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Sample records for mt ho ni

  1. Disordered ferromagnetism in Ho2NiMnO6 double perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Tirthankar; Nair, Harikrishnan S.; Nhalil, Hariharan; Kumar, K. Ramesh; Strydom, André M.; Elizabeth, Suja

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic and dielectric properties of the double perovskite Ho2NiMnO6 are reported. The compound is synthesized by nitrate route and is found to crystallize in monoclinic P21/n space group. Lattice parameters obtained by refining powder x-ray diffraction data are; a  =  5.218(2) Å, b  =  5.543(2) Å, c  =  7.480(3) Å and the monoclinic angle is β ={{90.18}\\circ} (4). A phase transition is observed at {{T}\\text{C}}=86 K in the temperature-dependent magnetization curve, M(T). The inverse magnetic susceptibility, (1/χ (T) ) fits reasonably well with modified Curie-Weiss law by incorporating the paramagnetic response of Ho3+. 1/χ (T) manifests as an upward deviation from ideal Curie-Weiss behaviour well above the ferromagnetic transition. Signs of inherent Griffiths phase pertaining to the Ni/Mn subsystem are visible when one subtracts the Ho3+ paramagnetic contribution from total susceptibility and does the power-law analysis. The magnetic hysteresis at 2 K gives the maximum value of magnetization {{M}\\text{max}}≈ 15 {μ\\text{B}} /f.u. at 50 kOe. Field-derivative of magnetization at 2 K shows discontinuities which indicates the existence of metamagnetic transitions in this compound. This needs to be probed further. Out of the two dielectric relaxations observed, the one at low temperature may be attributed to phononic frequencies and that at higher temperature may be due to Maxwell-Wagner relaxation. A correlation between magnetic and lattice degrees of freedom is plausible since the anomaly in dielectric constant coincides with T C.

  2. Disordered ferromagnetism in Ho2NiMnO6 double perovskite.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Tirthankar; Nair, Harikrishnan S; Nhalil, Hariharan; Ramesh Kumar, K; Strydom, André M; Elizabeth, Suja

    2017-01-18

    Magnetic and dielectric properties of the double perovskite Ho2NiMnO6 are reported. The compound is synthesized by nitrate route and is found to crystallize in monoclinic P21/n space group. Lattice parameters obtained by refining powder x-ray diffraction data are; a  =  5.218(2) Å, b  =  5.543(2) Å, c  =  7.480(3) Å and the monoclinic angle is [Formula: see text](4). A phase transition is observed at [Formula: see text] K in the temperature-dependent magnetization curve, M(T). The inverse magnetic susceptibility, (1/[Formula: see text]) fits reasonably well with modified Curie-Weiss law by incorporating the paramagnetic response of Ho(3+). 1/[Formula: see text] manifests as an upward deviation from ideal Curie-Weiss behaviour well above the ferromagnetic transition. Signs of inherent Griffiths phase pertaining to the Ni/Mn subsystem are visible when one subtracts the Ho(3+) paramagnetic contribution from total susceptibility and does the power-law analysis. The magnetic hysteresis at 2 K gives the maximum value of magnetization [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text]/f.u. at 50 kOe. Field-derivative of magnetization at 2 K shows discontinuities which indicates the existence of metamagnetic transitions in this compound. This needs to be probed further. Out of the two dielectric relaxations observed, the one at low temperature may be attributed to phononic frequencies and that at higher temperature may be due to Maxwell-Wagner relaxation. A correlation between magnetic and lattice degrees of freedom is plausible since the anomaly in dielectric constant coincides with T C.

  3. Magnetic ordering of YPd2Si-type HoNi2Si and ErNi2Si compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozkin, A. V.; Isnard, O.; Nirmala, R.; Quezado, S.; Malik, S. K.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic properties of YPd2Si-type HoNi2Si and ErNi2Si were investigated via neutron diffraction and magnetisation measurements. HoNi2Si and ErNi2Si show ferromagnetic-like ordering at TC of 9 K and 7 K, respectively. The paramagnetic Weiss temperatures are 9 K and 11 K and the effective magnetic moments are 10.76 μB/fu and 9.79 μB/fu for HoNi2Si and ErNi2Si compounds, respectively. The HoNi2Si and ErNi2Si are soft ferromagnets with saturation magnetization of 8.1 μB/fu and 7.5 μB/fu, respectively at 2 K and in field of 140 kOe. The isothermal magnetic entropy change, ΔSm, has a maximum value of -15.6 J/kg·K at 10 K for HoNi2Si and -13.9 J/kg·K at 6 K for ErNi2Si for a field change of 50 kOe. Neutron diffraction study in zero applied field shows mixed ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic ordering of HoNi2Si at 9 K and its magnetic structure is a sum of a-axis ferromagnetic Fa, b-axis antiferromagnetic AFb and c-axis antiferrromagnetic AFc components of Pn‧a21‧={1, mx‧/[1/2, 1/2, 1/2], 2y‧/[0, 1/2, 0], mz/[1/2, 0, 1/2]} magnetic space group and propagation vector K0=[0, 0, 0]. The holmium magnetic moment reaches a value of 9.23(9) μB at 1.5 K and the unit cell of HoNi2Si undergoes isotropic contraction around the temperature of magnetic transition.

  4. Magnetic properties of a new intermetallic compound Ho2Ni2Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Sandoval, E.; Chinchure, A. D.; Hendrikx, R. W. A.; Mydosh, J. A.

    2001-10-01

    Single-phase, textured samples of a new orthorhombic intermetallic compound Ho2Ni2Pb have been fabricated (space group Cmmm). Here the bulk magnetic properties are presented as determined via magnetization, susceptibility, heat capacity and resistivity measurements. The results exhibit two distinct magnetic transitions and large metamagnetic effects. Such behaviour is related to the unusual rare-earth symmetry of the highly anisotropic crystal structure.

  5. Large reversible magnetocaloric effect induced by metamagnetic transition in antiferromagnetic HoNiGa compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Xu; Zhang, Hu; Wu, Mei-Ling; Tao, Kun; Li, Ya-Wei; Yan, Tim; Long, Ke-Wen; Long, Teng; Pang, Zheng; Long, Yi

    2016-12-01

    The magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effects (MCE) of HoNiGa compound are investigated systematically. The HoNiGa exhibits a weak antiferromagnetic (AFM) ground state below the Ńeel temperature TN of 10 K, and the AFM ordering could be converted into ferromagnetic (FM) ordering by external magnetic field. Moreover, the field-induced FM phase exhibits a high saturation magnetic moment and a large change of magnetization around the transition temperature, which then result in a large MCE. A large -ΔSM of 22.0 J/kg K and a high RC value of 279 J/kg without magnetic hysteresis are obtained for a magnetic field change of 5 T, which are comparable to or even larger than those of some other magnetic refrigerant materials in the same temperature range. Besides, the μ0H2/3 dependence of well follows the linear fitting according to the mean-field approximation, suggesting the nature of second-order FM-PM magnetic transition under high magnetic fields. The large reversible MCE induced by metamagnetic transition suggests that HoNiGa compound could be a promising material for magnetic refrigeration in low temperature range. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51671022 and 51427806), the Beijing Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 2162022), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. FRF-TP-15-002A3).

  6. Family of defect-dicubane Ni4Ln2 (Ln = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho) and Ni4Y2 complexes: rare Tb(III) and Ho(III) examples showing SMM behavior.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lang; Wu, Jianfeng; Ke, Hongshan; Tang, Jinkui

    2014-04-07

    Reactions of Ln(III) perchlorate (Ln = Gd, Tb, Dy, and Ho), NiCl2·6H2O, and a polydentate Schiff base resulted in the assembly of novel isostructural hexanuclear Ni4Ln2 complexes [Ln = Gd (1), Tb (2), Dy (3), Ho (4)] with an unprecedented 3d-4f metal topology consisting of two defect-dicubane units. The corresponding Ni4Y2 (5) complex containing diamagnetic Y(III) atoms was also isolated to assist the magnetic studies. Interestingly, complexes 2 and 3 exhibit SMM characteristics and 4 shows slow relaxation of the magnetization. The absence of frequency-dependent in-phase and out-of-phase signals for the Ni-Y species suggests that the Ln ions' contribution to the slow relaxation must be effectual as previously observed in other Ni-Dy samples. However, the observation of χ″ signals with zero dc field for the Ni-Tb and Ni-Ho derivatives is notable. Indeed, this is the first time that such a behavior is observed in the Ni-Tb and Ni-Ho complexes.

  7. Enhanced ferromagnetic properties in Ho and Ni co-doped BiFeO{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J. S.; Yoo, Y. J.; Hwang, J. S.; Lee, Y. P.; Kang, J.-H.; Lee, B. W.

    2014-01-07

    The magnetic properties of polycrystalline Bi{sub 1-x}Ho{sub x}Fe{sub 1-y}Ni{sub y}O{sub 3} (x = 0, 0.1; y = 0, 0.03), which were prepared by the solid-state method, have been investigated. The powder X-ray diffraction reveals that all the samples are polycrystalline and show rhombohedral perovskite structure. The micro-Raman scattering studies confirm that Bi{sub 0.9}Ho{sub 0.1}Fe{sub 0.97}Ni{sub 0.03}O{sub 3} has a compressive lattice distortion induced by the simultaneous substitution of Ho and Ni ions at A and B-sites, respectively. From the magnetization dependences at room temperature, Bi{sub 0.9}Ho{sub 0.1}Fe{sub 0.97}Ni{sub 0.03}O{sub 3} has enhanced magnetization (0.2280 emu/g) and low coercive field (280 Oe). It was revealed that the Ni dopant plays an important role for the improved ferromagnetic properties and the Ho dopant favors the magnetic exchange interactions in the co-doped ceramic.

  8. Vortex imaging of magnetic superconductor HoNi 2B 2C by scanning SQUID microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Y.; Suzuki, J.; Kakeya, I.; Kadowaki, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nagata, A.; Odawara, A.; Chinone, K.

    2002-10-01

    We have observed vortex trapped images in the ab-plane of a HoNi 2B 2C single crystal in a magnetic field of 1.2 μT at 4 K using a scanning SQUID microscope. The vortex observed has a fine structure consisting of two regions with opposite signs of the magnetic field which is quantized with multiple flux quanta as a whole. The spatial size of the magnetic field distribution extends over 10 μm. Such giant vortices are also observed at TN< T< TC and disappear above TC where TN is the magnetic transition temperature and TC is the superconducting transition temperature.

  9. Vortex Imaging of REB2Ni2C (RE=Ho,Er) Using Scanning SQUID Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Kakeya, Itsuhiro; Kadowaki, Kazuo; Nakayama, Satoshi; Nagata, Atsushi; Chinone, Kazuo

    2001-03-01

    Scanning SQUID microscopy studies have been carried out on the [001] surface of a REB_2Ni_2C (RE = Ho, Er) single crystal at 2.8 K in weak magnetic field. This SQUID microscopy enables us to observe high resolution image of individual vortices at low temperature. In most of cases this giant vortex accompanies a few small antivortices as satellites. The distance of each vortex is about 10 μm apart and the size of the vortex is about 40 μm in diameter. The total flux of most paired vortices are estimated a few integer multiple of quantum flux. This interesting phenomenon is interpreted by a model proposed by Tachiki & Maekawa that the quantization of magnetic flux may occur in total flux including both supercurrent and spin magnetic moment.

  10. Magnetic ordering of Hf3Ni2Si3-type {Sm, Tb, Er}3Co2Ge3 and {Tb, Ho}3Ni2Ge3 compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozkin, A. V.; Yapaskurt, V. O.; Nirmala, R.; Quezado, S.; Malik, S. K.; Mozharivskyj, Y.; Isnard, O.

    2017-02-01

    The magnetic ordering of Hf3Ni2Si3-type {Sm, Tb, Er}3Co2Ge3 and {Tb, Ho}3Ni2Ge3 compounds (space group Cmcm, oC32) was investigated via magnetization measurements and neutron diffraction study in a zero-applied field. {Sm, Tb, Er}3Co2Ge3 and Ho3Ni2Ge3 exhibit field sensitive complex antiferromagnetic orderings with TN=51 K, Tm=10 K for Sm3Co2Ge3, TN=34 K, Tm=13 K for Tb3Co2Ge3, TN=7 K for Er3Co2Ge3 and TN=11 K for Ho3Ni2Ge3. At 2 K and above the critical field of 5 kOe, 20 kOe, 4 kOe and 7 kOe for Sm3Co2Ge3, Tb3Co2Ge3, Er3Co2Ge3 and Ho3Ni2Ge3, respectively, saturation magnetizations per rare-earth atom are 6.5 μB for Tb3Co2Ge3, 7.0 μB for Er3Co2Ge3 and 8.0 μB for Ho3Ni2Ge3 in the field of 140 kOe, whereas magnetization of Sm3Co2Ge3 has an antiferromagnetic behaviour. The isothermal magnetic entropy change, ΔSm, indicates a field-induced ferromagnetic ordering in Sm3Co2Ge3, Tb3Co2Ge3, Er3Co2Ge3 and Ho3Ni2Ge3 with a maximal ΔSm value of -10.9 J/kg K for Ho3Ni2Ge3 at 11 K for a field change of 50 kOe. In a zero-applied magnetic field, below TN=33 K and down to TmND=15 K Tb3Ni2Ge3 shows an ac-antiferromagnetic ordering with the C2‧/c magnetic space group, a K0=[0, 0, 0] propagation vector and a aTb3Ni2Ge3×bTb3Ni2Ge3×cTb3Ni2Ge3 magnetic unit cell. Below TmND=15 K, its magnetic structure is a sum of the ac-antiferromagnetic component with the C2‧/c magnetic space group of the K0 vector and a sine-modulated a-antiferromagnetic component of the K1=[0, 0, ±1/3] propagation vector (the magnetic unit cell is aTb3Ni2Ge3×bTb3Ni2Ge3×3cTb3Ni2Ge3). The magnetic structure is made from the 'Tb2 - 2Tb1‧ clusters of the Tb1 8f and Tb2 4c sublattices with a dominant role of the Tb2 sublattices in the magnetic ordering of Tb3Ni2Ge3.

  11. Study of morphology and magnetic properties of the HoNi{sub 3} crystalline and ball-milled compound

    SciTech Connect

    Bajorek, Anna; Skornia, Paweł; Prusik, Krystian; Wojtyniak, Marcin; Chełkowska, Grażyna

    2015-03-15

    The morphology and magnetic properties of the HoNi{sub 3} crystalline and ball-milled intermetallic compounds are presented. The polycrystalline HoNi{sub 3} bulk compound crystallizes in the rhombohedral PuNi{sub 3} — type of crystal structure and indicates ferrimagnetic arrangement with the Curie temperature of T{sub C} = 57 ± 2 K, the helimagnetic temperature T{sub h} = 23 ± 2 K with the total saturation magnetic moment of 6.84 μ{sub B}/f.u. at 2 K. The use of the ball-milling method leads to the formation of HoNi{sub 3} nanoflakes with typical thickness of less than 100 nm prone to agglomeration upon milling. The increase of grinding duration leads to the reduction in crystallite size, which was confirmed by various complementary microscopical and diffraction studies. Moreover, the increase in milling duration results in the emergence of the relatively small coercivity (H{sub C}), remanence (M{sub r}) and a variation of the saturation magnetization (M{sub S}). - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The ball-milling method exhibits significant potential for producing RT{sub 3} nanopowders. • The AFM method was used for the first time in analysis of R–T nanoflakes morphology. • HoNi{sub 3} compound forms polycrystalline and textured nanoflakes evolving upon milling. • The decrease in crystallite size via grinding is confirmed by XRD, TEM and AFM. • The magnetic parameters were sensitive to the extension of pulverization b.

  12. Complex Structures in the Reentrant Phase Diagram of HoNi_2B_2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, J.; Zhang, J.; Olinger, A., Jr.; Metlushko, V.; Delong, L.; Canfield, P.

    1996-03-01

    HoNi_2B_2C exhibits a resistive onset to superconductivity near 9.0 K, followed by transitions to incommensurate magnetic order (IMO) at 6.0 K and 5.5 K, and commensurate antiferromagnetic order (AFM) at TN = 5.2 K. Vibrating reed (VR) and resistance data reveal two previously unobserved lines of magnetic anomalies in both the upper superconducting (SC) and lower reentrant SC regions for H || a*b*. The wide region between the upper onset of SC and the first magnetic anomaly reflects weak vortex pinning, possibly due to a subtle buildup of IMO from well above 8K. The interplay between SC and magnetic order is evident in abrupt displacements of transition lines to IMO near their crossing with the reentrant normal transition line for 5.2

  13. Electronic structure and optical properties of the HoCoSi and ErNiSi compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Knyazev, Yu. V.; Lukoyanov, A. V. Kuz’min, Yu. I.; Gupta, S.; Suresh, K. G.

    2016-10-15

    The electronic structure and the optical properties of the HoCoSi and ErNiSi compounds are studied. Spin-polarized band calculations are performed in the local electron density approximation corrected for the strong electron–electron interactions in the 4f shell of a rare-earth ion (LSDA + U method [11]). The optical constants are measured by ellipsometry in a wide wavelength range, and the frequency dependences of a number of spectral parameters are determined. The calculated densities of states are used to interpret the structural features of the interband optical conductivities of the intermetallic compounds.

  14. Crystal field effects in the intermetallic R Ni3Ga9 (R =Tb , Dy, Ho, and Er) compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, L. S.; Mercena, S. G.; Garcia, D. J.; Bittar, E. M.; Jesus, C. B. R.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Lora-Serrano, R.; Meneses, C. T.; Duque, J. G. S.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we report temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility, electrical resistivity, and heat-capacity experiments in the family of intermetallic compounds R Ni3Ga9 (R = Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er). Single-crystalline samples were grown using Ga self-flux method. These materials crystallize in a trigonal ErNi3Al9 -type structure with space group R 32 . They all order antiferromagnetically with TN<20 K . The anisotropic magnetic susceptibility presents large values of the ratio χeasy/χhard indicating strong crystalline electric-field (CEF) effects. The evolution of the crystal-field scheme for each R was analyzed in detail by using a spin model including anisotropic nearest-neighbor Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction and the trigonal CEF Hamiltonian. Our analysis allows one to understand the distinct direction of the ordered moments along the series—the Tb-, Dy-, and Ho-based compounds have the ordered magnetic moments in the easy ab plane and the Er sample magnetization easy axis is along the c ̂ direction.

  15. Influence of Ni substitution at B-site for Fe3+ ions on morphological, optical, and magnetic properties of HoFeO3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Zubida; Majid, Kowsar; Ikram, Mohd.; Sultan, Khalid; Mir, Sajad Ahmad; Asokan, K.

    2016-05-01

    Present study reports the effect of Ni substitution at B-site in HoFeO3 on the morphological, optical and magnetic properties. These compounds were prepared by solid-state reaction method. Scanning electron microscope reveals an increase in average grain sizes with Ni concentration. Absorption and emission spectra show redshift in band gap with increase in Ni ion concentrations. The Tauc plots show direct allowed transitions. Temperature-dependent magnetization studies on these compounds revealed the transition from ferromagnetism to paramagnetism. There is separation between temperature at which zero-field-cooled and field-cooled occurs at varied temperature with Ni substitution. The separation effect is related to the impact of the paramagnetic Ho3+ ions, whose magnitude becomes more prominent at higher temperature. The value of squareness ratio in these materials is below 0.5 indicating presence of multidomain structures.

  16. Low-temperature heat-capacity studies of R2Ni3Si5 (R=Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumdar, Chandan; Ghosh, K.; Nagarajan, R.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Padalia, B. D.; Gupta, L. C.

    1999-02-01

    We report here our low temperature (2-30 K) heat capacity, Cp measurements of R2Ni3Si5 (R=Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd-Ho). Large peaks in heat capacity data at magnetic transition temperatures (TN) confirm the bulk nature of magnetic order in these compounds. In Nd2Ni3Si5, Gd2Ni3Si5, and Dy2Ni3Si5, magnetization studies indicated only one magnetic transition, whereas, heat-capacity data show two transitions. TN of the heavier rare-earth member, Tb2Ni3Si5, showing significant deviation from de Gennes scaling is notable. Magnetic entropy, ΔS, estimated from heat-capacity data suggest that the magnetic ground state is a doublet in R2Ni3Si5 (R=Pr, Nd, Sm, Dy, Ho) and a quartet in Tb2Ni3Si5. In all the cases, ΔS, at TN is slightly less than that expected due to the suggested states, which we attribute to the occurrence of precursor effects of magnetic order above TN. Except for Gd2Ni3Si5, ΔS of the compounds does not reach the saturation limit of R ln(2J+1) even at 30 K, indicating the presence of crystalline electric field (CEF) effects. A hump in Cp is observed below TN in Gd2Ni3Si5 which is interpreted in terms of a possible amplitude-modulated magnetic spin structure.

  17. Magnetocaloric properties of R2NiMnO6 (R=Pr, Nd, Tb, Ho and Y) double perovskite family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Tirthankar; Nhalil, Hariharan; Yadav, Ruchika; Wagh, Aditya A.; Elizabeth, Suja

    2017-04-01

    Double perovskite R2NiMnO6 (R=Pr, Nd, Tb, Ho and Y) composites are prepared via solid state synthesis or nitrate route. Isothermal magnetic entropy change (ΔSM (T , H)) and relative cooling power (RCP) for all systems are calculated and compared. All of them possess relatively high values of ΔSM (T , H) and RCP as compared to many perovskite and double perovskite systems reported previously. Ho2NiMnO6 has the highest value for | ΔSM (T , H) | and RCP as 8.4 JKg-1K-1 at 70 kOe and 59.18 J Kg-1 at 20 kOe respectively. This study highlights the potential of magnetocaloric refrigerant materials at low temperature.

  18. Large magnetic entropy change and relative cooling power in the rare earth intermetallic HoCo0.25Ni1.75 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Rajib; Nirmala, R.; Arout Chelvane, J.; Malik, S. K.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of cubic Laves phase rare earth intermetallic HoCo0.25Ni1.75 compound have been investigated. Magnetization measurements show that HoCo0.25Ni1.75 orders ferromagnetically at 22 K (TC). The magnetization vs field (M-μ0H) isotherm at 2 K shows negligible hysteresis. The isothermal magnetic entropy change (ΔSm) is calculated from the measured M-μ0H data near TC. The maximum value of ΔSm, ΔSmmax, is about -18.9 J/kg-K at TC for a field change of 5 T with a refrigerant capacity of 572 J/kg. The material exhibits large ΔSmmax of -9.4 J/kg-K even for a low field change of 2 T. Universal master curve is constructed by rescaling ΔSm vs T curves for various fields to confirm the second order nature of the magnetic transition at TC. Large ΔSmmax value, wide temperature span of cooling and high relative cooling power make HoCo0.25Ni1.75 a potential magnetic refrigerant for low temperature applications such as hydrogen liquefaction.

  19. Magnetic structures of R5Ni2In4 and R11Ni4In9 ( R = Tb and Ho): Strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic ordering in the multiple rare-earth sublattices

    DOE PAGES

    Ritter, C.; Provino, A.; Manfrinetti, P.; ...

    2015-11-09

    In this study, the magnetic properties and magnetic structures of the R5Ni2In4 and the microfibrous R 11Ni4In9 compounds with R = Tb and Ho have been examined using magnetization, heat capacity, and neutron diffraction data. Rare earth atoms occupy three and five symmetrically inequivalent rare earth sites in R5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 compounds, respectively. As a result of the intra- and inter-magnetic sublattice interactions, the magnetic exchange interactions are different for various rare earth sites; this leads to a cascade of magnetic transitions with a strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic orderings.

  20. Metamagnetism and giant magnetoresistance of the rare-earth intermetallic compounds R2Ni2Pb (R=Er,Ho,Dy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinchure, Aravind D.; Muñoz Sandoval, E.; Mydosh, J. A.

    2002-07-01

    We have measured the magnetization and magnetoresistance for a series of rare-earth (R=Er,Ho,Dy) plumbide intermetallic compounds, R2Ni2Pb. These materials form in an unusual orthorhombic structure with space group Cmmm. After multiple magnetic transitions, the ground state exhibits a steplike series of large-moment metamagnetic transitions in low fields (1-2 T) concomitant with switchinglike properties of the magnetoresistance where sharp changes of up to 30% are found. We relate these properties to the layered magnetic structure of the compound.

  1. Evolution of magnetic layers stacking sequence within the magnetic structure of Ho(CoxNi1-x)2B2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElMassalami, M.; Takeya, H.; Ouladdiaf, B.; Gomes, A. M.; Paiva, T.; dos Santos, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    We evaluated the influence of Co substitution on the magnetic structure of Ho(CoxNi1-x)2B2C (x=0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8) using neutron diffraction, magnetization and specific heat studies. Different modes are stabilized: an AFM k=(0,0,1) mode for x=0.2, a spiral k=(0,0,0.49) mode for x=0.4, a spiral k=(0,0,0.26) mode for x=0.6, and a FM k=(0,0,0) mode for x=0.8. Recalling that for x=0.0, k=(0,0,1) while for x=1.0, k=(0,0,0), then all these magnetic structures can be visualized as a variation in the stacking sequence, along the z-axis, of the intra-planar FM-coupled Ho sheets as such Co substitution controls the z-component of the k=(0,0,ux) vector where ux=0,0.26,0.49, or 1. We discuss this inference and the observation that in spite of such a diversity of magnetic structures, the critical temperatures and the saturated moments are only weakly influenced by substitution.

  2. Phase diagrams of anisotropic ferrimagnet HoCo{sub 3}Ni{sub 2} with T{sub comp} = T{sub SR1}

    SciTech Connect

    Zawadzki, J.; Szymczak, R.; Zvezdin, A.K.; Krynetski, I.

    1994-03-01

    The magnetic phase diagrams of the hexagonal intermetallic ferrimagnet HoCo{sub 3}Ni{sub 2} showing the spin reorientation transition are presented. The diagrams have been calculated from the thermodynamic potential including the exchange energy as well as the anisotropy energy, taking into consideration the second and fourth-order anisotropy terms. The obtained phase diagrams differ substantially from those of the isotropic or uniaxial ferrimagnets. In fields parallel to the basal plane, the new cone-canting phase with constant susceptibility has been found In the spin reorientation range. In fields parallel to the hexagonal axis there exists a narrow link between low and high-field canted phases. The existence of the new cone-canting phase has been confirmed by magnetization measurements on a single crystal using both ballistic and SQUID magnetometers.

  3. Spherical neutron polarimetry of the magnetic structure in HoNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C: Interplay between magnetic phases and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.; Zaharko, O.; Gasser, U.; Kreyssig, A.; Brown, P. J.; Canfield, P. C.

    2006-09-01

    Spherical neutron polarimetry has been used to answer open questions about different magnetic phases in HoNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C, which are important in their interplay with superconductivity. We established that the incommensurate a{sup *} structure of k{sub 3}=(0.585 0 0) at 5.4 K in a zero magnetic field is a transverse-amplitude modulated wave with the magnetic moment along the b direction of the tetragonal structure. The depolarization of a neutron beam scattered from the k{sub 2}=(0 0 0.915) reflections reveals a multidomain state but does not allow an unambiguous determination of the spin configuration. Based on present knowledge of borocarbides and other rare-earth systems we give preference to a long-range incommensurate helical structure as the origin of the k{sub 2}=(0 0 0.915) reflections.

  4. Mo{sub 2}NiB{sub 2}-type (Gd, Tb, Dy){sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65} and La{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}-type (Dy, Ho){sub 2}Ni{sub 2.5}Si{sub 0.5} compounds: Crystal structure and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Morozkin, A.V.; Isnard, O.; Nirmala, R.; Malik, S.K.

    2015-05-15

    The crystal structure of new Mo{sub 2}NiB{sub 2}-type (Gd, Tb, Dy){sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65} (Immm, No. 71, oI10) and La{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}-type (Dy, Ho){sub 2}Ni{sub 2.5}Si{sub 0.5} (Cmce No. 64, oC20) compounds has been established using powder X-ray diffraction studies. Magnetization measurements show that the Mo{sub 2}NiB{sub 2}-type Gd{sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65} undergoes a ferromagnetic transition at ~66 K, whereas isostructural Tb{sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65} shows an antiferromagnetic transition at ~52 K and a field-induced metamagnetic transition at low temperatures. Neutron diffraction study shows that, in zero applied field, Tb{sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65} exhibits c-axis antiferromagnetic order with propagation vector K=[1/2, 0, 1/2] below its magnetic ordering temperature and Tb magnetic moment reaches a value of 8.32(5) μ{sub B} at 2 K. The La{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}-type Dy{sub 2}Ni{sub 2.5}Si{sub 0.5} exhibits ferromagnetic like transition at ~42 K with coexisting antiferromagnetic interactions and field induced metamagnetic transition below ~17 K. The magnetocaloric effect of Gd{sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65}, Tb{sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65} and Dy{sub 2}Ni{sub 2.5}Si{sub 0.5} is calculated in terms of isothermal magnetic entropy change and it reaches a maximum value of −14.3 J/kg K, −5.3 J/kg K and −10.3 J/kg K for a field change of 50 kOe near 66 K, 52 K and 42 K, respectively. Low temperature magnetic ordering with enhanced anisotropic effects in Tb{sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65} and Dy{sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65} is accompanied by a positive magnetocaloric effect with isothermal magnetic entropy changes of +12.8 J/kg K and ~+9.9 J/kg K, respectively at 7 K for a field change of 50 kOe. - Graphical abstract: The (Gd, Tb, Dy){sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65} supplement the series of Mo{sub 2}NiB{sub 2}-type rare earth compounds, whereas the (Dy, Ho){sub 2}Ni{sub 2.5}Si{sub 0.5} supplement the series of La{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}-type rare

  5. Magnetic and Electronic Properties of R3Ni7B2 Compounds where R = Dy, Ho, Er

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucur, N.; Vlaic, P.; Burzo, E.

    2007-04-01

    Band structure calculations show the presence of small magnetic moments at Ni sites. Magnetic measurements at 4.2 K evidenced a relative high anisotropy. Magnetic behavior of nickel is analyzed in spin fluctuation model.

  6. Electronic structure of the Np MT 5 ( M = Fe, Co, Ni; T = Ga, In) series of neptunium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukoyanov, A. V.; Shorikov, A. O.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2016-03-01

    Evolution of the electronic structure of the Np MGa5 ( M = Fe, Co, Ni) series of neptunium compounds, whose crystal structure is similar to that of the known family of Pu115 superconductors, was studied by the LDA + U + SO method. The calculations took into account both the strong electron correlations and the spin‒orbit coupling in the 5 f shell of neptunium. For the first time, the electronic structure was calculated for a hypothetical series of compounds in which gallium is replaced with indium. Parameters of the crystal structure of the given series were obtained using the relationship between the parameters of the crystal structure of the earlier-studied compounds PuCoGa5 and PuCoIn5. The analysis of the electronic structure and characteristics of neptunium ions calculated in the framework of the LDA + U + SO method showed that the neptunium ions in Np MIn5 with M = Fe, Co, and Ni should have an electron configuration closer to f 4, but a spin and magnetic characteristics close to those in Np MGa5.

  7. Bonding Strength of Ceromer with Direct Laser Sintered, Ni-Cr-Based, and ZrO2 Metal Infrastructures After Er:YAG, Nd:YAG, and Ho:YAG Laser Surface Treatments-A Comparative In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Gorler, Oguzhan; Ozdemir, Ali Kemal

    2016-08-01

    Laser modalities instead of conventional surface treatment techniques have been suggested to obtain an adequate micromechanical bonding between dental super- and infrastructures. The present study was undertaken to assess the effect of surface treatment with Ho:YAG, Er:YAG, and Nd:YAG laser modalities on the shear bond strength (SBS) of ceromer to different types of metal infrastructures in in vitro settings. The study specimens consisted of 40 direct laser sintered (DLS), 40 Ni-Cr-based, and 40 zirconium oxide (ZrO2) infrastructures. In each infrastructure group, the specimens were divided randomly into five treatment modalities (n = 8): no treatment (controls), sandblasting, Er:YAG, Nd:YAG, and Ho:YAG lasers. The DLS, Ni-Cr-based, and ZrO2 infrastructures were prepared in the final dimensions of 7 mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness in line with the ISO 11405 standard. Ceromer as superstructure was applied to all the infrastructures after their surface treatments according to the selected treatment modality. SBS test was performed to test the effectiveness of surface treatments. A stereomicroscope was used to determine the changes in the surface morphology of specimens. Among the laser modalities and sandblasting, Ho:YAG laser caused the most important increase in the DLS and Ni-Cr-based infrastructures but sandblasting caused the most important increase in the ZrO2 infrastructure. In all the infrastructures, Nd:YAG laser has the least effectiveness, and Er:YAG laser makes an intermediate success. The stereomicroscopy images presented that the applications of laser surface treatments altered the surface in all the infrastructures. Overall, in current experimental settings, Ho:YAG, Nd:YAG, and Er:YAG lasers, in order of strength, are effective in improving the bonding of ceromer to all the infrastructures. Ho:YAG laser is more effective in the DLS and Ni-Cr-based infrastructures, but sandblasting is more effective in the ZrO2 infrastructure. The studied

  8. Magnetic structures of R5Ni2In4 and R11Ni4In9 ( R = Tb and Ho): Strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic ordering in the multiple rare-earth sublattices

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, C.; Provino, A.; Manfrinetti, P.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Gschneidner, Jr., K. A.; Dhar, S. K.

    2015-11-09

    In this study, the magnetic properties and magnetic structures of the R5Ni2In4 and the microfibrous R 11Ni4In9 compounds with R = Tb and Ho have been examined using magnetization, heat capacity, and neutron diffraction data. Rare earth atoms occupy three and five symmetrically inequivalent rare earth sites in R5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 compounds, respectively. As a result of the intra- and inter-magnetic sublattice interactions, the magnetic exchange interactions are different for various rare earth sites; this leads to a cascade of magnetic transitions with a strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic orderings.

  9. Mt. Everest

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-30

    STS068-259-009 (30 September-11 October 1994) --- This south-looking, summer-time view of Mt. Everest (center) - with strong sense of three dimension because of reduced amount of snow - and neighboring peaks of the Himalayas. Clouds cover lower slopes in India.

  10. Hetero-metallic {3d-4f-5d} complexes: preparation and magnetic behavior of trinuclear [(L(Me2)Ni-Ln){W(CN)(8)}] compounds (Ln = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Y; L(Me2) = Schiff base) and variable SMM characteristics for the Tb derivative.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Jean-Pascal; Dhers, Sébastien; Rajamani, Raghunathan; Ramasesha, S; Costes, Jean-Pierre; Duhayon, Carine; Vendier, Laure

    2009-07-06

    Assembling bimetallic {Ni-Ln}(3+) units and {W(CN)(8)}(3-) is shown to be an efficient route toward heteronuclear {3d-4f-5d} compounds. The reaction of either the binuclear [{L(Me2)Ni(H(2)O)(2)}{Ln(NO(3))(3)}] complexes or their mononuclear components [L(Me2)Ni] and Ln(NO(3))(3) with (HNBu(3))(3){W(CN)(8)} in dmf followed by diffusion of tetrahydrofuran yielded the trinuclear [{L(Me2)NiLn}{W(CN)(8)}] compounds 1 (Ln = Y), 2a,b (Gd), 3a,b (Tb), 4 (Dy), 5 (Ho), and 6 (Er) as crystalline materials. All of the derivatives possess the trinuclear core resulting from the linkage of the {W(CN)(8)} to the Ni center of the {Ni-Ln} unit. Differences are found in the solvent molecules acting as ligands and/or in the lattice depending on the crystallization conditions. For all the compounds ferromagnetic {Ni-W} and {Ni-Ln} (Ln = Gd, Tb, Dy, and Er} interactions are operative resulting in high spin ground states. Parameterization of the magnetic behaviors for the Y and Gd derivatives confirmed the strong cyano-mediated {Ni-W} interaction (J(NiW) = 27.1 and 28.5 cm(-1)) compared to the {Ni-Gd} interaction (J(NiGd) = 2.17 cm(-1)). The characteristic features for slow relaxation of the magnetization are observed for two Tb derivatives, but these are modulated by the crystal phase. Analysis of the frequency dependence of the alternating current susceptibility data yielded U(eff)/k(B) = 15.3 K and tau(0) = 4.5 x 10(-7) s for one derivative whereas no maxima of chi(M)'' appear above 2 K for the second one.

  11. Ternary rare-earth aluminium intermetallics RE10TAl3 (RE = Y, Ho, Tm, Lu; T = Fe, Co, Ni, Ru, Rh, Pd, Os, Ir, Pt) with an ordered anti-Co2Al5 structure.

    PubMed

    Benndorf, Christopher; Eckert, Hellmut; Janka, Oliver

    2017-01-24

    Twenty new rare-earth metal rich intermetallic aluminium compounds, RE10TAl3 (RE = Y, Ho, Tm, Lu; T = Fe, Co, Ni, Ru, Rh, Pd, Os, Ir, Pt), were synthesized by arc melting the elements. The compounds crystallize, in analogy to e.g. the respective Cd representatives, with a ternary ordered structure as anti-type to the hexagonal Co2Al5 type, with the space group P63/mmc. The three crystallographically independent rare-earth metal sites occupy the aluminium positions of the aristotype, while the transition metal and aluminium atoms are ordered on the two cobalt sites. Like other rare-earth rich compounds the RE10TX3 members also exhibit transition-metal-centred T@RE6 trigonal prisms as striking structural building units. The prepared compounds have been investigated by susceptibility measurements and (27)Al solid-state MAS-NMR measurements conducted on the Pauli-paramagnetic Y and Lu compounds. Some compounds show a certain amount of disorder as seen from the single crystal structure analysis and from signal broadening in the NMR investigations. By separating Knight shifts from second-order quadrupolar shifts via field dependent measurements, monotonic trends can be discerned regarding the effect of the T atom valence electron concentration and period number, as well as the effect of the closed 4f shell contributed in the Lu compounds. The results confirm that a comparison of Knight shifts within a series of isotypic compounds can reveal important electronic structure information in intermetallic systems.

  12. Rare earth-copper-magnesium compounds RECu{sub 9}Mg{sub 2} (RE=Y, La-Nd, Sm-Ho, Yb) with ordered CeNi{sub 3}-type structure

    SciTech Connect

    Solokha, P. . E-mail: solokha_pavlo@yahoo.com; Pavlyuk, V.; De Negri, S.; Prochwicz, W.

    2006-10-15

    A series of ternary compounds RECu{sub 9}Mg{sub 2} (RE=Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Yb) have been synthesized via induction melting of elemental metal ingots followed by annealing at 400 deg. C for 4 weeks. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) was used for examining microstructure and phase composition. These phases crystallize with an ordered version of the binary hexagonal structure type first reported for CeNi{sub 3}. The crystal structure was solved for TbCu{sub 9}Mg{sub 2} from single crystal X-ray counter data (TbCu{sub 9}Mg{sub 2}-structure type, P6{sub 3} /mmc-space group, hP24-Pearson symbol, a=0.49886 (7) nm, c=1.61646 (3) nm, R {sub F}=0.0474 for 190 unique reflections). The Rietveld refinement of the X-ray powder diffraction patterns of RECu{sub 9}Mg{sub 2} confirmed the same crystal structure for the reported rare earth metals. The unit cell volumes for RECu{sub 9}Mg{sub 2} smoothly follow the lanthanide contraction. The existence of a RECu{sub 9}Mg{sub 2} phase was excluded for RE=Er Tm under the investigated experimental conditions. - Graphical abstract: The perspective view of the arrangement of the icosahedrons and anti-cubooctahedrons in the structure of TbCu{sub 9}Mg{sub 2}.

  13. Minfong Ho: Politics in Prose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Joy L.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author interviews Minfong Ho, an award-winning Thai writer of children's and young adult novels. Ho was born in Burma to Chinese parents in 1951, raised in Singapore and Thailand, educated in Bangkok, Taiwan, and at Cornell University in New York. Ho's first novel, "Sing to the Dawn," won first prize from the Council of…

  14. Minfong Ho: Politics in Prose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Joy L.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author interviews Minfong Ho, an award-winning Thai writer of children's and young adult novels. Ho was born in Burma to Chinese parents in 1951, raised in Singapore and Thailand, educated in Bangkok, Taiwan, and at Cornell University in New York. Ho's first novel, "Sing to the Dawn," won first prize from the Council of…

  15. City of Jacksonville, Pollack Shores, Regency Centers, NAI Hallmark Partners and Mt. Sinai Missionary Holiness Church to Receive EPA Region 4s Excellence in Site Reuse Award

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will present the Region 4 Excellence in Site Reuse award to the City of Jacksonville, Pollack Shores Real Estate Group, Regency Centers, NAI Hallmark Partners and the Mt. Sinai Missionary Ho

  16. Tropospheric HO determination by FAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hard, T. M.; Obrien, R. J.; Chan, C. Y.; Mehrabzadeh, A. A.

    1986-01-01

    In the detection of tropospheric HO by laser excited fluorescence, and alternative air-sampling method, named FAGE (Fluorescence Assay with Gas Expansion) was introduced. Here the air is expanded through a nozzle prior to excitation, in order to improve the ratio of the HO signal to the scattered, fluorescent, and photolytic backgrounds. The improvement comes from the differing pressure dependence of the intensities of these four terms, as well as the distinguishability of their temporal waveforms at low pressures when excited by a pulsed laser. HO has been excited by a YAG/dye laser. Other lasers and pumping paths may perform as well or better in this method. With FAGE, chemical modulation of the HO signal was achieved by hydrocarbon addition to the nozzle flow, converting photolytic HO from an interference to a background. Chemical calibration of the instrumental response to external HO was also achieved, by hydrocarbon decay, at HO concentrations within the ambient range.

  17. Coso MT Site Locations

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2011-05-04

    This data includes the locations of the MT data collected in and around the Coso Geothermal field that covered the West Flank area. These are the data that the 3D MT models were created from that were discussed in Phase 1 of the West Flank FORGE project. The projected coordinate system is NAD 1927 State Plane California IV FIPS 0404 and the Projection is Lambert Conformal Conic. Units are in feet.

  18. Tropospheric HO2 determination by FAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hard, Thomas M.; George, L. A.; Obrien, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    In the present work, HO2 is determined by FAGE, a method which employs low-pressure laser-excited fluorescence to observe the hydroxyl radical HO, using chemical modulation to distinguish the desired signal from the background. In the HO2 determination mode, NO is added to the low-pressure flowing sample, converting HO2 to HO.

  19. Italy: Mt. Etna

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... SpectroRadiometer (MISR) images from Terra orbit 8476 capture the July 22, 2001 explosion of the Mt. Etna volcano. Etna is located ... also expels gases such as water vapor, sulfur dioxide, and carbon dioxide. Although the Etna volcano is one of the world's most ...

  20. Return to Mt. Makiling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, George C.

    1977-01-01

    The National Arts Center of the Philippines, built to assist in the cultural enrichment of the Philippines through the development of young talents, stands today as the Filipino's tribute to the artist. The author discusses his return to Mt. Makiling comparing the development of the National Arts Center with his first visit in October 1973 at the…

  1. Mt. St. Helens Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Len

    1992-01-01

    Provides a personal account of one science teacher's participation in a teacher workshop in which teachers learned about volcanic development, types of eruption, geomorphology, plate tectonics, volcano monitoring, and hazards created by volcanoes by examining Mt. St. Helens. Provides a graphic identifying volcanoes active since 1975. (MDH)

  2. Mt. St. Helens Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Len

    1992-01-01

    Provides a personal account of one science teacher's participation in a teacher workshop in which teachers learned about volcanic development, types of eruption, geomorphology, plate tectonics, volcano monitoring, and hazards created by volcanoes by examining Mt. St. Helens. Provides a graphic identifying volcanoes active since 1975. (MDH)

  3. HO:LULF and HO:LULF Laser Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Morrison, Clyde A. (Inventor); Filer, Elizabeth D. (Inventor); Jani, Mahendra G. (Inventor); Murray, Keith E. (Inventor); Lockard, George E. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A laser host material LULF (LuLiF4) is doped with holmium (Ho) and thulium (Tm) to produce a new laser material that is capable of laser light production in the vicinity of 2 microns. The material provides an advantage in efficiency over conventional Ho lasers because the LULF host material allows for decreased threshold and upconversion over such hosts as YAG and YLF. The addition of Tm allows for pumping by commonly available GaAlAs laser diodes. For use with flashlamp pumping, erbium (Er) may be added as an additional dopant. For further upconversion reduction, the Tm can be eliminated and the Ho can be directly pumped.

  4. Mt. Etna, Italy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-11-07

    On Sunday, November 3, 2002, Mt. Etna's ash-laden plume was imaged by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. The plume is seen blowing toward the south-southeast, over the city and airport of Catania, Sicily. The previous day, the plume was blowing toward the northwest, and posed no hazard to Catania. The current eruption of Mt. Etna, Europe's most active volcano, began on October 27. These sorts of observations from space may help civil defense authorities mitigate hazards from active eruptions. Space data may also help scientists evaluate the behavior and effects volcanic eruptions have on our global climate system. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03881

  5. Mt. Spurr's 1992 eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1993-01-01

    On 27 June, 1992, the Crater Peak vent on the south side of Mt. Spurr awoke from 39 years of dormancy and burst into sub-plinian eruption after 10 months of elevated seismicity. Two more eruptions followed in August and September. The volcano lies 125 km west of Anchorage, Alaska's largest city and an important international hub for air travel. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was able to warn communities and the aviation industry well in advance of these eruptions.

  6. {sup 163}Ho based experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gastaldo, Loredana

    2015-07-15

    The analysis of the endpoint region of the calorimetrically measured {sup 163}Ho electron capture spectrum is a very promising way to determine the mass of the electron neutrino. The achievable sensitivity of {sup 163}Ho-based experiments and the experimental challenges will be presented. Three large collaborations aim at developing large scale experiments able to reach sub-eV sensitivity. Presently pilot experiments are performed to demonstrate the possibility to calorimetrically measure high precision and high statistics {sup 163}Ho spectra. The different approaches as well as the state of the art of the experimental efforts for the three collaborations will be discussed.

  7. Compact Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1988-01-01

    Longitudinal pumping by laser diodes increases efficiency. Improved holmium:yttrium lithium fluoride laser radiates as much as 56 mW of power at wavelength of 2.1 micrometer. New Ho:YLF laser more compact and efficient than older, more powerful devices of this type. Compact, efficient Ho:YLF laser based on recent successes in use of diode lasers to pump other types of solid-state lasers.

  8. Hybrid Open-frameworks: structure determinations and ferromagnetism of MIL-41 or (V(IV)O) 2M(II)(H 2O) 4{HO 3PCH 2PO 3} 2 · 2H 2O (M=Mn, Co, Ni, Zn): four mixed metallomethylendiphosphonates hydrothermally synthesized by using pre-assembled building units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelet, Karin; Jouve, Cyril; Riou, Didier; Férey, Gérard

    2000-12-01

    MIL-41 or (V(IV)O) 2M(II)(H 2O) 4{HO 3PCH 2PO 3} 2 · 2H 2O was hydrothermally synthesized at 443 K with M(II)=Mn, Co, Ni, Zn. The structures of the four compounds were solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction in the noncentrosymmetric orthorhombic space group Fdd2 (no. 43). The lattice parameters of the Mn compound are a=22.0237(3) Å, b=22.3722(4) Å, c=7.2962(2) Å, V=3595.0(1) Å 3, Z=8 and the reliability factors R1=0.0352, w R2=0.0840 for 2142 reflections with I≥2 σ( I). The structure of MIL-41 is two-dimensional (2-D) with layers built from mixed vanadomethylendiphosphonate chains linked by MO 2(H 2O) 4 octahedra. These solids are ferromagnetic below 5 K due to dipolar interactions.

  9. Mt. St. Helens

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-10-22

    This 3-D anaglyph image of Mt. St. Helens volcano combines the nadir-looking and back-looking band 3 images of ASTER. To view the image in stereo, you will need blue-red glasses. Make sure to look through the red lens with your left eye. This ASTER image of Mt. St. Helens volcano in Washington was acquired on August 8, 2000 and covers an area of 37 by 51 km. Mount Saint Helens, a volcano in the Cascade Range of southwestern Washington that had been dormant since 1857, began to show signs of renewed activity in early 1980. On 18 May 1980, it erupted with such violence that the top of the mountain was blown off, spewing a cloud of ash and gases that rose to an altitude of 19 kilometers. The blast killed about 60 people and destroyed all life in an area of some 180 square kilometers (some 70 square miles), while a much larger area was covered with ash and debris. It continues to spit forth ash and steam intermittently. As a result of the eruption, the mountain's elevation decreased from 2,950 meters to 2,549 meters. The image is centered at 46.2 degrees north latitude, 122.2 degrees west longitude. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11160

  10. The nucleotide sequence of metallothioneins (MT) in liver of the Kafue lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis) and their potential as biomarkers of heavy metal pollution of the Kafue River.

    PubMed

    M'kandawire, Ethel; Syakalima, Michelo; Muzandu, Kaampwe; Pandey, Girja; Simuunza, Martin; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Kawai, Yusuke K; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2012-09-15

    The study determined heavy metal concentrations and MT1 nucleotide sequence [phylogeny] in liver of the Kafue lechwe. Applicability of MT1 as a biomarker of pollution was assessed. cDNA-encoding sequences for lechwe MT1 were amplified by RT-PCR to characterize the sequence of MT1 which was subjected to BLAST searching at NCBI. Phylogenetic relationships were based on pairwise matrix of sequence divergences calculated by Clustal W. Phylogenetic tree was constructed by NJ method using PHILLIP program. Metals were extracted by acid digestion and concentrations of Cr, Co, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, and Ni were determined using an AAS. MT1 mRNA expression levels were measured by quantitative comparative real-time RT-PCR. Lechwe MT1 has a length of 183bp, which encode for MT1 proteins of 61AA, which include 20 cysteines. Nucleotide sequence of lechwe MT1 showed identity with sheep MT (97%) and cattle MT1E (97%). Phylogenetic tree revealed that lechwe MT1 was clustered with sheep MT and cattle MT1E. Cu and Ni concentrations and MT1 mRNA expression levels of lechwe from Blue Lagoon were significantly higher than those from Lochinvar (p<0.05). Concentrations of Cd and Cu, Co and Cu, Co and Pb, Ni and Cu, and Ni and Cr were positively correlated. Spearman's rank correlations also showed positive correlations between Cu and Co concentrations and MT mRNA expression. PCA further suggested that MT mRNA expression was related to Zn and Cd concentrations. Hepatic MT1 mRNA expression in lechwe can be used as biomarker of heavy metal pollution.

  11. Mt. Vesuvius, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This ASTER image of Mt. Vesuvius Italy was acquired September 26, 2000, and covers an area of 36 by 45 km. Vesuvius overlooks the city of Naples and the Bay of Naples in central Italy. In 79 AD, Vesuvius erupted cataclysmically, burying all of the surrounding cites with up to 30 m of ash. The towns of Pompeii and Herculanaeum were rediscovered in the 18th century, and excavated in the 20th century. They provide a snapshot of Roman life from 2000 years ago: perfectly preserved are wooden objects, food items, and the casts of hundreds of victims. Vesuvius is intensively monitored for potential signs of unrest that could signal the beginning of another eruption. The image is centered at 40.8 degrees north latitude, 14.4 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  12. Mt. Vesuvius, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This ASTER image of Mt. Vesuvius Italy was acquired September 26, 2000, and covers an area of 36 by 45 km. Vesuvius overlooks the city of Naples and the Bay of Naples in central Italy. In 79 AD, Vesuvius erupted cataclysmically, burying all of the surrounding cites with up to 30 m of ash. The towns of Pompeii and Herculanaeum were rediscovered in the 18th century, and excavated in the 20th century. They provide a snapshot of Roman life from 2000 years ago: perfectly preserved are wooden objects, food items, and the casts of hundreds of victims. Vesuvius is intensively monitored for potential signs of unrest that could signal the beginning of another eruption. The image is centered at 40.8 degrees north latitude, 14.4 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  13. Mt. Vesuvius, Italy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-10-22

    This ASTER image of Mt. Vesuvius Italy was acquired September 26, 2000, and covers an area of 36 by 45 km. Vesuvius overlooks the city of Naples and the Bay of Naples in central Italy. In 79 AD, Vesuvius erupted cataclysmically, burying all of the surrounding cites with up to 30 m of ash. The towns of Pompeii and Herculanaeum were rediscovered in the 18th century, and excavated in the 20th century. They provide a snapshot of Roman life from 2000 years ago: perfectly preserved are wooden objects, food items, and the casts of hundreds of victims. Vesuvius is intensively monitored for potential signs of unrest that could signal the beginning of another eruption. The image is centered at 40.8 degrees north latitude, 14.4 degrees east longitude. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11091

  14. Mt. Kilimanjaro's Receding Glaciers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Mt. Kilimanjaro (Tanzania), the highest point in all Africa, was photographed by the crew of Space Shuttle mission STS-97 on December 2, 2000 (STS097-701-17). Kilimanjaro (Kilima Njaro or 'shining mountain' in Swahili) is capped by glaciers on its southern and southwestern flanks. The glaciers and snow cap covered a far greater area ten years prior to the view above. Compare the photograph above with a photograph of Kilimanjaro taken in November 1990 by the Space Shuttle mission STS-38 crew. Shuttle photograph provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center. Additional photographs taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed via the NASA - JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  15. Mt. St. Helens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Movie

    This 3-D anaglyph image of Mt. St. Helens volcano combines the nadir-looking and back-looking band 3 images of ASTER. To view the image in stereo, you will need blue-red glasses. Make sure to look through the red lens with your left eye. Figure 1: This ASTER image of Mt. St. Helens volcano in Washington was acquired on August 8, 2000 and covers an area of 37 by 51 km. Mount Saint Helens, a volcano in the Cascade Range of southwestern Washington that had been dormant since 1857, began to show signs of renewed activity in early 1980. On 18 May 1980, it erupted with such violence that the top of the mountain was blown off, spewing a cloud of ash and gases that rose to an altitude of 19 kilometers. The blast killed about 60 people and destroyed all life in an area of some 180 square kilometers (some 70 square miles), while a much larger area was covered with ash and debris. It continues to spit forth ash and steam intermittently. As a result of the eruption, the mountain's elevation decreased from 2,950 meters to 2,549 meters. The image is centered at 46.2 degrees north latitude, 122.2 degrees west longitude.

    Movie: The simulated fly-over was produced by draping ASTER visible and near infrared image data over a digital topography model, created from ASTER's 3-D stereo bands. The color was computer enhanced to create a natural color image, where the vegetation appears green. The topography has been exaggerated 2 times to enhance the appearance of the relief.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  16. Topics in Ho Morphophonology and Morphosyntax

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pucilowski, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Ho, an under-documented North Munda language of India, is known for its complex verb forms. This dissertation focuses on analysis of several features of those complex verbs, using data from original fieldwork undertaken by the author. By way of background, an analysis of the phonetics, phonology and morphophonology of Ho is first presented. Ho has…

  17. Topics in Ho Morphophonology and Morphosyntax

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pucilowski, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Ho, an under-documented North Munda language of India, is known for its complex verb forms. This dissertation focuses on analysis of several features of those complex verbs, using data from original fieldwork undertaken by the author. By way of background, an analysis of the phonetics, phonology and morphophonology of Ho is first presented. Ho has…

  18. Layer-structured LiNi0.8Co0.2O2: A new triple (H+/O2-/e-) conducting cathode for low temperature proton conducting solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Liangdong; Su, Pei-Chen

    2016-02-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells with proton conducting electrolytes (H-SOFCs) show great potential for more efficient energy conversion over their oxygen ionic conducting counterparts at temperatures below 650 °C, providing a comparably high performance cathode material can be available. A brief review of current development of cathode materials shows that materials with triple (oxygen ionic, protonic, and electronic) conducting properties are most promising for H-SOFCs. In this work, a triple-conducting LiNi0.8Co0.2O2 (LNCO) with layered structure, allowing simultaneous conduction of intrinsic oxygen ion and electron as well as the extrinsic proton, is proposed as a cathode material for H-SOFC. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis of LNCO shows the good oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity with a considerably low activation energy of 0.88 eV, and an evident water uptake capability those facilitate the cathode reaction process. Fuel cells using LNCO cathode on a BaZr0.1Ce0.7Y0.2O3 proton-conducting electrolyte render a peak power density of 410 mW cm-2 at 650 °C under H2/air condition, which is higher than most of the typical cathode materials reported with similar cell configurations. This work also demonstrated a new series of simple and low cost cathode materials simultaneously possessing interesting triple-conduction and good ORR activities for low temperature H-SOFCs.

  19. Mt. Etna, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Sunday, November 3, 2002, Mt. Etna's ash-laden plume was imaged by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. The plume is seen blowing toward the south-southeast, over the city and airport of Catania, Sicily. The previous day, the plume was blowing toward the northwest, and posed no hazard to Catania. The current eruption of Mt. Etna, Europe's most active volcano, began on October 27. These sorts of observations from space may help civil defense authorities mitigate hazards from active eruptions. Space data may also help scientists evaluate the behavior and effects volcanic eruptions have on our global climate system.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science

  20. Mt. Etna, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Sunday, November 3, 2002, Mt. Etna's ash-laden plume was imaged by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. The plume is seen blowing toward the south-southeast, over the city and airport of Catania, Sicily. The previous day, the plume was blowing toward the northwest, and posed no hazard to Catania. The current eruption of Mt. Etna, Europe's most active volcano, began on October 27. These sorts of observations from space may help civil defense authorities mitigate hazards from active eruptions. Space data may also help scientists evaluate the behavior and effects volcanic eruptions have on our global climate system.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science

  1. NdHO, a novel oxyhydride

    SciTech Connect

    Wideroe, Marius; Fjellvag, Helmer; Norby, Truls; Willy Poulsen, Finn; Willestofte Berg, Rolf

    2011-07-15

    A new metal oxyhydride; neodymium oxyhydride, NdHO, has been synthesized from a reactant mixture of metal hydride (CaH{sub 2} or NdH{sub 3}) and neodymium oxide (Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The unit cell dimensions decrease smoothly in the series from LaHO, CeHO, PrHO to NdHO, in line with the lanthanide contraction. The crystal structure of NdHO is described on the basis of Rietveld refinement on neutron powder diffraction data: Space group: P4/nmm (no. 129, D{sub 4h}{sup 7}). Axis lengths: a=7.8480(5) A, c=5.5601(8) A. Volume: V=342.46(6) A{sup 3}. The tetragonal structure is derived from the fluorite structure, showing complete ordering of hydride and oxide ions over the anion sublatttice. The formation of NdHO was further substantiated by Raman spectroscopy. - Graphical Abstract: View of the NdHO structure. Highlights: > CaH{sub 2} or NdH{sub 3} react with Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} in reducing atmospheres forming a new oxyhydride, NdHO. > NdHO crystalises in tetragonal space group P4/nmm with axes a=b=7.8480(5) A and c=5.5601(8) A. > The structure is similar to the fluorite structure with complete ordering of hydride and oxide ions. > Unit cell dimensions decrease smoothly in the series from LaHO, CeHO, PrHO to NdHO. > The formation of NdHO is substantiated by Raman spectroscopy.

  2. Effect of rapid quenching on the magnetism and magnetocaloric effect of equiatomic rare earth intermetallic compounds RNi (R = Gd, Tb and Ho)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajivgandhi, R.; Arout Chelvane, J.; Quezado, S.; Malik, S. K.; Nirmala, R.

    2017-07-01

    Magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in RNi (where R = Gd, Tb and Ho) compounds has been studied in their arc-melted and melt-spun forms. The compound GdNi has the orthorhombic CrB-type structure (Space group Cmcm, No. 63) and the compound HoNi has the orthorhombic FeB-type structure (Space group Pnma, No. 62) at room temperature regardless of their synthesis condition. However, arc-melted TbNi orders in a monoclinic structure (Space group P21/m, No. 11) and when it is rapidly quenched to a melt-spun form, it crystallizes in an orthorhombic structure (Space group Pnma, No. 62). The arc-melted GdNi, TbNi and HoNi compounds order ferromagnetically at ∼69 K, ∼67 K and ∼36 K (TC) respectively. While the melt-spun GdNi shows about 6 K increase in TC, the ordering temperature of TbNi remains nearly the same in both arc-melted and melt-spun forms. In contrast, a reduction in TC by about 8 K is observed in melt-spun HoNi, when compared to its arc-melted counterpart. Isothermal magnetic entropy change, ∆Sm, calculated from the field dependent magnetization data indicates an enhanced relative cooling power (RCP) for melt-spun GdNi for field changes of 20 kOe and 50 kOe. A lowered RCP value is observed in melt-spun TbNi and HoNi. These changes could have resulted from the competing shape anisotropy and the granular microstructure induced by the melt-spinning process. Tailoring the MCE of rare earth intermetallic compounds by suitably controlled synthesis techniques is certainly one of the directions to go forward in the search of giant magnetocaloric materials.

  3. Mt. Etna Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1: Vis/NIR Image CloseupFigure 2: Difference Image

    October 2002 Mt. Etna, a volcano on the island of Sicily, erupted on October 26, 2002. Preliminary analysis of data taken by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite on October 28 shows the instrument can provide an excellent means to study the evolution and structure of the sulfur dioxide (SO2) plume emitted from volcanoes. These data also demonstrate that AIRS can be used to obtain the total mass of SO2 injected into the atmosphere during a volcanic event, information that may help us to better understand these dangerous natural occurrences in the future.

    This image was made from a sensor on the AIRS instrument that is sensitive to the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. The visible/near infrared data show the smoke plume from Mt. Etna. The view is of Europe and the central Mediterranean with Italy in the center. Since the visible/near infrared sensor on AIRS is sensitive to wavelengths that are different than the human eye, vegetated regions appear red (compare the red color of Europe with the tan desert of North Africa in the lower left). Figure 1 is a closer view of Sicily and shows a long, brownish smoke plume extending across the Mediterranean to Africa. This is consistent with the enhanced feature in the difference image in Figure 2 and helps validate the information inferred from that image.

