Mohamed; Legout, Hélène; Moulin, Sibyle; Mougel, Florence; Garnery, Lionel

    2015-05-01

    Honeybee subspecies have been affected by human activities in Europe over the past few decades. One such example is the importation of nonlocal subspecies of bees which has had an adverse impact on the geographical repartition and subsequently on the genetic diversity of the black honeybee Apis mellifera mellifera. To restore the original diversity of this local honeybee subspecies, different conservation centres were set up in Europe. In this study, we established a black honeybee conservation centre Conservatoire de l'Abeille Noire d'Ile de France (CANIF) in the region of Ile-de-France, France. CANIF's honeybee colonies were intensively studied over a 3-year period. This study included a drone congregation area (DCA) located in the conservation centre. MtDNA COI-COII marker was used to evaluate the genetic diversity of CANIF's honeybee populations and the drones found and collected from the DCA. The same marker (mtDNA) was used to estimate the interactions and the haplotype frequency between CANIF's honeybee populations and 10 surrounding honeybee apiaries located outside of the CANIF. Our results indicate that the colonies of the conservation centre and the drones of the DCA show similar stable profiles compared to the surrounding populations with lower level of introgression. The mtDNA marker used on both DCA and colonies of the conservation centre seems to be an efficient approach to monitor and maintain the genetic diversity of the protected honeybee populations.

  13. MtDNA COI-COII marker and drone congregation area: an efficient method to establish and monitor honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) conservation centres.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Bénédicte; Alburaki, Mohamed; Legout, Hélène; Moulin, Sibyle; Mougel, Florence; Garnery, Lionel

    2015-05-01

    Honeybee subspecies have been affected by human activities in Europe over the past few decades. One such example is the importation of nonlocal subspecies of bees which has had an adverse impact on the geographical repartition and subsequently on the genetic diversity of the black honeybee Apis mellifera mellifera. To restore the original diversity of this local honeybee subspecies, different conservation centres were set up in Europe. In this study, we established a black honeybee conservation centre Conservatoire de l'Abeille Noire d'Ile de France (CANIF) in the region of Ile-de-France, France. CANIF's honeybee colonies were intensively studied over a 3-year period. This study included a drone congregation area (DCA) located in the conservation centre. MtDNA COI-COII marker was used to evaluate the genetic diversity of CANIF's honeybee populations and the drones found and collected from the DCA. The same marker (mtDNA) was used to estimate the interactions and the haplotype frequency between CANIF's honeybee populations and 10 surrounding honeybee apiaries located outside of the CANIF. Our results indicate that the colonies of the conservation centre and the drones of the DCA show similar stable profiles compared to the surrounding populations with lower level of introgression. The mtDNA marker used on both DCA and colonies of the conservation centre seems to be an efficient approach to monitor and maintain the genetic diversity of the protected honeybee populations. PMID:25335970

  14. Modeling the Geologic History of Mt. Sharp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascuzzo, A.; Allen, C.

    2015-01-01

    Gale is an approximately 155 km diameter crater located on the martian dichotomy boundary (5 deg S 138 deg E). Gale is estimated to have formed 3.8 - 3.5 Gya, in the late Noachian or early Hesperian. Mt. Sharp, at the center of Gale Crater, is a crescent shaped sedimentary mound that rises 5.2 km above the crater floor. Gale is one of the few craters that has a peak reaching higher than the rim of the crater wall. The Curiosity rover is currently fighting to find its way across a dune field at the northwest base of the mound searching for evidence of habitability. This study used orbital images and topographic data to refine models for the geologic history of Mt. Sharp by analyzing its morphological features. In addition, it assessed the possibility of a peak ring in Gale. The presence of a peak ring can offer important information to how Mt. Sharp was formed and eroded early in Gale's history.

  15. METHYLATION OF ARSENIC BY RECOMBINANT HUMAN AS3MT/287M AND AS3MT/287T POLYMORPHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is the key enzyme in the pathway for methylation of inorganic arsenic (iAs). AS3MT polymorphism is, in part, responsible for interindividual differences in iAs metabolism. AS3MT/M287T polymorphism that is found in ~ 10% of C...

  16. Mt. Kilimanjaro expedition in earth science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, Elena; Yoshikawa, Kenji; Narita, Kenji; Brettenny, Mark; Yule, Sheila; O'Toole, Michael; Brettenny, Rogeline

    2010-05-01

    Mt. Kilimanjaro, Africa's highest mountain is 5,895 meters above sea level and is located 330 km south of the equator in Tanzania. In 1976 glaciers covered most of Mt. Kilimanjaro's summit; however in 2000, an estimated eighty percent of the ice cap has disappeared since the last thorough survey done in 1912. There is increased scientific interest in Mt. Kilimanjaro with the increase in global and African average temperatures. A team of college and pre-college school students from Tanzania, South Africa and Kenya, teachers from South Africa and the United States, and scientists from the University of Alaska Fairbanks in the United States and Akita University in Japan, climbed to the summit of Mt Kilimanjaro in October 2009. They were accompanied by guides, porters, two expedition guests, and a videographer. This expedition was part of the GLOBE Seasons and Biomes Earth System Science Project and the GLOBE Africa science education initiative, exploring and contributing to climate change studies. Students learned about earth science experientially by observing their physical and biological surroundings, making soil and air temperature measurements, participating in discussions, journaling their experience, and posing research questions. The international trekkers noted the change in the biomes as the altitude, temperature and conditions changed, from cultivated lands, to rain forest, heath zone, moorland, alpine desert, and summit. They also discovered permafrost, but not at the summit as expected. Rather, it was where the mountain was not covered by a glacier and thus more exposed to low extreme temperatures. This was the first report of permafrost on Mt. Kilimanjaro. Classrooms from all over the world participated in the expedition virtually. They followed the trek through the expedition website (http://www.xpeditiononline.com/) where pictures and journals were posted, and posed their own questions which were answered by the expedition and base camp team members

  17. Genetic Diversity of Talpa Europaea and Nova Hanta Virus (NVAV) in France

    PubMed Central

    Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Gu, Se Hun; Feliu, Carlos; Ventur, Jacint; Ribas, Alexis; Dormion, Jerôme; Yanagihara, Richard; Nicolas, Violaine

    2014-01-01

    Summary Nova hantavirus (NVAV) was first identified in a single European mole (Talpa europaea), captured in Hungary. Analysis of lung tissues from 94 moles captured in France revealed NVAV in 50%. Based on the genetic diversity of the cytochrome b mtDNA, moles collected in Poitiers and Bordeaux were more closely related to the Iberian mole (T. occidentalis), a species previously assumed to be restricted to the Iberian Peninsula. Several hypotheses are discussed to explain these observations: 1) presence of hitherto unnoticed T. occidentalis in southwestern France; 2) existence of an ancient mitochondrial introgression phenomenon between the two Talpa species, producing a particular phenotype in some hybrids; 3) existence of a hybrid zone between the two species; and 4) existence of a new Talpa species. NVAV was not detected in the southwestern moles, which begs the question of the potential presence of a particular Hantavirus sp. in this population and/or in the Iberian moles. PMID:25530620

  18. Metallothionein (MT) -I and MT-II Expression Are Induced and Cause Zinc Sequestration in the Liver after Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pankhurst, Michael W.; Gell, David A.; Butler, Chris W.; Kirkcaldie, Matthew T. K.; West, Adrian K.; Chung, Roger S.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments with transgenic over-expressing, and null mutant mice have determined that metallothionein-I and -II (MT-I/II) are protective after brain injury. MT-I/II is primarily a zinc-binding protein and it is not known how it provides neuroprotection to the injured brain or where MT-I/II acts to have its effects. MT-I/II is often expressed in the liver under stressful conditions but to date, measurement of MT-I/II expression after brain injury has focused primarily on the injured brain itself. In the present study we measured MT-I/II expression in the liver of mice after cryolesion brain injury by quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the UC1MT antibody. Displacement curves constructed using MT-I/II knockout (MT-I/II−/−) mouse tissues were used to validate the ELISA. Hepatic MT-I and MT-II mRNA levels were significantly increased within 24 hours of brain injury but hepatic MT-I/II protein levels were not significantly increased until 3 days post injury (DPI) and were maximal at the end of the experimental period, 7 DPI. Hepatic zinc content was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy and was found to decrease at 1 and 3 DPI but returned to normal by 7DPI. Zinc in the livers of MT-I/II−/− mice did not show a return to normal at 7 DPI which suggests that after brain injury, MT-I/II is responsible for sequestering elevated levels of zinc to the liver. Conclusion: MT-I/II is up-regulated in the liver after brain injury and modulates the amount of zinc that is sequestered to the liver. PMID:22363575

  19. MT3DMSP - A parallelized version of the MT3DMS code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelaziz, Ramadan; Le, Hai Ha

    2014-12-01

    A parallelized version of the 3-D multi-species transport model MT3DMS was developed and tested. Specifically, the open multiprocessing (OpenMP) was utilized for communication between the processors. MT3DMS emulates the solute transport by dividing the calculation into the flow and transport steps. In this article, a new preconditioner, derived from Symmetric Successive Over Relaxation (SSOR) was added into the generalized conjugate gradient solver. This preconditioner is well suited and appropriate for the parallel architecture. A case study in the test field at TU Bergakademie Freiberg was used to produce the results and analyze the code performance. It was observed that most of running time would be required for the advection, dispersion. As a result, the parallel version decreases significantly running time of solute transport modeling. In addition, this work provides a first attempt to demonstrate the capability and versatility of MT3DMS5P to simulate the solute transport in fractured gneiss rock.

  20. [Health and politics in France].

    PubMed

    Tabuteau, Didier

    2012-06-01

    Health is a dual notion. It is individual, singular and intimate. It is also collective, statistical and political. The modern problematic of health relies upon a balance of complex relations between individual and collective acceptances of the notion. You can try to outline the evolutions and the main concepts through a quadruple approach: health and politics, health and its professionals, health and society and in the end, health and the State. The relationships between health and politics in France are affected by the historical delay of France in public health, namely because of a structural weakness of the administrative organization of public health. Nevertheless France developed a dense and well organized care system and a universal social protection against the disease. The creation of the health professions in France was marked by a historical opposition between the doctors and the state which led to a failure of hygienist medicine and a fundamental misunderstanding on health insurance. Medical domination led to the organization of a system based on professional dichotomy and the delegation of the regulation skills to the health care professionals. The role of health issues in the French society was deeply renewed by the development of the medical and epidemiological knowledge. This resulted in a new political responsibility in the management of health risks but also in the confirmation of the patients' rights and the role of their associations in the health systems operations and the piloting of public policies. In this environment, the state has recently and progressively confirmed its dominating role in the health sector. A public hospital service was created In the 60's and 70's, then in the 80's there were recurrent interventions in order to control health spendings and eventually in the 90's health safety devices were set up. More recently, a process of health policies institutionalization confirmed this evolution. In the future, health issues should

  1. Mt. Pinatubo Volcano - Post Eruption, Luzon, Philippines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Mt. Pinatubo, on the island of Luzon (15.0N, 120.5E) erupted catastrophically in June 1991, probably the largest of the twentieth century. Great rivers of gray ash (mud flows) radiate in all directions from the newly formed caldera. Within the caldera, a small lake can be seen. Since the eruption, the local environment has been impacted by mud flows and on a global scale, some of the ash is expected to remain in the atmosphere for several more years.

  2. 75 FR 43556 - TA-W-73,381, MT Rail Link, Inc., Missoula, MT; TA-W-73,381A, Billings, MT; TA-W-73,381B, Laurel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... Employment and Training Administration TA-W-73,381, MT Rail Link, Inc., Missoula, MT; TA-W-73,381A, Billings, MT; TA-W-73,381B, Laurel, MT; TA-W-73,381C, Livingston, MT; TA-W-73,381D, Helena, MT; Amended... in the Federal Register on July 7, 2010 (75 FR 39049). At the request of the State Agency,...

  3. [Dengue fever in mainland France].

    PubMed

    Paty, M-C

    2014-11-01

    Dengue fever is the most widespread distributed vector borne viral disease. It is transmitted through the bites of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. With the expansion of Aedes albopictus and increasing travel exchange, it is no longer limited to the tropical zone and transmission has been documented in temperate areas. In mainland France, where Aedes albopictus has been present and disseminating since 2004, 2 episodes of autochthonous transmission occurred in 2010 and in 2013. Control measures against dengue and chikungunya, which shares the same vector, are implemented every year since 2006, in the areas where the vector is present. They aim at preventing or limiting local transmission of these diseases. They are based on epidemiological and entomological surveillance and vector control measures. The diagnosis of dengue, and chikungunya should be considered in case of suggestive symptoms in patients returning from an area of virus circulation. It should also be considered for patients living or having stayed in areas of mainland France where Aedes albopictus is present, during its activity period from May 1 to November 30. The prevention and control system, including vector control measures and the notification of cases to the local health authority should be known, as the risk of autochthonous transmission increases every year. PMID:25080833

  4. [Dengue fever in mainland France].

    PubMed

    Paty, M-C

    2014-11-01

    Dengue fever is the most widespread distributed vector borne viral disease. It is transmitted through the bites of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. With the expansion of Aedes albopictus and increasing travel exchange, it is no longer limited to the tropical zone and transmission has been documented in temperate areas. In mainland France, where Aedes albopictus has been present and disseminating since 2004, 2 episodes of autochthonous transmission occurred in 2010 and in 2013. Control measures against dengue and chikungunya, which shares the same vector, are implemented every year since 2006, in the areas where the vector is present. They aim at preventing or limiting local transmission of these diseases. They are based on epidemiological and entomological surveillance and vector control measures. The diagnosis of dengue, and chikungunya should be considered in case of suggestive symptoms in patients returning from an area of virus circulation. It should also be considered for patients living or having stayed in areas of mainland France where Aedes albopictus is present, during its activity period from May 1 to November 30. The prevention and control system, including vector control measures and the notification of cases to the local health authority should be known, as the risk of autochthonous transmission increases every year.

  5. Mechanisms for the export of archaeal lipids down the water column in the upwelling area off Cape Blanc, North-West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebersbach, Friederike; Goldenstein, Nadine; Iversen, Morten; Mollenhauer, Gesine; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Transport mechanisms of microbial membrane lipids from surface waters to the seafloor are poorly understood. In particular, pelagic archaeal glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) from planktonic archaea are frequently used for reconstruction of ancient sea surface temperatures (Schouten et al. 2013). Because planktonic archaea are too small and neutrally buoyant to sink independently, transport vehicles for efficient export of fossil archaeal biomarkers to the sediment are required. The surface ocean is coupled with the deep ocean through biogenic sinking particles, a process known as the biological pump (Volk and Hoffert 1985). Two different pathways for particle formation, mainly taking place in the mesopelagic zone, are distinguished: Direct aggregation of phytoplankton blooms or grazing, resulting in phyto-detrital aggregates or reprocessed faecal material, respectively. Grazing and packaging into sinking particles is a possible export mechanism for GDGTs (Huguet et al. 2006). Moreover, it is assumed that phyto-detrital aggregates also play an important role in transporting GDGTs to the deep (Mollenhauer et al. 2015), but processes behind this pathway remain unclear. However, there are only few studies that link GDGT signals in sinking particles to the composition of the exported particulate matter (e.g. Yamamoto et al., 2012; Mollenhauer et al. 2015). Here we investigate sinking particles and suspended particulate matter (SPM) from spring blooms in 2012 and 2013 in the upwelling region in the Atlantic Ocean off Cape Blanc, Mauritania. We compare for the first time material from free-floating sediment traps (100, 200 and 400 m; purely sinking particles) with sinking particles and SPM from size fractionated in-situ pump (ISP) filters (several depths between 40 and 2350 m). This setup allows to relate the signal from archaeal lipids to (i) the flux of particulate organic carbon and the particle assemblages as revealed by the characterisation of

  6. Tracking Holocene glacial and high-altitude alpine environments fluctuations from minerogenic and organic markers in proglacial lake sediments (Lake Blanc Huez, Western French Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonneau, Anaëlle; Chapron, Emmanuel; Garçon, Marion; Winiarski, Thierry; Graz, Yann; Chauvel, Catherine; Debret, Maxime; Motelica-Heino, Mickaël; Desmet, Marc; Di Giovanni, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Holocene palaeoenvironmental evolution and glacial fluctuations at high-altitude in the western French Alps are reconstructed based on a multiproxy approach within Lake Blanc Huez (2550 m a.s.l.) drainage basin. The combination of seismic profiling (3.5 kHz), piston coring and radiocarbon dating in proglacial lacustrine sediments together with a detailed organic analysis of autochthonous and allochthonous supply allows documenting the evolution of glacier activity during the Holocene. Over the last 9700 years, the Holocene lake record has a bimodal pattern whose transition is progressive and occurring between 5400 and 4700 cal BP. During the Early Holocene, the organic lacustrine facies reflects reduced glacial activity in the catchment. This major glacial retreat seems to result from solar forcing and high summer insolation. After 5400 cal BP, lacustrine sedimentation is marked by the gradual increase both of minerogenic supply and soil erosion, suggesting a progressive transition to wetter climatic conditions. This climate change is synchronous both from the gradual decrease of summer insolation and the gradual reorganization of oceanic and atmospheric circulations, characterizing the beginning of the Neoglacial period. Both colder temperature and humid climate induced significant glacier advance, since 4700 cal BP. Over this global trend, three periods are particularly associated with higher runoff processes and higher soil erosion interpreted as wetter time intervals resulting from enhanced northern Westerlies regimes across the North Atlantic and Western Europe. They are dated from 8700 to 7000, 4700 to 2500 and 1200 to 200 cal BP. These wetter phases drastically contrast with periods of reduced glacial activities dated from the Early Bronze Age (ca 3870-3770 cal BP), the Iron Age (ca 2220-2150 cal BP), the Roman period (ca AD115-330) and the Medieval Warm Period (ca AD760-1160). In addition, these dryer periods are associated with mining activities at high-altitude.

  7. Surface and thickness variations of Brenva Glacier tongue (Mont Blanc, Italian Alps) in the second half of the 20th century by historical maps and aerial photogrammetry comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D Agata, C.; Zanutta, A.; Muzzu Martis, D.; Mancini, F.; Smiraglia, C.

    2003-04-01

    Aim of this contribution is the evaluation of volumetric and surface variations of Brenva Glacier (Mont Blanc, Italian Alps) during the second half of the 20th century, by GIS-based processing of maps and aerial photogrammetry technique. Brenva Glacier is a typical debris covered glacier, located in a valley on the S-E side of the Mont Blanc. The glacier covers a surface of 7 kmq and shows a length of 7,6 km at maximum. The glacier snout reaches 1415 m a.s.l., which is the lowest glacier terminus of the Italian Alps. To evaluate glacier variations different historical maps were used: 1) The 1959 Map, at the scale 1:5.000, by EIRA (Ente Italiano Rilievi Aerofotogrammetrici, Firenze), from terrestrial photogrammetric survey, published in the Bollettino del Comitato Glaciologico Italiano, 2, n. 19, 1971. 2) The 1971 Map, at the scale 1:5.000, from aerial photogrammetry (Alifoto, Torino) published in the Bollettino del Comitato Glaciologico Italiano, 2, n. 20, 1972. 3) The 1988 Map, at the scale 1:10.000, (Region Aosta Valley, Regional Technical Map) from 1983 aerial photogrammetric survey. 4) The 1999 Map, at the scale 1:10.000, (Region Aosta Valley, Regional Technical Map) from 1991 aerial photogrammetry survey. For the same purpose the following aereal photographs were used: 1) The 1975 image, CGR (Italian General Company aerial Surveys) flight RAVDA (Administrative Autonomous Region Aosta Valley), at the scale 1:17.000. 2) The 1991 image, CGR (Italian General Company aerial Surveys) flight RAVDA (Administrative Autonomous Region Aosta Valley), at the scale 1:17.000. Aerial imageries have been acquired over a long period from 1975 to 1991. The black and white images were scanned at suitable resolution if compared with the imagery scale and several models, representing the glacier tongue area, oriented using the inner and outer orientation parameters delivered with the images, were produced. The digital photogrammetric system, after orientation and matching, produces

  8. Evolution of anorthoclase phonolite, Mt. Erebus, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.A.; Kyle, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    Over the last 1 m.y. Mt. Erebus (3794 m) has erupted mainly anorthoclase phonolite (AP) and lesser trachyte, kaersutite phonolite and intermediate differentiates. An active convecting AP lava lake, identical in composition to the older lavas, existed from 1972 until late 1984. Most of the rocks define a strongly undersaturated continuous sodic differentiation series, composed of basanite, Ne-hawaiite, Ne-mugearite, Ne-benmoreite and AP. The main phenocryst phases and their ranges are: olivine (Fo 81-43), clinopyroxene (Wo 50-44, En 42-24, Fs 11-30), opaque oxides (Usp 52-79) and feldspar. Major, trace and REE analyses exhibit smooth trends on variation diagrams. REE are strongly LREE enriched and increase from La/sub N/=220 in the basanites to 400 in AP. There are no significant Eu anomalies. Published isotopic data show derivation of the basanite parental magmas from a depleted (/sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr=0.703) heterogeneous mantle source similar to that for oceanic island basalts. Crustal contamination is insignificant except in the trachytes. Evolution of the Erebus lineage by fractional crystallization of the above phases plus apatite is supported by mass balance models. Differentiation probably occurred in larger, hotter and lower P/sub H20/ magma chambers compared to the basanite to kaersutite phonolite DVDP lineage (Kyle, 1981) of the neighboring Hut Point Peninsula. Mt. Erebus may mark the site of a major mantle upwelling.

  9. Stereo Image of Mt. Usu Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On April 3, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra Satellite captured this image of the erupting Mt. Usu volcano in Hokkaido, Japan. This anaglyph stereo image is of Mt Usu volcano. On Friday, March 31, more than 15,000 people were evacuated by helicopter, truck and boat from the foot of Usu, that began erupting from the northwest flank, shooting debris and plumes of smoke streaked with blue lightning thousands of feet in the air. Although no lava gushed from the mountain, rocks and ash continued to fall after the eruption. The region was shaken by thousands of tremors before the eruption. People said they could taste grit from the ash that was spewed as high as 2,700 meters (8,850 ft) into the sky and fell to coat surrounding towns with ash. A 3-D view can be obtained by looking through stereo glasses, with the blue film through your left eye and red film with your right eye at the same time. North is on your right hand side. For more information, see When Rivers of Rock Flow ASTER web page Image courtesy of MITI, ERSDAC, JAROS, and the U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

  10. The puzzle of Mt. Etna 2015 activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Giuseppe Giovanni; Caltabiano, Tommaso; Cannata, Andrea; Cannavo', Flavio; Currenti, Gilda; Di Grazia, Giuseppe; La Spina, Alessandro; Palano, Mimmo; Napoli, Rosalba; Sciotto, Mariangela; Spampinato, Letizia

    2016-04-01

    During 2015, Mt. Etna volcano activity consisted of a sequence of seismic and volcanic events indicative of a complex cause-effect relationship between volcanism and tectonics. Here we analyze in details all these events in order to figure out a possible and reliable causative mechanism able to explain the measured evidences by exploiting an extensive and multi-parametric dataset, including geochemical, volcanological, magnetic, seismic, and geodetic data. The integration of the different parameters allowed us to observe a long-lasting inflation episode abruptly interrupted by two vigorous short-term deflations and an intense dynamics of the northern sector of the volcano unstable flank. This last feature was characterized by two seismic swarms (Mmax = 3.6) occurring along the central sector of the Pernicana Fault and aseismic slip with intense deformation affecting the north-eastern edge of the unstable flank. This is not the first time in which the interaction between volcanism and tectonics has been observed at Mt. Etna although poorly constrained. In our case, the used multidisciplinary approach suggested us that in 2015 the eruptive activity was mainly triggered by the tectonic framework of the volcano unstable flank.

  11. Barley metallothioneins: MT3 and MT4 are localized in the grain aleurone layer and show differential zinc binding.

    PubMed

    Hegelund, Josefine Nymark; Schiller, Michaela; Kichey, Thomas; Hansen, Thomas Hesselhøj; Pedas, Pai; Husted, Søren; Schjoerring, Jan Kofod

    2012-07-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low-molecular-weight, cysteine-rich proteins believed to play a role in cytosolic zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) homeostasis. However, evidence for the functional properties of MTs has been hampered by methodological problems in the isolation and characterization of the proteins. Here, we document that barley (Hordeum vulgare) MT3 and MT4 proteins exist in planta and that they differ in tissue localization as well as in metal coordination chemistry. Combined transcriptional and histological analyses showed temporal and spatial correlations between transcript levels and protein abundance during grain development. MT3 was present in tissues of both maternal and filial origin throughout grain filling. In contrast, MT4 was confined to the embryo and aleurone layer, where it appeared during tissue specialization and remained until maturity. Using state-of-the-art speciation analysis by size-exclusion chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry on recombinant MT3 and MT4, their specificity and capacity for metal ion binding were quantified, showing a strong preferential Zn binding relative to Cu and cadmium (Cd) in MT4, which was not the case for MT3. When complementary DNAs from barley MTs were expressed in Cu- or Cd-sensitive yeast mutants, MT3 provided a much stronger complementation than did MT4. We conclude that MT3 may play a housekeeping role in metal homeostasis, while MT4 may function in Zn storage in developing and mature grains. The localization of MT4 and its discrimination against Cd make it an ideal candidate for future biofortification strategies directed toward increasing food and feed Zn concentrations.

  12. Keeping mtDNA in Shape between Generations

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, James B.; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-01-01

    Since the unexpected discovery that mitochondria contain their own distinct DNA molecules, studies of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have yielded many surprises. In animals, transmission of the mtDNA genome is explicitly non-Mendelian, with a very high number of genome copies being inherited from the mother after a drastic bottleneck. Recent work has begun to uncover the molecular details of this unusual mode of transmission. Many surprising variations in animal mitochondrial biology are known; however, a series of recent studies have identified a core of evolutionarily conserved mechanisms relating to mtDNA inheritance, e.g., mtDNA bottlenecks during germ cell development, selection against specific mtDNA mutation types during maternal transmission, and targeted destruction of sperm mitochondria. In this review, we outline recent literature on the transmission of mtDNA in animals and highlight the implications for human health and ageing. PMID:25299061

  13. Keeping mtDNA in shape between generations.

    PubMed

    Stewart, James B; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-10-01

    Since the unexpected discovery that mitochondria contain their own distinct DNA molecules, studies of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have yielded many surprises. In animals, transmission of the mtDNA genome is explicitly non-Mendelian, with a very high number of genome copies being inherited from the mother after a drastic bottleneck. Recent work has begun to uncover the molecular details of this unusual mode of transmission. Many surprising variations in animal mitochondrial biology are known; however, a series of recent studies have identified a core of evolutionarily conserved mechanisms relating to mtDNA inheritance, e.g., mtDNA bottlenecks during germ cell development, selection against specific mtDNA mutation types during maternal transmission, and targeted destruction of sperm mitochondria. In this review, we outline recent literature on the transmission of mtDNA in animals and highlight the implications for human health and ageing.

  14. Vocational Training of Young Migrants in France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raimond, Jean-Marie

    This document reviews the literature on France's approximately 1.5 million young migrants. The introduction states that it is the second generation of migrants that were studied. In the second chapter, the statistical sources analyzed are explained and general descriptive statistics about foreigners in France are reported, including their numbers,…

  15. Apprenticeship in France: Between Tradition and Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon-Zarca, Georgie

    1996-01-01

    A study was made of the state of apprenticeship in France, using data gathered through telephone interviews with apprentices. Of a targeted group of 6,000 young apprentices, 70% participated in the survey. The study found that, until recently, apprenticeships had generally been used in France to train students in manual trades. During the past 10…

  16. Analysis of European mtDNAs for Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Elson, J. L.; Andrews, R. M.; Chinnery, P. F.; Lightowlers, R. N.; Turnbull, D. M.; Howell, Neil

    2001-01-01

    The standard paradigm postulates that the human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is strictly maternally inherited and that, consequently, mtDNA lineages are clonal. As a result of mtDNA clonality, phylogenetic and population genetic analyses should therefore be free of the complexities imposed by biparental recombination. The use of mtDNA in analyses of human molecular evolution is contingent, in fact, on clonality, which is also a condition that is critical both for forensic studies and for understanding the transmission of pathogenic mtDNA mutations within families. This paradigm, however, has been challenged recently by Eyre-Walker and colleagues. Using two different tests, they have concluded that recombination has contributed to the distribution of mtDNA polymorphisms within the human population. We have assembled a database that comprises the complete sequences of 64 European and 2 African mtDNAs. When this set of sequences was analyzed using any of three measures of linkage disequilibrium, one of the tests of Eyre-Walker and colleagues, there was no evidence for mtDNA recombination. When their test for excess homoplasies was applied to our set of sequences, only a slight excess of homoplasies was observed. We discuss possible reasons that our results differ from those of Eyre-Walker and colleagues. When we take the various results together, our conclusion is that mtDNA recombination has not been sufficiently frequent during human evolution to overturn the standard paradigm. PMID:11115380

  17. Regulation of Biobanks in France.

    PubMed

    Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; Pigeon, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The privacy of biobank research participants in France is protected by a combination of bioethics laws, research laws, and data protection laws. Although the law has attempted to facilitate research by creating an opt-out regime for research with pre-existing samples, other aspects of the law hinder research. The requirement for multiple consents throughout the process of biobank sample collection and use, the lack of acceptance of a broad consent for biobanking, and genetic exceptionalism in the law all complicate biobank research. With IRB approval, opt-out consent may be used for genetic research using human tissue collected for other purposes, but express consent is still required for research with the associated genetic data. Among the important issues remaining to be addressed are harmonizing and simplifying the various informed consent processes.

  18. Late abortion meeting, Paris / France.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, A

    1989-01-01

    On January 27 and 28, 1989 a workshop and a meeting were organized in Paris by Mouvement Francais pour le Planning Familial (MFPF/France) and the IPPF Europe Region. The workshop was held on the first day. 24 staff and volunteers from Planned Parenthood Associations of 15 countries attended, reviewing abortion laws, the definition of therapeutic abortion, and the incidence and problems of second trimester abortion. Second trimester abortion is available in only a few European countries. Second trimester abortions are rare in France (about 2000 per annum), and in 1986 1717 French women travelled to England in order to seek an abortion. All late abortions are performed for serious reasons. Older women may mistake signs of pregnancy for the onset of the menopause; and women fearful of social or familial punishment, especially teenagers, may be reluctant to consult a doctor. The experiences of Denmark and Sweden, where the problem is partially solved, suggest some strategies: optimize accessibility of contraceptive services, particularly for women at higher risk of late abortion; diminish the taboo surrounding abortion, so that women are less frightened to seek help at an early stage of pregnancy; make abortion services available in all regions of the country; avert time-consuming enforced waiting periods or consent for minors; and stimulate public information campaigns on the importance of seeking help early. On January 28 a meeting involving about 200 participants took place at the Universite Paris Dauphine, Salle Raymond Aron. Speakers at the meeting discussed the issue of late abortion in Europe, the difficulties of obtaining late abortions, counseling, medical problems, the woman's point of view, and possible solutions. At the close of the meeting, the MFPF called on the French government to modify some of the articles in the Penal Code that restrict women's access to safe and legal abortion.

  19. Tephra hazard assessment at Mt. Etna (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scollo, S.; Coltelli, M.; Bonadonna, C.; Del Carlo, P.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we present a probabilistic hazard assessment for tephra fallout at Mt. Etna (Italy) associated with both short- and long-lived eruptions. Eruptive scenarios and eruption source parameters were defined based on the geological record, while an advection-diffusion-sedimentation model was used to capture the variation in wind speed and direction with time after calibration with the field data. Two different types of eruptions were considered in our analysis: eruptions associated with strong short-lived plumes and eruptions associated with weak long-lived plumes. Our probabilistic approach was based on one eruption scenario for both types and on an eruption range scenario for eruptions producing weak long-lived plumes. Due to the prevailing wind direction, the eastern flanks are the most affected by tephra deposition, with the 122 BC Plinian and 2002-2003 eruptions showing the highest impact both on infrastructures and agriculture.

  20. WPA Omnibus Award MT Wind Power Outreach

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Spangler, Manager Energy Planning and Renewables

    2012-01-30

    The objective of this grant was to further the development of Montana's vast wind resources for small, medium, and large scale benefits to Montana and the nation. This was accomplished through collaborative work with wind industry representatives, state and local governments, the agricultural community, and interested citizens. Through these efforts MT Dept Environmental Quality (DEQ) was able to identify development barriers, educate and inform citizens, as well as to participate in regional and national dialogue that will spur the development of wind resources. The scope of DEQ's wind outreach effort evolved over the course of this agreement from the development of the Montana Wind Working Group and traditional outreach efforts, to the current focus on working with the state's university system to deliver a workforce trained to enter the wind industry.

  1. An Evaluation Study of Community Services, Mt. San Antonio College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Sue

    A study was conducted by the Community Services Department at Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) to evaluate participant satisfaction and suggestions for future direction for the department's comprehensive program of non-credit courses. A questionnaire was administered in class to 307 participants between April 1, and June 1, 1987, focusing on…

  2. 78 FR 67024 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT AGENCY... a final rule published in the Federal Register of September 30, 2013, that establishes Class E... aid, Glasgow, MT. A favorable comment from the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA)...

  3. 77 FR 55690 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Dillon, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ...), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The..., Dillon, MT (77 FR 15295). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort by... at Dillon Airport, Dillon, MT (77 FR 40834). Interested parties were invited to participate in...

  4. SignMT: An Alternative Language Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditcharoen, Nadh; Naruedomkul, Kanlaya; Cercone, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Learning a second language is very difficult, especially, for the disabled; the disability may be a barrier to learn and to utilize information written in text form. We present the SignMT, Thai sign to Thai machine translation system, which is able to translate from Thai sign language into Thai text. In the translation process, SignMT takes into…

  5. Mt. Hood Tech Prep Demonstration Project. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Thomas R.

    The Mt. Hood Tech Prep Demonstration Project provides technical education to students in grades 9-14 plus opportunities to continue into apprenticeship or four-year college programs. The consortium includes seven Oregon local school districts, Mt. Hood Community College (MHCC), and active business and industry partners. An estimated 1,500 students…

  6. Calendar-dated glacier variations in the western European Alps during the Neoglacial: the Mer de Glace record, Mont Blanc massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, Melaine; Nicolussi, Kurt; Deline, Philip; Astrade, Laurent; Edouard, Jean-Louis; Miramont, Cécile; Arnaud, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    Holocene glacier records from the western European Alps are still sparse, although a number of sites are well suited to constraining pre- and early- Little Ice Age (LIA) glacier advances. The present study provides the first dendrochronologically-based and calendar-dated Neoglacial glacier chronology for the Mont Blanc massif, French Alps. It is based on the analysis of over 240 glacially buried Pinus cembra subfossil logs and wood remains found either embedded-in-till or as detrital material in the Mer de Glace right lateral moraine. Only a few of the samples were found to be 'formally in situ' but we show that some logs were 'virtually in situ' (not rooted but showing little or no evidence of reworking) and could be used to accurately reconstruct past glacier margin behavior in space and time. Uncertainties regarding the other samples may relate to original growth location and/or to outer wood decay. The resulting dates (followed by a '+') were therefore considered maximum-limiting ages for glacier advances. The main burial events - interpreted as glacier advances - occurred between ca 1655+ and 1544+ BC, between ca 1230+ and 1105+ BC, between ca 1013+ and 962+/937+ BC, at ca 802-777 BC, after 608+ BC, between 312 and 337 AD, between ca 485+ AD and 606+ AD, between 1120 and 1178 AD, between ca 1248 and 1278+/1296 AD, and after 1352+ AD. These advances predate the late LIA maxima known from historical sources. The magnitude of the advances gradually increased to culminate in three near-Neoglacial maxima during the 7th, 12th and 13th centuries AD, followed by a first LIA/Neoglacial maximum in the second half of the 14th century AD. The pattern of Neoglacial events described here is coherent with Central and Eastern Alpine glacier chronologies. This indicates marked synchronicity of late Holocene glacier variability and forcing at a regional scale, although occasional differences could be detected between 'Western' and 'Eastern' records. The Mer de Glace record also

  7. mtDNAprofiler: a Web application for the nomenclature and comparison of human mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Yang, In Seok; Lee, Hwan Young; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2013-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a valuable tool in the fields of forensic, population, and medical genetics. However, recording and comparing mtDNA control region or entire genome sequences would be difficult if researchers are not familiar with mtDNA nomenclature conventions. Therefore, mtDNAprofiler, a Web application, was designed for the analysis and comparison of mtDNA sequences in a string format or as a list of mtDNA single-nucleotide polymorphisms (mtSNPs). mtDNAprofiler which comprises four mtDNA sequence-analysis tools (mtDNA nomenclature, mtDNA assembly, mtSNP conversion, and mtSNP concordance-check) supports not only the accurate analysis of mtDNA sequences via an automated nomenclature function, but also consistent management of mtSNP data via direct comparison and validity-check functions. Since mtDNAprofiler consists of four tools that are associated with key steps of mtDNA sequence analysis, mtDNAprofiler will be helpful for researchers working with mtDNA. mtDNAprofiler is freely available at http://mtprofiler.yonsei.ac.kr. PMID:23682804

  8. [Cannabis in France, new insights].

