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Sample records for mucin-domain-containing molecule-3 tim-3

  1. Expansion of dysfunctional Tim-3-expressing effector memory CD8+ T cells during simian immunodeficiency virus infection in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Burwitz, Benjamin J; Chew, Glen M; Reed, Jason S; Pathak, Reesab; Seger, Elizabeth; Clayton, Kiera L; Rini, James M; Ostrowski, Mario A; Ishii, Naoto; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Hansen, Scott G; Sacha, Jonah B; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C

    2014-12-01

    The T cell Ig- and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) negative immune checkpoint receptor demarcates functionally exhausted CD8(+) T cells arising from chronic stimulation in viral infections like HIV. Tim-3 blockade leads to improved antiviral CD8(+) T cell responses in vitro and, therefore, represents a novel intervention strategy to restore T cell function in vivo and protect from disease progression. However, the Tim-3 pathway in the physiologically relevant rhesus macaque SIV model of AIDS remains uncharacterized. We report that Tim-3(+)CD8(+) T cell frequencies are significantly increased in lymph nodes, but not in peripheral blood, in SIV-infected animals. Tim-3(+)PD-1(+)CD8(+) T cells are similarly increased during SIV infection and positively correlate with SIV plasma viremia. Tim-3 expression was found primarily on effector memory CD8(+) T cells in all tissues examined. Tim-3(+)CD8(+) T cells have lower Ki-67 content and minimal cytokine responses to SIV compared with Tim-3(-)CD8(+) T cells. During acute-phase SIV replication, Tim-3 expression peaked on SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells by 2 wk postinfection and then rapidly diminished, irrespective of mutational escape of cognate Ag, suggesting non-TCR-driven mechanisms for Tim-3 expression. Thus, rhesus Tim-3 in SIV infection partially mimics human Tim-3 in HIV infection and may serve as a novel model for targeted studies focused on rejuvenating HIV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. PMID:25348621

  2. Increased Tim-3 expression in peripheral NK cells predicts a poorer prognosis and Tim-3 blockade improves NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in human lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liyun; Huang, Yanyan; Tan, Linlin; Yu, Wei; Chen, Dongdong; Lu, ChangChang; He, Jianying; Wu, Guoqing; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Yongkui

    2015-12-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) has been shown to play an important role in mediating NK-cell function in human diseases. However, the relationship between Tim-3 expression in natural killer (NK) cells and human lung adenocarcinoma remains unclear. We therefore investigated the expression of Tim-3 in NK cells and explored the effect of Tim-3 blockade on NK cell-mediated activity in human lung adenocarcinoma. Upregulated expression of Tim-3 on CD3-CD56+ cells (P<0.05) and CD3-CD56(dim) cells (P<0.05) of patients with lung adenocarcinoma was detected by flow cytometry. Moreover, Tim-3 expression in CD3-CD56+ NK cells was higher in patients with lung adenocarcinoma with lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P<0.05) or with tumor stage T3-T4 (P<0.05). Tim-3 expression in CD56(dim) NK-cell subset was higher in patients with tumor size ≥3cm (P<0.05), or LNM (P<0.05) or with tumor stage T3-T4 (P<0.05). Further analysis showed that higher expressions of Tim-3 on both CD3-CD56+ NK cells and CD56(dim) NK-cell subset were independently correlated with shorter overall survival of patients with lung adenocarcinoma (log-rank test, P=0.0418, 0.0406, respectively). Importantly, blockade of Tim-3 signaling with anti-Tim-3 antibodies resulted in the increased cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production of peripheral NK cells from patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Our data indicate that Tim-3 expression in NK cells can function as a prognostic biomarker in human lung adenocarcinoma and support that Tim-3 could be a new target for an immunotherapeutic strategy.

  3. Tim-3 induces Th2-biased immunity and alternative macrophage activation during Schistosoma japonicum infection.

    PubMed

    Hou, Nan; Piao, Xianyu; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Chuang; Chen, Qijun

    2015-08-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule 3 (Tim-3) has been regarded as an important regulatory factor in both adaptive and innate immunity. Recently, Tim-3 was reported to be involved in Th2-biased immune responses in mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum, but the exact mechanism behind the involvement of Tim-3 remains unknown. The present study aims to understand the role of Tim-3 in the immune response against S. japonicum infection. Tim-3 expression was determined by flow cytometry, and increased Tim-3 expression was observed on CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, NK1.1(+) cells, and CD11b(+) cells from the livers of S. japonicum-infected mice. However, the increased level of Tim-3 was lower in the spleen than in the liver, and no increase in Tim-3 expression was observed on splenic CD8(+) T cells or CD11b(+) cells. The schistosome-induced upregulation of Tim-3 on natural killer (NK) cells was accompanied by reduced NK cell numbers in vitro and in vivo. Tim-3 antibody blockade led to upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and interleukin-12 (IL-12) mRNA in CD11b(+) cells cocultured with soluble egg antigen and downregulation of Arg1 and IL-10, which are markers of M2 macrophages. In summary, we observed schistosome-induced expression of Tim-3 on critical immune cell populations, which may be involved in the Th2-biased immune response and alternative activation of macrophages during infection.