    Figure 2 clearly shows the SO2 plume. This image was created by comparing data taken at two different frequencies, or channels, and creating one image that highlights the differences between these two channels. Both channels are sensitive to water vapor, but one of the channels is also sensitive to SO2. By subtracting out the common water vapor signal in both channels, the SO2 feature remains and shows up as an enhancement in the difference image.

    The

  4. MT1 and MT2 Melatonin Receptors: A Therapeutic Perspective.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiabei; Clough, Shannon J; Hutchinson, Anthony J; Adamah-Biassi, Ekue B; Popovska-Gorevski, Marina; Dubocovich, Margarita L

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin, or 5-methoxy-N-acetyltryptamine, is synthesized and released by the pineal gland and locally in the retina following a circadian rhythm, with low levels during the day and elevated levels at night. Melatonin activates two high-affinity G protein-coupled receptors, termed MT1 and MT2, to exert beneficial actions in sleep and circadian abnormality, mood disorders, learning and memory, neuroprotection, drug abuse, and cancer. Progress in understanding the role of melatonin receptors in the modulation of sleep and circadian rhythms has led to the discovery of a novel class of melatonin agonists for treating insomnia, circadian rhythms, mood disorders, and cancer. This review describes the pharmacological properties of a slow-release melatonin preparation (i.e., Circadin®) and synthetic ligands (i.e., agomelatine, ramelteon, tasimelteon), with emphasis on identifying specific therapeutic effects mediated through MT1 and MT2 receptor activation. Discovery of selective ligands targeting the MT1 or the MT2 melatonin receptors may promote the development of novel and more efficacious therapeutic agents.

  5. MT1 and MT2 Melatonin Receptors: A Therapeutic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiabei; Clough, Shannon J.; Hutchinson, Anthony J.; Adamah-Biassi, Ekue B.; Popovska-Gorevski, Marina; Dubocovich, Margarita L.

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin, or 5-methoxy-N-acetyltryptamine, is synthesized and released by the pineal gland and locally in the retina following a circadian rhythm, with low levels during the day and elevated levels at night. Melatonin activates two high-affinity G protein–coupled receptors, termed MT1 and MT2, to exert beneficial actions in sleep and circadian abnormality, mood disorders, learning and memory, neuroprotection, drug abuse, and cancer. Progress in understanding the role of melatonin receptors in the modulation of sleep and circadian rhythms has led to the discovery of a novel class of melatonin agonists for treating insomnia, circadian rhythms, mood disorders, and cancer. This review describes the pharmacological properties of a slow-release melatonin preparation (i.e., Circadin®) and synthetic ligands (i.e., agomelatine, ramelteon, tasimelteon), with emphasis on identifying specific therapeutic effects mediated through MT1 and MT2 receptor activation. Discovery of selective ligands targeting the MT1 or the MT2 melatonin receptors may promote the development of novel and more efficacious therapeutic agents. PMID:26514204

  6. Shape coexistence in 153Ho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Dibyadyuti; Sarkar, S.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Bisoi, Abhijit; Ray, Sudatta; Dasgupta, Shinjinee; Chakraborty, A.; Krishichayan, Kshetri, Ritesh; Ray, Indrani; Ganguly, S.; Pradhan, M. K.; Ray Basu, M.; Raut, R.; Ganguly, G.; Ghugre, S. S.; Sinha, A. K.; Basu, S. K.; Bhattacharya, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Banerjee, P.; Goswami, A.

    2016-08-01

    The high-spin states in 153Ho have been studied by the La57(20Ne139,6 n ) reaction at a projectile energy of 139 MeV at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Kolkata, India, utilizing an earlier campaign of the Indian National Gamma Array (INGA) setup. Data from γ -γ coincidence, directional correlation, and polarization measurements have been analyzed to assign and confirm the spins and parities of the levels. We have suggested a few additions and revisions of the reported level scheme of 153Ho. The RF-γ time difference spectra have been useful to confirm the half-life of an isomer in this nucleus. From the comparison of experimental and theoretical results, it is found that there are definite indications of shape coexistence in this nucleus. The experimental and calculated lifetimes of several isomers have been compared to follow the coexistence and evolution of shape with increasing spin.

  7. Tomato EF-Ts(mt), a functional mitochondrial translation elongation factor from higher plants.

    PubMed

    Benichou, Mohamed; Li, Zhengguo; Tournier, Barthélémy; Chaves, Ana; Zegzouti, Hicham; Jauneau, Alain; Delalande, Corinne; Latché, Alain; Bouzayen, Mondher; Spremulli, Linda L; Pech, Jean-Claude

    2003-10-01

    Ethylene-induced ripening in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) resulted in the accumulation of a transcript designated LeEF-Ts(mt) that encodes a protein with significant homology to bacterial Ts translational elongation factor (EF-Ts). Transient expression in tobacco and sunflower protoplasts of full-length and truncated LeEF-Ts(mt)-GFP fusion constructs and confocal microscopy observations clearly demonstrated the targeting of LeEF-Ts(mt) to mitochondria and not to chloroplasts and the requirement for a signal peptide for the proper sorting of the protein. Escherichia coli recombinant LeEF-Ts(mt) co-eluted from Ni-NTA resins with a protein corresponding to the molecular weight of the elongation factor EF-Tu of E. coli, indicating an interaction with bacterial EF-Tu. Increasing the GDP concentration in the extraction buffer reduced the amount of EF-Tu in the purified LeEF-Ts(mt) fraction. The purified LeEF-Ts(mt) stimulated the poly(U)-directed polymerization of phenylalanine 10-fold in the presence of EF-Tu. Furthermore, LeEF-Ts(mt) was capable of catalysing the nucleotide exchange reaction with E. coli EF-Tu. Altogether, these data demonstrate that LeEF-Ts(mt) encodes a functional mitochondrial EF-Ts. LeEF-Ts(mt) represents the first mitochondrial elongation factor to be isolated and functionally characterized in higher plants.

  8. Tm:YLF Pumped Ho:YAG and Ho:LuAG Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Reichle, Donald J.; Walsh, Brian M.; Axenson, Theresa J.

    2004-01-01

    Room temperature Ho:YAG and Ho:LuAG lasers pumped by a Tm:YLF laser demonstrated a 3.4 mJ threshold and 0.41 slope efficiency, incident optical to laser output energy. Results for numerous rod lengths, Ho concentrations, and output mirror reflectivities are presented.

  9. Cobalt-related features of spectral and magnetic properties of RNi4Co (R=Ho, Er)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukoyanov, A. V.; Knyazev, Yu. V.; Kuz`min, Yu. I.; Kuchin, A. G.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we investigate spectral and magnetic properties of RNi4Co (R=Ho, Er) intermetallics to reveal the features associated with the presence of Co substituting ion in comparison with the parent HoNi5 and ErNi5 compounds. Our ab initio LSDA+U calculations show that in the electronic structure Co states are strongly manifested near the Fermi energy for the case of Co in 2c position, while Co in 3g position results only in weak changes of the total DOS curve. Theoretical optical conductivity calculated assuming Co equally redistributed among 2c or 3g positions agrees well with the experimental optical conductivity. Cobalt ion in RNi4Co (R=Ho, Er) is characterized by magnetic moment of 1 μB that increases exchange interaction in the 3d sublattice by several times that contributes to the growth of Curie temperature in comparison with the parent compounds.

  10. Modelling Mt. Etna mantle sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casetta, Federico; Giacomoni, Pier Paolo; Coltorti, Massimo; Ferlito, Carmelo; Bonadiman, Costanza

    2017-04-01

    The mantle source beneath Mt. Etna is matter of a longstanding and controversial debate, due to the absence of mantle xenoliths, the evolved nature of the erupted magmas and their geochemical variations. This study is focused on the modelling of the petrogenetic processes responsible for the production of Mt. Etna magmas and their variation through time, by means of a comparison with the Hyblean lavas (Southern Sicily), their evolution and mantle source(s). Samples from all Mt. Etna eruptive events, from the tholeiites to the nowadays K-rich eruptions, were used to a backward reconstruction of the primitive magma compositions, taking into account the fO2 of the magmatic system and its effect on mineral-melt Fe partitioning. The eutectic melting proportions and the modal composition of the Mt. Etna mantle source, obtained by a mass balance melting model, allowed to: i) compare the etnean inferred primary magmas with the Ol-hosted melt inclusions (MI) composition and with the Hyblean real primary magmas; ii) define some petrologic and geodynamic constraints on the Hyblean-Mt. Etna area taking also in account the compositions of the Hyblean xenoliths. A 2% to 17% addition of dunitic to wehrlitic assemblages (Ol + Cpx in progressive equilibrium) to Mt. Etna less evolved lavas allowed to equilibrate the Mt. Etna primitive magmas (mg# = 68) compositions for Timpe, AAV, Ellittico, Mongibello and Post-1971 stages to mantle conditions; Ol with Fo=88). The calculated Lh source is constituted by Ol + Opx + Cpx + Cr-Sp, with addition of small amounts (4.3%) of Amph and Phlog. Decreasing partial melting degrees (from 19% to 13-10%) and a change in Amph and Phlog eutectic melting proportions can explain the entire Mt. Etna compositional range, from the tholeiitic event to the Post-1971 LILE-enriched episodes, leading to the production of primary magmas characterized by a 0.6 to 1.2 wt% H2O content. Some speculation between geodynamic and magmatic evolution of the articulated and

  11. Level structure of 154Ho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Chang-Bum; Komatsubara, Tetsuro; Furuno, Kohei

    2013-10-01

    The excited states of the odd-odd 154Ho nucleus have been studied by using in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy with the 141Pr (16O, 3n) 154Ho reaction at Elab=75 MeV. The beam was provided by the 12UD Pelletron accelerator at the University of Tsukuba. In this work, the complicated decay pattern of low energy transitions just above the T1/2=3.10 min isomer have been established. In addition, a number of new states and γ-ray transitions, especially those associated with energetically favored band termination, have been observed for the first time in 154Ho. A negative collective band and its signature partner built on the 11- level are interpreted as being based on the πh11/2⊗νi13/2 configuration. A positive band built on the 10+ level is based on the πh11/2⊗νh9/2 configuration while another positive band built on the 9+ level is being associated with the πh11/2⊗νf7/2 configuration. An energetically favored level Jπ=19- can be interpreted as being attributed to the πh11/2⊗νi13/2 configuration coupled to the 8+ state in neighboring core 152Dy, namely, a four-quasiparticle alignment based on the [πh11/2νi13/2]11-⊗[ν(h9/2f7/2)]8- configuration. Another energetically favored state at Jπ=27- is assigned the six-quasiparticle [π(h11/2)3]27/2-⊗[ν(f7/2h9/2i13/2)]27/2- configuration.

  12. Ferroelectricity and competing interactions in Ho-deficient non-stoichiometric orthorhombic HoMnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. X.; Yan, Z. B.; Xie, Y. L.; Zhou, X. H.; Liu, J.-M.

    2015-05-07

    We investigate the consequences of the Ho-deficient non-stoichiometry in orthorhombic HoMnO{sub 3} in terms of microscopic mechanisms for ferroelectricity modulation. It is suggested that the Ho-deficiency (then Mn excess) results in Ho-vacancies and then Mn occupation of the Ho-site with increasing non-stoichiometry. The Ho-deficiency enhances the Mn-Mn symmetric exchange striction by suppressing the independent Ho-Ho interaction, and thus benefits to the induced Ho spin ordering against the independent Ho spin ordering. The symmetric Ho-Mn exchange striction is thus enhanced by this induced Ho spin ordering, leading to remarkably enhanced ferroelectric polarization as observed. This work presents an alternative scheme to modulate the multiferroicity in rare-earth manganites of strong 4f-3d coupling.

  13. Ferroelectricity and competing interactions in Ho-deficient non-stoichiometric orthorhombic HoMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. X.; Yan, Z. B.; Xie, Y. L.; Zhou, X. H.; Liu, J.-M.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the consequences of the Ho-deficient non-stoichiometry in orthorhombic HoMnO3 in terms of microscopic mechanisms for ferroelectricity modulation. It is suggested that the Ho-deficiency (then Mn excess) results in Ho-vacancies and then Mn occupation of the Ho-site with increasing non-stoichiometry. The Ho-deficiency enhances the Mn-Mn symmetric exchange striction by suppressing the independent Ho-Ho interaction, and thus benefits to the induced Ho spin ordering against the independent Ho spin ordering. The symmetric Ho-Mn exchange striction is thus enhanced by this induced Ho spin ordering, leading to remarkably enhanced ferroelectric polarization as observed. This work presents an alternative scheme to modulate the multiferroicity in rare-earth manganites of strong 4f-3d coupling.

  14. Effect of Ho substitution on structure and magnetic properties of BiFeO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, Pittala; Srinath, S.; Babu, P. D.

    2014-05-07

    Structure and magnetic properties of trivalent Ho substituted BiFeO{sub 3} (Ho{sub x}Bi{sub 1−x}FeO{sub 3}) have been studied for the compositional range x = 0 to 0.2. The structure remains in rhombohedral R3c for x < 0.15, and further increase in x results a structural transition to orthorhombic Pnma. The decrease in Raman modes and the appearance of new mode at 475 cm{sup −1} confirms the structural changes. Ho doping at Bi site breaks the spin cycloid of BiFO{sub 3} and leads to the observation of ferromagnetic order at low temperatures. With increase in temperature, the M-H curves exhibit a pinching leading to double hysteresis loops. A minimum is observed in M-T curves for low fields at compensation temperature (Θ{sub C}) and H{sub C} attains a maximum close to Θ{sub C}. Variation of H{sub C} with temperature is discussed in terms of a model consisting of two sublattices. The improved magnetic properties achieved by Ho doping enhance the potential of BiFeO{sub 3} for multiferroic applications.

  15. Recreation conflicts on Mt. Evans

    Treesearch

    Jerry J. Vaske; Karin Wittmann; Susan Laidlaw; Maureen P. Donnelly

    1995-01-01

    This study examines recreation conflict at Mt. Evans, Colorado; a high visibility area that attracts both hunters and non-hunters. Two types of conflict were distinguished: goal interference and conflict of values. Data were obtained from a series of on-site and mailed surveys. For hunting related events (e.g. seeing an animal being shot, hearing...

  16. The Mt. Mitchell scenery assessment

    Treesearch

    Robert F. Scheele; Gary W. Johnson

    1979-01-01

    The scenery assessment process for the Mt. Mitchell Suitability/Feasibility Study was conducted by National Park Service personnel and consultants in 1977-78. It combined approaches designed by Lewis (1962) and Jones (1976) in a comparative evaluation of the scenery of two large landscapes in the Appalachian physiographic province. The purpose of this study was to...

  17. Mt. SAC Research Briefs, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mt. SAC Research Briefs, 2000

    2000-01-01

    These Research Briefs examine Mt. San Antonio College District's (MSAC's) (California) enrollment trends. Over the last few years, the district has drawn a large number of students from surrounding areas; however, there are concerns as to whether this fact will remain the same as new forms of educational techniques such as distance education and…

  18. Increasing Accuracy and Increasing Tension in Ho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Wendy L.

    2017-01-01

    The Hubble Constant, Ho, provides a measure of the current expansion rate of the universe. In recent decades, there has been a huge increase in the accuracy with which extragalactic distances, and hence Ho, can be measured. While the historical factor-of-two uncertainty in Ho has been resolved, a new discrepancy has arisen between the values of Ho measured in the local universe, and that estimated from cosmic microwave background measurements, assuming a Lambda cold dark matter model. I will review the advances that have led to the increase in accuracy in measurements of Ho, as well as describe exciting future prospects with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Gaia, which will make it feasible to measure extragalactic distances at percent-level accuracy in the next decade.

  19. Thermochemistry of HO2 + HO2 → H2O4: Does HO2 Dimerization Affect Laboratory Studies?

    PubMed

    Sprague, Matthew K; Irikura, Karl K

    2015-07-09

    Self-reaction is an important sink for the hydroperoxy radical (HO2) in the atmosphere. It has been suggested (Denis, P. A.; Ornellas, F. R. J. Phys. Chem. A, 2009, 113 (2), 499-506) that the minor product hydrogen tetroxide (HO4H) may act as a reservoir of HO2. Here, we compute the thermochemistry of HO2 self-reactions to determine if either HO4H or the cyclic hydrogen-bound dimer (HO2)2 can act as reservoirs. We computed electronic energies using coupled-cluster calculations in the complete basis set limit, CCSD(T)/CBS[45]//CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ. Our model chemistry includes corrections for vibrational anharmonicity in the zero-point energy and vibrational partition functions, core-valence correlation, scalar relativistic effects, diagonal Born-Oppenheimer, spin-orbit splitting, and higher-order corrections. We compute the Gibbs energy of dimerization to be (-20.1 ± 1.6) kJ/mol at 298.15 K (2σ uncertainty), and (-32.3 ± 1.5) kJ/mol at 220 K. For atmospherically relevant [HO2] = 10(8) molecules per cm(3), our thermochemistry indicates that dimerization will be negligible, and thus H2O4 species are atmospherically unimportant. Under conditions used in laboratory experiments ([HO2] > 10(12) molecules per cm(3), 220 K), H2O4 formation may be significant. We compute two absorption spectra that could be used for laboratory detection of HO4H: the OH stretch overtone (near-IR) and electronic (UV) spectra.

  20. Theoretical Studies of the HO/HO2 Catalytic Cycle for Ozone Destruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, Steve R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Recently it has been determined that the HO/HO2 catalytic cycle accounts for nearly one-half of the total ozone depletion in the lower stratosphere. The catalytic cycle is: (1) HO + O3 yields HO2 + O2; (2) HO2 + O3 yields HO + O2 + O2. The net reaction is 2O3 yields 3O2. The rate limiting step in this process is the reaction of HO2 with ozone. There is a problem extending the experimental measurement of the rate of this reaction over the range 233-400 K down to stratospheric temperatures of 210-220 K. Therefore we have undertaken a project to determine the temperature dependence of the rate constant for this reaction in the low temperature region. The first step in this project, which is described in this poster, is the determination of the relevant potential energy surfaces. The calculations use CASSCF/derivative methods to define the pathways followed by CASSCF/ACPF to determine the energetics. The HO + O3 reaction is found to proceed through an HO4 complex, which is unstable with respect to HO2 + O2. The HO2 +O3 reaction is more complex. One pathway, which has been characterized, is the formation of an HO5 complex which decomposes to HO3 + O2 and subsequently to HO + O2 + O2. Another pathway, which is believed to also play a role, is hydrogen abstraction to give O2 + HO3 and subsequent decomposition of HO3 to HO + O2. Isotopic labeling experiments indicate that the later pathway is dominant. However, so far attempts to locate the saddle point for this pathway have not been successful. We have also characterized the potential energy surfaces for a number of species involved in these reactions, including HO3 and triplet O4. The triplet O4 species is probably involved in the reaction of vibrationally excited O2 with ground state O2 leading to O3 + O. The latter reaction is believed to be important as an additional source of stratospheric ozone.

  1. Theoretical Studies of the HO/HO2 Catalytic Cycle for Ozone Destruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, Steve R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Recently it has been determined that the HO/HO2 catalytic cycle accounts for nearly one-half of the total ozone depletion in the lower stratosphere. The catalytic cycle is: (1) HO + O3 yields HO2 + O2; (2) HO2 + O3 yields HO + O2 + O2. The net reaction is 2O3 yields 3O2. The rate limiting step in this process is the reaction of HO2 with ozone. There is a problem extending the experimental measurement of the rate of this reaction over the range 233-400 K down to stratospheric temperatures of 210-220 K. Therefore we have undertaken a project to determine the temperature dependence of the rate constant for this reaction in the low temperature region. The first step in this project, which is described in this poster, is the determination of the relevant potential energy surfaces. The calculations use CASSCF/derivative methods to define the pathways followed by CASSCF/ACPF to determine the energetics. The HO + O3 reaction is found to proceed through an HO4 complex, which is unstable with respect to HO2 + O2. The HO2 +O3 reaction is more complex. One pathway, which has been characterized, is the formation of an HO5 complex which decomposes to HO3 + O2 and subsequently to HO + O2 + O2. Another pathway, which is believed to also play a role, is hydrogen abstraction to give O2 + HO3 and subsequent decomposition of HO3 to HO + O2. Isotopic labeling experiments indicate that the later pathway is dominant. However, so far attempts to locate the saddle point for this pathway have not been successful. We have also characterized the potential energy surfaces for a number of species involved in these reactions, including HO3 and triplet O4. The triplet O4 species is probably involved in the reaction of vibrationally excited O2 with ground state O2 leading to O3 + O. The latter reaction is believed to be important as an additional source of stratospheric ozone.

  2. AN ELISA ASSAY FOR HEME OXYGENASE (HO-1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ELISA assay for heme oxygenase (HO-l )

    Abstract

    A double antibody capture ELISA for the HO-l protein has been developed to separately quantitate HO-I protein. The use of 2.5% NP40 detergent greatly assists in freeing HO-l protein from membranes and/or other cel...

  3. Registration of "HoCP 00-950" Sugarcane

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    HoCP 00-950 sugarcane was selected from progeny of the cross HoCP 93-750 x HoCP 92-676 made at Canal Point, Florida. HoCP 00-950 was developed through cooperative research by the Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture, the Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Stati...

  4. AN ELISA ASSAY FOR HEME OXYGENASE (HO-1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ELISA assay for heme oxygenase (HO-l )

    Abstract

    A double antibody capture ELISA for the HO-l protein has been developed to separately quantitate HO-I protein. The use of 2.5% NP40 detergent greatly assists in freeing HO-l protein from membranes and/or other cel...

  5. Ho:YLF pumped HBr laser.

    PubMed

    Botha, L R; Bollig, C; Esser, M J D; Campbell, R N; Jacobs, C; Preussler, D R

    2009-10-26

    A Ho:YLF laser pumped HBr molecular laser was developed that produced up to 2.5 mJ of energy in the 4 micron wavelength region. The Ho:YLF laser was fiber pumped using a commercial Tm:fibre laser. The Ho:YLF laser was operated in a single longitudinal mode via injection seeding with a narrow band diode laser which in turn was locked to one of the HBr transitions. The behavior of the HBr laser was described using a rate equation mathematical model and this was solved numerically. Good agreement both qualitatively and quantitatively between the model and experimental results was obtained.

  6. Local Measurement of Tropospheric HO(x)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosley, David R.

    1994-01-01

    In March of 1992 a workshop sponsored by NASA and NSF was held at SRI International to assess the current ability to measure atmospheric OH and HO2. The measurement techniques reviewed during the workshop for detection of OH included five laser-induced fluorescence schemes, five laser-based adsorption techniques, and four non-laser methods. Six instruments or instrument concepts for HO2 detection, including chemical amplification, conversion to OH with subsequent OH detection, or direct spectroscopic detection of the HO2 were also discussed. The conclusions from the workshop identify several measurement techniques for OH and HO2 that are ready for field tests. These have the ability to measure the radicals with sufficient sensitivity and accuracy to form meaningful comparison with atmospheric model predictions. The workshop conclusions also include recommendations for informal and formal intercomparison protocols.

  7. LiHo(PO3)4

    PubMed Central

    Ben Zarkouna, Emna; Driss, Ahmed; Férid, Mokhtar

    2009-01-01

    Lithium holmium(III) polyphosphate(V), LiHo(PO3)4, belongs to the type I of polyphosphates with general formula ALn(PO3)4, where A is a monovalent cation and Ln is a trivalent rare earth cation. In the crystal structure, the polyphosphate chains spread along the b-axis direction, with a repeat period of four tetra­hedra and 21 inter­nal symmetry. The Li and Ho atoms are both located on twofold rotation axes and are surrounded by four and eight O atoms, leading to a distorted tetra­hedral and dodeca­hedral coordination, respectively. The HoO8 polyhedra are isolated from each other, the closest Ho⋯Ho distance being 5.570 (1) Å. PMID:21581738

  8. HO-1 expression control in the rat glomerulus.

    PubMed

    Detsika, Maria G; Duann, Pu; Lianos, Elias A

    2015-05-08

    The differential localization of HO-1 in renal cells under conditions of injury, and the demonstration that exaggerated HO-1 expression can have detrimental rather than beneficial effects, raises the question of whether HO-1 expression in these cells is subject to control. The present study identifies a unique HO-1 expression pattern in the renal glomerulus indicative of presence of HO-1 expression control following prolonged HO-1 induction. HO-1 and HO-2 expression in response to the natural HO substrate/inducer Fe(++) protoporphyrin (PP) IX (hemin) was assessed in normal rat glomeruli. Following 18 h incubations with hemin (0-200 μM), HO-1 expression increased in a concentration-dependent manner and via a hemopexin (HPX) independent mechanism with no effect on HO-2. In incubations with higher hemin concentrations (400 μM), likely to be encountered in hemolytic disorders, HO-1 expression, decreased. This was preceded by a prolonged and sustained increase in HO-1 protein and was independent of the Fe(++) moiety as incubations with Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) resulted in an identical expression pattern. The decrease of HO-1 protein could not be accounted for by proteasomal degradation since it was not reversed in co-incubations with hemin and the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, at concentrations sufficient to increase HO-1 glomerular content when used alone. Moreover, in the presence of MG132, a decrease of HO-1 expression also occurred at 100 and 200 μM hemin. The effect of MG132 was mimicked by two additional mechanistically different approaches which also raised HO-1 content: a) co-incubations of hemin with ZnPP which increased HO-1 protein when used alone, and b) glomerular HO-1 over expression achieved by SB transposon mediated transgenesis. In contrast, the decrease in HO-1 levels observed at high hemin concentrations was reversed in co-incubations with hemin and SnPP, which reduced HO-1 content when used alone. Expression of NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2

  9. Onboard Photo of Mt. Everest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronaut Daniel W. Bursch, Expedition Four flight engineer, was delighted in capturing this image of Mt. Everest in the Himalayan Range from aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The mountain is near frame center. Because the photo was taken close to orbital sunrise, the low sun angle gave tremendous relief to the mountains. Named for Sir George Everest, the British surveyor-general of India, Mount Everest is the tallest point on earth. Standing 29,028 feet tall, it is 5 1/2 miles above sea level. Mount Everest is located half in Nepal and half in Tibet.

  10. The interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in RNi 2B 2C (R dbnd Lu, Tm, Er, Ho, Dy, Tb, Gd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Massalami, M.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Giordanengo, B.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E. M.

    1995-02-01

    The superconducting and magnetic phase diagram (characteristic temperatures versus effective ionic radii) of the RNi 2B 2C (R dbnd Lu, Tm, Er, Ho, Dy, Tb, Gd) compounds are considered. Although the gradual degradation of superconductivity can be scaled to the de Gennes factor, ( g-1) 2J( J + 1), the unique reentrant behavior of the HoNi 2B 2C compound and the abrupt quenching of superconductivity for R lighter than Ho are most probably unaccountable within this scheme. Rather, it is argued that their low- T magnetic and transport properties as well as the main features of the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity can be accounted for if the low- T magnetism of HoNi 2B 2C, as reported by Grigereit et al., is generalized to the other isomorphous R members. Thus the onset of the 4f moments antiferromagnetic state at T1 is accompanied by an oscillatory component, which transforms to a commensurate antiferromagnetic state at T2. For HoNi 2B 2C, the pressure and magnetic-field influence on Tc, T1 and T2 will be discussed.

  11. The Unimolecular Decomposition and H Abstraction Reactions by HO and HO2 from n-Butanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moc, Jerzy; Black, Gráinne; Simmie, John M.; Curran, Henry J.

    2009-08-01

    By using correlated ab initio (MP2, CCSD(T)) and multi-level (G3, CBS-QB3) methods we have studied unimolecular and bimolecular reactions of n-butanol in the gas phase. The specific processes investigated include H2O elimination and hydrogen abstraction by the hydroxy (HO) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals from this alcohol.

  12. Therapeutic potential of HO-1 in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Bao-Zhu; Guo, Biao; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Liu, Juan; Tao, Sha-Sha; Pan, Hai-Feng; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2014-10-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the inducible isoform of heme oxygenase (HO), has raised a lot of concerns in recent years due to its multiple functions. HO-1 was found to be a pivotal cytoprotective, antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, immunosuppressive, as well as anti-inflammatory molecule. Recent studies have clarified its significant functions in many diseases with substantial findings. In autoimmune diseases, HO-1 may have promising therapeutic potential. Here, we briefly reviewed recent advances in this field, aiming at hopefully exploring the potential therapeutic roles of HO-1, and design HO-1-based strategies for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  13. Estimation of human absorbed dose for (166)Ho-PAM: comparison with (166)Ho-DOTMP and (166)Ho-TTHMP.

    PubMed

    Vaez-Tehrani, Mahdokht; Zolghadri, Samaneh; Yousefnia, Hassan; Afarideh, Hossein

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the human absorbed dose of holmium-166 ((166)Ho)-pamidronate (PAM) as a potential agent for the management of multiple myeloma was estimated. (166)Ho-PAM complex was prepared at optimized conditions and injected into the rats. The equivalent and effective absorbed doses to human organs after injection of the complex were estimated by radiation-absorbed dose assessment resource and methods proposed by Sparks et al based on rat data. The red marrow to other organ absorbed dose ratios were compared with these data for (166)Ho-DOTMP, as the only clinically used (166)Ho bone marrow ablative agent, and (166)Ho-TTHMP. The highest absorbed dose amounts are observed in the bone surface and bone marrow with 1.11 and 0.903 mGy MBq(-1), respectively. Most other organs would receive approximately insignificant absorbed dose. While (166)Ho-PAM demonstrated a higher red marrow to total body absorbed dose ratio than (166)Ho-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclo dodecane-1,4,7,10 tetra ethylene phosphonic acid (DOTMP) and (166)Ho-triethylene tetramine hexa (methylene phosphonic acid) (TTHMP), the red marrow to most organ absorbed dose ratios for (166)Ho-TTHMP and (166)Ho-PAM are much higher than the ratios for (166)Ho-DOTMP. The result showed that (166)Ho-PAM has significant characteristics than (166)Ho-DOTMP and therefore, this complex can be considered as a good agent for bone marrow ablative therapy. In this work, two separate points have been investigated: (1) human absorbed dose of (166)Ho-PAM, as a potential bone marrow ablative agent, has been estimated; and (2) the complex has been compared with (166)Ho-DOTMP, as the only clinically used bone marrow ablative radiopharmaceutical, showing significant characteristics.

  14. ASTER Images Mt. Usu Volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-26

    On April 3, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra Satellite captured this image of the erupting Mt. Usu volcano in Hokkaido, Japan. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image the Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. This false color infrared image of Mt Usu volcano is dominated by Lake Toya, an ancient volcanic caldera. On the south shore is the active Usu volcano. On Friday, March 31, more than 11,000 people were evacuated by helicopter, truck and boat from the foot of Usu, that began erupting from the northwest flank, shooting debris and plumes of smoke streaked with blue lightning thousands of feet in the air. Although no lava gushed from the mountain, rocks and ash continued to fall after the eruption. The region was shaken by thousands of tremors before the eruption. People said they could taste grit from the ash that was spewed as high as 2,700 meters (8,850 ft) into the sky and fell to coat surrounding towns with ash. "Mount Usu has had seven significant eruptions that we know of, and at no time has it ended quickly with only a small scale eruption," said Yoshio Katsui, a professor at Hokkaido University. This was the seventh major eruption of Mount Usu in the past 300 years. Fifty people died when the volcano erupted in 1822, its worst known eruption. In the image, most of the land is covered by snow. Vegetation, appearing red in the false color composite, can be seen in the agricultural fields, and forests in the mountains. Mt. Usu is crossed by three dark streaks. These are the paths of ash deposits that rained out from eruption plumes two days earlier. The prevailing wind was from the northwest, carrying the ash away from the main city of Date. Ash deposited can be traced on the image as far away as 10 kilometers (16 miles

  15. Functional MT + lesion impairs contralateral motion processing.

    PubMed

    Moo, Lauren R; Emerton, Britt C; Slotnick, Scott D

    2008-07-01

    Human motion processing region MT + is retinotopically organized with perception of and attention to motion in the right visual field preferentially associated with left MT + activity and vice versa. However, the degree to which MT + is crucial for motion processing is uncertain. We report an epilepsy patient with visual symptoms early in his seizure evolution and a left temporal-occipital seizure onset electrographically in whom we hypothesized a functional left MT + lesion. The patient was impaired in his right but not left visual field on a hemifield motion attention task and demonstrated worse performance on a hemifield picture identification task when pictures implying motion were presented in the right as opposed to the left visual field. Functional MRI (fMRI) during a full-field motion detection task activated right MT + but failed to activate left MT + despite activating both left and right MT + in each of 10 controls. Furthermore, fMRI during a hemifield motion attention task also showed a lack of left MT + attention effects in the patient. Together these results suggest that MT + is necessary for normal motion processing.

  16. Temperature changes under Ho:YLF irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zezell, Denise M.; Cecchini, Silvia C. M.; Pinotti, Marcos; Eduardo, Carlos d. P.

    1996-04-01

    A prototype of Er:Tm:Ho:LiYF4 (Ho:YLF) laser, emitting at 2,065 micrometers , 1,25 J 5 Hz, with pulsewidth of 250 microsecond(s) was developed for biomedical applications. In order to verify the possibility of using this laser for cavities preparation in vivo, temperature rise in the pulp chamber must be known. Temperature changes were measured during Ho:YLF irradiation with 500 mJ/pulse, 30 pulses/position with energy density of 2079 J/cm2/pulse. Two groups of teeth were used: group I with pulp chamber empty and group II with pulp chamber filled with phase change material. In both cases, there were no temperature rise above 3,8 degree(s)C in the pulp chamber.

  17. Water dependence of the HO2 self reaction: kinetics of the HO2-H2O complex.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Nozomu; Tonokura, Kenichi; Tezaki, Atsumu; Koshi, Mitsuo

    2005-04-14

    Transient absorption spectra and decay profiles of HO2 have been measured using cw near-IR two-tone frequency modulation absorption spectroscopy at 297 K and 50 Torr in diluent of N2 in the presence of water. From the depletion of the HO2 absorption peak area following the addition of water, the equilibrium constant of the reaction HO2 + H2O <--> HO2-H2O was determined to be K2 = (5.2 +/- 3.2) x 10(-19) cm3 molecule(-1) at 297 K. Substituting K2 into the water dependence of the HO2 decay rate, the rate coefficient of the reaction HO2 + HO2-H2O was estimated to be (1.5 +/- 0.1) x 10(-11) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) at 297 K and 50 Torr with N2 as the diluent. This reaction is much faster than the HO2 self-reaction without water. It is suggested that the apparent rate of the HO2 self-reaction is enhanced by the formation of the HO2-H2O complex and its subsequent reaction. Results are discussed with respect to the kinetics and atmospheric chemistry of the HO2-H2O complex. At 297 K and 50% humidity, the concentration ratio of [HO2-H2O]/[HO2] was estimated from the value of K2 to be 0.19 +/- 0.11.

  18. 75 FR 52534 - Su Van Ho: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... Salmonella bacteria, with verification of such exportation or destruction by FDA. Mr. Ho concealed and... with Salmonella bacteria. As a result of his conviction, on June 10, 2010, FDA sent Mr. Ho a notice by...

  19. Chemistry of HO x radicals in the upper troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeglé, Lyatt; Jacob, Daniel J.; Brune, William H.; Wennberg, Paul O.

    Aircraft observations from three recent missions (STRAT, SUCCESS, SONEX) are synthesized into a theoretical analysis of the factors controlling the concentrations of HO x radicals (HO x=OH+peroxy) and the larger reservoir family HO y (HO y=HO x+2H 2O 2+2CH 3OOH+HNO 2+HNO 4) in the upper troposphere. Photochemical model calculations capture 66% of the variance of observed HO x concentrations. Two master variables are found to determine the variance of the 24 h average HO x concentrations: the primary HO x production rate, P(HO x), and the concentration of nitrogen oxide radicals (NO x=NO+NO 2). We use these two variables as a coordinate system to diagnose the photochemistry of the upper troposphere and map the different chemical regimes. Primary HO x production is dominated by the O( 1D)+H 2O reaction when [H 2O]>100 ppmv, and by photolysis of acetone (and possibly other convected HO x precursors) under drier conditions. For the principally northern midlatitude conditions sampled by the aircraft missions, the HO x yield from acetone photolysis ranges from 2 to 3. Methane oxidation amplifies the primary HO x source by a factor of 1.1-1.9. Chemical cycling within the HO x family has a chain length of 2.5-7, while cycling between the HO x family and its HO y reservoirs has a chain length of 1.6-2.2. The number of ozone molecules produced per HO y molecule consumed ranges from 4 to 12, such that ozone production rates vary between 0.3 and 5 ppbv d -1 in the upper troposphere. Three chemical regimes (NO x-limited, transition, NO x-saturated) are identified to describe the dependence of HO x concentrations and ozone production rates on the two master variables P(HO x) and [NO x]. Simplified analytical expressions are derived to express these dependences as power laws for each regime. By applying an eigenlifetime analysis to the HO x-NO x-O 3 chemical system, we find that the decay of a perturbation to HO y in the upper troposphere (as from deep convection) is represented

  20. Magnetic structures in RNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C (R = Ho, Er) superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Stassis, C.; Goldman, A.I.; Dervenagas, P.; Zarestky, J.; Canfield, P.C.; Cho, B.K.; Johnston, D.C.; Sternlieb, B.; Sternlieb, B.

    1994-12-31

    Single crystal neutron diffraction techniques have been employed to study the evolution of magnetic structures in RNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C compounds in an attempt to understand the relationship between magnetic ordering and superconductivity in several members of this series. For HoNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C, below the superconducting transition (T{sub c} = 8 K), an incommensurate magnetic structure characterized by two wave vectors (0.585 a* and 0.915 c*) is found in a narrow temperature range between 4.7 K and 6 K. This is the same temperature range where bulk measurements find a deep minimum in the upper critical field, H{sub c2}. Below 4.7 K, HoNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C is a simple collinear antiferromagnet. ErNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C ({Tc} = 11 K) orders in an incommensurate modulated antiferromagnetic state characterized by an ordering wave vector 0.553 a* below 7 K, which coexists with superconductivity.

  1. ASTER Images Mt. Usu Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    On April 3, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra Satellite captured this image of the erupting Mt. Usu volcano in Hokkaido, Japan. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image the Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    This false color infrared image of Mt Usu volcano is dominated by Lake Toya, an ancient volcanic caldera. On the south shore is the active Usu volcano. On Friday, March 31, more than 11,000 people were evacuated by helicopter, truck and boat from the foot of Usu, that began erupting from the northwest flank, shooting debris and plumes of smoke streaked with blue lightning thousands of feet in the air. Although no lava gushed from the mountain, rocks and ash continued to fall after the eruption. The region was shaken by thousands of tremors before the eruption. People said they could taste grit from the ash that was spewed as high as 2,700 meters (8,850 ft) into the sky and fell to coat surrounding towns with ash. 'Mount Usu has had seven significant eruptions that we know of, and at no time has it ended quickly with only a small scale eruption,' said Yoshio Katsui, a professor at Hokkaido University. This was the seventh major eruption of Mount Usu in the past 300 years. Fifty people died when the volcano erupted in 1822, its worst known eruption.

    In the image, most of the land is covered by snow. Vegetation, appearing red in the false color composite, can be seen in the agricultural fields, and forests in the mountains. Mt. Usu is crossed by three dark streaks. These are the paths of ash deposits that rained out from eruption plumes two days earlier. The prevailing wind was from the northwest, carrying the ash away from the main city of Date. Ash deposited can be traced on the image as far away as 10 kilometers (16

  2. ASTER Images Mt. Usu Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    On April 3, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra Satellite captured this image of the erupting Mt. Usu volcano in Hokkaido, Japan. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image the Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    This false color infrared image of Mt Usu volcano is dominated by Lake Toya, an ancient volcanic caldera. On the south shore is the active Usu volcano. On Friday, March 31, more than 11,000 people were evacuated by helicopter, truck and boat from the foot of Usu, that began erupting from the northwest flank, shooting debris and plumes of smoke streaked with blue lightning thousands of feet in the air. Although no lava gushed from the mountain, rocks and ash continued to fall after the eruption. The region was shaken by thousands of tremors before the eruption. People said they could taste grit from the ash that was spewed as high as 2,700 meters (8,850 ft) into the sky and fell to coat surrounding towns with ash. 'Mount Usu has had seven significant eruptions that we know of, and at no time has it ended quickly with only a small scale eruption,' said Yoshio Katsui, a professor at Hokkaido University. This was the seventh major eruption of Mount Usu in the past 300 years. Fifty people died when the volcano erupted in 1822, its worst known eruption.

    In the image, most of the land is covered by snow. Vegetation, appearing red in the false color composite, can be seen in the agricultural fields, and forests in the mountains. Mt. Usu is crossed by three dark streaks. These are the paths of ash deposits that rained out from eruption plumes two days earlier. The prevailing wind was from the northwest, carrying the ash away from the main city of Date. Ash deposited can be traced on the image as far away as 10 kilometers (16

  3. Spectroscopic properties of Ho3+ ions doped in tellurite glass.

    PubMed

    Rai, S B; Singh, Anant Kumar; Singh, Shiv Kumar

    2003-12-01

    Spectroscopic properties of Ho3+ doped tellurite glass (1 mol.% of Ho3+) have been studied. The absorption and fluorescence spectra have been recorded and analysed using the Judd-Offelt theory. The analysis indicates that Ho doped tellurite glasses can show lasing on the 5F4 (5S2)-5I8 transition (548.0 nm).

  4. The role of MT2-MMP in cancer progression

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Emiko; Yana, Ikuo; Fujita, Chisato; Irifune, Aiko; Takeda, Maki; Madachi, Ayako; Mori, Seiji; Hamada, Yoshinosuke; Kawaguchi, Naomasa; Matsuura, Nariaki

    2010-03-05

    The role of MT2-MMP in cancer progression remains to be elucidated in spite of many reports on MT1-MMP. Using a human fibrosarcoma cell, HT1080 and a human gastric cancer cell, TMK-1, endogenous expression of MT1-MMP or MT2-MMP was suppressed by siRNA induction to examine the influence of cancer progression in vitro and in vivo. In HT1080 cells, positive both in MT1-MMP and MT2-MMP, the migration as well as the invasion was impaired by MT1-MMP or MT2-MMP suppression. Also cell proliferation in three dimensional (3D) condition was inhibited by MT1-MMP or MT2-MMP suppression and tumor growth in the nude mice transplanted with tumor cells were reduced either MT1-MMP or MT2-MMP suppression with a prolongation of survival time in vivo. MT2-MMP suppression induces more inhibitory effects on 3D proliferation and in vivo tumor growth than MT1-MMP. On the other hand, TMK-1 cells, negative in MT1-MMP and MMP-2 but positive in MT2-MMP, all the migratory, invasive, and 3D proliferative activities in TMK-1 are decreased only by MT2-MMP suppression. These results indicate MT2-MMP might be involved in the cancer progression more than or equal to MT1-MMP independently of MMP-2 and MT1-MMP.

  5. Mt. Pinatubo, Phillippines - Perspective View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The effects of the June 15, 1991, eruption of Mt. Pinatubo continue to affect the lives of people living near the volcano on the island of Luzon in the Philippines. The eruption produced a large amount of volcanic debris that was deposited on the flanks of the volcano as part of pyroclastic flows. This perspective view looking toward the east shows the western flank of the volcano where most of these pyroclastic flows were deposited.

    This debris consists of ash and boulders that mix with water after heavy rains to form volcanic mudflows called lahars. Lahars are moving rivers of concrete slurry that are highly erosive. They can sweep down existing river valleys, carving deep canyons where the slopes are steep, or depositing a mixture of fine ash and larger rocks on the gentler slopes. The deposits left from a lahar soon solidify into a material similar to concrete, but while they are moving, lahars are dynamic features, and in a single river valley the active channel may change locations within a few minutes or hours. These changes represent a significant natural hazard to local communities.

    The topographic data were collected by NASA's airborne imaging radar AIRSAR instrument on November 29, 1996. Colors are from the French SPOT satellite imaging data in both visible and infrared wavelengths collected in February 1996. Areas of vegetation appear red and areas without vegetation appear light blue. River valleys radiate out from the summit of the volcano (upper center). Since the eruption, lahars have stripped these valleys of any vegetation. The Pasig-Potrero River flows to the northeast off the summit in the upper right of the image.

    Scientists have been using airborne radar data collected by the AIRSAR instrument in their studies of the aftereffects of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption. AIRSAR collected imaging radar data over the volcano during a mission to the Pacific Rim region in late 1996 and on a follow-up mission to the area in late 2000. These data sets

  6. Metallothionein (MT) 1/2 expression in MT 1/2 and MT 3 knock-out mice and Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats.

    PubMed

    Nakazato, Kyoumi; Nakajima, Katsuyuki; Nakano, Takamitsu; Kodaira, Tsukasa; Nakayama, Kenji; Satoh, Masahiko; Nagamine, Takeaki

    2012-02-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is known to be involved in various physiological roles and diseases. However, a standard method for MT measurement has not been established until recently. Therefore, we have developed an easy and specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) to determine MT-1 and MT-2. In order to evaluate the method we developed, MT-1/2 in liver, kidney and brain was determined in wild type (WT), MT-1/2 knockout (KO) and MT-3 KO mice, with and without Cd treatment. MT 1/2 in urine was determined in genetically disordered LEC rats (an animal model of Wilson disease). MT-1/2 concentrations in the liver, kidney and brain in MT-1/2 KO mice were significantly lower compared to those of WT and MT-3 KO mice. MT-1/2 concentrations in the livers of WT mice significantly increased with Cd administration, but not in MT-1/2 KO mice. Similar results were observed by immunohistochemical staining. To confirm the molecular weight (MW) of MT detected in organs by the ELISA, analysis with a Sephadex G-75 was performed. Two peaks of MT-1/2 (MW small and large) were detected in WT and MT-3 KO mice. The small MT peak was mostly depleted in MT 1/2-KO mice, while a large MT peak remained. A significant increase in MT-1/2 concentration was detected in the urine of LEC rats with age and especially at the hepatitis stage. In conclusion, MT-1/2 ELISA and immunohistochemical staining was highly correlated with MT-1/2 determination in experimental animal specimens and could be a robust analytical tool for physiological and toxicological studies.

  7. Kinetics of the reaction HO2 + NO2 + M yields HO2NO2 + M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, S. P.; Peterson, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    The flash photolysis/ultraviolet absorption technique was used to measure the rate constants for the reaction HO2 + NO2 + M yields HO2NO2 + M over the pressure range 50-700 torr and temperature range 229-362 K using He, O2, and N2 as diluent gases. The data were fit to the expression derived by Troe (1979) and co-workers for describing the pressure and temperature dependence of reactions in the falloff region. By combining these data with recent measurements of the rate constant for HO2NO2 thermal decomposition values of 73.8 + or - 2 eu for the standard entropy and -12.6 + or - kcal/mol for the standard enthalpy of formation of HO2NO2 were obtained. A significant enhancement in the rate constant was observed when water vapor was added to the system.

  8. Molecular cloning and pharmacological characterization of rat melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Audinot, Valérie; Bonnaud, Anne; Grandcolas, Line; Rodriguez, Marianne; Nagel, Nadine; Galizzi, Jean-Pierre; Balik, Ales; Messager, Sophie; Hazlerigg, David G; Barrett, Perry; Delagrange, Philippe; Boutin, Jean A

    2008-05-15

    In order to interpret the effects of melatonin ligands in rats, we need to determine their activity at the receptor subtype level in the corresponding species. Thus, the rat melatonin rMT(1) receptor was cloned using DNA fragments for exon 1 and 2 amplified from rat genomic DNA followed by screening of a rat genomic library for the full length exon sequences. The rat rMT(2) receptor subtype was cloned in a similar manner with the exception of exon 1 which was identified by screening a rat genomic library with exon 1 of the human hMT(2) receptor. The coding region of these receptors translates proteins of 353 and 364 amino acids, respectively, for rMT(1) and rMT(2). A 55% homology was observed between both rat isoforms. The entire contiguous rat MT(1) and MT(2) receptor coding sequences were cloned, stably expressed in CHO cells and characterized in binding assay using 2-[(125)I]-Iodomelatonin. The dissociation constants (K(d)) for rMT(1) and rMT(2) were 42 and 130 pM, respectively. Chemically diverse compounds previously characterized at human MT(1) and MT(2) receptors were evaluated at rMT(1) and rMT(2) receptors, for their binding affinity and functionality in [(35)S]-GTPgammaS binding assay. Some, but not all, compounds shared a similar binding affinity and functionality at both rat and human corresponding subtypes. A different pharmacological profile of the MT(1) subtype has also been observed previously between human and ovine species. These in vitro results obtained with the rat melatonin receptors are thus of importance to understand the physiological roles of each subtype in animal models.

  9. Infrared Identification of HO2 and HO3 Radicals in Irradiated Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, P. D.; Moore, M. H.; Hudson, R. L.

    2006-05-01

    Absorption bands at 1259 and 1142 cm-1 in H2O-O2 ice mixtures irradiated with 0.8 MeV protons at 9 K, have been assigned to the HO3 and HO2 radicals respectively. The assignment of these bands is based upon isotopic shift measurements when 18O2 is used. These bands are also observed in irradiated H2O-O3 and pure H2O2 ices. In each case, they are formed by the following reactions: H + O3 → HO3 H + O2 → HO2 While neither radical has been observed in ice using infrared spectroscopy before, the HO2 radical is known to form in irradiated water ice, but remarkably, the lesser known HO3 is the more prominent spectral feature. These species are probably formed in the surfaces of icy outer solar system bodies where O2 and O3 have already been observed. Their ability to remain trapped in ice is unknown and their reactivity at typical surface temperatures may prevent signficant concentrations being produced. However, even as intermediate species, due to their reactivity they may constitute an important component of the oxidant population in such ices. If they can remain trapped, they may provide a potential energy source for organic reactions or even microbial life in places such as Europa's sub-surface ocean.

  10. Kinetics of Reactions of HO2 with HO2 and with organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyndall, G. S.; Orlando, J. J.; Tang, Y.; Hasson, A. S.; Scaldaferri, M. C.; Pimentel, A. S.; Wallington, T. J.

    2009-12-01

    Reactions of HO2 radicals with organics are in general assumed to be quite slow. However, it has been known for a number of years that HO2 adds reversibly to HCHO, in a reaction which can lead to the production of formic acid, particularly at low temperature. We have studied the reaction of HO2 with a number of carbonyls as a function of temperature using both time resolved diode laser absorption and FTIR analysis. In the time resolved studies, HO2 is produced by flash photolysis and detected in the overtone of the OH stretching mode by diode laser spectroscopy. The self reaction of HO2 was first studied as a function of temperature and added complexing gases (H2O, CH3OH). The rate coefficient of the self reaction was found to have a moderate negative temperature dependence, in agreement with older studies of this reaction. The addition of carbonyls (HCHO, CH3CHO, CF3CHO, acetone) led to an increase in the loss rate of HO2, enabling kinetic and thermodynamic information to be obtained about the equilibria. Complementary experiments were conducted to examine the products in an environmental chamber using FTIR detection of reactants and products. The reaction mechanisms and environmental impacts of the results will be discussed.

  11. Domain Tuning of Bilingual Lexicons for MT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-02-01

    SUBTITLE Domain Tuning of Bilingual Lexicons for MT 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Domain Tuning of Bilingual Lexicons for MT Necip Fazıl Ayan, Bonnie J. Dorr, Okan Kolak...umiacs.umd.edu Domain Tuning of Bilingual Lexicons for MT Abstract Our overall objective is to translate a domain-specific document in a for- eign language (in

  12. MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors: ligands, models, oligomers, and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Zlotos, Darius P; Jockers, Ralf; Cecon, Erika; Rivara, Silvia; Witt-Enderby, Paula A

    2014-04-24

    Numerous physiological functions of the pineal gland hormone melatonin are mediated via activation of two G-protein-coupled receptors, MT1 and MT2. The melatonergic drugs on the market, ramelteon and agomelatine, as well as the most advanced drug candidates under clinical evaluation, tasimelteon and TIK-301, are high-affinity nonselective MT1/MT2 agonists. A great number of MT2-selective ligands and, more recently, several MT1-selective agents have been reported to date. Herein, we review recent advances in the field focusing on high-affinity agonists and antagonists and those displaying selectivity toward MT1 and MT2 receptors. Moreover, the existing models of MT1 and MT2 receptors as well as the current status in the emerging field of melatonin receptor oligomerization are critically discussed. In addition to the already existing indications, such as insomnia, circadian sleep disorders, and depression, new potential therapeutic applications of melatonergic ligands including cardiovascular regulation, appetite control, tumor growth inhibition, and neurodegenerative diseases are presented.

  13. HO-1/CO system in tumor growth, angiogenesis and metabolism - Targeting HO-1 as an anti-tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Loboda, Agnieszka; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2015-11-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, hmox-1) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the heme degradation processes. Out of three by-products of HO-1 activity, biliverdin, iron ions and carbon monoxide (CO), the latter was mostly shown to mediate many beneficial HO-1 effects, including protection against oxidative injury, regulation of apoptosis, modulation of inflammation as well as contribution to angiogenesis. Mounting evidence suggests that HO-1/CO systemmay be of special benefit in protection inmany pathological conditions, like atherosclerosis or myocardial infarction. By contrast, the augmented expression of HO-1 in tumor tissues may have detrimental effect as HO-1 accelerates the formation of tumor neovasculature and provides the selective advantage for tumor cells to overcome the increased oxidative stress during tumorigenesis and during treatment. The inhibition of HO-1 has been proposed as an anti-cancer therapy, however, because of non-specific effects of known HO-1 inhibitors, the discovery of ideal drug lowering HO-1 expression/activity is still an open question. Importantly, in several types of cancer HO-1/CO system exerts opposite activities, making the possible treatment more complicated. All together indicates the complex role for HO-1/CO in various in vitro and in vivo conditions.

  14. 78 FR 44187 - Montana Disaster # MT-00079

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Montana Disaster MT-00079 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... have been determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Blaine,...

  15. Volcanic earthquake swarms at Mt. Erebus, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminuma, Katsutada; Ueki, Sadato; Juergen, Kienle

    1985-04-01

    Mount Erebus is an active volcano in Antarctica located on Ross Island. A convecting lava lake occupies the summit crater of Mt. Erebus. Since December 1980 the seismic activity of Mt. Erebus has been continuously monitored using a radio-telemetered network of six seismic stations. The seismic activity observed by the Ross Island network during the 1982-1983 field season shows that: (1)Strombolian eruptions occur frequently at the Erebus summit lava lake at rates of 2-5 per day; (2)centrally located earthquakes map out a nearly vertical, narrow conduit system beneath the lava lake; (3)there are other source regions of seismicity on Ross Island, well removed from Mt. Erebus proper. An intense earthquake swarm recorded in October 1982 near Abbott Peak, 10 km northwest of the summit of Mt. Erebus, and volcanic tremor accompanying the swarm, may have been associated with new dike emplacement at depth.

  16. Distant Mt. Fuji, Island of Honshu Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This distant view of Mt. Fuji, on the main home island of Honshu, Japan (34.0N, 139.0E) was taken from about 450 miles to the south. Evan at that great distance, the majestic and inspiring Mt. Fuji is still plainly visible and easily recognized as a world renowned symbol of Japan. The snow capped extinct volcano lies just a few miles south of Tokyo.

  17. Distant Mt. Fuji, Island of Honshu Japan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-11-01

    This distant view of Mt. Fuji, on the main home island of Honshu, Japan (34.0N, 139.0E) was taken from about 450 miles to the south. Evan at that great distance, the majestic and inspiring Mt. Fuji is still plainly visible and easily recognized as a world renowned symbol of Japan. The snow capped extinct volcano lies just a few miles south of Tokyo.

  18. Evaluation of HOx sources and cycling using measurement-constrained model calculations in a 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol (MBO) and monoterpene (MT) dominated ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Wolfe, G. M.; Mauldin, L.; Cantrell, C.; Guenther, A.; Karl, T.; Turnipseed, A.; Greenberg, J.; Hall, S. R.; Ullmann, K.; Apel, E.; Hornbrook, R.; Kajii, Y.; Nakashima, Y.; Keutsch, F. N.; DiGangi, J. P.; Henry, S. B.; Kaser, L.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Graus, M.; Hansel, A.

    2012-06-01

    We present a detailed analysis of OH and HO2 observations from the BEACHON (Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen)-ROCS (Rocky Mountain Organic Carbon Study) 2010 field campaign at the Manitou Forest Observatory (MFO), which is a 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol (MBO) and monoterpene (MT) dominated forest environment. A comprehensive suite of measurements was used to constrain primary production of OH via ozone photolysis, OH recycling from HO2, and OH chemical loss rates, in order to estimate the steady-state concentration of OH. In addition, the University of Washington Chemical Model (UWCM) was used to evaluate the performance of a near-explicit chemical mechanism. The diurnal cycle in OH from the steady-state calculations is in good agreement with measurement. A comparison between the photolytic production rates and the recycling rates from the HO2 + NO reaction shows that recycling rates are ~20 times faster than the photolytic OH production rates from ozone. Thus, we find that direct measurement of the recycling rates and the OH loss rates can provide accurate predictions of OH concentrations. More importantly, we also conclude that a conventional OH recycling pathway (HO2 + NO) can explain the observed OH levels in this non-isoprene environment. This is in contrast to observations in isoprene-dominated regions, where investigators have observed significant underestimation of OH and have speculated that unknown sources of OH are responsible. The highly-constrained UWCM calculation under-predicts observed HO2 by as much as a factor of 8. As HO2 maintains oxidation capacity by recycling to OH, UWCM underestimates observed OH by as much as a factor of 5. When the UWCM calculation is constrained by measured HO2, model calculated OH is in reasonable agreement with the observed OH levels. Conversely, constraining the model to observed OH only slightly reduces the model-measurement HO2 discrepancy, implying unknown HO2

  19. AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE

    Heme oxygenase (HO) occurs in biological tissues as two major isoforms HO-1 and HO-2. HO-1 is inducible by many treatments, particularly oxidative stress-related conditions such as depletion of gl...

  20. AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE

    Heme oxygenase (HO) occurs in biological tissues as two major isoforms HO-1 and HO-2. HO-1 is inducible by many treatments, particularly oxidative stress-related conditions such as depletion of gl...

  1. 77 FR 32896 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Billings, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... airspace at Billings Logan International Airport, Billings, MT. Controlled airspace is necessary to... Billings, MT Billings Logan International Airport, MT (Lat. 45 48'28'' N., long. 108 32'34'' W.) That... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Modification of Class E Airspace; Billings, MT AGENCY...

  2. 44 CFR 15.3 - Access to Mt. Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Access to Mt. Weather. 15.3... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CONDUCT AT THE MT. WEATHER EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE CENTER AND AT THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.3 Access to Mt. Weather. Mt. Weather contains classified material and areas...

  3. 44 CFR 15.3 - Access to Mt. Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Access to Mt. Weather. 15.3... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CONDUCT AT THE MT. WEATHER EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE CENTER AND AT THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.3 Access to Mt. Weather. Mt. Weather contains classified material and areas...

  4. 44 CFR 15.3 - Access to Mt. Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Access to Mt. Weather. 15.3... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CONDUCT AT THE MT. WEATHER EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE CENTER AND AT THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.3 Access to Mt. Weather. Mt. Weather contains classified material and areas...

  5. 44 CFR 15.3 - Access to Mt. Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Access to Mt. Weather. 15.3... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CONDUCT AT THE MT. WEATHER EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE CENTER AND AT THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.3 Access to Mt. Weather. Mt. Weather contains classified material and areas...

  6. 44 CFR 15.3 - Access to Mt. Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Access to Mt. Weather. 15.3... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CONDUCT AT THE MT. WEATHER EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE CENTER AND AT THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.3 Access to Mt. Weather. Mt. Weather contains classified material and areas...

  7. Low noise, tunable Ho:fiber soliton oscillator for Ho:YLF amplifier seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Ruehl, Axel; Bransley, Colleen; Hartl, Ingmar

    2016-06-01

    We present a passively mode-locked, tunable soliton Ho:fiber ring oscillator, optimized for seeding of holmium-doped yttrium lithium flouride (Ho:YLF) amplifiers. The oscillator is independently tunable in central wavelength and spectral width from 2040 to 2070 nm and from 5 to 10 nm, respectively. At all settings the pulse energy within the soliton is around 800 pJ. The soliton oscillator was optimized to fully meet the spectral requirements for seeding Ho:YLF amplifiers. Its Kelly sidebands are located outside the amplifier gain spectrum, resulting in a train of about 1 ps long pedestal-free pulses with relative intensity noise of only 0.13% RMS when integrated from 1 Hz to Nyquist frequency.

  8. Exchange bias beyond the superparamagnetic blocking temperature of the antiferromagnet in a Ni-NiO nanoparticulate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Aparna; De Toro, J. A.; Amaral, V. S.; Muniz, P.; Riveiro, J. M.; Ferreira, J. M. F.