    PubMed

    Costentin, Jean

    2014-03-01

    France holds the record for cannabis use in Europe, especially among adolescents. This drug of abuse is thus mainly used during a very sensitive period of brain development, education, vehicle driving and development of life projects. In addition, synthetic derivatives of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are more noxious than cannabis itself are now appearing on the market. Traficking and cultivation for personnal use have intensified; products proposed for sale are richer in THC; and some methods of consumption (e-cigarettes, vaporizers, water pipes) increase the supply of THC to the lungs and thence to the body and brain. It is in this context that attempts are being made to legalize this drug of abuse. Other attempts are made to disguise it as a medication. Meanwhile, the list of its psychic as well as physical damages grows longer, with some very severe cases of major injuries. This evolution takes place in spite of numerous warnings expressed by the French Academy of Medicine. Subsequently, it is prompted to carefully and vigorously denounce these events. This will be the aim of this thematic session. PMID:26427294

  9. [Cannabis in France, new insights].

    PubMed

    Costentin, Jean

    2014-03-01

    France holds the record for cannabis use in Europe, especially among adolescents. This drug of abuse is thus mainly used during a very sensitive period of brain development, education, vehicle driving and development of life projects. In addition, synthetic derivatives of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are more noxious than cannabis itself are now appearing on the market. Traficking and cultivation for personnal use have intensified; products proposed for sale are richer in THC; and some methods of consumption (e-cigarettes, vaporizers, water pipes) increase the supply of THC to the lungs and thence to the body and brain. It is in this context that attempts are being made to legalize this drug of abuse. Other attempts are made to disguise it as a medication. Meanwhile, the list of its psychic as well as physical damages grows longer, with some very severe cases of major injuries. This evolution takes place in spite of numerous warnings expressed by the French Academy of Medicine. Subsequently, it is prompted to carefully and vigorously denounce these events. This will be the aim of this thematic session.

  10. Expression of melatonin (MT1, MT2) and melatonin-related receptors in the adult rat testes and during development.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Gaia; Francesco, Aniello; Ferrara, Diana; Campitiello, Maria Rosaria; Serino, Ismene; Minucci, Sergio; d'Istria, Michela

    2010-08-01

    It is well known that melatonin provokes reproductive alterations in response to changes in hours of daylight in seasonally breeding mammals, exerting a regulatory role at different levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Although it has also been demonstrated that melatonin may affect testicular activity in vertebrates, until now, very few data support the hypothesis of a local action of melatonin in the male gonads. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MT1, MT2 melatonin receptors and the H9 melatonin-related receptor, are expressed in the adult rat testes and during development. A semi-quantitative RT-PCR method was used to analyse the expression of MT1, MT2 and H9 receptors mRNAs in several rat tissues, mainly focusing on testes during development and adult life. Our results provide molecular evidences of the presence of both MT1 and, for the first time, MT2 melatonin receptors as well as of the H9 melatonin-related receptor in the examined tissues, including adult testes. During development MT1 and MT2 transcripts are expressed at lower levels in testes of rats from 1 day to 1 week of age, lightly increased at 2 weeks of age and remained permanently expressed throughout development until 6 months. These data strongly support the hypothesis that melatonin acts directly in male vertebrate gonads suggesting that rat testes may be a suitable model to verify the role of indolamine in vertebrate testicular activity.

  11. 75 FR 16839 - Sorbitol From France

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ..., 2009, the Commission established a schedule for the conduct of the review (74 FR 66992, December 17... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Sorbitol From France AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION:...

  12. Demoiselles and Drafts from Italy and France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picard, M. Dane

    1988-01-01

    Recounts the adventures of a journey taken through France and Italy. Makes an analogy of this trip to that of the one Charles Dickens took in 1844. Describes silicified horizons of the southern Paris Basin, moraines, outcrops, and "Hoodoos." (RT)

  13. Napoli and Volcanism - Vesuvius and Mt. Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    For more than 240 million years the region now known as Italy has been the scene of episodic volcanic activity. East-southeast of Napoli (Naples) stands the imposing cone of Vesuvius, which erupted explosively in 79 A.D. to bury Pompeii and Herculaneum. More recently, when the crew of Space Shuttle mission STS-104 captured this view, Mt. Etna (Sicily, not seen in this image, but photographed the day before) was spewing ash and gas thousands of meters into the air, some of which can be seen as a brownish smear over Isola d' Ischia and the Tyrrhenian Sea. The Appenine ranges extend from northern Italy, down the boot of the peninsula and westward into Sicily. This photograph of the Appenino Napoletano is part of an 18-frame stereophoto mapping strip that spans the entire mountain chain. The almost 1200-km-long belt of volcanoes and folded/faulted mountains is a result of the ongoing collision of Africa and Eurasia, accompanied by the progressive closing of the Mediterranean Sea. Using overlapping pairs of stereophotos, and a special viewer, scientists can get a three-dimensional perspective on the ranges that surpasses any image viewed alone. For more information, see another image of Mt. Vesuvius, taken by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). References: Behncke, Boris, 2000, Vesuvio - The eruption of A.D. 79: Italy's Volcanoes - The Cradle of Volcanology [http://www.geo.mtu.edu/boris/VESUVIO_79.html (accessed 10/18/01)] Doglioni, C., and Flores, G., 1997, Italy, in Moores, E. M., and Fairbridge, R. W., editors, Encyclopedia of European and Asian Regional Geology: London, Chapman and Hall, p. 414-435 Shuttle photograph STS104-710-60 was taken 23 July 2001 from the orbiter Atlantis using a Hasselblad camera with 250-mm lens. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. The entire mapping series (of frames numbered in sequence from 50 through 68) can also be downloaded from the

  14. Near-complete elimination of mutant mtDNA by iterative or dynamic dose-controlled treatment with mtZFNs.

    PubMed

    Gammage, Payam A; Gaude, Edoardo; Van Haute, Lindsey; Rebelo-Guiomar, Pedro; Jackson, Christopher B; Rorbach, Joanna; Pekalski, Marcin L; Robinson, Alan J; Charpentier, Marine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Frezza, Christian; Minczuk, Michal

    2016-09-19

    Mitochondrial diseases are frequently associated with mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In most cases, mutant and wild-type mtDNAs coexist, resulting in heteroplasmy. The selective elimination of mutant mtDNA, and consequent enrichment of wild-type mtDNA, can rescue pathological phenotypes in heteroplasmic cells. Use of the mitochondrially targeted zinc finger-nuclease (mtZFN) results in degradation of mutant mtDNA through site-specific DNA cleavage. Here, we describe a substantial enhancement of our previous mtZFN-based approaches to targeting mtDNA, allowing near-complete directional shifts of mtDNA heteroplasmy, either by iterative treatment or through finely controlled expression of mtZFN, which limits off-target catalysis and undesired mtDNA copy number depletion. To demonstrate the utility of this improved approach, we generated an isogenic distribution of heteroplasmic cells with variable mtDNA mutant level from the same parental source without clonal selection. Analysis of these populations demonstrated an altered metabolic signature in cells harbouring decreased levels of mutant m.8993T>G mtDNA, associated with neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP). We conclude that mtZFN-based approaches offer means for mtDNA heteroplasmy manipulation in basic research, and may provide a strategy for therapeutic intervention in selected mitochondrial diseases.

  15. Near-complete elimination of mutant mtDNA by iterative or dynamic dose-controlled treatment with mtZFNs.

    PubMed

    Gammage, Payam A; Gaude, Edoardo; Van Haute, Lindsey; Rebelo-Guiomar, Pedro; Jackson, Christopher B; Rorbach, Joanna; Pekalski, Marcin L; Robinson, Alan J; Charpentier, Marine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Frezza, Christian; Minczuk, Michal

    2016-09-19

    Mitochondrial diseases are frequently associated with mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In most cases, mutant and wild-type mtDNAs coexist, resulting in heteroplasmy. The selective elimination of mutant mtDNA, and consequent enrichment of wild-type mtDNA, can rescue pathological phenotypes in heteroplasmic cells. Use of the mitochondrially targeted zinc finger-nuclease (mtZFN) results in degradation of mutant mtDNA through site-specific DNA cleavage. Here, we describe a substantial enhancement of our previous mtZFN-based approaches to targeting mtDNA, allowing near-complete directional shifts of mtDNA heteroplasmy, either by iterative treatment or through finely controlled expression of mtZFN, which limits off-target catalysis and undesired mtDNA copy number depletion. To demonstrate the utility of this improved approach, we generated an isogenic distribution of heteroplasmic cells with variable mtDNA mutant level from the same parental source without clonal selection. Analysis of these populations demonstrated an altered metabolic signature in cells harbouring decreased levels of mutant m.8993T>G mtDNA, associated with neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP). We conclude that mtZFN-based approaches offer means for mtDNA heteroplasmy manipulation in basic research, and may provide a strategy for therapeutic intervention in selected mitochondrial diseases. PMID:27466392

  16. Near-complete elimination of mutant mtDNA by iterative or dynamic dose-controlled treatment with mtZFNs

    PubMed Central

    Gammage, Payam A.; Gaude, Edoardo; Van Haute, Lindsey; Rebelo-Guiomar, Pedro; Jackson, Christopher B.; Rorbach, Joanna; Pekalski, Marcin L.; Robinson, Alan J.; Charpentier, Marine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Frezza, Christian; Minczuk, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are frequently associated with mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In most cases, mutant and wild-type mtDNAs coexist, resulting in heteroplasmy. The selective elimination of mutant mtDNA, and consequent enrichment of wild-type mtDNA, can rescue pathological phenotypes in heteroplasmic cells. Use of the mitochondrially targeted zinc finger-nuclease (mtZFN) results in degradation of mutant mtDNA through site-specific DNA cleavage. Here, we describe a substantial enhancement of our previous mtZFN-based approaches to targeting mtDNA, allowing near-complete directional shifts of mtDNA heteroplasmy, either by iterative treatment or through finely controlled expression of mtZFN, which limits off-target catalysis and undesired mtDNA copy number depletion. To demonstrate the utility of this improved approach, we generated an isogenic distribution of heteroplasmic cells with variable mtDNA mutant level from the same parental source without clonal selection. Analysis of these populations demonstrated an altered metabolic signature in cells harbouring decreased levels of mutant m.8993T>G mtDNA, associated with neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP). We conclude that mtZFN-based approaches offer means for mtDNA heteroplasmy manipulation in basic research, and may provide a strategy for therapeutic intervention in selected mitochondrial diseases. PMID:27466392

  17. Comparison of Complementary Reactions in the Production of Mt

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Sarah; Gregorich, Kenneth; Dragojevic, Irena; Ellison, Paul; Garcia, Mitch Andre; Gates, Jacklyn; Stavsetra, Liv; Ali, Mazhar; Nitsche, Heino

    2009-01-21

    The new reaction 208Pb(59Co,n)266Mt was studied using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. A cross section of 7.7+5.2-3.3 pb was measured at a compound nucleus excitation energy of 14.9 MeV. The measured decay properties of 266Mt and its daughters correspond well with existing data. We compare this experimental result to transactinide compound nucleus formation model predictions, and the previously studied 209Bi(58Fe,n)266Mt reaction.

  18. Comparison of complementary reactions in the production of Mt

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S. L.; Dragojevic, I.; Ellison, P. A.; Garcia, M. A.; Gates, J. M.; Nitsche, H.; Gregorich, K. E.; Dvorak, J.; Stavsetra, L.; Ali, M. N.

    2009-02-15

    The new reaction {sup 208}Pb({sup 59}Co,n){sup 266}Mt was studied using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. A cross section of 7.7{sub -3.3}{sup +5.2} pb was measured at a compound nucleus excitation energy of 14.9 MeV. The measured decay properties of {sup 266}Mt and its daughters correspond well with existing data. We compare this experimental result to transactinide compound nucleus formation model predictions, and the previously studied {sup 209}Bi({sup 58}Fe,n){sup 266}Mt reaction.

  19. Viscosity controlled magma-carbonate interaction: a comparison of Mt. Vesuvius (Italy) and Mt. Merapi (Indonesia).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythe, L. S.; Misiti, V.; Masotta, M.; Taddeucci, J.; Freda, C.; Troll, V. R.; Deegan, F. M.; Jolis, E. M.

    2012-04-01

    Magma-carbonate interaction is increasingly seen as a viable and extremely important cause of magma contamination, and the generation of a crustally sourced CO2 phase (Goff et al., 2001; Freda et al., 2010). Even though the process is well recognized at certain volcanoes e.g. Popocatépetl, (Mexico); Merapi, (Indonesia); and Colli Albani, (Italy) (Goff et al., 2001; Deegan et al., 2010; Freda et al., 2010), neither the kinetics of carbonate assimilation nor its consequences for controlling the explosivity of eruptions have been constrained. Here we show the results of magma-carbonate interaction experiments conducted at 1200 °C and 0.5 GPa for varying durations (0 s, 60 s, 90 s and 300 s) for the Mt. Merapi (Indonesia) and Mt. Vesuvius (Italy) volcanic systems. We performed experiments using glassy starting materials specific to each volcano (shoshonite for Mt. Vesuvius, basaltic-andesite for Mt. Merapi) with different degrees of hydration (anhydrous vs hydration with ~ 2 wt % water) and using carbonate fragments of local origin; see Deegan et al., (2010) and Jolis et al., (2011). Experimental products include a gas phase (CO2-rich) and two melt phases, one pristine (Ca-normal) and one contaminated (Ca-rich) separated by a 'contamination front' which propagates outwards from the carbonate clast. Vesicles appear to nucleate in the contaminated glass and then migrate into the pristine one. Both contamination front propagation and bubble migration away from the carbonate are slower in anhydrous basaltic-andesite (Merapi anhydrous series) than in hydrated basaltic-andesite and shoshonite (Merapi and Vesuvius hydrated series), suggesting that assimilation speed is strongly controlled by the degree of hydration and the SiO2 content, both of which influence melt viscosity and hence diffusivity. As the carbonate dissolution proceeds in our experiments, initially dissolved and eventually exsolved CO2 builds up in the contaminated Ca-rich melt phase. Once melt volatile

  20. Zinc metallothionein (MT) induction by parenteral iron and endotoxin: A temporal analysis of hepatic MT mRNA changes

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, C.C. )

    1991-03-15

    The present study was undertaken to compare the temporal characteristics of iron-induced hepatic MT mRNA accumulation to that effected by endotoxin. Young chicks were given (ip) either endotoxin, ferrous gluconate or an equivalent volume of saline. At various times following injections, liver was obtained from 5 chicks per treatment for total RNA extraction. Equal amounts of total hepatic RNA from each chick were pooled and 10 {mu}g separated by denaturing agarose gel electrophoresis. Hepatic MT mRNA and albumin mRNA were analyzed by Northern blot analysis using synthetic oligonucleotides. The results indicated little temporal difference in the accumulation of hepatic MT mRNA as affected by either endotoxin or iron. In both treatments, MT mRNA was minimally affected at 3 hours post-injection. Maximum accumulation was achieved during a 6 h period from 6 to 12 hours post-injection. At 24 hours, MT mRNA was considerably higher in liver of endotoxin-injected chicks when compared to that of iron-injection chicks. Albumin expression appeared not to be substantially affected by either treatment. The results suggest that the induction of hepatic MT by iron injection is not substantially different than that observed following endotoxin administration. It would be speculative to suggest that the processes by which MT is induced under these conditions are also similar.

  1. The eruptive history of the Trous Blancs pit craters, La Réunion Island: The origin of a 24 km long lava flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Georg; Frese, Ingmar; Di Muro, Andrea; Kueppers, Ulrich; Michon, Laurent; Métrich, Nicole

    2015-04-01

    The assessment of volcanic hazards is strongly based on the past eruptive behaviour of volcanoes and its morphological parameters. Since past eruption characteristics and their frequency provide the best probabilities of such eruptions for the future, understanding the complete eruptive history of a volcano is one of the most powerful tools in assessing the potential hazards or eruptions. At Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) volcano (La Réunion, Indian Ocean), the most frequent style of activity is the effusion of lava flows, which pose the greatest hazard by invasion of inhabited areas and destruction of human property. Here we examined the eruptive history of a previously uninvestigated area, believed to be the origin of a 24 km long lava flow. The eruptions recurrence time of PdF is about one eruption every 9 months in the central caldera. Besides this central activity, eruptive vents have been built along three main rift zones cutting the edifice during the last 50 kyrs. In this study we focused on the largest rift zone of about 15 km width and 20 km length, which extends in a north westerly direction between PdF and the nearby Piton des Neiges volcanic complex. This rift zone is typified by deep seismicity (up to 30 km), emitting mostly primitive magmas, indicative of high fluid pressures (up to 5 kbar) and large volume eruptions. Our area of investigation focused on four consecutively aligned pit craters called the Trous Blancs. These have been identified [1] as the source area of one of the youngest (ca. 6 kyrs) and largest lava field, which extends for 24 km from a height of 1800m asl, passing Le Tampon and Saint Pierre city, until it reaches the coast. To gain insight into the development of this eruption and possible future similar activity, we collected new field data (including stratigraphic logs, a geological map of the area, C-14 dating and geochemical analyses of the eruptive products). Fieldwork revealed that the eruption initiated with intense

  2. Advanced MCT technologies in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destefanis, Gérard; Tribolet, Philippe

    2007-04-01

    In this paper we present an overview of the very recent developments of the HgCdTe infrared detector technology developed by CEA-LETI and industrialized by Sofradir in France. Today Sofradir uses in production for more than 15years a very mature, reproducible, well mastered and fully understood, planar n on p ion implanted technology. This process that allows very high yields to be achieved in all infrared bands from SWIR to LWIR uses the very conventional approach of LPE growth of MCT on lattice-matched CdZnTe substrates. Progress in this field is continuous from 20years and has recently leaded to the fabrication of high performance VLWIR FPA (320x256 with cut off wavelengths as high as 20μm). Moreover, thanks to the design of the epitaxial structure and to the substrate removal step MCT FPAs present the unique features to have very high quantum efficiency (above 70%) from the cut off wavelength down to the UV. This effect, which opens new application fields, was recently demonstrated in SWIR 320x256 FPAs with cut off wavelength of 2.5μm. Very high quality FPAs (1280x1024) with pitches as small as 15μm have already been demonstrated last year using the MBE growth of MWIR MCT epilayers on 4 inches germanium substrates, n on p ion implanted photodiodes and the hot welding indium bump hybridization technique. At the same time, with the MBE growth, bicolor and dual band FPAs which uses more complex multi hetero-junctions architectures (both 4 layers npn and 'pseudo planar' structures and extrinsically doped MCT layers) were fabricated with formats of 320x256 and pitches as small as 25μm. A very new area of development concerns avalanche photodiodes (APD) made with MCT. This semiconductor presents a unique feature among all the over semiconductors. Extremely high avalanche gains can be obtained on n on p photodiodes without absolutely any noise excess (F(K)=1): MCT APDs act as perfect amplifiers. These results open new interesting fields of investigation for low

  3. Eudialyte-group minerals in rocks of Lovozero layered complex at Mt. Karnasurt and Mt. Kedykvyrpakhk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyuk, G. Yu.; Pakhomovsky, Ya. A.; Yakovenchuk, V. N.

    2015-12-01

    Eudialyte-bearing interbeds within layers I-4 (Mt. Karnasurt) and II-4 (Mt. Kedykvyrpakhk) in the layered complex of the Lovozero Pluton are localized symmetrically relative to the loparite-bearing ijolite-malignite layer; the content of eudialyte decreases from underlying nepheline syenite to overlying foidolite. Eudialyte-group minerals fill the interstices between nepheline, sodalite, and microcline-perthite crystals in all rock types and are partially replaced with georgechaoite and minerals of the lovozerite group as a result of hydrothermal alteration. Variations in the chemical composition of the eudialyte-group minerals are mainly controlled by block substitution NaFeZrCl ↔ LnMn(Nb,Ti)S producing eudialyte proper, manganoeudialyte (sharply predominant), kentbrooksite, alluaivite, and a phase intermediate between manganoeudialyte and alluaivite. As the total Ln2O3 content increases, the relative amounts of Ce and La oxides increases linearly in the proportion Ce2O3: La2O3 = 2.5: 1. In the phases containing lower than 3 wt % La2O3, Nd becomes the next REE after Ce. It is very likely that (mangano)eudialyte was mostly formed after parakeldyshite and other anhydrous zirconium-silicate under effect of residual fluids enriched in Ca and Mn, which took part in fenitization of basalt, tuff, and tuffite of the Lovozero Formation.

  4. Loparite-(Ce) in rocks of the Lovozero layered complex at Mt. Karnasurt and Mt. Kedykvyrpakhk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomovsky, Ya. A.; Ivanyuk, G. Yu.; Yakovenchuk, V. N.

    2014-12-01

    Following from a mineralogical and petrographic study of loparite-bearing units I-4 at Mt. Karnasurt and II-4 at Mt. Kedykvyrpakhk, loparite-(Ce) is found to be concentrated in thin (10-40 cm) malignite-ijolite layers at the boundary between the underlying nepheline syenite and the overlying foidolite. Skeletal loparite-(Ce) metacrysts occur as inclusions in nepheline, sodalite, natrolite, aegirine, eudialyte, and lomonosovite or within the intergranular space between them. In turn, the characteristic segregations of skeletal loparite-(Ce) metacrysts contain inclusions of natrolite, lomonosovite, rhabdophane-(Ce), labuntsovite, and other relatively low-temperature minerals typical of pegmatites and hydrothermally altered rocks. The chemical composition of loparite-(Ce) varies within narrow limits (Lop59-70Per11-18Lue5-11Tsn4-7 due to an increase in Ca, Ln, Al, and Ti contents and a decrease in Na, Mn, Th, Sr, Fe, and Ta contents in the transitional zone between the underlying nepheline syenite, ore-bearing foidolite-malignite, and overlying ijoliteurtite. Variations in composition are also caused by the lateral isomorphic replacement of Na and Nb with Ln and Ti. The data obtained show that loparite mineralization is related to a pneumatolytic-hydrothermal alteration of foidolite and nepheline syenite along the contact between them.

  5. Porous aerosol in degassing plumes of Mt. Etna and Mt. Stromboli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, Valery; Jourdan, Olivier; Voigt, Christiane; Gayet, Jean-Francois; Chauvigne, Aurélien; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Minikin, Andreas; Klingebiel, Marcus; Weigel, Ralf; Borrmann, Stephan; Jurkat, Tina; Kaufmann, Stefan; Schlage, Romy; Gourbeyre, Christophe; Febvre, Guy; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Frey, Wiebke; Molleker, Sergej; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2016-09-01

    Aerosols of the volcanic degassing plumes from Mt. Etna and Mt. Stromboli were probed with in situ instruments on board the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt research aircraft Falcon during the contrail, volcano, and cirrus experiment CONCERT in September 2011. Aerosol properties were analyzed using angular-scattering intensities and particle size distributions measured simultaneously with the Polar Nephelometer and the Forward Scattering Spectrometer probes (FSSP series 100 and 300), respectively. Aerosols of degassing plumes are characterized by low values of the asymmetry parameter (between 0.6 and 0.75); the effective diameter was within the range of 1.5-2.8 µm and the maximal diameter was lower than 20 µm. A principal component analysis applied to the Polar Nephelometer data indicates that scattering features of volcanic aerosols of different crater origins are clearly distinctive from angular-scattering intensities of cirrus and contrails. Retrievals of aerosol properties revealed that the particles were "optically spherical" and the estimated values of the real part of the refractive index are within the interval from 1.35 to 1.38. The interpretation of these results leads to the conclusion that the degassing plume aerosols were porous with air voids. Our estimates suggest that aerosol particles contained about 18 to 35 % of air voids in terms of the total volume.

  6. 75 FR 54419 - Environmental Impact Statement: Yellowstone County, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Yellowstone County, MT AGENCY: Federal... highway project in Yellowstone County, Montana. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Brian Hasselbach, Right... (I-90) and Old Highway 312 in or near the city of Billings, Yellowstone County, Montana....

  7. 4. AERIAL VIEW OF MT. VERNON TERMINUS, SOUTHERN TERMINUS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERIAL VIEW OF MT. VERNON TERMINUS, SOUTHERN TERMINUS OF GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL PARKWAY (GWMP), LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  8. Trajectory of the mt. St. Augustine 1976 eruption ash cloud.

    PubMed

    Meinel, A B; Meinel, M P; Shaw, G E

    1976-07-30

    The ash clouds from the 23 January 1976 eruption of Mt. St. Augustine in Alaska drifted over Arizona on 25 January at an altitude of 6 kilometers as deduced from air trajectories and the observation of an unusual cloud.

  9. 76 FR 27914 - Television Broadcasting Services; Kalispell, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Kalispell, MT AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Commission has before it a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking...

  10. Schizophrenia: maternal inheritance and heteroplasmy of mtDNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Tomoe; Arai, Makoto; Miyashita, Mitsuhiro; Arai, Mayumi; Obata, Nanako; Nohara, Izumi; Oshima, Kenichi; Niizato, Kazuhiro; Okazaki, Yuji; Doi, Nagafumi; Itokawa, Masanari

    2012-01-01

    Role of mitochondrial pathology in schizophrenia has not been fully clarified. We searched for distinctive variants in mtDNA extracted from the gray matter of postmortem brains and from peripheral blood samples. We screened mtDNA region containing 5 genes encoding subunits of cytochrome c oxidase and ATPases. Polymorphisms not already reported in databases are recorded as unregistered rare variants. Four unregistered, non-synonymous rare variants were detected in 4 schizophrenic samples. Seven registered non-synonymous variants were not previously detected in non-psychotic Japanese samples registered in the mtSNP database. These variants may contribute to disease pathophysiology. In one family, compound mutations showed co-segregation with schizophrenia. MtDNA mutations could confer a risk for schizophrenia in the Japanese population, although further analyses are needed.

  11. Introduction of heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from a patient with NARP into two human rho degrees cell lines is associated either with selection and maintenance of NARP mutant mtDNA or failure to maintain mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Vergani, L; Rossi, R; Brierley, C H; Hanna, M; Holt, I J

    1999-09-01

    Mitochondria from a patient heteroplasmic at nucleo-tide position 8993 of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were introduced into two human tumour cell lines lacking mtDNA. The donor mitochondria contained between 85 and 95% 8993G:C mtDNA. All detectable mtDNA in the mitochondrially transformed cells contained the pathological 8993G:C mutation 3 months after transformation. These results suggest that 8993G:C mtDNA had a selective advantage over 8993T:A mtDNA in both lung carcinoma and osteo-sarcoma cell backgrounds. In contrast, two other presumed pathological mtDNA variants were lost in favour of 'wild-type' mtDNA molecules in the same lung carcinoma cell background. Taken together, these findings suggest that the transmission bias of mtDNA variants is dependent upon a combination of nuclear background and mtDNA genotype. A second phenomenon observed was a marked decrease in the growth rate of many putative transformed cell lines after 6 weeks of culturing in selective medium, and in these cell lines mtDNA was not readily detectable by Southern blotting. Restriction endonuclease analysis and sequencing of amplified mtDNA demonstrated that the slow growing cells contained little or no mtDNA. It is concluded that these cells represented transient mitochondrial transformants.

  12. [Epidemiology of tuberculosis in France in 2005].

    PubMed

    Antoine, D; Che, D

    2007-05-01

    This article presents results on cases of tuberculosis disease notified in France in 2005 by mandatory notification. In 2005, a total of 5,374 cases were notified in France, representing a rate of 8.9 cases per 100,000. The notification rate per 100,000 was below 10 in all French regions, except the Ile-de-France and French Guyana (with respective rates of 19.7/10(5) and 44.0/10(5)). Notification rates were higher in some population groups such as people born abroad (41.5/10(5)), especially those born in sub-Saharan Africa (160/10(5)), and those recently (<2 years) arrived in France (251/10(5)), in homeless people (214/10(5)), and in persons aged 80 years and over (21.7/10(5)). Pulmonary tuberculosis accounted for 73% of notified cases, 79% of which were contagious (positive direct examination of sputum, positive culture). Results from the notification of tuberculosis disease in 2005 indicate a continuing decrease of incidence in France. However, the high incidence in some population groups requires adapting public health actions to the needs of population groups more exposed to tuberculosis.

  13. [Epidemiology of tuberculosis in France in 2008].

    PubMed

    Che, D; Antoine, D

    2011-07-01

    A total of 5,758 tuberculosis cases were notified in France in 2008, giving a rate of nine cases per 100,000 inhabitants. The median age was 45 years and 59% of cases were male patients. Île-de-France (Paris and greater Paris area) and French Guiana had the highest notification rate in 2008 (17.9/10(5) and 22.6/10(5) respectively). The rate of tuberculosis was higher in individuals born abroad (43.2/10(5) vs. 5.0/10(5) for individuals born in France), especially those recently arrived in France. Pulmonary tuberculosis accounted for 72% of notified cases, 76% of which were potentially contagious (positive sputum smear, or culture). Compared to 2007, the number of notified tuberculosis cases increased by 3.3% in 2008. This increase was not accompanied by a rise of severe cases (meningitis and miliary TB); this seemed to be due partly to improvement in identification and notification of cases. However this trend could require specific monitoring in future years. A national tuberculosis control program was launched in France in 2007, aiming at reducing epidemiological disparities. Clinical and public health expertise needs to be maintained on all the territory to ensure that implemented measures can have the expected impact on the epidemiology of the disease.

  14. The International Heliophysical Year in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.

    We are preparing in France the anniversary of IGY 50 We are gathering our efforts around few actions 1 We planned to follow the international campaigns with our solar Telescope THEMIS in Tenerife with the spacecrafts SOHO Cluster and the magnetometers of Superdarn A group is already formed with C Hanuise as responsible to understand some physical processes involved in these phenomena by using former data 2 On the initiative of CAWSES SCOSTEP program we plan to rehabilitate our heliograph in Meudon in order to be able to participate to the international network of flare survey The Japonese are leading this program Shibata and Kurokawa 3 We are developping lectures for students in different places in France We planned to work on the development of a DVD and video games in a IHY European context 4 We have also an outreach program which consists of an exhibition This exibition could be duplicated in France and for French speaking countries

  15. [Utilization of methylphenidate(Ritalin) in France].

    PubMed

    Frances, C; Hoizey, G; Millart, H; Trenque, T

    2002-01-01

    Methylphenidate (Ritalin) is the only psychostimulant approved in France and indicated in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children over 6 years. It is under restricted prescription and distribution conditions. As such, it requires a hospital initiated prescription from either a neurology, psychiatry or pediatric specialist and it is covered by the "narcotics" schedule. The French Pharmacovigilance database spontaneous adverse drug reactions reporting, since it was approved in 1995, were analyzed. 21 adverse drug reactions were reported. In 16 cases, methylphenidate was suspected. They were generally non-serious, mild side effects and in most cases promptly resolved. These results do not suggest methylphenidate misuse in France or an overuse in between 1300 and 4000 treated children, to date. Until more information is available concerning the long-term effects of methylphenidate, and in order to limit misuse, inappropriate or overuse, the current prescription and dispensing regulation should be maintained in France, and could well be developed in other countries.

  16. Syphilis surveillance in France, 2000-2003.

    PubMed

    Couturier, E; Michel, A; Janier, M; Dupin, N; Semaille, C

    2004-12-01

    This article describes syphilis trends, characteristics of patients from 2000 to 2003 in France and trends of the benzylpenicillin benzathine 2.4 million UI sales from 2001 to 2003. The ongoing surveillance system for syphilis case reporting since 2001 has been set up in volunteer settings, mostly public settings where STI treatment is offered. Clinical case reporting is complemented by sexual behavioural data based on a self-administered questionnaire. From 2000 to 2003, 1089 syphilis cases were reported in France, increasing from 37 cases in 2000 to 428 in 2003. Overall, 96% of syphilis cases were in men with a mean age of 36.5 years and 70% of whom were born in France. The proportion of syphilis cases with HIV co-infection decreased over time from 60% in 2000 to 33% in 2003. The most affected area by the syphilis epidemic is the Ile-de-France region, mainly the city of Paris. The greatest proportion of syphilis cases diagnosed in men who have sex with men (MSM) were in the Ile-de-France region, where they made up 87% of cases, compared with 75% in other regions. Among the patients who completed the self-administered questionnaire on sexual behaviour, 83% reported having casual sex partners in the 3 months prior to their syphilis diagnosis. Trends in the sales of benzylpenicillin benzathine 2.4 million UI in private pharmacies are similar to those observed in the surveillance system, and increased between 2001 and 2003. In conclusion, syphilis transmission is still ongoing in France in 2003 and the role of unprotected oral sex in the transmission of syphilis should be emphasised. PMID:15677855

  17. Directed Replacement of Mt a by Mt a-1 Effects a Mating Type Switch in Neurospora Crassa

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S.; Staben, C.

    1994-01-01

    To test the functions of a mating type genes, we developed an efficient strategy to select transformants of Neurospora crassa in which resident A mating type DNA was replaced by cloned DNA from the mt a idiomorph. Cloned a idiomorphic DNA could specify all functions, including fertility, of a mating type, but only when it replaced A DNA at the mating type locus. Only the mt a-1 region of the a idiomorph was necessary in order to specify a mating type. Gene replacement events involved the homologous sequences flanking the unique mating type idiomorphic DNA, resulting in apparently isogenic a and A strains. These isogenic strains were fertile when crossed with one another, indicating that no determinants outside the transforming DNA are necessary for fertility as a and that no host sequences of A strains interfere with fertility as a. One a replacement strain bore a duplication of the transforming mt a-1 and hph DNA. The duplication strain had unexpected properties. Although mating type segregated 1:1 in crosses of this strain to A, the duplicated regions were efficiently altered during the sexual process to generate a single copy in the progeny. No progeny were recovered that had undergone RIP (repeat induced point mutation) sufficient to inactivate the mt a-1 gene. We infer that the mt a-1 gene is necessary and sufficient to specify a mating type identity in all vegetative and sexual activities. Mt a-1 may also play an essential role in ascosporogenesis after fertilization. PMID:8001795

  18. 77 FR 20747 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Billings, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Billings, MT AGENCY... action proposes to modify Class E airspace at Billings Logan International Airport, Billings, MT, to... feet or more above the surface of the earth. * * * * * ANM MT E5 Billings, MT Billings...