  4. The Galectin-9/Tim-3 pathway is involved in the regulation of NK cell function at the maternal-fetal interface in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Hong; Zhou, Wen-Hui; Tao, Yu; Wang, Song-Cun; Jiang, Yun-Lan; Zhang, Di; Piao, Hai-Lan; Fu, Qiang; Li, Da-Jin; Du, Mei-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Decidual natural killer (dNK) cells actively participate in the establishment and maintenance of maternal-fetal immune tolerance and act as local guardians against infection. However, how dNK cells maintain the immune balance between tolerance and anti-infection immune responses during pregnancy remains unknown. Here, we demonstrated that the inhibitory molecule T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) are expressed on over 60% of dNK cells. Tim-3(+) dNK cells display higher interleukin (IL)-4 and lower tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and perforin production. Human trophoblast cells can induce the transformation of peripheral NK cells into a dNK-like phenotype via the secretion of galectin-9 (Gal-9) and the interaction between Gal-9 and Tim-3. In addition, trophoblasts inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine and perforin production by dNK cells, which can be attenuated by Tim-3 neutralizing antibodies. Interestingly, a decreased percentage of Tim-3-expressing dNK cells were observed in human miscarriages and murine abortion-prone models. Moreover, T helper (Th)2-type cytokines were decreased and Th1-type cytokines were increased in Tim-3(+) but not Tim-3(-) dNK cells from human and mouse miscarriages. Therefore, our results suggest that the Gal-9/Tim-3 signal is important for the regulation of dNK cell function, which is beneficial for the maintenance of a normal pregnancy.

  5. TIM-3 expression in lymphoma cells predicts chemoresistance in patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Horlad, Hasita; Ohnishi, Koji; Ma, Chaoya; Fujiwara, Yukio; Niino, Daisuke; Ohshima, Koichi; Jinushi, Masahisa; Matsuoka, Masao; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), an aggressive type of malignant lymphoma, is highly resistant to chemotherapy. However, the detailed mechanisms of the chemoresistance of ATLL have never been elucidated. We previously demonstrated that direct cell-cell interaction between macrophages and lymphoma cells was significantly associated with lymphoma progression in patients with ATLL. The present study aimed to further analyze the effects of cell-cell interaction between macrophages and ATLL cells by means of cell culture studies and immunohistochemical analysis using human ATLL samples. It was found that direct co-culture with macrophages induced chemoresistance in the ATLL ATN-1 cell line, but not in other cell lines, including TL-Mor, ED and ATL-2S. It was also found that expression of the T cell Ig and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (TIM-3) was induced in ATN-1 cells by their long-term co-culture with macrophages. TIM-3 gene transfection induced chemoresistance in the ATN-1 cells. Immunostaining of ATLL tissues showed TIM-3 expression in 25 out of 58 ATLL cases. Although TIM-3 expression was not associated with overall survival or T classification, it was associated with resistance to chemotherapy. TIM-3 expression is therefore considered to be a marker for predicting the efficacy of chemotherapy, and TIM-3-associated signals may be a therapeutic target for patients with ATLL. PMID:27446463

  6. The Coordinated Actions of TIM-3 on Cancer and Myeloid Cells in the Regulation of Tumorigenicity and Clinical Prognosis in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Komohara, Yoshihiro; Morita, Tomoko; Annan, Dorcas A; Horlad, Hasita; Ohnishi, Koji; Yamada, Sohsuke; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Kitada, Shohei; Suzu, Shinya; Kinoshita, Ichiro; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Akashi, Koichi; Takeya, Motohiro; Jinushi, Masahisa

    2015-09-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is one of most common cancers in urogenital organs. Although recent experimental and clinical studies have shown the immunogenic properties of ccRCC as illustrated by the clinical sensitivities to various immunotherapies, the detailed immunoregulatory machineries governing the tumorigenicity of human ccRCC remain largely obscure. In this study, we demonstrated the clinical significance and functional relevance of T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (TIM-3) expressed on tumor cells and myeloid cells in patients with ccRCC. TIM-3 expression was detected on cancer cells and CD204(+) tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), and higher expression level of TIM-3 was positively correlated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with ccRCC. We found that TIM-3 expression was detected on a large number of tumors, and there was significant correlation between an increased number of TAMs and high expression level of TIM-3 in patients with ccRCC. Furthermore, TIM-3 rendered RCC cells with the ability to induce resistance to sunitinib and mTOR inhibitors, the standard regimen for patients with ccRCC, as well as stem cell activities. TIM-3 expression was induced on CD14(+) monocytes upon long-term stimulation with RCC cells, and TIM-3-expressing myeloid cells play a critical role in augmenting tumorigenic activities of TIM-3-negative RCC cells. More importantly, treatment with anti-TIM-3 mAb suppressed its tumorigenic effects in in vitro and in vivo settings. These findings indicate the coordinated action of TIM-3 in cancer cells and in myeloid cells regulates the tumorigenicity of human RCC.

  7. The Coordinated Actions of TIM-3 on Cancer and Myeloid Cells in the Regulation of Tumorigenicity and Clinical Prognosis in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Komohara, Yoshihiro; Morita, Tomoko; Annan, Dorcas A; Horlad, Hasita; Ohnishi, Koji; Yamada, Sohsuke; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Kitada, Shohei; Suzu, Shinya; Kinoshita, Ichiro; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Akashi, Koichi; Takeya, Motohiro; Jinushi, Masahisa

    2015-09-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is one of most common cancers in urogenital organs. Although recent experimental and clinical studies have shown the immunogenic properties of ccRCC as illustrated by the clinical sensitivities to various immunotherapies, the detailed immunoregulatory machineries governing the tumorigenicity of human ccRCC remain largely obscure. In this study, we demonstrated the clinical significance and functional relevance of T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (TIM-3) expressed on tumor cells and myeloid cells in patients with ccRCC. TIM-3 expression was detected on cancer cells and CD204(+) tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), and higher expression level of TIM-3 was positively correlated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with ccRCC. We found that TIM-3 expression was detected on a large number of tumors, and there was significant correlation between an increased number of TAMs and high expression level of TIM-3 in patients with ccRCC. Furthermore, TIM-3 rendered RCC cells with the ability to induce resistance to sunitinib and mTOR inhibitors, the standard regimen for patients with ccRCC, as well as stem cell activities. TIM-3 expression was induced on CD14(+) monocytes upon long-term stimulation with RCC cells, and TIM-3-expressing myeloid cells play a critical role in augmenting tumorigenic activities of TIM-3-negative RCC cells. More importantly, treatment with anti-TIM-3 mAb suppressed its tumorigenic effects in in vitro and in vivo settings. These findings indicate the coordinated action of TIM-3 in cancer cells and in myeloid cells regulates the tumorigenicity of human RCC. PMID:25783986

