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Sample records for mu-opioid receptor knockout

  1. Increased gabaergic input to ventral tegmental area dopaminergic neurons associated with decreased cocaine reinforcement in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Mathon, D S; Lesscher, H M B; Gerrits, M A F M; Kamal, A; Pintar, J E; Schuller, A G P; Spruijt, B M; Burbach, J P H; Smidt, M P; van Ree, J M; Ramakers, G M J

    2005-01-01

    There is general agreement that dopaminergic neurons projecting from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex play a key role in drug reinforcement. The activity of these neurons is strongly modulated by the inhibitory and excitatory input they receive. Activation of mu-opioid receptors, located on GABAergic neurons in the VTA, causes hyperpolarization of these GABAergic neurons, thereby causing a disinhibition of VTA dopaminergic neurons. This effect of mu-opioid receptors upon GABA neurotransmission is a likely mechanism for mu-opioid receptor modulation of drug reinforcement. We studied mu-opioid receptor signaling in relation to cocaine reinforcement in wild-type and mu-opioid receptor knockout mice using a cocaine self-administration paradigm and in vitro electrophysiology. Cocaine self-administration was reduced in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice, suggesting a critical role of mu-opioid receptors in cocaine reinforcement. The frequency of spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents onto dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area was increased in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice compared with wild-type controls, while the frequency of spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents was unaltered. The reduced cocaine self-administration and increased GABAergic input to VTA dopaminergic neurons in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice supports the notion that suppression of GABAergic input onto dopaminergic neurons in the VTA contributes to mu-opioid receptor modulation of cocaine reinforcement. PMID:15664692

  2. Abolished thermal and mechanical antinociception but retained visceral chemical antinociception induced by butorphanol in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ide, Soichiro; Minami, Masabumi; Ishihara, Kumatoshi; Uhl, George R; Satoh, Masamichi; Sora, Ichiro; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2008-06-01

    Butorphanol is hypothesized to induce analgesia via opioid pathways, although the precise mechanisms for its effects remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of the mu-opioid receptor (MOP) in thermal, mechanical, and visceral chemical antinociception induced by butorphanol using MOP knockout (KO) mice. Butorphanol-induced thermal antinociception, assessed by the hot-plate and tail-flick tests, was significantly reduced in heterozygous and abolished in homozygous MOP-KO mice compared with wildtype mice. The results obtained from our butorphanol-induced mechanical antinociception experiments, assessed by the Randall-Selitto test, were similar to the results obtained from the thermal antinociception experiments in these mice. Interestingly, however, butorphanol retained its ability to induce significant visceral chemical antinociception, assessed by the writhing test, in homozygous MOP-KO mice. The butorphanol-induced visceral chemical antinociception that was retained in homozygous MOP-KO mice was completely blocked by pretreatment with nor-binaltorphimine, a kappa-opioid receptor (KOP) antagonist. In vitro binding and cyclic adenosine monophosphate assays also showed that butorphanol possessed higher affinity for KOPs and MOPs than for delta-opioid receptors. These results molecular pharmacologically confirmed previous studies implicating MOPs, and partially KOPs, in mediating butorphanol-induced analgesia. PMID:18417173

  3. Mu Opioid Receptors on Primary Afferent Nav1.8 Neurons Contribute to Opiate-Induced Analgesia: Insight from Conditional Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Karchewski, Laurie; Gardon, Olivier; Matifas, Audrey; Filliol, Dominique; Becker, Jérôme A. J.; Wood, John N.; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Gaveriaux-Ruff, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Opiates are powerful drugs to treat severe pain, and act via mu opioid receptors distributed throughout the nervous system. Their clinical use is hampered by centrally-mediated adverse effects, including nausea or respiratory depression. Here we used a genetic approach to investigate the potential of peripheral mu opioid receptors as targets for pain treatment. We generated conditional knockout (cKO) mice in which mu opioid receptors are deleted specifically in primary afferent Nav1.8-positive neurons. Mutant animals were compared to controls for acute nociception, inflammatory pain, opiate-induced analgesia and constipation. There was a 76% decrease of mu receptor-positive neurons and a 60% reduction of mu-receptor mRNA in dorsal root ganglia of cKO mice. Mutant mice showed normal responses to heat, mechanical, visceral and chemical stimuli, as well as unchanged morphine antinociception and tolerance to antinociception in models of acute pain. Inflammatory pain developed similarly in cKO and controls mice after Complete Freund’s Adjuvant. In the inflammation model, however, opiate-induced (morphine, fentanyl and loperamide) analgesia was reduced in mutant mice as compared to controls, and abolished at low doses. Morphine-induced constipation remained intact in cKO mice. We therefore genetically demonstrate for the first time that mu opioid receptors partly mediate opiate analgesia at the level of Nav1.8-positive sensory neurons. In our study, this mechanism operates under conditions of inflammatory pain, but not nociception. Previous pharmacology suggests that peripheral opiates may be clinically useful, and our data further demonstrate that Nav1.8 neuron-associated mu opioid receptors are feasible targets to alleviate some forms of persistent pain. PMID:24069332

  4. Mu opioid receptor binding sites in human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pilapil, C.; Welner, S.; Magnan, J.; Zamir, N.; Quirion, R.

    1986-01-01

    Our experiments focused on the examination of the distribution of mu opioid receptor binding sites in normal human brain using the highly selective ligand (/sup 3/H)DAGO, in both membrane binding assay and in vitro receptor autoradiography. Mu opioid binding sites are very discretely distributed in human brain with high densities of sites found in the posterior amygdala, caudate, putamen, hypothalamus and certain cortical areas. Moreover the autoradiographic distribution of (/sup 3/H)DAGO binding sites clearly reveals the discrete lamination (layers I and III-IV) of mu sites in cortical areas.

  5. Mu Opioid Receptor Gene: New Point Mutations in Opioid Addicts

    PubMed Central

    Dinarvand, Amin; Goodarzi, Ali; Vousooghi, Nasim; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Dinarvand, Rasoul; Ostadzadeh, Fahimeh; Khoshzaban, Ahad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in mu opioid receptor gene and drug addiction has been shown in various studies. Here, we have evaluated the existence of polymorphisms in exon 3 of this gene in Iranian population and investigated the possible association between these mutations and opioid addiction. Methods 79 opioid-dependent subjects (55 males, 24 females) and 134 non-addict or control individuals (74 males, 60 females) participated in the study. Genomic DNA was extracted from volunteers’ peripheral blood and exon 3 of the mu opioid receptor gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) whose products were then sequenced. Results Three different heterozygote polymorphisms were observed in 3 male individuals: 759T > C and 877G > A mutations were found in 2 control volunteers and 1043G > C substitution was observed in an opioid-addicted subject. Association between genotype and opioid addiction for each mutation was not statistically significant. Discussion It seems that the sample size used in our study is not enough to confirm or reject any association between 759T > C, 877G > A and 1043G > C substitutions in exon 3 of the mu opioid receptor gene and opioid addiction susceptibility in Iranian population. PMID:25436079

  6. Splice variation of the mu-opioid receptor and its effect on the action of opioids

    PubMed Central

    Droney, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Summary points An individual’s response to opioids is influenced by a complex combination of genetic, molecular and phenotypic factors. Intra- and inter-individual variations in response to mu opioids have led to the suggestion that mu-opioid receptor subtypes exist. Scientists have now proven that mu-opioid receptor subtypes exist and that they occur through a mechanism promoting protein diversity, called alternative splicing. The ability of mu opioids to differentially activate splice variants may explain some of the clinical differences observed between mu opioids. This article examines how differential activation of splice variants by mu opioids occurs through alternative mu-opioid receptor binding, through differential receptor activation, and as a result of the distinct distribution of variants located regionally and at the cellular level. PMID:26516547

  7. Orvinols with Mixed Kappa/Mu Opioid Receptor Agonist Activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dual-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonist and mu opioid receptor (MOR) partial agonist ligands have been put forward as potential treatment agents for cocaine and other psychostimulant abuse. Members of the orvinol series of ligands are known for their high binding affinity to both KOR and MOR, but efficacy at the individual receptors has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study, it is shown that a predictive model for efficacy at KOR can be derived, with efficacy being controlled by the length of the group attached to C20 and by the introduction of branching into the side chain. In vivo evaluation of two ligands with the desired in vitro profile confirms both display KOR, and to a lesser extent MOR, activity in an analgesic assay suggesting that, in this series, in vitro measures of efficacy using the [35S]GTPγS assay are predictive of the in vivo profile. PMID:23438330

  8. Orvinols with mixed kappa/mu opioid receptor agonist activity.

    PubMed

    Greedy, Benjamin M; Bradbury, Faye; Thomas, Mark P; Grivas, Konstantinos; Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Archambeau, Ashley; Bosse, Kelly; Clark, Mary J; Aceto, Mario; Lewis, John W; Traynor, John R; Husbands, Stephen M

    2013-04-25

    Dual-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonist and mu opioid receptor (MOR) partial agonist ligands have been put forward as potential treatment agents for cocaine and other psychostimulant abuse. Members of the orvinol series of ligands are known for their high binding affinity to both KOR and MOR, but efficacy at the individual receptors has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study, it is shown that a predictive model for efficacy at KOR can be derived, with efficacy being controlled by the length of the group attached to C20 and by the introduction of branching into the side chain. In vivo evaluation of two ligands with the desired in vitro profile confirms both display KOR, and to a lesser extent MOR, activity in an analgesic assay suggesting that, in this series, in vitro measures of efficacy using the [(35)S]GTPγS assay are predictive of the in vivo profile.

  9. Mu Opioid Receptor Actions in the Lateral Habenula

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Elyssa B.; Fields, Howard L.

    2016-01-01

    Increased activity of lateral habenula (LHb) neurons is correlated with aversive states including pain, opioid abstinence, rodent models of depression, and failure to receive a predicted reward. Agonists at the mu opioid receptor (MOR) are among the most powerful rewarding and pain relieving drugs. Injection of the MOR agonist morphine directly into the habenula produces analgesia, raising the possibility that MOR acts locally within the LHb. Consequently, we examined the synaptic actions of MOR agonists in the LHb using whole cell patch clamp recording. We found that the MOR selective agonist DAMGO inhibits a subset of LHb neurons both directly and by inhibiting glutamate release onto these cells. Paradoxically, DAMGO also presynaptically inhibited GABA release onto most LHb neurons. The behavioral effect of MOR activation will thus depend upon both the level of intrinsic neuronal activity in the LHb and the balance of activity in glutamate and GABA inputs to different LHb neuronal populations. PMID:27427945

  10. Mu Opioid Receptor Actions in the Lateral Habenula.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Elyssa B; Fields, Howard L

    2016-01-01

    Increased activity of lateral habenula (LHb) neurons is correlated with aversive states including pain, opioid abstinence, rodent models of depression, and failure to receive a predicted reward. Agonists at the mu opioid receptor (MOR) are among the most powerful rewarding and pain relieving drugs. Injection of the MOR agonist morphine directly into the habenula produces analgesia, raising the possibility that MOR acts locally within the LHb. Consequently, we examined the synaptic actions of MOR agonists in the LHb using whole cell patch clamp recording. We found that the MOR selective agonist DAMGO inhibits a subset of LHb neurons both directly and by inhibiting glutamate release onto these cells. Paradoxically, DAMGO also presynaptically inhibited GABA release onto most LHb neurons. The behavioral effect of MOR activation will thus depend upon both the level of intrinsic neuronal activity in the LHb and the balance of activity in glutamate and GABA inputs to different LHb neuronal populations. PMID:27427945

  11. Mu opioid receptor polymorphism, early social adversity, and social traits.

    PubMed

    Carver, Charles S; Johnson, Sheri L; Kim, Youngmee

    2016-10-01

    A polymorphism in the mu opioid receptor gene OPRM1 (rs1799971) has been investigated for its role in sensitivity to social contexts. Evidence suggests that the G allele of this polymorphism is associated with higher levels of sensitivity. This study tested for main effects of the polymorphism and its interaction with a self-report measure of childhood adversity as an index of negative environment. Outcomes were several personality measures relevant to social connection. Significant interactions were obtained, such that the negative impact of childhood adversity on personality was greater among G carriers than among A homozygotes on measures of agreeableness, interdependence, anger proneness, hostility, authentic pride, life engagement, and an index of (mostly negative) feelings coloring one's world view. Findings support the role of OPRM1 in sensitivity to negative environments. Limitations are noted, including the lack of a measure of advantageous social environment to assess sensitivity to positive social contexts.

  12. Ligand-Specific Regulation of the Endogenous Mu-Opioid Receptor by Chronic Treatment with Mu-Opioid Peptide Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Murányi, Marianna; Cinar, Resat; Kékesi, Orsolya; Birkás, Erika; Fábián, Gabriella; Bozó, Beáta; Zentai, András; Tóth, Géza; Kicsi, Emese Gabriella; Mácsai, Mónika; Szabó, Gyula; Szücs, Mária

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of the endomorphins (EM), the postulated endogenous peptide agonists of the mu-opioid receptors, several analogues have been synthesized to improve their binding and pharmacological profiles. We have shown previously that a new analogue, cis-1S,2R-aminocyclohexanecarboxylic acid2-endomorphin-2 (ACHC-EM2), had elevated mu-receptor affinity, selectivity, and proteolytic stability over the parent compound. In the present work, we have studied its antinociceptive effects and receptor regulatory processes. ACHC-EM2 displayed a somewhat higher (60%) acute antinociceptive response than the parent peptide, EM2 (45%), which peaked at 10 min after intracerebroventricular (icv) administration in the rat tail-flick test. Analgesic tolerance developed to the antinociceptive effect of ACHC-EM2 upon its repeated icv injection that was complete by a 10-day treatment. This was accompanied by attenuated coupling of mu-sites to G-proteins in subcellular fractions of rat brain. Also, the density of mu-receptors was upregulated by about 40% in the light membrane fraction, with no detectable changes in surface binding. Distinct receptor regulatory processes were noted in subcellular fractions of rat brains made tolerant by the prototypic full mu-agonist peptide, DAMGO, and its chloromethyl ketone derivative, DAMCK. These results are discussed in light of the recently discovered phenomenon, that is, the “so-called biased agonism” or “functional selectivity”. PMID:24350273

  13. Prolonged central mu-opioid receptor occupancy after single and repeated nalmefene dosing.

    PubMed

    Ingman, Kimmo; Hagelberg, Nora; Aalto, Sargo; Någren, Kjell; Juhakoski, Auni; Karhuvaara, Sakari; Kallio, Antero; Oikonen, Vesa; Hietala, Jarmo; Scheinin, Harry

    2005-12-01

    The opioid antagonist nalmefene offers an alternative to traditional pharmacological treatments for alcoholism. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between nalmefene plasma concentration and central mu-opioid receptor occupancy after a clinically effective dose (20 mg, orally). Pharmacokinetics and mu-opioid receptor occupancy of nalmefene after single and repeated dosing over 7 days was studied in 12 healthy subjects. Serial blood samples were obtained after both dosings, and pharmacokinetic parameters for nalmefene and main metabolites were determined. Central mu-opioid receptor occupancy of nalmefene was measured with positron emission tomography (PET) and [(11)C]carfentanil at four time points (3, 26, 50, 74 h) after both dosings. Nalmefene was rapidly absorbed in all subjects. The mean t(1/2) of nalmefene was 13.4 h after single and repeated dosing. The accumulation of nalmefene and its main metabolites in plasma during the repeated dosing period was as expected for a drug with linear pharmacokinetics, and steady-state was reached for all analytes. Both nalmefene dosings resulted in a very high occupancy at mu-opioid receptors (87-100%), and the decline in the occupancy was similar after both dosings but clearly slower than the decline in the plasma concentration of nalmefene or metabolites. High nalmefene occupancy (83-100%) persisted at 26 h after the dosings. The prolonged mu-opioid receptor occupancy by nalmefene indicates slow dissociation of the drug from mu-opioid receptors. These results support the rational of administering nalmefene when needed before alcohol drinking, and they additionally suggest that a high mu-opioid receptor occupancy can be maintained when nalmefene is taken once daily.

  14. Opioid agonist and antagonist treatment differentially regulates immunoreactive mu-opioid receptors and dynamin-2 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yoburn, Byron C; Purohit, Vishal; Patel, Kaushal; Zhang, Qiuyu

    2004-09-13

    Opioid agonists and antagonists can regulate the density of mu-opioid receptors in whole animal and in cell culture. High intrinsic efficacy agonists (e.g., etorphine), but not lower intrinsic efficacy agonists (e.g., morphine), produce mu-opioid receptor down-regulation and can alter the abundance of mu-opioid receptor mRNA. Conversely, opioid antagonists substantially increase the density of mu-opioid receptors without changing its mRNA. Mu-opioid receptor up-regulation has been associated with decreases in the trafficking protein dynamin-2, whereas mu-opioid receptor down-regulation produces an increase in dynamin-2 abundance. To probe the differences between opioid agonist and antagonist-induced mu-opioid receptor regulation, the current study determined changes in mu-opioid receptor density using a combined radioligand binding ([3H] DAMGO) and quantitative Western blotting approach in mouse spinal cord. Furthermore, the differences between intermittent and continuous dosing protocols were evaluated. Continuous (7-8 days) s.c. infusions of naloxone (5 mg/kg/day) or naltrexone (15 mg s.c. implant pellet) increased mu-opioid receptor density in radioligand binding assays (approximately +80%) in mouse spinal cord and down-regulated dynamin-2 abundance (approximately -30%), but had no effect on the abundance of immunoreactive mu-opioid receptor. Continuous (7 days) s.c. infusion of etorphine (200 microg/kg/day) decreased immunoreactive mu-opioid receptor (approximately -35%) and [3H] DAMGO binding (approximately -30%), and concurrently increased dynamin-2 abundance (approximately +40%). Continuous (7 days) morphine infusion (40 mg/kg/day plus 25 mg s.c. implant pellet) had no effect on any outcome measure. Delivery of the same daily dose of etorphine or naloxone using intermittent (every 24 h for 7 days) s.c. administration had no effect on immunoreactive mu-opioid receptor, [3H] DAMGO binding or dynamin-2 abundance. These data indicate that mu-opioid receptor

  15. The presence of the mu-opioid receptor in the isthmus of mare oviduct.

    PubMed

    Desantis, S; Albrizio, M; Ventriglia, G; Deflorio, M; Guaricci, A C; Minoia, R; De Metrio, G

    2008-05-01

    The presence of the mu-opioid receptor and the type of glycosylation in the third extra-cellular loop of this receptor was investigated in the isthmus of mare oviduct during oestrus by means of immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry combined with enzymatic (N-glycosidase F and O-glycosidase) and chemical (beta-elimination) treatments. Immunoblotting analysis showed that the mu-opioid receptor consists of two peptides with molecular weights of around 65 and 50 kDa. After N-deglycosylation with N-glycosidase F an additional immunoreactive peptide was observed at around 30 KDa. The cleavage of O-glycans by O-glycosidase failed in immunoblotting as well as in immunohistochemistry investigations, revealing that the third extra-cellular loop of the mu-opioid receptor expressed in mare isthmus oviduct contains some modifications of the Galbeta(1-3)GalNAc core binding to serine or threonine. Immunohistochemistry revealed the mu-opioid receptor in the mucosal epithelium, some stromal cells, muscle cells and blood vessels. In ciliated cells the mu-opioid receptor showed N-linked glycans, since the immunoreactivity was abolished after N-glycosidase F treatment, whereas it was preserved in the apical region after beta-elimination. Most non-ciliated cells expressed the mu-opioid receptor with both N- and O-linked oligosaccharides, as revealed by the abolition of immunostaining after N-glycosidase F and beta-elimination. Stromal cells, endothelial and muscle cells of blood vessels expressed the mu-opioid receptor containing both N- and O-linked oligosaccharides. Myosalpinx myocytes expressed the mu-opioid receptor with O-linked oligosaccharides. The immunopositive myocytes formed a circular coat in the intrinsic musculature, whereas they were arranged in some isolated, oblique bundles in the extrinsic musculature. In conclusion, the mu-opioid receptor could have a role in the production and the movement of isthmus lumen content that contributes to ensuring the effective

  16. The analgesic efficacy of fentanyl: relationship to tolerance and mu-opioid receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Sirohi, Sunil; Dighe, Shveta V; Walker, Ellen A; Yoburn, Byron C

    2008-11-01

    This study determined if fentanyl analgesic efficacy predicts the magnitude of tolerance and mu-opioid receptor regulation. To estimate efficacy, mice were injected i.p. with saline or clocinnamox (CCAM), an irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist, (0.32-25.6 mg/kg) and 24 h later fentanyl cumulative dose-response studies were conducted. CCAM dose dependently shifted the fentanyl dose-response function to the right. The apparent efficacy (tau) of fentanyl, based on the operational model of agonism, was estimated as 58, indicating that fentanyl is a high analgesic efficacy agonist. Next, mice were infused with fentanyl (1, 2 or 4 mg/kg/day) for 7 days. Controls were implanted with placebo pellets. At the end of 7 days, morphine cumulative dose-response studies or mu-opioid receptor saturation binding studies were conducted. Fentanyl infusions dose dependently decreased morphine potency with the highest fentanyl dose reducing morphine potency by approximately 6 fold. Chronic infusion with fentanyl (4 mg/kg/day) significantly reduced mu-opioid receptor density by 28% without altering affinity, whereas lower infusion doses had no effect. Taken together, the present results strengthen the proposal that opioid analgesic efficacy predicts mu-opioid receptor regulation and the magnitude of tolerance.

  17. Hydromorphone efficacy and treatment protocol impact on tolerance and mu-opioid receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Priyank; Sunkaraneni, Soujanya; Sirohi, Sunil; Dighe, Shveta V; Walker, Ellen A; Yoburn, Byron C

    2008-11-12

    This study examined the antinociceptive (analgesic) efficacy of hydromorphone and hydromorphone-induced tolerance and regulation of mu-opioid receptor density. Initially s.c. hydromorphone's time of peak analgesic (tail-flick) effect (45 min) and ED50 using standard and cumulative dosing protocols (0.22 mg/kg, 0.37 mg/kg, respectively) were determined. The apparent analgesic efficacy (tau) of hydromorphone was then estimated using the operational model of agonism and the irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist clocinnamox. Mice were injected with clocinnamox (0.32-25.6 mg/kg, i.p.) and 24 h later, the analgesic potency of hydromorphone was determined. The tau value for hydromorphone was 35, which suggested that hydromorphone is a lower analgesic efficacy opioid agonist. To examine hydromorphone-induced tolerance, mice were continuously infused s.c. with hydromorphone (2.1-31.5 mg/kg/day) for 7 days and then morphine cumulative dose response studies were performed. Other groups of mice were injected with hydromorphone (2.2-22 mg/kg/day) once, or intermittently every 24 h for 7 days. Twenty-four hours after the last injection, mice were tested using morphine cumulative dosing studies. There was more tolerance with infusion treatments compared to intermittent treatment. When compared to higher analgesic efficacy opioids, hydromorphone infusions induced substantially more tolerance. Finally, the effect of chronic infusion (31.5 mg/kg/day) and 7 day intermittent (22 mg/kg/day) hydromorphone treatment on spinal cord mu-opioid receptor density was determined. Hydromorphone did not produce any change in mu-opioid receptor density following either treatment. These results support suggestions that analgesic efficacy is correlated with tolerance magnitude and regulation of mu-opioid receptors when opioid agonists are continuously administered. Taken together, these studies indicate that analgesic efficacy and treatment protocol are important in determining tolerance and

  18. Shadows across mu-Star? Constitutively active mu-opioid receptors revisited.

    PubMed

    Connor, Mark

    2009-04-01

    Constitutively active mu-opioid receptors (mu* receptors) are reported to be formed following prolonged agonist treatment of cells or whole animals. mu* receptors signal in the absence of activating ligand and a blockade of mu* activation of G-proteins by naloxone and naltrexone has been suggested to underlie the profound withdrawal syndrome precipitated by these antagonists in vivo. In this issue of the Journal, Divin et al. examined whether treatment of C6 glioma cells with mu-opioid receptor agonists produced constitutively active mu-opioid receptors or other commonly reported adaptations to prolonged agonist treatment. Adenylyl cyclase superactivation was readily apparent following agonist treatment but there was no evidence of the formation of constitutively active mu-opioid receptors. This result challenges the notion that prolonged agonist exposure inevitably produces mu* receptors, and is consistent with many studies of adaptations in neurons produced by chronic agonist treatment. The investigators provide no explanation of their failure to see mu* receptors in C6 cells, but this is perhaps understandable because the molecular nature of mu* receptors remains elusive, and the precise mechanisms that lead to their formation are unknown. Without knowing exactly what mu* receptors are, how they are formed and how they signal, understanding their role in cellular adaptations to prolonged opioid treatment will remain impossible. Studies such as this should refocus attention on establishing the molecular mechanisms that underlie that phenomenon of mu* receptors. PMID:19368530

  19. Potent Dmt-Tic pharmacophoric delta- and mu-opioid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingyou; Fujita, Yoshio; Shiotani, Kimitaka; Miyazaki, Anna; Tsuda, Yuko; Ambo, Akihiro; Sasaki, Yusuke; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Marczak, Ewa; Bryant, Sharon D; Salvadori, Severo; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Okada, Yoshio

    2005-12-15

    A series of dimeric Dmt-Tic (2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid) analogues (8-14, 18-22) were covalently linked through diaminoalkane and symmetric or asymmetric 3,6-diaminoalkyl-2(1H)-pyrazinone moieties. All the compounds exhibited high affinity for both delta-opioid receptors [Ki(delta) = 0.06-1.53 nM] and mu-opioid receptors [Ki(mu) = 1.37-5.72 nM], resulting in moderate delta-receptor selectivity [Ki(mu)/Ki(delta) = 3-46]. Regardless of the type of linker between the Dmt-Tic pharmacophores, delta-opioid-mediated antagonism was extraordinarily high in all analogues (pA2 = 10.42-11.28), while in vitro agonism (MVD and GPI bioassays) was essentially absent (ca. 3 to >10 microM). While an unmodified N-terminus (9, 13, 18) revealed weak mu-opioid antagonism (pA2 = 6.78-6.99), N,N'-dimethylation (21, 22), which negatively impacts on mu-opioid-associated agonism (Balboni et al., Bioorg. Med. Chem. 2003, 11, 5435-5441), markedly enhanced mu-opioid antagonism (pA2 = 8.34 and 7.71 for 21 and 22, respectively) without affecting delta-opioid activity. These data are the first evidence that a single dimeric opioid ligand containing the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore exhibits highly potent delta- and mu-opioid antagonist activities.

  20. Increased agonist affinity at the mu-opioid receptor induced by prolonged agonist exposure

    PubMed Central

    Birdsong, William T.; Arttamangkul, Seksiri; Clark, Mary J.; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.; Traynor, John R.; Williams, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to high-efficacy agonists results in desensitization of the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Desensitized receptors are thought to be unable to couple to G-proteins, preventing downstream signaling, however the changes to the receptor itself are not well characterized. In the current study, confocal imaging was used to determine whether desensitizing conditions cause a change in agonist-receptor interactions. Using rapid solution exchange, the binding kinetics of fluorescently labeled opioid agonist, dermorphin Alexa594 (derm A594), to MORs was measured in live cells. The affinity of derm A594 binding increased following prolonged treatment of cells with multiple agonists that are known to cause receptor desensitization. In contrast, binding of a fluorescent antagonist, naltrexamine Alexa 594, was unaffected by similar agonist pre-treatment. The increased affinity of derm A594 for the receptor was long-lived and partially reversed after a 45 min wash. Treatment of the cells with pertussis toxin did not alter the increase in affinity of the derm A594 for MOR. Likewise the affinity of derm A594 for MORs expressed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from arrestin 1 and 2 knockout animals increased following treatment of the cells with the desensitization protocol. Thus, opioid receptors were “imprinted” with a memory of prior agonist exposure that was independent of G-protein activation or arrestin binding that altered subsequent agonist-receptor interactions. The increased affinity suggests that acute desensitization results in a long lasting but reversible conformational change in the receptor. PMID:23447620

  1. Mu opioid receptor modulation of somatodendritic dopamine overflow: GABA and glutamatergic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chefer, V.I.; Denoroy, L.; Zapata, A.; Shippenberg, T.S.

    2009-01-01

    Mu opioid receptor (MOR) regulation of somatodendritic dopamine neurotransmission in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) was investigated using conventional microdialysis in freely moving rats and mice. Reverse dialysis of the MOR agonist, DAMGO (50, 100 μM), into the VTA of rats produced a concentration-dependent increase in dialysate DA concentrations. Basal dopamine overflow in the VTA was unaltered in mice lacking the MOR gene. However, basal GABA overflow in these animals was significantly increased, while glutamate overflow was decreased. Intra-VTA perfusion of DAMGO to wildtype (WT) mice increased dopamine overflow. GABA concentrations were decreased whereas glutamate concentrations in the VTA were unaltered. Consistent with the loss of MOR, no effect of DAMGO was observed in MOR knockout (KO) mice. These data provide the first direct demonstration of tonically active MOR systems in the VTA that regulate basal glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in this region. We hypothesize that increased GABAergic neurotransmission following constitutive deletion of MOR is due to the elimination of a tonic inhibitory influence of MOR on GABA neurons in the VTA, whereas decreased glutamatergic neurotransmission in MOR KO mice is a consequence of intensified GABA tone on glutamatergic neurons and/or terminals. As a consequence, somatodendritic dopamine release is unaltered. Furthermore, MOR KO exhibit no positive correlation between basal dopamine levels and the glutamate/GABA ratio observed in WT animals. Together our findings indicate a critical role of VTA MOR in maintaining an intricate balance between excitatory and inhibitory inputs to dopaminergic neurons. PMID:19614973

  2. Interactions between cannabinoid receptor agonists and mu opioid receptor agonists in rhesus monkeys discriminating fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2016-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists such as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) enhance some (antinociceptive) but not other (positive reinforcing) effects of mu opioid receptor agonists, suggesting that cannabinoids might be combined with opioids to treat pain without increasing, and possibly decreasing, abuse. The degree to which cannabinoids enhance antinociceptive effects of opioids varies across drugs insofar as Δ(9)-THC and the synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 increase the potency of some mu opioid receptor agonists (e.g., fentanyl) more than others (e.g., nalbuphine). It is not known whether interactions between cannabinoids and opioids vary similarly for other (abuse-related) effects. This study examined whether Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 differentially impact the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine in monkeys (n=4) discriminating 0.01mg/kg of fentanyl (s.c.) from saline. Fentanyl (0.00178-0.0178mg/kg) and nalbuphine (0.01-0.32mg/kg) dose-dependently increased drug-lever responding. Neither Δ(9)-THC (0.032-1.0mg/kg) nor CP55940 (0.0032-0.032mg/kg) enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl or nalbuphine; however, doses of Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 that shifted the nalbuphine dose-effect curve markedly to the right and/or down were less effective or ineffective in shifting the fentanyl dose-effect curve. The mu opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (0.032mg/kg) attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine similarly. These data indicate that the discriminative stimulus effects of nalbuphine are more sensitive to attenuation by cannabinoids than those of fentanyl. That the discriminative stimulus effects of some opioids are more susceptible to modification by drugs from other classes has implications for developing maximally effective therapeutic drug mixtures with reduced abuse liability. PMID:27184925

  3. mu-Opioid receptor downregulation contributes to opioid tolerance in vivo.

    PubMed

    Stafford, K; Gomes, A B; Shen, J; Yoburn, B C

    2001-01-01

    The present study examined the contribution of downregulation of mu-opioid receptors to opioid tolerance in an intact animal model. Mice were implanted subcutaneously with osmotic minipumps that infused etorphine (50-250 microg/kg/day) for 7 days. Other mice were implanted subcutaneously with a morphine pellet (25 mg) or a morphine pellet plus an osmotic minipump that infused morphine (5-40 mg/kg/day) for 7 days. Controls were implanted with an inert placebo pellet. At the end of treatment, pumps and pellets were removed, and saturation binding studies were conducted in whole brain ([3H]DAMGO) or morphine and etorphine analgesic ED(50)s were determined (tail-flick). Morphine tolerance increased linearly with the infusion dose of morphine (ED(50) shift at highest infusion dose, 4.76). No significant downregulation of mu-receptors in whole brain was observed at the highest morphine treatment dose. Etorphine produced dose-dependent downregulation of mu-opioid receptor density and tolerance (ED(50) shift at highest infusion dose, 6.97). Downregulation of mu-receptors only occurred at the higher etorphine infusion doses (> or =150 microg/kg/day). Unlike morphine tolerance, the magnitude of etorphine tolerance was a nonlinear function of the dose and increased markedly at infusion doses that produced downregulation. These results suggest that mu-opioid receptor downregulation contributes to opioid tolerance in vivo. Therefore, opioid tolerance appears to rely upon both "receptor density-dependent" and " receptor density-independent" mechanisms.

  4. Specific activation of the mu opioid receptor (MOR) by endomorphin 1 and endomorphin 2.

    PubMed

    Monory, K; Bourin, M C; Spetea, M; Tömböly, C; Tóth, G; Matthes, H W; Kieffer, B L; Hanoune, J; Borsodi, A

    2000-02-01

    The recently discovered endomorphin 1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2) and endomorphin 2 (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2) were investigated with respect to their direct receptor-binding properties, and to their ability to activate G proteins and to inhibit adenylyl cyclase in both cellular and animal models. Both tetrapeptides activated G proteins and inhibited adenylyl cyclase activity in membrane preparations from cells stably expressing the mu opioid receptor, an effect reversed by the mu receptor antagonist CTAP (D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2), but they had no influence on cells stably expressing the delta opioid receptor. To further establish the selectivity of these peptides for the mu opioid receptor, brain preparations of mice lacking the mu opioid receptor gene were used to study their binding and signalling properties. Endomorphin 2, tritiated by a dehalotritiation method resulting in a specific radioactivity of 1.98 TBq/mmol (53.4 Ci/mmol), labelled the brain membranes of wild-type mice with a Kd value of 1.77 nM and a Bmax of 63.33 fmol/mg protein. In membranes of mice lacking the mu receptor gene, no binding was observed, and both endomorphins failed to stimulate [35S]guanosine-5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding and to inhibit adenylyl cyclase. These data show that endomorphins are capable of activating G proteins and inhibiting adenylyl cyclase activity, and all these effects are mediated by the mu opioid receptors.

  5. Mu Opioids and Their Receptors: Evolution of a Concept

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ying-Xian

    2013-01-01

    Opiates are among the oldest medications available to manage a number of medical problems. Although pain is the current focus, early use initially focused upon the treatment of dysentery. Opium contains high concentrations of both morphine and codeine, along with thebaine, which is used in the synthesis of a number of semisynthetic opioid analgesics. Thus, it is not surprising that new agents were initially based upon the morphine scaffold. The concept of multiple opioid receptors was first suggested almost 50 years ago (Martin, 1967), opening the possibility of new classes of drugs, but the morphine-like agents have remained the mainstay in the medical management of pain. Termed mu, our understanding of these morphine-like agents and their receptors has undergone an evolution in thinking over the past 35 years. Early pharmacological studies identified three major classes of receptors, helped by the discovery of endogenous opioid peptides and receptor subtypes—primarily through the synthesis of novel agents. These chemical biologic approaches were then eclipsed by the molecular biology revolution, which now reveals a complexity of the morphine-like agents and their receptors that had not been previously appreciated. PMID:24076545

  6. Human Mu Opioid Receptor (OPRM1A118G) polymorphism is associated with brain mu- opioid receptor binding potential in smokers

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.; Logan, J.; Ray, R.; Ruparel, K.; Newberg, A.; Wileyto, E.P.; Loughead, J.W.; Divgi, C.; Blendy, J.A.; Logan, J.; Zubieta, J.-K.; Lerman, C.

    2011-04-15

    Evidence points to the endogenous opioid system, and the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) in particular, in mediating the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, including nicotine. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human MOR gene (OPRM1 A118G) has been shown to alter receptor protein level in preclinical models and smoking behavior in humans. To clarify the underlying mechanisms for these associations, we conducted an in vivo investigation of the effects of OPRM1 A118G genotype on MOR binding potential (BP{sub ND} or receptor availability). Twenty-two smokers prescreened for genotype (12 A/A, 10 */G) completed two [{sup 11}C] carfentanil positron emission tomography (PET) imaging sessions following overnight abstinence and exposure to a nicotine-containing cigarette and a denicotinized cigarette. Independent of session, smokers homozygous for the wild-type OPRM1 A allele exhibited significantly higher levels of MOR BP{sub ND} than smokers carrying the G allele in bilateral amygdala, left thalamus, and left anterior cingulate cortex. Among G allele carriers, the extent of subjective reward difference (denicotinized versus nicotine cigarette) was associated significantly with MOR BP{sub ND} difference in right amygdala, caudate, anterior cingulate cortex, and thalamus. Future translational investigations can elucidate the role of MORs in nicotine addiction, which may lead to development of novel therapeutics.

  7. Partial purification of the mu opioid receptor irreversibly labeled with (/sup 3/H)b-funaltrexamine

    SciTech Connect

    Liu-Chen, L.Y.; Phillips, C.A.; Tam, S.W.

    1986-03-01

    The mu opioid receptor in bovine striatal membranes was specifically and irreversibly labeled by incubation with 5 nM (/sup 3/H)..beta..-funaltrexamine (approx.-FNA) at 37/sup 0/C for 90 min in the presence of 100 mM NaCl. The specific and irreversible binding of (/sup 3/H)..beta..-FNA as defined by that blocked by 1 /sup +/M naloxone was about 60% of total irreversible binding. The specific irreversible binding was saturable, stereospecific, time-, temperature, and tissue-dependent. Mu opioid ligands were much more potent than delta or kappa ligands in inhibiting the specific irreversible labeling. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of solubilized membranes in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol yielded a major radiolabeled broad band of MW 68-97K daltons, characteristic of a glycoprotein band. This band was not observed in membranes labeled in the presence of excess unlabeled naloxone. The glycoprotein nature of the (/sup 3/H)..beta..-FNA-labeled opioid receptor was confirmed by its binding to a wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose column and its elution with N-acetylglucosamine.

  8. Curvilinear relationships between mu-opioid receptor labeling and undirected song in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Kelm-Nelson, Cynthia A.; Riters, Lauren V.

    2013-01-01

    Female-directed communication in male songbirds has been reasonably well studied; yet, relatively little is known about communication in other social contexts. Songbirds also produce song that is not clearly directed towards another individual (undirected song) when alone or in flocks. Although the precise functions of undirected song may differ across species, this type of song is considered important for flock maintenance, song learning or practice. Past studies show that undirected song is tightly coupled to analgesia and positive affective state, which are both mediated by opioid activity. Furthermore, labeling for the opioid met-enkephalin in the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) correlates positively with undirected song production. We propose that undirected song is facilitated and maintained by opioid receptor activity in the POM and other brain regions involved in affective state, analgesia, and social behavior. To provide insight into this hypothesis, we used immunohistochemistry to examine relationships between undirected song and mu-opioid receptors in male starlings. Polynomial regression analyses revealed significant inverted-U shaped relationships between measures of undirected song and mu-opioid receptor labeling in the POM, medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTm), and periaqueductal gray (PAG). These results suggest that low rates of undirected song may stimulate and/or be maintained by mu-opioid receptor activity; however, it may be that sustained levels of mu-opioid receptor activity associated with high rates of undirected song cause mu-opioid receptor down-regulation. The results indicate that mu-opioid receptor activity in POM, BSTm, and PAG may underlie previous links identified between undirected song, analgesia, and affective state. PMID:23774651

  9. Curvilinear relationships between mu-opioid receptor labeling and undirected song in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Kelm-Nelson, Cynthia A; Riters, Lauren V

    2013-08-21

    Female-directed communication in male songbirds has been reasonably well studied; yet, relatively little is known about communication in other social contexts. Songbirds also produce song that is not clearly directed towards another individual (undirected song) when alone or in flocks. Although the precise functions of undirected song may differ across species, this type of song is considered important for flock maintenance, song learning or practice. Past studies show that undirected song is tightly coupled to analgesia and positive affective state, which are both mediated by opioid activity. Furthermore, labeling for the opioid met-enkephalin in the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) correlates positively with undirected song production. We propose that undirected song is facilitated and maintained by opioid receptor activity in the POM and other brain regions involved in affective state, analgesia, and social behavior. To provide insight into this hypothesis, we used immunohistochemistry to examine relationships between undirected song and mu-opioid receptors in male starlings. Polynomial regression analyses revealed significant inverted-U shaped relationships between measures of undirected song and mu-opioid receptor labeling in the POM, medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTm), and periaqueductal gray (PAG). These results suggest that low rates of undirected song may stimulate and/or be maintained by mu-opioid receptor activity; however, it may be that sustained levels of mu-opioid receptor activity associated with high rates of undirected song cause mu-opioid receptor down-regulation. The results indicate that mu-opioid receptor activity in POM, BSTm, and PAG may underlie previous links identified between undirected song, analgesia, and affective state. PMID:23774651

  10. Mu-opioid receptor down-regulation and tolerance are not equally dependent upon G-protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Benedict A; Shen, Ji; Stafford, Kristi; Patel, Minesh; Yoburn, Byron C

    2002-05-01

    In the present study, the contribution of pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G(i/o)-proteins to opioid tolerance and mu-opioid receptor down-regulation in the mouse were examined. Mice were injected once intracerebroventricularly and intrathecally with PTX (0.1 microg/site). Controls were treated with saline. On the 10th day following PTX treatment, continuous subcutaneous infusion of etorphine (150 or 200 microg/kg/day) or morphine (40 mg/kg/day+25 mg slow-release pellet) was begun. Control mice were implanted with inert placebo pellets. Pumps and pellets were removed 3 days later, and mice were tested for morphine analgesia or mu-opioid receptor density was determined in the whole brain, spinal cord, and midbrain. Both infusion doses of etorphine produced significant tolerance (ED50 shift=approximately 4-6-fold) and down-regulation of mu-opioid receptors (approximately 20-35%). Morphine treatment also produced significant tolerance (ED50 shift= approximately 5-8-fold), but no mu-opioid receptor down-regulation. PTX dramatically reduced the acute potency of morphine and blocked the further development of tolerance by both etorphine and morphine treatments. However, PTX had no effect on etorphine-induced mu-opioid receptor down-regulation in brain, cord, or midbrain. These results suggest that PTX-sensitive G-proteins have a minimal role in agonist-induced mu-opioid receptor density regulation in vivo, but are critical in mediating acute and chronic functional effects of opioids such as analgesia and tolerance.

  11. Quantitative autoradiography of (/sup 3/H)CTOP binding to mu opioid receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, K.N.; Knapp, R.J.; Gehlert, D.R.; Lui, G.K.; Yamamura, M.S.; Roeske, L.C.; Hruby, V.J.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1988-01-01

    (/sup 3/H)H-D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 ((/sup 3/H)CTOP), a potent and highly selective mu opioid antagonist, was used to localize the mu receptors in rat brain by light microscopic autoradiography. Radioligand binding studies with (/sup 3/H)CTOP using slide-mounted tissue sections of rat brain produced a Kd value of 1.1 nM with a Bmax value of 79.1 fmol/mg protein. Mu opioid agonists and antagonists inhibited (/sup 3/H)CTOP binding with high affinity (IC50 values of 0.2-2.4nM), while the delta agonist DPDPE, delta antagonist ICI 174,864, and kappa agonist U 69,593 were very weak inhibitors of (/sup 3/H)CTOP binding. Light microscopic autoradiography of (/sup 3/H)CTOP binding sites revealed regions of high density and regions of moderate labeling. The cerebral cortex showed a low density of (/sup 3/H)CTOP binding.

  12. Fourteen. beta. -(bromoacetamido)morphine irreversibly labels. mu. opioid receptors in rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Bidlack, J.M.; Frey, D.K.; Seyed-Mozaffari, A.; Archer, S. )

    1989-05-16

    The binding properties of 14{beta}-(bromoacetamido)morphine (BAM) and the ability of BAM to irreversibly inhibit opioid binding to rat brain membranes were examined to characterize the affinity and selectivity of BAM as an irreversible affinity ligand for opioid receptors. BAM had the same receptor selectivity as morphine, with a 3-5-fold decrease in affinity for the different types of opioid receptors. When brain membranes were incubated with BAM, followed by extensive washing, opioid binding was restored to control levels. However, when membranes were incubated with dithiothreitol (DTT), followed by BAM, and subsequently washed, 90% of the 0.25 nM ({sup 3}H)(D-Ala{sup 2},(Me)Phe{sup 4},Gly(ol){sup 5})enkephalin (DAGO) binding was irreversibly inhibited as a result of the specific alkylation of a sulfhydryl group at the {mu} binding site. This inhibition was dependent on the concentrations of both DTT and BAM. The {mu} receptor specificity of BAM alkylation was demonstrated by the ability of BAM alkylated membranes to still bind the {delta}-selective peptide ({sup 3}H)(D-penicillamine{sup 2},D-penicillamine{sup 5})enkephalin (DPDPE) and (-)-({sup 3}H)bremazocine in the presence of {mu} and {delta} blockers, selective for {kappa} binding sites. Morphine and naloxone partially protected the binding site from alkylation with BAM, while ligands that did not bind to the {mu}s site did not afford protection. These studies have demonstrated that when a disulfide bond at or near {mu} opioid binding sites was reduced, BAM could then alkylate this site, resulting in the specific irreversible labeling of {mu} opioid receptors.

  13. Mixed Kappa/Mu Opioid Receptor Agonists: The 6β-Naltrexamines

    PubMed Central

    Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Neal, Adrian P.; Bradbury, Faye A.; Purington, Lauren C.; Aceto, Mario D.; Harris, Louis S.; Lewis, John W.; Traynor, John R.; Husbands, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Ligands from the naltrexamine series have consistently demonstrated agonist activity at kappa opioid receptors (KOR), with varying activity at the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Various 6β-cinnamoylamino derivatives were made with the aim of generating ligands with a KOR agonist/MOR partial agonist profile, as ligands with this activity may be of interest as treatment agents for cocaine abuse. The ligands all displayed the desired high affinity, non-selective binding in vitro and in the functional assays were high efficacy KOR agonists with some partial agonist activity at MOR. Two of the new ligands (12a, 12b) have been evaluated in vivo, with 12a acting as a KOR agonist, and therefore somewhat similar to the previously evaluated analogues 3–6, while 12b displayed predominant MOR agonist activity. PMID:19253970

  14. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor modulation of mu (mu) opioid receptors in adult rat sphenopalatine ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Margas, Wojciech; Mahmoud, Saifeldin; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor

    2010-01-01

    The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) neurons represent the parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system involved in controlling cerebral blood flow. In the present study, we examined the coupling mechanism between mu (mu) opioid receptors (MOR) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) with Ca(2+) channels in acutely dissociated adult rat SPG neurons. Successful MOR activation was recorded in approximately 40-45% of SPG neurons employing the whole cell variant of the patch-clamp technique. In addition, immunofluorescence assays indicated that MOR are not expressed in all SPG neurons while M(2) mAChR staining was evident in all neurons. The concentration-response relationships generated with morphine and [d-Ala2-N-Me-Phe4-Glycol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO) showed IC(50) values of 15.2 and 56.1 nM and maximal Ca(2+) current inhibition of 26.0 and 38.7%, respectively. Activation of MOR or M(2) mAChR with morphine or oxotremorine-methiodide (Oxo-M), respectively, resulted in voltage-dependent inhibition of Ca(2+) currents via coupling with Galpha(i/o) protein subunits. The acute prolonged exposure (10 min) of neurons to morphine or Oxo-M led to the homologous desensitization of MOR and M(2) mAChR, respectively. The prolonged stimulation of M(2) mAChR with Oxo-M resulted in heterologous desensitization of morphine-mediated Ca(2+) current inhibition, and was sensitive to the M(2) mAChR blocker methoctramine. On the other hand, when the neurons were exposed to morphine or DAMGO for 10 min, heterologous desensitization of M(2) mAChR was not observed. These results suggest that in rat SPG neurons activation of M(2) mAChR likely modulates opioid transmission in the brain vasculature to adequately maintain cerebral blood flow. PMID:19889856

  15. The role of mu opioid receptor desensitization and endocytosis in morphine tolerance and dependence.

    PubMed

    Martini, Lene; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2007-10-01

    Following activation, most G protein coupled receptors undergo regulation by a cascade of events that promote receptor desensitization and endocytosis. Following endocytosis, receptors can then be recycled to the plasma membrane, retained in an intracellular compartment, or targeted for degradation. For receptors that are recycled, like the mu opioid receptor (MOR), endocytosis serves as the first step toward resensitizing receptors. For receptors that are degraded, endocytosis serves as the first step toward receptor downregulation. Thus, for receptors like the MOR, the desensitization-endocytosis-resensitization cycle serves as a rapid and dynamic means to titrate signaling through the receptor. However, not all agonist ligands at the MOR promote the same degree of receptor desensitization and endocytosis. For example, the endogenous peptide ligands at the MOR induce rapid desensitization, endocytosis, and recycling. By contrast, morphine induces only weak or partial desensitization and little to no endocytosis. As a consequence, signal transduction promoted by morphine is less dynamic than that induced by endogenous ligands as well as other opioid agonists that promote endocytosis. The resulting imbalance of desensitization-endocytosis-resensitization has at least two consequences: (1) in cell types where morphine induces desensitization but not endocytosis and/or resensitization, desensitization is protracted; (2) in cell types where morphine induces neither desensitization nor endocytosis, prolonged signaling through the receptor leads to multiple cellular adaptations downstream of receptor-G protein coupling. Both protracted desensitization and adaptive cellular changes probably contribute to the pronounced in vivo tolerance and dependence that occur with chronic morphine treatment. As a consequence, facilitating receptor endocytosis, using either genetic or pharmacological approaches, can restore the balance of signaling through the receptor and affect the

  16. Opioid agonist efficacy predicts the magnitude of tolerance and the regulation of mu-opioid receptors and dynamin-2.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Mohit; Kumar, Priyank; Sunkaraneni, Soujanya; Sirohi, Sunil; Walker, Ellen A; Yoburn, Byron C

    2007-06-01

    It has been proposed that opioid agonist efficacy may play a role in tolerance and the regulation of opioid receptor density. To address this issue, the present studies estimated the in vivo efficacy of three opioid agonists and then examined changes in spinal mu-opioid receptor density following chronic treatment in the mouse. In addition, tolerance and regulation of the trafficking protein dynamin-2 were determined. To evaluate efficacy, the method of irreversible receptor alkylation was employed and the efficacy parameter tau estimated. Mice were injected with the irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist clocinnamox (0.32-25.6 mg/kg, i.p), and 24 h later, the analgesic potency of s.c. morphine, oxycodone and etorphine were determined. Clocinnamox dose-dependently antagonized the analgesic effects of morphine, etorphine and oxycodone. The shift to the right of the dose-response curves was greater for morphine and oxycodone compared to etorphine and the highest dose of clocinnamox reduced the maximal effect of morphine and oxycodone, but not etorphine. The order of efficacy calculated from these results was etorphine>morphine>oxycodone. Other mice were infused for 7 days with oxycodone (10-150 mg/kg/day, s.c.) or etorphine (50-250 microg/kg/day, s.c.) and the analgesic potency of s.c. morphine determined. The low efficacy agonist (oxycodone) produced more tolerance than the high efficacy agonist (etorphine) at equi-effective infusion doses. In saturation binding experiments, the low efficacy opioid agonists (morphine, oxycodone) did not regulate the density of spinal mu-opioid receptors, while etorphine produced approximately 40% reduction in mu-opioid receptor density. Furthermore, etorphine increased spinal dynamin-2 abundance, while oxycodone did not produce any significant change in dynamin-2 abundance. Overall, these data indicate that high efficacy agonists produce less tolerance at equi-effective doses. Furthermore, increased efficacy was associated with

  17. Chronic ethanol consumption in rats produces opioid antinociceptive tolerance through inhibition of mu opioid receptor endocytosis.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) plays an important role in the rewarding properties of ethanol. However, it is less clear how chronic ethanol consumption affects MOR signaling. Here, we demonstrate that rats with prolonged voluntary ethanol consumption develop antinociceptive tolerance to opioids. Signaling through the MOR is controlled at many levels, including via the process of endocytosis. Importantly, agonists at the MOR that promote receptor endocytosis, such as the endogenous peptides enkephalin and β-endorphin, show a reduced propensity to promote antinociceptive tolerance than do agonists, like morphine, which do not promote receptor endocytosis. These observations led us to examine whether chronic ethanol consumption produced opioid tolerance by interfering with MOR endocytosis. Indeed, here we show that chronic ethanol consumption inhibits the endocytosis of MOR in response to opioid peptide. This loss of endocytosis was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in G protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) protein levels after chronic drinking, suggesting that loss of this component of the trafficking machinery could be a mechanism by which endocytosis is lost. We also found that MOR coupling to G-protein was decreased in ethanol-drinking rats, providing a functional explanation for loss of opioid antinociception. Together, these results suggest that chronic ethanol drinking alters the ability of MOR to endocytose in response to opioid peptides, and consequently, promotes tolerance to the effects of opioids.

  18. Crystal structure of the[mu]-opioid receptor bound to a morphinan antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C.; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Mathiesen, Jesper M.; Sunahara, Roger K.; Pardo, Leonardo; Weis, William I.; Kobilka, Brian K.; Granier, Sébastien

    2012-06-27

    Opium is one of the world's oldest drugs, and its derivatives morphine and codeine are among the most used clinical drugs to relieve severe pain. These prototypical opioids produce analgesia as well as many undesirable side effects (sedation, apnoea and dependence) by binding to and activating the G-protein-coupled {mu}-opioid receptor ({mu}-OR) in the central nervous system. Here we describe the 2.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of the mouse {mu}-OR in complex with an irreversible morphinan antagonist. Compared to the buried binding pocket observed in most G-protein-coupled receptors published so far, the morphinan ligand binds deeply within a large solvent-exposed pocket. Of particular interest, the {mu}-OR crystallizes as a two-fold symmetrical dimer through a four-helix bundle motif formed by transmembrane segments 5 and 6. These high-resolution insights into opioid receptor structure will enable the application of structure-based approaches to develop better drugs for the management of pain and addiction.

  19. Affinity of the enantiomers of. alpha. - and. beta. -cyclazocine for binding to the phencyclidine and. mu. opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, S.L.; Balster, R.L.; Martin, B.R. )

    1990-01-01

    The enantiomers in the {alpha} and {beta} series of cyclazocine were evaluated for their ability to bind to phencyclidine (PCP) and {mu}-opioid receptors in order to determine their receptor selectivity. The affinity of (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine for the PCP receptor was 1.5 greater than PCP itself. In contrast, (-)-{alpha}-cyclazocine, (+)-{alpha}-cyclazocine, and (+)-{beta}-cyclazocine were 3-, 5- and 138-fold less potent than PCP, respectively. Scatchard analysis of saturable binding of ({sup 3}H)Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-MePhe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) also exhibited a homogeneous population of binding sites with an apparent K{sub D} of 1.9 nM and an estimated Bmax of 117 pM. (3H)Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-MePhe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) binding studies revealed that (-)-{alpha}-cyclazocine (K{sub D} = 0.48 nM) was 31-, 1020- and 12,600-fold more potent than (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine, (+)-{alpha}-cyclazocine and (+)-{beta}-cyclazocine, respectively, for binding to the {mu}-opioid receptor. These data show that, although (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine is a potent PCP receptor ligand consistent with its potent PCP-like discriminative stimulus effects, it shows little selectivity for PCP receptor since it also potently displaces {mu}-opioid binding. However, these cyclazocine isomers, due to their extraordinary degree of stereoselectivity, may be useful in characterizing the structural requirements for benzomorphans having activity at the PCP receptor.

  20. Remifentanil produces cross-desensitization and tolerance with morphine on the mu-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Nowoczyn, M; Marie, N; Coulbault, L; Hervault, M; Davis, A; Hanouz, J L; Allouche, S

    2013-10-01

    Remifentanil is a powerful mu-opioid (MOP) receptor agonist used in anaesthesia with a very short half-life. However, per-operative perfusion of remifentanil was shown to increase morphine consumption during post-operative period to relieve pain. In the present study, we aimed to describe the cellular mechanisms responsible for this apparent reduction of morphine efficacy. For this purpose, we first examined the pharmacological properties of both remifentanil and morphine at the MOP receptor, endogenously expressed in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line, to regulate adenylyl cyclase and the MAP kinase ERK1/2 pathway, their potency to promote MOP receptor phosphorylation, arrestin 3-CFP (cyan fluorescent protein) recruitment and receptor trafficking during acute and sustained exposure. In the second part of this work, we studied the effects of a prior exposure of remifentanil on morphine-induced inhibition of cAMP accumulation, activation of ERK1/2 and analgesia. We showed that sustained exposure to remifentanil promoted a rapid desensitization of opioid receptors on both signalling pathways and a pretreatment with this agonist reduced signal transduction produced by a second challenge with morphine. While both opioid agonists promoted Ser(375) phosphorylation on MOP receptor, remifentanil induced a rapid internalization of opioid receptors compared to morphine but without detectable arrestin 3-CFP translocation to the plasma membrane in our experimental conditions. Lastly, a cross-tolerance between remifentanil and morphine was observed in mice using the hot plate test. Our in vitro and in vivo data thus demonstrated that remifentanil produced a rapid desensitization and internalization of the MOP receptor that would reduce the anti-nociceptive effects of morphine. PMID:23792280

  1. Genetic variation of the human mu-opioid receptor and susceptibility to idiopathic absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sander, T; Berlin, W; Gscheidel, N; Wendel, B; Janz, D; Hoehe, M R

    2000-03-01

    Pharmacological and autoradiological studies suggest that mu-opioid receptor (OPRM) mediated neurotransmission is involved in the generation of absence seizures. Mutation screening of the human OPRM gene identified a common amino acid substitution polymorphism (Asn40Asp) that differentially modulates the binding affinity of beta-endorphin and signal transduction of the receptor. The present association study tested the candidate gene hypothesis that the Asn40Asp substitution polymorphism in the N-terminal OPRM domain confers genetic susceptibility to idiopathic absence epilepsy (IAE). The genotypes of the Asn40Asp polymorphism were assessed by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction in 72 German IAE patients and in 340 ethnically matched control subjects. The frequency of the Asp40 allele was significantly increased in the IAE patients [f(Asp40) = 0.139] compared to the controls [f(Asp40) = 0.078; chi2 = 5.467, df = 1, P = 0.019; OR = 2.03; 95%-CI: 1.12-3.68]. This allelic association suggests that the functional Asp40 variant of OPRM modulates neuronal excitability underlying the epileptogenesis of IAE.

  2. Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) expression in the human spiral ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kimanh D.; Mowlds, Donald; Lopez, Ivan A.; Hosokawa, Seiji; Ishiyama, Akira; Ishiyama, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Opioid peptides and their receptors have been localized to the inner ear of the rat and guinea pig mammalian models. The expression of mu opioid receptor (MOR) in the human and mouse cochlea is not yet known. We present MOR protein localization by immunohistochemistry and mRNA expression by in situ hybridization in the human and mouse spiral ganglia (SG) and organ of Corti. In the human most of the (SG) neurons were immunoreactive; a subset was non-immunoreactive. In situ hybridization revealed a similar labeling pattern across the neurons of the SG. A similar distribution MOR pattern was demonstrated in the mouse SG. In the mouse organ of Corti MOR was expressed in inner and outer hair cells. Fibers underneath the inner hair cells were also MOR immunoreactive. These results are consistent with a role of MOR in neuro-modulation of the auditory periphery. The present results show that the expression of MORs is well-conserved across multiple mammalian species, indicative of an important role in auditory processing. PMID:25278190

  3. Mu Opioid Receptor Binding Correlates with Nicotine Dependence and Reward in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Brasic, James R.; Contoreggi, Carlo; Cascella, Nicola; Mackowick, Kristen M.; Taylor, Richard; Rousset, Olivier; Willis, William; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Concheiro, Marta; Wand, Gary; Wong, Dean F.; Volkow, Nora D.

    2014-01-01

    The rewarding effects of nicotine are associated with activation of nicotine receptors. However, there is increasing evidence that the endogenous opioid system is involved in nicotine's rewarding effects. We employed PET imaging with [11C]carfentanil to test the hypotheses that acute cigarette smoking increases release of endogenous opioids in the human brain and that smokers have an upregulation of mu opioid receptors (MORs) when compared to nonsmokers. We found no significant changes in binding potential (BPND) of [11C]carfentanil between the placebo and the active cigarette sessions, nor did we observe differences in MOR binding between smokers and nonsmokers. Interestingly, we showed that in smokers MOR availability in bilateral superior temporal cortices during the placebo condition was negatively correlated with scores on the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND). Also in smokers, smoking-induced decreases in [11C]carfentanil binding in frontal cortical regions were associated with self-reports of cigarette liking and wanting. Although we did not show differences between smokers and nonsmokers, the negative correlation with FTND corroborates the role of MORs in superior temporal cortices in nicotine addiction and provides preliminary evidence of a role of endogenous opioid signaling in frontal cortex in nicotine reward. PMID:25493427

  4. Inflammation enhances mu-opioid receptor transcription and expression in mice intestine.

    PubMed

    Pol, O; Alameda, F; Puig, M M

    2001-11-01

    Opioid receptors (ORs) and their mRNA are present in the central and peripheral nervous systems of mammals and in different peripheral tissues, including the gut. Using a model of croton oil-induced (CO) intestinal inflammation in mice, we have shown a 6-fold increase in the potency of the antitransit and antisecretory effects of mu-OR agonists, mediated by peripheral ORs. We postulate that the enhanced effects are mediated by an increase in the expression of intestinal OR. We used jejunum (stripped of the mucosal layer) from mice with CO-induced intestinal inflammation and, as control subjects, saline-treated animals (SS). We evaluated the quantity of mu-OR mRNA determined by a competitive reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction; the levels of mu-OR protein by Western blot immunoassay, and the localization and number of cells expressing mu-OR using immunohistochemistry. The results show a significant increase of mu-OR mRNA (7.7-fold) and receptor protein (3-fold) during intestinal inflammation. Inflammation also induced a 64.3% increase in the number of neurons expressing mu-OR immunoreactivity in the myenteric plexus but not in the submucosal plexus. Our results show that intestinal inflammation enhances the transcription and translation of mu-OR mRNA, thus explaining the increased potency of mu-opioids during inflammation.

  5. Designing bifunctional NOP receptor-mu opioid receptor ligands from NOP-receptor selective scaffolds. Part II

    PubMed Central

    Journigan, V. Blair; Polgar, Willma; Khroyan, Taline V.; Zaveri, Nurulain T.

    2014-01-01

    The nociceptin opioid receptor (NOP) and its endogenous peptide ligand nociceptin/orphanin FQ have been shown to modulate the pharmacological effects of the classical opioid receptor system. Suppression of opioid-induced reward associated with mu-opioid receptor (MOP)-mediated analgesia, without decreasing anti-nociceptive efficacy, can potentially be achieved with NOP agonists having bifunctional agonist activity at MOP, to afford ‘non-addicting’ analgesics. In Part II of this series, we describe a continuing structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of the NOP-selective piperidin-4-yl-1,3-dihydroindol-2-one scaffold, to obtain bifunctional activity at MOP, and a suitable ratio of NOP/MOP agonist activity that produces a non-addicting analgesic profile. The SAR reported here is focused on the influence of various piperidine nitrogen aromatic substituents on the ratio of binding affinity and intrinsic activity at both the NOP and MOP receptors. PMID:24657054

  6. A topographical model of mu-opioid and brain somatostatin receptor selective ligands. NMR and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Kazmierski, W M; Ferguson, R D; Lipkowski, A W; Hruby, V J

    1995-01-01

    We have refined the 1H NMR-based conformations of the mu-opioid receptor selective peptides related to somatostatin of general formula Xxx-Yyy1-Cys-Zzz-D-Trp-Lys(Orn)5-Thr-Pen-Thr8- NH2, where Xxx, Yyy, Zzz are 0, D-Phe and Tyr for 1; 0, D-Tic and Tyr for 2; Gly, D-Tic and Tyr for 3; and 0, D-Phe and Tic for 4, respectively, (Kazmierski et al., J. Am. Chem. 113, 2275-2283), using a molecular-dynamics approach. We present evidence that the NMR data are compatible with beta II'-, gamma- and gamma'-turns for the central tetrapeptide Tyr-D-Trp-Lys/Orn-Thr. Based on detailed structural and topographical considerations, we suggest that the mu-opioid receptor selectivity of 2 is due to a particular spatial arrangement of aromatic side chains of D-Tic1 and Tyr3 (7.5 A), and that the opioid receptor recognition domain is located in the N-terminal part of the peptide while the somatostatin receptor recognition domain is determined by the central, turn forming part of this class of cyclic peptides. A model for a mu-opioid selective ligand has emerged from these studies that shows excellent structural similarities to rigid opioid alkaloids. PMID:8537180

  7. Morphine-induced mu opioid receptor trafficking enhances reward yet prevents compulsive drug use.

    PubMed

    Berger, Amy Chang; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2011-07-01

    Morphine, heroin and other commonly abused opioids induce little mu opioid receptor (MOR) trafficking compared to endogenous opioids. We utilized knock-in mice expressing a mutant recycling MOR (RMOR) that desensitizes and is internalized in response to morphine to show that facilitating MOR trafficking not only enhances morphine reward but, despite this, reduces the development of addiction-like behaviours. To demonstrate this, we developed a novel model of the transition from controlled to compulsive drug use that recapitulates many features of human addiction, including persistent drug seeking despite adverse consequences and a decreased preference for alternative rewards. These behaviours emerged spontaneously in wild-type but not RMOR mice, and their intensity predicted the reinstatement of morphine seeking after extended abstinence, while prior morphine intake did not. These results confirm previous findings in the rat that addiction can be dissociated from both reward and consumption. Most importantly, these results demonstrate that one can simultaneously reduce the 'addictiveness' of morphine and enhance its desirable effects by promoting agonist-induced MOR trafficking.

  8. Graphene decorated with mu-opioid receptor: the ionic screening effect and detection of enkephalin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Jinglei; Johnson, A. T. Charlie; Liu, Renyu; A. T. Charlie Johnson Team; Renyu Liu Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the properties of graphene field effect transistors (GFETs) decorated with a computaionally redesigned, water-soluble variant of the human mu-opioid receptor (wsMOR) in physiological buffer solution. The shift of the Fermi level in the GFETs is quantitatively described by chemical-gating effect of charges on the wsMOR that are screened by the ionic solution. Our results suggest that sensitivity to the molecular target is lost when the Debye screening length of the solution is shorter than the distance from the graphene to the wsMOR; thus de-salting may be necessary when wsMOR decorated GFETs are used as biosensors in solution. We used this insight to detect DAMGO, a synthetic analog to the endogenous opioid peptide encephalin, at a concentration of 10 pM (5.1 pg/mL) in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) diluted to 5% of its normal salt concentration. When the sensors were measured in a dry state, the limit of detection for DAGMO was 1 pM (0.5 pg/mL), one-third of the baseline in human body.Funding for this work was provided by DARPA.

  9. Association of mu-opioid receptor expression with lymph node metastasis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-F; Xu, Q-X; Liao, L-D; Xu, X-E; Wu, J-Y; Wu, Z-Y; Shen, J-H; Li, E-M; Xu, L-Y

    2015-01-01

    The mu-opioid receptor (MOR), a membrane-bound G protein-coupled receptor, is the main target for opioids in the nervous system. MOR1 has been found in several types of cancer cells and reported to be involved in tumor progression and metastasis. However, the expression and clinical significance of MOR1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remain unclear. In our study, the expression of MOR1 was confirmed in ESCC cell lines (KYSE180, KYSE150, and EC109) by Western blot. MOR1 was also detected on tissue microarrays of ESCC samples in 239 cases using immunohistochemical staining. We found that MOR1 was mainly located in the cytoplasm and occasionally occurred in the membrane or nucleus of ESCC cells. Moreover, results indicated that MOR1 expression in the cytoplasm was associated with lymph node metastasis (R = 0.164, P = 0.008, Kendall's tau-b-test). No more associations were found between MOR1 expression status and other clinical parameters. However, no statistical significant differences were found between MOR1 expression in the cytoplasm, nucleus/membrane, and the overall survival of ESCC patients (P = 0.848; P = 0.167; P = 0.428, respectively, log-rank test). Our results suggest that the cytoplasmic MOR1 may be a high-risk factor for lymph node metastasis of ESCC patients. We also hypothesize that MOR1 agonists used in ESCC patients should be prudent, and opioid receptor antagonists may be novel therapeutic drugs for ESCC patients.

  10. Mu opioid receptor localization in the basolateral amygdala: An ultrastructural analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Muller, J F; McDonald, A J

    2015-09-10

    Receptor binding studies have shown that the density of mu opioid receptors (MORs) in the basolateral amygdala is among the highest in the brain. Activation of these receptors in the basolateral amygdala is critical for stress-induced analgesia, memory consolidation of aversive events, and stress adaptation. Despite the importance of MORs in these stress-related functions, little is known about the neural circuits that are modulated by amygdalar MORs. In the present investigation light and electron microscopy combined with immunohistochemistry was used to study the expression of MORs in the anterior basolateral nucleus (BLa). At the light microscopic level, light to moderate MOR-immunoreactivity (MOR-ir) was observed in a small number of cell bodies of nonpyramidal interneurons and in a small number of processes and puncta in the neuropil. At the electron microscopic level most MOR-ir was observed in dendritic shafts, dendritic spines, and axon terminals. MOR-ir was also observed in the Golgi apparatus of the cell bodies of pyramidal neurons (PNs) and interneurons. Some of the MOR-positive (MOR+) dendrites were spiny, suggesting that they belonged to PNs, while others received multiple asymmetrical synapses typical of interneurons. The great majority of MOR+ axon terminals (80%) that formed synapses made asymmetrical (excitatory) synapses; their main targets were spines, including some that were MOR+. The main targets of symmetrical (inhibitory and/or neuromodulatory) synapses were dendritic shafts, many of which were MOR+, but some of these terminals formed synapses with somata or spines. All of our observations were consistent with the few electrophysiological studies which have been performed on MOR activation in the basolateral amygdala. Collectively, these findings suggest that MORs may be important for filtering out weak excitatory inputs to PNs, allowing only strong inputs or synchronous inputs to influence pyramidal neuronal firing. PMID:26164501

  11. Mu-opioid receptors are not necessary for nortriptyline treatment of neuropathic allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Tessier, Luc-Henri; Yalcin, Ipek; Gavériaux-Ruff, Claire; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Barrot, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are among the first line treatments clinically recommended against neuropathic pain. However, the mechanism by which they alleviate pain is still unclear. Pharmacological and genetic approaches evidenced a critical role of delta-opioid receptors (DORs) in the therapeutic action of chronic TCA treatment. It is however unclear whether mu-opioid receptors (MORs) are also necessary to the pain-relieving action of TCAs. The lack of highly selective MOR antagonists makes difficult to conclude based on pharmacological studies. In the present work, we thus used a genetic approach and compared mutant mice lacking MORs and their wild-type littermates. The neuropathy was induced by unilateral sciatic nerve cuffing. The threshold for mechanical response was evaluated using von Frey filaments. MOR-deficient mice displayed the same baseline for mechanical sensitivity as their wild-type littermates. After sciatic nerve cuffing, both wild-type and MOR-deficient mice displayed an ipsilateral mechanical allodynia. After about 10 days of treatment, nortriptyline suppressed this allodynia in both wild-type and MOR-deficient mice. MORs are thus not critical for nortriptyline action against neuropathic pain. An acute injection of the DOR antagonist naltrindole induced a relapse of neuropathic allodynia in both wild-type and MOR-deficient mice, thus confirming the critical role of DORs in nortriptyline action. Moreover, morphine induced an acute analgesia in control and in neuropathic wild-type mice, but was without effect in MOR-deficient mice. While MORs are crucial for morphine action, they are not critical for nortriptyline action. Our results highlight the functional difference between DORs and MORs in mechanisms of pain relief. PMID:20056557

  12. Loss of the mu opioid receptor induces strain-specific alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis and spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Cominski, T P; Ansonoff, M A; Turchin, C E; Pintar, J E

    2014-10-10

    Alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis affect spatial learning, though, the relative contributions of cell proliferation and cell survival on this process are poorly understood. The current study utilized mu opioid receptor (MOR-1) knockout (KO) mice on two background strains, C57BL/6 and 129S6, to assess cell survival as well as determine the impact on spatial learning using the Morris water maze. These experiments were designed to extend prior work showing that both C57BL/6 and 129S6 MOR-1 KO mice have an increased number of proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) when compared to wild-type (WT) mice. The current study indicates that newly born neurons in the DG of C57BL/6 MOR-1 KO mice exhibit enhanced survival when compared to WT mice, while new neurons in the DG of 129S6 MOR-1 KO mice do not. In addition, C57BL/6 MOR-1 KO mice have a lower number of apoptotic cells in the DG compared to WT mice while, in contrast, 129S6 MOR-1 KO mice have a higher number of apoptotic cells in this region. These alterations collectively contribute to an increase in the granule cell number in the DG of C57BL/6 MOR-1 KO mice, while the total number of granule cells in 129S6 MOR-1 KO mice is unchanged. Thus, although C57BL/6 and 129S6 MOR-1 KO mice both exhibit increased cell proliferation in the DG, the impact of the MOR-1 mutation on cell survival differs between strains. Furthermore, the decrease in DG cell survival displayed by 129S6 MOR-1 KO mice is correlated with functional deficits in spatial learning, suggesting that MOR-1-dependent alterations in the survival of new neurons in the DG, and not MOR-1-dependent changes in proliferation of progenitor cells in the DG, is important for spatial learning. PMID:25086317

  13. Nitric oxide and zinc-mediated protein assemblies involved in mu opioid receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, María; Garzón, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Opioids are among the most effective analgesics in controlling the perception of intense pain, although their continuous use decreases their potency due to the development of tolerance. The glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor system is currently considered to be the most relevant functional antagonist of morphine analgesia. In the postsynapse of different brain regions the C terminus of the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) associates with NR1 subunits of NMDARs, as well as with a series of signaling proteins, such as neural nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)/nitric oxide (NO), protein kinase C (PKC), calcium and calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). NO is implicated in redox signaling and PKC falls under the regulation of zinc metabolism, suggesting that these signaling elements might participate in the regulation of MOR activity by the NMDAR. In this review, we discuss the influence of redox signaling in the mechanisms whose plasticity triggers opioid tolerance. Thus, the MOR C terminus assembles a series of signaling proteins around the homodimeric histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1). The NMDAR NR1 subunit and the regulator of G protein signaling RGSZ2 bind HINT1 in a zinc-independent manner, with RGSZ2 associating with nNOS and regulating MOR-induced production of NO. This NO acts on the RGSZ2 zinc finger, providing the zinc ions that are required for PKC/Raf-1 cysteine-rich domains to simultaneously bind to the histidines present in the HINT1 homodimer. The MOR-induced activation of phospholipase β (PLCβ) regulates PKC, which increases the reactive oxygen species (ROS) by acting on NOX/NADPH, consolidating the long-term PKC activation required to regulate the Raf-1/MAPK cascade and enhancing NMDAR function. Thus, RGSZ2 serves as a Redox Zinc Switch that converts NO signals into Zinc signals, thereby modulating Redox Sensor Proteins like PKCγ and Raf-1. Accordingly, redox-dependent and

  14. Mu opioid receptor modulation in the nucleus accumbens lowers voluntary wheel running in rats bred for high running motivation.

    PubMed

    Ruegsegger, Gregory N; Toedebusch, Ryan G; Will, Matthew J; Booth, Frank W

    2015-10-01

    The exact role of opioid receptor signaling in mediating voluntary wheel running is unclear. To provide additional understanding, female rats selectively bred for motivation of low (LVR) versus high voluntary running (HVR) behaviors were used. Aims of this study were 1) to identify intrinsic differences in nucleus accumbens (NAc) mRNA expression of opioid-related transcripts and 2) to determine if nightly wheel running is differently influenced by bilateral NAc injections of either the mu-opioid receptor agonist D-Ala2, NMe-Phe4, Glyo5-enkephalin (DAMGO) (0.25, 2.5 μg/side), or its antagonist, naltrexone (5, 10, 20 μg/side). In Experiment 1, intrinsic expression of Oprm1 and Pdyn mRNAs were higher in HVR compared to LVR. Thus, the data imply that line differences in opioidergic mRNA in the NAc could partially contribute to differences in wheel running behavior. In Experiment 2, a significant decrease in running distance was present in HVR rats treated with 2.5 μg DAMGO, or with 10 μg and 20 μg naltrexone between hours 0-1 of the dark cycle. Neither DAMGO nor naltrexone had a significant effect on running distance in LVR rats. Taken together, the data suggest that the high nightly voluntary running distance expressed by HVR rats is mediated by increased endogenous mu-opioid receptor signaling in the NAc, that is disturbed by either agonism or antagonism. In summary, our findings on NAc opioidergic mRNA expression and mu-opioid receptor modulations suggest HVR rats, compared to LVR rats, express higher running levels mediated by an increase in motivation driven, in part, by elevated NAc opioidergic signaling.

  15. Mu Opioid Receptor Modulation of Dopamine Neurons in the Periaqueductal Gray/Dorsal Raphe: A Role in Regulation of Pain.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia; Sugam, Jonathan A; Lowery-Gionta, Emily G; McElligott, Zoe A; McCall, Nora M; Lopez, Alberto J; McKlveen, Jessica M; Pleil, Kristen E; Kash, Thomas L

    2016-07-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is a brain region involved in nociception modulation, and an important relay center for the descending nociceptive pathway through the rostral ventral lateral medulla. Given the dense expression of mu opioid receptors and the role of dopamine in pain, the recently characterized dopamine neurons in the ventral PAG (vPAG)/dorsal raphe (DR) region are a potentially critical site for the antinociceptive actions of opioids. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate synaptic modulation of the vPAG/DR dopamine neurons by mu opioid receptors and to (2) dissect the anatomy and neurochemistry of these neurons, in order to assess the downstream loci and functions of their activation. Using a mouse line that expresses eGFP under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter, we found that mu opioid receptor activation led to a decrease in inhibitory inputs onto the vPAG/DR dopamine neurons. Furthermore, combining immunohistochemistry, optogenetics, electrophysiology, and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in a TH-cre mouse line, we demonstrated that these neurons also express the vesicular glutamate type 2 transporter and co-release dopamine and glutamate in a major downstream projection structure-the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Finally, activation of TH-positive neurons in the vPAG/DR using Gq designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs displayed a supraspinal, but not spinal, antinociceptive effect. These results indicate that vPAG/DR dopamine neurons likely play a key role in opiate antinociception, potentially via the activation of downstream structures through dopamine and glutamate release.

  16. The effect of the mu-opioid receptor antagonist naloxone on extinction of conditioned fear in the developing rat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jee Hyun; Richardson, Rick

    2009-03-01

    Several recent studies report that neurotransmitters that are critically involved in extinction in adult rats are not important for extinction in young rats. Specifically, pretest injection of the gamma-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor inverse agonist FG7142 has no effect on extinction in postnatal day (P)17 rats, although it reverses extinction in P24 rats as reported by Kim and Richardson in an earlier paper. Further, pre-extinction injection of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist MK-801 has no effect on extinction in P17 rats, whereas it impairs long-term extinction in P24 rats as per Langton and colleagues in an earlier work. These findings indicate that extinction in P17 rats is qualitatively different from extinction in older rats. The present study examines the involvement of the endogenous opioid system in extinction in the developing rat using systemic injections of the mu-opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. Experiment 1 showed that injection of naloxone before extinction training disrupted the acquisition of extinction in both P17 and P24 rats. This effect was dependent on central rather than peripheral mu-opioid receptors (Experiment 2), and neither pre-test nor post-extinction injection of naloxone had effects on extinction (Experiments 3 and 4). Taken together, these findings indicate that opioid neurotransmission, in contrast to GABA and NMDA activity, is critical for extinction acquisition across development.

  17. Distribution of CB1 Cannabinoid Receptors and Their Relationship with Mu-Opioid Receptors in the Rat Periaqueductal Gray

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Poe, A.R.; Morgan, M.M.; Aicher, S.A.; Hegarty, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is part of a descending pain modulatory system that, when activated, produces widespread and profound antinociception. Microinjection of either opioids or cannabinoids into the PAG elicits antinociception. Moreover, microinjection of the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor agonist HU-210 into the PAG enhances the antinociceptive effect of subsequent morphine injections, indicating a direct relationship between these two systems. The objective of this study was to characterize the distribution of CB1 receptors in the dorsolateral and ventrolateral PAG in relationship to mu-opioid peptide (MOP) receptors. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed extensive and diffuse CB1 receptor labeling in the PAG, 60% of which was found in somatodendritic profiles. CB1 and MOP receptor immunolabeling were co-localized in 32% of fluorescent Nissl-stained cells that were analyzed. Eight percent (8%) of PAG neurons that were MOP receptor-immunoreactive received CB1 receptor-immunoreactive appositions. Ultrastructural analysis confirmed the presence CB1 receptor-immunoreactive somata, dendrites and axon terminals in the PAG. These results indicate that behavioral interactions between cannabinoids and opioids may be the result of cellular adaptations within PAG neurons co-expressing CB1 and MOP receptors. PMID:22521830

  18. Pain hypersensitivity induced by paradoxical sleep deprivation is not due to altered binding to brain mu-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Danielle C; Andersen, Monica L; Hipólide, Débora Cristina; Nobrega, José N; Tufik, Sergio

    2007-03-28

    Previous studies have established a relationship between sleep disruption and pain, and it has been suggested that hyperalgesia induced by paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) could be due to a reduction of opioidergic neurotransmission in the brain. In the present study rats deprived of sleep for 96 h as well as rats allowed to recover for 24h after PSD and normal controls received vehicle or morphine (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) and were tested on a hot plate 1h later. Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to map alterations in binding to brain mu-opioid receptors in separate groups. Results demonstrated that PSD induced a significant reduction in thermal pain threshold, as measured by paw withdrawal latencies. This effect did not return to baseline control values after 24h of sleep recovery. The usual analgesic effect of morphine was observed in the control group but not in PSD or rebound groups except at the highest dose (10 mg/kg). Binding of [3H]DAMGO to mu sites did not differ significantly among the three groups in any of the 33 brain regions examined. These results do not exclude the participation of the opioid system in PSD-induced pain hypersensitivity since sleep-deprived rats were clearly resistant to morphine. However, the fact no changes were seen in [3H]DAMGO binding indicates that mechanisms other than altered mu-opioid binding must be sought to explain the phenomenon.