    2014-02-01

    We report magnetic and exchange bias studies on Ni-NiO nanoparticulate systems synthesized by a two-step process, namely, chemical reduction of a Ni salt followed by air annealing of the dried precipitate in the temperature range 400-550 °C. Size of Ni and NiO crystallites as estimated from X-ray diffraction line broadening ranges between 10.5-13.5 nm and 2.3-4 nm, respectively. The magneto-thermal plots (M-T) of these bi-magnetic samples show a well developed peak in the vicinity of 130 K. This has been identified as the superparamagnetic blocking temperature "TB" of NiO. Interestingly, all samples exhibit exchange bias even above their respective NiO blocking temperatures, right up to 300 K, the maximum temperature of measurement. This is in contrast to previous reports since exchange bias requires the antiferromagnetic NiO to have a stable direction of its moment in order to pin the ferromagnet (Ni) magnetization, whereas such stability is unlikely above TB since the NiO is superparamagnetic, its moment flipping under thermal activation. Our observation is elucidated by taking into account the core-shell morphology of the Ni-NiO nanoparticles whereby clustering of some of these nanoparticles connects their NiO shells to form extended continuous regions of NiO, which because of their large size remain blocked at T > TB, with thermally stable spins capable of pinning the Ni cores and giving rise to exchange bias. The investigated samples may thus be envisaged as being constituted of both isolated core-shell Ni-NiO nanoparticles as well as clustered ones, with TB denoting the blocking temperature of the NiO shell of the isolated particles.

  9. Exchange bias beyond the superparamagnetic blocking temperature of the antiferromagnet in a Ni-NiO nanoparticulate system

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Aparna E-mail: aparnaroy15@gmail.com; Ferreira, J. M. F.; De Toro, J. A.; Muniz, P.; Riveiro, J. M.; Amaral, V. S.

    2014-02-21

    We report magnetic and exchange bias studies on Ni-NiO nanoparticulate systems synthesized by a two-step process, namely, chemical reduction of a Ni salt followed by air annealing of the dried precipitate in the temperature range 400–550 °C. Size of Ni and NiO crystallites as estimated from X–ray diffraction line broadening ranges between 10.5–13.5 nm and 2.3–4 nm, respectively. The magneto-thermal plots (M-T) of these bi-magnetic samples show a well developed peak in the vicinity of 130 K. This has been identified as the superparamagnetic blocking temperature “T{sub B}” of NiO. Interestingly, all samples exhibit exchange bias even above their respective NiO blocking temperatures, right up to 300 K, the maximum temperature of measurement. This is in contrast to previous reports since exchange bias requires the antiferromagnetic NiO to have a stable direction of its moment in order to pin the ferromagnet (Ni) magnetization, whereas such stability is unlikely above T{sub B} since the NiO is superparamagnetic, its moment flipping under thermal activation. Our observation is elucidated by taking into account the core-shell morphology of the Ni-NiO nanoparticles whereby clustering of some of these nanoparticles connects their NiO shells to form extended continuous regions of NiO, which because of their large size remain blocked at T > T{sub B}, with thermally stable spins capable of pinning the Ni cores and giving rise to exchange bias. The investigated samples may thus be envisaged as being constituted of both isolated core-shell Ni-NiO nanoparticles as well as clustered ones, with T{sub B} denoting the blocking temperature of the NiO shell of the isolated particles.

  10. High Energy Directly Pumped Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Ji-Rong; Singh, Upendra N.; Barnes, Norman P.

    2000-01-01

    The most commonly used crystal architecture to produce 2 micrometer laser is co-doping Ho and Tm into a single host crystal. In this method, the stored energy transfer from the Tm (3)F4 to the Ho (5)I7 manifold is not fast enough to warrant high efficiency for short pulse applications. By separating the Ho and the Tm ions and doping the Tm in YALO3 and the Ho in YLF, we were able to directly pump the Ho (5)I7 manifold with 1.94 micrometers. The Ho:YLF laser has produced 33 mJ at 2.062 micrometers with a quantum efficiency of 0.88. The performance of each laser will be presented.

  11. Hydration and mobility of HO-(aq)

    PubMed Central

    Asthagiri, D.; Pratt, Lawrence R.; Kress, J. D.; Gomez, Maria A.

    2004-01-01

    The hydroxide anion plays an essential role in many chemical and biochemical reactions. But a molecular-scale description of its hydration state, and hence also its transport, in water is currently controversial. The statistical mechanical quasichemical theory of solutions suggests that \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{HO}}{\\cdot}[{\\mathrm{H}}_{2}{\\mathrm{O}}]_{3}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} is the predominant species in the aqueous phase under standard conditions. This result agrees with recent spectroscopic studies on hydroxide water clusters and with the available thermodynamic hydration free energies. In contrast, a recent ab initio molecular dynamics simulation has suggested that \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{HO}}{\\cdot}[{\\mathrm{H}}_{2}{\\mathrm{O}}]_{4}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} is the only dominant aqueous solution species. We apply adiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and find good agreement with both the quasichemical theoretical predictions and experimental results. The present results suggest a picture that is simpler, more traditional, but with additional subtlety. These coordination structures are labile but the tricoordinate species is the prominent case. This conclusion is unaltered with changes in the electronic density functional. No evidence is found for rate-determining activated interconversion of a \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength

  12. Spectroscopic and lasing properties of Ho:Tm:LuAG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Filer, Elizabeth D.; Naranjo, Felipe L.; Rodriguez, Waldo J.; Kokta, Milan R.

    1993-01-01

    Ho:Tm:LuAG has been grown, examined spectroscopically, and lased at 2.1 microns. Ho:Tm:LuAG was selected for this experimental investigation when quantum-mechanical modeling predicted that it would be a good laser material for Ho laser operation on one of the 5I7 to 5I8 transitions. Lasing was achieved at 2.100 microns, one of the three wavelengths predicted to be most probable for laser action.

  13. Pressure dependence on the remanent magnetization of Fe-Ni alloys and Ni metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qingguo; Gilder, Stuart Alan; Maier, Bernd

    2014-10-01

    We measured the acquisition of magnetic remanence of iron-nickel alloys (Fe64Ni36, Fe58Ni42, and Fe50Ni50) and pure Ni under pressures up to 23 GPa at room temperature. Magnetization decreases markedly for Fe64Ni36 between 5 and 7 GPa yet remains ferromagnetic until at least 16 GPa. Magnetization rises by a factor of 2-3 for the other compositions during compression to the highest applied pressures. Immediately upon decompression, magnetic remanence increases for all Fe-Ni alloys while magnetic coercivity remains fairly constant at relatively low values (5-20 mT). The amount of magnetization gained upon complete decompression correlates with the maximum pressure experienced by the sample. Martensitic effects best explain the increase in remanence rather than grain-size reduction, as the creation of single domain sized grains would raise the coercivity. The magnetic remanence of low Ni Invar alloys increases faster with pressure than for other body-centered-cubic compositions due to the higher magnetostriction of the low Ni Invar metals. Thermal demagnetization spectra of Fe64Ni36 measured after pressure release broaden as a function of peak pressure, with a systematic decrease in Curie temperature. Irreversible strain accumulation from the martensitic transition likely explains the broadening of the Curie temperature spectra, consistent with our x-ray diffraction analyses.

  14. Role of the Recombination Channel in the Reaction between the HO and HO2 Radicals.

    PubMed

    Badenes, María P; Tucceri, María E; Cobos, Carlos J

    2017-01-19

    The kinetics of the gas phase recombination reaction HO + HO2 + He → HOOOH + He has been studied between 200 and 600 K by using the SACM/CT model and the unimolecular rate theory. The molecular properties of HOOOH were derived at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ ab initio level of theory, while relevant potential energy features of the reaction were calculated at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ level. The resulting high and low pressure limit rate coefficients are k∞ = 3.55 × 10(-12) (T/300)(0.20) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and k0 = [He] 1.55 × 10(-31) (T/300)(-3.2) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The rate coefficients calculated over the 6 × 10(-4) - 400 bar range are smaller at least in a factor of about 60 than the consensus value determined for the main reaction channel HO + HO2 → H2O + O2, indicating that the recombination pathway is irrelevant.

  15. Earthworm Lumbricus rubellus MT-2: Metal Binding and Protein Folding of a True Cadmium-MT

    PubMed Central

    Kowald, Gregory R.; Stürzenbaum, Stephen R.; Blindauer, Claudia A.

    2016-01-01

    Earthworms express, as most animals, metallothioneins (MTs)—small, cysteine-rich proteins that bind d10 metal ions (Zn(II), Cd(II), or Cu(I)) in clusters. Three MT homologues are known for Lumbricus rubellus, the common red earthworm, one of which, wMT-2, is strongly induced by exposure of worms to cadmium. This study concerns composition, metal binding affinity and metal-dependent protein folding of wMT-2 expressed recombinantly and purified in the presence of Cd(II) and Zn(II). Crucially, whilst a single Cd7wMT-2 species was isolated from wMT-2-expressing E. coli cultures supplemented with Cd(II), expressions in the presence of Zn(II) yielded mixtures. The average affinities of wMT-2 determined for either Cd(II) or Zn(II) are both within normal ranges for MTs; hence, differential behaviour cannot be explained on the basis of overall affinity. Therefore, the protein folding properties of Cd- and Zn-wMT-2 were compared by 1H NMR spectroscopy. This comparison revealed that the protein fold is better defined in the presence of cadmium than in the presence of zinc. These differences in folding and dynamics may be at the root of the differential behaviour of the cadmium- and zinc-bound protein in vitro, and may ultimately also help in distinguishing zinc and cadmium in the earthworm in vivo. PMID:26742040

  16. Earthworm Lumbricus rubellus MT-2: Metal Binding and Protein Folding of a True Cadmium-MT.

    PubMed

    Kowald, Gregory R; Stürzenbaum, Stephen R; Blindauer, Claudia A

    2016-01-05

    Earthworms express, as most animals, metallothioneins (MTs)-small, cysteine-rich proteins that bind d(10) metal ions (Zn(II), Cd(II), or Cu(I)) in clusters. Three MT homologues are known for Lumbricus rubellus, the common red earthworm, one of which, wMT-2, is strongly induced by exposure of worms to cadmium. This study concerns composition, metal binding affinity and metal-dependent protein folding of wMT-2 expressed recombinantly and purified in the presence of Cd(II) and Zn(II). Crucially, whilst a single Cd₇wMT-2 species was isolated from wMT-2-expressing E. coli cultures supplemented with Cd(II), expressions in the presence of Zn(II) yielded mixtures. The average affinities of wMT-2 determined for either Cd(II) or Zn(II) are both within normal ranges for MTs; hence, differential behaviour cannot be explained on the basis of overall affinity. Therefore, the protein folding properties of Cd- and Zn-wMT-2 were compared by ¹H NMR spectroscopy. This comparison revealed that the protein fold is better defined in the presence of cadmium than in the presence of zinc. These differences in folding and dynamics may be at the root of the differential behaviour of the cadmium- and zinc-bound protein in vitro, and may ultimately also help in distinguishing zinc and cadmium in the earthworm in vivo.

  17. Evaluation of HOx sources and cycling using measurement-constrained model calculations in a 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol (MBO) and monoterpene (MT) dominated ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Wolfe, G. M.; Mauldin, L.; Cantrell, C.; Guenther, A.; Karl, T.; Turnipseed, A.; Greenberg, J.; Hall, S. R.; Ullmann, K.; Apel, E.; Hornbrook, R.; Kajii, Y.; Nakashima, Y.; Keutsch, F. N.; DiGangi, J. P.; Henry, S. B.; Kaser, L.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Graus, M.; Hansel, A.; Zheng, W.; Flocke, F. F.

    2013-02-01

    We present a detailed analysis of OH observations from the BEACHON (Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen)-ROCS (Rocky Mountain Organic Carbon Study) 2010 field campaign at the Manitou Forest Observatory (MFO), which is a 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol (MBO) and monoterpene (MT) dominated forest environment. A comprehensive suite of measurements was used to constrain primary production of OH via ozone photolysis, OH recycling from HO2, and OH chemical loss rates, in order to estimate the steady-state concentration of OH. In addition, the University of Washington Chemical Model (UWCM) was used to evaluate the performance of a near-explicit chemical mechanism. The diurnal cycle in OH from the steady-state calculations is in good agreement with measurement. A comparison between the photolytic production rates and the recycling rates from the HO2 + NO reaction shows that recycling rates are ~20 times faster than the photolytic OH production rates from ozone. Thus, we find that direct measurement of the recycling rates and the OH loss rates can provide accurate predictions of OH concentrations. More importantly, we also conclude that a conventional OH recycling pathway (HO2 + NO) can explain the observed OH levels in this non-isoprene environment. This is in contrast to observations in isoprene-dominated regions, where investigators have observed significant underestimation of OH and have speculated that unknown sources of OH are responsible. The highly-constrained UWCM calculation under-predicts observed HO2 by as much as a factor of 8. As HO2 maintains oxidation capacity by recycling to OH, UWCM underestimates observed OH by as much as a factor of 4. When the UWCM calculation is constrained by measured HO2, model calculated OH is in better agreement with the observed OH levels. Conversely, constraining the model to observed OH only slightly reduces the model-measurement HO2 discrepancy, implying unknown HO2 sources. These

  18. 77 FR 48198 - Montana Disaster #MT-00068

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... ADMINISTRATION Montana Disaster MT-00068 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Montana dated 08/06/2012. Incident: Dahl Fire. Incident Period: 06/26/2012 through 07/06/2012. Effective Date: 08/06/2012...

  19. 77 FR 47907 - Montana Disaster #MT-00067

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION Montana Disaster MT-00067 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of MONTANA dated 08/02/2012. Incident: Ash Creek Fire. Incident Period: 06/25/2012 through 07/22/2012. Effective Date: 08/02...

  20. "Climbing" Mt. Everest with IMAX Cinematographers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Nancy P.

    1997-01-01

    Describes how an elementary school teacher incorporated the real-life experiences of an IMAX (Image-Maximum) photography expedition to Mt. Everest into her curriculum. Highlights include geography lessons, math and problem solving, science-related issues, Tibetan Buddhism, and constructing a World Wide Web site. (LRW)

  1. HO-1 Is Essential for Tetrahydroxystilbene Glucoside Mediated Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Anti-Inflammation Process in LPS-Treated RAW264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Weihua; Zhang, Xiaodi; Liu, Jiangzheng

    2017-01-01

    2,3,5,4′-Tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (TSG), an important monomer extracted from Polygonum multiflorum, can prevent a number of inflammation associated chronic diseases. However, the mechanism involved in TSG inducing anti-inflammatory role remains unclear. As an inducible antioxidant enzyme, Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), is crucial for protecting the mammalian cells against adverse stimuli. Here, we found that the TSG treatment strongly induces the expression of HO-1 in an NRF2-depended manner. Meanwhile, TSG increased the mitochondrial mass through upregulation of the mitochondrial biogenesis activators (PGC-1α, NRF1, and TFAM) as well as the mitochondrial complex IV. Furthermore, TSG attenuated Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated RAW264.7 cells activation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Zinc Protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a selective inhibitor of HO-1 activity, was able to attenuate TSG mediated mitochondrial biogenesis and anti-inflammatory process. Finally, we observed that LPS induced obvious mtDNA depletion and ATP deficiency, which indicated a severe damage of mitochondria. TSG restored the LPS induced mitochondrial dysfunction via activation of the mitochondrial biogenesis. ZnPP treatment markedly reversed the inhibitory effects of TSG on mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress in LPS stimulated macrophages. Taken together, these findings suggest that TSG enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and function mainly via activation the HO-1. TSG can be developed as a potential drug for treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:28473878

  2. HO-1 Is Essential for Tetrahydroxystilbene Glucoside Mediated Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Anti-Inflammation Process in LPS-Treated RAW264.7 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weihua; Zhang, Xiaodi; Wu, Hao; Zhou, Qingbiao; Wang, Zhao; Liu, Rui; Liu, Jiangzheng; Wang, Xin; Hai, Chunxu

    2017-01-01

    2,3,5,4'-Tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (TSG), an important monomer extracted from Polygonum multiflorum, can prevent a number of inflammation associated chronic diseases. However, the mechanism involved in TSG inducing anti-inflammatory role remains unclear. As an inducible antioxidant enzyme, Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), is crucial for protecting the mammalian cells against adverse stimuli. Here, we found that the TSG treatment strongly induces the expression of HO-1 in an NRF2-depended manner. Meanwhile, TSG increased the mitochondrial mass through upregulation of the mitochondrial biogenesis activators (PGC-1α, NRF1, and TFAM) as well as the mitochondrial complex IV. Furthermore, TSG attenuated Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated RAW264.7 cells activation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Zinc Protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a selective inhibitor of HO-1 activity, was able to attenuate TSG mediated mitochondrial biogenesis and anti-inflammatory process. Finally, we observed that LPS induced obvious mtDNA depletion and ATP deficiency, which indicated a severe damage of mitochondria. TSG restored the LPS induced mitochondrial dysfunction via activation of the mitochondrial biogenesis. ZnPP treatment markedly reversed the inhibitory effects of TSG on mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress in LPS stimulated macrophages. Taken together, these findings suggest that TSG enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and function mainly via activation the HO-1. TSG can be developed as a potential drug for treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  3. Crystal structure of Tb5Ni2In4 and Y5Ni2In4, and magnetic properties of Dy5Ni2In4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provino, A.; Mudryk, Y.; Paudyal, D.; Smetana, V.; Manfrinetti, P.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Gschneidner, K. A.; Corbett, J. D.

    2012-04-01

    The crystal structure of the R5Ni2In4 intermetallic compounds was earlier reported for R = Ho, Er, Tm, and Lu (Lu5Ni2In4-type, oP22, Pbam); more recently the isostructural phases Dy5Ni2In4 and Sc5Ni2In4 have also been identified. Three inequivalent crystallographic sites are occupied by the R atoms in these compounds. We have synthesized and characterized Dy5Ni2In4 and the two new isotypic compounds Tb5Ni2In4 and Y5Ni2In4. So far, none of the physical properties have been reported on any of these phases; in this article we report on the physical properties of the Dy5Ni2In4 and the crystal structure of Tb5Ni2In4 and Y5Ni2In4 compounds. Measurements of the magnetic properties performed on Dy5Ni2In4 show a ferromagnetic-like ordering with a TC ≈105 K, followed by multiple magnetic orderings at lower temperatures. The fit of the inverse susceptibility in the paramagnetic state follows the Curie-Weiss law, where μeff. = 10.3 μB/Dy-atom (close to theoretical value of 10.64 μB for the free ion Dy3+) and a positive paramagnetic Curie temperature θp = 58 K. Ni atoms are most likely to be nonmagnetic. The heat capacity also shows three peaks: a large one at 103 K and two weaker at 12 and 8 K, respectively; the in-field heat capacity data corroborate these results, suggesting ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic orderings at the temperature of 103 and 12 K, respectively. Low temperature x-ray diffraction has shown that the compound does not undergo any structural change down to 5 K.

  4. EGR-1 regulates Ho-1 expression induced by cigarette smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huaqun; Wang, Lijuan; Gong, Tao; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Chunhua; Li, Fen; Wang, Li; Li, Chaojun

    2010-05-28

    As an anti-oxidant molecule, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been implicated in the protection of lung injury by cigarette smoke (CS). The mechanisms regulating its expression have not been defined. In this report, the role of early growth response 1 (EGR-1) in the regulation of Ho-1 expression was investigated. In C57BL/6 mice with CS exposure, HO-1 was greatly increased in bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar inflammatory cells. In primary cultured mouse lung fibroblasts and RAW264.7 cells exposed to cigarette smoke water extract (CSE), an increase in HO-1 protein level was detected. In addition, CSE induced HO-1 expression was decreased in Egr-1 deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (Egr-1{sup -/-} MEFs). Nuclear localization of EGR-1 was examined in mouse lung fibroblasts after exposure to CSE. Luciferase reporter activity assays showed that the enhancer region of the Ho-1 gene containing a proposed EGR-1 binding site was responsible for the induction of HO-1. A higher increase of alveolar mean linear intercept (Lm) was observed in lung tissues, and a larger increase in the number of total cells and monocytes/macrophages from bronchial alveolar lavage fluid was found in CS-exposed mice by loss of function of EGR-1 treatment. In summary, the present data demonstrate that EGR-1 plays a critical role in HO-1 production induced by CS.

  5. Effect of curvature on the structural and magnetic properties of Ni film deposited on self-assembled nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Tripathi, S.; Gupta, Dileep; Halder, N.; Tripathi, J.

    2016-05-01

    Important experimental findings and their impact on physical properties of Ni thin film are presented with the focus on structural and magnetic property investigations. For this purpose, Ni film (40 nm) was deposited on polystyrene nanospheres (PS, diameter 800 nm) using electron beam evaporation technique simultaneously with a similar reference film on plane Si substrate. The structural properties of the films measured using XRD technique show nanocrystalline growth of Ni on both size PS spheres with an average grain size of ˜ 78 nm, while high crystallinity was observed in the film deposited onto plane Si substrate. A lower coercivity (9 mT) was observed in the Ni/(800 nm) PS as compared to the film deposited on 530 nm PS (23 mT) (our earlier study) and Ni/Si (20 mT). The observed changes in structural and magnetic properties are attributed to the curvature induced modifications at atomic level.

  6. Bruce Medalists at the Mt. Wilson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, J. S.

    2004-12-01

    The institution which succeeded the Mt. Wilson Station of Yerkes Observatory in 1904 has had six names and three sites. From 1948-1980 it was united with Caltech's Palomar Observatory, and since then its main observatory has been in Chile, though still headquartered on Santa Barbara Street in Pasadena. For more than half of the twentieth century it was the leading observatory in the world. One bit of evidence for this is the amazing number of its staff members awarded the Bruce Medal. The Catherine Wolfe Bruce Gold Medal of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific has been awarded for lifetime contributions to astronomy since 1898. It is an international award. It wasn't until 1963 that the number of medalists who had worked primarily in the United States reached half the total. Yet fourteen of the first 87 medalists spent most of their careers at Mt. Wilson, including the period when it was Mt. Wilson and Palomar, and another three were Caltech observers who used the telescopes of the jointly operated observatory. Several more medalists made substantial use of the telescopes on Mt. Wilson and Palomar Mountain. We will discuss highlights of the careers of a number of these distinguished astronomers: directors George Ellery Hale, Walter Adams, Ira Bowen, and Horace Babcock; solar observer and satellite discoverer Seth Nicholson; instrument builder Harold Babcock; galactic and cosmological observers Frederick Seares, Edwin Hubble, Walter Baade, Rudolph Minkowski, and Allan Sandage; and spectroscopists Paul Merrill, Alfred Joy, Olin Wilson, Jesse Greenstein, Maarten Schmidt, and Wallace Sargent. We will touch briefly on others who used Mt. Wilson and/or Palomar, including Harlow Shapley, Joel Stebbins, Charlotte Moore Sitterly, Donald Osterbrock, and Albert Whitford.

  7. Monitoring DNA recombination initiated by HO endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Neal; Haber, James E

    2012-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) have proven to be very potent initiators of recombination in yeast and other organisms. A single, site-specific DSB initiates homologous DNA repair events such as gene conversion, break-induced replication, and single-strand annealing, as well as nonhomologous end joining, microhomology-mediated end joining, and new telomere addition. When repair is either delayed or prevented, a single DSB can trigger checkpoint-mediated cell cycle arrest. In budding yeast, expressing the HO endonuclease under the control of a galactose-inducible promoter has been instrumental in the study of these processes by providing us a way to synchronously induce a DSB at a unique site in vivo. We describe how the HO endonuclease has been used to study the recombination events in mating-type (MAT) switching. Southern blots provide an overview of the process by allowing one to examine the formation of the DSB, DNA degradation at the break, and formation of the product. Denaturing gels and slot blots as well as PCR have provided important tools to follow the progression of resection in wild-type and mutant cells. PCR has also been important in allowing us to follow the kinetics of certain recombination intermediates such as the initiation of repair DNA synthesis or the removal of nonhomologous Y sequences during MAT switching. Finally chromatin immunoprecipitation has been used to follow the recruitment of key proteins to the DSB and in subsequent steps in DSB repair.

  8. Towards Performance Portability with GungHo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Rupert; Glover, Matthew; Ham, David; Hobson, Mike; Maynard, Chris; Mitchell, Lawrence; Mullerworth, Steve; Pickles, Stephen; Rezny, Mike; Riley, Graham; Wood, Nigel; Ashworth, Mike

    2014-05-01

    The Met Office's numerical weather prediction and climate model code, the Unified Model (UM), is almost 25 years old. Up to the present day the UM has been able to be run efficiently on many of the worlds most powerful computers, helping to keep the Met Office at the forefront of climate prediction and weather forecasting. However, with performance increases from each new generation of computers now being primarily provided by an increase in the amount of parallelism rather than an increase in the clock-speed of the processors themselves, running higher resolutions of the UM now faces the double challenge of code scalability and numerical accuracy. The UM's atmospheric dynamical core makes use of a finite-difference scheme on a regular latitude-longitude grid. The regular latitude-longitude mesh results in an increasingly disparate grid resolution as the mesh resolution increases due to lines of longitude converging at the poles. For example, a 10km resolution at mid-latitudes would result in a 12m resolution at the poles. The difference in resolution leads to increased communication at the poles and load balance issues which are known to impair scalability; it also leads to issues with numerical accuracy and smaller time-steps due to the difference in scale. To address this problem the Met Office, NERC and STFC initiated the GungHo project. The primary aim of this project is to deliver a scalable, numerically accurate dynamical core. This dynamical core is scheduled to become operational around the year 2022. The project is currently investigating the use of quasi-uniform meshes, such as triangular, icosahedral and cubed-sphere meshes, using finite element methods. The associated GungHo software infrastructure is being developed to support multiple meshes and element types thus allowing for future model development. GungHo is also proposing a novel separation of concerns for the software implementation of the dynamical core. This approach distinguishes between

  9. Heterogeneous Reaction of HO2 Radical with Dicarboxylic Acid Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, F.; Kanaya, Y.

    2010-12-01

    HOx(OH+ HO2) radical plays a central role in the tropospheric chemistry. Recently, the heterogeneous loss of HO2 by aerosol particles is a potentially important HOx sink in the troposphere suggested from observation study. However, there have been few studies for loss of HO2 by aerosols. In this study, we measured the HO2 uptake coefficients for four dicarboxylic acids (succinic acid, glutaric acid, adipic acid, and pimelic acid) aerosol particles under ambient conditions (760Torr and 296K) using an aerosol flow tube(AFT) coupled with a chemical conversion /laser-induced fluorescence(CC/LIF) technique. The CC/LIF technique enabled experiments to be performed at almost the same HO2 radical concentration as that in the atmosphere(-10^8 molecules/cm^3). In this system, the effect of the self-reaction of HO2 in the gas phase can be neglected. HO2 radicals were injected into the AFT through a vertically movable Pyrex tube. Injector position dependent profiles of LIF intensity were measured as a function of aerosol concentration at 30% and 70% of relative humilities (RH). Determined HO2 uptake coefficients by succinic acid, glutaric acid, adipic acid, and pimelic acid aerosol particles at 30% RH were 0.05 +/- 0.02, 0.07 +/- 0.03, 0.02 +/- 0.01, and 0.06 +/- 0.03, respectively, while the uptake coefficients by those particles at 70% RH were 0.13 +/- 0.05, 0.13 +/- 0.03, 0.06 +/- 0.01, and 0.11 +/- 0.03, respectively. These results suggest that compositions and relative humidity are significant to the HO2 uptake. We will discuss the potential HO2 loss processes.

  10. The Use of Sculptures to Augment Naming of Buildings in Honor of Heroes and Heroines in Ho Polytechnic, Ho, Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokpokpo, Adja-Koadade

    2016-01-01

    It is important to celebrate our heroes and heroines, who in diverse ways, bring development to nations, peoples and places. These important personalities should be identified and acknowledged by the beneficiaries of their labor, and be given the due recognition. It is in light of this that Ho Polytechnic, now Ho Technical University, decided to…

  11. Melatonin MT1 and MT2 Receptors in the Ram Reproductive Tract

    PubMed Central

    González-Arto, Marta; Aguilar, David; Gaspar-Torrubia, Elena; Gallego, Margarita; Carvajal-Serna, Melissa; Herrera-Marcos, Luis V.; Serrano-Blesa, Edith; Hamilton, Thais Rose dos Santos; Pérez-Pé, Rosaura; Muiño-Blanco, Teresa; Cebrián-Pérez, José A.; Casao, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    Some melatonin functions in mammals are exerted through MT1 and MT2 receptors. However, there are no reports of their presence in the reproductive tract of the ram, a seasonal species. Thus, we have investigated their existence in the ram testis, epididymis, accessory glands and ductus deferens. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) revealed higher levels of m-RNA for both receptors in the testis, ampulla, seminal vesicles, and vas deferens, than in the other organs of the reproductive tract (p < 0.05). Western blot analyses showed protein bands compatible with the MT1 in the testis and cauda epididymis, and for the MT2 in the cauda epididymis and deferent duct. Immunohistochemistry analyses revealed the presence of MT1 receptors in spermatogonias, spermatocytes, and spermatids, and MT2 receptors in the newly-formed spermatozoa in the testis, whereas both receptors were located in the epithelial cells of the ampulla, seminal vesicles, and ductus deferens. Indirect immunofluorescence showed significant differences in the immunolocation of both receptors in spermatozoa during their transit in the epididymis. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that melatonin receptors are present in the ram reproductive tract. These results open the way for new studies on the molecular mechanism of melatonin and the biological significance of its receptors. PMID:28335493

  12. Heterogeneous Uptake of HO2 Radicals onto Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, I. J.; Matthews, P. S.; Brooks, B.; Goddard, A.; Whalley, L. K.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Heard, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxyl (HO2) radicals, together known as HOx, play a vital role in atmospheric chemistry by controlling the oxidative capacity of the troposphere. The atmospheric lifetime and concentrations of many trace reactive species, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), are determined by HOx radical levels. Therefore, the ability to accurately predict atmospheric HOx concentrations from a detailed knowledge of their sources and sinks is a very useful diagnostic tool to assess our current understanding of atmospheric chemistry. Several recent field studies have observed significantly lower concentrations of HO2 radicals than predicted using box models, where HO2 loss onto aerosols was suggested as a possible missing sink [1, 2]. However, the mechanism on HO2 uptake onto aerosols and its impact on ambient HOx levels are currently not well understood. To improve our understanding of this process, we have conducted laboratory experiments to measure HO2 uptake coefficients onto submicron aerosol particles. The FAGE (Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion) technique, a highly sensitive laser induced fluorescence based detection method, was used to monitor HO2 uptake kinetics onto aerosol particles in an aerosol flow tube. The application of the FAGE technique allowed for kinetic experiments to be performed under low HO2 concentrations, i.e. [HO2] < 109 molecules cm-3. HO2 radicals were produced by the photolysis of water vapour in the presence of O2 and aerosol particles were produced either by atomizing dilute salt solutions or by homogeneous nucleation. HO2 uptake coefficients (γ) have been measured for single-component solid and aqueous inorganic salt and organic aerosol particles with a wide range of hygroscopicities. HO2 uptake coefficients on solid particles were below the detection limit (γ < 0.001), whereas on aqueous aerosols uptake coefficients were somewhat larger (γ = 0.001 - 0.008). HO2 uptake coefficients were highest on aerosols

  13. Ternary system Er-Ni-In at T=870 K

    SciTech Connect

    Dzevenko, M.; Tyvanchuk, Yu.; Bratash, L.; Zaremba, V.; Havela, L.; Kalychak, Ya.

    2011-10-15

    Isothermal section of the Er-Ni-In system at T=870 K was constructed by means of X-ray powder diffraction and EDX-analyses. Nine ternary compounds, namely ErNi{sub 9}In{sub 2} (YNi{sub 9}In{sub 2}-type), Er{sub 1-1.22}Ni{sub 4}In{sub 1-0.78} (MgCu{sub 4}Sn-type), Er{sub 10}Ni{sub 9.07}In{sub 20} (Ho{sub 10}Ni{sub 9}In{sub 20}-type), ErNi{sub 1-0.60}In{sub 1-1.40} (ZrNiAl-type), Er{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}In (Mn{sub 2}AlB{sub 2}-type), Er{sub 2}Ni{sub 1.78}In (Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2}-type), Er{sub 5}Ni{sub 2}In{sub 4} (Lu{sub 5}Ni{sub 2}In{sub 4}-type), Er{sub 5}Ni{sub 2}In (Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}-type), and Er{sub 13.53}Ni{sub 3.14}In{sub 3.33} (Lu{sub 14}Co{sub 2}In{sub 3}-type), exist in the Er-Ni-In system at this temperature. The substitution of Ni for In was observed for ErNi{sub 1-0.60}In{sub 1-1.40} and In for Er in the case of related compounds ErNi{sub 2} and ErNi{sub 4}In. Er can enter NiIn (CoSn-type) leading to including-substitution type of compound Er{sub 0-0.12}NiIn{sub 1-0.89}. Basic magnetic properties of the Er{sub 0.04}NiIn{sub 0.97}, ErNi{sub 2}, Er{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 2}In{sub 0.1}, and ErNi{sub 4}In phases were inspected. Electrical-resistivity studies were performed on the ErNiIn, ErNi{sub 0.9}In{sub 1.1}, and ErNi{sub 4}In phases. - Graphical Abstract: Phase relations in the ternary system Er-Ni-In have been established for the isothermal section at T=870 K based on X-ray phase and EDX-analyses. Nine ternary compounds were observed. Highlights: > Isothermal section of Er-Ni-In system at T=870 K was constructed. > Nine ternary compounds were detected. > Basic magnetic properties of Er{sub 0.04}NiIn{sub 0.97} and ErNi{sub 4}In phases were inspected.

  14. Post Eruption Hazards at Mt. Pinatubo, Philippines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    Our project focused on the investigation of the post-eruption hazards at Mt. Pinatubo (Philippines) using remote sensing data, and field observations of the 1991 eruption deposits. Through the use of multiple satellite images, field work, and the 1996/2000 PacRim data sets, we conducted studies of the co- and post-eruption hazards of the volcano due to erosion and re-deposition of the extensive pyroclastic flow deposits. A major part of this project was the assembly and analysis of a database of over 50 high resolution (1 - 50 m/pixel) images that will facilitate this study. We collected Ikonos, SPOT, SIR-C/X-SAR, Landsat, ERS, RADARSAT, and ASTER images of the area around Mt. Pinatubo. An example of the changes that could be seen in these data is shown. Our investigation focused on a retrospective analysis of the erosion, redeposition, and re-vegetation of the 1991 pyroclastic flow deposits of Mt. Pinatubo. The primary geologic goal of our work was the analysis of the spatial distribution and volume change of the sources and sinks of materials associated with mudflow ('lahar') events. This included the measurement of river valley gradients and cross-sections using TOPSAR digital elevation data, as we are participating in the PacRim 2000 deployment to the Philippines specifically so that we can collect a second set of TOPSAR data that can then be used to create a topographic difference image of the volcano. The main results from this multi-sensor study have been published as Torres et al.. A discussion of the methodology that we used to assemble an appropriate database was included in Mouginis-Mark and Domergue-Schmidt. As part of an educational outreach effort, we also helped the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) in the Philippines to use NASA data to study Mt. Pinatubo and other Filipino volcanoes.

  15. Mt. Pinatubo Volcano - Post Eruption, Luzon, Philippines

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-08-08

    Mt. Pinatubo on the island of Luzon (15.0N, 120.0E) erupted catastrophically in June 1991 after over 600 years of inactivity. In this vertical view, the full extent of the eruption is obvious. Thick layers of ash completely surrounds the crater and the effect of mudflows in this previously heavily forested and agricultural region can be traced as ribbons flowing downhill. Clark AFB, once the crossroads of the SW Pacific can only partially be seen.

  16. Graphs for Isotopes of 109-Mt (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides a graphic representation of nucleon separation energies and residual interaction parameters for isotopes of the chemical element 109-Mt (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109).

  17. Mt. Pinatubo Volcano - Post Eruption, Luzon, Philippines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Mt. Pinatubo on the island of Luzon (14.5N, 120.5E) erupted catastrophically in June 1991 after over 600 years of inactivity. Partially obscured by clouds in this post eruption photo, the crater is not obvious in this scene but the blowout area, in the once heavily forested region, is easily observed as lava flow, ash fallout, mud slide and debris trails mar the landscape. Clark AFB, once the crossroads of the SW Pacific can only partially be seen.

  18. Area MT Encodes Three-Dimensional Motion

    PubMed Central

    Huk, Alexander C.; Cormack, Lawrence K.; Kohn, Adam

    2014-01-01

    We use visual information to determine our dynamic relationship with other objects in a three-dimensional (3D) world. Despite decades of work on visual motion processing, it remains unclear how 3D directions—trajectories that include motion toward or away from the observer—are represented and processed in visual cortex. Area MT is heavily implicated in processing visual motion and depth, yet previous work has found little evidence for 3D direction sensitivity per se. Here we use a rich ensemble of binocular motion stimuli to reveal that most neurons in area MT of the anesthetized macaque encode 3D motion information. This tuning for 3D motion arises from multiple mechanisms, including different motion preferences in the two eyes and a nonlinear interaction of these signals when both eyes are stimulated. Using a novel method for functional binocular alignment, we were able to rule out contributions of static disparity tuning to the 3D motion tuning we observed. We propose that a primary function of MT is to encode 3D motion, critical for judging the movement of objects in dynamic real-world environments. PMID:25411482

  19. Modeling the Geologic History of Mt. Sharp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascuzzo, A.; Allen, C.

    2015-01-01

    Gale is an approximately 155 km diameter crater located on the martian dichotomy boundary (5 deg S 138 deg E). Gale is estimated to have formed 3.8 - 3.5 Gya, in the late Noachian or early Hesperian. Mt. Sharp, at the center of Gale Crater, is a crescent shaped sedimentary mound that rises 5.2 km above the crater floor. Gale is one of the few craters that has a peak reaching higher than the rim of the crater wall. The Curiosity rover is currently fighting to find its way across a dune field at the northwest base of the mound searching for evidence of habitability. This study used orbital images and topographic data to refine models for the geologic history of Mt. Sharp by analyzing its morphological features. In addition, it assessed the possibility of a peak ring in Gale. The presence of a peak ring can offer important information to how Mt. Sharp was formed and eroded early in Gale's history.

  20. Novel Scalable 3-D MT Inverse Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvshinov, A. V.; Kruglyakov, M.; Geraskin, A.

    2016-12-01

    We present a new, robust and fast, three-dimensional (3-D) magnetotelluric (MT) inverse solver. As a forward modelling engine a highly-scalable solver extrEMe [1] is used. The (regularized) inversion is based on an iterative gradient-type optimization (quasi-Newton method) and exploits adjoint sources approach for fast calculation of the gradient of the misfit. The inverse solver is able to deal with highly detailed and contrasting models, allows for working (separately or jointly) with any type of MT (single-site and/or inter-site) responses, and supports massive parallelization. Different parallelization strategies implemented in the code allow for optimal usage of available computational resources for a given problem set up. To parameterize an inverse domain a mask approach is implemented, which means that one can merge any subset of forward modelling cells in order to account for (usually) irregular distribution of observation sites. We report results of 3-D numerical experiments aimed at analysing the robustness, performance and scalability of the code. In particular, our computational experiments carried out at different platforms ranging from modern laptops to high-performance clusters demonstrate practically linear scalability of the code up to thousands of nodes. 1. Kruglyakov, M., A. Geraskin, A. Kuvshinov, 2016. Novel accurate and scalable 3-D MT forward solver based on a contracting integral equation method, Computers and Geosciences, in press.

  1. Application of remote sensing analysis and MT method for identification geothermal prospect zone in Mt. Endut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, A. M.; Permadi, A. N.; Wildan, D.; Sobirin, R.; Supriyanto

    2017-07-01

    Mount Endut is located at Banten Province, 40 km southward Rangkasbitung City, with geographic UTM position between 9261000-9274000 N and 639000-652000 E. Preliminary survey at Mt. Endut was geological and geochemical survey in 2006, resistivity survey and MT survey in 2007 with 27 measurement point. All survey conducted by Pusat Sumber Daya Geologi (PSDG). According to result of premilinary survey, Mt. Endut is dominated by quartenary volcanic rock produced by Mt. Endut, which breakthrough tertiary sediment layer. NE to SW normal fault produced surface manifestation, namely Cikawah (CKW) hot spring and Handeleum (HDL) hot spring. According to SiO2 and NaK geothermometer, subsurface temperature of Mt Endut is ranging from 162 to 180 °C. Apparent resistivity maps show that thermal manifestation areas coincide with pronounced high anomaly due to resistive intrusion bodies contrast to conductive sedimentary basements. In order to delineate permeability zone, fracture fault density (FFD) analysis from remote sensing image is carry out. FFD analysis from lansdat 7 image shows the area on westward flank of Mt. Endut have high fracture fault density (162-276 m/km2), higher than it's surrounding area and can be assume that area is weak zone and have high permeability. That's structure density anomaly coincide with low resistivity from Magnetotelluric data. Resistivity structure from Magnetotelluric data shows western flank have low permeability layer (14-27 Ohmm) with average thickness 250 m. Below this layer there is layer with higher resistivity (37-100 Ohmm) with ±1000 m depth and interpreted as shallow reservoir. Massive resistif intrusive bodies act controlled the surface manifestation, and act as boundary and bounded the geothermal system in western part of Mt. Endut.

  2. HoBi-like viruses: an emerging group of pestiviruses.

    PubMed

    Bauermann, Fernando V; Ridpath, Julia F; Weiblen, Rudi; Flores, Eduardo F

    2013-01-01

    The genus Pestivirus is composed of 4 important pathogens of livestock: Bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 and 2 (BVDV-1 and BVDV-2), Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), and Border disease virus of sheep (BDV). BVDV are major pathogens of cattle, and infection results in significant economic loss worldwide. A new putative pestivirus species, tentatively called "HoBi-like," "BVDV-3," or "atypical pestiviruses," was first identified in Europe in fetal bovine serum (FBS) imported from Brazil. HoBi-like viruses are related to BVDV at the genetic and antigenic levels. Further, the disease caused by these new viruses resembles clinical presentations historically associated with BVDV infection, including growth retardation, reduced milk production, respiratory disease, reduced reproductive performance, and increased mortality among young stock. Current BVDV diagnostic tests may fail to detect HoBi-like viruses or to differentiate between BVDV and HoBi-like viruses. Further, commercial tests for BVDV exposure, based on serological response, do not reliably detect HoBi-like virus exposure, and cross protection against HoBi-like viruses conferred by current BVDV vaccines is likely limited. As many HoBi-like viruses, characterized to date, were isolated from FBS originating from Brazil, it is assumed that the agent is probably widespread in Brazilian herds. Nevertheless, reports of natural infection in Southeast Asia and Europe demonstrate that these viruses are not restricted to South America. Increased demand for FBS has led to widespread distribution of FBS originating in HoBi-like virus endemic regions. The contamination of such FBS with HoBi-like viruses may lead to spread of this virus to other regions.

  3. The Influence of Clouds on Radical Concentrations: Observations of OH and HO2 during the Hill CAP Cloud THÜRINGER (hcct) Campaign in 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, L. K.; Stone, D. J.; George, I. J.; Mertes, S.; van Pinxteren, D.; Fomba, K. W.; Evans, M. J.; Herrmann, H.; Heard, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of OH and HO2 radicals made during the HCCT (Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia) campaign that took place at Mt. Schmücke, Thuringia in Germany during September/October 2010 are reported. The University of Leeds Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE) instrument was located near the summit of Mt. Schmücke (982 m) and made near-continuous measurements of the radicals at the top of a 22 m tower. The site was regularly influenced by orographic clouds throughout the measurement period. On average, the photolysis rate of O3 to form O(1D), J(O1D), the usual primary initiator of HOx radicals, was ~ 30 % of its value out of cloud. The HO2 concentrations were significantly depleted in cloud, with concentrations just 10 % of the value out of cloud; an OH signal above the noise of the instrument was not observed during cloud events. These results suggest that heterogeneous processes in clouds do perturb the gas-phase radical chemistry. Using an analytical expression to simulate the HO2 in-cloud observations, a first order loss rate of HO2 to clouds = 0.1 s-1 is needed to enable agreement between the simulation and measured values, suggesting a reactive uptake coefficient, γ = 0.005, at the observed mean cloud droplet surface area of 1.2 x 10-3 cm2cm-3. This value is in good agreement with very recent recommendations based of laboratory studies of heterogeneous uptake of HO2 on aqueous aerosols1. The rate of loss of HO2 as a function of cloud droplet surface area and pH have demonstrated clear dependencies of γ on these parameters. The change in γ observed over the pH range encountered during the project can be well replicated using the mechanism outlined by Thornton et al. (2008)2 for HO2 loss in aqueous aerosol without the presence of significant levels of transition metal ions. This work provides experimental evidence that clouds can alter gas-phase concentrations of HO2 through heterogeneous reactions, reducing the oxidising capacity and O3 production in the

  4. Ho:YAG laser application in cerebellopontine angle tumor operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yaohua; Wang, Yu; Li, Xiaoxiong; Xiong, Xiong; Wang, Yong-ling; Li, Shanquan; Luo, Qizhong; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Weiguo

    2005-07-01

    We reported 25 cases of cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumor operation with Ho:YAG laser assistance during the operative procedure. We analysed the surgical effects of Ho:YAG laser, compare it with CO2 Nd:YAG argon laser, and illustrated its features and parameters. We think that Ho:YAG laser can be used to ablate and vaporize the tumor efficiently in the operation of the CPA tumors whose vascular supply is abundant and the texture is very tough. It can be used to reduce the bleeding and cooperate to incise tumor in the operation and improve the curable effect of the surgery.

  5. Operation of Ho:YAG ultrafast laser inscribed waveguide lasers.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Sean; Thorburn, Fiona; Lancaster, Adam; Stites, Ronald; Cook, Gary; Kar, Ajoy

    2017-04-20

    We report fabrication and operation of multi-watt level waveguide lasers utilizing holmium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Ho:YAG). The waveguides were fabricated using ultrafast laser inscription, which relies on a chirped pulse ytterbium fiber laser to create depressed cladding structures inside the material. A variety of waveguides were created inside the Ho:YAG samples. We demonstrate output powers of ∼2  W from both a single-mode 50 μm waveguide laser and a multimode 80 μm waveguide laser. In addition, laser action from a co-doped Yb:Ho:YAG sample under in-band pumping conditions was demonstrated.

  6. Review of Tm and Ho Materials; Spectroscopy and Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    2008-01-01

    A review of Tm and Ho materials is presented, covering some fundamental aspects on the spectroscopy and laser dynamics in both single and co-doped systems. Following an introduction to 2- m lasers, applications and historical development, the physics of quasi-four level lasers, energy transfer and modeling are discussed in some detail. Recent developments in using Tm lasers to pump Ho lasers are discussed, and seen to offer some advantages over conventional Tm:Ho lasers. This article is not intended as a complete review, but as a primer for introducing concepts and a resource for further study.

  7. Mt. Kilimanjaro expedition in earth science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, Elena; Yoshikawa, Kenji; Narita, Kenji; Brettenny, Mark; Yule, Sheila; O'Toole, Michael; Brettenny, Rogeline

    2010-05-01

    Mt. Kilimanjaro, Africa's highest mountain is 5,895 meters above sea level and is located 330 km south of the equator in Tanzania. In 1976 glaciers covered most of Mt. Kilimanjaro's summit; however in 2000, an estimated eighty percent of the ice cap has disappeared since the last thorough survey done in 1912. There is increased scientific interest in Mt. Kilimanjaro with the increase in global and African average temperatures. A team of college and pre-college school students from Tanzania, South Africa and Kenya, teachers from South Africa and the United States, and scientists from the University of Alaska Fairbanks in the United States and Akita University in Japan, climbed to the summit of Mt Kilimanjaro in October 2009. They were accompanied by guides, porters, two expedition guests, and a videographer. This expedition was part of the GLOBE Seasons and Biomes Earth System Science Project and the GLOBE Africa science education initiative, exploring and contributing to climate change studies. Students learned about earth science experientially by observing their physical and biological surroundings, making soil and air temperature measurements, participating in discussions, journaling their experience, and posing research questions. The international trekkers noted the change in the biomes as the altitude, temperature and conditions changed, from cultivated lands, to rain forest, heath zone, moorland, alpine desert, and summit. They also discovered permafrost, but not at the summit as expected. Rather, it was where the mountain was not covered by a glacier and thus more exposed to low extreme temperatures. This was the first report of permafrost on Mt. Kilimanjaro. Classrooms from all over the world participated in the expedition virtually. They followed the trek through the expedition website (http://www.xpeditiononline.com/) where pictures and journals were posted, and posed their own questions which were answered by the expedition and base camp team members

  8. METHYLATION OF ARSENIC BY RECOMBINANT HUMAN AS3MT/287M AND AS3MT/287T POLYMORPHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is the key enzyme in the pathway for methylation of inorganic arsenic (iAs). AS3MT polymorphism is, in part, responsible for interindividual differences in iAs metabolism. AS3MT/M287T polymorphism that is found in ~ 10% of C...

  9. METHYLATION OF ARSENIC BY RECOMBINANT HUMAN AS3MT/287M AND AS3MT/287T POLYMORPHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is the key enzyme in the pathway for methylation of inorganic arsenic (iAs). AS3MT polymorphism is, in part, responsible for interindividual differences in iAs metabolism. AS3MT/M287T polymorphism that is found in ~ 10% of C...

  10. Analysis of mtDNA/nDNA Ratio in Mice.

    PubMed

    Quiros, Pedro M; Goyal, Aashima; Jha, Pooja; Auwerx, Johan

    2017-03-02

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lacks the protection provided by the nucleosomes in the nuclear DNA and does not have a DNA repair mechanism, making it highly susceptible to damage, which can lead to mtDNA depletion. mtDNA depletion compromises the efficient function of cells and tissues and thus impacts negatively on health. Here, we describe a brief and easy protocol to quantify mtDNA copy number by determining the mtDNA/nDNA ratio. The procedure has been validated using a cohort of young and aged mice. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. Learning motion discrimination with suppressed and un-suppressed MT.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Benjamin; Liu, Zili

    2006-06-01

    Perceptual learning of motion direction discrimination is generally thought to rely on the middle temporal area of the brain (MT/V5). A recent study investigating learning of motion discrimination when MT was psychophysically suppressed found that learning was possible with suppressed MT, but only when the task was sufficiently easy [Lu, H., Qian, N., Liu, Z. (2004). Learning motion discrimination with suppressed MT. Vision Research 44, 1817-1825]. We investigated whether this effect was indeed due to MT suppression or whether it could be explained by task difficulty alone. By comparing learning of motion discrimination when MT was suppressed vs. un-suppressed, at different task difficulties, we found that task difficulty alone could not explain the effects. At the highest difficulty, learning was not possible with suppressed MT, confirming [Lu, H., Qian, N., Liu, Z. (2004). Learning motion discrimination with suppressed MT. Vision Research 44, 1817-1825]. In comparison, learning was possible with un-suppressed MT at the same difficulty level. At the intermediate task difficulty, there was a clear learning disadvantage when MT was suppressed. Only for the easiest level of difficulty, did learning become equally possible for both suppressed and un-suppressed conditions. These findings suggest that MT plays an important role in learning to discriminate relatively fine differences in motion direction.

  12. Kinetics and mechanism of HO2 and DO2 disproportionations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kircher, C. C.; Sander, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    A flash photolysis/UV abosrption technique was used to study the HO2 + HO2 and DO2 + DO2 reactions in the gas phase. Rate constants were measured at pressures between 100 and 700 torr of Ar and N2, and at temperatures between 230 and 420 K with up to 10 torr of added water vapor. The overall disproportionation rate constants for the reaction is given as the sum of pressure-independent and pressure-dependent terms. A kinetic analysis shows that both reactions have a zero-pressure bimolecular component and a termolecular component which is linearly dependent on pressure up to 700 torr. A priori estimates of the vibrational frequencies of the product of the HO2 + HO2 reaction suggest binding energies of 12-20 kcal per mol (for the initial association).

  13. High-spin yrast structure of {sup 159}Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Ollier, J.; Simpson, J.; Riley, M. A.; Wang, X.; Aguilar, A.; Teal, C.; Paul, E. S.; Nolan, P. J.; Petri, M.; Rigby, S. V.; Thomson, J.; Unsworth, C.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritsen, T.; Zhu, S.; Darby, I. G.; Hartley, D. J.; Kondev, F. G.

    2011-08-15

    An investigation of the yrast structure of the odd-Z {sup 159}Ho nucleus to high spin has been performed. The {sup 159}Ho nucleus was populated by the reaction {sup 116}Cd({sup 48}Ca,p4n{gamma}) at a beam energy of 215 MeV, and resulting {gamma} decays were detected by the Gammasphere spectrometer. The h{sub 11/2} yrast band has been significantly extended up to I{sup {pi}=}75/2{sup -} (tentatively 79/2{sup -}). A lower frequency limit for the second (h{sub 11/2}){sup 2} proton alignment was extracted consistent with the systematics of this alignment frequency, indicating an increased deformation with neutron number in the Ho isotopes. The energy-level splitting between the signature partners in the h{sub 11/2} structures of the Ho isotopes and the neighboring N=92 isotones is discussed.

  14. HoCaMA: Home Care Hybrid Multiagent Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile, Juan A.; Bajo, Javier; Abraham, Ajith; Corchado, Juan M.

    Home Care is one of the main objectives of Ambient Intelligence. Nowadays, the disabled and elderly population, which represents a significant part of our society, requires novel solutions for providing home care in an effective way. In this chapter, we present HoCaMA, a hybrid multiagent architecture that facilitates remote monitoring and care services for disabled patients at their homes. HoCaMA combines multiagent systems and Web services to facilitate the communication and integration with multiple health care systems. In addition, HoCaMA focuses on the design of reactive agents capable of interacting with different sensors present in the environment, and incorporates a system of alerts through SMS and MMS mobile technologies. Finally, it uses Radio Frequency IDentification and JavaCard technologies to provide advanced location and identification systems, as well as automatic access control facilities. HoCaMA has been implemented in a real environment and the results obtained are presented within this chapter.

  15. Road to Victory: Building the Ho Chi Minh Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Marianne

    1993-01-01

    Presents a secondary school lesson on the building of the Ho Chi Minh Trail during the Vietnam War. Helps students link history and geographical skills through cooperative group learning. Includes maps, diagrams, and three student readings. (CFR)

  16. Line Identification of Atomic and Ionic Spectra of Holmium in the Near-UV. II. Spectra of Ho II and Ho III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başar, Gö.; Al-Labady, N.; Özdalgiç, B.; Güzelçimen, F.; Er, A.; Öztürk, I. K.; Ak, T.; Bİlİr, S.; Tamanis, M.; Ferber, R.; Kröger, S.

    2017-02-01

    Fourier Transform spectra of holmium (Ho) in the UV spectral range from 31,530 to 25,000 cm‑1 (317 to 400 nm) have been investigated, particularly focusing on the ionic lines. The distinction between the different degrees of ionization (I, II, and III) is based on differences in signal-to-noise ratios from two Ho spectra, which have been measured with different buffer gases, i.e., neon and argon. Based on 106 known Ho ii and 126 known Ho iii energy levels, 97 lines could be classified as transitions of singly ionized Ho and 9 lines could be classified as transitions of doubly ionized Ho. Of the 97 Ho ii lines, 6 have not been listed in the extant literature. Another 215 lines have been assigned to Ho ii, though they could not be classified on the basis of the known energy levels.

  17. Uptake of HO2 Radicals Onto Dust Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, P. S.; Whalley, L. K.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Heard, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    OH and HO2 radicals play an important role in the troposphere by controlling its oxidative capacity and therefore the concentration of many trace species. Several field studies have observed significantly lower concentrations of HO2 radicals than predicted using box models (1,2). HO2 loss onto aerosols has been suggested as a possible sink. Mineral dust has an estimated annual flux of 2000 Tg year-1 (3). However, there has only been one study of HO2 uptake onto Arizona Test Dust (ATD) surfaces (4) and there are currently no published studies for dust aerosols. Therefore, the aim of this study was to measure the HO2 uptake coefficient onto ATD aerosols over a range of humidities and for different HO2 concentrations, as well as investigating the uptake as a function of the exposure time to the aerosol, for which a dependence had been observed for aqueous salt aerosols (5). Uptake coefficients were measured for ATD aerosols at atmospheric pressure and at 291 K using a Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE) detector combined with a flow tube. HO2 was formed from the photolysis of water vapour and was injected into the flow tube using a moveable injector, which was placed in six different positions along the flow tube. The non stable aerosol output was produced by stirring ATD in a bottle producing a dust cloud which was entrained into a flow. The aerosol number concentration was measured using a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) and was converted into a surface area using the average radius of one aerosol. The uptake coefficient was then able to be calculated by assuming first order kinetics. The HO2 uptake coefficient was measured at a relative humidity of between 6 and 75% and at initial HO2 concentrations of ~ 0.3 - 1 × 10^9 molecule cm-3. Average uptake coefficients of 0.018 × 0.006 and 0.031 × 0.008 were measured for the higher and lower HO2 concentrations respectively, and the impact investigated using a constrained box model. A time dependence was also

  18. Flashlamp-pumped Ho:Tm:Cr:LuAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jani, Mahendra G. (Inventor); Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Murray, Keith E. (Inventor); Kokta, Milan R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A room temperature solid-state laser is provided. A laser crystal is disposed in a laser cavity. The laser crystal has a LuAG host material doped with a concentration of about 0.35% Ho ions, about 5.57% Tm ions and at least about 1.01% Cr ions. A broadband energizing source such as a flashlamp is disposed transversely to the laser crystal to energize the Ho ions, Tm ions and Cr ions.

  19. Registration of 'HoCP 91-552' sugarcane

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    HoCP 91-552’ sugarcane was selected from progeny of the cross ‘LCP 81-10’ x ‘CP 72-356’ made at Canal Point, Florida. HoCP 91-552 was developed through cooperative research by the Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture’s Sugarcane Research Unit, the Louisiana A...

  20. MDI and GOLF simulation and intercomparison via the Mt. Wilson 150-foot tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Scott Edward

    A 24 channel analyzer (Evans and Ulrich, 1995) was designed and built for the Mt. Wilson 150-foot solar tower. This instrument has 4 channels dedicated to the continuance of the existing dataset for the CrII and FeI solar lines. Additionally, the instrument employs 10 channels each for NaD1 and NiI. The latter two lines are those studied by the SOHO instruments GOLF and MDI respectively. Ten-point line profiles are taken for both Ni and NaD1 and analyzed using computer simulations of both the MDI and GOLF instruments. Since the data are taken simultaneously and for a resolved sun, the signal derived from the MDI simulation can be compared on a pixel by pixel basis to the GOLF single wing signal. A correlation is found between MDI Id and GOLF single wing intensity. By removing the Id contribution to the GOLF signal, we hope to achieve a purer velocity signal in GOLF and hence raise the signal to noise ratio. The roll angle of MDI has not been accurately measured due to the failure of SOHO's gyros. At present, a single guide star is being used for spacecraft pointing and the error in roll angle is unkown. Previously (Ulrich and Henney, 1994) the MDI roll angle was estimated by comparing magnetograms from MDI and Mt. Wilson. Observations derived from the new multichannel system at Mt. Wilson can measure the roll angle directly by comparing MDI proxy images to a Mt. Wilson proxy derived from the MDI data. The 38 roll angle measurements spanning selected time frames covering nearly the entire SOHO mission average -.32 degrees. This suggests that a steady, equator-crossing flow of ~-10 m/s would exist due to the error in MDI coordinates. A Southward, equator-crossing flow has been observed (Giles, et al. 1997) whose magnitude is roughly -7 m/s. Thus some or even all of such a flow may be explainable by the MDI roll angle. Sources of error in the Mt. Wilson determination of the MDI roll angle are discussed and found to be relatively small (~3-4 are minutes) when estimated

  1. Mt. Pinatubo Volcano - Post Eruption, Luzon, Philippines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Mt. Pinatubo on the island of Luzon (15.5N, 120.0E) erupted catastrophically in June 1991 after over 600 years of inactivity. This is the first shuttle post eruption photo. The north facing crater is not obvious in this scene but the blowout area, in the once heavily forested region, is easily observed as lava flow, ash fallout, mud slide and debris trails mar the landscape. Clark AFB, once the crossroads of the SW Pacific can only partially be seen.

  2. Eurotra: A European perspective on MT

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, D.

    1986-07-01

    This paper describes the perspective on Machine Translation taken in the Eurotra project: an R and D project of the European Communities at a relatively early stage. It describes: i) the project's rather challenging aims; ii) the framework of design principles and linguistic and software methodology which are of particular importance given its size, scope, and organization; iii) the proposed representational theories and expressive (programming) languages with which actual instances of MT systems can be constructed. The final section sketches some recent proposals and directions for future research.

  3. Martensitic transition and structural modulations in the Heusler alloy Ni 2FeGa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. Q.; Liu, Z. H.; Yu, H. C.; Zhang, M.; Zhou, Y. Q.; Wu, G. H.

    2003-05-01

    We have found two distinctive structural modulations altering evidently along with the martensitic transition (MT) in the Ni 2FeGa alloy. The first one ( q1), corresponding to the well-known phonon anomalies in the [ ζζ0] TA 2 branch, occurs along the <110> direction. The second one ( q2), an incommensurate modulation observed for the first time, occurs along the <211>-direction. Both modulations change gradually with the premartensitic phonon softening and discontinuously with the MT. Anomalies in magnetic properties emerging around the MT have been briefly discussed.

  4. Reaction of HO2 with O3 and the effect of water vapor on HO2 kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of temperature and water vapor concentration on the ratio of the rate constant of the reaction HO2 + O3 yields OH + 2(O2) to the square root of the rate constant for the reaction HO2 + HO2 yields H2O2 + O2 are determined. Photolysis of H2-O2-O3 mixtures at 253.7 nm was carried out with H2O pressures in the range 0 to 15 torr at a temperature range of -42.5 to 61 C along with 184.9 nm photolysis of H2O-O2-O3 mixtures. It is shown that the rate of O3 photolysis is suppressed by the addition of water vapor and it is suggested that this effect is realized in the HO2 + HO2 yields H2O2 + O2 reaction. The calculated expression for the temperature dependence of the rate constant ratio is found to be in good agreement with that calculated from separate rate constants. Rate constants determined for the reaction OH + HO2 yields H2O + O2 are found to be higher than those previously determined, presumably due to increased pressure, indicating that atmospheric models should take into account the possible pressure dependences of the reactions considered.