  8. Genetic polymorphisms of immune checkpoint proteins PD-1 and TIM-3 are associated with survival of patients with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhu; Li, Na; Li, Fang; Zhou, Zhihua; Sang, Jiao; Jin, Zhao; Liu, Huihui; Han, Qunying; Lv, Yi; Liu, Zhengwen

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain containing molecule 3 (TIM-3) are involved in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study examined the associations of PD1 and TIM3 polymorphisms with the overall survival (OS) of a prospective cohort of 258 HBV-related HCC patients. Results showed that PD1 +8669 G allele-containing genotypes or TIM3 −1516 genotype GG were significantly associated with longer OS (P < 0.001 and P = 0.001, respectively). In multivariate analysis, PD1 +8669 G allele-containing genotypes and TIM3 −1516 genotype GG were independently associated with longer OS (hazard ratio (HR), 1.835; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.342–2.509; P < 0.001 and HR, 2.070; 95%CI, 1.428–3.002; P < 0.001, respectively). PD1 +8669 G allele-containing genotypes were significantly associated with longer OS in patients receiving surgical (resection or radiofrequency) treatment, transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) or supportive and symptomatic treatment. TIM3 −1516 genotype GG was significantly associated with longer OS in TACE patients. In multivariate analysis, PD1 +8669 G allele-containing genotypes were independently associated with longer OS in each treatment population. TIM3 −1516 genotype GG was independently associated with longer OS in patients receiving surgical treatment or TACE. These findings suggest that PD1 +8669 A/G and TIM3 −1516 G/T polymorphisms may affect the prognosis of HBV-related HCC and may be new predictors of prognosis for HCC patients. PMID:27034168

  9. Upregulation of Tim-3 on CD4(+) T cells is associated with Th1/Th2 imbalance in patients with allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fei; Wang, Fukun; An, Liyun; Wang, Xianling

    2015-01-01

    T cell Ig and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) is a negative regulator preferentially expressed on Th1 cells. Allergic asthma is a clinical syndrome well characterized by Th1/Th2 imbalance. To investigate the role of Tim-3 in the pathogenesis of asthma and its relationship with Th1/Th2 imbalance, a total of 40 patients with allergic asthma and 40 healthy controls were enrolled. Expression of Tim-3 and Th1/Th2 imbalance as well as the relationship between them was analyzed by flow cytometry and real-time PCR. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were cultured in vitro and anti-Tim-3 was used to block Tim-3 signaling; Th1/Th2 cytokines in the culture supernatant were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). CD4(+) T cells and B cells were sorted and co-cultured in vitro, and anti-Tim-3 was used to block Tim-3 signaling; Total IgG/IgE in the culture supernatant was detected by ELISA. The mRNA level of T-bet and IFN-γ were significantly decreased in allergic asthma patients, while GATA-3 and IL-4 were significantly increased. Expression of Tim-3 on CD4(+) T cells was much higher in allergic asthma patients and it was negatively correlated with T-bet/GATA-3 ratio or IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio. Blocking of Tim-3 significantly increased Th1 cytokines (TNF-α and IFN-γ) and decreased Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) in the culture supernatant of PBMCs. Blocking of Tim-3 dramatically reduced the production of IgG and IgE in the co-culture supernatant of CD4(+) T cells and B cells. In conclusion, Tim-3 was up-regulated in allergic asthma patients and related with the Th1/Th2 imbalance. Blocking of Tim-3 may be of therapeutic benefit by enhancing the Th1 cytokines response, down-regulating the Th2 cytokines response, and reducing IgG/IgE production.

  10. Upregulation of Tim-3 on CD4(+) T cells is associated with Th1/Th2 imbalance in patients with allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fei; Wang, Fukun; An, Liyun; Wang, Xianling

    2015-01-01

    T cell Ig and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) is a negative regulator preferentially expressed on Th1 cells. Allergic asthma is a clinical syndrome well characterized by Th1/Th2 imbalance. To investigate the role of Tim-3 in the pathogenesis of asthma and its relationship with Th1/Th2 imbalance, a total of 40 patients with allergic asthma and 40 healthy controls were enrolled. Expression of Tim-3 and Th1/Th2 imbalance as well as the relationship between them was analyzed by flow cytometry and real-time PCR. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were cultured in vitro and anti-Tim-3 was used to block Tim-3 signaling; Th1/Th2 cytokines in the culture supernatant were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). CD4(+) T cells and B cells were sorted and co-cultured in vitro, and anti-Tim-3 was used to block Tim-3 signaling; Total IgG/IgE in the culture supernatant was detected by ELISA. The mRNA level of T-bet and IFN-γ were significantly decreased in allergic asthma patients, while GATA-3 and IL-4 were significantly increased. Expression of Tim-3 on CD4(+) T cells was much higher in allergic asthma patients and it was negatively correlated with T-bet/GATA-3 ratio or IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio. Blocking of Tim-3 significantly increased Th1 cytokines (TNF-α and IFN-γ) and decreased Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) in the culture supernatant of PBMCs. Blocking of Tim-3 dramatically reduced the production of IgG and IgE in the co-culture supernatant of CD4(+) T cells and B cells. In conclusion, Tim-3 was up-regulated in allergic asthma patients and related with the Th1/Th2 imbalance. Blocking of Tim-3 may be of therapeutic benefit by enhancing the Th1 cytokines response, down-regulating the Th2 cytokines response, and reducing IgG/IgE production. PMID:26064278

  11. DNA demethylation of the TIM-3 promoter is critical for its stable expression on T cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, F-C; Kuo, C-C; Chen, H-Y; Chen, H-H; Sytwu, H-K