  19. Methylnaltrexone, a new peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist being evaluated for the treatment of postoperative ileus.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Michael D

    2008-09-01

    Postoperative ileus (POI), a transient impairment of bowel function, is considered an inevitable response after open abdominal surgery. It leads to significant patient morbidity and increased hospital costs and length of stay. The pathophysiology is multifactorial, involving neurogenic, hormonal, inflammatory and pharmacologic mediators. Several treatments have been shown to reduce the duration of POI, and a multimodal approach combining several of these interventions seems to be the most effective treatment option. Various drug therapies have been evaluated for the treatment of POI, although most have not shown any benefit. Peripherally active mu-opioid receptor antagonists are a new class of compounds that selectively block the peripheral (i.e., gastrointestinal [GI]) effects of opioids while preserving centrally mediated analgesia. Recently, alvimopan was approved in the US for the treatment of POI after abdominal surgery with bowel resection. Methylnaltrexone is a peripherally active mu-opioid receptor antagonist that has been shown to antagonize the inhibitory effects of opioids on GI transit without impairing analgesia. Phase II data indicated that methylnaltrexone was effective for improving GI recovery, reducing POI and shortening the time to discharge readiness in patients who underwent segmental colectomy. Two Phase III trials have been completed, and one is underway at present. Preliminary results from the two completed trials indicate that methylnaltrexone was not better than placebo for the primary or secondary outcomes. Further analyses of these data, clinical trial designs and the various dosage forms are necessary to determine the potential role of methylnaltrexone in the treatment of POI.

  20. Autistic-Like Syndrome in Mu Opioid Receptor Null Mice is Relieved by Facilitated mGluR4 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jérôme AJ; Clesse, Daniel; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Schwab, Yannick; Le Merrer, Julie; Kieffer, Brigitte L

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) remains largely unknown. Identifying vulnerability genes for autism represents a major challenge in the field and allows the development of animal models for translational research. Mice lacking the mu opioid receptor gene (Oprm1−/−) were recently proposed as a monogenic mouse model of autism, based on severe deficits in social behavior and communication skills. We confirm this hypothesis by showing that adult Oprm1−/− animals recapitulate core and multiple comorbid behavioral symptoms of autism and also display anatomical, neurochemical, and genetic landmarks of the disease. Chronic facilitation of mGluR4 signaling, which we identified as a novel pharmacological target in ASDs in these mice, was more efficient in alleviating behavioral deficits than the reference molecule risperidone. Altogether, our data provide first evidence that disrupted mu opioid receptor signaling is sufficient to trigger a comprehensive autistic syndrome, maybe through blunted social reward processes, and this mouse model opens promising avenues for therapeutic innovation. PMID:24619243

  1. Interaction among mu-opioid receptors and alpha 2-adrenoceptors on SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lameh, J; Eiger, S; Sadée, W

    1992-09-01

    The clonal human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-SH-SY5Y was previously shown to express mu-opioid and alpha 2-adrenoceptors which are both negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase. Because of the potential use of alpha 2-agonists in the treatment of narcotic dependence, we tested the interactions among he alpha 2-agonists, clonidine and norepinephrine, and morphine on AC in SH-SY5Y cells. Pretreatment with retinoic acid resulting in partial neuronal differentiation greatly enhanced the cells' sensitivity towards adenylyl cyclase stimulation by prostaglandin E1, and its inhibition by morphine and alpha 2-agonists. Norepinephrine (EC50 = 69 nM) maximally inhibited prostaglandin E1-stimulated cAMP accumulation (by approximately 83%), and the alpha 2-agonist yohimbine reversed these effects. Clonidine (EC50 = 32 nM) was a partial agonist, with 50 to 60% maximal inhibition. The combined effects of morphine (maximum approximately 70% inhibition) and norepinephrine exceeded the effect of either agent alone, yielding more than 90% inhibition of prostaglandin E1-stimulated cAMP accumulation. As previously reported for morphine, only a partial tolerance was observed for adenylyl cyclase inhibition by norepinephrine. Further, no cross-tolerance was observed between clonidine and morphine. The combined results indicate that mu-opioid receptors and an alpha 2-adrenoceptor subtype are colocalized on the same cells in SH-SY5Y culture, which hence serves as a model to study opioid-alpha 2-adrenergic interactions.

  2. Acute stimulation of brain mu opioid receptors inhibits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion via sympathetic innervation.

    PubMed

    Tudurí, Eva; Beiroa, Daniel; Stegbauer, Johannes; Fernø, Johan; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic insulin-secreting β-cells express opioid receptors, whose activation by opioid peptides modulates hormone secretion. Opioid receptors are also expressed in multiple brain regions including the hypothalamus, where they play a role in feeding behavior and energy homeostasis, but their potential role in central regulation of glucose metabolism is unknown. Here, we investigate whether central opioid receptors participate in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis in vivo. C57BL/6J mice were acutely treated by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection with specific agonists for the three main opioid receptors, kappa (KOR), delta (DOR) and mu (MOR) opioid receptors: activation of KOR and DOR did not alter glucose tolerance, whereas activation of brain MOR with the specific agonist DAMGO blunted glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), reduced insulin sensitivity, increased the expression of gluconeogenic genes in the liver and, consequently, impaired glucose tolerance. Pharmacological blockade of α2A-adrenergic receptors prevented DAMGO-induced glucose intolerance and gluconeogenesis. Accordingly, DAMGO failed to inhibit GSIS and to impair glucose tolerance in α2A-adrenoceptor knockout mice, indicating that the effects of central MOR activation on β-cells are mediated via sympathetic innervation. Our results show for the first time a new role of the central opioid system, specifically the MOR, in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose metabolism. PMID:27511839

  3. Enhanced dendritic availability of mu-opioid receptors in inhibitory neurons of the extended amygdala in mice deficient in the corticotropin-releasing factor-1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jaferi, Azra; Zhou, Ping; Pickel, Virginia M.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the corticotropin-releasing factor-1 (CRF-1) receptor in the anterolateral BNST (BSTal), a key subdivision of the extended amygdala, elicits opiate-seeking behavior exacerbated by stress. However, it is unknown whether the presence of CRF-1 affects expression of the mu-opioid receptor (μ-OR) in the many GABAergic BSTal neurons implicated in the stress response. We hypothesized that deletion of the CRF-1 receptor gene would alter the density and/or subcellular distribution of μ-ORs in GABAergic neurons of the BSTal. We used electron microscopy to quantitatively examine μ-OR immunogold and GABA immunoperoxidase labeling in the BSTal of CRFr-1 knockout (KO) compared to wildtype (WT) mice. To assess regional specificity, we examined μ-OR distribution in dorsal striatum. The μ-ORs in each region were predominantly localized in dendrites, many of which were GABA-immunoreactive. Significantly more cytoplasmic μ-OR gold particles per dendritic area were observed selectively in GABA-containing dendrites of the BSTal, but not of the dorsal striatum, in KO compared to WT mice. In both regions, however, significantly fewer GABA-immunoreactive axon terminals were present in KO compared to WT mice. Our results suggest that absence of CRF-1 results in enhanced expression and/or dendritic trafficking of μ-ORs in inhibitory BSTal neurons. They also suggest that expression of CRF-1 is a critical determinant of the availability of GABA in functionally diverse brain regions. These findings underscore the complex interplay between CRF, opioid and GABA systems in limbic and striatal regions, and have implications for the role of CRF-1 in influencing the pharmacological effects of opiates active at μ-ORs. PMID:20506149

  4. Mu-opioid receptor activation in the medial shell of nucleus accumbens promotes alcohol consumption, self-administration and cue-induced reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Richard, Jocelyn M; Fields, Howard L

    2016-09-01

    Endogenous opioid signaling in ventral cortico-striatal-pallidal circuitry is implicated in elevated alcohol consumption and relapse to alcohol seeking. Mu-opioid receptor activation in the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a region implicated in multiple aspects of reward processing, elevates alcohol consumption while NAc opioid antagonists reduce it. However, the precise nature of the increases in alcohol consumption, and the effects of mu-opioid agonists on alcohol seeking and relapse are not clear. Here, we tested the effects of the mu-opioid agonist [D-Ala(2), N-MePhe(4), Gly-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) in rat NAc shell on lick microstructure in a free-drinking test, alcohol seeking during operant self-administration, extinction learning and expression, and cue-reinforced reinstatement of alcohol seeking. DAMGO enhanced the number, but not the size of drinking bouts. DAMGO also enhanced operant alcohol self-administration and cue-induced reinstatement, but did not affect extinction learning or elicit reinstatement in the absence of cues. Our results suggest that mu-opioid agonism in NAc shell elevates alcohol consumption, seeking and conditioned reinforcement primarily by enhancing the incentive motivational properties of alcohol and alcohol-paired cues, rather than by modulating palatability, satiety, or reinforcement. PMID:27089981

  5. Biomarkers of morphine tolerance and dependence are prevented by morphine-induced endocytosis of a mutant mu-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Kim, Joseph A; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2009-12-01

    Growing evidence shows that trafficking of the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) is a critical process in functional recovery from desensitization following activation and plays important roles in morphine tolerance and dependence largely because of the failure of morphine to promote such trafficking. However, morphine tolerance and dependence are believed to be mediated by multiple mechanisms, including well-documented biochemical changes in cAMP activity, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), glucocorticoid receptors (GRs), and c-fos. Here, we assess the consequences of promoting morphine-induced endocytosis on these biochemical changes utilizing a knock-in mouse model, RMOR, in which MORs undergo morphine-induced endocytosis. Chronic morphine treatment of wild-type (WT) mice promoted superactivation of adenylyl cyclase, alterations in NMDARs, and up-regulation of GR and c-fos in distinct brain regions. Notably, none of these biochemical changes occurred in the RMOR-knock-in mice. Together, these data demonstrate that morphine tolerance and dependence are mediated by multiple biochemical mechanisms and that MOR endocytosis plays a critical role in each of these mechanisms.

  6. Mu Opioid Receptors Mediate the Effects of Chronic Ethanol Binge Drinking on the Hippocampal Neurogenic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Contet, Candice; Kim, Airee; Le, David; Iyengar, Siddharth; Kotzebue, Roxanne W.; Yuan, Clara J.; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol exposure and withdrawal alter the generation of new neurons in the adult hippocampus. The endogenous opioid system, in particular the μ opioid receptor (MOR), can modulate neural progenitors and also plays a critical role in ethanol drinking and dependence. In the present study, we sought to determine whether MOR contributes to the effects of ethanol on the dentate gyrus (DG) neurogenic niche. MOR wild-type (WT), heterozygous (Het) and knockout (KO) littermates were subjected to voluntary ethanol drinking in repeated limited-access two-bottle choice (2BC) sessions. MOR deficiency did not alter progenitor proliferation, neuronal differentiation and maturation, apoptosis or microglia in ethanol-naïve mice. When exposed to five consecutive weeks of 2BC, MOR mutant mice exhibited a gene-dosage dependent reduction of ethanol consumption compared to WT mice. Introducing a week of ethanol deprivation between each week of 2BC increased ethanol consumption in all genotypes and produced equivalent intakes in WT, Het and KO mice. Under the latter paradigm, ethanol drinking decreased progenitor proliferation and neuronal differentiation in the DG of WT mice. Interestingly, WT mice exhibited a strong negative correlation between ethanol intake and proliferation, which was disrupted in Het and KO mice. Moreover, MOR deficiency blocked the effect of ethanol on neuronal differentiation. MOR deficiency also protected against the neuroimmune response to ethanol drinking. Finally, chronic binge drinking induced a paradoxical decrease in apoptosis, which was independent of MOR. Altogether our data suggest that MOR is implicated in some of the neuroplastic changes produced by chronic ethanol exposure in the DG. PMID:23461397

  7. Subchronic nicotine exposure in adolescence induces long-term effects on hippocampal and striatal cannabinoid-CB1 and mu-opioid receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Marco, Eva M; Granstrem, Oleg; Moreno, Enrique; Llorente, Ricardo; Adriani, Walter; Laviola, Giovanni; Viveros, Maria-Paz

    2007-02-14

    There is evidence for the existence of functional interactions between nicotine and cannabinoids and opioid compounds in adult experimental animals. However, there is scarce information about these relationships in young animals. In the present study we evaluated short and long-term effects of a subchronic nicotine treatment [0.4 mg/kg daily i.p. injections from postnatal day (PND) 34 to PND 43], upon hippocampal and striatal cannabinoid-CB(1) and mu-opioid receptors in Wistar rats of both genders. Rats were sacrificed 2 h after the last nicotine injection (short-term effects, PND 43) or one month later (long-term effects, PND 75). Hippocampal and striatal cannabinoid CB(1) and mu-opioid receptors were quantified by Western blotting. The subchronic nicotine treatment induced a region-dependent long-lasting effect in cannabinoid CB(1) receptor: a significant increase in hippocampal cannabinoid CB(1) receptors and a significant decrease in striatal cannabinoid CB(1) receptors, with these effects being similar in males and females. With respect to mu-opioid receptors, subchronic nicotine induced a significant down-regulation in hippocampal and striatal mu-opioid receptors in the long-term, and within the striatum the effects were more marked in adult males than in females. The present results indicate that juvenile nicotine taking may have implications for the endocannabinoid and endogenous opioid function and for the behaviors served by those systems, this includes possible modification of the response of adults to different psychotropic drugs, i.e. cannabis and morphine/heroin when taken later in life.

  8. Argon prevents the development of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine and amphetamine-induced changes in mu opioid receptor in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    David, Hélène N; Dhilly, Martine; Poisnel, Géraldine; Degoulet, Mickael; Meckler, Cédric; Vallée, Nicolas; Blatteau, Jean-Éric; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Lemaire, Marc; Debruyne, Danièle; Abraini, Jacques H

    2014-01-01

    Systemic administration of γ-amino-butyric acid type A (GABA-A) and benzodiazepine receptor agonists has been reported to block the development of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine. Here, we investigated whether the non-anesthetic noble gas argon, shown to possess agonistic properties at these receptors, may block the acquisition of amphetamine-induced locomotor sensitization and mu opioid receptor activation in the nucleus accumbens. Rats were pretreated with saline solution or amphetamine (1 mg/kg) from day 1 to day 3 and then exposed, immediately after injection of amphetamine, to medicinal air or argon at 75 vol% (with the remainder being oxygen). After a 3-day period of withdrawal, rats were challenged with amphetamine on day 7. Rats pretreated with amphetamine and argon had lower locomotor activity (U = 5, P < 0.005) and mu opioid receptor activity in the nucleus accumbens (U = 0, P < 0.001) than rats pretreated with amphetamine and air. In contrast, argon had effect on locomotor and mu receptor activity neither in rats pretreated with saline and challenged with amphetamine (acute amphetamine) nor in rats pretreated and challenged with saline solution (controls). These results indicate that argon inhibits the development of both locomotor sensitization and mu opioid receptor activation induced by repeated administration of amphetamine.

  9. Morphine-induced antinociception and reward in "humanized" mice expressing the mu opioid receptor A118G polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Henderson-Redmond, Angela N; Yuill, Matthew B; Lowe, Tammy E; Kline, Aaron M; Zee, Michael L; Guindon, Josée; Morgan, Daniel J

    2016-05-01

    The rewarding and antinociceptive effects of opioids are mediated through the mu-opioid receptor. The A118G single nucleotide polymorphism in this receptor has been implicated in drug addiction and differences in pain response. Clinical and preclinical studies have found that the G allele is associated with increased heroin reward and self-administration, elevated post-operative pain, and reduced analgesic responsiveness to opioids. Male and female mice homozygous for the "humanized" 118AA or 118GG alleles were evaluated to test the hypothesis that 118GG mice are less sensitive to the rewarding and antinociceptive effects of morphine. We found that 118AA and 118GG mice of both genders developed conditioned place preference for morphine. All mice developed tolerance to the antinociceptive and hypothermic effects of morphine. However, morphine tolerance was not different between AA and GG mice. We also examined sensitivity to the antinociceptive and hypothermic effects of cumulative morphine doses. We found that 118GG mice show reduced hypothermic and antinociceptive responses on the hotplate for 10mg/kg morphine. Finally, we examined basal pain response and morphine-induced antinociception in the formalin test for inflammatory pain. We found no gender or genotype differences in either basal pain response or morphine-induced antinociception in the formalin test. Our data suggests that homozygous expression of the GG allele in mice blunts morphine-induced hypothermia and hotplate antinociception but does not alter morphine CPP, morphine tolerance, or basal inflammatory pain response. PMID:26521067

  10. Mu opioid receptor in spermatozoa, eggs and larvae of gilthead sea bream (Sparus Aurata) and its involvement in stress related to aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Albrizio, Maria; Guaricci, Antonio C; Milano, Serena; Macrì, Francesco; Aiudi, Giulio

    2014-08-01

    In aquaculture, unfavourable conditions experienced during early development may have strong downstream effects on the adult phenotype and fitness. Sensitivity to stress, leading to disease, reduced growth and mortality, is higher in larvae than in adult fish. In this study, conducted on sea bream (Sparus aurata), we evidenced the presence of the mu opioid receptor in gametes and larvae at different developmental stages. Moreover, we evaluated the possibility of reducing the effects of artificially produced stress, altering temperature, salinity and pH, by naloxone (an opioid antagonist) and calcium. Results evidenced that mu opioid receptor is present in larvae and in gametes of both sexes and that, during larval growth, its expression level changes accordingly; furthermore, naloxone/calcium association is efficacious in increasing the survival period of treated larvae compared to controls. We conclude that in sea bream rearing, the use of naloxone/calcium against stress can improve fish farming techniques by reducing larval mortality and consequently increasing productivity.

  11. Targeted Expression of Mu-Opioid Receptors in a Subset of Striatal Direct-Pathway Neurons Restores Opiate Reward

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yijun; Ostlund, Sean B.; James, Alex; Park, Chang Sin; Ge, Weihong; Roberts, Kristofer W.; Mittal, Nitish; Murphy, Niall P.; Cepeda, Carlos; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Levine, Michael S.; Jentsch, J. David; Walwyn, Wendy M.; Sun, Yi E.; Evans, Christopher J.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Yang, X. William

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mu-Opioid Receptors (MOR) are necessary for the analgesic and addictive effects of opioids such as morphine, but the MOR-expressing neuronal populations that mediate the distinct opiate effects remain elusive. Here we devised a novel conditional BAC rescue strategy to show that mice with targeted MOR expression in a subpopulation of striatal direct-pathway neurons enriched in the striosome and nucleus accumbens, in an otherwise MOR-null background, restore opiate reward, opiate-induced striatal dopamine release, and partially restore motivation to self-administer opiates. However, they lack opiate analgesia or withdrawal. Importantly, we used Cre-mediated deletion of the rescued MOR transgene to establish that striatal, rather than a few extrastriatal sites of MOR transgene expression, is needed for the restoration of opiate reward. Together, our study demonstrates that a subpopulation of striatal direct-pathway neurons is sufficient to support opiate reward-driven behaviors and provides a novel intersectional genetic approach to dissect neurocircuit-specific gene function in vivo. PMID:24413699

  12. Interface of physical and emotional stress regulation through the endogenous opioid system and mu-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Saulo C; Kennedy, Susan E; Smith, Yolanda R; Stohler, Christian S; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2005-12-01

    Unraveling the pathways and neurobiological mechanisms that underlie the regulation of physical and emotional stress responses in humans is of critical importance to understand vulnerability and resiliency factors to the development of a number of complex physical and psychopathological states. Dysregulation of central stress response circuits have been implicated in the establishment of conditions as diverse as persistent pain, mood and personality disorders and substance abuse and dependence. The present review examines the contribution of the endogenous opioid system and mu-opioid receptors to the modulation and adaptation of the organism to challenges, such as sustained pain and negative emotional states, which threaten its internal homeostasis. Data accumulated in animal models, and more recently in humans, point to this neurotransmitter system as a critical modulator of the transition from acute (warning signals) to sustained (stressor) environmental adversity. The existence of pathways and regulatory mechanisms common to the regulation of both physical and emotional states transcend classical categorical disease classifications, and point to the need to utilize dimensional, "symptom"-related approximations to their study. Possible future areas of study at the interface of "mind" (cognitive-emotional) and "body" (physical) functions are delineated in this context.

  13. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and large conductance calcium-sensitive potassium channels inhibit the release of opioid peptides that induce mu-opioid receptor internalization in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Song, B; Marvizón, J C G

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous opioids in the spinal cord play an important role in nociception, but the mechanisms that control their release are poorly understood. To simultaneously detect all opioids able to activate the mu-opioid receptor, we measured mu-opioid receptor internalization in rat spinal cord slices stimulated electrically or chemically to evoke opioid release. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal horn in the presence of peptidase inhibitors produced mu-opioid receptor internalization in half of the mu-opioid receptor neurons. This internalization was rapidly abolished by N-methyl-D-aspartate (IC50=2 microM), and N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists prevented this effect. mu-Opioid receptor internalization evoked by high K+ or veratridine was also inhibited by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation. N-methyl-D-aspartate did not affect mu-opioid receptor internalization induced by exogenous endomorphins, confirming that the effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate was on opioid release. We hypothesized that this inhibition was mediated by large conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels BK(Ca2+). Indeed, inhibition by N-methyl-D-aspartate was prevented by tetraethylammonium and by the selective BK(Ca2+) blockers paxilline, penitrem A and verruculogen. Paxilline did not increase mu-opioid receptor internalization in the absence of N-methyl-D-aspartate, indicating that it does not produce an increase in opioid release unrelated to the inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate. The BK(Ca2+) involved appears to be a subtype with slow association kinetics for iberiotoxin, which was effective only with long incubations. The BK(Ca2+) opener NS-1619 also inhibited the evoked mu-opioid receptor internalization, and iberiotoxin prevented this effect. We concluded that Ca2+ influx through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors causes the opening of BK(Ca2+) and hyperpolarization in opioid-containing dorsal horn neurons, resulting in the inhibition of opioid release. Since mu-opioid receptors in the dorsal horn

  14. It’s MORe exciting than mu: crosstalk between mu opioid receptors and glutamatergic transmission in the mesolimbic dopamine system

    PubMed Central

    Chartoff, Elena H.; Connery, Hilary S.

    2014-01-01

    Opioids selective for the G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor (MOR) produce potent analgesia and euphoria. Heroin, a synthetic opioid, is considered one of the most addictive substances, and the recent exponential rise in opioid addiction and overdose deaths has made treatment development a national public health priority. Existing medications (methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone), when combined with psychosocial therapies, have proven efficacy in reducing aspects of opioid addiction. Unfortunately, these medications have critical limitations including those associated with opioid agonist therapies (e.g., sustained physiological dependence and opioid withdrawal leading to high relapse rates upon discontinuation), non-adherence to daily dosing, and non-renewal of monthly injection with extended-release naltrexone. Furthermore, current medications fail to ameliorate key aspects of addiction such as powerful conditioned associations that trigger relapse (e.g., cues, stress, the drug itself). Thus, there is a need for developing novel treatments that target neural processes corrupted with chronic opioid use. This requires a basic understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying effects of opioids on synaptic transmission and plasticity within reward-related neural circuits. The focus of this review is to discuss how crosstalk between MOR-associated G protein signaling and glutamatergic neurotransmission leads to immediate and long-term effects on emotional states (e.g., euphoria, depression) and motivated behavior (e.g., drug-seeking, relapse). Our goal is to integrate findings on how opioids modulate synaptic release of glutamate and postsynaptic transmission via α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area with the clinical (neurobehavioral) progression of opioid dependence, as well as to identify gaps in knowledge that can be addressed in future studies

  15. Dalargin and [Cys-(O2NH2)]2 analogues of enkephalins and their selectivity for mu opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, N; Ivancheva, C; Dimitrov, E; Bocheva, A; Radomirov, R

    1995-07-01

    1. Effects of the enkephalins Met-enk (M) and Leu-enk (L), of two newly synthesized analogues--[Cys-(O2NH2)]2-Met-enk (CM) and [Cys-(O2NH2)]2-Leu-enk (CL)--and of a hexapeptide--D-Ala2-Leu5-Arg6 (Dalargin; DL) on the spontaneous and electrically stimulated activity were examined with respect to their selectivity for the mu opioid receptors in the longitudinal layer of guinea pig ileum. 2. M and CM exerted relaxing and contractile effects on the spontaneous contractile activity while L, CL and DL produced only relaxation. The order of potency towards the relaxatory phase was DL > M > CM > L > CL and towards the contractile phase CM > M. 3. The effects of enkephalins on the spontaneous activity were naloxone and TTX sensitive except for the contractile phase of M and CM which persisted in the presence of TTX. NO was not involved in the neurotransmission of the relaxatory responses, while the blockade of alpha and beta adrenoceptors showed the participation of adrenergic mechanisms. Relaxation and contraction induced by enkephalins could not be directly attributed to cholinergic neurotransmission. 4. The naloxone-sensitive and concentration-dependent inhibitory effects of enkephalins and their analogues on the electrically stimulated cholinergic contractions were established. The order of the relative potency of opioids was: DL-3.8; M-1.0; L-0.4; CM-0.01; CL-0.005. 5. These data indicated that the D-Ala2 substitution and lengthening of the peptide chain by Arg6 in the molecule of L increased the potency at the mu opiate receptors, while the substitution in position 2 with Cys-(O2NH2) in the molecule of M and L yielded a less potent and selective mu agonists.

  16. Association of Smoking with Mu- Opioid Receptor Availability Before and During Naltrexone Blockade in Alcohol-Dependent Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Weerts, Elise M.; Wand, Gary S.; Kuwabara, Hiroto; Xu, Xiaoqiang; Frost, J.James; Wong, Dean F.; McCaul, Mary E.

    2012-01-01

    Persons with a history of alcohol dependence are more likely to use tobacco and to meet criteria for nicotine dependence compared to social drinkers or nondrinkers. The high levels of comorbidity of nicotine and alcohol use and dependence are thought to be related to interactions between nicotinic, opioid and dopamine receptors in mesolimbic regions. The current study examined whether individual differences in regional mu-opioid receptor (MOR) availability were associated with tobacco use, nicotine dependence, and level of nicotine craving in 25 alcohol dependent (AD) subjects. AD subjects completed an inpatient protocol, which included medically supervised alcohol withdrawal, monitored alcohol abstinence, transdermal nicotine maintenance (21 mg/day), and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging using the MOR agonist [11C]-carfentanil (CFN) before (basal scan) and during treatment with 50 mg/day naltrexone (naltrexone scan). Subjects who had higher scores on the Fagerström Nicotine Dependence Test had significantly lower basal scan binding potential (BPND) across mesolimbic regions including the amygdala, cingulate, globus pallidus, thalamus and insula. Likewise, the number of cigarettes per day was negatively associated with basal scan BPND in mesolimbic regions Higher nicotine craving was significantly associated with lower BPND in amygdala, globus pallidus, putamen, thalamus and ventral striatum. Although blunted during naltrexone treatment, the negative association was maintained for nicotine dependence and cigarettes per day, but not for nicotine craving. These findings suggest that intensity of cigarette smoking and severity of nicotine dependence symptoms are systematically related to reduced BPND across multiple brain regions in AD subjects. PMID:23252742

  17. Mu opioid receptor up-regulation and participation in excitability of hippocampal pyramidal cell electrophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Moudy, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic administration of opiate antagonists to rats results in up-regulation of their brain opioid receptors. Using subcellular fractionation techniques, brain opioid receptors were resolved into two membrane populations, one associated with synaptic plasma membranes (SPM) and the other enriched in smooth endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi (microsomes). This study addressed in part the question of whether an antagonist induces up-regulation uniformly in these two populations. Rats were administered naltrexone by subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps. Forebrain mu receptor levels were determined by homologous displacement of ({sup 3}H)D-ala{sup 2}-mePhe{sup 4}-gly-ol{sup 5}-enkephalin (DAGO) followed by computer estimation of binding parameters. Receptor levels in crude membranes rose 77% after treatment. Microsomes displayed a 92% increase, a two-fold greater change than in SPMs (51%). These results establish that naltrexone induces up-regulation of both membrane populations; and that microsomal and SPM receptors represent discrete populations of intracellular and cell surface sites, respectively. Binding experiments on isolated hippocampi also demonstrated up-regulation (71%) of mu receptors. To demonstrate up-regulation of opioid receptors electrophysiologically, hippocampal slices were prepared from rats which had been chronically treated with naltrexone. After superfusion with DAGO, these slices showed a 42% greater population spike output than controls in response to the same EPSP input. Hippocampi from animals treated for two weeks showed an additional increase in sensitivity. The results support a disinhibitory role for opioids in pyramidal cell hyper-excitability. More importantly, they demonstrate a significant physiological correlate to opioid receptor up-regulation.

  18. Agonist-induced functional desensitization of the mu-opioid receptor is mediated by loss of membrane receptors rather than uncoupling from G protein.

    PubMed

    Pak, Y; Kouvelas, A; Scheideler, M A; Rasmussen, J; O'Dowd, B F; George, S R

    1996-11-01

    The effects of acute exposure of the opioid peptide [D-Ala2,N-MePhe4, Gly-ol5]enkephalin (DAMGO) on the mu-opioid receptor were examined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) K-1 and baby hamster kidney stable transfectants. In the CHO cell line, acute 1-hr treatment with DAMGO decreased the density of receptors without affecting the affinity or proportion of agonist-detected sites and attenuated the ability of the agonist to inhibit forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. In contrast, similar 1-hr treatment of baby hamster kidney cells did not affect receptor density or agonist ability to inhibit cAMP accumulation, but longer duration of agonist exposure resulted in a reduction in membrane receptor, identical to the CHO cells. These results suggested that for the mu-opioid receptor, alteration in receptor density was the major determinant for the observed agonist-induced desensitization. Consistent with this notion, the ratio of the DAMGO concentration yielding half-maximal occupation of the mu receptor to that yielding half-maximal functional response was < 1. This suggests the necessity for a high mu receptor occupancy rate for maximal functional response, so that any loss of cell surface opioid-binding sites was a critical determinant in reducing the maximal response. This hypothesis was further supported by the observation that irreversible inactivation of fixed proportions of opioid-binding sites with beta-chlorn-altrexamine demonstrated that there were few spare receptors, which is in contrast to what has been reported for other G protein-coupled receptors, including the delta-opioid receptor. Taken together, these data suggest that the opioid agonist DAMGO has a high affinity for the mu receptor but must occupy > 70% of the available receptors to generate the maximal second messenger-linked response.

  19. Nociceptive behaviour upon modulation of mu-opioid receptors in the ventrobasal complex of the thalamus of rats.

    PubMed

    Pozza, Daniel Humberto; Potes, Catarina Soares; Barroso, Patrícia Araújo; Azevedo, Luís; Castro-Lopes, José Manuel; Neto, Fani Lourença

    2010-03-01

    The role of mu-opioid receptors (MORs) in the inflammatory pain processing mechanisms within the ventrobasal complex of the thalamus (VB) is not well understood. This study investigated the effect of modulating MOR activity upon nociception, by stereotaxically injecting specific ligands in the VB. Nociceptive behaviour was evaluated in two established animal models of inflammatory pain, by using the formalin (acute and tonic pain) and the ankle-bend (chronic monoarthritic pain) tests. Control (saline intra-VB injection) formalin-injected rats showed acute and tonic pain-related behaviours. In contrast, intrathalamic administration of [D-Ala(2), N-Me-Phe(4), Gly(5)-ol]-enkephalin acetate (DAMGO), a MOR-specific agonist, induced a statistically significant decrease of all tonic phase pain-related behaviours assessed until 30-35min after formalin hind paw injection. In the acute phase only the number of paw-jerks was affected. In monoarthritic rats, there was a noticeable antinociceptive effect with approximately 40min of duration, as denoted by the reduced ankle-bend scores observed after DAMGO injection. Intra-VB injection of D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (CTOP), a specific MOR antagonist, or of CTOP followed, 10min after, by DAMGO had no effects in either formalin or ankle-bend tests. Data show that DAMGO-induced MOR activation in the VB has an antinociceptive effect in the formalin test as well as in chronic pain observed in MA rats, suggesting an important and specific role for MORs in the VB processing of inflammatory pain.

  20. The mu opioid receptor A118G gene polymorphism moderates effects of trait anger-out on acute pain sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bruehl, Stephen; Chung, Ok Y; Burns, John W

    2008-10-15

    Both trait anger-in (managing anger through suppression) and anger-out (managing anger through direct expression) are related to pain responsiveness, but only anger-out effects involve opioid mechanisms. Preliminary work suggested that the effects of anger-out on postoperative analgesic requirements were moderated by the A118G single nucleotide polymorphism of the mu opioid receptor gene. This study further explored these potential genotypexphenotype interactions as they impact acute pain sensitivity. Genetic samples and measures of anger-in and anger-out were obtained in 87 subjects (from three studies) who participated in controlled laboratory acute pain tasks (ischemic, finger pressure, thermal). McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) Sensory and Affective ratings for each pain task were standardized within studies, aggregated across pain tasks, and combined for analyses. Significant anger-outxA118G interactions were observed (p's<.05). Simple effects tests for both pain measures revealed that whereas anger-out was nonsignificantly hyperalgesic in subjects homozygous for the wild-type allele, anger-out was significantly hypoalgesic in those with the variant G allele (p's<.05). For the MPQ-Affective measure, this interaction arose both from low pain sensitivity in high anger-out subjects with the G allele and heightened pain sensitivity in low anger-out subjects with the G allele relative to responses in homozygous wild-type subjects. No genetic moderation was observed for anger-in, although significant main effects on MPQ-Affective ratings were noted (p<.005). Anger-in main effects were due to overlap with negative affect, but anger-outxA118G interactions were not, suggesting unique effects of expressive anger regulation. Results support opioid-related genotypexphenotype interactions involving trait anger-out.

  1. The Mu Opioid Receptor A118G Gene Polymorphism Moderates Effects of Trait Anger-Out on Acute Pain Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Bruehl, Stephen; Chung, Ok Y.; Burns, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Both trait anger-in (managing anger through suppression) and anger-out (managing anger through direct expression) are related to pain responsiveness, but only anger-out effects involve opioid mechanisms. Preliminary work suggested the effects of anger-out on post-operative analgesic requirements were moderated by the A118G single nucleotide polymorphism of the mu opioid receptor gene. This study further explored these potential genotype X phenotype interactions as they impact acute pain sensitivity. Genetic samples and measures of anger-in and anger-out were obtained in 87 subjects (from three studies) who participated in controlled laboratory acute pain tasks (ischemic, finger pressure, thermal). McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) Sensory and Affective ratings for each pain task were standardized within studies, aggregated across pain tasks, and combined for analyses. Significant anger-out X A118G interactions were observed (p’s<.05). Simple effects tests for both pain measures revealed that whereas anger-out was nonsignificantly hyperalgesic in subjects homozygous for the wild-type allele, anger-out was significantly hypoalgesic in those with the variant G allele (p’s<.05). For the MPQ-Affective measure, this interaction arose both from low pain sensitivity in high anger-out subjects with the G allele and heightened pain sensitivity in low anger-out subjects with the G allele relative to responses in homozygous wild-type subjects. No genetic moderation was observed for anger-in, although significant main effects on MPQ-Affective ratings were noted (p<.005). Anger-in main effects were due to overlap with negative affect, but anger-out X A118G interactions were not, suggesting unique effects of expressive anger regulation. Results support opioid-related genotype X phenotype interactions involving trait anger-out. PMID:18579306

  2. The influences of reproductive status and acute stress on the levels of phosphorylated mu opioid receptor immunoreactivity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Keith L; Chapleau, Jeanette D; Pierce, Joseph P; Kelter, David T; Williams, Tanya J; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; McEwen, Bruce S; Waters, Elizabeth M; Milner, Teresa A

    2011-08-19

    Opioids play a critical role in hippocampally dependent behavior and plasticity. In the hippocampal formation, mu opioid receptors (MOR) are prominent in parvalbumin (PARV) containing interneurons. Previously we found that gonadal hormones modulate the trafficking of MORs in PARV interneurons. Although sex differences in response to stress are well documented, the point at which opioids, sex and stress interact to influence hippocampal function remains elusive. Thus, we used quantitative immunocytochemistry in combination with light and electron microscopy for the phosphorylated MOR at the SER375 carboxy-terminal residue (pMOR) in male and female rats to assess these interactions. In both sexes, pMOR-immunoreactivity (ir) was prominent in axons and terminals and in a few neuronal somata and dendrites, some of which contained PARV in the mossy fiber pathway region of the dentate gyrus (DG) hilus and CA3 stratum lucidum. In unstressed rats, the levels of pMOR-ir in the DG or CA3 were not affected by sex or estrous cycle stage. However, immediately following 30 minutes of acute immobilization stress (AIS), males had higher levels of pMOR-ir whereas females at proestrus and estrus (high estrogen stages) had lower levels of pMOR-ir within the DG. In contrast, the number and types of neuronal profiles with pMOR-ir were not altered by AIS in either males or proestrus females. These data demonstrate that although gonadal steroids do not affect pMOR levels at resting conditions, they are differentially activated both pre- and post-synaptic MORs following stress. These interactions may contribute to the reported sex differences in hippocampally dependent behaviors in stressed animals. PMID:22468144

  3. Neonatal Administration of Thimerosal Causes Persistent Changes in Mu Opioid Receptors in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Olczak, Mieszko; Duszczyk, Michalina; Mierzejewski, Pawel; Bobrowicz, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Thimerosal added to some pediatric vaccines is suspected in pathogenesis of several neurodevelopmental disorders. Our previous study showed that thimerosal administered to suckling rats causes persistent, endogenous opioid-mediated hypoalgesia. Here we examined, using immunohistochemical staining technique, the density of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) in the brains of rats, which in the second postnatal week received four i.m. injections of thimerosal at doses 12, 240, 1,440 or 3,000 μg Hg/kg. The periaqueductal gray, caudate putamen and hippocampus were examined. Thimerosal administration caused dose-dependent statistically significant increase in MOR densities in the periaqueductal gray and caudate putamen, but decrease in the dentate gyrus, where it was accompanied by the presence of degenerating neurons and loss of synaptic vesicle marker (synaptophysin). These data document that exposure to thimerosal during early postnatal life produces lasting alterations in the densities of brain opioid receptors along with other neuropathological changes, which may disturb brain development. PMID:20803069

  4. Mu opioid receptor expression is increased in inflammatory bowel diseases: implications for homeostatic intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Philippe, D; Chakass, D; Thuru, X; Zerbib, P; Tsicopoulos, A; Geboes, K; Bulois, P; Breisse, M; Vorng, H; Gay, J; Colombel, J‐F; Desreumaux, P; Chamaillard, M

    2006-01-01

    Background and aims Recent studies with μ opioid receptor (MOR) deficient mice support a physiological anti‐inflammatory effect of MOR at the colon interface. To better understand the potential pharmacological effect of certain opiates in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), we (1) evaluated the regulation in vivo and in vitro of human MOR expression by inflammation; and (2) tested the potential anti‐inflammatory function of a specific opiate (DALDA) in inflamed and resting human mucosa. Patients and methods Expression of MOR mRNA and protein was evaluated in healthy and inflamed small bowel and colonic tissues, isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and purified monocytes, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from healthy donors and IBD patients. The effect of cytokines and nuclear factor κB (NFκB) activation on MOR expression in lymphocyte T and monocytic human cell lines was assessed. Finally, DALDA induced anti‐inflammatory effect was investigated in mucosal explants from controls and IBD patients. Results MOR was expressed in ileal and colonic enteric neurones as well as in immunocytes such as myeloid cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Overexpressed in active IBD mucosa, MOR was significantly enhanced by cytokines and repressed by NFκB inhibitor in myeloid and lymphocytic cell lines. Furthermore, ex vivo DALDA treatment dampened tumour necrosis factor α mRNA expression in the colon of active IBD patients. Conclusions Given the increased expression of MOR and the ex vivo beneficial effect of DALDA in active IBD, natural and/or synthetic opioid agonists could help to prevent overt pathological intestinal inflammation. PMID:16299031

  5. Examining the role of mu opioid receptor endocytosis in the beneficial and side-effects of prolonged opioid use: from a symposium on new concepts in mu-opioid pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Whistler, Jennifer L

    2012-03-01

    Opioid drugs remain the gold standard for the treatment of severe pain, both acute/post-surgical and chronic. However, the utility of opioid drugs for the treatment of chronic pain is compromised by the development of analgesic tolerance which, in turn, leads to dose-escalation and increased likelihood of dangerous side effects, including dependence. Consequently, there remains resistance among clinicians and the general population to using opiates for pain management because of risk of "addiction." These fears are not unwarranted. More than 2.5 million people begin abusing opioid painkillers each year, and prescription opioid abuse is now the second most common type of illegal drug use after marijuana. Some abusers become dependent due to recreational use of prescription painkillers. However, many abusers are among the 40 million people suffering from chronic pain, and developed dependence while using the drugs for legitimate purposes. Both of these trends highlight the need to develop opioid therapeutics with a reduced liability to cause tolerance, dependence and addiction. Identifying the ideal properties of opioid drugs that would retain analgesia but reduce these side-effects has been a goal of my laboratory for more than a decade. During this time, we have proposed the novel hypothesis that opioid drugs that promote desensitization, endocytosis and recycling of the mu-opioid-receptor (MOR) will retain analgesic efficacy, but will have a reduced liability to cause tolerance, dependence and addiction. We have generated substantial data, both pharmacological and genetic to suggest that our hypothesis is a valid one. These data are summarized in this review.

  6. Examining the role of mu opioid receptor endocytosis in the beneficial and side-effects of prolonged opioid use: from a symposium on new concepts in mu-opioid pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Whistler, Jennifer L

    2012-03-01

    Opioid drugs remain the gold standard for the treatment of severe pain, both acute/post-surgical and chronic. However, the utility of opioid drugs for the treatment of chronic pain is compromised by the development of analgesic tolerance which, in turn, leads to dose-escalation and increased likelihood of dangerous side effects, including dependence. Consequently, there remains resistance among clinicians and the general population to using opiates for pain management because of risk of "addiction." These fears are not unwarranted. More than 2.5 million people begin abusing opioid painkillers each year, and prescription opioid abuse is now the second most common type of illegal drug use after marijuana. Some abusers become dependent due to recreational use of prescription painkillers. However, many abusers are among the 40 million people suffering from chronic pain, and developed dependence while using the drugs for legitimate purposes. Both of these trends highlight the need to develop opioid therapeutics with a reduced liability to cause tolerance, dependence and addiction. Identifying the ideal properties of opioid drugs that would retain analgesia but reduce these side-effects has been a goal of my laboratory for more than a decade. During this time, we have proposed the novel hypothesis that opioid drugs that promote desensitization, endocytosis and recycling of the mu-opioid-receptor (MOR) will retain analgesic efficacy, but will have a reduced liability to cause tolerance, dependence and addiction. We have generated substantial data, both pharmacological and genetic to suggest that our hypothesis is a valid one. These data are summarized in this review. PMID:22226706

  7. Morphine-induced trafficking of a mu-opioid receptor interacting protein in rat locus coeruleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jaremko, Kellie M.; Thompson, Nicholas L.; Reyes, Beverly A. S.; Jin, Jay; Ebersole, Brittany; Jenney, Christopher B.; Grigson, Patricia S.; Levenson, Robert; Berrettini, Wade H.; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Opiate addiction is a devastating health problem, with approximately 2 million people currently addicted to heroin or non-medical prescription opiates in the United States alone. In neurons, adaptations in cell signaling cascades develop following opioid actions at the mu opioid receptor (MOR). A novel putative target for intervention involves interacting proteins that may regulate trafficking of MOR. Morphine has been shown to induce a re-distribution of a MOR-interacting protein Wntless (WLS, a transport molecule necessary for secretion of neurotrophic Wnt proteins), from cytoplasmic to membrane compartments in rat striatal neurons. Given its opiate-sensitivity and its well-characterized molecular and cellular adaptations to morphine exposure, we investigated the anatomical distribution of WLS and MOR in the rat locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine (NE) system. Dual immunofluorescence microscopy was used to test the hypothesis that WLS is localized to noradrenergic neurons of the LC and that WLS and MOR co-exist in common LC somatodendritic processes, providing an anatomical substrate for their putative interactions. We also hypothesized that morphine would influence WLS distribution in the LC. Rats received saline, morphine or the opiate agonist [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO), and tissue sections through the LC were processed for immunogold-silver detection of WLS and MOR. Statistical analysis showed a significant re-distribution of WLS to the plasma membrane following morphine treatment in addition to an increase in the proximity of gold-silver labels for MOR and WLS. Following DAMGO treatment, MOR and WLS were predominantly localized within the cytoplasmic compartment when compared to morphine and control. In a separate cohort of rats, brains were obtained from saline-treated or heroin self-administering male rats for pulldown co-immunoprecipitation studies. Results showed an increased association of WLS and MOR following heroin exposure. As

  8. Vimentin interacts with the 5′-untranslated region of mouse mu opioid receptor (MOR) and is required for post-transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyu Young; Choi, Hack Sun; Law, Ping-Yee; Wei, Li-Na; Loh, Horace H.

    2013-01-01

    The opioid receptors are among the most highly studied members of the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors. Morphine and endogenous mu opioid peptides exert their pharmacological actions mainly through the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Expression of opioid receptor proteins is controlled by extensive transcriptional and post-transcriptional processing. Previously, the 5′-untranslated region (UTR) of the mouse MOR was found to be important for post-transcriptional regulation of the MOR gene in neuronal cells. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the role of vimentin as a post-transcriptional repressor in MOR gene regulation. To identify potential regulators of the mouse MOR gene, we performed affinity column chromatography using 5′-UTR-specific RNA oligonucleotides using neuroblastoma NS20Y cells. Chromatography was followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. We identified an intermediate filament protein, vimentin, which bound specifically to the region between -175 and -150 (175–150) of the MOR 5′-UTR. Binding was confirmed by western blot analysis and RNA supershift assay. Furthermore, a cotransfection study demonstrated that the presence of vimentin resulted in reduced expression of the mouse MOR. Our data suggest that vimentin functions as a repressor of MOR translation, dependent on 175–150 of the MOR 5′-UTR. PMID:23353576

  9. /sup 125/I-FK 33-824: a selective probe for radioautographic labeling of mu opioid receptors in the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Moyse, E.; Pasquini, F.; Quirion, R.; Beaudet, A.

    1986-03-01

    The selectivity of the Met-enkephalin analog FK 33-824 (FK) for mu opioid receptors has been, over the years, a matter of controversy. We report here pharmacological and radioautographic data demonstrating that at nanomolar concentrations. /sup 125/I-FK interacts exclusively with mu sites. (1) Specific binding of /sup 125/I-FK to rat striatal membranes is totally inhibited by mu- and/or delta-preferring ligands according to monovalent, Michaelian kinetics, with a potency proportional to the affinity of competing drugs for mu receptors. (2) Unlabeled FK competes only at high concentration with the delta-selective ligand 3H-DPLPE and according to the same kinetics as the mu-selective agonist DAGO. (3) /sup 125/I-FK generates the same regional radioautographic labeling pattern as 3H-DAGO. We conclude that when used at nanomolar concentrations /sup 125/I-FK constitutes a selective probe for the radioautographic detection of mu opioid receptors at both light and electron microscopic levels.

  10. Argon blocks the expression of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine through antagonism at the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 and mu-opioid receptor in the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    David, H N; Dhilly, M; Degoulet, M; Poisnel, G; Meckler, C; Vallée, N; Blatteau, J-É; Risso, J-J; Lemaire, M; Debruyne, D; Abraini, J H

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the noble gas argon on the expression of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine and amphetamine-induced changes in dopamine release and mu-opioid neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. We found (1) argon blocked the increase in carrier-mediated dopamine release induced by amphetamine in brain slices, but, in contrast, potentiated the decrease in KCl-evoked dopamine release induced by amphetamine, thereby suggesting that argon inhibited the vesicular monoamine transporter-2; (2) argon blocked the expression of locomotor and mu-opioid neurotransmission sensitization induced by repeated amphetamine administration in a short-term model of sensitization in rats; (3) argon decreased the maximal number of binding sites and increased the dissociation constant of mu-receptors in membrane preparations, thereby indicating that argon is a mu-receptor antagonist; (4) argon blocked the expression of locomotor sensitization and context-dependent locomotor activity induced by repeated administration of amphetamine in a long-term model of sensitization. Taken together, these data indicate that argon could be of potential interest for treating drug addiction and dependence. PMID:26151922

  11. Argon blocks the expression of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine through antagonism at the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 and mu-opioid receptor in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    David, H N; Dhilly, M; Degoulet, M; Poisnel, G; Meckler, C; Vallée, N; Blatteau, J-É; Risso, J-J; Lemaire, M; Debruyne, D; Abraini, J H

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the noble gas argon on the expression of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine and amphetamine-induced changes in dopamine release and mu-opioid neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. We found (1) argon blocked the increase in carrier-mediated dopamine release induced by amphetamine in brain slices, but, in contrast, potentiated the decrease in KCl-evoked dopamine release induced by amphetamine, thereby suggesting that argon inhibited the vesicular monoamine transporter-2; (2) argon blocked the expression of locomotor and mu-opioid neurotransmission sensitization induced by repeated amphetamine administration in a short-term model of sensitization in rats; (3) argon decreased the maximal number of binding sites and increased the dissociation constant of mu-receptors in membrane preparations, thereby indicating that argon is a mu-receptor antagonist; (4) argon blocked the expression of locomotor sensitization and context-dependent locomotor activity induced by repeated administration of amphetamine in a long-term model of sensitization. Taken together, these data indicate that argon could be of potential interest for treating drug addiction and dependence. PMID:26151922

  12. Argon blocks the expression of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine through antagonism at the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 and mu-opioid receptor in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    David, H N; Dhilly, M; Degoulet, M; Poisnel, G; Meckler, C; Vallée, N; Blatteau, J-É; Risso, J-J; Lemaire, M; Debruyne, D; Abraini, J H

    2015-07-07

    We investigated the effects of the noble gas argon on the expression of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine and amphetamine-induced changes in dopamine release and mu-opioid neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. We found (1) argon blocked the increase in carrier-mediated dopamine release induced by amphetamine in brain slices, but, in contrast, potentiated the decrease in KCl-evoked dopamine release induced by amphetamine, thereby suggesting that argon inhibited the vesicular monoamine transporter-2; (2) argon blocked the expression of locomotor and mu-opioid neurotransmission sensitization induced by repeated amphetamine administration in a short-term model of sensitization in rats; (3) argon decreased the maximal number of binding sites and increased the dissociation constant of mu-receptors in membrane preparations, thereby indicating that argon is a mu-receptor antagonist; (4) argon blocked the expression of locomotor sensitization and context-dependent locomotor activity induced by repeated administration of amphetamine in a long-term model of sensitization. Taken together, these data indicate that argon could be of potential interest for treating drug addiction and dependence.

  13. The effects of RB101, a mixed inhibitor of enkephalin-catabolizing enzymes, on carrageenin-induced spinal c-Fos expression are completely blocked by beta-funaltrexamine, a selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Le Guen, S; Honoré, P; Catheline, G; Fournié-Zaluski, M C; Roques, B P; Besson, J M

    1999-07-10

    We have demonstrated that pre-administered RB101 (40 mg/kg, i.v.), a mixed inhibitor of enkephalin-catabolizing enzymes, decreased spinal c-Fos expression induced 1 h and 30 min after intraplantar (i.pl.) carrageenin (41% reduction, p<0.01). These effects were completely blocked by pre-administered beta-funaltrexamine (10 mg/kg, i.v., 24 h prior to stimulation), a selective long-lasting mu-opioid receptor antagonist. In conclusion, these results clearly demonstrate that the effects of endogenous enkephalins on noxiously evoked spinal c-Fos expression are essentially mediated via mu-opioid receptors.

  14. Dual regulation of mu opioid receptors in SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells by morphine and interleukin-1β: evidence for opioid-immune crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Shekher; Davis, Randall L; DeSilva, Udaya; Stevens, Craig W

    2010-10-01

    Treatment of SK-N-SH cells with morphine and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) produced dual regulation of the mRNA for the human mu opioid receptor (MOR) protein. Morphine produced a decrease in the MOR mRNA while IL-1β increased it, as assessed by real-time quantitative PCR. These data were consistent with immunocytochemical studies of treated and untreated cells. Morphine-mediated down-regulation of MOR was blocked by naltrexone and IL-1β-induced up-regulation of MOR was blocked by interleukin-1 receptor type 1 antagonist. Immune-opioid crosstalk was examined by IL-1β and morphine co-treatment. These data are the first to show dual regulation of MOR in neuroblastoma cells.

  15. mu-Opioid receptor-stimulated guanosine-5'-O-(gamma-thio)-triphosphate binding in rat thalamus and cultured cell lines: signal transduction mechanisms underlying agonist efficacy.

    PubMed

    Selley, D E; Sim, L J; Xiao, R; Liu, Q; Childers, S R

    1997-01-01

    G protein activation by different mu-selective opioid agonists was examined in rat thalamus, SK-N-SH cells, and mu-opioid receptor-transfected mMOR-CHO cells using agonist-stimulated guanosine-5'-O-(gamma-thio)-triphosphate ([35S]GTP gamma S) binding to membranes in the presence of excess GDP. [D-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly5-ol]Enkephalin (DAMGO) was the most efficacious agonist in rat thalamus and SK-N-SH cells, followed by (in rank order) fentanyl = morphine > > buprenorphine. In mMOR-CHO cells expressing a high density of mu receptors, no differences were observed among DAMGO, morphine or fentanyl, but these agonists were more efficacious than buprenorphine, which was more efficacious than levallorphan. In all three systems, efficacy differences were magnified by increasing GDP concentrations, indicating that the activity state of G proteins can affect agonist efficacy. Scatchard analysis of net agon stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding revealed two major components responsible for agonist efficacy differences. First, differences in the KD values of agonist-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding between high efficacy agonists (DAMGO, fentanyl, and morphine) and classic partial agonists (buprenorphine and levallorphan) were observed in all three systems. Second, differences in the Bmax value of agonist-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding were observed between DAMGO and morphine or fentanyl in rat thalamus and SK-N-SH cells and between the high efficacy agonists and buprenorphine or levallorphan in all three systems. These results suggest that mu-opioid agonist efficacy is determined by the magnitude of the receptor-mediated affinity shift in the binding of GTP (or[35S]GTP gamma S) versus GDP to the G protein and by the number of G proteins activated per occupied receptor.

  16. Mu-opioid receptor densities are depleted in regions implicated in agonistic and sexual behavior in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) defending nest sites and courting females

    PubMed Central

    Kelm, Cynthia A.; Forbes-Lorman, Robin M.; Auger, Catherine J.; Riters, Lauren V.

    2010-01-01

    Social status and resource availability can strongly influence individual behavioral responses to conspecifics. In European starlings, males that acquire nest sites sing in response to females and dominate other males. Males without nest sites sing, but not to females, and they do not interact agonistically with other males. Little is known about the neural regulation of status- or resource-appropriate behavioral responses to conspecifics. Opioid neuropeptides are implicated in birdsong and agonistic behavior, suggesting that opioids may underlie differences in the production of these behaviors in males with and without nest sites. Here, we examined densities of immunolabeled mu-opioid receptors in groups of male starlings. Males that defended nest boxes dominated other males and sang at higher rates when presented with a female than males without nest boxes, independent of testosterone concentrations. Multiple regression analyses showed nest box ownership (not agonistic behavior or singing) predicted the optical density of receptor labeling in the medial bed nucleus of stria terminalis, paraventricular nucleus, ventral tegmental area and the medial preoptic nucleus. Compared to males without nest boxes, males with nest boxes had lower densities of immunolabeled mu-opioid receptors in these regions. Singing additionally predicted the area covered by labeling in the ventral tegmental area. The results suggest that elevated opioid activity in these regions suppresses courtship and agonistic behavioral responses to conspecifics in males without nest boxes. The findings are consistent with a dynamic role for opioid receptors in adjusting social behavior so that it is appropriate given the resources available to an individual. PMID:21147175

  17. Mu-opioid receptor densities are depleted in regions implicated in agonistic and sexual behavior in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) defending nest sites and courting females.

    PubMed

    Kelm, Cynthia A; Forbes-Lorman, Robin M; Auger, Catherine J; Riters, Lauren V

    2011-05-16

    Social status and resource availability can strongly influence individual behavioral responses to conspecifics. In European starlings, males that acquire nest sites sing in response to females and dominate other males. Males without nest sites sing, but not to females, and they do not interact agonistically with other males. Little is known about the neural regulation of status- or resource-appropriate behavioral responses to conspecifics. Opioid neuropeptides are implicated in birdsong and agonistic behavior, suggesting that opioids may underlie differences in the production of these behaviors in males with and without nest sites. Here, we examined densities of immunolabeled mu-opioid receptors in groups of male starlings. Males that defended nest boxes dominated other males and sang at higher rates when presented with a female than males without nest boxes, independent of testosterone concentrations. Multiple regression analyses showed nest box ownership (not agonistic behavior or singing) predicted the optical density of receptor labeling in the medial bed nucleus of stria terminalis, paraventricular nucleus, ventral tegmental area and the medial preoptic nucleus. Compared to males without nest boxes, males with nest boxes had lower densities of immunolabeled mu-opioid receptors in these regions. Singing additionally predicted the area covered by labeling in the ventral tegmental area. The results suggest that elevated opioid activity in these regions suppresses courtship and agonistic behavioral responses to conspecifics in males without nest boxes. The findings are consistent with a dynamic role for opioid receptors in adjusting social behavior so that it is appropriate given the resources available to an individual. PMID:21147175

  18. Design, Syntheses, and Biological Evaluation of 14-Heteroaromatic Substituted Naltrexone Derivatives: Pharmacological Profile Switch from Mu Opioid Receptor Selectivity to Mu/Kappa Opioid Receptor Dual Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yunyun; Zaidi, Saheem A.; Elbegdorj, Orgil; Aschenbach, Lindsey C. K.; Li, Guo; Stevens, David L.; Scoggins, Krista L.; Dewey, William L.; Selley, Dana E.; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Based on a mu opioid receptor (MOR) homology model and the “isosterism” concept, three generations of 14-heteroaromatically substituted naltrexone derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated as potential MOR selective ligands. The first generation ligands appeared to be MOR selective, whereas the second and the third generation ones showed MOR/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) dual selectivity. Docking of ligands 2 (MOR selective) and 10 (MOR/KOR dual selective) to the three opioid receptor crystal structures revealed a non-conserved residue facilitated “hydrogen bonding network” that could be responsible for their distinctive selectivity profiles. The MOR/KOR dual selective ligand 10 showed no agonism and acted as a potent antagonist in the tail flick assay. It also produced less severe opioid withdrawal symptoms than naloxone in morphine dependent mice. In conclusion, ligand 10 may serve as a novel lead compound to develop MOR/KOR dual selective ligands, which might possess unique therapeutic value for opioid addiction treatment. PMID:24144240

  19. Mu-opioid receptor activation prevents apoptosis following serum withdrawal in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells and cortical neurons via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, M; Segura, M F; Comella, J X; Olmos, G

    2003-03-01

    Opioid peptides and alkaloids exert their effects via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). It has been shown that, in addition to trophic factors, some GPCRs are able to activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt (PI 3-K/Akt) signal transduction pathway, thus leading to cell survival. The aim of this study was to test whether activation of mu-opioid receptors has protective effects on serum withdrawal-induced cell death and to study the possible implication of PI 3-K in this process. In SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells fully differentiated by exposure to retinoic acid for five days, the enkephalin derivative selective mu-agonist DAMGO (0.1-2 microM) and the alkaloid morphine (0.1-10 microM) promoted cell survival after serum deprivation (MTT and trypan blue exclusion assays), without inducing cell proliferation. These effects were fully reversed by naloxone, by the selective mu-antagonist beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA) and also by the specific PI 3-K inhibitor LY294002. The two agonists stimulated Akt phosphorylation and the effect was also abolished by beta-FNA and by LY294002. In mouse primary cortical neurons, DAMGO reduced the percentage of apoptosis after 6, 12, 24 and 48 h of serum withdrawal; as determined by Hoechst staining. This effect was blocked by beta-FNA, by pre-treatment with pertussis toxin and by LY294002. DAMGO also stimulated Akt phosphorylation via PI 3-K in this primary neuronal culture. Together, these results indicate that stimulation of the mu-opioid receptor promotes neuronal survival in a G(i/o)-linked, PI 3-K-dependent signaling cascade and suggest that Akt may be a key downstream kinase involved in this anti-apoptotic effect. PMID:12646285

  20. The role of the Asn40Asp polymorphism of the mu opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) on alcoholism etiology and treatment: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Ray, Lara A; Barr, Christina S; Blendy, Julie A; Oslin, David; Goldman, David; Anton, Raymond F

    2012-03-01

    The endogenous opioid system has been implicated in the pathophysiology of alcoholism as it modulates the neurobehavioral effects of alcohol. A variant in the mu opioid receptor gene (OPRM1), the Asn40Asp polymorphism, has received attention as a functional variant that may influence a host of behavioral phenotypes for alcoholism as well as clinical response to opioid antagonists. This paper will review converging lines of evidence on the effect of the Asn40Asp SNP on alcoholism phenotypes, including: (i) genetic association studies; (ii) behavioral studies of alcoholism; (iii) neuroimaging studies; (iv) pharmacogenetic studies and clinical trials; and (v) preclinical animal studies. Together, these lines of research seek to elucidate the effects of this functional polymorphism on alcoholism etiology and treatment response.

  1. SR 16435 [1-(1-(bicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-9-yl)piperidin-4-yl)indolin-2-one], a novel mixed nociceptin/orphanin FQ/mu-opioid receptor partial agonist: analgesic and rewarding properties in mice.

    PubMed

    Khroyan, Taline V; Zaveri, Nurulain T; Polgar, Willma E; Orduna, Juan; Olsen, Cris; Jiang, Faming; Toll, Lawrence

    2007-02-01

    We identified a novel nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP)/mu-opioid receptor agonist, SR 16435 [1-(1-(bicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-9-yl)piperidin-4-yl)indolin-2-one], with high binding affinity and partial agonist activity at both receptors. It was hypothesized that SR 16435 would produce antinociception and yet, unlike morphine, would have diminished rewarding properties and tolerance development. Antinociception was assessed in mice using the tail-flick assay, whereas behavioral and rewarding effects were assessed using the place conditioning (PC) paradigm. PC was established by pairing drug injections with a distinct compartment. Behavioral effects were measured after acute and repeated drug administration, and the test for PC was carried out 24 h after four drug- and vehicle-pairing sessions. SR 16435 produced an increase in tail-flick latency, but SR 16435-induced antinociception was lower than that observed with morphine. Given that naloxone blocked SR 16435-induced antinociception, it is highly likely that this effect was mediated by mu-opioid receptors. Compared with morphine, chronic SR 16435 treatment resulted in reduced development of tolerance to its antinociceptive effects. SR 16435-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) was evident, an effect that was probably mediated via mu-opioid receptors, as it was reversed by coadministration of naloxone. NOP agonist activity was also present, given that SR 16435 decreased global activity, and this effect was partially reversed with the selective NOP antagonist, SR 16430 [1-(cyclooctylmethyl)-4-(3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)piperidin-4-ol]. Naloxone, however, also reversed the SR 16435-induced decrease in activity, indicating that both opioid and NOP receptors mediate this behavior. In summary, the mixed NOP/mu-opioid partial agonist SR 16435 exhibited both NOP and mu-opioid receptor-mediated behaviors. PMID:17132815

  2. Mu-Opioid (MOP) receptor mediated G-protein signaling is impaired in specific brain regions in a rat model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Szűcs, Edina; Büki, Alexandra; Kékesi, Gabriella; Horváth, Gyöngyi; Benyhe, Sándor

    2016-04-21

    Schizophrenia is a complex mental health disorder. Clinical reports suggest that many patients with schizophrenia are less sensitive to pain than other individuals. Animal models do not interpret schizophrenia completely, but they can model a number of symptoms of the disease, including decreased pain sensitivities and increased pain thresholds of various modalities. Opioid receptors and endogenous opioid peptides have a substantial role in analgesia. In this biochemical study we investigated changes in the signaling properties of the mu-opioid (MOP) receptor in different brain regions, which are involved in the pain transmission, i.e., thalamus, olfactory bulb, prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Our goal was to compare the transmembrane signaling mediated by MOP receptors in control rats and in a recently developed rat model of schizophrenia. Regulatory G-protein activation via MOP receptors were measured in [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays in the presence of a highly selective MOP receptor peptide agonist, DAMGO. It was found that the MOP receptor mediated activation of G-proteins was substantially lower in membranes prepared from the 'schizophrenic' model rats than in control animals. The potency of DAMGO to activate MOP receptor was also decreased in all brain regions studied. Taken together in our rat model of schizophrenia, MOP receptor mediated G-proteins have a reduced stimulatory activity compared to membrane preparations taken from control animals. The observed distinct changes of opioid receptor functions in different areas of the brain do not explain the augmented nociceptive threshold described in these animals.

  3. INHIBITION OF INFLAMMATORY AND NEUROPATHIC PAIN BY TARGETING A MU OPIOID RECEPTOR/CHEMOKINE RECEPTOR5 HETEROMER (MOR-CCR5)

    PubMed Central

    Akgün, Eyup; Javed, Muhammad I.; Lunzer, Mary M.; Powers, Michael D.; Sham, Yuk Y.; Watanabe, Yoshikazu; Portoghese, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine release promotes crosstalk between opioid and chemokine receptors that in part leads to reduced efficacy of morphine in the treatment of chronic pain. Based on the possibility that a MOR-CCR5 heteromer is involved in such crosstalk, we have synthesized bivalent ligands (MCC series) that contain mu opioid agonist and CCR5 antagonist pharmacophores linked through homologous spacers (14–24 atoms). When tested on lipopolysaccharide-inflamed mice, a member of the series (MCC22; 3e) with a 22-atom spacer exhibited profound antinociception (i.t. ED50 = 0.0146 pmol/mouse) that was >2000× greater than morphine. Moreover, MCC22 was ~3500× more potent than a mixture of mu agonist and CCR5 antagonist monovalent ligands. These data strongly suggest that MCC22 acts by bridging the protomers of a MOR-CCR5 heteromer having a TM5,6 interface. Molecular simulation studies are consistent with such bridging. This study supports the MOR-CCR5 heteromer as a novel target for treatment of chronic pain. PMID:26451468

  4. Inhibition of Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain by Targeting a Mu Opioid Receptor/Chemokine Receptor5 Heteromer (MOR-CCR5).

    PubMed

    Akgün, Eyup; Javed, Muhammad I; Lunzer, Mary M; Powers, Michael D; Sham, Yuk Y; Watanabe, Yoshikazu; Portoghese, Philip S

    2015-11-12

    Chemokine release promotes cross-talk between opioid and chemokine receptors that in part leads to reduced efficacy of morphine in the treatment of chronic pain. On the basis of the possibility that a MOR-CCR5 heteromer is involved in such cross-talk, we have synthesized bivalent ligands (MCC series) that contain mu opioid agonist and CCR5 antagonist pharmacophores linked through homologous spacers (14-24 atoms). When tested on lipopolysaccharide-inflamed mice, a member of the series (MCC22; 3e) with a 22-atom spacer exhibited profound antinociception (i.t. ED50 = 0.0146 pmol/mouse) that was 2000× greater than morphine. Moreover, MCC22 was ~3500× more potent than a mixture of mu agonist and CCR5 antagonist monovalent ligands. These data strongly suggest that MCC22 acts by bridging the protomers of a MOR-CCR5 heteromer having a TM5,6 interface. Molecular simulation studies are consistent with such bridging. This study supports the MOR-CCR5 heteromer as a novel target for the treatment of chronic pain.

  5. Temporal lobe epilepsy causes selective changes in mu opioid and nociceptin receptor binding and functional coupling to G-proteins in human temporal neocortex.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Luisa; Orozco-Suarez, Sandra; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Villeda-Hernandez, Juana; Gaona, Andres; Páldy, Eszter; Benyhe, Sandor; Borsodi, Anna

    2009-09-01

    There is no information concerning signal transduction mechanisms downstream of the opioid/nociceptin receptors in the human epileptic brain. The aim of this work was to evaluate the level of G-proteins activation mediated by DAMGO (a mu receptor selective peptide) and nociceptin, and the binding to mu and nociceptin (NOP) receptors and adenylyl cyclase (AC) in neocortex of patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy associated with mesial sclerosis (MTLE) or secondary to tumor or vascular lesion showed enhanced [3H]DAMGO and [3H]forskolin binding, lower DAMGO-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding and no significant changes in nociceptin-stimulated G-protein. [3H]Nociceptin binding was lower in patients with MTLE. Age of seizure onset correlated positively with [3H]DAMGO binding and DAMGO-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding, whereas epilepsy duration correlated negatively with [3H]DAMGO and [3H]nociceptin binding, and positively with [3H]forskolin binding. In conclusion, our present data obtained from neocortex of epileptic patients provide strong evidence that a) temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with alterations in mu opioid and NOP receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors, and b) clinical aspects may play an important role on these receptor changes.

  6. MOR Is Not Enough: Identification of Novel mu-Opioid Receptor Interacting Proteins Using Traditional and Modified Membrane Yeast Two-Hybrid Screens

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jay; Wong, Victoria; Kittanakom, Saranya; Ferraro, Thomas N.; Stagljar, Igor; Levenson, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The mu-opioid receptor (MOR) is the G-protein coupled receptor primarily responsible for mediating the analgesic and rewarding properties of opioid agonist drugs such as morphine, fentanyl, and heroin. We have utilized a combination of traditional and modified membrane yeast two-hybrid screening methods to identify a cohort of novel MOR interacting proteins (MORIPs). The interaction between the MOR and a subset of MORIPs was validated in pulldown, co-immunoprecipitation, and co-localization studies using HEK293 cells stably expressing the MOR as well as rodent brain. Additionally, a subset of MORIPs was found capable of interaction with the delta and kappa opioid receptors, suggesting that they may represent general opioid receptor interacting proteins (ORIPS). Expression of several MORIPs was altered in specific mouse brain regions after chronic treatment with morphine, suggesting that these proteins may play a role in response to opioid agonist drugs. Based on the known function of these newly identified MORIPs, the interactions forming the MOR signalplex are hypothesized to be important for MOR signaling and intracellular trafficking. Understanding the molecular complexity of MOR/MORIP interactions provides a conceptual framework for defining the cellular mechanisms of MOR signaling in brain and may be critical for determining the physiological basis of opioid tolerance and addiction. PMID:23840749

  7. An early granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment attenuates neuropathic pain through activation of mu opioid receptors on the injured nerve

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ming-Feng; Yeh, Shin-Rung; Lo, Ai-Lun; Chao, Po-Kuan; Lee, Yun-Lin; Hung, Yu-Hui; Lu, Kwok-Tung; Ro, Long-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the mu opioid receptor (MOR) located in the peripheral nerves can be activated after nerve injury and that it attenuates peripheral nociceptive signals to the spinal dorsal horn. Various cytokines and phosphorylated-p38 (p-p38) activation in the dorsal horn also play an important role in neuropathic pain development. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) is a growth factor that can stimulate granulocyte formation and has been shown to exert an analgesic effect on neuropathic pain through recruiting opioid-containing leukocytes to the injured nerve. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Herein, the results of behavior tests in addition to MOR levels in the injured sciatic nerve and the levels of p-p38 and various cytokines in the spinal dorsal horn were studied in vehicle-treated or GCSF-treated chronic constriction injured (CCI) rats at different time points (i.e., 1, 3, and 7 days, respectively) after nerve injury. The results showed that a single early systemic GCSF treatment after nerve injury can up-regulate MORs in the injured nerve, which can decrease peripheral nociceptive signals. Thereafter, those changes suppress the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 but enhance the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4, followed by decreases in p-p38 in the dorsal horn, and thus further attenuate neuropathic pain. PMID:27180600

  8. Antinociceptive action of DBO 17 and DBO 11 in mice: two 3,8 diazabicyclo (3.2.1.) octane derivates with selective mu opioid receptor affinity.

    PubMed

    Fadda, P; Barlocco, D; Tronci, S; Cignarella, G; Fratta, W

    1997-11-01

    Two 3,8 diazabicyclo (3.2.1.) octane derivates, namely DBO 17 and DBO 11, were studied for the opioid-like activity. In the rat brain membrane preparation binding studies, DBO 17 and DBO 11 showed a high affinity and selectivity for the mu opioid receptor (Ki's: 5.1 and 25 nM, respectively). DBO 17 and DBO 11 inhibited the nociceptive response in the hot-plate test of mice with ED50 values of 0.16 mg/kg and 0.44 mg/kg, respectively. The antinociceptive action of both DBO 17 and DBO 11 was blocked by naloxone. Tolerance to the antinociceptive action of DBO 17 and DBO 11 was present after 13 and 7 days of repeated treatment, respectively. Both DBO 17 and DBO 11 were ineffective in morphine-tolerant mice and vice versa. Chronic treatments (three times daily for seven consecutive days) of DBO 17 and DBO 11 induced a naloxone-precipitated withdrawal syndrome in DBO 17 treated mice similar to that in morphine treated mice, whereas in DBO 11 treated mice abstinence signs were virtually absent. These results indicate an interesting pharmacological profile that suggests these compounds as possible new candidates for the clinical treatment of pain.

  9. Isolating and characterizing three alternatively spliced mu opioid receptor variants: mMOR-1A, mMOR-1O and mMOR-1P

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Bolan, Elizabeth; Gilbert, Annie-Kim; Pasternak, Gavril W.; Pan, Ying-Xian

    2014-01-01

    Extensive alternative pre-mRNA splicing of the mu opioid receptor gene, OPRM1, has demonstrated an array of splice variants in mouse, rat and human. Three classes of splice variants have been identified: full length 7 transmembrane (TM) domain variants with C-terminal splicing, truncated 6TM variants and single TM variants. The current studies isolates and characterizes an additional three full length C-terminal splice variants generated from the mouse OPRM1 gene: mMOR-1A, mMOR-1O and mMOR-1P. Using RT-qPCR, we demonstrated differential expression of these variants' mRNAs among selected brain regions, supporting region-specific alternative splicing. When expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells, all the variants displayed high mu binding affinity and selectivity with subtle differences in the affinities toward some agonists. [35S]γGTP binding assays revealed marked differences in agonist-induced G protein activation in both potency and efficacy among the variants. Together with the previous studies of mu agonist-induced phosphorylation and internalization in several carboxyl terminal splice variants, the current studies further suggest the existence of biased signaling of various agonists within each individual variant and/or among different variants. PMID:24375714

  10. Methamphetamine-induced stereotypy correlates negatively with patch-enhanced prodynorphin and arc mRNA expression in the rat caudate putamen: the role of mu opioid receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Horner, Kristen A; Noble, Erika S; Gilbert, Yamiece E

    2010-06-01

    Amphetamines induce stereotypy, which correlates with patch-enhanced c-Fos expression the patch compartment of caudate putamen (CPu). Methamphetamine (METH) treatment also induces patch-enhanced expression of prodynorphin (PD), arc and zif/268 in the CPu. Whether patch-enhanced activation of any of these genes correlates with METH-induced stereotypy is unknown, and the factors that contribute to this pattern of expression are poorly understood. Activation of mu opioid receptors, which are expressed by the neurons of the patch compartment, may underlie METH-induced patch-enhanced gene expression and stereotypy. The current study examined whether striatal mu opioid receptor blockade altered METH-induced stereotypy and patch-enhanced gene expression, and if there was a correlation between the two responses. Animals were intrastriatally infused with the mu antagonist CTAP (10 microg/microl), treated with METH (7.5 mg/kg, s.c.), placed in activity chambers for 3h, and then sacrificed. CTAP pretreatment attenuated METH-induced increases in PD, arc and zif/268 mRNA expression and significantly reduced METH-induced stereotypy. Patch-enhanced PD and arc mRNA expression in the dorsolateral CPu correlated negatively with METH-induced stereotypy. These data indicate that mu opioid receptor activation contributes to METH-induced gene expression in the CPu and stereotypy, and that patch-enhanced PD and arc expression may be a homeostatic response to METH treatment.

  11. Type and location of fluorescent probes incorporated into the potent mu-opioid peptide [Dmt]DALDA affect potency, receptor selectivity and intrinsic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Schiller, P W; Berezowska, I; Weltrowska, G; Chen, H; Lemieux, C; Chung, N N

    2005-06-01

    The dermorphin-derived tetrapeptide H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH(2) (Dmt = 2',6'-dimethyltyrosine) ([Dmt(1)]DALDA) is a highly potent and selective mu-opioid agonist capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier and producing a potent, centrally mediated analgesic effect when given systemically. For the purpose of biodistribution studies by fluorescence techniques, [Dmt(1)]DALDA analogues containing various fluorescent labels [dansyl, anthraniloyl (atn), fluorescein, or 6-dimethylamino-2'-naphthoyl] in several different locations of the peptide were synthesized and characterized in vitro in the guinea-pig ileum and mouse vas deferens assays, and in mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptor-binding assays. The analogues showed various degrees of mu receptor-binding selectivity, but all of them were less mu-selective than the [Dmt(1)]DALDA parent peptide. Most analogues retained potent, full mu-agonist activity, except for one with fluorescein attached at the C-terminus (3a) (partial mu-agonist) and one containing beta-(6'-dimethylamino-2'-naphthoyl)alanine (aladan) in place of Phe(3) (4) (mu- and kappa-antagonist). The obtained data indicate that the receptor-binding affinity, receptor selectivity and intrinsic efficacy of the prepared analogues vary very significantly, depending on the type of fluorescent label used and on its location in the peptide. The results suggest that the biological activity profile of fluorescence-labeled peptide analogues should always be carefully determined prior to their use in biodistribution studies or other studies. One of the analogues containing the atn group (2a) proved highly useful in a study of cellular uptake and intracellular distribution by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  12. Calmodulin regulation of basal and agonist-stimulated G protein coupling by the mu-opioid receptor (OP(3)) in morphine-pretreated cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Surratt, C K; Sadée, W

    2000-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) has been shown to suppress basal G protein coupling and attenuate agonist-stimulated G protein coupling of the mu-opioid receptor (OP(3)) through direct interaction with the third intracellular (i3) loop of the receptor. Here we have investigated the role of CaM in regulating changes in OP(3)-G protein coupling during morphine treatment, shown to result in CaM release from plasma membranes. Basal and agonist-stimulated G protein coupling by OP(3) was measured before and after morphine pretreatment by incorporation of guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thiotriphosphate) into membranes, obtained from HEK 293 cells transfected with human OP(3) cDNA. The opioid antagonist beta-chlornaltrexamine fully suppressed basal G protein coupling of OP(3), providing a direct measure of basal signaling. Pretreatment of the cells with morphine enhanced basal G protein coupling (sensitization). In contrast, agonist-stimulated coupling was diminished (desensitization), resulting in a substantially flattened morphine dose-response curve. To test whether CaM is involved in these changes, we constructed OP(3)-i3 loop mutants with reduced affinity for CaM (K273A, R275A, and K273A/R275A). Basal signaling of these mutant OP(3) receptors was higher than that of the wild-type receptor and, moreover, unaffected by morphine pretreatment, whereas desensitization to agonist stimulation was only slightly attenuated. Therefore, CaM-OP(3) interactions appear to play only a minor role in the desensitization of OP(3). In contrast, release of CaM from the plasma membrane appears to enhance the inherent basal G protein coupling of OP(3), thereby resolving the paradox that OP(3) displays both desensitization and sensitization during morphine treatment.