  5. New Radioligands for Describing the Molecular Pharmacology of MT1 and MT2 Melatonin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Legros, Céline; Matthey, Ulrich; Grelak, Teresa; Pedragona-Moreau, Sandrine; Hassler, Werner; Yous, Saïd; Thomas, Emmanuel; Suzenet, Franck; Folleas, Benoît; Lefoulon, François; Berthelot, Pascal; Caignard, Daniel-Henri; Guillaumet, Gérald; Delagrange, Philippe; Brayer, Jean-Louis; Nosjean, Olivier; Boutin, Jean A.

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin receptors have been studied for several decades. The low expression of the receptors in tissues led the scientific community to find a substitute for the natural hormone melatonin, the agonist 2-[125I]-iodomelatonin. Using the agonist, several hundreds of studies were conducted, including the discovery of agonists and antagonists for the receptors and minute details about their molecular behavior. Recently, we attempted to expand the panel of radioligands available for studying the melatonin receptors by using the newly discovered compounds SD6, DIV880, and S70254. These compounds were characterized for their affinities to the hMT1 and hMT2 recombinant receptors and their functionality in the classical GTPγS system. SD6 is a full agonist, equilibrated between the receptor isoforms, whereas S70254 and DIV880 are only partial MT2 agonists, with Ki in the low nanomolar range while they have no affinity to MT1 receptors. These new tools will hopefully allow for additions to the current body of information on the native localization of the receptor isoforms in tissues. PMID:23698757

  6. New radioligands for describing the molecular pharmacology of MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Legros, Céline; Matthey, Ulrich; Grelak, Teresa; Pedragona-Moreau, Sandrine; Hassler, Werner; Yous, Saïd; Thomas, Emmanuel; Suzenet, Franck; Folleas, Benoît; Lefoulon, François; Berthelot, Pascal; Caignard, Daniel-Henri; Guillaumet, Gérald; Delagrange, Philippe; Brayer, Jean-Louis; Nosjean, Olivier; Boutin, Jean A

    2013-04-25

    Melatonin receptors have been studied for several decades. The low expression of the receptors in tissues led the scientific community to find a substitute for the natural hormone melatonin, the agonist 2-[125I]-iodomelatonin. Using the agonist, several hundreds of studies were conducted, including the discovery of agonists and antagonists for the receptors and minute details about their molecular behavior. Recently, we attempted to expand the panel of radioligands available for studying the melatonin receptors by using the newly discovered compounds SD6, DIV880, and S70254. These compounds were characterized for their affinities to the hMT1 and hMT2 recombinant receptors and their functionality in the classical GTPS system. SD6 is a full agonist, equilibrated between the receptor isoforms, whereas S70254 and DIV880 are only partial MT2 agonists, with Ki in the low nanomolar range while they have no affinity to MT1 receptors. These new tools will hopefully allow for additions to the current body of information on the native localization of the receptor isoforms in tissues.

  7. Stereo Image of Mt. Usu Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On April 3, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra Satellite captured this image of the erupting Mt. Usu volcano in Hokkaido, Japan. This anaglyph stereo image is of Mt Usu volcano. On Friday, March 31, more than 15,000 people were evacuated by helicopter, truck and boat from the foot of Usu, that began erupting from the northwest flank, shooting debris and plumes of smoke streaked with blue lightning thousands of feet in the air. Although no lava gushed from the mountain, rocks and ash continued to fall after the eruption. The region was shaken by thousands of tremors before the eruption. People said they could taste grit from the ash that was spewed as high as 2,700 meters (8,850 ft) into the sky and fell to coat surrounding towns with ash. A 3-D view can be obtained by looking through stereo glasses, with the blue film through your left eye and red film with your right eye at the same time. North is on your right hand side. For more information, see When Rivers of Rock Flow ASTER web page Image courtesy of MITI, ERSDAC, JAROS, and the U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

  8. Evolution of anorthoclase phonolite, Mt. Erebus, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.A.; Kyle, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    Over the last 1 m.y. Mt. Erebus (3794 m) has erupted mainly anorthoclase phonolite (AP) and lesser trachyte, kaersutite phonolite and intermediate differentiates. An active convecting AP lava lake, identical in composition to the older lavas, existed from 1972 until late 1984. Most of the rocks define a strongly undersaturated continuous sodic differentiation series, composed of basanite, Ne-hawaiite, Ne-mugearite, Ne-benmoreite and AP. The main phenocryst phases and their ranges are: olivine (Fo 81-43), clinopyroxene (Wo 50-44, En 42-24, Fs 11-30), opaque oxides (Usp 52-79) and feldspar. Major, trace and REE analyses exhibit smooth trends on variation diagrams. REE are strongly LREE enriched and increase from La/sub N/=220 in the basanites to 400 in AP. There are no significant Eu anomalies. Published isotopic data show derivation of the basanite parental magmas from a depleted (/sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr=0.703) heterogeneous mantle source similar to that for oceanic island basalts. Crustal contamination is insignificant except in the trachytes. Evolution of the Erebus lineage by fractional crystallization of the above phases plus apatite is supported by mass balance models. Differentiation probably occurred in larger, hotter and lower P/sub H20/ magma chambers compared to the basanite to kaersutite phonolite DVDP lineage (Kyle, 1981) of the neighboring Hut Point Peninsula. Mt. Erebus may mark the site of a major mantle upwelling.

  9. The electron capture in 163Ho experiment - ECHo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastaldo, L.; Blaum, K.; Chrysalidis, K.; Day Goodacre, T.; Domula, A.; Door, M.; Dorrer, H.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Eliseev, S.; Enss, C.; Faessler, A.; Filianin, P.; Fleischmann, A.; Fonnesu, D.; Gamer, L.; Haas, R.; Hassel, C.; Hengstler, D.; Jochum, J.; Johnston, K.; Kebschull, U.; Kempf, S.; Kieck, T.; Köster, U.; Lahiri, S.; Maiti, M.; Mantegazzini, F.; Marsh, B.; Neroutsos, P.; Novikov, Yu. N.; Ranitzsch, P. C. O.; Rothe, S.; Rischka, A.; Saenz, A.; Sander, O.; Schneider, F.; Scholl, S.; Schüssler, R. X.; Schweiger, Ch.; Simkovic, F.; Stora, T.; Szücs, Z.; Türler, A.; Veinhard, M.; Weber, M.; Wegner, M.; Wendt, K.; Zuber, K.

    2017-06-01

    Neutrinos, and in particular their tiny but non-vanishing masses, can be considered one of the doors towards physics beyond the Standard Model. Precision measurements of the kinematics of weak interactions, in particular of the 3H β-decay and the 163Ho electron capture (EC), represent the only model independent approach to determine the absolute scale of neutrino masses. The electron capture in 163Ho experiment, ECHo, is designed to reach sub-eV sensitivity on the electron neutrino mass by means of the analysis of the calorimetrically measured electron capture spectrum of the nuclide 163Ho. The maximum energy available for this decay, about 2.8 keV, constrains the type of detectors that can be used. Arrays of low temperature metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are being developed to measure the 163Ho EC spectrum with energy resolution below 3 eV FWHM and with a time resolution below 1 μs. To achieve the sub-eV sensitivity on the electron neutrino mass, together with the detector optimization, the availability of large ultra-pure 163Ho samples, the identification and suppression of background sources as well as the precise parametrization of the 163Ho EC spectrum are of utmost importance. The high-energy resolution 163Ho spectra measured with the first MMC prototypes with ion-implanted 163Ho set the basis for the ECHo experiment. We describe the conceptual design of ECHo and motivate the strategies we have adopted to carry on the present medium scale experiment, ECHo-1K. In this experiment, the use of 1 kBq 163Ho will allow to reach a neutrino mass sensitivity below 10 eV/ c 2. We then discuss how the results being achieved in ECHo-1k will guide the design of the next stage of the ECHo experiment, ECHo-1M, where a source of the order of 1 MBq 163Ho embedded in large MMCs arrays will allow to reach sub-eV sensitivity on the electron neutrino mass.

  10. Trace elements in scalp hair of children chronically exposed to volcanic activity (Mt. Etna, Italy).

    PubMed

    Varrica, D; Tamburo, E; Dongarrà, G; Sposito, F

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this survey was to use scalp hair as a biomonitor to evaluate the environmental exposure to metals and metalloids of schoolchildren living around the Mt. Etna area, and to verify whether the degree of human exposure to trace elements is subject to changes in local environmental factors. Twenty trace elements were determined in 376 samples of scalp hair from schoolboys (11-13 years old) of both genders, living in ten towns located around the volcanic area of Mt. Etna (Sicily). The results were compared with those (215 samples) from children living in areas of Sicily characterized by a different geological setting (reference site). As, U and V showed much higher concentrations at the volcanic site whereas Sr was particularly more abundant at the reference site. Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) indicated an Etna factor, made up of V, U and Mn, and a second factor, concerning the reference site, characterized by Ni and Sr, and to a lesser extent by Mo and Cd. Significant differences in element concentrations were also observed among three different sectors of Mt. Etna area. Young people living in the Mt. Etna area are naturally exposed to enhanced intakes of some metals (V, U, Mn) and non-metals (e.g., As) than individuals of the same age residing in other areas of Sicily, characterized by different lithologies and not influenced by volcanic activity. The petrographic nature of local rocks and the dispersion of the volcanic plume explain the differences, with ingestion of water and local food as the most probable exposure pathways. © 2013.

  11. Linear mtDNA fragments and unusual mtDNA rearrangements associated with pathological deficiency of MGME1 exonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Thomas J.; Zsurka, Gábor; Peeva, Viktoriya; Schöler, Susanne; Szczesny, Roman J.; Cysewski, Dominik; Reyes, Aurelio; Kornblum, Cornelia; Sciacco, Monica; Moggio, Maurizio; Dziembowski, Andrzej; Kunz, Wolfram S.; Minczuk, Michal

    2014-01-01

    MGME1, also known as Ddk1 or C20orf72, is a mitochondrial exonuclease found to be involved in the processing of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) during replication. Here, we present detailed insights on the role of MGME1 in mtDNA maintenance. Upon loss of MGME1, elongated 7S DNA species accumulate owing to incomplete processing of 5′ ends. Moreover, an 11-kb linear mtDNA fragment spanning the entire major arc of the mitochondrial genome is generated. In contrast to control cells, where linear mtDNA molecules are detectable only after nuclease S1 treatment, the 11-kb fragment persists in MGME1-deficient cells. In parallel, we observed characteristic mtDNA duplications in the absence of MGME1. The fact that the breakpoints of these mtDNA rearrangements do not correspond to either classical deletions or the ends of the linear 11-kb fragment points to a role of MGME1 in processing mtDNA ends, possibly enabling their repair by homologous recombination. In agreement with its functional involvement in mtDNA maintenance, we show that MGME1 interacts with the mitochondrial replicase PolgA, suggesting that it is a constituent of the mitochondrial replisome, to which it provides an additional exonuclease activity. Thus, our results support the viewpoint that MGME1-mediated mtDNA processing is essential for faithful mitochondrial genome replication and might be required for intramolecular recombination of mtDNA. PMID:24986917

  12. Heterogeneous Uptake of HO2 Radicals onto Submicron Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, P. S.; George, I. J.; Brooks, B.; Whalley, L. K.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Heard, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    OH and HO2 (HOx) radicals are closely coupled and OH is responsible for the majority of the oxidation in the troposphere and controls the concentrations of many trace species. Therefore, it is important to be able to accurately predict HOx concentrations. However, some field measurement studies have reported significantly lower HO2 radical concentrations than calculated by constrained box models using detailed chemical mechanisms. Although the inclusion of halogen chemistry into the mechanisms can explain much of the differences in the marine boundary layer (MBL) (1,2), HO2 uptake by aerosols has been suggested as a possible sink in the MBL (2), the Arctic troposphere (3) and the upper troposphere (4). There have been very few laboratory studies (5,6) on HO2 uptake by aerosols and the rates and mechanism is still uncertain. The HO2 uptake coefficients were measured for a variety of atmospherically relevant inorganic and organic aerosols. The measurements were performed using an aerosol flow tube combined with a Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE) detector. The sensitive FAGE cell allowed low HO2 concentrations (108-109 molecule cm-3) to be injected into the flow tube using a moveable injector. By moving the injector along the flow tube, position dependent HO2 decays were able to be recorded which when plotted against the total aerosol surface area allowed an uptake coefficient to be obtained. The aerosols were generated using an atomiser or by homogeneous nucleation and the total aerosol surface area was measured using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer. The HO2 uptake coefficient (γ) was measured at room temperature for dry inorganic salts and dry organics (γ< 0.004), wet inorganic salts and wet organics (γ= 0.002-0.005), wet copper doped ammonium sulfate aerosols (γ= 0.28± 0.05) and ammonium sulfate aerosols doped with different molar amounts of iron (γ= 0.003-0.06). The pH dependence of the HO2 uptake coefficient was investigated, however no

  13. Keeping mtDNA in Shape between Generations

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, James B.; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-01-01

    Since the unexpected discovery that mitochondria contain their own distinct DNA molecules, studies of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have yielded many surprises. In animals, transmission of the mtDNA genome is explicitly non-Mendelian, with a very high number of genome copies being inherited from the mother after a drastic bottleneck. Recent work has begun to uncover the molecular details of this unusual mode of transmission. Many surprising variations in animal mitochondrial biology are known; however, a series of recent studies have identified a core of evolutionarily conserved mechanisms relating to mtDNA inheritance, e.g., mtDNA bottlenecks during germ cell development, selection against specific mtDNA mutation types during maternal transmission, and targeted destruction of sperm mitochondria. In this review, we outline recent literature on the transmission of mtDNA in animals and highlight the implications for human health and ageing. PMID:25299061

  14. 76 FR 56967 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Glendive, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    .... * * * * * ANM MT E5 Glendive, MT Glendive, Dawson Community Airport, MT (Lat. 47 08'19'' N., long. 104 48'26'' W... extending upward from 1,200 feet above the surface within an area bounded by lat. 47 38'00'' N., long. 104 48'00'' W.; to lat. 47 17'00'' N., long. 104 05'00'' W.; to lat. 46 54'00'' N., long. 104 05'00''...

  15. New orthorhombic derivative of CaCu{sub 5}-type structure: RNi{sub 4}Si compounds (R=Y, La, Ce, Sm, Gd–Ho), crystal structure and some magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Morozkin, A.V.; Knotko, A.V.; Yapaskurt, V.O.; Yuan, Fang; Mozharivskyj, Y.; Nirmala, R.

    2013-12-15

    The crystal structure of new YNi{sub 4}Si-type RNi{sub 4}Si (R=Y, La, Ce, Sm, Gd–Ho) compounds has been established using powder X-ray diffraction. The YNi{sub 4}Si structure is a new structure type, which is orthorhombic derivative of CaCu{sub 5}-type structure (space group Cmmm N 65, oC12). GdNi{sub 4}Si and DyNi{sub 4}Si compounds order ferromagnetically at 25 and 19 K, respectively whereas YNi{sub 4}Si shows antiferromagnetic nature. At 15 K, DyNi{sub 4}Si shows second antiferromagnetic-like transition. The magnetic moment of GdNi{sub 4}Si at 5 K in 50 kOe field is ∼7.2 μ{sub B}/f.u. suggesting a completely ordered ferromagnetic state. The magnetocaloric effect of GdNi{sub 4}Si is calculated in terms of isothermal magnetic entropy change and it reaches the maximum value of −12.8 J/kg K for a field change of 50 kOe near T{sub C} ∼25 K. - Graphical abstract: The RNi{sub 4}Si (R=Y, La, Ce, Sm, Gd–Ho) compounds crystallize in new YNi{sub 4}Si-type structure which is orthorhombic derivative of the basic CaCu{sub 5}-type structure. GdNi{sub 4}Si and DyNi{sub 4}Si compounds show the ferromagnetic-like ordering, whereas.YNi{sub 4}Si has the antiferromagnetic nature. The GdNi{sub 4}Si demonstrates the big magnetocaloric effect near temperature of ferromagnetic ordering. The relationship between initial CaCu{sub 5}-type DyNi{sub 5} and YNi{sub 4}Si-type DyNi{sub 4}Si lattices.

  16. Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mtFabD, a malonyl-CoA:acyl carrier protein transacylase (MCAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Ghadbane, Hemza; Brown, Alistair K.; Kremer, Laurent; Besra, Gurdyal S. Fütterer, Klaus

    2007-10-01

    Binding of Ni{sup 2+} ions to the uncleaved affinity tag facilitated de novo phasing of the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis mtFabD to 3.0 Å resolution. Mycobacteria display a unique and unusual cell-wall architecture, central to which is the membrane-proximal mycolyl-arabinogalactan-peptidoglycan core (mAGP). The biosynthesis of mycolic acids, which form the outermost layer of the mAGP core, involves malonyl-CoA:acyl carrier protein transacylase (MCAT). This essential enzyme catalyses the transfer of malonyl from coenzyme A to acyl carrier protein AcpM, thus feeding these two-carbon units into the chain-elongation cycle of the type II fatty-acid synthase. The crystal structure of M. tuberculosis mtFabD, the mycobacterial MCAT, has been determined to 3.0 Å resolution by multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion. Phasing was facilitated by Ni{sup 2+} ions bound to the 20-residue N-terminal affinity tag, which packed between the two independent copies of mtFabD.

  17. 76 FR 35967 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bozeman, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... Bozeman, Gallatin Field Airport, Bozeman, MT, to accommodate aircraft using Instrument Landing System (ILS.... Controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate aircraft using the ILS LOC standard instrument...

  18. 77 FR 52219 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Lewistown, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... aircraft using Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) standard instrument approach... surface, at Lewistown Municipal Airport, Lewistown, MT, to accommodate IFR aircraft executing RNAV...

  19. Theoretical characterization of the potential energy surface for H + O2 yields HO2(asterisk) yields HO + O. II - The potential for H atom exchange in HO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Rohlfing, Celeste Mcmichael

    1989-01-01

    The results of CASSCF multireference contracted CI calculations with large ANO basis sets are presented for the exchange region of the HO2 potential-energy surface. The saddle point for H atom exchange is about 13 kcal/mol below the energy of H + O2; therefore, this region of the surface should be accessible during H + O2 recombination and methathesis reactions.

  20. Theoretical characterization of the potential energy surface for H + O2 yields HO2(asterisk) yields HO + O. II - The potential for H atom exchange in HO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Rohlfing, Celeste Mcmichael

    1989-01-01

    The results of CASSCF multireference contracted CI calculations with large ANO basis sets are presented for the exchange region of the HO2 potential-energy surface. The saddle point for H atom exchange is about 13 kcal/mol below the energy of H + O2; therefore, this region of the surface should be accessible during H + O2 recombination and methathesis reactions.

  1. Infrared spectra of products of the reaction of H atoms with O2 trapped in solid neon: HO2, HO2(+), HOHOH(-), and H2O(HO).

    PubMed

    Jacox, Marilyn E; Thompson, Warren E

    2013-10-03

    When a Ne/O2 mixture is codeposited at 4.3 K with a Ne/H2 mixture that has been passed through a microwave discharge, the infrared spectrum of the resulting deposit includes prominent absorptions of the three vibrational fundamentals of HO2 and seven relatively weak absorptions in the infrared and near-infrared, only one of them previously reported, that can be assigned to overtones and combination bands of that product. Similar assignments are made for DO2. A new, broad absorption at 702.9 cm(-1) appears close to the gas-phase absorption of HOHOH(-) at 697 cm(-1). Isotopic substitution experiments support that assignment. Evidence is also presented for the stabilization of HOHO(-). Absorptions near the vibrational fundamentals of H2O and an absorption at 3472.4 cm(-1) grow on exposure of the deposit to radiation of wavelength shorter than 345 nm. These absorptions are assigned to the H2O(HO) complex, in agreement with the results of an earlier argon-matrix study. In both studies, photodestruction of HO2 molecules that have H2O trapped in a nearby site results in formation of the complex. Because the discharge through Ne/H2 supports ion production, photodetachment of the resulting HOHOH(-) is an additional source of the complex. Other absorptions may be contributed by the bending fundamental of HO2(+) and by a cation complex with H2.

  2. 1.88 Micrometers InGaAsP Pumped, Room Temperature Ho: LuAG Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Reichle, Donald J.; Busch, George; Leisher, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A room temperature, directly diode pumped Ho:LuAG laser oscillated for the first time. Direct pumping of the Ho upper laser manifold maximizes efficiency, minimizes heating, and eliminates Ho:Tm energy sharing. Design and performance are presented.

  3. 1.88 Micrometers InGaAsP Pumped, Room Temperature Ho: LuAG Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Reichle, Donald J.; Busch, George; Leisher, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A room temperature, directly diode pumped Ho:LuAG laser oscillated for the first time. Direct pumping of the Ho upper laser manifold maximizes efficiency, minimizes heating, and eliminates Ho:Tm energy sharing. Design and performance are presented.

  4. Heterogeneous Uptake of HO2 Radicals onto Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, I. J.; Brooks, B.; Goddard, A.; Whalley, L. K.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Heard, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxyl (HO2) radicals, known collectively as HOx radicals, are the key reactants that control the oxidative capacity of the troposphere and the atmospheric lifetimes and concentrations of most trace reactive species, i.e. NOx, O3 and volatile organic compounds. Therefore, in order to gain an overall understanding of atmospheric chemistry and to predict the fate of atmospheric pollutants, a detailed knowledge of the sources and sinks of HOx species and their steady-state atmospheric concentrations is crucial. To this end, field measurements of atmospheric HOx concentrations have been recently compared to model predictions to gauge our level of understanding of atmospheric chemistry of trace reactive species. Box models incorporating known gas-phase chemistry have significantly overpredicted steady-state HO2 levels in comparison to field observations, suggesting heterogeneous uptake onto aerosols as a possible missing atmospheric sink for HO2 radicals [1-2]. However, relatively few laboratory studies have been performed to determine the kinetic parameters for HO2 loss onto aerosols, and thus the ability to assess the impact of this mechanism on HOx levels is limited. The goal of this laboratory study is to improve our understanding of the tropospheric HOx budget by measuring HO2 uptake kinetics onto aerosol particles. In this work, HO2 radicals were produced by the photolysis of water vapour and the FAGE (Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion) technique was used to monitor HO2 loss kinetics onto aerosol particles in an aerosol flow tube setup. FAGE is a highly sensitive laser-induced fluorescence based detection method for HOx radicals that has allowed for kinetic measurements to be performed under low HO2 concentrations minimizing gas-phase HO2 self reaction, i.e. for [HO2] < 109 molecules cm-3. The mass accommodation coefficient was determined by measuring HO2 uptake onto Cu(II)-doped ammonium sulfate aerosols. Reactive uptake coefficients

  5. Quantum yields of OH, HO2 and NO3 in the UV photolysis of HO2NO2.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Elena; Gierczak, Tomasz; Stark, Harald; Burkholder, James B; Ravishankara, A R

    2005-01-21

    Quantum yields, phi, of OH and HO2 in the ultraviolet photolysis of HO2NO2 (peroxynitric acid, PNA) at 193 and 248 nm and that of NO3 at 193, 248 and 308 nm are reported. Quantum yields were measured using pulsed excimer laser photolysis combined with pulsed laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) detection of OH radicals and cavity ring-down (CRD) detection of NO3 radicals. HO2 radicals were quantified by converting them to OH via the HO2 + NO --> OH + NO2 reaction and detecting OH. The quantum yields obtained at 296 K are: phi193 nm(OH) = 0.21 +/- 0.12, phi248 nm(OH) = 0.085 +/- 0.08, phi193 nm(HO2) = 0.56 +/- 0.09, phi248 nm(HO2) = 0.89 +/- 0.26, phi193 nm(NO3) = 0.35 +/- 0.09, phi248 nm(NO3) = 0.08 +/- 0.04 and phi308 nm(NO3) = 0.05 +/- 0.02. The quoted uncertainties are 2sigma (95% confidence level) and include estimated systematic errors. Our results are compared with the previous quantum yield measurements of OH (MacLeod et al., J. Geophys. Res., 1988, 93, 3813) and NO2 (Roehl et al., 2001, J. Phys. Chem., 105, 1592) at 248 nm and the discrepancies are discussed. The rate coefficients at 298 K for reactions of OH with HO2NO2, H2O2, HNO3 and NO are also reported.

  6. WPA Omnibus Award MT Wind Power Outreach

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Spangler, Manager Energy Planning and Renewables

    2012-01-30

    The objective of this grant was to further the development of Montana's vast wind resources for small, medium, and large scale benefits to Montana and the nation. This was accomplished through collaborative work with wind industry representatives, state and local governments, the agricultural community, and interested citizens. Through these efforts MT Dept Environmental Quality (DEQ) was able to identify development barriers, educate and inform citizens, as well as to participate in regional and national dialogue that will spur the development of wind resources. The scope of DEQ's wind outreach effort evolved over the course of this agreement from the development of the Montana Wind Working Group and traditional outreach efforts, to the current focus on working with the state's university system to deliver a workforce trained to enter the wind industry.

  7. The Zn- and Cd-clusters of recombinant mammalian MT1 and MT4 metallothionein domains include sulfide ligands.

    PubMed

    Tío, Laura; Villarreal, Laura; Atrian, Sílvia; Capdevila, Mercè

    2006-10-01

    Recombinant (E. coli ) synthesis of mammalian MT1 and MT4 domains as separate peptides in Zn(II) and Cd(II) enriched growth media has rendered metal complexes containing sulfide anions as additional ligands. The Cd preparations show higher sulfide content than the Zn preparations. Also, the betaMT1 and betaMT4 fragments exhibit higher sulfide/peptide ratios than the respective alpha fragments. Titration of Zn3-betaMT1 with Cd(II) followed by addition of several sodium sulfide equivalents shows that the Cd(II)-betaMT1 species can incorporate sulfide ligands in vitro, with a concomitant evolution of their UV-vis and CD fingerprints to those characteristic of the Cd-S2- chromophores. Current results have also provided full understanding of previous data collected by this group in the characterization of the Cd-betaMT1 preparations obtained from large-scale fermentor synthesis by allowing identification of at least 2S2- ligands per Cd-betaMT1 species. Furthermore, the results here presented have revealed that synthesis of betaMT4 in Cd-supplemented cultures yielded Cd,S(2-)-containing clusters instead of the proposed heterometallic Zn,Cd-betaMT4 complexes. Finally, a global evaluation of our results suggests that the higher the Cu-thionein character of a MT peptide, the higher is its tendency to harbor nonproteic ligands (i.e., sulfide anions) when building divalent metal clusters, especially Cd-MT complexes.

  8. The mutation rate of the human mtDNA deletion mtDNA4977.

    PubMed

    Shenkar, R; Navidi, W; Tavaré, S; Dang, M H; Chomyn, A; Attardi, G; Cortopassi, G; Arnheim, N

    1996-10-01

    The human mitochondrial mutation mtDNA4977 is a 4,977-bp deletion that originates between two 13-bp direct repeats. We grew 220 colonies of cells, each from a single human cell. For each colony, we counted the number of cells and amplified the DNA by PCR to test for the presence of a deletion. To estimate the mutation fate, we used a model that describes the relationship between the mutation rate and the probability that a colony of a given size will contain no mutants, taking into account such factors as possible mitochondrial turnover and mistyping due to PCR error. We estimate that the mutation rate for mtDNA4977 in cultured human cells is 5.95 x 10(-8) per mitochondrial genome replication. This method can be applied to specific chromosomal, as well as mitochondrial, mutations.

  9. Effects of the Melatonin MT-1/MT-2 Agonist Ramelteon on Daytime Body Temperature and Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Markwald, Rachel R.; Lee-Chiong, Teofilo L.; Burke, Tina M.; Snider, Jesse A.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: A reduction in core temperature and an increase in the distal-proximal skin gradient (DPG) are reported to be associated with shorter sleep onset latencies (SOL) and better sleep quality. Ramelteon is a melatonin MT-1/MT-2 agonist approved for the treatment of insomnia. At night, ramelteon has been reported to shorten SOL. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that ramelteon would reduce core temperature, increase the DPG, as well as shorten SOL, reduce wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO), and increase total sleep time (TST) during a daytime sleep opportunity. Design: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Eight mg ramelteon or placebo was administered 2 h prior to a 4-h daytime sleep opportunity. Setting: Sleep and chronobiology laboratory. Participants: Fourteen healthy adults (5 females), aged (23.2 ± 4.2 y). Measurements and Results: Primary outcome measures included core body temperature, the DPG and sleep physiology (minutes of total sleep time [TST], wake after sleep onset [WASO], and SOL). We also assessed as secondary outcomes, proximal and distal skin temperatures, sleep staging and subjective TST. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed ramelteon significantly reduced core temperature and increased the DPG (both P < 0.05). Furthermore, ramelteon reduced WASO and increased TST, and stages 1 and 2 sleep (all P < 0.05). The change in the DPG was negatively correlated with SOL in the ramelteon condition. Conclusions: Ramelteon improved daytime sleep, perhaps mechanistically in part by reducing core temperature and modulating skin temperature. These findings suggest that ramelteon may have promise for the treatment of insomnia associated with circadian misalignment due to circadian sleep disorders. Citation: Markwald RR; Lee-Choing TL; Burke TM; Snider JA; Wright KP. Effects of the melatonin MT-1/MT-2 agonist ramelteon on daytime body temperature and sleep. SLEEP 2010;33(6):825-831 PMID:20550024

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of the glyoxal + HO2 reaction: conversion of HO2 to OH by carbonyls.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Gabriel

    2011-01-27

    The kinetics of the glyoxal + HO(2) reaction have been investigated using computational chemistry and statistical reaction rate theory techniques, with consideration of a novel pathway that results in the conversion of HO(2) to OH. Glyoxal is shown to react with HO(2) to form an α-hydroxyperoxy radical with additional α-carbonyl functionality. Intramolecular H atom abstraction from the carbonyl moiety proceeds with a relatively low barrier, facilitating decomposition to OH + CO + HC(O)OH (formic acid). Time-dependent master equation simulations demonstrate that direct reaction to form OH is relatively slow at ambient temperature. The major reaction product is predicted to be collisionally deactivated HC(OH)(OO)CHO, which predominantly dissociates to reform the reactants under low-NO(x) conditions. The mechanism described here for the conversion of OH to HO(2) is available to a diverse range of carbonyls, including methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, hydroxyacetone, and glyoxylic acid, and energy surfaces are reported for the reaction of these species with HO(2).

  11. An Evaluation Study of Community Services, Mt. San Antonio College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Sue

    A study was conducted by the Community Services Department at Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) to evaluate participant satisfaction and suggestions for future direction for the department's comprehensive program of non-credit courses. A questionnaire was administered in class to 307 participants between April 1, and June 1, 1987, focusing on…

  12. An Evaluation Study of Community Services, Mt. San Antonio College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Sue

    A study was conducted by the Community Services Department at Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) to evaluate participant satisfaction and suggestions for future direction for the department's comprehensive program of non-credit courses. A questionnaire was administered in class to 307 participants between April 1, and June 1, 1987, focusing on…

  13. 78 FR 67024 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT AGENCY... a final rule published in the Federal Register of September 30, 2013, that establishes Class E... aid, Glasgow, MT. A favorable comment from the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA)...

  14. SignMT: An Alternative Language Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditcharoen, Nadh; Naruedomkul, Kanlaya; Cercone, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Learning a second language is very difficult, especially, for the disabled; the disability may be a barrier to learn and to utilize information written in text form. We present the SignMT, Thai sign to Thai machine translation system, which is able to translate from Thai sign language into Thai text. In the translation process, SignMT takes into…

  15. Construct Validity of the MMPI-2 College Maladjustment (Mt) Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barthlow, Deanna L.; Graham, John R.; Ben-Porath, Yossef S.; McNulty, John L

    2004-01-01

    The construct validity of the MMPI-2 (Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2) College Maladjustment (Mt) Scale was examined using 376 student clients at a university psychological clinic. A principal components analysis and correlations of Mt scale scores with clients' and therapists' ratings of symptoms and functioning showed that the Mt…

  16. 75 FR 41075 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bozeman, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bozeman, MT AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action will amend Class E airspace at... proposed rulemaking to amend Class E airspace at Bozeman, MT (75 FR 20321). Interested parties were...

  17. Interface Symbiotic Membrane Formation in Root Nodules of Medicago truncatula: the Role of Synaptotagmins MtSyt1, MtSyt2 and MtSyt3

    PubMed Central

    Gavrin, Aleksandr; Kulikova, Olga; Bisseling, Ton; Fedorova, Elena E.

    2017-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria (rhizobia) are maintained and conditioned to fix atmospheric nitrogen in infected cells of legume root nodules. Rhizobia are confined to the asymmetrical protrusions of plasma membrane (PM): infection threads (IT), cell wall-free unwalled droplets and symbiosomes. These compartments rapidly increase in surface and volume due to the microsymbiont expansion, and remarkably, the membrane resources of the host cells are targeted to interface membrane quite precisely. We hypothesized that the change in the membrane tension around the expanding microsymbionts creates a vector for membrane traffic toward the symbiotic interface. To test this hypothesis, we selected calcium sensors from the group of synaptotagmins: MtSyt1, Medicago truncatula homolog of AtSYT1 from Arabidopsis thaliana known to be involved in membrane repair, and two other homologs expressed in root nodules: MtSyt2 and MtSyt3. Here we show that MtSyt1, MtSyt2, and MtSyt3 are expressed in the expanding cells of the meristem, zone of infection and proximal cell layers of zone of nitrogen fixation (MtSyt1, MtSyt3). All three GFP-tagged proteins delineate the interface membrane of IT and unwalled droplets and create a subcompartments of PM surrounding these structures. The localization of MtSyt1 by EM immunogold labeling has shown the signal on symbiosome membrane and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To specify the role of synaptotagmins in interface membrane formation, we compared the localization of MtSyt1, MtSyt3 and exocyst subunit EXO70i, involved in the tethering of post-Golgi secretory vesicles and operational in tip growth. The localization of EXO70i in root nodules and arbusculated roots was strictly associated with the tips of IT and the tips of arbuscular fine branches, but the distribution of synaptotagmins on membrane subcompartments was broader and includes lateral parts of IT, the membrane of unwalled droplets as well as the symbiosomes. The double silencing of synaptotagmins

  18. Interface Symbiotic Membrane Formation in Root Nodules of Medicago truncatula: the Role of Synaptotagmins MtSyt1, MtSyt2 and MtSyt3.

    PubMed

    Gavrin, Aleksandr; Kulikova, Olga; Bisseling, Ton; Fedorova, Elena E

    2017-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria (rhizobia) are maintained and conditioned to fix atmospheric nitrogen in infected cells of legume root nodules. Rhizobia are confined to the asymmetrical protrusions of plasma membrane (PM): infection threads (IT), cell wall-free unwalled droplets and symbiosomes. These compartments rapidly increase in surface and volume due to the microsymbiont expansion, and remarkably, the membrane resources of the host cells are targeted to interface membrane quite precisely. We hypothesized that the change in the membrane tension around the expanding microsymbionts creates a vector for membrane traffic toward the symbiotic interface. To test this hypothesis, we selected calcium sensors from the group of synaptotagmins: MtSyt1, Medicago truncatula homolog of AtSYT1 from Arabidopsis thaliana known to be involved in membrane repair, and two other homologs expressed in root nodules: MtSyt2 and MtSyt3. Here we show that MtSyt1, MtSyt2, and MtSyt3 are expressed in the expanding cells of the meristem, zone of infection and proximal cell layers of zone of nitrogen fixation (MtSyt1, MtSyt3). All three GFP-tagged proteins delineate the interface membrane of IT and unwalled droplets and create a subcompartments of PM surrounding these structures. The localization of MtSyt1 by EM immunogold labeling has shown the signal on symbiosome membrane and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To specify the role of synaptotagmins in interface membrane formation, we compared the localization of MtSyt1, MtSyt3 and exocyst subunit EXO70i, involved in the tethering of post-Golgi secretory vesicles and operational in tip growth. The localization of EXO70i in root nodules and arbusculated roots was strictly associated with the tips of IT and the tips of arbuscular fine branches, but the distribution of synaptotagmins on membrane subcompartments was broader and includes lateral parts of IT, the membrane of unwalled droplets as well as the symbiosomes. The double silencing of synaptotagmins

  19. Melatonin inhibits cholangiocyte hyperplasia in cholestatic rats by interaction with MT1 but not MT2 melatonin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Renzi, Anastasia; Glaser, Shannon; DeMorrow, Sharon; Mancinelli, Romina; Meng, Fanyin; Franchitto, Antonio; Venter, Julie; White, Mellanie; Francis, Heather; Han, Yuyan; Alvaro, Domenico; Gaudio, Eugenio; Carpino, Guido; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Onori, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    In bile duct-ligated (BDL) rats, large cholangiocytes proliferate by activation of cAMP-dependent signaling. Melatonin, which is secreted from pineal gland as well as extrapineal tissues, regulates cell mitosis by interacting with melatonin receptors (MT1 and MT2) modulating cAMP and clock genes. In the liver, melatonin suppresses oxidative damage and ameliorates fibrosis. No information exists regarding the role of melatonin in the regulation of biliary hyperplasia. We evaluated the mechanisms of action by which melatonin regulates the growth of cholangiocytes. In normal and BDL rats, we determined the hepatic distribution of MT1, MT2, and the clock genes, CLOCK, BMAL1, CRY1, and PER1. Normal and BDL (immediately after BDL) rats were treated in vivo with melatonin before evaluating 1) serum levels of melatonin, bilirubin, and transaminases; 2) intrahepatic bile duct mass (IBDM) in liver sections; and 3) the expression of MT1 and MT2, clock genes, and PKA phosphorylation. In vitro, large cholangiocytes were stimulated with melatonin in the absence/presence of luzindole (MT1/MT2 antagonist) and 4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetralin (MT2 antagonist) before evaluating cell proliferation, cAMP levels, and PKA phosphorylation. Cholangiocytes express MT1 and MT2, CLOCK, BMAL1, CRY1, and PER1 that were all upregulated following BDL. Administration of melatonin to BDL rats decreased IBDM, serum bilirubin and transaminases levels, the expression of all clock genes, cAMP levels, and PKA phosphorylation in cholangiocytes. In vitro, melatonin decreased the proliferation, cAMP levels, and PKA phosphorylation, decreases that were blocked by luzindole. Melatonin may be important in the management of biliary hyperplasia in human cholangiopathies. PMID:21757639

  20. Behavior of OH and HO 2 in the winter atmosphere in New York City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xinrong; Brune, William H.; Mao, Jingqiu; Mitchell, Michael J.; Lesher, Robert L.; Simpas, James B.; Metcalf, Andrew R.; Schwab, James J.; Cai, Chenxia; Li, Yongquan; Demerjian, Kenneth L.; Felton, Henry D.; Boynton, Garry; Adams, Allen; Perry, Jacqueline; He, Yi; Zhou, Xianliang; Hou, Jian

    Hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperxy (HO 2) radicals, collectively known as HO x, were measured during an intensive field study in January and February 2004 in New York City. Much less OH and HO 2 levels were observed than in the summer of 2001 at the same site. On average, the maximum daytime mixing ratios were 0.05 pptv (1.4×10 6 cm -3) for OH and 0.7 pptv for HO 2, which were about one fifth of the levels in the summer of 2001. A zero-dimensional chemical model, based on the regional atmospheric chemical mechanism (RACM) and constrained by the measured concentrations of O 3, NO, NO 2, CO, SO 2, speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and meteorological parameters, was used to study the HO x chemistry in this environment. The model generally reproduced the daytime OH well, with a median measured-to-model ratio of 0.98. However, HO 2 was significantly under-predicted both at day and at night, with a median measured-to-model ratio of 6.0 during daytime. The discrepancy is pronounced when NO concentrations were high, a result that is consistent with some previous studies in urban environments. Photolysis of HONO was the dominant calculated HO x source during daytime; O 3 reactions with alkenes became the main calculated HO x source at night. The main calculated HO x sink was the OH reaction with NO 2. The discrepancy between measured and modeled HO 2 may be caused by significant HO x production that is missing in the model. An additional HO 2 production of up to 3×10 7 cm -3 s -1 (1.1 pptv s -1), which is three times the calculated HO x production, is needed. This HO 2 production can come either from unknown new HO x production or from unknown HO 2 recycling that does not go through OH.

  1. Asymptotic Freedom in Hořava-Lifshitz Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, Giulio; Saueressig, Frank; Schutten, Marrit

    2014-10-01

    We use the Wetterich equation for foliated spacetimes to study the renormalization group flow of projectable Hořava-Lifshitz gravity coupled to n Lifshitz scalars. Using novel results for anisotropic heat kernels, the matter-induced beta functions for the gravitational couplings are computed explicitly. The renormalization group flow exhibits an UV attractive anisotropic Gaussian fixed point where Newton's constant vanishes and the extra scalar mode decouples. This fixed point ensures that the theory is asymptotically free in the large-n expansion, indicating that projectable Hořava-Lifshitz gravity is perturbatively renormalizable. Notably, the fundamental fixed point action does not obey detailed balance.

  2. Magnetic properties of HoMn2O5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulov, I.; Lovchinov, V.; Dimitrov, D.; Apostolov, A.; Nizhankovskii, V.; Daszkiewicz, M.

    2007-04-01

    We have investigated the detailed field and temperature dependence of the dielectric constant, dielectric losses, electric polarization, magnetization and magnetostriction (MS) in orthorhombic HoMn2O5 single crystals. HoMn2O5 displays incommensurate antiferromagnetic ordering below 39 K, becoming commensurate on further cooling. The commensurate-incommensurate transition takes place at low temperatures. The inherent magnetic frustration in this material is lifted by a small lattice distortion, primarily involving shifts of the Mn3+ cations and giving rise to a canted antiferroelectric phase. Colossal magnetostriction (CMS) effect was observed and a novel phase transition diagram was build.

  3. Developing equine mtDNA profiling for forensic application.

    PubMed

    Gurney, Susan M R; Schneider, Sandra; Pflugradt, René; Barrett, Elizabeth; Forster, Anna Catharina; Brinkmann, Bernd; Jansen, Thomas; Forster, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Horse mtDNA profiling can be useful in forensic work investigating degraded samples, hair shafts or highly dilute samples. Degraded DNA often does not allow sequencing of fragments longer than 200 nucleotides. In this study we therefore search for the most discriminatory sections within the hypervariable horse mtDNA control region. Among a random sample of 39 horses, 32 different sequences were identified in a stretch of 921 nucleotides. The sequences were assigned to the published mtDNA types A-G, and to a newly labelled minor type H. The random match probability within the analysed samples is 3.61%, and the average pairwise sequence difference is 15 nucleotides. In a "sliding window" analysis of 200-nucleotide sections of the mtDNA control region, we find that the known repetitive central motif divides the mtDNA control region into a highly diverse segment and a markedly less discriminatory segment.

  4. Spotlight on the relevance of mtDNA in cancer.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Bermúdez, A; Vicente-Blanco, R J; Gonzalez-Vioque, E; Provencio, M; Fernández-Moreno, M Á; Garesse, R

    2017-04-01

    The potential role of the mitochondrial genome has recently attracted interest because of its high mutation frequency in tumors. Different aspects of mtDNA make it relevant for cancer's biology, such as it encodes a limited but essential number of genes for OXPHOS biogenesis, it is particularly susceptible to mutations, and its copy number can vary. Moreover, most ROS in mitochondria are produced by the electron transport chain. These characteristics place the mtDNA in the center of multiple signaling pathways, known as mitochondrial retrograde signaling, which modifies numerous key processes in cancer. Cybrid studies support that mtDNA mutations are relevant and exert their effect through a modification of OXPHOS function and ROS production. However, there is still much controversy regarding the clinical relevance of mtDNA mutations. New studies should focus more on OXPHOS dysfunction associated with a specific mutational signature rather than the presence of mutations in the mtDNA.

  5. mtDNAprofiler: a Web application for the nomenclature and comparison of human mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Yang, In Seok; Lee, Hwan Young; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2013-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a valuable tool in the fields of forensic, population, and medical genetics. However, recording and comparing mtDNA control region or entire genome sequences would be difficult if researchers are not familiar with mtDNA nomenclature conventions. Therefore, mtDNAprofiler, a Web application, was designed for the analysis and comparison of mtDNA sequences in a string format or as a list of mtDNA single-nucleotide polymorphisms (mtSNPs). mtDNAprofiler which comprises four mtDNA sequence-analysis tools (mtDNA nomenclature, mtDNA assembly, mtSNP conversion, and mtSNP concordance-check) supports not only the accurate analysis of mtDNA sequences via an automated nomenclature function, but also consistent management of mtSNP data via direct comparison and validity-check functions. Since mtDNAprofiler consists of four tools that are associated with key steps of mtDNA sequence analysis, mtDNAprofiler will be helpful for researchers working with mtDNA. mtDNAprofiler is freely available at http://mtprofiler.yonsei.ac.kr.

  6. Napoli and Volcanism - Vesuvius and Mt. Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    For more than 240 million years the region now known as Italy has been the scene of episodic volcanic activity. East-southeast of Napoli (Naples) stands the imposing cone of Vesuvius, which erupted explosively in 79 A.D. to bury Pompeii and Herculaneum. More recently, when the crew of Space Shuttle mission STS-104 captured this view, Mt. Etna (Sicily, not seen in this image, but photographed the day before) was spewing ash and gas thousands of meters into the air, some of which can be seen as a brownish smear over Isola d' Ischia and the Tyrrhenian Sea. The Appenine ranges extend from northern Italy, down the boot of the peninsula and westward into Sicily. This photograph of the Appenino Napoletano is part of an 18-frame stereophoto mapping strip that spans the entire mountain chain. The almost 1200-km-long belt of volcanoes and folded/faulted mountains is a result of the ongoing collision of Africa and Eurasia, accompanied by the progressive closing of the Mediterranean Sea. Using overlapping pairs of stereophotos, and a special viewer, scientists can get a three-dimensional perspective on the ranges that surpasses any image viewed alone. For more information, see another image of Mt. Vesuvius, taken by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). References: Behncke, Boris, 2000, Vesuvio - The eruption of A.D. 79: Italy's Volcanoes - The Cradle of Volcanology [http://www.geo.mtu.edu/boris/VESUVIO_79.html (accessed 10/18/01)] Doglioni, C., and Flores, G., 1997, Italy, in Moores, E. M., and Fairbridge, R. W., editors, Encyclopedia of European and Asian Regional Geology: London, Chapman and Hall, p. 414-435 Shuttle photograph STS104-710-60 was taken 23 July 2001 from the orbiter Atlantis using a Hasselblad camera with 250-mm lens. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. The entire mapping series (of frames numbered in sequence from 50 through 68) can also be downloaded from the

  7. Napoli and Volcanism - Vesuvius and Mt. Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    For more than 240 million years the region now known as Italy has been the scene of episodic volcanic activity. East-southeast of Napoli (Naples) stands the imposing cone of Vesuvius, which erupted explosively in 79 A.D. to bury Pompeii and Herculaneum. More recently, when the crew of Space Shuttle mission STS-104 captured this view, Mt. Etna (Sicily, not seen in this image, but photographed the day before) was spewing ash and gas thousands of meters into the air, some of which can be seen as a brownish smear over Isola d' Ischia and the Tyrrhenian Sea. The Appenine ranges extend from northern Italy, down the boot of the peninsula and westward into Sicily. This photograph of the Appenino Napoletano is part of an 18-frame stereophoto mapping strip that spans the entire mountain chain. The almost 1200-km-long belt of volcanoes and folded/faulted mountains is a result of the ongoing collision of Africa and Eurasia, accompanied by the progressive closing of the Mediterranean Sea. Using overlapping pairs of stereophotos, and a special viewer, scientists can get a three-dimensional perspective on the ranges that surpasses any image viewed alone. For more information, see another image of Mt. Vesuvius, taken by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). References: Behncke, Boris, 2000, Vesuvio - The eruption of A.D. 79: Italy's Volcanoes - The Cradle of Volcanology [http://www.geo.mtu.edu/boris/VESUVIO_79.html (accessed 10/18/01)] Doglioni, C., and Flores, G., 1997, Italy, in Moores, E. M., and Fairbridge, R. W., editors, Encyclopedia of European and Asian Regional Geology: London, Chapman and Hall, p. 414-435 Shuttle photograph STS104-710-60 was taken 23 July 2001 from the orbiter Atlantis using a Hasselblad camera with 250-mm lens. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. The entire mapping series (of frames numbered in sequence from 50 through 68) can also be downloaded from the

  8. Mt. Logan Ice Core Record of North Pacific Holocene Climate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterberg, E. C.; Mayewski, P. A.; Fisher, D. A.; Kreutz, K. J.; Handley, M. J.; Sneed, S. B.

    2006-12-01

    A >12,000 year-long, continuous, high-resolution (sub-annual to multi-decadal) ice core record from the summit plateau (5300 m asl) of Mt. Logan, Yukon, Canada, reveals large, abrupt fluctuations in North Pacific climate throughout the Holocene with a 1-2 ky periodicity. Co-registered major ion, trace element and stable isotope time series reveal a strong inverse relationship between precipitation δ18O and atmospheric seasalt and dust concentrations over multi-decadal to millennial periods (r<-0.6, p<0.0001). Intervals with depleted stable isotope ratios are associated with elevated concentrations of dust and seasalt aerosol at ca. 2.5, 4, 6.2, 7.5, 8.2, 9, and 10 k.y. B.P. Contrary to the traditional paleothermometric model of stable isotopes in ice cores, instrumental data and computer models suggest that stable isotopes on the summit of Mt. Logan represent changes in moisture source region between dominantly cold North Pacific waters (more zonal circulation; enriched stable isotope values) and warmer subtropical waters (more meridional circulation; depleted stable isotope values). Consequently, Holocene millennial-scale stable isotope fluctuations in the Mt. Logan core have a larger amplitude (6-9‰ for δ18O) than those found in Greenland and Canadian Arctic ice core records (e.g. 2-3‰ for GISP2 δ18O). Over the instrumental period (1948-1998), higher Mt. Logan dust concentrations are strongly associated with enhanced springtime cyclonic activity over East Asian desert source regions (r<-0.6, p<0.0001), which is characteristic of the La Niña atmospheric pressure pattern in the North Pacific. Mt. Logan seasalt aerosol concentrations are related to the wintertime strength of the Aleutian Low pressure center (r<-0.45, p<0.001). We use these calibrated proxy relationships to propose a conceptual model of North Pacific atmospheric circulation during the Holocene.

  9. Measurements of uptake coefficients for heterogeneous loss of HO2 onto submicron inorganic salt aerosols.

    PubMed

    George, I J; Matthews, P S J; Whalley, L K; Brooks, B; Goddard, A; Baeza-Romero, M T; Heard, D E

    2013-08-21

    Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate the kinetics of HO2 radical uptake onto submicron inorganic salt aerosols. HO2 reactive uptake coefficients were measured at room temperature using an aerosol flow tube and the Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE) technique that allowed for measurements to be conducted under atmospherically relevant HO2 concentrations ([HO2] = 10(8) to 10(9) molecule cm(-3)). The uptake coefficient for HO2 uptake onto dry inorganic salt aerosols was consistently below the detection limit (γ(HO2) < 0.004). The mass accommodation coefficient of HO2 radicals onto Cu(II)-doped (NH4)2SO4 aerosols was measured to be α(HO2) = 0.4 ± 0.3 representing the kinetic upper limit to γ. For aqueous (NH4)2SO4, NaCl and NH4NO3 aerosols not containing traces of transition metal ions, a range of γ(HO2) = 0.003-0.02 was measured. These values were much lower than γ values previously measured on aqueous (NH4)2SO4 and NaCl aerosols and also those typically used in atmospheric models (γ(HO2) = 0.1-1.0). Evidence is presented showing that the HO2 uptake coefficients onto aqueous salt aerosol particles are dependent both on the exposure time to the aerosol and on the HO2 concentration used.

  10. Microscopic insight into the study of band spectra of 158Ho and 159,161,163Ho isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slathia, Barun; Devi, Rani; Khosa, S. K.

    2016-11-01

    The nuclear structure properties of the low-lying and excited states of Holmium isotopes have been studied within the framework of Projected Shell Model. The theoretical results are found to be in the reasonable agreement with the observed ones. The theoretical B (M 1) / B (E 2) estimates of 158Ho are seen to reproduce the same systematics as shown by the observed ones. However, for 159,161,163Ho, the B (E 2) transition probabilities for the ground state band have been predicted for transitions for which the experimental values are not available.

  11. Theoretical characterization of the minimum energy path for the reaction H + O2 to HO2(asterisk) to HO + O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Rohlfing, Celeste Mcmichael; Melius, Carl F.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The potential energy surface for the H + O2 to HO2(asterisk) to HO + O reaction has been investigated in the region of the minimum energy path using CASSCF/contracted CI (CCI) calculations with a large basis set. The results show no barrier for the addition of an H atom to O2, in agreement with previous studies. A crossing between the surface for electrostatic (OH dipole-O quadrupole) interaction and that for the formation of an O-O chemical bond, at r(infinity) of about 5.5 a(0), results in a small (about 0.5 kcal/mol) barrier.

  12. Theoretical characterization of the minimum energy path for the reaction H + O2 to HO2(asterisk) to HO + O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Rohlfing, Celeste Mcmichael; Melius, Carl F.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The potential energy surface for the H + O2 to HO2(asterisk) to HO + O reaction has been investigated in the region of the minimum energy path using CASSCF/contracted CI (CCI) calculations with a large basis set. The results show no barrier for the addition of an H atom to O2, in agreement with previous studies. A crossing between the surface for electrostatic (OH dipole-O quadrupole) interaction and that for the formation of an O-O chemical bond, at r(infinity) of about 5.5 a(0), results in a small (about 0.5 kcal/mol) barrier.

  13. Flash-lamp-pumped Ho:Tm:Cr:YAG and Ho:Tm:Er:YLF lasers: experimental results of a single, long pulse length comparison.

    PubMed

    Jani, M G; Barnes, N P; Murray, K E

    1997-05-20

    Flash-lamp-pumped, room-temperature Ho:Tm:Cr:YAG and Ho:Tm:Er:YLF are compared for single but long pulse operation, with pulse lengths of approximately 1.0 mus. Under similar operating conditions in normal-mode operation, a slope efficiency of 0.0331 was observed for Ho:Tm:Er:YLF compared with 0.0047 for Ho:Tm:Cr:YAG. For Q-switched operation, Ho:Tm:Er:YLF yielded a slope efficiency of 0.0075. In comparison, a slope efficiency of 0.0012 was obtained for Ho:Tm:Cr:YAG. Two methods of producing long pulse lengths are compared: pulse selection of normal-mode relaxation oscillations and Q-switching in a long resonator. Theoretical models developed in a companion paper for normal-mode relaxation oscillations and Q-switching in quasi-four-level solid-state lasers are in agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Materials Data on NiHO2 (SG:156) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-05-24

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on HoNi4B (SG:191) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Ho3Ni19B10 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on HoNiO3 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-22

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on HoNi (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-05-16

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Ho2(Ni2B)5 (SG:61) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on BaHo2NiO5 (SG:71) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Ho2(Ni5B3)3 (SG:64) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Ho2Ni12P7 (SG:174) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Ho2NiAs2 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-05

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Ho2Ni2Pb (SG:65) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Ho2(Ni5B2)3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Ho2Si5Ni3 (SG:72) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-07

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Ho2NiGe6 (SG:38) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on HoNi2B2C (SG:139) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-07-14

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Ni(HO)2 (SG:156) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Ho(SiNi)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Ho(NiB)2 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Ho(NiP)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Ni(HO)2 (SG:5) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Ho(NiGe)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on HoNi2 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-05

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Ho5NiPb3 (SG:193) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-07-25

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Ho(SiNi5)2 (SG:129) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-05

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Ni(HO)2 (SG:5) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Ho2NiIr (SG:225) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-08-28

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Programme Note: Realities and Opportunities in Ho Chi Minh City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franchet, Chi Nguyen

    1996-01-01

    The current status of street children in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, is characterized by marginalization from society through street vending, begging, theft, and prostitution. Evaluation of a drop-in center serving children without family linkages indicates need for needs assessments, follow-up activities, measurement of individual child progress,…

  1. Registration of ‘Ho 00-961’ sugarcane

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ho 00-961’ (Reg. No., PI) sugarcane (a complex hybrid of Saccharum officinarum L., S. spontaneum L., S. barberi Jeswiet, and S. sinense Roxb. amend. Jeswiet) was selected by the USDA-ARS Sugarcane Research Unit, and evaluated cooperatively with the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, an...

  2. Registration of ‘Ho 02-113’ Sugarcane

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ho 02-113’ sugarcane was released by the USDA-ARS Sugarcane Research Unit working cooperatively with the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, and the American Sugarcane League of the U.S.A. This high-fiber sugarcane variety was released for use as a biofuel feedstock to fill the rising i...

  3. Single-frequency lasing of monolithic Ho,Tm:YLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Deyst, John P.; Storm, Mark E.

    1993-01-01

    Single-frequency lasing in monolithic crystals of holmium-thulium-doped YLF (Ho,Tm:YLF) is reported. A maximum single-frequency output power of 6 mW at a wavelength of 2.05 microns is demonstrated. Frequency tuning is also described.

  4. Low temperature magnetic transitions of single crystal HoBi

    SciTech Connect

    Fente, A.; Suderow, H.; Vieira, S.; Nemes, N. M.; García-Hernández, M.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2013-10-01

    We present resistivity, specific heat and magnetization measurements in high quality single crystals of HoBi, with a residual resistivity ratio of 126. We find, from the temperature and field dependence of the magnetization, an antiferromagnetic transition at 5.7 K, which evolves, under magnetic fields, into a series of up to five metamagnetic phases.

  5. Atomic transition rates for neutral holmium (Ho I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gillian

    2003-10-01

    Transition rates for 321 lines between 345 and 1080 nm from 73 levels of Ho I are presented. They have been measured by combining branching fractions obtained by Fourier transform spectrometry with lifetimes of Den Hartog et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 6, 2278 (1999)]. The uncertainty of the transition rates is 5%-10%.

  6. Resonantly pumped room temperature Ho:LuVO₄ laser.

    PubMed

    Yao, B Q; Cui, Z; Duan, X M; Du, Y Q; Han, L; Shen, Y J

    2014-11-01

    Spectroscopic characterization of a Ho:LuVO4 crystal grown by the Czochralski method has been performed, including the absorption and emission spectra. We demonstrate a 2 μm room temperature Ho:LuVO4 laser, resonantly pumped by a 1.94 μm Tm:YAP laser. By use of an output coupler with T=10% transmission, the Ho:LuVO4 laser generated continuous-wave output power of 2.5 W at 2074.18 nm, with a beam quality factor of Mx2=My2=1.3, for a total incident pump power of 19.4 W. The slope efficiency with respect to the pump power was 17.6%, and the optical-to-optical efficiency was 12.9%. Moreover, we obtained a Ho:LuVO4 laser that operated at 2073.77 and 2055.27 nm, by using different output couplers with transmissions of T=15 and 30%.

  7. Programme Note: Realities and Opportunities in Ho Chi Minh City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franchet, Chi Nguyen

    1996-01-01

    The current status of street children in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, is characterized by marginalization from society through street vending, begging, theft, and prostitution. Evaluation of a drop-in center serving children without family linkages indicates need for needs assessments, follow-up activities, measurement of individual child progress,…

  8. Conductively Cooled Ho:Tm:LuLiF Laser Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo; Petros, M.; Petzar, Paul; Lee, Hyung; Singh, U.

    2008-01-01

    A conductively-cooled Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser head can amplify 80mJ/340ns probe pulses into 400mJ when the pump pulse energy is close to amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) threshold, 5.6J. For a small signal, the double-pass amplification exceeds 25.

  9. Temperature Dependence of the O + HO2 Rate Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A pulsed laser photolysis technique has been employed to investigate the kinetics of the radical-radical reaction O((sup 3)P) + HO2 OH + O2 over the temperature range 266-391 K in 80 Torr of N2 diluent gas. O((sup 3)P) was produced by 248.5-nm KrF laser photolysis of O3 followed by rapid quenching of O(1D) to O((sup 3)P) while HO2 was produced by simultaneous photolysis of H2O2 to create OH radicals which, in turn, reacted with H2O2 to yield HO2. The O((sup 3)P) temporal profile was monitored by using time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy. The HO2 concentration was calculated based on experimentally measured parameters. The following Arrhenius expression describes our experimental results: k(sub 1)(T) equals (2.91 +/- 0.70) x 10(exp -11) exp[(228 +/- 75)/T] where the errors are 2 sigma and represent precision only. The absolute uncertainty in k, at any temperature within the range 266-391 K is estimated to be +/- 22 percent. Our results are in excellent agreement with a discharge flow study of the temperature dependence of k(sub 1) in 1 Torr of He diluent reported by Keyser, and significantly reduce the uncertainty in the rate of this important stratospheric reaction at subambient temperatures.

  10. Performance of Ho:YAG as a function of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Gettemy, Donald J.

    1990-01-01

    The performance of two multiply doped Ho:YAG lasers has been characterized as a function of the laser rod temperature. From the experimental results, the dependence of the slope efficiency and threshold on temperature has been extracted. Threshold can be correlated with the occupation of the lower laser level. Implications on the optimum operating temperature are discussed.

  11. Living with ghosts in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazanov, S.; Arroja, F.; Celoria, M.; Matarrese, S.; Pilo, L.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the branch of the projectable Hořava-Lifshitz model which exhibits ghost instabilities in the low energy limit. It turns out that, due to the Lorentz violating structure of the model and to the presence of a finite strong coupling scale, the vacuum decay rate into photons is tiny in a wide range of phenomenologically acceptable parameters. The strong coupling scale, understood as a cutoff on ghosts' spatial momenta, can be raised up to Λ ˜ 10 TeV. At lower momenta, the projectable Hořava-Lifshitz gravity is equivalent to General Relativity supplemented by a fluid with a small positive sound speed squared (10-42 ≲) c s 2 ≲ 10-20, that could be a promising candidate for the Dark Matter. Despite these advantages, the unavoidable presence of the strong coupling obscures the implementation of the original Hořava's proposal on quantum gravity. Apart from the Hořava-Lifshitz model, conclusions of the present work hold also for the mimetic matter scenario, where the analogue of the projectability condition is achieved by a non-invertible conformal transformation of the metric.