    2016-04-01

    The T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing protein 3 (TIM-3) is selectively expressed on terminally differentiated T helper 1 (Th1) cells and acts as a negative regulator that terminates Th1 responses. The dysregulation of TIM-3 expression on T cells is associated with several autoimmune phenotypes and with chronic viral infections; however, the mechanism of this regulation is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of DNA methylation on the expression of TIM-3. By analyzing the sequences of TIM-3 promoter regions in human and mouse, we identified a CpG island within the TIM-3 promoter and demonstrated that the promoter activity was controlled by DNA methylation. Furthermore, treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine enhanced TIM-3 expression on mouse primary CD4(+) T cells under Th0-, Th1- or Th2-polarizing conditions. Finally, pyrosequencing analysis revealed that the methylation level of the TIM-3 promoter gradually decreased after each round of T-cell polarization, and this decrease was inversely correlated with TIM-3 expression. These data suggest that the DNA methylation of the TIM-3 promoter cooperates with lineage-specific transcription factors in the control of Th-cell development. In conclusion, DNA methylation-based regulation of TIM-3 may provide novel insights into understanding the dysregulation of TIM-3 expression under pathogenic conditions.

  12. TIM3 Mediates T Cell Exhaustion during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Pushpa; Jacques, Miye K; Zhu, Chen; Steblenko, Katherine M; Stowell, Britni L; Madi, Asaf; Anderson, Ana C; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Behar, Samuel M

    2016-03-01

    While T cell immunity initially limits Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, why T cell immunity fails to sterilize the infection and allows recrudescence is not clear. One hypothesis is that T cell exhaustion impairs immunity and is detrimental to the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. Here we provide functional evidence for the development T cell exhaustion during chronic TB. Second, we evaluate the role of the inhibitory receptor T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing-3 (TIM3) during chronic M. tuberculosis infection. We find that TIM3 expressing T cells accumulate during chronic infection, co-express other inhibitory receptors including PD1, produce less IL-2 and TNF but more IL-10, and are functionally exhausted. Finally, we show that TIM3 blockade restores T cell function and improves bacterial control, particularly in chronically infected susceptible mice. These data show that T cell immunity is suboptimal during chronic M. tuberculosis infection due to T cell exhaustion. Moreover, in chronically infected mice, treatment with anti-TIM3 mAb is an effective therapeutic strategy against tuberculosis.

  13. Tim-3 Is Upregulated in NK Cells during Early Pregnancy and Inhibits NK Cytotoxicity toward Trophoblast in Galectin-9 Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jintang; Yang, Meixiang; Ban, Yanli; Gao, Wenjuan; Song, Bingfeng; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Yun; Shao, Qianqian; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    NK cells accumulate at the maternal-fetal interface (MFI) and play essential roles in maintaining immune tolerance during pregnancy. The mechanisms that facilitate NK cells tolerance to fetal tissue are largely unknown. T cell Ig and mucin domain-containing protein 3 (Tim-3) is a newly defined molecule with essential immunological function in many physiological and pathological processes. Recent study showed that Tim-3 was involved in the regulation of immune tolerance at MFI. However, whether Tim-3 regulates NK cells cytotoxicity toward trophoblasts is unclear. Here, we showed Tim-3 was mainly expressed by decidual NK cells (dNK) and Tim-3 level in dNK was higher than peripheral NK cells (pNK). Tim-3(+) dNK expressed more levels of mature markers CD94 and CD69 than Tim-3- dNK cells and blocking Tim-3 significantly inhibited dNK IFN-γ and TNF-α secretion. Furthermore, we found TGF-β1 may contribute to such up-regulation of Tim-3 in NK cells. Interestingly, blocking Tim-3 enhanced NK cytotoxicity toward trophoblast cell line HTR-8 but not K562. We found HTR-8 expressed Tim-3 ligand Galectin-9, in contrast K562 did not. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of Galectin-9 expression enhanced NK cytotoxicity toward HTR-8. We further showed Tim-3/Galecin-9 inhibited NK cytotoxicity toward trophoblast partially via impairing the degranulation process. In addition, clinical data showed that abnormal Tim-3 level on pNK might be associated with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). Thus, our data demonstrate Tim-3/Galectin-9 pathway maintains local tolerance by suppressing NK cytotoxicity toward trophoblasts which may represent a new immunologic tolerance mechanism at MFI.

  14. TIM-3 Suppresses Anti-CD3/CD28-Induced TCR Activation and IL-2 Expression through the NFAT Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Tomkowicz, Brian; Walsh, Eileen; Cotty, Adam; Verona, Raluca; Sabins, Nina; Kaplan, Fred; Santulli-Marotto, Sandy; Chin, Chen-Ni; Mooney, Jill; Lingham, Russell B; Naso, Michael; McCabe, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    TIM-3 (T cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain containing protein 3) is a member of the TIM family of proteins that is preferentially expressed on Th1 polarized CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Recent studies indicate that TIM-3 serves as a negative regulator of T cell function (i.e. T cell dependent immune responses, proliferation, tolerance, and exhaustion). Despite having no recognizable inhibitory signaling motifs, the intracellular tail of TIM-3 is apparently indispensable for function. Specifically, the conserved residues Y265/Y272 and surrounding amino acids appear to be critical for function. Mechanistically, several studies suggest that TIM-3 can associate with interleukin inducible T cell kinase (ITK), the Src kinases Fyn and Lck, and the p85 phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) adaptor protein to positively or negatively regulate IL-2 production via NF-κB/NFAT signaling pathways. To begin to address this discrepancy, we examined the effect of TIM-3 in two model systems. First, we generated several Jurkat T cell lines stably expressing human TIM-3 or murine CD28-ECD/human TIM-3 intracellular tail chimeras and examined the effects that TIM-3 exerts on T cell Receptor (TCR)-mediated activation, cytokine secretion, promoter activity, and protein kinase association. In this model, our results demonstrate that TIM-3 inhibits several TCR-mediated phenotypes: i) NF-kB/NFAT activation, ii) CD69 expression, and iii) suppression of IL-2 secretion. To confirm our Jurkat cell observations we developed a primary human CD8+ cell system that expresses endogenous levels of TIM-3. Upon TCR ligation, we observed the loss of NFAT reporter activity and IL-2 secretion, and identified the association of Src kinase Lck, and PLC-γ with TIM-3. Taken together, our results support the conclusion that TIM-3 is a negative regulator of TCR-function by attenuating activation signals mediated by CD3/CD28 co-stimulation.