  19. Transcriptional quiescence of paternal mtDNA in cyprinid fish embryos.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ming; Peng, Liangyue; Hu, Xinjiang; Zhao, Yuling; Liu, Shaojun; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial homoplasmy signifies the existence of identical copies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and is essential for normal development, as heteroplasmy causes abnormal development and diseases in human. Homoplasmy in many organisms is ensured by maternal mtDNA inheritance through either absence of paternal mtDNA delivery or early elimination of paternal mtDNA. However, whether paternal mtDNA is transcribed has remained unknown. Here we report that paternal mtDNA shows late elimination and transcriptional quiescence in cyprinid fishes. Paternal mtDNA was present in zygotes but absent in larvae and adult organs of goldfish and blunt-snout bream, demonstrating paternal mtDNA delivery and elimination for maternal mtDNA inheritance. Surprisingly, paternal mtDNA remained detectable up to the heartbeat stage, suggesting its late elimination leading to embryonic heteroplasmy up to advanced embryogenesis. Most importantly, we never detected the cytb RNA of paternal mtDNA at all stages when paternal mtDNA was easily detectable, which reveals that paternal mtDNA is transcriptionally quiescent and thus excludes its effect on the development of heteroplasmic embryos. Therefore, paternal mtDNA in cyprinids shows late elimination and transcriptional quiescence. Clearly, transcriptional quiescence of paternal mtDNA represents a new mechanism for maternal mtDNA inheritance and provides implications for treating mitochondrion-associated diseases by mitochondrial transfer or replacement. PMID:27334806

  20. Transcriptional quiescence of paternal mtDNA in cyprinid fish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ming; Peng, Liangyue; Hu, Xinjiang; Zhao, Yuling; Liu, Shaojun; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial homoplasmy signifies the existence of identical copies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and is essential for normal development, as heteroplasmy causes abnormal development and diseases in human. Homoplasmy in many organisms is ensured by maternal mtDNA inheritance through either absence of paternal mtDNA delivery or early elimination of paternal mtDNA. However, whether paternal mtDNA is transcribed has remained unknown. Here we report that paternal mtDNA shows late elimination and transcriptional quiescence in cyprinid fishes. Paternal mtDNA was present in zygotes but absent in larvae and adult organs of goldfish and blunt-snout bream, demonstrating paternal mtDNA delivery and elimination for maternal mtDNA inheritance. Surprisingly, paternal mtDNA remained detectable up to the heartbeat stage, suggesting its late elimination leading to embryonic heteroplasmy up to advanced embryogenesis. Most importantly, we never detected the cytb RNA of paternal mtDNA at all stages when paternal mtDNA was easily detectable, which reveals that paternal mtDNA is transcriptionally quiescent and thus excludes its effect on the development of heteroplasmic embryos. Therefore, paternal mtDNA in cyprinids shows late elimination and transcriptional quiescence. Clearly, transcriptional quiescence of paternal mtDNA represents a new mechanism for maternal mtDNA inheritance and provides implications for treating mitochondrion-associated diseases by mitochondrial transfer or replacement. PMID:27334806

  1. The Formation and Erosion History of Mt. Sharp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Dapremont, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    The Curiosity rover is exploring 155 km diameter Gale crater and Mt. Sharp, Gale's 5 km high central mound (Fig. 1). This study addresses the formation and erosion history of Mt. Sharp. Gale lies on the topographic dichotomy between the southern highlands and the northern plains - a drop of over 2 km [1,2]. Altitude differences between the north and south rim reflect this regional slope, as do altitude differences between the deep annulus north of Mt. Sharp and the southern crater floor. Orbiter and rover images demonstrate that most exposed areas on Mt. Sharp consist of thin, sub-parallel units interpreted as sedimentary layers [3]. Gale is typical of the 50 large martian craters that have been totally or partially filled with such layers [4,5]. In many craters these sediments have been deeply eroded. Central Peak and Peak Ring: The highest point on Mt. Sharp, near the crater's center, is interpreted as a central peak [6]. The peak has a massive lower portion and a thin, smooth capping deposit (Fig. 2). Gale's size is transitional between martian craters with single central peaks and craters with peak rings approximately half the crater's diameter [2,6]. The boundaries of Mt. Sharp, as well as an arc of hills to the southeast of the mountain, closely match a circle approximately 80 km in diameter (Fig. 3). This morphology suggests that the Gale impact may have formed both a central peak and a partial peak ring, which is covered by the sediments of Mt. Sharp in the north and possibly exposed in the arc of eroded hills in the southeast quadrant (Figs. 3,4).

  2. Measurements of IN and BIO-IN with the fast ice nucleus chamber FINCH at Mt. Zugspitze, Mt. Puy de Dôme and Jungfraujoch during fall and winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nillius, B.; Frank, F.; Bingemer, H.; Curtius, J.; Bundke, U.

    2013-05-01

    In this work we present IN measurements at Mt. Zugspitze, Germany, 2650 m.a.s.l., Mt. Puy de Dôme, France, 1464 m.a.s.l. and Jungfraujoch, Switzerland, 3580 m a.s.l during fall and winter 2012 with the instrument FINCH HALO (Fast Ice Nucleus Chamber for the High Altitude and LOng range research aircraft HALO). In this device the temperature and super saturation for activation of Ice Nuclei (IN) and the growth to ice crystals is obtained by mixing three gas flows of different temperatures and moisture. After the growth of IN and Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) to macroscopic ice crystals and super-cooled water droplets in the development chamber, they are counted using an optical detector. The discrimination between ice and water is made by measuring the circular depolarization ratio of the backscattered laser light of each individual particle. IN are classified as biological particles by measuring their individual intrinsic-fluorescence during the winter campaigns in average 30-40 % of the IN show an intrinsic fluorescence and are supposed to be of biological origin.

  3. 75 FR 39277 - Sorbitol From France; Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... The Commission instituted this review on July 1, 2009 (74 FR 31762, July 2, 2009) and determined on... publishing the notice in the Federal Register on December 17, 2009 (74 FR 66992). The hearing was held in... COMMISSION Sorbitol From France; Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject...

  4. Murine Typhus, Reunion, France, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Camuset, Guillaume; Socolovschi, Cristina; Moiton, Marie-Pierre; Kuli, Barbara; Foucher, Aurélie; Poubeau, Patrice; Borgherini, Gianandrea; Wartel, Guillaume; Audin, Héla; Raoult, Didier; Filleul, Laurent; Parola, Philippe; Pagès, Fréderic

    2015-01-01

    Murine typhus case was initially identified in Reunion, France, in 2012 in a tourist. Our investigation confirmed 8 autochthonous cases that occurred during January 2011–January 2013 in Reunion. Murine typhus should be considered in local patients and in travelers returning from Reunion who have fevers of unknown origin. PMID:25625653

  5. Frances Rauscher: Music and Reasoning. Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Neal

    1995-01-01

    Reports on an interview with Frances Rauscher, a research psychologist and musician who has studied the effects of music on the brain. Maintains that students who have studied music have enhanced spatial reasoning. Recommends that music education begin at younger ages. (CFR)

  6. The Occitan Movement in Southern France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Klaus

    The Occitan movement in Southern France should be studied in the light of a world-wide political reality of our days, the surfacing of ethnic minorities which are beginning to voice cultural and political demands in almost all large industrialized or developing countries. The first step for a minority group to come into existence is almost without…

  7. [New conditions for organ donation in France].

    PubMed

    Antoine, Corinne; Maroudy, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    The procurement of organs from donors after circulatory death is a reliable technique which gives satisfactory posttransplant results and also represents a potential source of additional organs. In order to meet the growing need for organ donations, the 'anticipated organ donation approach' procedure is currently receiving renewed interest with new conditions for its implementation in France. PMID:27596496

  8. Shocks and Aftershocks: France Confronts Its Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracher, Nathan; Golsan, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that events in France during and after World War II are still controversial political and social issues. Describes the program and activities of U.S. teachers during a summer seminar on French literature and filmmaking during the German occupation years. (CFR)

  9. Competence: Conceptual Approach and Practice in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Deist, Francoise

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to analyse the conceptual approaches to competence and practice in competence management in France. Design/methodology/approach: Extensive literature review, discussion with academic experts in the French competence network of AGRH and interviews concerning developments following the 2003 national agreement…

  10. A Paradox in Physics Education in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smigiel, Eddie; Sonntag, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the nature and the level of difficulty of teaching and learning physics in the first year of undergraduate engineering schools in France. Our case study is based on a survey regarding a classic and basic question in applied physics, and which was conducted with a group of second-year students in a post-baccalaureate 1…

  11. Les instituts universitaires de technologie en France. (The university institutes of technology in France)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pineau, Gaston

    1971-01-01

    In 1966 France passed legislation naming three types of technical training: two year postbaccalaureate, short-cycle for those without a bachelor's degree, adult education, for those already employed. (MF)

  12. The mitochondrial Italian Human Proteome Project initiative (mt-HPP).

    PubMed

    Urbani, Andrea; De Canio, Michele; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Sechi, Salvatore; Bini, Luca; Castagnola, Massimo; Fasano, Mauro; Modesti, Alessandra; Roncada, Paola; Timperio, Anna Maria; Bonizzi, Luigi; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca; De Pinto, Vito; Di Ilio, Carmine; Federici, Giorgio; Folli, Franco; Foti, Salvatore; Gelfi, Cecilia; Lauro, Davide; Lucacchini, Antonio; Magni, Fulvio; Messana, Irene; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Papa, Sergio; Pucci, Piero; Sacchetta, Paolo

    2013-08-01

    Mitochondria carry maternally inherited genetic material, called the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA), which can be defined as the 25th human chromosome. The chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (c-HPP) has initially focused its activities addressing the characterization and quantification of the nuclear encoded proteins. Following the last International HUPO Congress in Boston (September 2012) it was clear that however small the mitochondrial chromosome is, it plays an important role in many biological and physiopathological functions. Mutations in the mtDNA have been shown to be associated with dozens of unexplained disorders and the information contained in the mtDNA should be of major relevance to the understanding of many human diseases. Within this paper we describe the Italian initiative of the Human Proteome Project dedicated to mitochondria as part of both programs: chromosome-centric (c-HPP) and Biology/Disease (B/D-HPP). The mt-HPP has finally shifted the attention of the HUPO community outside the nuclear chromosomes with the general purpose to highlight the mitochondrial processes influencing the human health. Following this vision and considering the large interest and evidence collected on the non-Mendelian heredity of Homo sapiens associated with mt-chromosome and with the microbial commensal ecosystem constituting our organism we may speculate that this program will represent an initial step toward other HPP initiatives focusing on human phenotypic heredity.

  13. Effect of mtDNA point mutations on cellular bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Szczepanowska, Joanna; Malinska, Dominika; Wieckowski, Mariusz R; Duszynski, Jerzy

    2012-10-01

    This overview discusses the results of research on the effects of most frequent mtDNA point mutations on cellular bioenergetics. Thirteen proteins coded by mtDNA are crucial for oxidative phosphorylation, 11 of them constitute key components of the respiratory chain complexes I, III and IV and 2 of mitochondrial ATP synthase. Moreover, pathogenic point mutations in mitochondrial tRNAs and rRNAs generate abnormal synthesis of the mtDNA coded proteins. Thus, pathogenic point mutations in mtDNA usually disturb the level of key parameter of the oxidative phosphorylation, i.e. the electric potential on the inner mitochondrial membrane (Δψ), and in a consequence calcium signalling and mitochondrial dynamics in the cell. Mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species is also modified in the mutated cells. The results obtained with cultured cells and describing biochemical consequences of mtDNA point mutations are full of contradictions. Still they help elucidate the biochemical basis of pathologies and provide a valuable tool for finding remedies in the future. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 17th European Bioenergetics Conference (EBEC 2012). PMID:22406627

  14. Melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2 are expressed in spermatozoa from several seasonal and nonseasonal breeder species.

    PubMed

    González-Arto, Marta; Vicente-Carrillo, Alejandro; Martínez-Pastor, Felipe; Fernández-Alegre, Estela; Roca, Jordi; Miró, Jordi; Rigau, Teresa; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan E; Pérez-Pé, Rosaura; Muiño-Blanco, Teresa; Cebrián-Pérez, José A; Casao, Adriana

    2016-11-01

    Melatonin is a ubiquitous and multipurpose molecule, and one of its roles is to regulate reproduction in some seasonal mammals. Our group has previously reported the variation in the melatonin levels in ram seminal plasma along the year and identified MT1 and MT2 receptors in ram spermatozoa. The objective of this study was to elucidate whether the presence of melatonin receptors (MT1 and MT2) in the sperm plasma membrane, and melatonin in the seminal plasma is related to seasonal breeding. For this purpose, the presence of melatonin receptors and the levels of melatonin in seminal plasma have been examined in several species: donkey and stallion as long-day breeders; red deer as a wild, short-day, highly seasonal breeder (epididymal spermatozoa); bull as a conventional nonseasonal breeder; boar as a seasonal breeder under management techniques; and dog as possible a seasonal breeder not regulated by melatonin. We have detected measurable levels of melatonin in the seminal plasma of all ejaculated semen samples (from donkey, stallion, boar, bull, and dog). Also, and for the first time, we have demonstrated the presence of MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors in the spermatozoa of all these species, regardless their type of reproduction or sperm source (ejaculated or epididymal), using indirect immunofluorescence techniques and Western blotting. Our findings suggest that melatonin and melatonin receptors may be universally distributed in the reproductive system of mammals and that the sperm melatonin receptors cells may not be necessarily related with seasonal reproduction. Furthermore, the presence of MT1 at the cytoplasmic droplet in immature ejaculated stallion spermatozoa found in one sample and epididymal red deer spermatozoa suggests that melatonin may be involved in specific functions during spermatogenesis and sperm maturation, like protecting spermatozoa from oxidative damage, this activity being mediated through these receptors. PMID:27448693

  15. Melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2 are expressed in spermatozoa from several seasonal and nonseasonal breeder species.

    PubMed

    González-Arto, Marta; Vicente-Carrillo, Alejandro; Martínez-Pastor, Felipe; Fernández-Alegre, Estela; Roca, Jordi; Miró, Jordi; Rigau, Teresa; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan E; Pérez-Pé, Rosaura; Muiño-Blanco, Teresa; Cebrián-Pérez, José A; Casao, Adriana

    2016-11-01

    Melatonin is a ubiquitous and multipurpose molecule, and one of its roles is to regulate reproduction in some seasonal mammals. Our group has previously reported the variation in the melatonin levels in ram seminal plasma along the year and identified MT1 and MT2 receptors in ram spermatozoa. The objective of this study was to elucidate whether the presence of melatonin receptors (MT1 and MT2) in the sperm plasma membrane, and melatonin in the seminal plasma is related to seasonal breeding. For this purpose, the presence of melatonin receptors and the levels of melatonin in seminal plasma have been examined in several species: donkey and stallion as long-day breeders; red deer as a wild, short-day, highly seasonal breeder (epididymal spermatozoa); bull as a conventional nonseasonal breeder; boar as a seasonal breeder under management techniques; and dog as possible a seasonal breeder not regulated by melatonin. We have detected measurable levels of melatonin in the seminal plasma of all ejaculated semen samples (from donkey, stallion, boar, bull, and dog). Also, and for the first time, we have demonstrated the presence of MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors in the spermatozoa of all these species, regardless their type of reproduction or sperm source (ejaculated or epididymal), using indirect immunofluorescence techniques and Western blotting. Our findings suggest that melatonin and melatonin receptors may be universally distributed in the reproductive system of mammals and that the sperm melatonin receptors cells may not be necessarily related with seasonal reproduction. Furthermore, the presence of MT1 at the cytoplasmic droplet in immature ejaculated stallion spermatozoa found in one sample and epididymal red deer spermatozoa suggests that melatonin may be involved in specific functions during spermatogenesis and sperm maturation, like protecting spermatozoa from oxidative damage, this activity being mediated through these receptors.

  16. Aging in France: Population Trends, Policy Issues, and Research Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beland, Daniel; Durandal, Jean-Philippe Viriot

    2013-01-01

    Like in other advanced industrial countries, in France, demographic aging has become a widely debated research and policy topic. This article offers a brief overview of major aging-related trends in France. The article describes France's demographics of aging, explores key policy matters, maps the institutional field of French social gerontology…

  17. Genetic analysis of the presumptive blood from Louis XVI, King of France.

    PubMed

    Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Gigli, Elena; Bini, Carla; Calafell, Francesc; Luiselli, Donata; Pelotti, Susi; Pettener, Davide

    2011-11-01

    A text on a pyrographically decorated gourd dated to 1793 explains that it contains a handkerchief dipped with the blood of Louis XVI, king of France, after his execution. Biochemical analyses confirmed that the material contained within the gourd was blood. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) and 2 (HVR2), the Y-chromosome STR profile, some autosomal STR markers and a SNP in HERC2 gene associated to blue eyes, were retrieved, and some results independently replicated in two different laboratories. The uncommon mtDNA sequence retrieved can be attributed to a N1b haplotype, while the novel Y-chromosome haplotype belongs to haplogroup G2a. The HERC2 gene showed that the subject analyzed was a heterozygote, which is compatible with a blue-eyed person, as king Louis XVI was. To confirm the identity of the subject, an analysis of the dried heart of his son, Louis XVII, could be undertaken. PMID:20940110

  18. Gravity survey of the Mt. Toondina impact structure, South Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, J. B.; Shoemaker, E. M.; Shoemaker, C. S.

    1991-01-01

    The Mt. Toondina impact structure is located in northern South Australia, about 45 km south of the town of Oodnadatta. Only the central uplift is exposed. The outcrops at Mt. Toondina reveal a remarkable structural anomaly surrounded by a broad expanse of nearly flat-lying beds of the Bulldog Shale of Early Cretaceous age. A gravity survey was undertaken in 1989 to determine the diameter of the impact structure, define the form of the central uplift, and understand the local crustal structure. Data were collected along two orthogonal lines across the structure. In addition to the profiles, a significant number of measurements were made on and around the central uplift. The 1989 gravity data combined with 1963 gravity data and the seismic reflection data provide an excellent data base to interpret the subsurface structure of the Mt. Toondina feature.

  19. MtDNA ancestry of Rio de Janeiro population, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Suellen; Hermida, Rose; Desidério, Márcia; Silva, Dayse A; de Carvalho, Elizeu F

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphism studies concerning HVI and HVII regions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have improved the understanding of the admixture genetic process related to the occupation of the continents by human population groups. We have analyzed the mtDNA lineages of 190 healthy and maternally unrelated individuals born in the metropolitan region of the Rio de Janeiro city, the capital of the State of Rio de Janeiro, southeastern Brazil. The data showing that 57.9, 25.3 and 16.8 % of the matrilineages found in Rio de Janeiro come from African, Amerindian and European population groups. They are, respectively, in close agreement with historical records which indicate that the admixture population of Brazil is the resulting of interethnic asymmetry crosses between individuals from those population groups. The high proportion of African mtDNA lineages in the population of Rio de Janeiro is in accordance with studies related to other Brazilian states.

  20. Rheology of Crystallizing Basalts from Mt. Nyiragongo and Mt. Nyamuragira D.R.C.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, A. A.; Whittington, A. G.; Sehlke, A.

    2015-12-01

    Mt. Nyiragongo, located within the Virunga Volcanic Province on the western branch of the East African Rift, is known for its persistent lava lake activity as well as devastating eruptions in 1977 and 2002. The 2002 eruption caused a humanitarian crisis when channelized lava flows entered the nearby city of Goma killing 170 people and displacing ~350,000 others. These lavas have extremely low silica contents (39-42 wt.% SiO2) and are very fluid, allowing flows to move rapidly away from the source. We have measured the rheology of lavas from Nyiragongo using a concentric cylinder viscometer at temperatures of ~1220, 1205, 1190, 1175, 1165, and 1145°C. Each experiment starts with a liquid viscosity measurement at 1500˚C, followed by cooling to the desired experimental temperature. The lava spends 10-12 hours at this temperature, with constant stirring, before measurements begin. After measuring at a range of strain rates, the lava is quenched by immersion of the Pt crucible in a water bath. The viscosity is ~32 Pas at the liquidus temperature of ~1220°C, increasing gradually to ~142 Pas at 1165˚C. These viscosity measurements are much lower than most other basaltic compositions including Hawaiian lavas which have a crystal fraction of ~42% and apparent viscosity of ~2000 Pas at 1169°C. Over this temperature range, crystal fraction varies little (1-5% spinel crystals). Interpolating between measurements of the melt viscosity by concentric cylinder and parallel-plate viscometry suggests that at 1165˚C, the viscosity of the starting melt would be ~63 Pas. Consequently, the change in viscosity is due primarily to cooling rather than either the physical or chemical effects of crystallization. The data were collected at strain rates between ~1 and 46 s-1, and are well reproduced using a power-law model with exponents ~0.94 to 0.96. Below 1165˚C, crystal fraction and magma viscosity both increase rapidly. Further experiments at lower temperatures will quantify this

  1. Cell Cycle- and Ribonucleotide Reductase-Driven Changes in mtDNA Copy Number Influence mtDNA Inheritance Without Compromising Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lebedeva, Maria A.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2008-01-01

    Most eukaryotes maintain multiple copies of mtDNA, ranging from 20–50 in yeast to as many as 10,000 in mammalian cells. The mitochondrial genome encodes essential subunits of the respiratory chain, but the number of mtDNA molecules is apparently in excess of that needed to sustain adequate respiration, as evidenced by the “threshold effect” in mitochondrial diseases. Thus, other selective pressures apparently have contributed to the universal maintenance of multiple mtDNA molecules/cell. Here we analyzed the interplay between the two pathways proposed to regulate mtDNA copy number in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the requirement of normal mtDNA copy number for mitochondrial gene expression, respiration, and inheritance. We provide the first direct evidence that upregulation of mtDNA can be achieved by increasing ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) activity via derepression of nuclear RNR gene transcription or elimination of allosteric-feedback regulation. Analysis of rad53 mutant strains also revealed upregulation of mtDNA copy number independent of that resulting from elevated RNR activity. We present evidence that a prolonged cell cycle allows accumulation of mtDNA in these strains. Analysis of multiple strains with increased or decreased mtDNA revealed that mechanisms are in place to prevent significant changes in mitochondrial gene expression and respiration in the face of ∼two-fold alterations in mtDNA copy number. However, depletion of mtDNA in abf2 null strains leads to defective mtDNA inheritance that is partially rescued by replenishing mtDNA via overexpression of RNR1. These results indicate that one role for multiple mtDNA copies is to ensure optimal inheritance of mtDNA during cell division. PMID:17721079

  2. Mapping topoisomerase sites in mitochondrial DNA with a poisonous mitochondrial topoisomerase I (Top1mt).

    PubMed

    Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Huang, Shar-Yin N; Agama, Keli; Khiati, Salim; Zhang, Hongliang; Pommier, Yves

    2014-06-27

    Mitochondrial topoisomerase I (Top1mt) is a type IB topoisomerase present in vertebrates and exclusively targeted to mitochondria. Top1mt relaxes mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) supercoiling by introducing transient cleavage complexes wherein the broken DNA strand swivels around the intact strand. Top1mt cleavage complexes (Top1mtcc) can be stabilized in vitro by camptothecin (CPT). However, CPT does not trap Top1mtcc efficiently in cells and is highly cytotoxic due to nuclear Top1 targeting. To map Top1mtcc on mtDNA in vivo and to overcome the limitations of CPT, we designed two substitutions (T546A and N550H) in Top1mt to stabilize Top1mtcc. We refer to the double-mutant enzyme as Top1mt*. Using retroviral transduction and ChIP-on-chip assays with Top1mt* in Top1mt knock-out murine embryonic fibroblasts, we demonstrate that Top1mt* forms high levels of cleavage complexes preferentially in the noncoding regulatory region of mtDNA, accumulating especially at the heavy strand replication origin OH, in the ribosomal genes (12S and 16S) and at the light strand replication origin OL. Expression of Top1mt* also caused rapid mtDNA depletion without affecting mitochondria mass, suggesting the existence of specific mitochondrial pathways for the removal of damaged mtDNA.

  3. Lack of mitochondrial topoisomerase I (TOP1mt) impairs liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Khiati, Salim; Baechler, Simone A; Factor, Valentina M; Zhang, Hongliang; Huang, Shar-yin N; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Sourbier, Carole; Neckers, Leonard; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Pommier, Yves

    2015-09-01

    The liver has an exceptional replicative capacity following partial hepatectomy or chemical injuries. Cellular proliferation requires increased production of energy and essential metabolites, which critically depend on the mitochondria. To determine whether Top1mt, the vertebrate mitochondrial topoisomerase, is involved in this process, we studied liver regeneration after carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) administration. TOP1mt knockout (KO) mice showed a marked reduction in regeneration and hepatocyte proliferation. The hepatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) failed to increase during recovery from CCl4 exposure. Reduced glutathione was also depleted, indicating increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). Steady-state levels of ATP, O2 consumption, mtDNA, and mitochondrial mass were also reduced in primary hepatocytes from CCl4-treated KO mice. To further test whether Top1mt acted by enabling mtDNA regeneration, we tested TOP1mt KO fibroblasts and human colon carcinoma HCT116 cells and measured mtDNA after 3-d treatment with ethidium bromide. Both types of TOP1mt knockout cells showed defective mtDNA regeneration following mtDNA depletion. Our study demonstrates that Top1mt is required for normal mtDNA homeostasis and for linking mtDNA expansion with hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:26305952

  4. Lack of mitochondrial topoisomerase I (TOP1mt) impairs liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Khiati, Salim; Baechler, Simone A.; Factor, Valentina M.; Zhang, Hongliang; Huang, Shar-yin N.; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Sourbier, Carole; Neckers, Leonard; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Pommier, Yves

    2015-01-01

    The liver has an exceptional replicative capacity following partial hepatectomy or chemical injuries. Cellular proliferation requires increased production of energy and essential metabolites, which critically depend on the mitochondria. To determine whether Top1mt, the vertebrate mitochondrial topoisomerase, is involved in this process, we studied liver regeneration after carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) administration. TOP1mt knockout (KO) mice showed a marked reduction in regeneration and hepatocyte proliferation. The hepatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) failed to increase during recovery from CCl4 exposure. Reduced glutathione was also depleted, indicating increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). Steady-state levels of ATP, O2 consumption, mtDNA, and mitochondrial mass were also reduced in primary hepatocytes from CCl4-treated KO mice. To further test whether Top1mt acted by enabling mtDNA regeneration, we tested TOP1mt KO fibroblasts and human colon carcinoma HCT116 cells and measured mtDNA after 3-d treatment with ethidium bromide. Both types of TOP1mt knockout cells showed defective mtDNA regeneration following mtDNA depletion. Our study demonstrates that Top1mt is required for normal mtDNA homeostasis and for linking mtDNA expansion with hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:26305952

  5. Identifying Water on Mt. Baker and Mt. St. Helens, WA with Geophysics: Implications for Volcanic Landslide Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, C.; Bedrosian, P.; Wisniewski, M.; Deszcz-Pan, M.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater position, abundance, and flow rates within a volcano affect the transmission of fluid pressure, transport of mass and heat and formation of mechanically weak hydrothermal alteration influencing the stability of volcanoes. In addition, eruptions can shatter volcanic rocks, weakening the edifice. Helicopter magnetic and electromagnetic (HEM) data collected over Mt. Baker and Mt. St. Helens volcanoes reveal the distribution of water, shattered volcanic rocks and hydrothermal alteration essential to evaluating volcanic landslide hazards. These data, combined with geological mapping and rock property measurements, indicate the presence of localized <100 m thick zones of water-saturated hydrothermally altered rock beneath Sherman Crater and the Dorr Fumarole Fields at Mt. Baker. Nuclear magnetic resonance data indicate that the hydrothermal clays contain ~50% bound water with no evidence for free water ponded beneath the ice. The HEM data suggest water-saturated fresh volcanic rocks from the surface to the detection limit (~100 m) over the entire summit of Mt. Baker (below the ice). A 50-100 m thick high resistivity layer (>1500 ohm-m) corresponding to domes, debris avalanche, volcanic rocks and glaciers mantles the crater at Mt. St. Helens. Shallow low resistivity layers corresponding to fresh, cold water and hot brines are observed below the high resistivity surface in EM data. Shallow ground water mainly concentrates in shattered dome material in the crater of Mt. St. Helens. Aeromagnetic data indicate the location of basalts sandwiched between debris avalanche deposits and shattered dome material. The combination of the EM and magnetic data help map the location of the shattered dome material that is considered to be the failure surface for the 1980 debris avalanche. The EM data image the regional groundwater table near the base of the volcano. The geophysical identification of groundwater and weak layers constrain landslide hazards assessments.

  6. Young people's heroes in France and Spain.

    PubMed

    Gash, Hugh; Domínguez Rodríguez, Pilar

    2009-05-01

    Heroes play collectivist or individualist roles in imagination and self-development. Representations of heroic figures in questionnaires given to French (n = 241) and Spanish (n = 227) samples of 10 and 15-year-olds were examined to assess the extent that heroes originated in digital media, and whether they were proximal or distal personalities. There is strong evidence that heroes in this sample were largely learned about in digital media (France 45%, Spain 50%): family and community heroes were a minority (France 11%, Spain 9%). Male heroes were more important to Spanish participants compared to their French peers. The acquisition sequence for hero type reported in the pre-television era, proximal (family and community) to distal (beyond the neighbourhood), is reversed in this study. Generally, 10-year-olds preferred heroes with collectivist qualities and 15-year-olds with individualised qualities. Findings are discussed in terms of the emergence of social capital. PMID:19476237

  7. Postglacial dispersal of Phlebotomus perniciosus into France.

    PubMed

    Perrotey, S; Mahamdallie, S S; Pesson, B; Richardson, K J; Gállego, M; Ready, P D

    2005-12-01

    Phlebotomus perniciosus was identified morphologically in samples from France and northeast Spain, and individuals were then characterized at three polymorphic isoenzyme loci (by isoelectrofocusing) and at the mitochondrial DNA locus (by comparative DNA sequence analysis of a fragment of the Cytochrome b gene). The four polymorphic loci gave conflicting patterns of population relationships, which can be explained by hypothesizing different amounts of gene introgression at each locus when two distinctive lineages met in southern France or northeast Spain after isolation in southern Italy and Spain during the Pleistocene Ice Ages. P. perniciosus is an important vector of leishmania infantum and so these population differentiation studies are relevant for predicting the emergence and spread of leishmaniasis in relation to environmental changes, including climate.

  8. Young people's heroes in France and Spain.

    PubMed

    Gash, Hugh; Domínguez Rodríguez, Pilar

    2009-05-01

    Heroes play collectivist or individualist roles in imagination and self-development. Representations of heroic figures in questionnaires given to French (n = 241) and Spanish (n = 227) samples of 10 and 15-year-olds were examined to assess the extent that heroes originated in digital media, and whether they were proximal or distal personalities. There is strong evidence that heroes in this sample were largely learned about in digital media (France 45%, Spain 50%): family and community heroes were a minority (France 11%, Spain 9%). Male heroes were more important to Spanish participants compared to their French peers. The acquisition sequence for hero type reported in the pre-television era, proximal (family and community) to distal (beyond the neighbourhood), is reversed in this study. Generally, 10-year-olds preferred heroes with collectivist qualities and 15-year-olds with individualised qualities. Findings are discussed in terms of the emergence of social capital.

  9. Minimally Invasive Forefoot Surgery in France.

    PubMed

    Meusnier, Tristan; Mukish, Prikesht

    2016-06-01

    Study groups have been formed in France to advance the use of minimally invasive surgery. These techniques are becoming more frequently used and the technique nuances are continuing to evolve. The objective of this article was to advance the awareness of the current trends in minimally invasive surgery for common diseases of the forefoot. The percutaneous surgery at the forefoot is less developed at this time, but also will be discussed.

  10. Enterovirus Migration Patterns between France and Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Ines; Mirand, Audrey; Slama, Ichrak; Mastouri, Maha; Peigue-Lafeuille, Hélène; Aouni, Mahjoub; Bailly, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    The enterovirus (EV) types echovirus (E-) 5, E-9, and E-18, and coxsackievirus (CV-) A9 are infrequently reported in human diseases and their epidemiologic features are poorly defined. Virus transmission patterns between countries have been estimated with phylogenetic data derived from the 1D/VP1 and 3CD gene sequences of a sample of 74 strains obtained in France (2000–2012) and Tunisia (2011–2013) and from the publicly available sequences. The EV types (E-5, E-9, and E-18) exhibited a lower worldwide genetic diversity (respective number of genogroups: 4, 5, and 3) in comparison to CV-A9 (n = 10). The phylogenetic trees estimated with both 1D/VP1 and 3CD sequence data showed variations in the number of co-circulating lineages over the last 20 years among the four EV types. Despite the low number of genogroups in E-18, the virus exhibited the highest number of recombinant 3CD lineages (n = 10) versus 4 (E-5) to 8 (E-9). The phylogenies provided evidence of multiple transportation events between France and Tunisia involving E-5, E-9, E-18, and CV-A9 strains. Virus spread events between France and 17 other countries in five continents had high probabilities of occurrence as those between Tunisia and two European countries other than France. All transportation events were supported by BF values > 10. Inferring the source of virus transmission from phylogenetic data may provide insights into the patterns of sporadic and epidemic diseases caused by EVs. PMID:26709514

  11. First case of human gongylonemosis in France.

    PubMed

    Pesson, Bernard; Hersant, Christel; Biehler, Jean-François; Abou-Bacar, Ahmed; Brunet, Julie; Pfaff, Alexander W; Ferté, Hubert; Candolfi, Ermanno

    2013-01-01

    Gongylonema spp. are cosmopolitan spirurid nematodes that are common parasites of wild and domesticated mammals and birds. Gongylonema pulchrum Molin, 1857 is most common in ruminants, where it invades mucosa and submucosa of the mouth, tongue, oesophagus and forestomachs. It extremely rarely occurs in man, and fewer than 60 cases have been reported worldwide. We report a case from the Alsace region, which appears to be the first case of human gongylonemosis described in France.

  12. First case of human gongylonemosis in France

    PubMed Central

    Pesson, Bernard; Hersant, Christel; Biehler, Jean-François; Abou-Bacar, Ahmed; Brunet, Julie; Pfaff, Alexander W.; Ferté, Hubert; Candolfi, Ermanno

    2013-01-01

    Gongylonema spp. are cosmopolitan spirurid nematodes that are common parasites of wild and domesticated mammals and birds. Gongylonema pulchrum Molin, 1857 is most common in ruminants, where it invades mucosa and submucosa of the mouth, tongue, oesophagus and forestomachs. It extremely rarely occurs in man, and fewer than 60 cases have been reported worldwide. We report a case from the Alsace region, which appears to be the first case of human gongylonemosis described in France. PMID:23425508

  13. The e-Bug project in France.

    PubMed

    Touboul, Pia; Dunais, Brigitte; Urcun, Jeanne-Marie; Michard, Jean-Louis; Loarer, Christian; Azanowsky, Jean-Michel; Vincent, Isabelle; Jestin, Christine; Housseau, Bruno; de Warren, Anne; Dellamonica, Pierre

    2011-06-01

    The high rates of antibiotic prescriptions and antimicrobial resistance in France motivated its participation in the European e-Bug school project concerning microbes, and infection transmission, prevention and treatment. The prospect of raising awareness among children, helping them to adopt suitable attitudes and behaviour towards infection transmission and treatment starting from childhood, generated enthusiastic support from relevant national educational and health institutions throughout the Project. France was actively involved in every stage: background research showed that the subject matter was best suited to the national science curricula of the fourth and fifth forms in junior schools, and the sixth and ninth forms in senior schools; a focus group study with junior and senior teachers elicited teachers' needs concerning teaching resources; and a qualitative and quantitative evaluation, after translation and pack review, enabled further adaptation of the packs. This evaluation showed an overall enthusiastic reception by teachers and their students in France, and reassured teachers on the ease of use of the Project's resources and students' progress. The e-Bug Project was launched through a national institutional implementation plan in September 2009 and orders for e-Bug tools increased rapidly. By the end of October, 57% of all senior science teachers and 16% of all junior school teachers had ordered the pack. France is one of the most frequent users of the e-Bug web site. The collaboration with both educational and health partners was particularly helpful to implementing the Project, and this was confirmed by the favourable reception and participation of teachers and students in the field.