  12. Performance of Ho:YAG as a function of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Gettemy, Donald J.

    1990-01-01

    The performance of two multiply doped Ho:YAG lasers has been characterized as a function of the laser rod temperature. From the experimental results, the dependence of the slope efficiency and threshold on temperature has been extracted. Threshold can be correlated with the occupation of the lower laser level. Implications on the optimum operating temperature are discussed.

  13. HO2 and HO2* Radical Chemistry during PROPHET-AMOS: Measurement and Model Comparison HO2 and HO2* Radical Chemistry during PROPHET-AMOS: Measurement and Model Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, M.; Bottorff, B.; Stevens, P. S.; Sigler, P. S. R.

    2016-12-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) and peroxy radicals, both the hydroperoxy radicals (HO2) and organic peroxy radicals (RO2) play an important role in atmospheric chemistry. In addition to controlling lifetimes of many trace gases important to issues of global climate change, reactions of these radicals can also lead to the production of ozone and secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere. Previous measurements of these radicals in forest environments characterized by high mixing ratios of isoprene and low mixing ratios of NOx have shown serious discrepancies with modeled concentrations. These results bring into question our understanding of the atmospheric chemistry of isoprene and other biogenic VOCs under low NOxconditions. In the summer of 2016, HO2 and HO2* (S HO2 + αRO2) radicals were measured using the Laser-Induced Fluorescence Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (LIF-FAGE) technique as part of the Program for Research on Oxidants: PHtochemistry, Emissions, and Transport- Atmospheric Measurements of Oxidants in Summer (PROPHET-AMOS). This campaign took place in a forested area in northern Michigan characterized by high mixing ratios of isoprene and low mixing ratios of NOx. Ambient measurements from this campaign will be compared to previous measurements at this site and to modeled predictions.

  14. OH, HO2, and ozone gaseous diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Andrey V; Trakhtenberg, Sofia; Bertram, Allan K; Gershenzon, Yulii M; Molina, Mario J

    2007-03-08

    The diffusion of OH, HO2, and O3 in He, and of OH in air, has been investigated using a coated-wall flow tube reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The diffusion coefficients were determined from measurements of the loss of the reactive species to the flow tube wall as a function of pressure. On the basis of the experimental results, D(OH-He) = 662 +/- 33 Torr cm2 s-1, D(OH-air) = 165 +/- 20 Torr cm2 s-1, D(HO2-He) = 430 +/- 30 Torr cm2 s-1, and D(O3-He) = 410 +/- 25 Torr cm2 s-1 at 296 K. We show that the measured values for OH and HO2 are in better agreement with measured values of their polar analogues (H2O and H2O2) compared with measured values of their nonpolar analogues (O and O2). The measured value for OH in air is 25% smaller than that for O (the nonpolar analogue). The difference between the measured value for HO2 and O2 (the nonpolar analogue) in air is expected to be even larger. Also we show that calculations of the diffusion coefficients based on Lennard-Jones potentials are in excellent agreement with the measurements. This gives further confidence that these calculations can be used to estimate accurate diffusion coefficients for conditions where laboratory data currently do not exist.

  15. Temperature Dependence of the O + HO2 Rate Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A pulsed laser photolysis technique has been employed to investigate the kinetics of the radical-radical reaction O((sup 3)P) + HO2 OH + O2 over the temperature range 266-391 K in 80 Torr of N2 diluent gas. O((sup 3)P) was produced by 248.5-nm KrF laser photolysis of O3 followed by rapid quenching of O(1D) to O((sup 3)P) while HO2 was produced by simultaneous photolysis of H2O2 to create OH radicals which, in turn, reacted with H2O2 to yield HO2. The O((sup 3)P) temporal profile was monitored by using time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy. The HO2 concentration was calculated based on experimentally measured parameters. The following Arrhenius expression describes our experimental results: k(sub 1)(T) equals (2.91 +/- 0.70) x 10(exp -11) exp[(228 +/- 75)/T] where the errors are 2 sigma and represent precision only. The absolute uncertainty in k, at any temperature within the range 266-391 K is estimated to be +/- 22 percent. Our results are in excellent agreement with a discharge flow study of the temperature dependence of k(sub 1) in 1 Torr of He diluent reported by Keyser, and significantly reduce the uncertainty in the rate of this important stratospheric reaction at subambient temperatures.

  16. 2012 Louisiana "Ho" nursery and infield variety trials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Three years after selection in the seedling stage of the USDA variety program, superior experimental varieties are assigned permanent “HoCP” or “Ho” numbers. These varieties are then planted in replicated yield trials at SRU’s Ardoyne Farm in Schriever and at the LSU AgCenter’s Iberia Research Stati...

  17. 2014 Louisiana "Ho" nursery and infield variety trials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the USDA sugarcane variety program, superior experimental varieties are assigned permanent “HoCP” or “Ho” numbers three years after selection in the seedling stage. These varieties are then planted in replicated yield trials at the Sugarcane Research Unit's (SRU) Ardoyne Farm in Schriever and at ...

  18. MT3DMS: Model use, calibration, and validation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zheng, C.; Hill, Mary C.; Cao, G.; Ma, R.

    2012-01-01

    MT3DMS is a three-dimensional multi-species solute transport model for solving advection, dispersion, and chemical reactions of contaminants in saturated groundwater flow systems. MT3DMS interfaces directly with the U.S. Geological Survey finite-difference groundwater flow model MODFLOW for the flow solution and supports the hydrologic and discretization features of MODFLOW. MT3DMS contains multiple transport solution techniques in one code, which can often be important, including in model calibration. Since its first release in 1990 as MT3D for single-species mass transport modeling, MT3DMS has been widely used in research projects and practical field applications. This article provides a brief introduction to MT3DMS and presents recommendations about calibration and validation procedures for field applications of MT3DMS. The examples presented suggest the need to consider alternative processes as models are calibrated and suggest opportunities and difficulties associated with using groundwater age in transport model calibration.

  19. Derivation of hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) levels at an urban site via measurement of pernitric acid (HO2NO2) by iodide chemical ionization mass spectrometry (I(-)-CIMS).

    PubMed

    Chen, Dexian; Huey, L Gregory; Tanner, David J; Li, Jianfeng; Ng, Nga Lee; Wang, Yuhang

    2017-02-17

    Hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) is a key species to atmospheric chemistry. At warm temperatures, the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) and NO2 come to a rapid steady state with pernitric acid (HO2NO2). This paper presents the derivation of HO2 from observations of HO2NO2 and NO2 in metropolitan Atlanta, US in winter 2014 and summer 2015. HO2 was observed to have a diurnal cycle with morning concentrations suppressed by high NO from the traffic. At night, derived HO2 levels were nonzero and exhibited correlations with O3 and NO3, consistent with previous studies that ozonolysis and oxidation by NO3 are sources of nighttime HO2. Measured and model calculated HO2 were in reasonable agreement: Without the constraint of measured HO2NO2 , the model reproduced HO2 with a model-to-observed ratio (M/O) 1.27 (r = 0.54) for winter, 2014, and 0.70 (r = 0.80) for summer, 2015. Adding measured HO2NO2 as a constraint, the model predicted HO2 with M/O = 1.13 ((r = 0.77) for winter 2014, and 0.90 ((r = 0.97) for summer 2015. These results demonstrate the feasibility of deriving HO2 from HO2NO2 measurements in warm regions where HO2NO2 has a short lifetime.

  20. Viscosity controlled magma-carbonate interaction: a comparison of Mt. Vesuvius (Italy) and Mt. Merapi (Indonesia).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythe, L. S.; Misiti, V.; Masotta, M.; Taddeucci, J.; Freda, C.; Troll, V. R.; Deegan, F. M.; Jolis, E. M.

    2012-04-01

    Magma-carbonate interaction is increasingly seen as a viable and extremely important cause of magma contamination, and the generation of a crustally sourced CO2 phase (Goff et al., 2001; Freda et al., 2010). Even though the process is well recognized at certain volcanoes e.g. Popocatépetl, (Mexico); Merapi, (Indonesia); and Colli Albani, (Italy) (Goff et al., 2001; Deegan et al., 2010; Freda et al., 2010), neither the kinetics of carbonate assimilation nor its consequences for controlling the explosivity of eruptions have been constrained. Here we show the results of magma-carbonate interaction experiments conducted at 1200 °C and 0.5 GPa for varying durations (0 s, 60 s, 90 s and 300 s) for the Mt. Merapi (Indonesia) and Mt. Vesuvius (Italy) volcanic systems. We performed experiments using glassy starting materials specific to each volcano (shoshonite for Mt. Vesuvius, basaltic-andesite for Mt. Merapi) with different degrees of hydration (anhydrous vs hydration with ~ 2 wt % water) and using carbonate fragments of local origin; see Deegan et al., (2010) and Jolis et al., (2011). Experimental products include a gas phase (CO2-rich) and two melt phases, one pristine (Ca-normal) and one contaminated (Ca-rich) separated by a 'contamination front' which propagates outwards from the carbonate clast. Vesicles appear to nucleate in the contaminated glass and then migrate into the pristine one. Both contamination front propagation and bubble migration away from the carbonate are slower in anhydrous basaltic-andesite (Merapi anhydrous series) than in hydrated basaltic-andesite and shoshonite (Merapi and Vesuvius hydrated series), suggesting that assimilation speed is strongly controlled by the degree of hydration and the SiO2 content, both of which influence melt viscosity and hence diffusivity. As the carbonate dissolution proceeds in our experiments, initially dissolved and eventually exsolved CO2 builds up in the contaminated Ca-rich melt phase. Once melt volatile

  1. Comparison of complementary reactions in the production of Mt

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S. L.; Dragojevic, I.; Ellison, P. A.; Garcia, M. A.; Gates, J. M.; Nitsche, H.; Gregorich, K. E.; Dvorak, J.; Stavsetra, L.; Ali, M. N.

    2009-02-15

    The new reaction {sup 208}Pb({sup 59}Co,n){sup 266}Mt was studied using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. A cross section of 7.7{sub -3.3}{sup +5.2} pb was measured at a compound nucleus excitation energy of 14.9 MeV. The measured decay properties of {sup 266}Mt and its daughters correspond well with existing data. We compare this experimental result to transactinide compound nucleus formation model predictions, and the previously studied {sup 209}Bi({sup 58}Fe,n){sup 266}Mt reaction.

  2. Comparison of Complementary Reactions in the Production of Mt

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Sarah; Gregorich, Kenneth; Dragojevic, Irena; Ellison, Paul; Garcia, Mitch Andre; Gates, Jacklyn; Stavsetra, Liv; Ali, Mazhar; Nitsche, Heino

    2009-01-21

    The new reaction 208Pb(59Co,n)266Mt was studied using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. A cross section of 7.7+5.2-3.3 pb was measured at a compound nucleus excitation energy of 14.9 MeV. The measured decay properties of 266Mt and its daughters correspond well with existing data. We compare this experimental result to transactinide compound nucleus formation model predictions, and the previously studied 209Bi(58Fe,n)266Mt reaction.

  3. Stoichiometric expression of mtHsp40 and mtHsp70 modulates mitochondrial morphology and cristae structure via Opa1L cleavage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byoungchun; Ahn, Younghee; Kang, Sung-Myung; Park, Youngjin; Jeon, You-Jin; Rho, Jong M; Kim, Sung-Woo

    2015-06-15

    Deregulation of mitochondrial heat-shock protein 40 (mtHsp40) and dysfunction of mtHsp70 are associated with mitochondrial fragmentation, suggesting that mtHsp40 and mtHsp70 may play roles in modulating mitochondrial morphology. However, the mechanism of mitochondrial fragmentation induced by mtHsp40 deregulation and mtHsp70 dysfunction remains unclear. In addition, the functional link between mitochondrial morphology change upon deregulated mtHsp40/mtHsp70 and mitochondrial function has been unexplored. Our coimmunoprecipitation and protein aggregation analysis showed that both overexpression and depletion of mtHsp40 accumulated aggregated proteins in fragmented mitochondria. Moreover, mtHsp70 loss and expression of a mtHsp70 mutant lacking the client-binding domain caused mitochondrial fragmentation. Together the data suggest that the molecular ratio of mtHsp40 to mtHsp70 is important for their chaperone function and mitochondrial morphology. Whereas mitochondrial translocation of Drp1 was not altered, optic atrophy 1 (Opa1) short isoform accumulated in fragmented mitochondria, suggesting that mitochondrial fragmentation in this study results from aberration of mitochondrial inner membrane fusion. Finally, we found that fragmented mitochondria were defective in cristae development, OXPHOS, and ATP production. Taken together, our data suggest that impaired stoichiometry between mtHsp40 and mtHsp70 promotes Opa1L cleavage, leading to cristae opening, decreased OXPHOS, and triggering of mitochondrial fragmentation after reduction in their chaperone function.

  4. Near-complete elimination of mutant mtDNA by iterative or dynamic dose-controlled treatment with mtZFNs

    PubMed Central

    Gammage, Payam A.; Gaude, Edoardo; Van Haute, Lindsey; Rebelo-Guiomar, Pedro; Jackson, Christopher B.; Rorbach, Joanna; Pekalski, Marcin L.; Robinson, Alan J.; Charpentier, Marine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Frezza, Christian; Minczuk, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are frequently associated with mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In most cases, mutant and wild-type mtDNAs coexist, resulting in heteroplasmy. The selective elimination of mutant mtDNA, and consequent enrichment of wild-type mtDNA, can rescue pathological phenotypes in heteroplasmic cells. Use of the mitochondrially targeted zinc finger-nuclease (mtZFN) results in degradation of mutant mtDNA through site-specific DNA cleavage. Here, we describe a substantial enhancement of our previous mtZFN-based approaches to targeting mtDNA, allowing near-complete directional shifts of mtDNA heteroplasmy, either by iterative treatment or through finely controlled expression of mtZFN, which limits off-target catalysis and undesired mtDNA copy number depletion. To demonstrate the utility of this improved approach, we generated an isogenic distribution of heteroplasmic cells with variable mtDNA mutant level from the same parental source without clonal selection. Analysis of these populations demonstrated an altered metabolic signature in cells harbouring decreased levels of mutant m.8993T>G mtDNA, associated with neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP). We conclude that mtZFN-based approaches offer means for mtDNA heteroplasmy manipulation in basic research, and may provide a strategy for therapeutic intervention in selected mitochondrial diseases. PMID:27466392

  5. Magnetic influence on the martensitic transformation entropy in Ni-Mn-In metamagnetic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barandiaran, J. M.; Chernenko, V. A.; Cesari, E.; Salas, D.; Lazpita, P.; Gutierrez, J.; Orue, I.

    2013-02-01

    We study the martensitic transformation (MT) of metamagnetic shape memory alloy Ni50Mn34.5In15.5 in the magnetic fields up to 12 T. The observed dependence of the MT temperature, Tm, on the field is highly nonlinear. As far as magnetization change, ΔM, remains field-independent, a depart from linearity of Tm(H) function is attributed to a decrease of the transformation entropy, ΔS. This decrease correlates with the parameter (TC-Tm), controlled by magnetic field, where TC is the Curie temperature of austenite, and with the dependence of ΔS on the width of the MT temperature interval deduced from a ferroelastic model of MT.

  6. Relationships between NOS2 and HO-1 in liver of rats with chronic bile duct ligation.

    PubMed

    Flores, Olga; Criado, Manuela; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Angel; Hidalgo, Froilán; Collía, Francisco; López-Novoa, José Miguel; Esteller, Alejandro

    2005-05-01

    An increased expression and activity of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the liver has been observed in models of hepatic damage. Nitric oxide (NO) seems to be involved in HO-1 regulation. The aim of this work is to assess HO-1 induction and heme oxygenase (HO) activity in rats with bile duct ligation (BDL). We have assessed the effect of chronic inhibition of the NO synthesis by N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) on HO-1 induction and HO activity. In the BDL animals, compared with sham-operated ones, we found an increased plasma nitrite and bilirubin concentration, and a marked liver expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and HO-1, assessed by both Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Chronic l-NAME treatment prevented plasma nitrite increase in animals subjected to BDL. BDL animals treated with l-NAME, compared with untreated BDL rats, showed an important decrease in HO-1 expression and in HO activity (assessed as a decreased plasma bilirubin and bilirubin excretion). In conclusion, our experiments show parallel changes in expression and activity of HO-1 and NOS2 activity in the BDL model of liver damage and suggest that increased NO production is involved in HO-1 overexpression.

  7. HO(x) Measurements in PEM Tropics B with the Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, William H.

    2001-01-01

    The primary objective of PEM Tropics B was to study the processes responsible for the production and loss of tropospheric ozone over the tropical Pacific. This region of the globe contains very clean air as well as aged, polluted air that was advected from both the Asian and American continents. Understanding ozone requires understanding of HO(x) (HO(x) = OH + HO2) chemistry, since the reaction between H02 and NO leads to ozone production and the production of OH often requires ozone loss. In addition, OH is the atmosphere's primary oxidant. Since most atmospheric oxidation is thought to occur in the tropical lower troposphere, measurements during PEM Tropics B should provide an important test of the OH abundances and distributions. Thus, understanding and thoroughly testing HO(x) processes was an important objective of PEM Tropics B. Several issues need to be tested, One is HO, production rates and sources, since HO,, production directly affects ozone production and loss. Another is HO(x) behavior in and around clouds, since HO(x) is lost to cloud particles, but convection may bring HO(x) precursors from near the surface to the upper troposphere. A third is the rise and fall of HO(x) at sunrise and sunset, since these variations give strong indications of the important sources and sinks of HO(x). Making and interpreting high-quality OH and H02 measurements from the NASA DC-8 during PEM Tropics B is the objective of this research effort.

  8. Extratumoral Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Expressing Macrophages Likely Promote Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Nilsson, Maria; Adamo, Hanibal; Thysell, Elin; Jernberg, Emma; Stattin, Pär; Widmark, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive tumors induce tumor-supporting changes in the benign parts of the prostate. One factor that has increased expression outside prostate tumors is hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1). To investigate HO-1 expression in more detail, we analyzed samples of tumor tissue and peritumoral normal prostate tissue from rats carrying cancers with different metastatic capacity, and human prostate cancer tissue samples from primary tumors and bone metastases. In rat prostate tumor samples, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR showed that the main site of HO-1 synthesis was HO-1+ macrophages that accumulated in the tumor-bearing organ, and at the tumor-invasive front. Small metastatic tumors were considerably more effective in attracting HO-1+ macrophages than larger non-metastatic ones. In clinical samples, accumulation of HO-1+ macrophages was seen at the tumor invasive front, almost exclusively in high-grade tumors, and it correlated with the presence of bone metastases. HO-1+ macrophages, located at the tumor invasive front, were more abundant in bone metastases than in primary tumors. HO-1 expression in bone metastases was variable, and positively correlated with the expression of macrophage markers but negatively correlated with androgen receptor expression, suggesting that elevated HO-1 could be a marker for a subgroup of bone metastases. Together with another recent observation showing that selective knockout of HO-1 in macrophages reduced prostate tumor growth and metastatic capacity in animals, the results of this study suggest that extratumoral HO-1+ macrophages may have an important role in prostate cancer.

  9. Zinc metallothionein (MT) induction by parenteral iron and endotoxin: A temporal analysis of hepatic MT mRNA changes

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, C.C. )

    1991-03-15

    The present study was undertaken to compare the temporal characteristics of iron-induced hepatic MT mRNA accumulation to that effected by endotoxin. Young chicks were given (ip) either endotoxin, ferrous gluconate or an equivalent volume of saline. At various times following injections, liver was obtained from 5 chicks per treatment for total RNA extraction. Equal amounts of total hepatic RNA from each chick were pooled and 10 {mu}g separated by denaturing agarose gel electrophoresis. Hepatic MT mRNA and albumin mRNA were analyzed by Northern blot analysis using synthetic oligonucleotides. The results indicated little temporal difference in the accumulation of hepatic MT mRNA as affected by either endotoxin or iron. In both treatments, MT mRNA was minimally affected at 3 hours post-injection. Maximum accumulation was achieved during a 6 h period from 6 to 12 hours post-injection. At 24 hours, MT mRNA was considerably higher in liver of endotoxin-injected chicks when compared to that of iron-injection chicks. Albumin expression appeared not to be substantially affected by either treatment. The results suggest that the induction of hepatic MT by iron injection is not substantially different than that observed following endotoxin administration. It would be speculative to suggest that the processes by which MT is induced under these conditions are also similar.

  10. Porous aerosol in degassing plumes of Mt. Etna and Mt. Stromboli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, Valery; Jourdan, Olivier; Voigt, Christiane; Gayet, Jean-Francois; Chauvigne, Aurélien; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Minikin, Andreas; Klingebiel, Marcus; Weigel, Ralf; Borrmann, Stephan; Jurkat, Tina; Kaufmann, Stefan; Schlage, Romy; Gourbeyre, Christophe; Febvre, Guy; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Frey, Wiebke; Molleker, Sergej; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2016-09-01

    Aerosols of the volcanic degassing plumes from Mt. Etna and Mt. Stromboli were probed with in situ instruments on board the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt research aircraft Falcon during the contrail, volcano, and cirrus experiment CONCERT in September 2011. Aerosol properties were analyzed using angular-scattering intensities and particle size distributions measured simultaneously with the Polar Nephelometer and the Forward Scattering Spectrometer probes (FSSP series 100 and 300), respectively. Aerosols of degassing plumes are characterized by low values of the asymmetry parameter (between 0.6 and 0.75); the effective diameter was within the range of 1.5-2.8 µm and the maximal diameter was lower than 20 µm. A principal component analysis applied to the Polar Nephelometer data indicates that scattering features of volcanic aerosols of different crater origins are clearly distinctive from angular-scattering intensities of cirrus and contrails. Retrievals of aerosol properties revealed that the particles were "optically spherical" and the estimated values of the real part of the refractive index are within the interval from 1.35 to 1.38. The interpretation of these results leads to the conclusion that the degassing plume aerosols were porous with air voids. Our estimates suggest that aerosol particles contained about 18 to 35 % of air voids in terms of the total volume.

  11. Eudialyte-group minerals in rocks of Lovozero layered complex at Mt. Karnasurt and Mt. Kedykvyrpakhk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyuk, G. Yu.; Pakhomovsky, Ya. A.; Yakovenchuk, V. N.

    2015-12-01

    Eudialyte-bearing interbeds within layers I-4 (Mt. Karnasurt) and II-4 (Mt. Kedykvyrpakhk) in the layered complex of the Lovozero Pluton are localized symmetrically relative to the loparite-bearing ijolite-malignite layer; the content of eudialyte decreases from underlying nepheline syenite to overlying foidolite. Eudialyte-group minerals fill the interstices between nepheline, sodalite, and microcline-perthite crystals in all rock types and are partially replaced with georgechaoite and minerals of the lovozerite group as a result of hydrothermal alteration. Variations in the chemical composition of the eudialyte-group minerals are mainly controlled by block substitution NaFeZrCl ↔ LnMn(Nb,Ti)S producing eudialyte proper, manganoeudialyte (sharply predominant), kentbrooksite, alluaivite, and a phase intermediate between manganoeudialyte and alluaivite. As the total Ln2O3 content increases, the relative amounts of Ce and La oxides increases linearly in the proportion Ce2O3: La2O3 = 2.5: 1. In the phases containing lower than 3 wt % La2O3, Nd becomes the next REE after Ce. It is very likely that (mangano)eudialyte was mostly formed after parakeldyshite and other anhydrous zirconium-silicate under effect of residual fluids enriched in Ca and Mn, which took part in fenitization of basalt, tuff, and tuffite of the Lovozero Formation.

  12. Loparite-(Ce) in rocks of the Lovozero layered complex at Mt. Karnasurt and Mt. Kedykvyrpakhk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomovsky, Ya. A.; Ivanyuk, G. Yu.; Yakovenchuk, V. N.

    2014-12-01

    Following from a mineralogical and petrographic study of loparite-bearing units I-4 at Mt. Karnasurt and II-4 at Mt. Kedykvyrpakhk, loparite-(Ce) is found to be concentrated in thin (10-40 cm) malignite-ijolite layers at the boundary between the underlying nepheline syenite and the overlying foidolite. Skeletal loparite-(Ce) metacrysts occur as inclusions in nepheline, sodalite, natrolite, aegirine, eudialyte, and lomonosovite or within the intergranular space between them. In turn, the characteristic segregations of skeletal loparite-(Ce) metacrysts contain inclusions of natrolite, lomonosovite, rhabdophane-(Ce), labuntsovite, and other relatively low-temperature minerals typical of pegmatites and hydrothermally altered rocks. The chemical composition of loparite-(Ce) varies within narrow limits (Lop59-70Per11-18Lue5-11Tsn4-7 due to an increase in Ca, Ln, Al, and Ti contents and a decrease in Na, Mn, Th, Sr, Fe, and Ta contents in the transitional zone between the underlying nepheline syenite, ore-bearing foidolite-malignite, and overlying ijoliteurtite. Variations in composition are also caused by the lateral isomorphic replacement of Na and Nb with Ln and Ti. The data obtained show that loparite mineralization is related to a pneumatolytic-hydrothermal alteration of foidolite and nepheline syenite along the contact between them.

  13. Nuclear spectroscopy above isomers in {sub 67}{sup 148}Ho{sub 81} and {sub 67}{sup 149}Ho{sub 82} nuclei: Search for core-excited states in {sup 149}Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Kownacki, J.; Napiorkowski, P. J.; Zielinska, M.; Kordyasz, A.; Srebrny, J.; Droste, Ch.; Morek, T.; Grodner, E.; Ruchowska, E.; Korman, A.; Czarnacki, W.; Kisielinski, M.; Kowalczyk, M.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; Hadynska-KlePk, K.; Mierzejewski, J.; Lieder, R. M.; Perkowski, J.; Andrzejewski, J.; Krol, A.

    2010-04-15

    The excited states of {sup 148}Ho and {sup 149}Ho isotopes are studied using gamma-ray and electron spectroscopy in off-beam and in-beam modes following {sup 112,114}Sn({sup 40}Ar,xnyp) reactions. Experiments include measurements of single gamma-rays and conversion electron spectra as well as gamma-gamma, electron-gamma, gamma-t, and gamma-gamma-t coincidences with the use of the OSIRIS-II 12-HPGe array and conversion electron spectrometer. Based on the present results, the level schemes of {sup 148}Ho and {sup 149}Ho are revised and significantly extended, up to about 4 and 5 MeV of excitation energy, respectively. Spin and parity of 5{sup -} are assigned to the 9.59-s isomer in {sup 148}Ho based on conversion electron results. Previously unobserved gamma rays feeding the 10{sup +} isomer in {sup 148}Ho and the 27/2{sup -} isomer in {sup 149}Ho nuclei are proposed. Shell-model calculations are performed. Possible core-excited states in {sup 149}Ho are discussed.

  14. Altered MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors expression in the hippocampus of pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Anna Karynna Alves de Alencar; de Lima, Eliangela; Amaral, Fernanda; Peres, Rafael; Cipolla-Neto, José; Amado, Débora

    2017-06-01

    Clinical and experimental findings show that melatonin may be used as an adjuvant to the treatment of epilepsy-related complications by alleviates sleep disturbances, circadian alterations and attenuates seizures alone or in combination with AEDs. In addition, it has been observed that there is a circadian component on seizures, which cause changes in circadian system and in melatonin production. Nevertheless, the dynamic changes of the melatoninergic system, especially with regard to its membrane receptors (MT1 and MT2) in the natural course of TLE remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the 24-hour profile of MT1 and MT2 mRNA and protein expression in the hippocampus of rats submitted to the pilocarpine-induced epilepsy model analyzing the influence of the circadian rhythm in the expression pattern during the acute, silent, and chronic phases. Melatonin receptor MT1 and MT2 mRNA expression levels were increased in the hippocampus of rats few hours after SE, with MT1 returning to normal levels and MT2 reducing during the silent phase. During the chronic phase, mRNA expression levels of both receptors return to levels close to control, however, presenting a different daily profile, showing that there is a circadian change during the chronic phase. Also, during the acute and silent phase it was possible to verify MT1 label only in CA2 hippocampal region with an increased expression only in the dark period of the acute phase. The MT2 receptor was present in all hippocampal regions, however, it was reduced in the acute phase and it was found in astrocytes. In chronic animals, there is a reduction in the presence of both receptors especially in regions where there is a typical damage derived from epilepsy. Therefore, we conclude that SE induced by pilocarpine is able to change melatonin receptor MT1 and MT2 protein and mRNA expression levels in the hippocampus of rats few hours after SE as well as in silent and chronic phases. Copyright © 2017

  15. RadNet Air Data From Kalispell, MT

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Kalispell, MT from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  16. RadNet Air Data From Billings, MT

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Billings, MT from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  17. Mt. Etna, Italy taken by the Expedition Two crew

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-07-22

    ISS002-E-8683 (22 July 2001) --- Smoke and ash combine to create a plume extending from the erupting volcano on Mt. Etna in Sicily. The digital still image was recorded by one of the Expedition Two crew members.

  18. 75 FR 54419 - Environmental Impact Statement: Yellowstone County, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Yellowstone County, MT AGENCY: Federal... highway project in Yellowstone County, Montana. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Brian Hasselbach, Right... (I-90) and Old Highway 312 in or near the city of Billings, Yellowstone County, Montana....

  19. 76 FR 27914 - Television Broadcasting Services; Kalispell, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Kalispell, MT AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Commission has before it a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking...

  20. Motion-dependent representation of space in area MT+

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Jason; Whitney, David

    2013-01-01

    Summary How is visual space represented in cortical area MT+? At a relatively coarse scale, the organization of MT+ is debated: Retinotopic, spatiotopic, or mixed representations have been proposed. However, none of these entirely explains perceptual localization of objects at a fine spatial scale—a scale relevant for tasks like navigating or manipulating objects. For example, perceived positions of objects are strongly modulated by visual motion: stationary flashes appear shifted in the direction of nearby motion. Does spatial coding in MT+ reflect these shifts in perceived position? We performed an fMRI experiment employing this “flash-drag effect”, and found that flashes presented near motion produced patterns of activity similar to physically shifted flashes in the absence of motion. This reveals a motion-dependent change in the neural representation of object position in human MT+, a process that could help compensate for perceptual and motor delays in localizing objects in dynamic scenes. PMID:23664618

  1. Cluster-size dependent internal dynamics and magnetic anisotropy of Ho ions in HoM2N@C80 and Ho2MN@C80 families (M = Sc, Lu, Y)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Krylov, D.; Schiemenz, S.; Rosenkranz, M.; Westerström, R.; Dreiser, J.; Greber, T.; Büchner, B.; Popov, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    The paramagnetic NMR study of HoM2N@C80-Ih and Ho2MN@C80-Ih nitride cluster fullerenes (M = Sc, Lu, Y) reveals strong dependence of Ho-induced paramagnetic shifts (δpara) in 13C NMR spectra on the size of the diamagnetic metal in the cluster. In particular, the δpara value in HoY2N@C80 is almost doubled in comparison to that in HoSc2N@C80. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies show that all Ho-nitride cluster fullerenes have the same magnetic ground state of Ho3+. Point-charge ligand-field splitting calculations show that the increase of the M3+ radius in going from Sc to Y results in a considerable increase of the energy splitting between different Jz states. This leads to a 19% higher magnetic anisotropy of Ho3+ in HoY2N@C80 than in HoSc2N@C80 at 300 K. Variations of the molecular geometry and cluster dynamics with the size of the cluster are found to have even greater influence on δpara values. This work shows that the magnetic properties of the species confined inside the fullerene cages can be tuned using the geometrical factors such as the cluster and the cage size.The paramagnetic NMR study of HoM2N@C80-Ih and Ho2MN@C80-Ih nitride cluster fullerenes (M = Sc, Lu, Y) reveals strong dependence of Ho-induced paramagnetic shifts (δpara) in 13C NMR spectra on the size of the diamagnetic metal in the cluster. In particular, the δpara value in HoY2N@C80 is almost doubled in comparison to that in HoSc2N@C80. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies show that all Ho-nitride cluster fullerenes have the same magnetic ground state of Ho3+. Point-charge ligand-field splitting calculations show that the increase of the M3+ radius in going from Sc to Y results in a considerable increase of the energy splitting between different Jz states. This leads to a 19% higher magnetic anisotropy of Ho3+ in HoY2N@C80 than in HoSc2N@C80 at 300 K. Variations of the molecular geometry and cluster dynamics with the size of the cluster are found to have even greater influence on

  2. Spectral studies on sulfur poisoning of Pd/Mg6Ni by NEXAFS and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, S.; Nambu, M.; Tsukada, C.; Ogawa, S.; Kutluk, G.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.

    2013-02-01

    We have studied on the hydrogen storage materials based on Mg-Ni alloy and fabricated the sample constructed with the Pd thin layer (TL) on Mg6Ni alloy substrate. The adsorption behavior of the dimethyl disulfide (DMS) molecules on the sample has been measured to reveal the sulfur poisoning of the Pd TL/Mg6Ni by means of XPS and Sulfur K-edge NEXAFS techniques. The chemisorbed DMS, methanethiolate (MT) and atomic S have been observed on the surface. Especially, it is clear that some atomic S has been oxidized by air and detected the adsorbate of the SO32- and SO42- species. During exposure to the atmosphere, most of the adsorbed DMS and MT adsorbates desorb from the Pd TL surface. We thus conclude the Pd TL might be able to prevent the hydrogen storage materials from the sulfur poisoning.

  3. Revealing the hidden complexities of mtDNA inheritance.

    PubMed

    White, Daniel James; Wolff, Jonci Nikolai; Pierson, Melanie; Gemmell, Neil John

    2008-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a pivotal tool in molecular ecology, evolutionary and population genetics. The power of mtDNA analyses derives from a relatively high mutation rate and the apparent simplicity of mitochondrial inheritance (maternal, without recombination), which has simplified modelling population history compared to the analysis of nuclear DNA. However, in biology things are seldom simple, and advances in DNA sequencing and polymorphism detection technology have documented a growing list of exceptions to the central tenets of mitochondrial inheritance, with paternal leakage, heteroplasmy and recombination now all documented in multiple systems. The presence of paternal leakage, recombination and heteroplasmy can have substantial impact on analyses based on mtDNA, affecting phylogenetic and population genetic analyses, estimates of the coalescent and the myriad of other parameters that are dependent on such estimates. Here, we review our understanding of mtDNA inheritance, discuss how recent findings mean that established ideas may need to be re-evaluated, and we assess the implications of these new-found complications for molecular ecologists who have relied for decades on the assumption of a simpler mode of inheritance. We show how it is possible to account for recombination and heteroplasmy in evolutionary and population analyses, but that accurate estimates of the frequencies of biparental inheritance and recombination are needed. We also suggest how nonclonal inheritance of mtDNA could be exploited, to increase the ways in which mtDNA can be used in analyses.

  4. MT1-MMP: universal or particular player in angiogenesis?

    PubMed

    Genís, Laura; Gálvez, Beatriz G; Gonzalo, Pilar; Arroyo, Alicia G

    2006-03-01

    Tumorigenesis involves not only tumor cells that become transformed but also the peritumoral stroma which reacts inducing inflammatory and angiogenic responses. Angiogenesis, the formation of new capillaries from preexisting vessels, is an absolute requirement for tumor growth and metastasis, and it can be induced and modulated by a wide variety of soluble factors. During angiogenesis, quiescent endothelial cells are activated and they initiate migration by degrading the basement membranes through the action of specific proteases, in particular of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Among these, the membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) has been identified as a key player during the angiogenic response. In this review, we will summarize the role of MT1-MMP in angiogenesis and the regulatory mechanisms of this protease in endothelial cells. Since our recent findings have suggested that MT1-MMP is not universally required for angiogenesis, we hypothesize that the regulation and participation of MT1-MMP in angiogenesis may depend on the nature of the angiogenic stimulus. Experiments aimed at testing this hypothesis have shown that similarly to the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/CXCL12, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) seems to induce the formation of capillary tubes by human or mouse endothelial cells (ECs) in an MT1-MMP-independent manner. The implications of these findings in the potential use of MT1-MMP inhibitors in cancer therapy are discussed.

  5. mtDNA Heteroplasmy in Monozygotic Twins Discordant for Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Bi, Rui; Fan, Yu; Wu, Yong; Tang, Yanqing; Li, Zongchang; He, Ying; Zhou, Jun; Tang, Jinsong; Chen, Xiaogang; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2017-08-01

    Although monozygotic (MZ) twins have theoretically identical nuclear DNA sequences, there may be phenotypic differences between them caused by somatic mutations and epigenetic changes affecting each genome. In this study, we collected eight families of MZ twins discordant for schizophrenia with the aim of investigating the potential role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) heteroplasmy in causing the phenotypic differences between the twin pairs. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology was used to screen the whole mitochondrial genome of the twin pairs and their parents. The mtDNA heteroplasmy level was found to be nearly identical between the twin pairs but was distinctly different between each mother and their offspring. These results suggest that the discordance of schizophrenia between MZ twins may not be attributable to the difference in mtDNA heteroplasmy, and the high concordance of mtDNA heteroplasmy between MZ twins may indicate the relatively equal distribution of mtDNA during embryo separation of MZ twins and/or the modulation effect from the same nuclear genetic background. Furthermore, we observed an overrepresentation of heteroplasmy in noncoding regions and an elevated ratio of nonsynonymous heteroplasmy, suggesting the possible effects of a purifying selection in shaping the pattern of mtDNA heteroplasmy.

  6. Characteristics of Honey from Serpentine Area in the Eastern Rhodopes Mt., Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Atanassova, Juliana; Pavlova, Dolja; Lazarova, Maria; Yurukova, Lilyana

    2016-09-01

    Honey samples collected during 2007-2010 from serpentine and non-serpentine localities in the Eastern Rhodopes Mt. (Bulgaria) were characterized on the basis of their pollen content by qualitative melissopalynological analysis and physicochemical composition. Water content, pH, electrical conductivity, macroelements-K, Ca, Mg, P, and microelements-As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, and Zn were determined after the Harmonised Methods of the International Honey Commission and ICP-AES method. The results from serpentine honey samples were compared with data from bee pollen collected from the same serpentine area. Different elements have different concentrations in honey from the same botanical type even collected from the same geographical region, same locality, and same beehive but in different vegetation season. The elements Mg, Mn, Ni, and P contribute mostly for separation of the serpentine honey samples based on measured elemental concentrations and performed principal component analysis. The element concentrations were higher in bee pollen and above the permissible limits for the toxic metals Cd and Pb. No specific indicator plant species was found for identification of the geographical origin of serpentine honey in relation to the forage of bees.

  7. Melatonin, selective and non-selective MT1/MT2 receptors agonists: differential effects on the 24-h vigilance states.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Sanchez, Rafael; Comai, Stefano; Spadoni, Gilberto; Bedini, Annalida; Tarzia, Giorgio; Gobbi, Gabriella

    2014-02-21

    Melatonin (MLT) is a neurohormone implicated in several physiological processes such as sleep. Contrasting results have been produced on whether or not it may act as a hypnotic agent, and the neurobiological mechanism through which it controls the vigilance states has not yet been elucidated. In this study we investigated the effect of MLT (40 mg/kg), a non-selective MT1/MT2 receptor agonist (UCM793, 40 mg/kg), and a selective MT2 partial agonist (UCM924, 40 mg/kg) on the 24-h vigilance states. EEG and EMG sleep-wake patterns were registered across the 24-h light-dark cycle in adult Sprague-Dawley male rats. MLT decreased (-37%) the latency to the first episode of non rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS), enhanced the power of NREMS delta band (+33%), but did not alter the duration of any of the three vigilance states. Differently, UCM793 increased the number of episodes (+52%) and decreased the length of the episodes (-38%) of wakefulness but did not alter the 24-h duration of wakefulness, NREMS and REMS. UCM924 instead reduced the latency (-56%) and increased (+31%) the duration of NREMS. Moreover, it raised the number of REMS episodes (+57%) but did not affect REMS duration. Taken together, these findings show that MLT and non-selective MT1/MT2 receptor agonists do not increase the quantity of sleep but differently influence the three vigilance states. In addition, they support the evidence that selective MT2 receptor agonists increase NREMS duration compared to MLT and non-selective MT1/MT2 agonists.

  8. Magnetic properties and structures of fibrous R11Ni4In9 intermetallics (R = heavy rare earths)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provino, Alessia; Ritter, Clemens; Gschneidner, Karl A.; Manfrinetti, Pietro; Dhar, Sudesh K.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2015-03-01

    The existence and the unusual self-assembled nano/microfibrous morphology of the R11T4In9 (R = rare earth, T = Ni, Pd, Pt) phases has been recently studied [1,2,3]. All the rare earths (but Sc, Eu, Yb) form this ternary compound (orthorhombic Nd11Pd4In9-type, oC48, Cmmm). The bundles of fibers grow parallel to the temperature gradient and along the short c-axis. In this presentation we describe the results of a detailed investigation of the physical properties (electrical resistivity, heat capacity, magnetization measurements) of Tb11Ni4In9, Dy11Ni4In9andHo11Ni4In9 by orienting the fibers parallel and orthogonal, respectively, to the electric current and magnetic field. The unusual fibrous microstructure of these compounds leads to a strong anisotropy in their physical properties, with the c-axis of the orthorhombic cell being the easy magnetization and high electrical-conductivity direction. The magnetic structures of Tb11Ni4In9andHo11Ni4In9, which have multiple magnetic orderings, have been investigated by neutron diffraction. The complex magnetic behavior found in these phases is a result of the competing ferrimagnetic (along the c-axis) and antiferromagnetic (on the a - b plane) orderings of the five R sublattices.

  9. Novel imidazole derivatives as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2) inhibitors and their cytotoxic activity in human-derived cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Loredana; Pittalà, Valeria; Romeo, Giuseppe; Modica, Maria N; Marrazzo, Agostino; Siracusa, Maria A; Sorrenti, Valeria; Di Giacomo, Claudia; Vanella, Luca; Parayath, Neha N; Greish, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is a cytoprotective enzyme that can be overexpressed in some pathological conditions, including certain cancers. In this work, novel imidazole derivatives were designed and synthesized as inhibitors of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2). In these compounds the imidazole ring, crucial for the activity, is connected to a hydrophobic group, represented by aryloxy, benzothiazole, or benzoxazole moieties, by means of alkyl or thioalkyl chains of different length. Many of the tested compounds were potent and/or selective against one of the two isoforms of HO. Furthermore, most of the pentyl derivatives showed to be better inhibitors of HO-2 with respect to HO-1, revealing a critical role of the alkyl chain in discriminating between the two isoenzymes. Compounds which showed the better profile of HO inhibition were selected and tested to evaluate their cytotoxic properties in prostate and breast cancer cell lines (DU-145, PC3, LnCap, MDA-MB-231, and MCF-7). In these assays, aryloxyalkyl derivatives resulted more cytotoxic than benzothiazolethioalkyl ones; in particular compound 31 was active against all the cell lines tested, confirming the anti-proliferative properties of HO inhibitors and their potential use in the treatment of specific cancers.

  10. Simultaneous, in situ measurements of OH, HO2, O3, and H2O - A test of modeled stratospheric HO(x) chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wennberg, P. O.; Stimpfle, R. M.; Weinstock, E. M.; Dessler, A. E.; Lloyd, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    Simultaneous, in situ measurements of OH, HO2, H2O, and O3 from 37-23 km are reported. The partitioning between OH and HO2 and the total HO(x) concentration are compared with expected steady-state values. The ratio of HO2 to OH varies from less than 2 at 36 km to more than 3 at 25 km; in the lower stratosphere this ratio is nearly a factor of two less than predicted. The data are used to calculate HO(x) production and loss rates. The measured HO(x) mixing ratio is consistent with production dominated by the reaction of O(1D) with H2O, and loss controlled by NOy below 28 km and HO(x) above 30 km. The steady-state concentration of H2O2 is inferred from the measured HO2 concentration and calculated photolysis rate. The maximum H2O2 mixing ratio (at 33 km) is predicted to be less than 0.2 ppb.

  11. Isolation of 163Ho from dysprosium target material by HPLC for neutrino mass measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Mocko, Veronika; Taylor, Wayne  A.; Nortier, Francois M.; ...

    2015-04-29

    The rare earth isotope 163Ho is of interest for neutrino mass measurements. This report describes the isolation of 163Ho from a proton-irradiated dysprosium target and its purification. A Dy metal target was irradiated with 16 MeV protons for 10 h. After target dissolution, 163Ho was separated from the bulk Dy via cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography using 70 mmol dm–3 α-hydroxyisobutyric acid as the mobile phase. Subsequent purification of the collected Ho fraction was performed to remove the α-hydroxyisobutyrate chelating agent and to concentrate the Ho in a low ionic strength aqueous matrix. The final solution was characterized by MC-ICP-MSmore » to determine the 163Ho/165Ho ratio, 163Ho and the residual Dy content. The HPLC purification process resulted in a decontamination factor 1.4E5 for Dy. As a result, the isolated Ho fraction contained 24.8 ±1.3 ng of 163Ho corresponding to holmium recovery of 72 ± 3%.« less

  12. Probing the interphase "HO zone" originated by carbon nanotube during catalytic ozonation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuo; Quan, Xie; Zheng, Jian-Feng; Wang, Dong

    2017-10-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) is an attractive metal-free catalyst that can be explored in combination with ozone treatment. Using fluorescence microscopy image analysis, we investigated the production of hydroxyl radicals (HO) within the solid-liquid interphase for CNT-mediated catalytic ozonation. The visualized results suggest that HO was vastly generated via catalysis and accumulated within a surface region of the CNT (we defined this region as the interphase "HO zone"). In this region, using 7-hydroxycoumarin as a HO marker, the radical abundance was at least 1000 times higher than that in the aqueous bulk phase. Owing to the observed inhomogeneity of HO, the CNT/ozone system effectively decomposed perfluorooctane sulfonate that was fairly resistant to non-catalytic ozonation, and the decomposition kinetics was not much inhibited by tert-butanol as bulk-phase HO scavenger due to the remaining "HO zone" at surface region available for reaction. A longevity trial revealed the sustained formation of the interphase "HO zone" and strongly indicated that the graphitic structure may optimize the density of surface active sites responsible for the proliferation and local concentration of HO. CNT, with good catalytic efficiency, longevity and stability, is anticipated as the basis of future nanomaterials able to promote HO exposure in ozone treatment for advanced oxidation process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sex-Dependent Effects of HO-1 Deletion from Adipocytes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hosick, Peter A.; Weeks, Mary Frances; Hankins, Michael W.; Moore, Kyle H.; Stec, David E.

    2017-01-01

    Induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been demonstrated to decrease body weight and improve insulin sensitivity in several models of obesity in rodents. To further study the role of HO-1 in adipose tissue, we created an adipose-specific HO-1 knockout mouse model. Male and female mice were fed either a control or a high-fat diet for 30 weeks. Body weights were measured weekly and body composition, fasting blood glucose and insulin levels were determined every six weeks. Adipocyte-specific knockout of HO-1 had no significant effect on body weight in mice fed a high-fat diet but increased body weight in female mice fed a normal-fat diet. Although body weights were not different in females fed a high fat diet, loss of HO-1 in adipocytes resulted in significant alterations in body composition. Adipose-specific HO-1 knockout resulted in increased fasting hyperglycemia and insulinemia in female but not male mice on both diets. Adipose-specific knockout of HO-1 resulted in a significant loss of HO activity and a decrease in the protein levels of adiponectin in adipose tissue. These results demonstrate that loss of HO-1 in adipocytes has greater effects on body fat and fasting hyperglycemia in a sex-dependent fashion and that expression of HO-1 in adipose tissue may have a greater protective role in females as compared to males. PMID:28287466

  14. Sex-Dependent Effects of HO-1 Deletion from Adipocytes in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hosick, Peter A; Weeks, Mary Frances; Hankins, Michael W; Moore, Kyle H; Stec, David E

    2017-03-11

    Induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been demonstrated to decrease body weight and improve insulin sensitivity in several models of obesity in rodents. To further study the role of HO-1 in adipose tissue, we created an adipose-specific HO-1 knockout mouse model. Male and female mice were fed either a control or a high-fat diet for 30 weeks. Body weights were measured weekly and body composition, fasting blood glucose and insulin levels were determined every six weeks. Adipocyte-specific knockout of HO-1 had no significant effect on body weight in mice fed a high-fat diet but increased body weight in female mice fed a normal-fat diet. Although body weights were not different in females fed a high fat diet, loss of HO-1 in adipocytes resulted in significant alterations in body composition. Adipose-specific HO-1 knockout resulted in increased fasting hyperglycemia and insulinemia in female but not male mice on both diets. Adipose-specific knockout of HO-1 resulted in a significant loss of HO activity and a decrease in the protein levels of adiponectin in adipose tissue. These results demonstrate that loss of HO-1 in adipocytes has greater effects on body fat and fasting hyperglycemia in a sex-dependent fashion and that expression of HO-1 in adipose tissue may have a greater protective role in females as compared to males.

  15. Single domain metallothioneins: supermetalation of human MT 1a.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Duncan E K; Willans, Mathew J; Stillman, Martin J

    2012-02-15

    Metallothioneins are a family of small, cysteine rich proteins that have been implicated in a range of roles including toxic metal detoxification, protection against oxidative stress, and as metallochaperones involved in the homeostasis of both essential zinc and copper. We report that human metallothionein 1a, well-known to coordinate 7 Zn(2+) or Cd(2+) ions with 20 cysteinyl thiols, will bind 8 structurally significant Cd(2+) ions, leading to the formation of the supermetalated Cd(8)-βα-rhMT 1a species, for which the structure is a novel single domain. ESI-mass spectrometry was used to determine the exact metalation status of the βα-rhMT. The derivative-shaped CD envelope of Cd(7)-βα-rhMT [peak extrema (+) 260 and (-) 239 nm] changed drastically upon formation of the Cd(8)-βα-rhMT with the appearance of a sharp monophasic CD band centered on 252 nm, a feature indicative of the loss of cluster symmetry. The structural significance of the eighth Cd(2+) ion was determined from a combination of direct and indirect (113)Cd nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. In the case of Cd(8)-βα-rhMT, only four peaks were observed in the direct (113)Cd NMR spectrum. Significantly, while both of the isolated domains can be supermetalated forming Cd(4)-β-rhMT and Cd(5)-α-rhMT, Cd(8)-βα-rhMT and not Cd(9)-βα-rhMT was observed following addition of excess Cd(2+). We propose that both domains act in concert to coordinate the eighth Cd(2+) atom, and furthermore that this interaction results in a coalescence of the two domains leading to collapse of the two-domain structure. This is the first report of a possible single-"superdomain" metallothionein structure for Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) binding mammalian proteins. A computational model of a possible single-domain structure of Cd(8)-βα-rhMT is described.

  16. Kinetic evidence for different mechanisms of interaction of black mamba toxins MT alpha and MT beta with muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Jolkkonen, M; Oras, A; Toomela, T; Karlsson, E; Järv, J; Akerman, K E

    2001-01-01

    By studying the influence of two toxins from the black mamba Dendroaspis polylepis on the kinetics of [3H]-N-methylscopolamine binding to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors from rat cerebral cortex, it was revealed that these toxins, MT alpha and MT beta, interact with the receptors via kinetically distinct mechanisms. MT beta bound to receptors in a one-step, readily reversible process with the dissociation constant K(d)=5.3 microM. The binding mechanism of MTalpha was more complex, involving at least two consecutive steps. A fast receptor-toxin complex formation (K(T)=3.8 microM) was followed by a slow process of isomerisation of this complex (k(i)=1.8 x 10(-2) s(-1), half-time 39 s). A similar two-step interaction mechanism has been established for a related toxin, MT2 from the green mamba D. angusticeps (K(T)=1.4 microM, k(i)=8.3 x 10(-4) s(-1), half-time 840 s). The slow isomerisation process delays the effect of MT alpha and MT2, but increases their apparent potency compared to toxins unable to induce the isomerisation process.

  17. Directed Replacement of Mt a by Mt a-1 Effects a Mating Type Switch in Neurospora Crassa

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S.; Staben, C.

    1994-01-01

    To test the functions of a mating type genes, we developed an efficient strategy to select transformants of Neurospora crassa in which resident A mating type DNA was replaced by cloned DNA from the mt a idiomorph. Cloned a idiomorphic DNA could specify all functions, including fertility, of a mating type, but only when it replaced A DNA at the mating type locus. Only the mt a-1 region of the a idiomorph was necessary in order to specify a mating type. Gene replacement events involved the homologous sequences flanking the unique mating type idiomorphic DNA, resulting in apparently isogenic a and A strains. These isogenic strains were fertile when crossed with one another, indicating that no determinants outside the transforming DNA are necessary for fertility as a and that no host sequences of A strains interfere with fertility as a. One a replacement strain bore a duplication of the transforming mt a-1 and hph DNA. The duplication strain had unexpected properties. Although mating type segregated 1:1 in crosses of this strain to A, the duplicated regions were efficiently altered during the sexual process to generate a single copy in the progeny. No progeny were recovered that had undergone RIP (repeat induced point mutation) sufficient to inactivate the mt a-1 gene. We infer that the mt a-1 gene is necessary and sufficient to specify a mating type identity in all vegetative and sexual activities. Mt a-1 may also play an essential role in ascosporogenesis after fertilization. PMID:8001795

  18. Body composition and hematological changes following ascents of Mt. Aconcagua and Mt. Everest.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Dale R

    2010-11-01

    Both Mt. Aconcagua (22,841.2 ft/6962 m) and Mt. Everest (29,035.4 ft/ 8850 m) are highly prized summits by mountaineers, yet there are no published studies comparing the physiological adaptations that occur from climbing both peaks. This case study compares the changes in body composition and hematology of a mountaineer who ascended both peaks. The male subject was 41 yr of age during the Aconcagua ascent and 43 yr of age during the Everest ascent, and had a history of ascents above 19,685 ft (6000 m). Baseline body composition measurements and blood draws were done within a few days of departure for both expeditions. Body composition was assessed by air displacement plethysmography and the blood draw consisted of a complete blood count (CBC). Post-expedition measurements were taken 10-14 d after reaching the summits. The ascent of Aconcagua resulted in a 2.0-kg drop in body mass and a reduction in body fat (15.5% to 12.1%), but blood chemistry remained within +/- 2% of baseline values. Body mass was reduced from 65.0 kg to 60.5 kg during the Everest expedition with a drop in body fat from 17.3% to 10.2%. Despite no change in RBCs there were increases in hemoglobin and mean corpuscular hemoglobin of 12.7% and 13.7%, respectively. It took the subject 12 d to reach the summit of Aconcagua, whereas it took 50 d to reach the summit of Everest. The longer duration at higher altitude for the Everest expedition resulted in more dramatic physiological changes.

  19. Effects of the melatonin MT-1/MT-2 agonist ramelteon on daytime body temperature and sleep.

    PubMed

    Markwald, Rachel R; Lee-Chiong, Teofilo L; Burke, Tina M; Snider, Jesse A; Wright, Kenneth P

    2010-06-01

    A reduction in core temperature and an increase in the distal-proximal skin gradient (DPG) are reported to be associated with shorter sleep onset latencies (SOL) and better sleep quality. Ramelteon is a melatonin MT-1/MT-2 agonist approved for the treatment of insomnia. At night, ramelteon has been reported to shorten SOL. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that ramelteon would reduce core temperature, increase the DPG, as well as shorten SOL, reduce wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO), and increase total sleep time (TST) during a daytime sleep opportunity. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Eight mg ramelteon or placebo was administered 2 h prior to a 4-h daytime sleep opportunity. Sleep and chronobiology laboratory. Fourteen healthy adults (5 females), aged (23.2 +/- 4.2 y). Primary outcome measures included core body temperature, the DPG and sleep physiology (minutes of total sleep time [TST], wake after sleep onset [WASO], and SOL). We also assessed as secondary outcomes, proximal and distal skin temperatures, sleep staging and subjective TST. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed ramelteon significantly reduced core temperature and increased the DPG (both P < 0.05). Furthermore, ramelteon reduced WASO and increased TST, and stages 1 and 2 sleep (all P < 0.05). The change in the DPG was negatively correlated with SOL in the ramelteon condition. Ramelteon improved daytime sleep, perhaps mechanistically in part by reducing core temperature and modulating skin temperature. These findings suggest that ramelteon may have promise for the treatment of insomnia associated with circadian misalignment due to circadian sleep disorders.

  20. Reaction of HO2 with NO and NO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonaitis, R.; Heicklen, J.

    1974-01-01

    A kinetic study is made of the reaction of HO2 with NO2, and relative rate coefficients are derived for this reaction and for the reaction of HO2 with NO. It is shown that irradiation of mixtures of N2O-O2-H2 in the presence of small amounts of NO2 at 2139 A and 25 C leads to the consumption of NO2. The results clearly indicate that NO2 is consumed during irradiation to form a product which thermally decomposes to regenerate NO2 thermally and that this product is undoubtedly HONO. In the case of mixtures of N2O-O2-H2 and N2O-O2-H2-CO in the presence of small amounts of both NO and NO2 the NO2 pressure increases initially, reaches a maximum, and then decreases at a constant rate.

  1. The uptake of HO2 radicals to organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Pascale; Krapf, Manuel; Dommen, Josef; George, Ingrid; Whalley, Lisa; Ingham, Trevor; Baeza-Romero, Maria Teresa; Ammann, Markus; Heard, Dwayne

    2014-05-01

    HOx (OH + HO2) radicals are responsible for the majority of the oxidation in the troposphere and control the concentrations of many trace species in the atmosphere. There have been many field studies where the measured HO2 concentrations have been smaller than the concentration predicted by model calculations [1,2]. The difference has often been attributed to HO2 uptake by aerosols. Organics are a major component of aerosols accounting for 10 - 70 % of their mass [3]. However, there have been very few laboratory studies measuring HO2 uptake onto organic aerosols [4]. Uptake coefficients (γ) were measured for a range of aerosols using a Fluorescence Assay By Gas Expansion (FAGE) detector combined with an aerosol flow tube. HO2 was injected into the flow tube using a moveable injector which allowed first order HO2 decays to be measured along the flow tube both with and without aerosols. Laboratory generated aerosols were made using an atomiser or by homogeneous nucleation. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) were made using the Paul Scherrer Institute smog chamber and also by means of a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) chamber. The total aerosol surface area was then measured using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). Experiments were carried out on aerosols containing glutaric acid, glyoxal, malonic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid and squalene. The HO2 uptake coefficients for these species were measured in the range of γ < 0.004 to γ = 0.008 ± 0.004. Humic acid was also studied, however, much larger uptake coefficients (γ = 0.007 - 0.09) were measured, probably due to the fact that these aerosols contained elevated levels of transition metal ions. For humic acid the uptake coefficient was highly dependent on humidity and this may be explained by the liquid water content of the aerosols. Measurements were also performed on copper doped aerosols containing different organics. An uptake coefficient of 0.23 ± 0.07 was measured for copper doped ammonium sulphate

  2. Itinerant and Localized Magnetization Dynamics in Antiferromagnetic Ho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettig, L.; Dornes, C.; Thielemann-Kühn, N.; Pontius, N.; Zabel, H.; Schlagel, D. L.; Lograsso, T. A.; Chollet, M.; Robert, A.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Glownia, J. M.; Schüßler-Langeheine, C.; Johnson, S. L.; Staub, U.

    2016-06-01

    Using femtosecond time-resolved resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction at the Ho L3 absorption edge, we investigate the demagnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetically ordered metallic Ho after femtosecond optical excitation. Tuning the x-ray energy to the electric dipole (E 1 , 2 p →5 d ) or quadrupole (E 2 , 2 p →4 f ) transition allows us to selectively and independently study the spin dynamics of the itinerant 5 d and localized 4 f electronic subsystems via the suppression of the magnetic (2 1 3 -τ ) satellite peak. We find demagnetization time scales very similar to ferromagnetic 4 f systems, suggesting that the loss of magnetic order occurs via a similar spin-flip process in both cases. The simultaneous demagnetization of both subsystems demonstrates strong intra-atomic 4 f -5 d exchange coupling. In addition, an ultrafast lattice contraction due to the release of magneto-striction leads to a transient shift of the magnetic satellite peak.

  3. Itinerant and Localized Magnetization Dynamics in Antiferromagnetic Ho.

    PubMed

    Rettig, L; Dornes, C; Thielemann-Kühn, N; Pontius, N; Zabel, H; Schlagel, D L; Lograsso, T A; Chollet, M; Robert, A; Sikorski, M; Song, S; Glownia, J M; Schüßler-Langeheine, C; Johnson, S L; Staub, U

    2016-06-24

    Using femtosecond time-resolved resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction at the Ho L_{3} absorption edge, we investigate the demagnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetically ordered metallic Ho after femtosecond optical excitation. Tuning the x-ray energy to the electric dipole (E1, 2p→5d) or quadrupole (E2, 2p→4f) transition allows us to selectively and independently study the spin dynamics of the itinerant 5d and localized 4f electronic subsystems via the suppression of the magnetic (2 1 3-τ) satellite peak. We find demagnetization time scales very similar to ferromagnetic 4f systems, suggesting that the loss of magnetic order occurs via a similar spin-flip process in both cases. The simultaneous demagnetization of both subsystems demonstrates strong intra-atomic 4f-5d exchange coupling. In addition, an ultrafast lattice contraction due to the release of magneto-striction leads to a transient shift of the magnetic satellite peak.