  15. TIM-3 Suppresses Anti-CD3/CD28-Induced TCR Activation and IL-2 Expression through the NFAT Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tomkowicz, Brian; Walsh, Eileen; Cotty, Adam; Verona, Raluca; Sabins, Nina; Kaplan, Fred; Santulli-Marotto, Sandy; Chin, Chen-Ni; Mooney, Jill; Lingham, Russell B.; Naso, Michael; McCabe, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    TIM-3 (T cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain containing protein 3) is a member of the TIM family of proteins that is preferentially expressed on Th1 polarized CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Recent studies indicate that TIM-3 serves as a negative regulator of T cell function (i.e. T cell dependent immune responses, proliferation, tolerance, and exhaustion). Despite having no recognizable inhibitory signaling motifs, the intracellular tail of TIM-3 is apparently indispensable for function. Specifically, the conserved residues Y265/Y272 and surrounding amino acids appear to be critical for function. Mechanistically, several studies suggest that TIM-3 can associate with interleukin inducible T cell kinase (ITK), the Src kinases Fyn and Lck, and the p85 phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) adaptor protein to positively or negatively regulate IL-2 production via NF-κB/NFAT signaling pathways. To begin to address this discrepancy, we examined the effect of TIM-3 in two model systems. First, we generated several Jurkat T cell lines stably expressing human TIM-3 or murine CD28-ECD/human TIM-3 intracellular tail chimeras and examined the effects that TIM-3 exerts on T cell Receptor (TCR)-mediated activation, cytokine secretion, promoter activity, and protein kinase association. In this model, our results demonstrate that TIM-3 inhibits several TCR-mediated phenotypes: i) NF-kB/NFAT activation, ii) CD69 expression, and iii) suppression of IL-2 secretion. To confirm our Jurkat cell observations we developed a primary human CD8+ cell system that expresses endogenous levels of TIM-3. Upon TCR ligation, we observed the loss of NFAT reporter activity and IL-2 secretion, and identified the association of Src kinase Lck, and PLC-γ with TIM-3. Taken together, our results support the conclusion that TIM-3 is a negative regulator of TCR-function by attenuating activation signals mediated by CD3/CD28 co-stimulation. PMID:26492563

  16. Participation of T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-3 (TIM-3) and its ligand (galectin-9) in the pathogenesis of active generalized vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Tembhre, Manoj Kumar; Parihar, Anita Singh; Sharma, Alpana; Gupta, Somesh; Chattopadhyay, Parthaprasad; Sharma, Vinod Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Vitiligo is a depigmentary disease where melanocytes of the basal layer of epidermis are selectively destroyed by immune-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. The T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecules (TIMs) are involved in immune regulation, and their participation is not known in vitiligo. The present study revealed significant increase in the percentage of CD3+CD4+TIM3+ T cells (P < 0.05) in peripheral blood and was positively correlated with percentage body surface area involvement in aGV group. Further, increased expression of TIM-3 and its ligand galectin-9 (Gal-9) mRNA was found in peripheral blood and lesional/perilesional skin of active generalized vitiligo (aGV) compared with controls. Characteristic migration pattern of TIM-3-positive immune cells in lesional (near/in the epidermis) and perilesional (towards epidermis) skin section suggested that TIM-3+ immune cells may be involved in melanocyte destruction. Further, investigation is required to understand the role of TIM-3/Gal-9 signalling pathways in aGV and it can be targeted in the management of vitiligo.

  17. Abnormal expression of Tim-3 antigen on peripheral blood T cells is associated with progressive disease in osteosarcoma patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongliang; Zhi, Liqiang; Duan, Ning; Su, Pengxiao

    2016-08-01

    T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain-3-containing molecule 3 (TIM-3) plays a pivotal role in immune regulation and has been found in various tumors. However, the prevalence and distribution of Tim-3 in osteosarcoma (OS) is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and distribution of Tim-3 in OS. Tim-3 on peripheral T cells from 82 OS patients and 60 healthy controls were examined by flow cytometry. Plasma levels of IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were measured by ELSIA. Tim-3 on both CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cells were significantly upregulated in OS patients compared with healthy controls, Tim-3(+) CD4(+) T, and Tim-3(+) CD8(+) T cells were both negatively associated with serum levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ and TNF-α. In addition, Tim-3 showed similar levels in patients with different tumor sites. Nevertheless, patients with advanced tumor stage, metastasis, and pathological tumor fracture displayed significantly higher Tim-3 on both CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells than those with early tumor stage, without metastasis and pathological tumor fracture. Moreover, high Tim-3 on peripheral CD4(+) T cells or CD8(+) T were significantly related to poor overall survival (P = 0.014, P = 0.035, respectively). In conclusion, Tim-3 may be a potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for OS progression.