  14. Enterovirus Migration Patterns between France and Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Othman, Ines; Mirand, Audrey; Slama, Ichrak; Mastouri, Maha; Peigue-Lafeuille, Hélène; Aouni, Mahjoub; Bailly, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    The enterovirus (EV) types echovirus (E-) 5, E-9, and E-18, and coxsackievirus (CV-) A9 are infrequently reported in human diseases and their epidemiologic features are poorly defined. Virus transmission patterns between countries have been estimated with phylogenetic data derived from the 1D/VP1 and 3CD gene sequences of a sample of 74 strains obtained in France (2000-2012) and Tunisia (2011-2013) and from the publicly available sequences. The EV types (E-5, E-9, and E-18) exhibited a lower worldwide genetic diversity (respective number of genogroups: 4, 5, and 3) in comparison to CV-A9 (n = 10). The phylogenetic trees estimated with both 1D/VP1 and 3CD sequence data showed variations in the number of co-circulating lineages over the last 20 years among the four EV types. Despite the low number of genogroups in E-18, the virus exhibited the highest number of recombinant 3CD lineages (n = 10) versus 4 (E-5) to 8 (E-9). The phylogenies provided evidence of multiple transportation events between France and Tunisia involving E-5, E-9, E-18, and CV-A9 strains. Virus spread events between France and 17 other countries in five continents had high probabilities of occurrence as those between Tunisia and two European countries other than France. All transportation events were supported by BF values > 10. Inferring the source of virus transmission from phylogenetic data may provide insights into the patterns of sporadic and epidemic diseases caused by EVs.

  15. Cancer mortality among Polish migrants to France.

    PubMed

    Tyczynski, J; Parkin, D; Zatonski, W; Tarkowski, W

    1992-01-01

    Cancer risk in the Polish-born population of France has been compared to that in Poland and in native French subjects (born in France), using mortality data from the period 1979-1985. The Polish-born community in France is a long-established one--most migration occurred during the 1920s--so that for many cancer sites the cancer pattern is closer to that of French natives than that in Poland (eg oral cavity, oesophagus, large bowel, gall bladder, uterus, leukaemia). Polish migrants, however, retain their characteristically high rates of cancer of the stomach and lung (in men), and low rates of breast and prostate cancer. The Polish-born community has a characteristic pattern of residence (living mainly in the Nord and the Pas-de-Calais) and occupational status (a higher proportion of 'workers' than the French-born); these are important confounding factors which can mask the true differences in risk for several sites (larynx, oesophagus, large bowel) if no adjustment is made during analysis. PMID:1467602

  16. Populations at Risk for Alveolar Echinococcosis, France

    PubMed Central

    Piarroux, Martine; Piarroux, Renaud; Knapp, Jenny; Bardonnet, Karine; Dumortier, Jérôme; Watelet, Jérôme; Gerard, Alain; Beytout, Jean; Abergel, Armand; Bresson-Hadni, Solange

    2013-01-01

    During 1982–2007, alveolar echinococcosis (AE) was diagnosed in 407 patients in France, a country previously known to register half of all European patients. To better define high-risk groups in France, we conducted a national registry-based study to identify areas where persons were at risk and spatial clusters of cases. We interviewed 180 AE patients about their way of life and compared responses to those of 517 controls. We found that almost all AE patients lived in 22 départements in eastern and central France (relative risk 78.63, 95% CI 52.84–117.02). Classification and regression tree analysis showed that the main risk factor was living in AE-endemic areas. There, most at-risk populations lived in rural settings (odds ratio [OR] 66.67, 95% CI 6.21–464.51 for farmers and OR 6.98, 95% CI 2.88–18.25 for other persons) or gardened in nonrural settings (OR 4.30, 95% CI 1.82–10.91). These findings can help sensitization campaigns focus on specific groups. PMID:23647623

  17. A paradox in physics education in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smigiel, Eddie; Sonntag, Michel

    2013-07-01

    This paper deals with the nature and the level of difficulty of teaching and learning physics in the first year of undergraduate engineering schools in France. Our case study is based on a survey regarding a classic and basic question in applied physics, and which was conducted with a group of second-year students in a post-baccalaureateThe French baccalaureate (baccalauréat) is the examination students must pass to graduate from high school. undergraduate engineering school. The responses to the survey indicate that many students fall into a kind of mathematical ‘formalism’, which prevents them from understanding the actual physics behind the question. This leads us to believe that we must reconsider the way that physics is taught. An analysis of a physics teaching sequence in French and English undergraduate textbooks confirms the weight given to mathematical formalism in France. When approached from a purely mathematical angle, physics becomes a long and slow process of assimilation of the specific scientific culture that underlies the teaching model used in classes préparatoires, classes that are usually presented as a model of academic excellence. However, this model appears to be less suitable when teaching more ‘ordinary students’, who respond better when taken through a ‘detour’ of the ‘important roots’ of physics. This paper shows that in France historically rooted pedagogical traditions persist, ignoring the latest advances in research on science teaching.

  18. Mt. San Antonio Community College Information Notebook; Volume Two, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Community Coll. District, Walnut, CA.

    This databook contains some of the basic information to be used in decision making and planning in the Mt. San Antonio College (MSAC) District. Part I focuses on the demographic characteristics of the district population, feeder school districts, and data from other educational providers. Part II presents statewide data on potential enrollment by…

  19. Mt. San Antonio College Matriculation Research Update, 1989-90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Barbara Ann; And Others

    In fall 1986, Mt. San Antonio College (MSAC) initiated a 5-year longitudinal study of the effectiveness of its matriculation services, including assessment, orientation, counseling/advisement, and follow-up. The academic performance and success of students participating in one or more of these services were compared to those of degree- and…

  20. Mt. San Antonio College Matriculation Study: Fall 1986-Spring 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Barbara Ann; And Others

    In fall 1986, Mt. San Antonio College (MSAC) began a five year longitudinal study of the effectiveness of its matriculation services, which include assessment, orientation, counseling/advisement, and follow-up of students by staff members. The study utilized a computerized tracking system to compare retention, grade point average (GPA),…

  1. 75 FR 41075 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bozeman, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... proposed rulemaking to amend Class E airspace at Bozeman, MT (75 FR 20321). Interested parties were invited..., 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation... Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44...

  2. 77 FR 32896 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Billings, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... modify controlled airspace at Billings, MT (77 FR 20747). Interested parties were invited to participate... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR...

  3. 77 FR 41259 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Plentywood, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... modify controlled airspace at Plentywood, MT (77 FR 24159). Interested parties were invited to... Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR...: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p....

  4. 78 FR 59807 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... Salt Lake City, and Minneapolis Air Route Traffic Control Centers (ARTCCs). This improves the safety... proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to establish controlled airspace at Glasgow, MT (78 FR 41337). Interested... control of Salt Lake City, and Minneapolis ARTCCs by vectoring aircraft from en route airspace to...

  5. 76 FR 9991 - Television Broadcasting Services; Kalispell, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Kalispell, MT AGENCY: Federal Communications... CFR 1.415 and 1.420. List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television, Television broadcasting. For...

  6. Limnology of Mt. Elbert Forebay, 1978-1979. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmke, J.R.; LaBounty, J.F.; Sartoris, J.J.; Roline, R.A.

    1982-03-01

    The 1978-79 limnological study of Mt. Elbert Forebay was done in conjunction with other limnological studies at Twin Lakes. The purpose of the overall study is to determine the effects of pumped storage on the aquatic environment of Twin Lakes. Information will help maximize ecological resources while meeting the water storage and power generation objectives of Fryingpan-Arkansas Project.

  7. 76 FR 40322 - Mt. Hood Meadows Ski Resort Parking Improvements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... disclose the potential environmental effects of improving the parking at Mt. Hood Meadows Ski Resort. The..., cut/fill slopes, storm water swales, snow storage, and an equipment maintenance yard. In addition, the...). An additional 4.5 acres would be cleared for access roads, cut/fill slopes, storm water swales,...

  8. 77 FR 52219 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Lewistown, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ...) to modify controlled airspace at Lewistown, MT (77 FR 38226). Interested parties were invited to... 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034...), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2....

  9. 76 FR 53049 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Shelby, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... modify controlled airspace at Shelby, MT (76 FR 35362). Interested parties were invited to participate in... Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR..., 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The...

  10. 77 FR 44120 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Roundup, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to establish controlled airspace at Roundup, MT (77 FR 27148... Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR..., 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The...

  11. 78 FR 67298 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Ennis, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... rulemaking (NPRM) to establish controlled airspace at Ennis, MT (78 FR 54415). Interested parties were... 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034...), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2....

  12. 76 FR 28308 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Poplar, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ...) Global Positioning System (GPS) standard instrument approach procedures at Poplar Municipal Airport... Support Group, Western Service Center, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, WA 98057; telephone (425) 203-4537... proposed rulemaking to establish additional controlled airspace at Poplar, MT (76 FR 8921)....

  13. Mt. Druitt Longitudinal Study: Second Major Report, 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Peter

    Sections of this report introduce many of the activities undertaken in 1982 within the purview of the Mt. Druitt (Australia) longitudinal study. Included are reports of (1) the 1982 math investigation, (2) a longitudinal study of child growth and development and the incidence of physical defects at ages 9 and 10, (3) an investigation of classroom…

  14. Mt. St. Helens Seen Close Up on May 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoffel, Dorothy B.; Stoffel, Keith L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes eruption steps in Mt. St. Helens' top surface deformation: constant shaking of earthquakes, minor steaming from vents, and sudden catastrophic eruption. Explosions caused black projectile-laden ash clouds, vertical white steam clouds, and vertical gray ash-laden clouds. (SK)

  15. 76 FR 45179 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... proposed rulemaking to amend Class E controlled airspace at Glasgow, MT (76 FR 30300). Interested parties...), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The...) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February...

  16. 76 FR 47435 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Forsyth, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E. O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp..., MT (76 FR 32879). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort by... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of...

  17. 76 FR 56967 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Glendive, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... rulemaking to amend controlled airspace at Glendive, MT (76 FR 41145). Interested parties were invited to... 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034.... 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in...

  18. 76 FR 59479 - Montana Disaster Number MT-00062

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Montana Disaster Number MT-00062 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera, Associate Administrator for...

  19. Pharmacology of ramelteon, a selective MT1/MT2 receptor agonist: a novel therapeutic drug for sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Masaomi

    2009-01-01

    An estimated one-third of the general population is affected by insomnia, and this number is increasing due to more stressful working conditions and the progressive aging of society. However, current treatment of insomnia with hypnotics, gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptor modulators, induces various side effects, including cognitive impairment, motor disturbance, dependence, tolerance, hangover, and rebound insomnia. Ramelteon (Rozerem; Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited, Osaka, Japan) is an orally active, highly selective melatonin MT(1)/MT(2) receptor agonist. Unlike the sedative hypnotics that target GABA(A) receptor complexes, ramelteon is a chronohypnotic that acts on the melatonin MT(1) and MT(2) receptors, which are primarily located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the body's "master clock." As such, ramelteon possesses the first new therapeutic mechanism of action for a prescription insomnia medication in over three decades. Ramelteon has demonstrated sleep-promoting effects in clinical trials, and coupled with its favorable safety profile and lack of abuse potential or dependence, this chronohypnotic provides an important treatment option for insomnia. PMID:19228178

  20. Barley Metallothioneins: MT3 and MT4 Are Localized in the Grain Aleurone Layer and Show Differential Zinc Binding1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hegelund, Josefine Nymark; Schiller, Michaela; Kichey, Thomas; Hansen, Thomas Hesselhøj; Pedas, Pai; Husted, Søren; Schjoerring, Jan Kofod

    2012-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low-molecular-weight, cysteine-rich proteins believed to play a role in cytosolic zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) homeostasis. However, evidence for the functional properties of MTs has been hampered by methodological problems in the isolation and characterization of the proteins. Here, we document that barley (Hordeum vulgare) MT3 and MT4 proteins exist in planta and that they differ in tissue localization as well as in metal coordination chemistry. Combined transcriptional and histological analyses showed temporal and spatial correlations between transcript levels and protein abundance during grain development. MT3 was present in tissues of both maternal and filial origin throughout grain filling. In contrast, MT4 was confined to the embryo and aleurone layer, where it appeared during tissue specialization and remained until maturity. Using state-of-the-art speciation analysis by size-exclusion chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry on recombinant MT3 and MT4, their specificity and capacity for metal ion binding were quantified, showing a strong preferential Zn binding relative to Cu and cadmium (Cd) in MT4, which was not the case for MT3. When complementary DNAs from barley MTs were expressed in Cu- or Cd-sensitive yeast mutants, MT3 provided a much stronger complementation than did MT4. We conclude that MT3 may play a housekeeping role in metal homeostasis, while MT4 may function in Zn storage in developing and mature grains. The localization of MT4 and its discrimination against Cd make it an ideal candidate for future biofortification strategies directed toward increasing food and feed Zn concentrations. PMID:22582132

  1. Analysis of BRCA1 and mtDNA haplotypes and mtDNA polymorphism in familial breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Povedano, Cristina; Salgado, Josefa; Gil, Carmen; Robles, Maitane; Patiño-García, Ana; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects have been postulated to play an important role in the modulation and/or progression of cancer. In the past decade, a wide spectrum of mtDNA variations have been suggested as potentially sensitive and specific biomarkers for several human cancer types. In this context, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) described as protective or risk variants have been published, in particular in breast cancer, though not without controversy. Moreover, many mtDNA haplogroups have been associated with different phenotypes and diseases. We genotyped 18 SNPs, 15 of them defining European mtDNA haplogroups, including SNPs described as protective or risk variants, 7 SNPs that determine BRCA1 haplotypes and a BRCA1 intron 7 polymorphism. We included in this study 90 Caucasian unrelated women with breast cancer with familial criteria and 96 controls. Our aim was to clarify the importance of any of these SNPs, mitochondrial haplogroups and BRCA1 haplotypes in the modulation of breast cancer. We detected no significant differences in the distribution of BRCA1 haplotypes between patients and controls. Haplogroup U and the 12308G variant of mtDNA were overrepresented within the control group (p = 0.005 and p = 0.036, respectively) compared to breast cancer. Finally, we identified a significant association between the BRCA1 intron 7 polymorphism and BRCA1 haplotypes. Specifically, (TTC)6/6 and (TTC)6/7 genotypes with the seven polymorphic site cassette of "H2-like" haplotypes, and the (TTC)7/7 genotype associated with the "H1-like" haplotypes (p < 0.001).

  2. Effects of Grapevine Leafroll associated Virus 3 (GLRaV-3) and duration of infection on fruit composition and wine chemical profile of Vitis vinifera L. cv. Sauvignon blanc.

    PubMed

    Montero, R; Mundy, D; Albright, A; Grose, C; Trought, M C T; Cohen, D; Chooi, K M; MacDiarmid, R; Flexas, J; Bota, J

    2016-04-15

    In order to determine the effects of Grapevine Leafroll associated Virus 3 (GLRaV-3) on fruit composition and chemical profile of juice and wine from Vitis vinifera L. cv. Sauvignon blanc grown in New Zealand, composition variables were measured on fruit from vines either infected with GLRaV-3 (established or recent infections) or uninfected vines. Physiological ripeness (20.4°Brix) was the criterion established to determine the harvest date for each of the three treatments. Date of grape ripeness was strongly affected by virus infection. In juice and wine, GLRaV-3 infection prior to 2008 reduced titratable acidity compared with the uninfected control. Differences observed in amino acids from the three infection status groups did not modify basic wine chemical properties. In conclusion, GLRaV-3 infection slowed grape ripening, but at equivalent ripeness to result in minimal effects on the juice and wine chemistry. Time of infection produced differences in specific plant physiological variables.

  3. Weak Lensing Calibrated M-T Scaling Relation of Galaxy Groups in the COSMOS Fieldsstarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettula, K.; Finoguenov, A.; Massey, R.; Rhodes, J.; Hoekstra, H.; Taylor, J. E.; Spinelli, P. F.; Tanaka, M.; Ilbert, O.; Capak, P.; McCracken, H. J.; Koekemoer, A.

    2013-11-01

    The scaling between X-ray observables and mass for galaxy clusters and groups is instrumental for cluster-based cosmology and an important probe for the thermodynamics of the intracluster gas. We calibrate a scaling relation between the weak lensing mass and X-ray spectroscopic temperature for 10 galaxy groups in the COSMOS field, combined with 55 higher-mass clusters from the literature. The COSMOS data includes Hubble Space Telescope imaging and redshift measurements of 46 source galaxies per arcminute2, enabling us to perform unique weak lensing measurements of low-mass systems. Our sample extends the mass range of the lensing calibrated M-T relation an order of magnitude lower than any previous study, resulting in a power-law slope of 1.48^{+0.13}_{-0.09}. The slope is consistent with the self-similar model, predictions from simulations, and observations of clusters. However, X-ray observations relying on mass measurements derived under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium have indicated that masses at group scales are lower than expected. Both simulations and observations suggest that hydrostatic mass measurements can be biased low. Our external weak lensing masses provide the first observational support for hydrostatic mass bias at group level, showing an increasing bias with decreasing temperature and reaching a level of 30%-50% at 1 keV. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Also based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; the XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA; the European Southern Observatory under Large Program 175.A-0839, Chile; Kitt Peak National Observatory, Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which

  4. Progressive increase in mtDNA 3243A>G heteroplasmy causes abrupt transcriptional reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Picard, Martin; Zhang, Jiangwen; Hancock, Saege; Derbeneva, Olga; Golhar, Ryan; Golik, Pawel; O'Hearn, Sean; Levy, Shawn; Potluri, Prasanth; Lvova, Maria; Davila, Antonio; Lin, Chun Shi; Perin, Juan Carlos; Rappaport, Eric F; Hakonarson, Hakon; Trounce, Ian A; Procaccio, Vincent; Wallace, Douglas C

    2014-09-23

    Variation in the intracellular percentage of normal and mutant mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNA) (heteroplasmy) can be associated with phenotypic heterogeneity in mtDNA diseases. Individuals that inherit the common disease-causing mtDNA tRNA(Leu(UUR)) 3243A>G mutation and harbor ∼10-30% 3243G mutant mtDNAs manifest diabetes and occasionally autism; individuals with ∼50-90% mutant mtDNAs manifest encephalomyopathies; and individuals with ∼90-100% mutant mtDNAs face perinatal lethality. To determine the basis of these abrupt phenotypic changes, we generated somatic cell cybrids harboring increasing levels of the 3243G mutant and analyzed the associated cellular phenotypes and nuclear DNA (nDNA) and mtDNA transcriptional profiles by RNA sequencing. Small increases in mutant mtDNAs caused relatively modest defects in oxidative capacity but resulted in sharp transitions in cellular phenotype and gene expression. Cybrids harboring 20-30% 3243G mtDNAs had reduced mtDNA mRNA levels, rounded mitochondria, and small cell size. Cybrids with 50-90% 3243G mtDNAs manifest induction of glycolytic genes, mitochondrial elongation, increased mtDNA mRNA levels, and alterations in expression of signal transduction, epigenomic regulatory, and neurodegenerative disease-associated genes. Finally, cybrids with 100% 3243G experienced reduced mtDNA transcripts, rounded mitochondria, and concomitant changes in nuclear gene expression. Thus, striking phase changes occurred in nDNA and mtDNA gene expression in response to the modest changes of the mtDNA 3243G mutant levels. Hence, a major factor in the phenotypic variation in heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations is the limited number of states that the nucleus can acquire in response to progressive changes in mitochondrial retrograde signaling. PMID:25192935

  5. [Infant botulism in France, 1991-2009].

    PubMed

    King, L-A; Popoff, M-R; Mazuet, C; Espié, E; Vaillant, V; de Valk, H

    2010-09-01

    Infant botulism is caused by the ingestion of spores of Clostridium botulinum and affects newborns and infants under 12 months of age. Ingested spores multiply and produce botulinum toxin in the digestive tract, which then induces clinical symptoms. A single French case was described in the literature prior to 1991. We describe the cases of infant botulism identified in France between 1991 and 2009. All clinical suspicions of botulism must be declared in France. Biological confirmation of the disease is provided by the National reference laboratory for anaerobic bacteria and botulism at the Pasteur Institute. During this period, 7 cases of infant botulism were identified, 1 per year from 2004 to 2008 and 2 in 2009. The median age of affected infants was 119 days and all were female. All infants presented with constipation and oculomotor symptoms. All were hospitalized and required mechanical ventilation. The infants recovered from their botulism. The diagnosis of infant botulism was biologically confirmed for all patients. One 4-month-old infant was treated with a single dose of the human-derived botulism antitoxin specific for infant botulism types A and B (BabyBIG®). The infants all had different feeding habits ranging from exclusive breast feeding to a mix of formula feeding and solid food consumption. The consumption of honey, the only documented risk food for this disease, was reported for 3 of the infants. The honey had been placed on the pacifier of 2 infants and directly in the mouth of the 3rd by the mother. Infant botulism, a form of botulism that was previously rarely recognized in France, has been reported more frequently during the last 6 years. This disease remains rare but nonetheless severe. In light of recent epidemiological data, efforts to raise awareness among parents of infants and health professionals on the danger of infant botulism and particularly, its association with honey consumption seems necessary.

  6. [Current data on malaria in metropolitan France].

    PubMed

    Danis, M; Legros, F; Thellier, M; Caumes, E

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiological data from the French National Reference Center for Imported Diseases showed that the estimated number of cases of imported malaria in France increased from 5,940 in 1998 to 7,127 in 1999 and 8,056 in 2000. This three-year progression ended in 2001 when the number of estimated cases fell back to 7,223. It was due mainly to the concomitant increase in the number of people traveling to endemic zones especially in Africa. In 2000 the median age of patients with imported malaria in France was 29.5 years and the sex ratio was 1.78. Sixty-three percent of cases involved people of African origin and 37% involved "Westerners". The countries in which contamination occurred were located in tropical Africa (95%), Asia (2.2%), and Latin America (2.7%). During the three year period from 1998 to 2000, there were a total of 13 accidental autochtonous cases of malaria involving patients with no history of travel to tropical areas. The distribution of Plasmodium species involved in imported malaria in France was stable with 83% of cases involving Plasmodium falciparum, 6% involving Plasmodium vivax, 6.5% involving Plasmodium ovale and 1.3% involving Plasmodium malariae. Attacks were clinically uncomplicated in 90 to 95% of cases and severe in 2 to 5% including fatal Plasmodium falciparum malaria in 0.49 to 0.37% of cases. Less than 10% of the 45% of patients claiming use of prophylaxis complied properly. Analysis of the drugs used for curative treatment in 2000 showed an increase in the use of quinine and mefloquine and decrease in the use of halofantrine. The main objectives remain reduction of mortality and improvement of prevention.

  7. How Gaz de France optimizes LNG regasification

    SciTech Connect

    Colonna, J.L.; Lecomte, B.; Caudron, S.

    1986-05-05

    A regasification optimization program was implemented at Montoir-de-Bretagne in 1984, and rapidly accepted by the operators. It has been an important tool for decision-making in the optimizing operation of this liquefied natural gas (LNG) storage and regasification terminal. The models used are regularly and easily updated on the basis of equipment behavior: aging or fouling. The Montoir-de-Bretagne LNG terminal is in the port area of Nates-Saint Nazaire on the Atlantic coast. It was commissioned in 1982 by Gaz de France. This terminal is used for receiving, storing, and regasifying the Algerian LNG received under a contract between Gaz de France and Sonatrach, as well as the LNG imported by Belgium and temporarily routed through France. It is designed to receive 25,000 to 200,000 cu m LNG carriers and has three 120,000 cm m LNG storage tanks. The daily sendout ranges between 6.7 million cu m and 36 million cu m. Monitor terminal supplies mainly Brittany and the Paris area. Two identifical berths allow the simultaneous reception of two LNG carriers. LNG is carried to the storage tanks in 32-in. lines at a rate of 12,000 cu m/hr. Each storage tank is equipped with three submerged 450 cu m/hr pumps with which the LNG is sent from the tanks to the secondary pumps at 8 bar. The nine high-pressure (HP) secondary pumps, with a capacity of either 450 cu m/hr or 180 cu m/hr, raise the LNG pressure to a level at least equal to pipeline pressure prior to revaporization.

  8. New melatonin (MT1/MT2) ligands: design and synthesis of (8,9-dihydro-7H-furo[3,2-f]chromen-1-yl) derivatives.

    PubMed

    Landagaray, Elodie; Ettaoussi, Mohamed; Leclerc, Véronique; Traoré, Balla; Perez, Valérie; Nosjean, Olivier; Boutin, Jean A; Caignard, Daniel-Henri; Delagrange, Philippe; Berthelot, Pascal; Yous, Saïd

    2014-02-01

    Herein we describe the synthesis of novel tricyclic analogues issued from the rigidification of the methoxy group of the benzofuranic analogue of melatonin as MT1 and MT2 ligands. Most of the synthesized compounds displayed high binding affinities at MT1 and MT2 receptors subtypes. Compound 6b (MT1, Ki=0.07nM; MT2, Ki=0.08nM) exhibited with the vinyl 6c and allyl 6d the most interesting derivatives of this series. Functional activity of these compounds showed full agonist activity with EC50 in the nanomolar range. Compounds 6a (EC50=0.8nM and Emax=98%) and 6b (EC50=0.2nM and Emax=121%) exhibited good pharmacological profiles.

  9. Directions toward the Year 2000. Strategic Plan, Mt. San Antonio Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Community Coll. District, Walnut, CA.

    This booklet presents Mt. San Antonio College's (Mt. SAC's) long-range goals and specific action priorities in an effort to focus planning on the year 2000. Introductory comments discuss the purpose of strategic planning and Mt. SAC's planning orientation. The next sections list goals and objectives with respect to: (1) the improvement of existing…

  10. Contrahelicase activity of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor mtDBP

    PubMed Central

    Polosa, Paola Loguercio; Deceglie, Stefania; Roberti, Marina; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola; Cantatore, Palmiro

    2005-01-01

    The sea urchin mitochondrial D-loop binding protein (mtDBP) is a transcription termination factor that is able to arrest bidirectionally mitochondrial RNA chain elongation. The observation that the mtDBP binding site in the main non-coding region is located in correspondence of the 3′ end of the triplex structure, where the synthesis of heavy strand mitochondrial (mt) DNA is either prematurely terminated or allowed to continue, raised the question whether mtDBP could also regulate mtDNA replication. By using a helicase assay in the presence of the replicative helicase of SV40, we show that mtDBP is able to inhibit the enzyme thus acting as a contrahelicase. The impairing activity of mtDBP is bidirectional as it is independent of the orientation of the protein binding site. The inhibition is increased by the presence of the guanosine-rich sequence that flanks mtDBP binding site. Finally, a mechanism of abrogation of mtDBP contrahelicase activity is suggested that is based on the dissociation of mtDBP from DNA caused by the passage of the RNA polymerase through the protein–DNA complex. All these findings favour the view that mtDBP, besides serving as transcription termination factor, could also act as a negative regulator of mtDNA synthesis at the level of D-loop expansion. PMID:16006625

  11. 77 FR 67829 - Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge and UL Bend National Wildlife Refuge, MT...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    .... Montana State University- 1500 University Drive, 406-657-2011 Billings. Billings, MT 59101. Montana State... Refuge, MT; Availability of Record of Decision for the Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Final... of the message. U.S. mail: Charles M. Russell NWR, P.O. Box 110, Lewistown, MT 59457....

  12. 75 FR 54381 - Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge and UL Bend National Wildlife Refuge, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... 59538. Montana State University- 1500 University Drive, (406) 657-2011 Billings. Billings, MT 59101... Refuge, MT AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability: Draft.... Russell NWR CCP/EIS, P.O. Box 110, Lewistown, MT 59457. In-Person Viewing or Pickup: Call (406)...

  13. France: Thrust and parry over nuclear risks

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, M.

    1997-01-31

    Claims about the health risks posed by nuclear-power installations are always controversial, but nowhere more so than in France, where some 75% of the nation`s electricity is generated from nuclear energy. So, it was no surprise that publication of a study by two French epidemiologists earlier this month claiming to show a link between cases of childhood leukemia and the nuclear-waste reprocessing plant at La Hague on the Normandy coast sparked fireworks in the French press. Several French epidemiologists sharply criticized the study`s methodology and conclusions. Their attacks have now drawn an unusual response from the British Medical Journal (BMJ), in which the paper appeared.

  14. Puumala and Tula hantaviruses in France.

    PubMed

    Plyusnina, Angelina; Deter, Julie; Charbonnel, Nathalie; Cosson, Jean-François; Plyusnin, Alexander

    2007-10-01

    The first genome sequences of Tula (TULV) and Puumala (PUUV) hantaviruses undoubtedly originated from France were recovered from tissue samples of European common voles and bank voles captured in Jura region. Genetic analysis of S and M segments of French PUUV strain revealed its highest similarity to strains from neighboring Belgium and Germany and also from Slovakia. On phylogenetic trees, French PUUV strain was placed within the central European lineage formed by strains from these three countries. Both of our French TULV strains clustered together and formed a distinct, well-supported genetic lineage. PMID:17532080

  15. [National organization of forensic medicine in France].

    PubMed

    Chariot, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Forensic medicine has long been characterized, in France, by diverse medical practices, which affected its recognition and development. A change was needed, Harmonization procedure includes the development of professional guidelines and allows forensic medicine to look at itself. However, the implementation of the recommendations is still far from complete. A national reform came into effect on 15 January 2011 and has defined a national reform of forensic medicine which includes funding by global budgets instead of fee-for-service. This reform allows easier organization and identification of forensic medicine units. One year later, tangible results are mixed. Forensic medicine is now more clearly identified but properly defined funding criteria are still lacking.

  16. Frances E. Jensen's The Teenage Brain.

    PubMed

    Silveri, Marisa M

    2015-01-01

    The unpredictable and sometimes incomprehensible moods and behaviors of a teenager can be a head-scratching mystery-especially to parents. Hormones, boredom, social media, peer pressure, and drugs and alcohol are just a few of the factors to consider. Frances E. Jensen, M.D., professor and chair of neurology at the University of Pennsylvania and the mother of two sons who are now in their twenties (along with Washington Post health and science reporter and Pulitzer Prize winner Amy Ellis Nutt) look at the emerging science of the adolescent brain and provide advice based on Jensen's own research and experience as a single mother. PMID:27408670

  17. [Cost of multiple sclerosis in France].

    PubMed

    Fromont, A; Lehanneur, M-N; Rollot, F; Weill, A; Clerc, L; Bonithon Kopp, C; Binquet, C; Moreau, T

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the 30 chronic conditions specifically listed by the French healthcare system as a long-term disease (affections de longue durée [ALD]) for which the main health insurance fund (Caisse nationale d'assurance maladie des travailleurs salariés [CNAMTS]) provides full (100%) coverage of healthcare costs. The CNAMTS insures 87% of the French population (52,359,912 of the 60,028,292 inhabitants). The objectives of this study were to evaluate the direct and indirect medical costs of MS among the entire population insured by the CNAMTS in France in 2004. The CNAMTS provided us with access to the ALD database of patients with MS that contains different MS-related expenditures made in 2004. We calculated the overall direct and indirect cost of MS and the cost per patient and per item of expenditure. In 2004, 49,413 patients were registered on the ALD list for MS. Direct cost for MS patients was 469,719,967 €. The direct cost per patient and per year was 9,506 € with variations between regions (French administrative divisions) ranging from 10,800 € in northeastern France (Champagne-Ardenne) to 8,217 € in western France (Pays de la Loire). The different items of expenditure were treatments (44.5%), hospitalization (27.9%), nursing care (5.8%), physiotherapy (5.7%), transport (4%), biology (1.1%), and other (1.5%). During the course of the disease, the overall cost of MS increased slowly during the first 15 years (from 8,000 to 11,000 €), but dramatically the last year of life (23,410 €). The costs of immunomodulator treatments were higher during the first six years after registration on the ALD list. Conversely, physiotherapy costs increased linearly with time during the course of MS. Indirect costs were an estimated 116 million euros in 2004. A disability pension (8,918 € per patient) was perceived by 9,430 patients (19.1%) and a daily allowance (3,317 € per patient) by 9,894 patients (20%). In France, MS has an important

  18. Frances E. Jensen's The Teenage Brain.

    PubMed

    Silveri, Marisa M

    2015-01-01

    The unpredictable and sometimes incomprehensible moods and behaviors of a teenager can be a head-scratching mystery-especially to parents. Hormones, boredom, social media, peer pressure, and drugs and alcohol are just a few of the factors to consider. Frances E. Jensen, M.D., professor and chair of neurology at the University of Pennsylvania and the mother of two sons who are now in their twenties (along with Washington Post health and science reporter and Pulitzer Prize winner Amy Ellis Nutt) look at the emerging science of the adolescent brain and provide advice based on Jensen's own research and experience as a single mother.

  19. Quasi MT Inversion of Short-Offset Transient Electromagnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-ying; Xue, Guo-qiang; Khan, Muhammad Younis

    2016-07-01

    The short-offset transient electromagnetic method (SOTEM) has been extensively used for mineral and hydrocarbon exploration and hydrogeological investigations due to its ease of use and capability to generate diagnostic subsurface information. At present, the data processing methods of SOTEM are mainly focused on one dimensional inversion. To apply the proven inversion methods of frequency domain electromagnetic methods to SOTEM data, this paper presents a new transformation relation from time to frequency based on the similarity between SOTEM all-time apparent resistivity and magnetotelluric (MT) apparent resistivity. Results show that the transformation coefficients depend on the variation trend of SOTEM all-time apparent resistivity curves. Bostick inversion and conjugate gradient inversion techniques were applied to transformed SOTEM data and the results were validated by some simulated calculations and field measured data. This study provides a novel method to SOTEM data processing and a useful aid to join inversion with MT data.

  20. Microtron MT 25 as a source of neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kralik, M.; Solc, J.; Chvatil, D.; Krist, P.; Turek, K.; Granja, C.

    2012-08-15

    The objective was to describe Microtron MT25 as a source of neutrons generated by bremsstrahlung induced photonuclear reactions in U and Pb targets. Bremsstrahlung photons were produced by electrons accelerated at energy 21.6 MeV. Spectral fluence of the generated neutrons was calculated with MCNPX code and then experimentally determined at two positions by means of a Bonner spheres spectrometer in which the detector of thermal neutrons was replaced by activation Mn tablets or track detectors CR-39 with a {sup 10}B radiator. The measured neutron spectral fluence and the calculated anisotropy served for the estimation of neutron yield from the targets and for the determination of ambient dose equivalent rate at the place of measurement. Microtron MT25 is intended as one of the sources for testing neutron sensitive devices which will be sent into the space.

  1. Volcanogenic origin of cenotes near Mt Gambier, southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, John A.; Grimes, Ken G.; Lewis, Ian D.