  4. Ho:Tm:Er:LuAG and Two Wavelength Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Murray, Keith E.; Walsh, Brian M.; Hutcheson, Ralph L.

    1997-01-01

    Ho:Tm:Er:LuAG demonstrated simultaneous laser oscillation associated with two different transitions and different atoms. Two wavelength oscillation, or TWO, can be achieved in a single laser and single resonator. Moreover, the wavelength can be electronically controlled by varying the pump pulse length, Either the short wavelength, the Ho (5)1(sub 7) to (5)1(sub 8) transition at 2.1 microns, or the long wavelength, the Er (4)1(sub 11/2) to (4)1(sub 13/2) transition at 2.7 microns, or both wavelengths simultaneously can be produced without resorting to mechanical intervention. Consequently, a single laser system can easily switch between producing either of these useful wavelengths. Laser operation of both transitions has been characterized and is presented.

  5. Degradation of poly(3-hydroxyoctanoic acid) [P(3HO)] by bacteria: Purification and properties of a P(3HO) depolymerase from Pseudomonas fluorescens GK13

    SciTech Connect

    Schirmer, A.; Jendrossek, D.; Schlegel, H.G. )

    1993-04-01

    Poly(3-hydroxyoctanoic acid)[P(3HO)] and other poly(hydroxyalkanoic acids) PHA are widespread bacterial storage compounds of carbon and reducing power. They are biodegradable to carbon dioxide and water, and both aerobic and anaerobic P(3HB)-degradable bacteria are widely distributed in various ecosytems: soil, activated sludge, lake water and air, sea water, estuarine sediment, and anaerobic sewage sludge. This study describes the isolation and characterization of P(3HO) degrading bacteria: Alcaligenes eutrophus, Comamonas violaceum, Pseudomonas citronellolis, and P. fluorescenes (2 strains). The authors also describe purified P(3HO) depolymerase and compared it to PHB and PHA deploymerases. P(3HO) depolymerase activity was found not only in the sulture supernatant but also in the soluble fraction and membrane fractions of P(3HO) grown cells.39 refs.,5 figs.,3 tabs.

  6. The uptake of HO2 on meteoric smoke analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Alexander D.; Moon, Daniel R.; Feng, Wuhu; Lakey, Pascale S. J.; Frankland, Victoria L.; Heard, Dwayne E.; Plane, John M. C.

    2017-01-01

    The kinetics of heterogeneous HO2 uptake onto meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) has been studied in the laboratory using analogues of MSP aerosol entrained into a flow tube. The uptake coefficient, γ, was determined on synthetic amorphous olivine (MgFeSiO4) to be (6.9 ± 1.2) × 10-2 at a relative humidity (RH) of 10%. On forsterite (Mg2SiO4), γ = (4.3 ± 0.4) × 10-3 at RH = 11.6% and (7.3 ± 0.4) × 10-2 at RH = 9.9% on fayalite (Fe2SiO4). These results indicate that Fe plays a more important mechanistic role than Mg in the removal of HO2 from the gas phase. Electronic structure calculations show that Fe atoms exposed at the particle surface provide a catalytic site where HO2 is converted to H2O2 via an Eley-Rideal mechanism, but this does not occur on exposed surface Mg atoms. The impact of this heterogeneous process in the middle atmosphere was then investigated using a whole atmosphere chemistry-climate model which incorporates a microphysical treatment of MSPs. Using a global MSP production rate from meteoric ablation of 44 t/day, heterogeneous uptake (with γ = 0.2) on MSPs significantly alters the HOx budget in the nighttime polar vortex. This impact is highly latitude dependent and thus could not be confirmed using currently available satellite measurements of HO2, which are largely unavailable at latitudes greater than 70°.

  7. Crystallization of Al-Co-Dy(Ho) amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, V.; Petrova, S.; Svec, P., Sr.; Svec, P.; Janickovic, D.; Palitsina, A.

    2016-10-01

    Amorphous ribbons of Al92-xCo8Dy(Ho)x (x = 6 and 10 at.%) composition were produced by a standard planar flow casting method. Their kinetics of crystallization was studied by X-rays, DSC and electric resistivity. The phase composition was determined at each stage of crystallization. In order to increase the stability of amorphous state, use of alloy with high REM content and holmium is preferred to dysprosium.

  8. Crystallization of Al-Co-Dy(Ho) amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, V.; Petrova, S.; Svec, P., Sr.; Svec, P.; Janickovic, D.; Palitsina, A.

    2017-04-01

    Amorphous ribbons of Al92- x Co8Dy(Ho) x ( x = 6 and 10 at.%) composition were produced by a standard planar flow casting method. Their kinetics of crystallization was studied by X-rays, DSC and electric resistivity. The phase composition was determined at each stage of crystallization. In order to increase the stability of amorphous state, use of alloy with high REM content and holmium is preferred to dysprosium.

  9. Identical gamma-vibrational bands in {sup 165}Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Radford, D.C.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Janzen, V.P.

    1996-12-31

    The structure of {sup 165}Ho at moderate spins has been investigated by means of Coulomb excitation. Two {gamma}-vibrational bands (K{sup {pi}} = 11/2{sup {minus}} and K{sup {pi}} = 3/2{sup {minus}}) are observed, with very nearly identical in-band {gamma}-ray energies. Gamma-ray branching ratios are analyzed to extract information on Coriolis mixing, and the role of the K quantum number in identical bands is discussed.

  10. Smart Ho:YAG laser lithotriptor using optical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokaj, Jahja O.; Marafi, Mustafa A.; Makdisi, Yacob; Bhatia, Kuldip S.; Mathew, K. J.; Caka, Nebi; Hasani, Rexhep

    1998-03-01

    Ultra fast imaging and destruction of the gall bladder stone is performed using Ho:YAG laser. A laser guided approach for lithotropsy is proposed. The correlation output peak is introduced as a feedback signal for firing the laser pulse for stone destruction and 'discrimination' of the tissue image so that the risk of damaging and perforation of the tissue is reduced. A system constituted by correlation of ballistic images and fluorescent signals is proposed.

  11. The Formation and Erosion History of Mt. Sharp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Dapremont, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    The Curiosity rover is exploring 155 km diameter Gale crater and Mt. Sharp, Gale's 5 km high central mound (Fig. 1). This study addresses the formation and erosion history of Mt. Sharp. Gale lies on the topographic dichotomy between the southern highlands and the northern plains - a drop of over 2 km [1,2]. Altitude differences between the north and south rim reflect this regional slope, as do altitude differences between the deep annulus north of Mt. Sharp and the southern crater floor. Orbiter and rover images demonstrate that most exposed areas on Mt. Sharp consist of thin, sub-parallel units interpreted as sedimentary layers [3]. Gale is typical of the 50 large martian craters that have been totally or partially filled with such layers [4,5]. In many craters these sediments have been deeply eroded. Central Peak and Peak Ring: The highest point on Mt. Sharp, near the crater's center, is interpreted as a central peak [6]. The peak has a massive lower portion and a thin, smooth capping deposit (Fig. 2). Gale's size is transitional between martian craters with single central peaks and craters with peak rings approximately half the crater's diameter [2,6]. The boundaries of Mt. Sharp, as well as an arc of hills to the southeast of the mountain, closely match a circle approximately 80 km in diameter (Fig. 3). This morphology suggests that the Gale impact may have formed both a central peak and a partial peak ring, which is covered by the sediments of Mt. Sharp in the north and possibly exposed in the arc of eroded hills in the southeast quadrant (Figs. 3,4).

  12. Spectroscopic investigations on Ho 3+ doped mixed alkali phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnakaram, Y. C.; Srihari, N. V.; Naidu, D. Thirupathi; Vijayakumar, A.; Chakradhar, R. P. S.

    2008-06-01

    Optical absorption and emission properties of Ho3+ doped mixed alkali phosphate glasses of the type 69.5NH4H2PO4 · xLi2CO3 · (30 - x)K2CO3 and 69.5NH4H2PO4 · xNa2CO3 · (30 - x)K2CO3 (where x = 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25) were studied. Racah (E1, E2, E3), spin-orbit (ξ4f) and configuration interaction (α, β) parameters are calculated and these values are compared for different x values in the glass matrix. Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters (Ω2, Ω4, Ω6) are calculated for all the Ho3+ doped mixed alkali phosphate glasses. From these parameters and from the spectral profiles of the hypersensitive transition structural studies have obtained. Radiative transition probabilities (A), radiative lifetimes (τ), branching ratios (β) and integrated absorption cross-sections (Σ) are obtained from the intensity parameters. Emission cross-sections (σ) are calculated for the two transitions, 5F4, 5S2 → 5I8 and 5F5 → 5I8 of Ho3+ in these two mixed alkali phosphate glasses. Optical band gaps (Eopt) for both direct and indirect transitions are reported.

  13. Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żmojda, Jacek; Dorosz, Dominik; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Jan

    2012-05-01

    The emission properties of Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber has been investigated. Luminescence at 2.1 μm corresponding to 5I7--> 5I8 transition in holmium was obtained by energy transfer between Yb3+ and Ho3+ ions. According to the Dexter-Miyakawa model, the parameters of energy migration CDD of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) <--> 2F5/2 (Yb3+) transition and direct energy transfer CDA of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) --> 5I6 (Ho3+) transition was calculated. The optimization of the activator content and the concentration ratio were conducted with the purpose of maximizing the efficiency of energy transfer. It made possible to select best-suited glass which was used to manufacture double-clad optical fiber. Strong and narrow bands of spontaneous emission which formed as a result of energy transfer between ytterbium and holmium ions were observed in the fiber under exciting with radiation at 978 nm wavelength.

  14. Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żmojda, Jacek; Dorosz, Dominik; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Jan

    The emission properties of Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber has been investigated. Luminescence at 2.1 μm corresponding to 5I7--> 5I8 transition in holmium was obtained by energy transfer between Yb3+ and Ho3+ ions. According to the Dexter-Miyakawa model, the parameters of energy migration CDD of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) <--> 2F5/2 (Yb3+) transition and direct energy transfer CDA of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) --> 5I6 (Ho3+) transition was calculated. The optimization of the activator content and the concentration ratio were conducted with the purpose of maximizing the efficiency of energy transfer. It made possible to select best-suited glass which was used to manufacture double-clad optical fiber. Strong and narrow bands of spontaneous emission which formed as a result of energy transfer between ytterbium and holmium ions were observed in the fiber under exciting with radiation at 978 nm wavelength.

  15. Treatment of condylomata acuminata with Ho:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongmin; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Mei-Jue

    2005-07-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study to evaluate the effectiveness of Ho: YAG laser irradiation in treatment of condylomata acuminata. Methods: 1025 patients of condylomata acuminata, in which the lesions of 620 patients were interior of different lacuna, the lesions in 79 patients were huge (the diameter of lesion is over than 5cm), and 26 patients were pregnant, were treated with Ho:YAG laser (0.5-0.8J/pulse, 5-15 pulses/sec) to melt all the lesions. Results: All lesions in 1025 patients were removed after one laser treatment. The recrudescent and regenerative lesions could be removed completely after repeated treatment. No scarring and stricture on the peristome of the urethra was observed. No abortion, premature delivery and other syndrome were occurred among the total 26 pregnant patients. Conclusion: The technique of treatment of condylomata acuminata with Ho:YAG laser is an effective and safe therapeutics with the characteristic of better function of the homeostasis, shorter period of the concrescence and easy to operate.

  16. Brillouin Light Scattering study of the rotatable magnetic anisotropy in exchange biased bilayers of Ni81 Fe19 Ir20 Mn80

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Roberto; Oliveira, Alexandre; Estrada, Francisco; Santos, Obed; Azevedo, Antonio; Rezende, Sergio

    It is known that when a ferromagnet (FM) is in atomic contact with an antiferromagnet (AF) the exchange coupling between the FM and AF spins at the interface induces a unidirectional anisotropy in the ferromagnetic film. This effect is known as exchange bias (EB). Despite the large amount of research on this topic there are still several aspects of the EB mechanism that are not well understood. One of this aspects is the origin of the rotatable anisotropy in polycrystalline AFs. By means of Brillouin Light Scattering (BLS) measurements, we investigated the dependence of the rotatable anisotropy field HRA and exchange field HE with the magnitude of the external magnetic field (Ho) in FM/AM bilayers of Ni81Fe19(10nm)/Ir20Mn80(tAF) . We developed an algorithm to numerically fit the in-plane angular dependence of the magnon frequency, at a fixed value of Ho measured by BLS. From the fit parameters we were able to investigate HRA and HE dependency on Ho. The results reveal that HRA value depends on Ho, so we argue that AF grain distribution at the interface is partially modified by the applied field strength. Contrary to this, the relation between HE and Ho is not straightforward, remaining constant at high values of Ho.

  17. Water-catalyzed gas-phase hydrogen abstraction reactions of CH3O2 and HO2 with HO2: a computational investigation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianlei; Wang, Wenliang; Zhang, Pei; Lü, Jian; Zhang, Yue

    2011-12-14

    The gas-phase hydrogen abstraction reactions of CH(3)O(2) and HO(2) with HO(2) in the presence and absence of a single water molecule have been studied at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3d,2p)//B3LYP/6-311G(2d,2p) level of theory. The calculated results show that the process for O(3) formation is much faster than that for (1)O(2) and (3)O(2) formation in the water-catalyzed CH(3)O(2) + HO(2) reaction. This is different from the results for the non-catalytic reaction of CH(3)O(2) + HO(2), in which almost only the process for (3)O(2) formation takes place. Unlike CH(3)O(2) + HO(2) reaction in which the preferred process is different in the catalytic and non-catalytic conditions, the channel for (3)O(2) formation is the dominant in both catalytic and non-catalytic HO(2) + HO(2) reactions. Furthermore, the calculated total CVT/SCT rate constants for water-catalyzed and non-catalytic title reactions show that the water molecule doesn't contribute to the rate of CH(3)O(2) + HO(2) reaction though the channel for O(3) formation in this water-catalyzed reaction is more kinetically favorable than its non-catalytic process. Meanwhile, the water molecule plays an important positive role in increasing the rate of HO(2) + HO(2) reaction. These results are in good agreement with available experiments.

  18. 77 FR 20747 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Billings, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... action proposes to modify Class E airspace at Billings Logan International Airport, Billings, MT, to... feet or more above the surface of the earth. * * * * * ANM MT E5 Billings, MT Billings Logan... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Billings, MT AGENCY...

  19. Transcriptional quiescence of paternal mtDNA in cyprinid fish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ming; Peng, Liangyue; Hu, Xinjiang; Zhao, Yuling; Liu, Shaojun; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial homoplasmy signifies the existence of identical copies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and is essential for normal development, as heteroplasmy causes abnormal development and diseases in human. Homoplasmy in many organisms is ensured by maternal mtDNA inheritance through either absence of paternal mtDNA delivery or early elimination of paternal mtDNA. However, whether paternal mtDNA is transcribed has remained unknown. Here we report that paternal mtDNA shows late elimination and transcriptional quiescence in cyprinid fishes. Paternal mtDNA was present in zygotes but absent in larvae and adult organs of goldfish and blunt-snout bream, demonstrating paternal mtDNA delivery and elimination for maternal mtDNA inheritance. Surprisingly, paternal mtDNA remained detectable up to the heartbeat stage, suggesting its late elimination leading to embryonic heteroplasmy up to advanced embryogenesis. Most importantly, we never detected the cytb RNA of paternal mtDNA at all stages when paternal mtDNA was easily detectable, which reveals that paternal mtDNA is transcriptionally quiescent and thus excludes its effect on the development of heteroplasmic embryos. Therefore, paternal mtDNA in cyprinids shows late elimination and transcriptional quiescence. Clearly, transcriptional quiescence of paternal mtDNA represents a new mechanism for maternal mtDNA inheritance and provides implications for treating mitochondrion-associated diseases by mitochondrial transfer or replacement. PMID:27334806

  20. Influence of volume magnetostriction on the thermodynamic properties of Ni-Mn-Ga shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kosogor, Anna; L'vov, Victor A.; Cesari, Eduard

    2015-10-07

    In the present article, the thermodynamic properties of Ni-Mn-Ga ferromagnetic shape memory alloys exhibiting the martensitic transformations (MTs) above and below Curie temperature are compared. It is shown that when MT goes below Curie temperature, the elastic and thermal properties of alloy noticeably depend on magnetization value due to spontaneous volume magnetostriction. However, the separation of magnetic parts from the basic characteristics of MT is a difficult task, because the volume magnetostriction does not qualitatively change the transformational behaviour of alloy. This problem is solved for several Ni-Mn-Ga alloys by means of the quantitative theoretical analysis of experimental data obtained in the course of stress-strain tests. For each alloy, the entropy change and the transformation heat evolved in the course of MT are evaluated, first, from the results of stress-strain tests and, second, from differential scanning calorimetry data. For all alloys, a quantitative agreement between the values obtained in two different ways is observed. It is shown that the magnetic part of transformation heat exceeds the non-magnetic one for the Ni-Mn-Ga alloys undergoing MTs in ferromagnetic state, while the elevated values of transformation heat measured for the alloys undergoing MTs in paramagnetic state are caused by large MT strains.

  1. Martensitic transformation and magnetocaloric properties in Ni40.4Mn46.5Sn10.9Sb2.2 ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, H. C.; Zhang, T.; Wu, Y. F.; Xu, Y. K.; Li, H.; Han, P. D.; Du, Y. W.; Zhang, C. L.

    2017-01-01

    The Ni40.4Mn46.5Sn10.9Sb2.2 ribbons were prepared by melt-spun method. The martensitic transformation (MT) and magnetocaloric effect in melt-spun and annealed Ni40.4Mn46.5Sn10.9Sb2.2 ribbons were investigated. After the heat treatment, the MT temperature increases obviously in the annealed ribbons. The large values of magnetic entropy changes and the effective refrigerant capacity around the MT and Curie temperature of the austenite are found to be 30.9 and -2.2 J/kg K, 70.6 and 132.6 J/kg, respectively, under the field change of 30 kOe for the annealed ribbons. The annealing effect on the MT and magnetocaloric effect, together with the origin of the large magnetic entropy changes, has been discussed in this paper.

  2. A Model of Binocular Motion Integration in MT Neurons.

    PubMed

    Baker, Pamela M; Bair, Wyeth

    2016-06-15

    Primate cortical area MT plays a central role in visual motion perception, but models of this area have largely overlooked the binocular integration of motion signals. Recent electrophysiological studies tested binocular integration in MT and found surprisingly that MT neurons lose their hallmark "pattern motion" selectivity when stimuli are presented dichoptically and that many neurons are selective for motion-in-depth (MID). By unifying these novel observations with insights from monocular, frontoparallel motion studies concurrently in a binocular MT motion model, we generated clear, testable predictions about the circuitry and mechanisms underlying visual motion processing. We built binocular models in which signals from left- and right-eye streams could be integrated at various stages from V1 to MT, attempting to create the simplest plausible circuits that accounted for the physiological range of pattern motion selectivity, that explained changes across this range for dichoptic stimulus presentation, and that spanned the spectrum of MID selectivity observed in MT. Our successful models predict that motion-opponent suppression is the key mechanism to account for the striking loss of pattern motion sensitivity with dichoptic plaids, that opponent suppression precedes binocular integration, and that opponent suppression will be stronger in inputs to pattern cells than to component cells. We also found an unexpected connection between circuits for pattern motion selectivity and MID selectivity, suggesting that these two separately studied phenomena could be related. These results also hold in models that include binocular disparity computations, providing a platform for future exploration of binocular response properties in MT. The neural pathways underlying our sense of visual motion are among the most studied and well-understood parts of the primate cerebral cortex. Nevertheless, our understanding is incomplete because electrophysiological research has focused

  3. Effect of Wildfire Aerosols on NO2 Photolysis and Ozone Production at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylon, P.; Jaffe, D. A.; Hall, S. R.; Ullmann, K.; Lefer, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we have two goals: to quantify the effect of biomass burning aerosols on jNO2 photolysis and to look at O3 formation in biomass burning plumes as it relates to jNO2 photolysis. Wildfire plumes were observed during the summer of 2015 at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory, a high-elevation (2.8 km a.s.l.) mountaintop site located in central Oregon. These plumes were identified using the following criteria: (1) 5-minute ambient aerosol scattering σsp ≥ 20 Mm-1 for at least two hours, (2) 5-minute CO ≥ 150 ppbv for at least two hours, (3) strong correlation (r2 ≥ 0.70) between σsp and CO, and (4) consistent air mass back trajectories indicating transport over known fire locations. We measure nitrogen oxides using a chemiluminescence detector and jNO2 photolysis using a diode array actinic flux spectroradiometer. We also measure O3 using two techniques: (a) UV method with a cavity ring-down spectrometer and (b) chemiluminescence method with a custom-made instrument. We compare fire event observations between these two procedures to prove consistency. Based on these measurements, we quantify a lower bound for the HO2 and RO2 radical concentrations in wildfire plumes. We then look at plume and non-plume data and examine deviations from the photostationary state. Finally, we use the TUV model v5.2 to simulate clear-sky conditions and therefore quantify the reduction/enhancement in jNO2 values and O3 production due to wildfire aerosols. This gives us insight into the photochemical environment in biomass burning plumes, which until now, remains poorly understood.

  4. Spatial precision of population activity in primate area MT

    PubMed Central

    Morley, John W.; Solomon, Samuel G.

    2015-01-01

    The middle temporal (MT) area is a cortical area integral to the “where” pathway of primate visual processing, signaling the movement and position of objects in the visual world. The receptive field of a single MT neuron is sensitive to the direction of object motion but is too large to signal precise spatial position. Here, we asked if the activity of MT neurons could be combined to support the high spatial precision required in the where pathway. With the use of multielectrode arrays, we recorded simultaneously neural activity at 24–65 sites in area MT of anesthetized marmoset monkeys. We found that although individual receptive fields span more than 5° of the visual field, the combined population response can support fine spatial discriminations (<0.2°). This is because receptive fields at neighboring sites overlapped substantially, and changes in spatial position are therefore projected onto neural activity in a large ensemble of neurons. This fine spatial discrimination is supported primarily by neurons with receptive fields flanking the target locations. Population performance is degraded (by 13–22%) when correlations in neural activity are ignored, further reflecting the contribution of population neural interactions. Our results show that population signals can provide high spatial precision despite large receptive fields, allowing area MT to represent both the motion and the position of objects in the visual world. PMID:26041825

  5. MtDNA haplogroups and elite Korean athlete status.

    PubMed

    Kim, K C; Cho, H I; Kim, W

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation has recently been suggested to have an association with athletic performance or physical endurance. Since mtDNA is haploid and lacks recombination, specific mutations in the mtDNA genome associated with human exercise tolerance or intolerance arise and remain in particular genetic backgrounds referred to as haplogroups. To assess the possible contribution of mtDNA haplogroup-specific variants to differences in elite athletic performance, we performed a population-based study of 152 Korean elite athletes [77 sprint/power athletes (SPA) and 75 endurance/middle-power athletes (EMA)] and 265 non-athletic controls (CON). The overall haplogroup distribution of EMA differed significantly from CON (p<0.01), but that of SPA did not. The EMA have an excess of haplogroups M* (OR 4.38, 95% CI 1.63-11.79, p=0.003) and N9 (OR 2.32, 95% CI 0.92-5.81, p=0.042), but a dearth of haplogroup B (OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.09-0.75, p=0.003) compared with the CON. Thus, our data imply that specific mtDNA lineages may provide a significant effect on elite Korean endurance status, although functional studies with larger sample sizes are necessary to further substantiate these findings.

  6. The mitochondrial Italian Human Proteome Project initiative (mt-HPP).

    PubMed

    Urbani, Andrea; De Canio, Michele; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Sechi, Salvatore; Bini, Luca; Castagnola, Massimo; Fasano, Mauro; Modesti, Alessandra; Roncada, Paola; Timperio, Anna Maria; Bonizzi, Luigi; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca; De Pinto, Vito; Di Ilio, Carmine; Federici, Giorgio; Folli, Franco; Foti, Salvatore; Gelfi, Cecilia; Lauro, Davide; Lucacchini, Antonio; Magni, Fulvio; Messana, Irene; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Papa, Sergio; Pucci, Piero; Sacchetta, Paolo

    2013-08-01

    Mitochondria carry maternally inherited genetic material, called the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA), which can be defined as the 25th human chromosome. The chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (c-HPP) has initially focused its activities addressing the characterization and quantification of the nuclear encoded proteins. Following the last International HUPO Congress in Boston (September 2012) it was clear that however small the mitochondrial chromosome is, it plays an important role in many biological and physiopathological functions. Mutations in the mtDNA have been shown to be associated with dozens of unexplained disorders and the information contained in the mtDNA should be of major relevance to the understanding of many human diseases. Within this paper we describe the Italian initiative of the Human Proteome Project dedicated to mitochondria as part of both programs: chromosome-centric (c-HPP) and Biology/Disease (B/D-HPP). The mt-HPP has finally shifted the attention of the HUPO community outside the nuclear chromosomes with the general purpose to highlight the mitochondrial processes influencing the human health. Following this vision and considering the large interest and evidence collected on the non-Mendelian heredity of Homo sapiens associated with mt-chromosome and with the microbial commensal ecosystem constituting our organism we may speculate that this program will represent an initial step toward other HPP initiatives focusing on human phenotypic heredity.

  7. Melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2 are expressed in spermatozoa from several seasonal and nonseasonal breeder species.

    PubMed

    González-Arto, Marta; Vicente-Carrillo, Alejandro; Martínez-Pastor, Felipe; Fernández-Alegre, Estela; Roca, Jordi; Miró, Jordi; Rigau, Teresa; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan E; Pérez-Pé, Rosaura; Muiño-Blanco, Teresa; Cebrián-Pérez, José A; Casao, Adriana

    2016-11-01

    Melatonin is a ubiquitous and multipurpose molecule, and one of its roles is to regulate reproduction in some seasonal mammals. Our group has previously reported the variation in the melatonin levels in ram seminal plasma along the year and identified MT1 and MT2 receptors in ram spermatozoa. The objective of this study was to elucidate whether the presence of melatonin receptors (MT1 and MT2) in the sperm plasma membrane, and melatonin in the seminal plasma is related to seasonal breeding. For this purpose, the presence of melatonin receptors and the levels of melatonin in seminal plasma have been examined in several species: donkey and stallion as long-day breeders; red deer as a wild, short-day, highly seasonal breeder (epididymal spermatozoa); bull as a conventional nonseasonal breeder; boar as a seasonal breeder under management techniques; and dog as possible a seasonal breeder not regulated by melatonin. We have detected measurable levels of melatonin in the seminal plasma of all ejaculated semen samples (from donkey, stallion, boar, bull, and dog). Also, and for the first time, we have demonstrated the presence of MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors in the spermatozoa of all these species, regardless their type of reproduction or sperm source (ejaculated or epididymal), using indirect immunofluorescence techniques and Western blotting. Our findings suggest that melatonin and melatonin receptors may be universally distributed in the reproductive system of mammals and that the sperm melatonin receptors cells may not be necessarily related with seasonal reproduction. Furthermore, the presence of MT1 at the cytoplasmic droplet in immature ejaculated stallion spermatozoa found in one sample and epididymal red deer spermatozoa suggests that melatonin may be involved in specific functions during spermatogenesis and sperm maturation, like protecting spermatozoa from oxidative damage, this activity being mediated through these receptors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc

  8. EPR study of high-T c superconductor Y 0.9Ho 0.1Ba 2Cu 3O 7- δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, S. K.; Misiak, L. E.

    1989-10-01

    X-band EPR study of polycrystalline Y 0.9Ho 0.1Ba 2Cu 3O 7- δ high- T c superconductor has been made in the temperature range 4.2-300 K. As the temperature is lowered, the dependence of the intensity of the Cu 2+ line on temperature exhibits a jump at 80 K, while the low-field microwave absorption, indicating onset of superconducting properties, begins to occur at the superconducting transition temperature Tc = 60 K. The estimated sizes of Josephson junctions are in the range 0.2-0.4 μm below 60 K. The amplitude of the low-field microwave absorption line fitted to ( Tc- T) n, yields the critical exponent to be n = 1.45. The values of the lower critical field, the thermodynamic critical field, and the upper critical field for the Y 0.9Ho 0.1Ba 2Cu 3O 7- δ sample, extrapolated to 0 K, have been determined to be 75 mT, 1.75 T, and 173 T, respectively. The electronic specific heat coefficient is estimated to be γ = 3.4 mJ/( moleCu) K2. Significant covalency due to Cu 2+-O 2- bonds is observed. The Cu 2+ EPR spectrum is due to the phase with increased oxygen vacancies.

  9. Caenorhabditis elegans metallothionein isoform specificity--metal binding abilities and the role of histidine in CeMT1 and CeMT2.

    PubMed

    Bofill, Roger; Orihuela, Rubén; Romagosa, Míriam; Domènech, Jordi; Atrian, Sílvia; Capdevila, Mercè

    2009-12-01

    Two metallothionein (MT) isoforms have been identified in the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans: CeMT1 and CeMT2, comprising two polypeptides that are 75 and 63 residues in length, respectively. Both isoforms encompass a conserved cysteine pattern (19 in CeMT1 and 18 in CeMT2) and, most significantly, as a result of their coordinative potential, CeMT1 includes four histidines, whereas CeMT2 has only one. In the present study, we present a comprehensive and comparative analysis of the metal [Zn(II), Cd(II) and Cu(I)] binding abilities of CeMT1 and CeMT2, performed through spectroscopic and spectrometric characterization of the recombinant metal-MT complexes synthesized for wild-type isoforms (CeMT1 and CeMT2), their separate N- and C-terminal moieties (NtCeMT1, CtCeMT1, NtCeMT2 and CtCeMT2) and a DeltaHisCeMT2 mutant. The corresponding in vitro Zn/Cd- and Zn/Cu-replacement and acidification/renaturalization processes have also been studied, as well as protein modification strategies that make it possible to identify and quantify the contribution of the histidine residues to metal coordination. Overall, the data obtained in the present study are consistent with a scenario where both isoforms exhibit a clear preference for divalent metal ion binding, rather than for Cu coordination, although this preference is more pronounced towards cadmium for CeMT2, whereas it is markedly clearer towards Zn for CeMT1. The presence of histidines in these MTs is revealed to be decisive for their coordination performance. In CeMT1, they contribute to the binding of a seventh Zn(II) ion in relation to the M(II)(6)-CeMT2 complexes, both when synthesized in the presence of supplemented Zn(II) or Cd(II). In CeMT2, the unique C-terminal histidine abolishes the Cu-thionein character that this isoform would otherwise exhibit.

  10. Kinetics of HO2 + HO2 -> H2O2 + O2: Implications for Stratospheric H2O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, L. E.; Okumura, M.; Sander, S. P.; Salawitch, R. J.; Toon, G. C.; Sen, B.; Blavier, J.-F.; Jucks, K. W.

    2002-05-01

    The reaction HO2 + HO2 -> H2O2 + O2(1) has been studied at 100 Torr and 222 K to 295 K. Experiments employing photolysis of Cl2/CH3OH/O2/N2 and F2/H2/O2/N2 gas mixtures to produce HO2 confirmed that methanol enhanced the observed reaction rate. At 100 Torr, zero methanol, k1 = (8.8 +/- 0.9) 10-13 × exp[(210 +/- 26)/T] cm3 molecule-1 s-1 (2σ uncertainties), which agrees with current recommendations at 295 K but is nearly 2 times slower at 231 K. The general expression for k1, which includes the dependence on bath gas density, is k1 = (1.5 +/- 0.2) × 10-12 × exp[(19 +/- 31)/T] + 1.7 × 10-33 × [M] × exp[1000/T], where the second term is taken from the JPL00-3 recommendation. The revised rate largely accounts for a discrepancy between modeled and measured [H2O2] in the lower to middle stratosphere.

  11. High-power and highly efficient diode-cladding-pumped Ho3+-doped silica fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Stuart D; Bugge, Frank; Erbert, Götz

    2007-11-15

    We demonstrate high-power operation from a singly Ho3+-doped silica fiber laser that is cladding pumped directly with diode lasers operating at 1150 nm. Internal slope efficiencies approaching the Stokes limit were produced, and the maximum output power was 2.2W. This result was achieved using a low Ho3+-ion concentration and La3+-ion codoping, which together limit the transfer of energy between excited Ho3+ ions.

  12. Rheology of Crystallizing Basalts from Mt. Nyiragongo and Mt. Nyamuragira D.R.C.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, A. A.; Whittington, A. G.; Sehlke, A.

    2015-12-01

    Mt. Nyiragongo, located within the Virunga Volcanic Province on the western branch of the East African Rift, is known for its persistent lava lake activity as well as devastating eruptions in 1977 and 2002. The 2002 eruption caused a humanitarian crisis when channelized lava flows entered the nearby city of Goma killing 170 people and displacing ~350,000 others. These lavas have extremely low silica contents (39-42 wt.% SiO2) and are very fluid, allowing flows to move rapidly away from the source. We have measured the rheology of lavas from Nyiragongo using a concentric cylinder viscometer at temperatures of ~1220, 1205, 1190, 1175, 1165, and 1145°C. Each experiment starts with a liquid viscosity measurement at 1500˚C, followed by cooling to the desired experimental temperature. The lava spends 10-12 hours at this temperature, with constant stirring, before measurements begin. After measuring at a range of strain rates, the lava is quenched by immersion of the Pt crucible in a water bath. The viscosity is ~32 Pas at the liquidus temperature of ~1220°C, increasing gradually to ~142 Pas at 1165˚C. These viscosity measurements are much lower than most other basaltic compositions including Hawaiian lavas which have a crystal fraction of ~42% and apparent viscosity of ~2000 Pas at 1169°C. Over this temperature range, crystal fraction varies little (1-5% spinel crystals). Interpolating between measurements of the melt viscosity by concentric cylinder and parallel-plate viscometry suggests that at 1165˚C, the viscosity of the starting melt would be ~63 Pas. Consequently, the change in viscosity is due primarily to cooling rather than either the physical or chemical effects of crystallization. The data were collected at strain rates between ~1 and 46 s-1, and are well reproduced using a power-law model with exponents ~0.94 to 0.96. Below 1165˚C, crystal fraction and magma viscosity both increase rapidly. Further experiments at lower temperatures will quantify this

  13. Brg1-mediated Nrf2/HO-1 pathway activation alleviates hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Ge, Mian; Yao, Weifeng; Yuan, Dongdong; Zhou, Shaoli; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Yihan; Li, Haobo; Xia, Zhengyuan; Hei, Ziqing

    2017-06-01

    Cytoprotective gene heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) could be induced by nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of Brahma-related gene 1 (Brg1), a catalytic subunit of SWI2/SNF2-like chromatin remodeling complexes, in Nrf2/HO-1 pathway activation during hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (HIR). Our results showed that hepatic Brg1 was inhibited during early HIR while Brg1 overexpression reduced oxidative injury in CMV-Brg1 mice subjected to HIR. Moreover, promoter-driven luciferase assay showed that overexpression of Brg1 by adenovirus transfection in AML12 cells selectively enhanced HO-1 gene expression after hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) treatment but did not affect the other Nrf2 target gene NQO1. Furthermore, inhibition of HO-1 by the selective HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyria could partly reverse the hepatic protective effects of Brg1 overexpression while HO-1-Adv attenuated AML12 cells H/R damage. Further, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that Brg1 overexpression, which could significantly increase the recruitment of Brg1 protein to HO-1 but not NQO1 promoter, was recruited by Nrf2 to the HO-1 regulatory regions in AML12 hepatocytes subjected to H/R. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that restoration of Brg1 during reperfusion could enhance Nrf2-mediated inducible expression of HO-1 during HIR to effectively increase antioxidant ability to combat against hepatocytes damage.

  14. North Pacific Atmospheric Circulation and Tropical Teleconnections Over the Past 1500 Years From a Mt. Logan Ice Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterberg, E. C.; Mayewski, P. A.; Kreutz, K. J.; Fisher, D. A.; Maasch, K.; Sneed, S. B.

    2007-12-01

    A calibrated 1500 year-long glaciochemical proxy record for the strength of the wintertime (November-March) Aleutian Low (ALOW) from the Mt. Logan summit (PR Col; 5300 m a.s.l.) ice core [Na+] time series reveals a strong ALOW from ca. 650-900 A.D., ca. 1300-1550 A.D., and ca. 1700-1998 A.D., and a weaker ALOW from ca. 900-1300 A.D. and ca. 1550-1700 A.D. The proxy record was calibrated to instrumental sea-level pressure data using standard regression techniques, and verified using statistical, spectral, and spatial correlation analyses. The Mt. Logan ALOW proxy record shows strong similarities with sea surface temperature, precipitation, and glacier extent proxy records from the Pacific basin sensitive to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, indicating a robust coupling between high-latitude and tropical Pacific climate during the late Holocene. The Medieval Warm Period was characterized by more persistent La Niña-like conditions (weak ALOW), while the Little Ice Age (LIA) was characterized by at least two intervals of more persistent El Niño-like conditions (strong ALOW; 1300-1550 A.D., 1700-1998 A.D.). The LIA intensification of the ALOW is similar to the LIA intensification of the Icelandic Low in the North Atlantic (based on the GISP2, Greenland ice core [Na+] calibrated proxy record) and the Amundsen Sea Low in the high-latitude South Pacific (based on the Siple Dome, West Antarctica ice core [Na+] calibrated proxy record).

  15. Mitochondrial disease in childhood: mtDNA encoded.

    PubMed

    Saneto, Russell P; Sedensky, Margret M

    2013-04-01

    Since the first description of a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-associated disease in the late 1980s, there have been more than 275 mutations within the mtDNA genome described causing human disease. The phenotypic expression of these disorders is vast, as disturbances of the unique physiology of mitochondria can create a wide range of clinical heterogeneity. Features of heteroplasmy, threshold effect, genetic bottleneck, mtDNA depletion, mitotic segregation, and maternal inheritance have been identified and described as a result of novel biochemical and genetic controls of mitochondrial function. We hope that as we unfold this fascinating part of clinical medicine, the reader will see how alterations in the tapestry of mitochondrial biochemistry and genetics can give rise to human illness.

  16. Gravity survey of the Mt. Toondina impact structure, South Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, J. B.; Shoemaker, E. M.; Shoemaker, C. S.

    1991-01-01

    The Mt. Toondina impact structure is located in northern South Australia, about 45 km south of the town of Oodnadatta. Only the central uplift is exposed. The outcrops at Mt. Toondina reveal a remarkable structural anomaly surrounded by a broad expanse of nearly flat-lying beds of the Bulldog Shale of Early Cretaceous age. A gravity survey was undertaken in 1989 to determine the diameter of the impact structure, define the form of the central uplift, and understand the local crustal structure. Data were collected along two orthogonal lines across the structure. In addition to the profiles, a significant number of measurements were made on and around the central uplift. The 1989 gravity data combined with 1963 gravity data and the seismic reflection data provide an excellent data base to interpret the subsurface structure of the Mt. Toondina feature.

  17. EMT and EndMT: regulated in similar ways?

    PubMed

    Saito, Akira

    2013-06-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an evolutionary conserved developmental process, which is evoked during tumour invasion and metastasis. In the tumour microenvironment, a variety of resident and recruited cells participate in tumour progression. Kawata et al. demonstrated an experimental model where proinflammatory cytokines derived from macrophages could enhance EMT of cancer cells. Endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) is originally observed during heart development, and recent studies suggest its role in pathological settings such as cancer and fibrosis. Mihira et al. demonstrated a line of evidence showing endothelial cell plasticity to undergo EndMT in vitro. Both in EMT and EndMT, transforming growth factor-β played pivotal roles, and multiple downstream mechanisms were used, depending on cell context. These recent works unraveled discrete regulatory networks in mesenchymal transition of epithelial and endothelial cells.

  18. MtDNA ancestry of Rio de Janeiro population, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Suellen; Hermida, Rose; Desidério, Márcia; Silva, Dayse A; de Carvalho, Elizeu F

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphism studies concerning HVI and HVII regions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have improved the understanding of the admixture genetic process related to the occupation of the continents by human population groups. We have analyzed the mtDNA lineages of 190 healthy and maternally unrelated individuals born in the metropolitan region of the Rio de Janeiro city, the capital of the State of Rio de Janeiro, southeastern Brazil. The data showing that 57.9, 25.3 and 16.8 % of the matrilineages found in Rio de Janeiro come from African, Amerindian and European population groups. They are, respectively, in close agreement with historical records which indicate that the admixture population of Brazil is the resulting of interethnic asymmetry crosses between individuals from those population groups. The high proportion of African mtDNA lineages in the population of Rio de Janeiro is in accordance with studies related to other Brazilian states.

  19. New oxide-ion conductor Ho2(Ti1.904Ho0.096)O6.952: structure and conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrantes, J. C. C.; Savvin, S. N.; Shlyakhtina, A. V.; Shcherbakova, L. G.; Nunez, P.

    2011-03-01

    The crystal structure and conductivity of pyrochlore-like Ho2(Ti2-xHox)O7-x/2 (x=0, 0.01, 0.02, 0.096) ceramics are studied by X-ray diffraction and impedance spectroscopy as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure in the temperature range 700-1000 °C. According to the Rietveld refinement data the fraction of cation anti-site pairs in Ho2(Ti1.904Ho0.096)O6.952 sintered at 1400 and 1600 °C is 1.5% and 4.3% respectively. Heat treatment of Ho2(Ti1.904Ho0.096)O6.952 between 1400 and 1600 °C was shown to lead to the formation of pyrochlore-like solid solutions with pure oxide ion conductivities of about 4×10-4 and 1.5×10-3 S/cm at 800 °C, respectively. The ionic transport number is ∼1 at 800 °C and pO2>10 Pa. The electrolyte domain was observed for a wide range of oxygen partial pressures (10 Pa>pO2>10 Pa), which turns the Ho2(Ti1.904Ho0.096)O6.952 ceramic into a typical member of the LANTIOX family, with good oxide ion conductivity.

  20. Predicting the risk for hospital-onset Clostridium difficile infection (HO-CDI) at the time of inpatient admission: HO-CDI risk score.

    PubMed

    Tabak, Ying P; Johannes, Richard S; Sun, Xiaowu; Nunez, Carlos M; McDonald, L Clifford

    2015-06-01

    To predict the likelihood of hospital-onset Clostridium difficile infection (HO-CDI) based on patient clinical presentations at admission Retrospective data analysis Six US acute care hospitals Adult inpatients We used clinical data collected at the time of admission in electronic health record (EHR) systems to develop and validate a HO-CDI predictive model. The outcome measure was HO-CDI cases identified by a nonduplicate positive C. difficile toxin assay result with stool specimens collected >48 hours after inpatient admission. We fit a logistic regression model to predict the risk of HO-CDI. We validated the model using 1,000 bootstrap simulations. Among 78,080 adult admissions, 323 HO-CDI cases were identified (ie, a rate of 4.1 per 1,000 admissions). The logistic regression model yielded 14 independent predictors, including hospital community onset CDI pressure, patient age ≥65, previous healthcare exposures, CDI in previous admission, admission to the intensive care unit, albumin ≤3 g/dL, creatinine >2.0 mg/dL, bands >32%, platelets ≤150 or >420 109/L, and white blood cell count >11,000 mm3. The model had a c-statistic of 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76-0.81) with good calibration. Among 79% of patients with risk scores of 0-7, 19 HO-CDIs occurred per 10,000 admissions; for patients with risk scores >20, 623 HO-CDIs occurred per 10,000 admissions (P<.0001). Using clinical parameters available at the time of admission, this HO-CDI model demonstrated good predictive ability, and it may have utility as an early risk identification tool for HO-CDI preventive interventions and outcome comparisons.

  1. Passive monitoring of Mt. Etna and Mt. Yasur to probe the upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assink, J. D.; Le Pichon, A.; Blanc, E.

    2013-12-01

    We present two case studies in which the influence of atmospheric dynamics on infrasound propagation is studied. We make use of a volcanic infrasound data set that has been recorded at infrasound arrays in the vicinity of Mount Etna, Italy (37 N). In addition, we revisit the Mt. Yasur (22 S) dataset. Respectively, over 6 and 10 years of infrasound observables are compared to theoretical estimates obtained from propagation modeling using existing European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) atmospheric databases. Long-term detail comparisons such as presented in this study have been unprecedented and are useful for atmospheric modeling and infrasound propagation studies. While a first-order agreement is found, we report on significant discrepancies around the equinox period and during intervals during which anomalous detections occur during the winter, such as during Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs). We present an inversion study in which we make use of measured trace velocity estimates to predict effective sound speed model updates in a Bayesian framework. Such estimates will be compared to independent wind and temperature measurements that are available through the Atmospheric dynamics Research InfraStructure in Europe (ARISE) network.

  2. Zero-field studies of spin-lattice relaxation processes in non-Kramers doublet of LiF:Ni2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azamat, D. V.; Badalyan, A. G.; Dejneka, A.; Jastrabik, L.; Lančok, J.

    2016-12-01

    We use the inversion recovery technique with electron-spin-echo detection in order to study the non-resonant cross-relaxation of Ni2+-VLi with a faster relaxers—the exchange-coupled clusters of Ni2+ ions. An analysis of the results revealed a very high relaxation rate in non-Kramers doublet of LiF:Ni2+. The effect of a magnetic field on the spin-lattice relaxation of Ni2+ has estimated by comparing the results obtained for non-Kramers doublet around zero-magnetic field and for resonance at 394 mT (X-band microwave frequency).

  3. Mt. Etna: rationale and implementation of a Supersite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    Mt. Etna is one of the most active volcanoes on Earth and, in the past few decades, has erupted virtually every year. The volcanism of Mt. Etna results from the interaction between magma ascent in the rather complex plumbing feeding system and the local tectonic regime controlled by the volcano edifice's eastern flank instability, whose driving conditions (e.g., structural setting, tectonic forces) and cause-effect relationships are not yet completely understood. At the surface, the combination of the two factors produces eruptions that might consist of either strongly explosive (e.g., 2002; 2011) and produce volcanic ash plumes likely to disrupt air traffic for hours to weeks (e.g., 5 January 2012), including powerful summit paroxysms in the 2012-2013 time span or lava flows capable of invading the populated sectors, that can threat human property and vital infrastructures. Mt. Etna presents many characteristics that make it prone to be a Geohazard Supersite. The volcano consists of an open-vent system characterised by continuous degassing from the volcano summit craters and frequent eruptive summit and flank eruptions. Eruptions can be of different kinds passing from violent short-lasting explosive events to long-lasting lava output, thus producing different kinds of impacts on the surrounding environment, and especially on the large number of people living around the volcano foot. Over time, the frequency and variety of Mt. Etna's eruptive activity have made the volcano one of the most well-studied and monitored worldwide. At Mt. Etna volcanic activity produces a wide spectrum of signals, spanning from seismic and geodetic to geochemical and radiometric signals, which are tracked in continuous and in real-and quasi-real time by the automatic multi-disciplinary monitoring systems deployed by INGV. The huge amount of ground-based collected data sets enforces the vision of Mt. Etna supersite as a Geohazard Supersite where applying the overarching criteria of the

  4. A new perspective in Oral health: potential importance and actions of melatonin receptors MT1, MT2, MT3, and RZR/ROR in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Cutando, Antonio; Aneiros-Fernández, Jose; López-Valverde, Antonio; Arias-Santiago, Salvador; Aneiros-Cachaza, Jose; Reiter, Russel J

    2011-10-01

    Melatonin is involved in many physiological processes in mammals, amongst others; it is implicated in sleep-wake regulation. It has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It also acts as an immunomodulator, stimulates bone metabolism and inhibits various tumours. Additionally an abnormal melatonin rhythm may contribute to depression and insomnia. The mechanisms of action of melatonin include the involvement of membrane receptors (MT1, MT2), cytosolic binding sites (MT3 and calmodulin), and nuclear receptors of the RZR/ROR family. Melatonin also has receptor-independent activity and can directly scavenge free radicals. The current review addresses the functions of melatonin in the oral cavity in relation to its receptors. An extensive search was conducted on the following scientific databases Pub Med, Science Direct, ISI Web of Knowledge and Cochrane database in order to review all pertinent literature. Melatonin from the blood into the saliva may play an important role in suppressing oral diseases. It may have beneficial effects in periodontal disease, herpes and oral cancer, amongst others. Melatonin contributes to protecting of oral cavity from tissue damage due to its action of different receptors. From the reviewed literature it is concluded that experimental evidence suggests that melatonin can be useful in treating several common diseases of the oral cavity. Specific studies are necessary to extend the therapeutic possibilities of melatonin to other oral diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Melatonin influences somatostatin secretion from human pancreatic δ-cells via MT1 and MT2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Zibolka, Juliane; Mühlbauer, Eckhard; Peschke, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Melatonin is an effector of the diurnal clock on pancreatic islets. The membrane receptor-transmitted inhibitory influence of melatonin on insulin secretion is well established and contrasts with the reported stimulation of glucagon release from α-cells. Virtually, nothing is known concerning the melatonin-mediated effects on islet δ-cells. Analysis of a human pancreatic δ-cell model, the cell line QGP-1, and the use of a somatostatin-specific radioimmunoassay showed that melatonin primarily has an inhibitory effect on somatostatin secretion in the physiological concentration range. In the pharmacological range, melatonin elicited slightly increased somatostatin release from δ-cells. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is the major second messenger dose-dependently stimulating somatostatin secretion, in experiments employing the membrane-permeable 8-Br-cAMP. 8-Br-cyclic guanosine monophosphate proved to be of only minor relevance to somatostatin release. As the inhibitory effect of 1 nm melatonin was reversed after incubation of QGP-1 cells with the nonselective melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole, but not with the MT2-selective antagonist 4-P-PDOT (4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetraline), an involvement of the MT1 receptor can be assumed. Somatostatin release from the δ-cells at low glucose concentrations was significantly inhibited during co-incubation with 1 nm melatonin, an effect which was less pronounced at higher glucose levels. Transient expression experiments, overexpressing MT1, MT2, or a deletion variant as a control, indicated that the MT1 and not the MT2 receptor was the major transmitter of the inhibitory melatonin effect. These data point to a significant influence of melatonin on pancreatic δ-cells and on somatostatin release.

  6. Identifying Water on Mt. Baker and Mt. St. Helens, WA with Geophysics: Implications for Volcanic Landslide Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, C.; Bedrosian, P.; Wisniewski, M.; Deszcz-Pan, M.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater position, abundance, and flow rates within a volcano affect the transmission of fluid pressure, transport of mass and heat and formation of mechanically weak hydrothermal alteration influencing the stability of volcanoes. In addition, eruptions can shatter volcanic rocks, weakening the edifice. Helicopter magnetic and electromagnetic (HEM) data collected over Mt. Baker and Mt. St. Helens volcanoes reveal the distribution of water, shattered volcanic rocks and hydrothermal alteration essential to evaluating volcanic landslide hazards. These data, combined with geological mapping and rock property measurements, indicate the presence of localized <100 m thick zones of water-saturated hydrothermally altered rock beneath Sherman Crater and the Dorr Fumarole Fields at Mt. Baker. Nuclear magnetic resonance data indicate that the hydrothermal clays contain ~50% bound water with no evidence for free water ponded beneath the ice. The HEM data suggest water-saturated fresh volcanic rocks from the surface to the detection limit (~100 m) over the entire summit of Mt. Baker (below the ice). A 50-100 m thick high resistivity layer (>1500 ohm-m) corresponding to domes, debris avalanche, volcanic rocks and glaciers mantles the crater at Mt. St. Helens. Shallow low resistivity layers corresponding to fresh, cold water and hot brines are observed below the high resistivity surface in EM data. Shallow ground water mainly concentrates in shattered dome material in the crater of Mt. St. Helens. Aeromagnetic data indicate the location of basalts sandwiched between debris avalanche deposits and shattered dome material. The combination of the EM and magnetic data help map the location of the shattered dome material that is considered to be the failure surface for the 1980 debris avalanche. The EM data image the regional groundwater table near the base of the volcano. The geophysical identification of groundwater and weak layers constrain landslide hazards assessments.

  7. Lack of mitochondrial topoisomerase I (TOP1mt) impairs liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Khiati, Salim; Baechler, Simone A.; Factor, Valentina M.; Zhang, Hongliang; Huang, Shar-yin N.; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Sourbier, Carole; Neckers, Leonard; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Pommier, Yves

    2015-01-01

    The liver has an exceptional replicative capacity following partial hepatectomy or chemical injuries. Cellular proliferation requires increased production of energy and essential metabolites, which critically depend on the mitochondria. To determine whether Top1mt, the vertebrate mitochondrial topoisomerase, is involved in this process, we studied liver regeneration after carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) administration. TOP1mt knockout (KO) mice showed a marked reduction in regeneration and hepatocyte proliferation. The hepatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) failed to increase during recovery from CCl4 exposure. Reduced glutathione was also depleted, indicating increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). Steady-state levels of ATP, O2 consumption, mtDNA, and mitochondrial mass were also reduced in primary hepatocytes from CCl4-treated KO mice. To further test whether Top1mt acted by enabling mtDNA regeneration, we tested TOP1mt KO fibroblasts and human colon carcinoma HCT116 cells and measured mtDNA after 3-d treatment with ethidium bromide. Both types of TOP1mt knockout cells showed defective mtDNA regeneration following mtDNA depletion. Our study demonstrates that Top1mt is required for normal mtDNA homeostasis and for linking mtDNA expansion with hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:26305952

  8. Superdeformation studies in {sup 150}Tb and {sup 153}Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Nisius, D.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Crowell, B.

    1995-08-01

    There are now over 40 superdeformed (SD) bands known in the A {approximately} 150 region and in most cases the properties of these bands are understood in terms of single-particle excitations in the absence of pairing. By continuing the search for new SD bands we hope to gain insight into (1) the ordering of the proton and neutron orbitals near the Fermi surface in the SD well, (2) the effects that the alignment of those orbitals has on the moments of inertia, and (3) the collective excitations in the SD well. For {sup 150}Tb, which is one proton and one neutron away from the SD doubly-magic nucleus {sup 152}Dy, it should be possible to study SD bands based on both proton and neutron hole excitations. By adding one proton to the {sup 152}Dy nucleus (i.e. {sup 153}Ho) proton excitations above the Z = 66 shell gap can be studied. These excitations are important as calculations suggested that the proton intruder orbital N = 7 might become occupied. Interactions between this orbital and a N = 5 level may result in softness towards octupole vibrations. High spin states in {sup 150}Th and {sup 153}Ho were populated using the {sup 124}Sn({sup 31}P,5n) and {sup 120}Sn({sup 37}Cl,4n) reactions, respectively. In both cases the early implementation phase of Gammasphere was used to detect the decay gamma rays and over 1 x 10{sup 9} triple and higher fold coincidence events were recorded. In {sup 150}Tb, the data analysis is complete and two new SD bands were identified. The fact that Im{sup (2)} moments of inertia are sensitive to the specific high-N intruder content of the SD bands was used to suggest configurations for the two new bands. A paper reporting these results is being prepared. For {sup 153}Ho, data analysis is still in its early stages.

  9. Detailed course of the O + HO2 reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, U. C.; Klein, F. S.; Kaufman, F.

    1985-01-01

    The elementary radical-radical reactions that are of such importance in laser, astrophysical, atmospheric, and combustion processes are increasingly open to direct rate measurement. Attention is presently given to the O + HO2 reaction, which has only one exothermic product channel: OH + O2. Isotopic product analysis was conducted spectroscopically using laser-induced fluorescence of OH. It is found that the simple atom-radical reaction takes place by way of the rapid formation and breakup of an unexpected radical intermediate, thereby raising questions as to the formation, thermochemistry, and decomposition of poorly known products in many other radical-radical reaction systems.

  10. Dy163-Ho163 branching: an s-process barometer

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, H.; Walter, G.; Macklin, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of Dy163 and Er164 have been measured to analyze the s-process branching at Dy163-Ho163. The reproduction of the s-process abundance of Er164 via this branching is sensitive to temperature kT, neutron density, and electron density n/sub e/. The calculations using information from other branchings on kT and the neutron density n/sub n/ give constraints for n/sub e/ at the site of the s-process.

  11. Dy163-Ho163 branching: An s-process barometer

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, H.; Walter, G.; Macklin, R.L.

    1985-01-15

    The neutron capture cross sections of Dy163 and Er164 have been measured to analyse the s-process branching at Dy163-Ho163. The reproduction of the s-process abundance of Er164 via this branching is sensitive to temperature kT, neutron density, and electron density n/sub e/. The calculations using information from other branchings on kT and the neutron density n/sub n/ give constraints for n/sub e/ at the site of the s-process.

  12. Chaplygin gas Hořava-Lifshitz quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardehali, Hossein; Pedram, Pouria

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we study the Chaplygin gas Hořava-Lifshitz quantum cosmology. Using Schutz formalism and Arnowitt-Deser-Misner decomposition, we obtain the corresponding Schrödinger-Wheeler-DeWitt equation. We obtain exact classical and quantum mechanical solutions and construct wave packets to study the time evolution of the expectation value of the scale factor for two cases. We show that unlike classical solutions and upon choosing appropriate initial conditions, the expectation value of the scale factor never tends to the singular point which exhibits the singularity-free behavior of the solutions in the quantum domain.

  13. Scalar field perturbations in Hořava-Lifshitz cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Anzhong; Wands, David; Maartens, Roy

    2010-03-01

    We study perturbations of a scalar field cosmology in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity, adopting the most general setup without detailed balance but with the projectability condition. We derive the generalized Klein-Gordon equation, which is sixth-order in spatial derivatives. Then we investigate scalar field perturbations coupled to gravity in a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background. In the sub-horizon regime, the metric and scalar field modes have independent oscillations with different frequencies and phases except in particular cases. On super-horizon scales, the perturbations become adiabatic during slow-roll inflation driven by a single field, and the comoving curvature perturbation is constant.

  14. Auxin 2012: a rich mea ho'oulu.

    PubMed

    Strader, Lucia C; Nemhauser, Jennifer L

    2013-03-01

    In December 2012, scientists from around the world gathered in Waikoloa, Hawaii for 'Auxin 2012', a meeting organized by Paula McSteen (University of Missouri, USA), Ben Scheres (Utrecht University, The Netherlands) and Yunde Zhao (University of California, San Diego, USA). At the meeting, participants discussed the latest advances in auxin biosynthesis, transport and signaling research, in addition to providing context for how these pathways intersect with other aspects of plant physiology and development. Fittingly, the meeting began with a traditional Hawaiian ceremony that recognized the centrality of the harvest of plant life ('mea ho'oulu' in Hawaiian) for continued human survival.

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Ho-198 (Holmium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Ho-198 (Holmium, atomic number Z = 67, mass number A = 198).

  16. Ho:YLF Laser Pumped by TM:Fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Kohei; Ishii, Shoken; Itabe, Toshikazu; Asai, Kazuhiro; Sato, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    A 2-micron Ho:YLF laser end-pumped by 1.94-micron Tm:fiber laser is described. A ring resonator of 3m length is adopted for the oscillator. The laser is a master oscillator and an amplifier system. It is operated at high repetition rate of 200-5000 Hz in room temperature. The laser outputs were about 9W in CW and more than 6W in Q-switched operation. This laser was developed to be used for wind and CO2 measurements.

  17. 76 FR 9991 - Television Broadcasting Services; Kalispell, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Kalispell, MT AGENCY: Federal Communications... ex parte contacts (other than ex parte presentations exempt under 47 CFR 1.1204(a)) are prohibited in Commission proceedings, such as this one, which involve channel allotments. See 47 CFR 1.1208 for...

  18. Mt. San Antonio College Matriculation Study: Fall 1986-Spring 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Barbara Ann; And Others

    In fall 1986, Mt. San Antonio College (MSAC) began a five year longitudinal study of the effectiveness of its matriculation services, which include assessment, orientation, counseling/advisement, and follow-up of students by staff members. The study utilized a computerized tracking system to compare retention, grade point average (GPA),…

  19. Mt. San Antonio College Matriculation Research Update, 1989-90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Barbara Ann; And Others

    In fall 1986, Mt. San Antonio College (MSAC) initiated a 5-year longitudinal study of the effectiveness of its matriculation services, including assessment, orientation, counseling/advisement, and follow-up. The academic performance and success of students participating in one or more of these services were compared to those of degree- and…

  20. Mt. San Antonio Community College Information Notebook; Volume Two, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Community Coll. District, Walnut, CA.

    This databook contains some of the basic information to be used in decision making and planning in the Mt. San Antonio College (MSAC) District. Part I focuses on the demographic characteristics of the district population, feeder school districts, and data from other educational providers. Part II presents statewide data on potential enrollment by…

  1. Mt. St. Helens Seen Close Up on May 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoffel, Dorothy B.; Stoffel, Keith L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes eruption steps in Mt. St. Helens' top surface deformation: constant shaking of earthquakes, minor steaming from vents, and sudden catastrophic eruption. Explosions caused black projectile-laden ash clouds, vertical white steam clouds, and vertical gray ash-laden clouds. (SK)

  2. 77 FR 41259 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Plentywood, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ..., which is incorporated by reference in 14 CFR 71.1. The Class E airspace designations listed in this... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Modification of Class E Airspace; Plentywood, MT AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action modifies Class...

  3. Mt. Etna taken by the Expedition Two crew

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-07-22

    ISS002-E-9637 (22 July 2001) --- An overhead look at the smoke and ash being expelled from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily. This image was recorded by an Expedition Two crew member with a digital still camera.

  4. Mt. Etna taken by the Expedition Two crew

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-07-22

    ISS002-E-9639 (22 July 2001) --- An overhead look at the smoke and ash being expelled from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily. This image was recorded by an Expedition Two crew member with a digital still camera.