  18. Abnormal expression of Tim-3 antigen on peripheral blood T cells is associated with progressive disease in osteosarcoma patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongliang; Zhi, Liqiang; Duan, Ning; Su, Pengxiao

    2016-08-01

    T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain-3-containing molecule 3 (TIM-3) plays a pivotal role in immune regulation and has been found in various tumors. However, the prevalence and distribution of Tim-3 in osteosarcoma (OS) is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and distribution of Tim-3 in OS. Tim-3 on peripheral T cells from 82 OS patients and 60 healthy controls were examined by flow cytometry. Plasma levels of IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were measured by ELSIA. Tim-3 on both CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cells were significantly upregulated in OS patients compared with healthy controls, Tim-3(+) CD4(+) T, and Tim-3(+) CD8(+) T cells were both negatively associated with serum levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ and TNF-α. In addition, Tim-3 showed similar levels in patients with different tumor sites. Nevertheless, patients with advanced tumor stage, metastasis, and pathological tumor fracture displayed significantly higher Tim-3 on both CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells than those with early tumor stage, without metastasis and pathological tumor fracture. Moreover, high Tim-3 on peripheral CD4(+) T cells or CD8(+) T were significantly related to poor overall survival (P = 0.014, P = 0.035, respectively). In conclusion, Tim-3 may be a potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for OS progression. PMID:27516959

  19. TIM-3 Regulates Distinct Functions in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane protein TIM-3 is a type I protein expressed by sub-types of lymphoid cells, such as lymphocytes Th1, Th17, Tc1, NK, as well as in myeloid cells. Scientific evidence indicates that this molecule acts as a negative regulator of T lymphocyte activation and that its expression is modified in viral infections or autoimmune diseases. In addition to evidence from lymphoid cells, the function of TIM-3 has been investigated in myeloid cells, such as monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DC), where studies have demonstrated that it can regulate cytokine production, cell activation, and the capture of apoptotic bodies. Despite these advances, the function of TIM-3 in myeloid cells and the molecular mechanisms that this protein regulates are not yet fully understood. This review examines the most recent evidence concerning the function of TIM-3 when expressed in myeloid cells, primarily macrophages, and the potential impact of that function on the field of basic immunology.

  20. TIM-3 Regulates Distinct Functions in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane protein TIM-3 is a type I protein expressed by sub-types of lymphoid cells, such as lymphocytes Th1, Th17, Tc1, NK, as well as in myeloid cells. Scientific evidence indicates that this molecule acts as a negative regulator of T lymphocyte activation and that its expression is modified in viral infections or autoimmune diseases. In addition to evidence from lymphoid cells, the function of TIM-3 has been investigated in myeloid cells, such as monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DC), where studies have demonstrated that it can regulate cytokine production, cell activation, and the capture of apoptotic bodies. Despite these advances, the function of TIM-3 in myeloid cells and the molecular mechanisms that this protein regulates are not yet fully understood. This review examines the most recent evidence concerning the function of TIM-3 when expressed in myeloid cells, primarily macrophages, and the potential impact of that function on the field of basic immunology. PMID:27379093

  1. Plasma soluble Tim-3 emerges as an inhibitor in sepsis: sepsis contrary to membrane Tim-3 on monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ren, F; Li, J; Jiang, X; Xiao, K; Zhang, D; Zhao, Z; Ai, J; Hou, C; Jia, Y; Han, G; Xie, L

    2015-11-01

    Immune dysfunction is the main characteristic of sepsis. T cell Ig and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3) on the monocytes has been reported to promote immune homeostasis during sepsis, but the influences of plasm soluble Tim-3 (sTim-3) on the immune system during sepsis remain unknown. Here, 100 patients with different severities of sepsis (40 sepsis, 42 severe sepsis, and 18 septic shock) were enrolled in this study. The Tim-3 and human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) on the circulating monocytes were detected using flow cytometry. Plasma sTim-3 was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Inflammatory factors and two kinds of A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) - ADAM10 and ADAM17 were assessed. The Tim-3 and HLA-DR on the monocytes decreased with increasing sepsis severity. The sTim-3 was reduced in the sepsis and severe sepsis patients but was elevated in the septic shock patients who exhibited significant immunosuppression as predicted by HLA-DR. sTim-3 levels were negatively correlated with IL-12 and TNF-α. ADAM10 and ADAM17, sheddases of Tim-3, exhibited trends toward elevations in the septic shock group. In conclusion, sTim-3 was involved in the development of sepsis. The homeostasis-promoting role of the Tim-3 on the monocytes was disrupted, while the inhibitory role of sTim-3 emerged during sepsis-induced immunosuppression.

  2. CEACAM1 regulates TIM-3-mediated tolerance and exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Hwa; Zhu, Chen; Kondo, Yasuyuki; Anderson, Ana C; Gandhi, Amit; Russell, Andrew; Dougan, Stephanie K; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Melum, Espen; Pertel, Thomas; Clayton, Kiera L; Raab, Monika; Chen, Qiang; Beauchemin, Nicole; Yazaki, Paul J; Pyzik, Michal; Ostrowski, Mario A; Glickman, Jonathan N; Rudd, Christopher E; Ploegh, Hidde L; Franke, Andre; Petsko, Gregory A; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Blumberg, Richard S

    2015-01-15

    T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain-3 (TIM-3, also known as HAVCR2) is an activation-induced inhibitory molecule involved in tolerance and shown to induce T-cell exhaustion in chronic viral infection and cancers. Under some conditions, TIM-3 expression has also been shown to be stimulatory. Considering that TIM-3, like cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1), is being targeted for cancer immunotherapy, it is important to identify the circumstances under which TIM-3 can inhibit and activate T-cell responses. Here we show that TIM-3 is co-expressed and forms a heterodimer with carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1), another well-known molecule expressed on activated T cells and involved in T-cell inhibition. Biochemical, biophysical and X-ray crystallography studies show that the membrane-distal immunoglobulin-variable (IgV)-like amino-terminal domain of each is crucial to these interactions. The presence of CEACAM1 endows TIM-3 with inhibitory function. CEACAM1 facilitates the maturation and cell surface expression of TIM-3 by forming a heterodimeric interaction in cis through the highly related membrane-distal N-terminal domains of each molecule. CEACAM1 and TIM-3 also bind in trans through their N-terminal domains. Both cis and trans interactions between CEACAM1 and TIM-3 determine the tolerance-inducing function of TIM-3. In a mouse adoptive transfer colitis model, CEACAM1-deficient T cells are hyper-inflammatory with reduced cell surface expression of TIM-3 and regulatory cytokines, and this is restored by T-cell-specific CEACAM1 expression. During chronic viral infection and in a tumour environment, CEACAM1 and TIM-3 mark exhausted T cells. Co-blockade of CEACAM1 and TIM-3 leads to enhancement of anti-tumour immune responses with improved elimination of tumours in mouse colorectal cancer models. Thus, CEACAM1 serves as a heterophilic ligand for TIM-3 that is required for its ability to mediate T