    2010-07-01

    The cenotes near Mt Gambier are circular, cliffed, collapse dolines containing water-table lakes up to 125 m deep, floored by large rubble cones. They lie in a flat, coastal plain composed of mid-Tertiary limestone. Most of the deepest cenotes are concentrated in two small areas located along trends sub-parallel to the main joint direction in the limestone. The cenotes do not connect to underwater phreatic passages, and water chemistry data confirm that they are not part of an interconnected karst network. They formed by collapse into large chambers (up to > 1 million m 3) that extended 125 m or more below the land surface. Several cenotes have actively growing stromatolites on the sub-vertical walls that started growing at ˜ 8000 years BP. The caves that collapsed to form the deep Mt Gambier cenotes are much larger than shallow and deep phreatic caves in the area, and do not connect into deep phreatic systems. They were not formed by freshwater/seawater mixing, responsible for many of the well-known Yucatan cenotes, because they are not associated with locations of the mixing zone during previous high sea levels, and are much larger than caves presently forming along the mixing zone near Mt Gambier. Instead dissolution was most likely due to a process whereby acidified groundwater containing large amounts of volcanogenic CO 2 ascended up fractures from the magma chambers that fed the Pleistocene-Holocene volcanic eruptions in the area; deep reservoirs of volcanogenic CO 2 occur nearby. Cave dissolution could have been due to release of CO 2 during the Mt Gambier eruption ˜ 28,000 years ago, followed by collapse to form cenotes during the low sea levels of the Last Glacial Maximum ˜ 20,000 years ago. The cenotes then flooded ˜ 8000 years ago as sea level rose, and stromatolites began to grow on the walls.

  2. An Analysis of the Mt. Meron Seismic Array

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E; Ryall, F

    2008-01-10

    We have performed a quick analysis of the Mt. Meron seismic array to monitor regional seismic events in the Middle East. The Meron array is the only current array in the Levant and Arabian Peninsula and, as such, might be useful in contributing to event location, identification, and other analysis. Here, we provide a brief description of the array and a review of the travel time and array analysis done to assess its performance.

  3. miRNAs in mtDNA-less cell mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, N; Peng, Y; Tan, Z; Ciraolo, G; Wang, D; Li, R

    2015-01-01

    The novel regulation mechanism in mtDNA-less cells was investigated. Very low mtDNA copy in mtDNA-less 206 ρ° cells was identified. But no 13 mitochondria-specific proteins were translated in 206 ρ° cells. Their mitochondrial respiration complexes V, III and II were 86.5, 29.4 and 49.6% of 143B cells, respectively. Complexes I and IV completely lack in 206 ρ° cells. Non-mitochondrial respiration to generate ATP in 206 ρ° cells was discovered. The expression levels of some mitochondrial RNAs including 12S rRNA, COX1, COX2, COX3, ND4 and ND5 were low. However, ND1, ND3 and Cyto b were not expressed in 206 ρ° cells. Unequal transcription of mitochondrial RNAs indicated the post-transcriptional cleavage and processing mechanisms in the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression in 206 ρ° cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) may modulate these mitochondrial RNA expression in these cells. RNA-induced silencing complex indeed within 206 ρ° cell mitochondria indicated miRNAs in 206 ρ° cell mitochondria. miRNA profile in mtDNA-less 206 ρ° cells was studied by next-generation sequencing of small RNAs. Several mitochondria-enriched miRNAs such as miR-181c-5p and miR-146a-5p were identified in 206 ρ° cell mitochondria. miR-181c-5p and miR-146a-5p had 23 and 19 potential targets on mitochondrial RNAs respectively, and these two miRNAs had multiple targets on mitochondria-associated messenger RNAs encoded by nuclear genes. These data provided the first direct evidence that miRNAs were imported into mitochondria and regulated mitochondrial RNA expressions. PMID:27551440

  4. Fine characterization of the Iceman's mtDNA haplogroup.

    PubMed

    Rollo, Franco; Ermini, Luca; Luciani, Stefania; Marota, Isolina; Olivieri, Cristina; Luiselli, Donata

    2006-08-01

    Starting from specimens of the intestinal contents of the so-called Tyrolean Iceman or Otzi (5,350-5,100 years before present), it was possible by polymerase chain reaction to amplify fragments of the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region that correspond to the sequence found in 1994 at the Munich and Oxford laboratories and which had been attributed to the original DNA of the mummy. The particularly favorable condition of the specimens, showing very low contamination levels, made it easier to extend the analyses to the coding region, which had not previously been considered. The mtDNA of the European population is currently divided into nine (H, T, U, V, W, X, I, J, and K) main groups (haplogroups). The K haplogroup, in particular, is composed of two (K1 and K2) subclusters. The results demonstrate that the Iceman's mtDNA belongs to the K1 subcluster, yet it does not fit any of the three known branches (a, b, and c) into which the K1 subcluster is presently divided. In addition, some other sites, reported to be linked to environmental adaptation or pathologies, were investigated.

  5. The Making of the African mtDNA Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Antonio; Richards, Martin; De la Fe, Tomás; Lareu, María-Victoria; Sobrino, Beatriz; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Macaulay, Vincent; Carracedo, Ángel

    2002-01-01

    Africa presents the most complex genetic picture of any continent, with a time depth for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages >100,000 years. The most recent widespread demographic shift within the continent was most probably the Bantu dispersals, which archaeological and linguistic evidence suggest originated in West Africa 3,000–4,000 years ago, spreading both east and south. Here, we have carried out a thorough phylogeographic analysis of mtDNA variation in a total of 2,847 samples from throughout the continent, including 307 new sequences from southeast African Bantu speakers. The results suggest that the southeast Bantu speakers have a composite origin on the maternal line of descent, with ∼44% of lineages deriving from West Africa, ∼21% from either West or Central Africa, ∼30% from East Africa, and ∼5% from southern African Khoisan-speaking groups. The ages of the major founder types of both West and East African origin are consistent with the likely timing of Bantu dispersals, with those from the west somewhat predating those from the east. Despite this composite picture, the southeastern African Bantu groups are indistinguishable from each other with respect to their mtDNA, suggesting that they either had a common origin at the point of entry into southeastern Africa or have undergone very extensive gene flow since. PMID:12395296

  6. The making of the African mtDNA landscape.

    PubMed

    Salas, Antonio; Richards, Martin; De la Fe, Tomás; Lareu, María-Victoria; Sobrino, Beatriz; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Macaulay, Vincent; Carracedo, Angel

    2002-11-01

    Africa presents the most complex genetic picture of any continent, with a time depth for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages >100,000 years. The most recent widespread demographic shift within the continent was most probably the Bantu dispersals, which archaeological and linguistic evidence suggest originated in West Africa 3,000-4,000 years ago, spreading both east and south. Here, we have carried out a thorough phylogeographic analysis of mtDNA variation in a total of 2,847 samples from throughout the continent, including 307 new sequences from southeast African Bantu speakers. The results suggest that the southeast Bantu speakers have a composite origin on the maternal line of descent, with approximately 44% of lineages deriving from West Africa, approximately 21% from either West or Central Africa, approximately 30% from East Africa, and approximately 5% from southern African Khoisan-speaking groups. The ages of the major founder types of both West and East African origin are consistent with the likely timing of Bantu dispersals, with those from the west somewhat predating those from the east. Despite this composite picture, the southeastern African Bantu groups are indistinguishable from each other with respect to their mtDNA, suggesting that they either had a common origin at the point of entry into southeastern Africa or have undergone very extensive gene flow since.

  7. Geothermal energy resource investigations at Mt. Spurr, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.L.; Wescott, E.M.

    1986-12-01

    Spurr volcano is a composite Quaternary cone of largely andesitic composition located on the west side of Cook Inlet about 80 miles west of Anchorage and about 40 miles from the Beluga electrical transmission line. Geologic mapping (Plate 1-1) shows that the present summit depression was produced by a Mt. St. Helens-type sector collapse, rather than by a caldera collapse. Geochronologic and previous tephrachronologic studies show that there has been an active magmatic system at Spurr volcano during the late Pleistocene-to-Holocene time interval that is of critical interest for geothermal energy resource assessment. Major effort was devoted to geochemical and geophysical surveys of the accessible area south of Mt. Spurr, in addition to geologic mapping and geochronologic studies. Many coincident mercury and helium anomalies were found, suggesting the presence of geothermal systems at depth. Extremely large electrical self-potential anomalies were also found, together with extensive zones of low resistivity discovered by our controlled-source audiomagnetotelluric survey. The juxtaposition of all of these different types of anomalies at certain areas on the south slope of Crater Peak indicates the presence of a geothermal system which should be accessible by drilling to about 2000 ft depth. It is also evident that there is a strong volcanic hazard to be evaluated in considering any development on the south side of Mt. Spurr. This hazardous situation may require angle drilling of production wells from safer areas and placement of power generation facilities at a considerable distance from hazardous areas.

  8. Evidences for higher nocturnal seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarella, Adriano; Scafetta, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    We analyze hourly seismic data measured at the Osservatorio Vesuviano Ovest (OVO, 1972-2014) and at the Bunker Est (BKE, 1999-2014) stations on the Mt. Vesuvius. The OVO record is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 1.9. We demonstrate that before 1996 this record presents a daily oscillation that nearly vanishes afterwards. To determine whether a daily oscillation exists in the seismic activity of the Mt. Vesuvius, we use the higher quality BKE record that is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 0.2. We demonstrate that BKE confirms that the seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius is higher during nighttime than during daytime. The amplitude of the daily oscillation is enhanced during summer and damped during winter. We speculate possible links with the cooling/warming diurnal cycle of the volcanic edifice, with external geomagnetic field and with magnetostriction, which stress the rocks. We find that the amplitude of the seismic daily cycle changes in time and has been increasing since 2008. Finally, we propose a seismic activity index to monitor the 24-hour oscillation that could be used to complement other methodologies currently adopted to determine the seismic status of the volcano to prevent the relative hazard.

  9. Minifish shows high genetic variation in mtDNA size.

    PubMed

    Chen, X-W; Li, Q-L; Hu, X-J; Yuan, Y-M; Wen, M; Peng, L-Y; Liu, S-J; Hong, Y-H

    2014-01-01

    The genus Paedocypris is a newly described taxon of minifish species that are characterized by extensive chromosome evolution and one of the smallest known vertebrate nuclear genomes. Paedocypris features a tiny adult size, a short generation time, low fecundity and fragmented tropical habitats, which are factors that favor rapid speciation. Most recently, we have revealed that P. progenetica (Pp), the type species of the genus Paedocypris, has an unusual mtDNA bearing - within its D-loop - a tandem array of a 34-bp repeat sequence called the minifish repeat, which shows compromised replication efficiency in vitro. Here we report that Pp exhibits high genetic variation in mtDNA size. The efficiency of D-loop amplification was found to depend upon primers. Interestingly, Pp individuals of one and the same population differed drastically in mtDNA size resulting from varying copy numbers of the minifish repeat. We conclude that minifish has a high mutation rate and perhaps represents a rapidly evolving taxon of vertebrates.

  10. Adjusting MtDNA Quantification in Whole Blood for Peripheral Blood Platelet and Leukocyte Counts

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Lazaro, Monica; Moreno-Loshuertos, Raquel; Fernandez-Silva, Patricio; Enriquez, Jose Antonio; Laclaustra, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn) in the blood (mitochondrial to nuclear DNA ratio) appear associated with several systemic diseases, including primary mitochondrial disorders, carcinogenesis, and hematologic diseases. Measuring mtDNAcn in DNA extracted from whole blood (WB) instead of from peripheral blood mononuclear cells or buffy coat may yield different results due to mitochondrial DNA present in platelets. The aim of this work is to quantify the contribution of platelets to mtDNAcn in whole blood [mtDNAcn(WB)] and to propose a correction formula to estimate leukocytes' mtDNAcn [mtDNAcn(L)] from mtDNAcn(WB). Blood samples from 10 healthy adults were combined with platelet-enriched plasma and saline solution to produce artificial blood preparations. Aliquots of each sample were combined with five different platelet concentrations. In 46 of these blood preparations, mtDNAcn was measured by qPCR. MtDNAcn(WB) increased 1.07 (95%CI 0.86, 1.29; p<0.001) per 1000 platelets present in the preparation. We proved that leukocyte count should also be taken into account as mtDNAcn(WB) was inversely associated with leukocyte count; it increased 1.10 (95%CI 0.95, 1.25, p<0.001) per unit increase of the ratio between platelet and leukocyte counts. If hematological measurements are available, subtracting 1.10 the platelets/leukocyte ratio from mtDNAcn(WB) may serve as an estimation for mtDNAcn(L). Both platelet and leukocyte counts in the sample are important sources of variation if comparing mtDNAcn among groups of patients when mtDNAcn is measured in DNA extracted from whole blood. Not taking the platelet/leukocyte ratio into account in whole blood measurements, may lead to overestimation and misclassification if interpreted as leukocytes' mtDNAcn. PMID:27736919

  11. Age-Related and Heteroplasmy-Related Variation in Human mtDNA Copy Number

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingkun; Madea, Burkhard; Stoneking, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial (mt) genome is present in many copies in human cells, and intra-individual variation in mtDNA sequences is known as heteroplasmy. Recent studies found that heteroplasmies are highly tissue-specific, site-specific, and allele-specific, however the functional implications have not been explored. This study investigates variation in mtDNA copy numbers (mtCN) in 12 different tissues obtained at autopsy from 152 individuals (ranging in age from 3 days to 96 years). Three different methods to estimate mtCN were compared: shotgun sequencing (in 4 tissues), capture-enriched sequencing (in 12 tissues) and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR, in 2 tissues). The highest precision in mtCN estimation was achieved using shotgun sequencing data. However, capture-enrichment data provide reliable estimates of relative (albeit not absolute) mtCNs. Comparisons of mtCN from different tissues of the same individual revealed that mtCNs in different tissues are, with few exceptions, uncorrelated. Hence, each tissue of an individual seems to regulate mtCN in a tissue-related rather than an individual-dependent manner. Skeletal muscle (SM) samples showed an age-related decrease in mtCN that was especially pronounced in males, while there was an age-related increase in mtCN for liver (LIV) samples. MtCN in SM samples was significantly negatively correlated with both the total number of heteroplasmic sites and with minor allele frequency (MAF) at two heteroplasmic sites, 408 and 16327. Heteroplasmies at both sites are highly specific for SM, accumulate with aging and are part of functional elements that regulate mtDNA replication. These data support the hypothesis that selection acting on these heteroplasmic sites is reducing mtCN in SM of older individuals. PMID:26978189

  12. Acute anaphylactoid reactions during hemodialysis in France.

    PubMed

    Forêt, M; Kuentz, F; Meftahi, H; Milongo, R; Hachache, T; Elsener, M; Dechelette, E; Cordonnier, D

    1987-04-01

    A retrospective survey of anaphylactoid reactions during dialysis in France was conducted. In 52 of 112 hemodialysis units surveyed 111 patients who had suffered one or more anaphylactoid reactions during dialysis were identified. According to the Hamilton/Adkinson classification, in 31 patients reactions were minor, in 54 patients moderate, and in 26 patients severe. Four patients died of their reactions. A preponderance of reactions (75 and 11%) occurred with cuprammonium cellulose hollow-fiber and plate dialyzers, respectively. Severe dialyzer reactions were found to occur more frequently after the long (weekend) interdialytic interval. In an in vitro study, six brands of cuprammonium cellulose hollow-fiber dialyzers were rinsed with water and the eluates analyzed by size exclusion chromatography for contaminant particles. Substantial variation in the amount of extractable material was found between dialyzers of different brands, despite the fact that all dialyzers used membranes from the same manufacturer. Previous data by others has suggested that this extractable material is a derivative of cellulose. Results of our epidemiologic survey in France are similar to those previously reported in the United States and suggest an increased incidence of dialyzer reactions with ethylene oxide-sterilized cuprammonium cellulose dialyzers. The presence of cellulose-derived particles in the rinsing fluid of such dialyzers and the possible increased incidence of reactions after the long (weekend) interdialytic interval suggest that allergy to cellulose-derived particles eluted from cellulosic dialyzers may contribute to dialyzer hypersensitivity reactions.

  13. [Maternal mortality in France, 2007-2009].

    PubMed

    Saucedo, M; Deneux-Tharaux, C; Bouvier-Colle, M-H

    2013-11-01

    To monitor the maternal mortality which is an indicator of the quality of obstetric and intensive care, France has a specific approach since 1996. Recently linkages have been introduced to improve the inclusion of cases. Here are the results for the 2007 to 2009 period. The identification of the pregnancy associated deaths is lying on different data bases that are medical causes of death, birth register and hospital discharges. To document the cases, confidential enquiries are conducted by two assessors on the field; a committee of medical experts analyses the documents, select the underlying cause and assess the quality of health care. Two hundred and fifty-four obstetric deaths were identified from 2007 to 2009 giving the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) of 10.3 per 100,000 births. The maternal age and nationality, the region of deaths are associated to the MMR. The haemorrhages are the leading cause but their ratio is 1.9 versus 2.5 previously; this decrease results from the postpartum haemorrhage by uterine atony going down. The suboptimal care are still frequent (60%) but slightly less than before. The linkage method should be pursued. Maternal mortality is rather stable in France. We may reach more reduction as deaths due to atony decreased as suboptimal care did.

  14. [Distribution in early mouse embryos of foreign mtDNA transmitted along the paternal lineage].

    PubMed

    Kustova, M E; Kidgotko, O V; Sokolova, V A; Bass, M G; Zakharova, F M; Vasil'ev, V B

    2015-01-01

    Transmission of foreign mtDNA along the paternal lineage founded by male mice (F0), and distribution of that mtDNA in their progeny at early stages of prenatal development were studied. Transmitochondrial males of F0 obtained after injection of human mitochondria into mouse zygotes has been shown to transmit foreign mtDNA to subsequent generations. Individual peculiarities among the males studied, concerning transmission of foreign mtDNA to the progeny, are likely to exist. Besides, the distribution of human mtDNA among blastomeres of transmitochondrial embryos under study differed from that observed in previous investogation of its inheritance along the maternal lineage. PMID:25872374

  15. Processes Controlling Spessartite Generation beneath Mt. Rainier, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrson, W. A.; Scott, S. R.

    2008-12-01

    Mt. Rainier is a composite volcano located in the Cascade volcanic arc about 60km SE of Tacoma, Washington (Crowley et at., 1997). The volcanism at Mt. Rainier is a consequence of subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate under the North American plate at an average rate of 50mmyr-1 (Lowrie, 2007). Based on a compilation of data representing basaltic andesites through dacites (Sisson & Vallance, submitted, Sisson, personal communication) 125 MELTS (Ghiorso & Sack, 1995) models have been run to constrain the mechanisms of formation for the typical liquid line of descent. Using a variety of parental magmas, models were run through pressure space of 1-10 kbars, with initial water contents from 1-5 wt. %, and with fO2 buffers of QFM or NNO. The best fit model for the Mt. Rainier rocks involves crystallization at 1-1.5 kbars from a melt with an initial H2O content of 3.5 wt. % and oxygen fugacity of QFM. Comparing the best fit MELTS models with the suite of associated rocks from Mt. Rainier provides evidence for fractional crystallization and magma mixing as the dominant processes, consistent with the work of Sisson & Hankins (2007). While most Mt. Rainier lavas typically contain phenocrysts of plagioclase and pyroxene, one particular lava flow classified as a spessartite andesite possesses phenocrysts of amphibole and pyroxene. The spessartite also has a high concentration of K2O relative to typical andesites and is enriched in LREEs and LILEs. Fractional and equilibrium crystallization MELTS models have not successfully reproduced the trends exhibited by the spessartite, suggesting that the magma evolved by processes different than simple crystallization; MELTS modeling of more complex petrogenetic scenarios is currently underway. Electron microprobe data of amphibole and pyroxene from the spessartite demonstrate a complex history of crystal growth as well. The amphiboles range in composition from ~2 to 15 wt. % Al2O3 and ~6 to 12 wt. % FeO*. Pyroxene phenocrysts have Mg

  16. Cellular Heterogeneity in the Level of mtDNA Heteroplasmy in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Jitesh; Ghimire, Sabitri; Vandewoestyne, Mado; Lu, Yuechao; Gerris, Jan; Van Coster, Rudy; Deroo, Tom; Deforce, Dieter; Vansteelandt, Stijn; De Sutter, Petra; Heindryckx, Björn

    2015-11-17

    Variation in the level of mtDNA heteroplasmy in adult tissues is commonly seen in patients with a mixture of wild-type and mutant mtDNA. A mixture of different mtDNA variants may influence such variation and cause mtDNA segregation bias. We analyzed cellular heterogeneity in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) derived from a polymorphic mouse model containing NZB and BALB mtDNA genotypes. In ESCs, inter-colony heterogeneity varied up to 61%, whereas intra-colony heterogeneity varied up to 100%. Three out of five cell lines displayed nearly homoplasmic BALB and NZB mtDNA haplotypes in differentiated single cells. The proportion of NZB mtDNA genotype increased with progressive passaging (0.39%; p = 0.002). These results demonstrate the bimodal segregation of mtDNA haplotypes, indicating the occurrence of tissues with variable levels of heteroplasmies in individuals with mtDNA mutations. Furthermore, proliferation of one mtDNA genotype over another may pose the risk of accumulating mutant mtDNAs during subsequent cell divisions.

  17. MtArt: a new model of amino acid replacement for Arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Posada, David; Zardoya, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    A statistical approach was applied to select those models that best fit each individual mitochondrial (mt) protein at different taxonomic levels of metazoans. The existing mitochondrial replacement matrices, MtREV and MtMam, were found to be the best-fit models for the mt-proteins of vertebrates, with the exception of Nd6, at different taxonomic levels. Remarkably, existing mitochondrial matrices generally failed to best-fit invertebrate mt-proteins. In an attempt to better model the evolution of invertebrate mt-proteins, a new replacement matrix, named MtArt, was constructed based on arthropod mt-proteomes. The new model was found to best fit almost all analyzed invertebrate mt-protein data sets. The observed pattern of model fit across the different data sets indicates that no single replacement matrix is able to describe the general evolutionary properties of mt-proteins but rather that taxonomical biases and/or the existence of different mt-genetic codes have great influence on which model is selected.

  18. Mito-protective autophagy is impaired in erythroid cells of aged mtDNA-mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Li-Harms, XiuJie; Milasta, Sandra; Lynch, John; Wright, Christopher; Joshi, Aashish; Iyengar, Rekha; Neale, Geoffrey; Wang, Xi; Wang, Yong-Dong; Prolla, Tomas A; Thompson, James E; Opferman, Joseph T; Green, Douglas R; Schuetz, John; Kundu, Mondira

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations contribute to the pathogenesis of age-related disorders, including myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). The accumulation of mitochondria harboring mtDNA mutations in patients with these disorders suggests a failure of normal mitochondrial quality-control systems. The mtDNA-mutator mice acquire somatic mtDNA mutations via a targeted defect in the proofreading function of the mtDNA polymerase, PolgA, and develop macrocytic anemia similar to that of patients with MDS. We observed an unexpected defect in clearance of dysfunctional mitochondria at specific stages during erythroid maturation in hematopoietic cells from aged mtDNA-mutator mice. Mechanistically, aberrant activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin signaling and phosphorylation of uncoordinated 51-like kinase (ULK) 1 in mtDNA-mutator mice resulted in proteasome-mediated degradation of ULK1 and inhibition of autophagy in erythroid cells. To directly evaluate the consequence of inhibiting autophagy on mitochondrial function in erythroid cells harboring mtDNA mutations in vivo, we deleted Atg7 from erythroid progenitors of wild-type and mtDNA-mutator mice. Genetic disruption of autophagy did not cause anemia in wild-type mice but accelerated the decline in mitochondrial respiration and development of macrocytic anemia in mtDNA-mutator mice. These findings highlight a pathological feedback loop that explains how dysfunctional mitochondria can escape autophagy-mediated degradation and propagate in cells predisposed to somatic mtDNA mutations, leading to disease.

  19. Evidence for a Fourteenth mtDNA-Encoded Protein in the Female-Transmitted mtDNA of Marine Mussels (Bivalvia: Mytilidae)

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Sophie; Ghiselli, Fabrizio; Passamonti, Marco; Milani, Liliana; Stewart, Donald T.; Hoeh, Walter R.

    2011-01-01

    Background A novel feature for animal mitochondrial genomes has been recently established: i.e., the presence of additional, lineage-specific, mtDNA-encoded proteins with functional significance. This feature has been observed in freshwater mussels with doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA (DUI). The latter unique system of mtDNA transmission, which also exists in some marine mussels and marine clams, is characterized by one mt genome inherited from the female parent (F mtDNA) and one mt genome inherited from the male parent (M mtDNA). In freshwater mussels, the novel mtDNA-encoded proteins have been shown to be mt genome-specific (i.e., one novel protein for F genomes and one novel protein for M genomes). It has been hypothesized that these novel, F- and M-specific, mtDNA-encoded proteins (and/or other F- and/or M-specific mtDNA sequences) could be responsible for the different modes of mtDNA transmission in bivalves but this remains to be demonstrated. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated all complete (or nearly complete) female- and male-transmitted marine mussel mtDNAs previously sequenced for the presence of ORFs that could have functional importance in these bivalves. Our results confirm the presence of a novel F genome-specific mt ORF, of significant length (>100aa) and located in the control region, that most likely has functional significance in marine mussels. The identification of this ORF in five Mytilus species suggests that it has been maintained in the mytilid lineage (subfamily Mytilinae) for ∼13 million years. Furthermore, this ORF likely has a homologue in the F mt genome of Musculista senhousia, a DUI-containing mytilid species in the subfamily Crenellinae. We present evidence supporting the functionality of this F-specific ORF at the transcriptional, amino acid and nucleotide levels. Conclusions/Significance Our results offer support for the hypothesis that “novel F genome-specific mitochondrial genes” are involved in key

  20. Intracellular evolution of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the tragedy of the cytoplasmic commons.

    PubMed

    Haig, David

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria exist in large numbers per cell. Therefore, the strength of natural selection on individual mtDNAs for their contribution to cellular fitness is weak whereas the strength of selection in favor of mtDNAs that increase their own replication without regard for cellular functions is strong. This problem has been solved for most mitochondrial genes by their transfer to the nucleus but a few critical genes remain encoded by mtDNA. Organisms manage the evolution of mtDNA to prevent mutational decay of essential services mitochondria provide to their hosts. Bottlenecks of mitochondrial numbers in female germlines increase the homogeneity of mtDNAs within cells and allow intraorganismal selection to eliminate cells with low quality mitochondria. Mechanisms of intracellular "quality control" allow direct selection on the competence of individual mtDNAs. These processes maintain the integrity of mtDNAs within the germline but are inadequate to indefinitely maintain mitochondrial function in somatic cells. PMID:27062292

  1. Intracellular evolution of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the tragedy of the cytoplasmic commons.

    PubMed

    Haig, David

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria exist in large numbers per cell. Therefore, the strength of natural selection on individual mtDNAs for their contribution to cellular fitness is weak whereas the strength of selection in favor of mtDNAs that increase their own replication without regard for cellular functions is strong. This problem has been solved for most mitochondrial genes by their transfer to the nucleus but a few critical genes remain encoded by mtDNA. Organisms manage the evolution of mtDNA to prevent mutational decay of essential services mitochondria provide to their hosts. Bottlenecks of mitochondrial numbers in female germlines increase the homogeneity of mtDNAs within cells and allow intraorganismal selection to eliminate cells with low quality mitochondria. Mechanisms of intracellular "quality control" allow direct selection on the competence of individual mtDNAs. These processes maintain the integrity of mtDNAs within the germline but are inadequate to indefinitely maintain mitochondrial function in somatic cells.

  2. An enhanced MITOMAP with a global mtDNA mutational phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Lott, Marie T.; Procaccio, Vincent; Poole, Jason C.; Brandon, Marty C.; Mishmar, Dan; Yi, Christina; Kreuziger, James; Baldi, Pierre; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2007-01-01

    The MITOMAP () data system for the human mitochondrial genome has been greatly enhanced by the addition of a navigable mutational mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogenetic tree of ∼3000 mtDNA coding region sequences plus expanded pathogenic mutation tables and a nuclear-mtDNA pseudogene (NUMT) data base. The phylogeny reconstructs the entire mutational history of the human mtDNA, thus defining the mtDNA haplogroups and differentiating ancient from recent mtDNA mutations. Pathogenic mutations are classified by both genotype and phenotype, and the NUMT sequences permits detection of spurious inclusion of pseudogene variants during mutation analysis. These additions position MITOMAP for the implementation of our automated mtDNA sequence analysis system, Mitomaster. PMID:17178747

  3. 78 FR 37154 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska to the extent that it... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France...). SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for Eurocopter France (Eurocopter)...

  4. 78 FR 47230 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France (Eurocopter) Model Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ...'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France... authority of France and are approved for operation in the United States. Pursuant to our bilateral...

  5. 78 FR 66668 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France (Eurocopter) Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France... Determination These helicopters have been approved by the aviation authority of France and are approved...

  6. 78 FR 54792 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France (Eurocopter) Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... 12866; 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France... France and are approved for operation in the United States. Pursuant to our bilateral agreement...

  7. 77 FR 58973 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-25

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France...). SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for the Eurocopter France...

  8. 78 FR 63853 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France (Eurocopter) Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); ] 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation...-033-AD; Amendment 39-17625; AD 2013-21-01] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France... These helicopters have been approved by the aviation authority of France and are approved for...

  9. 77 FR 58925 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-25

    ...'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect...-17204; AD 2012-19-09] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters AGENCY... comments. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for Eurocopter France...

  10. 78 FR 33766 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France (Eurocopter) Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska to the extent that it... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France... approved by the aviation authority of France and are approved for operation in the United States....

  11. France: The Move toward Distance Education in the University Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortimer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    France is one of the most modern countries in the world and is a leading force in Europe. A highly literate and well-educated society, France's education statistics for 2003 show 12.1 million French children in primary and secondary education and 2.2 million students in tertiary education. The concept of education as a market commodity--long since…

  12. France: The Challenges of Renewal. Headline Series #282.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePorte, A. W.

    France has responded well to the social, economic, and political challenges which began when that nation was defeated by Germany in 1940. Two major challenges have been to limit internal quarrels which reduce the nation's ability to handle current issues and to accept the fact that France is no longer the greatest power in Europe. Chapter 1…

  13. Social Representation of Gifted Children: A Preliminary Study in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavani, Jean Louis; Zenasni, Franck; Pereira-Fradin, Maria

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing recognition of giftedness in France and the need for identification. Social Representations (SR) of gifted children have never been examined in France with an appropriate methodology, yet it is important to do so as the information obtained may help ensure the insertion and inclusion of these children in school and society. The…

  14. Absence of Pneumocystis dihydropteroate synthase mutants in Brittany, France.

    PubMed

    Le Gal, Solène; Robert-Gangneux, Florence; Perrot, Maëla; Rouillé, Amélie; Virmaux, Michèle; Damiani, Céline; Totet, Anne; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre; Nevez, Gilles

    2013-05-01

    Archival Pneumocystis jirovecii specimens from 84 patients monitored at Rennes University Hospital (Rennes, France) were assayed at the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) locus. No patient was infected with mutants. The results provide additional data showing that P. jirovecii infections involving DHPS mutants do not represent a public health issue in Brittany, western France.

  15. International Reports on Literacy Research: France and Argentina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malloy, Jacquelynn A., Comp.; Botzakis, Stergios, Comp.

    2006-01-01

    This is a compilation of two separate reports on international literacy research from France and Argentina. In the reports from France, research correspondent Jacques Fijalkow detailed three research projects that included the following: (1) A description of adult literacy skills; (2) An investigation of how study-abroad students were integrated…

  16. 47 CFR 3.46 - Use of gold francs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Use of gold francs. 3.46 Section 3.46... AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Settlement Operations § 3.46 Use of gold francs. An accounting authority must accept accounts presented to it from foreign administrations in...

  17. 47 CFR 3.46 - Use of gold francs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Use of gold francs. 3.46 Section 3.46... AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Settlement Operations § 3.46 Use of gold francs. An accounting authority must accept accounts presented to it from foreign administrations in...

  18. 47 CFR 3.46 - Use of gold francs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of gold francs. 3.46 Section 3.46... AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Settlement Operations § 3.46 Use of gold francs. An accounting authority must accept accounts presented to it from foreign administrations in...

  19. La punaise diabolique a la conquete de la France

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Halyomorpha halys is now present in France in Alsace and in several neighboring countries (Switzerland and Italy). The potential risk of invasion of H. halys throughout France is considered to be high. Through its natural dispersal, or with human assistance, this insect will likely colonize the majo...

  20. 47 CFR 3.46 - Use of gold francs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of gold francs. 3.46 Section 3.46... AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Settlement Operations § 3.46 Use of gold francs. An accounting authority must accept accounts presented to it from foreign administrations in...

  1. 47 CFR 3.46 - Use of gold francs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Use of gold francs. 3.46 Section 3.46... AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Settlement Operations § 3.46 Use of gold francs. An accounting authority must accept accounts presented to it from foreign administrations in...

  2. The Definition of Vocational Diplomas in Germany and France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobus, Martine; Verdier, Eric

    1997-01-01

    In both France and Germany, the government, employers' organizations, and unions all participate in defining vocational diplomas based on a national framework of procedures of elaborating and standardizing titles. Important differences between the diploma definition processes in France and Germany may be identified. In Germany, the issue is…

  3. [Training in tropical medicine in France].

    PubMed

    Touze, Jean-Étienne; Laroche, Roland

    2013-10-01

    Tropical medicine was a key element of the medical structures provided by France to our former colonies and, later; to countries within the scope of our international cooperation. hI recent decades, France has drastically reduced its bilateral commitments to countries in the tropics, and especially in sub-Saharan Africa. At the same time, the teaching of tropical medicine, which was highly regarded even beyond our borders, has lost a good deal of its expertise. Initially available in a few large French centers, and ensured by teachers with extensive field experience, training in tropical medicine is now offered in many universities. However; their programs and educational objectives, focusing mainly on infectious and parasitic diseases, no longer meet the healthcare priorities of southern countries, which are facing an epidemiological transition and the rise of non communicable diseases. Few teachers now have recognized expertise in tropical medicine. These changes have had negative consequences for research programs in tropical medicine and for the image of French assistance to developing countries. In this context, the followving perspectives should be considered: 1) training in tropical medicine should be enhanced by the creation of a national diploma recognized by international bodies. 2) The creation of a doctoral course in tropical medicine is a prerequisite for achieving this goal, and the future diploma must include a significant research component. 3) Teaching in tropical medicine must become more practical and be ensured by teachers with extensive field experience. 4) Training in tropical medicine should be part of a bilateral relationship with countries in the tropics, each party contributing its expertise while respecting that of its partners. 5) Training in tropical medicine should be backed uip by high-level scientific research based on enhanced synergy of our current networks (Institute for Research and Development, Network of overseas Pasteur

  4. Transcriptional response of two metallothionein genes (OcMT1 and OcMT2) and histological changes in Oxya chinensis (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) exposed to three trace metals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaoming; Wu, Haihua; Yu, Zhitao; Guo, Yaping; Zhang, Jianzhen; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the transcriptional responses of two metallothionein (MT) genes (OcMT1 and OcMT2) in various tissues (brain, optic lobe, Malpighian tubules, fat bodies, foregut, gastric caeca, midgut and hindgut) of Oxya chinensis (Thunberg) (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) after exposed to the trace metals cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) for 48h. The study revealed that the exposure of O. chinensis to each of the three metals at the median lethal concentration (LC50) or lower concentration(s) up-regulated the transcriptions of both OcMT1 and OCMT2 in the eight tissues except for OcMT1 and OcMT2 with Cd in brain and gastric caeca, respectively, and OcMT2 with Cu in gastric caeca. These results suggested that the exposure of O. chinensis to the metals may enhance MT biosynthesis that protects tissues by binding these metals in various tissues. To examine possible histopathological effect of the metals, we examined the histological changes in the fat bodies after O. chinensis was exposed to each of these metals at LC50. The exposure of Cd significantly reduced the size and number of adipocytes as compared with the control. However, such an effect was not observed in O. chinensis exposed to either Cu or Zn. These results suggested that fat bodies might be either significantly affected by Cd or play a crucial role in detoxification of excessive trace metals. PMID:26159299

  5. Similar patterns of clonally expanded somatic mtDNA mutations in the colon of heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice and ageing humans.