  13. Alteration of the mu opioid receptor: Ca2+ channel signaling pathway in a subset of rat sensory neurons following chronic femoral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Bassil; Kim, Joyce S; Farrag, Mohamed; Kaufman, Marc P; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor

    2014-12-15

    The exercise pressor reflex, a crucial component of the cardiovascular response under physiological and pathophysiological states, is activated via metabolic and mechanical mediators that originate from contracting muscles and stimulate group III and IV afferents. We reported previously that stimulation of mu opioid receptors (MOR), expressed in both afferents, led to a significant attenuation of the reflex in rats whose femoral arteries had been occluded for 72 h. The present study examined the effect of arterial occlusion on the signaling components involved in the opioid-mediated modulation of Ca(2+) channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons innervating the triceps surae muscles. We focused on neurons that were transfected with cDNA coding for enhanced green fluorescent protein whose expression is driven by the voltage-gated Na(+) channel 1.8 (Na(V)1.8) promoter region, a channel expressed primarily in nociceptive neurons. With the use of a small interference RNA approach, our results show that the pertussis toxin-sensitive Gα(i3) subunit couples MOR with Ca(2+) channels. We observed a significant leftward shift of the MOR agonist [D-Ala2-N-Me-Phe4-Glycol5]-enkephalin concentration-response relationship in neurons isolated from rats with occluded arteries compared with those that were perfused freely. Femoral occlusion did not affect Ca(2+) channel density or the fraction of the main Ca(2+) channel subtype. Furthermore, Western blotting analysis indicated that the leftward shift did not result from either increased Gα(i3) or MOR expression. Finally, all neurons from both groups exhibited an inward current following exposure of the transient potential receptor vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) agonist, 8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide. These findings suggest that sensory neurons mediating the exercise pressor reflex express Na(V)1.8 and TRPV1 channels, and femoral occlusion alters the MOR pharmacological profile. PMID:25231620

  14. A role for kappa-, but not mu-opioid, receptor activation in acute food deprivation-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Sedki, Firas; Eigenmann, Karine; Gelinas, Jessica; Schouela, Nicholas; Courchesne, Shannon; Shalev, Uri

    2015-05-01

    Stress is considered to be one of the major triggers to drug relapse, even after prolonged periods of abstinence. In rats, the activation of stress-related brain systems, including corticotropin-releasing factor and norepinephrine, is critical for stress-induced reinstatement of extinguished drug seeking, an animal model for drug relapse. In addition, there are strong indications that activation of the endogenous opioid system is important for the effects of stress on drug seeking. More specifically, activation of the dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system is critically involved in the reinstatement of cocaine seeking following exposure to stressors, such as footshock, forced swimming or social stress. However, studies on the role of the dynorphin/KOR system in stress-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking are scarce. Here, rats were trained to self-administer heroin (0.1 mg/kg/infusion) for 10 days. Drug seeking was then extinguished and the rats were tested for acute (21 hours) food deprivation-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking. In two separate experiments, rats were injected with the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonist, naltrexone (0.0, 1.0, 10.0 mg/kg; s.c.) or the KOR antagonist, norBNI (0.0, 1.0, 10.0 mg/kg; i.p.) before the reinstatement test. Naltrexone treatment did not affect stress-induced reinstatement. In contrast, treatment with norBNI dose-dependently attenuated food deprivation-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking. These results support the hypothesis that activation of KOR, but not MOR, is critically involved in stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking.

  15. Mechanisms of the regional hemodynamic effects of a mu-opioid receptor agonist microinjected into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei of conscious unrestrained rats.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, H; Pître, M; Lessard, A

    1997-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterize the mechanisms of the hemodynamic responses to microinjection of the selective mu-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly5-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO) into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, in conscious rats chronically instrumented with pulsed Doppler flow probes. We found that i.v. pretreatment with phentolamine had no effect on the tachycardia elicited by DAMGO (1 nmol); however, the pressor response was reversed to a state of hypotension, the renal and superior mesenteric vasoconstrictions were attenuated and the hindquarter vasodilation was potentiated. In the presence of propranolol, the pressor response and renal vasoconstriction were unchanged, whereas the superior mesenteric vasoconstriction was reduced and the hindquarter vasodilation was abolished. Moreover, in those animals we observed bradycardia followed by tachycardia. Combined i.v. pretreatment with phentolamine and propranolol abolished the pressor and heart rate responses to DAMGO but had no effect on the renal and superior mesenteric vasoconstrictions, although the hindquarter vasodilation was reduced. Intravenous pretreatment with a vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist or captopril had no effect on the cardiovascular responses to DAMGO. Together, these results indicate that the hypertension observed after injection of DAMGO into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus was secondary to alpha adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstrictions in renal and superior mesenteric vascular beds and to beta adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation in the hindquarter vascular bed, whereas the involvement of circulating vasopressin or angiotensin seems less obvious from the present findings. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that nonadrenergic, nonvasopressinergic and nonangiotensinergic vasoconstrictor mechanisms were acting in the renal and superior mesenteric vascular beds.

  16. Stress differentially alters mu opioid receptor density and trafficking in parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the female and male rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Teresa A.; Burstein, Suzanne R.; Marrone, Gina F.; Khalid, Sana; Gonzalez, Andreina D.; Williams, Tanya J.; Schierberl, Kathryn C.; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Gonzales, Keith L.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Waters, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Stress differentially affects hippocampal dependent learning relevant to addiction and morphology in male and female rats. Mu opioid receptors (MORs), which are located in parvalbumin (PARV)-containing GABAergic interneurons and are trafficked in response to changes in the hormonal environment, play a critical role in promoting principal cell excitability and long-term potentiation. Here, we compared the effects of acute and chronic immobilization stress (AIS and CIS) on MOR trafficking in PARV-containing neurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus in female and male rats using dual label immuno-electron microscopy. Following AIS, the density of MOR silver-intensified gold particles (SIGs) in the cytoplasm of PARV-labeled dendrites was significantly reduced in females (estrus stage). Conversely, AIS significantly increased the proportion of cytoplasmic MOR SIGs in PARV-labeled dendrites in male rats. CIS significantly reduced the number of PARV-labeled neurons in the dentate hilus of males but not females. However, MOR/PARV-labeled dendrites and terminals were significantly smaller in CIS females, but not males, compared to controls. Following CIS, the density of cytoplasmic MOR SIGs increased in PARV-labeled dendrites and terminals in females. Moreover, the proportion of near-plasmalemmal MOR SIGs relative to total decreased in large PARV-labeled dendrites in females. After CIS, no changes in the density or trafficking of MOR SIGs were seen in PARV-labeled dendrites or terminals in males. These data show that AIS and CIS differentially affect available MOR pools in PARV-containing interneurons in female and male rats. Furthermore, they suggest that CIS could affect principal cell excitability in a manner that maintains learning processes in females but not males. PMID:23720407

  17. Buprenorphine maintenance and mu-opioid receptor availability in the treatment of opioid use disorder: implications for clinical use and policy

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Mark K.; Comer, Sandra D.; Fiellin, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sublingual formulations of buprenorphine (BUP) and BUP/naloxone have well-established pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles, and are safe and effective for treating opioid use disorder. Since approvals of these formulations, their clinical use has increased. Yet, questions have arisen as to how BUP binding to mu-opioid receptors (μORs), the neurobiological target for this medication, relate to its clinical application. BUP produces dose- and time-related alterations of μOR availability but some clinicians express concern about whether doses higher than those needed to prevent opioid withdrawal symptoms are warranted, and policymakers consider limiting reimbursement for certain BUP dosing regimens. Methods We review scientific data concerning BUP-induced changes in μOR availability and their relationship to clinical efficacy. Results Withdrawal suppression appears to require ≤50% μOR availability, associated with BUP trough plasma concentrations ≥1 ng/mL; for most patients, this may require single daily BUP doses of 4-mg to defend against trough levels, or lower divided doses. Blockade of the reinforcing and subjective effects of typical doses of abused opioids require <20% μOR availability, associated with BUP trough plasma concentrations ≥3 ng/mL; for most individuals, this may require single daily BUP doses >16-mg, or lower divided doses. For individuals attempting to surmount this blockade with higher-than-usual doses of abused opioids, even larger BUP doses and <10% μOR availability would be required. Conclusion For these reasons, and given the complexities of studies on this issue and comorbid problems, we conclude that fixed, arbitrary limits on BUP doses in clinical care or limits on reimbursement for this care are unwarranted. PMID:25179217

  18. Sex and age-dependent effects of a maternal junk food diet on the mu-opioid receptor in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Gugusheff, Jessica R; Bae, Sung Eun; Rao, Alexandra; Clarke, Iain J; Poston, Lucilla; Taylor, Paul D; Coen, Clive W; Muhlhausler, Beverly S

    2016-03-15

    Perinatal junk food exposure increases the preference for palatable diets in juvenile and adult rat offspring. Previous studies have implicated reduced sensitivity of the opioid pathway in the programming of food preferences; however it is not known when during development these changes in opioid signalling first emerge. This study aimed to determine the impact of a maternal junk food (JF) diet on mu-opioid receptor (MuR) expression and ligand binding in two key regions of the reward pathway, the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in rats during the early suckling (postnatal day (PND) 1 and 7) and late suckling/early post-weaning (PND 21 and 28) periods. Female rats were fed either a JF or a control diet for two weeks prior to mating and throughout pregnancy and lactation. MuR expression in the VTA was significantly reduced in female JF offspring on PND 21 and 28 (by 32% and 57% respectively, P<0.05), but not at earlier time points (PND 1 and 7). MuR ligand binding was also reduced (by 22%, P<0.05) in the VTA of female JF offspring on PND 28. No effects of perinatal junk food exposure on MuR mRNA expression or binding were detected at these time points in male offspring. These findings provide evidence that the opioid signalling system is a target of developmental programming by the end of the third postnatal week in females, but not in males. PMID:26718219

  19. Stress differentially alters mu opioid receptor density and trafficking in parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the female and male rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Milner, Teresa A; Burstein, Suzanne R; Marrone, Gina F; Khalid, Sana; Gonzalez, Andreina D; Williams, Tanya J; Schierberl, Kathryn C; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Gonzales, Keith L; McEwen, Bruce S; Waters, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-01

    Stress differentially affects hippocampal-dependent learning relevant to addiction and morphology in male and female rats. Mu opioid receptors (MORs), which are located in parvalbumin (PARV)-containing GABAergic interneurons and are trafficked in response to changes in the hormonal environment, play a critical role in promoting principal cell excitability and long-term potentiation. Here, we compared the effects of acute and chronic immobilization stress (AIS and CIS) on MOR trafficking in PARV-containing neurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus in female and male rats using dual label immunoelectron microscopy. Following AIS, the density of MOR silver-intensified gold particles (SIGs) in the cytoplasm of PARV-labeled dendrites was significantly reduced in females (estrus stage). Conversely, AIS significantly increased the proportion of cytoplasmic MOR SIGs in PARV-labeled dendrites in male rats. CIS significantly reduced the number of PARV-labeled neurons in the dentate hilus of males but not females. However, MOR/PARV-labeled dendrites and terminals were significantly smaller in CIS females, but not males, compared with controls. Following CIS, the density of cytoplasmic MOR SIGs increased in PARV-labeled dendrites and terminals in females. Moreover, the proportion of near-plasmalemmal MOR SIGs relative to total decreased in large PARV-labeled dendrites in females. After CIS, no changes in the density or trafficking of MOR SIGs were seen in PARV-labeled dendrites or terminals in males. These data show that AIS and CIS differentially affect available MOR pools in PARV-containing interneurons in female and male rats. Furthermore, they suggest that CIS could affect principal cell excitability in a manner that maintains learning processes in females but not males. PMID:23720407

  20. The Effect of the [mu]-Opioid Receptor Antagonist Naloxone on Extinction of Conditioned Fear in the Developing Rat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jee Hyun; Richardson, Rick

    2009-01-01

    Several recent studies report that neurotransmitters that are critically involved in extinction in adult rats are not important for extinction in young rats. Specifically, pretest injection of the [gamma]-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor inverse agonist FG7142 has no effect on extinction in postnatal day (P)17 rats, although it reverses…

  1. Long-term blockade of mu-opioid receptors suggests a role in control of ingestive behaviour, body weight and core temperature in the rat.

    PubMed

    Millan, M J; Morris, B J

    1988-05-31

    Chronic subcutaneous infusion with a low dose (0.5 mg/kg/h) of naloxone via minipumps blocked the antinociceptive action of the mu-agonist, morphine, without affecting that of the kappa-agonist, U50488H. This dose resulted in a transient suppression in the rate of body weight gain and a sustained reduction in daily food intake (FI) and water intake (WI): this decrease was seen in both the light and dark phases. Naloxone also resulted in a reduction in resting core temperature (TC) in the light but not the dark phase. It did not affect the weight loss or hypothermia which accompanied 24 h food and water deprivation. Naloxone did, however, suppress FI and WI following deprivation and inhibited the recovery of body weight thereafter. The influence of naloxone upon FI, WI, TC and body weight was dose-dependent over 0.05-0.50 mg/kg/h. Increasing the dose to 3.0 mg/kg/h eliminated the antinociceptive action of U50,488H revealing a blockade of kappa- (in addition to mu-) receptors. This higher dose was not more effective in reducing FI, WI, body weight and TC than 0.5 mg/kg/h. Further, treatment with MR 2266, an antagonist (or weak partial agonist) with a higher activity at kappa-receptors than naloxone, was not more effective than naloxone in reducing FI, WI and body weight: further, it did not affect TC. Moreover, chronic infusion of bremazocine, (a kappa-agonist and mu-antagonist) reduced WI, FI, body weight and TC by a magnitude comparable to that of naloxone. Finally, chronic infusion of the mu-agonist, sufentanyl, led to a sustained rise in TC. It is concluded, that: (1) mu-opioid receptors may play a major role in the modulation of daily FI and WI and of body weight in freely behaving rats: this action is expressed in both the light and dark phases of the cycle and maintained following deprivation. The data provide no evidence for (but do not exclude) a particular role of kappa-receptors. (2) mu-Receptors play a physiological role in the modulation of TC in the

  2. Effects of the Mu opioid receptor polymorphism (OPRM1 A118G) on pain regulation, placebo effects and associated personality trait measures.

    PubMed

    Peciña, Marta; Love, Tiffany; Stohler, Christian S; Goldman, David; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2015-03-01

    Mu-opioid receptors (MOPRs) are critically involved in the modulation of pain and analgesia, and represent a candidate mechanism for the development of biomarkers of pain conditions and their responses to treatment. To further understand the human implications of genetic variation within the opioid system in pain and opioid-mediated placebo responses, we investigated the association between the functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the μ-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1), A118G, and psychophysical responses, personality traits, and neurotransmitter systems (dopamine (DA), opioid) related to pain and placebo analgesia. OPRM1 G carriers, compared with AA homozygotes, showed an overall reduction of baseline μ-opioid receptor availability in regions implicated in pain and affective regulation. In response to a sustained painful stimulus, we found no effect of A118G on pain-induced endogenous opioid release. Instead, AA homozygotes showed a blunted DA response in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in response to the pain challenge. After placebo administration, G carriers showed more pronounced mood disturbances and lower placebo-induced μ-opioid system activation in the anterior insula (aINS), the amygdala (AMY), the NAc, the thalamus (THA), and the brainstem, as well as lower levels of DA D2/3 activation in the NAc. At a trait level, G carriers reported higher NEO-Neuroticism scores; a personality trait previously associated with increased pain and lower placebo responses, which were negatively correlated with baseline μ-opioid receptor availability in the aINS and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC). Our results demonstrate that the A118G OPRM1 polymorphism contributes to interindividual variations in the function of neurotransmitters responsive to pain (endogenous opioid and dopamine), as well as their regulation through cognitive-emotional influences in the context of therapeutic expectations, the so-called placebo effect. These effects are relevant to

  3. Effects of the Mu Opioid Receptor Polymorphism (OPRM1 A118G) on Pain Regulation, Placebo Effects and Associated Personality Trait Measures

    PubMed Central

    Peciña, Marta; Love, Tiffany; Stohler, Christian S; Goldman, David; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2015-01-01

    Mu-opioid receptors (MOPRs) are critically involved in the modulation of pain and analgesia, and represent a candidate mechanism for the development of biomarkers of pain conditions and their responses to treatment. To further understand the human implications of genetic variation within the opioid system in pain and opioid-mediated placebo responses, we investigated the association between the functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the μ-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1), A118G, and psychophysical responses, personality traits, and neurotransmitter systems (dopamine (DA), opioid) related to pain and placebo analgesia. OPRM1 G carriers, compared with AA homozygotes, showed an overall reduction of baseline μ-opioid receptor availability in regions implicated in pain and affective regulation. In response to a sustained painful stimulus, we found no effect of A118G on pain-induced endogenous opioid release. Instead, AA homozygotes showed a blunted DA response in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in response to the pain challenge. After placebo administration, G carriers showed more pronounced mood disturbances and lower placebo-induced μ-opioid system activation in the anterior insula (aINS), the amygdala (AMY), the NAc, the thalamus (THA), and the brainstem, as well as lower levels of DA D2/3 activation in the NAc. At a trait level, G carriers reported higher NEO-Neuroticism scores; a personality trait previously associated with increased pain and lower placebo responses, which were negatively correlated with baseline μ-opioid receptor availability in the aINS and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC). Our results demonstrate that the A118G OPRM1 polymorphism contributes to interindividual variations in the function of neurotransmitters responsive to pain (endogenous opioid and dopamine), as well as their regulation through cognitive-emotional influences in the context of therapeutic expectations, the so-called placebo effect. These effects are relevant to

  4. The mu-opioid receptor agonist/noradrenaline reuptake inhibition (MOR-NRI) concept in analgesia: the case of tapentadol.

    PubMed

    Tzschentke, Thomas M; Christoph, Thomas; Kögel, Babette Y

    2014-04-01

    Tapentadol is a novel, centrally-acting analgesic drug, with an analgesic efficacy comparable to that of strong opioids such as oxycodone and morphine. Its high efficacy has been demonstrated in a range of animal models of acute and chronic, nociceptive, inflammatory, and neuropathic pain as well as in clinical studies with moderate to severe pain arising from a number of different etiologies. At the same time, a favorable gastrointestinal tolerability has been demonstrated in rodents and humans, and advantages over morphine regarding tolerance development and physical dependence were shown in animal studies. Furthermore, a low level of abuse and diversion is beginning to emerge from first post-marketing data. Tapentadol acts as a μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (NRI). Both mechanisms of action have been shown to contribute to the analgesic activity of tapentadol and to produce analgesia in a synergistic manner, such that relatively moderate activity at the two target sites (MOR and noradrenaline reuptake transporter) is sufficient to produce strong analgesic effects. It has been suggested that tapentadol is the first representative of a proposed new class of analgesics, MOR-NRI. This review presents the evidence that has led to this suggestion, and outlines how the pharmacology of tapentadol can explain its broad analgesic activity profile and high analgesic potency as well as its favorable tolerability.

  5. Expression of delta- and mu-opioid receptors in the ventricular and subventricular zones of the developing human neocortex.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Anushree; Khurshid, Nazia; Kumar, Praveen; Iyengar, Soumya

    2008-07-01

    Recent research has documented the involvement of the endogenous opioid system in neural development, including neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation. However, the expression of opioid receptors (ORs) in different cell types of the human ventricular and subventricular zones (VZ and SVZ) has not been studied during early gestation. In the present study, we have used immunohistochemistry and quantified the results to demonstrate that the levels of delta- and mu-OR subtypes were high in the VZ and SVZ between 11 and 16 gestation weeks (GW) and decreased by 20GW. These results have also been confirmed by studying OR mRNA expression in the VZ and SVZ. Both delta- and mu-OR subtypes were expressed by multipotential stem cells, newly differentiated neurons and developing glial cells to different extents. However, migrating neurons expressed negligible levels of both OR subtypes. Our results suggest that the opioid system may affect cellular proliferation and/or differentiation of stem cells into neurons and glia during the first and second trimesters of gestation in humans. Since layers II and III of the cerebral cortex are being formed during the second trimester, their development is most likely affected by the opioid system mediated through delta- and mu-ORs.

  6. Mu opioid receptor (OPRM1) as a predictor of treatment outcome in opiate-dependent individuals of Arab descent

    PubMed Central

    AL-Eitan, Laith N; Jaradat, Saied A; Su, Steve YS; Tay, Guan K; Hulse, Gary K

    2012-01-01

    Background: A number of research studies on the genetics of opiate dependence have focused on the μ-opioid receptor (OPRM1), which is a primary target for opiates. This study aims to identify genetic polymorphisms within the OPRM1 gene involved in response to the biopsychosocial treatment in opiate-dependent individuals of Arab descent. Methods: Unrelated Jordanian Nationals of Arab descent (N = 183) with opiate dependence were selected for this study. These individuals, all males, met the DSM-IV criteria for opiate dependence and were undergoing a voluntary 8-week treatment program at a Jordanian Drug Rehabilitation Centre. All individuals were genotyped for 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the OPRM1 gene using the Sequenom MassARRAY® system (iPLEX GOLD). Statistical analyses were carried out using the R package. Results: Patients receiving biopsychosocial treatment showed that there was a significant difference in their OPRM1 SNPs’ genotyping distribution between good, moderate, and poor responders to the treatment at two sites (rs6912029 [G-172T], and rs12205732 [G-1510A], P < 0.05, Fisher’s exact test). Conclusion: This study is the first report of an association between the OPRM1 G-172T and G-1510A polymorphisms and treatment response for opiate dependence. Specifically, this study demonstrated that the OPRM1 GG-172 and GG-1510 genotypes were more frequent among patients who were nonresponders to the biopsychosocial treatment. However, further pharmacogenetic studies in a larger cohort of opiate-dependent patients of Arab descent are needed to confirm these findings and identify individuals with increased chance of relapse. PMID:23226066

  7. Exposure to morphine-associated cues increases mu opioid receptor mRNA expression in the nucleus accumbens of Wistar Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Torry S; Beck, Kevin D; Cominski, Tara P; Bobzean, Samara A M; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V; Servatius, Richard J; Perrotti, Linda I

    2016-10-15

    The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat has been proposed as a model of anxiety vulnerability as it exhibits pronounced behavioral inhibition, passive avoidance, exaggerated startle response, enhanced HPA-axis activation, and active avoidance that is resistant to extinction. Accumulating evidence suggests that WKY rats respond differently to rewarding stimuli when compared to outbred strains of rat. Conditioned responding to drug-associated cues is linked with alterations in the activation of mu opioid receptors (MOR) and kappa opioid receptors (KOR) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Furthermore, alterations in KOR expression/activation in the NAc of WKY rats are implicated in the regulation of some of the components that make up the unique behavioral phenotype of this strain. The purpose of this study was to extend upon previous work from our laboratory by investigating conditioned morphine reward in adult male WKY and SD rats, and to examine levels of KOR mRNA and MOR mRNA in the NAc at baseline and after acquisition of morphine CPP. Our results demonstrate that SD rats displayed morphine-induced CPP to each of the six doses of morphine tested (0.5, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 7.5, or 10mg/kg). Interestingly, WKY rats demonstrated CPP for only the 1.25, 2.5, and 5mg/kg doses, yet no preference at the lowest (0.5mg/kg) or highest (7.5 and 10mg/kg) doses. qPCR analysis of MOR and KOR in the NAc revealed no strain differences in basal levels of MOR, but higher levels of KOR in WKY rats compared to those of SD rats. Interestingly, after completion of the CPP task, WKY rats had overall higher levels of NAc MOR mRNA compared to SD rats; the initial basal differences in NAc KOR levels persisted without change due to CPP in either strain. These results demonstrate that the WKY rat exhibits a unique pattern of behavioral responding to morphine and implicates differences in NAc KOR signaling as a potential source of aversion to higher doses of morphine. Additionally, the CPP-induced upregulation of

  8. Exposure to morphine-associated cues increases mu opioid receptor mRNA expression in the nucleus accumbens of Wistar Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Torry S; Beck, Kevin D; Cominski, Tara P; Bobzean, Samara A M; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V; Servatius, Richard J; Perrotti, Linda I

    2016-10-15

    The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat has been proposed as a model of anxiety vulnerability as it exhibits pronounced behavioral inhibition, passive avoidance, exaggerated startle response, enhanced HPA-axis activation, and active avoidance that is resistant to extinction. Accumulating evidence suggests that WKY rats respond differently to rewarding stimuli when compared to outbred strains of rat. Conditioned responding to drug-associated cues is linked with alterations in the activation of mu opioid receptors (MOR) and kappa opioid receptors (KOR) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Furthermore, alterations in KOR expression/activation in the NAc of WKY rats are implicated in the regulation of some of the components that make up the unique behavioral phenotype of this strain. The purpose of this study was to extend upon previous work from our laboratory by investigating conditioned morphine reward in adult male WKY and SD rats, and to examine levels of KOR mRNA and MOR mRNA in the NAc at baseline and after acquisition of morphine CPP. Our results demonstrate that SD rats displayed morphine-induced CPP to each of the six doses of morphine tested (0.5, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 7.5, or 10mg/kg). Interestingly, WKY rats demonstrated CPP for only the 1.25, 2.5, and 5mg/kg doses, yet no preference at the lowest (0.5mg/kg) or highest (7.5 and 10mg/kg) doses. qPCR analysis of MOR and KOR in the NAc revealed no strain differences in basal levels of MOR, but higher levels of KOR in WKY rats compared to those of SD rats. Interestingly, after completion of the CPP task, WKY rats had overall higher levels of NAc MOR mRNA compared to SD rats; the initial basal differences in NAc KOR levels persisted without change due to CPP in either strain. These results demonstrate that the WKY rat exhibits a unique pattern of behavioral responding to morphine and implicates differences in NAc KOR signaling as a potential source of aversion to higher doses of morphine. Additionally, the CPP-induced upregulation of

  9. The effects of alcohol on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist GSK1521498 in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Ziauddeen, Hisham; Nathan, Pradeep J; Dodds, Chris; Maltby, Kay; Miller, Sam R; Waterworth, Dawn; Song, Kijoung; Warren, Liling; Hosking, Louise; Zucchetto, Mauro; Bush, Mark; Johnson, Lakshmi Vasist; Sarai, Bhopinder; Mogg, Karin; Bradley, Brendan P; Richards, Duncan B; Fletcher, Paul C; Bullmore, Edward T

    2013-10-01

    The mu-opioid system has a key role in hedonic and motivational processes critical to substance addiction. However, existing mu-opioid antagonists have had limited success as anti-addiction treatments. GSK1521498 is a selective and potent mu-opioid antagonist being developed for the treatment of overeating and substance addictions. In this study, 28 healthy participants were administered single doses of GSK1521498 20 mg, ethanol 0.5 g/kg body weight, or both in combination, in a double blind placebo controlled four-way crossover design. The primary objective was to determine the risk of significant adverse pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions. The effects of GSK1521498 on hedonic and consummatory responses to alcohol and the attentional processing of alcohol-related stimuli, and their modulation by the OPRM1 A118G polymorphism were also explored. GSK1521498 20 mg was well tolerated alone and in combination with ethanol. There were mild transient effects of GSK1521498 on alertness and mood that were greater when it was combined with ethanol. These effects were not of clinical significance. There were no effects of GSK1521498 on reaction time, hedonic or consummatory responses. These findings provide encouraging safety and PK data to support continued development of GSK1521498 for the treatment of alcohol addiction.

  10. Prohormone convertase 2 (PC2) null mice have increased mu opioid receptor levels accompanied by altered morphine-induced antinociception, tolerance and dependence.

    PubMed

    Lutfy, K; Parikh, D; Lee, D L; Liu, Y; Ferrini, M G; Hamid, A; Friedman, T C

    2016-08-01

    Chronic morphine treatment increases the levels of prohormone convertase 2 (PC2) in brain regions involved in nociception, tolerance and dependence. Thus, we tested if PC2 null mice exhibit altered morphine-induced antinociception, tolerance and dependence. PC2 null mice and their wild-type controls were tested for baseline hot plate latency, injected with morphine (1.25-10mg/kg) and tested for antinociception 30min later. For tolerance studies, mice were tested in the hot plate test before and 30min following morphine (5mg/kg) on day 1. Mice then received an additional dose so that the final dose of morphine was 10mg/kg on this day. On days 2-4, mice received additional doses of morphine (20, 40 and 80mg/kg on days 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively). On day 5, mice were tested in the hot plate test before and 30min following morphine (5mg/kg). For withdrawal studies, mice were treated with the escalating doses of morphine (10, 20, 40 and 80mg/kg) for 4days, implanted with a morphine pellet on day 5 and 3 days later injected with naloxone (1mg/kg) and signs of withdrawal were recorded. Morphine dose-dependently induced antinociception and the magnitude of this response was greater in PC2 null mice. Tolerance to morphine was observed in wild-type mice and this phenomenon was blunted in PC2 null mice. Withdrawal signs were also reduced in PC2 null mice. Immunohistochemical studies showed up-regulation of the mu opioid receptor (MOP) protein expression in the periaqueductal gray area, ventral tegmental area, lateral hypothalamus, medial hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, and somatosensory cortex in PC2 null mice. Likewise, naloxone specific binding was increased in the brains of these mice compared to their wild-type controls. The results suggest that the PC2-derived peptides may play a functional role in morphine-induced antinociception, tolerance and dependence. Alternatively, lack of opioid peptides led to up-regulation of the MOP and altered morphine

  11. From the potent and selective mu opioid receptor agonist H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH(2) to the potent delta antagonist H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Lys(Z)-OH.

    PubMed

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Cocco, Maria Teresa; Salvadori, Severo; Romagnoli, Romeo; Sasaki, Yusuke; Okada, Yoshio; Bryant, Sharon D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2005-08-25

    H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH(2) ([Dmt(1)]DALDA) binds with high affinity and selectivity to the mu opioid receptor and is a potent and long-acting analgesic. Substitution of d-Arg in position 2 with Tic and masking of the lysine amine side chain by Z protection and of the C-terminal carboxylic function instead of the amide function transform a potent and selective mu agonist into a potent and selective delta antagonist H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Lys(Z)-OH. Such a delta antagonist could be used as a pharmacological tool.

  12. Dual single-scission event analysis of constitutive transferrin receptor (TfR) endocytosis and ligand-triggered β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) or Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Lampe, Marko; Pierre, Fabienne; Al-Sabah, Suleiman; Krasel, Cornelius; Merrifield, Christien J

    2014-10-01

    The dynamic relationship between constitutive and ligand-triggered clathrin-mediated endocytosis is only poorly characterized, and it remains controversial whether clathrin-coated pits specialize to internalize particular receptor cargo. Here we analyzed the ligand-triggered endocytosis of the model G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) at the level of individual endocytic events using a total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM)-based assay. Similar to the constitutive endocytosis of transferrin receptor (TfR), ligand- triggered endocytosis of β2AR occurs via quantized scission events hosted by clathrin spots and plaques of variable size and persistence. To address whether clathrin-coated structures (CCSs) specialize to internalize particular GPCRs, we adapted the TIRFM imaging assay to simultaneously quantify the internalization of TfR and the ligand- triggered endocytosis of the β2AR or MOR. Agonist-triggered β2AR or MOR endocytosis extended the maturation time of CCSs, as shown previously, but did not affect the rate of constitutive TfR endocytosis or loading of TfR into individual endocytic vesicles. Both the β2AR and the MOR receptors entered cells in the same vesicles as TfR, and the overall evidence for CCS specialization was weak. These data support a simple model in which different cargoes internalize through common CCSs.

  13. Dual single-scission event analysis of constitutive transferrin receptor (TfR) endocytosis and ligand-triggered β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) or Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Marko; Pierre, Fabienne; Al-Sabah, Suleiman; Krasel, Cornelius; Merrifield, Christien J.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic relationship between constitutive and ligand-triggered clathrin-mediated endocytosis is only poorly characterized, and it remains controversial whether clathrin-coated pits specialize to internalize particular receptor cargo. Here we analyzed the ligand-triggered endocytosis of the model G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) at the level of individual endocytic events using a total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM)–based assay. Similar to the constitutive endocytosis of transferrin receptor (TfR), ligand- triggered endocytosis of β2AR occurs via quantized scission events hosted by clathrin spots and plaques of variable size and persistence. To address whether clathrin-coated structures (CCSs) specialize to internalize particular GPCRs, we adapted the TIRFM imaging assay to simultaneously quantify the internalization of TfR and the ligand- triggered endocytosis of the β2AR or MOR. Agonist-triggered β2AR or MOR endocytosis extended the maturation time of CCSs, as shown previously, but did not affect the rate of constitutive TfR endocytosis or loading of TfR into individual endocytic vesicles. Both the β2AR and the MOR receptors entered cells in the same vesicles as TfR, and the overall evidence for CCS specialization was weak. These data support a simple model in which different cargoes internalize through common CCSs. PMID:25079691

  14. Synthesis and characterization of potent and selective mu-opioid receptor antagonists, [Dmt(1), D-2-Nal(4)]endomorphin-1 (Antanal-1) and [Dmt(1), D-2-Nal(4)]endomorphin-2 (Antanal-2).

    PubMed

    Fichna, Jakub; do-Rego, Jean-Claude; Chung, Nga N; Lemieux, Carole; Schiller, Peter W; Poels, Jeroen; Broeck, Jozef Vanden; Costentin, Jean; Janecka, Anna

    2007-02-01

    To synthesize potent antagonists of the mu-opioid receptor, we prepared a series of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 analogues with 3-(1-naphthyl)-d-alanine (d-1-Nal) or 3-(2-naphthyl)-d-alanine (d-2-Nal) in position 4. Some of these analogues displayed weak antagonist properties. We tried to strengthen these properties by introducing the structurally modified tyrosine residue 2,6-dimethyltyrosine (Dmt) in place of Tyr1. Among the synthesized compounds, [Dmt1, d-2-Nal4]endomorphin-1, designated antanal-1, and [Dmt1, d-2-Nal4]endomorphin-2, designated antanal-2, turned out to be highly potent and selective mu-opioid receptor antagonists, as judged on the basis of two functional assays, the receptor binding assay and the hot plate test of analgesia. Interestingly, another analogue of this series, [Dmt1, d-1-Nal4]endomorphin-1, turned out to be a moderately potent mixed mu-agonist/delta-antagonist.

  15. Changes in D1 but not D2 dopamine or mu-opioid receptor expression in limbic and motor structures after lateral hypothalamus electrical self-stimulation: A quantitative autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Simon, Maria J; Higuera-Matas, A; Roura-Martinez, D; Ucha, M; Santos-Toscano, R; Garcia-Lecumberri, C; Ambrosio, E; Puerto, A

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) is involved in the activation of neuroanatomical systems that are also associated with the processing of natural and other artificial rewarding stimuli. Specific components of this behavior (hedonic impact, learning, and motor behavior) may involve changes in different neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and opioids. In this study, quantitative autoradiography was used to examine changes in mu-opioid and D1/D2-dopamine receptor expression in various anatomical regions related to the motor and mesolimbic reward systems after intracranial self-stimulation of the LH. Results of the behavioral procedure and subsequent radiochemical assays show selective changes in D1 but not D2 or mu receptors in Accumbens-Shell, Ventral Pallidum, Caudate-Putamen, and Medial Globus Pallidus. These findings are discussed in relation to the different psychobiological components of the appetitive motivational system, identifying some dissociation among them, particularly with respect to the involvement of the D1-dopamine subsystem (but not D2 or mu receptors) in goal-directed behaviors.

  16. Contusive spinal cord injury up regulates mu-opioid receptor (mor) gene expression in the brain and down regulates its expression in the spinal cord: possible implications in spinal cord injury research.

    PubMed

    Michael, Felicia Mary; Mohapatra, Alok Nath; Venkitasamy, Lavanya; Chandrasekar, Kirubhanand; Seldon, Tenzin; Venkatachalam, Sankar

    2015-09-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the dreaded neurological conditions and finding a cure for it has been a hot area of research. Naloxone - a mu-opiate receptor (mor) antagonist was considered for SCI treatment based on its positive effects under shock conditions. In contrary to animal studies based reports about the potential benefits of naloxone in treating SCI, a large scale clinical trial [National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study II (NASCIS II)] conducted in USA failed to witness any effectiveness. The inconsistency noticed was intriguing. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to re-examine the role of naloxone in treating SCI using a highly standardised Multicenter Animal Spinal Cord Injury Study (MASCIS) animal model of contusive SCI. Results indicated that naloxone produced negligible and insignificant neuroprotection. In an attempt to understand the cause for the failure, it was found that mu-opioid receptor (mor) gene expression was upregulated in the brain but was down regulated in the spinal cord after contusive SCI. Given that the beneficial effects of naloxone are through its action on the mor, the results indicate that unlike the brain, spinal cord might not be bracing to utilise the opiate system in the repair process. This could possibly explain the failure of naloxone treatment in NASCIS II. To conclude, opiate antagonists like naloxone may be neuroprotective for treating traumatic brain injuries, but not for traumatic/contusive spinal cord injuries. PMID:26039701

  17. Transcriptional regulation of the human mu opioid receptor (hMOR) gene: evidence of positive and negative cis-acting elements in the proximal promoter and presence of a distal promoter.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Carr, L G

    2001-07-01

    The mu opioid receptor (MOR), the primary binding site for morphine, is an important target for treating pain and drug addiction. The MOR gene is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, and potential polymorphisms in its 5' regulatory region can cause individual variation in MOR gene expression, nociception, and opiate responses. To study the 5' regulatory region of the human MOR gene (hMOR), we further investigated our previous finding of two regulatory regions and have localized a 40-bp positive cis-acting element and a 35-bp negative cis-acting element that regulate hMOR transcription in SK-N-SH cells. Electromobility shift assays and methylation interference assay with the 40-bp probe suggested that protein contacts were made with the core recognition sequence GCC (-510 to -508). The 35-bp sequence (-694 to -660) was the hMOR homolog of the mMOR negative regulatory element, and it suppressed proximal promoter activity of the hMOR gene. Additionally, the presence of an hMOR distal promoter was confirmed using RT-PCR. However, the activity of the distal promoter construct (-2325 to -777) was weak compared with the activity of the proximal promoter construct (-776 to -212).

  18. Knockdown of ventral tegmental area mu-opioid receptors in rats prevents effects of social defeat stress: implications for amphetamine cross-sensitization, social avoidance, weight regulation and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Caitlin E; Herschel, Daniel J; Lasek, Amy W; Hammer, Ronald P; Nikulina, Ella M

    2015-02-01

    Social defeat stress causes social avoidance and long-lasting cross-sensitization to psychostimulants, both of which are associated with increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Moreover, social stress upregulates VTA mu-opioid receptor (MOR) mRNA. In the VTA, MOR activation inhibits GABA neurons to disinhibit VTA dopamine neurons, thus providing a role for VTA MORs in the regulation of psychostimulant sensitization. The present study determined the effect of lentivirus-mediated MOR knockdown in the VTA on the consequences of intermittent social defeat stress, a salient and profound stressor in humans and rodents. Social stress exposure induced social avoidance and attenuated weight gain in animals with non-manipulated VTA MORs, but both these effects were prevented by VTA MOR knockdown. Rats with non-manipulated VTA MOR expression exhibited cross-sensitization to amphetamine challenge (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.), evidenced by a significant augmentation of locomotion. By contrast, knockdown of VTA MORs prevented stress-induced cross-sensitization without blunting the locomotor-activating effects of amphetamine. At the time point corresponding to amphetamine challenge, immunohistochemical analysis was performed to examine the effect of stress on VTA BDNF expression. Prior stress exposure increased VTA BDNF expression in rats with non-manipulated VTA MOR expression, while VTA MOR knockdown prevented stress-induced expression of VTA BDNF. Taken together, these results suggest that upregulation of VTA MOR is necessary for the behavioral and biochemical changes induced by social defeat stress. Elucidating VTA MOR regulation of stress effects on the mesolimbic system may provide new therapeutic targets for treating stress-induced vulnerability to substance abuse.

  19. Association of time-dependent changes in mu opioid receptor mRNA, but not BDNF, TrkB, or MeCP2 mRNA and protein expression in the rat nucleus accumbens with incubation of heroin craving

    PubMed Central

    Theberge, Florence R. M.; Pickens, Charles L.; Goldart, Evan; Fanous, Sanya; Hope, Bruce T.; Liu, Qing-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Rationale and objectives Responding to heroin cues progressively increases after cessation of heroin self-administration (incubation of heroin craving). We investigated whether this incubation is associated with time-dependent changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) signaling and mu opioid receptor (MOR) expression in nucleus accumbens (NAc), dorsal striatum (DS), and medial pre-frontal cortex (mPFC). We also investigated the effect of the preferential MOR antagonist naloxone on cue-induced heroin seeking during abstinence. Methods We trained rats to self-administer heroin or saline for 9–10 days and then dissected the NAc, DS, and mPFC at different abstinence days and measured mRNA and protein levels of BDNF, TrkB, and MeCP2, as well as MOR mRNA (Oprm1). In other groups, we assessed cue-induced heroin seeking in extinction tests after 1, 11, and 30 abstinence days, and naloxone’s (0–1.0 mg/kg) effect on extinction responding after 1 and 15 days. Results Cue-induced heroin seeking progressively increased or incubated during abstinence. This incubation was not associated with changes in BDNF, TrkB, or MeCP2 mRNA or protein levels in NAc, DS, or mPFC; additionally, no molecular changes were observed after extinction tests on day 11. In NAc, but not DS or mPFC, MOR mRNA decreased on abstinence day 1 and returned to basal levels over time. Naloxone significantly decreased cue-induced heroin seeking after 15 abstinence days but not 1 day. Conclusions Results suggest a role of MOR in incubation of heroin craving. As previous studies implicated NAc BDNF in incubation of cocaine craving, our data suggest that different mechanisms contribute to incubation of heroin versus cocaine craving. PMID:22790874

  20. Increased mesolimbic cue-reactivity in carriers of the mu-opioid-receptor gene OPRM1 A118G polymorphism predicts drinking outcome: a functional imaging study in alcohol dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    Bach, Patrick; Vollsta Dt-Klein, Sabine; Kirsch, Martina; Hoffmann, Sabine; Jorde, Anne; Frank, Josef; Charlet, Katrin; Beck, Anne; Heinz, Andreas; Walter, Henrik; Sommer, Wolfgang H; Spanagel, Rainer; Rietschel, Marcella; Kiefer, Falk

    2015-08-01

    The endogenous opioid system is involved in the pathophysiology of alcohol-use disorders. Genetic variants of the opioid system alter neural and behavioral responses to alcohol. In particular, a single nucleotide polymorphism rs1799971 (A118G) in the mu-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) is suggested to modulate alcohol-related phenotypes and neural response in the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system. Little is known about the clinical implications of these changes. The current study investigated the relationship of genotype effects on subjective and neural responses to alcohol cues and relapse in a sample of abstinent alcohol-dependent patients. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate alcohol cue-reactivity and drinking outcome of 81 abstinent alcohol-dependent patients. G-allele carriers displayed increased fMRI cue-reactivity in the left dorsal striatum and bilateral insulae. Neural responses to alcohol cues in these brain regions correlated positively with subjective craving for alcohol and positive expectations of alcohol׳s effects. Moreover, alcohol cue-reactivity in the left dorsal striatum predicted time to first severe relapse. Current results show that alcohol-dependent G-allele carriers׳ increased cue-reactivity is associated with an increased relapse risk. This suggests that genotype effects on cue-reactivity might link the OPRM1 A118G risk allele with an increased relapse risk that was reported in earlier studies. From a clinical perspective, risk-allele carriers might benefit from treatments, such as neuro-feedback or extinction-based therapy that are suggested to reduce mesolimbic reactivity.

  1. Knockdown of ventral tegmental area mu-opioid receptors in rats prevents effects of social defeat stress: Implications for amphetamine cross-sensitization, social avoidance, weight regulation and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Caitlin E.; Herschel, Daniel; Lasek, Amy W.; Hammer, Ronald P.; Nikulina, Ella M.

    2014-01-01

    Social defeat stress causes social avoidance and long-lasting cross-sensitization to psychostimulants, both of which are associated with increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Moreover, social stress upregulates VTA mu-opioid receptor (MOR) mRNA. In the VTA, MOR activation inhibits GABA neurons to disinhibit VTA dopamine neurons, thus providing a role for VTA MORs in the regulation of psychostimulant sensitization. The present study determined the effect of lentivirus-mediated MOR knockdown in the VTA on the consequences of intermittent social defeat stress, a salient and profound stressor in humans and rodents. Social stress exposure induced social avoidance and attenuated weight gain in animals with non-manipulated VTA MORs, but both these effects were prevented by VTA MOR knockdown. Rats with non-manipulated VTA MOR expression exhibited cross-sensitization to amphetamine challenge (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.), evidenced by a significant augmentation of locomotion. By contrast, knockdown of VTA MORs prevented stress-induced cross-sensitization without blunting the locomotor-activating effects of amphetamine. At the time point corresponding to amphetamine challenge, immunohistochemical analysis was performed to examine the effect of stress on VTA BDNF expression. Prior stress exposure increased VTA BDNF expression in rats with non-manipulated VTA MOR expression, while VTA MOR knockdown prevented stress-induced expression of VTA BDNF. Taken together, these results suggest that upregulation of VTA MOR is necessary for the behavioral and biochemical changes induced by social defeat stress. Elucidating VTA MOR regulation of stress effects on the mesolimbic system may provide new therapeutic targets for treating stress-induced vulnerability to substance abuse. PMID:25446676

  2. New 2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine (Dmt) opioid peptidomimetics based on the Aba-Gly scaffold. Development of unique mu-opioid receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Ballet, Steven; Salvadori, Severo; Trapella, Claudio; Bryant, Sharon D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Negri, Lucia; Giannini, Elisa; Lattanzi, Roberta; Tourwé, Dirk; Balboni, Gianfranco

    2006-06-29

    The Aba-Gly scaffold, incorporated into Dmt-Tic ligands (H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-CH2-Ph, H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-Ph, H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH2-Bid), exhibited mixed micro/delta or delta opioid receptor activities with micro agonism. Substitution of Tic by Aba-Gly coupled to -NH-CH2-Ph (1), -NH-Ph (2), or -Bid (Bid=1H-benzimidazole-2-yl) (3) shifted affinity (Ki(micro)=0.46, 1.48, and 19.9 nM, respectively), selectivity, and bioactivity to micro-opioid receptors. These compounds represent templates for a new class of lead opioid agonists that are easily synthesized and suitable for therapeutic pain relief.

  3. Redoubling the ring size of an endomorphin-2 analog transforms a centrally acting mu-opioid receptor agonist into a pure peripheral analgesic.

    PubMed

    Piekielna, Justyna; De Marco, Rossella; Gentilucci, Luca; Cerlesi, Maria Camilla; Calo', Girolamo; Tömböly, Csaba; Artali, Roberto; Janecka, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The study reports the synthesis and biological evaluation of two opioid analogs, a monomer and a dimer, obtained as products of the solid-phase, side-chain to side-chain cyclization of the pentapeptide Tyr-d-Lys-Phe-Phe-AspNH2 . The binding affinities to the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors, as well as results obtained in a calcium mobilization functional assay are reported. Tyr-[d-Lys-Phe-Phe-Asp]2 -NH2 1 was a potent and selective full agonist of mu with sub-nanomolar affinity, while the dimer (Tyr-[d-Lys-Phe-Phe-Asp]2 -NH2 )2 2 showed a significant mixed mu/kappa affinity, acting as an agonist at the mu. Molecular docking computations were utilized to explain the ability of the dimeric cyclopeptide 2 to interact with the receptor. Interestingly, in spite of the increased ring size, the higher flexibility allowed 2 to fold and fit into the mu receptor binding pocket. Both cyclopeptides were shown to elicit strong antinociceptive activity after intraventricular injection but only cyclomonomer 1 was able to cross the blood-brain barrier. However, the cyclodimer 2 displayed a potent peripheral antinociceptive activity in a mouse model of visceral inflammatory pain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 309-317, 2016. PMID:27038094

  4. Synthesis, modelling, and mu-opioid receptor affinity of N-3(9)-arylpropenyl-N-9(3)-propionyl-3,9-diazabicycl.

    PubMed

    Pinna, G A; Murineddu, G; Curzu, M M; Villa, S; Vianello, P; Borea, P A; Gessi, S; Toma, L; Colombo, D; Cignarella, G

    2000-08-01

    A series of N-3-arylpropenyl-N-9-propionyl-3,9-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonanes (1a-g) and of reverted N-3-propionyl-N-9-arylpropenyl isomers (2a-g), as homologues of the previously reported analgesic 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octanes (I-II), were synthesized and evaluated for the binding affinity towards opioid receptor subtypes mu, delta and kappa. Compounds 1a-g and 2a-g exhibited a strong selective mu-affinity with Ki values in the nanomolar range, which favourably compared with those of I and II. In addition, contrary to the trend observed for DBO-I, II, the mu-affinity of series 2 is markedly higher than that of the isomeric series 1. This aspect was discussed on the basis of the conformational studies performed on DBN which allowed hypotheses on the mode of interaction of these compounds with the mu receptor.

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of aryl-naloxamide opiate analgesics targeting truncated exon 11-associated mu opioid receptor (MOR-1) splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Susruta; Subrath, Joan; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Polikar, Lisa; Burgman, Maxim; Nagakura, Kuni; Ocampo, Julie; Haselton, Nathan; Pasternak, Anna R.; Grinnell, Steven; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2012-01-01

    3-Iodobenzoylnaltrexamide 1 (IBNtxA) is a potent analgesic acting through a novel receptor target that lack many side-effects of traditional opiates composed, in part, of exon 11-associated truncated six transmembrane domain MOR-1 (6TM/E11) splice variants. To better understand the SAR of this drug target, a number of 4,5-epoxymorphinan analogs were synthesized. Results show the importance of a free 3-phenolic group, a phenyl ring at the 6 position, an iodine at the 3′ or 4′ position of the phenyl ring and an N-allyl or c-propylmethyl group to maintain high 6TM/E11 affinity and activity. 3-Iodobenzoylnaloxamide 15 (IBNalA) with a N-allyl group displayed lower delta opioid receptor affinity than its naltrexamine analog, was 10-fold more potent an analgesic than morphine, elicited no respiratory depression or physical dependence and only limited inhibition of gastrointestinal transit. Thus, the aryl-naloxamide scaffold can generate a potent analgesic acting through the 6TM/E11 sites with advantageous side-effect profile and greater selectivity. PMID:22734622

  6. Mu-opioid and corticotropin-releasing-factor receptors show largely postsynaptic co-expression, and separate presynaptic distributions, in the mouse central amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis

    PubMed Central

    Jaferi, Azra; Pickel, Virginia M.

    2009-01-01

    The anxiolytic effects of opiates active at the mu-opioid receptor (μ-OR) may be ascribed, in part, to suppression of neurons that are responsive to the stress-associated peptide, corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), in the central amygdala (CeA) and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST). The CRF receptor (CRFr) and μ-OR are expressed in both the CeA and BNST, but their subcellular relationship to each other is not known in either region. To address this question, we used dual electron microscopic immunolabeling of μ-OR and CRFr in the mouse lateral CeA and anterolateral BNST. Immunolabeling for each receptor was detected in the same as well as in separate somatic, dendritic and axonal profiles of neurons in each region. CRFr had a plasmalemmal or cytoplasmic distribution in many dendrites, including those co-expressing μ-OR. The co-expression of CRFr and μ-OR also was seen near excitatory-type synapses on dendritic spines. In both the CeA and BNST, over 50% of the CRFr-labeled dendritic profiles (dendrites and spines) contained immunoreactivity for the μ-OR. However, less than 25% of the dendritic profiles containing the μ-OR were labeled for CRFr in either region, suggesting that opiate activation of the μ-OR affects many neurons in addition to those responsive to CRF. The dendritic profiles containing CRFr and/or μ-OR received asymmetric, excitatory-type synapses from unlabeled or CRFr-labeled axon terminals. In contrast, the μ-OR was identified in terminals forming symmetric, inhibitory-type synapses. Thus, in both the CeA and BNST, μ-OR and CRFr have strategic locations for mediation of CRF and opioid effects on the postsynaptic excitability of single neurons, and on the respective presynaptic release of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. The commonalities in the synaptic location of both receptors in the CeA and BNST suggest that this is a fundamental cellular association of relevance to both drug addiction and stress

  7. SEIZURE ACTIVITY INVOLVED IN THE UP-REGULATION OF BDNF mRNA EXPRESSION BY ACTIVATION OF CENTRAL MU OPIOID RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, H. N.; KO, M. C.

    2009-01-01

    Chemical-induced seizures up-regulated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of endogenous opioids preferentially activating μ opioid receptor (MOR) could also increase BDNF mRNA expression. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent i.c.v. administration of synthetic MOR-selective agonists in rats can modulate both seizure activity and up-regulation of BDNF mRNA expression. Effects and potencies of i.c.v. administration of morphine and [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO), were directly investigated by scoring behavioral seizures and measuring BDNF mRNA expression. In addition, effects of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone and antiepileptic drugs, diazepam, phenobarbital, and valproate, on i.c.v. MOR agonist-induced behavioral seizures and up-regulation of BDNF mRNA expression were determined. A single i.c.v. administration of morphine (10–100 μg) or DAMGO (0.15–1.5 μg) dose-dependently elicited behavioral seizures and increased BDNF mRNA expression in the widespread brain regions. However, subcutaneous administration of MOR agonists neither produced behavioral seizures nor increased BDNF mRNA expression. Pretreatment with naloxone 1 mg/kg significantly reduced behavioral seizure scores and the up-regulation of BDNF mRNA expression elicited by i.c.v. morphine or DAMGO. Similarly, diazepam 10 mg/kg and phenobarbital 40 mg/kg significantly blocked i.c.v. MOR agonist-induced actions. Pretreatment with valproate 300 mg/kg only attenuated behavioral seizures, but it did not affect morphine-induced increase of BDNF mRNA expression. This study provides supporting evidence that seizure activity plays an important role in the up-regulation of BDNF mRNA expression elicited by central MOR activation and that decreased inhibitory action of GABAergic system through the modulation on GABA receptor synaptic function by central MOR activation is involved in its regulation of BDNF m

  8. [Dmt(1)]DALDA is highly selective and potent at mu opioid receptors, but is not cross-tolerant with systemic morphine.

    PubMed

    Riba, Pal; Ben, Yong; Nguyen, Thi M-D; Furst, Susanna; Schiller, Peter W; Lee, Nancy M

    2002-01-01

    The clinical effectiveness of morphine is limited by several side effects, including the development of tolerance and dependence. Most of these side effects are believed to be mediated by central opioid receptors; therefore, hydrophilic opioids, which don't cross the blood-brain barrier, may have advantages over morphine in some clinical applications. We recently synthesized several analogues of DALDA (Tyr-D-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2), a highly hydrophilic peptide derived from the endogenous opioid peptide dermorphin; all of them, particularly [Dmt(1)] DALDA (Dmt - 2',6'-dimethyl tyrosine), had high potency and selectivity at mu receptors, the target of morphine, in activity assays. Here we report the pharmacological characterization of [Dmt(1)] DALDA in the whole animal. [Dmt(1)]DALDA was 40 times more potent than morphine in inducing antinociception in mice when both drugs were given s.c., and 6-14 times more potent than DAMGO, a selective m agonist, when both drugs were given it. However, [Dmt(1)]DALDA showed poor cross-tolerance to morphine; thus chronic morphine treatment of animals increased the antinociceptive AD(50) of systemic [Dmt(1)]DALDA two fold or less, as compared to an 8-9-fold increase for morphine and a 4-5-fold increase for DAMGO. The antinociceptive activity of [Dmt(1)]DALDA (i.t) was blocked by CTAP, a selective mu antagonist, but not by TIPP psi, a selective delta antagonist, nor by nor-BNI, a selective kappa antagonist. [Dmt(1)]DALDA-induced antinociception was also blocked by naloxone methiodide, an antagonist that does not cross the blood-brain barrier, when agonist and antagonist were given i.t. or i.c.v., but not when they were given s.c. We conclude that [Dmt(1)] DALDA is a highly potent analgesic acting at mu receptors. Though it appears to penetrate the blood-brain barrier, it exhibits low cross-tolerance to morphine, suggesting that it may have advantages over the latter in certain clinical applications.

  9. Dual growth of adolescent smoking and drinking: evidence for an interaction between the mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1) A118G polymorphism and sex.

    PubMed

    Kleinjan, Marloes; Poelen, Evelien A; Engels, Rutger C M E; Verhagen, Maaike

    2013-11-01

    Smoking and alcohol use often co-occur during adolescence, but little is known about the codevelopment of these substances. In the search for etiological factors that help to explain the development of adolescent substance use patterns, studies have revealed substantial heritability for both alcohol use and smoking. In this regard, the µ-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1, chromosome 6q24-q25) has been linked to both substances. This study examined the predictive relationships between initial level and growth of smoking and drinking in 311 early adolescents (13-15 years old) over a 4-year period. In addition, the effects of the A118G polymorphism of the OPRM1 gene on the initial values and the development over time of alcohol use and smoking were assessed. Finally, as prevalence and heritability estimates for both alcohol- and smoking-related behaviors differ between males and females, OPRM1 by sex interactions were tested. We found that high initial levels of early adolescent alcohol consumption were related to a stronger increase in smoking levels over time. In contrast, high initial levels of smoking were not related to growth of alcohol use. No main OPRM1 effects were found, but sex-specificity of the gene was found for smoking development. Male A-allele carriers showed a faster development in smoking behavior, whereas in females, the G-allele led to a faster development in smoking. Thus, in addition to high levels of alcohol as a risk factor for the development of smoking behavior, sex-specific effects exist for OPRM1, which may additionally have consequences for the development of adolescent smoking.

  10. Peripherally mediated antinociception of the mu-opioid receptor agonist 2-[(4,5alpha-epoxy-3-hydroxy-14beta-methoxy-17-methylmorphinan-6beta-yl)amino]acetic acid (HS-731) after subcutaneous and oral administration in rats with carrageenan-induced hindpaw inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre; Spetea, Mariana; Guo, Yan; Schütz, Johannes; Windisch, Petra; Schmidhammer, Helmut

    2006-04-01

    Opioids induce analgesia by activating opioid receptors not only within the central nervous system but also on peripheral sensory neurons. This study investigated peripherally mediated antinociception produced by the mu-opioid receptor agonist 2-[(4,5alpha-epoxy-3-hydroxy-14beta-methoxy-17-methylmorphinan-6beta-yl)amino]acetic acid (HS-731) after s.c. and oral administration in rats with carrageenan-induced hindpaw inflammation. Antinociceptive effects after s.c. administration were assessed 3 h after intraplantar carrageenan injection and compared with those of centrally acting mu-opioid agonists 14-methoxymetopon and morphine. Opioid agonists caused dose-dependent increases in inflamed paw withdrawal latencies to mechanical and thermal stimulation. The time course of action was different, in that HS-731 (20 microg/kg s.c.) produced significant long-lasting effects up to 4 h after administration, whereas 14-methoxymetopon (20 microg/kg) and morphine (2 mg/kg) reached their peak of action at 10 to 30 min, and their effect declined rapidly thereafter. Subcutaneous administration of the peripherally selective opioid antagonist naloxone methiodide inhibited antinociception elicited by HS-731 (20 microg/kg s.c.), whereas it was ineffective against 14-methoxymetopon (20 microg/kg s.c.). Moreover, the antinociception produced by 100 microg/kg s.c. HS-731 was dose-dependently reversed by s.c. naloxone methiodide. This indicates that HS-731 preferentially activates peripheral opioid receptors, whereas 14-methoxymetopon mediates analgesia via central mechanisms. Orally administered HS-731 significantly reduced hyperalgesia in the inflamed paw induced by carrageenan, which was reversible by s.c. administered naloxone methiodide. These results show that systemic (s.c. and oral) treatment with the mu-opioid agonist HS-731 produces potent and long-lasting antinociception through peripheral mechanisms in rats with carrageenan-induced hindpaw inflammation.

  11. Signal transduction efficacy of the highly potent mu opioid agonist 14-methoxymetopon.

    PubMed

    Zernig, G; Saria, A; Krassnig, R; Schmidhammer, H

    2000-03-31

    In search of a truly high-efficacy (i.e., tau > 100) mu opioid analgesic, we determined the efficacy (tau) and apparent in vivo affinity (KA) of the high-potency alkoxymorphinan 14-methoxymetopon. However, in the present study, 14-methoxymetopon's efficacy proved to be only 1.5-fold higher than that of morphine (tau, 19 vs. 12). KA values were 2,900 nmol/kg for 14-methoxymetopon and 46,000 nmol/kg for morphine (Ki for [3H]DAMGO binding, 0.33 vs 3.4 nmol/l). Thus, the 24-fold higher potency of methoxymetopon could be fully accounted for by its 16-fold higher apparent in vivo affinity and its only 1.5-fold higher efficacy. Furthermore, the 10-fold higher affinity of 14-methoxymetopon for the mu opioid receptor - as previously determined in radioligand binding assays - was confirmed in the present behavioral tests of thermal antinociception.

  12. Mu Opioid Mediated Discriminative-Stimulus Effects of Tramadol: An Individual Subjects Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Justin C.; Rush, Craig R.; Stoops, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Drug discrimination procedures use dose-dependent generalization, substitution, and pretreatment with selective agonists and antagonists to evaluate receptor systems mediating interoceptive effects of drugs. Despite the extensive use of these techniques in the nonhuman animal literature, few studies have used human subjects. Specifically, human studies have not routinely used antagonist administration as a pharmacological tool to elucidate the mechanisms mediating the discriminative stimulus effects of drugs. This study evaluated the discriminative-stimulus effects of tramadol, an atypical analgesic with monoamine and mu opioid activity. Three human subjects first learned to discriminate 100 mg tramadol from placebo. A range of tramadol doses (25 to 150 mg) and hydromorphone (4 mg) with and without naltrexone pretreatment (50 mg) were then administered to subjects after acquiring the discrimination. Tramadol produced dose-dependent increases in drug-appropriate responding and hydromorphone partially or fully substituted for tramadol in all subjects. These effects were attenuated by naltrexone. Individual subject records indicated a relationship between mu opioid activity (i.e., miosis) and drug discrimination performance. Our findings indicate that mu opioid activity may mediate the discriminative-stimulus effects of tramadol in humans. The correspondence of generalization, substitution, and pretreatment findings with the animal literature supports the neuropharmacological specificity of the drug discrimination procedure. PMID:25664525

  13. Truncated mu opioid GPCR variant involvement in opioid-dependent and opioid-independent pain modulatory systems within the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Marrone, Gina F.; Grinnell, Steven G.; Lu, Zhigang; Rossi, Grace C.; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Xu, Jin; Majumdar, Susruta; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical management of severe pain depends heavily on opioids acting through mu opioid receptors encoded by the Oprm1 gene, which undergoes extensive alternative splicing. In addition to generating a series of prototypic seven transmembrane domain (7TM) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), Oprm1 also produces a set of truncated splice variants containing only six transmembrane domains (6TM) through which selected opioids such as IBNtxA (3′-iodobenzoyl-6β-naltrexamide) mediate a potent analgesia without many undesirable effects. Although morphine analgesia is independent of these 6TM mu receptor isoforms, we now show that the selective loss of the 6TM variants in a knockout model eliminates the analgesic actions of delta and kappa opioids and of α2-adrenergic compounds, but not cannabinoid, neurotensin, or muscarinic drugs. These observations were confirmed by using antisense paradigms. Despite their role in analgesia, loss of the 6TM variants were not involved with delta opioid-induced seizure activity, aversion to the kappa drug U50,488H, or α2-mediated hypolocomotion. These observations support the existence of parallel opioid and nonopioid pain modulatory systems and highlight the ability to dissociate unwanted delta, kappa1, and α2 actions from analgesia. PMID:26976581

  14. Truncated mu opioid GPCR variant involvement in opioid-dependent and opioid-independent pain modulatory systems within the CNS.

    PubMed

    Marrone, Gina F; Grinnell, Steven G; Lu, Zhigang; Rossi, Grace C; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Xu, Jin; Majumdar, Susruta; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2016-03-29

    The clinical management of severe pain depends heavily on opioids acting through mu opioid receptors encoded by the Oprm1 gene, which undergoes extensive alternative splicing. In addition to generating a series of prototypic seven transmembrane domain (7TM) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), Oprm1 also produces a set of truncated splice variants containing only six transmembrane domains (6TM) through which selected opioids such as IBNtxA (3'-iodobenzoyl-6β-naltrexamide) mediate a potent analgesia without many undesirable effects. Although morphine analgesia is independent of these 6TM mu receptor isoforms, we now show that the selective loss of the 6TM variants in a knockout model eliminates the analgesic actions of delta and kappa opioids and of α2-adrenergic compounds, but not cannabinoid, neurotensin, or muscarinic drugs. These observations were confirmed by using antisense paradigms. Despite their role in analgesia, loss of the 6TM variants were not involved with delta opioid-induced seizure activity, aversion to the kappa drug U50, 488H, or α2-mediated hypolocomotion. These observations support the existence of parallel opioid and nonopioid pain modulatory systems and highlight the ability to dissociate unwanted delta, kappa1, and α2 actions from analgesia. PMID:26976581

  15. (/sup 3/H)(D-Ala2,NMePhe4,Gly-ol5)-enkephalin (mu-opioid) binding in beige-J mice

    SciTech Connect

    Raffa, R.B.; Baldy, W.J. Jr.; Shank, R.P.; Mathiasen, J.R.; Vaught, J.L.

    1988-05-01

    Tritiated (D-Ala2,NMePhe4,Gly-ol5)-enkephalin ((3H)DAGO) was used to examine mu-opioid receptor number and mu-ligand binding in brain synaptic membranes (P2 fraction) from C57BL/6J-bgJ/bgJ (beige-J) mice, a strain with combined deficiencies in immunological function (resembling Chediak-Higashi syndrome) and analgesic response to mu-opioid agonists such as morphine and DAGO. As controls, white mice, beige-J littermates (normally responsive to mu-opioid agonists), and a known mu-deficient strain (CXBK) were also examined. Neither the KD (0.47 to 0.49 nM) nor the Bmax (153 to 168 fmol/mg protein) determined for beige-J mice was significantly different from values determined for littermates or white mice. In contrast, the Bmax of CXBK mice (66 fmol/mg protein) was clearly less than that of the other strains. The analgesic defect of beige-J mice, therefore, is not likely due to an insufficient number of mu-opioid receptors, as it presumably is in CXBK mice. Carbachol (200 micrograms/ml), which partly corrects the analgesic defect of beige-J mice, had no effect on (3H)DAGO binding either acutely in vitro or chronically ex vivo after administration to beige-J mice for three weeks. Hence, the analgesic defect of beige-J mice appears to be due to some defect in the mu-opioid receptor-effector coupling mechanism or to some endogenous substance that inhibits binding of mu-opioid ligands to otherwise functional receptors.

  16. The competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist (-)-6-phosphonomethyl-deca-hydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (LY235959) potentiates the antinociceptive effects of opioids that vary in efficacy at the mu-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Allen, Richard M; Granger, Arthur L; Dykstra, Linda A

    2003-11-01

    (-)-6-Phosphonomethyl-deca-hydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (LY235959) is a competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist shown to prevent the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effects of morphine in rodents. Although administration of LY235959 alone generally does not produce antinociception, LY235959 potentiates the antinociceptive effects of morphine in squirrel monkeys. The present study was designed to determine whether LY235959 would potentiate the acute antinociceptive effects of morphine as well those of the opioid receptor agonists l-methadone, levorphanol, butorphanol, and buprenorphine. A squirrel monkey titration procedure was used in which shock (delivered to the tail) increased in intensity every 15 s (0.01-2.0 mA) in 30 increments. Five lever presses during any given 15-s shock period (fixed ratio 5) produced a 15-s shock-free period after which shock resumed at the next lower intensity. Morphine (0.3-3.0 mg/kg i.m.), l-methadone (0.1-0.56 mg/kg i.m.), levorphanol (0.1-1.0 mg/kg i.m.), butorphanol (1.0-10 mg/kg i.m.), and buprenorphine (0.01-0.03 mg/kg i.m.), but not LY235959 (0.1-1.0 mg/kg i.m.), dose and time dependently increased the intensity below which monkeys maintained shock 50% of the time (median shock level, MSL). LY235959 dose dependently potentiated the effect of each opioid agonist on MSL when concurrently administered to monkeys. Although LY235959 potentiated the antinociceptive effect of each opioid examined in a statistically significant manner, LY235959 seemed more potent and effective when combined with higher efficacy opioids. The present data suggest that the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist, LY235959, can potentiate the antinociceptive effects of a range of opioid receptor agonists independently of nonspecific motor effects. PMID:12975489

  17. Chronic exercise decreases sensitivity to mu opioids in female rats: correlation with exercise output.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark A; Lyle, Megan A

    2006-09-01

    Aerobic exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides and increases nociceptive (i.e., pain) threshold in a naloxone-reversible manner. During chronic exercise, sensitivity to the antinociceptive effects of morphine and other mu opioids decreases, leading some investigators to propose that exercise may lead to the development of cross-tolerance to exogenously administered opioid agonists. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of chronic exercise on sensitivity to mu opioids, and to determine if changes in opioid sensitivity during chronic exercise are correlated with exercise output. Eight female rats were obtained at weaning and housed in standard laboratory cages that did not permit any exercise beyond normal cage ambulation. Following 6 weeks under these conditions, opioids possessing a range of relative efficacies at the mu receptor (morphine, levorphanol, buprenorphine, butorphanol) were examined in a warm-water, tail-withdrawal procedure. Under sedentary conditions, all opioids produced dose-dependent increases in tail-withdrawal latencies, and high levels of antinociception were observed for all drugs. Following these tests, rats were reassigned to exercise conditions and transferred to cages equipped with running wheels. Under these conditions, rats ran an average of 7154 rev/day (7869 m/day), with a range across rats from 4501 to 10,164 rev/day (4951-11,180 m/day). Sensitivity to all four opioids decreased significantly during the exercise period, resulting in 2- to 5-fold decreases in the potency of morphine, levorphanol and buprenorphine, and decreases in the effectiveness of buprenorphine and butorphanol. When rats were returned to sedentary conditions, sensitivity to all four opioids increased significantly and returned to that observed prior to the exercise period. For all drugs, there was a positive correlation between exercise output and changes in opioid sensitivity between sedentary and exercise conditions

  18. N-3(9)-arylpropenyl-N-9(3)-propionyl-3,9-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonanes as mu-opioid receptor agonists. Effects on mu-affinity of arylalkenyl chain modifications.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Gérard A; Cignarella, Giorgio; Loriga, Giovanni; Murineddu, Gabriele; Mussinu, Jean Mario; Ruiu, Stefania; Fadda, Paola; Fratta, Walter

    2002-06-01

    Two series of N-3-arylpropenyl-N-9-propionyl-3,9-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonanes (1b-j) and of the reverted N-3-propionyl-N-9-arylpropenyl isomers (2b-j) as analogues of the previously reported analgesic N-3(9)-cinnamyl-N-9(3)-propionyl-3,9-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonanes (DBN) (1a, 2a) were synthesised and their affinity and selectivity towards opioid mu-, delta- and kappa-receptors were evaluated. Several compounds (1e,i,j-2d,e,f,g,j) exhibited a mu-affinity in the low nanomolar range with moderate or negligible affinity towards delta- and kappa-receptors. The representative term N-9-(3,3-diphenylprop-2-enyl)-N-3-propionyl-DBN (2d) displayed in vivo (mouse) a potent analgesic effect (ED(50) 3.88 mg/kg ip) which favourably compared with that of morphine (ED(50) 5 mg/kg ip). In addition, 2d produced in mice tolerance after a period twice as long with morphine.

  19. Repeated Mu-Opioid Exposure Induces a Novel Form of the Hyperalgesic Priming Model for Transition to Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F; Levine, Jon D

    2015-09-01

    The primary afferent nociceptor was used as a model system to study mechanisms of pain induced by chronic opioid administration. Repeated intradermal injection of the selective mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO induced mechanical hyperalgesia and marked prolongation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) hyperalgesia, a key feature of hyperalgesic priming. However, in contrast to prior studies of priming induced by receptor-mediated (i.e., TNFα, NGF, or IL-6 receptor) or direct activation of protein kinase Cε (PKCε), the pronociceptive effects of PGE2 in DAMGO-treated rats demonstrated the following: (1) rapid induction (4 h compared with 3 d); (2) protein kinase A (PKA), rather than PKCε, dependence; (3) prolongation of hyperalgesia induced by an activator of PKA, 8-bromo cAMP; (4) failure to be reversed by a protein translation inhibitor; (5) priming in females as well as in males; and (6) lack of dependence on the isolectin B4-positive nociceptor. These studies demonstrate a novel form of hyperalgesic priming induced by repeated administration of an agonist at the Gi-protein-coupled MOR to the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor. Significance statement: The current study demonstrates the molecular mechanisms involved in the sensitization of nociceptors produced by repeated activation of mu-opioid receptors and contributes to our understanding of the painful condition observed in patients submitted to chronic use of opioids. PMID:26354917

  20. Repeated Mu-Opioid Exposure Induces a Novel Form of the Hyperalgesic Priming Model for Transition to Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F.

    2015-01-01

    The primary afferent nociceptor was used as a model system to study mechanisms of pain induced by chronic opioid administration. Repeated intradermal injection of the selective mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO induced mechanical hyperalgesia and marked prolongation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) hyperalgesia, a key feature of hyperalgesic priming. However, in contrast to prior studies of priming induced by receptor-mediated (i.e., TNFα, NGF, or IL-6 receptor) or direct activation of protein kinase Cε (PKCε), the pronociceptive effects of PGE2 in DAMGO-treated rats demonstrated the following: (1) rapid induction (4 h compared with 3 d); (2) protein kinase A (PKA), rather than PKCε, dependence; (3) prolongation of hyperalgesia induced by an activator of PKA, 8-bromo cAMP; (4) failure to be reversed by a protein translation inhibitor; (5) priming in females as well as in males; and (6) lack of dependence on the isolectin B4-positive nociceptor. These studies demonstrate a novel form of hyperalgesic priming induced by repeated administration of an agonist at the Gi-protein-coupled MOR to the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The current study demonstrates the molecular mechanisms involved in the sensitization of nociceptors produced by repeated activation of mu-opioid receptors and contributes to our understanding of the painful condition observed in patients submitted to chronic use of opioids. PMID:26354917

  1. Central HIV-1 Tat exposure elevates anxiety and fear conditioned responses of male mice concurrent with altered mu-opioid receptor-mediated G-protein activation and β-arrestin 2 activity in the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Yun K; Paris, Jason J; Lichtman, Aron H; Hauser, Kurt F; Sim-Selley, Laura J; Selley, Dana E; Knapp, Pamela E

    2016-08-01

    Co-exposure to opiates and HIV/HIV proteins results in enhanced CNS morphological and behavioral deficits in HIV(+) individuals and in animal models. Opiates with abuse liability, such as heroin and morphine, bind preferentially to and have pharmacological actions through μ-opioid-receptors (MORs). The mechanisms underlying opiate-HIV interactions are not understood. Exposure to the HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein causes neurodegenerative outcomes that parallel many aspects of the human disease. We have also observed that in vivo exposure to Tat results in apparent changes in morphine efficacy, and thus have hypothesized that HIV proteins might alter MOR activation. To test our hypothesis, MOR-mediated G-protein activation was determined in neuroAIDS-relevant forebrain regions of transgenic mice with inducible CNS expression of HIV-1 Tat. G-protein activation was assessed by MOR agonist-stimulated [(35)S]guanosine-5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) autoradiography in brain sections, and in concentration-effect curves of MOR agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding in membranes isolated from specific brain regions. Comparative studies were done using the MOR-selective agonist DAMGO ([D-Ala(2), N-MePhe(4), Gly-ol]-enkephalin) and a more clinically relevant agonist, morphine. Tat exposure reduced MOR-mediated G-protein activation in an agonist, time, and regionally dependent manner. Levels of the GPCR regulatory protein β-arrestin-2, which is involved in MOR desensitization, were found to be elevated in only one affected brain region, the amygdala; amygdalar β-arrestin-2 also showed a significantly increased association with MOR by co-immunoprecipitation, suggesting decreased availability of MOR. Interestingly, this correlated with changes in anxiety and fear-conditioned extinction, behaviors that have substantial amygdalar input. We propose that HIV-1 Tat alters the intrinsic capacity of MOR to signal in response to agonist binding

  2. Clinically relevant infusion rates of mu-opioid agonist remifentanil cause bradypnea in decerebrate dogs but not via direct effects in the pre-Bötzinger complex region.

    PubMed

    Mustapic, Sanda; Radocaj, Tomislav; Sanchez, Antonio; Dogas, Zoran; Stucke, Astrid G; Hopp, Francis A; Stuth, Eckehard A E; Zuperku, Edward J

    2010-01-01

    Systemic administration of mu-opioids at clinical doses for analgesia typically slows respiratory rate. Mu-opioid receptors (MORs) on pre-Bötzinger Complex (pre-BötC) respiratory neurons, the putative kernel of respiratory rhythmogenesis, are potential targets. The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of pre-BötC MORs to the bradypnea produced in vivo by intravenous administration of clinically relevant infusion rates of remifentanil (remi), a short-acting, potent mu-opioid analgesic. In decerebrate dogs, multibarrel micropipettes were used to record pre-BötC neuronal activity and to eject the opioid antagonist naloxone (NAL, 0.5 mM), the glutamate agonist D-homocysteic acid (DLH, 20 mM), or the MOR agonist [D-Ala(2), N-Me-Phe(4), gly-ol(5)]-enkephalin (DAMGO, 100 microM). Inspiratory and expiratory durations (T(I) and T(E)) and peak phrenic nerve activity (PPA) were measured from the phrenic neurogram. The pre-BötC was functionally identified by its rate altering response (typically tachypnea) to DLH microinjection. During intravenous remi-induced bradypnea (approximately 60% decrease in central breathing frequency, f(B)), bilateral injections of NAL in the pre-BötC did not change T(I), T(E), f(B), and PPA. Also, NAL picoejected onto single pre-BötC neurons depressed by intravenous remi had no effect on their discharge. In contrast, approximately 60 microg/kg of intravenous NAL rapidly reversed all remi-induced effects. In a separate group of dogs, microinjections of DAMGO in the pre-BötC increased f(B) by 44%, while subsequent intravenous remi infusion more than offset this DAMGO induced tachypnea. These results indicate that mu-opioids at plasma concentrations that cause profound analgesia produce their bradypneic effect via MORs located outside the pre-BötC region.

  3. Mu-opioids activate phospholipase C in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells via calcium-channel opening.

    PubMed

    Smart, D; Smith, G; Lambert, D G

    1995-01-15

    We have recently reported that, in SH-SY5Y cells, mu-opioid receptor occupancy activates phospholipase C via a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein. In the present study we have further characterized the mechanisms involved in this process. Fentanyl (0.1 microM) caused a monophasic increase in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate mass formation, with a peak (20.5 +/- 3.6 pmol/mg of protein) at 15 s. Incubation in Ca(2+)-free buffer abolished this response, while Ca2+ replacement 1 min later restored the stimulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation (20.1 +/- 0.6 pmol/mg of protein). In addition, nifedipine (1 nM-0.1 mM), an L-type Ca(2+)-channel antagonist, caused a dose-dependent inhibition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation, with an IC50 of 60.3 +/- 1.1 nM. Elevation of endogenous beta/gamma subunits by selective activation of delta-opioid and alpha 2 adrenoceptors failed to stimulate phospholipase C. Fentanyl also caused a dose-dependent (EC50 of 16.2 +/- 1.0 nM), additive enhancement of carbachol-induced inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation. In summary, we have demonstrated that in SH-SY5Y cells activation of the mu-opioid receptor allows Ca2+ influx to activate phospholipase C. However, the possible role of this mechanism in the process of analgesia remains to be elucidated. PMID:7832776

  4. Mu Opioid Splice Variant MOR-1K Contributes to the Development of Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Oladosu, Folabomi A.; Conrad, Matthew S.; O’Buckley, Sandra C.; Rashid, Naim U.; Slade, Gary D.; Nackley, Andrea G.

    2015-01-01

    Background A subset of the population receiving opioids for the treatment of acute and chronic clinical pain develops a paradoxical increase in pain sensitivity known as opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Given that opioid analgesics are one of few treatments available against clinical pain, it is critical to determine the key molecular mechanisms that drive opioid-induced hyperalgesia in order to reduce its prevalence. Recent evidence implicates a splice variant of the mu opioid receptor known as MOR-1K in the emergence of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Results from human genetic association and cell signaling studies demonstrate that MOR-1K contributes to decreased opioid analgesic responses and produces increased cellular activity via Gs signaling. Here, we conducted the first study to directly test the role of MOR-1K in opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Methods and Results In order to examine the role of MOR-1K in opioid-induced hyperalgesia, we first assessed pain responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli prior to, during, and following chronic morphine administration. Results show that genetically diverse mouse strains (C57BL/6J, 129S6, and CXB7/ByJ) exhibited different morphine response profiles with corresponding changes in MOR-1K gene expression patterns. The 129S6 mice exhibited an analgesic response correlating to a measured decrease in MOR-1K gene expression levels, while CXB7/ByJ mice exhibited a hyperalgesic response correlating to a measured increase in MOR-1K gene expression levels. Furthermore, knockdown of MOR-1K in CXB7/ByJ mice via chronic intrathecal siRNA administration not only prevented the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia, but also unmasked morphine analgesia. Conclusions These findings suggest that MOR-1K is likely a necessary contributor to the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. With further research, MOR-1K could be exploited as a target for antagonists that reduce or prevent opioid-induced hyperalgesia. PMID:26270813

  5. Aminothiazolomorphinans with Mixed Kappa and Mu Opioid Activitya

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tangzhi; Yan, Zhaohua; Sromek, Anna; Knapp, Brian I.; Scrimale, Thomas; Bidlack, Jean M.; Neumeyer, John L.