  3. TIM-3 Regulates Innate Immune Cells to Induce Fetomaternal Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Chabtini, Lola; Mfarrej, Bechara; Mounayar, Marwan; Zhu, Bing; Batal, Ibrahim; Dakle, Pranal J; Smith, Brian D; Boenisch, Olaf; Najafian, Nader; Akiba, Hisaya; Yagita, Hideo; Guleria, Indira

    2012-01-01

    TIM-3 is constitutively expressed on subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells. Its expression on other cells of the innate immune system and its role in fetomaternal tolerance has not yet been explored. Here we investigate the role of TIM-3 expressing innate immune cells in the regulation of tolerance at the fetomaternal interface (FMI) using an allogeneic mouse model of pregnancy. Blockade of TIM-3 results in accumulation of inflammatory granulocytes and macrophages at the utero-placental interface and up regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, TIM-3 blockade inhibits the phagocytic potential of uterine macrophages resulting in a build up of apoptotic bodies at the utero-placental interface that elicits a local immune response. In response to inflammatory cytokines, Ly-6ChiGneg M-MDSCs (monocytic myeloid derived suppressor cells) expressing iNOS and arginase 1 are induced. However, these suppressive cells fail to down-regulate the inflammatory cascade induced by inflammatory granulocytes (Ly-6Cint Ghi) and apoptotic cells; the increased production of IFNγ and TNFα by inflammatory granulocytes leads to abrogation of tolerance at the fetomaternal interface and fetal rejection. These data highlight the interplay between cells of the innate immune system at the FMI and their influence on successful pregnancy in mice. PMID:23180822

  4. The regulation of TIM-3 transcription in T cells involves c-Jun binding but not CpG methylation at the TIM-3 promoter.

    PubMed

    Yun, Su Jin; Jun, Ka-Jung; Komori, Kuniharu; Lee, Mi Jin; Kwon, Myung-Hee; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin; Shin, Ho-Joon; Park, Sun

    2016-07-01

    Tim-3 is an immunomodulatory protein that is expressed constitutively on monocytes but is induced in activated T cells. The mechanisms involved in the regulation of TIM-3 transcription are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated whether methylation of the TIM-3 promoter is involved in regulatingTIM-3 transcription in T cells, and identified a transcription factor that regulates TIM-3 transcription by associating with the TIM-3 minimal promoter region. Pyrosequencing of the TIM-3 promoter up to -1440bp revealed 11 hypermethylated CpG sites and 4 hypomethylated CpG sites in human CD4(+) T cells as well as in CD11b(+) cells. Dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4), a mark of transcriptional activation, was predominantly found in the proximal TIM-3 promoter -954 to -34bp region, whereas trimethylation of H3K9 and H3K27, which are markers of transcriptional suppression, were mostly observed in the distal promoter -1549 to -1048bp region in human CD4(+) T cells and CD11b(+) cells. However, no change in the methylation status of CpG sites and the histone H3 in the TIM-3 promoter was found during induction of TIM-3 transcription in T cells. Finally, AP-1 involvement in TIM-3 transcription was shown in relation with the TIM-3 minimal promoter -146 to +144bp region. The present study defines the minimal TIM-3 promoter region and demonstrates its interaction with c-Jun during TIM-3 transcription in CD4(+) T cells.

  5. Apoptosis of tumor infiltrating effector TIM-3+CD8+ T cells in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chiao-Wen; Dutta, Avijit; Chang, Li-Yuan; Mahalingam, Jayashri; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chiang, Jy-Ming; Hsu, Chen-Yu; Huang, Ching-Tai; Su, Wan-Ting; Chu, Yu-Yi; Lin, Chun-Yen

    2015-01-01

    TIM-3 functions to enforce CD8+ T cell exhaustion, a dysfunctional state associated with the tolerization of tumor microenvironment. Here we report apoptosis of IFN-γ competent TIM-3+ population of tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells in colon cancer. In humans suffering from colorectal cancer, TIM-3+ population is higher in cancer tissue-resident relative to peripheral blood CD8+ T cells. Both the TIM-3+ and TIM-3- cancer tissue-resident CD8+ T cells secrete IFN-γ of comparable levels, although apoptotic cells are more in TIM-3+ compared to TIM-3- population. In mouse CT26 colon tumor model, majority of tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells express TIM-3 and execute cytolysis function with higher effector cytokine secretion and apoptosis in TIM-3+ compared to TIM-3- population. The tumor cells secrete galectin-9, which increases apoptosis of tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells. Galectin-9/TIM-3 signaling blockade with anti-TIM-3 antibody reduces the apoptosis and in addition, inhibits tumor growth in mice. The blockade increases therapeutic efficacy of cyclophosphamide to treat tumor in mice as well. These results reveal a previously unexplored role of TIM-3 on tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells in vivo.