    PubMed

    Baines, Holly L; Stewart, James B; Stamp, Craig; Zupanic, Anze; Kirkwood, Thomas B L; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Turnbull, Douglass M; Greaves, Laura C

    2014-07-01

    Clonally expanded mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations resulting in focal respiratory chain deficiency in individual cells are proposed to contribute to the ageing of human tissues that depend on adult stem cells for self-renewal; however, the consequences of these mutations remain unclear. A good animal model is required to investigate this further; but it is unknown whether mechanisms for clonal expansion of mtDNA mutations, and the mutational spectra, are similar between species. Here we show that mice, heterozygous for a mutation disrupting the proof-reading activity of mtDNA polymerase (PolgA(+/mut)) resulting in an increased mtDNA mutation rate, accumulate clonally expanded mtDNA point mutations in their colonic crypts with age. This results in focal respiratory chain deficiency, and by 81 weeks of age these animals exhibit a similar level and pattern of respiratory chain deficiency to 70-year-old human subjects. Furthermore, like in humans, the mtDNA mutation spectrum appears random and there is an absence of selective constraints. Computer simulations show that a random genetic drift model of mtDNA clonal expansion can accurately model the data from the colonic crypts of wild-type, PolgA(+/mut) animals, and humans, providing evidence for a similar mechanism for clonal expansion of mtDNA point mutations between these mice and humans.

  6. The Tour de France: a physiological review.

    PubMed

    Lucia, Alejandro; Earnest, Conrad; Arribas, Carlos

    2003-10-01

    On 5 July 2003, the Tour de France (TDF) has celebrated 100th running. Instead of a chimney sweep competing during his free time (as in 1903), the recent winner is a highly trained, professional cyclist whose entire life-style has been dedicated to reach his pinnacle during this event. The TDF has been held successfully for 100 years, but the application of the physiologic sciences to the sport is a relatively recent phenomenon. Although some historical reports help to understand the unique physiological characteristics of this race, scientific studies were not available in Sports Science/Applied Physiology journals until the 1990s. The aim of this article is to review the history of the TDF. Special emphasis is placed on the last decade where classic physiology has been integrated into applied scientific cycling data.

  7. The death of Henry II of France.

    PubMed

    Faria, M A

    1992-12-01

    On June 30, 1559, King Henry II of France (1519-1559), against the advice of his court ministers, participated in a fateful joust. The wooden lance of his younger opponent pierced the King's headgear, shattered into fragments, and penetrated his right orbit and temple. The King survived for 11 days following the mortal wound and was treated by two of the most distinguished physicians of the Renaissance: Ambroise Paré (1510-1590), the master surgeon, and Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564), the great anatomist. The unfortunate event, the nature of the injury, and the medical consultation between these eminent physicians should all be of interest to neurosurgeons. The historical consequences of this event are briefly reviewed. PMID:1432144

  8. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarcat, Noel; Lafon, Alain; Perves, Jean-Pierre; Rosengard, Alex; Sauzay, Guy

    1993-05-01

    France has developed a very complete nuclear industry, from mining to reprocessing and radwastes management, and now has a major electro-nuclear park, with 55 power reactors, supplying 75% of the nation's electricity and representing 32% of its energy requirements. The modern multinational EURODIF enrichment plant in Pierrelatte in the south of the country supplies these reactors with enriched uranium as well as foreign utilities (30% exports). It works smoothly and has continuously been improved to reduce operating costs and to gain flexibility and longevity. Investment costs will be recovered at the turn of the century. The plant will be competitive well ahead of an aging production park, with large overcapacity, in other countries. Meanwhile, world needs will increase only slightly during the next 15 years, apart from the Asian Pacific area, but many world governments are becoming well aware of the necessity to progressively resume nuclear energy development worldwide from the year 2000 on.

  9. The LUNEX5 project in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Benabderrahmane, C.; Betinelli, P.; Bouvet, F.; Buteau, A.; Cassinari, L.; Daillant, J.; Denard, J. C.; Eymard, P.; Gagey, B.; Herbeaux, C.; Labat, M.; Lagarde, B.; Lestrade, A.; Loulergue, A.; Marchand, P.; Marlats, J. L.; Miron, C.; Morin, P.; Nadji, A.; Polack, F.; Pruvost, J. B.; Ribeiro, F.; Ricaud, J. P.; Roy, P.; Tanikawa, T.; Roux, R.; Bielawski, S.; Evain, C.; Szwaj, C.; Lambert, G.; Lifschitz, A.; Malka, V.; Lehe, R.; Rousse, A.; Phuoc, K. Ta; Thaury, C.; Devanz, G.; Luong, M.; Carré, B.; LeBec, G.; Farvacque, L.; Dubois, A.; Lüning, J.

    2013-03-01

    The LUNEX5 (free electron Laser Using a New accelerator for the Exploitation of X-ray radiation of 5th generation) in France aims at investigating the generation of short, intense, and coherent pulses in the soft x-ray region (with two particular targeted wavelengths of 20 and 13 nm). It consists in a single Free Electron Laser (FEL) line with cryo-ready in-vacuum undulators using a Conventional Linear Accelerator (CLA) using the superconducting technology of 400 MeV or a Laser Wake Field Accelerator (LWFA) ranging from 0.4 to 1 GeV with multi-TW or PW lasers. The FEL line can be operated in the seeded (High order Harmonic in Gas seeding) and Echo Enable Harmonic Generation configurations, which performances will be compared. Two pilot user experiments for time-resolved studies of isolated species and magnetization dynamics will take benefit of LUNEX5 FEL radiation.

  10. Mt. Elgon, Africa, Shaded Relief and Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The striking contrast of geologic structures in Africa is shown in this shaded relief image of Mt. Elgon on the left and a section of the Great Rift Valley on the right.

    Mt. Elgon is a solitary extinct volcano straddling the border between Uganda and Kenya, and at 4,321 meters (14,178 feet) tall is the eighth highest mountain in Africa. It is positioned on the Pre-Cambriam bedrock of the Trans Nzoia Plateau, and is similar to other such volcanoes in East Africa in that it is associated with the formation of the Rift Valley. However one thing that sets Mt. Elgon apart is its age.

    Although there is no verifiable evidence of its earliest volcanic activity, Mt. Elgon is estimated to be at least 24 million years old, making it the oldest extinct volcano in East Africa. This presents a striking comparison to Mt. Kilimanjaro, the highest mountain in Africa at 5,895 meters (19,341 feet), which is just over one million years old. Judging by the diameter of its base, it is a common belief among geological experts that Mt. Elgon was once the highest mountains in Africa, however erosion has played a significant role in reducing the height to its present value.

    Juxtaposed with this impressive mountain is a section of the Great Rift Valley, a geological fault system that extends for about 4,830 kilometers (2,995 miles) from Syria to central Mozambique. Erosion has concealed some sections, but in some sections like that shown here, there are sheer cliffs several thousand feet high. The present configuration of the valley, which dates from the mid-Pleistocene epoch, results from a rifting process associated with thermal currents in the Earth's mantle.

    Two visualization methods were combined to produce the image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the northwest-southeast direction, so that northwest slopes appear bright and southeast slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly

  11. DNA Barcoding the Medusozoa using mtCOI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortman, Brian D.; Bucklin, Ann; Pagès, Francesc; Youngbluth, Marsh

    2010-12-01

    The Medusozoa are a clade within the Cnidaria comprising the classes Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa, and Cubozoa. Identification of medusozoan species is challenging, even for taxonomic experts, due to their fragile forms and complex, morphologically-distinct life history stages. In this study 231 sequences for a portion of the mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase I (mtCOI) gene were obtained from 95 species of Medusozoans including; 84 hydrozoans (61 siphonophores, eight anthomedusae, four leptomedusae, seven trachymedusae, and four narcomedusae), 10 scyphozoans (three coronatae, four semaeostomae, two rhizostomae, and one stauromedusae), and one cubozoan. This region of mtCOI has been used as a DNA barcode (i.e., a molecular character for species recognition and discrimination) for a diverse array of taxa, including some Cnidaria. Kimura 2-parameter (K2P) genetic distances between sequence variants within species ranged from 0 to 0.057 (mean 0.013). Within the 13 genera for which multiple species were available, K2P distance between congeneric species ranged from 0.056 to 0.381. A cluster diagram generated by Neighbor Joining (NJ) using K2P distances reliably clustered all barcodes of the same species with ≥99% bootstrap support, ensuring accurate identification of species. Intra- and inter-specific variation of the mtCOI gene for the Medusozoa are appropriate for this gene to be used as a DNA barcode for species-level identification, but not for phylogenetic analysis or taxonomic classification of unknown sequences at higher taxonomic levels. This study provides a set of molecular tools that can be used to address questions of speciation, biodiversity, life-history, and population boundaries in the Medusozoa.

  12. Influence of the Mt. Pinatubo Eruption on the Stratospheric Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aquila, V.; Oman, Luke D.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Colarco, Peter R.; Newman, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    On June 15th, 1991 the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines injected about 20 Tg of sulfur dioxide in the stratosphere, which was transformed into sulfuric acid aerosol. Even though stratospheric winds climatologically tend to hinder the air mixing between the two hemispheres, observations have shown that a large part of the SO2 emitted by Mt. Pinatubo have been transported from the Northern to the Southern Hemisphere. We show how the absorption of radiation by sulfate aerosol is responsible for the spreading to the southern hemisphere through a middle stratospheric channel. We simulate the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo with the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) version 5 general circulation model, coupled to the aerosol module GOCART and the stratospheric chemistry module StratChem. Our simulations are in good agreement with SAGE-II and AVHRR data. We perform two ensembles of simulations: the first ensemble consists of runs without coupling between aerosol and radiation. In these simulations the plume of aerosols is treated as a passive tracer and the atmosphere is unperturbed. In the second ensemble of simulations aerosols and radiation are coupled. We show that the set of runs with interactive aerosol produces a larger cross-equatorial transport of the Pinatubo cloud, in agreement with the observations. At first, the volcanic cloud is transported from the latitude of the eruption to both hemispheres through a lower stratospheric pathway. Additionally, in the interactive simulations the absorption of long wave radiation from the volcanic sulfate induces a lofting of the cloud to the middle atmosphere and, at the same time, a divergent motion from the center of the cloud. Such motion spreads the volcanic cloud across the equator and to the tropics, where the background circulation carry it to higher latitudes.

  13. The Interaction between Mt. Pinatubo Aerosols and the Stratospheric Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquila, V.; Oman, L.; Stolarski, R. S.; Colarco, P. R.; Newman, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    On June 15th, 1991 the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines injected about 20 Tg of sulfur dioxide in the stratosphere, which was transformed into sulfuric acid aerosol. Even though stratospheric winds climatologically tend to hinder the air mixing between the two hemispheres, observations have shown that a large part of the SO2 emitted by Mt. Pinatubo has been transported from the Northern to the Southern Hemisphere. We show how the absorption of radiation by sulfate aerosol is responsible for the spreading to the southern hemisphere through a middle stratospheric channel. We simulate the Mt. Pinatubo eruption with the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) version 5 general circulation model, coupled to the GOCART aerosol module and the StratChem stratospheric chemistry module. Our simulations are in good agreement with SAGE-II and AVHRR data. We perform two simulation ensembles. The first ensemble does not couple aerosols and radiation. In these simulations the aerosols are treated as passive tracers and the atmosphere is unperturbed. In the second ensemble the aerosols and radiation are coupled. The interactive aerosols produce a larger cross-equatorial transport of the Pinatubo cloud, in agreement with the observations. In this simulation, the volcanic cloud is transported from the latitude of the eruption to both hemispheres through a lower stratospheric pathway. Additionally, in the interactive simulations the absorption of long wave radiation from the volcanic sulfate induces a cloud "self-lofting" into the middle atmosphere and, at the same time, a divergent motion from the cloud's center. Such motion spreads the volcanic cloud across the equator and to the tropics, where the background circulation carries it to higher latitudes. These simulations demonstrate that radiative-dynamical interactive aerosols are necessary to correctly model the dispersion of the Pinatubo cloud.

  14. Mycobacteria, but not mercury, induces metallothionein (MT) protein in striped bass, Morone saxitilis, phagocytes, while both stimuli induce MT in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Regala, R P; Rice, C D

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular immunology indicate that the expression of inducible pro-inflammatory proteins is increased in vertebrates in response to both infectious disease agents and various xenobiotics. For example, iNOS, COX-2, and CYP1A are induced by both inflammation and AhR ligands. Moreover, the expression of these proteins in response to stimuli varies among individuals within populations. Little is known of the differences among fish in the inducibility of proinflammatory proteins in response to both infectious agents and xenobiotics. Through random screening of a striped bass, Morone saxitilis, peritoneal macrophage cDNA library, a full length metallothionein (MT) gene was cloned and sequenced. MT is a low-molecular weight (6-8 kDa), cysteine-rich metal binding protein. Metals are required by pathogenic bacteria for growth, and by the host defense system by serving as a catalyst for the generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) by phagocytes. A recombinant striped bass MT (rMT) was expressed and purified, then used to generate a specific mAb (MT-16). MT protein expression was followed in freshly isolated striped bass and channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, phagocytes after in vitro exposure to the naturally occurring intracellular pathogen Mycobacteria fortuitum or to 0.1 and 1 microM mercury (Hg), as HgCl(2). MT expression was increased by 24 h in both channel catfish and striped bass phagocytes as a result of exposure to M. fortuitum cells. On the other hand, MT was induced by Hg in channel catfish cells, but not those of striped bass. These results indicate that metal homeostasis in phagocytes is different between catfish and striped bass. In addition, these data suggest that care should be taken to distinguish between inflammation-induced vs. metal-induced MT when using MT expression as a biomarker of metal exposure.

  15. Seismic evidence of an extended magmatic sill under Mt. Vesuvius.

    PubMed

    Auger, E; Gasparini, P; Virieux, J; Zollo, A

    2001-11-16

    Mt. Vesuvius is a small volcano associated with an elevated risk. Seismic data were used to better define its magmatic system. We found evidence of an extended (at least 400 square kilometers) low-velocity layer at about 8-kilometer depth. The inferred S-wave (approximately 0.6 to 1.0 kilometer per second) and P-wave velocities (approximately 2.0 kilometer per second) as well as other evidence indicate an extended sill with magma interspersed in a solid matrix.

  16. Partial reanimation of experimental complex ANI at Mt. Aragats (proposal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaulov, S.B.; Martirosov, R.M.; Mamidjanian, E.A.; Jones, L.W.; Saavedra, O.; Tamada, M.

    We present the proposal for reanimation of the half-built experimental complex ANI at Mt. Aragats (Armenia, 3200 m a.s.l.). It is proposed as a first stage to complete the functioning GAMMA installation by big X-ray emulsion chamber for detailed study of EAS cores at energies 1-100 PeV. Preliminary data obtained in this fieled by the Tien Shan “Hadron” installation are presented. This proposal is an EFT and requests creation of an international cooperation.

  17. Partial reanimation of experimental complex ANI at Mt. Aragats (proposal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaulov, S. B.; Martirosov, R. M.; Mamidjanian, E. A.; Jones, L. W.; Saavedra, O.; Tamada, M.

    2009-12-01

    The proposal is presented for reanimation of the half-built experimental complex ANI at Mt. Aragats (Armenia, 3200 m a.s.l.). It is proposed as a first stage to complete the functioning GAMMA installation by big X-ray emulsion chamber for detailed study of extensive air shower cores at energies 1-100 PeV. Preliminary data obtained in this field by the Tien-Shan HADRON installation are presented. This proposal is an EFT and requests creation of an international cooperation.

  18. A miniature VGA SWIR camera using MT6415CA ROIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eminoglu, Selim; Yilmaz, S. Gokhan; Kocak, Serhat

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports the development of a new miniature VGA SWIR camera called NanoCAM-6415, which is developed to demonstrate the key features of the MT6415CA ROIC such as high integration level, low-noise, and low-power in a small volume. The NanoCAM-6415 uses an InGaAs Focal Plane Array (FPA) with a format of 640 × 512 and pixel pitch of 15 μm built using MT6415CA ROIC. MT6415CA is a low-noise CTIA ROIC, which has a system-on-chip architecture, allows generation of all the required timing and biases on-chip in the ROIC without requiring any external components or inputs, thus enabling the development of compact and low-noise SWIR cameras, with reduced size, weight, and power (SWaP). NanoCAM-6415 camera supports snapshot operation using Integrate-Then-Read (ITR) and Integrate-While-Read (IWR) modes. The camera has three gain settings enabled by the ROIC through programmable Full-Well-Capacity (FWC) values of 10.000 e-, 20.000 e-, and 350.000 e- in the very high gain (VHG), high-gain (HG), and low-gain (LG) modes, respectively. The camera has an input referred noise level of 10 e- rms in the VHG mode at 1 ms integration time, suitable for low-noise SWIR imaging applications. In order to reduce the size and power of the camera, only 2 outputs out of 8 of the ROIC are connected to the external Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADCs) in the camera electronics, providing a maximum frame rate of 50 fps through a 26-pin SDR type Camera Link connector. NanoCAM-6415 SWIR camera without the optics measures 32 mm × 32 mm × 35 mm, weighs 45gr, and dissipates less than 1.8 W using a 5 V supply. These results show that MT6415CA ROIC can successfully be used to develop cameras for SWIR imaging applications where SWaP is a concern. Mikro-Tasarim has also developed new imaging software to demonstrate the functionality of this miniature VGA camera. Mikro-Tasarim provides tested ROIC wafers and also offers compact and easy-to-use test electronics, demo cameras, and hardware

  19. Intrinsic and scattering attenuation of the Mt Fuji Region, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Tae Woong; Lees, Jonathan M.; Yoshimoto, Kazuo; Fujita, Eisuke; Ukawa, Motoo

    2009-06-01

    Mount Fuji is the focus of intense study because of its potential hazard signaled by seismic, geologic and historical activity. Based on extensive seismic data recorded in the vicinity of Mt Fuji, coda quality factor (Q-1C) using a single scattering model hypothesis, and intrinsic and scattering quality factor (Q-1i and Q-1S) using the Multiple Lapse Time Window (MLTW) method were measured. To focus the study on the magmatic structure below Mt Fuji, the data were separated into two groups: a near-Fuji region of rays traversing an area with radius 5 km around the summit (R < 5 km), and a far-Fuji region of rays beyond a radius of 20 km around the summit (R > 20 km). This classification shows the largest discrepancy of Q-1C at a range of sampling volumes corresponding to overlapped sampling depth of about 80 km. Further, the spatial division shows significant difference of Q-1i and Q-1s at hypocentral distance of 80 km. The large difference of Q-1s in bandwidths 2-4, and 4-8 Hz indicates lithospheric heterogeneity beneath Mt Fuji with a characteristic heterogeneity scale length of about 1 km. The results have a small error range due to the large data sample, showing that all Q-1 values in the near-Fuji area are greater than those of the far-Fuji area, and Q-1i for both the near and far-Fuji areas is higher than Q-1s at high frequencies. The Q-1i and Q-1s values for far-Fuji are in the range of values for typical non-volcanic areas. The Q-1i values of the near-Fuji area are lower than those of other volcanic areas considered, where as values of Q-1s are not. The low Q-1i for the volcanic region of near-Fuji suggests that the magmatic activity, indicated by percent partial melt, in the vicinity of Mt Fuji is not as active as hot spot volcanoes, such as Kilauea, Hawaii.

  20. A VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST TOWARD MT. SAN ANTONIO FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST TOWARD MT. SAN ANTONIO FROM THE UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD TRACK NEAR CAJON PASS. VISIBLE FROM LEFT TO RIGHT ARE THE SANDSTONE OUTCROPS AT SULLIVAN’S CURVE IN THE FAR LEFT DISTANCE; BNSF RAILROAD MAIN TRACK 2 CURVING THROUGH THE HILLS IN THE LEFT DISTANCE; HILL 58.2 AT CENTER, MARKED BY AN ISOLATED STAND OF TREES; BNSF RAILROAD MAIN TRACK 1, RUNNING STRAIGHT THROUGH THE CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH; AND THE UNION PACIFIC TRACK AT THE FAR RIGHT. 123 - Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad, Cajon Subdivision, Between Cajon Summit and Keenbrook, Devore, San Bernardino County, CA

  1. Multi-task guiding system of the Mt. Suhora Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzesinski, J.; Wojcik, K.

    1993-12-01

    A short description of the computer controlled guiding system using images from a sensitive TV camera is presented. The system works with a 0.6/7.5 m telescope of Mt. Suhora Observatory and can accept input from any standard video camera. The IBM 286-486 or compatible personal computer equipped with a SVGA graphic card and framegrabber card is used as a control unit. The program works under a DOS operating system. An effect of guiding on the classic photoelectric photometry and CCD image quality is discussed.

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-327 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-327 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 327).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-350 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-350 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 350).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-331 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-331 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 331).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-343 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-343 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 343).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-315 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-315 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 315).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-299 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-299 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 299).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-310 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-310 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 310).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-323 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-323 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 323).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-297 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-297 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 297).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-281 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-281 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 281).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-335 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-335 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 335).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-334 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-334 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 334).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-342 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-342 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 342).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-291 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-291 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 291).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-329 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-329 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 329).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-341 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-341 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 341).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-333 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-333 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 333).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-264 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-264 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 264).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-356 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-356 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 356).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-357 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-357 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 357).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-348 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-348 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 348).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-274 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-274 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 274).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-268 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-268 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 268).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-271 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-271 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 271).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-286 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-286 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 286).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-303 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-303 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 303).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-300 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-300 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 300).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-313 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-313 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 313).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-265 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-265 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 265).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-308 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-308 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 308).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-332 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-332 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 332).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-349 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-349 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 349).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-309 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-309 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 309).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-330 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-330 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 330).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-289 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-289 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 289).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-287 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-287 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 287).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-347 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-347 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 347).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-344 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-344 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 344).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-305 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-305 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 305).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-270 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-270 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 270).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-277 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-277 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 277).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-267 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-267 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 267).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-273 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-273 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 273).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-296 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-296 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 296).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-288 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-288 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 288).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-301 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-301 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 301).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-272 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-272 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 272).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-340 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-340 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 340).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-292 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-292 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 292).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-322 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-322 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 322).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-320 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-320 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 320).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-336 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-336 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 336).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-359 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-359 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 359).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-306 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-306 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 306).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-325 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-325 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 325).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-326 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-326 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 326).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-324 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-324 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 324).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-321 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-321 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 321).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-312 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-312 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 312).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-354 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-354 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 354).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-284 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-284 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 284).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-290 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-290 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 290).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-358 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-358 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 358).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-352 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-352 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 352).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-280 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-280 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 280).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-275 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-275 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 275).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-316 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-316 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 316).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-328 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-328 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 328).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-298 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-298 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 298).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-338 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-338 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 338).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-266 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-266 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 266).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-319 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-319 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 319).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-302 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-302 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 302).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-339 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-339 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 339).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-278 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-278 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 278).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-345 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-345 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 345).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-311 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-311 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 311).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-282 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-282 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 282).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-317 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-317 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 317).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-314 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-314 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 314).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-269 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-269 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 269).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-294 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-294 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 294).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-355 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-355 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 355).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-304 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-304 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 304).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-295 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-295 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 295).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-293 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-293 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 293).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-307 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-307 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 307).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-279 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-279 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 279).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-285 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-285 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 285).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-353 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-353 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 353).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-337 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-337 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 337).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-318 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-318 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 318).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-351 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-351 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 351).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-346 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-346 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 346).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-276 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-276 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 276).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-283 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-283 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 283).

  18. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Conceptual Design for 13 MT Case

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.D.

    2001-01-31

    The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading conceptual design for the 13 Metric Ton (MT) PIP throughput case. This report includes a process block diagram, process description, and preliminary equipment specifications and documents the changes to the original can loading concept documented in previous reports.

  19. Infrared site testing of Mt. Lemmon and Catalina Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    The operation and problems involved with two sky noise meters installed in the Catalina Mountains near Tucson, Arizona are discussed. The instruments were installed at two different locations on Mt. Lemon. It was found that when photometric conditions prevailed, a positive correlation existed between the outputs of the two instruments. In particular, the strongdiurnal effect, in which the sky noise increases abruptly at sunrise and falls markedly after sunset, was reproduced by both instruments. Discrepancies in data recorded by the two instruments are analyzed and possible causes for the discrepancies are proposed.

  20. Depletion of mitochondrial DNA in leucocytes harbouring the 3243A→G mtDNA mutation

    PubMed Central

    Pyle, Angela; Taylor, Robert W; Durham, Steve E; Deschauer, Marcus; Schaefer, Andrew M; Samuels, David C; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2007-01-01

    Background The 3243A→G MTTL1 mutation is the most common heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation associated with disease. Previous studies have shown that the percentage of mutated mtDNA decreases in blood as patients get older, but the mechanisms behind this remain unclear. Objectives and method To understand the dynamics of the process and the underlying mechanisms, an accurate fluorescent assay was established for 3243A→G heteroplasmy and the amount of mtDNA in blood with real‐time polymerase chain reaction was determined. The amount of mutated and wild‐type mtDNA was measured at two time points in 11 subjects. Results The percentage of mutated mtDNA decreases exponentially during life, and peripheral blood leucocytes in patients harbouring 3243A→G are profoundly depleted of mtDNA. Conclusions A similar decrease in mtDNA has been seen in other mitochondrial disorders, and in 3243A→G cell lines in culture, indicating that depletion of mtDNA may be a common secondary phenomenon in several mitochondrial diseases. Depletion of mtDNA is not always due to mutation of a nuclear gene involved in mtDNA maintenance. PMID:16950816

  1. The role of regional tectonics, magma pressure and gravitational spreading in earthquakes of the eastern sector of Mt. Etna volcano (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patanè, G.; Montalto, A.; Imposa, S.; Menza, S.

    1994-07-01

    Data concerning M ⩾ 3.3 earthquakes that occurred in the eastern sector of Mt. Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy) in the period 1984-1989 are here presented and discussed. Only events with reliable focal mechanisms and detailed macroseismic investigations have been considered. Instrumental information come from local seismic networks, both permanent and temporary, run by the University of Catania (UCT), the Seismological Observatory of Acireale (SOACR), the CNRS (Grenoble, France) and the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPG, France). Observations regarding the macroseismic effects have been collected by means of field recognitions mainly carried out by the authors. All available data are analyzed in light of the more recent interpretations on the kinematic behaviour of the shallowest structures of Etna, with particular reference to its eastern flank which, according to Borgia et al. (1992), is likely affected by a seaward gravitational migration, driven by the sliding of this sector of the volcanic apparatus over its clay-rich substratum. The results obtained support the hypothesis that the shallow seismicity of the eastern flank of Mt. Etna is related to a complex stress field due to the combined effects of: (a) the tectonics associated with the interaction between the African and Eurasian plates; (b) the rise of magma into the crust; and (c) the gravitative seaward sliding of the eastern sector of the volcano. In particular, we hypothesize that: (1) tectonic forces caused the end of the 1984 eruption, by means of a "locking mechanism"; (2) the increment of magma pressure at depth is periodically responsible for local re-orientation of the stress field acting on the volcano, which also produces earthquakes of high intensity; (3) shallow earthquakes ( z < = 5 km), showing eastward compression mechanism, could be related to the gravitational sliding of unbuttressed sectors of the volcanic body accompanying the emplacement of intrusive dykes.

  2. Expression of melatonin receptor MT1 in cells of human invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jablonska, Karolina; Pula, Bartosz; Zemla, Agata; Owczarek, Tomasz; Wojnar, Andrzej; Rys, Janusz; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzena; Ugorski, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    In humans, two main types of membrane melatonin receptors have been identified, MT1 and MT2. Expression of MT1 in neoplastic cells seems to increase the efficacy of melatonin's oncostatic activity. The purpose of this study was to determine the distribution and the intensity of MT1 expression in breast cancer cells and to correlate it with clinicopathological factors. Immunohistochemical studies (IHC) were conducted on 190 cases of invasive ductal breast carcinomas (IDC) and molecular studies were performed on 29 cases of frozen tumor fragments and selected breast cancer cell lines. Most of the studied tumors manifested a membranous/cytoplasmic IHC expression of MT1. In IDC, the MT1 expression was higher than in fibrocystic breast disease. MT1 expression was higher in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and HER2 positive (HER2+) tumors. Triple negative tumors (TN) manifested the lowest MT1 expression level. The lowest MT1 protein expression level was noted in the TN breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 compared with ER+ cell lines MCF-7 and SK-BR-3. MT1 mRNA expression was negatively correlated with the malignancy grade of the studied IDC cases. Moreover, higher MT1 expression was associated with patients' longer overall survival (OS) in the group of ER+ breast cancers and treated with tamoxifen. Multivariate analysis indicated that MT1 was an independent prognostic factor in the ER+ tumors for OS and event-free survival in the ER+ tumors. The results of this study may point to a potential prognostic and therapeutic significance of MT1 in IDC.

  3. Integrated reservoir study - M/T structure offshore Abu Dhabi

    SciTech Connect

    Cartier, G.; Combes, J.T. des; Hassan, T.H.

    1995-08-01

    A multidisciplinary approach involving geology, geophysics, petrophysics and reservoir engineering is used to assess the oil-bearing Thamama reservoirs in the Offshore Abu Dhabi M/T Structure. The structural definition is hampered by subtle variations of the seismic velocities created by shallow high velocity channel fills. Improved time to depth conversion was achieved through detailed velocity studies and layer caking. As currently defined at the Thamama level, the M/T structure is a gentle low relief feature with closure of about 125 feet. The Lower Cretaceous Thamama Group comprises the producing zones and consists of a succession which was deposited over an extensive carbonate ramp platform. Seven depositional environments and fifteen associated lithofacies range from slope or basin edge, gradually passing to fore shoal, algal shoal, and rudistid backshoal of the inner ramp. Three third order sequences, their associated systems tracts, sequence boundaries and shallowing upwards parasequences are recognised. Based on geological and petrophysical data, a rock type scheme was developed as a basis for detailed reservoir layering and simulation studies. The main diagenetic processes which adversely affect porosity are circumgranular, ferroan and non-ferroan calcite and saddle dolomite cementation, while leaching is the primary porosity-enhancing process. Conventional and special core analyses indicate that specific poroperm, petrophysical and engineering parameters can be assigned to various rock types. The integration of all disciplines will optimise future appraisal drilling and lead to a more efficient development strategy of this field.

  4. MT-compatible red VCSEL module for parallel optical interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hove, An; Van de Putte, Koen; Naessens, Kris; Dhoedt, Bart; Baets, Roel G.; Van Daele, Peter

    2000-04-01

    In this paper we present the design, fabrication and characterization of a module which directly connectorizes a 1 by 8 red VCSEL array to a small diameter polymer optical fiber array, using a standard MT ferrule. The facets of the POF are prepared by a hot knife cutting, followed by a short polishing step. First coupling results show total losses in the range of 1.1 dB/channel for a 30 cm POF link. Optical crosstalk between adjacent channels is below -45 dB. Plastic micromachined parts surrounding the VCSEL chip ensure the correct alignment of the connector, using the connector, using the connector guiding points. The parts themselves are aligned to the chip with a n index-alignment technique, using an excimer laser ablated mastertool. In a deconnectorizable version of the module, a thin, flat glue layer on the chip acts as a window between the VCSEL chip and the MT terminated POF array. Integrated in a standard ceramic package, clear eye diagrams have been measured at 150 MHz for a 10m POF link, coupled to the VCSEL array. Further efforts on higher speed measurements using dedicated drivers, will also be presented.

  5. The novel high-performance 3-D MT inverse solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglyakov, Mikhail; Geraskin, Alexey; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    We present novel, robust, scalable, and fast 3-D magnetotelluric (MT) inverse solver. The solver is written in multi-language paradigm to make it as efficient, readable and maintainable as possible. Separation of concerns and single responsibility concepts go through implementation of the solver. As a forward modelling engine a modern scalable solver extrEMe, based on contracting integral equation approach, is used. Iterative gradient-type (quasi-Newton) optimization scheme is invoked to search for (regularized) inverse problem solution, and adjoint source approach is used to calculate efficiently the gradient of the misfit. The inverse solver is able to deal with highly detailed and contrasting models, allows for working (separately or jointly) with any type of MT responses, and supports massive parallelization. Moreover, different parallelization strategies implemented in the code allow optimal usage of available computational resources for a given problem statement. To parameterize an inverse domain the so-called mask parameterization is implemented, which means that one can merge any subset of forward modelling cells in order to account for (usually) irregular distribution of observation sites. We report results of 3-D numerical experiments aimed at analysing the robustness, performance and scalability of the code. In particular, our computational experiments carried out at different platforms ranging from modern laptops to HPC Piz Daint (6th supercomputer in the world) demonstrate practically linear scalability of the code up to thousands of nodes.

  6. The setting of the Mt. Carmel caves reassessed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vita-Finzi, Claudio; Stringer, Chris

    2007-02-01

    Four caves on the SW flank of Mt. Carmel, es Skhul, el Wad, el Jaml and et Tabun, were first excavated in the 1930s by a team led by Dorothy Garrod. They yielded human remains whose age and evolutionary status remain controversial partly because the complexity of the cave deposits invites conflicting interpretations. The abrasion of artefacts and pebbles in el Wad and es Skhul, which was originally ascribed to spring flow within the caves, is explained here by wave action, with the implication that during part of the Middle Palaeolithic the caves were on the shoreline rather than being separated from it—as they now are—by several kilometres of coastal plain and a height difference of some 45 m. U-series, thermoluminescence (TL) and electron spin resonance (ESR) dating suggests that this occurred about 120,000 years ago, when sea level in the eastern Mediterranean stood 5-6 m above its present position. It follows that Mt. Carmel has subsequently undergone some 40 m of uplift. During the period of maximum submergence, the coastal route between Africa and the northern Mediterranean would have been partly blocked, but the loss of the coastal plain for transit and as a source of animal food was offset by easier access from the caves to marine resources.

  7. Formation of superconducting junctions in MT-YBCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikhna, T. A.; Gawalek, W.; Novikov, N. V.; Moshchil, V. E.; Sverdun, V. B.; Sergienko, N. V.; Surzhenko, A. B.; Uspenskaya, L. S.; Viznichenko, R.; Kordyuk, A. A.; Litzkendorf, D.; Habisreuther, T.; Krachunovska, S.; Vlasenko, A. V.

    2005-02-01

    The formation of superconducting junctions between MT-YBCO using TmBa2Cu3O7-δ powder as a solder has been studied. The method proposed excludes the step of a very slow cooling (at a rate of several degrees per hour) during seam formation. The heating and cooling rate for joining parts produced from single-domain material without visible cracks (macrocracks) can be rather high (500-1000 K h-1) and a holding time at the highest temperature (1010 °C) of several minutes (0.05 h) is enough to form a reliable junction. Reasonable rates of heating and cooling are however around 100 K h-1 if crack propagation is to be avoided in joined blocks used for practical application. Modelling experiments on rings and studies of the ring properties by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), field mapping with a Hall probe and magneto-optical microscopy have shown that superconducting properties of the junction were not lower than that of the joined material (jc of about 30 kA cm-2 was observed in zero field at 77 K) and that the proposed process of joining did not adversely affect the properties of the material. The structure of the resulting junction was in good agreement with the structure of MT-YBCO.

  8. Geochemical characteristics of acid fluids in Mt Pinatubo, Philipines

    SciTech Connect

    Buenviaje, Marinela M.