    2011-01-01

    A series of N-substituted and N′-substituted aminothiazole-derived morphinans (5) were synthesized for expanding the structure-activity relationships of aminothiazolo-morphinans. Although their affinities were somewhat lower than their prototype aminothiazolo-N-cyclopropylmorphinan (3), 3-aminothiazole derivatives of cyclorphan (1) containing a primary amino group displayed high affinity and selectivity at the κ and μ opioid receptors. [35S]GTPγS binding assays showed that the aminothiazolomorphinans were κ agonists with mixed agonist and antagonist activity at the μ opioid receptor. These novel N′-monosubstituted aminothiazole-derived morphinans may be valuable for the development of drug abuse medications. PMID:21351746

  6. Pharmacological characterization of the dermorphin analog [Dmt(1)]DALDA, a highly potent and selective mu-opioid peptide.

    PubMed

    Neilan, C L; Nguyen, T M; Schiller, P W; Pasternak, G W

    2001-05-01

    The dermorphin-derived peptide [Dmt(1)]DALDA (H-Dmt-D-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH(2)), labels mu-opioid receptors with high affinity and selectivity in receptor binding assays. In mouse, radiant heat tail-flick assay [Dmt(1)]DALDA produced profound spinal and supraspinal analgesia, being approximately 5000- and 100-fold more potent than morphine on a molar basis, respectively. When administered systemically, [Dmt(1)]DALDA was over 200-fold more potent than morphine. Pharmacologically, [Dmt(1)]DALDA was distinct from morphine. [Dmt(1)]DALDA displayed no cross-tolerance to morphine in the model used and it retained supraspinal analgesic activity in morphine-insensitive CXBK mice. Supraspinally, it also differed from morphine in its lack of sensitivity towards naloxonazine. Finally, in antisense mapping studies, [Dmt(1)]DALDA was insensitive to MOR-1 exon probes that reduced morphine analgesia, implying a distinct receptor mechanism of action. Thus, [Dmt(1)]DALDA is an interesting and extraordinarily potent, systemically active peptide analgesic, raising the possibility of novel approaches in the design of clinically useful drugs.

  7. Hepatic changes in metabolic gene expression in old ghrelin and ghrelin receptor knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin knockout (GKO) and ghrelin receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor) knockout (GHSRKO) mice exhibit enhanced insulin sensitivity, but the mechanism is unclear. Insulin sensitivity declines with age and is inversely associated with accumulation of lipid in liver, a key glucoregulatory ...

  8. Intracranial self-stimulation in rats: sensitization to an opioid antagonist following acute or chronic treatment with mu opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Easterling, K W; Holtzman, S G

    1997-04-01

    Acute mu opioid agonist pretreatment (4 hr) dose-dependently sensitizes rats responding for food reinforcement to the rate-decreasing effects of naltrexone (NTX). In the present study, adult rats were trained to respond in an intracranial self-stimulation autotitration procedure in which responding resulted in electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle that decreased in frequency until reset to the initial value. In an acute sensitization experiment, pretreatment (4 hr) doses of 3.0 and 10 mg/kg morphine reduced the ED25 value for the intracranial self-stimulation rate-decreasing effect of NTX from 28.2 mg/kg to 0.29 and 0.02 mg/kg, respectively. All mu-selective opioid agonists tested, fentanyl > levorphanol > methadone > morphine > meperidine (listed in order of decreasing potency), produced similar large increases in sensitivity to NTX. Acute sensitization was not induced by the kappa-selective opioid agonist spiradoline, the dextrorotary enantiomer of levorphanol, dextrorphan, or the nonopioid drugs d-amphetamine and pentobarbital. Pretreatment with morphine for 10 days by continuous subcutaneous infusion (15 mg/kg/day) reduced the ED25 value of NTX from 28.2 to 0.002 +/- 1.48 mg/kg. The correlation of decreases in ED25 values for the rate-decreasing effect of NTX after both acute and chronic morphine administration is consistent with the theory that acute agonist-induced sensitization reflects receptor-mediated changes occurring early in the development of physical dependence.

  9. Oestrogen receptor knockout mice: roles for oestrogen receptors alpha and beta in reproductive tissues.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sylvia Curtis; Korach, Kenneth S

    2003-02-01

    Oestrogen is an essential component of female reproduction, with well-characterized functions in the uterus, ovaries, mammary gland and hypothalamic-pituitary axis. The mechanism of oestrogen action involves mediation of the rate of transcription by nuclear-localized oestrogen receptor molecules. Two oestrogen receptors are present in mouse tissues, oestrogen receptors alpha and beta. Each receptor exhibits differential tissue expression patterns. Mouse models with genetically engineered disruption or 'knockout' of the oestrogen receptors have been developed. Characterization of the resulting defects in reproductive tissues as well as alterations in physiological and genomic responses has given insight into the receptor-mediated effects of oestrogen in reproduction. Oestrogen receptor alpha knockout females are infertile because they are anovulatory, have disruption in LH regulation and have uteri that are insensitive to oestrogen. In contrast, oestrogen receptor beta knockout females are sub-fertile and primarily lack efficient ovulatory function. Mice with deletion of both oestrogen receptors alpha and beta are similar to those lacking oestrogen receptor alpha only, but exhibit a unique ovarian pathology. These observed phenotypes elucidate the relative roles of the oestrogen receptors in reproductive functions of female rodents.

  10. Combination of cell culture assays and knockout mouse analyses for the study of opioid partial agonism.

    PubMed

    Ide, Soichiro; Minami, Masabumi; Sora, Ichiro; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2010-01-01

    Nonselective opioid partial agonists, such as buprenorphine, butorphanol, and pentazocine, have been widely used as analgesics and for anti-addiction therapy. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic and rewarding effects of these drugs have not been clearly delineated. Recent success in developing mu-opioid receptor knockout (MOP-KO) mice has elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of morphine and other opioids. We have revealed the in vivo roles of MOPs in the effects of opioid partial agonists by using MOP-KO mice for behavioral tests (e.g., several kinds of antinociceptive tests for analgesic effects, conditioned place preference test for dependence). The combination of the cell culture assays using cDNA for mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors and the behavioral tests using MOP-KO mice has provided novel theories on the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of opioid ligands, especially opioid partial agonists. PMID:20336435

  11. The peripheral cannabinoid receptor knockout mice: an update

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, N E

    2007-01-01

    This review gives an overview of the CB2 receptor (CB2R) knockout (CB2R−/−) mice phenotype and the work that has been carried out using this mutant mouse. Using the CB2R−/− mice, investigators have discovered the involvement of CB2R on immune cell function and development, infection, embryonic development, bone loss, liver disorders, pain, autoimmune inflammation, allergic dermatitis, atherosclerosis, apoptosis and chemotaxis. Using the CB2R−/− mice, investigators have also found that this receptor is not involved in cannabinoid-induced hypotension. In addition, the CB2R−/− mice have been used to determine specific tissue CB2R expression. The specificity of synthetic cannabinoid agonists, antagonists and anti-CB2R antibodies has been screened using tissues from CB2R−/− mice. Thus, the use of this mouse model has greatly helped reveal the diverse events involving the CB2R, and has aided in drug and antibody screening. PMID:17965741

  12. Bone Growth and Turnover in Progesterone Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rickard, David J.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Evans, Glenda; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Hunter, Jamie C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Lydon, John P.; O’Malley, Bert W.; Khosla, Sundeep; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Turner, Russell T.

    2008-01-01

    The role of progesterone receptor (PR) signaling in skeletal metabolism is controversial. To address whether signaling through the PR is necessary for normal bone growth and turnover, we performed histomorphometric and microcomputed tomography analyses of bone from homozygous female PR knockout (PRKO) mice at 6, 12, and 26 wk of age. These mice possess a null mutation of the PR locus, which blocks the gene expression of A and B isoforms of PR. Body weight gain, uterine weight gain, and tibia longitudinal bone growth were normal in PRKO mice. In contrast, total, cancellous, and cortical bone mass were increased in the humerus of 12-wk-old PRKO mice, whereas cortical and cancellous bone mass in the tibia was normal. At 26 wk of age, cancellous bone area in the proximal tibia metaphysis of PRKO mice was 153% greater than age matched wild-type mice. The improved cancellous bone balance in 6-month-old PRKO mice was associated with elevated bone formation and a tendency toward reduced osteoclast perimeter. Taken together, these findings suggest that PR signaling in mice is not essential for bone growth and turnover. However, at some skeletal sites, PR signaling attenuates the accumulation of cortical and cancellous bone mass during adolescence. PMID:18276762

  13. Bone growth and turnover in progesterone receptor knockout mice.

    SciTech Connect

    Rickard, David J.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Evans, Glenda; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Hunter, Jaime C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Lydon, John P.; O'Malley, Bert W.; Khosla, Sundeep; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Turner, Russell T.

    2008-05-01

    The role of progesterone receptor (PR) signaling in skeletal metabolism is controversial. To address whether signaling through the PR is necessary for normal bone growth and turnover, we performed histomorphometric and mCT analyses of bone from homozygous female PR knockout (PRKO) mice at 6, 12, and 26 weeks of age. These mice possess a null mutation of the PR locus, which blocks the gene expression of A and B isoforms of PR. Body weight gain, uterine weight gain and tibia longitudinal bone growth was normal in PRKO mice. In contrast, total and cortical bone mass were increased in long bones of post-pubertal (12 and 26-week-old) PRKO mice, whereas cancellous bone mass was normal in the tibia but increased in the humerus. The striking 57% decrease in cancellous bone from the proximal tibia metaphysis which occurred between 6 and 26 weeks in WT mice was abolished in PRKO mice. The improved bone balance in aging PRKO mice was associated with elevated bone formation and a tendency toward reduced osteoclast perimeter. Taken together, these findings suggest that PR signaling in mice attenuates the accumulation of cortical bone mass during adolescence and is required for early age-related loss of cancellous bone.

  14. INDUCTION OF MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-ALPHA KNOCKOUT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary glands from the estrogen receptor knockout ( ERKO) mouse do not undergo ductal morphogenesis or alveolar development. Disrupted Er signaling may result in reduced estrogen-responsive gene products in the mammary gland or reduced mammotropic hormones that contribute t...

  15. Effects of D1 receptor knockout on fear and reward learning.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Antony D; Neve, Kim A; Lattal, K Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Dopamine signaling is involved in a variety of neurobiological processes that contribute to learning and memory. D1-like dopamine receptors (including D1 and D5 receptors) are thought to be involved in memory and reward processes, but pharmacological approaches have been limited in their ability to distinguish between D1 and D5 receptors. Here, we examine the effects of a specific knockout of D1 receptors in associative learning tasks involving aversive (shock) or appetitive (cocaine) unconditioned stimuli. We find that D1 knockout mice show similar levels of cued and contextual fear conditioning to WT controls following conditioning protocols involving one, two, or four shocks. D1 knockout mice show increased generalization of fear conditioning and extinction across contexts, revealed as increased freezing to a novel context following conditioning and decreased freezing to an extinguished cue during a contextual renewal test. Further, D1 knockout mice show mild enhancements in extinction following an injection of SKF81297, a D1/D5 receptor agonist, suggesting a role for D5 receptors in extinction enhancements induced by nonspecific pharmacological agonists. Finally, although D1 knockout mice show decreased locomotion induced by cocaine, they are able to form a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference. We discuss these findings in terms of the role of dopamine D1 receptors in general learning and memory processes. PMID:27423521

  16. Rescue of the mineralocorticoid receptor knock-out mouse.

    PubMed

    Bleich, M; Warth, R; Schmidt-Hieber, M; Schulz-Baldes, A; Hasselblatt, P; Fisch, D; Berger, S; Kunzelmann, K; Kriz, W; Schütz, G; Greger, R

    1999-08-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor knock-out mouse (MR-/-), resembling inborn pseudohypoaldosteronism, dies 8-12 days after birth in circulatory failure with all the signs of terminal volume contraction. The present study aimed to examine the functional defects in the kidney and colon in detail and to attempt to rescue these mice. In neonatal (nn) MR-/- the amiloride-sensitive short-circuit current in the colon was reduced to approximately one-third compared to controls (MR+/+ and MR+/-). In isolated in vitro perfused collecting ducts the amiloride-induced hyperpolarization of the basolateral membrane (Vbl) of nn MR-/- was similar to that of controls, but urinary Na+ excretion was markedly increased to 4.3 micromol/day.g (BW). Based on this measured urinary Na+ loss we tried to rescue nn MR-/- mice by injecting NaCl twice daily (3.85 micromol/g BW), corresponding to 22 microliter of isotonic saline/g BW subcutaneously. This regimen was continued until the animals had reached a body mass of 8.5 g. Thereafter, in addition to normal chow and tap water, NaCl drinking water (333 mmol/l) and pellets soaked in 333 mmol/l NaCl were offered. Unlike the untreated nn MR-/- most of these mice survived. The adult animals were examined between days 27 and 41, some were used for breeding. When compared to age-matched controls the growth of MR-/- was delayed until day 20. Then their growth curve increased in slope and reached that of controls. MR-/- retained their Na+-losing defect. Amiloride's effect on urinary Na+ excretion was not significant in MR-/- mice and the effect on Vbl in isolated cortical collecting ducts was attenuated. The renin-producing cells were hypertrophic and hyperplastic. Plasma renin and aldosterone concentrations were significantly elevated in MR-/- mice. These data indicate that MR-/- can be rescued by timely and matched NaCl substitutions. This enables the animals to develop through a critical phase of life, after which they adapt their oral salt and water

  17. Enhanced sexual behaviors and androgen receptor immunoreactivity in the male progesterone receptor knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Johanna S; Burgess, Carly; Sleiter, Nicole C; DonCarlos, Lydia L; Lydon, John P; O'Malley, Bert; Levine, Jon E

    2005-10-01

    Reproductive and behavioral functions of progesterone receptors (PRs) in males were assessed by examining consequences of PR gene deletion. Basal hormone levels were measured in male progesterone receptor knockout (PRKO) mice and compared to wild-type (WT) counterparts. RIA of serum LH, testosterone, and progesterone levels revealed no significant differences. Levels of FSH were moderately but significantly lower and inhibin levels were higher in PRKOs; these differences were not accompanied by gross differences in testicular weight or morphology. PRKOs exhibited significant alterations in sexual behavior. In initial tests PRKOs exhibited reduced latency to mount, compared with WT. In second sessions, PRKOs again showed a significantly reduced latency to mount and increased likelihood of achieving ejaculation. RU486 treatment in WT produced increased mount and intromission frequency and decreased latency to intromission. In anxiety-related behavior tests, PRKO mice exhibited intermediate anxiety levels, compared with WT, suggesting that enhanced sexual behavior in PRKOs is not secondary to reduced anxiety. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed significantly enhanced androgen receptor expression in the medial preoptic nucleus and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis of PRKO. We conclude that testicular development and function and homeostatic regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary testicular axis are altered to a lesser extent by PR gene deletion. In contrast, PR appears to play a substantial role in inhibiting the anticipatory/motivational components of male sexual behavior in the mouse. The biological significance of this inhibitory mechanism and the extent to which it is mediated by reduced androgen receptor expression remain to be clarified.

  18. Normal maternal behavior, but increased pup mortality, in conditional oxytocin receptor knockout females.

    PubMed

    Macbeth, Abbe H; Stepp, Jennifer E; Lee, Heon-Jin; Young, W Scott; Caldwell, Heather K

    2010-10-01

    Oxytocin (Oxt) and the Oxt receptor (Oxtr) are implicated in the onset of maternal behavior in a variety of species. Recently, we developed two Oxtr knockout lines: a total body knockout (Oxtr-/-) and a conditional Oxtr knockout (OxtrFB/FB) in which the Oxtr is lacking only in regions of the forebrain, allowing knockout females to potentially nurse and care for their biological offspring. In the current study, we assessed maternal behavior of postpartum OxtrFB/FB females toward their own pups and maternal behavior of virgin Oxtr-/- females toward foster pups and compared knockouts of both lines to wildtype (Oxtr+/+) littermates. We found that both Oxtr-/- and OxtrFB/FB females appear to have largely normal maternal behaviors. However, with first litters, approximately 40% of the OxtrFB/FB knockout dams experienced high pup mortality, compared to fewer than 10% of the Oxtr+/+ dams. We then went on to test whether or not this phenotype occurred in subsequent litters or when the dams were exposed to an environmental disturbance. We found that regardless of the degree of external disturbance, OxtrFB/FB females lost more pups on their first and second litters compared to wildtype females. Possible reasons for higher pup mortality in OxtrFB/FB females are discussed.

  19. Acute and chronic mu opioids differentially regulate thrombospondins 1 and 2 isoforms in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Phamduong, Ellen; Rathore, Maanjot K; Crews, Nicholas R; D'Angelo, Alexander S; Leinweber, Andrew L; Kappera, Pranay; Krenning, Thomas M; Rendell, Victoria R; Belcheva, Mariana M; Coscia, Carmine J

    2014-02-19

    Chronic opioids induce synaptic plasticity, a major neuronal adaptation. Astrocyte activation in synaptogenesis may play a critical role in opioid tolerance, withdrawal, and dependence. Thrombospondins 1 and 2 (TSP1/2) are astrocyte-secreted matricellular glycoproteins that promote neurite outgrowth as well as dendritic spine and synapse formation, all of which are inhibited by chronic μ opioids. In prior studies, we discovered that the mechanism of TSP1 regulation by μ opioids in astrocytes involves crosstalk between three different classes of receptors, μ opioid receptor, EGFR and TGFβR. Moreover, TGFβ1 stimulated TSP1 expression via EGFR and ERK/MAPK activation, indicating that EGFR is a signaling hub for opioid and TGFβ1 actions. Using various selective antagonists, and inhibitors, here we compared the mechanisms of chronic opioid regulation of TSP1/2 isoform expression in vivo and in immortalized rat cortical astrocytes. TSP1/2 release from astrocytes was also monitored. Acute and chronic μ opioids, morphine, and the prototypic μ ligand, DAMGO, modulated TSP2 protein levels. TSP2 but not TSP1 protein content was up-regulated by acute (3 h) morphine or DAMGO by an ERK/MAPK dependent mechanism. Paradoxically, TSP2 protein levels were altered neither by TGFβ1 nor by astrocytic neurotrophic factors, EGF, CNTF, and BMP4. TSP1/2 immunofluorescence was increased in astrocytes subjected to scratch-wounding, suggesting TSPs may be useful markers for the "reactive" state of these cells and potentially for different types of injury. Previously, we determined that chronic morphine attenuated both neurite outgrowth and synapse formation in cocultures of primary astrocytes and neurons under similar temporal conditions that μ opioids reduced TSP1 protein levels in astrocytes. Here we found that, after the same 8 day treatment, morphine or DAMGO diminished TSP2 protein levels in astrocytes. Therefore, μ opioids may deter synaptogenesis via both TSP1/2 isoforms, but

  20. Wheel running reduces high-fat diet intake, preference and mu-opioid agonist stimulated intake.

    PubMed

    Liang, Nu-Chu; Bello, Nicholas T; Moran, Timothy H

    2015-05-01

    The ranges of mechanisms by which exercise affects energy balance remain unclear. One potential mechanism may be that exercise reduces intake and preference for highly palatable, energy dense fatty foods. The current study used a rodent wheel running model to determine whether and how physical activity affects HF diet intake/preference and reward signaling. Experiment 1 examined whether wheel running affected the ability of intracerebroventricular (ICV) μ opioid receptor agonist D-Ala2, NMe-Phe4, Glyol5-enkephalin (DAMGO) to increase HF diet intake. Experiment 2 examined the effects of wheel running on the intake of and preference for a previously preferred HF diet. We also assessed the effects of wheel running and diet choice on mesolimbic dopaminergic and opioidergic gene expression. Experiment 1 revealed that wheel running decreased the ability of ICV DAMGO administration to stimulate HF diet intake. Experiment 2 showed that wheel running suppressed weight gain and reduced intake and preference for a previously preferred HF diet. Furthermore, the mesolimbic gene expression profile of wheel running rats was different from that of their sedentary paired-fed controls but similar to that of sedentary rats with large HF diet consumption. These data suggest that alterations in preference for palatable, energy dense foods play a role in the effects of exercise on energy homeostasis. The gene expression results also suggest that the hedonic effects of exercise may substitute for food reward to limit food intake and suppress weight gain.

  1. Lack of self-administration of cocaine in dopamine D1 receptor knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Caine, S Barak; Thomsen, Morgane; Gabriel, Kara I; Berkowitz, Jill S; Gold, Lisa H; Koob, George F; Tonegawa, Susumu; Zhang, Jianhua; Xu, Ming

    2007-11-28

    Evidence suggests a critical role for dopamine in the reinforcing effects of cocaine in rats and primates. However, self-administration has been less often studied in the mouse species, and, to date, "knock-out" of individual dopamine-related genes in mice has not been reported to reduce the reinforcing effects of cocaine. We studied the dopamine D1 receptor and cocaine self-administration in mice using a combination of gene-targeted mutation and pharmacological tools. Two cohorts with varied breeding and experimental histories were tested, and, in both cohorts, there was a significant decrease in the number of D1 receptor knock-out mice that met criteria for acquisition of cocaine self-administration (2 of 23) relative to wild-type mice (27 of 32). After extinction of responding with saline self-administration, dose-response studies showed that cocaine reliably and dose dependently maintained responding greater than saline in all wild-type mice but in none of the D1 receptor knock-out mice. The D1-like agonist SKF 82958 (2,3,4,5,-tetrahydro-6-chloro-7,8-dihydroxy-1-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepine hydrobromide) and the D2-like agonist quinelorane both functioned as positive reinforcers in wild-type mice but not in D1 receptor mutant mice, whereas food and intravenous injections of the opioid agonist remifentanil functioned as positive reinforcers in both genotypes. Finally, pretreatment with the D1-like antagonist SCH 23390 [R-(+)-8-chloro-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-methyl-5-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepine-7-01] produced surmountable antagonism of the reinforcing effects of cocaine in the commonly used strain C57BL/6J. We conclude that D1 receptor knock-out mice do not reliably self-administer cocaine and that the D1 receptor is critical for the reinforcing effects of cocaine and other dopamine agonists, but not food or opioids, in mice.

  2. Activation of delta-opioid receptor contributes to the antinociceptive effect of oxycodone in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pao-Pao; Yeh, Geng-Chang; Yeh, Teng-Kuang; Xi, Jinghua; Loh, Horace H; Law, Ping-Yee; Tao, Pao-Luh

    2016-09-01

    Oxycodone has been used clinically for over 90 years. While it is known that it exhibits low affinity for the multiple opioid receptors, whether its pharmacological activities are due to oxycodone activation of the opioid receptor type or due to its active metabolite (oxymorphone) that exhibits high affinity for the mu-opioid receptors remains unresolved. Ross and Smith (1997) reported the antinociceptive effects of oxycodone (171nmol, i.c.v.) are induced by putative kappa-opioid receptors in SD rat while others have reported oxycodone activities are due to activation of mu- and/or delta-opioid receptors. In this study, using male mu-opioid receptor knock-out (MOR-KO) mice, we examined whether delta-opioid receptor was involved in oxycodone antinociception. Systemic subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of oxycodone (above 40mg/kg) could induce a small but significant antinociceptive effect in MOR-KO mice by the tail flick test. Delta-opioid receptor antagonist (naltrindole, 10mg/kg or 20mg/kg, i.p.) could block this effect. When oxycodone was injected directly into the brain of MOR-KO mice by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) route, oxycodone at doses of 50nmol or higher could induce similar level of antinociceptive responses to those observed in wild type mice at the same doses by i.c.v. Delta-opioid receptor antagonists (naltrindole at 10nmol or ICI 154,129 at 20μg) completely blocked the supraspinal antinociceptive effect of oxycodone in MOR-KO mice. Such oxycodone antinociceptive responses were probably not due to its active metabolites oxymorphone because (a) the relative low level of oxymorphone was found in the brain after systemically or centrally oxycodone injection using LC/MS/MS analysis; (b) oxymorphone at a dose that mimics the level detected in the mice brain did not show any significant antinocieption effect; (c) oxycodone exhibits equal potency as oxymorphone albeit being a partial agonist in regulating [Ca(2+)]I transients in a clonal cell line

  3. Gender-specific alteration of adrenergic responses in small femoral arteries from estrogen receptor-beta knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Luksha, Leonid; Poston, Lucilla; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Aghajanova, Lusine; Kublickiene, Karolina

    2005-11-01

    Estrogen receptor-beta knockout mice become hypertensive as they age, and males have a higher blood pressure than females. We hypothesized that the absence of estrogen receptor-beta may contribute to development of cardiovascular dysfunction by modification of adrenergic responsiveness in the peripheral vasculature. Small femoral arteries (internal diameter <200 microm) were isolated from estrogen receptor-beta knockout and wild-type mice and mounted on a wire myograph. Concentration-response curves to phenylephrine and norepinephrine were compared and the contribution of adrenoceptor subtypes established using specific agonists and antagonists. The involvement of endothelial factors in the modulation of resting tone was also investigated and immunohistochemical analysis used to confirm the presence or absence of estrogen receptor expression. Compared with wild type, arteries from estrogen receptor-beta knockout male, but not female, mice demonstrated gender-specific enhancement of the response to phenylephrine (alpha1-adrenoceptor agonist), which was accompanied by elevated basal tension attributable to endothelial factors. Contractile responses to the mixed adrenoceptor agonist norepinephrine did not differ significantly between estrogen receptor-beta knockout and wild type; however, beta-adrenoceptor inhibition unmasked an enhanced underlying alpha1-adrenoceptor responsiveness in estrogen receptor-beta knockout males. beta-adrenoceptor-mediated dilatation was also enhanced in estrogen receptor-beta knockout versus wild-type males. We suggest that estrogen receptor-beta modifies the adrenergic control of small artery tone in males but not in females.

  4. CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor Knockout in Mice Impairs Contextual Long-Term Memory and Enhances Spatial Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Kim, Jimok

    2016-01-01

    Neurocognitive effects of cannabinoids have been extensively studied with a focus on CB1 cannabinoid receptors because CB1 receptors have been considered the major cannabinoid receptor in the nervous system. However, recent discoveries of CB2 cannabinoid receptors in the brain demand accurate determination of whether and how CB2 receptors are involved in the cognitive effects of cannabinoids. CB2 cannabinoid receptors are primarily involved in immune functions, but also implicated in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. Here, we examined the effects of CB2 receptor knockout in mice on memory to determine the roles of CB2 receptors in modulating cognitive function. Behavioral assays revealed that hippocampus-dependent, long-term contextual fear memory was impaired whereas hippocampus-independent, cued fear memory was normal in CB2 receptor knockout mice. These mice also displayed enhanced spatial working memory when tested in a Y-maze. Motor activity and anxiety of CB2 receptor knockout mice were intact when assessed in an open field arena and an elevated zero maze. In contrast to the knockout of CB2 receptors, acute blockade of CB2 receptors by AM603 in C57BL/6J mice had no effect on memory, motor activity, or anxiety. Our results suggest that CB2 cannabinoid receptors play diverse roles in regulating memory depending on memory types and/or brain areas.

  5. CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor Knockout in Mice Impairs Contextual Long-Term Memory and Enhances Spatial Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Kim, Jimok

    2016-01-01

    Neurocognitive effects of cannabinoids have been extensively studied with a focus on CB1 cannabinoid receptors because CB1 receptors have been considered the major cannabinoid receptor in the nervous system. However, recent discoveries of CB2 cannabinoid receptors in the brain demand accurate determination of whether and how CB2 receptors are involved in the cognitive effects of cannabinoids. CB2 cannabinoid receptors are primarily involved in immune functions, but also implicated in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. Here, we examined the effects of CB2 receptor knockout in mice on memory to determine the roles of CB2 receptors in modulating cognitive function. Behavioral assays revealed that hippocampus-dependent, long-term contextual fear memory was impaired whereas hippocampus-independent, cued fear memory was normal in CB2 receptor knockout mice. These mice also displayed enhanced spatial working memory when tested in a Y-maze. Motor activity and anxiety of CB2 receptor knockout mice were intact when assessed in an open field arena and an elevated zero maze. In contrast to the knockout of CB2 receptors, acute blockade of CB2 receptors by AM603 in C57BL/6J mice had no effect on memory, motor activity, or anxiety. Our results suggest that CB2 cannabinoid receptors play diverse roles in regulating memory depending on memory types and/or brain areas. PMID:26819779

  6. ABSENCE OF THE SP/SP RECEPTOR CIRCUITRY IN THE SP PRECURSOR KNOCKOUT MICE OR SP-RECEPTOR, NEUROKININ (NK1) KNOCKOUT MICE LEADS TO AN INHIBITED CYTOKINE RESPONSE IN GRANULOMAS ASSOCIATED WITH MURINE TAENIA CRASSICEPS INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Garza, Armandina; Weinstock, Joel; Robinson, Prema

    2008-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis, caused by the cestode Taenia solium, is the most common parasitic infection of the human central nervous system that leads to seizures. Taenia crassiceps cysticercosis in mice is an experimental model for Taenia solium cysticercosis. Similar to the human infection, live parasites cause little or no granulomatous inflammation. Dying parasites initiate a granulomatous reaction. The neuropeptide, Substance P (SP), stimulates Th1 cytokine production. In the current studies, we determined if absence of SP/SP receptor circuitry in the SP precursor, preprotachykinin knockout or SP-receptor, neurokinin (NK1) knockout mice, affected granuloma cytokine production. We hence compared the levels of Th1 cytokines, IL-2 and IFN-γ, and levels of Th2/immunoregulatory cytokines, IL-4 and IL-10, by ELISA in T. crassiceps-induced granulomas derived from infected C57BL/6 wild type (WT) versus SP-Precursor knockout and NK1 knockout mice. We found that mean levels of IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-10 in infected, WT-derived granulomas were significantly higher than those of granulomas derived from infected SP-Precursor knockout or the NK1 receptor knockout mice. Levels of Th2/immunoregulatory cytokines, IL-4 and IL-10, were higher in early stage granulomas (histologically-staged on basis of evidence of parasite remnants) versus late stage granulomas (no parasite-remnants) of both knockouts, whereas the reverse was noted in WT-derived granulomas. These studies established that the absence of an SP/SP receptor circuitry in the SP precursor knockout mice or NK1 receptor knockout led to an inhibited cytokine response. PMID:18576810

  7. PROXIMAL GUT MUCOSAL EPITHELIAL HOMEOSTASIS IN AGED IL-1 TYPE I RECEPTOR KNOCKOUT MICE AFTER STARVATION

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juquan; Wolf, Steven E.; Wu, Xiao-Wu; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Herndon, David N.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that starvation induces small bowel atrophy, and that atrophy diminishes with aging. In this experiment, we assessed whether starvation-induced atrophy of proximal gut mucosa is associated with the Interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) signaling pathway in aged mice. Materials and Methods Thirty 26-month-old IL-1R knockout mice and age-matched wild-type C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into two groups: ad libitum fed and fasted. Mice were euthanized 12 or 48 hours after starvation. The proximal small bowel was harvested for morphologic analysis. Gut epithelial cell proliferation was detected using immunohistochemical staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and apoptosis was identified using terminal deoxyuridine nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Results Aged IL-1R knockout mice were larger than aged-matched wild-type mice (p<0.05). Proximal gut mucosal height and mucosal cell number were not different between aged IL-1R knockout and wild-type groups. The apoptosis index in gut epithelial cells was higher in fed IL-1R knockout versus wild-type mice (p<0.05), while no significant difference in cell proliferation between both groups. Mucosal atrophy was induced in both aged IL-1R knockout and wild-type groups by starvation (p<0.05), however, aged IL-1R knockout mice experienced greater losses in proximal gut weight, mucosal length, and corresponding cell number than did wild-type mice at the 12-hour time point (p<0.05). The apoptosis index in gut epithelial cells significantly increased in both groups after starvation (p<0.05). Starvation decreased cell proliferation in IL-1R knockout mice (p<0.05), but not in wild-type mice. Conclusions The response in aged IL-1R knockout mice differs from wild-type mice in that starvation increases atrophy and is associated with decreased cell proliferation rather than increased apoptosis. PMID:20605606

  8. Prostanoids and inflammation: a new concept arising from receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Narumiya, Shuh

    2009-10-01

    Prostanoids including various types of prostaglandins and thromboxanes are arachidonate metabolites produced and released in response to a variety of physiological and pathological stimuli and function to maintain the body homeostasis. Since cyclooxygenase, the enzyme initiating their biosynthesis, is inhibited by aspirin-like antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic drugs, contribution of prostanoids to acute inflammation such as fever generation, pain sensitization, and inflammatory swelling has been recognized very early. On the other hand, since aspirin-like drugs generally show little effects on allergy and immunity, it has been believed that prostanoids play little roles in these processes. Prostanoids act on a family of G-protein-coupled receptors designated PGD receptor, PGE receptor subtypes EP1-EP4, PGF receptor, PGI receptor, and TX receptor to elicit their actions. Studies using mice deficient in each of these receptors have revealed that prostanoids indeed function in the above aspirin-sensitive processes. However, these studies have also revealed that prostanoids exert both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory actions not only by acting as mediators of acute inflammation but also by regulating gene expression in mesenchymal and epithelial cells at inflammatory site. Such dual actions of prostanoids are frequently seen in immune and allergic reactions, where different type of prostanoids and their receptors often exert opposite actions in a single process. Thus, a new concept on the role of prostanoids in inflammation has arisen from studies using the receptor knockout mice. PMID:19609495

  9. Quantification of beta adrenergic receptor subtypes in beta-arrestin knockout mouse airways.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Akhil; Strachan, Ryan T; Walker, Julia K L

    2015-01-01

    In allergic asthma Beta 2 adrenergic receptors (β2ARs) are important mediators of bronchorelaxation and, paradoxically, asthma development. This contradiction is likely due to the activation of dual signaling pathways that are downstream of G proteins or β-arrestins. Our group has recently shown that β-arrestin-2 acts in its classical role to desensitize and constrain β2AR-induced relaxation of both human and murine airway smooth muscle. To assess the role of β-arrestins in regulating β2AR function in asthma, we and others have utilized β-arrestin-1 and -2 knockout mice. However, it is unknown if genetic deletion of β-arrestins in these mice influences β2AR expression in the airways. Furthermore, there is lack of data on compensatory expression of βAR subtypes when either of the β-arrestins is genetically deleted, thus necessitating a detailed βAR subtype expression study in these β-arrestin knockout mice. Here we standardized a radioligand binding methodology to characterize and quantitate βAR subtype distribution in the airway smooth muscle of wild-type C57BL/6J and β-arrestin-1 and β-arrestin-2 knockout mice. Using complementary competition and single-point saturation binding assays we found that β2ARs predominate over β1ARs in the whole lung and epithelium-denuded tracheobronchial smooth muscle of C57BL/6J mice. Quantification of βAR subtypes in β-arrestin-1 and β-arrestin-2 knockout mouse lung and epithelium-denuded tracheobronchial tissue showed that, similar to the C57BL/6J mice, both knockouts display a predominance of β2AR expression. These data provide further evidence that β2ARs are expressed in greater abundance than β1ARs in the tracheobronchial smooth muscle and that loss of either β-arrestin does not significantly affect the expression or relative proportions of βAR subtypes. As β-arrestins are known to modulate β2AR function, our analysis of βAR subtype expression in β-arrestin knockout mice airways sets a reference

  10. Pituitary gonadotrophic hormone synthesis, secretion, subunit gene expression and cell structure in normal and follicle-stimulating hormone β knockout, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor knockout, luteinising hormone receptor knockout, hypogonadal and ovariectomised female mice.

    PubMed

    Abel, M H; Widen, A; Wang, X; Huhtaniemi, I; Pakarinen, P; Kumar, T R; Christian, H C

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between gonadotroph function and ultrastructure, we have compared, in parallel in female mice, the effects of several different mutations that perturb the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Specifically, serum and pituitary gonadotrophin concentrations, gonadotrophin gene expression, gonadotroph structure and number were measured. Follicle-stimulating hormone β knockout (FSHβKO), follicle-stimulating hormone receptor knockout (FSHRKO), luteinising hormone receptor knockout (LuRKO), hypogonadal (hpg) and ovariectomised mice were compared with control wild-type or heterozygote female mice. Serum levels of LH were elevated in FSHβKO and FSHRKO compared to heterozygote females, reflecting the likely decreased oestrogen production in KO females, as demonstrated by the threadlike uteri and acyclicity. As expected, there was no detectable FSH in the serum or pituitary and an absence of expression of the FSHβ subunit gene in FSHβKO mice. However, there was a significant increase in expression of the FSHβ and LHβ subunit genes in FSHRKO female mice. The morphology of FSHβKO and FSHRKO gonadotrophs was not significantly different from the control, except that secretory granules in FSHRKO gonadotrophs were larger in diameter. In LuRKO and ovariectomised mice, stimulation of LHβ and FSHβ mRNA, as well as serum protein concentrations, were reflected in subcellular changes in gonadotroph morphology, including more dilated rough endoplasmic reticula and fewer, larger secretory granules. In the gonadotophin-releasing hormone deficient hpg mouse, gonadotrophin mRNA and protein levels were significantly lower than in control mice and gonadotrophs were correspondingly smaller with less abundant endoplasmic reticula and reduced numbers of secretory granules. In summary, major differences in pituitary content and serum concentrations of the gonadotrophins LH and FSH were found between control and mutant female mice. These changes were

  11. Parkin expression profile in dopamine d3 receptor knock-out mice brains.

    PubMed

    D'Agata, Velia; Tiralongo, Adriana; Castorina, Alessandro; Leggio, Gian Marco; Micale, Vincenzo; Carnazza, Maria Luisa; Drago, Filippo

    2009-02-01

    Patients affected by autosomic recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP) exhibit parkin gene mutations with brain decrease in dopamine D2/D3 binding sites. To date, there are no data indicating whether the reduction in dopamine D3 receptors (DRD3) may be associated with the expression of specific parkin variants. In the present study we investigated parkin expression profile in DRD3 knock-out mice brains. RT-PCR analysis was performed to assess qualitative changes in parkin isoforms' distribution pattern and in exons' expression both in wild type controls and dopamine D3 receptor's knock-out mice. Real-time PCR was performed to quantify single exons mRNA. Results demonstrated that exons 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, were more expressed in wild type compared to dopamine D3 receptor KO mice brains while some other (3, 9, 10) were lower expressed. The expression levels of exons 5, 11 and 12 did not change in both animal groups. Our analysis was confirmed by western blot, which showed that parkin protein levels were influenced by the absence of DRD3.

  12. HSL-knockout mouse testis exhibits class B scavenger receptor upregulation and disrupted lipid raft microdomains.

    PubMed

    Casado, María Emilia; Huerta, Lydia; Ortiz, Ana Isabel; Pérez-Crespo, Mirian; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Kraemer, Fredric B; Lasunción, Miguel Ángel; Busto, Rebeca; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia

    2012-12-01

    There is a tight relationship between fertility and changes in cholesterol metabolism during spermatogenesis. In the testis, class B scavenger receptors (SR-B) SR-BI, SR-BII, and LIMP II mediate the selective uptake of cholesterol esters from HDL, which are hydrolyzed to unesterified cholesterol by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). HSL is critical because HSL knockout (KO) male mice are sterile. The aim of the present work was to determine the effects of the lack of HSL in testis on the expression of SR-B, lipid raft composition, and related cell signaling pathways. HSL-KO mouse testis presented altered spermatogenesis associated with decreased sperm counts, sperm motility, and infertility. In wild-type (WT) testis, HSL is expressed in elongated spermatids; SR-BI, in Leydig cells and spermatids; SR-BII, in spermatocytes and spermatids but not in Leydig cells; and LIMP II, in Sertoli and Leydig cells. HSL knockout male mice have increased expression of class B scavenger receptors, disrupted caveolin-1 localization in lipid raft plasma membrane microdomains, and activated phospho-ERK, phospho-AKT, and phospho-SRC in the testis, suggesting that class B scavenger receptors are involved in cholesterol ester uptake for steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in the testis.

  13. Altered hippocampal expression of glutamate receptors and transporters in GRM2 and GRM3 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Louisa; Kew, James N C; Corti, Corrado; Harrison, Paul J; Burnet, Philip W J

    2008-11-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2 and mGluR3, also called mGlu2 and mGlu3, encoded by GRM2 and GRM3, respectively) are therapeutic targets for several psychiatric disorders. GRM3 may also be a schizophrenia susceptibility gene. mGluR2-/- and mGluR3-/- mice provide the only unequivocal means to differentiate between these receptors, yet interpretation of in vivo findings may be complicated by secondary effects on expression of other genes. To address this issue, we examined the expression of NMDA receptor subunits (NR1, NR2A, NR2B) and glutamate transporters (EAAT1-3), as well as the remaining group II mGluR, in the hippocampus of mGluR2-/- and mGluR3-/- mice, compared with wild-type controls. mGluR2 mRNA was increased in mGluR3-/- mice, and vice versa. NR2A mRNA was increased in both knockout mice. EAAT1 (GLAST) mRNA and protein, and EAAT2 (GLT-1) protein, were reduced in mGluR3-/- mice, whereas EAAT3 (EAAC1) mRNA was decreased in mGluR2-/- mice. Transcripts for NR1 and NR2B were unchanged. The findings show a compensatory upregulation of the remaining group II metabotropic glutamate receptor in the knockout mice. Upregulation of NR2A expression suggests modified NMDA receptor signaling in mGluR2-/- and mGluR3-/- mice, and downregulation of glutamate transporter expression suggests a response to altered synaptic glutamate levels. The results show a mutual interplay between mGluR2 and mGluR3, and also provide a context in which to interpret behavioral and electrophysiological results in these mice. PMID:18720515

  14. Raphe serotonin neuron-specific oxytocin receptor knockout reduces aggression without affecting anxiety-like behavior in male mice only.

    PubMed

    Pagani, J H; Williams Avram, S K; Cui, Z; Song, J; Mezey, É; Senerth, J M; Baumann, M H; Young, W S

    2015-02-01

    Serotonin and oxytocin influence aggressive and anxiety-like behaviors, though it is unclear how the two may interact. That the oxytocin receptor is expressed in the serotonergic raphe nuclei suggests a mechanism by which the two neurotransmitters may cooperatively influence behavior. We hypothesized that oxytocin acts on raphe neurons to influence serotonergically mediated anxiety-like, aggressive and parental care behaviors. We eliminated expression of the oxytocin receptor in raphe neurons by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of the serotonin transporter promoter (Slc6a4) with our conditional oxytocin receptor knockout line. The knockout mice generated by this cross are normal across a range of behavioral measures: there are no effects for either sex on locomotion in an open-field, olfactory habituation/dishabituation or, surprisingly, anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated O and plus mazes. There was a profound deficit in male aggression: only one of 11 raphe oxytocin receptor knockouts showed any aggressive behavior, compared to 8 of 11 wildtypes. In contrast, female knockouts displayed no deficits in maternal behavior or aggression. Our results show that oxytocin, via its effects on raphe neurons, is a key regulator of resident-intruder aggression in males but not maternal aggression. Furthermore, this reduction in male aggression is quite different from the effects reported previously after forebrain or total elimination of oxytocin receptors. Finally, we conclude that when constitutively eliminated, oxytocin receptors expressed by serotonin cells do not contribute to baseline anxiety-like behaviors or maternal care.

  15. Raphe serotonin neuron-specific oxytocin receptor knockout reduces aggression without affecting anxiety-like behavior in male mice only

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Jerome H.; Williams Avram, Sarah K.; Cui, Zhenzhong; Song, June; Mezey, Éva; Senerth, Julia M.; Baumann, Michael H.; Young, W. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin and oxytocin influence aggressive and anxiety-like behaviors, though it is unclear how the two may interact. That the oxytocin receptor is expressed in the serotonergic raphe nuclei suggests a mechanism by which the two neurotransmitters may cooperatively influence behavior. We hypothesized that oxytocin acts on raphe neurons to influence serotonergically-mediated anxiety-like, aggressive and parental care behaviors. We eliminated expression of the oxytocin receptor in raphe neurons by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of the serotonin transporter promoter (Slc6a4) with our conditional oxytocin receptor knockout line. The knockout mice generated by this cross are normal across a range of behavioral measures: there are no effects for either sex on locomotion in an open-field, olfactory habituation/dishabituation or, surprisingly, anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated O and plus mazes. There was a profound deficit in male aggression: only one of 11 raphe oxytocin receptor knockouts showed any aggressive behavior, compared to eight of 11 wildtypes. In contrast, female knockouts displayed no deficits in maternal behavior or aggression. Our results show that oxytocin, via its effects on raphe neurons, is a key regulator of resident-intruder aggression in males but not maternal aggression. Furthermore, this reduction in male aggression is quite different from the effects reported previously after forebrain or total elimination of oxytocin receptors. Finally, we conclude that when constitutively eliminated, oxytocin receptors expressed by serotonin cells do not contribute to baseline anxiety-like behaviors or maternal care. PMID:25677455

  16. Uptake and catabolism of modified LDL in scavenger-receptor class A type I/II knock-out mice.

    PubMed Central

    Van Berkel, T J; Van Velzen, A; Kruijt, J K; Suzuki, H; Kodama, T

    1998-01-01

    The liver is the major organ responsible for the uptake of modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) from the blood circulation, with endothelial and Kupffer cells as major cellular uptake sites. Scavenger-receptors, which include various classes, are held responsible for this uptake. Mice deficient in scavenger-receptor class A types I and II were created and the fate of acetylated LDL (Ac-LDL) in vivo and its interaction with liver endothelial, Kupffer and peritoneal macrophages was characterized. Surprisingly, the decay in vivo (t12 < 2 min), tissue distribution and liver uptake (at 5 min it was 77.4 +/- 4.6% of the injected dose) of Ac-LDL in the knock-out mice were not significantly different from control mice (t12 < 2 min and liver uptake 79.1 +/- 4.6% of the injected dose). A separation of mice liver cells into parenchymal, endothelial and Kupffer cells 10 min after injection of Ac-LDL indicated that in both control and knock-out mice the liver endothelial cells were responsible for more than 70% of the liver uptake. Both in control and knock-out mice, preinjection of polyinosinic acid (poly I, 200 microg) completely blocked the liver uptake, indicating that both in control and knock-out mice the scavenger-receptors are sensitive to poly I. Preinjection of suboptimal poly I concentrations (20 and 50 microg) provided evidence that the serum decay and liver uptake of Ac-LDL is more readily inhibited in the knock-out mice as compared with the control mice, indicating less efficient removal of Ac-LDL in vivo in the knock-out mice under these conditions. Studies in vitro with isolated liver endothelial and Kupffer cells from knock-out mice indicate that the cell association of Ac-LDL during 2 h at 37 degrees C is 50 and 53% of the control, respectively, whereas the degradation reaches values of 58 and 63%. For peritoneal macrophages from knock-out mice the cell association of Ac-LDL was identical to the control mice whereas the Ac-LDL degradation in cells from the

  17. Altered photic and non-photic phase shifts in 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, V M; Sterniczuk, R; Phillips, C I; Antle, M C

    2008-12-01

    The mammalian circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is thought to be modulated by 5-HT. 5-HT is though to inhibit photic phase shifts by inhibiting the release of glutamate from retinal terminals, as well as by decreasing the responsiveness of retinorecipient cells in the SCN. Furthermore, there is also evidence that 5-HT may underlie, in part, non-photic phase shifts of the circadian system. Understanding the mechanism by which 5-HT accomplishes these goals is complicated by the wide variety of 5-HT receptors found in the SCN, the heterogeneous organization of both the circadian clock and the location of 5-HT receptors, and by a lack of sufficiently selective pharmacological agents for the 5-HT receptors of interest. Genetically modified animals engineered to lack a specific 5-HT receptor present an alternative avenue of investigation to understand how 5-HT regulates the circadian system. Here we examine behavioral and molecular responses to both photic and non-photic stimuli in mice lacking the 5-HT(1A) receptor. When compared with wild-type controls, these mice exhibit larger phase advances to a short late-night light pulse and larger delays to long 12 h light pulses that span the whole subjective night. Fos and mPer1 expression in the retinorecipient SCN is significantly attenuated following late-night light pulses in the 5-HT(1A) knockout animals. Finally, non-photic phase shifts to (+/-)-8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) are lost in the knockout animals, while attenuation of the phase shift to the long light pulse due to rebound activity following a wheel lock is unaffected. These findings suggest that the 5-HT(1A) receptor plays an inhibitory role in behavioral phase shifts, a facilitatory role in light-induced gene expression, a necessary role in phase shifts to 8-OH-DPAT, and is not necessary for activity-induced phase advances that oppose photic phase shifts to long light pulses.

  18. Comparative effects of chlorpyrifos in wild type and cannabinoid Cb1 receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Baireddy, Praveena; Liu, Jing; Hinsdale, Myron; Pope, Carey

    2011-11-15

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting the release of a variety of neurotransmitters. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55.212-2 (WIN) can modulate organophosphorus (OP) anticholinesterase toxicity in rats, presumably by inhibiting acetylcholine (ACh) release. Some OP anticholinesterases also inhibit eCB-degrading enzymes. We studied the effects of the OP insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) on cholinergic signs of toxicity, cholinesterase activity and ACh release in tissues from wild type (+/+) and cannabinoid CB1 receptor knockout (-/-) mice. Mice of both genotypes (n = 5-6/treatment group) were challenged with CPF (300 mg/kg, 2 ml/kg in peanut oil, sc) and evaluated for functional and neurochemical changes. Both genotypes exhibited similar cholinergic signs and cholinesterase inhibition (82-95% at 48 h after dosing) in cortex, cerebellum and heart. WIN reduced depolarization-induced ACh release in vitro in hippocampal slices from wild type mice, but had no effect in hippocampal slices from knockouts or in striatal slices from either genotype. Chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO, 100 {mu}M) reduced release in hippocampal slices from both genotypes in vitro, but with a greater reduction in tissues from wild types (21% vs 12%). CPO had no significant in vitro effect on ACh release in striatum. CPF reduced ACh release in hippocampus from both genotypes ex vivo, but reduction was again significantly greater in tissues from wild types (52% vs 36%). In striatum, CPF led to a similar reduction (20-23%) in tissues from both genotypes. Thus, while CB1 deletion in mice had little influence on the expression of acute toxicity following CPF, CPF- or CPO-induced changes in ACh release appeared sensitive to modulation by CB1-mediated eCB signaling in a brain-regional manner. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C57Bl/6 mice showed dose-related cholinergic toxicity following subcutaneous chlorpyrifos exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wild type and

  19. Effect of P2X7 Receptor Knockout on AQP-5 Expression of Type I Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ebeling, Georg; Bläsche, Robert; Hofmann, Falk; Augstein, Antje; Kasper, Michael; Barth, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    P2X7 receptors, ATP-gated cation channels, are specifically expressed in alveolar epithelial cells. The pathophysiological function of this lung cell type, except a recently reported putative involvement in surfactant secretion, is unknown. In addition, P2X7 receptor-deficient mice show reduced inflammation and lung fibrosis after exposure with bleomycin. To elucidate the role of the P2X7 receptor in alveolar epithelial type I cells we characterized the pulmonary phenotype of P2X7 receptor knockout mice by using immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and real-time RT PCR. No pathomorphological signs of fibrosis were found. Results revealed, however, a remarkable loss of aquaporin-5 protein and mRNA in young knockout animals. Additional in vitro experiments with bleomycin treated precision cut lung slices showed a greater sensitivity of the P2X7 receptor knockout mice in terms of aquaporin-5 reduction as wild type animals. Finally, P2X7 receptor function was examined by using the alveolar epithelial cell lines E10 and MLE-12 for stimulation experiments with bleomycin. The in vitro activation of P2X7 receptor was connected with an increase of aquaporin-5, whereas the inhibition of the receptor with oxidized ATP resulted in down regulation of aquaporin-5. The early loss of aquaporin-5 which can be found in different pulmonary fibrosis models does not implicate a specific pathogenetic role during fibrogenesis. PMID:24941004

  20. Immune malfunction in the GPR39 zinc receptor of knockout mice: Its relationship to depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Młyniec, Katarzyna; Trojan, Ewa; Ślusarczyk, Joanna; Głombik, Katarzyna; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Skrzeszewski, Jakub; Siwek, Agata; Holst, Birgitte; Nowak, Gabriel

    2016-02-15

    Depression is a serious psychiatric disorder affecting not only the monaminergic, glutamatergic, and GABAergic neurosystems, but also the immune system. Patients suffering from depression show disturbance in the immune parameters as well as increased susceptibility to infections. Zinc is well known as an anti-inflammatory agent, and its link with depression has been proved, zinc deficiency causing depression- and anxiety-like behavior with immune malfunction. It has been discovered that trace-element zinc acts as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system via zinc receptor GPR39. In this study we investigated whether GPR39 knockout would cause depressive-like behavior as measured by the forced swim test, and whether these changes would coexist with immune malfunction. In GPR39 knockout mice versus a wild-type control we found: i) depressive-like behavior; ii) significantly reduced thymus weight; (iii) reduced cell viability of splenocytes; iv) reduced proliferative response of splenocytes; and v) increased IL-6 production of splenocytes after ConA stimulation and decreased IL-1b and IL-6 release after LPS stimulation. The results indicate depressive-like behavior in GPR39 KO animals with an immune response similar to that observed in depressive disorder. Here for the first time we show immunological changes under GPR39-deficient conditions. PMID:26857489

  1. Myeloid Deletion of α1AMPK Exacerbates Atherosclerosis in LDL Receptor Knockout (LDLRKO) Mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qiang; Cui, Xin; Wu, Rui; Zha, Lin; Wang, Xianfeng; Parks, John S; Yu, Liqing; Shi, Hang; Xue, Bingzhong

    2016-06-01

    Macrophage inflammation marks all stages of atherogenesis, and AMPK is a regulator of macrophage inflammation. We therefore generated myeloid α1AMPK knockout (MAKO) mice on the LDL receptor knockout (LDLRKO) background to investigate whether myeloid deletion of α1AMPK exacerbates atherosclerosis. When fed an atherogenic diet, MAKO/LDLRKO mice displayed exacerbated atherosclerosis compared with LDLRKO mice. To determine the underlying pathophysiological pathways, we characterized macrophage inflammation/chemotaxis and lipid/cholesterol metabolism in MAKO/LDLRKO mice. Myeloid deletion of α1AMPK increased macrophage inflammatory gene expression and enhanced macrophage migration and adhesion to endothelial cells. Remarkably, MAKO/LDLRKO mice also displayed higher composition of circulating chemotaxically active Ly-6C(high) monocytes, enhanced atherosclerotic plaque chemokine expression, and monocyte recruitment into plaques, leading to increased atherosclerotic plaque macrophage content and inflammation. MAKO/LDLRKO mice also exhibited higher plasma LDL and VLDL cholesterol content, increased circulating apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels, and higher liver apoB expression. We conclude that macrophage α1AMPK deficiency promotes atherogenesis in LDLRKO mice and is associated with enhanced macrophage inflammation and hypercholesterolemia and that macrophage α1AMPK may serve as a therapeutic target for prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:26822081

  2. Immune malfunction in the GPR39 zinc receptor of knockout mice: Its relationship to depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Młyniec, Katarzyna; Trojan, Ewa; Ślusarczyk, Joanna; Głombik, Katarzyna; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Skrzeszewski, Jakub; Siwek, Agata; Holst, Birgitte; Nowak, Gabriel

    2016-02-15

    Depression is a serious psychiatric disorder affecting not only the monaminergic, glutamatergic, and GABAergic neurosystems, but also the immune system. Patients suffering from depression show disturbance in the immune parameters as well as increased susceptibility to infections. Zinc is well known as an anti-inflammatory agent, and its link with depression has been proved, zinc deficiency causing depression- and anxiety-like behavior with immune malfunction. It has been discovered that trace-element zinc acts as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system via zinc receptor GPR39. In this study we investigated whether GPR39 knockout would cause depressive-like behavior as measured by the forced swim test, and whether these changes would coexist with immune malfunction. In GPR39 knockout mice versus a wild-type control we found: i) depressive-like behavior; ii) significantly reduced thymus weight; (iii) reduced cell viability of splenocytes; iv) reduced proliferative response of splenocytes; and v) increased IL-6 production of splenocytes after ConA stimulation and decreased IL-1b and IL-6 release after LPS stimulation. The results indicate depressive-like behavior in GPR39 KO animals with an immune response similar to that observed in depressive disorder. Here for the first time we show immunological changes under GPR39-deficient conditions.

  3. Estrogens and Spermiogenesis: New Insights from Type 1 Cannabinoid Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cacciola, Giovanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo; Cobellis, Gilda

    2013-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex mechanism which allows the production of male gametes; it consists of mitotic, meiotic, and differentiation phases. Spermiogenesis is the terminal differentiation process during which haploid round spermatids undergo several biochemical and morphological changes, including extensive remodelling of chromatin and nuclear shape. Spermiogenesis is under control of endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine factors, like gonadotropins and testosterone. More recently, emerging pieces of evidence are suggesting that, among these factors, estrogens may have a role. To date, this is a matter of debate and concern because of the agonistic and antagonistic estrogenic effects that environmental chemicals may have on animal and human with damaging outcome on fertility. In this review, we summarize data which fuel this debate, with a particular attention to our recent results, obtained using type 1 cannabinoid receptor knockout male mice as animal model. PMID:24324492

  4. Interferon α/β receptor knockout mice as a model to study bluetongue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ortego, Javier; de la Poza, Francisco; Marín-López, Alejandro

    2014-03-01

    Bluetongue is an arthropod-borne disease caused by a virus of the genus Orbivirus, the bluetongue virus (BTV), which affects ruminant livestock such as cattle, sheep, and goats and wild ruminants such as deer, and camelids. Recently, adult mice with gene knockouts of the interferon α/β receptor (IFNAR-/-) have been described as a model of lethal BTV infection. IFNAR(-/-) mice are highly susceptible to BTV-1, BTV-4 and BTV-8 infection when the virus is administered intravenously or subcutaneosuly. Disease progression and pathogenesis closely mimics signs of bluetongue disease in ruminants. In the present paper we review the studies where IFNAR(-/-) mice have been used as an animal model to study BTV transmission, pathogenesis, virulence, and protective efficacy of inactivated and new recombinant marker BTV vaccines. Furthermore, we report new data on protective efficacy of different strategies of BTV vaccination and also on induction of interferon α/β and proinflammatory immune responses in IFNAR(-/-) mice infected with BTV.

  5. [Upregulation of P2X3 receptors in dorsal root ganglion of TRPV1 knockout female mice].

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao; Shi, Xiao-Han; Huang, Li-Bin; Rong, Wei-Fang; Ma, Bei

    2014-08-25

    The study was aimed to investigate the changes in mechanical pain threshold in the condition of chronic inflammatory pain after transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) gene was knockout. Hind-paw intraplantar injection of complete freund's adjuvant (CFA, 20 μL) produced peripheral inflammation in wild-type and TRPV1 knockout female mice. The mechanical pain thresholds were measured during the 8 days after injection and pre-injection by using Von-Frey hair. Nine days after injection, mice were killed and the differences of expression of c-Fos and P2X3 receptor in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord dorsal horn were examined by Western blotting between the two groups. Compared with that in wild-type mice, the mechanical pain threshold was increased significantly in TRPV1 knockout mice (P < 0.05); 3 days after CFA injection, the baseline mechanical pain threshold in the TRPV1 knockout mice group was significantly higher than that in the wild-type mice group (P < 0.05); The result of Western blotting showed that the expression of c-Fos protein both in DRG and spinal cord dorsal horn of TRPV1 knockout mice group was decreased significantly compared with that in wild-type mice group (P < 0.01, P < 0.05), while the expression of P2X3 receptor in DRG of TRPV1 knockout mice group was increased significantly compared with that in wild-type mice group (P < 0.05). Our findings indicate that TRPV1 may influence the peripheral mechanical pain threshold by mediating the expression of c-Fos protein both in DRG and spinal cord dorsal horn and changing the expression of P2X3 receptor in DRG.

  6. The restructuring of muscarinic receptor subtype gene transcripts in c-fos knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Benes, Jan; Mravec, Boris; Kvetnansky, Richard; Myslivecek, Jaromir

    2013-05-01

    Although c-Fos plays a key role in intracellular signalling, the disruption of the c-fos gene has only minor consequences on the central nervous system (CNS) function. As muscarinic receptors (MR) play important roles in many CNS functions (attention, arousal, and cognition), the c-fos knock-out might be compensated through MR changes. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in the M1-M5 MR mRNA in selected CNS areas: frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital cortex, striatum, hippocampus, hypothalamus and cerebellum (FC, PC, TC, OC, stria, hip, hypo, and crbl, respectively). Knocking out the c-fos gene changed the expression of MR in FC (reduced M1R, M4R and M5R expression), TC (increased M4R expression), OC (decreased M2R and M3R expression) and hippocampus (reduced M3R expression). Moreover, gender differences were observed in WT mice: increased expression of all M1-M5R in the FC in males and M1-M4R in the striatum in females. A detailed analysis of MR transcripts showed pre-existing correlations in the amount of MR-mRNA between specific regions. WT mice showed three major types of cortico-cortical correlations: fronto-occipital, temporo-parietal and parieto-occipital. The cortico-subcortical correlations involved associations between the FC, PC, TC and striatum. In KO mice, a substantial rearrangement of the correlation pattern was observed: only a temporo-parietal correlation and correlations between the FC and striatum remained, and a new correlation between the hypothalamus and cerebellum appeared. Thus, in addition to the previously described dopamine receptor restructuring, the restructuring of MR mRNA correlations reveals an additional mechanism for adaptation to the c-fos gene knockout.

  7. Knockout of NMDA receptors in parvalbumin interneurons recreates autism-like phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Saunders, John A; Tatard-Leitman, Valerie M; Suh, Jimmy; Billingslea, Eddie N; Roberts, Timothy P; Siegel, Steven J

    2013-04-01

    Autism is a disabling neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social deficits, language impairment, and repetitive behaviors with few effective treatments. New evidence suggests that autism has reliable electrophysiological endophenotypes and that these measures may be caused by n-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) disruption on parvalbumin (PV)-containing interneurons. These findings could be used to create new translational biomarkers. Recent developments have allowed for cell-type selective knockout of NMDARs in order to examine the perturbations caused by disrupting specific circuits. This study examines several electrophysiological and behavioral measures disrupted in autism using a PV-selective reduction in NMDA R1 subunit. Mouse electroencephalograph (EEG) was recorded in response to auditory stimuli. Event-related potential (ERP) component amplitude and latency analysis, social testing, and premating ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) recordings were performed. Correlations were examined between the ERP latency and behavioral measures. The N1 ERP latency was delayed, sociability was reduced, and mating USVs were impaired in PV-selective NMDA Receptor 1 Knockout (NR1 KO) as compared with wild-type mice. There was a significant correlation between N1 latency and sociability but not between N1 latency and premating USV power or T-maze performance. The increases in N1 latency, impaired sociability, and reduced vocalizations in PV-selective NR1 KO mice mimic similar changes found in autism. Electrophysiological changes correlate to reduced sociability, indicating that the local circuit mechanisms controlling N1 latency may be utilized in social function. Therefore, we propose that behavioral and electrophysiological alterations in PV-selective NR1 KO mice may serve as a useful model for therapeutic development in autism. Autism Res 2013, 6: 69-77. © 2013 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Conditional Knockout of NMDA Receptors in Dopamine Neurons Prevents Nicotine-Conditioned Place Preference

    PubMed Central

    Phillip Wang, Lei; Li, Fei; Shen, Xiaoming; Tsien, Joe Z.

    2010-01-01

    Nicotine from smoking tobacco produces one of the most common forms of addictive behavior and has major societal and health consequences. It is known that nicotine triggers tobacco addiction by activating nicotine acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the midbrain dopaminergic reward system, primarily via the ventral tegmental area. Heterogeneity of cell populations in the region has made it difficult for pharmacology-based analyses to precisely assess the functional significance of glutamatergic inputs to dopamine neurons in nicotine addiction. By generating dopamine neuron-specific NR1 knockout mice using cre/loxP-mediated method, we demonstrate that genetic inactivation of the NMDA receptors in ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons selectively prevents nicotine-conditioned place preference. Interestingly, the mutant mice exhibit normal performances in the conditioned place aversion induced by aversive air puffs. Therefore, this selective effect on addictive drug-induced reinforcement behavior suggests that NMDA receptors in the dopamine neurons are critical for the development of nicotine addiction. PMID:20062537

  9. Brain Region-Specific Effects of cGMP-Dependent Kinase II Knockout on AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Animal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seonil; Pick, Joseph E.; Abera, Sinedu; Khatri, Latika; Ferreira, Danielle D. P.; Sathler, Matheus F.; Morison, Sage L.; Hofmann, Franz; Ziff, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), is critical for AMPAR synaptic trafficking and control of synaptic transmission. cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII) mediates this phosphorylation, and cGKII knockout (KO) affects GluA1 phosphorylation and alters animal behavior. Notably, GluA1 phosphorylation in the KO…

  10. Somatostatin Receptor 1 and 5 Double Knockout Mice Mimic Neurochemical Changes of Huntington's Disease Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Padmesh S.; Kharmate, Geetanjali; Norman, Michael; Liu, Shi-He; Sastry, Bhagavatula R.; Brunicardi, Charles F.; Kumar, Ujendra

    2011-01-01

    Background Selective degeneration of medium spiny neurons and preservation of medium sized aspiny interneurons in striatum has been implicated in excitotoxicity and pathophysiology of Huntington's disease (HD). However, the molecular mechanism for the selective sparing of medium sized aspiny neurons and vulnerability of projection neurons is still elusive. The pathological characteristic of HD is an extensive reduction of the striatal mass, affecting caudate putamen. Somatostatin (SST) positive neurons are selectively spared in HD and Quinolinic acid/N-methyl-D-aspartic acid induced excitotoxicity, mimic the model of HD. SST plays neuroprotective role in excitotoxicity and the biological effects of SST are mediated by five somatostatin receptor subtypes (SSTR1-5). Methods and Findings To delineate subtype selective biological responses we have here investigated changes in SSTR1 and 5 double knockout mice brain and compared with HD transgenic mouse model (R6/2). Our study revealed significant loss of dopamine and cAMP regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) and comparable changes in SST, N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors subtypes, calbindin and brain nitric oxide synthase expression as well as in key signaling proteins including calpain, phospho-extracellular-signal-regulated kinases1/2, synapsin-IIa, protein kinase C-α and calcineurin in SSTR1/5−/− and R6/2 mice. Conversely, the expression of somatostatin receptor subtypes, enkephalin and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases were strain specific. SSTR1/5 appears to be important in regulating NMDARs, DARPP-32 and signaling molecules in similar fashion as seen in HD transgenic mice. Conclusions This is the first comprehensive description of disease related changes upon ablation of G- protein coupled receptor gene. Our results indicate that SST and SSTRs might play an important role in regulation of neurodegeneration and targeting this pathway can provide a novel insight in understanding the pathophysiology of

  11. Kisspeptin regulation of arcuate neuron excitability in kisspeptin receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhuai; Herbison, Allan

    2015-05-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) is critical for kisspeptin to activate GnRH neurons to modulate fertility. However, the often mismatching distribution of kisspeptin and GPR54 in the brain suggests that kisspeptin may also act on other receptors. The arcuate nucleus (ARN) is one brain region with a very high density of kisspeptin fibers but only limited evidence for the expression of GPR54. Using acute brain slice electrophysiology in combination with Gpr54 knockout (GPR54KO) mouse models, we examined whether actions of kisspeptin in the ARN were dependent upon GPR54. Cell-attached recordings from unidentified ARN neurons in wild-type mice revealed that approximately one third of neurons were either excited or inhibited by kisspeptin in a dose-dependent manner. The responses of ARN neurons to kisspeptin were exactly the same in GPR54KO mice despite effects of kisspeptin on GnRH neurons being abolished. To evaluate whether kisspeptin may be acting through neuropeptide FF receptors, the effects of an agonist RFamide-related peptide 3 (RFRP-3) and antagonists RF9 and BIBP-3226 were evaluated. Both the excitatory and inhibitory effects of kisspeptin were mimicked by the agonist RFRP-3. RF9 itself activated ARN neurons and suppressed only the inhibitory actions of kisspeptin. BIBP-3226 suppressed kisspeptin actions in 50% of neurons. Whole-cell recordings in GPR54KO mice demonstrated that both kisspeptin and RFRP-3 acted directly on the same ARN neurons and activated the same ion channels. Together, these studies demonstrate that kisspeptin can act partly through neuropeptide FF receptors to modulate neuronal activity independent of GPR54 in the mouse brain.

  12. Hypersomnolence and reduced activity in pan-leptin receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuping; He, Junyun; Kastin, Abba J; Hsuchou, Hung; Pan, Weihong

    2013-11-01

    Excessive obesity correlates with hypersomnolence and impaired cognitive function, presumably induced by metabolic factors and cytokines. Production of the adipokine leptin correlates with the amount of adiposity, and leptin has been shown to promote sleep. To determine whether leptin plays a major role in the hypersomnolence of obesity, we measured sleep architecture in pan-leptin receptor knockout (POKO) mice that do not respond to leptin because of the production of a mutant, non-signaling receptor. The obese POKO mice had more non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and less waking time than their littermate controls. This was mainly seen during the light span, although increased bouts of rapid eye movement sleep were also seen in the dark span. The increase of NREM sleep correlated with the extent of obesity. The POKO mice also had decreased locomotor activity and more immobility in the open field test, but there was no increase of forced immobility nor reduction of sucrose intake as would be seen in depression. The increased NREM sleep and reduced locomotor activity in the POKO mice suggest that it was obesity, rather than leptin signaling, that played a predominant role in altering sleep architecture and activity.

  13. Hypersomnolence and reduced activity in pan-leptin receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuping; He, Junyun; Kastin, Abba J.; Hsuchou, Hung; Pan, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    Excessive obesity correlates with hypersomnolence and impaired cognitive function, presumably induced by metabolic factors and cytokines. Production of the adipokine leptin correlates with the amount of adiposity, and leptin has been shown to promote sleep. To determine whether leptin plays a major role in the hypersomnolence of obesity, we measured sleep architecture in pan-leptin receptor knockout (POKO) mice that do not respond to leptin because of the production of a mutant, non-signaling receptor. The obese POKO mice had more non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and less waking time than their littermate controls. This was mainly seen during the light span, although increased bouts of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep were also seen in the dark span. The increase of NREM sleep correlated with the extent of obesity. The POKO mice also had decreased locomotor activity and more immobility in the open field test, but there was no increase of forced immobility nor reduction of sucrose intake as would be seen in depression. The increased NREM sleep and reduced locomotor activity in the POKO mice suggest that it was obesity, rather than leptin signaling, that played a predominant role in altering sleep architecture and activity. PMID:23955775

  14. Acceleration of atherogenesis by COX-1-dependent prostanoid formation in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Praticò, D; Tillmann, C; Zhang, Z B; Li, H; FitzGerald, G A

    2001-03-13

    The cyclooxygenase (COX) product, prostacyclin (PGI(2)), inhibits platelet activation and vascular smooth-muscle cell migration and proliferation. Biochemically selective inhibition of COX-2 reduces PGI(2) biosynthesis substantially in humans. Because deletion of the PGI(2) receptor accelerates atherogenesis in the fat-fed low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mouse, we wished to determine whether selective inhibition of COX-2 would accelerate atherogenesis in this model. To address this hypothesis, we used dosing with nimesulide, which inhibited COX-2 ex vivo, depressed urinary 2,3 dinor 6-keto PGF(1alpha) by approximately 60% but had no effect on thromboxane formation by platelets, which only express COX-1. By contrast, the isoform nonspecific inhibitor, indomethacin, suppressed platelet function and thromboxane formation ex vivo and in vivo, coincident with effects on PGI(2) biosynthesis indistinguishable from nimesulide. Indomethacin reduced the extent of atherosclerosis by 55 +/- 4%, whereas nimesulide failed to increase the rate of atherogenesis. Despite their divergent effects on atherogenesis, both drugs depressed two indices of systemic inflammation, soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 to a similar but incomplete degree. Neither drug altered serum lipids and the marked increase in vascular expression of COX-2 during atherogenesis. Accelerated progression of atherosclerosis is unlikely during chronic intake of specific COX-2 inhibitors. Furthermore, evidence that COX-1-derived prostanoids contribute to atherogenesis suggests that controlled evaluation of the effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and/or aspirin on plaque progression in humans is timely.

  15. Theca-specific estrogen receptor-alpha knockout mice lose fertility prematurely.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungeun; Kang, Dong-Wook; Hudgins-Spivey, Susan; Krust, Andree; Lee, Eun-Young; Koo, Youngbum; Cheon, Yongpil; Gye, Myung Chan; Chambon, Pierre; Ko, ChemYong

    2009-08-01

    Estrogen receptor-alpha (Esr1) mediates estrogen action in regulating at all levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Whereas the importance of Esr1 in hypothalamus and pituitary has been demonstrated by loss of fertility in the neuron- and pituitary-specific Esr1 knockout mice, whether Esr1 plays a critical role in the ovary remains to be determined. In the ovary, Esr1 is mainly expressed in the theca/interstitial cells and germinal epithelium and thus is believed to mediate estrogen action in these cells. In this study, we assessed the importance of Esr1 in the ovarian theca cells in regulating female reproduction. The Cre-LoxP approach was used to selectively delete the Esr1 gene in the theca cells, and the reproductive consequence of the deletion was measured. Adolescent theca-specific Esr1 knockout (thEsr1KO) mice (<4 months of age) are fertile and cycling. However, they begin to display an erratic pattern of estrous cycles and become infertile before they reach the age of 6 months. The ovaries of thEsr1KOmice (>or=4 months) have fewer corpora lutea but more antral follicles than the age-matching wild-type mice. The numbers of 17-hydroxylase-expressing cells are largely increased in the interstitium of the thEsr1KO mouse ovary. Interestingly, whereas basal levels of serum testosterone and FSH were mildly elevated, LH level was either markedly lower or undetectable in the thEsr1KO mice. When superstimulated by exogenous gonadotropins, thEsr1KO mice released significantly fewer oocytes that wild-type littermates and developed multiple hemorrhagic cysts. Taken together, this study demonstrates that theca Esr1 plays a critical role in regulating female reproduction.

  16. Dysregulation of Uterine Signaling Pathways in Progesterone Receptor-Cre Knockout of Dicer

    PubMed Central

    Andreu-Vieyra, Claudia V.; Kim, Tae Hoon; Jeong, Jae-Wook; Hodgson, Myles C.; Chen, Ruihong; Creighton, Chad J.; Lydon, John P.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial-stromal interactions in the uterus are required for normal uterine functions such as pregnancy, and multiple signaling pathways are essential for this process. Although Dicer and microRNA (miRNA) have been implicated in several reproductive processes, the specific roles of Dicer and miRNA in uterine development are not known. To address the roles of miRNA in the regulation of key uterine pathways, we generated a conditional knockout of Dicer in the postnatal uterine epithelium and stroma using progesterone receptor-Cre. These Dicer conditional knockout females are sterile with small uteri, which demonstrate significant defects, including absence of glandular epithelium and enhanced stromal apoptosis, beginning at approximately postnatal d 15, with coincident expression of Cre and deletion of Dicer. Specific miRNA (miR-181c, −200b, −101, let-7d) were down-regulated and corresponding predicted proapoptotic target genes (Bcl2l11, Aldh1a3) were up-regulated, reflecting the apoptotic phenomenon. Although these mice had normal serum hormone levels, critical uterine signaling pathways, including progesterone-responsive genes, Indian hedgehog signaling, and the Wnt/β-catenin canonical pathway, were dysregulated at the mRNA level. Importantly, uterine stromal cell proliferation in response to progesterone was absent, whereas uterine epithelial cell proliferation in response to estradiol was maintained in adult uteri. These data implicate Dicer and appropriate miRNA expression as essential players in the regulation of multiple uterine signaling pathways required for uterine development and appropriate function. PMID:22798293

  17. Alterations in the expression of G-proteins and regulation of adenylate cyclase in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells chronically exposed to low-efficacy mu-opioids.

    PubMed

    Ammer, H; Schulz, R

    1993-10-01

    with low-nanomolar concentrations of guanosine 5'-[beta gamma- imido]triphosphate. Our data demonstrate that chronic treatment of SH-SY5Y cells with low-efficacy mu-opioids increases G-protein abundance, a phenomenon which might contribute to the biochemical mechanisms underlying opioid tolerance/dependence. PMID:8216227

  18. Induction of delta-opioid receptor function in the midbrain after chronic morphine treatment.

    PubMed

    Hack, Stephen P; Bagley, Elena E; Chieng, Billy C H; Christie, MacDonald J

    2005-03-23

    Delta-opioid receptor (DOPr) activation fails to produce cellular physiological responses in many brain regions, including the periaqueductal gray (PAG), despite neural expression of high densities of the receptor. Previous histochemical studies have demonstrated that a variety of stimuli, including chronic morphine treatment, induce the translocation of DOPr from intracellular pools to the surface membrane of CNS neurons. PAG neurons in slices taken from untreated mice exhibited mu-opioid receptor (MOPr) but not DOPr-mediated presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic synaptic currents. In contrast, after 5-6 d of chronic morphine treatment, DOPr stimulation inhibited synaptic GABA release onto most neurons. Shorter exposure to morphine in vitro (upto 4 h) or in vivo (18 h) did not induce functional DOPr responses. DOPr-mediated presynaptic inhibition could not be induced in slices from untreated animals by increasing synaptic activity in vitro using high extracellular potassium concentrations or activation of protein kinase A. Induction of functional DOPr signaling by chronic morphine required MOPr expression, because no DOPr receptor responses were observed in MOPr knock-out mice. DOPr agonists also had no effect on miniature IPSCs in beta-arrestin-2 knock-out mice after chronic morphine. These results suggest that induction of DOPr-mediated actions in PAG by chronic morphine requires prolonged MOPr stimulation and expression of beta-arrestin-2.

  19. Delayed procedural learning in α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Young, J. W.; Meves, J. M.; Tarantino, I. S.; Caldwell, S.; Geyer, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    The α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has long been a procognitive therapeutic target to treat schizophrenia. Evidence on the role of this receptor in cognition has been lacking, however, in part due to the limited availability of suitable ligands. The behavior of α7-nAChR knockout (KO) mice has been examined previously, but cognitive assessments using tests with cross-species translatability have been limited to date. Here, we assessed the cognitive performance of α7-nAChR KO and wild-type (WT) littermate mice in the attentional set-shifting task of executive functioning, the radial arm maze test of spatial working memory span capacity and the novel object recognition test of short-term memory. The reward motivation of these mutants was assessed using the progressive ratio breakpoint test. In addition, we assessed the exploratory behavior and sensorimotor gating using the behavioral pattern monitor and prepulse inhibition, respectively. α7-nAChR KO mice exhibited normal set-shifting, but impaired procedural learning (rule acquisition) in multiple paradigms. Spatial span capacity, short-term memory, motivation for food, exploration and sensorimotor gating were all comparable to WT littermates. The data presented here support the notion that this receptor is important for such procedural learning, when patterns in the environment become clear and a rule is learned. In combination with the impaired attention observed previously in these mice, this finding suggests that agonist treatments should be examined in clinical studies of attention and procedural learning, perhaps in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy. PMID:21679297

  20. The in vivo respiratory phenotype of the adenosine A1 receptor knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Heitzmann, Dirk; Buehler, Philipp; Schweda, Frank; Georgieff, Michael; Warth, Richard; Thomas, Joerg

    2016-02-01

    The nucleoside adenosine has been implicated in the regulation of respiration, especially during hypoxia in the newborn. In this study the role of adenosine A1 receptors for the control of respiration was investigated in vivo. To this end, respiration of unrestrained adult and neonatal adenosine A1 receptor knockout mice (A1R(-/-)) was measured in a plethysmographic device. Under control conditions (21% O2) and mild hypoxia (12-15% O2) no difference of respiratory parameters was observed between adult wildtype (A1R(+/+)) and A1R(-/-) mice. Under more severe hypoxia (6-10% O2) A1R(+/+) mice showed, after a transient increase of respiration, a decrease of respiration frequency (fR) and tidal volume (VT) leading to a decrease of minute volume (MV). This depression of respiration during severe hypoxia was absent in A1R(-/-) mice which displayed a stimulated respiration as indicated by the enhancement of MV by some 50-60%. During hypercapnia-hyperoxia (3-10% CO2/97-90 % O2), no obvious differences in respiration of A1R(-/-) and A1R(+/+) was observed. In neonatal mice, the respiratory response to hypoxia was surprisingly similar in both genotypes. However, neonatal A1R(-/-) mice appeared to have more frequently periods of apnea during hypoxia and in the post-hypoxic control period. In conclusion, these data indicate that the adenosine A1 receptor is an important molecular component mediating hypoxic depression in adult mice and it appears to stabilize respiration of neonatal mice. PMID:26593641

  1. CXC receptor knockout mice: characterization of skeletal features and membranous bone healing in the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, David S; Sakamoto, Taylor; Ishida, Kenji; Makhijani, Nalini S; Gruber, Helen E; Yamaguchi, Dean T

    2011-02-01

    The potential role of CXC chemokines bearing the glu-leu-arg (ELR) motif in bone repair was studied using a cranial defect (CD) model in mice lacking the CXC receptor (mCXCR(-/-) knockout mice), which is homologous to knockout of the human CXC receptor 2 (CXCR2) gene. During the inflammatory stage of bone repair, ELR CXC chemokines are released by inflammatory cells and serve as chemotactic and angiogenic factors. mCXCR(-/-) mice were smaller in weight and length from base of tail to nose tip, compared to WT littermates. DEXA analysis indicated that bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), total area (TA), bone area (BA), and total tissue mass (TTM) were decreased in the mCXCR(-/-) mice at 6, 12, and 18 weeks of age. Trabecular bone characteristics in mCXCR(-/-) (% bone, connectivity, number, and thickness) were reduced, and trabecular spacing was increased as evidenced by μCT. There was no difference in bone formation or resorption indices measured by bone histomorphometry. Trabecular BMD was not altered. Cortical bone volume, BMD, and thickness were reduced; whereas, bone marrow volume was increased in mCXCR(-/-). Decreased polar moment of inertia (J) in the tibias/femurs suggested that the mCXCR(-/-) long bones are weaker. This was confirmed by three-point bending testing of the femurs. CDs created in 6-week-old male mCXCR(-/-) and WT littermates were not completely healed at 12 weeks; WT animals, however, had significantly more bone in-growth than mCXCR(-/-). New bone sites were identified using polarized light and assessed for numbers of osteocyte (OCy) lacunae and blood vessels (BlV) around the original CD. In new bone, the number of BlV in WT was >2× that seen in mCXCR(-/-). Bone histomorphometry parameters in the cranial defect did not show any difference in bone formation or resorption markers. In summary, studies showed that mCXCR(-/-) mice have (1) reduced weight and size; (2) decreased BMD and BMC; (3) decreased amounts of trabecular

  2. Reduced anxiety-like and depression-related behavior in neuropeptide Y Y4 receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Painsipp, E; Wultsch, T; Edelsbrunner, M E; Tasan, R O; Singewald, N; Herzog, H; Holzer, P

    2008-07-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) acting through Y1 receptors reduces anxiety- and depression-like behavior in rodents, whereas Y2 receptor stimulation has the opposite effect. This study addressed the implication of Y4 receptors in emotional behavior by comparing female germ line Y4 knockout (Y4-/-) mice with control and germ line Y2-/- animals. Anxiety- and depression-like behavior was assessed with the open field (OF), elevated plus maze (EPM), stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) and tail suspension tests (TST), respectively. Learning and memory were evaluated with the object recognition test (ORT). In the OF and EPM, both Y4-/- and Y2-/- mice exhibited reduced anxiety-related behavior and enhanced locomotor activity relative to control animals. Locomotor activity in a familiar environment was unchanged in Y4-/- but reduced in Y2-/- mice. The basal rectal temperature exhibited diurnal and genotype-related alterations. Control mice had temperature minima at noon and midnight, whereas Y4-/- and Y2-/- mice displayed only one temperature minimum at noon. The magnitude of SIH was related to time of the day and genotype in a complex manner. In the TST, the duration of immobility was significantly shorter in Y4-/- and Y2-/- mice than in controls. Object memory 6 h after initial exposure to the ORT was impaired in Y2-/- but not in Y4-/- mice, relative to control mice. These results show that genetic deletion of Y4 receptors, like that of Y2 receptors, reduces anxiety-like and depression-related behavior. Unlike Y2 receptor knockout, Y4 receptor knockout does not impair object memory. We propose that Y4 receptors play an important role in the regulation of behavioral homeostasis.