  5. Mt. St. Helens Seen Close Up on May 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoffel, Dorothy B.; Stoffel, Keith L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes eruption steps in Mt. St. Helens' top surface deformation: constant shaking of earthquakes, minor steaming from vents, and sudden catastrophic eruption. Explosions caused black projectile-laden ash clouds, vertical white steam clouds, and vertical gray ash-laden clouds. (SK)

  6. Conflicting Values: Spirituality and Wilderness at Mt. Shasta

    Treesearch

    Maria Fernandez-Gimenez; Lynn Huntsinger; Catherine Phillips; Barbara Allen-Diaz

    1992-01-01

    Many people from a variety of backgrounds believe that Mt. Shasta is a major spiritual center. Although these "spiritual users" value the area's natural features, their spiritual and social activities, including construction of sweat lodges, medicine wheels, altars, meditation pads, trails, and campsites, are leading to rapid ecological degradation. This...

  7. Gravity Survey of the Mt. Toondina Impact Structure South Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, J.; Shoemaker, E.; Shoemaker, C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents data to support the conclusion that gravity data combined with seismic reflection data and surface stuctural geologic mapping for the Mt. Toondina structure in South Australia reveal that the central uplift is surrounded by a ring structural depression.

  8. Mt. San Antonio Community College Information Notebook; Volume Two, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Community Coll. District, Walnut, CA.

    This databook contains some of the basic information to be used in decision making and planning in the Mt. San Antonio College (MSAC) District. Part I focuses on the demographic characteristics of the district population, feeder school districts, and data from other educational providers. Part II presents statewide data on potential enrollment by…

  9. Mt. San Antonio College Matriculation Research Update, 1989-90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Barbara Ann; And Others

    In fall 1986, Mt. San Antonio College (MSAC) initiated a 5-year longitudinal study of the effectiveness of its matriculation services, including assessment, orientation, counseling/advisement, and follow-up. The academic performance and success of students participating in one or more of these services were compared to those of degree- and…

  10. Mt. San Antonio College Matriculation Study: Fall 1986-Spring 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Barbara Ann; And Others

    In fall 1986, Mt. San Antonio College (MSAC) began a five year longitudinal study of the effectiveness of its matriculation services, which include assessment, orientation, counseling/advisement, and follow-up of students by staff members. The study utilized a computerized tracking system to compare retention, grade point average (GPA),…

  11. Mt. Etna, Sicily as seen from STS-62

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-03-05

    STS062-85-195 (4-18 March 1994) --- A thin plume of steam blows southward from the summit of Mt. Etna, the active volcano on the island of Sicily. The summit is capped with snow but the dark lava flow along the eastern flank (the 1991-93 flow) is clearly visible. The coastal city south of Etna is Catania.

  12. Motion-dependent representation of space in area MT+.

    PubMed

    Maus, Gerrit W; Fischer, Jason; Whitney, David

    2013-05-08

    How is visual space represented in cortical area MT+? At a relatively coarse scale, the organization of MT+ is debated; retinotopic, spatiotopic, or mixed representations have all been proposed. However, none of these representations entirely explain the perceptual localization of objects at a fine spatial scale--a scale relevant for tasks like navigating or manipulating objects. For example, perceived positions of objects are strongly modulated by visual motion; stationary flashes appear shifted in the direction of nearby motion. Does spatial coding in MT+ reflect these shifts in perceived position? We performed an fMRI experiment employing this "flash-drag" effect and found that flashes presented near motion produced patterns of activity similar to physically shifted flashes in the absence of motion. This reveals a motion-dependent change in the neural representation of object position in human MT+, a process that could help compensate for perceptual and motor delays in localizing objects in dynamic scenes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 76 FR 59479 - Montana Disaster Number MT-00062

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Montana Disaster Number MT-00062 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera, Associate Administrator for Disaster...

  14. Evidences for higher nocturnal seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, Nicola; Mazzarella, Adriano

    2017-04-01

    We analyze hourly seismic data measured at the Osservatorio Vesuviano Ovest (OVO, 1972-2014) and at the Bunker Est (BKE, 1999-2014) stations on the Mt. Vesuvius (Italy). The OVO record is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 1.9. We demonstrate that before 1996 this record presents a daily oscillation that nearly vanishes afterwards. To determine whether a daily oscillation exists in the seismic activity of the Mt. Vesuvius, we use the higher quality BKE record that is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 0.2. We demonstrate that BKE confirms that the seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius is higher during nighttime than during daytime. The amplitude of the daily oscillation is enhanced during summer and damped during winter. We speculate possible links with the cooling/warming diurnal cycle of the volcanic edifice and with external geomagnetic field. We find that the amplitude of the seismic daily cycle changes in time and has been increasing since 2008. Finally, we propose a seismic activity index to monitor the 24-hour oscillation that could be used to complement other methodologies currently adopted to determine the seismic status of the volcano to prevent the relative hazard. Reference: Mazzarella, A., Scafetta, N., 2016. Evidences for higher nocturnal seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 321, 102-113. DOI: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2016.04.026

  15. Limnology of Mt. Elbert Forebay, 1978-1979. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmke, J.R.; LaBounty, J.F.; Sartoris, J.J.; Roline, R.A.

    1982-03-01

    The 1978-79 limnological study of Mt. Elbert Forebay was done in conjunction with other limnological studies at Twin Lakes. The purpose of the overall study is to determine the effects of pumped storage on the aquatic environment of Twin Lakes. Information will help maximize ecological resources while meeting the water storage and power generation objectives of Fryingpan-Arkansas Project.

  16. 76 FR 53049 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Shelby, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Shelby, MT AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action modifies Class E airspace at... received. Class E airspace designations are published in paragraph 6005 of FAA Order 7400.9U dated...

  17. 77 FR 44120 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Roundup, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Roundup, MT AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action establishes Class E... Association (NBAA). The NBAA comments recommended that the FAA lower some of the adjacent Class E...

  18. 77 FR 55690 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Dillon, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Dillon, MT AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends Class E airspace... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend Class E airspace at Dillon...

  19. Southern Hemisphere Lidar Measurements of the Aerosol Clouds from Mt. Pinatubo and Mt. Hudson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Stuart A.; Manson, Peter J.; Patterson, Graeme R.

    1992-01-01

    On 19 Jul., 1991, during tests to determine the ability of the newly-modified CSIRO Ns:YAG lidar to measure signals from the stratosphere before the arrival of dust from the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, a strongly scattering layer was detected at an altitude of 2 km. That evening, the spectacular sunset and twilight were typical of volcanically disturbed conditions. Lidar measurements at 532 nm were made between 1400 and 1500 EST (0400-0500 UT) on 19 Jul. through broken cloud. Approximately 3800 laser firings were averaged in 256 shot blocks. These and subsequent data have been analyzed to produce profiles of aerosol volume backscatter function and scattering ratio. Clouds again prevented a clear view of the twilights on the next two nights, although there was some evidence for an enhanced glow. The evidence suggested that the aerosol layer had disappeared. An explanation for this disappearance and the earlier than expected arrival of the layer over Melbourne was required. Nimbus 7 TOMS data for 23 Jun. showed that the SO2 from the eruption had extended at least 11000 km to the west and that the southern boundary of the cloud had reached 15 degrees S just 8 days after the climactic eruption. It can be assumed that this cloud also contained dust and sulphuric acid aerosol. It was proposed that a section had then been broken away from the main cloud and carried south by a large scale eddy between the low latitude easterlies and the strong mid-latitude westerlies which finally carried the aerosol cloud over southern Australia. Accompanying 30 mb wind data showed a counter clockwise circulation, responsible for the transport, located in the South Atlantic Ocean.

  20. Southern Hemisphere Lidar Measurements of the Aerosol Clouds from Mt. Pinatubo and Mt. Hudson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Stuart A.; Manson, Peter J.; Patterson, Graeme R.

    1992-01-01

    On 19 Jul., 1991, during tests to determine the ability of the newly-modified CSIRO Ns:YAG lidar to measure signals from the stratosphere before the arrival of dust from the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, a strongly scattering layer was detected at an altitude of 2 km. That evening, the spectacular sunset and twilight were typical of volcanically disturbed conditions. Lidar measurements at 532 nm were made between 1400 and 1500 EST (0400-0500 UT) on 19 Jul. through broken cloud. Approximately 3800 laser firings were averaged in 256 shot blocks. These and subsequent data have been analyzed to produce profiles of aerosol volume backscatter function and scattering ratio. Clouds again prevented a clear view of the twilights on the next two nights, although there was some evidence for an enhanced glow. The evidence suggested that the aerosol layer had disappeared. An explanation for this disappearance and the earlier than expected arrival of the layer over Melbourne was required. Nimbus 7 TOMS data for 23 Jun. showed that the SO2 from the eruption had extended at least 11000 km to the west and that the southern boundary of the cloud had reached 15 degrees S just 8 days after the climactic eruption. It can be assumed that this cloud also contained dust and sulphuric acid aerosol. It was proposed that a section had then been broken away from the main cloud and carried south by a large scale eddy between the low latitude easterlies and the strong mid-latitude westerlies which finally carried the aerosol cloud over southern Australia. Accompanying 30 mb wind data showed a counter clockwise circulation, responsible for the transport, located in the South Atlantic Ocean.

  1. Trace element biomonitoring using mosses in urban areas affected by mud volcanoes around Mt. Etna. The case of the Salinelle, Italy.

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Giuseppe; Lo Giudice, Rosa; Pavone, Pietro

    2012-08-01

    Trace element impact was assessed using mosses in a densely inhabited area affected by mud volcanoes. Such volcanoes, locally called Salinelle, are phenomena that occur around Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy) and are interpreted as the surface outflow of a hydrothermal system located below Mt. Etna, releasing sedimentary fluids (hydrocarbons and NaCl brines) along with magmatic gases (mainly CO(2) and He). To date, scarce data are available about the presence of trace elements, and no biomonitoring campaigns are reported about the cumulative effects of such emissions. In this study, concentrations of Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn were detected in the moss Bryum argenteum, in soil and water. Results showed that the trace element contribution of the Salinelle to the general pollution was significant for Al, Mn, Ni, and Zn. The comparison of trace concentrations in mosses from Salinelle and Etna showed that the mud volcanoes release a greater amount of Al and Mn, whereas similar values of Ni were found. Natural emissions of trace elements could be hazardous in human settlements, in particular, the Salinelle seem to play an important role in environmental pollution.

  2. Effect of curvature on the structural and magnetic properties of Ni film deposited on self-assembled nanospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A. Tripathi, S.; Halder, N.; Gupta, Dileep; Tripathi, J.

    2016-05-06

    Important experimental findings and their impact on physical properties of Ni thin film are presented with the focus on structural and magnetic property investigations. For this purpose, Ni film (40 nm) was deposited on polystyrene nanospheres (PS, diameter 800 nm) using electron beam evaporation technique simultaneously with a similar reference film on plane Si substrate. The structural properties of the films measured using XRD technique show nanocrystalline growth of Ni on both size PS spheres with an average grain size of ∼ 78 nm, while high crystallinity was observed in the film deposited onto plane Si substrate. A lower coercivity (9 mT) was observed in the Ni/(800 nm) PS as compared to the film deposited on 530 nm PS (23 mT) (our earlier study) and Ni/Si (20 mT). The observed changes in structural and magnetic properties are attributed to the curvature induced modifications at atomic level.

  3. HoCP 04-838 – A new sugarcane variety for Louisiana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    HoCP 04-838 was released to the Louisiana sugar industry on May 3, 2011 by the Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture in cooperation with the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, and the American Sugar Cane League of the U.S.A., Inc. HoCP 04-838 re...

  4. Ho 07-613 – A potential new sugarcane variety for Louisiana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The clone Ho 07-613 will be up for release to Louisiana sugarcane farmers in May of 2014. This potential new variety is a joint release of the United States Department of Agriculture, the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, and the American Sugar Cane League of the U.S.A., Inc. Ho 07-613...

  5. Diurnal HO2 cycles at clean air and urban sites in the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hard, T. M.; Chan, C. Y.; Mehrabzadeh, A. A.; O'Brien, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    HO2 concentrations at two Oregon sites were determined for continuous periods of 36 to 48 hours, using fluorescence assay with gas expansion. At the sea level coastal site, NNW winds prevailed during daytime, and a point measurement of very low total nonmethane hydrocarbon concentration indicated the presence of remote tropospheric air of oceanic origin. At the urban site, HO2 was determined during moderately low ozone pollution levels. At both sites, maximum daily (HO2) was in the range of 1-2 x 10 exp 8/cu cm under clear-sky conditions, with an estimated overall uncertainty of 40 percent. HO2 was detected by continuous low-pressure sampling with flowing chemical conversion to HO, which was detected by laser-excited fluorescence. The instrumental response to HO2 was calibrated by the self-decay of HO2 at atmospheric pressure. Interference in the measured daytime HO2 concentrations by RO2 was estimated at less than 20 percent.

  6. Intense red upconversion emission of Yb/Tm/Ho triply-doped tellurite glasses.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Huan; Zhou, Zhiguang; He, Jianli; Lin, Aoxiang

    2012-05-20

    By conventional melting and quenching methods, 3Yb2O3-0.2Tm2O3-xHo2O3 (wt%, x=0.2~1.2) was doped into an easily fiberized tellurite glass with composition of 78TeO2-10ZnO-12Na2O (mol%) to form YTH-TZN78 glasses. Under 976 nm excitation, the direct sensitizing effect of Yb ions (Yb→Ho) and indirect sensitizing and self-depopulating effects of Tm ions (Yb→Tm→Ho) were found to present intense red upconversion emission at 657 nm (Red, Ho:5F5→5I8) and were responsible for the absence of the usually observed 484 nm emission (Blue, Tm:1G4→3H36). Regardless of the dopant concentration of Ho ions, the intensity of the red emission at 657 nm (Red, Ho:5F5→5I8) is about three times stronger than that of the green one at 543 nm (Green, Ho:5S2→5I8). For this certain red emission at 657 nm, 0.4 wt% Ho2O3-doped YTH-TZN78 glass was found to present the highest emission intensity and is therefore determined as a promising active tellurite glass for red fiber laser development.

  7. Photoluminescence properties of Ho3+/Tm3+-doped YAGG nano-crystalline powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveena, R.; Sameera, V. Sravani; Babu, P.; Basavapoornima, Ch.; Jayasankar, C. K.

    2017-10-01

    Y3Al4GaO12 (YAGG):(Tm3+, Ho3+) nanoparticles have been synthesized by Pechini sol-gel method and characterised their X-ray diffraction patterns, scanning electron microscope image, energy dispersive and photoluminescence spectra. From XRD results, phase purity and structure have been confirmed. Excitation spectra reveal that 363 nm excitation is suitable to excite the co-doped samples. Under ultraviolet excitation at 363 nm, the characteristic emissions of Tm3+ and Ho3+ ions have been observed in the photoluminescence (PL) spectra. Concentration dependent luminescence and energy transfer between Tm3+ and Ho3+ ions have been studied. The CIE chromaticity coordinates and correlated colour temperature values have been obtained from the emission spectra. Moreover, the emission colour of the YAGG:TmHo nano-powders was slightly shifted to red colour while increasing the Ho concentration and can be tuned from blue/green to white by adjusting the Tm3+/Ho3+ ions concentration. The optimum concentration of Tm3+ and Ho3+ ions were found to be 1:1 ratio in the YAGG host. The optimized single component white light emitting YAGG:TmHo phosphors could be a potential candidate for phosphor-converted white light emitting diode and full colour display applications.

  8. Diurnal HO2 cycles at clean air and urban sites in the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hard, T. M.; Chan, C. Y.; Mehrabzadeh, A. A.; O'Brien, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    HO2 concentrations at two Oregon sites were determined for continuous periods of 36 to 48 hours, using fluorescence assay with gas expansion. At the sea level coastal site, NNW winds prevailed during daytime, and a point measurement of very low total nonmethane hydrocarbon concentration indicated the presence of remote tropospheric air of oceanic origin. At the urban site, HO2 was determined during moderately low ozone pollution levels. At both sites, maximum daily (HO2) was in the range of 1-2 x 10 exp 8/cu cm under clear-sky conditions, with an estimated overall uncertainty of 40 percent. HO2 was detected by continuous low-pressure sampling with flowing chemical conversion to HO, which was detected by laser-excited fluorescence. The instrumental response to HO2 was calibrated by the self-decay of HO2 at atmospheric pressure. Interference in the measured daytime HO2 concentrations by RO2 was estimated at less than 20 percent.

  9. Insights into the photochemical transformation pathways of triclosan and 2'-HO-BDE-28.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-nan; Xie, Qing; Chen, Jingwen; Li, Yingjie; Fu, Zhiqiang

    2015-12-30

    Hydroxylated polyhalogenated diphenyl ethers (HO-PXDEs) have been recognized as a group of widely detected emerging contaminants in natural waters. Photolysis was proved to be an important transformation pathway for these compounds and their direct phototransformation results in highly toxic dioxins. However, the roles of excited states and reactive oxygen species in the photochemical transformation of these compounds are still unclear. In this study, 2'-HO-2,4,4'-trichlorodiphenyl ether (triclosan) and 2'-HO-2,4,4'-tribromodiphenyl ether (2'-HO-BDE-28) were selected as model compounds to investigate their phototransformation processes. Results showed that the direct photolysis reactions of both triclosan and 2'-HO-BDE-28 occurred via their respective excited singlet states, leading to the generation of dioxins. In addition, the energy and electron transfer reactions between excited states of model compounds and molecular O2 can lead to the generation of (1)O2 and OH, which results in self-sensitized photolysis. We also found that both the k, Φ dioxin yield for anionic triclosan were higher than those of anionic 2'-HO-BDE-28. This study revealed the roles of the excited states in direct photolysis and the generation pathway of reactive oxygen species in self-sensitized photolysis of HO-PXDEs, which is important for understanding the phototransformation mechanisms of HO-PXDEs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Quercetin and tin protoporphyrin attenuate hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury: role of HO-1.

    PubMed

    Atef, Yara; El-Fayoumi, Hassan M; Abdel-Mottaleb, Yousra; Mahmoud, Mona F

    2017-06-06

    Ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury occurs in many clinical situations such as organ transplantation and hepatectomies resulting in oxidative stress and immune activation. Heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) is the rate-limiting step in the heme-degradation pathway and has a critical cytoprotective role. Induction of HO-1 improves liver I/R injury. Quercetin, a plant pigment (flavonoid), is an antioxidant and HO-1 inducer. Tin protoporphyrin (SnPP) is a HO-1 inhibitor. This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of quercetin in hepatic I/R injury and the role of HO-1. Wister rats were randomly divided into four groups (sham, I/R, quercetin, and SnPP). Liver ischemia was induced for 45 min then reperfusion was allowed for 1 h. Quercetin and surprisingly SnPP ameliorate the deleterious effect of I/R by reducing the oxidative stress and hepatocyte degeneration. Both agents decreased the elevated inflammatory cytokines and improved the inhibition of the antiapoptotic marker, Bcl2. They induced HO-1 content and expression. Quercetin has better cytoprotective effect than SnPP. These findings suggest that quercetin has a hepatoprotective effect against I/R injury via HO-1 induction and unexpectedly, SnPP showed the similar effect. Quercetin has more prominent protective effect than SnPP because of its superior ability to induce HO-1.

  11. Telegram from Ho Chi Minh to Harry S. Truman. Teaching with Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann; Schamel, Wynell

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on a telegram sent from Hanoi, Vietnam, by Ho Chi Minh through the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) station in Kunming, China, to President Truman in which Ho asked for support of Vietnam's independence from France. Provides background information, a reproduction of the telegram, and ideas for teaching activities. (CMK)

  12. Transformation of MT Resistivity Sections into Geologically Meaningful Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. K.

    2004-05-01

    Earthscope offers an unprecedented opportunity for interdisciplinary studies of North America. In addition to a continent-wide seismic study, it includes the acquisition of magnetotelluric (MT) data at many of the Bigfoot array sites. Earthscope will thus provide a uniform 3-D MT survey over regional scales when completed. MT interpreters will be able to include 3-D regional effects in their models for the first time whether they are interpreting local studies. However, the full value of the interdisciplinary nature of Earthscope will be realized only if MT sections and maps are useful to other earth scientists. The standard final product from any 2-D or 3-D MT interpretation is a spatial distribution of electrical resistivity. Inference of the physicochemical state from bulk resistivity is complicated because a variety of factors influence the property including temperature, intrinsic conduction of silicates, and small amounts of interconnected conducting materials (e.g., graphite, metallic minerals, partial melt, fluid). Here, I use petrophysical measurements and a petrological model to transform a resistivity section into cross sections of temperature and partial melt fraction in the mantle beneath the Sierra Nevada. In this manner, I am able to separate the contributions of increasing temperature and melt fraction to the bulk resistivity. Predicted melt fractions match observations from xenoliths relatively well but temperatures are systematically 200C higher than those observed. A small amount of dissolved hydrogen (~70 ppm H/Si) lowers the predicted temperatures to match those from the xenoliths, however. I conclude that while this transformation is a simple first step based on many assumptions, initial results are promising.

  13. Moisture Sources for Snowfall to Mt. Logan, Yukon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupper, S. R.; Steig, E. J.

    2002-05-01

    Accumulation and isotopic data from an ice core obtained at Mt. Logan, Yukon Territory (Holdsworth et al, 1992) are used to determine possible sources of precipitation at the site, an important prerequisite to the use of Mt. Logan data as quantitative measures of past North Pacific climate variability. Annual accumulation at Logan is poorly correlated with Gulf of Alaska sea level pressure (SLP), but well correlated with Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies. The latter correlation forms a horseshoe pattern of warmer than average SSTs in the eastern North Pacific around colder than average SSTs in the central Pacific similar to the dominant EOF of SSTs (the Pacific Decadal Oscillation). Back-trajectory calculations show that most air reaching Mt. Logan follows a high-altitude pathway along the upper limb of the horseshoe pattern from the western Pacific. However, further analyses suggest that the moisture source changes according to the strength of the Aleutian Low. Mean SSTs are highest along the west coast of North America and lowest in the central North Pacific and Japan during years when the Aleutian Low is strong. During weak Aleutian Low years, accumulation is most highly correlated with SSTs around Japan and the Philippines (r ~ 0.5), while when the Aleutian Low is strong, it is most highly correlated with SSTs along the west coast of North America and the northern most part of the Pacific (r ~ 0.7). Finally, \\delta18O ratios at Mt. Logan are negatively correlated with sea level pressure (SLP) anomalies in the Gulf of Alaska (r ~ -0.4). Together, these results suggest that during years in which the Aleutian Low is weak, the west and central Pacific are the moisture sources for Mt. Logan while advection of local moisture dominates precipitation when the Aleutian Low is strong.

  14. New geophysical views of Mt.Melbourne Volcano (East Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armadillo, E.; Gambetta, M.; Ferraccioli, F.; Corr, H.; Bozzo, E.

    2009-05-01

    Mt. Melbourne volcano is located along the transition between the Transantarctic Mountains and the West Antarctic Rift System. Recent volcanic activity is suggested by the occurrence of blankets of pyroclastic pumice and scoria fall around the eastern and southern flanks of Mt Melbourne and by pyroclastic layers interbedded with the summit snows. Geothermal activity in the crater area of Mount Melbourne may be linked to the intrusion of dykes within the last 200 years. Geophysical networks suggest that Mount Melbourne is a quiescent volcano, possibly characterised by slow internal dynamics. During the 2002-2003 Italian Antarctic campaign a high-resolution aeromagnetic survey was performed within the TIMM (Tectonics and Interior of Mt. Melbourne area) project. This helicopter-borne survey was flown at low-altitude and in drape-mode configuration (305 m above terrain) with a line separation less than 500 m. Our new high-resolution magnetic maps reveal the largely ice-covered magmatic and tectonic patters in the Mt. Melbourne volcano area. Additionally, in the frame of the UK-Italian ISODYN-WISE project (2005-06), an airborne ice-sounding radar survey was flown. We combine the sub-ice topography with images and models of the interior of Mt. Melbourne volcano, as derived from the high resolution aeromagnetic data and land gravity data. Our new geophysical maps and models also provide a new tool to study the regional setting of the volcano. In particular we re-assess whether there is geophysical evidence for coupling between strike-slip faulting, the Terror Rift, and Mount Melbourne volcano.

  15. Peroxone chemistry: Formation of H2O3 and ring-(HO2)(HO3) from O3/H2O2

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Goddard, William A.

    2002-01-01

    The recent observation [Wentworth, P., Jones, L. H., Wentworth, A. D., Zhu, X. Y., Larsen, N. A., Wilson, I. A., Xu, X., Goddard, W. A., Janda, K. D., Eschenmoser, A. & Lerner, R. A. (2001) Science 293, 1806–1811] that antibodies form H2O2 from 1O2 plus H2O was explained in terms of the formation of the H2O3 species that in the antibody reacts with a second H2O3 to form H2O2. There have been few reports of the chemistry for forming H2O3, but recently Engdahl and Nelander [Engdahl, A. & Nelander, B. (2002) Science 295, 482–483] reported that photolysis of the ozone–hydrogen peroxide complex in argon matrices leads to significant concentrations of H2O3. We report here the chemical mechanism for this process, determined by using first-principles quantum mechanics. We show that in an argon matrix it is favorable (3.5 kcal/mol barrier) for H2O2 and O3 to form a [(HO2)(HO3)] hydrogen-bonded complex [head-to-tail seven-membered ring (7r)]. In this complex, the barrier for forming H2O3 plus 3O2 is only 4.8 kcal/mol, which should be observable by means of thermal processes (not yet reported). Irradiation of the [(HO2)(HO3)-7r] complex should break the HO–OO bond of the HO3 moiety, eliminating 3O2 and leading to [(HO2)(HO)]. This [(HO2)(HO)] confined in the matrix cage is expected to rearrange to also form H2O3 (observed experimentally). We show that these two processes can be distinguished isotopically. These results (including the predicted vibrational frequencies) suggest strategies for synthesizing H2O3 and characterizing its chemistry. We suggest that the [(HO2)(HO3)-7r] complex and H2O3 are involved in biological, atmospheric, and environmental oxidative processes. PMID:12438699

  16. tBHQ-induced HO-1 expression is mediated by calcium through regulation of Nrf2 binding to enhancer and polymerase II to promoter region of HO-1.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ka Lung; Yu, Siwang; Pan, Zui; Ma, Jianjie; Wu, Tien Yuan; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2011-05-16

    Induction of Nrf2-mediated detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes is an effective strategy for cancer chemoprevention. The goal of this study was to examine the role of calcium [Ca(2+)] in regulating a well-known phenolic chemopreventive compound tertiary-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) activation of Nrf2 and induction of Nrf2 downstream target gene heme-oxygenase (HO-1). tBHQ alone caused Nrf2 nuclear localization and induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression in a dose-dependent manner. Using RT-PCR and Western blotting, we showed that tBHQ-induced transcription of HO-1 is Ca(2+)-dependent. Chelation of [Ca(2+)](ext) or [Ca(2+)](intra) by EGTA or BAPTA attenuated tBHQ-induced HO-1. Cotreatment of tBHQ with inhibitors of [Ca(2+)]-sensitive protein kinase C and camodulin kinase did not attenuate HO-1 induction. Nuclear translocation of Nrf2 induced by tBHQ was also not affected by treatment of EGTA or BAPTA. Additionally, EGTA and BAPTA treatments decreased basal nuclear phosphorylation of CREB and decreased tBHQ-induced Nrf2-CBP binding and Nrf2 binding to enhancer as well as polymerase II binding to the promoter of HO-1 gene. Furthermore, tBHQ in combination with higher [Ca(2+)](ext) augmented HO-1 induction both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that the modulation of [Ca(2+)](int) could be used as an adjuvant to increase the efficacy of chemopreventive agents. Taken together, our results indicated that in addition to tBHQ-induced oxidative stress-mediated Nrf2 translocation, HO-1 induction by tBHQ also appears to be dependent on a series of Ca(2+)-regulated mechanisms.

  17. Radical scavenging activity of antioxidants evaluated by means of electrogenerated HO radical.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Raquel; Geraldo, Dulce; Bento, Fátima

    2014-11-01

    A method is proposed and tested concerning the characterization of antioxidants by means of their reaction with electrogenerated HO radicals in galvanostatic assays with simultaneous O2 evolution, using a Pt anode fairly oxidized. The consumption of a set of species with antioxidant activity, ascorbic acid (AA), caffeic acid (CA), gallic acid (GA) and trolox (T), is described by a first order kinetics. The rate of the processes is limited by the kinetics of reaction with HO radicals and by the kinetics of charge transfer. Information regarding the scavenger activity of antioxidants is obtained by the relative value of the rate constant of the reaction between antioxidants and HO radicals, k(AO,HO)/k(O2). The number of HO radicals scavenged per molecule of antioxidant is also estimated and ranged from 260 (ascorbic acid) to 500 (gallic acid). The method is applied successfully in the characterization of the scavenger activity of ascorbic acid in a green-tea based beverage.

  18. Theoretical study of reactions of HO{sub 2} in low-temperature oxidation of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z.; Kennedy, Eric M.; Mackie, John C.

    2010-07-15

    We have generated a set of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for the reactions involving HO{sub 2} in the very early stages of benzene oxidation at low temperatures using density functional theory (DFT). In particular, we report the rate constants for the reactions of HO{sub 2} with benzene and phenyl. The calculated reaction rate constant for the abstraction of H-C{sub 6}H{sub 5} by HO{sub 2} is found to be in good agreement with the limited experimental values. HO{sub 2} addition to benzene is found to be more important than direct abstraction. We show that the reactions of HO{sub 2} with the phenyl radical generate the propagating radical OH in a highly exoergic reaction. The results presented herein should be useful in modeling the oxidation of aromatic compounds at low temperatures. (author)

  19. Magnetic properties of Ho1- x Lu x B12 solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabáni, S.; Gaz̆o, E.; Pristás̆, G.; Takác̆ová, I.; Flachbart, K.; Shitsevalova, N.; Siemensmeyer, K.; Sluchanko, N.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic properties of the geometrically frustrated antiferromagnet HoB12 (with T N = 7.4 K) modified by substitution of magnetic Ho atoms through non-magnetic Lu ones are presented and discussed. In this case, in Ho1- x Lu x B12 solid solutions, both chemical pressure resulting from different Lu3+ and Ho3+ radii and magnetic dilution take place with increasing Lu content ( x) that change properties of the system. The received results show strong indication for the existence of a quantum critical point near x = 0.9, which separates the region of magnetic order (starting with HoB12 for x = 0) and the nonmagnetic region (ending with superconducting LuB12 for x = 1).

  20. Microcalorimetric studies of the biological effects of Ho(III) on Halobacterium halobium R1.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liu; Yi, Liu; Xi, Li; Ping, Shen

    2008-04-01

    The biological effect of Ho3+ on Halobacterium halobium R1 growth was analyzed using the microcalorimetric method. Using the LKB-2277 Bioactivity Monitor with the ampoule method at 37 degrees C, the thermogenic curves of the growth of H. halobium R1 were obtained. Then, the maximum power (P (m)) and the growth rate constants (k) were determined, and the values of P (m) and k were linked to the concentration of Ho3+. In all, the addition of Ho3+ cause a decrease in the maximum heat production and growth rate constants. To confirm the results, the shapes of H. halobium R1 cell addition with Ho3+ using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) were observed. According to the thermogenic curves and TEM photos of H. halobium R1 under different conditions, it is clear that the metabolic mechanism of H. halobium R1 growth has been changed with the addition of Ho3+.

  1. HO-1 Induction in Cancer Progression: A Matter of Cell Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Nitti, Mariapaola; Piras, Sabrina; Marinari, Umberto M; Moretta, Lorenzo; Pronzato, Maria A; Furfaro, Anna Lisa

    2017-05-05

    The upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is one of the most important mechanisms of cell adaptation to stress. Indeed, the redox sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 is the pivotal regulator of HO-1 induction. Through the antioxidant, antiapoptotic, and antinflammatory properties of its metabolic products, HO-1 plays a key role in healthy cells in maintaining redox homeostasis and in preventing carcinogenesis. Nevertheless, several lines of evidence have highlighted the role of HO-1 in cancer progression and its expression correlates with tumor growth, aggressiveness, metastatic and angiogenetic potential, resistance to therapy, tumor escape, and poor prognosis, even though a tumor- and tissue-specific activity has been observed. In this review, we summarize the current literature regarding the pro-tumorigenic role of HO-1 dependent tumor progression as a promising target in anticancer strategy.

  2. Kinetic and Thermochemical Studies of Weakly-Bound HO2 Complexes with Carboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.; Nicovich, J. M.; McKee, M. L.; Wine, P. H.

    2008-12-01

    Numerous theoretical and experimental studies have suggested that HO2 radicals are able to form strong hydrogen bonds with some closed-shell species, which can potentially influence our understanding of HO2 chemistry in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. In this study, a laser flash photolysis-tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy technique has been employed to study the formation of HO2 complexes with formic and acetic acids. At low temperatures, equilibration kinetics have been observed, allowing adduct formation and dissociation rate coefficients to be obtained and adduct binding enthalpies to be determined. This is the first experimental study of the HO2-carboxylic acid complexes and the binding energies are in good agreement with the most recent theoretical estimates. The potential role of HO2-RC(O)OH adducts in atmospheric chemistry will be discussed.

  3. Ramelteon, a selective MT1/MT2 receptor agonist, suppresses the proliferation and invasiveness of endometrial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Osanai, Kiyono; Kobayashi, Yoichi; Otsu, Masahiro; Izawa, Tomoko; Sakai, Keiji; Iwashita, Mitsutoshi

    2017-07-01

    The incidence of endometrial cancer is increasing, making it the fifth most common cancer worldwide. To date, however, there is no standard therapy for patients with recurrent endometrial cancer. Melatonin, a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, has been shown to have anti-tumor effects in various tumor types. Although melatonin is available as a supplement, it has not been approved for cancer treatment. Ramelteon, a selective melatonin receptor type 1 and 2 (MT1/MT2) receptor agonist, has been approved to treat sleep disorders, suggesting that ramelteon may be effective in the treatment of endometrial cancer. To determine whether this agent may be effective in the treatment of endometrial cancer, this study investigated the ability of ramelteon to suppress the proliferation and invasiveness of HHUA cells, an estrogen receptor-positive endometrial cancer cell line. Ramelteon at 10(-8) M maximally suppressed the proliferation of HHUA cells, reducing the percentage of Ki-67 positive proliferating cells. This effect was completely blocked by luzindole, a MT1/MT2 receptor antagonist. Furthermore, ramelteon inhibited HHUA cell invasion and reduced the expression of the MMP-2 and MMP-9 genes. These results suggested that ramelteon may be a candidate for the treatment of recurrent endometrial cancer, with activity similar to that of melatonin.

  4. Decay spectroscopy of element 115 daughters: Rg280→Mt276 and Mt276→Bh272

    DOE PAGES

    Gates, J. M.; Gregorich, K. E.; Gothe, O. R.; ...

    2015-08-03

    In this study, forty-six decay chains, assigned to the decay of 288115, were produced using the 243Am (48Ca, 3n) 288115 reaction at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-in. cyclotron. The resulting series of α decays were studied using α-photon and α-x-ray spectroscopies. Multiple α-photon coincidences were observed in the element 115 decay chain members, particularly in the third- and fourth-generation decays (presumed to be 280Rg and 276Mt, respectively). Upon combining these data with those from 22 288115 decay chains observed in a similar experiment, updated level schemes in 276Mt and 272Bh (populated by the α decay of 280Rg and 276Mt,more » respectively) are proposed. Additionally, photons were observed in the energy range expected for K x rays coincident with the α decay of both 280Rg and 276Mt. However, Compton scattering of higher-energy γ rays and discrete transitions are present in the K x-ray region preventing a definitive Z identification to be made based on observation of characteristic K x-ray energies.« less

  5. The mixmaster universe in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakas, Ioannis; Bourliot, Francois; Lüst, Dieter; Petropoulos, Marios

    2010-02-01

    We consider spatially homogeneous (but generally non-isotropic) cosmologies in the recently proposed Hořava-Lifshitz gravity and compare them to those of general relativity using Hamiltonian methods. In all cases, the problem is described by an effective point particle moving in a potential well with exponentially steep walls. Focusing on the closed-space cosmological model (Bianchi type IX), the mixmaster dynamics is now completely dominated by the quadratic Cotton tensor potential term for a very small volume of the universe. Unlike general relativity, where the evolution toward the initial singularity always exhibits chaotic behavior with alternating Kasner epochs, the anisotropic universe in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity (with parameter λ > 1/3) is described by a particle moving in a frozen potential well with fixed (but arbitrary) energy E. Alternating Kasner epochs still provide a good description of the early universe for very large E, but the evolution appears to be non-ergodic. For very small E there are harmonic oscillations around the fully isotropic model. The question of chaos remains open for intermediate energy levels.

  6. Containment-enhanced Ho:YAG photofragmentation of soft tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christens-Barry, William A.; Guarnieri, Michael; Carson, Benjamin S.

    1998-01-01

    Laser surgery of soft tissue can exploit the power of brief, intense pulses of light to cause localized disruption of tissue with minimal effect upon surrounding tissue. In particular, studies of Ho:YAG laser surgery have shown that the effects of cavitation upon tissues and bone depend upon the physical composition of structures in the vicinity of the surgical site. For photofragmentation of occluding structures within catheters and other implant devices, it is possible to exploit the particular geometry of the catheter to amplify the effects of photofragmentation beyond those seen in bulk tissue. A Ho:YAG laser was used to photofragment occlusive material (tissue and tissue analogs) contained in glass capillary tubing and catheter tubing of the kind used in ventricular shunt implants for the management of hydrocephalus. Occluded catheters obtained from patient explants were also employed. Selection of operational parameters used in photoablation and photofragmentation of soft tissue must consider the physical composition and geometry of the treatment site. In the present case, containment of the soft tissue within relatively inelastic catheters dramatically alters the extent of photofragmentation relative to bulk (unconstrained) material. Our results indicate that the disruptive effect of cavitation bubbles is increased in catheters, due to the rapid displacement of material by cavitation bubbles comparable in size to the inner diameter of the catheter. The cylindrical geometry of the catheter lumen may additionally influence the propagation of acoustic shock waves that result from the collapse of the condensing cavitation bubbles.

  7. Itinerant and localized magnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetic Ho

    DOE PAGES

    Rettig, L.; Dornes, C.; Thielemann-Kuhn, N.; ...

    2016-06-21

    Using femtosecond time-resolved resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction at the Ho L3 absorption edge, we investigate the demagnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetically ordered metallic Ho after femtosecond optical excitation. Here, tuning the x-ray energy to the electric dipole (E1, 2p → 5d) or quadrupole (E2, 2p → 4f) transition allows us to selectively and independently study the spin dynamics of the itinerant 5d and localized 4f electronic subsystems via the suppression of the magnetic (2 1 3–τ) satellite peak. We find demagnetization time scales very similar to ferromagnetic 4f systems, suggesting that the loss of magnetic order occurs via a similar spin-flipmore » process in both cases. The simultaneous demagnetization of both subsystems demonstrates strong intra-atomic 4f–5d exchange coupling. In addition, an ultrafast lattice contraction due to the release of magneto-striction leads to a transient shift of the magnetic satellite peak.« less

  8. Minimally invasive scoliosis treatment with a Ho:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, Christian G.; Lang, Robert D.; Goetz, Marcus H.

    2000-11-01

    Today most surgical treatment of spinal deformations is concentrated on invasive mechanical techniques with long operation times and major effects on the patient's mobility. The proposed minimally invasive technique using laser light for tissue ablation offers a possibility of gentle scoliosis treatment. It is thought that an early removal of the epiphysial growth zone on the convex side over several vertebrae results in a straightening of the spine. In a first evaluation, four different laser systems including argon ion, Nd:YAG (Q-switched), Nd:YAG (cw), and Ho:YAG laser were compared with respect to thermal damage to adjacent tissue, ablation rates, efficiency and laser handling. For in-vivo investigation, fresh lamb spine was used. Comparison showed that the Ho:YAG laser is the most appropriate laser for the given goal, providing efficient photoablation with moderate thermal effects on the adjacent tissue. In a second step the proposed minimally invasive operation technique was performed in in-vivo experiments on young foxhounds using 3D- thoracoscopic operation techniques. During these operations temperature mapping was done using fiber-optic fluorescent probes. After 12 months of normal growth the animals were sacrificed and x-ray as well as MRI was performed on the spine. First results show a positive effect of scoliotic growth in two cases. Being able to produce a scoliosis by hemiepiphysiodesis on the vertebra, It is thought that this technique is successful for a straightening of the spine on patients with scoliosis.

  9. Structure evolution of HoMnO3 under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Dera, P. K.; Yang, W.; Liu, H.

    2012-12-01

    Hexagonal manganites belong to a special group called ferroelectromagnets, in which frustrated antiferromagnetic and ferroelectric orders coexist. These materials attract much attention for the potential applications on transducers, magnetic field sensors, as well as the information storage industry. Hexagonal manganites can be converted to orthorhombic structure at 1000 °C, 4 GPa conditions. The transition can also be realized under high pressure at room temperature, as observed in TmMnO3, YMnO3, LuMnO3, etc. The structure stability of hexagonal manganites is therefore of both fundamental and applied interests. In this paper, X-ray diffraction was performed on HoMnO3 single crystal under pressure up to 43 GPa by using helium as pressure medium. At 35.6 GPa, HoMnO3 converts to another hexagonal phase, whose lattice parameter along c axis reduces to half. The P-V data can be well fitted by 3-order Birch-Murnaghan equation with K0 = 154 GPa and K0' = 4.6.

  10. Kinetics of the gas phase reaction CH3 + HO2.

    PubMed

    Sangwan, Manuvesh; Krasnoperov, Lev N

    2013-04-11

    Reaction of methyl radicals with hydroperoxy radicals, CH3 + HO2 → products (1) was studied using pulsed laser photolysis coupled to transient UV-vis absorption spectroscopy at 295 K and 1 bar (He). Photolysis of N2O/H2O2/CH4/H2O/He mixtures at 193.3 nm (ArF excimer laser) was used to simultaneously produce methyl radicals and hydroperoxy radicals in reactions of electronically excited oxygen atoms O((1)D) with CH4 and OH radicals with H2O2, respectively. Temporal profiles of CH3 and HO2 were recorded via absorption at 216.4 and 224 nm. The absolute intensity of the photolysis light inside the reactor was determined by an accurate in situ actinometry based on the ozone formation in the presence of molecular oxygen. The measured rate constant of reaction 1 is k1 = (3.7 ± 1.8 × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) (295 K, 1 bar, He).

  11. Itinerant and localized magnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetic Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Rettig, L.; Dornes, C.; Thielemann-Kuhn, N.; Pontius, N.; Zabel, H.; Schlagel, D. L.; Lograsso, T. A.; Chollet, M.; Robert, A.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Glownia, J. M.; SchuBler-Langeheine, C.; Johnson, S. L.; Staub, U.

    2016-06-21

    Using femtosecond time-resolved resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction at the Ho L3 absorption edge, we investigate the demagnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetically ordered metallic Ho after femtosecond optical excitation. Here, tuning the x-ray energy to the electric dipole (E1, 2p → 5d) or quadrupole (E2, 2p → 4f) transition allows us to selectively and independently study the spin dynamics of the itinerant 5d and localized 4f electronic subsystems via the suppression of the magnetic (2 1 3–τ) satellite peak. We find demagnetization time scales very similar to ferromagnetic 4f systems, suggesting that the loss of magnetic order occurs via a similar spin-flip process in both cases. The simultaneous demagnetization of both subsystems demonstrates strong intra-atomic 4f–5d exchange coupling. In addition, an ultrafast lattice contraction due to the release of magneto-striction leads to a transient shift of the magnetic satellite peak.

  12. Black strings in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Alikram N.; Şentürk, Çetin

    2011-08-01

    We examine a class of cylindrically symmetric solutions in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity. For the relativistic value of the coupling constant, λ=1, we find the hedgehog-type static black string solution with the nonvanishing radial shift in the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner-type decomposition of the spacetime metric. With zero radial shift, this solution corresponds to the usual Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black string in general relativity. However, unlike the general relativity case, the BTZ-type black strings do naturally exist in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity, without the need for any specific source term. We also find a rotating BTZ-type black string solution which requires the nonvanishing radial shift for its very existence. We calculate the mass and the angular momentum of this solution, using the canonical Hamiltonian approach. Next, we discuss the Lemos-type black string, which is inherent in general relativity with a negative cosmological constant, and present the static metric for any value of λ>1/3. Finally, we show that while, for λ=1, the entropy of the Lemos-type black string is given by one quarter of the horizon area, the entropy of the static BTZ-type black string is one half of its horizon area.

  13. Gravitational collapse in Hořava-Lifshitz theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Jared; Lenells, Jonatan; Satheeshkumar, V. H.; Wang, Anzhong

    2013-07-01

    We study gravitational collapse of a spherical fluid in nonrelativistic general covariant theory of the Hořava-Lifshitz gravity with the projectability condition and an arbitrary coupling constant λ, where |λ-1| characterizes the deviation of the theory from general relativity in the infrared limit. The junction conditions across the surface of a collapsing star are derived under the (minimal) assumption that the junctions be mathematically meaningful in terms of distribution theory. When the collapsing star is made of a homogeneous and isotropic perfect fluid, and the external region is described by a stationary spacetime, the problem reduces to the matching of six independent conditions. If the perfect fluid is pressureless (a dust fluid), it is found that the matching is also possible. In particular, in the case λ=1, the external spacetime is described by the Sch-(anti-)de Sitter solution written in Painlevé-Gullstrand coordinates. In the case λ≠1, the external spacetime is static but not asymptotically flat. Our treatment can be easily generalized to other versions of Hořava-Lifshitz gravity or, more generally, to any theory of higher-order derivative gravity.

  14. Itinerant and localized magnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetic Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Rettig, L.; Dornes, C.; Thielemann-Kuhn, N.; Pontius, N.; Zabel, H.; Schlagel, D. L.; Lograsso, T. A.; Chollet, M.; Robert, A.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Glownia, J. M.; SchuBler-Langeheine, C.; Johnson, S. L.; Staub, U.

    2016-06-21

    Using femtosecond time-resolved resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction at the Ho L3 absorption edge, we investigate the demagnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetically ordered metallic Ho after femtosecond optical excitation. Here, tuning the x-ray energy to the electric dipole (E1, 2p → 5d) or quadrupole (E2, 2p → 4f) transition allows us to selectively and independently study the spin dynamics of the itinerant 5d and localized 4f electronic subsystems via the suppression of the magnetic (2 1 3–τ) satellite peak. We find demagnetization time scales very similar to ferromagnetic 4f systems, suggesting that the loss of magnetic order occurs via a similar spin-flip process in both cases. The simultaneous demagnetization of both subsystems demonstrates strong intra-atomic 4f–5d exchange coupling. In addition, an ultrafast lattice contraction due to the release of magneto-striction leads to a transient shift of the magnetic satellite peak.

  15. Energy transfer and lasing in LiYbF4:Ho, LiYbF4:Ho,Tm, and KYb(WO4)3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandulenko, Alexander V.; Sandulenko, V. A.; Tkachuk, Alexandra M.; Titov, Alexandre N.; Reiterov, V. M.; Ivanov, V. N.

    1998-12-01

    We have studied both theoretically and experimentally the energy transfer processes in YbLiF4:Ho3+ (0.4%) and YbLiF4:Ho3+ (0.4%),Tm3+ (10%) crystals and in the series of crystals KYb(WO4)2:Tm3+,Ho3+ (0.4%) with the thulium concentration 5; 10; and 20%. The population kinetics of the 5I7 holmium level was studied under the 1.047 micrometers Q-switched YLF:Nd3+ laser pumping. The efficiency of energy transfer processes in Ho3+ doped crystals, codoped with Yb3+ and Tm3+, was demonstrated. With an YbLiF4:Ho3+ (0.4%) laser rod we have obtained lasing at 2.06 micrometers with the total efficiency of 4.8% and the slope efficiency of 11%. In the KYb(WO4)2:Tm3+ (10%),Ho3+ (0.4%) crystal, lasing was obtained for the first time at 2 micrometers . The pumping threshold being approximately 150 mJ, total efficiency 6% and slope efficiency 9.7% was achieved.

  16. Induction of heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) does not enhance adiponectin production in human adipocytes: Evidence against a direct HO-1 - Adiponectin axis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mengliu; Kimura, Masaki; Ng, Choaping; He, Jingjing; Keshvari, Sahar; Rose, Felicity J; Barclay, Johanna L; Whitehead, Jonathan P

    2015-09-15

    Adiponectin is a salutary adipokine and hypoadiponectinemia is implicated in the aetiology of obesity-related inflammation and cardiometabolic disease making therapeutic strategies to increase adiponectin attractive. Emerging evidence, predominantly from preclinical studies, suggests induction of heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) increases adiponectin production and reduces inflammatory tone. Here, we aimed to test whether induction of HO-1 enhanced adiponectin production from mature adipocytes. Treatment of human adipocytes with cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) or hemin for 24-48 h increased HO-1 expression and activity without affecting adiponectin expression and secretion. Treatment of adipocytes with TNFα reduced adiponectin secretion and increased expression and secretion of additional pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and MCP-1, as well as expression of sXBP-1, a marker of ER stress. HO-1 induction failed to reverse these effects. These results demonstrate that induction of HO-1 does not directly enhance adiponectin production or ameliorate the pro-inflammatory effects of TNFα and argue against a direct HO-1 - adiponectin axis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. ZmHO-1, a maize haem oxygenase-1 gene, plays a role in determining lateral root development.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Xu, Sheng; Xie, Yan-Jie; Huang, Jing-Jing; Wang, Li-Juan; Yang, Zheng; Zhang, Chang-He; Sun, Ya; Shen, Wen-Biao; Xie, Gui-Shui

    2012-03-01

    Previous results revealed that haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1)/carbon monoxide (CO) system is involved in auxin-induced adventitious root formation. In this report, a cDNA for the gene ZmHO-1, encoding an HO-1 protein, was cloned from Zea mays seedlings. ZmHO-1 has a conserved HO signature sequence and shares highest homology with rice SE5 (OsHO-1) protein. We further discovered that N-1-naphthylacetic acid (NAA), haemin, and CO aqueous solution, led to the induction of ZmHO-1 expression as well as the thereafter promotion of lateral root development. These effects were specific for ZmHO-1 since the potent HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX) differentially blocked the above actions. The addition of haemin and CO were able to reverse the auxin depletion-triggered inhibition of lateral root formation as well as the decreased ZmHO-1 transcripts. Molecular evidence showed that the haemin- or CO-mediated the modulation of target genes responsible for lateral root formation, including ZmCDK and ZmCKI2, could be blocked by ZnPPIX. Overexpression of ZmHO-1 in transgenic Arabidopsis plants resulted in promotion of lateral root development as well as the modulation of cell cycle regulatory gene expressions. Overall, our results suggested that a maize HO-1 gene is required for the lateral root formation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Magnetic properties of Ni and Cu-Ni nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganga, B. G.; Santhosh, P. N.; Thomas, P. John

    2012-06-01

    Ni and Cu-Ni nanoparticles were prepared by solution phase method and crystal phase was identified by XRD. SEM and EDX were used to analyze morphology and elemental composition of nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements indicate that Ni nanoparticles are superparamagnetic at room temperature and blocking temperature is around 103 K. Ferromagnetism is observed in the case of Cu-Ni nanoparticles with decrease in magnetization compared to Ni nanoparticles.

  19. Kinetics of hydroperoxy radical reactions with acetone/HO2 adduct and with acetonylperoxy radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieman, F. J.; VanDerGeest, K.; Newenhouse, E.; Watkins, K.; Noell, A. C.; Hui, A.; Sander, S. P.; Okumura, M.

    2013-12-01

    Reactions of hydroperoxy radical, HO2, with acetone and with acetonylperoxy radical, CH3C(O)CH2OO, may play an important role in the oxidation chemistry of the troposphere. Using a temperature-controlled slow-flow tube cell and laser flash photolysis of Cl2 to produce HO2 and CH3C(O)CH2OO from methanol and acetone, respectively, we studied the chemical kinetics involved over the temperature range of 215 to 298 K at 100 Torr. Rates of chemical reactions were determined by monitoring the HO2 concentration as a function of time by near-IR diode laser wavelength modulation spectroscopy. (See Fig.1.) The primary reactions are rapid (<100 μsec) reactions to form the adducts HO2-CH3OH and HO2-CH3C(O)CH3 followed by HO2 reactions with itself, the adducts (chaperone mechanisms), and acetonylperoxy radical. The equilibrium constants for adduct formation were determined in previous work.1,2 In this work, rate coefficients were determined for the acetone chaperone mechanism over the entire temperature range. (E.g., see Fig. 2.) The rate coefficients and energies obtained are very similar to those found for the methanol case.1 Rate coefficients for the CH3C(O)CH2OO/HO2 reaction were also determined over a smaller temperature range, extending the measured value beyond room temperature, and yielding an activation energy. 1. Christensen et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2006, 110, 6948-6959. 2. Grieman et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2011, 115, 10527-10538. Fig.1. HO2 decay for HO2/Acetone chemistry at T = 298 K. Fig.2. Determining rate coefficient (k") for HO2/acetone chaperone effect at T = 222.5 K.

  20. Baicalein protects rat insulinoma INS-1 cells from palmitate-induced lipotoxicity by inducing HO-1.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hyun Jeong; Yang, Dongki; Hwang, Yongha; Jun, Hee-Sook; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong

    2017-01-01

    β-Cell dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D), and the identification of novel approaches to improve β-cell function is essential to treat this disease. Baicalein, a flavonoid originally isolated from the root of Scutellaria Baicalensis, has been shown to have beneficial effects on β-cell function. Here, the authors investigated the molecular mechanism responsible for the protective effects of baicalein against palmitate (PA)-induced impaired β-cell function, and placed focus on the role of heme oxygenase (HO)-1. Rat pancreatic β-cell line INS-1 cells or mouse pancreatic islets were cultured with PA (500 μM) to induce lipotoxicity in the presence or absence of baicalein (50 μM), and the expressions of the ER stress markers, ATF-3, CHOP and GRP78 were detected by Western blotting and/or qPCR. The involvement of HO-1 was evaluated by HO-1 siRNA transfection and using the HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP. Baicalein reduced PA-induced ER stress and inflammation and enhanced insulin secretion, and these effects were associated with the induction of HO-1. Furthermore, these protective effects were attenuated by ZnPP and by HO-1 siRNA. Pretreatment of PD98059 (an ERK inhibitor) significantly inhibited the protective effects of baicalein and blocked HO-1 induction. On the other hand, CO production by RuCO (a CO donor) ameliorated PA-induced ER stress, suggesting that CO production followed by HO-1 induction may contribute to the protective effects of baicalein against PA-induced β-cell dysfunction. Baicalein protects pancreatic β-cells from PA-induced ER stress and inflammation via an ERK-HO-1 dependent pathway. The authors suggest HO-1 induction in pancreatic β-cells appears to be a promising therapeutic strategy for T2D.

  1. Analysis of BRCA1 and mtDNA haplotypes and mtDNA polymorphism in familial breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Povedano, Cristina; Salgado, Josefa; Gil, Carmen; Robles, Maitane; Patiño-García, Ana; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects have been postulated to play an important role in the modulation and/or progression of cancer. In the past decade, a wide spectrum of mtDNA variations have been suggested as potentially sensitive and specific biomarkers for several human cancer types. In this context, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) described as protective or risk variants have been published, in particular in breast cancer, though not without controversy. Moreover, many mtDNA haplogroups have been associated with different phenotypes and diseases. We genotyped 18 SNPs, 15 of them defining European mtDNA haplogroups, including SNPs described as protective or risk variants, 7 SNPs that determine BRCA1 haplotypes and a BRCA1 intron 7 polymorphism. We included in this study 90 Caucasian unrelated women with breast cancer with familial criteria and 96 controls. Our aim was to clarify the importance of any of these SNPs, mitochondrial haplogroups and BRCA1 haplotypes in the modulation of breast cancer. We detected no significant differences in the distribution of BRCA1 haplotypes between patients and controls. Haplogroup U and the 12308G variant of mtDNA were overrepresented within the control group (p = 0.005 and p = 0.036, respectively) compared to breast cancer. Finally, we identified a significant association between the BRCA1 intron 7 polymorphism and BRCA1 haplotypes. Specifically, (TTC)6/6 and (TTC)6/7 genotypes with the seven polymorphic site cassette of "H2-like" haplotypes, and the (TTC)7/7 genotype associated with the "H1-like" haplotypes (p < 0.001).

  2. Barley Metallothioneins: MT3 and MT4 Are Localized in the Grain Aleurone Layer and Show Differential Zinc Binding1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hegelund, Josefine Nymark; Schiller, Michaela; Kichey, Thomas; Hansen, Thomas Hesselhøj; Pedas, Pai; Husted, Søren; Schjoerring, Jan Kofod

    2012-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low-molecular-weight, cysteine-rich proteins believed to play a role in cytosolic zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) homeostasis. However, evidence for the functional properties of MTs has been hampered by methodological problems in the isolation and characterization of the proteins. Here, we document that barley (Hordeum vulgare) MT3 and MT4 proteins exist in planta and that they differ in tissue localization as well as in metal coordination chemistry. Combined transcriptional and histological analyses showed temporal and spatial correlations between transcript levels and protein abundance during grain development. MT3 was present in tissues of both maternal and filial origin throughout grain filling. In contrast, MT4 was confined to the embryo and aleurone layer, where it appeared during tissue specialization and remained until maturity. Using state-of-the-art speciation analysis by size-exclusion chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry on recombinant MT3 and MT4, their specificity and capacity for metal ion binding were quantified, showing a strong preferential Zn binding relative to Cu and cadmium (Cd) in MT4, which was not the case for MT3. When complementary DNAs from barley MTs were expressed in Cu- or Cd-sensitive yeast mutants, MT3 provided a much stronger complementation than did MT4. We conclude that MT3 may play a housekeeping role in metal homeostasis, while MT4 may function in Zn storage in developing and mature grains. The localization of MT4 and its discrimination against Cd make it an ideal candidate for future biofortification strategies directed toward increasing food and feed Zn concentrations. PMID:22582132

  3. Legume Resources: MtDB and Medicago.Org.

    PubMed

    Retzel, Ernest F; Johnson, James E; Crow, John A; Lamblin, Anne F; Paule, Charles E

    2007-01-01

    To identify the genes and gene functions that underlie key aspects of legume biology, researchers have selected the cool season legume Medicago truncatula as a model system for legume research. The mission of the M. truncatula Consortium is to promote unrestricted sharing of data and information that are provided by Medicago research groups worldwide. Through integration of a variety of data and tools, the medicago.org site intends to facilitate progress in the fields of structural, comparative, and functional genomics. To this goal, and as a consortium partner, the Center for Computational Genomics and Bioinformatics (CCGB) at the University of Minnesota has developed MtDB2.0, the M. truncatula database version 2.0. The MtDB2.0 database is the first step toward the global integration of M. truncatula genomic, genetic, and biological information. MtDB2.0 is a relational database that integrates M. truncatula transcriptome data and provides a wide range of user-defined data mining options. The database is interrogated through a series of interfaces, with 58 options grouped into two filters. Sequence identifiers from all public M. truncatula sites [e.g., IDs from GenBank, CCGB, The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR), National Center for Genome Resources (NCGR), and I'Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA)] are fully cross-referenced to facilitate comparisons between different sites, and hypertext links to the appropriate database records are provided for all queries' results. MtDB's goal is to provide researchers with the means to quickly and independently identify sequences that match specific research interests based on user-defined criteria. MtDB2.0 offers unrestricted access to advanced and powerful querying tools unmatched by any other public databases. Structurad Query Language (SQL)-encoded queries with a Java-based Web user interface, incorporate different filtering that allow sophisticated data mining of the expressed sequence tag sequencing

  4. Snow Depth Depicted on Mt. Lyell by NASA Airborne Snow Observatory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-05-02

    A natural color image of Mt. Lyell, the highest point in the Tuolumne River Basin top image is compared with a three-dimensional color composite image of Mt. Lyell from NASA Airborne Snow Observatory depicting snow depth bottom image.

  5. Review of magnetic features observed in (A,A')Ni 2B 2C solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznietz, Moshe; Gonçalves, António P.; Almeida, Manuel

    2002-08-01

    The nickel-borocarbides ANi 2B 2C [A=Y, Ln (lanthanide), An(actinide)], crystallizing in the body-centred tetragonal LuNi 2B 2C-type structure, are classified according to the existence or coexistence of superconducting and antiferromagnetic states (AF). The magnetic features observed in polycrystalline (A,A')Ni 2B 2C solid solutions, adopting the same crystal structure, are reviewed and discussed. Published data on the magnetism in (A,Ln)Ni 2B 2C systems (ANi 2B 2C nonmagnetic, A=Y,La,Lu) indicate a gradual rise in the threshold content, x( m), in (Y 1- xLn x)Ni 2B 2C (Ln=Gd,Tb,Dy,Ho,Er) for the establishment of AF states. (A,A')Ni 2B 2C systems with magnetic end compounds show gradual variation in magnetic features when A and A' are both heavy Ln. The behaviour of (A,A')Ni 2B 2C systems of light A (Pr or U) and heavy A' (Dy or Tm) depends on the magnetic structures of the end compounds. In intermediate compositions, incomplete moment compensation in (Pr,Dy)Ni 2B 2C decreases TN, while different moment directions in the end compounds in (U,Dy)Ni 2B 2C lead to a directional frustration of ordered moments. Such a frustration in (U,Tm)Ni 2B 2C is related to different magnetic structures of the end compounds.