    1991-01-01

    The surface geochemical characteristics of Mt Pinatubo indicate widespread deep acid fluids as shown by the following: presence of solfataras or sulfur-depositing fumaroles near or at the summit, and recent or active volcanism; discharge of mixed fluids with significant chloride at middle elevations; significant amounts of sulfate found in spring discharges at almost all levels (except at lowest levels or near sea level); springs with neutral pH and have high amounts of chloride and significant amounts of magnesium and boron; low Cl/Mg values accompanied by significant amounts of Mg observed at various elevations; higher proportions of gases, especially CO{sub 2} and significant N{sub 2}; widespread occurrence of iron hydroxide deposits at almost all elevations; and all springs discharge immature waters. A new mixing model is proposed, the Cl-B-Mg ternary diagram, to differentiate the effects on well and spring water chemistry of the following processes: seawater mixing, groundwater dilution and magmatic input. Seawater mixing is not indicated for Mt Pinatubo springs as shown by crossplots of chloride versus other chemical constituents and the Cl-B-Mg ternary diagram. Neutral alkali chloride waters are present in the area. This is supported by the chemical crossplots, and the Cl-B-Mg plots. In the Cl-B-Mg plot, springs that discharge low pH waters are shown to be manifestations of acid fluids that are localized within a shallow or deep fault zone.

  9. Groundwater radon measurements in the Mt. Etna area.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Walter; Vita, Fabio

    2003-01-01

    Radon levels were measured in 119 groundwater samples collected throughout the active volcanic area of Mt. Etna by means of a portable Lucas-type scintillation chamber. The measured activity values range from 1.8 to 52.7 Bq l(-1). About 40% of the samples exceed the maximum contaminant level of 11 Bq l(-1) proposed by the USEPA in 1991. The highest radon levels are measured in the eastern sector of the volcano, which is the seismically most active zone of the volcano. On the contrary the south-western sector, which is both seismically active and a site of intense magmatic degassing, display lower radon levels. This is probably due to the formation of a free gas phase (oversaturation of CO(2)) that strips the radon from the water. Comparison of the data gathered at Mt. Etna with those of other areas indicates that (222)Rn activity in groundwater is positively correlated with both the content of parent elements in the aquifer rocks and the temperature of the geothermal systems that interacts with the sampled aquifers. PMID:12527235

  10. Pyritic shale integration into waste rock management, Mt. Whaleback

    SciTech Connect

    O'Kane, M.; Porterfield, D.; Weir, A.

    1999-07-01

    BHP Iron Ore operates the Mt. Whaleback mine in a semi-arid climate adjacent to Newman, Western Australia, approximately 1,200 km north-northeast of Perth, Western Australia. More than 2 billion tones of waste rock were excavated and deposited on the surface during the past 30 years. Ultimately, approximately 4 billion tonnes will be deposited in waste rock dumps constructed near the open pit. Management of the potentially acid forming pyritic shale is based on the application of state-of-the-art conceptual and numerically modeling tools, and operational considerations. The potentially acid forming material is encapsulated within barren run-of-mine material. A moisture storage and release cover system is employed to control water infiltration on the sloping and horizontal waste rock surfaces. This paper will first summarize the overall environmental management plan at Mt. Whaleback. The rationale for differentiating waste rock types is presented. A summary of the design of the moisture storage and release cover system is offered. Finally, performance of field trials are summarized.

  11. Groundwater radon measurements in the Mt. Etna area.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Walter; Vita, Fabio

    2003-01-01

    Radon levels were measured in 119 groundwater samples collected throughout the active volcanic area of Mt. Etna by means of a portable Lucas-type scintillation chamber. The measured activity values range from 1.8 to 52.7 Bq l(-1). About 40% of the samples exceed the maximum contaminant level of 11 Bq l(-1) proposed by the USEPA in 1991. The highest radon levels are measured in the eastern sector of the volcano, which is the seismically most active zone of the volcano. On the contrary the south-western sector, which is both seismically active and a site of intense magmatic degassing, display lower radon levels. This is probably due to the formation of a free gas phase (oversaturation of CO(2)) that strips the radon from the water. Comparison of the data gathered at Mt. Etna with those of other areas indicates that (222)Rn activity in groundwater is positively correlated with both the content of parent elements in the aquifer rocks and the temperature of the geothermal systems that interacts with the sampled aquifers.

  12. New Evidence for Holocene Glacier Fluctuations on Mt. Baker, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, P. T.; Osborn, G.; Menounos, B.; Ryane, C.; Clague, J.; Riedel, J.; Koch, J.; Scott, K.

    2005-12-01

    Ongoing research on Mt. Baker, an active Cascades stratovolcano, provides new constraints on the timing of Holocene glacier fluctuations. Previously mapped deposits on the southwest flank of Mt. Baker suggested to some that glacial advances during the early to mid- Holocene were more extensive than those during the Little Ice Age (LIA). This interpretation was based on the presence and absence of Mazama (ca. 6800 14C yr BP) and Mt. Baker set OP (ca. 5800 14C yr BP) tephras, and a scoria deposited at ca. 8,800 14C yr BP. Our work indicates a more complex distribution of the scoria than previously thought, as well as its presence on deposits reported to be scoria-free. In addition, many of the landforms previously mapped as moraines are bedrock or bedrock-cored ridges. At Easton Glacier, we identified two tills separated by an abrupt unconformity in the east lateral moraine about 20 m below the moraine crest. The unconformity is marked by (1) a deformed mat of peat and detrital wood fragments and trunks up to 0.5 m in diameter, (2) two tephra layers, and (3) a thick red silt below the two tephra layers that may be a weathering product of the tephra(s) or, alternatively, a third, weathered tephra. The two tephras have field characteristics identical to those of Mazama and Baker Set OP present on the south flank of the volcano. Two samples of detrital wood yielded ages of 5260 ± 70 and 5240 ± 70 14C yr BP, which we interpret to indicate (1) construction of a moraine prior to 6800 14C yr by a glacier with an extent similar to that of the LIA, (2) retreat of the glacier, stabilization of the moraine, and establishment of a forest, and (3) advance of the glacier at ca. 5200 14C yr, overriding the vegetated moraine surface. This advance is correlative with the well-known `Garibaldi Advance' in the southern Coast Mountains of British Columbia. At Coleman Glacier, an unconformity about 12 m below the crest of the southwest lateral moraine is marked by a laterally

  13. Reservoir characterization of the Mt. Simon Sandstone, Illinois Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frailey, S.M.; Damico, J.; Leetaru, H.E.

    2011-01-01

    The integration of open hole well log analyses, core analyses and pressure transient analyses was used for reservoir characterization of the Mt. Simon sandstone. Characterization of the injection interval provides the basis for a geologic model to support the baseline MVA model, specify pressure design requirements of surface equipment, develop completion strategies, estimate injection rates, and project the CO2 plume distribution.The Cambrian-age Mt. Simon Sandstone overlies the Precambrian granite basement of the Illinois Basin. The Mt. Simon is relatively thick formation exceeding 800 meters in some areas of the Illinois Basin. In the deeper part of the basin where sequestration is likely to occur at depths exceeding 1000 m, horizontal core permeability ranges from less than 1 ?? 10-12 cm 2 to greater than 1 ?? 10-8 cm2. Well log and core porosity can be up to 30% in the basal Mt. Simon reservoir. For modeling purposes, reservoir characterization includes absolute horizontal and vertical permeability, effective porosity, net and gross thickness, and depth. For horizontal permeability, log porosity was correlated with core. The core porosity-permeability correlation was improved by using grain size as an indication of pore throat size. After numerous attempts to identify an appropriate log signature, the calculated cementation exponent from Archie's porosity and resistivity relationships was used to identify which porosity-permeability correlation to apply and a permeability log was made. Due to the relatively large thickness of the Mt. Simon, vertical permeability is an important attribute to understand the distribution of CO2 when the injection interval is in the lower part of the unit. Only core analyses and specifically designed pressure transient tests can yield vertical permeability. Many reservoir flow models show that 500-800 m from the injection well most of the CO2 migrates upward depending on the magnitude of the vertical permeability and CO2 injection

  14. ER-mitochondria contacts couple mtDNA synthesis with mitochondrial division in human cells.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Samantha C; Uchiyama, Lauren F; Nunnari, Jodi

    2016-07-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes RNAs and proteins critical for cell function. In human cells, hundreds to thousands of mtDNA copies are replicated asynchronously, packaged into protein-DNA nucleoids, and distributed within a dynamic mitochondrial network. The mechanisms that govern how nucleoids are chosen for replication and distribution are not understood. Mitochondrial distribution depends on division, which occurs at endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria contact sites. These sites were spatially linked to a subset of nucleoids selectively marked by mtDNA polymerase and engaged in mtDNA synthesis--events that occurred upstream of mitochondrial constriction and division machine assembly. Our data suggest that ER tubules proximal to nucleoids are necessary but not sufficient for mtDNA synthesis. Thus, ER-mitochondria contacts coordinate licensing of mtDNA synthesis with division to distribute newly replicated nucleoids to daughter mitochondria. PMID:27418514

  15. ER-mitochondria contacts couple mtDNA synthesis with mitochondrial division in human cells.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Samantha C; Uchiyama, Lauren F; Nunnari, Jodi

    2016-07-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes RNAs and proteins critical for cell function. In human cells, hundreds to thousands of mtDNA copies are replicated asynchronously, packaged into protein-DNA nucleoids, and distributed within a dynamic mitochondrial network. The mechanisms that govern how nucleoids are chosen for replication and distribution are not understood. Mitochondrial distribution depends on division, which occurs at endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria contact sites. These sites were spatially linked to a subset of nucleoids selectively marked by mtDNA polymerase and engaged in mtDNA synthesis--events that occurred upstream of mitochondrial constriction and division machine assembly. Our data suggest that ER tubules proximal to nucleoids are necessary but not sufficient for mtDNA synthesis. Thus, ER-mitochondria contacts coordinate licensing of mtDNA synthesis with division to distribute newly replicated nucleoids to daughter mitochondria.

  16. Human mtDNA Haplogroups Associated with High or Reduced Spermatozoa Motility

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Lapeña, Ana-Cristina; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Montoya, Julio; Alvarez, Enrique; Díaz, Miguel; Urriés, Antonio; Montoro, Luis; López-Pérez, Manuel J.; Enríquez, José A.

    2000-01-01

    A variety of mtDNA mutations responsible for human diseases have been associated with molecular defects in the OXPHOS system. It has been proposed that mtDNA genetic alterations can also be responsible for sperm dysfunction. In addition, it was suggested that if sperm dysfunction is the main phenotypic consequence, these mutations could be fixed as stable mtDNA variants, because mtDNA is maternally inherited. To test this possibility, we have performed an extensive analysis of the distribution of mtDNA haplogroups in white men having fertility problems. We have found that asthenozoospermia, but not oligozoospermia, is associated with mtDNA haplogroups in whites. Thus, haplogroups H and T are significantly more abundant in nonasthenozoospermic and asthenozoospermic populations, respectively, and show significant differences in their OXPHOS performance. PMID:10936107

  17. A method for mutagenesis of mouse mtDNA and a resource of mouse mtDNA mutations for modeling human pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fayzulin, Rafik Z.; Perez, Michael; Kozhukhar, Natalia; Spadafora, Domenico; Wilson, Glenn L.; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause mitochondrial disease and have been associated with neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, diabetes and aging. Yet our progress toward delineating the precise contributions of mtDNA mutations to these conditions is impeded by the limited availability of faithful transmitochondrial animal models. Here, we report a method for the isolation of mutations in mouse mtDNA and its implementation for the generation of a collection of over 150 cell lines suitable for the production of transmitochondrial mice. This method is based on the limited mutagenesis of mtDNA by proofreading-deficient DNA-polymerase γ followed by segregation of the resulting highly heteroplasmic mtDNA population by means of intracellular cloning. Among generated cell lines, we identify nine which carry mutations affecting the same amino acid or nucleotide positions as in human disease, including a mutation in the ND4 gene responsible for 70% of Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathies (LHON). Similar to their human counterparts, cybrids carrying the homoplasmic mouse LHON mutation demonstrated reduced respiration, reduced ATP content and elevated production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). The generated resource of mouse mtDNA mutants will be useful both in modeling human mitochondrial disease and in understanding the mechanisms of ROS production mediated by mutations in mtDNA. PMID:25820427

  18. Determinants of measles seroprevalence among pregnant women in Paris, France.

    PubMed

    Bodilis, H; Goffinet, F; Krivine, A; Andrieu, T; Anselem, O; Tsatsaris, V; Rozenberg, F; Launay, O

    2014-08-01

    Non-immune pregnant women are at risk of severe measles. As the measles vaccination is contraindicated during pregnancy, women should be vaccinated before conception or during the postpartum period. Nevertheless, measles serology is not recommended during pregnancy in France, and there are no data available concerning measles susceptibility and its associated risk factors among pregnant women. The socio-demographic determinants of measles seronegativity have been identified in a prospective cohort of 826 pregnant women in Paris, France. Measles seronegativity was 10.41% (95% CI 8.32-12.50). Women from higher socio-economic groups, born in France after 1980, were more frequently seronegative.

  19. Pronatalist policies in Eastern Europe and France.

    PubMed

    Girard, A

    1983-08-01

    Western European fertility rates dropped markedly during the 1930s, and several governments established pronatalist policies. The policies were shortlived as fertility began to rise again after World War 2 and government intervention no longer appeared warranted. In contrast the countries of Eastern Europe retained their relatively high birthrates until measures in the 1950s gave individuals, especially women, greater freedom of choice in childbearing. Divorce laws were liberalized following World War 2, and women's participation in the labor force became widespread. Most European governments, following the example of the Soviet Union, liberalized abortion laws as well, making safe, medical abortion available for social, economic, and medical reasons. Whether or not as a direct result of this legislation, the Eastern European nations experienced such a rapid decline in birthrates that governments, fearing further ramifications, decided to intervene. In 1966, for example, Romania decreed abortion to be illegal except for medical reasons or in the case of rape. Eastern European governments justified their actions by emphasizing their concern about longterm effects. They wanted to avoid the "aging" of their population and the risk of future decrease in total population size. The abortion restrictions were accompanied by widespread efforts to encourage contraception through education, information programs, and postnatal consultations. Incentives were also adopted, and there were adjustments in working conditions for women including longer maternity leave and the opportunity for young mothers to have extended leave. The government's goal is to encourage 2 child families with enough 3 or 4 child families to compensate for 1 child or childless households. Eastern Europe is not alone in its pronatalist policy. France has set similar policies into motion. If this is exceptional among Western countries, it is because French fertility declined about a century before other

  20. Periodicities of hail precipitation in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermida, Lucía; Sánchez, José Luis; Berthet, Claude; Dessens, Jean; López, Laura; Hierro, Rodrigo; Wu, Xueke; García-Ortega, Eduardo

    2013-04-01

    The wavelet analysis is a powerful tool appropriated for studying multiscale and non-stationary processes that occur in finite spatial and temporal domains. Its development began with Morlet and, since then, the wavelet transform (WT) has had better applications in Geophysics. However, the characterization of hail precipitation is not exempt from difficulty, since it deals with phenomenon on a small scale, with elevated spatial and temporal variation. The extreme variability of the frequency and distribution of hail is attributed, among other things, to the same process of its formation. The conditions that influence hail formation span from air masses climatology to lower-scale factors such as orography, wind fields, concentration of ice nuclei or temperature. This last factor is important both from a point of view of convective activity as well as its influence in the height of the freezing point. Thus, it would be possible to do comparative analysis between time series of temperature and diverse hail variables; or, rather, to try to establish a relationship between periodicities found and phenomenon such as ENSO (El Niño, Southern Oscillation) or NAO (North-Atlantic Oscillation). France is one of the European countries that is most affected by hail precipitation. Previous climatic studies have been done with the objective of characterizing the long-term variability of distinct variables of this hydrometeor that is present in the time series. These measurements are obtained using networks of hailpads distributed in French territory and managed by ANELFA. Berthet et al. (2011) observed the annual hail frequency in France, finding successions of three years with high values followed by three years of low values; this being calculated as the number of hailfalls per year divided by the number of hailpad stations that were in use during said year. In the present paper, a wavelet analysis was carried out with the objective of detecting the possible existence of

  1. A κ Model for Mainland France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, John; Gehl, Pierre; Bonilla, Luis Fabian; Gélis, Céline

    2010-11-01

    An important parameter for the characterization of strong ground motion at high-frequencies (>1 Hz) is kappa, κ, which models a linear decay of the acceleration spectrum, a( f), in log-linear space (i.e. a( f) = A 0 exp(- π κ f) for f > f E where f is frequency, f E is a low frequency limit and A 0 controls the amplitude of the spectrum). κ is a key input parameter in the stochastic method for the simulation of strong ground motion, which is particularly useful for areas with insufficient strong-motion data to enable the derivation of robust empirical ground motion prediction equations, such as mainland France. Numerous studies using strong-motion data from western North America (WNA) (an active tectonic region where surface rock is predominantly soft) and eastern North America (ENA) (a stable continental region where surface rock is predominantly very hard) have demonstrated that κ varies with region and surface geology, with WNA rock sites having a κ of about 0.04 s and ENA rock sites having a κ of about 0.006 s. Lower κs are one reason why high-frequency strong ground motions in stable regions are generally higher than in active regions for the same magnitude and distance. Few, if any, estimates of κs for French sites have been published. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to estimate κ using data recorded by the French national strong-motion network (RAP) for various sites in different regions of mainland France. For each record, a value of κ is estimated by following the procedure developed by Anderson and Hough (Bull Seismol Soc Am 74:1969-1993, 1984): this method is based on the analysis of the S-wave spectrum, which has to be performed manually, thus leading to some uncertainties. For the three French regions where most records are available (the Pyrenees, the Alps and the Côtes-d’Azur), a regional κ model is developed using weighted regression on the local geology (soil or rock) and source-to-site distance. It is found that the studied

  2. Metabolic rescue in pluripotent cells from patients with mtDNA disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hong; Folmes, Clifford D L; Wu, Jun; Morey, Robert; Mora-Castilla, Sergio; Ocampo, Alejandro; Ma, Li; Poulton, Joanna; Wang, Xinjian; Ahmed, Riffat; Kang, Eunju; Lee, Yeonmi; Hayama, Tomonari; Li, Ying; Van Dyken, Crystal; Gutierrez, Nuria Marti; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Koski, Amy; Mitalipov, Nargiz; Amato, Paula; Wolf, Don P; Huang, Taosheng; Terzic, Andre; Laurent, Louise C; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2015-08-13

    Mitochondria have a major role in energy production via oxidative phosphorylation, which is dependent on the expression of critical genes encoded by mitochondrial (mt)DNA. Mutations in mtDNA can cause fatal or severely debilitating disorders with limited treatment options. Clinical manifestations vary based on mutation type and heteroplasmy (that is, the relative levels of mutant and wild-type mtDNA within each cell). Here we generated genetically corrected pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) from patients with mtDNA disease. Multiple induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines were derived from patients with common heteroplasmic mutations including 3243A>G, causing mitochondrial encephalomyopathy and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), and 8993T>G and 13513G>A, implicated in Leigh syndrome. Isogenic MELAS and Leigh syndrome iPS cell lines were generated containing exclusively wild-type or mutant mtDNA through spontaneous segregation of heteroplasmic mtDNA in proliferating fibroblasts. Furthermore, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) enabled replacement of mutant mtDNA from homoplasmic 8993T>G fibroblasts to generate corrected Leigh-NT1 PSCs. Although Leigh-NT1 PSCs contained donor oocyte wild-type mtDNA (human haplotype D4a) that differed from Leigh syndrome patient haplotype (F1a) at a total of 47 nucleotide sites, Leigh-NT1 cells displayed transcriptomic profiles similar to those in embryo-derived PSCs carrying wild-type mtDNA, indicative of normal nuclear-to-mitochondrial interactions. Moreover, genetically rescued patient PSCs displayed normal metabolic function compared to impaired oxygen consumption and ATP production observed in mutant cells. We conclude that both reprogramming approaches offer complementary strategies for derivation of PSCs containing exclusively wild-type mtDNA, through spontaneous segregation of heteroplasmic mtDNA in individual iPS cell lines or mitochondrial replacement by SCNT in homoplasmic mtDNA-based disease. PMID:26176921

  3. Characterization of pancreatic lesions from MT-tgf alpha, Ela-myc and MT-tgf alpha/Ela-myc single and double transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Liao, Dezhong Joshua; Wang, Yong; Wu, Jiusheng; Adsay, Nazmi Volkan; Grignon, David; Khanani, Fayyaz; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2006-07-05

    In order to identify good animal models for investigating therapeutic and preventive strategies for pancreatic cancer, we analyzed pancreatic lesions from several transgenic models and made a series of novel findings. Female MT-tgf alpha mice of the MT100 line developed pancreatic proliferation, acinar-ductal metaplasia, multilocular cystic neoplasms, ductal adenocarcinomas and prominent fibrosis, while the lesions in males were less severe. MT-tgf alpha-ES transgenic lines of both sexes developed slowly progressing lesions that were similar to what was seen in MT100 males. In both MT100 and MT-tgf alpha-ES lines, TGF alpha transgene was expressed mainly in proliferating ductal cells. Ela-myc transgenic mice with a mixed C57BL/6, SJL and FVB genetic background developed pancreatic tumors at 2-7 months of age, and half of the tumors were ductal adenocarcinomas, similar to what was reported originally by Sandgren et al 1. However, in 20% of the mice, the tumors metastasized to the liver. MT100/Ela-myc and MT-tgf alpha-ES/Ela-myc double transgenic mice developed not only acinar carcinomas and mixed carcinomas as previously reported but also various ductal-originated lesions, including multilocular cystic neoplasms and ductal adenocarcinomas. The double transgenic tumors were more malignant and metastasized to the liver at a higher frequency (33%) compared with the Ela-myc tumors. Sequencing of the coding region of p16ink4, k-ras and Rb cDNA in small numbers of pancreatic tumors did not identify mutations. The short latency for tumor development, the variety of tumor morphology and the liver metastases seen in Ela-myc and MT-tgf alpha/Ela-myc mice make these animals good models for investigating new therapeutic and preventive strategies for pancreatic cancer.

  4. Nonsynonymous variants in mt-Nd2, mt-Nd4, and mt-Nd5 are linked to effects on oxidative phosphorylation and insulin sensitivity in rat conplastic strains

    PubMed Central

    Houštěk, Josef; Hejzlarová, Kateřina; Vrbacký, Marek; Drahota, Zdeněk; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Šilhavý, Jan; Mikšík, Ivan; Kazdová, Ludmila; Oliyarnyk, Olena; Kurtz, Theodore

    2012-01-01

    Common inbred strains of the laboratory rat can be divided into four different mitochondrial DNA haplotype groups represented by the SHR, BN, LEW, and F344 strains. In the current study, we investigated the metabolic and hemodynamic effects of the SHR vs. LEW mitochondrial genomes by comparing the SHR to a new SHR conplastic strain, SHR-mtLEW; these strains are genetically identical except for their mitochondrial genomes. Complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence analysis comparing the SHR and LEW strains revealed gene variants encoding amino acid substitutions limited to a single mitochondrial enzyme complex, NADH dehydrogenase (complex I), affecting subunits 2, 4, and 5. Two of the variants in the mt-Nd4 subunit gene are located close to variants known to be associated with exercise intolerance and diabetes mellitus in humans. No variants were found in tRNA or rRNA genes. These variants in mt-Nd2, mt-Nd4, and mt-Nd5 in the SHR-mtLEW conplastic strain were linked to reductions in oxidative and nonoxidative glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. In addition, SHR-mtLEW conplastic rats showed increased serum nonesterified fatty acid levels and resistance to insulin stimulated incorporation of glucose into adipose tissue lipids. These results provide evidence that inherited variation in mitochondrial genes encoding respiratory chain complex I subunits, in the absence of variation in the nuclear genome and other confounding factors, can influence glucose and lipid metabolism when expressed on the nuclear genetic background of the SHR strain. PMID:22414913

  5. REM sleep deprivation promotes a dopaminergic influence in the striatal MT2 anxiolytic-like effects.

    PubMed

    Noseda, Ana Carolina D; Targa, Adriano D S; Rodrigues, Lais S; Aurich, Mariana F; Lima, Marcelo M S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible anxiolytic-like effects of striatal MT2 activation, and its counteraction induced by the selective blockade of this receptor. Furthermore, we analyzed this condition under the paradigm of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation (REMSD) and the animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD) induced by rotenone. Male Wistar rats were infused with intranigral rotenone (12 μg/μL), and 7 days later were subjected to 24 h of REMSD. Afterwards the rats underwent striatal micro-infusions of selective melatonin MT2 receptor agonist, 8-M-PDOT (10 μg/μL) or selective melatonin MT2 receptor antagonist, 4-P-PDOT (5 μg/μL) or vehicle. Subsequently, the animals were tested in the open-field (OP) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests. Results indicated that the activation of MT2 receptors produced anxiolytic-like effects. In opposite, the MT2 blockade did not show an anxiogenic-like effect. Besides, REMSD induced anxiolytic-like effects similar to 8-M-PDOT. MT2 activation generated a prevalent locomotor increase compared to MT2 blockade in the context of REMSD. Together, these results suggest a striatal MT2 modulation associated to the REMSD-induced dopaminergic supersensitivity causing a possible dopaminergic influence in the MT2 anxiolytic-like effects in the intranigral rotenone model of PD.

  6. REM sleep deprivation promotes a dopaminergic influence in the striatal MT2 anxiolytic-like effects.

    PubMed

    Noseda, Ana Carolina D; Targa, Adriano D S; Rodrigues, Lais S; Aurich, Mariana F; Lima, Marcelo M S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible anxiolytic-like effects of striatal MT2 activation, and its counteraction induced by the selective blockade of this receptor. Furthermore, we analyzed this condition under the paradigm of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation (REMSD) and the animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD) induced by rotenone. Male Wistar rats were infused with intranigral rotenone (12 μg/μL), and 7 days later were subjected to 24 h of REMSD. Afterwards the rats underwent striatal micro-infusions of selective melatonin MT2 receptor agonist, 8-M-PDOT (10 μg/μL) or selective melatonin MT2 receptor antagonist, 4-P-PDOT (5 μg/μL) or vehicle. Subsequently, the animals were tested in the open-field (OP) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests. Results indicated that the activation of MT2 receptors produced anxiolytic-like effects. In opposite, the MT2 blockade did not show an anxiogenic-like effect. Besides, REMSD induced anxiolytic-like effects similar to 8-M-PDOT. MT2 activation generated a prevalent locomotor increase compared to MT2 blockade in the context of REMSD. Together, these results suggest a striatal MT2 modulation associated to the REMSD-induced dopaminergic supersensitivity causing a possible dopaminergic influence in the MT2 anxiolytic-like effects in the intranigral rotenone model of PD. PMID:27226821

  7. Tumor-specific changes in mtDNA content in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Mambo, Elizabeth; Chatterjee, Aditi; Xing, Mingzhao; Tallini, Giovanni; Haugen, Bryan R; Yeung, Sai-Ching J; Sukumar, Saraswati; Sidransky, David

    2005-10-10

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations are associated with various cancer types, suggesting that the mitochondrial genome may be a critical contributing factor in carcinogenesis. mtDNA alterations have been suggested as a potentially sensitive and specific biomarker for several cancer types. We examined mtDNA content in 25 pairs of normal and tumor breast tissue samples, 37 papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), 21 benign thyroid neoplasms and in 20 paired normal and PTC samples. Our results showed that mtDNA content was reduced in 80% of the breast tumors relative to their corresponding normal. mtDNA was increased in papillary thyroid carcinomas, however, when compared to the corresponding normal DNA taken from the same individual. Also, mtDNA content was increased in none-paired PTC samples compared to the normal controls. Our findings indicate that changes in mtDNA content during carcinogenesis may be regulated in a tumor specific manner. Additionally, changes in mtDNA levels did not correlate with tumor grade and metastasis, suggesting that these alterations may occur in the early stages of tumorigenesis. Our findings suggest that mtDNA content can be used as a molecular diagnostic tool to help identify genetic abnormalities in human tumors.

  8. REM sleep deprivation promotes a dopaminergic influence in the striatal MT2 anxiolytic-like effects

    PubMed Central

    Noseda, Ana Carolina D.; Targa, Adriano D.S.; Rodrigues, Lais S.; Aurich, Mariana F.; Lima, Marcelo M.S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible anxiolytic-like effects of striatal MT2 activation, and its counteraction induced by the selective blockade of this receptor. Furthermore, we analyzed this condition under the paradigm of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation (REMSD) and the animal model of Parkinson’s disease (PD) induced by rotenone. Male Wistar rats were infused with intranigral rotenone (12 μg/μL), and 7 days later were subjected to 24 h of REMSD. Afterwards the rats underwent striatal micro-infusions of selective melatonin MT2 receptor agonist, 8-M-PDOT (10 μg/μL) or selective melatonin MT2 receptor antagonist, 4-P-PDOT (5 μg/μL) or vehicle. Subsequently, the animals were tested in the open-field (OP) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests. Results indicated that the activation of MT2 receptors produced anxiolytic-like effects. In opposite, the MT2 blockade did not show an anxiogenic-like effect. Besides, REMSD induced anxiolytic-like effects similar to 8-M-PDOT. MT2 activation generated a prevalent locomotor increase compared to MT2 blockade in the context of REMSD. Together, these results suggest a striatal MT2 modulation associated to the REMSD-induced dopaminergic supersensitivity causing a possible dopaminergic influence in the MT2 anxiolytic-like effects in the intranigral rotenone model of PD. PMID:27226821

  9. The Quaternary coversands of southwest France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitzia, Luca; Bertran, Pascal; Bahain, Jean-Jacques; Bateman, Mark D.; Hernandez, Marion; Garon, Henri; de Lafontaine, Guillaume; Mercier, Norbert; Leroyer, Chantal; Queffelec, Alain; Voinchet, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    Detailed stratigraphic analysis and numerical dating (OSL, IRSL, ESR, 14C) of Pleistocene coversands in southwest France enable the construction of a renewed chronostratigraphic framework for sand deposition. The chronological data obtained from sandsheet units testify to the development of transgressive dunefields since at least the Middle Pleistocene (MIS 10). Three main phases of accumulation occurred during the Last Glacial. The oldest one (64-42 ka) is associated with wet sandsheet facies, histic horizons and zibar-type dune fields, which reflect deposition in a context strongly influenced by the groundwater table. The Late Pleniglacial (24-14 ka) corresponds to the main phase of coversand extension in a drier context. Silty gley horizons suggest, however, local interruptions of sand drifting during GS 2.1. Lateglacial stabilization of the coversands may not have occurred before GI-1c (Allerød), which was typified by the development of cumulic arenosols. These were covered by parabolic dunes during the Younger Dryas. The variations in extent of the emerged continental shelf during the glacial-interglacial cycles may explain the uneven geographical distribution of sand deposition through time. Because of coastline retreat up to 100 km north of 45°N during the LGM lowstand, the coversands were unable to reach the northern part of the basin. Comparison with other European regions highlights stronger affinities of the French record with Portugal than with the Netherlands and Great Britain, probably because of reduced influence of permafrost.

  10. [Legionnaire's disease: surveillance in France in 2005].

    PubMed

    Campèse, C; Jarraud, S; Che, D

    2007-11-01

    Legionnaire's disease is a recently described infection and surveillance in France was implemented in 1987. In 2005, 1,527 cases were notified corresponding to a population incidence rate of 2.5 per 100,000. The median age of cases was 61 years [5-100] and the male to female sex ratio was 3.0. The case fatality rate was 11%. One or more risk factors were identified for 1,084 (71%) cases. The majority of cases (91%) was diagnosed by urinary antigen detection and a strain was identified in 276 cases (18%). Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 infection was confirmed in 95% of cases. A specific exposure during the incubation period was reported for 39% of cases. Travel exposure was reported for 17% and hospital exposure for 7%. Multiple clusters and outbreaks were investigated. The largest one reported was identified in the north Lyon with 34 cases. Since 1997 the incidence of LD has steadily increased. This probably suggests a better detection of cases and an improvement in the surveillance system. In recent years, several new measures concerning prevention and control were implemented. However these efforts must continue particularly in the research domain to improve knowledge of the disease, in order to limit its impact on exposed populations.

  11. Briquet and Briquet's syndrome viewed from France.

    PubMed

    Dongier, M

    1983-10-01

    Briquet's contributions to the description of hysteria have been almost completely forgotten in France. One may wonder how he, as well as contemporary French psychiatrists, would react to the approach to hysteria introduced and officialized by DSM III. In particular, its fragmentation into syndromes without apparent link to each other (psychogenic amnesia, conversion disorders, histrionic personality disorder, etc.) and its psychological causation, unbalanced by the consideration of organic factors in etiology, may raise questions. The correlation of conversion disorders with hysterical personality remains a feature of the WHO classification (ICD 9), as well as a feature of French contemporary texts, although it is no longer viewed as a regular association by American psychiatry. It may be that cultural factors lead, as suggested by Brisset, to a repression of conversion phenomena and of hyperexpressivity of affects replaced by more psychosomatic disorders in many contemporary societies. Finally, one may question whether the choice of the term "Briquet Syndrome" is appropriate, as many of the patients described by him did not have the chronic and malignant course described by Guze: It tends to limit hysteria to one end (the most severe one) of a spectrum of disorders.

  12. Briquet and Briquet's syndrome viewed from France.

    PubMed

    Dongier, M

    1983-10-01

    Briquet's contributions to the description of hysteria have been almost completely forgotten in France. One may wonder how he, as well as contemporary French psychiatrists, would react to the approach to hysteria introduced and officialized by DSM III. In particular, its fragmentation into syndromes without apparent link to each other (psychogenic amnesia, conversion disorders, histrionic personality disorder, etc.) and its psychological causation, unbalanced by the consideration of organic factors in etiology, may raise questions. The correlation of conversion disorders with hysterical personality remains a feature of the WHO classification (ICD 9), as well as a feature of French contemporary texts, although it is no longer viewed as a regular association by American psychiatry. It may be that cultural factors lead, as suggested by Brisset, to a repression of conversion phenomena and of hyperexpressivity of affects replaced by more psychosomatic disorders in many contemporary societies. Finally, one may question whether the choice of the term "Briquet Syndrome" is appropriate, as many of the patients described by him did not have the chronic and malignant course described by Guze: It tends to limit hysteria to one end (the most severe one) of a spectrum of disorders. PMID:6357422

  13. Identifying barriers to Muslim integration in France

    PubMed Central

    Adida, Claire L.; Laitin, David D.; Valfort, Marie-Anne

    2010-01-01

    Is there a Muslim disadvantage in economic integration for second-generation immigrants to Europe? Previous research has failed to isolate the effect that religion may have on an immigrant family's labor market opportunities because other factors, such as country of origin or race, confound the result. This paper uses a correspondence test in the French labor market to identify and measure this religious effect. The results confirm that in the French labor market, anti-Muslim discrimination exists: a Muslim candidate is 2.5 times less likely to receive a job interview callback than is his or her Christian counterpart. A high-n survey reveals, consistent with expectations from the correspondence test, that second-generation Muslim households in France have lower income compared with matched Christian households. The paper thereby contributes to both substantive debates on the Muslim experience in Europe and methodological debates on how to measure discrimination. Following the National Academy of Sciences’ 2001 recommendations on combining a variety of methodologies and applying them to real-world situations, this research identifies, measures, and infers consequences of discrimination based on religious affiliation, controlling for potentially confounding factors, such as race and country of origin. PMID:21098283

  14. Novel Protein Genes in Animal mtDNA: A New Sex Determination System in Freshwater Mussels (Bivalvia: Unionoida)?

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Sophie; Stewart, Donald T.; Shepardson, Sally; Trdan, Richard J.; Bogan, Arthur E.; Chapman, Eric G.; Ruminas, Andrew J.; Piontkivska, Helen; Hoeh, Walter R.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) function depends critically on optimal interactions between components encoded by mt and nuclear DNAs. mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance (SMI) is thought to have evolved in animal species to maintain mito-nuclear complementarity by preventing the spread of selfish mt elements thus typically rendering mtDNA heteroplasmy evolutionarily ephemeral. Here, we show that mtDNA intraorganismal heteroplasmy can have deterministic underpinnings and persist for hundreds of millions of years. We demonstrate that the only exception to SMI in the animal kingdom, that is, the doubly uniparental mtDNA inheritance system in bivalves, with its three-way interactions among egg mt-, sperm mt- and nucleus-encoded gene products, is tightly associated with the maintenance of separate male and female sexes (dioecy) in freshwater mussels. Specifically, this mother-through-daughter and father-through-son mtDNA inheritance system, containing highly differentiated mt genomes, is found in all dioecious freshwater mussel species. Conversely, all hermaphroditic species lack the paternally transmitted mtDNA (=possess SMI) and have heterogeneous macromutations in the recently discovered, novel protein-coding gene (F-orf) in their maternally transmitted mt genomes. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we have localized the F-open reading frame (ORF) protein, likely involved in specifying separate sexes, in mitochondria and in the nucleus. Our results support the hypothesis that proteins coded by the highly divergent maternally and paternally transmitted mt genomes could be directly involved in sex determination in freshwater mussels. Concomitantly, our study demonstrates novel features for animal mt genomes: the existence of additional, lineage-specific, mtDNA-encoded proteins with functional significance and the involvement of mtDNA-encoded proteins in extra-mt functions. Our results open new avenues for the identification, characterization, and functional analyses of ORFs in the

  15. Neoglacial fluctuations of Deming Glacier, Mt. Baker, Washington USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, G.; Menounos, B.; Scott, K.; Clague, J. J.; Tucker, D.; Riedel, J.; Davis, P.