  3. Effects of dopamine D1-like and D2-like antagonists on cocaine discrimination in muscarinic receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Morgane; Caine, Simon Barak

    2016-04-01

    Muscarinic and dopamine brain systems interact intimately, and muscarinic receptor ligands, like dopamine ligands, can modulate the reinforcing and discriminative stimulus (S(D)) effects of cocaine. To enlighten the dopamine/muscarinic interactions as they pertain to the S(D) effects of cocaine, we evaluated whether muscarinic M1, M2 or M4 receptors are necessary for dopamine D1 and/or D2 antagonist mediated modulation of the S(D) effects of cocaine. Knockout mice lacking M1, M2, or M4 receptors, as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10mg/kg cocaine from saline in a food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure. Effects of pretreatments with the dopamine D1 antagonist SCH 23390 and the dopamine D2 antagonist eticlopride were evaluated. In intact mice, both SCH 23390 and eticlopride attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect, as expected. SCH 23390 similarly attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect in M1 knockout mice, but not in mice lacking M2 or M4 receptors. The effects of eticlopride were comparable in each knockout strain. These findings demonstrate differences in the way that D1 and D2 antagonists modulate the S(D) effects of cocaine, D1 modulation being at least partially dependent upon activity at the inhibitory M2/M4 muscarinic subtypes, while D2 modulation appeared independent of these systems. PMID:26874213

  4. Improved efficacy of fluoxetine in increasing hippocampal 5-hydroxytryptamine outflow in 5-HT(1B) receptor knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Malagié, Isabelle; David, Denis J; Jolliet, Pascale; Hen, René; Bourin, Michel; Gardier, Alain M

    2002-05-17

    To test for the contribution of the 5-HT(1B) receptor subtype in mediating the effects of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), we used intracerebral in vivo microdialysis in awake, freely moving 5-HT(1B) receptor knock-out mice. We show that a single systemic administration of fluoxetine (1, 5 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.) increased extracellular serotonin levels [5-HT](ext) in the ventral hippocampus and frontal cortex of wild-type and mutant mice. However, in the ventral hippocampus, fluoxetine, at the three doses studied, induced a larger increase in [5-HT](ext) in knock-out than in wild-type mice. In the frontal cortex, the effect of fluoxetine did not differ between the two genotypes. The region-dependent response to fluoxetine described here in mutants confirms data we recently reported for another SSRI, paroxetine. These data suggest that 5-HT(1B) autoreceptors limit the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on dialysate 5-HT levels at serotonergic nerve terminals located mainly in the ventral hippocampus. Alternative mechanisms, e.g., changes in 5-HT transporter and/or 5-HT(1A) receptor density in 5-HT(1B) receptor knock-out mice could also explain these findings.

  5. Induction of mammary gland development in estrogen receptor-alpha knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Bocchinfuso, W P; Lindzey, J K; Hewitt, S C; Clark, J A; Myers, P H; Cooper, R; Korach, K S

    2000-08-01

    Mammary glands from the estrogen receptor-a knockout (alphaERKO) mouse do not undergo ductal morphogenesis or alveolar development. Disrupted ERalpha signaling may result in reduced estrogen-responsive gene products in the mammary gland or reduced mammotropic hormones that contribute to the alphaERKO mammary phenotype. We report that circulating PRL is reduced in the female alphaERKO mouse. Implantation of an age-matched, heterozygous ERalpha pituitary isograft under the renal capsule of 25-day-old or 12-week-old alphaERKO mice increased circulating PRL and progesterone levels, and induced mammary gland development. Grafted alphaERKO mice also possessed hypertrophied corpora lutea demonstrating that PRL is luteotropic in the alphaERKO ovary. By contrast, ovariectomy at the time of pituitary grafting prevented mammary gland development in alphaERKO mice despite elevated PRL levels. Hormone replacement using pellet implants demonstrated that pharmacological doses of estradiol induced limited mammary ductal elongation, and estradiol in combination with progesterone stimulated lobuloalveolar development. PRL alone or in combination with progesterone or estradiol did not induce alphaERKO mammary growth. Estradiol and progesterone are required for the structural development of the alphaERKO mammary gland, and PRL contributes to this development by inducing ovarian progesterone levels. Therefore, the manifestation of the alphaERKO mammary phenotype appears due to the lack of direct estrogen action at the mammary gland and an indirect contributory role of estrogen signaling at the hypothalamic/pituitary axis.

  6. Attenuation of lithium-induced natriuresis and kaliuresis in P2Y2 receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Li, Lijun; Kohan, Donald E.; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M.

    2013-01-01

    Whole body knockout (KO) of the P2Y2 receptor (P2Y2R) results in enhanced vasopressin V2 receptor activity and increased renal Na+ conservation. We hypothesized that P2Y2R KO mice would be less sensitive to lithium-induced natriuresis and kaliuresis due to attenuated downregulation of one or more of the major renal Na+ or K+ transporter/channel proteins. KO and wild-type (WT) mice were fed a control or lithium-added diet (40 mmol/kg food) for 14 days. Lithium-induced natriuresis and kaliuresis were significantly (∼25%) attenuated in KO mice. The subunits of the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) were variably affected by lithium and genotype, but, overall, medullary levels were decreased substantially by lithium (15–60%) in both genotypes. In contrast, cortical, β-, and γ-ENaC were increased by lithium (∼50%), but only in WT mice. Moreover, an assessment of ENaC activity by benzamil sensitivity suggested that lithium increased ENaC activity in WT mice but in not KO mice. In contrast, medullary levels of Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter 2 and cortical levels of the renal outer medullary K+ channel were not downregulated by lithium and were significantly (15–76%) higher in KO mice under both dietary conditions. In addition, under control conditions, tissue osmolality of the inner medulla as well as furosemide sensitivity were significantly higher in KO mice versus WT mice. Therefore, we suggest that increased expression of these proteins, particularly in the control state, reduces Na+ delivery to the distal nephron and provides a buffer to attenuate collecting duct-mediated natriuresis and kaliuresis. Additional studies are warranted to explore the potential therapeutic benefits of purinergic antagonism. PMID:23739592

  7. GABAB receptors and glucose homeostasis: evaluation in GABAB receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Bonaventura, M M; Catalano, P N; Chamson-Reig, A; Arany, E; Hill, D; Bettler, B; Saravia, F; Libertun, C; Lux-Lantos, V A

    2008-01-01

    GABA has been proposed to inhibit insulin secretion through GABAB receptors (GABABRs) in pancreatic beta-cells. We investigated whether GABABRs participated in the regulation of glucose homeostasis in vivo. The animals used in this study were adult male and female BALB/C mice, mice deficient in the GABAB1 subunit of the GABABR (GABAB(-/-)), and wild types (WT). Blood glucose was measured under fasting/fed conditions and in glucose tolerance tests (GTTs) with a Lifescan Glucose meter, and serum insulin was measured by ELISA. Pancreatic insulin content and islet insulin were released by RIA. Western blots for the GABAB1 subunit in islet membranes and immunohistochemistry for insulin and GABAB1 were performed in both genotypes. BALB/C mice preinjected with Baclofen (GABABR agonist, 7.5 mg/kg ip) presented impaired GTTs and decreased insulin secretion compared with saline-preinjected controls. GABAB(-/-) mice showed fasting and fed glucose levels similar to WT. GABAB(-/-) mice showed improved GTTs at moderate glucose overloads (2 g/kg). Baclofen pretreatment did not modify GTTs in GABAB(-/-) mice, whereas it impaired normal glycemia reinstatement in WT. Baclofen inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in WT isolated islets but was without effect in GABAB(-/-) islets. In GABAB(-/-) males, pancreatic insulin content was increased, basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were augmented, and impaired insulin tolerance test and increased homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index were determined. Immunohistochemistry for insulin demonstrated an increase of very large islets in GABAB(-/-) males. Results demonstrate that GABABRs are involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis in vivo and that the constitutive absence of GABABRs induces alterations in pancreatic histology, physiology, and insulin resistance. PMID:17971510

  8. Effects of chronic paroxetine treatment on dialysate serotonin in 5-HT1B receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Gardier, A M; David, D J; Jego, G; Przybylski, C; Jacquot, C; Durier, S; Gruwez, B; Douvier, E; Beauverie, P; Poisson, N; Hen, R; Bourin, M

    2003-07-01

    The role of serotonin (5-HT)1B receptors in the mechanism of action of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRI) was studied by using intracerebral in vivo microdialysis in conscious, freely moving wild-type and 5-HT1B receptor knockout (KO 5-HT1B) mice in order to compare the effects of chronic administration of paroxetine via osmotic minipumps (1 mg per kg per day for 14 days) on extracellular 5-HT levels ([5-HT]ext) in the medial prefrontal cortex and ventral hippocampus. Basal [5-HT]ext values in the medial prefrontal cortex and ventral hippocampus, approximately 20 h after removing the minipump, were not altered by chronic paroxetine treatment in both genotypes. On day 15, in the ventral hippocampus, an acute paroxetine challenge (1 mg/kg i.p.) induced a larger increase in [5-HT]ext in saline-pretreated mutant than in wild-type mice. This difference between the two genotypes in the effect of the paroxetine challenge persisted following chronic paroxetine treatment. Conversely, in the medial prefrontal cortex, the paroxetine challenge increased [5-HT]ext similarly in saline-pretreated mice of both genotypes. Such a challenge produced a further increase in cortical [5-HT]ext compared with that in saline-pretreated groups of both genotypes, but no differences were found between genotypes following chronic treatment. To avoid the interaction with raphe 5-HT1A autoreceptors, 1 micro m paroxetine was perfused locally through the dialysis probe implanted in the ventral hippocampus; similar increases in hippocampal [5-HT]ext were found in acutely or chronically treated wild-type mice. Systemic administration of the mixed 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist GR 127935 (4 mg/kg) in chronically treated wild-type mice potentiated the effect of a paroxetine challenge dose on [5-HT]ext in the ventral hippocampus, whereas systemic administration of the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY 100635 did not. By using the zero net flux method of quantitative microdialysis in

  9. Regulation of FSHbeta and GnRH receptor gene expression in activin receptor II knockout male mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, T Rajendra; Agno, Julio; Janovick, Jo Ann; Conn, P Michael; Matzuk, Martin M

    2003-12-30

    To examine in vivo, the local effects of inhibins and activins within the anterior pituitary, independent of their endocrine effects exerted from the gonad, in mediating FSH homeostasis, we used castrated knockout mice lacking either inhibin alpha or activin receptor II (ACVR2) alone or in combination. Compared to castrated wild-type (WT) mice, FSHbeta mRNA levels in the pituitaries of Acvr2 null mice were significantly downregulated in the absence of gonadal feedback. FSHbeta mRNA levels were not significantly higher in the pituitaries of castrated inhibin alpha null mice compared to those in Acvr2 null mice and remained the same in the pituitaries of castrated double mutant mice lacking both inhibin and ACVR2. In contrast to FSHbeta mRNA expression changes, pituitary FSH content was significantly reduced in Acvr2 null mice whereas it was only slightly upregulated in inhibin alpha null mice. Combined absence of both ACVR2 signaling and inhibins caused a decrease in FSH content compared to that in the absence of inhibins alone. These changes in pituitary content were in parallel to those in serum FSH levels in these three groups of castrated mice, suggesting that the unopposed actions of locally produced inhibins are dominant over those effects mediated by ACVR2 signaling to regulate FSH biosynthesis and secretion. Thus, our in vivo results demonstrate that within the pituitary, locally produced activins and inhibins exert their actions at distinct phases of FSH homeostasis. In an independent set of experiments, we tested whether in vivo signaling via ACVR2 is necessary for hypothalamic GnRH biosynthesis and for GnRH receptor expression. Our results demonstrate that in contrast to previous in vitro studies, signaling through ACVR2 is neither required for hypothalamic synthesis of GnRH peptide nor for expression of GnRH receptors in the anterior pituitary. We conclude that within the hypothalamic-pituitary short loop, ACVR2 signaling is critical only for FSH

  10. Opioid Receptors Mediate Direct Predictive Fear Learning: Evidence from One-Trial Blocking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Sindy; McNally, Gavan P.

    2007-01-01

    Pavlovian fear learning depends on predictive error, so that fear learning occurs when the actual outcome of a conditioning trial exceeds the expected outcome. Previous research has shown that opioid receptors, including [mu]-opioid receptors in the ventrolateral quadrant of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (vlPAG), mediate such predictive fear…

  11. Impaired spatial learning and reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis in histamine H1-receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ambrée, Oliver; Buschert, Jens; Zhang, Weiqi; Arolt, Volker; Dere, Ekrem; Zlomuzica, Armin

    2014-08-01

    The histamine H1-receptor (H1R) is expressed in wide parts of the brain including the hippocampus, which is involved in spatial learning and memory. Previous studies in H1R knockout (H1R-KO) mice revealed deficits in a variety of learning and memory tasks. It was also proposed that H1R activation is crucial for neuronal differentiation of neural progenitors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate negatively reinforced spatial learning in the water-maze and to assess survival and neuronal differentiation of newborn cells in the adult hippocampus of H1R-KO mice. H1R-KO and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to the following sequence of tests: (a) cued version, (b) place learning, (c) spatial probe, (d) long-term retention and (e) reversal learning. Furthermore hippocampal neurogenesis in terms of survival and differentiation was assessed in H1R-KO and WT mice. H1R-KO mice showed normal cued learning, but impaired place and reversal learning as well as impaired long-term retention performance. In addition, a marked reduction of newborn neurons in the hippocampus but no changes in differentiation of neural progenitors into neuronal and glial lineage was found in H1R-KO mice. Our data suggest that H1R deficiency in mice is associated with pronounced deficits in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory. Furthermore, we herein provide first evidence that H1R deficiency in the mouse leads to a reduced neurogenesis. However, the exact mechanisms for the reduced number of cells in H1R-KO mice remain elusive and might be due to a reduced survival of newborn hippocampal neurons and/or a reduction in cell proliferation.

  12. Determining Pharmacological Selectivity of the Kappa Opioid Receptor Antagonist LY2456302 Using Pupillometry as a Translational Biomarker in Rat and Human

    PubMed Central

    Witcher, Jennifer W.; Lowe, Stephen L.; Gonzales, Celedon R.; Weller, Mary Ann; Bell, Robert L.; Hart, John C.; Need, Anne B.; McKinzie, Jamie H.; Statnick, Michael A.; Suico, Jeffrey G.; McKinzie, David L.; Tauscher-Wisniewski, Sitra; Mitch, Charles H.; Stoltz, Randall R.; Wong, Conrad J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Selective kappa opioid receptor antagonism is a promising experimental strategy for the treatment of depression. The kappa opioid receptor antagonist, LY2456302, exhibits ~30-fold higher affinity for kappa opioid receptors over mu opioid receptors, which is the next closest identified pharmacology. Methods: Here, we determined kappa opioid receptor pharmacological selectivity of LY2456302 by assessing mu opioid receptor antagonism using translational pupillometry in rats and humans. Results: In rats, morphine-induced mydriasis was completely blocked by the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (3mg/kg, which produced 90% mu opioid receptor occupancy), while 100 and 300mg/kg LY2456302 (which produced 56% and 87% mu opioid receptor occupancy, respectively) only partially blocked morphine-induced mydriasis. In humans, fentanyl-induced miosis was completely blocked by 50mg naltrexone, and LY2456302 dose-dependently blocked miosis at 25 and 60mg (minimal-to-no blockade at 4–10mg). Conclusions: We demonstrate, for the first time, the use of translational pupillometry in the context of receptor occupancy to identify a clinical dose of LY2456302 achieving maximal kappa opioid receptor occupancy without evidence of significant mu receptor antagonism. PMID:25637376

  13. A satellite cell-specific knockout of the androgen receptor reveals myostatin as a direct androgen target in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël R; Sinnesael, Mieke; Cielen, Nele; Helsen, Christine; Clinckemalie, Liesbeth; Spans, Lien; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Deldicque, Louise; Hespel, Peter; Carmeliet, Geert; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Androgens have well-established anabolic actions on skeletal muscle, although the direct effects of the androgen receptor (AR) in muscle remain unclear. We generated satellite cell-specific AR-knockout (satARKO) mice in which the AR is selectively ablated in satellite cells, the muscle precursor cells. Total-limb maximal grip strength is decreased by 7% in satARKO mice, with soleus muscles containing ∼10% more type I fibers and 10% less type IIa fibers than the corresponding control littermates. The weight of the perineal levator ani muscle is markedly reduced (-52%). Thus, muscle AR is involved in fiber-type distribution and force production of the limb muscles, while it is a major determinant of the perineal muscle mass. Surprisingly, myostatin (Mstn), a strong inhibitor of skeletal muscle growth, is one of the most androgen-responsive genes (6-fold reduction in satARKO) through direct transcription activation by the AR. Consequently, muscle hypertrophy in response to androgens is augmented in Mstn-knockout mice. Our finding that androgens induce Mstn signaling to restrain their own anabolic actions has implications for the treatment of muscle wasting disorders.-Dubois, V., Laurent, M. R., Sinnesael, M., Cielen, N., Helsen, C., Clinckemalie, L., Spans, L., Gayan-Ramirez, G., Deldicque, L., Hespel, P., Carmeliet, G., Vanderschueren, D., and Claessens, F. A satellite cell-specific knockout of the androgen receptor reveals myostatin as a direct androgen target in skeletal muscle.

  14. Synaptic abnormalities and cytoplasmic glutamate receptor aggregates in contactin associated protein-like 2/Caspr2 knockout neurons

    PubMed Central

    Varea, Olga; Martin-de-Saavedra, Maria Dolores; Kopeikina, Katherine J.; Schürmann, Britta; Fleming, Hunter J.; Fawcett-Patel, Jessica M.; Bach, Anthony; Jang, Seil; Peles, Elior; Kim, Eunjoon; Penzes, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Central glutamatergic synapses and the molecular pathways that control them are emerging as common substrates in the pathogenesis of mental disorders. Genetic variation in the contactin associated protein-like 2 (CNTNAP2) gene, including copy number variations, exon deletions, truncations, single nucleotide variants, and polymorphisms have been associated with intellectual disability, epilepsy, schizophrenia, language disorders, and autism. CNTNAP2, encoded by Cntnap2, is required for dendritic spine development and its absence causes disease-related phenotypes in mice. However, the mechanisms whereby CNTNAP2 regulates glutamatergic synapses are not known, and cellular phenotypes have not been investigated in Cntnap2 knockout neurons. Here we show that CNTNAP2 is present in dendritic spines, as well as axons and soma. Structured illumination superresolution microscopy reveals closer proximity to excitatory, rather than inhibitory synaptic markers. CNTNAP2 does not promote the formation of synapses and cultured neurons from Cntnap2 knockout mice do not show early defects in axon and dendrite outgrowth, suggesting that CNTNAP2 is not required at this stage. However, mature neurons from knockout mice show reduced spine density and levels of GluA1 subunits of AMPA receptors in spines. Unexpectedly, knockout neurons show large cytoplasmic aggregates of GluA1. Here we characterize, for the first time to our knowledge, synaptic phenotypes in Cntnap2 knockout neurons and reveal a novel role for CNTNAP2 in GluA1 trafficking. Taken together, our findings provide insight into the biological roles of CNTNAP2 and into the pathogenesis of CNTNAP2-associated neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25918374

  15. Distinct mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptor mechanisms underlie low sociability and depressive-like behaviors during heroin abstinence.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Pierre-Eric; Ayranci, Gulebru; Chu-Sin-Chung, Paul; Matifas, Audrey; Koebel, Pascale; Filliol, Dominique; Befort, Katia; Ouagazzal, Abdel-Mouttalib; Kieffer, Brigitte L

    2014-10-01

    Addiction is a chronic disorder involving recurring intoxication, withdrawal, and craving episodes. Escaping this vicious cycle requires maintenance of abstinence for extended periods of time and is a true challenge for addicted individuals. The emergence of depressive symptoms, including social withdrawal, is considered a main cause for relapse, but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we establish a mouse model of protracted abstinence to heroin, a major abused opiate, where both emotional and working memory deficits unfold. We show that delta and kappa opioid receptor (DOR and KOR, respectively) knockout mice develop either stronger or reduced emotional disruption during heroin abstinence, establishing DOR and KOR activities as protective and vulnerability factors, respectively, that regulate the severity of abstinence. Further, we found that chronic treatment with the antidepressant drug fluoxetine prevents emergence of low sociability, with no impact on the working memory deficit, implicating serotonergic mechanisms predominantly in emotional aspects of abstinence symptoms. Finally, targeting the main serotonergic brain structure, we show that gene knockout of mu opioid receptors (MORs) in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) before heroin exposure abolishes the development of social withdrawal. This is the first result demonstrating that intermittent chronic MOR activation at the level of DRN represents an essential mechanism contributing to low sociability during protracted heroin abstinence. Altogether, our findings reveal crucial and distinct roles for all three opioid receptors in the development of emotional alterations that follow a history of heroin exposure and open the way towards understanding opioid system-mediated serotonin homeostasis in heroin abuse. PMID:24874714

  16. Distinct Mu, Delta, and Kappa Opioid Receptor Mechanisms Underlie Low Sociability and Depressive-Like Behaviors During Heroin Abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Pierre-Eric; Ayranci, Gulebru; Chu-Sin-Chung, Paul; Matifas, Audrey; Koebel, Pascale; Filliol, Dominique; Befort, Katia; Ouagazzal, Abdel-Mouttalib; Kieffer, Brigitte L

    2014-01-01

    Addiction is a chronic disorder involving recurring intoxication, withdrawal, and craving episodes. Escaping this vicious cycle requires maintenance of abstinence for extended periods of time and is a true challenge for addicted individuals. The emergence of depressive symptoms, including social withdrawal, is considered a main cause for relapse, but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we establish a mouse model of protracted abstinence to heroin, a major abused opiate, where both emotional and working memory deficits unfold. We show that delta and kappa opioid receptor (DOR and KOR, respectively) knockout mice develop either stronger or reduced emotional disruption during heroin abstinence, establishing DOR and KOR activities as protective and vulnerability factors, respectively, that regulate the severity of abstinence. Further, we found that chronic treatment with the antidepressant drug fluoxetine prevents emergence of low sociability, with no impact on the working memory deficit, implicating serotonergic mechanisms predominantly in emotional aspects of abstinence symptoms. Finally, targeting the main serotonergic brain structure, we show that gene knockout of mu opioid receptors (MORs) in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) before heroin exposure abolishes the development of social withdrawal. This is the first result demonstrating that intermittent chronic MOR activation at the level of DRN represents an essential mechanism contributing to low sociability during protracted heroin abstinence. Altogether, our findings reveal crucial and distinct roles for all three opioid receptors in the development of emotional alterations that follow a history of heroin exposure and open the way towards understanding opioid system-mediated serotonin homeostasis in heroin abuse. PMID:24874714

  17. Stress-induced dura vascular permeability does not develop in mast cell-deficient and neurokinin-1 receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kandere-Grzybowska, Kristiana; Gheorghe, Daniela; Priller, Josef; Esposito, Pamela; Huang, Man; Gerard, Norma; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2003-08-01

    Migraine headaches are often precipitated by stress and seem to involve neurogenic inflammation (NI) of the dura mater associated with the sensation of throbbing pain. Trigeminal nerve stimulation had been reported to activate rat dura mast cells and increase vascular permeability, effects inhibited by neonatal pretreatment with capsaicin implicating sensory neuropeptides, such as substance P (SP). The aim of the present study was to investigate NI, assessed by extravasation of 99-Technetium-gluceptate (99Tc-G), as well as the role of mast cells, SP and its receptor (NK-1R) in dura mater of mice in response to acute stress. Restraint stress for thirty min significantly increased 99Tc-G extravasation in the dura mater of C57BL mice. This effect was absent in W/W(v) mast cell-deficient mice and NK-1 receptor knockout mice (NK-1R-/-), but was unaltered in SP knockout mice (SP-/-). Acute restraint stress also resulted in increased dura mast cell activation in C57BL mice, but not in NK-1R-/- mice. These data demonstrate for the first time that acute stress triggers NI and mast cell activation in mouse dura mater through the activation of NK-1 receptors. The fact that SP-/- mice had intact vascular permeability response to stress indicates that some other NK-1 receptor agonist may substitute for SP. These results may help explain initial events in pathogenesis of stress-induced migraines.

  18. Enhanced response to mouse thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor immunization in TSH receptor-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Mami; Mitsutake, Norisato; Sakamoto, Hikaru; Chen, Chun-Rong; Rapoport, Basil; McLachlan, Sandra M; Nagayama, Yuji

    2010-08-01

    Graves-like hyperthyroidism is induced in BALB/c mice by immunization with adenovirus expressing the human TSH receptor (TSHR) A-subunit (amino acids 1-289). However, because of nonidentity between the human and mouse TSHR ( approximately 87% amino acid homology), we compared the responses of mice immunized with adenoviruses expressing either the mouse or the human TSHR A-subunit. Wild-type (wt) BALB/c mice immunized with the mouse A-subunit developed neither TSHR antibodies (measured by flow cytometry) nor thyroid lymphocytic infiltration. However, wt C57BL/6 mice developed sparse intrathyroidal lymphocyte infiltration without antibody production. Depletion of naturally occurring regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells had little effect. These results indicate the inability to break tolerance to the mouse TSHR in wt mice. In contrast, TSHR knockout (KO) BALB/c mice generated mouse TSHR antibodies in response to mouse A-subunit immunization and augmented human TSHR antibody response to human A-subunit immunization. Thyroid-stimulating antibody titers measured in a functional bioassay were comparable in human A-subunit immunized wt mice and in TSHR KO mice immunized with either the mouse or human A-subunit. In conclusion, immune response to the mouse TSHR is readily induced in TSHR KO but not in wt mice. Only in the former does immunization with adenovirus expressing the mouse A-subunit generate antibodies capable of activating the mouse TSHR. TSHR KO mice are, therefore, of value for future studies dissecting the autoimmune response to the mouse TSHR.

  19. [Effect of P2X7 receptor knock-out on bone cancer pain in mice].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Liu, Hui-Zhu; Zhang, Yu-Qiu

    2016-06-25

    Cancer pain is one of the most common symptoms in patients with late stage cancer. Lung, breast and prostate carcinoma are the most common causes of pain from osseous metastasis. P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is one of the subtypes of ATP-gated purinergic ion channel family, predominately distributed in microglia in the spinal cord. Activation of P2X7Rs in the spinal dorsal horn has been associated with release of proinflammatory cytokines from glial cells, causing increased neuronal excitability and exaggerated nociception. Mounting evidence implies a critical role of P2X7R in inflammatory and neuropathic pain. However, whether P2X7R is involved in cancer pain remains controversial. Here we established a bone cancer pain model by injecting the Lewis lung carcinoma cells into the femur bone marrow cavity of C57BL/6J wild-type mice (C57 WT mice) and P2X7R knockout mice (P2rx7(-/-) mice) to explore the role of P2X7R in bone cancer pain. Following intrafemur carcinoma inoculation, robust mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in C57 WT mice were developed on day 7 and 14, respectively, and persisted for at least 28 days in the ipsilateral hindpaw of the affected limb. CatWalk gait analysis showed significant decreases in the print area and stand phase, and a significant increase in swing phase in the ipsilateral hindpaw on day 21 and 28 after carcinoma cells inoculation. Histopathological sections (hematoxylin and eosin stain) showed that the bone marrow of the affected femur was largely replaced by invading tumor cells, and the femur displayed medullary bone loss and bone destruction on day 28 after inoculation. Unexpectedly, no significant changes in bone cancer-induced hypersensitivity of pain behaviors were found in P2rx7(-/-) mice, and the changes of pain-related values in CatWalk gait analysis even occurred earlier in P2rx7(-/-) mice, as compared with C57 WT mice. Together with our previous study in rats that blockade of P2X7R significantly alleviated bone cancer

  20. HSL-knockout mouse testis exhibits class B scavenger receptor upregulation and disrupted lipid raft microdomains[S

    PubMed Central

    Casado, María Emilia; Huerta, Lydia; Ortiz, Ana Isabel; Pérez-Crespo, Mirian; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Kraemer, Fredric B.; Lasunción, Miguel Ángel; Busto, Rebeca; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia

    2012-01-01

    There is a tight relationship between fertility and changes in cholesterol metabolism during spermatogenesis. In the testis, class B scavenger receptors (SR-B) SR-BI, SR-BII, and LIMP II mediate the selective uptake of cholesterol esters from HDL, which are hydrolyzed to unesterified cholesterol by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). HSL is critical because HSL knockout (KO) male mice are sterile. The aim of the present work was to determine the effects of the lack of HSL in testis on the expression of SR-B, lipid raft composition, and related cell signaling pathways. HSL-KO mouse testis presented altered spermatogenesis associated with decreased sperm counts, sperm motility, and infertility. In wild-type (WT) testis, HSL is expressed in elongated spermatids; SR-BI, in Leydig cells and spermatids; SR-BII, in spermatocytes and spermatids but not in Leydig cells; and LIMP II, in Sertoli and Leydig cells. HSL knockout male mice have increased expression of class B scavenger receptors, disrupted caveolin-1 localization in lipid raft plasma membrane microdomains, and activated phospho-ERK, phospho-AKT, and phospho-SRC in the testis, suggesting that class B scavenger receptors are involved in cholesterol ester uptake for steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in the testis. PMID:22988039

  1. Paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B knockout does not enhance axonal regeneration or locomotor recovery after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuka; Fujita, Yuki; Ueno, Masaki; Takai, Toshiyuki; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2011-01-21

    Myelin components that inhibit axonal regeneration are believed to contribute significantly to the lack of axonal regeneration noted in the adult central nervous system. Three proteins found in myelin, Nogo, myelin-associated glycoprotein, and oligodendrocyte-myelin glycoprotein, inhibit neurite outgrowth in vitro. All of these proteins interact with the same receptors, namely, the Nogo receptor (NgR) and paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PIR-B). As per previous reports, corticospinal tract (CST) regeneration is not enhanced in NgR-knock-out mice after spinal cord injury. Therefore, we assessed CST regeneration in PIR-B-knock-out mice. We found that hindlimb motor function, as assessed using the Basso mouse scale, footprint test, inclined plane test, and beam walking test, did not differ between the PIR-B-knock-out and wild-type mice after dorsal hemisection of the spinal cord. Further, tracing of the CST fibers after injury did not reveal enhanced axonal regeneration or sprouting in the CST of the PIR-B-knock-out mice. Systemic administration of NEP1-40, a NgR antagonist, to PIR-B knock-out mice did not enhance the regenerative response. These results indicate that PIR-B knock-out is not sufficient to induce extensive axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury. PMID:21087927

  2. Data on Arc and Zif268 expression in the brain of the α-2A adrenergic receptor knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Jeff

    2016-06-01

    The α2-adrenergic receptor (α2-AR) is widely distributed in the brain with distinct roles for α2-AR subtypes (A, B and C). In this article, data are provided on Activity Regulated Cytoskeleton Associated Protein (Arc) and Zif268 expression in the brain of the α2A-AR knockout (α2A-AR KO) mouse. These data are supplemental to an original research article examining Arc and Zif268 expression in rats injected with the α2-AR antagonist, RX821002 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2015.12.002. [1]). PMID:26952134

  3. Characterization of the retina in the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Marci L.

    Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are involved in visual processing and are expressed by inner retinal neurons in all species studied to date (Keyser et al., 2000; Dmitrieva et al., 2007; Liu et al., 2009), but their distribution in the mouse retina remains unknown. Reductions in alpha7 nicotinic AChRs (nAChRs) are thought to contribute to memory and visual deficits observed in Alzheimer's and schizophrenia (Coyle et al., 1983; Nordberg et al., 1999; Leonard et al., 2006). However, the alpha7 nAChR knockout (KO) mouse has a mild phenotype (Paylor et al., 1998; Fernandes et al., 2006; Young et al., 2007; Origlia et al., 2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the expression of AChRs in wildtype (WT) mouse retina and to assess whether up-regulation of other AChRs in the alpha7 nAChR KO retina may explain the minimal deficits described in the KO mouse. Reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) showed that mRNA transcripts for alpha2-7, alpha 9, alpha10, beta2-4 nAChR subunits and m1-m5 muscarinic AChR (mAChR) subtypes were present in WT murine retina. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of alpha3-5, alpha9, and m1-m5 AChR proteins and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated nAChR and mAChR proteins expressed by subsets of bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells. This is the first reported expression of alpha9 and alpha10 nAChR transcripts and alpha9 nAChR proteins in the retina of any species. Quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) showed changes in AChR transcript expression in the alpha7 nAChR KO mouse retina relative to WT. Within whole retina alpha2, alpha9, alpha10, beta4, m1 and m4 AChR transcripts were up-regulated, while alpha5 nAChR transcripts were down-regulated. However, cell populations showed subtle differences; m4 mAChR transcripts were up-regulated in the ganglion cell layer and outer portion of the inner nuclear layer (oINL),while beta4 nAChR transcript up-regulation was limited to the oINL. Surprisingly, alpha2, alpha9, beta4, m2 and m4 transcripts were

  4. Oxytocin and estrogen receptor alpha and beta knockout mice provide discriminably different odor cues in behavioral assays.

    PubMed

    Kavaliers, M; Agmo, A; Choleris, E; Gustafsson, J A; Korach, K S; Muglia, L J; Pfaff, D W; Ogawa, S

    2004-08-01

    Social behavior involves both the recognition and pro-duction of social cues. Mice with selective deletion(knockout) of either the gene for oxytocin (OT) or genes for the estrogen receptor (ER) -c or -B display impaired social recognition. In this study we demonstrate that these gene knockout mice also provide discriminably different social stimuli in behavioral assays. In an odor choice test, which is a measure of social interest and discrimination, outbred female Swiss-Webster mice discriminated the urine odors of male knock-outs IKO: OTKO, alphaERKO, betaERKO) from the odors of their wildtype littermates (WT: OTWT, alphaERWT, betaERWT). Females showed marked initial choices of the urine odors of OTWT and betaERWT males over those of OTKOand PERKO males, and alphaERKO males over alphaERWT males. The odors of OTKO and betaERKO males also induced aversive, analgesic responses, with the odors of WTs having no significant effects. Odors of both the alphaERWT andalphaERKO males induced aversive, analgesic responses,with the odors of the WT inducing significantly greater analgesia. The odors of restraint stressed WT and KO males also elicited analgesia with, again, females dis-playing significantly greater responses to the odors of stressed OTKO and betaERKO males than their WTs, and significantly lower analgesia to the odors of stressedalphaERKO than alphaERWT males. These findings show that the KO mice are discriminated from their WTs on the basis of odor and that the various KOs differ in the relative attractiveness/aversiveness of their odors. Therefore, in behavioral assays one causal route by which gene inactivation alters the social behavior of knockout mice may be mediated through the partners'modified responses to their odors.

  5. Cannabinoid 1 receptor knockout mice display cold allodynia, but enhanced recovery from spared-nerve injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Piskoun, Boris; Russo, Lori; Norcini, Monica; Blanck, Thomas; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    Background The function of the Cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) in the development of neuropathic pain is not clear. Mounting evidence suggest that CB1R expression and activation may contribute to pain. Cannabinoid 1 receptor knockout mice (CB1R−/−) generated on a C57Bl/6 background exhibit hypoalgesia in the hotplate assay and formalin test. These findings suggest that Cannabinoid 1 receptor expression mediates the responses to at least some types of painful stimuli. By using this mouse line, we sought to determine if the lack of Cannabinoid 1 receptor unveils a general hypoalgesic phenotype, including protection against the development of neuropathic pain. The acetone test was used to measure cold sensitivity, the electronic von Frey was used to measure mechanical thresholds before and after spared-nerve injury, and analysis of footprint patterns was conducted to determine if motor function is differentially affected after nerve-injury in mice with varying levels of Cannabinoid 1 receptor. Results At baseline, CB1R−/− mice were hypersensitive in the acetone test, and this phenotype was maintained after spared-nerve injury. Using calcium imaging of lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures, a higher percentage of neurons isolated from CB1R−/− mice were menthol sensitive relative to DRG isolated from wild-type (CB1R+/+) mice. Baseline mechanical thresholds did not differ among genotypes, and mechanical hypersensitivity developed similarly in the first two weeks following spared-nerve injury (SNI). At two weeks post-SNI, CB1R−/− mice recovered significantly from mechanical hypersensitivity, while the CB1R+/+ mice did not. Heterozygous knockouts (CB1R+/−) transiently developed cold allodynia only after injury, but recovered mechanical thresholds to a similar extent as the CB1R−/− mice. Sciatic functional indices, which reflect overall nerve health, and alternation coefficients, which indicate uniformity of strides, were not significantly different

  6. Genetic background can result in a marked or minimal effect of gene knockout (GPR55 and CB2 receptor) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis models of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sisay, Sofia; Pryce, Gareth; Jackson, Samuel J; Tanner, Carolyn; Ross, Ruth A; Michael, Gregory J; Selwood, David L; Giovannoni, Gavin; Baker, David

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoids and some phytocannabinoids bind to CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors, transient receptor potential vanilloid one (TRPV1) receptor and the orphan G protein receptor fifty-five (GPR55). Studies using C57BL/10 and C57BL/6 (Cnr2 (tm1Zim)) CB2 cannabinoid receptor knockout mice have demonstrated an immune-augmenting effect in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models of multiple sclerosis. However, other EAE studies in Biozzi ABH mice often failed to show any treatment effect of either CB2 receptor agonism or antagonism on inhibition of T cell autoimmunity. The influence of genetic background on the induction of EAE in endocannabinoid system-related gene knockout mice was examined. It was found that C57BL/6.GPR55 knockout mice developed less severe disease, notably in female mice, following active induction with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 peptide. In contrast C57BL/6.CB2 (Cnr2 (Dgen)) receptor knockout mice developed augmented severity of disease consistent with the genetically and pharmacologically-distinct, Cnr2 (tm1Zim) mice. However, when the knockout gene was bred into the ABH mouse background and EAE induced with spinal cord autoantigens the immune-enhancing effect of CB2 receptor deletion was lost. Likewise CB1 receptor and transient receptor potential vanilloid one knockout mice on the ABH background demonstrated no alteration in immune-susceptibility, in terms of disease incidence and severity of EAE, in contrast to that reported in some C57BL/6 mouse studies. Furthermore the immune-modulating influence of GPR55 was marginal on the ABH mouse background. Whilst sedative doses of tetrahydrocannabinol could induce immunosuppression, this was associated with a CB1 receptor rather than a CB2 receptor-mediated effect. These data support the fact that non-psychoactive doses of medicinal cannabis have a marginal influence on the immune response in MS. Importantly, it adds a note of caution for the translational value of some

  7. Genetic Background Can Result in a Marked or Minimal Effect of Gene Knockout (GPR55 and CB2 Receptor) in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Models of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Samuel J.; Tanner, Carolyn; Ross, Ruth A.; Michael, Gregory J.; Selwood, David L.; Giovannoni, Gavin; Baker, David

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoids and some phytocannabinoids bind to CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors, transient receptor potential vanilloid one (TRPV1) receptor and the orphan G protein receptor fifty-five (GPR55). Studies using C57BL/10 and C57BL/6 (Cnr2tm1Zim) CB2 cannabinoid receptor knockout mice have demonstrated an immune-augmenting effect in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models of multiple sclerosis. However, other EAE studies in Biozzi ABH mice often failed to show any treatment effect of either CB2 receptor agonism or antagonism on inhibition of T cell autoimmunity. The influence of genetic background on the induction of EAE in endocannabinoid system-related gene knockout mice was examined. It was found that C57BL/6.GPR55 knockout mice developed less severe disease, notably in female mice, following active induction with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 peptide. In contrast C57BL/6.CB2 (Cnr2Dgen) receptor knockout mice developed augmented severity of disease consistent with the genetically and pharmacologically-distinct, Cnr2tm1Zim mice. However, when the knockout gene was bred into the ABH mouse background and EAE induced with spinal cord autoantigens the immune-enhancing effect of CB2 receptor deletion was lost. Likewise CB1 receptor and transient receptor potential vanilloid one knockout mice on the ABH background demonstrated no alteration in immune-susceptibility, in terms of disease incidence and severity of EAE, in contrast to that reported in some C57BL/6 mouse studies. Furthermore the immune-modulating influence of GPR55 was marginal on the ABH mouse background. Whilst sedative doses of tetrahydrocannabinol could induce immunosuppression, this was associated with a CB1 receptor rather than a CB2 receptor-mediated effect. These data support the fact that non-psychoactive doses of medicinal cannabis have a marginal influence on the immune response in MS. Importantly, it adds a note of caution for the translational value of some

  8. A muscle-specific knockout implicates nuclear receptor coactivator MED1 in the regulation of glucose and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoting; Birsoy, Kivanc; Roeder, Robert G

    2010-06-01

    As conventional transcriptional factors that are activated in diverse signaling pathways, nuclear receptors play important roles in many physiological processes that include energy homeostasis. The MED1 subunit of the Mediator coactivator complex plays a broad role in nuclear receptor-mediated transcription by anchoring the Mediator complex to diverse promoter-bound nuclear receptors. Given the significant role of skeletal muscle, in part through the action of nuclear receptors, in glucose and fatty acid metabolism, we generated skeletal muscle-specific Med1 knockout mice. Importantly, these mice show enhanced insulin sensitivity and improved glucose tolerance as well as resistance to high-fat diet-induced obesity. Furthermore, the white muscle of these mice exhibits increased mitochondrial density and expression of genes specific to type I and type IIA fibers, indicating a fast-to-slow fiber switch, as well as markedly increased expression of the brown adipose tissue-specific UCP-1 and Cidea genes that are involved in respiratory uncoupling. These dramatic results implicate MED1 as a powerful suppressor in skeletal muscle of genetic programs implicated in energy expenditure and raise the significant possibility of therapeutical approaches for metabolic syndromes and muscle diseases through modulation of MED1-nuclear receptor interactions.

  9. Increased brain monoaminergic tone after the NMDA receptor GluN2A subunit gene knockout is responsible for resistance to the hypnotic effect of nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Andrey B; Yamakura, Tomohiro; Kohno, Tatsuro; Sakimura, Kenji; Baba, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors can be inhibited by inhalational anesthetics in vitro at clinically relevant concentrations. Here, to clarify the role of NMDA receptors in anesthetic-induced unconsciousness, we examined the hypnotic properties of isoflurane, sevoflurane and nitrous oxide in NMDA receptor GluN2A subunit knockout mice. The hypnotic properties of inhalational anesthetics were evaluated in mice in the loss of righting reflex (LORR) assay by measuring the 50% concentration for LORR (LORR ED(50)). Knockout mice displayed isoflurane and sevoflurane LORR ED(50) values similar to wild-type controls, indicating no significant contribution of these receptors to the hypnotic action of halogenated anesthetics. However, compared with wild-type controls, mutant mice displayed larger isoflurane LORR ED(50) values in the presence of nitrous oxide, indicating a resistance to this gaseous anesthetic. Knockout mice have enhanced brain monoaminergic activity which occurs secondary to NMDA receptor dysfunction, and the observed resistance to the isoflurane LORR ED(50)-sparing effect of nitrous oxide could be abolished by pretreatment with the dopamine D(2) receptor antagonist droperidol or with the serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist ketanserin. Thus, resistance to nitrous oxide in knockout mice appears to be a secondary phenomenon of monoaminergic origin and not a direct result of impaired NMDA receptor function. Our results indicate that NMDA receptors are not critically involved in the hypnotic action of conventionally-used inhalational anesthetics. Also, they suggest that increased brain monoaminergic tone can diminish the effects of general anesthesia. Finally, they provide further evidence that changes secondary to genetic manipulation can explain the results obtained in global knockouts. PMID:23123346

  10. Histamine responses of large neostriatal interneurons in histamine H1 and H2 receptor knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Sachie; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Takeshi; Wang, Zhi-Ming; Akaike, Hironari; Ito, Yushi; Akaike, Norio

    2009-03-16

    Histamine (HA) is an important neuro-modulator, contributing to a variety of physiological responses in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). However there is little information about the cell/signaling mechanism underlying its role. In the present study, we characterized HA responses in single large neostriatal neurons acutely dissociated from wild type (WT) and HA receptor knock-out (KO) mice, with a particular emphasis on identifying the role of HA receptor subtypes. HA (10 microM) and a selective H(2) receptor agonist dimaprit (1 microM) both evoked an inward current in H(1)-KO mice, and HA and a selective H(1) receptor agonist HTMT (10 microM) both evoked an inward current in H(2)-KO mice. In the H(1) and H(2) double (H(1/2)) KO mice, there was no response to either the application of HA or the selective H(1), H(2) receptor agonists. Hence we have confirmed that the targeted genes were indeed absent in these KO mice and that both receptor subtypes contribute to HA's excitatory actions. Furthermore the HA-induced inward currents were mediated by a decrease in current through K(+) channels. In addition, we observed the effects of methamphetamine (METH) on the locomotor activity of WT and HA receptor KO mice, and found that METH-induced behavioral sensitization is evident in H(1/2)-KO mice, but not in H(1)- or H(2)-KO mice. These observations suggest that suppressive roles of HA on methamphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization would be mediated through both H(1) and H(2) receptors in the CNS including neostriatum.

  11. IL-1 receptor-antagonist (IL-1Ra) knockout mice show anxiety-like behavior by aging.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Chisato; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Odaka, Haruki; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Kiyama, Yuji; Manabe, Toshiya; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Iwakura, Yoichiro

    2015-07-10

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) plays a critical role in stress responses, and its mRNA is induced in the brain by restraint stress. Previously, we reported that IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) knockout (KO) mice, which lacked IL-1Ra molecules that antagonize the IL-1 receptor, showed anti-depression-like behavior via adrenergic modulation at the age of 8 weeks. Here, we report that IL-1Ra KO mice display an anxiety-like phenotype that is induced spontaneously by aging in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test. This anxiety-like phenotype was improved by the administration of diazepam. The expression of the anxiety-related molecule glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was significantly reduced in 20-week-old but not in 11-week-old IL-1Ra KO mice compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. The expression of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) was not altered between IL-1Ra KO mice and WT littermates at either 11 or 20 weeks old. Analysis of monoamine concentration in the hippocampus revealed that tryptophan, the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), and the dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA) were significantly increased in 20-week-old IL-1Ra KO mice compared to littermate WT mice. These findings strongly suggest that the anxiety-like behavior observed in older mice was caused by the complicated alteration of monoamine metabolism and/or GR expression in the hippocampus.

  12. Interaction between 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) receptors: effects of 8-OH-DPAT-induced hypothermia in 5-HT(1B) receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Gardier, A M; Gruwez, B; Trillat, A C; Jacquot, C; Hen, R; Bourin, M

    2001-06-15

    To test for adaptive compensatory changes that may have occurred in the functional activity of somatodendritic 5-HT(1A) receptors during the development of constitutive "knockout" mice lacking the 5-HT(1B) receptor subtype (5-HT(1B) -/- KO), we assayed for decrease in body temperature induced by an acute subcutaneous injection of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, 8-hydroxy 2(di-n-propyl(amino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), either alone or in the presence of a selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, N-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]-N-(2-pyridinyl) cyclo-hexanecarboxamide (WAY 100635). We compared dose-response curves, time course study, calculated ED(50) values (potency), maximal response to 8-OH-DPAT (efficacy) as well as measurements of the dose-dependent blockade of this response by WAY 100635 between wild-type controls and mutant mice. We found a higher efficacy of 8-OH-DPAT-induced hypothermia in 5-HT(1B) -/- KO compared to wild-type mice suggesting that an adaptive thermoregulatory process involving the functional activity of somatodendritic 5-HT(1A) receptors is altered in mutant mice lacking 5-HT(1B) receptors.

  13. Phenotypic screening of hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4-{gamma} receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdin, Anna Karin; Surve, Vikas V.; Joensson, Marie; Bjursell, Mikael; Edenro, Anne; Schuelke, Meint; Saad, Alaa; Bjurstroem, Sivert; Lundgren, Elisabeth Jensen; Snaith, Michael; Fransson-Steen, Ronny; Toernell, Jan; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad . E-mail: mohammad.bohlooly@astrazeneca.com

    2006-10-20

    Using the mouse as a model organism in pharmaceutical research presents unique advantages as its physiology in many ways resembles the human physiology, it also has a relatively short generation time, low breeding and maintenance costs, and is available in a wide variety of inbred strains. The ability to genetically modify mouse embryonic stem cells to generate mouse models that better mimic human disease is another advantage. In the present study, a comprehensive phenotypic screening protocol is applied to elucidate the phenotype of a novel mouse knockout model of hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4-{gamma}. HNF4-{gamma} is expressed in the kidneys, gut, pancreas, and testis. First level of the screen is aimed at general health, morphologic appearance, normal cage behaviour, and gross neurological functions. The second level of the screen looks at metabolic characteristics and lung function. The third level of the screen investigates behaviour more in-depth and the fourth level consists of a thorough pathological characterisation, blood chemistry, haematology, and bone marrow analysis. When compared with littermate wild-type mice (HNF4-{gamma}{sup +/+}), the HNF4-{gamma} knockout (HNF4-{gamma}{sup -/-}) mice had lowered energy expenditure and locomotor activity during night time that resulted in a higher body weight despite having reduced intake of food and water. HNF4-{gamma}{sup -/-} mice were less inclined to build nest and were found to spend more time in a passive state during the forced swim test.

  14. Toll-like receptor 4 knockout alleviates paraquat-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction through an autophagy-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuyi; Zhu, Xiaoling; Xiong, Lize; Zhang, Yingmei; Ren, Jun

    2016-08-22

    Paraquat, a quarternary nitrogen herbicide, is a toxic prooxidant leading to multi-organ failure including the heart although the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. This study was designed to examine the role of the innate proinflammatory mediator toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in paraquat-induced cardiac contractile anomalies and the underlying mechanisms involved with a focus on autophagy, a conservative machinery governing protein and organelle degradation and recycling for cardiac homeostasis. Wild-type (WT) and TLR4 knockout (TLR4(-/-)) mice were challenged with paraquat (45mg/kg, i.p.) for 48h. Paraquat challenge did not affect mRNA levels of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 in WT mice nor did paraquat treatment alter TREM-1 levels. Paraquat challenge elicited cardiac mechanical defects including compromised cardiomyocyte contractile function, intracellular Ca(2+) handling, and overt autophagy as manifested by increased LC3BII-to-LC3BI ratio, Atg5, Atg7 and p62 levels. Interestingly, TLR4 knockout significantly attenuated paraquat-induced cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) derangement as well as alterations of autophagy markers. Paraquat-elicited changes in cardiac autophagy markers (LC3BII, LC3BII-to-LC3BI ratio and p62) were augmented by lysosomal inhibition using bafilomycin A1 in WT mice. TLR4 knockout significantly attenuated or negated paraquat-elicited increase in LC3BII, LC3BII-to-LC3BI ratio and p62 levels in the presence of lysosomal inhibition. In addition, paraquat challenge promoted phosphorylation of AMPK while suppressing the phosphorylation of mTOR and ULK1 (the autophagy inhibitory Ser(757)), the effects of which were significantly attenuated by TLR4 ablation. In vitro study revealed that AMPK activation using AICAR or mTOR inhibition using rapamycin effectively negated the beneficial cardiomyocyte mechanical effects of TLR4 inhibition (CLI-095) against paraquat toxicity, supporting a permissive role for AMPK-mTOR in TLR4 inhibition

  15. Toll-like receptor 4 knockout alleviates paraquat-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction through an autophagy-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuyi; Zhu, Xiaoling; Xiong, Lize; Zhang, Yingmei; Ren, Jun

    2016-08-22

    Paraquat, a quarternary nitrogen herbicide, is a toxic prooxidant leading to multi-organ failure including the heart although the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. This study was designed to examine the role of the innate proinflammatory mediator toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in paraquat-induced cardiac contractile anomalies and the underlying mechanisms involved with a focus on autophagy, a conservative machinery governing protein and organelle degradation and recycling for cardiac homeostasis. Wild-type (WT) and TLR4 knockout (TLR4(-/-)) mice were challenged with paraquat (45mg/kg, i.p.) for 48h. Paraquat challenge did not affect mRNA levels of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 in WT mice nor did paraquat treatment alter TREM-1 levels. Paraquat challenge elicited cardiac mechanical defects including compromised cardiomyocyte contractile function, intracellular Ca(2+) handling, and overt autophagy as manifested by increased LC3BII-to-LC3BI ratio, Atg5, Atg7 and p62 levels. Interestingly, TLR4 knockout significantly attenuated paraquat-induced cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) derangement as well as alterations of autophagy markers. Paraquat-elicited changes in cardiac autophagy markers (LC3BII, LC3BII-to-LC3BI ratio and p62) were augmented by lysosomal inhibition using bafilomycin A1 in WT mice. TLR4 knockout significantly attenuated or negated paraquat-elicited increase in LC3BII, LC3BII-to-LC3BI ratio and p62 levels in the presence of lysosomal inhibition. In addition, paraquat challenge promoted phosphorylation of AMPK while suppressing the phosphorylation of mTOR and ULK1 (the autophagy inhibitory Ser(757)), the effects of which were significantly attenuated by TLR4 ablation. In vitro study revealed that AMPK activation using AICAR or mTOR inhibition using rapamycin effectively negated the beneficial cardiomyocyte mechanical effects of TLR4 inhibition (CLI-095) against paraquat toxicity, supporting a permissive role for AMPK-mTOR in TLR4 inhibition

  16. Differential actions of orexin receptors in brainstem cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons revealed by receptor knockouts: implications for orexinergic signaling in arousal and narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kohlmeier, Kristi A.; Tyler, Christopher J.; Kalogiannis, Mike; Ishibashi, Masaru; Kristensen, Morten P.; Gumenchuk, Iryna; Chemelli, Richard M.; Kisanuki, Yaz Y.; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Leonard, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Orexin neuropeptides influence multiple homeostatic functions and play an essential role in the expression of normal sleep-wake behavior. While their two known receptors (OX1 and OX2) are targets for novel pharmacotherapeutics, the actions mediated by each receptor remain largely unexplored. Using brain slices from mice constitutively lacking either receptor, we used whole-cell and Ca2+ imaging methods to delineate the cellular actions of each receptor within cholinergic [laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT)] and monoaminergic [dorsal raphe (DR) and locus coeruleus (LC)] brainstem nuclei—where orexins promote arousal and suppress REM sleep. In slices from OX−/−2 mice, orexin-A (300 nM) elicited wild-type responses in LDT, DR, and LC neurons consisting of a depolarizing current and augmented voltage-dependent Ca2+ transients. In slices from OX−/−1 mice, the depolarizing current was absent in LDT and LC neurons and was attenuated in DR neurons, although Ca2+-transients were still augmented. Since orexin-A produced neither of these actions in slices lacking both receptors, our findings suggest that orexin-mediated depolarization is mediated by both receptors in DR, but is exclusively mediated by OX1 in LDT and LC neurons, even though OX2 is present and OX2 mRNA appears elevated in brainstems from OX−/−1 mice. Considering published behavioral data, these findings support a model in which orexin-mediated excitation of mesopontine cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons contributes little to stabilizing spontaneous waking and sleep bouts, but functions in context-dependent arousal and helps restrict muscle atonia to REM sleep. The augmented Ca2+ transients produced by both receptors appeared mediated by influx via L-type Ca2+ channels, which is often linked to transcriptional signaling. This could provide an adaptive signal to compensate for receptor loss or prolonged antagonism and may contribute to the reduced severity of narcolepsy in single receptor

  17. Glutamate receptor mGlu2 and mGlu3 knockout striata are dopamine supersensitive, with elevated D2(High) receptors and marked supersensitivity to the dopamine agonist (+)PHNO.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Philip; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Corti, Corrado; Corsi, Mauro; Bruno, Valeria

    2009-03-01

    The finding that the mGlu2/3 metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, LY404039, improves clinical symptoms in schizophrenia warrants a search for a possible interaction between mGlu2/3 receptors and dopamine D2 receptors. Here, this topic is examined in striatal tissue of mice lacking either mGlu2 or mGlu3 receptor. Such mice are known to be behaviorally supersensitive to dopamine receptor agonists. Therefore, to determine the basis of this dopamine supersensitivity, the proportion of dopamine D2(High) receptors was measured in the striata of mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptor knockout mice. The proportion of D2(High) receptors was found to be elevated by 220% in the striata of both knockouts. To measure the functional dopamine supersensitivity, the D2 agonist (+)PHNO was used to stimulate the incorporation of GTP-gamma-S in the striatal homogenates in the presence of drugs that blocked the dopamine D1, D3, and D5 receptors. Compared with control striata, the mGlu2 receptor knockout tissues were 67-fold more sensitive to (+)PHNO, while the mGlu3 receptor knockout tissues were 17-fold more sensitive. These data suggest that group II mGlu receptors-mGlu2 receptors in particular-may normally regulate D2 receptors by reducing the proportion of high-affinity D2 receptors in membranes. Such regulation may contribute to the antipsychotic action of mGlu2/3 receptor agonists. PMID:19084908

  18. Enhanced histaminergic neurotransmission and sleep-wake alterations, a study in histamine H3-receptor knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Gondard, Elise; Anaclet, Christelle; Akaoka, Hidéo; Guo, Rui-Xian; Zhang, Mei; Buda, Colette; Franco, Patricia; Kotani, Hidehito; Lin, Jian-Sheng

    2013-05-01

    Long-term abolition of a brain arousal system impairs wakefulness (W), but little is known about the consequences of long-term enhancement. The brain histaminergic arousal system is under the negative control of H3-autoreceptors whose deletion results in permanent enhancement of histamine (HA) turnover. In order to determine the consequences of enhancement of the histaminergic system, we compared the cortical EEG and sleep-wake states of H3-receptor knockout (H3R-/-) and wild-type mouse littermates. We found that H3R-/-mice had rich phenotypes. On the one hand, they showed clear signs of enhanced HA neurotransmission and vigilance, i.e., a higher EEG θ power during spontaneous W and a greater extent of W or sleep restriction during behavioral tasks, including environmental change, locomotion, and motivation tests. On the other hand, during the baseline dark period, they displayed deficient W and signs of sleep deterioration, such as pronounced sleep fragmentation and reduced cortical slow activity during slow wave sleep (SWS), most likely due to a desensitization of postsynaptic histaminergic receptors as a result of constant HA release. Ciproxifan (H3-receptor inverse agonist) enhanced W in wild-type mice, but not in H3R-/-mice, indicating a functional deletion of H3-receptors, whereas triprolidine (postsynaptic H1-receptor antagonist) or α-fluoromethylhistidine (HA-synthesis inhibitor) caused a greater SWS increase in H3R-/- than in wild-type mice, consistent with enhanced HA neurotransmission. These sleep-wake characteristics and the obesity phenotypes previously reported in this animal model suggest that chronic enhancement of histaminergic neurotransmission eventually compromises the arousal system, leading to sleep-wake, behavioral, and metabolic disorders similar to those caused by voluntary sleep restriction in humans.

  19. Normal sleep homeostasis and lack of epilepsy phenotype in GABA A receptor alpha3 subunit-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Winsky-Sommerer, R; Knapman, A; Fedele, D E; Schofield, C M; Vyazovskiy, V V; Rudolph, U; Huguenard, J R; Fritschy, J-M; Tobler, I

    2008-06-23

    Thalamo-cortical networks generate specific patterns of oscillations during distinct vigilance states and epilepsy, well characterized by electroencephalography (EEG). Oscillations depend on recurrent synaptic loops, which are controlled by GABAergic transmission. In particular, GABA A receptors containing the alpha3 subunit are expressed predominantly in cortical layer VI and thalamic reticular nucleus (nRT) and regulate the activity and firing pattern of neurons in relay nuclei. Therefore, ablation of these receptors by gene targeting might profoundly affect thalamo-cortical oscillations. Here, we investigated the role of alpha3-GABA A receptors in regulating vigilance states and seizure activity by analyzing chronic EEG recordings in alpha3 subunit-knockout (alpha3-KO) mice. The presence of postsynaptic alpha3-GABA A receptors/gephyrin clusters in the nRT and GABA A-mediated synaptic currents in acute thalamic slices was also examined. EEG spectral analysis showed no difference between genotypes during non rapid-eye movement (NREM) sleep or at waking-NREM sleep transitions. EEG power in the spindle frequency range (10-15 Hz) was significantly lower at NREM-REM sleep transitions in mutant compared with wild-type mice. Enhancement of sleep pressure by 6 h sleep deprivation did not reveal any differences in the regulation of EEG activities between genotypes. Finally, the waking EEG showed a slightly larger power in the 11-13-Hz band in alpha3-KO mice. However, neither behavior nor the waking EEG showed alterations suggestive of absence seizures. Furthermore, alpha3-KO mice did not differ in seizure susceptibility in a model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Strikingly, despite the disruption of postsynaptic gephyrin clusters, whole-cell patch clamp recordings revealed intact inhibitory synaptic transmission in the nRT of alpha3-KO mice. These findings show that the lack of alpha3-GABA(A) receptors is extensively compensated for to preserve the integrity of thalamo

  20. Enhanced Histaminergic Neurotransmission and Sleep-Wake Alterations, a Study in Histamine H3-Receptor Knock-Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gondard, Elise; Anaclet, Christelle; Akaoka, Hidéo; Guo, Rui-Xian; Zhang, Mei; Buda, Colette; Franco, Patricia; Kotani, Hidehito; Lin, Jian-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Long-term abolition of a brain arousal system impairs wakefulness (W), but little is known about the consequences of long-term enhancement. The brain histaminergic arousal system is under the negative control of H3-autoreceptors whose deletion results in permanent enhancement of histamine (HA) turnover. In order to determine the consequences of enhancement of the histaminergic system, we compared the cortical EEG and sleep-wake states of H3-receptor knockout (H3R−/−) and wild-type mouse littermates. We found that H3R−/−mice had rich phenotypes. On the one hand, they showed clear signs of enhanced HA neurotransmission and vigilance, i.e., a higher EEG θ power during spontaneous W and a greater extent of W or sleep restriction during behavioral tasks, including environmental change, locomotion, and motivation tests. On the other hand, during the baseline dark period, they displayed deficient W and signs of sleep deterioration, such as pronounced sleep fragmentation and reduced cortical slow activity during slow wave sleep (SWS), most likely due to a desensitization of postsynaptic histaminergic receptors as a result of constant HA release. Ciproxifan (H3-receptor inverse agonist) enhanced W in wild-type mice, but not in H3R−/−mice, indicating a functional deletion of H3-receptors, whereas triprolidine (postsynaptic H1-receptor antagonist) or α-fluoromethylhistidine (HA-synthesis inhibitor) caused a greater SWS increase in H3R−/− than in wild-type mice, consistent with enhanced HA neurotransmission. These sleep-wake characteristics and the obesity phenotypes previously reported in this animal model suggest that chronic enhancement of histaminergic neurotransmission eventually compromises the arousal system, leading to sleep-wake, behavioral, and metabolic disorders similar to those caused by voluntary sleep restriction in humans. PMID:23303066

  1. Synthetic and Receptor Signaling Explorations of the Mitragyna Alkaloids: Mitragynine as an Atypical Molecular Framework for Opioid Receptor Modulators.

    PubMed

    Kruegel, Andrew C; Gassaway, Madalee M; Kapoor, Abhijeet; Váradi, András; Majumdar, Susruta; Filizola, Marta; Javitch, Jonathan A; Sames, Dalibor

    2016-06-01

    Mu-opioid receptor agonists represent mainstays of pain management. However, the therapeutic use of these agents is associated with serious side effects, including potentially lethal respiratory depression. Accordingly, there is a longstanding interest in the development of new opioid analgesics with improved therapeutic profiles. The alkaloids of the Southeast Asian plant Mitragyna speciosa, represented by the prototypical member mitragynine, are an unusual class of opioid receptor modulators with distinct pharmacological properties. Here we describe the first receptor-level functional characterization of mitragynine and related natural alkaloids at the human mu-, kappa-, and delta-opioid receptors. These results show that mitragynine and the oxidized analogue 7-hydroxymitragynine, are partial agonists of the human mu-opioid receptor and competitive antagonists at the kappa- and delta-opioid receptors. We also show that mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine are G-protein-biased agonists of the mu-opioid receptor, which do not recruit β-arrestin following receptor activation. Therefore, the Mitragyna alkaloid scaffold represents a novel framework for the development of functionally biased opioid modulators, which may exhibit improved therapeutic profiles. Also presented is an enantioselective total synthesis of both (-)-mitragynine and its unnatural enantiomer, (+)-mitragynine, employing a proline-catalyzed Mannich-Michael reaction sequence as the key transformation. Pharmacological evaluation of (+)-mitragynine revealed its much weaker opioid activity. Likewise, the intermediates and chemical transformations developed in the total synthesis allowed the elucidation of previously unexplored structure-activity relationships (SAR) within the Mitragyna scaffold. Molecular docking studies, in combination with the observed chemical SAR, suggest that Mitragyna alkaloids adopt a binding pose at the mu-opioid receptor that is distinct from that of classical opioids. PMID

  2. Assessment of ethanol consumption and water drinking by NPY Y(2) receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Todd E; Naveilhan, Philippe; Ernfors, Patrik

    2004-06-01

    In recent years, pharmacological and genetic evidence have emerged suggesting that neuropeptide Y (NPY) and the NPY Y(1) receptor are involved with neurobiological responses to ethanol. Pharmacological data implicate a role for the NPY Y(2) receptor in ethanol self-administration. The purpose of the present study was to determine if genetic mutation of the Y(2) receptor would modulate ethanol consumption and/or ethanol-induced sedation. Here, we report that mutant mice lacking the NPY Y(2) receptor (Y(2)(-/-)), when maintained on a mixed 50% 129/ SvJ x 50 % Balb/cJ background, drink significantly less of solutions containing 3 or 6% (v/v) ethanol relative to wild-type (Y(2)(+/+)) mice. These mice drink normal amounts of solutions containing sucrose or quinine, have normal blood ethanol clearance, and show normal sensitivity to ethanol-induced sedation. However, Y(2)(-/-) mice that are backcrossed to a Balb/cJ background show normal consumption of ethanol, indicating that the contributions of the NPY Y(2) receptor to ethanol consumption are genetic background dependent. Consistent with previous data suggesting that NPY modulates water drinking, Y(2)(-/-) mice of both genetic backgrounds consume significantly more water than Y(2)(+/+) mice. The present results suggest roles for the NPY Y(2) receptor in the modulation of ethanol and water consumption.

  3. Dysfunctional Presynaptic M2 Receptors in the Presence of Chronically High Acetylcholine Levels: Data from the PRiMA Knockout Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Franziska; Krejci, Eric; Zimmermann, Martina; Klein, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    The muscarinic M2 receptor (M2R) acts as a negative feedback regulator in central cholinergic systems. Activation of the M2 receptor limits acetylcholine (ACh) release, especially when ACh levels are increased because acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity is acutely inhibited. Chronically high ACh levels in the extracellular space, however, were reported to down-regulate M2R to various degrees. In the present study, we used the PRiMA knockout mouse which develops severely reduced AChE activity postnatally to investigate ACh release, and we used microdialysis to investigate whether the function of M2R to reduce ACh release in vivo was impaired in adult PRiMA knockout mice. We first show that striatal and hippocampal ACh levels, while strongly increased, still respond to AChE inhibitors. Infusion or injection of oxotremorine, a muscarinic M2 agonist, reduced ACh levels in wild-type mice but did not significantly affect ACh levels in PRiMA knockout mice or in wild-type mice in which ACh levels were artificially increased by infusion of neostigmine. Scopolamine, a muscarinic antagonist, increased ACh levels in wild-type mice receiving neostigmine, but not in wild-type mice or in PRiMA knockout mice. These results demonstrate that M2R are dysfunctional and do not affect ACh levels in PRiMA knockout mice, likely because of down-regulation and/or loss of receptor-effector coupling. Remarkably, this loss of function does not affect cognitive functions in PRiMA knockout mice. Our results are discussed in the context of AChE inhibitor therapy as used in dementia. PMID:26506622

  4. Specific regions display altered grey matter volume in μ-opioid receptor knockout mice: MRI voxel-based morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Kazumasu; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Nonaka, Hiroi; Kasahara, Yoshiyuki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Hall, F Scott; Uhl, George R; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kawashima, Ryuta; Sora, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE μ Opioid receptor knockout (MOP-KO) mice display several behavioural differences from wild-type (WT) littermates including differential responses to nociceptive stimuli. Brain structural changes have been tied to behavioural alterations noted in transgenic mice with targeting of different genes. Hence, we assess the brain structure of MOP-KO mice. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and histological methods were used to identify structural differences between extensively backcrossed MOP-KO mice and WT mice. KEY RESULTS MOP-KO mice displayed robust increases in regional grey matter volume in olfactory bulb, several hypothalamic nuclei, periaqueductal grey (PAG) and several cerebellar areas, most confirmed by VBM analysis. The largest increases in grey matter volume were detected in the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb, arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus, ventrolateral PAG (VLPAG) and cerebellar regions including paramedian and cerebellar lobules. Histological analyses confirm several of these results, with increased VLPAG cell numbers and increased thickness of the olfactory bulb granule cell layer and cerebellar molecular and granular cell layers. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS MOP deletion causes previously undescribed structural changes in specific brain regions, but not in all regions with high MOP receptor densities (e.g. thalamus, nucleus accumbens) or that exhibit adult neurogenesis (e.g. hippocampus). Volume differences in hypothalamus and PAG may reflect behavioural changes including hyperalgesia. Although the precise relationship between volume change and MOP receptor deletion was not determined from this study alone, these findings suggest that levels of MOP receptor expression may influence a broader range of neural structure and function in humans than previously supposed. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity

  5. Decreased Incentive Motivation Following Knockout or Acute Blockade of the Serotonin Transporter: Role of the 5-HT2C Receptor.

    PubMed

    Browne, Caleb J; Fletcher, Paul J

    2016-09-01

    Acute pharmacological elevation of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) activity decreases operant responding for primary reinforcers, suggesting that 5-HT reduces incentive motivation. The mechanism by which 5-HT alters incentive motivation is unknown, but parallel evidence that 5-HT2C receptor agonists also reduce responding for primary reinforcers implicates this receptor as a potential candidate. These experiments examined whether chronic and acute disruptions of serotonin transporter (SERT) activity altered incentive motivation, and whether the 5-HT2C receptor mediated the effects of elevated 5-HT on behavior. To assess incentive motivation, we measured responding for three different reinforcers: a primary reinforcer (saccharin), a conditioned reinforcer (CRf), and an unconditioned sensory reinforcer (USRf). In the chronic condition, responding was compared between SERT knockout (SERT-KO) mice and their wild-type littermates. In the acute condition, responding was examined in wild-type mice following treatment with 10 or 20 mg/kg citalopram, or its vehicle. The ability of the selective 5-HT2C antagonist SB 242084 to prevent the effects of SERT-KO and citalopram on responding was subsequently examined. Both SERT-KO and citalopram reduced responding for saccharin, a CRf, and a USRf. Treatment with SB 242084 enhanced responding for a CRf and a USRf in SERT-KO mice and blocked the effects of citalopram on CRf and USRf responding. However, SB 242084 was unable to prevent the effects of SERT-KO or citalopram on responding for saccharin. These results support a powerful inhibitory function for 5-HT in the control of incentive motivation, and indicate that the 5-HT2C receptor mediates these effects of 5-HT in a reinforcer-dependent manner. PMID:27125304

  6. Opioids and their receptors: Are we there yet?

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Gavril

    2014-01-01

    Opioids have an important place in pharmacology. While their clinical use as analgesics is fundamental in medicine, their use is constrained by their side-effects and abuse potential. Pharmacologists have sought analgesics lacking side-effects and the abuse liability of the current agents. The identification of the opioid receptors in 1973 marked the beginning of our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of these agents. The isolation of the opioid peptides quickly followed, along with the classification of three families of opioid receptors. Clinicians have long been aware of subtle differences among the mu opioids that were not easily reconciled with a single receptor and selective antagonists implied two subdivisions of mu receptors. However, the cloning of the mu opioid receptor MOR-1 has led to the realization of the extensive complexity of the mu opioid receptor gene and its vast array of splice variants. Many of these splice variants are truncated and do not conform to the structure of traditional G-protein coupled receptors. Yet, evidence now shows that they are quite important and may prove valuable targets in the development of potent analgesics lacking the undesirable properties of current opioids. PMID:23624289

  7. Hypoglycemia, hyperglucagonemia, and fetoplacental defects in glucagon receptor knockout mice: a role for glucagon action in pregnancy maintenance.

    PubMed

    Ouhilal, Sophia; Vuguin, Patricia; Cui, Lingguang; Du, Xiu-Quan; Gelling, Richard W; Reznik, Sandra E; Russell, Robert; Parlow, Albert F; Karpovsky, Clara; Santoro, Nanette; Charron, Maureen J

    2012-03-01

    Alterations in insulin signaling as well as insulin action predispose to infertility as well as adverse pregnancy outcomes; however, little is known about the role of glucagon signaling in reproduction. The glucagon receptor knockout (Gcgr(-/-)) mouse created by our laboratory was used to define the role of glucagon signaling in maintaining normal reproduction. In this mouse model, lack of glucagon signaling did not alter the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Pregnant Gcgr(-/-) female mice displayed persistent hypoglycemia and hyperglucagonemia. Gcgr(-/-) pregnancies were associated with decreased fetal weight, increased late-gestation fetal demise, and significant abnormalities of placentation. Gcgr(-/-) placentas contained areas of extensive mineralization, fibrinoid necrosis, narrowing of the vascular channels, and a thickened interstitium associated with trophoblast hyperplasia. Absent glucagon signaling did not alter glycogen content in Gcgr(-/-) placentas but significantly downregulated genes that control growth, adrenergic signaling, vascularization, oxidative stress, and G protein-coupled receptors. Our data suggest that, similarly to insulin, glucagon action contributes to normal female reproductive function.

  8. Investigation of nasal CO₂ receptor transduction mechanisms in wild-type and GC-D knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kenemuth, Jessica K; Hennessy, Shane P; Hanson, Ryan J; Hensler, Allison J; Coates, E Lee

    2013-11-01

    The main olfactory system of mice contains a small subset of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that are stimulated by CO₂. The objective of this study was to record olfactory receptor responses to a range of CO₂ concentrations to further elucidate steps in the proposed CO₂ transduction pathway in mice. Electro-olfactograms (EOGs) were recorded before and after inhibiting specific steps in the CO₂ transduction pathway with topically applied inhibitors. Inhibition of extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA) did not significantly affect EOG responses to CO₂ but did decrease EOG responses to several control odorants. Inhibition of intracellular CA or cyclic nucleotide-gated channels attenuated EOG responses to CO₂, confirming the role of these components in CO₂ sensing in mice. We also show that, like canonical OSNs, CO₂-sensitive OSNs depend on Ca²⁺-activated Cl⁻ channels for depolarization of receptor neurons. Lastly, we found that guanylyl cyclase-D knockout mice were still able to respond to CO₂, indicating that other pathways may exist for the detection of low concentrations of nasal CO₂. We discuss these findings as they relate to previous studies on CO₂-sensitive OSNs in mice and other animals.

  9. Development of Accelerated Coronary Atherosclerosis Model Using Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Knock-Out Swine with Balloon Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ogita, Manabu; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Onishi, Akira; Tsuboi, Shuta; Wada, Hideki; Konishi, Hirokazu; Naito, Ryo; Dohi, Tomotaka; Kasai, Takatoshi; Kojima, Yuko; Schwartz, Robert S.; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Several animal models have facilitated the evaluation and pathological understanding of atherosclerosis, but a definitive animal model of coronary atherosclerosis is not available. We therefore developed low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR-KO) pigs with hypercholesterolemia, a model which rapidly developed coronary atherosclerosis following balloon injury. Methods and Results We deleted LDLR exon regions from cultured porcine fetal fibroblasts and cloned LDLR knockout (LDLR-KO) embryos microinjecting fetal fibroblast nuclei into enucleated oocytes. Twelve LDLR-KO pigs were fed a 2.0% cholesterol and 20% fat diet. Baseline serum LDL cholesterol level was 510.0±86.1 mg/dL. Balloon injury was created in 46 coronary segments and necropsy were obtained 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks later. Coronary artery sections were reviewed to evaluate lesion progression. We found lipid accumulation with foam cells and inflammatory cells beginning four weeks after balloon injury. The mean ratio of macrophages to plaque area was significantly higher in the four- weeks and eight-week animals compared with those at 2-weeks (8.79% ± 5.98% and 17.00% ± 10.38% vs. 1.14% ± 1.88%, P < 0.0001). At 12 weeks the ratio decreased toward the level at 2 week level (4.00% ± 4.56%, P = 0.66 vs. baseline). Advanced coronary atherosclerotic lesions contained lipid pools at eight-weeks with fibrous components beginning at 12 weeks. Conclusions We developed a model of rapid coronary atherosclerosis using LDLR KO pigs with balloon injury. This model may be useful for preclinical evaluation of medication or devices, and may also help investigate mechanisms of plaque progression. PMID:27631974

  10. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor/translocator protein global knock-out mice are viable with no effects on steroid hormone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Lan N; Morohaku, Kanako; Manna, Pulak R; Pelton, Susanne H; Butler, W Ronald; Stocco, Douglas M; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2014-10-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein implicated as essential for cholesterol import to the inner mitochondrial membrane, the rate-limiting step in steroid hormone biosynthesis. Previous research on TSPO was based entirely on in vitro experiments, and its critical role was reinforced by an early report that claimed TSPO knock-out mice were embryonic lethal. In a previous publication, we examined Leydig cell-specific TSPO conditional knock-out mice that suggested TSPO was not required for testosterone production in vivo. This raised controversy and several questions regarding TSPO function. To examine the definitive role of TSPO in steroidogenesis and embryo development, we generated global TSPO null (Tspo(-/-)) mice. Contrary to the early report, Tspo(-/-) mice survived with no apparent phenotypic abnormalities and were fertile. Examination of adrenal and gonadal steroidogenesis showed no defects in Tspo(-/-) mice. Adrenal transcriptome comparison of gene expression profiles showed that genes involved in steroid hormone biosynthesis (Star, Cyp11a1, and Hsd3b1) were unchanged in Tspo(-/-) mice. Adrenocortical ultrastructure illustrated no morphological alterations in Tspo(-/-) mice. In an attempt to correlate our in vivo findings to previously used in vitro models, we also determined that siRNA knockdown or the absence of TSPO in different mouse and human steroidogenic cell lines had no effect on steroidogenesis. These findings directly refute the dogma that TSPO is indispensable for steroid hormone biosynthesis and viability. By amending the current model, this study advances our understanding of steroidogenesis with broad implications in biology and medicine.