  6. Neural HO-1/sterol interactions in vivo: implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hascalovici, J R; Song, W; Liberman, A; Vaya, J; Khatib, S; Holcroft, C; Laferla, F; Schipper, H M

    2014-11-07

    Up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and altered cholesterol (CH) metabolism are characteristic of Alzheimer-diseased (AD) neural tissues. We previously provided evidence of significant HO-1/sterol interactions in vitro (cultured rat astroglia) and in post-mortem human AD brain (Religious Orders Study). The current experiments were designed to further delineate these interactions in vivo by comparing the behavior of HO-1/sterol interactions in two mouse models; (1) a novel HO-1 transgenic mouse (GFAP.HMOX1) engineered to selectively express human HO-1 in the astrocytic compartment and (2) the previously described triple transgenic AD mouse (3xTg-AD). In samples of frontal cortex, total CH, CH precursors and relevant oxysterols were quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and HO-1 protein expression was assessed by ELISA. The relationships of HO-1 expression to total CH, CH precursors and total oxysterols were determined for both mouse models using linear regression analysis. HO-1 expression is increased in GFAP.HMOX1 mice relative to wild type and in 11-12-month-old 3xTg-AD mice (with AD-like phenotype) relative to control mice and 5-6-month-old 3xTg-AD mice (no AD-like phenotype). Total oxysterols significantly decreased as HO-1 expression increased in GFAP.HMOX1 mice expressing high levels of HO-1, whereas total oxysterols increased as HO-1 expression increased in aged 3xTg-AD mice. Total CH and total CH precursors increased as HO-1 protein expression increased in 11-12-month-old 3xTg-AD mice relative to 5-6-month old 3xTg-AD mice. Our findings indicate a differential impact of HO-1 on patterns of brain sterol and redox homeostasis that is contingent on the presence or absence of AD-like neuropathology. These data provide fresh insight concerning the regulation of sterol homeostasis within the aging and degenerating CNS which may inform the development of novel therapeutic and preventive strategies for the management of AD and related

  7. Adjustment of temperature coefficient of resistance in NiCr/CuNi(Mn)/NiCr films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückner, W.; Baunack, St.; Elefant, D.; Reiss, G.

    1996-06-01

    The thin-film system Ni0.37Cr0.63/Cu0.57Ni0.42Mn0.01/Ni0.37Cr0. 63 with a typical thickness of 1 μm is used for low-ohmic precision resistors. The necessary adjustment of the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) by annealing has been studied by investigating the irreversible changes of the resistance during various annealing steps of NiCr/CuNi(Mn)/NiCr multilayers in comparison with single layers of CuNi(Mn) and NiCr. Auger depth profiles showed that the interdiffusion of CuNi(Mn) and NiCr results in an impoverishment of Ni in CuNi(Mn), explaining the TCR shift by comparison with data of Cu1-xNix bulk material. The decrease of the resistivity and the reduction of the width of the copper-nickel conductive layer by formation of a Ni0.6Cr0.2Cu0.2 interdiffusion zone phase (in accordance with the Cu-Ni-Cr phase diagram) cause a significant curvature of the resistance-temperature curve. As main result, it is shown that the NiCr base and cover layers and their interdiffusion with CuNi(Mn) play the decisive role in adjusting the TCR. It was checked that oxidation and topography effects have no remarkable influences.

  8. A systematic computational study on the reactions of HO2 with RO2: The HO2 + CH3O2(CD3O2) and HO2 + CH2FO2 reactions.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hua; Wang, Baoshan

    2005-01-27

    A systematic theoretical study of the reactions of HO2 with RO2 has been carried out. The major concern of the present work is to gain insight into the reaction mechanism and then to explain experimental observations and to predict new product channels for this class of reactions of importance in the atmosphere. In this paper, the reaction mechanisms for two reactions, namely, HO2 + CH3O2 and HO2 + CH2FO2, are reported. Both singlet and triplet potential energy surfaces are investigated. The complexity of the present system makes it impossible to use a single ab initio method to map out all the reaction paths. Various ab initio methods including MP2, CISD, QCISD(T), CCSD(T), CASSCF, and density function theory (B3LYP) have been employed with the basis sets ranging from 6-31G(d) to an extrapolated complete basis set (CBS) limit. It has been established that the CCSD(T)/cc-pVDZ//B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) scheme represents the most feasible method for our systematic study. For the HO2 + CH3O2 reaction, the production of CH3OOH is determined to be the dominant channel. For the HO2 + CH2FO2 reaction, both CH2FOOH and CHFO are major products, whereas the formation of CHFO is dominant in the overall reaction. The computational findings give a fair explanation for the experimental observation of the products.

  9. New melatonin (MT1/MT2) ligands: design and synthesis of (8,9-dihydro-7H-furo[3,2-f]chromen-1-yl) derivatives.

    PubMed

    Landagaray, Elodie; Ettaoussi, Mohamed; Leclerc, Véronique; Traoré, Balla; Perez, Valérie; Nosjean, Olivier; Boutin, Jean A; Caignard, Daniel-Henri; Delagrange, Philippe; Berthelot, Pascal; Yous, Saïd

    2014-02-01

    Herein we describe the synthesis of novel tricyclic analogues issued from the rigidification of the methoxy group of the benzofuranic analogue of melatonin as MT1 and MT2 ligands. Most of the synthesized compounds displayed high binding affinities at MT1 and MT2 receptors subtypes. Compound 6b (MT1, Ki=0.07nM; MT2, Ki=0.08nM) exhibited with the vinyl 6c and allyl 6d the most interesting derivatives of this series. Functional activity of these compounds showed full agonist activity with EC50 in the nanomolar range. Compounds 6a (EC50=0.8nM and Emax=98%) and 6b (EC50=0.2nM and Emax=121%) exhibited good pharmacological profiles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mt. Wilson Meets the Lyot Double Image Micrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, Eric; Genet, Russell; Buchheim, Bob; Gelston, Ryan; Brewer, Mark; Genet, Cheryl; Gerhart, Christine; Wallen, Vera

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Mt. Wilson Double Star Workshop, the authors used a double image micrometer to observe two double stars, STF2383CD and STF2583AB, on the night of July 19, 2013 (B2013.547). The instrument was designed in 1949 by Bernard Lyot and built by Meca-Precis. We found separations of 2.53±0.29'' for STF2383CD and 1.58±0.40'' for STF2583AB, and positions angles of 77.8±2.3° for STF 2383CD and 103.4±1.6° for STF2583AB. The scarcity of double image micrometers and the opportunity to use the historic 60 inch telescope at Mt Wilson made this workshop a very unique experience.

  11. Microtron MT 25 as a source of neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kralik, M.; Solc, J.; Chvatil, D.; Krist, P.; Turek, K.; Granja, C.

    2012-08-15

    The objective was to describe Microtron MT25 as a source of neutrons generated by bremsstrahlung induced photonuclear reactions in U and Pb targets. Bremsstrahlung photons were produced by electrons accelerated at energy 21.6 MeV. Spectral fluence of the generated neutrons was calculated with MCNPX code and then experimentally determined at two positions by means of a Bonner spheres spectrometer in which the detector of thermal neutrons was replaced by activation Mn tablets or track detectors CR-39 with a {sup 10}B radiator. The measured neutron spectral fluence and the calculated anisotropy served for the estimation of neutron yield from the targets and for the determination of ambient dose equivalent rate at the place of measurement. Microtron MT25 is intended as one of the sources for testing neutron sensitive devices which will be sent into the space.

  12. A portable ELF-MT system for shallow resistivity sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, T.; Komori, H.; Honkura, Y.

    1989-03-01

    In view of recent extensive investigation of shallow resistivity structure for active fault studies and geothermal exploration, we developed a portable magnetotelluric (MT) system for the extremely low frequency (ELF) range. The system aims primarily at making real-time analyses of MT data at the so-called Schumann resonance frequencies of ˜ 8, 14 and 20 Hz. Calculations of the apparent resistivity, the phase, etc. are made by a small HC-20 computer, which also controls data acquisition. We made performance tests of this system and compared the results with those derived by the conventional method using the large computer at our computer center. The stacking number of 30 for Fourier transform stacking turned out to be sufficient to obtain results comparable with those by the conventional method. The time required for this processing is ˜ 15 min. This system can also be used for continuous monitoring of time-dependence of shallow crustal resistivity, particularly for earthquake prediction studies.

  13. Mt. Etna, Sicily as seen from STS-64

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-19

    STS064-71-037 (9-20 Sept. 1994) --- Mt. Etna on Sicily displays a steam plume from its summit. Geologists attribute the volcano's existence to the collision of tectonic plates. Unlike the sudden, explosive eruption at Rabaul, Mt. Etna's activity is ongoing and is generally not explosive - Etna's slopes have been settled with villages and cultivated land for centuries. Other Mediterranean volcanoes (like Santorini) have experienced large catastrophic eruptions. Etna recently finished a two-year eruption (ending in 1993), marked by relatively gentle lava flows down the eastern flank. It has been continually degassing since then, according to the geologists, producing an omnipresent steam plume, as seen here. The 1993 flow is difficult to identify in this image because it lies within shadows on the eastern flank, but small cinder cones on the western flank mark earlier episodes of volcanic activity. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  14. Attention to surfaces modulates motion processing in extrastriate area MT.

    PubMed

    Wannig, Aurel; Rodríguez, Valia; Freiwald, Winrich A

    2007-05-24

    In the visual system, early atomized representations are grouped into higher-level entities through processes of perceptual organization. Here we present neurophysiological evidence that a representation of a simple object, a surface defined by color and motion, can be the unit of attentional selection at an early stage of visual processing. Monkeys were cued by the color of a fixation spot to attend to one of two transparent random-dot surfaces, one red and one green, which occupied the same region of space. Motion of the attended surface drove neurons in the middle temporal (MT) visual area more strongly than physically identical motion of the non-attended surface, even though both occurred within the spotlight of attention. Surface-based effects of attention persisted even without differential surface coloring, but attentional modulation was stronger with color. These results show that attention can select surface representations to modulate visual processing as early as cortical area MT.

  15. MT Serpentis: A pre-cataclysmic variable or not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, A.

    2002-01-01

    MT Ser, the central star of the planetary nebula Abell 41, shows photometric variations with a period of P1 = 2h 43m (Grauer & Bond 1983, ApJ, 271, 259). They are interpreted as due to a reflection effect in a close binary consisting of a compact hot component and a cool star (Model 1). This configuration would make MT Ser the pre-cataclysmic variable with the shortest known orbital period. However, an alternative scenario of a system consisting of two hot subdwarfs in an orbit with period P2 = 2 P1 is also possible (Model 2). The light curve can then be explained by ellipsoidal variations and (partial) eclipses.

  16. Neural Representation of Motion-In-Depth in Area MT

    PubMed Central

    Sanada, Takahisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Neural processing of 2D visual motion has been studied extensively, but relatively little is known about how visual cortical neurons represent visual motion trajectories that include a component toward or away from the observer (motion in depth). Psychophysical studies have demonstrated that humans perceive motion in depth based on both changes in binocular disparity over time (CD cue) and interocular velocity differences (IOVD cue). However, evidence for neurons that represent motion in depth has been limited, especially in primates, and it is unknown whether such neurons make use of CD or IOVD cues. We show that approximately one-half of neurons in macaque area MT are selective for the direction of motion in depth, and that this selectivity is driven primarily by IOVD cues, with a small contribution from the CD cue. Our results establish that area MT, a central hub of the primate visual motion processing system, contains a 3D representation of visual motion. PMID:25411481

  17. Sticking of HO2 on fatty acids aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanega, Delphine; Briquez, Stéphane; Duflot, Denis; Monnerville, Maurice; Toubin, Céline

    2015-04-01

    Models of atmospheric chemistry are widely used to perform projections of future changes in the chemical composition of the global troposphere, including changes in climate related greenhouse gases and aerosol particles. However, large uncertainties are still associated with the chemistry implemented in these models, which in turn can lead to inaccurate long-term predictions. The proposed work seeks to improve our understanding of the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, which drives the lifetime of trace gases, and therefore atmospheric composition. Recent measurements [1] of free radicals made in forested environments characterized by low levels of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO and NO2) indicate that current models of atmospheric chemistry tend to overestimate the concentration of peroxy radicals (HO2 and RO2). An overestimation of peroxy radicals is an important issue since these radicals are the main precursors of the hydroxyl radical (OH), the most important atmospheric oxidant during daytime. This issue could lead to a significant overestimation of the oxidative capacity of the global atmosphere since more than 86% of the Earth surface is covered by forests, oceans, and polar regions. An analysis of this dataset indicates that the missing sink could be due to an underestimation of the rates of RO2+HO2 reactions, and/or the uptake of peroxy radicals onto aerosol particles. A thorough evaluation of scientific studies published in the literature shows that there is a lack of kinetic and mechanistic data to correctly assess the contribution of these two loss pathways of peroxy radicals in low NOx environments. Classical molecular dynamics simulations, using the Gromacs package [2], are performed to study the interaction of HO2 with organic (carboxylic acid) aerosols. The effect of the presence of water molecules on the surface are also be investigated. These calculations provide theoretical values for observable quantities such as uptake and mass accommodation

  18. Cosmological perturbations in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xian; Wang, Yi; Brandenberger, R.; Riotto, A.

    2010-04-01

    We study cosmological perturbations in Hořava-Lifshitz Gravity, a recently proposed potentially ultraviolet-complete quantum theory of gravity. We consider scalar metric fluctuations about a homogeneous and isotropic space-time. Starting from the most general metric, we work out the complete second order action for the perturbations. We then make use of the residual gauge invariance and of the constraint equations to reduce the number of dynamical degrees of freedom. At first glance, it appears that there is an extra scalar metric degree of freedom. However, introducing the Sasaki-Mukhanov variable, the combination of spatial metric fluctuation and matter inhomogeneity for which the action in general relativity has canonical form, we find that this variable has the standard time derivative term in the second order action, and that the extra degree of freedom is nondynamical. The limit λ→1 is well behaved, unlike what is obtained when expanding about Minkowski space-time. Thus, there is no strong coupling problem for Hořava-Lifshitz gravity when considering cosmological solutions. We also compute the spectrum of cosmological perturbations. If the potential in the action is taken to be of “detailed balance” form, we find a cancellation of the highest derivative terms in the action for the curvature fluctuations. As a consequence, the initial spectrum of perturbations will not be scale-invariant in a general space-time background, in contrast to what happens when considering Hořava-Lifshitz matter leaving the gravitational sector unperturbed. However, if we break the detailed balance condition, then the initial spectrum of curvature fluctuations is indeed scale-invariant on ultraviolet scales. As an application, we consider fluctuations in an inflationary background and draw connections with the “trans-Planckian problem” for cosmological perturbations. In the special case in which the potential term in the action is of detailed balance form and in which

  19. Directions toward the Year 2000. Strategic Plan, Mt. San Antonio Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Community Coll. District, Walnut, CA.

    This booklet presents Mt. San Antonio College's (Mt. SAC's) long-range goals and specific action priorities in an effort to focus planning on the year 2000. Introductory comments discuss the purpose of strategic planning and Mt. SAC's planning orientation. The next sections list goals and objectives with respect to: (1) the improvement of existing…

  20. 77 FR 41939 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Deer Lodge, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-17

    ... Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Deer Lodge, MT AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... airspace at Deer Lodge-City-County Airport, Deer Lodge, MT. Controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate... procedures at Deer Lodge-City-County Airport, Deer Lodge, MT. The FAA is proposing this action to enhance...

  1. 77 FR 39651 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Circle Town, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... County Airport, Circle Town, MT, to accommodate aircraft using new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global... aircraft using new RNAV (GPS) standard instrument approach procedures at Circle Town County Airport. This.... * * * * * ANM MT E5 Circle Town, MT [New] Circle Town County Airport (Lat. 47[deg]25'06'' N., long. 105[deg]33...

  2. Random Genetic Drift Determines the Level of Mutant mtDNA in Human Primary Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. T.; Samuels, D. C.; Michael, E. M.; Turnbull, D. M.; Chinnery, P. F.

    2001-01-01

    We measured the proportion of mutant mtDNA (mutation load) in 82 primary oocytes from a woman who harbored the A3243G mtDNA mutation. The frequency distribution of mutation load indicates that random drift is the principal mechanism that determines the level of mutant mtDNA within individual oocytes. PMID:11133360

  3. 78 FR 52112 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cut Bank, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cut Bank, MT AGENCY... action proposes to modify Class E airspace at Cut Bank Municipal Airport, Cut Bank, MT. Controlled... from 700/1,200 feet above the surface at Cut Bank Municipal Airport, Cut Bank, MT. Controlled airspace...

  4. 78 FR 54415 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Ennis, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    ...). SUMMARY: This action proposes to establish Class E airspace at Ennis- Big Sky Airport, Ennis, MT... System (GPS) standard instrument approach procedures at Ennis-Big Sky Airport, Ennis, MT. The FAA is... from 700 feet above the surface within a 7-mile radius of Ennis- Big Sky Airport, Ennis, MT, along...

  5. Directions toward the Year 2000. Strategic Plan, Mt. San Antonio Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Community Coll. District, Walnut, CA.

    This booklet presents Mt. San Antonio College's (Mt. SAC's) long-range goals and specific action priorities in an effort to focus planning on the year 2000. Introductory comments discuss the purpose of strategic planning and Mt. SAC's planning orientation. The next sections list goals and objectives with respect to: (1) the improvement of existing…

  6. Contrahelicase activity of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor mtDBP

    PubMed Central

    Polosa, Paola Loguercio; Deceglie, Stefania; Roberti, Marina; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola; Cantatore, Palmiro

    2005-01-01

    The sea urchin mitochondrial D-loop binding protein (mtDBP) is a transcription termination factor that is able to arrest bidirectionally mitochondrial RNA chain elongation. The observation that the mtDBP binding site in the main non-coding region is located in correspondence of the 3′ end of the triplex structure, where the synthesis of heavy strand mitochondrial (mt) DNA is either prematurely terminated or allowed to continue, raised the question whether mtDBP could also regulate mtDNA replication. By using a helicase assay in the presence of the replicative helicase of SV40, we show that mtDBP is able to inhibit the enzyme thus acting as a contrahelicase. The impairing activity of mtDBP is bidirectional as it is independent of the orientation of the protein binding site. The inhibition is increased by the presence of the guanosine-rich sequence that flanks mtDBP binding site. Finally, a mechanism of abrogation of mtDBP contrahelicase activity is suggested that is based on the dissociation of mtDBP from DNA caused by the passage of the RNA polymerase through the protein–DNA complex. All these findings favour the view that mtDBP, besides serving as transcription termination factor, could also act as a negative regulator of mtDNA synthesis at the level of D-loop expansion. PMID:16006625

  7. 77 FR 43183 - Proposed Modification of Class E Airspace; Wolf Point, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ...-ANM-17 Proposed Modification of Class E Airspace; Wolf Point, MT AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Class E airspace at Wolf Point, MT. Controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate aircraft using Nondirectional Radio Beacon (NDB) standard instrument approach procedures at L M Clayton Airport, Wolf Point, MT...

  8. 77 FR 64714 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Wolf Point, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Modification of Class E Airspace; Wolf Point, MT AGENCY... airspace at Wolf Point, MT. Controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate aircraft using Nondirectional Radio Beacon (NDB) standard instrument approach procedures at L M Clayton Airport, Wolf Point, MT. This...

  9. Atmospheric deposition of trace elements recorded in snow from the Mt. Nyainqêntanglha region, southern Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Kang, Shichang; Zhang, Qianggong; Guo, Junming; Chen, Pengfei; Zhang, Guoshuai; Tripathee, Lekhendra

    2013-08-01

    In May 2009, snowpit samples were collected from a high-elevation glacier in the Mt. Nyainqêntanglha region on the southern Tibetan Plateau. A set of elements (Al, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg and Pb) was analyzed to investigate the concentrations, deposition fluxes of trace elements, and the relative contributions from anthropogenic and natural sources deposited on the southern Tibetan Plateau. Concentrations of most of the trace elements in snowpit samples from the Zhadang glacier are significantly lower than those examined from central Asia (e.g., eastern Tien Shan), with higher concentrations during the non-monsoon season than during the monsoon season. The elements of Al, V, Cr, Mn, Co, and Ni display low crustal enrichment factors (EFs), while Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg, and Pb show high EF values in the snow samples, suggesting anthropogenic inputs are potentially important for these elements in the remote, high-elevation atmosphere on the southern Tibetan Plateau. Together with the fact that the concentration levels of such elements in the Mt. Nyainqêntanglha region are significantly higher than those observed on the south edge of the Tibetan Plateau, our results suggest that the high-elevation atmosphere on the southern Tibetan Plateau may be more sensitive to variations in the anthropogenic emissions of atmospheric trace elements than that in the central Himalayas. Moreover, the major difference between deposition fluxes estimated in our snow samples and those recently measured at Nam Co Station for elements such as Cr and Cu may suggest that atmospheric deposition of some of trace elements reconstructed from snowpits and ice cores could be grossly underestimated on the Tibetan Plateau.

  10. An Analysis of the Mt. Meron Seismic Array

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E; Ryall, F

    2008-01-10

    We have performed a quick analysis of the Mt. Meron seismic array to monitor regional seismic events in the Middle East. The Meron array is the only current array in the Levant and Arabian Peninsula and, as such, might be useful in contributing to event location, identification, and other analysis. Here, we provide a brief description of the array and a review of the travel time and array analysis done to assess its performance.

  11. Vertical Scales of Turbulence at the Mt. Wilson Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treuhaft, Robert N.

    1995-01-01

    The vertical scales of turbulence at the Mt. Wilson observatory are inferred from data from the University of California at Berkeley Infrared Spatial Interferometer (ISI), by modeling path length fluctuations observed in the interferometric paths to celestial objects and those in instrumental ground- based paths. The correlations between the stellar and ground-based path length fluctuations and the temporal statistic of those fluctuations are modeled on various time scales to constrain the vertical scales.

  12. MT-Toolbox: improved amplicon sequencing using molecule tags.

    PubMed

    Yourstone, Scott M; Lundberg, Derek S; Dangl, Jeffery L; Jones, Corbin D

    2014-08-22

    Short oligonucleotides can be used as markers to tag and track DNA sequences. For example, barcoding techniques (i.e. Multiplex Identifiers or Indexing) use short oligonucleotides to distinguish between reads from different DNA samples pooled for high-throughput sequencing. A similar technique called molecule tagging uses the same principles but is applied to individual DNA template molecules. Each template molecule is tagged with a unique oligonucleotide prior to polymerase chain reaction. The resulting amplicon sequences can be traced back to their original templates by their oligonucleotide tag. Consensus building from sequences sharing the same tag enables inference of original template molecules thereby reducing effects of sequencing error and polymerase chain reaction bias. Several independent groups have developed similar protocols for molecule tagging; however, user-friendly software for build consensus sequences from molecule tagged reads is not readily available or is highly specific for a particular protocol. MT-Toolbox recognizes oligonucleotide tags in amplicons and infers the correct template sequence. On a set of molecule tagged test reads, MT-Toolbox generates sequences having on average 0.00047 errors per base. MT-Toolbox includes a graphical user interface, command line interface, and options for speed and accuracy maximization. It can be run in serial on a standard personal computer or in parallel on a Load Sharing Facility based cluster system. An optional plugin provides features for common 16S metagenome profiling analysis such as chimera filtering, building operational taxonomic units, contaminant removal, and taxonomy assignments. MT-Toolbox provides an accessible, user-friendly environment for analysis of molecule tagged reads thereby reducing technical errors and polymerase chain reaction bias. These improvements reduce noise and allow for greater precision in single amplicon sequencing experiments.

  13. Vertical Scales of Turbulence at the Mt. Wilson Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treuhaft, Robert N.

    1995-01-01

    The vertical scales of turbulence at the Mt. Wilson observatory are inferred from data from the University of California at Berkeley Infrared Spatial Interferometer (ISI), by modeling path length fluctuations observed in the interferometric paths to celestial objects and those in instrumental ground- based paths. The correlations between the stellar and ground-based path length fluctuations and the temporal statistic of those fluctuations are modeled on various time scales to constrain the vertical scales.

  14. Volcanogenic origin of cenotes near Mt Gambier, southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, John A.; Grimes, Ken G.; Lewis, Ian D.

    2010-07-01

    The cenotes near Mt Gambier are circular, cliffed, collapse dolines containing water-table lakes up to 125 m deep, floored by large rubble cones. They lie in a flat, coastal plain composed of mid-Tertiary limestone. Most of the deepest cenotes are concentrated in two small areas located along trends sub-parallel to the main joint direction in the limestone. The cenotes do not connect to underwater phreatic passages, and water chemistry data confirm that they are not part of an interconnected karst network. They formed by collapse into large chambers (up to > 1 million m 3) that extended 125 m or more below the land surface. Several cenotes have actively growing stromatolites on the sub-vertical walls that started growing at ˜ 8000 years BP. The caves that collapsed to form the deep Mt Gambier cenotes are much larger than shallow and deep phreatic caves in the area, and do not connect into deep phreatic systems. They were not formed by freshwater/seawater mixing, responsible for many of the well-known Yucatan cenotes, because they are not associated with locations of the mixing zone during previous high sea levels, and are much larger than caves presently forming along the mixing zone near Mt Gambier. Instead dissolution was most likely due to a process whereby acidified groundwater containing large amounts of volcanogenic CO 2 ascended up fractures from the magma chambers that fed the Pleistocene-Holocene volcanic eruptions in the area; deep reservoirs of volcanogenic CO 2 occur nearby. Cave dissolution could have been due to release of CO 2 during the Mt Gambier eruption ˜ 28,000 years ago, followed by collapse to form cenotes during the low sea levels of the Last Glacial Maximum ˜ 20,000 years ago. The cenotes then flooded ˜ 8000 years ago as sea level rose, and stromatolites began to grow on the walls.

  15. Into thin air: extreme ultrasound on Mt Everest.

    PubMed

    Otto, Christian; Hamilton, Douglas R; Levine, Benjamin D; Hare, Craig; Sargsyan, Ashot E; Altshuler, Peter; Dulchavsky, Scott A

    2009-01-01

    Mountaineers face a variety of health risks at altitude including pulmonary edema; portable ultrasound may be used to diagnose high altitude pulmonary edema. This report tests the functionality of electronic equipment in a hypobaric test environment and the ability of remotely guided nonexperts to use ultrasound to evaluate respiratory status on Mt Everest. Two ultrasound devices and associated video equipment were tested in a cooled (4 degrees C-5 degrees C) hypobaric chamber to 27000 feet (8230 m) before travel to Mt Everest. The ultrasound system was connected via satellite phone to a video streaming device and portable computer to stream video through the Internet for remote guidance of a novice user by an expert. Pulmonary interstitial fluid was quantified by the presence of "comet tail" artifacts. There was no notable degradation in equipment performance in cold, hypobaric conditions; ultrasound confirmation of increased comet tails was noted in the chamber despite oxygen supplementation and the very brief exposure. Two pulmonary surveys of asymptomatic participants were completed by novice operators within 25 minutes on Mt Everest. The remote expert was able to guide and identify comet tails suggestive of intermediate pulmonary interstitial fluid. Image quality was excellent. The tested ultrasound devices functioned nominally in cold, hypobaric conditions; acute changes in lung fluid content were noted in these conditions despite normoxia. We successfully used a satellite telemedical connection with a remote expert to guide thoracic ultrasound examinations at Advanced Base Camp on Mt Everest. Coupling portable ultrasound with remote expert guidance telemedicine provides a robust diagnostic capability in austere locations.

  16. miRNAs in mtDNA-less cell mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, N; Peng, Y; Tan, Z; Ciraolo, G; Wang, D; Li, R

    2015-01-01

    The novel regulation mechanism in mtDNA-less cells was investigated. Very low mtDNA copy in mtDNA-less 206 ρ° cells was identified. But no 13 mitochondria-specific proteins were translated in 206 ρ° cells. Their mitochondrial respiration complexes V, III and II were 86.5, 29.4 and 49.6% of 143B cells, respectively. Complexes I and IV completely lack in 206 ρ° cells. Non-mitochondrial respiration to generate ATP in 206 ρ° cells was discovered. The expression levels of some mitochondrial RNAs including 12S rRNA, COX1, COX2, COX3, ND4 and ND5 were low. However, ND1, ND3 and Cyto b were not expressed in 206 ρ° cells. Unequal transcription of mitochondrial RNAs indicated the post-transcriptional cleavage and processing mechanisms in the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression in 206 ρ° cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) may modulate these mitochondrial RNA expression in these cells. RNA-induced silencing complex indeed within 206 ρ° cell mitochondria indicated miRNAs in 206 ρ° cell mitochondria. miRNA profile in mtDNA-less 206 ρ° cells was studied by next-generation sequencing of small RNAs. Several mitochondria-enriched miRNAs such as miR-181c-5p and miR-146a-5p were identified in 206 ρ° cell mitochondria. miR-181c-5p and miR-146a-5p had 23 and 19 potential targets on mitochondrial RNAs respectively, and these two miRNAs had multiple targets on mitochondria-associated messenger RNAs encoded by nuclear genes. These data provided the first direct evidence that miRNAs were imported into mitochondria and regulated mitochondrial RNA expressions. PMID:27551440

  17. Geothermal energy resource investigations at Mt. Spurr, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.L.; Wescott, E.M.

    1986-12-01

    Spurr volcano is a composite Quaternary cone of largely andesitic composition located on the west side of Cook Inlet about 80 miles west of Anchorage and about 40 miles from the Beluga electrical transmission line. Geologic mapping (Plate 1-1) shows that the present summit depression was produced by a Mt. St. Helens-type sector collapse, rather than by a caldera collapse. Geochronologic and previous tephrachronologic studies show that there has been an active magmatic system at Spurr volcano during the late Pleistocene-to-Holocene time interval that is of critical interest for geothermal energy resource assessment. Major effort was devoted to geochemical and geophysical surveys of the accessible area south of Mt. Spurr, in addition to geologic mapping and geochronologic studies. Many coincident mercury and helium anomalies were found, suggesting the presence of geothermal systems at depth. Extremely large electrical self-potential anomalies were also found, together with extensive zones of low resistivity discovered by our controlled-source audiomagnetotelluric survey. The juxtaposition of all of these different types of anomalies at certain areas on the south slope of Crater Peak indicates the presence of a geothermal system which should be accessible by drilling to about 2000 ft depth. It is also evident that there is a strong volcanic hazard to be evaluated in considering any development on the south side of Mt. Spurr. This hazardous situation may require angle drilling of production wells from safer areas and placement of power generation facilities at a considerable distance from hazardous areas.

  18. Study on new optimum parameters in MT repeated survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun-Lin; Liu, Xiao-Ling; An, Hai-Jing; Jiang, Mei; Li, Zhi-Xiong; Si, Yu-Lan; Zhang, Wu-Si

    1994-11-01

    The first MT monitoring profile with initial shape both at home and abroad has been built in the northern margin of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Based on MT data observed before and after the eight earthquakes of M=5 7 from 1988 to 1992, a new parameter-mean resistivitybar ρ has been introduced. The results show thatbar ρ indicates not only the major feature of decreasing-increasing and recovering to normal value, but also synchronism of phase or the variation in a large area, “lead or delay” among different small areas and the amplitude decreasing with the increase of the distance from the epicenter. Two characters mentioned above might correspond to reginal field precursor of the tectonic generating earthquake and field precursor of the tectonic kinematics. This paper analyses the errors of observed data and the cause of ρ variation. The MT profile optimum parameter system consists of parameterbar ρ , apparent resistivity ρ, twisting degree and the principal-axis azimuth which might provide quantitative criterion for the physical proces of the great destructive earthquake and moderate and short-term earthquake prediction.

  19. Evidences for higher nocturnal seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarella, Adriano; Scafetta, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    We analyze hourly seismic data measured at the Osservatorio Vesuviano Ovest (OVO, 1972-2014) and at the Bunker Est (BKE, 1999-2014) stations on the Mt. Vesuvius. The OVO record is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 1.9. We demonstrate that before 1996 this record presents a daily oscillation that nearly vanishes afterwards. To determine whether a daily oscillation exists in the seismic activity of the Mt. Vesuvius, we use the higher quality BKE record that is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 0.2. We demonstrate that BKE confirms that the seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius is higher during nighttime than during daytime. The amplitude of the daily oscillation is enhanced during summer and damped during winter. We speculate possible links with the cooling/warming diurnal cycle of the volcanic edifice, with external geomagnetic field and with magnetostriction, which stress the rocks. We find that the amplitude of the seismic daily cycle changes in time and has been increasing since 2008. Finally, we propose a seismic activity index to monitor the 24-hour oscillation that could be used to complement other methodologies currently adopted to determine the seismic status of the volcano to prevent the relative hazard.

  20. Seismo Gravity Observations of Mt. Bromo, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryanto, S.

    2016-12-01

    Mt. Bromo, an active quaternary volcanoes located at Tengger caldera, Probolinggo, East Java. The magma chamber of Mt. Bromo had been studied by using the intergrated method of gravity and seismic. Gravity method studied subsurface density contrast variation in 2D model. Meanwhile, seismic method studied magma chamber geometry based on hypocenter distribution of A-type volcanic earthquake (VTA) signals. 2D gravity model showed that the magma chamber exists at 2 km up to 12.5 km under mean sea level and dominated by andesitic magmas (ρ=2.66 g/cm3). Besides, quantitative interpretation of Bromo subsurface also indicates that this area is formed by quartzite and granite formations. Based on the hypocenter distribution, shown that two magma chambers estimated beneath Bromo volcano. The shallow magma chamber located at 2 km up to 5 km depth under the summit of Bromo volcano. Meanwhile, the deep magma chamber located on 7 km up to 15 km of depth under the summit of Mt. Bromo.

  1. CD44 regulates pancreatic cancer invasion through MT1-MMP.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Yaqing; Kane, Kevin T; Collins, Meredith A; Simeone, Diane M; di Magliano, Marina Pasca; Nguyen, Kevin Tri

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest human malignancies due to its early metastatic spread and resistance to therapy. The mechanisms regulating pancreatic cancer metastasis are so far poorly understood. Here, using both in vitro and in vivo approaches, it is demonstrated that CD44, a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on a subset of pancreatic cancer cells, is required for the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the activation of an invasive program in pancreatic cancer. Mechanistically, the transcription factor Snail1 (SNAI1), a regulator of the EMT program, is a downstream target of CD44 in primary pancreatic cancer cells and regulates membrane bound metalloproteinase (MMP14/MT1-MMP) expression. In turn, MT1-MMP expression is required for pancreatic cancer invasion. Thus, these data establish the CD44-Snail-MMP axis as a key regulator of the EMT program and of invasion in pancreatic cancer. This study sets the stage for CD44 and MT1-MMP as therapeutic targets in pancreatic cancer, for which small molecule or biologic inhibitors are available. Visual Overview: http://mcr.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2014/09/10/1541-7786.MCR-14-0076/F1.large.jpg. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. CD44 regulates pancreatic cancer invasion through MT1-MMP

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Yaqing; Kane, Kevin T.; Collins, Meredith A.; Simeone, Diane M.; di Magliano, Marina Pasca; Nguyen, Kevin Tri

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest human malignancies due to its early metastatic spread and resistance to therapy. The mechanisms regulating pancreatic cancer metastasis are so far poorly understood. Here, using both in vitro and in vivo approaches, it is demonstrated that CD44, a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on a subset of pancreatic cancer cells, is required for the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the activation of an invasive program in pancreatic cancer. Mechanistically, the transcription factor Snail1 (SNAI1), a regulator of the EMT program, is a downstream target of CD44 in primary pancreatic cancer cells and regulates membrane bound metalloproteinase (MMP14/MT1-MMP) expression. In turn, MT1-MMP expression is required for pancreatic cancer invasion. Thus, these data establish the CD44-Snail-MMP axis as a key regulator of the EMT program and of invasion in pancreatic cancer. (135) IMPLICATIONS This study sets the stage for CD44 and MT1-MMP as therapeutic targets in pancreatic cancer, for which small molecule or biologic inhibitors are available. PMID:25566991

  3. The making of the African mtDNA landscape.

    PubMed

    Salas, Antonio; Richards, Martin; De la Fe, Tomás; Lareu, María-Victoria; Sobrino, Beatriz; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Macaulay, Vincent; Carracedo, Angel

    2002-11-01

    Africa presents the most complex genetic picture of any continent, with a time depth for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages >100,000 years. The most recent widespread demographic shift within the continent was most probably the Bantu dispersals, which archaeological and linguistic evidence suggest originated in West Africa 3,000-4,000 years ago, spreading both east and south. Here, we have carried out a thorough phylogeographic analysis of mtDNA variation in a total of 2,847 samples from throughout the continent, including 307 new sequences from southeast African Bantu speakers. The results suggest that the southeast Bantu speakers have a composite origin on the maternal line of descent, with approximately 44% of lineages deriving from West Africa, approximately 21% from either West or Central Africa, approximately 30% from East Africa, and approximately 5% from southern African Khoisan-speaking groups. The ages of the major founder types of both West and East African origin are consistent with the likely timing of Bantu dispersals, with those from the west somewhat predating those from the east. Despite this composite picture, the southeastern African Bantu groups are indistinguishable from each other with respect to their mtDNA, suggesting that they either had a common origin at the point of entry into southeastern Africa or have undergone very extensive gene flow since.

  4. The Making of the African mtDNA Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Antonio; Richards, Martin; De la Fe, Tomás; Lareu, María-Victoria; Sobrino, Beatriz; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Macaulay, Vincent; Carracedo, Ángel

    2002-01-01

    Africa presents the most complex genetic picture of any continent, with a time depth for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages >100,000 years. The most recent widespread demographic shift within the continent was most probably the Bantu dispersals, which archaeological and linguistic evidence suggest originated in West Africa 3,000–4,000 years ago, spreading both east and south. Here, we have carried out a thorough phylogeographic analysis of mtDNA variation in a total of 2,847 samples from throughout the continent, including 307 new sequences from southeast African Bantu speakers. The results suggest that the southeast Bantu speakers have a composite origin on the maternal line of descent, with ∼44% of lineages deriving from West Africa, ∼21% from either West or Central Africa, ∼30% from East Africa, and ∼5% from southern African Khoisan-speaking groups. The ages of the major founder types of both West and East African origin are consistent with the likely timing of Bantu dispersals, with those from the west somewhat predating those from the east. Despite this composite picture, the southeastern African Bantu groups are indistinguishable from each other with respect to their mtDNA, suggesting that they either had a common origin at the point of entry into southeastern Africa or have undergone very extensive gene flow since. PMID:12395296

  5. HO-1 and VEGF gene expressions are time dependant during exposure to welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Stark, M; Zubareb, J; Jacovovitz, R; Schwartz, Y; Lerman, Y; Grinberg, N; Fireman, E

    2009-05-01

    Hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a defensive enzyme against oxidative stress. Vascular epithelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent cytokine which promotes angiogenesis. We used induced sputum (IS) technology to study HO-1 and VEGF expressions in neutrophilic inflammation in asymptomatic welders. Aircraft plant employees were divided into three groups: Welders 1 (n=30) had short-term exposure to aluminum/iron, Welders 2 (n=16) had long-term exposure to cadmium/chromium/iron/nickel, and controls (n=27 non-exposed individuals). Participants underwent pulmonary function tests (PFTs), IS, differential cell counts, and determination of particle size distribution in IS samples. HO-1 and VEGF gene expressions were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and protein levels were measured by bilirubin reductase-dependant reaction and ELISA, respectively. All subjects had normal PFTs. Welders 2 had neutrophilic inflammation and higher percentages of particles between 2-5 micron than the other groups. HO-1 inversely correlated with VEGF gene expression: HO-1 was significantly higher and VEGF was significantly lower in the Welders 1 group than in the other groups. There was a correlation between HO-1 expression and protein activity (r=0.33, P=0.05). Particulate matters significantly influenced HO-1 and VEGF gene expressions, caused neutrophilic inflammation and promoted oxidative stress in welders with long-term exposure.

  6. Photocatalytic activity of Ho-doped anatase titanium dioxide coated magnetite.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhongliang; Xiang, Yongfang; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yao, Shuhua

    2011-01-01

    A composite photocatalyst (Ho/TiO(2)/Fe(3)O(4)) with Ho-doped anatase titanium dioxide (Ho/TiO(2)) shell and a magnetite core was prepared by coating photoactive Ho/TiO(2) onto a magnetic Fe(3)O(4) core through the hydrolysis of tetrabutyltitanate (Ti(OBu)(4), TBT) in water/oil (w/o) microemulsion with precursors of Ho(NO(3))(3) and TBT in the presence of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles. The morphological, structural and optical properties of the prepared samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV-Vis diffusive reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis DRS). The effect of Ho ion content on the photocatalytic activity was studied. The photodegradation behavior of the prepared photocatalyst under UV and visible light was investigated in aqueous solution using methyl orange (MO) as target pollutant. The results showed that the prepared photocatalyst was activated by visible light and used as effective catalyst in photo-oxidation reactions. In addition, the possibility of cyclic usage of the prepared photocatalyst was also confirmed. Moreover, Ho/TiO(2) was tightly bound to Fe(3)O(4) and could be easily recovered from the medium by a simple magnetic process. It can therefore be potentially applied for the treatment of water contaminated by organic pollutants. © 2011 The Authors. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2011 The American Society of Photobiology.

  7. Cellular uptake, retention and bioabsorption of HO-3867, a fluorinated curcumin analog with potential antitumor properties

    PubMed Central

    Dayton, Alex; Selvendiran, Karuppaiyah; Kuppusamy, M Lakshmi; Rivera, Brian K; Meduru, Sarath; Kálai, Tamás; Hideg, Kálmán

    2010-01-01

    Curcumin, a naturally-occurring compound found in the rhizome of Curcuma longa plant, is known for its antitumor activities. However, its clinical efficacy is limited due to poor bioabsorption. A new class of synthetic analogs of curcumin, namely diarylidenylpiperidone (DAP), has been developed with substantially higher anticancer activity than curcumin. However, its cellular uptake and bioabsorption have not been evaluated. In this study we have determined the absorption of a representative DAP compound, HO-3867, using optical and electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry. The cellular uptake of HO-3867 was measured in a variety of cancer cell lines. HO-3867 was taken in cells within 15 minutes of exposure and its uptake was more than 100-fold higher than curcumin. HO-3867 was also retained in cells in an active form for 72 hours and possibly longer. HO-3867 was substantially cytotoxic to all the cancer cells tested. However, there was no direct correlation between cellular uptake and cytotoxicity suggesting that the cytotoxic mechanisms could be cell-type specific. When administered to rats by intraperitoneal injection, significantly high levels of HO-3867 were found in the liver, kidney, stomach and blood after 3 hours. Also, significant accumulation of HO-3867 was found in murine tumor xenografts with a dose-dependent inhibition of tumor growth. The results suggest that the curcumin analog has substantially higher bioabsorption when compared to curcumin. PMID:20798598

  8. HO endonuclease-induced recombination in yeast meiosis resembles Spo11-induced events.

    PubMed

    Malkova, A; Klein, F; Leung, W Y; Haber, J E

    2000-12-19

    In meiosis, gene conversions are accompanied by higher levels of crossing over than in mitotic cells. To determine whether the special properties of meiotic recombination can be attributed to the way in which Spo11p creates double-strand breaks (DSBs) at special hot spots in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we expressed the site-specific HO endonuclease in meiotic cells. We could therefore compare HO-induced recombination in a well-defined region both in mitosis and meiosis, as well as compare Spo11p- and HO-induced meiotic events. HO-induced gene conversions in meiosis were accompanied by crossovers at the same high level (52%) as Spo11p-induced events. Moreover, HO-induced crossovers were reduced 3-fold by a msh4Delta mutation that similarly affects Spo11p-promoted events. In a spo11Delta diploid, where the only DSB is made by HO, crossing over was significantly higher (27%) than in mitotic cells (HO-induced gene conversion tract lengths are shorter in meiotic than in mitotic cells. We conclude that a hallmark of meiotic recombination, the production of crossovers, is independent of the nature of Spo11p-generated DSBs at special hotspots, but some functions of Spo11p are required in trans to achieve maximum crossing over.

  9. Mechanical properties, in vitro corrosion and biocompatibility of newly developed biodegradable Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yunfei; Lin, Jixing; Wen, Cuie; Zhang, Dongmei; Li, Yuncang

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that Mg-Zr-Sr alloys can be anticipated as excellent biodegradable implant materials for load-bearing applications. In general, rare earth elements (REEs) are widely used in magnesium (Mg) alloys with the aim of enhancing the mechanical properties of Mg-based alloys. In this study, the REE holmium (Ho) was added to an Mg-1Zr-2Sr alloy at different concentrations of Mg1Zr2SrxHo alloys (x = 0, 1, 3, 5 wt. %) and the microstructure, mechanical properties, degradation behaviour and biocompatibility of the alloys were systematically investigated. The results indicate that the addition of Ho to Mg1Zr2Sr led to the formation of the intermetallic phases MgHo3, Mg2Ho and Mg17Sr2 which resulted in enhanced mechanical strength and decreased degradation rates of the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys. Furthermore, Ho addition (≤5 wt. %) to Mg-Zr-Sr alloys led to enhancement of cell adhesion and proliferation of osteoblast cells on the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys. The in vitro biodegradation and the biocompatibility of the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys were both influenced by the Ho concentration in the Mg alloys; Mg1Zr2Sr3Ho exhibited lower degradation rates than Mg1Zr2Sr and displayed the best biocompatibility compared with the other alloys. PMID:27553403

  10. Mechanical properties, in vitro corrosion and biocompatibility of newly developed biodegradable Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yunfei; Lin, Jixing; Wen, Cuie; Zhang, Dongmei; Li, Yuncang

    2016-08-24

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that Mg-Zr-Sr alloys can be anticipated as excellent biodegradable implant materials for load-bearing applications. In general, rare earth elements (REEs) are widely used in magnesium (Mg) alloys with the aim of enhancing the mechanical properties of Mg-based alloys. In this study, the REE holmium (Ho) was added to an Mg-1Zr-2Sr alloy at different concentrations of Mg1Zr2SrxHo alloys (x = 0, 1, 3, 5 wt. %) and the microstructure, mechanical properties, degradation behaviour and biocompatibility of the alloys were systematically investigated. The results indicate that the addition of Ho to Mg1Zr2Sr led to the formation of the intermetallic phases MgHo3, Mg2Ho and Mg17Sr2 which resulted in enhanced mechanical strength and decreased degradation rates of the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys. Furthermore, Ho addition (≤5 wt. %) to Mg-Zr-Sr alloys led to enhancement of cell adhesion and proliferation of osteoblast cells on the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys. The in vitro biodegradation and the biocompatibility of the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys were both influenced by the Ho concentration in the Mg alloys; Mg1Zr2Sr3Ho exhibited lower degradation rates than Mg1Zr2Sr and displayed the best biocompatibility compared with the other alloys.

  11. Mechanical properties, in vitro corrosion and biocompatibility of newly developed biodegradable Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yunfei; Lin, Jixing; Wen, Cuie; Zhang, Dongmei; Li, Yuncang

    2016-08-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that Mg-Zr-Sr alloys can be anticipated as excellent biodegradable implant materials for load-bearing applications. In general, rare earth elements (REEs) are widely used in magnesium (Mg) alloys with the aim of enhancing the mechanical properties of Mg-based alloys. In this study, the REE holmium (Ho) was added to an Mg-1Zr-2Sr alloy at different concentrations of Mg1Zr2SrxHo alloys (x = 0, 1, 3, 5 wt. %) and the microstructure, mechanical properties, degradation behaviour and biocompatibility of the alloys were systematically investigated. The results indicate that the addition of Ho to Mg1Zr2Sr led to the formation of the intermetallic phases MgHo3, Mg2Ho and Mg17Sr2 which resulted in enhanced mechanical strength and decreased degradation rates of the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys. Furthermore, Ho addition (≤5 wt. %) to Mg-Zr-Sr alloys led to enhancement of cell adhesion and proliferation of osteoblast cells on the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys. The in vitro biodegradation and the biocompatibility of the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys were both influenced by the Ho concentration in the Mg alloys; Mg1Zr2Sr3Ho exhibited lower degradation rates than Mg1Zr2Sr and displayed the best biocompatibility compared with the other alloys.

  12. Resonantly pumped high efficiency Ho:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying-Jie; Yao, Bao-Quan; Duan, Xiao-Ming; Dai, Tong-Yu; Ju, You-Lun; Wang, Yue-Zhu

    2012-11-20

    High-efficient CW and Q-switched Ho:YAG lasers resonantly dual-end-pumped by two diode-pumped Tm:YLF lasers at 1908 nm were investigated. A maximum slope efficiency of 74.8% in CW operation as well as a maximum output power of 58.7 W at 83.2 W incident pump power was achieved, which corresponded to an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 70.6%. The maximum pulse energy of 2.94 mJ was achieved, with a 31 ns FWHM pulse width and a peak power of approximately 94.7 kW.

  13. BRIEF REVIEW Hořava-Lifshitz cosmology: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukohyama, Shinji

    2010-11-01

    Here we review the basic construction and cosmological implications of a power-counting renormalizable theory of gravitation, recently proposed by Hořava. We explain that (i) at low energy this theory does not exactly recover general relativity but instead mimics general relativity plus dark matter; (ii) higher spatial curvature terms allow bouncing and cyclic universes as regular solutions; (iii) the anisotropic scaling with the dynamical critical exponent z = 3 solves the horizon problem and leads to scale-invariant cosmological perturbations even without inflation. We also comment on issues related to an extra scalar degree of freedom called scalar graviton. In particular, for spherically-symmetric, static, vacuum configurations we prove non-perturbative continuity of the λ → 1 + 0 limit, where λ is a parameter in the kinetic action and general relativity has the value λ = 1. We also derive the condition under which linear instability of the scalar graviton does not show up.

  14. Mechanical Stress Changes the Complex Interplay Between HO-1, Inflammation and Fibrosis, During Excisional Wound Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Niels A. J.; Suttorp, Maarten; Gerritsen, Marlous M.; Wong, Ronald J.; van Run-van Breda, Coby; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Brouwer, Katrien M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Carels, Carine E. L.; Lundvig, Ditte M. S.; Wagener, Frank A. D. T. G.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stress following surgery or injury can promote pathological wound healing and fibrosis, and lead to functional loss and esthetic problems. Splinted excisional wounds can be used as a model for inducing mechanical stress. The cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is thought to orchestrate the defense against inflammatory and oxidative insults that drive fibrosis. Here, we investigated the activation of the HO-1 system in a splinted and non-splinted full-thickness excisional wound model using HO-1-luc transgenic mice. Effects of splinting on wound closure, HO-1 promoter activity, and markers of inflammation and fibrosis were assessed. After seven days, splinted wounds were more than three times larger than non-splinted wounds, demonstrating a delay in wound closure. HO-1 promoter activity rapidly decreased following removal of the (epi)dermis, but was induced in both splinted and non-splinted wounds during skin repair. Splinting induced more HO-1 gene expression in 7-day wounds; however, HO-1 protein expression remained lower in the epidermis, likely due to lower numbers of keratinocytes in the re-epithelialization tissue. Higher numbers of F4/80-positive macrophages, αSMA-positive myofibroblasts, and increased levels of the inflammatory genes IL-1β, TNF-α, and COX-2 were present in 7-day splinted wounds. Surprisingly, mRNA expression of newly formed collagen (type III) was lower in 7-day wounds after splinting, whereas, VEGF and MMP-9 were increased. In summary, these data demonstrate that splinting delays cutaneous wound closure and HO-1 protein induction. The pro-inflammatory environment following splinting may facilitate higher myofibroblast numbers and increase the risk of fibrosis and scar formation. Therefore, inducing HO-1 activity against mechanical stress-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be an interesting strategy to prevent negative effects of surgery on growth and function in patients with orofacial clefts or in patients with

  15. Mechanical Stress Changes the Complex Interplay Between HO-1, Inflammation and Fibrosis, During Excisional Wound Repair.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Niels A J; Suttorp, Maarten; Gerritsen, Marlous M; Wong, Ronald J; van Run-van Breda, Coby; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Brouwer, Katrien M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Carels, Carine E L; Lundvig, Ditte M S; Wagener, Frank A D T G

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stress following surgery or injury can promote pathological wound healing and fibrosis, and lead to functional loss and esthetic problems. Splinted excisional wounds can be used as a model for inducing mechanical stress. The cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is thought to orchestrate the defense against inflammatory and oxidative insults that drive fibrosis. Here, we investigated the activation of the HO-1 system in a splinted and non-splinted full-thickness excisional wound model using HO-1-luc transgenic mice. Effects of splinting on wound closure, HO-1 promoter activity, and markers of inflammation and fibrosis were assessed. After seven days, splinted wounds were more than three times larger than non-splinted wounds, demonstrating a delay in wound closure. HO-1 promoter activity rapidly decreased following removal of the (epi)dermis, but was induced in both splinted and non-splinted wounds during skin repair. Splinting induced more HO-1 gene expression in 7-day wounds; however, HO-1 protein expression remained lower in the epidermis, likely due to lower numbers of keratinocytes in the re-epithelialization tissue. Higher numbers of F4/80-positive macrophages, αSMA-positive myofibroblasts, and increased levels of the inflammatory genes IL-1β, TNF-α, and COX-2 were present in 7-day splinted wounds. Surprisingly, mRNA expression of newly formed collagen (type III) was lower in 7-day wounds after splinting, whereas, VEGF and MMP-9 were increased. In summary, these data demonstrate that splinting delays cutaneous wound closure and HO-1 protein induction. The pro-inflammatory environment following splinting may facilitate higher myofibroblast numbers and increase the risk of fibrosis and scar formation. Therefore, inducing HO-1 activity against mechanical stress-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be an interesting strategy to prevent negative effects of surgery on growth and function in patients with orofacial clefts or in patients with

  16. A Reevaluation of Airborne HO(x) Observations from NASA Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Jennifer; Crawford, James H.; Chen, Gao; Brune, William H.; Faloona, Ian C.; Tan, David; Harder, Hartwig; Martinez, Monica

    2006-01-01

    In-situ observations of tropospheric HO(x) (OH and HO2) obtained during four NASA airborne campaigns (SUCCESS, SONEX, PEM-Tropics B and TRACE-P) are reevaluated using the NASA Langley time-dependent photochemical box model. Special attention is given to previously diagnosed discrepancies between observed and predicted HO2 which increase with higher NO(x) levels and at high solar zenith angles. This analysis shows that much of the model discrepancy at high NO(x) during SUCCESS can be attributed to modeling observations at time-scales too long to capture the nonlinearity of HO(x) chemistry under highly variable conditions for NO(x). Discrepancies at high NO(x) during SONEX can be moderated to a large extent by complete use of all available precursor observations. Differences in kinetic rate coefficients and photolysis frequencies available for previous studies versus current recommendations also explain some of the disparity. Each of these causes is shown to exert greater influence with increasing NO(x) due to both the chemical nonlinearity between HO(x) and NO(x) and the increased sensitivity of HO(x) to changes in sources at high NO(x). In contrast, discrepancies at high solar zenith angles will persist until an adequate nighttime source of HO(x) can be identified. It is important to note that this analysis falls short of fully eliminating the issue of discrepancies between observed and predicted HO(x) for high NO(x) environments. These discrepancies are not resolved with the above causes in other data sets from ground-based field studies. Nevertheless, these results highlight important considerations in the application of box models to observationally based predictions of HO(x) radicals.

  17. Development of a Chemiluminescence Method for Gas-Phase HO2 Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Lloyd, J.; Springston, S.

    2003-12-01

    Hydroperoxyl Radical (HO2) is a highly reactive intermediate species that participates in photochemical processes in the troposphere. Accurate measurement of HO2 will facilitate the verification of the ozone production mechanism used by the atmospheric chemistry community. HO2 is also the major source of H2O2, which is responsible for the oxidation of SO2 in droplets. Here, we describe a new HO2 detection method based on flow injection analysis (FIA) with a chemiluminescence detector. Gas-phase HO2 is first scrubbed into a pH 9 borax buffer solution, then injected into a chemiluminescence detector, where HO2 and its conjugate base O2- react with MCLA, a synthetic analog of the luciferin from the crustacean Cypridina, to emit light at 465 nm. This technique shows high sensitivity (DL = 0.1 nM in liquid phase or 1 pptv in gas phase) and selectivity for the HO2 / O2- system. A unique feature of our technique is the calibration with a radiolytic method that uses a 60Co gamma ray source to quantitatively produce stable aqueous HO2 / O2- standards. This calibration method is highly reproducible, producing an instrument response that varies less than 5% from day to day. We tested our instrument in the meteorology field at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), which is considered a clean remote rural site with background ozone levels about 30 ppbv. On July 17, 2003, a clear sunny day, with a steady NW wind, HO2 started to build up after sunrise and reached a maximum of 9 pptv at about 3 pm local time, approximately two hours after the maximum solar intensity. Our technique has the advantages of simplicity, low cost and ease of operation. It is especially suitable for field measurements, where space and energy resources are usually limited.

  18. Organics Substantially Reduce HO2 Uptake onto Aerosols Containing Transition Metal ions.

    PubMed

    Lakey, Pascale S J; George, Ingrid J; Baeza-Romero, Maria T; Whalley, Lisa K; Heard, Dwayne E

    2016-03-10

    A HO2 mass accommodation coefficient of α = 0.23 ± 0.07 was measured onto submicron copper(II)-doped ammonium sulfate aerosols at a relative humidity of 60 ± 3%, at 293 ± 2 K and at an initial HO2 concentration of ∼ 1 × 10(9) molecules cm(-3) by using an aerosol flow tube coupled to a sensitive fluorescence assay by gas expansion (FAGE) HO2 detection system. The effect upon the HO2 uptake coefficient γ of adding different organic species (malonic acid, citric acid, 1,2-diaminoethane, tartronic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and oxalic acid) into the copper(II)-doped aerosols was investigated. The HO2 uptake coefficient decreased steadily from the mass accommodation value to γ = 0.008 ± 0.009 when EDTA was added in a one-to-one molar ratio with the copper(II) ions, and to γ = 0.003 ± 0.004 when oxalic acid was added into the aerosol in a ten-to-one molar ratio with the copper(II). EDTA binds strongly to copper(II) ions, potentially making them unavailable for catalytic destruction of HO2, and could also be acting as a surfactant or changing the viscosity of the aerosol. The addition of oxalic acid to the aerosol potentially forms low-volatility copper-oxalate complexes that reduce the uptake of HO2 either by changing the viscosity of the aerosol or by causing precipitation out of the aerosol forming a coating. It is likely that there is a high enough oxalate to copper(II) ion ratio in many types of atmospheric aerosols to decrease the HO2 uptake coefficient. No observable change in the HO2 uptake coefficient was measured when the other organic species (malonic acid, citric acid, 1,2-diaminoethane, and tartronic acid) were added in a ten-to-one molar ratio with the copper(II) ions.

  19. Antigenic diversity of Brazilian isolates of HoBi-like pestiviruses.

    PubMed

    Dias, R K; Cargnelutti, J F; Weber, M N; Canal, C W; Bauermann, F V; Ridpath, J F; Weiblen, R; Flores, E F

    2017-05-01

    Hobi-like viruses comprise an unclassified group of bovine pestiviruses related to bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1) and 2 (BVDV-2). These viruses were originally identified in fetal bovine serum from Brazilian origin and, subsequently, isolated from diseased animals in several countries. Herein we performed an antigenic characterization of eight Brazilian HoBi-like viruses isolated from persistently infected (PI) animals and from gastroenteric disease (2007-2015). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 5' unstranslated region (UTR) clustered these viruses with other HoBi-like viruses from European and Asiatic origin. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) binding indicated variability in the Hobi-like virus glycoprotein E2 and significant differences from the homologous BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 glycoprotein. Analysis of antigenic relatedness based on virus-neutralizing titers using virus-specific antisera revealed that HoBi-like viruses are antigenically very different from BVDV-1 and, to a lesser extent, from BVDV-2. Cross-neutralizing assays between pairs of HoBi-like viruses and their respective antisera indicated the existence of antigenic variability among these viruses, even for viruses isolated from the same herd in different occasions. Moreover, the identification of a HoBi-like isolate with low antigenic similarity with the other isolates indicates the potential existence of antigenic subgroups among HoBi-like virus isolates. Finally, sera of lambs immunized with commercial BVDV vaccines showed low or undetectable neutralizing activity against HoBi-like isolates. These results indicate significant antigenic differences between BVDV genotypes and Brazilian HoBi-like viruses and the existence of antigenic variability within this atypical group of pestiviruses. These findings extend the knowledge about the antigenic diversity of HoBi-like viruses and reinforce the need for their inclusion in current BVDV vaccines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Downregulation of Heme Oxygenase 1 (HO-1) Activity in Hematopoietic Cells Enhances Their Engraftment After Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Adamiak, Mateusz; Moore, Joseph B; Zhao, John; Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Grubczak, Kamil; Rzeszotek, Sylwia; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is an inducible stress-response enzyme that not only catalyzes the degradation of heme (e.g., released from erythrocytes) but also has an important function in various physiological and pathophysiological states associated with cellular stress, such as ischemic/reperfusion injury. HO-1 has a well-documented anti-inflammatory potential, and HO-1 has been reported to have a negative effect on adhesion and migration of neutrophils in acute inflammation in a model of peritonitis. This finding is supported by our recent observation that hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) from HO-1 KO mice are easy mobilizers, since they respond better to peripheral blood chemotactic gradients than wild-type littermates. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that transient inhibition of HO-1 by nontoxic small-molecule inhibitors would enhance migration of HSPCs in response to bone marrow chemoattractants and thereby facilitate their homing. To directly address this issue, we generated several human hematopoietic cell lines in which HO-1 was upregulated or downregulated. We also exposed murine and human BM-derived cells to small-molecule activators and inhibitors of HO-1. Our results indicate that HO-1 is an inhibitor of hematopoietic cell migration in response to crucial BM homing chemoattractants such as stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Most importantly, our in vitro and in vivo animal experiments demonstrate for the first time that transiently inhibiting HO-1 activity in HSPCs by small-molecule inhibitors improves HSPC engraftment. We propose that this simple and inexpensive strategy could be employed in the clinical setting to improve engraftment of HSPCs, particularly in those situations in which the number of HSPCs available for transplant is limited (e.g., when transplanting umbilical cord blood).