    2007-12-01

    Deming Glacier flows from the upper west slopes of Mt. Baker, a stratovolcano in the Cascade Range of Washington, USA. The north and south lateral moraines of Deming Glacier are composed of at least four tills separated by layers of detrital wood and sheared stumps in growth position. The stratigraphy records fluctuations of the glacier during the Holocene. The outer ten rings of an in situ stump from the middle wood layer, which is about 40 m below the north lateral moraine crest and 1.2 km downvalley from the present glacier terminus, yielded an age of 1750 ± 50~~ 14C yr BP [1810-1550 cal yr BP]. The stump revealed at least 300 rings and thus records a period of landscape stability and relatively restricted glaciation for several hundred years prior to ca. 1750 14C yr BP . Samples from the lowest wood layer also have been submitted for radiocarbon dating. Outer rings of detrital wood samples collected from two wood mats exposed in the south lateral moraine, 2.3 km downvalley of the glacier terminus, returned radiocarbon ages of 1600 ± 30~~ 14C yr BP [1550- 1410 cal yr BP] and 430 ± 30~~ 14C yr BP [AD 1420-1620]. These data indicate that Deming Glacier advanced over a vegetated moraine sometime after 1810 cal yr BP to a position less extensive that it achieved at the peak of the Little Ice Age. The glacier then receded before it began its final and most extensive Holocene advance after AD 1420. The older advance is correlative with the 'First Millennium AD' advance, recently recognized throughout western North America. The younger advance coincides with an advance of Mt. Baker's Easton Glacier [AD 1430-1630], and advances of many alpine glaciers elsewhere in western North America. Our data suggest that glaciers on Mt. Baker fluctuated in a similar manner to alpine glaciers in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia and in other mountain ranges of northwest North America during Neoglaciation.

  16. Magma Supply Path Beneath Mt. Asama Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeo, M.; Yamamoto, M.; Ohminato, T.; Aoki, Y.

    2005-12-01

    On September 1, 2004, a moderate eruption occurred at Mt. Asama, in central Japan, for the first time in the last 21 years. An earthquake swarm started on August 31, 2004, lasting just before the eruption. After this first eruption, 4 moderate eruptions had occurred by the end of November, 2004. Hypocenters of more than three hundreds volcanic earthquakes occurring from January 1, 2004 to January 31, 2005, were relocated using the double-difference earthquake location algorithm [Waldhauser, F. and Ellsworth, W. L., 2000] to get an accurate hypocenter distribution. The relocated hypocenter distribution reveals a sharp image of seismicity composed of two groups. The one group forms an WNW-SSE striking zone at a depth of 1 km to 1.5 km deep below the sea level. The eastern end of this seismic zone lies about 3 km deep beneath the summit crater and extends westward over 2 km in length. The other group forms a narrow vertical seismic zone extending from the eastern edge of the first group to just under the summit crater. Aoki et al. [2005] reveals that dike intrusions occurred several times before and after the summit eruption based on the GPS data. The east parts of intrusive dikes are overlapped with the first seismic group. Moreover, the top depths of these dikes coincide with the depth of the first group. The hypocenters of the swarm, which occurred just before the eruption, were also determined using the double-difference method. These hypocenters lie just under the vent ranging from 300 m to 800 m deep, suggesting that the shallowest part of the vent is broken during the swarm activity. These facts indicate that the hypocenter distribution before and after the eruption represents the magma supply path beneath Mt. Asama volcano. Before the eruption, long-period volcanic earthquakes were recorded using broadband seismographs located at the summit of Mt. Asama since October 17, 2003. The sources of these long-period events are located relatively shallow at a depth of

  17. The impact of international recruitment on healthcare delivery in France.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Ioana; Planck, Ashlee

    2010-01-01

    Mobility of Health Professionals (MoHProf), the European Commission-sponsored collaborative project, examines current trends in the mobility of health professionals to, from and within the European Union (EU). The French national level project studies the relevance of international recruitment in France by studying migratory flows and the "pull" and "preventive" factors influencing immigration of foreign health professionals to France. Using the results of the study, in this article, firstly, we quantify the phenomenon of health professional immigration and secondly, we discuss the 'pull' and 'preventive' factors. We argue that diploma and professional recognition is a variable that acts both as a 'pull' and 'preventive' factor at once and has one of the most significant impacts on international recruitment in France. We, therefore, analyze its impact on the recruitment of health professionals having obtained their diploma and qualifications abroad and the possible consequences on healthcare delivery in France. PMID:21155427

  18. 20. Photocopy of photograph (From Frances Rand Smith Collection, California ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopy of photograph (From Frances Rand Smith Collection, California Historical Society) Photographer unknown, Date unknown VIEW OF CHURCH FROM REAR - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  19. 16. Photocopy of photograph (from Frances Rand Smith Collection, California ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of photograph (from Frances Rand Smith Collection, California Historical Society, 1900) Photographer unknown, Date unknown FRONT VIEW OF MISSION, c. 1900 - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  20. Chirac of France: A new leader of the west?

    SciTech Connect

    Moiesi, D.

    1995-11-01

    In foreign and security policy the issues for France are contradictory nature of Chirac`s goals or in the incompatibility of the means to those ends. Chirac`s modernized Gaullist formula for independent French action to meet the exigencies of the post-Cold War world may be irreconcilable with the constraints and demands of the European unification process. The goal of independence may not mesh with the retention of influence. An immediate, concrete example is the apparent contradiction between France`s European and world ambitions and its resumption of nuclear testing. Four foreign policy themes have dominated the initial months of Chirac`s presidency: the war in Bosnia, nuclear testing, European relations, and the conflict in Algeria and its repercussions in France. These themes are examined in more detail.

  1. A short account of forensic dentistry in France.

    PubMed

    Riaud, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The earliest records and more recent cases where forensic dentistry has been used to identify bodies in France are described. The establishment of the French Society of Forensic Odontology is detailed.

  2. Multiparametric Experiment at Mt. Etna: Investigation on Both Degassing and Eruptive Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannata, A.; Privitera, E.

    2014-12-01

    In the framework of the MED-SUV project, a multi-parametric experiment to investigate degassing, explosive and effusive dynamics was performed at Mt. Etna volcano in July 2014. The experiment has involved the so-called "Scientific Team of NEC multi-parametric experiment" composed of researchers/technicians from different institutions in Italy, Germany and France: D. Andronico, T. Barnie, A. Boselli, M. Burton, T. Caltabiano, A. Cannata, D. Carbone, A. Chiarugi, F. Ciancitto, D. Contrafatto, S. Corradini, F. D'Amato, E. Del Bello, F. Donnadieu, F. Ferrari, A. Ferro, S. Gambino, F. Greco, A. Harris, U. Kueppers, A. La Spina, P. Labazuy, G. Leto, L. Lodato, R. Maugeri, L. Merucci, S. Moune, R. Paris, J.J. Pena Fernandez, E. Privitera, M. Queisser, T. Ricci, G. Salerno, R. Z. Sanchez, P. Scarlato, M. Sciotto, S. Scollo, L. Scuderi, J. Sesterhenn, L. Spampinato, L. Spina, J. Taddeucci, X. Wang, L. Zuccarello. The aim was two-fold: first, to study degassing processes at Etna's NE Crater (NEC); second, to investigate the activity at the eruptive fissure (EF) that opened at the base of the NEC in early-July 2014. Indeed, NEC is the main contributor to Etna's gas release, and continuously generates infrasonic events: a result of its impulsive degassing regime. Moreover, the opening of the EF offered a unique opportunity to investigate the partitioning of energy and geophysical signals between degassing, explosive and effusive sources. The field campaign involved coupled deployment of seismometers, microphones, thermopiles, a mini-UV scanner, FTIR spectrometer, SO2 camera systems, high-speed video cameras, thermal and visible cameras, gravimeters, tiltmeters, drones, laser HCl sensor, Lidar and satellite data. Moreover, this experiment gave the opportunity to test the prototype of a DIAL for volcanic CO2 sensing the first time in a volcanic environment. Gathered information were integrated with data simultaneously recorded by the permanent networks run by Istituto Nazionale

  3. The Multi-Stage History of Mt. Sharp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, C.; Dapremont, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Curiosity rover is exploring Gale crater and Mt. Sharp, Gale's 5-km high central mound. We are investigating the history of alteration and erosion of Mt. Sharp using orbital imagery, spectroscopy and rover observations. Our results suggest a significant time gap between emplacement of the upper and lower sections of the mound. Crater counts show that the lower mound was formed soon after Gale itself, and that it contains distinct units ranging in altitude from approximately -4,500 to -1,800 m. Spectral data suggest that many units contain phyllosilicates. We found that these clay-bearing rocks occur in distinct layers concentrated below -2,900 m. Parts of the lower mound exhibit a transition from clays to sulfates with increasing altitude. The lower mound shows evidence of flowing water, including canyons and inverted channels. Wind erosion produced km-scale yardangs and scalloped cliffs. Our mapping shows that many yardangs in the lower mound are clay-bearing, with a predominant orientation of around N-S. Curiosity's ground-level images show myriad fine-scale, mainly horizontal layers in the lower mound. The rover has found stream beds and conglomerates, indicating that water once flowed on the crater floor. Drilling near the deepest point in Gale produced abundant clay, providing additional evidence of aqueous alteration. Upper mound units range in altitude from -2,100 m to +500 m, and mantle the lower mound above an angular unconformity. Most upper mound units are composed of layers. The formation age of the upper mound is unknown, since few craters are preserved. Clay-bearing layers are detectable in several locations, mainly at altitudes near -2,000 m. There is no evidence of water flow, but wind erosion has scalloped the surfaces and edges of layers, and fine-scale yardangs are common. Correlations between yardangs and clay spectra are apparent only in the lowermost units of the upper mound. Yardang orientations vary, and include N-S, NW-SE, and NE

  4. The Multi-Stage History of Mt. Sharp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C.; Dapremont, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Curiosity rover is exploring Gale crater and Mt. Sharp, Gale's 5-km high central mound. We are investigating the history of alteration and erosion of Mt. Sharp using orbital imagery, spectroscopy and rover observations. Our results suggest a significant time gap between emplacement of the upper and lower sections of the mound. Crater counts show that the lower mound was formed soon after Gale itself, and that it contains distinct units ranging in altitude from approximately -4,500 to -1,800 m. Spectral data suggest that many units contain phyllosilicates. We found that these clay-bearing rocks occur in distinct layers concentrated below -2,900 m. Parts of the lower mound exhibit a transition from clays to sulfates with increasing altitude. The lower mound shows evidence of flowing water, including canyons and inverted channels. Wind erosion produced km-scale yardangs and scalloped cliffs. Our mapping shows that many yardangs in the lower mound are clay-bearing, with a predominant orientation of around N-S. Curiosity's ground-level images show myriad fine-scale, mainly horizontal layers in the lower mound. The rover has found stream beds and conglomerates, indicating that water once flowed on the crater floor. Drilling near the deepest point in Gale produced abundant clay, providing additional evidence of aqueous alteration. Upper mound units range in altitude from -2,100 m to +500 m, and mantle the lower mound above an angular unconformity. Most upper mound units are composed of layers. The formation age of the upper mound is unknown, since few craters are preserved. Clay-bearing layers are detectable in several locations, mainly at altitudes near -2,000 m. There is no evidence of water flow, but wind erosion has scalloped the surfaces and edges of layers, and fine-scale yardangs are common. Correlations between yardangs and clay spectra are apparent only in the lowermost units of the upper mound. Yardang orientations vary, and include N-S, NW-SE, and NE

  5. Mt. Pinatubo SO2 column measurements from Mauna Loa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Rinsland, C. P.; Blatherwick, R. D.; David, S. J.; Murcray, F. H.; Murcray, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    Absorption features of the nu sub 1 band of SO2 are identified in high-resolution IR solar-absorption spectra recorded from Mauna Loa, Hawaii, on July 9 and 12, 1991, shortly after the arrival of the first eruption plume from the Mt. Pinatubo volcano. A total SO2 vertical column amount of (5.1 +/- 0.5) x 10 exp 16 molecules/sq cm on July 9 is retrieved based on nonlinear least-squares spectral fittings of 9 selected SO2 absorption features with an updated set of SO2 spectral parameters. A SO2 total-column upper limit of 0.9 x 10 exp 16 molecules/sq cm deduced from measurements on September 20-24, 1991, is consistent with the dispersion of the SO2 cloud and the rapid conversion of the SO2 vapor into volcanic aerosol particles.

  6. Demographic history of India and mtDNA-sequence diversity.

    PubMed Central

    Mountain, J L; Hebert, J M; Bhattacharyya, S; Underhill, P A; Ottolenghi, C; Gadgil, M; Cavalli-Sforza, L L

    1995-01-01

    The demographic history of India was examined by comparing mtDNA sequences obtained from members of three culturally divergent Indian subpopulations (endogamous caste groups). While an inferred tree revealed some clustering according to caste affiliation, there was no clear separation into three genetically distinct groups along caste lines. Comparison of pairwise nucleotide difference distributions, however, did indicate a difference in growth patterns between two of the castes. The Brahmin population appears to have undergone either a rapid expansion or steady growth. The low-ranking Mukri caste, however, may have either maintained a roughly constant population size or undergone multiple bottlenecks during that period. Comparison of the Indian sequences to those obtained from other populations, using a tree, revealed that the Indian sequences, along with all other non-African samples, form a starlike cluster. This cluster may represent a major expansion, possibly originating in southern Asia, taking place at some point after modern humans initially left Africa. PMID:7717409

  7. Dynamic evolution of the Mt. Cameroon volcanic edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barfod, Dan N.; Njome, Manga S.; Suh, Cheo E.; Godfrey Fitton, J.

    2014-05-01

    The growth and destruction of a volcanic edifice reflects dynamic processes that shape the Earth, including transport of mass and heat in a cooling planet versus the mechanical and chemical degradation of igneous material driving toward equilibrium. Central to understanding the nature of volcanoes are determinations of the rates of change in the volumes of these features. Through a quantitative temporal framework it is possible to elucidate the relative importance of competing processes that govern growth and destruction of volcanoes, e.g., magma production versus mass wasting. As the energetics of constructive and destructive processes are directly linked to the hazards that they pose to human populations and because volcanoes are stochastic systems, the only means of long-term forecast is via comprehensive understanding of volcanic history. Mount Cameroon is one of Africa's largest volcanoes and is currently the only active centre on the Cameroon line. The edifice is 4 km high with a volume of at least 1200 km3. Seventeen eruptions have been reported since 1800 and a time-averaged eruption volume of 6 x 106 m3/year is calculated from 7 eruptions over the past 91 years. Eight new Ar/Ar ages have been determined for basaltic rocks distributed across Mt. Cameroon; plateau ages are 4139±19 ka, 195±2 ka, 187±5 ka, 161±2 ka, 82±4, 68±3, 14±4 and 2±4 ka (1σ). The upper age from this set defines the oldest age yet measured for the Mt. Cameroon system. The data demonstrate activity through the mid to upper Pleistocene, continuing through to modern activity. Using recent estimates for basin-wide erosion of ca. 0.05 mm/a on a similar edifice (Kauai, Hawaii, Gayer et al 2008) and extrapolating over the Mt. Cameroon edifice yields an erosion rate of 5x104 m3/a, a factor of 30 times lower than the modern magma production rate. Considering these two fluxes implies that approximately 700 ka is required to construct an edifice of 1200 km3 (the current volume of Mt

  8. Spine growth and seismogenic faulting at Mt. Unzen, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornby, Adrian J.; Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lamb, Oliver D.; Hirose, Takehiro; De Angelis, Silvio; Aulock, Felix W.; Umakoshi, Kodo; Miwa, Takahiro; Henton De Angelis, Sarah; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.; Lavallée, Yan

    2015-06-01

    The concluding episode of activity during the recent eruption of Mt. Unzen (October 1994 to February 1995) was characterized by incremental spine extrusion, accompanied by seismicity. Analysis of the seismic record reveals the occurrence of two dominant long-period event families associated with a repeating, nondestructive source mechanism, which we attribute to magma failure and fault-controlled ascent. We obtain constraints on the slip rate and distance of faulting events within these families. That analysis is complemented by an experimental thermomechanical investigation of fault friction in Mt. Unzen dacitic dome rock using a rotary-shear apparatus at variable slip rates and normal stresses. A power density threshold is found at 0.3 MW m-2, above which frictional melt forms and controls the shear resistance to slip, inducing a deviation from Byerlee's frictional law. Homogenized experimentally generated pseudotachylytes have a similar final chemistry, thickness, and crystal content, facilitating the construction of a rheological model for particle suspensions. This is compared to the viscosity constrained from the experimental data, to assess the viscous control on fault dynamics. The onset of frictional melt formation during spine growth is constrained to depths below 300 m for an average slip event. This combination of experimental data, viscosity modeling, and seismic analysis offers a new description of material response during conduit plug flow and spine growth, showing that volcanic pseudotachylyte may commonly form and modify fault friction during faulting of dome rock. This model furthers our understanding of faulting and seismicity during lava dome formation and is applicable to other eruption modes.

  9. Lava flows during the continuing eruption of Mt. Etna, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The current eruption of Mt. Etna started on July 17, and has continued to the present. This ASTER image was acquired on Sunday, July 29 and shows advancing lava flows on the southern flank of Mt. Etna above the town of Nicolosi, which is potentially threatened if the eruption increases in magnitude. Also visible are glowing summit craters above the main lava flows, and a small fissure eruption. The bright puffy clouds were formed from water vapor released during the eruption. The image covers an area of 24 x 30 km.

    The image is centered at 37.7 degrees north latitude, 15 degrees east longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Examples of applications include monitoring glacial advances and retreats, potentially active volcanoes, thermal pollution, and coral reef degradation; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; evaluating wetlands; mapping surface temperature of soils

  10. Ethnobotany of the Samburu of Mt. Nyiru, South Turkana, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Bussmann, Rainer W

    2006-01-01

    Traditional plant use is of extremely high importance in many societies, and prevalent in African communities. This knowledge is however dwindling rapidly due to changes towards a more Western lifestyle. The influence of modern tourism cannot be neglected in this context. This paper examines the plant use of the Samburu of the Mt. Nyiru area in Northern Kenya. The Samburu pastoralists of Kenya are still amongst the most traditional communities of the country and have retained most of their knowledge about the use of a large part of the plants in their environment for a wide variety of purposes. The results indicate that the local population has a very high knowledge of the plants in their surroundings, and attributes a purpose to a large percentage of the plants found. 448 plant species were collected, identified and their Samburu names and traditional uses recorded. 199 species were reported as of "no use". The high proportion of 249 plant species however had some traditional use: The highest number (180 species) was used as fodder, followed by 80 species that had medicinal use. Firewood (59 species), construction (42 species), tools (31 species), food (29 species) and ceremonial use (19 species) ranked far behind. Traditionally the Samburu attribute most illnesses to the effect of pollutants that block or inhibit digestion. This can include "polluted" food, contagion through sick people as well as witchcraft. In most cases the treatment of illness involves herbal purgatives to cleanse the patient. There are however frequent indications of plant use for common problems like wounds, parasites, body aches and burns. The change from a nomadic to a more sedentary lifestyle, often observed in other areas of the country, has affected the Samburu of remote Mt. Nyiru to a much lesser extent and did so far not lead to a major loss of traditional plant knowledge. However, overgrazing and over-exploitation of plant resources have already led to a decline of the plant

  11. Geographic patterns of mtDNA diversity in Europe.

    PubMed

    Simoni, L; Calafell, F; Pettener, D; Bertranpetit, J; Barbujani, G

    2000-01-01

    Genetic diversity in Europe has been interpreted as a reflection of phenomena occurring during the Paleolithic ( approximately 45,000 years before the present [BP]), Mesolithic ( approximately 18,000 years BP), and Neolithic ( approximately 10,000 years BP) periods. A crucial role of the Neolithic demographic transition is supported by the analysis of most nuclear loci, but the interpretation of mtDNA evidence is controversial. More than 2,600 sequences of the first hypervariable mitochondrial control region were analyzed for geographic patterns in samples from Europe, the Near East, and the Caucasus. Two autocorrelation statistics were used, one based on allele-frequency differences between samples and the other based on both sequence and frequency differences between alleles. In the global analysis, limited geographic patterning was observed, which could largely be attributed to a marked difference between the Saami and all other populations. The distribution of the zones of highest mitochondrial variation (genetic boundaries) confirmed that the Saami are sharply differentiated from an otherwise rather homogeneous set of European samples. However, an area of significant clinal variation was identified around the Mediterranean Sea (and not in the north), even though the differences between northern and southern populations were insignificant. Both a Paleolithic expansion and the Neolithic demic diffusion of farmers could have determined a longitudinal cline of mtDNA diversity. However, additional phenomena must be considered in both models, to account both for the north-south differences and for the greater geographic scope of clinical patterns at nuclear loci. Conversely, two predicted consequences of models of Mesolithic reexpansion from glacial refugia were not observed in the present study.

  12. Ethnobotany of the Samburu of Mt. Nyiru, South Turkana, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Bussmann, Rainer W

    2006-01-01

    Traditional plant use is of extremely high importance in many societies, and prevalent in African communities. This knowledge is however dwindling rapidly due to changes towards a more Western lifestyle. The influence of modern tourism cannot be neglected in this context. This paper examines the plant use of the Samburu of the Mt. Nyiru area in Northern Kenya. The Samburu pastoralists of Kenya are still amongst the most traditional communities of the country and have retained most of their knowledge about the use of a large part of the plants in their environment for a wide variety of purposes. The results indicate that the local population has a very high knowledge of the plants in their surroundings, and attributes a purpose to a large percentage of the plants found. 448 plant species were collected, identified and their Samburu names and traditional uses recorded. 199 species were reported as of "no use". The high proportion of 249 plant species however had some traditional use: The highest number (180 species) was used as fodder, followed by 80 species that had medicinal use. Firewood (59 species), construction (42 species), tools (31 species), food (29 species) and ceremonial use (19 species) ranked far behind. Traditionally the Samburu attribute most illnesses to the effect of pollutants that block or inhibit digestion. This can include "polluted" food, contagion through sick people as well as witchcraft. In most cases the treatment of illness involves herbal purgatives to cleanse the patient. There are however frequent indications of plant use for common problems like wounds, parasites, body aches and burns. The change from a nomadic to a more sedentary lifestyle, often observed in other areas of the country, has affected the Samburu of remote Mt. Nyiru to a much lesser extent and did so far not lead to a major loss of traditional plant knowledge. However, overgrazing and over-exploitation of plant resources have already led to a decline of the plant

  13. Mitochondrial comparative genomics and phylogenetic signal assessment of mtDNA among arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Nadimi, Maryam; Daubois, Laurence; Hijri, Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) genes, such as cytochrome C oxidase genes (cox), have been widely used for barcoding in many groups of organisms, although this approach has been less powerful in the fungal kingdom due to the rapid evolution of their mt genomes. The use of mt genes in phylogenetic studies of Dikarya has been met with success, while early diverging fungal lineages remain less studied, particularly the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Advances in next-generation sequencing have substantially increased the number of publically available mtDNA sequences for the Glomeromycota. As a result, comparison of mtDNA across key AMF taxa can now be applied to assess the phylogenetic signal of individual mt coding genes, as well as concatenated subsets of coding genes. Here we show comparative analyses of publically available mt genomes of Glomeromycota, augmented with two mtDNA genomes that were newly sequenced for this study (Rhizophagus irregularis DAOM240159 and Glomus aggregatum DAOM240163), resulting in 16 complete mtDNA datasets. R. irregularis isolate DAOM240159 and G. aggregatum isolate DAOM240163 showed mt genomes measuring 72,293bp and 69,505bp with G+C contents of 37.1% and 37.3%, respectively. We assessed the phylogenies inferred from single mt genes and complete sets of coding genes, which are referred to as "supergenes" (16 concatenated coding genes), using Shimodaira-Hasegawa tests, in order to identify genes that best described AMF phylogeny. We found that rnl, nad5, cox1, and nad2 genes, as well as concatenated subset of these genes, provided phylogenies that were similar to the supergene set. This mitochondrial genomic analysis was also combined with principal coordinate and partitioning analyses, which helped to unravel certain evolutionary relationships in the Rhizophagus genus and for G. aggregatum within the Glomeromycota. We showed evidence to support the position of G. aggregatum within the R. irregularis 'species complex'. PMID:26868331

  14. Re-examining overlap between tactile and visual motion responses within hMT+ and STS.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fang; Beauchamp, Michael S; Fine, Ione

    2015-10-01

    Here, we examine overlap between tactile and visual motion BOLD responses within the human MT+ complex. Although several studies have reported tactile responses overlapping with hMT+, many used group average analyses, leaving it unclear whether these responses were restricted to subregions of hMT+. Moreover, previous studies either employed a tactile task or passive stimulation, leaving it unclear whether or not tactile responses in hMT+ are simply the consequence of visual imagery. Here, we carried out a replication of one of the classic papers finding tactile responses in hMT+. We mapped MT and MST in individual subjects using visual field localizers. We then examined responses to tactile motion on the arm, either presented passively or in the presence of a visual task performed at fixation designed to minimize visualization of the concurrent tactile stimulation. To our surprise, without a visual task, we found only weak tactile motion responses in MT (6% of voxels showing tactile responses) and MST (2% of voxels). With an unrelated visual task designed to withdraw attention from the tactile modality, responses in MST were reduced to almost nothing (<1% regions). Consistent with previous results, we did observe tactile responses in STS regions superior and anterior to hMT+. Despite the lack of individual overlap, group-averaged responses produced strong spurious overlap between tactile and visual motion responses within hMT+ that resembled those observed in previous studies. The weak nature of tactile responses in hMT+ (and their abolition by withdrawal of attention) suggests that hMT+ may not serve as a supramodal motion processing module.

  15. Re-examining overlap between tactile and visual motion responses within hMT+ and STS.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fang; Beauchamp, Michael S; Fine, Ione

    2015-10-01

    Here, we examine overlap between tactile and visual motion BOLD responses within the human MT+ complex. Although several studies have reported tactile responses overlapping with hMT+, many used group average analyses, leaving it unclear whether these responses were restricted to subregions of hMT+. Moreover, previous studies either employed a tactile task or passive stimulation, leaving it unclear whether or not tactile responses in hMT+ are simply the consequence of visual imagery. Here, we carried out a replication of one of the classic papers finding tactile responses in hMT+. We mapped MT and MST in individual subjects using visual field localizers. We then examined responses to tactile motion on the arm, either presented passively or in the presence of a visual task performed at fixation designed to minimize visualization of the concurrent tactile stimulation. To our surprise, without a visual task, we found only weak tactile motion responses in MT (6% of voxels showing tactile responses) and MST (2% of voxels). With an unrelated visual task designed to withdraw attention from the tactile modality, responses in MST were reduced to almost nothing (<1% regions). Consistent with previous results, we did observe tactile responses in STS regions superior and anterior to hMT+. Despite the lack of individual overlap, group-averaged responses produced strong spurious overlap between tactile and visual motion responses within hMT+ that resembled those observed in previous studies. The weak nature of tactile responses in hMT+ (and their abolition by withdrawal of attention) suggests that hMT+ may not serve as a supramodal motion processing module. PMID:26123373

  16. Genetic deletion of the MT1 or MT2 melatonin receptors abrogates methamphetamine-induced reward in C3H/HeN mice.

    PubMed

    Clough, Shannon J; Hutchinson, Anthony J; Hudson, Randall L; Dubocovich, Margarita L

    2014-06-10

    The drug of abuse methamphetamine (METH) is known for its ability to enhance reward responses. The rewarding properties of psychostimulants have been shown to vary across time of day in mice. The goal of this study was to determine the role of the MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors in METH-induced reward, as measured by the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm during the light and dark phases. C3H/HeN wild-type mice were trained for METH-induced CPP at either ZT 6-8 (ZT: Zeitgeber time; ZT 0=lights on), when endogenous melatonin levels are low, or ZT 19-21, when melatonin levels are high. These time points also correspond to the high and low points for expression of the circadian gene Period1, respectively. The locomotor response to METH (1.2mg/kg, ip) treatment was of similar magnitude at both times; however only C3H/HeN mice conditioned to METH at ZT 6-8 developed a place preference. C3H/HeN mice with a genetic deletion of either the MT1 (MT1KO) or MT2 (MT2KO) receptor tested at ZT 6-8 or ZT 19-21 did not develop a place preference for METH, though both showed a similar increase in locomotor activity following METH treatment when compared to wild-type mice. We conclude that in our mouse model METH-induced CPP is dependent on time of day and the presence of the MT1 or MT2 receptors, suggesting a role for melatonin in METH-induced reward.

  17. History of infrared optronics in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouilloy, J. P.; Siriex, Michel B.

    1995-09-01

    In France, the real start of work on the applications of infrared radiations occurred around 1947 - 1948. During many years, technological research was performed in the field of detectors, optical material, modulation techniques, and a lot of measurements were made in order to acquire a better knowledge of the propagation medium and radiation of IR sources, namely those of jet engines. The birth of industrial infrared activities in France started with the Franco-German missile guidance programs: Milan, HOT, Roland and the French air to air missile seeker programs: R530, MAGIC. At these early stages of IR technologies development, it was a great technical adventure for both the governmental agencies and industry to develop: detector technology with PbS and InSb, detector cooling for 3 - 5 micrometer wavelength range, optical material transparent in the infrared, opto mechanical design, signal processing and related electronic technologies. Etablissement Jean Turck and SAT were the pioneers associated with Aerospatiale, Matra and under contracts from the French Ministry of Defence (DGA). In the 60s, the need arose to enhance night vision capability of equipment in service with the French Army. TRT was chosen by DGA to develop the first thermal imagers: LUTHER 1, 2, and 3 with an increasing number of detectors and image frequency rate. This period was also the era in which the SAT detector made rapid advance. After basic work done in the CNRS and with the support of DGA, SAT became the world leader of MCT photovoltaic detector working in the 8 to 12 micron waveband. From 1979, TRT and SAT were given the responsibility for the joint development and production of the first generation French thermal imaging modular system so-called SMT. Now, THOMSON TTD Optronique takes over the opto-electronics activities of TRT. Laser based systems were also studied for military application using YAG type laser and CO2 laser: Laboratoire de Marcousis, CILAS, THOMSON CSF and SAT have

  18. France, Shaded Relief and Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image of France was generated with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). For this broad view the resolution of the data was reduced to 6 arcseconds (about 185 meters north-south and 127 meters east-west), resampled to a Mercator projection, and the French border outlined. Even at this decreased resolution the variety of landforms comprising the country is readily apparent.

    The upper central part of this scene is dominated by the Paris Basin, which consists of a layered sequence of sedimentary rocks. Fertile soils over much of the area make good agricultural land. The Normandie coast to the upper left is characterized by high, chalk cliffs, while the Brittany coast (the peninsula to the left) is highly indented where deep valleys were drowned by the sea, and the Biscay coast to the southwest is marked by flat, sandy beaches.

    To the south, the Pyrenees form a natural border between France and Spain, and the south-central part of the country is dominated by the ancient Massif Central. Subject to volcanism that has only subsided in the last 10,000 years, these central mountains are separated from the Alps by the north-south trending Rhone River Basin.

    Two visualization methods were combined to produce the image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the northwest-southeast direction, so that northwest slopes appear bright and southeast slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations.

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to

  19. The spatial distribution of Mustelidae in France.

    PubMed

    Calenge, Clément; Chadoeuf, Joël; Giraud, Christophe; Huet, Sylvie; Julliard, Romain; Monestiez, Pascal; Piffady, Jérémy; Pinaud, David; Ruette, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    We estimated the spatial distribution of 6 Mustelidae species in France using the data collected by the French national hunting and wildlife agency under the "small carnivorous species logbooks" program. The 1500 national wildlife protection officers working for this agency spend 80% of their working time traveling in the spatial area in which they have authority. During their travels, they occasionally detect dead or living small and medium size carnivorous animals. Between 2002 and 2005, each car operated by this agency was equipped with a logbook in which officers recorded information about the detected animals (species, location, dead or alive, date). Thus, more than 30000 dead or living animals were detected during the study period. Because a large number of detected animals in a region could have been the result of a high sampling pressure there, we modeled the number of detected animals as a function of the sampling effort to allow for unbiased estimation of the species density. For dead animals -- mostly roadkill -- we supposed that the effort in a given region was proportional to the distance traveled by the officers. For living animals, we had no way to measure the sampling effort. We demonstrated that it was possible to use the whole dataset (dead and living animals) to estimate the following: (i) the relative density -- i.e., the density multiplied by an unknown constant -- of each species of interest across the different French agricultural regions, (ii) the sampling effort for living animals for each region, and (iii) the relative detection probability for various species of interest. PMID:25811456

  20. The Spatial Distribution of Mustelidae in France

    PubMed Central

    Calenge, Clément; Chadoeuf, Joël; Giraud, Christophe; Huet, Sylvie; Julliard, Romain; Monestiez, Pascal; Piffady, Jérémy; Pinaud, David; Ruette, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    We estimated the spatial distribution of 6 Mustelidae species in France using the data collected by the French national hunting and wildlife agency under the “small carnivorous species logbooks” program. The 1500 national wildlife protection officers working for this agency spend 80% of their working time traveling in the spatial area in which they have authority. During their travels, they occasionally detect dead or living small and medium size carnivorous animals. Between 2002 and 2005, each car operated by this agency was equipped with a logbook in which officers recorded information about the detected animals (species, location, dead or alive, date). Thus, more than 30000 dead or living animals were detected during the study period. Because a large number of detected animals in a region could have been the result of a high sampling pressure there, we modeled the number of detected animals as a function of the sampling effort to allow for unbiased estimation of the species density. For dead animals -- mostly roadkill -- we supposed that the effort in a given region was proportional to the distance traveled by the officers. For living animals, we had no way to measure the sampling effort. We demonstrated that it was possible to use the whole dataset (dead and living animals) to estimate the following: (i) the relative density -- i.e., the density multiplied by an unknown constant -- of each species of interest across the different French agricultural regions, (ii) the sampling effort for living animals for each region, and (iii) the relative detection probability for various species of interest. PMID:25811456