  11. Inflammatory bone loss in experimental periodontitis induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in interleukin-1 receptor antagonist knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Izawa, A; Ishihara, Y; Mizutani, H; Kobayashi, S; Goto, H; Okabe, E; Takeda, H; Ozawa, Y; Kamiya, Y; Sugita, Y; Kubo, K; Kamei, H; Kikuchi, T; Mitani, A; Hayashi, J; Nishihara, T; Maeda, H; Noguchi, T

    2014-05-01

    The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) binds to IL-1 receptors and inhibits IL-1 activity. However, it is not clear whether IL-1Ra plays a protective role in periodontal disease. This study was undertaken to compare experimental periodontitis induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in IL-1Ra knockout (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. Computed tomography (CT) analysis and hematoxylin-and-eosin (H&E) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining were performed. In addition, osteoblasts were isolated; the mRNA expression of relevant genes was assessed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR); and calcification was detected by Alizarin Red staining. Infected IL-1Ra KO mice exhibited elevated (P, <0.05) levels of antibody against A. actinomycetemcomitans, bone loss in furcation areas, and alveolar fenestrations. Moreover, protein for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-6, mRNA for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in IL-1Ra KO mouse osteoblasts stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans were increased (P, <0.05) compared to in WT mice. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteocalcin (OCN)/bone gla protein (BGP), and runt-related gene 2 (Runx2) mRNA levels were decreased (P, <0.05). IL-1α mRNA expression was increased, and calcification was not observed, in IL-1 Ra KO mouse osteoblasts. In brief, IL-1Ra deficiency promoted the expression of inflammatory cytokines beyond IL-1 and altered the expression of genes involved in bone resorption in A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected osteoblasts. Alterations consistent with rapid bone loss in infected IL-Ra KO mice were also observed for genes expressed in bone formation and calcification. In short, these data suggest that IL-1Ra may serve as a potential therapeutic drug for periodontal disease.

  12. Inflammatory bone loss in experimental periodontitis induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in interleukin-1 receptor antagonist knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Izawa, A; Ishihara, Y; Mizutani, H; Kobayashi, S; Goto, H; Okabe, E; Takeda, H; Ozawa, Y; Kamiya, Y; Sugita, Y; Kubo, K; Kamei, H; Kikuchi, T; Mitani, A; Hayashi, J; Nishihara, T; Maeda, H; Noguchi, T

    2014-05-01

    The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) binds to IL-1 receptors and inhibits IL-1 activity. However, it is not clear whether IL-1Ra plays a protective role in periodontal disease. This study was undertaken to compare experimental periodontitis induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in IL-1Ra knockout (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. Computed tomography (CT) analysis and hematoxylin-and-eosin (H&E) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining were performed. In addition, osteoblasts were isolated; the mRNA expression of relevant genes was assessed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR); and calcification was detected by Alizarin Red staining. Infected IL-1Ra KO mice exhibited elevated (P, <0.05) levels of antibody against A. actinomycetemcomitans, bone loss in furcation areas, and alveolar fenestrations. Moreover, protein for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-6, mRNA for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in IL-1Ra KO mouse osteoblasts stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans were increased (P, <0.05) compared to in WT mice. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteocalcin (OCN)/bone gla protein (BGP), and runt-related gene 2 (Runx2) mRNA levels were decreased (P, <0.05). IL-1α mRNA expression was increased, and calcification was not observed, in IL-1 Ra KO mouse osteoblasts. In brief, IL-1Ra deficiency promoted the expression of inflammatory cytokines beyond IL-1 and altered the expression of genes involved in bone resorption in A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected osteoblasts. Alterations consistent with rapid bone loss in infected IL-Ra KO mice were also observed for genes expressed in bone formation and calcification. In short, these data suggest that IL-1Ra may serve as a potential therapeutic drug for periodontal disease. PMID:24566623

  13. Autoradiographic localization of mu and delta opioid receptors in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system

    SciTech Connect

    Dilts, R.P. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    In vitro autoradiographic techniques were coupled with selective chemical lesions of the A10 dopamine cells and intrinsic perikarya of the region to delineate the anatomical localization of mu and delta opioid receptors, as well as, neurotensin receptors. Mu opioid receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-DAGO. Delta receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-DPDPE. Neurotensin receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-NT3. Unilateral lesions of the dopamine perikarya were produced by injections of 6-OHDA administered in the ventral mesencephalon. Unilateral lesions of intrinsic perikarya were induced by injections of quinolinic acid in to the A10 dopamine cell region. Unilateral lesions produced with 6-OHDA resulted in the loss of neurotensin receptors in the A10 region and within the terminal fields. Mu opioid receptors were unaffected by this treatment, but delta opioid receptors increased in the contralateral striatum and nucleus accumbens following 6-OHDA administration. Quinolinic acid produced a reduction of mu opioid receptors within the A10 region with a concomitant reduction in neurotensin receptors in both the cell body region and terminal fields. These results are consistent with a variety of biochemical and behavioral data which suggest the indirect modulation of dopamine transmission by the opioids. In contrast these results strongly indicate a direct modulation of the mesolimbic dopamine system by neurotensin.

  14. Estrogen receptor function as revealed by knockout studies: neuroendocrine and behavioral aspects.

    PubMed

    Rissman, E F; Wersinger, S R; Taylor, J A; Lubahn, D B

    1997-06-01

    Estrogens are an important class of steroid hormones, involved in the development of brain, skeletal, and soft tissues. These hormones influence adult behaviors, endocrine state, and a host of other physiological functions. Given the recent cloning of a second estrogen receptor (ER) cDNA (the ER beta), work on alternate spliced forms of ER alpha, and the potential for membrane estrogen receptors, an animal with a null background for ER alpha function is invaluable for distinguishing biological responses of estrogens working via the ER alpha protein and those working via another ER protein. Data generated to date, and reviewed here, indicate that there are profound ramifications of the ER alpha disruption on behavior and neuroendocrine function. First, data on plasma levels of estradiol (E2), testosterone (T), and luteinizing hormone (LH) in wild-type (WT) versus ER alpha- mice confirm that ER alpha is essential in females for normal regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis. Second, ovariectomized female ER alpha- mice do not display sexual receptivity when treated with a hormonal regime of estrogen and progesterone that induces receptivity in WT littermates. Finally, male sexual behaviors are disrupted in ER alpha- animals. Given decades of data on these topics our findings may seem self-evident. However, these data represent the most direct test currently possible of the specific role of the ER alpha protein on behavior and neuroendocrinology. The ER alpha- mouse can be used to ascertain the specific functions of ER alpha, to suggest functions for the other estrogen receptors, and to study indirect effects of ER alpha on behavior via actions on other receptors, neurotransmitters, and neuropeptides.

  15. Knockout of Angiotensin AT2 receptors accelerates healing but impairs quality

    PubMed Central

    Faghih, Mahya; Hosseini, Sayed M.; Smith, Barbara; Ansari, Amir Mehdi.; Lay, Frank; Ahmed, Ali Karim; Inagami, Tedashi; Marti, Guy P.; Harmon, John W.; Walston, Jeremy D.; Abadir, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Wounds are among the most common, painful, debilitating and costly conditions in older adults. Disruption of the angiotensin type 1 receptors (AT1R), has been associated with impaired wound healing, suggesting a critical role for AT1R in this repair process. Biological functions of angiotensin type 2 receptors (AT2R) are less studied. We investigated effects of genetically disrupting AT2R on rate and quality of wound healing. Our results suggest that AT2R effects on rate of wound closure depends on the phase of wound healing. We observed delayed healing during early phase of wound healing (inflammation). An accelerated healing rate was seen during later stages (proliferation and remodeling). By day 12, fifty percent of AT2R−/− mice had complete wound closure as compared to none in either C57/BL6 or AT1R−/− mice. There was a significant increase in AT1R, TGFβ1 and TGFβ2 expression during the proliferative and remodeling phases in AT2R−/− mice. Despite the accelerated closure rate, AT2R−/− mice had more fragile healed skin. Our results suggest that in the absence of AT2R, wound healing rate is accelerated, but yielded worse skin quality. Elucidating the contribution of both of the angiotensin receptors may help fine tune future intervention aimed at wound repair in older individuals. PMID:26727887

  16. Alpha-Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II contributes to the developmental programming of anxiety in serotonin receptor 1A knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Lo Iacono, Luisa; Gross, Cornelius

    2008-06-11

    Mice lacking the serotonin receptor 1A [Htr1aknock-out (Htr1a(KO))] display increased innate and conditioned anxiety-related behavior. Expression of the receptor in the mouse forebrain during development is sufficient to restore normal anxiety-related behavior to knock-out mice, demonstrating a role for serotonin in the developmental programming of anxiety circuits. However, the precise developmental period as well as the signaling pathways and neural substrates involved in this phenomenon are unknown. Here, we show that pharmacological blockade of the receptor from postnatal day 13 (P13)-P34 is sufficient to reproduce the knock-out phenotype in adulthood, thus defining a role for serotonin in the maturation and refinement of anxiety circuits during a limited postnatal period. Furthermore, we identify increases in the phosphorylation of alpha-Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (alphaCaMKII) at threonine 286 in the hippocampus of young Htr1a(KO) mice under anxiety-provoking conditions. Increases in alphaCaMKII phosphorylation were most pronounced in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and were localized to the extrasynaptic compartment, consistent with a tissue-specific effect of the receptor. No changes in alphaCaMKII phosphorylation were found in adult knock-out mice, suggesting a transient role of alphaCaMKII as a downstream target of the receptor. Finally, the anxiety phenotype was abolished when knock-out mice were crossed to mice in which alphaCaMKII phosphorylation was compromised by the heterozygous mutation of threonine 286 into alanine. These findings suggest that modulation of alphaCaMKII function by serotonin during a restricted postnatal period contributes to the developmental programming of anxiety-related behavior. PMID:18550767

  17. β-arrestin-2 regulates NMDA receptor function in spinal lamina II neurons and duration of persistent pain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Xie, Rou-Gang; Gao, Yong-Jing; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Zhao, Lin-Xia; Bang, Sangsu; Berta, Temugin; Park, Chul-Kyu; Lay, Mark; Chen, Wei; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of acute pain transition to chronic pain are not fully understood. Here we demonstrate an active role of β-arrestin 2 (Arrb2) in regulating spinal cord NMDA receptor (NMDAR) function and the duration of pain. Intrathecal injection of the mu-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala(2), NMe-Phe(4), Gly-ol(5)]-enkephalin produces paradoxical behavioural responses: early-phase analgesia and late-phase mechanical allodynia which requires NMDAR; both phases are prolonged in Arrb2 knockout (KO) mice. Spinal administration of NMDA induces GluN2B-dependent mechanical allodynia, which is prolonged in Arrb2-KO mice and conditional KO mice lacking Arrb2 in presynaptic terminals expressing Nav1.8. Loss of Arrb2 also results in prolongation of inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain and enhancement of GluN2B-mediated NMDA currents in spinal lamina IIo not lamina I neurons. Finally, spinal over-expression of Arrb2 reverses chronic neuropathic pain after nerve injury. Thus, spinal Arrb2 may serve as an intracellular gate for acute to chronic pain transition via desensitization of NMDAR. PMID:27538456

  18. Upregulation of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptors in Dopamine D2 Receptor Knockout Mice Is Reversed by Chronic Forced Ethanol Consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, P.K.; Wang, G.; Thanos, P.K.; Gopez, V.; Delis, F.; Michaelides, M.; Grand, D.K.; Wang, G.-J.; Kunos, G.; Volkow, N.D.

    2011-01-01

    The anatomical proximity of the cannabinoid type 1 (CNR1/CB1R) and the dopamine D2 receptors (DRD2), their ability to form CB1R-DRD2 heteromers, their opposing roles in locomotion, and their involvement in ethanol's reinforcing and addictive properties prompted us to study the levels and distribution of CB1R after chronic ethanol intake, in the presence and absence of DRD2. We monitored the drinking patterns and locomotor activity of Drd2+/+ and Drd2-/- mice consuming either water or a 20% (v/v) ethanol solution (forced ethanol intake) for 6 months and used the selective CB1 receptor antagonist [{sup 3}H]SR141716A to quantify CB1R levels in different brain regions with in vitro receptor autoradiography. We found that the lack of DRD2 leads to a marked upregulation (approximately 2-fold increase) of CB1R in the cerebral cortex, the caudate-putamen, and the nucleus accumbens, which was reversed by chronic ethanol intake. The results suggest that DRD2-mediated dopaminergic neurotransmission and chronic ethanol intake exert an inhibitory effect on cannabinoid receptor expression in cortical and striatal regions implicated in the reinforcing and addictive properties of ethanol.

  19. Increased frequencies of micronucleated reticulocytes and T-cell receptor mutation in Aldh2 knockout mice exposed to acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Kunugita, Naoki; Isse, Toyohi; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Ogawa, Masanori; Yamaguchi, Tetsunosuke; Kinaga, Tsuyoshi; Kawamoto, Toshihiro

    2008-02-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) metabolizes acetaldehyde produced from ethanol into acetate and plays a major role in the oxidation of acetaldehyde in vivo. About half of all Japanese people have inactive ALDH2. We generated homozygous Aldh2 null (Aldh2-/-) mice by gene targeting knockout as a model of ALDH2-deficient humans. To investigate the mutagenicity of acetaldehyde, a micronucleus assay and a T-cell receptor (TCR) gene mutation assay were performed in Aldh2-/- mice and wild-type (Aldh2 +/+) mice exposed to acetaldehyde. The mice were continuously exposed to 125 and 500 ppm of acetaldehyde vapor for 2 weeks. Another group was orally administered 100 mg/kg once a day for 2 weeks continuously. The mice were killed after 2 weeks of exposure to acetaldehyde, and the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes was measured by flow cytometry. We also observed the incidence of TCR gene mutations in T-lymphocytes by measuring the variant CD3(-CD4+) expression by flow cytometry. The frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes induced by acetaldehyde was significantly increased in Aldh2 -/- mice, but not in Aldh2 +/+ mice. TCR mutant frequency was also associated with acetaldehyde exposure in Aldh2-/ - mice, especially after oral administration; however, it was not associated with acetaldehyde exposure in Aldh2 +/+ mice. In conclusion, Aldh2 -/- mice showed high sensitivity in the micronuclei and TCR mutation assays compared with Aldh2 +/+ mice after exposure to acetaldehyde. PMID:18303182

  20. Metabolic alterations due to caloric restriction and every other day feeding in normal and growth hormone receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Reyhan; Bonkowski, Michael S; Arum, Oge; Strader, April D; Bartke, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Mutations causing decreased somatotrophic signaling are known to increase insulin sensitivity and extend life span in mammals. Caloric restriction and every other day (EOD) dietary regimens are associated with similar improvements to insulin signaling and longevity in normal mice; however, these interventions fail to increase insulin sensitivity or life span in growth hormone receptor knockout (GHRKO) mice. To investigate the interactions of the GHRKO mutation with caloric restriction and EOD dietary interventions, we measured changes in the metabolic parameters oxygen consumption (VO2) and respiratory quotient produced by either long-term caloric restriction or EOD in male GHRKO and normal mice. GHRKO mice had increased VO2, which was unaltered by diet. In normal mice, EOD diet caused a significant reduction in VO2 compared with ad libitum (AL) mice during fed and fasted conditions. In normal mice, caloric restriction increased both the range of VO2 and the difference in minimum VO2 between fed and fasted states, whereas EOD diet caused a relatively static VO2 pattern under fed and fasted states. No diet significantly altered the range of VO2 of GHRKO mice under fed conditions. This provides further evidence that longevity-conferring diets cause major metabolic changes in normal mice, but not in GHRKO mice. PMID:23833202

  1. Liver protein profiles in insulin receptor-knockout mice reveal novel molecules involved in the diabetes pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Capuani, Barbara; Della-Morte, David; Donadel, Giulia; Caratelli, Sara; Bova, Luca; Pastore, Donatella; De Canio, Michele; D'Aguanno, Simona; Coppola, Andrea; Pacifici, Francesca; Arriga, Roberto; Bellia, Alfonso; Ferrelli, Francesca; Tesauro, Manfredi; Federici, Massimo; Neri, Anna; Bernardini, Sergio; Sbraccia, Paolo; Di Daniele, Nicola; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Orlandi, Augusto; Urbani, Andrea; Lauro, Davide

    2015-05-01

    Liver has a principal role in glucose regulation and lipids homeostasis. It is under a complex control by substrates such as hormones, nutrients, and neuronal impulses. Insulin promotes glycogen synthesis, lipogenesis, and lipoprotein synthesis and inhibits gluconeogenesis, glycogenolysis, and VLDL secretion by modifying the expression and enzymatic activity of specific molecules. To understand the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to metabolic liver disease, we analyzed liver protein patterns expressed in a mouse model of diabetes by proteomic approaches. We used insulin receptor-knockout (IR(-/-)) and heterozygous (IR(+/-)) mice as a murine model of liver metabolic dysfunction associated with diabetic ketoacidosis and insulin resistance. We evaluated liver fatty acid levels by microscopic examination and protein expression profiles by orthogonal experimental strategies using protein 2-DE MALDI-TOF/TOF and peptic nLC-MS/MS shotgun profiling. Identified proteins were then loaded into Ingenuity Pathways Analysis to find possible molecular networks. Twenty-eight proteins identified by 2-DE analysis and 24 identified by nLC-MS/MS shotgun were differentially expressed among the three genotypes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a central role of high-mobility group box 1/2 and huntigtin never reported before in association with metabolic and related liver disease. A different modulation of these proteins in both blood and hepatic tissue further suggests their role in these processes. These results provide new insight into pathophysiology of insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis and could be useful in identifying novel biomarkers to predict risk for diabetes and its complications.

  2. Sex-related neurogenesis decrease in hippocampal dentate gyrus with depressive-like behaviors in sigma-1 receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Sha, Sha; Hong, Juan; Qu, Wei-Jun; Lu, Zi-Hong; Li, Lin; Yu, Wen-Feng; Chen, Ling

    2015-08-01

    Male sigma-1 receptor knockout (σ1R(-/-)) mice showed depressive-like phenotype with deficit in the survival of newly generated neuronal cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG), but female σ1R(-/-) mice did not. The level of serum estradiol (E2) at proestrus or diestrus did not differ between female σ1R(-/-) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. Ovariectomized (OVX) female σ1R(-/-) mice, but not WT mice, presented the same depressive-like behaviors and neurogenesis decrease as male σ1R(-/-) mice. Treatment of male σ1R(-/-) mice with E2 could alleviate the depressive-like behaviors and rescue the neurogenesis decrease. In addition, E2 could correct the decline in the density of NMDA-activated current (INMDA) in granular cells of DG and the phosphorylation of NMDA receptor (NMDAr) subtype 2B (NR2B) in male σ1R(-/-) mice, which was associated with the elevation of Src phosphorylation. The neuroprotection and antidepressant effects of E2 in male σ1R(-/-) mice were blocked by the inhibitor of Src or NR2B. The NMDAr agonist showed also the neuroprotection and antidepressant effects in male σ1R(-/-) mice, which were insensitive to the Src inhibitor. On the other hand, either the deprivation of E2 or the inhibition of Src in female σ1R(-/-) mice rather than WT mice led to a distinct decline in INMDA and NR2B phosphorylation. Similarly, the Src inhibitor could cause neurogenesis decrease and depressive-like behaviors in female σ1R(-/-) mice, but not in WT mice. These results indicate that the σ1R deficiency impairs neurogenesis leading to a depressive-like phenotype, which is alleviated by the neuroprotection of E2.

  3. Hippocampal neurofibromin and amyloid precursor protein expression in dopamine D3 receptor knock-out mice following passive avoidance conditioning.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Agata Grazia; Castorina, Alessandro; Leggio, Gian Marco; Drago, Filippo; D'Agata, Velia

    2013-03-01

    Passive avoidance (PA) conditioning is a fear motivated task able to initiate a cascade of altered gene expression within the hippocampus, a structure critical to learning and memory. We have previously shown that neurofibromin (NF1) and amyloid precursor protein (APP), two genes implicated in cognitive function, are differentially expressed in brain of dopamine D3 receptor knock-out mice (D(3)R(-/-)), suggesting that the receptor might have a role in their trascriptional regulation. Here in this study, we hypothesized that during acquisition of PA conditioning the expression of NF1 and APP genes could be influenced by D(3)Rs. To address this issue, we analyzed the expression of NF1 and APP in the hippocampus of both wild-type (WT) and D(3)R(-/-) mice subjected to the single trial step-through PA paradigm. Our finding demonstrated that (1) D(3)R(-/-) mice exhibit increased cognitive performance as compared to WT mice in the step-through PA trial; (2) acquisition of PA increased D(3)R and NF1, but not APP expression in WT mice hippocampus; (3) PA-driven NF1 induction in WT was abrogated in D(3)R(-/-) mice and finally that (4) the heightened basal APP expression observed in naive D(3)R(-/-) mice was totally reversed by acquisition of PA. In conclusion, the present finding show for the first time that both D(3)R and NF1 genes are upregulated following PA conditioning and suggest that hippocampal D(3)Rs might be relevant to NF1 transcriptional regulation in the hippocampus.

  4. Colonic mucosal DNA methylation, immune response, and microbiome patterns in Toll-like receptor 2-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Kellermayer, Richard; Dowd, Scot E.; Harris, R. Alan; Balasa, Alfred; Schaible, Tiffany D.; Wolcott, Randy D.; Tatevian, Nina; Szigeti, Reka; Li, Zhijie; Versalovic, James; Smith, C. Wayne

    2011-01-01

    The connection between intestinal microbiota and host physiology is increasingly becoming recognized. The details of this dynamic interaction, however, remain to be explored. Toll-like receptor 2 (Tlr2) is important for its role in bacterial recognition, intestinal inflammation, and obesity-related metabolic changes. Therefore, we sought to determine the epigenomic and metagenomic consequences of Tlr2 deficiency in the colonic mucosa of mice to gain insights into biological pathways that shape the interface between the gut microbiota and the mammalian host. Colonic mucosa from wild type (WT) and Tlr2−/− C57BL/6 mice was interrogated by microarrays specific for DNA methylation and gene expression. The mucosal microbiome was studied by next-generation pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA. The expression of genes involved in immune processes was significantly modified by the absence of Tlr2, a number of which correlated with DNA methylation changes. The epigenomic and transcriptomic modifications associated with alteration in mucosal microbial composition. Several bacterial species, including members of the Firmicutes were significantly different in abundance between WT and Tlr2−/− animals. This manuscript highlights the intimate interrelationships between expression of immune-related genes and immunity pathways in the host with compositional and functional differences of the mammalian microbiome.—Kellermayer, R., Dowd, S. E., Harris, R. A., Balasa, A., Schaible, T. D., Wolcott, R. D., Tatevian, N., Szigeti, R., Li, Z., Versalovic, J., Smith, C. W. Colonic mucosal DNA methylation, immune response, and microbiome patterns in Toll-like receptor 2-knockout mice. PMID:21228220

  5. Progesterone receptor knockout mice have an improved glucose homeostasis secondary to -cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Frédéric; Wanatabe, Mitsuhiro; Schoonjans, Kristina; Lydon, John; O'Malley, Bert W.; Auwerx, Johan

    2002-11-01

    Gestational diabetes coincides with elevated circulating progesterone levels. We show that progesterone accelerates the progression of diabetes in female db/db mice. In contrast, RU486, an antagonist of the progesterone receptor (PR), reduces blood glucose levels in both female WT and db/db mice. Furthermore, female, but not male, PR-/- mice had lower fasting glycemia than PR+/+ mice and showed higher insulin levels on glucose injection. Pancreatic islets from female PR-/- mice were larger and secreted more insulin consequent to an increase in -cell mass due to an increase in -cell proliferation. These findings demonstrate an important role of progesterone signaling in insulin release and pancreatic function and suggest that it affects the susceptibility to diabetes.

  6. Small heterodimer partner overexpression partially protects against liver tumor development in farnesoid X receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guodong; Kong, Bo; Zhu, Yan; Zhan, Le; Williams, Jessica A.; Tawfik, Ossama; Kassel, Karen M.; Luyendyk, James P.; Wang, Li; Guo, Grace L.

    2013-10-15

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR, Nr1h4) and small heterodimer partner (SHP, Nr0b2) are nuclear receptors that are critical to liver homeostasis. Induction of SHP serves as a major mechanism of FXR in suppressing gene expression. Both FXR{sup −/−} and SHP{sup −/−} mice develop spontaneous hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). SHP is one of the most strongly induced genes by FXR in the liver and is a tumor suppressor, therefore, we hypothesized that deficiency of SHP contributes to HCC development in the livers of FXR{sup −/−} mice and therefore, increased SHP expression in FXR{sup −/−} mice reduces liver tumorigenesis. To test this hypothesis, we generated FXR{sup −/−} mice with overexpression of SHP in hepatocytes (FXR{sup −/−}/SHP{sup Tg}) and determined the contribution of SHP in HCC development in FXR{sup −/−} mice. Hepatocyte-specific SHP overexpression did not affect liver tumor incidence or size in FXR{sup −/−} mice. However, SHP overexpression led to a lower grade of dysplasia, reduced indicator cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. All tumor-bearing mice had increased serum bile acid levels and IL-6 levels, which was associated with activation of hepatic STAT3. In conclusion, SHP partially protects FXR{sup −/−} mice from HCC formation by reducing tumor malignancy. However, disrupted bile acid homeostasis by FXR deficiency leads to inflammation and injury, which ultimately results in uncontrolled cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in the liver. - Highlights: • SHP does not prevent HCC incidence nor size in FXR KO mice but reduces malignancy. • Increased SHP promotes apoptosis. • Bile acids and inflammation maybe critical for HCC formation with FXR deficiency.

  7. Vasopressin 1b receptor knock-out impairs memory for temporal order.

    PubMed

    DeVito, Loren M; Konigsberg, Rachael; Lykken, Christine; Sauvage, Magdalena; Young, W Scott; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2009-03-01

    Mice lacking a functional vasopressin 1b receptor (Avpr1b) display decreased levels of aggression and social memory. Here, we used Avpr1b-knock-out (Avpr1b(-/-)) mice to examine whether an abnormality of this receptor results in specific cognitive deficits in the domain of hippocampal function. Avpr1b(-/-) mice were deficient in sociability and in detecting social novelty, extending previous findings of impairment in social recognition in these mutants. Avpr1b(-/-) mice could recognize previously explored objects and remember where they were experienced, but they were impaired in remembering the temporal order of presentation of those objects. Consistent with this finding, Avpr1b(-/-) mice were also impaired on an object-odor paired associate task that involved a temporal discontiguity between the associated elements. Finally, Avpr1b(-/-) mice performed normally in learning a set of overlapping odor discriminations and could infer relationships among odors that were only indirectly associated (i.e., transitive inference), indicating intact relational memory. The Avpr1b is expressed at much higher levels than any other part of the brain in the pyramidal cells of hippocampal CA2 area, a subfield of the hippocampus that has physiological and genetic properties that distinguish it from subfields CA1 and CA3. The combined results suggest that the Avpr1b, perhaps in CA2, may play a highly specific role in social behavior and episodic memory. Because schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are associated with a unique pathology in CA2 and impairments in both social behavior and episodic memory, this animal model could provide insights into the etiology of these disorders.

  8. Knockout of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor results in distinct hepatic and renal phenotypes in rats and mice

    SciTech Connect

    Harrill, Joshua A.; Hukkanen, Renee R.; Lawson, Marie; Martin, Greg; Gilger, Brian; Soldatow, Valerie; LeCluyse, Edward L.; Budinsky, Robert A.; Rowlands, J. Craig; Thomas, Russell S.

    2013-10-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor which plays a role in the development of multiple tissues and is activated by a large number of ligands, including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). In order to examine the roles of the AHR in both normal biological development and response to environmental chemicals, an AHR knockout (AHR-KO) rat model was created and compared with an existing AHR-KO mouse. AHR-KO rats harboring either 2-bp or 29-bp deletion mutation in exon 2 of the AHR were created on the Sprague–Dawley genetic background using zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology. Rats harboring either mutation type lacked expression of AHR protein in the liver. AHR-KO rats were also insensitive to thymic involution, increased hepatic weight and the induction of AHR-responsive genes (Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1, Ahrr) following acute exposure to 25 μg/kg TCDD. AHR-KO rats had lower basal expression of transcripts for these genes and also accumulated ∼ 30–45-fold less TCDD in the liver at 7 days post-exposure. In untreated animals, AHR-KO mice, but not AHR-KO rats, had alterations in serum analytes indicative of compromised hepatic function, patent ductus venosus of the liver and persistent hyaloid arteries in the eye. AHR-KO rats, but not AHR-KO mice, displayed pathological alterations to the urinary tract: bilateral renal dilation (hydronephrosis), secondary medullary tubular and uroepithelial degenerative changes and bilateral ureter dilation (hydroureter). The present data indicate that the AHR may play significantly different roles in tissue development and homeostasis and toxicity across rodent species. - Highlights: • An AHR knockout rat was generated on a Sprague–Dawley outbred background. • AHR-KO rats lack expression of AHR protein. • AHR-KO rats are insensitive to TCDD-mediated effects. • Data suggests difference in the role of AHR in tissue development of rats and mice. • Abnormalities in vascular

  9. Ovariectomy-mediated impairment of spatial working memory, but not reference memory, is attenuated by the knockout of the dopamine D(3) receptor in female mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fang; Zhang, Hongbo; Meng, Xia; Feng, Jiali; Li, Teng; Wei, Shuguang; Li, Shengbin

    2013-06-15

    Memory modulation is implemented through many different factors, such as the dopaminergic system and ovarian hormones. Alterations of these factors may cause memory behavior changes. In the current study, dopamine D3 receptor mutant (D3(-/-)) female mice and their wild-type (WT) controls were used and randomly assigned to ovariectomized (OVX) and sham-operated (Sham) groups (four groups: WT-OVX, WT-Sham, D3(-/-)-OVX, and D3(-/-)-Sham). The possibility of co-effects of the dopamine D3 receptor and ovarian hormones on cognitive behavior was then examined. The spatial reference memory (SRM) and the motivation to escape from the water maze were not affected by either knockout of the dopamine D3 receptor or ovariectomy. Knockout of the dopamine D3 receptor had no effect on spatial working memory (SWM) in the Sham groups, but had a positive effect on SWM in the OVX groups. While an ovariectomy inhibited SWM in WT mice, it had no effect on SWM in D3(-/-) mice. These data suggested that ovarian hormone deprivation may induce spatial working memory decline, and blockade of D3 receptors could ameliorate this impairment. Based on our findings, there may be specific molecular changes responsible for the function of D3 receptors in modulating information processes under conditions of ovarian hormone deficit, which need to be further elucidated.

  10. Development of schemas revealed by prior experience and NMDA receptor knock-out

    PubMed Central

    Dragoi, George; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    Prior experience accelerates acquisition of novel, related information through processes like assimilation into mental schemas, but the underlying neuronal mechanisms are poorly understood. We investigated the roles that prior experience and hippocampal CA3 N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent synaptic plasticity play in CA1 place cell sequence encoding and learning during novel spatial experiences. We found that specific representations of de novo experiences on linear environments were formed on a framework of pre configured network activity expressed in the preceding sleep and were rapidly, flexibly adjusted via NMDAR-dependent activity. This prior experience accelerated encoding of subsequent experiences on contiguous or isolated novel tracks, significantly decreasing their NMDAR-dependence. Similarly, de novo learning of an alternation task was facilitated by CA3 NMDARs; this experience accelerated subsequent learning of related tasks, independent of CA3 NMDARs, consistent with a schema-based learning. These results reveal the existence of distinct neuronal encoding schemes which could explain why hippocampal dysfunction results in anterograde amnesia while sparing recollection of old, schema-based memories. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01326.001 PMID:24327561

  11. Altered enteroendocrine cell expression in T cell receptor alpha chain knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Rubin, D C; Zhang, H; Qian, P; Lorenz, R G; Hutton, K; Peters, M G

    2000-10-15

    Mice lacking T cell receptor alpha chain (TCRalpha(-/-)) develop inflammation of the colon. We have examined the effect of this inflammation on the colonic epithelium by studying markers of epithelial cuff, enteroendocrine, and immune cell differentiation. Using immunohistochemical techniques, colons were compared in normal C57/BL6 and murine TCR alpha(-/-) mice aged 2 and 3 weeks and 3-11 months. TCR alpha(-/-) mice aged 3-11 months had histologic evidence of inflammation with increased expression of CD45, CD4+, CD8+, and B220+ cells and a decrease in expression of IgA+ cells. There was a decrease in the number of cholecystokinin, serotonin, and neurotensin enteroendocrine expressing cells in the colon of TCR alpha(-/-) mice. These changes were not present in 2-3-week-old suckling/weaning mice. In contrast, peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY), glucagon-like peptide-1, and gastrin expression did not change and small intestinal enteroendocrine cells remained unaltered. The change in colonic enteroendocrine cell expression appears to be a specific response, since only a subset of these cells was altered, and the epithelium was intact by histologic analysis. The absence of functional T cells in TCR alpha(-/-) colon has a marked effect on differentiation of a specific subpopulation of enteroendocrine cells, prior to loss of integrity of the epithelium. PMID:11054861

  12. Endothelium dysfunction in LDL receptor knockout mice: a role for H2O2

    PubMed Central

    Rabelo, Luíza A; Cortes, Steyner F; Alvarez-Leite, Jacqueline I; Lemos, Virgínia S

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the role of endogenous H2O2 as an endothelium-dependent relaxant factor was characterised in aortas from C57BL/6J and LDL receptor-deficient mice (LDLR−/−). Aortic rings from LDLR−/− mice showed impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh; 0.001–100 μM) and to the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 (0.001–3 μM) compared with aortic rings from control mice. Endothelium-independent relaxation produced by the NO donor, 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1) was not different between strains. Pretreatment of vessels with L-NNA (100 μM) or L-NNA (100 μM) plus L-NAME (300 μM) plus haemoglobin (10 μM) markedly decreased, but did not abolish the relaxation to ACh in control mice. In the aortas from LDLR−/− mice treated with L-NNA (100 μM), ACh induced a contractile effect. Catalase (800 and 2400 U ml−1) shifted to the right the endothelium-dependent relaxation to ACh in aortas from control but not from LDLR−/− mice. Aminotriazole (50 mM), which inhibits catalase, abolished its effect on control mice. Treatment of vessels with L-NNA and catalase abolished vasorelaxation induced by ACh. Indomethacin (10 μM) did not modify the concentration–response curve to ACh. Superoxide dismutase (300 U ml−1) did not change ACh-induced relaxation in both strains. Exogenous H2O2 produced a concentration-dependent relaxation in endothelium-denuded aortic rings, which was not different between strains. It is concluded that H2O2 greatly contributes to relaxation to ACh in aorta from control mice. Endothelial-dependent relaxation to ACh is impaired in LDLR−/− mice. Reduced biosynthesis or increased inactivation of H2O2 is the possible mechanism responsible for endothelial dysfunction in aortas of atherosclerosis-susceptible LDLR−/− mice. PMID:12711621

  13. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor knock-out exacerbates choroidal neovascularization via multiple pathogenic pathways.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Mayur; Kazmin, Dmitri; Hu, Peng; Thomas, Russell S; McDonnell, Donald P; Malek, Goldis

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a heterodimeric transcriptional regulator with pleiotropic functions in xenobiotic metabolism and detoxification, vascular development and cancer. Herein, we report a previously undescribed role for the AhR signalling pathway in the pathogenesis of the wet, neovascular subtype of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly in the Western world. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles of aged AhR(-/-) and wild-type (wt) mice, using high-throughput RNA sequencing, revealed differential modulation of genes belonging to several AMD-related pathogenic pathways, including inflammation, angiogenesis and extracellular matrix regulation. To investigate AhR regulation of these pathways in wet AMD, we experimentally induced choroidal neovascular lesions in AhR(-/-) mice and found that they measured significantly larger in area and volume compared to age-matched wt mice. Furthermore, these lesions displayed a higher number of ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1-positive (Iba1(+) ) microglial cells and a greater amount of collagen type IV deposition, events also seen in human wet AMD pathology specimens. Consistent with our in vivo observations, AhR knock-down was sufficient to increase choroidal endothelial cell migration and tube formation in vitro. Moreover, AhR knock-down caused an increase in collagen type IV production and secretion in both retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and choroidal endothelial cell cultures, increased expression of angiogenic and inflammatory molecules, including vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) in RPE cells, and increased expression of secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1) in choroidal endothelial cells. Collectively, our findings identify AhR as a regulator of multiple pathogenic pathways in experimentally induced choroidal neovascularization, findings that

  14. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor knock-out exacerbates choroidal neovascularization via multiple pathogenic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Mayur; Kazmin, Dmitri; Hu, Peng; Thomas, Russell S; McDonnell, Donald P; Malek, Goldis

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a heterodimeric transcriptional regulator with pleiotropic functions in xenobiotic metabolism and detoxification, vascular development and cancer. Herein, we report a previously undescribed role for the AhR signalling pathway in the pathogenesis of the wet, neovascular subtype of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly in the Western world. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles of aged AhR−/− and wild-type (wt) mice, using high-throughput RNA sequencing, revealed differential modulation of genes belonging to several AMD-related pathogenic pathways, including inflammation, angiogenesis and extracellular matrix regulation. To investigate AhR regulation of these pathways in wet AMD, we experimentally induced choroidal neovascular lesions in AhR−/− mice and found that they measured significantly larger in area and volume compared to age-matched wt mice. Furthermore, these lesions displayed a higher number of ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1-positive (Iba1+) microglial cells and a greater amount of collagen type IV deposition, events also seen in human wet AMD pathology specimens. Consistent with our in vivo observations, AhR knock-down was sufficient to increase choroidal endothelial cell migration and tube formation in vitro. Moreover, AhR knock-down caused an increase in collagen type IV production and secretion in both retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and choroidal endothelial cell cultures, increased expression of angiogenic and inflammatory molecules, including vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) in RPE cells, and increased expression of secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1) in choroidal endothelial cells. Collectively, our findings identify AhR as a regulator of multiple pathogenic pathways in experimentally induced choroidal neovascularization, findings that

  15. Impact of growth hormone resistance on female reproductive function: new insights from growth hormone receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zaczek, Denise; Hammond, James; Suen, Lii; Wandji, Serge; Service, Darlene; Bartke, Andrzej; Chandrashekar, Varadaraj; Coschigano, Karen; Kopchick, John

    2002-10-01

    We examined multiple aspects of reproductive function in growth hormone receptor gene knockout (GHR-KO) and normal mice to clarify the role of growth hormone in female reproduction. In adult animals, estrous cycle duration was comparable in all mice housed individually but was significantly longer in group-housed GHR-KO females. Histological evaluation of ovaries of adult females at estrus showed that the numbers of preovulatory follicles and corpora lutea were significantly reduced in GHR-KO mice, as was the plasma estradiol level. The number of atretic preovulatory follicles was reduced in GHR gene-ablated animals. Although reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed reduced ovarian insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) mRNA expression in GHR-KO females, the expression of several steroidogenic enzyme mRNAs did not differ between groups. The numbers of active corpora lutea and uterine implantation sites were reduced in GHR-KO females at Day 7 of gestation. When young females were mated to normal males, latency to first mating and age of the female at first mating were significantly delayed in GHR-KO females, but maternal age at first conception was similar between groups. Significantly fewer virgin GHR-KO females exhibited pseudopregnancies when initially placed with vasectomized normal males than did normal female counterparts. Growth hormone resistance and IGF-I insufficiency negatively impacted 1) follicular development/ovulation rate, 2) sexual maturation, 3) production of and responsiveness to pheromonal signals, and 4) the ability of virgin females to respond to coitus by activation of luteal function. Although GHR-KO female mice are fertile, they exhibit quantitative deficits in various parameters of reproductive function.

  16. Knockout of NMDA-receptors from parvalbumin interneurons sensitizes to schizophrenia-related deficits induced by MK-801

    PubMed Central

    Bygrave, A M; Masiulis, S; Nicholson, E; Berkemann, M; Barkus, C; Sprengel, R; Harrison, P J; Kullmann, D M; Bannerman, D M; Kätzel, D

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that a functional deficit in NMDA-receptors (NMDARs) on parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons (PV-NMDARs) is central to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Supportive evidence come from examination of genetically modified mice where the obligatory NMDAR-subunit GluN1 (also known as NR1) has been deleted from PV interneurons by Cre-mediated knockout of the corresponding gene Grin1 (Grin1ΔPV mice). Notably, such PV-specific GluN1 ablation has been reported to blunt the induction of hyperlocomotion (a surrogate for psychosis) by pharmacological NMDAR blockade with the non-competitive antagonist MK-801. This suggests PV-NMDARs as the site of the psychosis-inducing action of MK-801. In contrast to this hypothesis, we show here that Grin1ΔPV mice are not protected against the effects of MK-801, but are in fact sensitized to many of them. Compared with control animals, Grin1ΔPVmice injected with MK-801 show increased stereotypy and pronounced catalepsy, which confound the locomotor readout. Furthermore, in Grin1ΔPVmice, MK-801 induced medial-prefrontal delta (4 Hz) oscillations, and impaired performance on tests of motor coordination, working memory and sucrose preference, even at lower doses than in wild-type controls. We also found that untreated Grin1ΔPVmice are largely normal across a wide range of cognitive functions, including attention, cognitive flexibility and various forms of short-term memory. Taken together these results argue against PV-specific NMDAR hypofunction as a key starting point of schizophrenia pathophysiology, but support a model where NMDAR hypofunction in multiple cell types contribute to the disease. PMID:27070406

  17. Knockout of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor results in distinct hepatic and renal phenotypes in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Harrill, Joshua A; Hukkanen, Renee R; Lawson, Marie; Martin, Greg; Gilger, Brian; Soldatow, Valerie; Lecluyse, Edward L; Budinsky, Robert A; Rowlands, J Craig; Thomas, Russell S

    2013-10-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor which plays a role in the development of multiple tissues and is activated by a large number of ligands, including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). In order to examine the roles of the AHR in both normal biological development and response to environmental chemicals, an AHR knockout (AHR-KO) rat model was created and compared with an existing AHR-KO mouse. AHR-KO rats harboring either 2-bp or 29-bp deletion mutation in exon 2 of the AHR were created on the Sprague-Dawley genetic background using zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology. Rats harboring either mutation type lacked expression of AHR protein in the liver. AHR-KO rats were also insensitive to thymic involution, increased hepatic weight and the induction of AHR-responsive genes (Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1, Ahrr) following acute exposure to 25 μg/kg TCDD. AHR-KO rats had lower basal expression of transcripts for these genes and also accumulated ~30-45-fold less TCDD in the liver at 7 days post-exposure. In untreated animals, AHR-KO mice, but not AHR-KO rats, had alterations in serum analytes indicative of compromised hepatic function, patent ductus venosus of the liver and persistent hyaloid arteries in the eye. AHR-KO rats, but not AHR-KO mice, displayed pathological alterations to the urinary tract: bilateral renal dilation (hydronephrosis), secondary medullary tubular and uroepithelial degenerative changes and bilateral ureter dilation (hydroureter). The present data indicate that the AHR may play significantly different roles in tissue development and homeostasis and toxicity across rodent species. PMID:23859880

  18. Yellow wine polyphenolic compounds inhibit matrix metalloproteinase-2, -9 expression and improve atherosclerotic plaque in LDL-receptor-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xiaoya; Chi, Jufang; Tang, Weiliang; Ji, Zheng; Zhao, Fei; Jiang, Chengjian; Lv, Haitao; Guo, Hangyuan

    2014-01-01

    Many epidemiological studies have strongly suggested an inverse correlation between dietary polyphenol consumption and reduced risks of cardiovascular diseases. Yellow rice wine is a Chinese specialty and one of the three most ancient wines in the world (Shaoxing rice wine, beer, and grape wine). There is a large amount of polyphenol substances in yellow rice wine. This experiment was designed to study the potential beneficial effects of yellow wine polyphenolic compounds (YWPC) from yellow rice wine on progression of atherosclerosis in vivo and to further explore its underlying mechanisms. Six-week-old male LDL-receptor-knockout mice were treated with high-fat diet to establish the mouse model with atherosclerosis. Animals received 10, 30, or 50 mg/kg per day of YWPC or 10 mg/kg per day rosuvastatin or water (vehicle) for 14 weeks. The results indicated that YWPC and rosuvastatin significantly decreased circulating total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Compared to the control group, the atherosclerosis lesion area in the rosuvastatin-intervention group and YWPC at doses of 10, 30, and 50 mg/kg per day intervention groups decreased by 74.14%, 18.51%, 40.09%, and 38.42%, respectively. YWPC and rosuvastatin decreased the expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2, 9, whereas the expression of the endogenous inhibitors of these proteins, namely, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1, 2, increased when compared to the control group. It can be concluded that the YWPC is similar to the benefic effects of rosuvastatin on cardiovascular system. These effects may be attributed to their anti-atherosclerotic actions by lowering lipid and modulating the activity and expression of MMP-2, 9 and TIMP-1, 2.

  19. Toll-like receptor 4 knockout ameliorates neuroinflammation due to lung-brain interaction in mechanically ventilated mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Chen, Chang; Zhang, Zongze; Zou, Yufeng; Peng, Mian; Wang, Yanlin

    2016-08-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a crucial receptor in the innate immune system, and increasing evidence supports its role in inflammation, stress, and tissue injury, including injury to the lung and brain. We aimed to investigate the effects of TLR4 on neuroinflammation due to the lung-brain interaction in mechanically ventilated mice. Male wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 and TLR4 knockout (TLR4 KO) mice were divided into three groups: (1) control group (C): spontaneous breathing; (2) anesthesia group (A): spontaneous breathing under anesthesia; and (3) mechanical ventilation group (MV): 6h of MV under anesthesia. The behavioral responses of mice were tested with fear conditioning tests. The histological changes in the lung and brain were assessed using hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. The level of TLR4 mRNA in tissue was measured using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The levels of inflammatory cytokines were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the TLR4 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus were measured by double immunofluorescence. MV mice exhibited impaired cognition, and this impairment was less severe in TLR4 KO mice than in WT mice. In WT mice, MV increased TLR4 mRNA expression in the lung and brain. MV induced mild lung injury, which was prevented in TLR4 KO mice. MV mice exhibited increased levels of inflammatory cytokines, increased microglia and astrocyte activation. Microgliosis was alleviated in TLR4 KO mice. MV mice exhibited increased TLR4 immunoreactivity, which was expressed in microglia and astrocytes. These results demonstrate that TLR4 is involved in neuroinflammation due to the lung-brain interaction and that TLR4 KO ameliorates neuroinflammation due to lung-brain interaction after prolonged MV. In addition, Administration of a TLR4 antagonist (100μg/mice) to WT mice also significantly attenuated neuroinflammation of lung-brain interaction due to prolonged MV. TLR4 antagonism

  20. Serum cholesterol and expression of ApoAI, LXRbeta and SREBP2 in vitamin D receptor knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Huan; Keisala, Tiina; Solakivi, Tiina; Minasyan, Anna; Kalueff, Allan V; Tuohimaa, Pentti

    2009-02-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency has been reported to be associated with increased blood cholesterol concentrations. Here we used two strains of VDR knock-out (VDR-KO) mice to study whether a lack of vitamin D action has any effect on cholesterol metabolism. In 129S1 mice, both in male and female VDR-KO mice serum total cholesterol levels were significantly higher than those in wild type (WT) mice (20.7% (P=0.05) and 22.2% (P=0.03), respectively). In addition, the serum high-density lipoprotein-bound cholesterol (HDL-C) level was 22% (P=0.03), respectively higher in male VDR-KO mice than in WT mice. The mRNA expression levels of five cholesterol metabolism related genes in livers of 129S1 mice were studied using quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR): ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), regulatory element binding protein (SREBP2), apolipoprotein A-I (ApoAI), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and liver X receptor beta (LXRbeta). In the mutant male mice, the mRNA level of ApoAI and LXRbeta were 49.2% (P=0.005) and 38.8% (P=0.034) higher than in the WT mice. These changes were not observed in mutant female mice, but the female mutant mice showed 52.5% (P=0.006) decrease of SREBP2 mRNA expression compared to WT mice. Because the mutant mice were fed with a special rescue diet, we wanted to test whether the increased cholesterol levels in mutant mice were due to the diet. Both the WT and mutant NMRI mice were given the same diet for 3 weeks before the blood sampling. No difference in cholesterol or in HDL-C between WT and mutant mice was found. The results suggest that the food, gender and genetic background have an effect on the cholesterol metabolism. Although VDR seems to regulate some of the genes involved in cholesterol metabolism, its role in the regulation of serum cholesterol seems to be minimal.

  1. Differential regulation of primary afferent input to spinal cord by muscarinic receptor subtypes delineated using knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Rui; Chen, Hong; Yuan, Wei-Xiu; Wess, Jürgen; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2014-05-16

    Stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) inhibits nociceptive transmission at the spinal level. However, it is unclear how each mAChR subtype regulates excitatory synaptic input from primary afferents. Here we examined excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) of dorsal horn neurons evoked by dorsal root stimulation in spinal cord slices from wild-type and mAChR subtype knock-out (KO) mice. In wild-type mice, mAChR activation with oxotremorine-M decreased the amplitude of monosynaptic EPSCs in ∼67% of neurons but increased it in ∼10% of neurons. The inhibitory effect of oxotremorine-M was attenuated by the M2/M4 antagonist himbacine in the majority of neurons, and the remaining inhibition was abolished by group II/III metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonists in wild-type mice. In M2/M4 double-KO mice, oxotremorine-M inhibited monosynaptic EPSCs in significantly fewer neurons (∼26%) and increased EPSCs in significantly more neurons (33%) compared with wild-type mice. Blocking group II/III mGluRs eliminated the inhibitory effect of oxotremorine-M in M2/M4 double-KO mice. In M2 single-KO and M4 single-KO mice, himbacine still significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of oxotremorine-M. However, the inhibitory and potentiating effects of oxotremorine-M on EPSCs in M3 single-KO and M1/M3 double-KO mice were similar to those in wild-type mice. In M5 single-KO mice, oxotremorine-M failed to potentiate evoked EPSCs, and its inhibitory effect was abolished by himbacine. These findings indicate that activation of presynaptic M2 and M4 subtypes reduces glutamate release from primary afferents. Activation of the M5 subtype either directly increases primary afferent input or inhibits it through indirectly stimulating group II/III mGluRs. PMID:24695732

  2. Vaccination with recombinant adenoviruses expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein elicits protection in the interferon alpha/beta receptor knock-out mouse.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Lyn M; Stokes, Margaret G; Lonsdale, Stephen G; Maslowski, David R; Smither, Sophie J; Lever, Mark S; Laws, Thomas R; Perkins, Stuart D

    2014-03-01

    The resistance of adult immunocompetent mice to infection with ebolaviruses has led to the development of alternative small animal models that utilise immunodeficient mice, for example the interferon α/β receptor knock-out mouse (IFNR(-/-)). IFNR(-/-) mice have been shown to be susceptible to infection with ebolaviruses by multiple routes but it is not known if this murine model is suitable for testing therapeutics that rely on the generation of an immune response for efficacy. We have tested recombinant adenovirus vectors for their ability to protect IFNR(-/-) mice from challenge with Ebola virus and have analysed the humoral response generated after immunisation. The recombinant vaccines elicited good levels of protection in the knock-out mouse and the antibody response in IFNR(-/-) mice was similar to that observed in vaccinated wild-type mice. These results indicate that the IFNR(-/-) mouse is a relevant small animal model for studying ebolavirus-specific therapeutics.

  3. Prevention of the polycystic ovarian phenotype and characterization of ovulatory capacity in the estrogen receptor-alpha knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Couse, J F; Bunch, D O; Lindzey, J; Schomberg, D W; Korach, K S

    1999-12-01

    Ovarian-derived estradiol plays a critical endocrine role in the regulation of gonadotropin synthesis and secretion from the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. In turn, several para/autocrine effects of estrogen within the ovary are known, including increased ovarian weight, stimulation of granulosa cell growth, augmentation of FSH action, and attenuation of apoptosis. The estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) is present in all three components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis of the mouse. In contrast, estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta) is easily detectable in ovarian granulosa cells but is low to absent in the pituitary of the adult mouse. This distinct expression pattern for the two ERs suggests the presence of separate roles for each in the regulation of ovarian function. Herein, we definitively show that a lack of ERalpha in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis of the ERalpha-knockout (alphaERKO) mouse results in chronic elevation of serum LH and is the primary cause of the ovarian phenotype of polycystic follicles and anovulation. Prolonged treatment with a GnRH antagonist reduced serum LH levels and prevented the alphaERKO cystic ovarian phenotype. To investigate a direct role for ERalpha within the ovary, immature alphaERKO females were stimulated to ovulate with exogenous gonadotropins. Ovulatory capacity in the immature alphaERKO female was reduced compared with age-matched wild-type (14.5+/-2.9 vs. 40.6+/-2.6 oocytes/animal, respectively); however, oocytes collected from the alphaERKO were able to undergo successful in vitro fertilization. A similar discrepancy in oocyte yield was observed after superovulation of peripubertal (42 days) wild-type and alphaERKO females. In addition, ovaries from immature superovulated alphaERKO females possessed several ovulatory but unruptured follicles. Investigations of the possible reasons for the reduced number of ovulations in the alphaERKO included ribonuclease protection assays to assess the mRNA levels of several markers

  4. β-Arrestin-2 knockout prevents development of cellular μ-opioid receptor tolerance but does not affect opioid-withdrawal-related adaptations in single PAG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Connor, M; Bagley, E E; Chieng, B C; Christie, M J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Tolerance to the behavioural effects of morphine is blunted in β-arrestin-2 knockout mice, but opioid withdrawal is largely unaffected. The cellular mechanisms of tolerance have been studied in some neurons from β-arrestin-2 knockouts, but tolerance and withdrawal mechanisms have not been examined at the cellular level in periaqueductal grey (PAG) neurons, which are crucial for central tolerance and withdrawal phenomena. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH μ-Opioid receptor (MOPr) inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channel currents (ICa) was examined by patch-clamp recordings from acutely dissociated PAG neurons from wild-type and β-arrestin-2 knockout mice treated chronically with morphine (CMT) or vehicle. Opioid withdrawal-induced activation of GABA transporter type 1 (GAT-1) currents was determined using perforated patch recordings from PAG neurons in brain slices. KEY RESULTS MOPr inhibition of ICa in PAG neurons was unaffected by β-arrestin-2 deletion. CMT impaired coupling of MOPrs to ICa in PAG neurons from wild-type mice, but this cellular tolerance was not observed in neurons from CMT β-arrestin-2 knockouts. However, β-arrestin-2 knockouts displayed similar opioid-withdrawal-induced activation of GAT-1 currents as wild-type PAG neurons. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS In β-arrestin-2 knockout mice, the central neurons involved in the anti-nociceptive actions of opioids also fail to develop cellular tolerance to opioids following chronic morphine. The results also provide the first cellular physiological evidence that opioid withdrawal is not disrupted by β-arrestin-2 deletion. However, the unaffected basal sensitivity to opioids in PAG neurons provides further evidence that changes in basal MOPr sensitivity cannot account for the enhanced acute nociceptive response to morphine reported in β-arrestin-2 knockouts. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other

  5. Enhanced effects of amphetamine but reduced effects of the hallucinogen, 5-MeO-DMT, on locomotor activity in 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout mice: implications for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    van den Buuse, Maarten; Ruimschotel, Emma; Martin, Sally; Risbrough, Victoria B; Halberstadt, Adam L

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin-1A (5-HT(1A)) receptors may play a role in schizophrenia and the effects of certain antipsychotic drugs. However, the mechanism of interaction of 5-HT(1A) receptors with brain systems involved in schizophrenia, remains unclear. Here we show that 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout mice display enhanced locomotor hyperactivity to acute treatment with amphetamine, a widely used animal model of hyperdopaminergic mechanisms in psychosis. In contrast, the effect of MK-801 on locomotor activity, modeling NMDA receptor hypoactivity, was unchanged in the knockouts. The effect of the hallucinogen 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) was markedly reduced in 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout mice. There were no changes in apomorphine-induced disruption of PPI, a model of sensory gating deficits seen in schizophrenia. Similarly, there were no major changes in density of dopamine transporters (DAT) or dopamine D(1) or D(2) receptors which could explain the behavioural changes observed in 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout mice. These results extend our insight into the possible role of these receptors in aspects of schizophrenia. As also suggested by previous studies using agonist and antagonist drugs, 5-HT(1A) receptors may play an important role in hallucinations and to modulate dopaminergic activity in the brain.

  6. Knockout of Toll-Like Receptors 2 and 4 Prevents Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trentin-Sonoda, Mayra; da Silva, Rogério Cirino; Kmit, Fernanda Vieira; Abrahão, Mariana Vieira; Monnerat Cahli, Gustavo; Brasil, Guilherme Visconde; Muzi-Filho, Humberto; Silva, Paulo André; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda Freire; Vieyra, Adalberto; Medei, Emiliano; Carneiro-Ramos, Marcela Sorelli

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether the pathways linked to Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (TLRs) are involved in renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Wild type (WT) C57BL/6J, TLR2-/- and TLR4-/- mice were subjected to left kidney ischemia for 60 min followed by reperfusion for 5, 8, 12 and 15 days. Proton density magnetic resonance showed alterations in the injured kidney from WT mice, together with signs of parenchymal edema and higher levels of vimentin mRNA, accompanied by: (i) small, but significant, increase in serum urea after 24 h, (ii) 100% increase in serum creatinine at 24 h. A serum peak of inflammatory cytokines occurred after 5 days of reperfusion. Heart weight/body weight and heart weight/tibia length ratios increased after 12 and 15 days of reperfusion, respectively. Cardiac hypertrophy markers, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and α-actin, left ventricle mass, cardiac wall thickness and myocyte width increased after 15 days of reperfusion, together with longer QTc and action potential duration. Cardiac TLRs, MyD88, HSP60 and HSP70 mRNA levels also increased. After 15 days of reperfusion, absence of TLRs prevented cardiac hypertrophy, as reflected by similar values of left ventricular cardiac mass and heart weight/body weight ratio compared to the transgenic Sham. Renal tissular injury also ameliorated in both knockout mice, as revealed by the comparison of their vimentin mRNA levels with those found in the WT on the same day after I/R. The I/R TLR2-/- group had TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-1β levels similar to the non-I/R group, whereas the TLR4-/- group conserved the p-NF-κB/NF- κB ratio contrasting with that found in TLR2-/-. We conclude: (i) TLRs are involved in renal I/R-induced cardiac hypertrophy; (ii) absence of TLRs prevents I/R-induced cardiac hypertrophy, despite renal lesions seeming to evolve towards those of chronic disease; (iii) TLR2 and TLR4 selectively regulate the systemic inflammatory profile and NF- κB activation. PMID

  7. Abuse-related effects of mu opioid analgesics in an assay of intracranial self-stimulation in rats: modulation by chronic morphine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Altarifi, Ahmad A.; Rice, Kenner C.; Negus, S. Stevens

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) is an operant procedure in which responding is maintained by electrical brain stimulation. Stimulation frequency can be rapidly varied to maintain a wide range of baseline response rates, and drugs effects can be simultaneously evaluated on both low ICSS rates maintained by low stimulation frequencies and high ICSS rates maintained by high stimulation frequencies. ICSS “facilitation” denotes drug-induced increases in low ICSS rates and is often interpreted as an abuse-related effect, whereas ICSS “depression” denotes decreases in high ICSS rates and may indicate abuse-limiting effects. This study examined the roles of drug efficacy and of prior mu agonist exposure as determinants of mu agonist effects on ICSS in rats with electrodes implanted in the medial forebrain bundle. The high-, intermediate- and low-efficacy mu agonists methadone, fentanyl and nalbuphine were tested during escalating regimens of morphine exposure (Vehicle, 3.2, 18 mg/kg/day). During vehicle treatment, methadone and fentanyl primarily depressed ICSS, whereas nalbuphine produced weak facilitation that was not dose-dependent. Chronic morphine produced tolerance to ICSS depression and increased expression of ICSS facilitation. These results suggest that mu agonist exposure increases expression of abuse-related ICSS facilitation by mu agonists with a broad range of efficacies at mu receptors. PMID:23881045

  8. Nature's knockout: the Mel1b receptor is not necessary for reproductive and circadian responses to melatonin in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Weaver, D R; Liu, C; Reppert, S M

    1996-11-01

    The pineal hormone melatonin regulates seasonal reproduction and influences the timing of circadian rhythms. The Mel1a and Mel1b receptors are the high-affinity melatonin receptors present in mammals. Unexpectedly, the Mel1b receptor gene of the Siberian hamster, Phodopus sungorus, cannot encode a functional receptor; two nonsense mutations are present within the coding region. Southern blot analysis indicates that this is a single copy gene. The Mel1b receptor gene is nonfunctional in outbred populations of P. sungorus and Phodopus campbelli. Siberian hamsters lacking a functional Mel1b receptor nevertheless show seasonal reproductive and circadian responses to melatonin, indicating that the Mel1b receptor is not necessary for these responses. These data support the hypothesis that the Mel1a receptor, which does encode a functional receptor in this species, mediates reproductive and circadian responses to melatonin.

  9. Activity profiles of dalargin and its analogues in mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptor selective bioassays.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, N; Pospisek, J; Hauzerova, L; Barth, T; Milanov, P

    1999-10-01

    1. To elucidate the structural features ensuring action of [D-Ala2, Leu5]-enkephalyl-Arg (dalargin), a series of dalargin analogues were tested for their effectiveness in depressing electrically-evoked contractions of the guinea-pig myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle preparations (mu- and kappa-opioid receptors) and the vasa deferentia of the hamster (delta-opioid receptors), mouse (mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors), rat (similar to mu-opioid receptors) and rabbit (kappa-opioid receptors). The naloxone KB values in the myenteric plexus were also obtained. 2. [L-Ala2]-dalargin was 19 times less potent than dalargin, and its pharmacological activity was peptidase-sensitive. The ratio of delta-activity to mu-activity for [L-Ala2]-dalargin was 6.78, and KB was 7.9 nM. This emphasizes the role that D-configuration of Ala2 plays in determining the active folding of dalargin molecule as well as in conferring resistance to peptidases. 3. [Met5]-dalargin was equipotent to dalargin in the myenteric plexus, but was more potent in the vasa deferentia of hamster and mouse (KB=5.5 nM). Leu5 and the interdependence of Leu5 and D-Ala2 are of importance for the selectivity of dalargin for mu-opioid receptors. 4. Dalarginamide was more potent and selective for mu-opioid receptors than dalargin, whilst dalarginethylamide, though equipotent to dalarginamide in the myenteric plexus, was more potent at delta-opioid receptors (KB=5.0 nM). [D-Phe4]-dalarginamide and N-Me-[D-Phe4]-dalarginamide were inactive indicating the contribution of L-configuration of Phe4 to the pharmacological potency of dalargin. 5. N-Me-[L-Phe4]-dalarginamide possessed the highest potency and selectivity for mu-opioid receptors (the ratio of delta-activity to mu-activity was 0.00053; KB=2.6 nM). The CONH2 terminus combined with the N-methylation of L-Phe4 increased the potency and selectivity of dalargin for mu-opioid receptors.

  10. A shutoff and exonuclease mutant of murine gammaherpesvirus-68 yields infectious virus and causes RNA loss in type I interferon receptor knockout cells.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Victoria; Polychronopoulos, Louise; Dutia, Bernadette M; Ebrahimi, Bahram

    2014-05-01

    Significant loss of RNA followed by severely reduced cellular protein pool, a phenomenon termed host shutoff, is associated with a number of lytic virus infections and is a critical player in viral pathogenesis. Until recently, viral DNA exonucleases were associated only with processing of viral genomic DNA and its encapsidation. However, recent observations have identified host shutoff and exonuclease function for the highly conserved viral exonucleases in γ-herpesviruses, which include Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus and the mouse model murine gammaherpesvirus-68, also referred to as MHV-68. In this study, we show that although ablation of the MHV-68 exonuclease ORF37 caused a restrictive phenotype in WT IFN-α/β receptor-positive cells such as NIH 3T3, lack of ORF37 was tolerated in cells lacking the IFN-α/β receptor: the ORF37Stop virus was capable of forming infectious particles and caused loss of mRNA in IFN-α/β receptor knockout cells. Moreover, ORF37Stop virus was able to establish lytic infection in the lungs of mice lacking the IFN-α/β receptor. These observations provide evidence that lytic MHV-68 infection and subsequent loss of mRNA can take place independently of ORF37. Moreover, efficient growth of ORF37Stop virus also identifies a role for this family of viral nucleases in providing a window of opportunity for virus growth by overcoming type I IFN-dependent responses.

  11. Absence seizures in C3H/HeJ and knockout mice caused by mutation of the AMPA receptor subunit Gria4

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Barbara; Deleuze, Charlotte; Letts, Verity A.; Mahaffey, Connie L.; Boumil, Rebecca M.; Lew, Timothy A.; Huguenard, John R.; Frankel, Wayne N.

    2008-01-01

    Absence epilepsy, characterized by spike–wave discharges (SWD) in the electroencephalogram, arises from aberrations within the circuitry of the cerebral cortex and thalamus that regulates awareness. The inbred mouse strain C3H/HeJ is prone to absence seizures, with a major susceptibility locus, spkw1, accounting for most of the phenotype. Here we find that spkw1 is associated with a hypomorphic retroviral-like insertion mutation in the Gria4 gene, encoding one of the four amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits in the brain. Consistent with this, Gria4 knockout mice also have frequent SWD and do not complement spkw1. In contrast, null mutants for the related gene Gria3 do not have SWD, and Gria3 loss actually lowers SWD of spkw1 homozygotes. Gria3 and Gria4 encode the predominant AMPA receptor subunits in the reticular thalamus, which is thought to play a central role in seizure genesis by inhibiting thalamic relay cells and promoting rebound burst firing responses. In Gria4 mutants, synaptic excitation of inhibitory reticular thalamic neurons is enhanced, with increased duration of synaptic responses—consistent with what might be expected from reduction of the kinetically faster subunit of AMPA receptors encoded by Gria4. These results demonstrate for the first time an essential role for Gria4 in the brain, and suggest that abnormal AMPA receptor-dependent synaptic activity can be involved in the network hypersynchrony that underlies absence seizures. PMID:18316356

  12. Direct influence of C-terminally substituted amino acids in the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore on delta-opioid receptor selectivity and antagonism.

    PubMed

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Guerrini, Remo; Negri, Lucia; Giannini, Elisa; Bryant, Sharon D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2004-07-29

    A series of 17 analogues were developed on the basis of the general formula H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH(R)-R' (denotes chirality; R = charged, neutral, or aromatic functional group; R' = -OH or -NH(2)). These compounds were designed to test the following hypothesis: the physicochemical properties of third-residue substitutions C-terminal to Tic in the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore modify delta-opioid receptor selectivity and delta-opioid receptor antagonism through enhanced interactions with the mu-opioid receptor. The data substantiate the following conclusions: (i) all compounds had high receptor affinity [K(i)(delta) = 0.034-1.1 nM], while that for the mu-opioid receptor fluctuated by orders of magnitude [K(i)(mu) = 15.1-3966 nM]; (ii) delta-opioid receptor selectivity [K(i)(mu)/K(i)(delta)] declined 1000-fold from 22,600 to 21; (iii) a C-terminal carboxyl group enhanced selectivity but only as a consequence of the specific residue; (iv) amidated, positive charged residues [Lys-NH(2) (6), Arg-NH(2) (7)], and a negatively charged aromatic residue [Trp-OH (11)] enhanced mu-opioid affinity [K(i)(mu) = 17.0, 15.1, and 15.7 nM, respectively], while Gly-NH(2) (8), Ser-NH(2) (10), and His-OH (12) were nearly one-tenth as active; and (v) D-isomers exhibited mixed effects on mu-opioid receptor affinity (2' < 3' < 4' < 1' < 5') and decreased delta-selectivity in D-Asp-NH(2) (1') and D-Lys(Ac)-OH (5'). The analogues exhibited delta-opioid receptor antagonism (pA(2) = 6.9-10.07) and weak mu-opioid receptor agonism (IC(50) > 1 microM) except H-Dmt-Tic-Glu-NH(2) (3), which was a partial delta-opioid receptor agonist (IC(50) = 2.5 nM). Thus, these C-terminally extended analogues indicated that an amino acid residue containing a single charge, amino or guanidino functionality, or aromatic group substantially altered the delta-opioid receptor activity profile (selectivity and antagonism) of the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore, which suggests that the C-terminal constituent plays a major role in determining

  13. Effect of AVE 0991 angiotensin-(1-7) receptor agonist treatment on elemental and biomolecular content and distribution in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE-knockout mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska, J.; Gajda, M.; Jawień, J.; Kwiatek, W. M.; Appel, K.; Dumas, P.

    2013-12-01

    Gene-targeted apolipoprotein E-knockout (apoE-KO) mice display early and highly progressive vascular lesions containing lipid deposits and they became a reliable animal model to study atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of AVE 0991 angiotensin-(1-7) receptor agonist on the distribution of selected pro- and anti- inflammatory elements as well as biomolecules in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE-knockout mice. Synchrotron radiation-based X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) and Fourier Transform Infrared (micro-FTIR) microspectroscopies were applied. Two-month-old apoE-KO mice were fed for following four months diet supplemented with AVE 0991 (0.58 μmol/kg b.w. per day). Histological sections of ascending aortas were analyzed spectroscopically. The distribution of P, Ca, Fe and Zn were found to correspond with histological structure of the lesion. Significantly lower contents of P, Ca, Zn and significantly higher content of Fe were observed in animals treated with AVE 0991. Biomolecular analysis showed lower lipids saturation level and lower lipid to protein ratio in AVE 0991 treated group. Protein secondary structure was studied according to the composition of amide I band (1660 cm-1) and it demonstrated higher proportion of β-sheet structure as compared to α-helix in both studied groups.

  14. Knockout crickets for the study of learning and memory: Dopamine receptor Dop1 mediates aversive but not appetitive reinforcement in crickets.

    PubMed

    Awata, Hiroko; Watanabe, Takahito; Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Mito, Taro; Noji, Sumihare; Mizunami, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Elucidation of reinforcement mechanisms in associative learning is an important subject in neuroscience. In mammals, dopamine neurons are thought to play critical roles in mediating both appetitive and aversive reinforcement. Our pharmacological studies suggested that octopamine and dopamine neurons mediate reward and punishment, respectively, in crickets, but recent studies in fruit-flies concluded that dopamine neurons mediates both reward and punishment, via the type 1 dopamine receptor Dop1. To resolve the discrepancy between studies in different insect species, we produced Dop1 knockout crickets using the CRISPR/Cas9 system and found that they are defective in aversive learning with sodium chloride punishment but not appetitive learning with water or sucrose reward. The results suggest that dopamine and octopamine neurons mediate aversive and appetitive reinforcement, respectively, in crickets. We suggest unexpected diversity in neurotransmitters mediating appetitive reinforcement between crickets and fruit-flies, although the neurotransmitter mediating aversive reinforcement is conserved. This study demonstrates usefulness of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for producing knockout animals for the study of learning and memory. PMID:26521965

  15. Secretin receptor-knockout mice are resistant to high-fat diet-induced obesity and exhibit impaired intestinal lipid absorption.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Revathi; Chow, Billy K C

    2014-08-01

    Secretin, a classical gastrointestinal hormone released from S cells in response to acid and dietary lipid, regulates pleiotropic physiological functions, such as exocrine pancreatic secretion and gastric motility. Subsequent to recently proposed revisit on secretin's metabolic effects, we have confirmed lipolytic actions of secretin during starvation and discovered a hormone-sensitive lipase-mediated mechanistic pathway behind. In this study, a 12 wk high-fat diet (HFD) feeding to secretin receptor-knockout (SCTR(-/-)) mice and their wild-type (SCTR(+/+)) littermates revealed that, despite similar food intake, SCTR(-/-) mice gained significantly less weight (SCTR(+/+): 49.6±0.9 g; SCTR(-/-): 44.7±1.4 g; P<0.05) and exhibited lower body fat content. These SCTR(-/-) mice have corresponding alleviated HFD-associated hyperleptinemia and improved glucose/insulin tolerance. Further analyses indicate that SCTR(-/-) have impaired intestinal fatty acid absorption while having similar energy expenditure and locomotor activity. Reduced fat absorption in the intestine is further supported by lowered postprandial triglyceride concentrations in circulation in SCTR(-/-) mice. In jejunal cells, transcript and protein levels of a key fat absorption regulator, cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36), was reduced in knockout mice, while transcript of Cd36 and fatty-acid uptake in isolated enterocytes was stimulated by secretin. Based on our findings, a novel positive feedback pathway involving secretin and CD36 to enhance intestinal lipid absorption is being proposed.

  16. Knockout crickets for the study of learning and memory: Dopamine receptor Dop1 mediates aversive but not appetitive reinforcement in crickets.

    PubMed

    Awata, Hiroko; Watanabe, Takahito; Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Mito, Taro; Noji, Sumihare; Mizunami, Makoto

    2015-11-02

    Elucidation of reinforcement mechanisms in associative learning is an important subject in neuroscience. In mammals, dopamine neurons are thought to play critical roles in mediating both appetitive and aversive reinforcement. Our pharmacological studies suggested that octopamine and dopamine neurons mediate reward and punishment, respectively, in crickets, but recent studies in fruit-flies concluded that dopamine neurons mediates both reward and punishment, via the type 1 dopamine receptor Dop1. To resolve the discrepancy between studies in different insect species, we produced Dop1 knockout crickets using the CRISPR/Cas9 system and found that they are defective in aversive learning with sodium chloride punishment but not appetitive learning with water or sucrose reward. The results suggest that dopamine and octopamine neurons mediate aversive and appetitive reinforcement, respectively, in crickets. We suggest unexpected diversity in neurotransmitters mediating appetitive reinforcement between crickets and fruit-flies, although the neurotransmitter mediating aversive reinforcement is conserved. This study demonstrates usefulness of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for producing knockout animals for the study of learning and memory.

  17. Knockout crickets for the study of learning and memory: Dopamine receptor Dop1 mediates aversive but not appetitive reinforcement in crickets

    PubMed Central

    Awata, Hiroko; Watanabe, Takahito; Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Mito, Taro; Noji, Sumihare; Mizunami, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Elucidation of reinforcement mechanisms in associative learning is an important subject in neuroscience. In mammals, dopamine neurons are thought to play critical roles in mediating both appetitive and aversive reinforcement. Our pharmacological studies suggested that octopamine and dopamine neurons mediate reward and punishment, respectively, in crickets, but recent studies in fruit-flies concluded that dopamine neurons mediates both reward and punishment, via the type 1 dopamine receptor Dop1. To resolve the discrepancy between studies in different insect species, we produced Dop1 knockout crickets using the CRISPR/Cas9 system and found that they are defective in aversive learning with sodium chloride punishment but not appetitive learning with water or sucrose reward. The results suggest that dopamine and octopamine neurons mediate aversive and appetitive reinforcement, respectively, in crickets. We suggest unexpected diversity in neurotransmitters mediating appetitive reinforcement between crickets and fruit-flies, although the neurotransmitter mediating aversive reinforcement is conserved. This study demonstrates usefulness of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for producing knockout animals for the study of learning and memory. PMID:26521965

  18. μ Opioid Receptor Expression after Morphine Administration Is Regulated by miR-212/132 Cluster.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Concejo, Adrian; Jimenez-Gonzalez, Ada; Rodríguez, Raquel E

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, miRNAs have emerged as a promising therapeutical approach in the treatment of several diseases, as demonstrated by miR-212 and its relation to addiction. Here we prove that the miR-212/132 cluster can be regulated by morphine, through the activation of mu opioid receptor (Oprm1). The molecular pathways triggered after morphine administration also induce changes in the levels of expression of oprm1. In addition, miR-212/132 cluster is actively repressing the expression of mu opioid receptor by targeting a sequence in the 3' UTR of its mRNA. These findings suggest that this cluster is closely related to opioid signaling, and function as a post-transcriptional regulator, modulating morphine response in a dose dependent manner. The regulation of miR-212/132 cluster expression is mediated by MAP kinase pathway, CaMKII-CaMKIV and PKA, through the phosphorylation of CREB. Moreover, the regulation of both oprm1 and of the cluster promoter is mediated by MeCP2, acting as a transcriptional repressor on methylated DNA after prolonged morphine administration. This mechanism explains the molecular signaling triggered by morphine as well as the regulation of the expression of the mu opioid receptor mediated by morphine and the implication of miR-212/132 in these processes. PMID:27380026

  19. μ Opioid Receptor Expression after Morphine Administration Is Regulated by miR-212/132 Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Concejo, Adrian; Jimenez-Gonzalez, Ada; Rodríguez, Raquel E.

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, miRNAs have emerged as a promising therapeutical approach in the treatment of several diseases, as demonstrated by miR-212 and its relation to addiction. Here we prove that the miR-212/132 cluster can be regulated by morphine, through the activation of mu opioid receptor (Oprm1). The molecular pathways triggered after morphine administration also induce changes in the levels of expression of oprm1. In addition, miR-212/132 cluster is actively repressing the expression of mu opioid receptor by targeting a sequence in the 3’ UTR of its mRNA. These findings suggest that this cluster is closely related to opioid signaling, and function as a post-transcriptional regulator, modulating morphine response in a dose dependent manner. The regulation of miR-212/132 cluster expression is mediated by MAP kinase pathway, CaMKII-CaMKIV and PKA, through the phosphorylation of CREB. Moreover, the regulation of both oprm1 and of the cluster promoter is mediated by MeCP2, acting as a transcriptional repressor on methylated DNA after prolonged morphine administration. This mechanism explains the molecular signaling triggered by morphine as well as the regulation of the expression of the mu opioid receptor mediated by morphine and the implication of miR-212/132 in these processes. PMID:27380026

  20. Long-lived growth hormone receptor knockout mice show a delay in age-related changes of body composition and bone characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bonkowski, Michael S; Pamenter, Richard W; Rocha, Juliana S; Masternak, Michal M; Panici, Jacob A; Bartke, Andrzej

    2006-06-01

    There is conflicting information on the physiological role of growth hormone (GH) in the control of aging. This study reports dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements of body composition and bone characteristics in young, adult, and aged long-lived GH receptor knockout (GHR-KO) and normal mice to determine the effects of GH resistance during aging. Compared to controls, GHR-KO mice showed an increased percentage of body fat. GHR-KO mice have reduced total-body bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content, and bone area, but these parameters increased with age. In addition, GHR-KO mice have decreased femur length, femur BMD, and lower lumbar BMD compared to controls in all age groups. These parameters also continued to increase with age. Our results indicate that GH resistance alters body composition, bone growth, and bone maintenance during aging in GHR-KO mice.

  1. Rescue of a Recombinant Machupo Virus from Cloned cDNAs and In Vivo Characterization in Interferon (αβ/γ) Receptor Double Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Michael; Seregin, Alexey; Huang, Cheng; Kolokoltsova, Olga; Smith, Jennifer; Miller, Milagros; Smith, Jeanon; Yun, Nadezhda; Poussard, Allison; Grant, Ashley; Tigabu, Bersabeh; Walker, Aida

    2014-01-01

    Machupo virus (MACV) is the etiological agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever (BHF), a reemerging and neglected tropical disease associated with high mortality. The prototypical strain of MACV, Carvallo, was isolated from a human patient in 1963, but minimal in vitro and in vivo characterization has been reported. To this end, we utilized reverse genetics to rescue a pathogenic MACV from cloned cDNAs. The recombinant MACV (rMACV) had in vitro growth properties similar to those of the parental MACV. Both viruses caused similar disease development in alpha/beta and gamma interferon receptor knockout mice, including neurological disease development and high mortality. In addition, we have identified a novel murine model with mortality and neurological disease similar to BHF disease reported in humans and nonhuman primates. PMID:24284323

  2. Rescue of a recombinant Machupo virus from cloned cDNAs and in vivo characterization in interferon (αβ/γ) receptor double knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Michael; Seregin, Alexey; Huang, Cheng; Kolokoltsova, Olga; Smith, Jennifer; Miller, Milagros; Smith, Jeanon; Yun, Nadezhda; Poussard, Allison; Grant, Ashley; Tigabu, Bersabeh; Walker, Aida; Paessler, Slobodan

    2014-02-01

    Machupo virus (MACV) is the etiological agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever (BHF), a reemerging and neglected tropical disease associated with high mortality. The prototypical strain of MACV, Carvallo, was isolated from a human patient in 1963, but minimal in vitro and in vivo characterization has been reported. To this end, we utilized reverse genetics to rescue a pathogenic MACV from cloned cDNAs. The recombinant MACV (rMACV) had in vitro growth properties similar to those of the parental MACV. Both viruses caused similar disease development in alpha/beta and gamma interferon receptor knockout mice, including neurological disease development and high mortality. In addition, we have identified a novel murine model with mortality and neurological disease similar to BHF disease reported in humans and nonhuman primates.

  3. Evidence from knockout mice for distinct implications of neuropeptide-Y Y2 and Y4 receptors in the circadian control of locomotion, exploration, water and food intake.

    PubMed

    Edelsbrunner, M E; Painsipp, E; Herzog, H; Holzer, P

    2009-12-01

    Members of the neuropeptide-Y (NPY) family acting via Y2 and/or Y4 receptors have been proposed to participate in the control of ingestive behaviour and energy homeostasis. Since these processes vary between day and night, we explored the circadian patterns of locomotor, exploratory and ingestive behaviour in mice with disrupted genes for Y2 (Y2-/-) or Y4 (Y4-/-) receptors. To this end, the LabMaster system was used and its utility for the analysis of changes in circadian activity and ingestion caused by gene knockout evaluated. Female animals, aged 27weeks on average, were housed singly in cages fitted with sensors for water and food intake and two infrared frames for recording ambulation and rearing under a 12h light/dark cycle for 4days. Relative to WT animals, diurnal locomotion, exploration, drinking and feeding were reduced, whereas nocturnal locomotion was enhanced in Y2-/- mice. In contrast, Y4-/- mice moved more but ate and drank less during the photophase, while they ate more and explored less during the scotophase. Both Y2-/- and Y4-/- mice weighed more than WT mice. These findings attest to a differential role of Y2 and Y4 receptor signalling in the circadian control of behaviours that balance energy intake and energy expenditure. These phenotypic traits can be sensitively and continuously recorded by the LabMaster system.

  4. Immunohistochemical distribution of somatostatin and somatostatin receptor subtypes (SSTR1-5) in hypothalamus of ApoD knockout mice brain.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ujendra

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, the expression of somatostatin (SST) and somatostatin receptor subtypes (SSTR1-5) was determined in the hypothalamus of wild-type (wt) and apolipoprotein D knockout (ApoD(-/-)) mice brain. SST-like immunoreactivity, while comparable in most regions of hypothalamus, diminished significantly in arcuate nucleus of ApoD(-/-) mice. SSTR1 strongly localized in all major hypothalamic nuclei as well as in the median eminence and ependyma of the third ventricle of wt mice brain. SSTR1-like immunoreactivity increases in hypothalamus except in paraventricular nucleus of ApoD(-/-) mice. SSTR2 was well expressed in most of the hypothalamic regions whereas it decreases significantly in ventromedial and arcuate nucleus of ApoD(-/-) mice. SSTR3 and SSTR4-like immunoreactivity increases in ApoD(-/-) mice in all major nuclei of hypothalamus, median eminence, and ependymal cells of third ventricle. SSTR5 is well expressed in ventromedial and arcuate nucleus whereas weakly expressed in paraventricular nucleus. In comparison to wt, ApoD(-/-) mice exhibit increased SSTR5-like immunoreactivity in paraventricular nuclei and decreased receptor expression in ventromedial hypothalamus and arcuate nucleus. In conclusion, the changes in hypothalamus of ApoD(-/-) mice may indicate potential role of ApoD in regulation of endocrine functions of somatostatin in a receptor-dependent manner.

  5. Mitochondrial gene expression and increased oxidative metabolism: role in increased lifespan of fat-specific insulin receptor knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Katic, Masa; Kennedy, Adam R; Leykin, Igor; Norris, Andrew; McGettrick, Aileen; Gesta, Stephane; Russell, Steven J; Bluher, Matthias; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria; Kahn, C Ronald

    2007-12-01

    Caloric restriction, leanness and decreased activity of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) receptor signaling are associated with increased longevity in a wide range of organisms from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans. Fat-specific insulin receptor knock-out (FIRKO) mice represent an interesting dichotomy, with leanness and increased lifespan, despite normal or increased food intake. To determine the mechanisms by which a lack of insulin signaling in adipose tissue might exert this effect, we performed physiological and gene expression studies in FIRKO and control mice as they aged. At the whole body level, FIRKO mice demonstrated an increase in basal metabolic rate and respiratory exchange ratio. Analysis of gene expression in white adipose tissue (WAT) of FIRKO mice from 6 to 36 months of age revealed persistently high expression of the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes involved in glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, beta-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation as compared to expression of the same genes in WAT from controls that showed a tendency to decline in expression with age. These changes in gene expression were correlated with increased cytochrome c and cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV at the protein level, increased citrate synthase activity, increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha) and PGC-1beta, and an increase in mitochondrial DNA in WAT of FIRKO mice. Together, these data suggest that maintenance of mitochondrial activity and metabolic rates in adipose tissue may be important contributors to the increased lifespan of the FIRKO mouse.

  6. DECREASED EXPRESSION LEVEL OF APOPTOSIS-RELATED GENES AND/OR PROTEINS IN SKELETAL MUSCLES, BUT NOT IN HEARTS, OF GROWTH HORMONE RECEPTOR KNOCKOUT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Gesing, Adam; Masternak, Michal M.; Wang, Feiya; Lewinski, Andrzej; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Bartke, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    The long-lived growth hormone (GH) receptor knockout (GHRKO; KO) mice are GH resistant due to targeted disruption of the GH receptor (Ghr) gene. Apoptosis is a physiological process in which cells play an active role in their own death and is a normal component of the development and health of multicellular organisms. Aging is associated with the progressive loss of strength of skeletal and heart muscles. Calorie restriction (CR) is a well known experimental model to delay aging and increase lifespan. The aim of the study was to examine the expression of the following apoptosis-related genes: caspase-3, caspase-9, caspase-8, bax, bcl-2, Smac/DIABLO, p53 and cytochrome c1 (cyc1) in the skeletal muscles and hearts of female normal and GHRKO mice, fed ad libitum or subjected to 40% CR for 6 months, starting at 2 months of age. Moreover, skeletal muscle caspase-3, caspase-9, caspase-8, bax, bcl-2, Smac/DIABLO, Apaf-1, bad, phospho-bad (pbad), phospho-p53 (pp53) and cytochrome c (cyc) protein expression levels were assessed. Results Expression of caspase-3, caspase-9, bax and Smac/DIABLO genes and proteins was decreased in GHRKO’s skeletal muscles. The Apaf-1 protein expression also was diminished in this tissue. In contrast, bcl-2 and pbad protein levels were increased in skeletal muscles in knockouts. No changes were demonstrated for the examined genes expression in GHRKO’s hearts except for the increased level of cyc1 mRNA. CR did not alter the expression of the examined genes and proteins in skeletal muscles of knockouts vs. normal (N) mice. In heart homogenates, CR increased caspase-3 mRNA level as compared to ad libitum (AL) mice. Conclusion decreased expression of certain pro-apoptotic genes and/or proteins may constitute the potential mechanism of prolonged longevity in GHRKO mice, protecting these animals from aging; this potential beneficial mechanism is not affected by calorie restriction. PMID:21321312

  7. Genomic Profiling of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNF-α) Receptor and Interleukin-1 Receptor Knockout Mice Reveals a Link between TNF-α Signaling and Increased Severity of 1918 Pandemic Influenza Virus Infection▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Belisle, Sarah E.; Tisoncik, Jennifer R.; Korth, Marcus J.; Carter, Victoria S.; Proll, Sean C.; Swayne, David E.; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Katze, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    The influenza pandemic of 1918 to 1919 was one of the worst global pandemics in recent history. The highly pathogenic nature of the 1918 virus is thought to be mediated in part by a dysregulation of the host response, including an exacerbated proinflammatory cytokine response. In the present study, we compared the host transcriptional response to infection with the reconstructed 1918 virus in wild-type, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-1 knockout (TNFRKO), and interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor-1 knockout (IL1RKO) mice as a means of further understanding the role of proinflammatory cytokine signaling during the acute response to infection. Despite reported redundancy in the functions of IL-1β and TNF-α, we observed that reducing the signaling capacity of each of these molecules by genetic disruption of their key receptor genes had very different effects on the host response to infection. In TNFRKO mice, we found delayed or decreased expression of genes associated with antiviral and innate immune signaling, complement, coagulation, and negative acute-phase response. In contrast, in IL1RKO mice numerous genes were differentially expressed at 1 day postinoculation, including an increase in the expression of genes that contribute to dendritic and natural killer cell processes and cellular movement, and gene expression profiles remained relatively constant at later time points. We also observed a compensatory increase in TNF-α expression in virus-infected IL1RKO mice. Our data suggest that signaling through the IL-1 receptor is protective, whereas signaling through the TNF-α receptor increases the severity of 1918 virus infection. These findings suggest that manipulation of these pathways may have therapeutic benefit. PMID:20926563

  8. Genomic profiling of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) receptor and interleukin-1 receptor knockout mice reveals a link between TNF-alpha signaling and increased severity of 1918 pandemic influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Belisle, Sarah E; Tisoncik, Jennifer R; Korth, Marcus J; Carter, Victoria S; Proll, Sean C; Swayne, David E; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Tumpey, Terrence M; Katze, Michael G

    2010-12-01

    The influenza pandemic of 1918 to 1919 was one of the worst global pandemics in recent history. The highly pathogenic nature of the 1918 virus is thought to be mediated in part by a dysregulation of the host response, including an exacerbated proinflammatory cytokine response. In the present study, we compared the host transcriptional response to infection with the reconstructed 1918 virus in wild-type, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-1 knockout (TNFRKO), and interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor-1 knockout (IL1RKO) mice as a means of further understanding the role of proinflammatory cytokine signaling during the acute response to infection. Despite reported redundancy in the functions of IL-1β and TNF-α, we observed that reducing the signaling capacity of each of these molecules by genetic disruption of their key receptor genes had very different effects on the host response to infection. In TNFRKO mice, we found delayed or decreased expression of genes associated with antiviral and innate immune signaling, complement, coagulation, and negative acute-phase response. In contrast, in IL1RKO mice numerous genes were differentially expressed at 1 day postinoculation, including an increase in the expression of genes that contribute to dendritic and natural killer cell processes and cellular movement, and gene expression profiles remained relatively constant at later time points. We also observed a compensatory increase in TNF-α expression in virus-infected IL1RKO mice. Our data suggest that signaling through the IL-1 receptor is protective, whereas signaling through the TNF-α receptor increases the severity of 1918 virus infection. These findings suggest that manipulation of these pathways may have therapeutic benefit.

  9. Relaxin-3 receptor (Rxfp3) gene knockout mice display reduced running wheel activity: implications for role of relaxin-3/RXFP3 signalling in sustained arousal.

    PubMed

    Hosken, Ihaia T; Sutton, Steven W; Smith, Craig M; Gundlach, Andrew L

    2015-02-01

    Anatomical and pharmacological evidence suggests the neuropeptide, relaxin-3, is the preferred endogenous ligand for the relaxin family peptide-3 receptor (RXFP3) and suggests a number of putative stress- and arousal-related roles for RXFP3 signalling. However, in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrates exogenous relaxin-3 can activate other relaxin peptide family receptors, and the role of relaxin-3/RXFP3 signalling in specific brain circuits and associated behaviours in mice is not well described. In this study, we characterised the behaviour of cohorts of male and female Rxfp3 gene knockout (KO) mice (C57/B6J(RXFP3TM1/DGen)), relative to wild-type (WT) littermates to determine if this receptor KO strain has a similar phenotype to its ligand KO equivalent. Rxfp3 KO mice displayed similar performance to WT littermates in several acute behavioural paradigms designed to gauge motor coordination (rotarod test), spatial memory (Y-maze), depressive-like behaviour (repeat forced-swim test) and sensorimotor gating (prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle). Notably however, male and female Rxfp3 KO mice displayed robust and consistent (dark phase) hypoactivity on voluntary home-cage running wheels (∼20-60% less activity/h), and a small but significant decrease in anxiety-like behavioural traits in the elevated plus maze and light/dark box paradigms. Importantly, this phenotype is near identical to that observed in two independent lines of relaxin-3 KO mice, suggesting these phenotypes are due to the elimination of ligand or receptor and RXFP3-linked signalling. Furthermore, this behavioural characterisation of Rxfp3 KO mice identifies them as a useful experimental model for studying RXFP3-linked signalling and assessing the selectivity and/or potential off-target actions of RXFP3 agonists and antagonists, which could lead to an improved understanding of dysfunctional arousal in mental health disorders, including depression, anxiety, insomnia and neurodegenerative

  10. Behavioural and biochemical responses to morphine associated with its motivational properties are altered in adenosine A2A receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Castañé, A; Wells, L; Soria, G; Hourani, S; Ledent, C; Kitchen, I; Opacka-Juffry, J; Maldonado, R; Valverde, O

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: The purinergic system through the A2A adenosine receptor regulates addiction induced by different drugs of abuse. The aim of the present study was to investigate the specific role of A2A adenosine receptors (A2ARs) in the behavioural and neurochemical responses to morphine associated with its motivational properties. Experimental approach: Mice lacking A2ARs (A2A knockout (KO) mice) and wild-type littermates were used to evaluate behavioural responses induced by morphine. Antinociception was assessed using the tail-immersion and the hot-plate tests. Place-conditioning paradigms were used to evaluate the rewarding effects of morphine and the dysphoric responses of morphine withdrawal. Microdialysis studies were carried out to evaluate changes in the extracellular levels of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens of A2A KO mice after morphine administration. Key results: The acute administration of morphine induced a similar enhancement of locomotor activity and antinociceptive responses in both genotypes. However, the rewarding effects induced by morphine were completely blocked in A2A KO mice. Also, naloxone did not induce place aversion in animals lacking the A2ARs. Conclusions and implications: Our findings demonstrate that the rewarding and aversive effects associated with morphine abstinence were abolished in A2A KO mice, supporting a differential role of the A2A adenosine receptor in the somatic and motivational effects of morphine addiction. This study provides evidence for the role of A2ARs as general modulators of the motivational properties of drugs of abuse. Pharmacological manipulation of these receptors may represent a new target in the management of drug addiction. PMID:18660831

  11. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1: Unique tissue-specific functions revealed by selective gene knockout studies

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Anna P.; Van Duyn, Lauren B.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2008-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein (originally called LRP, but now referred to as LRP1) is a large endocytic receptor that is widely expressed in several tissues. LRP1 is a member of the LDL receptor family that plays diverse roles in various biological processes including lipoprotein metabolism, degradation of proteases, activation of lysosomal enzymes and cellular entry of bacterial toxins and viruses. Deletion of the LRP1 gene leads to lethality in mice, revealing a critical, but as of yet, undefined role in development. Tissue-specific gene deletion studies reveal an important contribution of LRP1 in the vasculature, central nervous system, in macrophages and in adipocytes. Three important properties of LRP1 dictate its diverse role in physiology: first, its ability to recognize more than thirty distinct ligands; second, its ability to bind a large number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins via determinants located on its cytoplasmic domain in a phosphorylation-specific manner; and third, its ability to associate with and modulate the activity of other transmembrane receptors such as integrins and receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:18626063

  12. High Affinity Dopamine D3 Receptor (D3R)-Selective Antagonists Attenuate Heroin Self-Administration in Wild-Type but not D3R Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) is a promising target for the development of pharmacotherapeutics to treat substance use disorders. Several D3R-selective antagonists are effective in animal models of drug abuse, especially in models of relapse. Nevertheless, poor bioavailability, metabolic instability, and/or predicted toxicity have impeded success in translating these drug candidates to clinical use. Herein, we report a series of D3R-selective 4-phenylpiperazines with improved metabolic stability. A subset of these compounds was evaluated for D3R functional efficacy and off-target binding at selected 5-HT receptor subtypes, where significant overlap in SAR with D3R has been observed. Several high affinity D3R antagonists, including compounds 16 (Ki = 0.12 nM) and 32 (Ki = 0.35 nM), showed improved metabolic stability compared to the parent compound, PG648 (6). Notably, 16 and the classic D3R antagonist SB277011A (2) were effective in reducing self-administration of heroin in wild-type but not D3R knockout mice. PMID:26203768

  13. Genetic knockout of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene alters hippocampal long-term potentiation in a background strain-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Freund, Ronald K; Graw, Sharon; Choo, Kevin S; Stevens, Karen E; Leonard, Sherry; Dell'Acqua, Mark L

    2016-08-01

    Reduced α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) function is linked to impaired hippocampal-dependent sensory processing and learning and memory in schizophrenia. While knockout of the Chrna7 gene encoding the α7nAChR on a C57/Bl6 background results in changes in cognitive measures, prior studies found little impact on hippocampal synaptic plasticity in these mice. However, schizophrenia is a multi-genic disorder where complex interactions between specific genetic mutations and overall genetic background may play a prominent role in determining phenotypic penetrance. Thus, we compared the consequences of knocking out the α7nAChR on synaptic plasticity in C57/Bl6 and C3H mice, which differ in their basal α7nAChR expression levels. Homozygous α7 deletion in C3H mice, which normally express higher α7nAChR levels, resulted in impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) at hippocampal CA1 synapses, while C3H α7 heterozygous mice maintained robust LTP. In contrast, homozygous α7 deletion in C57 mice, which normally express lower α7nAChR levels, did not alter LTP, as had been previously reported for this strain. Thus, the threshold of Chrna7 expression required for LTP may be different in the two strains. Measurements of auditory gating, a hippocampal-dependent behavioral paradigm used to identify schizophrenia-associated sensory processing deficits, was abnormal in C3H α7 knockout mice confirming that auditory gating also requires α7nAChR expression. Our studies highlight the importance of genetic background on the regulation of synaptic plasticity and could be relevant for understanding genetic and cognitive heterogeneity in human studies of α7nAChR dysfunction in mental disorders.

  14. Peripheral Benzodiazepine Receptor/Translocator Protein Global Knock-out Mice Are Viable with No Effects on Steroid Hormone Biosynthesis*♦

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Lan N.; Morohaku, Kanako; Manna, Pulak R.; Pelton, Susanne H.; Butler, W. Ronald; Stocco, Douglas M.; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2014-01-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein implicated as essential for cholesterol import to the inner mitochondrial membrane, the rate-limiting step in steroid hormone biosynthesis. Previous research on TSPO was based entirely on in vitro experiments, and its critical role was reinforced by an early report that claimed TSPO knock-out mice were embryonic lethal. In a previous publication, we examined Leydig cell-specific TSPO conditional knock-out mice that suggested TSPO was not required for testosterone production in vivo. This raised controversy and several questions regarding TSPO function. To examine the definitive role of TSPO in steroidogenesis and embryo development, we generated global TSPO null (Tspo−/−) mice. Contrary to the early report, Tspo−/− mice survived with no apparent phenotypic abnormalities and were fertile. Examination of adrenal and gonadal steroidogenesis showed no defects in Tspo−/− mice. Adrenal transcriptome comparison of gene expression profiles showed that genes involved in steroid hormone biosynthesis (Star, Cyp11a1, and Hsd3b1) were unchanged in Tspo−/− mice. Adrenocortical ultrastructure illustrated no morphological alterations in Tspo−/− mice. In an attempt to correlate our in vivo findings to previously used in vitro models, we also determined that siRNA knockdown or the absence of TSPO in different mouse and human steroidogenic cell lines had no effect on steroidogenesis. These findings directly refute the dogma that TSPO is indispensable for steroid hormone biosynthesis and viability. By amending the current model, this study advances our understanding of steroidogenesis with broad implications in biology and medicine. PMID:24936060

  15. Growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1a) knockout mice exhibit improved spatial memory and deficits in contextual memory.

    PubMed

    Albarran-Zeckler, Rosie G; Brantley, Alicia Faruzzi; Smith, Roy G

    2012-06-15

    Although the hormone ghrelin is best known for its stimulatory effect on appetite and regulation of growth hormone release, it is also reported to have beneficial effects on learning and memory formation in mice. Nevertheless, controversy exists about whether endogenous ghrelin acts on its receptors in extra-hypothalamic areas of the brain. The ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1a) is co-expressed in neurons that express dopamine receptor type-1 (DRD1a) and type-2 (DRD2), and we have shown that a subset of GHS-R1a, which are not occupied by the agonist (apo-GHSR1a), heterodimerize with these two receptors to regulate dopamine signaling in vitro and in vivo. To determine the consequences of ghsr ablation on brain function, congenic ghsr -/- mice on the C57BL6/J background were subjected to a battery of behavioral tests. We show that the ghsr -/- mice exhibit normal balance, movement, coordination, and pain sensation, outperform ghsr +/+ mice in the Morris water maze, but show deficits in contextual fear conditioning.

  16. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) receptor phosphorylation in µ-calpain knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous cellular processes are controlled by insulin and IGF-I signaling pathways. Due to previous work in our laboratories, we hypothesized that insulin (IR) and type 1 IGF-I (IGF-IR) receptor signaling is decreased due to increased protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) activity. C57BL/6J mice...

  17. Effects of female pheromones on gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene expression and luteinizing hormone release in male wild-type and oestrogen receptor-alpha knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Gore, A C; Wersinger, S R; Rissman, E F

    2000-12-01

    Pheromones are an important class of environmental cues that affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in a variety of vertebrate species, including humans. When male mice contact female-soiled bedding, or urine, they display a reflexive luteinizing hormone (LH) surge within 30 min. Aside from the requirement that males have gonads to show this response, the physiological mechanisms that underlie this pituitary response are unknown. In this experiment, we asked if female pheromones acted at the level of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) gene expression to affect this hormone response. In addition, we also examined the contribution of one of the oestrogen receptors (ERalpha) by studying this neuroendocrine reflex in wild-type and oestrogen receptor-alpha knockout (ERalphaKO) males. Both ERalphaKO and wild-type males showed the expected LH surge, 45 and 90 min after contact with female pheromones. Males housed in clean bedding or bedding soiled by another adult male did not display the LH elevation. Interestingly, this dramatic change in LH concentrations was not accompanied by any alterations in GnRH mRNA expression or levels of primary transcript in the preoptic area-anterior hypothalamus. The one exception to this was a significant increase in GnRH mRNA expression in tissue collected from wild-type males exposed to bedding from another male. This is particularly intriguing since LH was not elevated in these males. These data replicate and extend our previous finding that ERalphaKO males do exhibit an LH surge in response to female pheromones. Thus, this neuroendocrine response is regulated by a steroid receptor other than ERalpha and does not require alterations in GnRH mRNA expression.

  18. The role of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in cognition and anxiety: comparative studies in GRM2(-/-), GRM3(-/-) and GRM2/3(-/-) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Bianca; Lyon, Louisa; Taylor, Amy; Lane, Tracy; Burnet, Philip W J; Harrison, Paul J; Bannerman, David M

    2015-02-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu2 and mGlu3, encoded by GRM2 and GRM3) have been implicated in both cognitive and emotional processes, although their precise role remains to be established. Studies with knockout (KO) mice provide an important approach for investigating the role of specific receptor genes in behaviour. In the present series of experiments we extended our prior characterisation of GRM2/3(-/-) double KO mice and, in complementary experiments, investigated the behavioural phenotype of single GRM2(-/-) and GRM3(-/-) mice. We found no consistent effect on anxiety in either the double or single KO mice. The lack of an anxiety phenotype in any of the lines contrasts with the clear anxiolytic effects of mGlu2/3 ligands. Motor co-ordination was impaired in GRM2/3(-/-) mice, but spared in single GRM2(-/-) and GRM3(-/-) mice. Spatial working memory (rewarded alternation) testing on the elevated T-maze revealed a deficit in GRM2(-/-) mice throughout testing, whereas GRM3(-/-) mice exhibited a biphasic effect (initially impaired, but performing better than controls by the end of training). A biphasic effect on activity levels was seen for the GRM2(-/-) mice. Overall, the phenotype in both GRM2(-/-) and GRM3(-/-) mice was less pronounced - if present at all - compared to GRM2/3(-/-) mice, across the range of task domains. This is consistent with possible redundancy of function and/or compensation in the single KO lines. Results are discussed with reference to a possible role for group II metabotropic glutamate receptors at the interface between arousal and behavioural performance, according to an inverted U-shaped function. PMID:25158312

  19. Changes of epidermal mu-opiate receptor expression and nerve endings in chronic atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bigliardi-Qi, M; Lipp, B; Sumanovski, L T; Buechner, S A; Bigliardi, P L

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that neuropeptides such as a substance P, neurotrophins or beta-endorphin, an endogenous agonist for mu-opioid receptor, are involved in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis in which mental stress and scratching deteriorate the disease. mu-Opioid receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor, can be downregulated and internalized by agonists and other factors in vitro. In this study, we investigated the regulation of mu-opioid receptor and nerve endings in atopic dermatitis patients. Skin biopsies from atopic dermatitis patients revealed a significant downregulation of mu-opiate receptor expression in epidermis of atopic dermatitis. Permeabilization of the skin showed that the receptor in keratinocytes from atopic dermatitis is internalized. The mRNA expression pattern of the mu-opiate receptor is different in epidermis taken from patients with chronic atopic dermatitis compared to normal skin. In atopic dermatitis, the mRNA is concentrated in the subcorneal layers of the epidermis and in normal skin in the suprabasal layers. Staining of the nerve endings using protein gene product 9.5 shows a different pattern of epidermal nerve endings in normal skin compared to atopic dermatitis. In normal skin, the epidermal nerve endings are rather thick. However, in atopic dermatitis, the epidermal nerve endings are thin and run straight through the epidermis. Based on these observations and combining the 'intensity' and 'pattern' hypothesis, we propose a new theory especially for histamine-unrelated, peripheral induction of chronic pruritus. We suggest that 'itch' is elicited in the epidermal unmyelinated nerve C-fibers and 'pain' in the dermal unmyelinated nerve fibers. The downregulation of the opioid receptor in the epidermis contributes to the chronic itching. We call this new hypothesis the 'layer hypothesis'.

  20. Cognitive and socio-emotional deficits in platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β gene knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong Thi Hong; Nakamura, Tomoya; Hori, Etsuro; Urakawa, Susumu; Uwano, Teruko; Zhao, Juanjuan; Li, Ruixi; Bac, Nguyen Duy; Hamashima, Takeru; Ishii, Yoko; Matsushima, Takako; Ono, Taketoshi; Sasahara, Masakiyo; Nishijo, Hisao

    2011-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a potent mitogen. Extensive in vivo studies of PDGF and its receptor (PDGFR) genes have reported that PDGF plays an important role in embryogenesis and development of the central nervous system (CNS). Furthermore, PDGF and the β subunit of the PDGF receptor (PDGFR-β) have been reported to be associated with schizophrenia and autism. However, no study has reported on the effects of PDGF deletion on mice behavior. Here we generated novel mutant mice (PDGFR-β KO) in which PDGFR-β was conditionally deleted in CNS neurons using the Cre/loxP system. Mice without the Cre transgene but with floxed PDGFR-β were used as controls. Both groups of mice reached adulthood without any apparent anatomical defects. These mice were further examined by conducting several behavioral tests for spatial memory, social interaction, conditioning, prepulse inhibition, and forced swimming. The test results indicated that the PDGFR-β KO mice show deficits in all of these areas. Furthermore, an immunohistochemical study of the PDGFR-β KO mice brain indicated that the number of parvalbumin (calcium-binding protein)-positive (i.e., putatively γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic) neurons was low in the amygdala, hippocampus, and medial prefrontal cortex. Neurophysiological studies indicated that sensory-evoked gamma oscillation was low in the PDGFR-β KO mice, consistent with the observed reduction in the number of parvalbumin-positive neurons. These results suggest that PDGFR-β plays an important role in cognitive and socioemotional functions, and that deficits in this receptor may partly underlie the cognitive and socioemotional deficits observed in schizophrenic and autistic patients. PMID:21437241

  1. Pharmacological enhancement of mGlu5 receptors rescues behavioral deficits in SHANK3 knock-out mice

    PubMed Central

    Vicidomini, Cinzia; Ponzoni, Luisa; Lim, Dmitry; Schmeisser, Michael; Reim, Dominik; Morello, Noemi; Orelanna, Daniel; Tozzi, Alessandro; Durante, Valentina; Scalmani, Paolo; Mantegazza, Massimo; Genazzani, Armando A.; Giustetto, Maurizio; Sala, Mariaelvina; Calabresi, Paolo; Boeckers, Tobias M.; Sala, Carlo; Verpelli, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    SHANK3 (also called PROSAP2) genetic haploinsufficiency is thought to be the major cause of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Phelan-McDermid syndrome (PMS). PMS is a rare genetic disorder that causes a severe form of intellectual disability (ID), expressive language delays and other autistic features. Furthermore, a significant number of SHANK3 mutations have been identified in patients with Autism Spectrum disorders ASD, and SHANK3 truncating mutations are associated with moderate to profound ID. The Shank3 protein is a scaffold protein that is located in the postsynaptic density (PSD) of excitatory synapses and is crucial for synapse development and plasticity. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms associated with the ASD-like behaviors observed in Shank3Δ11-/- mice in which exon 11 has been deleted. Our results indicate that Shank3 is essential to mediating mGlu5 receptor signaling by recruiting Homer1b/c to the PSD, specifically in the striatum and cortex. Moreover, augmenting mGlu5 receptor activity by administering 3-Cyano-N-(1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)benzamide (CDPPB) ameliorated the functional and behavioral defects that were observed in Shank3Δ11-/- mice, suggesting that pharmaceutical treatments that increase mGlu5 activity may represent a new approach for treating patients that are affected by PMS and SHANK3 mutations. PMID:27021819

  2. Gene knockout of nuclear progesterone receptor provides insights into the regulation of ovulation by LH signaling in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Haipei; Liu, Yun; Li, Jianzhen; Yin, Yike; Li, Gaofei; Chen, Yu; Li, Shuisheng; Zhang, Yong; Lin, Haoran; Liu, Xiaochun; Cheng, Christopher H. K.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the luteinizing hormone surge triggers ovulation, a dynamic process leading to the release of the mature oocyte from the ovarian follicle. But how this process controlled by LH signaling remains largely unknown in non-mammalian species. In this study, we investigated the roles of nuclear progesterone receptor (npr) in LH-induced ovulation. Our results indicate that the nuclear progesterone receptor serves as an important mediator of LH action on ovulation. This conclusion is based on the following results: (1) the expression level of npr peaks at the full-grown stage of the follicles; (2) the expression of npr is stimulated by LH signaling in vitro and in vivo; and (3) the npr null females are infertile due to ovulation defects. Moreover, we further show that LH signaling could induce ptger4b expression in an npr-dependent manner, and blockage of Ptger4b could also block hCG-induced ovulation. Collectively, our results not only demonstrate that npr serves an indispensable role in mediating the action of LH on ovulation in zebrafish, but also provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of the regulation of ovulation in fish. PMID:27333837

  3. Generation of Interleukin-2 Receptor Gamma Gene Knockout Pigs from Somatic Cells Genetically Modified by Zinc Finger Nuclease-Encoding mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masahito; Nakano, Kazuaki; Matsunari, Hitomi; Matsuda, Taisuke; Maehara, Miki; Kanai, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Mirina; Matsumura, Yukina; Sakai, Rieko; Kuramoto, Momoko; Hayashida, Gota; Asano, Yoshinori; Takayanagi, Shuko; Arai, Yoshikazu; Umeyama, Kazuhiro; Nagaya, Masaki; Hanazono, Yutaka; Nagashima, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) is a powerful tool for genome editing. ZFN-encoding plasmid DNA expression systems have been recently employed for the generation of gene knockout (KO) pigs, although one major limitation of this technology is the use of potentially harmful genome-integrating plasmid DNAs. Here we describe a simple, non-integrating strategy for generating KO pigs using ZFN-encoding mRNA. The interleukin-2 receptor gamma (IL2RG) gene was knocked out in porcine fetal fibroblasts using ZFN-encoding mRNAs, and IL2RG KO pigs were subsequently generated using these KO cells through somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The resulting IL2RG KO pigs completely lacked a thymus and were deficient in T and NK cells, similar to human X-linked SCID patients. Our findings demonstrate that the combination of ZFN-encoding mRNAs and SCNT provides a simple robust method for producing KO pigs without genomic integration. PMID:24130776

  4. A role for glucocorticoid-signaling in depression-like behavior of gastrin-releasing peptide receptor knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Monje, Francisco J; Kim, Eun-Jung; Cabatic, Maureen; Lubec, Gert; Herkner, Kurt R; Pollak, Daniela D

    2011-08-01

    Abstract Background. The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is highly expressed in the limbic system, where it importantly regulates emotional functions and in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, where it is central for the photic resetting of the circadian clock. Mice lacking GRPR presented with deficient light-induced phase shift in activity as well altered emotional learning and amygdala function. The effect of GRPR deletion on depression-like behavior and its molecular signature in the amygdala, however, has not yet been evaluated. Methods. GRPR knock-out mice (GRPR-KO) were tested in the forced-swim test and the sucrose preference test for depression-like behavior. Gene expression in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala was evaluated by micorarray analysis subsequent to laser-capture microdissection-assisted extraction of mRNA. The expression of selected genes was confirmed by RT-PCR. Results. GRPR-KO mice were found to present with increased depression-like behavior. Microarray analysis revealed down-regulation of several glucocorticoid-responsive genes in the basolateral amygdala. Acute administration of dexamethasone reversed the behavioral phenotype and alterations in gene expression. Discussion. We propose that deletion of GRPR leads to the induction of depression-like behavior which is paralleled by dysregulation of amygdala gene expression, potentially resulting from deficient light-induced corticosterone release in GRPR-KO.

  5. Comprehensive Behavioral Phenotyping of Ryanodine Receptor type 3 (RyR3) Knockout Mice: Decreased Social Contact Duration in Two Social Interaction Tests

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Naoki; Tanda, Koichi; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Yamasaki, Nobuyuki; Toyama, Keiko; Takao, Keizo; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration is crucial for various neuronal functions such as synaptic transmission and plasticity, and gene expression. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a family of intracellular calcium release channels that mediate calcium-induced calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Among the three RyR isoforms, RyR3 is preferentially expressed in the brain especially in the hippocampus and striatum. To investigate the behavioral effects of RyR3 deficiency, we subjected RyR3 knockout (RyR3–/–) mice to a battery of behavioral tests. RyR3–/– mice exhibited significantly decreased social contact duration in two different social interaction tests, where two mice can freely move and make contacts with each other. They also exhibited hyperactivity and mildly impaired prepulse inhibition and latent inhibition while they did not show significant abnormalities in motor function and working and reference memory tests. These results indicate that RyR3 has an important role in locomotor activity and social behavior. PMID:19503748

  6. Androgen Receptor (AR) Physiological Roles in Male and Female Reproductive Systems: Lessons Learned from AR-Knockout Mice Lacking AR in Selective Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chawnshang; Lee, Soo Ok; Wang, Ruey-Sheng; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Ta-Min

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Androgens/androgen receptor (AR) signaling is involved primarily in the development of male-specific phenotypes during embryogenesis, spermatogenesis, sexual behavior, and fertility during adult life. However, this signaling has also been shown to play an important role in development of female reproductive organs and their functions, such as ovarian folliculogenesis, embryonic implantation, and uterine and breast development. The establishment of the testicular feminization (Tfm) mouse model exploiting the X-linked Tfm mutation in mice has been a good in vivo tool for studying the human complete androgen insensitivity syndrome, but this mouse may not be the perfect in vivo model. Mouse models with various cell-specific AR knockout (ARKO) might allow us to study AR roles in individual types of cells in these male and female reproductive systems, although discrepancies are found in results between labs, probably due to using various Cre mice and/or knocking out AR in different AR domains. Nevertheless, no doubt exists that the continuous development of these ARKO mouse models and careful studies will provide information useful for understanding AR roles in reproductive systems of humans and may help us to develop more effective and more specific therapeutic approaches for reproductive system-related diseases. PMID:23782840

  7. Nuclear Progestin Receptor (Pgr) Knockouts in Zebrafish Demonstrate Role for Pgr in Ovulation but Not in Rapid Non-Genomic Steroid Mediated Meiosis Resumption

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yong; Liu, Dongteng; Shaner, Zoe C.; Chen, Shixi; Hong, Wanshu; Stellwag, Edmund J.

    2015-01-01

    Progestins, progesterone derivatives, are the most critical signaling steroid for initiating final oocyte maturation (FOM) and ovulation, in order to advance fully-grown immature oocytes to become fertilizable eggs in basal vertebrates. It is well-established that progestin induces FOM at least partly through a membrane receptor and a non-genomic steroid signaling process, which precedes progestin triggered ovulation that is mediated through a nuclear progestin receptor (Pgr) and genomic signaling pathway. To determine whether Pgr plays a role in a non-genomic signaling mechanism during FOM, we knocked out Pgr in zebrafish using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and studied the oocyte maturation phenotypes of Pgr knockouts (Pgr-KOs). Three TALENs-induced mutant lines with different frame shift mutations were generated. Homozygous Pgr-KO female fish were all infertile while no fertility effects were evident in homozygous Pgr-KO males. Oocytes developed and underwent FOM normally in vivo in homozygous Pgr-KO female compared to the wild-type controls, but these mature oocytes were trapped within the follicular cells and failed to ovulate from the ovaries. These oocytes also underwent normal germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and FOM in vitro, but failed to ovulate even after treatment with human chronic gonadotropin (HCG) or progestin (17α,20β-dihydroxyprogesterone or DHP), which typically induce FOM and ovulation in wild-type oocytes. The results indicate that anovulation and infertility in homozygous Pgr-KO female fish was, at least in part, due to a lack of functional Pgr-mediated genomic progestin signaling in the follicular cells adjacent to the oocytes. Our study of Pgr-KO supports previous results that demonstrate a role for Pgr in steroid-dependent genomic signaling pathways leading to ovulation, and the first convincing evidence that Pgr is not essential for initiating non-genomic progestin signaling and triggering of meiosis

  8. Characterization of interleukin-1β in Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric inflammation and DNA methylation in interleukin-1 receptor type 1 knockout (IL-1R1(-/-)) mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fung-Yu; Chan, Annie On-On; Lo, Regina Cheuk-Lam; Rashid, Asif; Wong, Danny Ka-Ho; Cho, Chi-Hin; Lai, Ching-Lung; Yuen, Man-Fung

    2013-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection induced interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production and is associated with aberrant DNA methylation and gastric diseases. Here, we investigated the role of IL-1β in H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation and DNA methylation using IL-1 receptor type 1 knockout (IL-1R1(-/-)) mice, and compared the therapeutic efficacy of antimicrobial therapy with IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). IL-1R1(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice were infected with H. pylori for 16, 24 and 32 weeks. Infected WT mice at 24 weeks were given either antimicrobial therapy or IL-1ra. Comparing to the IL-1R1(-/-) mice, infected WT mice with functional IL-1β signaling had higher gastritis scores, higher IL-1β and iNOS mRNA expression, higher nitric oxide (NO) production and increased frequency of E-cadherin (E-cad) methylation at all the time points analyzed. IL-1β release was significantly elevated in infected WT mice than normal controls at 16 weeks post-infection (p<0.005). Treatment of infected mice with antimicrobial therapy and IL-1ra significantly reduced the degree of gastritis (p<0.005; p<0.05, respectively), iNOS expression (p<0.0001; p<0.01, respectively) and NO production (both p<0.001) compared with untreated controls. Mice receiving antimicrobial therapy had significantly lower IL-1β expression than untreated controls (p<0.0001). Both treatments reduced the incidence of E-cad methylation in infected mice compared with controls, however, no statistical significance was observed. There was no significant alteration of total DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity. These results demonstrated that IL-1β played a crucial role in H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation and DNA methylation. H. pylori eradication and IL-1ra administration could ameliorate inflammatory stress.

  9. Automated pipeline to analyze non-contact infrared images of the paraventricular nucleus specific leptin receptor knock-out mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Martinez, Myriam; Ghamari-Langroudi, Masoud; Gifford, Aliya; Cone, Roger; Welch, E. B.

    2015-03-01

    Evidence of leptin resistance is indicated by elevated leptin levels together with other hallmarks of obesity such as a defect in energy homeostasis.1 As obesity is an increasing epidemic in the US, the investigation of mechanisms by which leptin resistance has a pathophysiological impact on energy is an intensive field of research.2 However, the manner in which leptin resistance contributes to the dysregulation of energy, specifically thermoregulation,3 is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the leptin receptor expressed in paraventricular nucleus (PVN) neurons plays a role in thermoregulation at different temperatures. Non-contact infrared (NCIR) thermometry was employed to measure surface body temperature (SBT) of nonanesthetized mice with a specific deletion of the leptin receptor in the PVN after exposure to room (25 °C) and cold (4 °C) temperature. Dorsal side infrared images of wild type (LepRwtwt/sim1-Cre), heterozygous (LepRfloxwt/sim1-Cre) and knock-out (LepRfloxflox/sim1-Cre) mice were collected. Images were input to an automated post-processing pipeline developed in MATLAB to calculate average and maximum SBTs. Linear regression was used to evaluate the relationship between sex, cold exposure and leptin genotype with SBT measurements. Findings indicate that average SBT has a negative relationship to the LepRfloxflox/sim1-Cre genotype, the female sex and cold exposure. However, max SBT is affected by the LepRfloxflox/sim1-Cre genotype and the female sex. In conclusion this data suggests that leptin within the PVN may have a neuroendocrine role in thermoregulation and that NCIR thermometry combined with an automated imaging-processing pipeline is a promising approach to determine SBT in non-anesthetized mice.

  10. Adult female wildtype, but not oestrogen receptor β knockout, mice have decreased depression-like behaviour during pro-oestrus and following administration of oestradiol or diarylpropionitrile

    PubMed Central

    Walf, AA; Koonce, CJ; Frye, CA

    2013-01-01

    Studies in people and animal models suggest that depression is influenced by natural, fluctuations in the levels of 17β-oestradiol (E2), as well as administration of E2-based therapies, such as selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). Elucidating the effects and mechanisms of E2 is important to improve future E2-based therapeutics. An important question is whether effects of E2 or SERMs for mood regulation act at the α or β isoform of the oestrogen receptor (ER) because some of the unwanted trophic effects of E2-based therapies may involve actions at ERα, rather than ERβ. In the present study, whether there are sex differences in depression-like behaviour of adult mice (experiment 1), and the effects of natural fluctuations in E2 (experiment 2), or administration of E2 or a SERM that has higher affinity for ERβ than for ERα (diarylpropionitrile; DPN) to ovariectomised (experiment 3) wildtype and ERβ knockout (βERKO) mice were investigated. Results of this study supported our hypotheses that: there would be sex differences favouring males for depression-like behaviour and endogenous increases in, or exogenous administration of, E2 or administration of an ERβ SERM would decrease depression-like behaviour in wildtype, but not βERKO, mice. In experiment 1, adult male mice spent less time immobile in the forced swim test (i.e., showed less depression-like behaviour) compared with female mice. In experiment 2, pro-oestrous (higher circulating E2 levels), compared with dioestrous (lower circulating E2 levels), mice had reduced immobility in the forced swim test; this effect was not observed in βERKO mice. In experiment 3, administration of E2 or DPN to ovariectomised wildtype, but not βERKO, mice decreased immobility compared with vehicle administration, these data suggest that ERβ may be required for some of the anti–depressant-like effects of E2. PMID:18562442

  11. Adipose tissue deficiency results in severe hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in the low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengyu; Gao, Mingming; Liao, Jiawei; Qi, Yanfei; Du, Ximing; Wang, Yuhui; Li, Ling; Liu, George; Yang, Hongyuan

    2016-05-01

    Adipose tissue can store over 50% of whole-body cholesterol; however, the physiological role of adipose tissue in cholesterol metabolism and atherogenesis has not been directly assessed. Here, we examined lipoprotein metabolism and atherogenesis in a unique mouse model of severe lipodystrophy: the Seipin(-/-) mice, and also in mice deficient in both low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr) and Seipin: the Ldlr(-/-)Seipin(-/-) mice. Plasma cholesterol was moderately increased in the Seipin(-/-) mice when fed an atherogenic diet. Strikingly, plasma cholesterol reached ~6000 mg/dl in the Seipin(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice on an atherogenic diet, as compared to ~1000 mg/dl in the Ldlr(-/-) mice on the same diet. The Seipin(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice also developed spontaneous atherosclerosis on chow diet and severe atherosclerosis on an atherogenic diet. Rosiglitazone treatment significantly reduced the hypercholesterolemia of the Seipin(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice, and also alleviated the severity of atherosclerosis. Our results provide direct evidence, for the first time, that the adipose tissue plays a critical role in the clearance of plasma cholesterol. Our results also reveal a previously unappreciated strong link between adipose tissue and LDLR in plasma cholesterol metabolism.

  12. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ)-evoked bradycardia, hypotension, and diuresis are absent in N/OFQ peptide (NOP) receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, Melissa A; Ansonoff, Michael A; Pintar, John E; Kapusta, Daniel R

    2008-09-01

    Intracerebroventricular administration of the opioid-like peptide nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) produces bradycardia, hypotension, and diuresis in mice. We hypothesized that these responses are solely caused by selective activation of central N/OFQ peptide (NOP) receptors. To test this premise, we first examined whether i.c.v. N/OFQ produced dose-dependent diuretic and cardiovascular depressor responses in commercially available C57BL/6 mice. Next, using doses established in these studies, we examined the renal excretory and cardiovascular responses to i.c.v. N/OFQ in conscious transgenic NOP receptor knockout mice (NOP(-/-)). In metabolic studies, i.c.v. N/OFQ, but not saline vehicle, dose-dependently increased urine output (V) in NOP(+/+); this response was significant at 3 nmol (N/OFQ, V = 0.39 +/- 0.10 ml/2 h; saline, 0.08 +/- 0.05 ml/2 h). The N/OFQ-evoked diuresis was absent in littermate NOP(-/-) (N/OFQ, V = 0.06 +/- 0.06 ml/2 h; saline, 0.03 +/- 0.03 ml/2 h). There were no significant changes in urinary sodium or potassium excretion or free water clearance in either group. In telemetry studies, i.c.v. N/OFQ dose dependently lowered heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). At 3 nmol N/OFQ, both HR and MAP were reduced in NOP(+/+) (peak DeltaHR = -217 +/- 31 bpm; peak DeltaMAP =-47 +/- 7 mm Hg) compared with saline (peak DeltaHR =-14 +/- 5 bpm; peak DeltaMAP = 2 +/- 3 mm Hg). These N/OFQ-evoked bradycardic and hypotensive responses were absent in NOP(-/-) (peak DeltaHR =-13 +/- 17 bpm; peak DeltaMAP =-2 +/- 4 mm Hg, respectively). Basal 24-h cardiovascular and renal excretory function were not different between NOP(-/-) and NOP(+/+) mice. These results establish that the bradycardia, hypotension and diuresis produced by centrally administered N/OFQ are mediated by selective activation of NOP receptors.

  13. Epididymal Hypo-Osmolality Induces Abnormal Sperm Morphology and Function in the Estrogen Receptor Alpha Knockout Mouse1

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Avenel; Shur, Barry D.; Ko, CheMyong; Chambon, Pierre; Hess, Rex A.

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen receptor-alpha (ESR1) is highly expressed in the efferent ductules of all species studied as well as in the epididymal epithelium in mice and other select species. Male mice lacking ESR1 (Esr1KO) are infertile, but transplantation studies demonstrated that Esr1KO germ cells are capable of fertilization when placed in a wild-type reproductive tract. These results suggest that extratesticular regions, such as the efferent ductules and epididymis, are the major source of pathological changes in Esr1KO males. Previous studies have shown alterations in ion and fluid transporters in the efferent duct and epididymal epithelia of Esr1KO males, leading to misregulation of luminal fluid pH. To determine the effect of an altered epididymal milieu on Esr1KO sperm, we assayed sperm morphology in the different regions of the epididymis. Sperm recovered from the epididymis exhibited abnormal flagellar coiling and increased incidence of spontaneous acrosome reactions, both of which are consistent with exposure to abnormal epididymal fluid. Analysis of the epididymal fluid revealed that the osmolality of the Esr1KO fluid was reduced relative to wild type, consistent with prior reports of inappropriate fluid absorption from the efferent ductules. This, along with the finding that morphological defects increased with transit through the epididymal duct, suggests that the anomalies in sperm are a consequence of the abnormal luminal environment. Consistent with this, incubating Esr1KO sperm in a more wild-type-like osmotic environment significantly rescued the abnormal flagellar coiling. This work demonstrates that Esr1KO mice exhibit an abnormal fluid environment in the lumen of the efferent ducts and epididymis, precluding normal sperm maturation and instead resulting in progressive deterioration of sperm that contributes to infertility. PMID:20130266

  14. Increased oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hypothalamus of diabetic male mice in the insulin receptor substrate-2 knockout model

    PubMed Central

    Canelles, Sandra; Argente, Jesús; Barrios, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Insulin receptor substrate-2-deficient (IRS2−/−) mice are considered a good model to study the development of diabetes because IRS proteins mediate the pleiotropic effects of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin on metabolism, mitogenesis and cell survival. The hypothalamus might play a key role in the early onset of diabetes, owing to its involvement in the control of glucose homeostasis and energy balance. Because some inflammatory markers are elevated in the hypothalamus of diabetic IRS2−/− mice, our aim was to analyze whether the diabetes associated with the absence of IRS2 results in hypothalamic injury and to analyze the intracellular mechanisms involved. Only diabetic IRS2−/− mice showed increased cell death and activation of caspase-8 and -3 in the hypothalamus. Regulators of apoptosis such as FADD, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and p53 were also increased, whereas p-IκB and c-FLIPL were decreased. This was accompanied by increased levels of Nox-4 and catalase, enzymes involved in oxidative stress. In summary, the hypothalamus of diabetic IRS2−/− mice showed an increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory markers that finally resulted in cell death via substantial activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Conversely, non-diabetic IRS2−/− mice did not show cell death in the hypothalamus, possibly owing to an increase in the levels of circulating IGF-I and in the enhanced hypothalamic IGF-IR phosphorylation that would lead to the stimulation of survival pathways. In conclusion, diabetes in IRS2-deficient male mice is associated with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hypothalamus. PMID:27013528

  15. Increased oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hypothalamus of diabetic male mice in the insulin receptor substrate-2 knockout model.

    PubMed

    Baquedano, Eva; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Canelles, Sandra; González-Rodríguez, Agueda; Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús; Barrios, Vicente; Valverde, Angela M; Frago, Laura M

    2016-05-01

    Insulin receptor substrate-2-deficient (IRS2(-/-)) mice are considered a good model to study the development of diabetes because IRS proteins mediate the pleiotropic effects of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin on metabolism, mitogenesis and cell survival. The hypothalamus might play a key role in the early onset of diabetes, owing to its involvement in the control of glucose homeostasis and energy balance. Because some inflammatory markers are elevated in the hypothalamus of diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice, our aim was to analyze whether the diabetes associated with the absence of IRS2 results in hypothalamic injury and to analyze the intracellular mechanisms involved. Only diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice showed increased cell death and activation of caspase-8 and -3 in the hypothalamus. Regulators of apoptosis such as FADD, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and p53 were also increased, whereas p-IκB and c-FLIPL were decreased. This was accompanied by increased levels of Nox-4 and catalase, enzymes involved in oxidative stress. In summary, the hypothalamus of diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice showed an increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory markers that finally resulted in cell death via substantial activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Conversely, non-diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice did not show cell death in the hypothalamus, possibly owing to an increase in the levels of circulating IGF-I and in the enhanced hypothalamic IGF-IR phosphorylation that would lead to the stimulation of survival pathways. In conclusion, diabetes in IRS2-deficient male mice is associated with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hypothalamus. PMID:27013528

  16. Increased oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hypothalamus of diabetic male mice in the insulin receptor substrate-2 knockout model.

    PubMed

    Baquedano, Eva; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Canelles, Sandra; González-Rodríguez, Agueda; Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús; Barrios, Vicente; Valverde, Angela M; Frago, Laura M

    2016-05-01

    Insulin receptor substrate-2-deficient (IRS2(-/-)) mice are considered a good model to study the development of diabetes because IRS proteins mediate the pleiotropic effects of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin on metabolism, mitogenesis and cell survival. The hypothalamus might play a key role in the early onset of diabetes, owing to its involvement in the control of glucose homeostasis and energy balance. Because some inflammatory markers are elevated in the hypothalamus of diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice, our aim was to analyze whether the diabetes associated with the absence of IRS2 results in hypothalamic injury and to analyze the intracellular mechanisms involved. Only diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice showed increased cell death and activation of caspase-8 and -3 in the hypothalamus. Regulators of apoptosis such as FADD, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and p53 were also increased, whereas p-IκB and c-FLIPL were decreased. This was accompanied by increased levels of Nox-4 and catalase, enzymes involved in oxidative stress. In summary, the hypothalamus of diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice showed an increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory markers that finally resulted in cell death via substantial activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Conversely, non-diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice did not show cell death in the hypothalamus, possibly owing to an increase in the levels of circulating IGF-I and in the enhanced hypothalamic IGF-IR phosphorylation that would lead to the stimulation of survival pathways. In conclusion, diabetes in IRS2-deficient male mice is associated with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hypothalamus.

  17. Conditional knockout of collecting duct bradykinin B2 receptors exacerbates angiotensin II-induced hypertension during high salt intake.

    PubMed

    Kopkan, Libor; Husková, Zuzana; Jíchová, Šárka; Červenková, Lenka; Červenka, Luděk; Saifudeen, Zubaida; El-Dahr, Samir S

    2016-01-01

    We elucidated the role of collecting duct kinin B2 receptor (B2R) in the development of salt-sensitivity and angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension. To this end, we used a Cre-Lox recombination strategy to generate mice lacking Bdkrb2 gene for B2R in the collecting duct (Hoxb7-Cre(tg/+):Bdkrb2(flox/flox)). In 3 groups of control (Bdkrb2(flox/flox)) and 3 groups of UB(Bdkrb2-/-) mice, systolic blood pressure (SBP) responses to high salt intake (4 or 8% NaCl; HS) were monitored by radiotelemetry in comparison with standard salt diet (0.4% NaCl) prior to and during subcutaneous ANG II infusion (1000 ng/min/kg) via osmotic minipumps. High salt intakes alone for 2 weeks did not alter SBP in either strain. ANG II significantly increased SBP equally in control (121 ± 2 to 156 ± 3 mmHg) and UB(Bdkrb2-/-) mice (120 ± 2 to 153 ± 2 mmHg). The development of ANG II-induced hypertension was exacerbated by 4%HS in both control (125 ± 3 to 164 ± 5 mmHg) and UB(Bdkrb2-/-) mice (124 ± 2 to 162 ± 3 mmHg) during 2 weeks. Interestingly, 8%HS caused a more profound and earlier ANG II-induced hypertension in UB(Bdkrb2-/-) (129 ± 2 to 166 ± 3 mmHg) as compared to control (128 ± 2 to 158 ± 2 mmHg) and it was accompanied by body weight loss and increased mortality. In conclusion, targeted inactivation of B2R in the renal collecting duct does not cause salt-sensitivity; however, collecting duct B2R attenuates the hypertensive actions of ANG II under conditions of very high salt intake.

  18. Angiotensin receptor-1A knockout leads to hydronephrosis not associated with a loss of pyeloureteric peristalsis in the mouse renal pelvis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michael J; Hashitani, Hikaru; Lang, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    The action of angiotensin II (AngII) on the Ca(2+) signals driving pyeloureteric peristalsis was investigated using both conventional and angiotensin receptor (ATr) ATr1A and ATr2 knockout ((-/-)) mice. Contractility in the renal pelvis of adult ATr1A(-/-) and ATr2(-/-) mice was compared to their respective wildtype (ATr1A(+/+) and ATr2(+/+)) controls of the same genetic background (FVB/N and C57Bl/6 respectively) using video microscopy. The effects of AngII on the Ca(2+) signals in typical and atypical smooth muscle cells (TSMCs and ASMCs, respectively) within the pelvic wall of conventional mice were recorded using Fluo-4 Ca(2+) imaging. Compared to ATr1A(+/+) , ATr2(+/+) and ATr2(-/-) mice, kidneys of the ATr1A(-/-) mouse were mildly-to-severely hydronephrotic, associated with an enlarged calyx, an atrophic papilla and a hypoplastic renal pelvis. Contraction frequencies in the renal pelvis of moderately hydronephrotic ATr1A(-/-) and unaffected ATr2(-/-) mice were not significantly different from their ATr1A(+/+), ATr2(+/+) controls. No contractions were observed in severely-hydronephrotic ATr1A(-/-) kidneys. AngII increased the spontaneous contraction frequency of the renal pelvis in ATr1A(+/+), ATr2(+/+) and ATr2(-/-) mice, but had little effect on the contractions in the mildly-hydronephrotic ATr1A(-/-) renal pelvis. The ATr1 blocker, candesartan prevented the positive chronotropic effects of AngII. AngII increased the frequency and synchronicity of Ca(2+) transients in both TSMCs and ASMCs. It was concluded that the hydronephrosis observed in ATr1A(-/-) mouse kidneys does not arise from a failure in the development of the essential pacemaker and contractile machinery driving pyeloureteric peristalsis. PMID:26876143

  19. High Fat High Cholesterol Diet (Western Diet) Aggravates Atherosclerosis, Hyperglycemia and Renal Failure in Nephrectomized LDL Receptor Knockout Mice: Role of Intestine Derived Lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Siddhartha S; Righi, Samuel; Krieg, Richard; Kang, Le; Carl, Daniel; Wang, Jing; Massey, H Davis; Sica, Domenic A; Gehr, Todd W B; Ghosh, Shobha

    2015-01-01

    A high fat meal, frequently known as western diet (WD), exacerbates atherosclerosis and diabetes. Both these diseases are frequently associated with renal failure. Recent studies have shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) leaks into the circulation from the intestine in the setting of renal failure and after WD. However, it is not clear how renal function and associated disorders are affected by LPS. This study demonstrates that circulatory LPS exacerbates renal insufficiency, atherosclerosis and glucose intolerance. Renal insufficiency was induced by 2/3 nephrectomy in LDL receptor knockout mice. Nx animals were given normal diet (Nx) or WD (Nx+WD). The controls were sham operated animals on normal diet (control) and WD (WD). To verify if LPS plays a role in exaggerating renal insufficiency, polymyxin (PM), a known LPS antagonist, and curcumin (CU), a compound known to ameliorate chronic kidney disease (CKD), was given to Nx animals on western diet (Nx+WD+PM and Nx+WD+CU, respectively). Compared to control, all other groups displayed increased circulatory LPS. The Nx+WD cohort had the highest levels of LPS. Nx group had significant renal insufficiency and glucose intolerance but not atherosclerosis. WD had intense atherosclerosis and glucose intolerance but it did not show signs of renal insufficiency. Compared to other groups, Nx+WD had significantly higher cytokine expression, macrophage infiltration in the kidney, renal insufficiency, glucose intolerance and atherosclerosis. PM treatment blunted the expression of cytokines, deterioration of renal function and associated disorders, albeit not to the levels of Nx, and was significantly inferior to CU. PM is a non-absorbable antibiotic with LPS binding properties, hence its beneficial effect can only be due to its effect within the GI tract. We conclude that LPS may not cause renal insufficiency but can exaggerate kidney failure and associated disorders following renal insufficiency.

  20. Experimental transmission of AA amyloidosis by injecting the AA amyloid protein into interleukin-1 receptor antagonist knockout (IL-1raKO) mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Uchida, K; Chambers, J K; Tei, M; Shoji, A; Ushio, N; Nakayama, H

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of AA amyloidosis is high in humans with rheumatoid arthritis and several animal species, including cats and cattle with prolonged inflammation. AA amyloidosis can be experimentally induced in mice using severe inflammatory stimuli and a coinjection of AA amyloid; however, difficulties have been associated with transmitting AA amyloidosis to a different animal species, and this has been attributed to the "species barrier." The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist knockout (IL-1raKO) mouse, a rodent model of human rheumatoid arthritis, has been used in the transmission of AA amyloid. When IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with mouse AA amyloid together with a subcutaneous pretreatment of 2% AgNO3, all mice from both strains that were injected with crude or purified murine AA amyloid developed AA amyloidosis. However, the amyloid index, which was determined by the intensity of AA amyloid deposition, was significantly higher in IL-1raKO mice than in BALB/c mice. When IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were injected with crude or purified bovine AA amyloid together with the pretreatment, 83% (5/6 cases) and 38% (3/8 cases) of IL-1raKO mice and 17% (1/6 cases) and 0% (0/6 cases) of BALB/c mice, respectively, developed AA amyloidosis. Similarly, when IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were injected with crude or purified feline AA amyloid, 33% (2/6 cases) and 88% (7/8 cases) of IL-1raKO mice and 0% (0/6 cases) and 29% (2/6 cases) of BALB/c mice, respectively, developed AA amyloidosis. These results indicated that IL-1raKO mice are a useful animal model for investigating AA amyloidogenesis.

  1. High Fat High Cholesterol Diet (Western Diet) Aggravates Atherosclerosis, Hyperglycemia and Renal Failure in Nephrectomized LDL Receptor Knockout Mice: Role of Intestine Derived Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Siddhartha S.; Righi, Samuel; Krieg, Richard; Kang, Le; Carl, Daniel; Wang, Jing; Massey, H. Davis; Sica, Domenic A.; Gehr, Todd W. B.; Ghosh, Shobha

    2015-01-01

    A high fat meal, frequently known as western diet (WD), exacerbates atherosclerosis and diabetes. Both these diseases are frequently associated with renal failure. Recent studies have shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) leaks into the circulation from the intestine in the setting of renal failure and after WD. However, it is not clear how renal function and associated disorders are affected by LPS. This study demonstrates that circulatory LPS exacerbates renal insufficiency, atherosclerosis and glucose intolerance. Renal insufficiency was induced by 2/3 nephrectomy in LDL receptor knockout mice. Nx animals were given normal diet (Nx) or WD (Nx+WD). The controls were sham operated animals on normal diet (control) and WD (WD). To verify if LPS plays a role in exaggerating renal insufficiency, polymyxin (PM), a known LPS antagonist, and curcumin (CU), a compound known to ameliorate chronic kidney disease (CKD), was given to Nx animals on western diet (Nx+WD+PM and Nx+WD+CU, respectively). Compared to control, all other groups displayed increased circulatory LPS. The Nx+WD cohort had the highest levels of LPS. Nx group had significant renal insufficiency and glucose intolerance but not atherosclerosis. WD had intense atherosclerosis and glucose intolerance but it did not show signs of renal insufficiency. Compared to other groups, Nx+WD had significantly higher cytokine expression, macrophage infiltration in the kidney, renal insufficiency, glucose intolerance and atherosclerosis. PM treatment blunted the expression of cytokines, deterioration of renal function and associated disorders, albeit not to the levels of Nx, and was significantly inferior to CU. PM is a non-absorbable antibiotic with LPS binding properties, hence its beneficial effect can only be due to its effect within the GI tract. We conclude that LPS may not cause renal insufficiency but can exaggerate kidney failure and associated disorders following renal insufficiency. PMID:26580567

  2. Normal thermoregulatory responses to 3-iodothyronamine, trace amines and amphetamine-like psychostimulants in trace amine associated receptor 1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Panas, Helen N; Lynch, Laurie J; Vallender, Eric J; Xie, Zhihua; Chen, Guo-Lin; Lynn, Spencer K; Scanlan, Thomas S; Miller, Gregory M

    2010-07-01

    3-Iodothyronamine (T1AM) is a metabolite of thyroid hormone. It is an agonist at trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1), a recently identified receptor involved in monoaminergic regulation and a potential novel therapeutic target. Here, T1AM was studied using rhesus monkey TAAR1 and/or human dopamine transporter (DAT) co-transfected cells, and wild-type (WT) and TAAR1 knock-out (KO) mice. The IC(50) of T1AM competition for binding of the DAT-specific radio-ligand [(3)H]CFT was highly similar in DAT cells, WT striatal synaptosomes and KO striatal synaptosomes (0.72-0.81 microM). T1AM inhibition of 10 nM [(3)H]dopamine uptake (IC(50): WT, 1.4 + or - 0.5 microM; KO, 1.2 + or - 0.4 microM) or 50 nM [(3)H]serotonin uptake (IC(50): WT, 4.5 + or - 0.6 microM; KO, 4.7 + or - 1.1 microM) in WT and KO synaptosomes was also highly similar. Unlike other TAAR1 agonists that are DAT substrates, TAAR1 signaling in response to T1AM was not enhanced in the presence of DAT as determined by CRE-luciferase assay. In vivo, T1AM induced robust hypothermia in WT and KO mice equivalently and dose dependently (maximum change degrees Celsius: 50 mg/kg at 60 min: WT -6.0 + or - 0.4, KO -5.6 + or - 1.0; and 25 mg/kg at 30 min: WT -2.7 + or - 0.4, KO -3.0 + or - 0.2). Other TAAR1 agonists including beta-phenylethylamine (beta-PEA), MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) and methamphetamine also induced significant, time-dependent thermoregulatory responses that were alike in WT and KO mice. Therefore, TAAR1 co-expression does not alter T1AM binding to DAT in vitro nor T1AM inhibition of [(3)H]monoamine uptake ex vivo, and TAAR1 agonist-induced thermoregulatory responses are TAAR1-independent. Accordingly, TAAR1-directed compounds will likely not affect thermoregulation nor are they likely to be cryogens.

  3. Role of α7- and β4-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the affective and somatic aspects of nicotine withdrawal: studies in knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Stoker, Astrid K; Olivier, Berend; Markou, Athina

    2012-05-01

    To assess which nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are involved in the aversive aspects of nicotine withdrawal, brain reward function and the somatic signs of nicotine withdrawal were assessed in mice that lack α7 and β4 nAChR subunits. Brain reward function was assessed with the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure, in which elevations in ICSS thresholds reflect an anhedonic mood state. At 3-6 h of spontaneous nicotine/saline withdrawal, thresholds were elevated in nicotine-withdrawing α7(+/+) and β4(+/+), but not α7(-/-) or β4(-/-), mice compared with saline-withdrawing mice, indicating a delay in the onset of withdrawal in the knockout mice. From 8 to 100 h of withdrawal, thresholds in α7(+/+) and α7(-/-) mice were equally elevated, whereas thresholds in β4(+/+) and β4(-/-) mice returned to baseline levels. Somatic signs were attenuated in nicotine-withdrawing β4(-/-), but not α7(-/-), mice. Administration of a low dose of the nAChR antagonist mecamylamine induced threshold elevations in α7(-/-), but not α7(+/+), mice, whereas the highest dose tested only elevated thresholds in α7(+/+) mice. Mecamylamine-induced threshold elevations were similar in β4(-/-) and β4(+/+) mice. In conclusion, null mutation of the α7 and β4 nAChR subunits resulted in a delayed onset of the anhedonic aspects of the spontaneous nicotine withdrawal syndrome. Previous findings of attenuated somatic signs of nicotine withdrawal in β4(-/-), but not α7(-/-), mice were confirmed in the present study, indicating an important role for β4-containing nAChRs in the somatic signs of nicotine withdrawal. The mecamylamine-precipitated withdrawal data suggest that compensatory adaptations may occur in constitutive α7(-/-) mice or that mecamylamine may interact with other receptors besides nAChRs in these mice. In summary, the present results indicate an important role for α7 and β4-containing nAChRs in the anhedonic or somatic signs of nicotine withdrawal.

  4. GH in the dwarf dopaminergic D2 receptor knockout mouse: somatotrope population, GH release, and responsiveness to GH-releasing factors and somatostatin.

    PubMed

    García-Tornadú, Isabel; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Gaylinn, Bruce D; Hill, David; Arany, Edith; Low, Malcolm J; Díaz-Torga, Graciela; Becu-Villalobos, Damasia

    2006-09-01

    Recently, the importance of the dopaminergic D2 receptor (D2R) subtype in normal body growth and neonatal GH secretion has been highlighted. Disruption of D2R alters the GHRH-GH-IGF-I axis and impairs body growth in adult male mice. The D2R knockout (KO) dwarf mouse has not been well characterized; we therefore sought to determine somatotrope function in the adult pituitary. Using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy, we found a significant decrease in the somatotrope population in pituitaries from KO mice (P=0.043), which was paralleled by a decreased GH output from pituitary cells cultured in vitro. In cells from adult mice the response amplitude to GHRH differed between genotypes (lower in KO), but this difference was less dramatic after taking into account the lower basal release and hormone content in the KO cells. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in cAMP generation in response to GHRH between genotypes. By Western blot, GHRH-receptor in pituitary membranes from KO mice was reduced to 46% of the level found in wildtype (WT) mice (P=0.016). Somatostatin induced a concentration-dependent decrease in GH and prolactin (PRL) secretion in both genotypes, and 1x10(-7) M ghrelin released GH in cells from both genotypes (P=0.017) in a proportionate manner to basal levels. These results suggest that KO somatotropes maintain a regulated secretory function. Finally, we tested the direct effect of dopamine on GH and PRL secretion in cells from both genotypes at 20 days and 6 months of life. As expected, we found that dopamine could reduce PRL levels at both ages in WT mice but not in KO mice, but there was no consistent effect of the neurotransmitter on GH release in either genotype at the ages studied. The present study demonstrates that in the adult male D2R KO mouse, there is a reduction in pituitary GH content and secretory activity. Our results point to an involvement of D2R signaling at the hypothalamic level as dopamine did not release GH

  5. Small-molecule nociceptin receptor agonist ameliorates mast cell activation and pain in sickle mice

    PubMed Central

    Vang, Derek; Paul, Jinny A.; Nguyen, Julia; Tran, Huy; Vincent, Lucile; Yasuda, Dennis; Zaveri, Nurulain T.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of pain with morphine and its congeners in sickle cell anemia is suboptimal, warranting the need for analgesics devoid of side effects, addiction and tolerance liability. Small-molecule nociceptin opioid receptor ligands show analgesic efficacy in acute and chronic pain models. We show that AT-200, a high affinity nociceptin opioid receptor agonist with low efficacy at the mu opioid receptor, ameliorated chronic and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced mechanical, thermal and deep tissue/musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in HbSS-BERK sickle mice. The antinociceptive effect of AT-200 was antagonized by SB-612111, a nociceptin opioid receptor antagonist, but not naloxone, a non-selective mu opioid receptor antagonist. Daily 7-day treatment with AT-200 did not develop tolerance and showed a sustained anti-nociceptive effect, which improved over time and led to reduced plasma serum amyloid protein, neuropeptides, inflammatory cytokines and mast cell activation in the periphery. These data suggest that AT-200 ameliorates pain in sickle mice via the nociceptin opioid receptor by reducing inflammation and mast cell activation without causing tolerance. Thus, nociceptin opioid receptor agonists are promising drugs for treating pain in sickle cell anemia. PMID:26294734

  6. Small-molecule nociceptin receptor agonist ameliorates mast cell activation and pain in sickle mice.

    PubMed

    Vang, Derek; Paul, Jinny A; Nguyen, Julia; Tran, Huy; Vincent, Lucile; Yasuda, Dennis; Zaveri, Nurulain T; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of pain with morphine and its congeners in sickle cell anemia is suboptimal, warranting the need for analgesics devoid of side effects, addiction and tolerance liability. Small-molecule nociceptin opioid receptor ligands show analgesic efficacy in acute and chronic pain models. We show that AT-200, a high affinity nociceptin opioid receptor agonist with low efficacy at the mu opioid receptor, ameliorated chronic and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced mechanical, thermal and deep tissue/musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in HbSS-BERK sickle mice. The antinociceptive effect of AT-200 was antagonized by SB-612111, a nociceptin opioid receptor antagonist, but not naloxone, a non-selective mu opioid receptor antagonist. Daily 7-day treatment with AT-200 did not develop tolerance and showed a sustained anti-nociceptive effect, which improved over time and led to reduced plasma serum amyloid protein, neuropeptides, inflammatory cytokines and mast cell activation in the periphery. These data suggest that AT-200 ameliorates pain in sickle mice via the nociceptin opioid receptor by reducing inflammation and mast cell activation without causing tolerance. Thus, nociceptin opioid receptor agonists are promising drugs for treating pain in sickle cell anemia.

  7. Pharmacological characterization of an opioid receptor in the ciliate Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, R; Silva, W I; Renaud, F L

    1993-01-01

    A pharmacological characterization has been performed of the opioid receptor involved in modulation of phagocytosis in the protozoan ciliate Tetrahymena. Studies on inhibition of phagocytosis by mammalian prototypic opioid agonists revealed that morphine and beta-endorphin have the highest intrinsic activity, whereas all the other opioids tested can only be considered partial agonists. However, morphine (a mu-receptor agonist) is twice as potent as beta-endorphin (a delta-receptor agonist). Furthermore, the sensitivity for the opioid antagonist naloxone, determined in the presence of morphine and beta-endorphin, is very similar to the sensitivity exhibited by mammalian tissues rich in mu-opioid receptors. We suggest that the opioid receptor coupled to phagocytosis in Tetrahymena is mu-like in some of its pharmacological characteristics and may serve as a model system for studies on opioid receptor function and evolution.

  8. Physiological roles of A1 and A2A adenosine receptors in regulating heart rate, body temperature, and locomotion as revealed using knockout mice and caffeine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiang-Ning; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Fredholm, Bertil B

    2009-04-01

    Heart rate (HR), body temperature (Temp), locomotor activity (LA), and oxygen consumption (O(2)C) were studied in awake mice lacking one or both of the adenosine A(1) or A(2A) receptors (A(1)R or A(2A)R, respectively) using telemetry and respirometry, before and after caffeine administration. All parameters were lower during day than night and higher in females than males. When compared with wild-type (WT) littermates, HR was higher in male A(1)R knockout (A(1)RKO) mice but lower in A(2A)RKO mice and intermediate in A(1)-A(2A)R double KO mice. A single dose of an unselective beta-blocker (timolol; 1 mg/kg) abolished the HR differences between these genotypes. Deletion of A(1)Rs had little effect on Temp, whereas deletion of A(2A)Rs increased it in females and decreased it in males. A(1)-A(2A)RKO mice had lower Temp than WT mice. LA was unaltered in A(1)RKO mice and lower in A(2A)RKO and A(1)-A(2A)RKO mice than in WT mice. Caffeine injection increased LA but only in mice expressing A(2A)R. Caffeine ingestion also increased LA in an A(2A)R-dependent manner in male mice. Caffeine ingestion significantly increased O(2)C in WT mice, but less in the different KO mice. Injection of 30 mg/kg caffeine decreased Temp, especially in KO mice, and hence in a manner unrelated to A(1)R or A(2A)R blockade. Selective A(2B) antagonism had little or no effect. Thus A(1)R and A(2A)R influence HR, Temp, LA, and O(2)C in mice in a sex-dependent manner, indicating effects of endogenous adenosine. The A(2A)R plays an important role in the modulation of O(2)C and LA by acute and chronic caffeine administration. There is also evidence for effects of higher doses of caffeine being independent of both A(1)R and A(2A)R.

  9. Oleylphosphocholine (OlPC) arrests Cryptosporidium parvum growth in vitro and prevents lethal infection in interferon gamma receptor knock-out mice

    PubMed Central

    Sonzogni-Desautels, Karine; Renteria, Axel E.; Camargo, Fabio V.; Di Lenardo, Thomas Z.; Mikhail, Alexandre; Arrowood, Michael J.; Fortin, Anny; Ndao, Momar

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a species of protozoa that causes cryptosporidiosis, an intestinal disease affecting many mammals including humans. Typically, in healthy individuals, cryptosporidiosis is a self-limiting disease. However, C. parvum can cause a severe and persistent infection that can be life-threatening for immunocompromised individuals, such as AIDS patients. As there are no available treatments for these patients that can cure the disease, there is an urgent need to identify treatment options. We tested the anti-parasitic activity of the alkylphosphocholine oleylphosphocholine (OlPC), an analog of miltefosine, against C. parvum in in vitro and in vivo studies. In vitro experiments using C. parvum infected human ileocecal adenocarcinoma cells (HCT-8 cells) showed that OlPC has an EC50 of 18.84 nM. Moreover, no cell toxicity has been seen at concentrations ≤50 μM. C57BL/6 interferon gamma receptor knock-out mice, were infected by gavage with 4000 C. parvum oocysts on Day 0. Oral treatments, with OlPC, miltefosine, paromomycin or PBS, began on Day 3 post-infection for 10 days. Treatment with OlPC, at 40 mg/kg/day resulted in 100% survival, complete clearance of parasite in stools and a 99.9% parasite burden reduction in the intestines at Day 30. Doses of 30 and 20 mg/kg/day also demonstrated an increased survival rate and a dose-dependent parasite burden reduction. Mice treated with 10 mg/kg/day of miltefosine resulted in 50% survival at Day 30. In contrast, control mice, treated with PBS or 100 mg/kg/day of paromomycin, died or had to be euthanized between Days 6 and 13 due to severe illness. Results of parasite burden were obtained by qPCR and cross-validated by both flow cytometry of stool oocysts and histological sections of the ileum. Together, our results strongly support that OlPC represents a potential candidate for the treatment of C. parvum infections in immunocompromised patients. PMID:26441906

  10. Oleylphosphocholine (OlPC) arrests Cryptosporidium parvum growth in vitro and prevents lethal infection in interferon gamma receptor knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Sonzogni-Desautels, Karine; Renteria, Axel E; Camargo, Fabio V; Di Lenardo, Thomas Z; Mikhail, Alexandre; Arrowood, Michael J; Fortin, Anny; Ndao, Momar

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a species of protozoa that causes cryptosporidiosis, an intestinal disease affecting many mammals including humans. Typically, in healthy individuals, cryptosporidiosis is a self-limiting disease. However, C. parvum can cause a severe and persistent infection that can be life-threatening for immunocompromised individuals, such as AIDS patients. As there are no available treatments for these patients that can cure the disease, there is an urgent need to identify treatment options. We tested the anti-parasitic activity of the alkylphosphocholine oleylphosphocholine (OlPC), an analog of miltefosine, against C. parvum in in vitro and in vivo studies. In vitro experiments using C. parvum infected human ileocecal adenocarcinoma cells (HCT-8 cells) showed that OlPC has an EC50 of 18.84 nM. Moreover, no cell toxicity has been seen at concentrations ≤50 μM. C57BL/6 interferon gamma receptor knock-out mice, were infected by gavage with 4000 C. parvum oocysts on Day 0. Oral treatments, with OlPC, miltefosine, paromomycin or PBS, began on Day 3 post-infection for 10 days. Treatment with OlPC, at 40 mg/kg/day resulted in 100% survival, complete clearance of parasite in stools and a 99.9% parasite burden reduction in the intestines at Day 30. Doses of 30 and 20 mg/kg/day also demonstrated an increased survival rate and a dose-dependent parasite burden reduction. Mice treated with 10 mg/kg/day of miltefosine resulted in 50% survival at Day 30. In contrast, control mice, treated with PBS or 100 mg/kg/day of paromomycin, died or had to be euthanized between Days 6 and 13 due to severe illness. Results of parasite burden were obtained by qPCR and cross-validated by both flow cytometry of stool oocysts and histological sections of the ileum. Together, our results strongly support that OlPC represents a potential candidate for the treatment of C. parvum infections in immunocompromised patients. PMID:26441906

  11. Morphine-induced desensitization and down-regulation at mu-receptors in 7315C pituitary tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Puttfarcken, P.S.; Cox, B.M. )

    1989-01-01

    Pituitary 7315c tumor cells maintained in culture were treated with varying concentrations of morphine from 10 nM to 300 {mu}M, for periods of five or forty-eight hours. The ability of the mu-opioid receptor agonist, DAMGO, to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase in washed membrane preparations from the treated cells was compared with its activity in membranes from cells incubated in the absence of added morphine. In the same membrane preparations, the number and affinity of mu-opioid receptors was estimated by measurements of ({sup 3}H)diprenorphine binding. After 5 hr of treatment with morphine concentrations of 100 nM or higher, a significant reduction in inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by DAMGO was observed. Little further loss of agonist activity was observed when the incubations were extended to 48 hr. After 5 hr of morphine treatment, there was no change in either the number of receptors, or their affinity for ({sup 3}H)diprenorphine. However after 48 hr of morphine treatment, greater than 25% reductions in receptor number were apparent with morphine pretreatment concentrations of 10 {mu}M or higher. These results suggest that opioid tolerance in this system is primarily associated with a reduced ability of agonist-occupied receptor to activate the effector system. Receptor down-regulation was not necessary for loss of agonist response, although a reduction in receptor number occurred after exposure to high concentrations of morphine for periods longer than 5hr.

  12. Antitussive activity of Withania somnifera and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Nosálová, Gabriela; Sivová, Veronika; Ray, Bimalendu; Fraňová, Soňa; Ondrejka, Igor; Flešková, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Arabinogalactan is a polysaccharide isolated from the roots of the medicinal plant Withania somnifera L. It contains 65% arabinose and 18% galactose. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antitussive activity of arabinogalactan in conscious, healthy adult guinea pigs and the role of the opioid pathway in the antitussive action. A polysaccharide extract was given orally in a dose of 50 mg/kg. Cough was induced by an aerosol of citric acid in a concentration 0.3 mol/L, generated by a jet nebulizer into a plethysmographic chamber. The intensity of cough response was defined as the number of cough efforts counted during a 3-min exposure to the aerosol. The major finding was that arabinogalactan clearly suppressed the cough reflex; the suppression was comparable with that of codeine that was taken as a reference drug. The involvement of the opioid system was tested with the use of a blood-brain barrier penetrable, naloxone hydrochloride, and non-penetrable, naloxone methiodide, to distinguish between the central and peripheral mu-opioid receptor pathways. Both opioid antagonists acted to reverse the arabinogalactan-induced cough suppression; the reversion was total over time with the latter antagonist. We failed to confirm the presence of a bronchodilating effect of the polysaccharide, which could be involved in its antitussive action. We conclude that the polysaccharide arabinogalactan from Withania somnifera has a distinct antitussive activity consisting of cough suppression and that this action involves the mu-opioid receptor pathways.

  13. Positron emission tomographic imaging of the cannabinoid type 1 receptor system with [¹¹C]OMAR ([¹¹C]JHU75528): improvements in image quantification using wild-type and knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Herance, Raúl; Rojas, Santiago; Abad, Sergio; Jiménez, Xavier; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Millán, Olga; Martín-García, Elena; Burokas, Aurelijus; Serra, Miquel Àngel; Maldonado, Rafael; Pareto, Deborah

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we assessed the feasibility of using positron emission tomography (PET) and the tracer [¹¹C]OMAR ([¹¹C]JHU75528), an analogue of rimonabant, to study the brain cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor system. Wild-type (WT) and CB1 knockout (KO) animals were imaged at baseline and after pretreatment with blocking doses of rimonabant. Brain uptake in WT animals was higher (50%) than in KO animals in baseline conditions. After pretreatment with rimonabant, WT uptake lowered to the level of KO animals. The results of this study support the feasibility of using PET with the radiotracer [¹¹C]JHU75528 to image the brain CB1 receptor system in mice. In addition, this methodology can be used to assess the effect of new drugs in preclinical studies using genetically manipulated animals.

  14. Differential effects of exercise on brain opioid receptor binding and activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Brand, Serge; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides supposed to be responsible for changes in mood, anxiety, and performance. Exercise alters sensitivity to these effects that modify the efficacy at the opioid receptor. Although there is evidence that relates exercise to neuropeptide expression in the brain, the effects of exercise on opioid receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors have not been explored. Here, we characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor or delta opioid receptor in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. As regards short- (acute) or long-term effects (chronic) of exercise, overall, higher opioid receptor binding was observed in acute-exercise animals and the opposite was found in the chronic-exercise animals. The binding of [(35) S]GTPγS under basal conditions (absence of agonists) was elevated in sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus, an effect more evident after chronic exercise. Divergence of findings was observed for mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor, and delta opioid receptor receptor activation in our study. Our results support existing evidence of opioid receptor binding and G protein activation occurring differentially in brain regions in response to diverse exercise stimuli. We characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. Higher opioid receptor binding was observed in the acute exercise animal group and opposite findings in the chronic exercise group. Higher G protein activation under basal conditions was noted in rats submitted to chronic exercise, as visible in the depicted pseudo-color autoradiograms. PMID:25330347

  15. Differential effects of exercise on brain opioid receptor binding and activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Brand, Serge; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides supposed to be responsible for changes in mood, anxiety, and performance. Exercise alters sensitivity to these effects that modify the efficacy at the opioid receptor. Although there is evidence that relates exercise to neuropeptide expression in the brain, the effects of exercise on opioid receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors have not been explored. Here, we characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor or delta opioid receptor in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. As regards short- (acute) or long-term effects (chronic) of exercise, overall, higher opioid receptor binding was observed in acute-exercise animals and the opposite was found in the chronic-exercise animals. The binding of [(35) S]GTPγS under basal conditions (absence of agonists) was elevated in sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus, an effect more evident after chronic exercise. Divergence of findings was observed for mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor, and delta opioid receptor receptor activation in our study. Our results support existing evidence of opioid receptor binding and G protein activation occurring differentially in brain regions in response to diverse exercise stimuli. We characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. Higher opioid receptor binding was observed in the acute exercise animal group and opposite findings in the chronic exercise group. Higher G protein activation under basal conditions was noted in rats submitted to chronic exercise, as visible in the depicted pseudo-color autoradiograms.

  16. Blockade of 5-HT1A receptors by (+/-)-pindolol potentiates cortical 5-HT outflow, but not antidepressant-like activity of paroxetine: microdialysis and behavioral approaches in 5-HT1A receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Guilloux, Jean-Philippe; David, Denis J P; Guiard, Bruno P; Chenu, Franck; Repérant, Christelle; Toth, Miklos; Bourin, Michel; Gardier, Alain M

    2006-10-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors like paroxetine (Prx) often requires 4-6 weeks to achieve clinical benefits in depressed patients. Pindolol shortens this delay and it has been suggested that this effect is mediated by somatodendritic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 1A autoreceptors. However clinical data on the beneficial effects of pindolol are conflicting. To study the effects of (+/-)-pindolol-paroxetine administration, we used genetical and pharmacological approaches in 5-HT1A knockout mice (5-HT1A-/-). Two assays, in vivo intracerebral microdialysis in awake mice and the forced swimming test (FST), were used to assess the antidepressant-like effects of this drug combination. Basal levels of extracellular serotonin, 5-HT ([5-HT]ext) in the frontal cortex (FCX) and the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) did not differ between the two strains of mice, suggesting a lack of tonic control of 5-HT1A autoreceptors on nerve terminal 5-HT release. Prx (1 and 4 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased cortical [5-HT]ext in both genotypes, but the effects were greater in mutants. The selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY-100635 (0.5 mg/kg), or (+/-)-pindolol (5 and 10 mg/kg) potentiated the effects of Prx (4 mg/kg) on cortical [5-HT]ext in 5-HT1A+/+, but not in 5-HT1A-/- mice. Similar responses were obtained following local intra-raphe perfusion by reverse microdialysis of either WAY-100635 or (+/-)-pindolol (100 microM each). In the FST, Prx administration dose-dependently decreased the immobility time in both strains of mice, but the response was much greater in 5HT1A-/- mice. In contrast, (+/-)-pindolol blocked Prx-induced decreases in the immobility time while WAY-100635 had no effect in both genotypes. These findings using 5-HT1A-/- mice confirm that (+/-)-pindolol behaves as an antagonist of 5-HT1A autoreceptor in mice, but its blockade of paroxetine-induced antidepressant-like effects in the FST may be due to its binding to other neurotransmitter receptors.

  17. Corynebacterium parvum- and Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin-induced granuloma formation is inhibited in TNF receptor I (TNF-RI) knockout mice and by treatment with soluble TNF-RI.

    PubMed

    Senaldi, G; Yin, S; Shaklee, C L; Piguet, P F; Mak, T W; Ulich, T R

    1996-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of TNF receptor I (TNF-RI) in the pathogenesis of heat-killed Corynebacterium parvum- and live bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-induced granulomas. Granuloma formation was analyzed in TNF-RI knockout mice and after treatment with soluble TNF-RI (sTNF-RI). TNF-RI knockout mice injected with C. parvum or BCG developed fewer and smaller granulomas than wild-type control mice. Mice treated with sTNF-RI from days 7 to 13 after injection of C. parvum or BCG developed fewer and smaller granulomas than saline-treated control mice. Established granulomas regressed in rats treated with sTNF-RI from days 10 to 13 after injection of C. parvum. In conclusion, TNF signaling via TNF-RI contributes to the pathogenesis of C. parvum- and BCG-induced granulomas. sTNF-RI inhibits the development of granulomas and can cause the regression of established granulomas. PMID:8943410

  18. The use of knock-out mice unravels distinct roles for mGlu2 and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptors in mechanisms of neurodegeneration/neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Corti, Corrado; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Molinaro, Gemma; Riozzi, Barbara; Pittaluga, Anna; Corsi, Mauro; Mugnaini, Manolo; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Bruno, Valeria

    2007-08-01

    Dual metabotropic glutamate 2/3 (mGlu2/3) receptor agonists have been examined with success in the clinic with positive proof of efficacy in several tests of anxiety and schizophrenia. Moreover, a large body of evidence has accumulated that these drugs have significant neuroprotective potential. An important discussion in the field deals with dissecting effects on mGlu2 versus effects on mGlu3 receptors, which is relevant for the potential use of subtype-selective agonists or allosteric activators. We addressed this issue using mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptor knock-out mice. We used mixed cultures of cortical cells in which astrocytes and neurons were plated at different times and could therefore originate from different mice. Cultures were challenged with NMDA for the induction of excitotoxic neuronal death. The mGlu2/3 receptor agonist, (-)-2-oxa-4-aminocyclo[3.1.0]hexane-4,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY379268), was equally neuroprotective in cultures containing neurons from wild-type, mGlu2-/-, or mGlu3-/- mice. Neuroprotection was instead abolished when astrocytes lacked mGlu3 receptors, unless neuronal mGlu2 receptors were also absent. The latter condition partially restored the protective activity of LY379268. Cultures in which neurons originated from mGlu2-/- mice were also intrinsically resistant to NMDA toxicity. In in vivo experiments, systemic administration of LY379268 protected striatal neurons against NMDA toxicity in wild-type and mGlu2-/- mice but not in mGlu3-/- mice. In addition, LY379268 was protective against nigrostriatal degeneration induced by low doses of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine only in mice lacking mGlu2 receptors. We conclude that neuroprotection by mGlu2/3 receptor agonists requires the activation of astrocytic mGlu3 receptors, whereas, unexpectedly, activation of mGlu2 receptors might be harmful to neurons exposed to toxic insults. PMID:17670976

  19. Selective and interactive down-regulation of mu- and delta-opioid receptors in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells.

    PubMed

    Baumhaker, Y; Gafni, M; Keren, O; Sarne, Y

    1993-08-01

    Human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells, which contain both mu- and delta-opioid receptors, were grown under conditions that provided a mu:delta ratio of 1.5:1. Both receptors were down-regulated after 72 hr of exposure to 100 nM etorphine. Selective down-regulation was demonstrated using selective opioid agonists; the mu agonist Tyr-D-Ala2-Gly-(Me)Phe4-Gly-ol down-regulated mu- but not delta-opioid receptors, whereas prolonged exposure to the selective delta agonist D-Pen2,D-Pen5-enkephalin resulted in delta- but not mu-opioid receptor down-regulation. Morphine, which binds mu- as well as delta-opioid receptors, down-regulated both receptor subtypes. NG108-15 cells, which contain delta receptors exclusively, were also tested. NG108-15 cells did not exhibit delta-opioid receptor down-regulation when exposed to morphine. The discrepancy between the effect of chronic morphine treatment on delta receptors in SK-N-SH cells and in NG108-15 cells raised the question of whether the coexistence of mu receptors in the former allowed morphine to down-regulate delta receptors. The role of mu-opioid receptors in morphine-induced delta receptor down-regulation was studied by using the irreversible mu antagonist beta-funaltrexamine. Pretreatment of SK-N-SH cells with beta-funaltrexamine prevented down-regulation of delta receptors in response to chronic exposure to morphine but did not affect down-regulation of delta receptors in response to D-Pen2,D-Pen5-enkephalin. The experimental data indicate that morphine-induced delta-opioid receptor down-regulation is dependent on the presence of functional mu receptors in the same cell.

  20. In vivo SPECT and ex vivo autoradiographic brain imaging of the novel selective CB1 receptor antagonist radioligand [125I]SD7015 in CB1 knock-out and wildtype mouse

    PubMed Central

    Máthé, Domokos; Horváth, Ildikó; Szigeti, Krisztián; Donohue, Sean R.; Pike, Victor W.; Jia, Zisheng; Ledent, Catherine; Palkovits, Miklós; Freund, Tamás F.; Halldin, Christer; Gulyás, Balázs

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the novel high-affinity and relatively lipophilic CB1 receptor (CB1R) antagonist radioligand [125I]SD7015 for SPECT imaging of CB1Rs in vivo using the multiplexed multipinhole dedicated small animal SPECT/CT system, NanoSPECT/CTPLUS (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary), in knock-out CB1 receptor knock-out (CB1R-/-) and wildtype mice. In order to exclude possible differences in cerebral blood flow between the two types of animals, HMPAO SPECT scans were performed, whereas in order to confirm the brain uptake differences of the radioligand between knock-out mice and wildtype mice, in vivo scans were complemented with ex vivo autoradiographic measurements using the brains of the same animals. With SPECT/CT imaging, we measured the brain uptake of radioactivity, using %SUV (% standardised uptake values) in CB1R-/- mice (n = 3) and C57BL6 wildtype mice (n = 7) under urethane anaesthesia after injecting [125I]SD7015 intravenously or intraperitoneally. The Brookhaven Laboratory mouse MRI atlas was fused to the SPECT/CT images by using a combination of rigid and non-rigid algorithms in the Mediso Fusion™ (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary) and VivoQuant (inviCRO, Boston, MA, USA) softwares. Phosphor imager plate autoradiography (ARG) was performed on 4 μm-thin cryostat sections of the excised brains. %SUV was 8.6 ± 3.6 (average ± SD) in CB1R-/- mice and 22.1 ± 12.4 in wildtype mice between 2 and 4 h after injection (p < 0.05). ARG of identically taken sections from wildtype mouse brain showed moderate radioactivity uptake when compared with the in vivo images, with a clear difference between grey matter and white matter, whereas ARG in CB1R(-/-) mice showed practically no radioactivity uptake. [125I]SD7015 enters the mouse brain in sufficient amount to enable SPECT imaging. Brain radioactivity distribution largely coincides with that of the known CB1R expression pattern in rodent brain. We conclude that [125I]SD7015 should be a useful SPECT radioligand for

  1. In vivo SPECT and ex vivo autoradiographic brain imaging of the novel selective CB1 receptor antagonist radioligand [125I]SD7015 in CB1 knock-out and wildtype mouse.

    PubMed

    Máthé, Domokos; Horváth, Ildikó; Szigeti, Krisztián; Donohue, Sean R; Pike, Victor W; Jia, Zisheng; Ledent, Catherine; Palkovits, Miklós; Freund, Tamás F; Halldin, Christer; Gulyás, Balázs

    2013-02-01

    We aimed to evaluate the novel high-affinity and relatively lipophilic CB(1) receptor (CB(1)R) antagonist radioligand [(125)I]SD7015 for SPECT imaging of CB(1)Rs in vivo using the multiplexed multipinhole dedicated small animal SPECT/CT system, NanoSPECT/CT(PLUS) (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary), in knock-out CB(1) receptor knock-out (CB(1)R-/-) and wildtype mice. In order to exclude possible differences in cerebral blood flow between the two types of animals, HMPAO SPECT scans were performed, whereas in order to confirm the brain uptake differences of the radioligand between knock-out mice and wildtype mice, in vivo scans were complemented with ex vivo autoradiographic measurements using the brains of the same animals. With SPECT/CT imaging, we measured the brain uptake of radioactivity, using %SUV (% standardised uptake values) in CB(1)R-/- mice (n=3) and C57BL6 wildtype mice (n=7) under urethane anaesthesia after injecting [(125)I]SD7015 intravenously or intraperitoneally. The Brookhaven Laboratory mouse MRI atlas was fused to the SPECT/CT images by using a combination of rigid and non-rigid algorithms in the Mediso Fusion™ (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary) and VivoQuant (inviCRO, Boston, MA, USA) softwares. Phosphor imager plate autoradiography (ARG) was performed on 4 μm-thin cryostat sections of the excised brains. %SUV was 8.6±3.6 (average±SD) in CB(1)R-/- mice and 22.1±12.4 in wildtype mice between 2 and 4 h after injection (p<0.05). ARG of identically taken sections from wildtype mouse brain showed moderate radioactivity uptake when compared with the in vivo images, with a clear difference between grey matter and white matter, whereas ARG in CB(1)R(-/-) mice showed practically no radioactivity uptake. [(125)I]SD7015 enters the mouse brain in sufficient amount to enable SPECT imaging. Brain radioactivity distribution largely coincides with that of the known CB(1)R expression pattern in rodent brain. We conclude that [(125)I]SD7015 should be a useful SPECT

  2. mRNA transfection of a novel TAL effector nuclease (TALEN) facilitates efficient knockout of HIV co-receptor CCR5.

    PubMed

    Mock, Ulrike; Machowicz, Rafał; Hauber, Ilona; Horn, Stefan; Abramowski, Pierre; Berdien, Belinda; Hauber, Joachim; Fehse, Boris

    2015-06-23

    Homozygosity for a natural deletion variant of the HIV-coreceptor molecule CCR5, CCR5Δ32, confers resistance toward HIV infection. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation from a CCR5Δ32-homozygous donor has resulted in the first cure from HIV ('Berlin patient'). Based thereon, genetic disruption of CCR5 using designer nucleases was proposed as a promising HIV gene-therapy approach. Here we introduce a novel TAL-effector nuclease, CCR5-Uco-TALEN that can be efficiently delivered into T cells by mRNA electroporation, a gentle and truly transient gene-transfer technique. CCR5-Uco-TALEN mediated high-rate CCR5 knockout (>90% in PM1 and >50% in primary T cells) combined with low off-target activity, as assessed by flow cytometry, next-generation sequencing and a newly devised, very convenient gene-editing frequency digital-PCR (GEF-dPCR). GEF-dPCR facilitates simultaneous detection of wild-type and gene-edited alleles with remarkable sensitivity and accuracy as shown for the CCR5 on-target and CCR2 off-target loci. CCR5-edited cells were protected from infection with HIV-derived lentiviral vectors, but also with the wild-type CCR5-tropic HIV-1BaL strain. Long-term exposure to HIV-1BaL resulted in almost complete suppression of viral replication and selection of CCR5-gene edited T cells. In conclusion, we have developed a novel TALEN for the targeted, high-efficiency knockout of CCR5 and a useful dPCR-based gene-editing detection method.

  3. Specific Activation of A3, A2A and A1 Adenosine Receptors in CD73-Knockout Mice Affects B16F10 Melanoma Growth, Neovascularization, Angiogenesis and Macrophage Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Koszałka, Patrycja; Gołuńska, Monika; Urban, Aleksandra; Stasiłojć, Grzegorz; Stanisławowski, Marcin; Majewski, Marceli; Składanowski, Andrzej C.; Bigda, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase), a cell surface enzyme hydrolyzing AMP to adenosine, was lately demonstrated to play a direct role in tumor progression including regulation of tumor vascularization. It was also shown to stimulate tumor macrophage infiltration. Interstitial adenosine, accumulating in solid tumors due to CD73 enzymatic activity, is recognized as a main mediator regulating the production of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors, but the engagement of specific adenosine receptors in tumor progression in vivo is still poorly researched. We have analyzed the role of high affinity adenosine receptors A1, A2A, and A3 in B16F10 melanoma progression using specific agonists (CCPA, CGS-21680 and IB-MECA, respectively). We limited endogenous extracellular adenosine background using CD73 knockout mice treated with CD73 chemical inhibitor, AOPCP (adenosine α,β-methylene 5’-diphosphate). Activation of any adenosine receptor significantly inhibited B16F10 melanoma growth but only at its early stage. At 14th day of growth, the decrease in tumor neovascularization and MAPK pathway activation induced by CD73 depletion was reversed by all agonists. Activation of A1AR primarily increased angiogenic activation measured by expression of VEGF-R2 on tumor blood vessels. However, mainly A3AR activation increased both the microvessel density and expression of pro-angiogenic factors. All agonists induced significant increase in macrophage tumor infiltration, with IB-MECA being most effective. This effect was accompanied by substantial changes in cytokines regulating macrophage polarization between pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic phenotype. Our results demonstrate an evidence that each of the analyzed receptors has a specific role in the stimulation of tumor angiogenesis and confirm significantly more multifaceted role of adenosine in its regulation than was already observed. They also reveal previously unexplored consequences to extracellular adenosine signaling depletion in

  4. Combined behavioral studies and in vivo imaging of inflammatory response and expression of mGlu5 receptors in schnurri-2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji-Kyung; Zhu, Aijun; Jenkins, Bruce G; Hattori, Satoko; Kil, Kun-Eek; Takagi, Tsuyoshi; Ishii, Shunsuke; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Brownell, Anna-Liisa

    2015-11-16

    Schnurri-2 (Shn-2) knockout (KO) mice have been proposed as a preclinical neuroinflammatory schizophrenia model. We used behavioral studies and imaging markers that can be readily translated to human populations to explore brain effects of inflammation. Shn-2 KO mice and their littermate control mice were imaged with two novel PET ligands; an inflammation marker [(11)C]PBR28 and the mGluR5 ligand [(18)F]FPEB. Locomotor activity was measured using open field exploration with saline, methamphetamine or amphetamine challenge. A significantly increased accumulation of [(11)C]PBR28 was found in the cortex, striatum, hippocampus and olfactory bulb of Shn-2 KO mice. Increased mGluR5 binding was also observed in the cortex and hippocampus of the Shn-2 KO mice. Open field locomotor testing revealed a large increase in novelty-induced hyperlocomotion in Shn-2 KO mice with abnormal (decreased) responses to either methamphetamine or amphetamine. These data provide additional support to demonstrate that the Shn-2 KO mouse model exhibits several behavioral and pathological markers resembling human schizophrenia making it an attractive translational model for the disease.

  5. Behavioral effects of a synthetic agonist selective for nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide receptors in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ko, Mei-Chuan; Woods, James H; Fantegrossi, William E; Galuska, Chad M; Wichmann, Jürgen; Prinssen, Eric P

    2009-08-01

    Behavioral effects of a nonpeptidic NOP (nociceptin/orphanin FQ Peptide) receptor agonist, Ro 64-6198, have not been studied in primate species. The aim of the study was to verify the receptor mechanism underlying the behavioral effects of Ro 64-6198 and to systematically compare behavioral effects of Ro 64-6198 with those of a mu-opioid receptor agonist, alfentanil, in monkeys. Both Ro 64-6198 (0.001-0.06 mg/kg, s.c.) and alfentanil (0.001-0.06 mg/kg, s.c.) produced antinociception against an acute noxious stimulus (50 degrees C water) and capsaicin-induced allodynia. An NOP receptor antagonist, J-113397 (0.01-0.1 mg/kg, s.c.), dose-dependently produced rightward shifts of the dose-response curve of Ro 64-6198-induced antinociception. The apparent pA(2) value of J-113397 was 8.0. Antagonist studies using J-113397 and naltrexone revealed that Ro 64-6198 produced NOP receptor-mediated antinociception independent of mu-opioid receptors. In addition, alfentanil dose-dependently produced respiratory depression and itch/scratching responses, but antinociceptive doses of Ro 64-6198 did not produce such effects. More important, Ro 64-6198 did not produce reinforcing effects comparable with those of alfentanil, cocaine, or methohexital under self-administration procedures in monkeys. These results provide the first functional evidence that the activation of NOP receptors produces antinociception without reinforcing effects in primates. Non-peptidic NOP receptor agonists may have therapeutic value as novel analgesics without abuse liability in humans. PMID:19279568

  6. Accumulation of cytolytic CD8{sup +} T cells in B16-melanoma and proliferation of mature T cells in TIS21-knockout mice after T cell receptor stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Min Sook; Woo, Min-Yeong; Kwon, Daeho; Hong, Allen E.; Song, Kye Yong; Park, Sun; Lim, In Kyoung

    2014-10-01

    In vivo and in vitro effects of TIS21 gene on the mature T cell activation and antitumor activities were explored by employing MO5 melanoma orthograft and splenocytes isolated from the TIS21-knockout (KO) mice. Proliferation and survival of mature T cells were significantly increased in the KO than the wild type (WT) cells, indicating that TIS21 inhibits the rate of mature T cell proliferation and its survival. In MO5 melanoma orthograft model, the KO mice recruited much more CD8{sup +} T cells into the tumors at around day 14 after tumor cell injection along with reduced tumor volumes compared with the WT. The increased frequency of granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in splenocytes of the KO mice compared with the WT may account for antitumor-immunity of TIS21 gene in the melanoma orthograft. In contrast, reduced frequencies of CD107a{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in the splenocytes of KO mice may affect the loss of CD8{sup +} T cell infiltration in the orthograft at around day 19. These results indicate that TIS21 exhibits antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in mature T cells, and differentially affects the frequencies of granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T-cells and CD107a{sup +} CD8{sup +} T-cells, thus transiently regulating in vivo anti-tumor immunity. - Highlights: • Constitutive expression of TIS21 in splenocytes and upregulation by TCR stimulation. • Proliferation of mature T-cells in spleen of TIS21KO mice after TCR stimulation. • Inhibition of cell death in mature T-cells of TIS21KO mice compared with the wild type. • Inhibition of melanoma growth in TIS21KO mice and CD8{sup +} T cell infiltration in tumor. • Reduction of CD 107{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cells, but increased granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in TIS21KO mice.

  7. The role of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in cognition and anxiety: Comparative studies in GRM2−/−, GRM3−/− and GRM2/3−/− knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    De Filippis, Bianca; Lyon, Louisa; Taylor, Amy; Lane, Tracy; Burnet, Philip W.J.; Harrison, Paul J.; Bannerman, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu2 and mGlu3, encoded by GRM2 and GRM3) have been implicated in both cognitive and emotional processes, although their precise role remains to be established. Studies with knockout (KO) mice provide an important approach for investigating the role of specific receptor genes in behaviour. In the present series of experiments we extended our prior characterisation of GRM2/3−/− double KO mice and, in complementary experiments, investigated the behavioural phenotype of single GRM2−/− and GRM3−/− mice. We found no consistent effect on anxiety in either the double or single KO mice. The lack of an anxiety phenotype in any of the lines contrasts with the clear anxiolytic effects of mGlu2/3 ligands. Motor co-ordination was impaired in GRM2/3−/− mice, but spared in single GRM2−/− and GRM3−/− mice. Spatial working memory (rewarded alternation) testing on the elevated T-maze revealed a deficit in GRM2−/− mice throughout testing, whereas GRM3−/− mice exhibited a biphasic effect (initially impaired, but performing better than controls by the end of training). A biphasic effect on activity levels was seen for the GRM2−/− mice. Overall, the phenotype in both GRM2−/− and GRM3−/− mice was less pronounced – if present at all – compared to GRM2/3−/− mice, across the range of task domains. This is consistent with possible redundancy of function and/or compensation in the single KO lines. Results are discussed with reference to a possible role for group II metabotropic glutamate receptors at the interface between arousal and behavioural performance, according to an inverted U-shaped function. PMID:25158312

  8. Analysis in conditional cannabinoid 1 receptor-knockout mice reveals neuronal subpopulation-specific effects on epileptogenesis in the kindling paradigm.

    PubMed

    von Rüden, E L; Jafari, M; Bogdanovic, R M; Wotjak, C T; Potschka, H

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system serves as a retrograde negative feedback mechanism. It is thought to control neuronal activity in an epileptic neuronal network. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the endocannabinoid and endovanilloid systems on both epileptogenesis and ictogenesis. Therefore, we modulated the endocannabinoid and endovanilloid systems genetically and pharmacologically, and analyzed the subsequent impact on seizure progression in the kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy in mice. In addition, the impact of seizures on associated cellular alterations was evaluated. Our principal results revealed that the endocannabinoid system affects seizure and afterdischarge duration dependent on the neuronal subpopulation being modulated. Genetic deletion of CB1-receptors (CB1Rs) from principal neurons of the forebrain and pharmacological antagonism with rimonabant (5 mg/kg) caused longer seizure duration. Deletion of CB1R from GABAergic forebrain neurons resulted in the opposite effect. Along with these findings, the CB1R density was elevated in animals with repetitively induced seizures. However, neither genetic nor pharmacological interventions had any impact on the development of generalized seizures. Other than CB1, genetic deletion or pharmacological blockade with SB366791 (1 mg/kg) of transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) had no effect on the duration of behavioral or electrographic seizure activity in the kindling model. In conclusion, we demonstrate that endocannabinoid, but not endovanilloid, signaling affects termination of seizure activity, without influencing seizure severity over time. These effects are dependent on the neuronal subpopulation. Thus, the data argue that the endocannabinoid system plays an active role in seizure termination but does not regulate epileptogenesis.

  9. Alterations of gene expression of sodium channels in dorsal root ganglion neurons of estrogen receptor knockout (ERKO) mice induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP).

    PubMed

    Ding, Haixia; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Jingli; Qian, Wenyi; Wang, Wenjuan; Wang, Jun; Gao, Rong; Xiao, Hang

    2012-08-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) mediate the neuroprotection of estrogens against MPTP-induced striatal dopamine (DA) depletion. Pain is an important and distressing symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD). Voltage-gated sodium channels in sensory neurons are involved in the development of neuropathic pain. In this study, MPTP caused changes in nociception and alterations of gene expression of voltage-gated sodium channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in ER knockout (ERKO) mice were investigated. We found that administration of MPTP (11 mg/kg) to WT mice led to an extensive depletion of DA and its two metabolites, αERKO mice were observed to be more susceptible to MPTP toxicity than βERKO or WT mice. In addition, we found that the mRNA levels of TTX-S and TTX-R sodium channel subtypes were differentially affected in MPTP-treated WT animals. The MPTP-induced up-regulation of Nav1.1 and Nav1.9, down-regulation of Nav1.6 in DRG neurons may be through ERβ, up-regulation of Nav1.7 and down-regulation of Nav1.8 are dependent on both ERα and ERβ. Therefore, the MPTP-induced alterations of gene expression of sodium channels in DRG neurons could be an important mechanism to affect excitability and nociceptive thresholds, and the ERs appear to play a role in nociception in PD. PMID:22371119

  10. Fractionation of spatial memory in GRM2/3 (mGlu2/mGlu3) double knockout mice reveals a role for group II metabotropic glutamate receptors at the interface between arousal and cognition.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Louisa; Burnet, Philip W J; Kew, James N C; Corti, Corrado; Rawlins, J Nicholas P; Lane, Tracy; De Filippis, Bianca; Harrison, Paul J; Bannerman, David M

    2011-12-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2 and mGluR3, encoded by GRM2 and GRM3) are implicated in hippocampal function and cognition, and in the pathophysiology and treatment of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. However, pharmacological and behavioral studies with group II mGluR agonists and antagonists have produced complex results. Here, we studied hippocampus-dependent memory in GRM2/3 double knockout (GRM2/3(-/-)) mice in an iterative sequence of experiments. We found that they were impaired on appetitively motivated spatial reference and working memory tasks, and on a spatial novelty preference task that relies on animals' exploratory drive, but were unimpaired on aversively motivated spatial memory paradigms. GRM2/3(-/-) mice also performed normally on an appetitively motivated, non-spatial, visual discrimination task. These results likely reflect an interaction between GRM2/3 genotype and the arousal-inducing properties of the experimental paradigm. The deficit seen on appetitive and exploratory spatial memory tasks may be absent in aversive tasks because the latter induce higher levels of arousal, which rescue spatial learning. Consistent with an altered arousal-cognition relationship in GRM2/3(-/-) mice, injection stress worsened appetitively motivated, spatial working memory in wild-types, but enhanced performance in GRM2/3(-/-) mice. GRM2/3(-/-) mice were also hypoactive in response to amphetamine. This fractionation of hippocampus-dependent memory depending on the appetitive-aversive context is to our knowledge unique, and suggests a role for group II mGluRs at the interface of arousal and cognition. These arousal-dependent effects may explain apparently conflicting data from previous studies, and have translational relevance for the involvement of these receptors in schizophrenia and other disorders. PMID:21832989

  11. Activation of G protein by opioid receptors: role of receptor number and G-protein concentration.

    PubMed

    Remmers, A E; Clark, M J; Alt, A; Medzihradsky, F; Woods, J H; Traynor, J R

    2000-05-19

    The collision-coupling model for receptor-G-protein interaction predicts that the rate of G-protein activation is dependent on receptor density, but not G-protein levels. C6 cells expressing mu- or delta-opioid receptors, or SH-SY5Y cells, were treated with beta-funaltrexamine (mu) or naltrindole-5'-isothiocyanate (delta) to decrease receptor number. The time course of full or partial agonist-stimulated ¿35SGTPgammaS binding did not vary in C6 cell membranes containing <1-25 pmol/mg mu-opioid receptor, or 1. 4-4.3 pmol/mg delta-opioid receptor, or in SHSY5Y cells containing 0. 16-0.39 pmol/mg receptor. The association of ¿35SGTPgammaS binding was faster in membranes from C6mu cells than from C6delta cells. A 10-fold reduction in functional G-protein, following pertussis toxin treatment, lowered the maximal level of ¿35SGTPgammaS binding but not the association rate. These data indicate a compartmentalization of opioid receptors and G protein at the cell membrane. PMID:10822058

  12. Toll like receptor 2 knock-out attenuates carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver fibrosis by downregulating MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lingling; Xue, Ruyi; Tang, Wenqing; Wu, Weibin; Hu, Tingting; Liu, Xijun; Peng, Xiaomin; Gu, Jianxin; Chen, She; Zhang, Si

    2014-06-01

    Innate immune signaling associated with Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is a key pathway involved in the progression of liver fibrosis. In this study, we reported that TLR2 is required for hepatic fibrogenesis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). After CCl4 treatment, TLR2(-/-) mice had reduced liver enzyme levels, diminished collagen deposition, decreased inflammatory infiltration and impaired activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) than wild type (WT) mice. Furthermore, after CCl4 treatment, TLR2(-/-) mice demonstrated downregulated expression of profibrotic and proinflammatory genes and impaired mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation than WT mice. Collectively, our data indicate that TLR2 deficiency protects against CCl4-induced liver fibrosis.

  13. TRAIL-Death Receptor 4 Signaling via Lysosome Fusion and Membrane Raft Clustering In Coronary Arterial Endothelial Cells: Evidence from ASM Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Han, Wei-Qing; Boini, Krishna M.; Xia, Min; Zhang, Yang; Li, Pin-Lan

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its receptor death receptor 4 (DR4) have been implicated in the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. However, the signaling mechanism mediating DR4 activation and leading to endothelial injury remains unclear. We recently demonstrated that ceramide production via hydrolysis of membrane sphingomyelin by acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) results in membrane raft (MRs) clustering and formation of important redox signaling platforms, which play a crucial role in amplifying redox signaling in endothelial cells leading to endothelial dysfunction. The present study aims to investigate whether TRAIL triggers MR clustering via lysosome fusion and ASM activation, thereby conducting transmembrane redox signaling and changing endothelial function. Using confocal microscopy, we found that TRAIL induced MR clustering and its co-localization with DR4 in coronary arterial endothelial cells (CAECs) isolated from wild-type (Smpd1+/+) mice. Further, TRAIL triggered ASM translocation, ceramide production and NADPH oxidase aggregation in MR clusters in Smpd1+/+ CAECs, whereas these observations were not found in Smpd1−/− CAECs. Moreover, ASM deficiency reduced TRAIL-induced O2−· production in CAECs and abolished TRAIL-induced impairment on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in small resistance arteries. By measuring fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we found that Lamp-1 (lysosome membrane marker protein) and ganglioside GM1 (MR marker) were trafficking together in Smpd1+/+ CAECs, which was absent in Smpd1−/− CAECs. Consistently, fluorescence imaging of living cells with specific lysosome probes demonstrated that TRAIL-induced lysosome fusion with membrane was also absent in Smpd1−/− CAECs. Taken together, these results suggest that ASM is essential for TRAIL-induced lysosomal trafficking and fusion with membrane and formation of MR redox signaling platforms, which may

  14. Repeated activation of delta opioid receptors counteracts nerve injury-induced TNF-α up-regulation in the sciatic nerve of rats with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Vicario, Nunzio; Parenti, Rosalba; Aricò, Giuseppina; Turnaturi, Rita; Scoto, Giovanna Maria; Chiechio, Santina

    2016-01-01

    Despite mu opioid receptor agonists are the cornerstones of moderate-to-severe acute pain treatment, their effectiveness in chronic pain conditions is controversial. In contrast to mu opioid receptor agonists, a number of studies have reported the effectiveness of delta opioid receptor agonists on neuropathic pain strengthening the idea that delta opioid receptors gain importance when chronic pain develops. Among other effects, it has been shown that delta opioid receptor activation in optic nerve astrocytes inhibits tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated inflammation in response to severe hypoxia. Considering the involvement of tumor necrosis factor-α in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain, with this study we sought to correlate the effect of delta opioid receptor agonist on the development of mechanical allodynia to tumor necrosis factor-α expression at the site of nerve injury in rats subjected to chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. To this aim, we measured the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α in the sciatic nerve of rats with neuropathic pain after repeated injections with a delta opioid receptor agonist. Results obtained demonstrated that repeated administrations of the delta opioid receptor agonist SNC80 (10 mg/kg, i.p. for seven consecutive days) significantly inhibited the development of mechanical allodynia in rats with neuropathic pain and that the improvement of neuropathic symptom was timely related to the reduced expression of tumor necrosis factor-α in the rat sciatic nerve. We demonstrated also that when treatment with the delta opioid receptor agonist was suspended both allodynia and tumor necrosis factor-α up-regulation in the sciatic nerve of rats with neuropathic pain were restored. These results show that persistent delta opioid receptor activation significantly attenuates neuropathic pain and negatively regulates sciatic nerve tumor necrosis factor-α expression in chronic constriction injury rats. PMID:27590071

  15. CB1-receptor knockout neonatal mice are protected against ethanol-induced impairments of DNMT1, DNMT3A, and DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Nagre, Nagaraja N; Subbanna, Shivakumar; Shivakumar, Madhu; Psychoyos, Delphine; Basavarajappa, Balapal S

    2015-02-01

    The significant consequences of ethanol use during pregnancy are neurobehavioral abnormalities involving hippocampal and neocortex malfunctions that cause learning and memory deficits collectively named fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these abnormalities are still poorly understood and therefore warrant systematic research. Here, we document novel epigenetic abnormalities in the mouse model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Ethanol treatment of P7 mice, which induces activation of caspase 3, impaired DNA methylation through reduced DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1 and DNMT3A) levels. Inhibition of caspase 3 activity, before ethanol treatment, rescued DNMT1, DNMT3A proteins as well as DNA methylation levels. Blockade of histone methyltransferase (G9a) activity or cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1R), prior to ethanol treatment, which, respectively, inhibits or prevents activation of caspase 3, rescued the DNMT1 and DNMT3A proteins and DNA methylation. No reduction of DNMT1 and DNMT3A proteins and DNA methylation was found in P7 CB1R null mice, which exhibit no ethanol-induced activation of caspase 3. Together, these data demonstrate that ethanol-induced activation of caspase 3 impairs DNA methylation through DNMT1 and DNMT3A in the neonatal mouse brain, and such impairments are absent in CB1R null mice. Epigenetic events mediated by DNA methylation may be one of the essential mechanisms of ethanol teratogenesis. Schematic mechanism of action by which ethanol impairs DNA methylation. Studies have demonstrated that ethanol has the capacity to bring epigenetic changes to contribute to the development of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). However, the mechanisms are not well studied. P7 ethanol induces the activation of caspase 3 and impairs DNA methylation through reduced DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1 and DNMT3A) proteins (→). The inhibition or genetic ablation of cannabinoid receptor type-1 or inhibition of histone

  16. Double P2X2/P2X3 Purinergic Receptor Knockout Mice Do Not Taste NaCl or the Artificial Sweetener SC45647

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Meghan C.; Eschle, Benjamin K.; Barrows, Jennell; Hallock, Robert M.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    The P2X ionotropic purinergic receptors, P2X2 and P2X3, are essential for transmission of taste information from taste buds to the gustatory nerves. Mice lacking both P2X2 and P2X3 purinergic receptors (P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/−) exhibit no taste-evoked activity in the chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal nerves when stimulated with taste stimuli from any of the 5 classical taste quality groups (salt, sweet, sour, bitter, and umami) nor do the mice show taste preferences for sweet or umami, or avoidance of bitter substances (Finger et al. 2005. ATP signaling is crucial for communication from taste buds to gustatory nerves. Science. 310[5753]:1495–1499). Here, we compare the ability of P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice and P2X2/P2X3Dbl+/+ wild-type (WT) mice to detect NaCl in brief-access tests and conditioned aversion paradigms. Brief-access testing with NaCl revealed that whereas WT mice decrease licking at 300 mM and above, the P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice do not show any change in lick rates. In conditioned aversion tests, P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice did not develop a learned aversion to NaCl or the artificial sweetener SC45647, both of which are easily avoided by conditioned WT mice. The inability of P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice to show avoidance of these taste stimuli was not due to an inability to learn the task because both WT and P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice learned to avoid a combination of SC45647 and amyl acetate (an odor cue). These data suggest that P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice are unable to respond to NaCl or SC45647 as taste stimuli, mirroring the lack of gustatory nerve responses to these substances. PMID:19833661

  17. Activation of IKK/NF-κB provokes renal inflammatory responses in guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A gene-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Das, Subhankar; Periyasamy, Ramu

    2012-01-01

    The present study was aimed at determining the consequences of the disruption of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) gene (Npr1) on proinflammatory responses of nuclear factor kappa B, inhibitory kappa B kinase, and inhibitory kappa B alpha (NF-κB, IKK, IκBα) in the kidneys of mutant mice. The results showed that the disruption of Npr1 enhanced the renal NF-κB binding activity by 3.8-fold in 0-copy (−/−) mice compared with 2-copy (+/+) mice. In parallel, IKK activity and IκBα protein phosphorylation were increased by 8- and 11-fold, respectively, in the kidneys of 0-copy mice compared with wild-type mice. Interestingly, IκBα was reduced by 80% and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and renal fibrosis were significantly enhanced in 0-copy mice than 2-copy mice. Treatment of 0-copy mice with NF-κB inhibitors andrographolide, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, and etanercept showed a substantial reduction in renal fibrosis, attenuation of proinflammatory cytokines gene expression, and significantly reduced IKK activity and IkBα phosphorylation. These findings indicate that the systemic disruption of Npr1 activates the renal NF-κB pathways in 0-copy mice, which transactivates the expression of various proinflammatory cytokines to initiate renal remodeling; however, inhibition of NF-κB pathway repairs the abnormal renal pathology in mutant mice. PMID:22318993

  18. Discovery of Spiro[cyclohexane-dihydropyrano[3,4-b]indole]-amines as Potent NOP and Opioid Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Schunk, Stefan; Linz, Klaus; Frormann, Sven; Hinze, Claudia; Oberbörsch, Stefan; Sundermann, Bernd; Zemolka, Saskia; Englberger, Werner; Germann, Tieno; Christoph, Thomas; Kögel, Babette-Y; Schröder, Wolfgang; Harlfinger, Stephanie; Saunders, Derek; Kless, Achim; Schick, Hans; Sonnenschein, Helmut

    2014-08-14

    We report the discovery of spiro[cyclohexane-pyrano[3,4-b]indole]-amines, as functional nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) and opioid receptor agonists with strong efficacy in preclinical models of acute and neuropathic pain. Utilizing 4-(dimethylamino)-4-phenylcyclo-hexanone 1 and tryptophol in an oxa-Pictet-Spengler reaction led to the formation of spiroether 2, representing a novel NOP and opioid peptide receptor agonistic chemotype. This finding initially stems from the systematic derivatization of 1, which resulted in alcohols 3-5, ethers 6 and 7, amines 8-10, 22-24, and 26-28, amides 11 and 25, and urea 12, many with low nanomolar binding affinities at the NOP and mu opioid peptide (MOP) receptors. PMID:25147602

  19. Effect of long-term ingestion of weakly oxidised flaxseed oil on biomarkers of oxidative stress in LDL-receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, M S; Kessuane, M C; Lobo Ladd, A A B; Lobo Ladd, F V; Cogliati, B; Castro, I A

    2016-07-01

    The effect of oxidised fatty acids on atherosclerosis progression is controversial. Thus, our objective was to evaluate the effect of long-term consumption of weakly oxidised PUFA from flaxseed oil on oxidative stress biomarkers of LDL-receptor(-/-) mice. To test our hypothesis, mice were separated into three groups. The first group received a high-fat diet containing fresh flaxseed oil (CONT-), the second was fed the same diet prepared using heated flaxseed oil (OXID), and the third group received the same diet containing fresh flaxseed oil and had diabetes induced by streptozotocin (CONT+). Oxidative stress, aortic parameters and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were assessed. After 3 months, plasma lipid profile, glucose levels, body weight, energy intake and dietary intake did not differ among groups. Likewise, oxidative stress, plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), hepatic MDA expressed as nmol/mg portion (ptn) and antioxidant enzymes did not differ among the groups. Hepatic linoleic acid, α-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid and EPA acid declined in the OXID and CONT+ groups. Aortic wall thickness, lumen and diameter increased only in the OXID group. OXID and CONT+ groups exhibited higher concentrations of MDA, expressed as μmol/mg ptn per %PUFA, when compared with the CONT- group. Our results suggest that ingestion of oxidised flaxseed oil increases hepatic MDA concentration and is potentially pro-atherogenic. In addition, the mean MDA value observed in all groups was similar to those reported in other studies that used xenobiotics as oxidative stress inducers. Thus, the diet applied in this study represents an interesting model for further research involving antioxidants.

  20. Ultrasound Biomicroscopic Imaging for Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist-Inhibiting Atherosclerosis and Markers of Inflammation in Atherosclerotic Development in Apolipoprotein-E Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong-Juan; Sun, Yan; Wang, Qin; Yang, Jiao; Yang, Ya; Song, Li; Wang, Zheng; Luo, Xiang-Hong; Su, Rui-Juan

    2015-08-01

    We sought to validate the hypothesis that the development of atherosclerosis can be suppressed by the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in murine models of atherosclerosis in vivo, noninvasively seen by means of high-resolution ultrasound biomicroscopy, and we studied changes in inflammatory markers such as IL-1 and C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels in these models of atherosclerosis. We divided IL-1Ra(+/-)/apolipoprotein-E (apoE)(-/-) and IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice into 2 age groups, used as atherosclerotic models. The control groups were age-matched IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(+/+) mice. Plaque thickness was measured in the ascending aorta in short-axis images by means of ultrasound and histology. Plasma levels of IL-1 and CRP were quantified in the 3 murine groups. At 16 weeks, plaque thickness in the ascending aortas of the IL-1Ra(+/-)/apoE(-/-) mice was significantly greater than that in the IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice, on ultrasound and histology (P <0.01). In contrast, at 32 weeks, the differences between these 2 genotypes were not statistically significant. Serum IL-1 levels were lower in the IL-1Ra(+/-)/apoE(-/-) mice than in the IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice at 16 and 32 weeks (P <0.05). At 16 weeks, serum CRP levels in the IL-1Ra(+/-)/apoE(-/-) mice were higher than in the IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice (P <0.01). Our results suggest that ultrasound biomicroscopy enables evaluation of atherosclerotic lesions in vivo, noninvasively and in real-time, in apoE(-/-) mice. Partial IL-1Ra deficiencies might promote early plaque development in 16-week-old apoE(-/-) mice. The balance of IL-1 and IL-1Ra might influence atherosclerotic development. Finally, CRP might affect the initiation of atherosclerosis, rather than its progression.

  1. Ultrasound Biomicroscopic Imaging for Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist-Inhibiting Atherosclerosis and Markers of Inflammation in Atherosclerotic Development in Apolipoprotein-E Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong-Juan; Sun, Yan; Wang, Qin; Yang, Jiao; Yang, Ya; Song, Li; Wang, Zheng; Luo, Xiang-Hong; Su, Rui-Juan

    2015-08-01

    We sought to validate the hypothesis that the development of atherosclerosis can be suppressed by the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in murine models of atherosclerosis in vivo, noninvasively seen by means of high-resolution ultrasound biomicroscopy, and we studied changes in inflammatory markers such as IL-1 and C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels in these models of atherosclerosis. We divided IL-1Ra(+/-)/apolipoprotein-E (apoE)(-/-) and IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice into 2 age groups, used as atherosclerotic models. The control groups were age-matched IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(+/+) mice. Plaque thickness was measured in the ascending aorta in short-axis images by means of ultrasound and histology. Plasma levels of IL-1 and CRP were quantified in the 3 murine groups. At 16 weeks, plaque thickness in the ascending aortas of the IL-1Ra(+/-)/apoE(-/-) mice was significantly greater than that in the IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice, on ultrasound and histology (P <0.01). In contrast, at 32 weeks, the differences between these 2 genotypes were not statistically significant. Serum IL-1 levels were lower in the IL-1Ra(+/-)/apoE(-/-) mice than in the IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice at 16 and 32 weeks (P <0.05). At 16 weeks, serum CRP levels in the IL-1Ra(+/-)/apoE(-/-) mice were higher than in the IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice (P <0.01). Our results suggest that ultrasound biomicroscopy enables evaluation of atherosclerotic lesions in vivo, noninvasively and in real-time, in apoE(-/-) mice. Partial IL-1Ra deficiencies might promote early plaque development in 16-week-old apoE(-/-) mice. The balance of IL-1 and IL-1Ra might influence atherosclerotic development. Finally, CRP might affect the initiation of atherosclerosis, rather than its progression. PMID:26413013

  2. Somatostatin receptor 2 knockout/lacZ knockin mice show impaired motor coordination and reveal sites of somatostatin action within the striatum.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jeremy P; Hathway, Gareth J; Clarke, Neil J; Jowett, Mike I; Topps, Stephanie; Kendrick, Keith M; Humphrey, Patrick P A; Wilkinson, Lawrence S; Emson, Piers C

    2003-05-01

    The peptide somatostatin can modulate the functional output of the basal ganglia. The exact sites and mechanisms of this action, however, are poorly understood, and the physiological context in which somatostatin acts is unknown. Somatostatin acts as a neuromodulator via a family of five 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors, SSTR1-5, one of which, SSTR2, is known to be functional in the striatum. We have investigated the role of SSTR2 in basal ganglia function using mice in which Sstr2 has been inactivated and replaced by the lacZ reporter gene. Analysis of Sstr2lacZ expression in the brain by beta-galactosidase histochemistry demonstrated a widespread pattern of expression. By comparison to previously published in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical data, Sstr2lacZ expression was shown to accurately recapitulate that of Sstr2 and thus provided a highly sensitive model to investigate cell-type-specific expression of Sstr2. In the striatum, Sstr2 expression was identified in medium spiny projection neurons restricted to the matrix compartment and in cholinergic interneurons. Sstr2 expression was not detected in any other nuclei of the basal ganglia except for a sparse number of nondopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Microdialysis in the striatum showed Sstr2-null mice were selectively refractory to somatostatin-induced dopamine and glutamate release. In behavioural tests, Sstr2-null mice showed normal levels of locomotor activity and normal coordination in undemanding tasks. However, in beam-walking, a test of fine motor control, Sstr2-null mice were severely impaired. Together these data implicate an important neuromodulatory role for SSTR2 in the striatum. PMID:12752788

  3. Effects of chemokine receptor signalling on cognition-like, emotion-like and sociability behaviours of CCR6 and CCR7 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Jaehne, E J; Baune, B T

    2014-03-15

    Inflammation is regarded as an important mechanism of neuropsychiatric disorders. Chemokines, which are a part of the immune system, have effects on various aspects of brain function, but little is known about their effects on behaviour. We have compared the cognition-like behaviour (learning and spatial memory) of CCR6(-/-) and CCR7(-/-) mice with wild type (WT) C57BL/6 mice, in the Barnes maze, as well as a range of other behaviours, including exploratory, anxiety and depression-like behaviour, using a battery of tests. Levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 were also measured. In the Barnes maze, CCR7(-/-) mice were shown to take longer to learn the location of the escape box on the 1st of 4 days of training. In the behavioural battery, CCR6(-/-) mice showed higher locomotor activity and lower anxiety in the open field test, and a lack of preference for social novelty in a sociability test. CCR7(-/-) mice behaved much like WT mice, although showed higher anxiety in Elevated Zero Maze. While baseline saccharin preference in a 2-bottle choice test, a test for anhedonia depression-like behaviour, was equal in all strains at baseline, weekly tests showed that both CCR6(-/-) and CCR7(-/-) mice developed a decreased preference for saccharin compared to WT over time. There were no differences between strains in any of the cytokines measured. These results suggest that chemokine receptors may play a role in cognition and learning behaviour, as well as anxiety and other behaviours, although the biological mechanisms are still unclear.

  4. Synthesis and characterizations of novel quinoline derivatives having mixed ligand activities at the kappa and mu receptors: Potential therapeutic efficacy against morphine dependence.

    PubMed

    Deb, Ishani; Paira, Priyankar; Hazra, Abhijit; Banerjee, Sukdeb; Dutta, Pradip Kumar; Mondal, Nirup Bikash; Das, Sumantra

    2009-08-15

    Based on an established 3D pharmacophore, a series of quinoline derivatives were synthesized. The opioidergic properties of these compounds were determined by a competitive binding assay using (125)I-Dynorphine, (3)H-DAMGO and (125)I-DADLE for kappa, mu, and delta receptors, respectively. Results showed varying degree of activities of the compounds to kappa and mu opioid receptors with negligible interactions at the delta receptor. The compound, S4 was the most successful in inhibiting the two most prominent quantitative features of naloxone precipitated withdrawal symptoms - stereotyped jumping and body weight loss. Determination of IC(50) of S4 revealed a greater affinity towards mu compared to kappa receptor. In conclusion, quinoline derivatives of S4 like structure offer potential tool for treatment of narcotic addictions.

  5. Performance Deficits of NK1 Receptor Knockout Mice in the 5-Choice Serial Reaction-Time Task: Effects of d-Amphetamine, Stress and Time of Day

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ting Carrie; Dudley, Julia A.; Weir, Ruth K.; Grabowska, Ewelina M.; Peña-Oliver, Yolanda; Ripley, Tamzin L.; Hunt, Stephen P.; Stephens, David N.; Stanford, S. Clare

    2011-01-01

    Background The neurochemical status and hyperactivity of mice lacking functional substance P-preferring NK1 receptors (NK1R-/-) resemble abnormalities in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Here we tested whether NK1R-/- mice express other core features of ADHD (impulsivity and inattentiveness) and, if so, whether they are diminished by d-amphetamine, as in ADHD. Prompted by evidence that circadian rhythms are disrupted in ADHD, we also compared the performance of mice that were trained and tested in the morning or afternoon. Methods and Results The 5-Choice Serial Reaction-Time Task (5-CSRTT) was used to evaluate the cognitive performance of NK1R-/- mice and their wildtypes. After training, animals were tested using a long (LITI) and a variable (VITI) inter-trial interval: these tests were carried out with, and without, d-amphetamine pretreatment (0.3 or 1 mg/kg i.p.). NK1R-/- mice expressed greater omissions (inattentiveness), perseveration and premature responses (impulsivity) in the 5-CSRTT. In NK1R-/- mice, perseveration in the LITI was increased by injection-stress but reduced by d-amphetamine. Omissions by NK1R-/- mice in the VITI were unaffected by d-amphetamine, but premature responses were exacerbated by this psychostimulant. Omissions in the VITI were higher, overall, in the morning than the afternoon but, in the LITI, premature responses of NK1R-/- mice were higher in the afternoon than the morning. Conclusion In addition to locomotor hyperactivity, NK1R-/- mice express inattentiveness, perseveration and impulsivity in the 5-CSRTT, thereby matching core criteria for a model of ADHD. Because d-amphetamine reduced perseveration in NK1R-/- mice, this action does not require functional NK1R. However, the lack of any improvement of omissions and premature responses in NK1R-/- mice given d-amphetamine suggests that beneficial effects of this psychostimulant in other rodent models, and ADHD patients, need functional NK1R. Finally, our results

  6. The antinociceptive effects of ferulic acid on neuropathic pain: involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Lin, Dan; Yu, Xuefeng; Xie, Xupei; Wang, Liqun; Lian, Lejing; Fei, Ning; Chen, Jie; Zhu, Naping; Wang, Gang; Huang, Xianfeng; Pan, Jianchun

    2016-04-12

    Neuropathic pain can be considered as a form of chronic stress that may share common neuropathological mechanism between pain and stress-related depression and respond to similar treatment. Ferulic acid (FA) is a major active component of angelica sinensis and has been reported to exert antidepressant-like effects; however, it remains unknown whether FA ameliorate chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain and the involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors. Chronic treatment with FA (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) ameliorated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in von Frey hair and hot plate tasks, accompanied by increasing spinal noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) levels. Subsequent study suggested that treatment of CCI animals with 40 and 80 mg/kg FA also inhibited spinal MAO-A levels. FA's effects on mechanical allodynia or thermal hyperalgesiawas blocked by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) via pharmacological depletion of spinal noradrenaline or serotonin. Moreover, the anti-allodynic action of FA on mechanical stimuli was prevented by pre-treatment with beta2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 118,551, or by the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole. While the anti-hyperalgesia on thermal stimuli induced by FA was blocked by pre-treatment with 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635, or with the irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine. These results suggest that the effect of FA on neuropathic pain is potentially mediated via amelioration of the descending monoaminergic system that coupled with spinal beta2- and 5-HT1A receptors and the downstream delta- and mu-opioid receptors differentially. PMID:26967251

  7. The antinociceptive effects of ferulic acid on neuropathic pain: involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Lin, Dan; Yu, Xuefeng; Xie, Xupei; Wang, Liqun; Lian, Lejing; Fei, Ning; Chen, Jie; Zhu, Naping; Wang, Gang; Huang, Xianfeng; Pan, Jianchun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain can be considered as a form of chronic stress that may share common neuropathological mechanism between pain and stress-related depression and respond to similar treatment. Ferulic acid (FA) is a major active component of angelica sinensis and has been reported to exert antidepressant-like effects; however, it remains unknown whether FA ameliorate chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain and the involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors. Chronic treatment with FA (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) ameliorated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in von Frey hair and hot plate tasks, accompanied by increasing spinal noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) levels. Subsequent study suggested that treatment of CCI animals with 40 and 80 mg/kg FA also inhibited spinal MAO-A levels. FA's effects on mechanical allodynia or thermal hyperalgesiawas blocked by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) via pharmacological depletion of spinal noradrenaline or serotonin. Moreover, the anti-allodynic action of FA on mechanical stimuli was prevented by pre-treatment with beta2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 118,551, or by the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole. While the anti-hyperalgesia on thermal stimuli induced by FA was blocked by pre-treatment with 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635, or with the irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine. These results suggest that the effect of FA on neuropathic pain is potentially mediated via amelioration of the descending monoaminergic system that coupled with spinal beta2- and 5-HT1A receptors and the downstream delta- and mu-opioid receptors differentially. PMID:26967251

  8. Leptin receptor-deficient (knockout) medaka, Oryzias latipes, show chronical up-regulated levels of orexigenic neuropeptides, elevated food intake and stage specific effects on growth and fat allocation.

    PubMed

    Chisada, Shin-ichi; Kurokawa, Tadahide; Murashita, Koji; Rønnestad, Ivar; Taniguchi, Yoshihito; Toyoda, Atsushi; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Takeda, Shunichi; Yoshiura, Yasutoshi

    2014-01-01

    The first studies that identified leptin and its receptor (LepR) in mammals were based on mutant animals that displayed dramatic changes in body-weight and regulation of energy homeostasis. Subsequent studies have shown that a deficiency of leptin or LepR in homoeothermic mammals results in hyperphagia, obesity, infertility and a number of other abnormalities. The physiological roles of leptin-mediated signaling in ectothermic teleosts are still being explored. Here, we produced medaka with homozygous LepR gene mutation using the targeting induced local lesions in a genome method. This knockout mutant had a point mutation of cysteine for stop codon at the 357th amino acid just before the leptin-binding domain. The evidence for loss of function of leptin-mediated signaling in the mutant is based on a lack of response to feeding in the expression of key appetite-related neuropeptides in the diencephalon. The mutant lepr−/− medaka expressed constant up-regulated levels of mRNA for the orexigenic neuropeptide Ya and agouti-related protein and a suppressed level of anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin 1 in the diencephalon independent of feeding, which suggests that the mutant did not possess functional LepR. Phenotypes of the LepR-mutant medaka were analyzed in order to understand the effects on food intake, growth, and fat accumulation in the tissues. The food intake of the mutant medaka was higher in post-juveniles and adult stages than that of wild-type (WT) fish. The hyperphagia led to a high growth rate at the post-juvenile stage, but did not to significant alterations in final adult body size. There was no additional deposition of fat in the liver and muscle in the post-juvenile and adult mutants, or in the blood plasma in the adult mutant. However, adult LepR mutants possessed large deposits of visceral fat, unlike in the WT fish, in which there were none. Our analysis confirms that LepR in medaka exert a powerful influence on the control on food intake. Further

  9. Unexpected Opioid Activity Profiles of Analogs of the Novel Peptide Kappa Opioid Receptor Ligand CJ-15,208

    PubMed Central

    Aldrich, Jane V.; Kulkarni, Santosh S.; Senadheera, Sanjeewa N.; Ross, Nicolette C.; Reilley, Kate J.; Eans, Shainnel O.; Ganno, Michelle L.; Murray, Thomas F.; McLaughlin, Jay P.

    2013-01-01

    An alanine scan was performed on the novel kappa opioid receptor (KOR) peptide ligand CJ-15,208 to determine which residues contribute to the potent in vivo agonist activity observed for the parent peptide. These cyclic tetrapeptides were synthesized by a combination of solid phase peptide synthesis of the linear precursors, followed by cyclization in solution. Like the parent peptide, each of the analogs exhibited agonist activity and KOR antagonist activity in an antinociceptive assay in vivo. Unlike the parent peptide, the agonist activity of the potent analogs was mediated predominantly if not exclusively by mu opioid receptors (MOR). Thus analogs 2 and 4, in which one of the phenylalanine residues was replaced by alanine, exhibited both potent MOR agonist activity and KOR antagonist activity in vivo. These peptides represent novel lead compounds for the development of peptide-based opioid analgesics. PMID:21761566

  10. Knockout beyond the dripline

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaccorso, A.; Charity, R. J.; Kumar, R.; Salvioni, G.

    2015-02-24

    In this contribution, we will describe neutron and proton removal from {sup 9}C and {sup 7}Be which are two particularly interesting nuclei entering the nucleo-synthesis pp-chain [1, 2]. Neutron and proton removal reactions have been used in the past twenty years to probe the single-particle structure of exotic nuclei. The core parallel-momentum distribution can give information on the angular momentum and spin of the nucleon initial state while the total removal cross section is sensitive to the asymptotic part of the initial wave function and also to the reaction mechanism. Because knockout is a peripheral reaction from which the Asymptotic Normalization Constant (ANC) of the single-particle wave function can be extracted, it has been used as an indirect method to obtain the rate of reactions like {sup 8}B(p,γ){sup 9}C or {sup 7}Be(p,γ){sup 8}B. Nucleon removal has recently been applied by the HiRA collaboration [3] to situations in which the remaining “core” is beyond the drip line, such as {sup 8}C and {sup 6}Be, unbound by one or more protons, and whose excitation-energy spectrum can be obtained by the invariant-mass method. By gating on the ground-state peak, “core” parallel-momentum distributions and total knockout cross sections have been obtained similar to previous studies with well-bound “cores”. In addition for each projectile, knock out to final bound states has also been obtained in several cases. We will report on the theoretical description and comparison to this experimental data for a few cases for which advances in the accuracy of the transfer-to-the continuum model [4, 5] have been made [6]. These include the use, when available, of “ab-initio” overlaps for the initial state [7] and in particular their ANC values [8]. Also, the construction of a nucleus-target folding potential for the treatment of the core-target S-matrix [9] using for the cores “ab-initio” densities [10] and state-of-the-art n−{sup 9}Be optical

  11. Methylphenidate restores novel object recognition in DARPP-32 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Heyser, Charles J; McNaughton, Caitlyn H; Vishnevetsky, Donna; Fienberg, Allen A

    2013-09-15

    Previously, we have shown that Dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32kDa (DARPP-32) knockout mice required significantly more trials to reach criterion than wild-type mice in an operant reversal-learning task. The present study was conducted to examine adult male and female DARPP-32 knockout mice and wild-type controls in a novel object recognition test. Wild-type and knockout mice exhibited comparable behavior during the initial exploration trials. As expected, wild-type mice exhibited preferential exploration of the novel object during the substitution test, demonstrating recognition memory. In contrast, knockout mice did not show preferential exploration of the novel object, instead exhibiting an increase in exploration of all objects during the test trial. Given that the removal of DARPP-32 is an intracellular manipulation, it seemed possible to pharmacologically restore some cellular activity and behavior by stimulating dopamine receptors. Therefore, a second experiment was conducted examining the effect of methylphenidate. The results show that methylphenidate increased horizontal activity in both wild-type and knockout mice, though this increase was blunted in knockout mice. Pretreatment with methylphenidate significantly impaired novel object recognition in wild-type mice. In contrast, pretreatment with methylphenidate restored the behavior of DARPP-32 knockout mice to that observed in wild-type mice given saline. These results provide additional evidence for a functional role of DARPP-32 in the mediation of processes underlying learning and memory. These results also indicate that the behavioral deficits in DARPP-32 knockout mice may be restored by the administration of methylphenidate.

  12. Changes in G protein-coupled receptor sorting protein affinity regulate postendocytic targeting of G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Dawn; Pusch, Margareta; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2007-10-01

    After activation, most G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are regulated by a cascade of events involving desensitization and endocytosis. Internalized receptors can then be recycled to the plasma membrane, retained in an endosomal compartment, or targeted for degradation. The GPCR-associated sorting protein, GASP, has been shown to preferentially sort a number of native GPCRs to the lysosome for degradation after endocytosis. Here we show that a mutant beta(2) adrenergic receptor and a mutant mu opioid receptor that have previously been described as lacking "recycling signals" due to mutations in their C termini in fact bind to GASP and are targeted for degradation. We also show that a mutant dopamine D1 receptor, which has likewise been described as lacking a recycling signal, does not bind to GASP and is therefore not targeted for degradation. Together, these results indicate that alteration of receptors in their C termini can expose determinants with affinity for GASP binding and consequently target receptors for degradation.

  13. Retention of heroin and morphine-6 beta-glucuronide analgesia in a new line of mice lacking exon 1 of MOR-1.

    PubMed

    Schuller, A G; King, M A; Zhang, J; Bolan, E; Pan, Y X; Morgan, D J; Chang, A; Czick, M E; Unterwald, E M; Pasternak, G W; Pintar, J E

    1999-02-01

    Morphine produces analgesia by activating mu opioid receptors encoded by the MOR-1 gene. Although morphine-6 beta-glucuronide (M6G), heroin and 6-acetylmorphine also are considered mu opioids, recent evidence suggests that they act through a distinct receptor mechanism. We examined this question in knockout mice containing disruptions of either the first or second coding exon of MOR-1. Mice homozygous for either MOR-1 mutation were insensitive to morphine. Heroin, 6-acetylmorphine and M6G still elicited analgesia in the exon-1 MOR-1 mutant, which also showed specific M6G binding, whereas M6G and 6-acetylmorphine were inactive in the exon-2 MOR-1 mutant. These results provide genetic evidence for a unique receptor site for M6G and heroin analgesia.

  14. Altered dendritic distribution of dopamine D2 receptors and reduction in mitochondrial number in parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex of cannabinoid-1 (CB1) receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Megan L.; Chan, June; Mackie, Kenneth; Lupica, Carl R.; Pickel, Virginia M.

    2013-01-01

    The prelimbic prefrontal cortex (PL) is a brain region integral to complex behaviors that are highly influenced by cannabinoids and by dopamine D2 receptor (D2R)-mediated regulation of fast-firing parvalbumin-containing interneurons. We have recently shown that constitutive deletion of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) greatly reduces parvalbumin levels in these neurons. The effects of CB1R deletion on PL parvalbumin interneurons may be ascribed to loss of CB1R-mediated retrograde signaling on mesocortical dopamine transmission, and, in turn, altered expression and/or subcellular distribution of the D2R in the PL. Furthermore, diminished parvalbumin expression could indicate metabolic changes in fast-firing interneurons that may be reflected in changes in mitochondrial density in this population. We therefore comparatively examined electron microscopic dual labeling of the D2R and parvalbumin in CB1 (−/−) and CB1 (+/+) mice to test the hypothesis that absence of the CB1R produces changes in D2R localization and mitochondrial distribution in parvalbumin-containing interneurons of the PL. CB1 (−/−) mice had a significantly lower density of cytoplasmic D2R-immunogold particles in medium parvalbumin-labeled dendrites and a concomitant increase in the density of these particles in small dendrites. These dendrites received both excitatory and inhibitory-type synapses from unlabeled terminals and contained many mitochondria, whose numbers were significantly reduced in the CB1 (−/−) mice. Non-parvalbumin containing dendrites showed no between-group differences in either D2R distribution or mitochondrial number. These results suggest that cannabinoid signaling provides an important determinant of dendritic D2 receptor distribution and mitochondrial availability in fast-spiking interneurons. PMID:22592925

  15. Morphine withdrawal precipitated by specific mu, delta or kappa opioid receptor antagonists: a c-Fos protein study in the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Le Guen, Stéphanie; Gestreau, Christian; Besson, Jean-Marie

    2003-06-01

    We have recently shown concurrent changes in behavioural responses and c-Fos protein expression in the central nervous system in both naive and morphine-dependent rats after systemic administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone. However, because naloxone acts on the three major types of opioid receptors, the present study aimed at determining, in the same animals, both changes in behaviour and c-Fos-like immunoreactivity after intravenous injection of selective opioid antagonists, such as mu (beta-funaltrexamine, 10 mg/kg), delta (naltrindole, 4 mg/kg) or kappa (nor-binaltorphimine, 5 mg/kg) opioid receptor antagonists, in naive or morphine-dependent rats. In a first experimental series, only beta-funaltrexamine increased c-Fos expression in the eight central nervous system structures examined, whereas no effect was seen after naltrindole or nor-binaltorphimine administration in naive rats. These results suggest a tonic activity in the endogenous opioid peptides acting on mu opioid receptors in normal rats. A second experimental series in morphine-dependent rats showed that beta-funaltrexamine had the highest potency in the induction of classical signs of morphine withdrawal syndrome, as well as the increase in c-Fos expression in the 22 central nervous system structures studied, suggesting a major role of mu opioid receptors in opioid dependence. However, our results also demonstrated that naltrindole and, to a lesser extent, nor-binaltorphimine were able to induce moderate signs of morphine withdrawal and relatively weak c-Fos protein expression in restricted central nervous system structures. Therefore, delta and kappa opioid receptors may also contribute slightly to opioid dependence.

  16. In vivo interaction of steroid receptor coactivator (SRC)-1 and the activation function-2 domain of the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) beta in TRbeta E457A knock-in and SRC-1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Manuela; Goodwin, Charles; Liao, Xiaohui; Ortiga-Carvalho, Tania; Machado, Danielle S; Wondisford, Fredric E; Refetoff, Samuel; Weiss, Roy E

    2009-08-01

    The activation function-2 (AF-2) domain of the thyroid hormone (TH) receptor (TR)-beta is a TH-dependent binding site for nuclear coactivators (NCoA), which modulate TH-dependent gene transcription. In contrast, the putative AF-1 domain is a TH-independent region interacting with NCoA. We determined the specificity of the AF-2 domain and NCoA interaction by evaluating thyroid function in mice with combined disruption of the AF-2 domain in TRbeta, due to a point mutation (E457A), and deletion of one of the NCoAs, steroid receptor coactivator (SRC)-1. The E457A mutation was chosen because it abolishes NCoA recruitment in vitro while preserving normal TH binding and corepressor interactions resulting in resistance to TH. At baseline, disruption of SRC-1 in the homozygous knock-in (TRbeta(E457A/E457A)) mice worsened the degree of resistance to TH, resulting in increased serum T(4) and TSH. During TH deprivation, disruption of AF-2 and SRC-1 resulted in a TSH rise 50% of what was seen when AF-2 alone was removed, suggesting that SRC-1 was interacting outside of the AF-2 domain. Therefore, 1) during TH deprivation, SRC-1 is necessary for activating the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis; 2) ligand-dependent repression of TSH requires an intact AF-2; and 3) SRC-1 may interact with the another region of the TRbeta or the TRalpha to regulate TH action in the pituitary. This report demonstrates the dual interaction of NCoA in vivo: the TH-independent up-regulation possibly through another domain and TH-dependent down-regulation through the AF-2 domain. PMID:19406944

  17. Desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors and neuronal functions.

    PubMed

    Gainetdinov, Raul R; Premont, Richard T; Bohn, Laura M; Lefkowitz, Robert J; Caron, Marc G

    2004-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have proven to be the most highly favorable class of drug targets in modern pharmacology. Over 90% of nonsensory GPCRs are expressed in the brain, where they play important roles in numerous neuronal functions. GPCRs can be desensitized following activation by agonists by becoming phosphorylated by members of the family of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). Phosphorylated receptors are then bound by arrestins, which prevent further stimulation of G proteins and downstream signaling pathways. Discussed in this review are recent progress in understanding basics of GPCR desensitization, novel functional roles, patterns of brain expression, and receptor specificity of GRKs and beta arrestins in major brain functions. In particular, screening of genetically modified mice lacking individual GRKs or beta arrestins for alterations in behavioral and biochemical responses to cocaine and morphine has revealed a functional specificity in dopamine and mu-opioid receptor regulation of locomotion and analgesia. An important and specific role of GRKs and beta arrestins in regulating physiological responsiveness to psychostimulants and morphine suggests potential involvement of these molecules in certain brain disorders, such as addiction, Parkinson's disease, mood disorders, and schizophrenia. Furthermore, the utility of a pharmacological strategy aimed at targeting this GPCR desensitization machinery to regulate brain functions can be envisaged. PMID:15217328

  18. Dopamine D4 Receptor Counteracts Morphine-Induced Changes in μ Opioid Receptor Signaling in the Striosomes of the Rat Caudate Putamen

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Boomgaard, Diana; Gago, Belén; Valderrama-Carvajal, Alejandra; Roales-Buján, Ruth; Van Craenenbroeck, Kathleen; Duchou, Jolien; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.; Medina-Luque, José; de la Calle, Adelaida; Fuxe, Kjell; Rivera, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    The mu opioid receptor (MOR) is critical in mediating morphine analgesia. However, prolonged exposure to morphine induces adaptive changes in this receptor leading to the development of tolerance and addiction. In the present work we have studied whether the continuous administration of morphine induces changes in MOR protein levels, its pharmacological profile, and MOR-mediated G-protein activation in the striosomal compartment of the rat CPu, by using immunohistochemistry and receptor and DAMGO-stimulated [35S]GTPγS autoradiography. MOR immunoreactivity, agonist binding density and its coupling to G proteins are up-regulated in the striosomes by continuous morphine treatment in the absence of changes in enkephalin and dynorphin mRNA levels. In addition, co-treatment of morphine with the dopamine D4 receptor (D4R) agonist PD168,077 fully counteracts these adaptive changes in MOR, in spite of the fact that continuous PD168,077 treatment increases the [3H]DAMGO Bmax values to the same degree as seen after continuous morphine treatment. Thus, in spite of the fact that both receptors can be coupled to Gi/0 protein, the present results give support for the existence of antagonistic functional D4R-MOR receptor-receptor interactions in the adaptive changes occurring in MOR of striosomes on continuous administration of morphine. PMID:24451133

  19. Evaluation of the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore: conversion of a potent delta-opioid receptor antagonist into a potent delta agonist and ligands with mixed properties.

    PubMed

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Guerrini, Remo; Salvadori, Severo; Bianchi, Clementina; Rizzi, Daniela; Bryant, Sharon D; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2002-01-31

    Analogues of the 2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine (Dmt)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (Tic) pharmacophore were prepared to test the hypothesis that a "spacer" and a third aromatic center in opioid peptides are required to convert a delta-antagonist into ligands with delta-agonist or with mixed delta-antagonist/mu-agonist properties. Potent delta-agonists and bifunctional compounds with high delta- and mu-opioid receptor affinities were obtained by varying the spacer length [none, NH-CH(2), NH-CH(2)-CH(2), Gly-NH-CH(2)] and C-terminal aromatic nucleus [1H-benzimidazole-2-yl, phenyl (Ph) and benzyl groups]. C-terminal modification primarily affected mu-opioid receptor affinities, which increased maximally 1700-fold relative to the prototype delta-antagonist H-Dmt-Tic-NH(2) and differentially modified bioactivity. In the absence of a spacer (1), the analogue exhibited dual delta-agonism (pEC(50), 7.28) and delta-antagonism (pA(2), 7.90). H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH(2)-1H-benzimidazole-2-yl (Bid) (2) became a highly potent delta-agonist (pEC(50), 9.90), slightly greater than deltorphin C (pEC(50), 9.56), with mu-agonism (pE(50), 7.57), while H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-CH(2)-Bid (4) retained potent delta-antagonism (pA(2), 9.0) but with an order of magnitude less mu-agonism. Similarly, H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-Ph (5) had nearly equivalent high delta-agonism (pEC(50), 8.52) and mu-agonism (pEC(50), 8.59), while H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-CH(2)-Ph (6) whose spacer was longer by a single methylene group exhibited potent delta-antagonism (pA(2), 9.25) and very high mu-agonism (pEC(50), 8.57). These data confirm that the distance between the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore and a third aromatic nucleus is an important criterion in converting Dmt-Tic from a highly potent delta-antagonist into a potent delta-agonist or into ligands with mixed delta- and mu-opioid properties.

  20. GRK2 Constitutively Governs Peripheral Delta Opioid Receptor Activity.

    PubMed

    Brackley, Allison Doyle; Gomez, Ruben; Akopian, Armen N; Henry, Michael A; Jeske, Nathaniel A

    2016-09-01

    Opioids remain the standard for analgesic care; however, adverse effects of systemic treatments contraindicate long-term administration. While most clinical opioids target mu opioid receptors (MOR), those that target the delta class (DOR) also demonstrate analgesic efficacy. Furthermore, peripherally restrictive opioids represent an attractive direction for analgesia. However, opioid receptors including DOR are analgesically incompetent in the absence of inflammation. Here, we report that G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) naively associates with plasma membrane DOR in peripheral sensory neurons to inhibit analgesic agonist efficacy. This interaction prevents optimal Gβ subunit association with the receptor, thereby reducing DOR activity. Importantly, bradykinin stimulates GRK2 movement away from DOR and onto Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP). protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent RKIP phosphorylation induces GRK2 sequestration, restoring DOR functionality in sensory neurons. Together, these results expand the known function of GRK2, identifying a non-internalizing role to maintain peripheral DOR in an analgesically incompetent state. PMID:27568556

  1. Central nervous system-specific knockout of steroidogenic factor 1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Woo; Zhao, Liping; Parker, Keith L

    2009-03-01

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is a nuclear receptor that plays important roles in the hypothalamus-pituitary-steroidogenic organ axis. Global knockout studies in mice revealed the essential in vivo roles of SF-1 in the ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) nucleus, adrenal glands, and gonads. One limitation of global SF-1 knockout mice is their early postnatal death from adrenocortical insufficiency. To overcome limitations of the global knockout mice and to delineate the roles of SF-1 in the brain, we used Cre/loxP recombination technology to genetically ablate SF-1 specifically in the central nervous system (CNS). Mice with CNS-specific knockout of SF-1 mediated by nestin-Cre showed increased anxiety-like behavior, revealing a crucial role of SF-1 in a complex behavioral phenotype. Our studies with CNS-specific SF-1 KO mice also defined roles of SF-1 in regulating the VMH expression of target genes implicated in anxiety and energy homeostasis. Therefore, this review will focus on our recent studies defining the functional roles of SF-1 in the VMH linked to anxiety and energy homeostasis.

  2. Endocytosis as a biological response in receptor pharmacology: evaluation by fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Campa, Víctor M; Capilla, Almudena; Varela, María J; de la Rocha, Arlet M Acanda; Fernandez-Troyano, Juan C; Barreiro, R Belén; Lopez-Gimenez, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    The activation of G-protein coupled receptors by agonist compounds results in diverse biological responses in cells, such as the endocytosis process consisting in the translocation of receptors from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm within internalizing vesicles or endosomes. In order to functionally evaluate endocytosis events resulted from pharmacological responses, we have developed an image analysis method -the Q-Endosomes algorithm- that specifically discriminates the fluorescent signal originated at endosomes from that one observed at the plasma membrane in images obtained from living cells by fluorescence microscopy. Mu opioid (MOP) receptor tagged at the carboxy-terminus with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and permanently expressed in HEK293 cells was used as experimental model to validate this methodology. Time-course experiments performed with several agonists resulted in different sigmoid curves depending on the drug used to initiate MOP receptor endocytosis. Thus, endocytosis resulting from the simultaneous activation of co-expressed MOP and serotonin 5-HT2C receptors by morphine plus serotonin was significantly different, in kinetics as well as in maximal response parameters, from the one caused by DAMGO, sufentanyl or methadone. Therefore, this analytical tool permits the pharmacological characterization of receptor endocytosis in living cells with functional and temporal resolution.

  3. Differential receptor binding characteristics of consecutive phenylalanines in micro-opioid specific peptide ligand endomorphin-2.

    PubMed

    Honda, Takeshi; Shirasu, Naoto; Isozaki, Kaname; Kawano, Michiaki; Shigehiro, Daiki; Chuman, Yoshiro; Fujita, Tsugumi; Nose, Takeru; Shimohigashi, Yasuyuki

    2007-06-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides consist of a conserved amino acid residue of Phe(3) and Phe(4), although their binding modes for opioid receptors have not been elucidated in detail. Endomorphin-2, which is highly selective and specific for the mu opioid receptor, possesses two Phe residues at the consecutive positions 3 and 4. In order to clarify the role of Phe(3) and Phe(4) in binding to the mu receptor, we synthesized a series of analogs in which Phe(3) and Phe(4) were replaced by various amino acids. It was found that the aromaticity of the Phe-beta-phenyl groups of Phe(3) and Phe(4) is a principal determinant of how strongly it binds to the receptor, although better molecular hydrophobicity reinforces the activity. The receptor binding subsites of Phe(3) and Phe(4) of endomorphin-2 were found to exhibit different structural requirements. The results suggest that [Trp(3)]endomorphin-2 (native endomorphin-1) and endomorphin-2 bind to different receptor subclasses. PMID:17395470

  4. The use of bifunctional NOP/mu and NOP receptor selective compounds for the treatment of pain, drug abuse, and psychiatric disorders.