  6. Up-regulation of Tim-3 is associated with poor prognosis of patients with colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Encheng; Huang, Qing; Wang, Ji; Fang, Chengfeng; Yang, Leilei; Zhu, Min; Chen, Jianhui; Chen, Lihua; Dong, Milian

    2015-01-01

    Tim-3 (T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3), belonging to the member of the novel Tim family, has been confirmed that it plays a critical negative role in regulating the immune responses against viral infection and carcinoma. Recently, it has also been reported that the over-expression of Tim-3 is associated with poor prognosis in solid tumors. However, the role of Tim-3 in colorectal cancer remains largely unknown. In the current study, we aim to investigate the expression of Tim-3 in colorectal carcinoma and discuss the relationship between Tim-3 expression and colon cancer prognosis, thus speculating the possible role of Tim-3 in colon cancer progression. Colon cancer tissues and paired normal tissue were obtained from 201 patients with colon cancer for preparation of tissue microarray. Tim-3 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. The Tim-3 expression level was evaluated by q-RT-PCR, western blot and immunocytochemistry in four colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, HCT116, LoVo, SW620). Tim-3 was expressed in 92.5% tumor tissue samples and 86.5% corresponding normal tissue samples. Expression of Tim-3 was significantly higher in tumor tissues than in normal tissues (P < 0.0001). Tim-3 expression in colon cancer tissues is in correlation with colon cancer lymphatic metastasis and TNM (P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that Tim-3 expression could be a potential independent prognostic factor for colon cancer patients (P < 0.0001). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis result showed that patients with higher Tim-3 expression had a significantly shorter survival time than those with lower Tim-3 expression patients. Our results indicated that Tim-3 might participate in the tumorgenesis of colon cancer and Tim-3 expression might be a potential independent prognostic factor for patients with colorectal cancer.

  7. The immune receptor Tim-3 acts as a trafficker in a Tim-3/galectin-9 autocrine loop in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Rüegg, Laura; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Bardelli, Marco; Fruehwirth, Alexander; Varani, Luca; Berger, Steffen M; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2016-07-01

    The immune receptor Tim-3 is often highly expressed in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells where it acts as a growth factor and inflammatory receptor. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Tim-3 forms an autocrine loop with its natural ligand galectin-9 in human AML cells. However, the pathophysiological functions of Tim-3 in human AML cells remain unclear. Here, we report for the first time that Tim-3 is required for galectin-9 secretion in human AML cells. However, this effect is cell-type specific and was found so far to be applicable only to myeloid (and not, for example, lymphoid) leukemia cells. We concluded that AML cells might use Tim-3 as a trafficker for the secretion of galectin-9 which can then be possibly used to impair the anticancer activities of cytotoxic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells.

  8. The immune receptor Tim-3 acts as a trafficker in a Tim-3/galectin-9 autocrine loop in human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Rüegg, Laura; Gibbs, Bernhard F.; Bardelli, Marco; Fruehwirth, Alexander; Varani, Luca; Berger, Steffen M.; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The immune receptor Tim-3 is often highly expressed in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells where it acts as a growth factor and inflammatory receptor. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Tim-3 forms an autocrine loop with its natural ligand galectin-9 in human AML cells. However, the pathophysiological functions of Tim-3 in human AML cells remain unclear. Here, we report for the first time that Tim-3 is required for galectin-9 secretion in human AML cells. However, this effect is cell-type specific and was found so far to be applicable only to myeloid (and not, for example, lymphoid) leukemia cells. We concluded that AML cells might use Tim-3 as a trafficker for the secretion of galectin-9 which can then be possibly used to impair the anticancer activities of cytotoxic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells. PMID:27622049

  9. The immune receptor Tim-3 acts as a trafficker in a Tim-3/galectin-9 autocrine loop in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Rüegg, Laura; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Bardelli, Marco; Fruehwirth, Alexander; Varani, Luca; Berger, Steffen M; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2016-07-01

    The immune receptor Tim-3 is often highly expressed in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells where it acts as a growth factor and inflammatory receptor. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Tim-3 forms an autocrine loop with its natural ligand galectin-9 in human AML cells. However, the pathophysiological functions of Tim-3 in human AML cells remain unclear. Here, we report for the first time that Tim-3 is required for galectin-9 secretion in human AML cells. However, this effect is cell-type specific and was found so far to be applicable only to myeloid (and not, for example, lymphoid) leukemia cells. We concluded that AML cells might use Tim-3 as a trafficker for the secretion of galectin-9 which can then be possibly used to impair the anticancer activities of cytotoxic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells. PMID:27622049

  10. Tim-3 and Tim-4 as the potential targets for antitumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lin; Ruan, Zhihua

    2015-01-01

    Both Tim-3 and Tim-4 belong to the T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (Tim) gene family, which plays a critical role in immunoregulation. Tim-3 has been suggested as a negative regulator of anti-tumor immunity due to its function on inducing T cells exhaustion in cancer. In addition to its expression on exhausted T cells, Tim-3 also has been reported to up-regulate on nature killer (NK) cells and promote NK cells functionally exhausted in cancer. While Tim-3 selectively expression on most types of leukemia stem cells, it promotes the progression of acute myeloid leukemia. Recently, data from experimental models of tumor discovered that Tim-3 and Tim-4 up-regulation on tumor associated dendritic cells and macrophages attenuated the anti-tumor effects of cancer vaccines and chemotherapy. Moreover, co-blockage of Tim-3 and PD-1, Tim-3 and CD137, Tim-3 and carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) could enhance cell-mediated immunity in advanced tumor, and combined treatment with anti-Tim-3 and anti-Tim-4 mAbs further increase the efficacy of cancer vaccines. The therapeutic manipulation of TIM-3 and TIM-4 may provide a novel strategy to improve the clinical efficacy of cancer immunotherapy.

  11. Increased bovine Tim-3 and its ligand expressions during bovine leukemia virus infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The immunoinhibitory receptor T cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain-3 (Tim-3) and its ligand, galectin-9 (Gal-9), are involved in the immune evasion mechanisms for several pathogens causing chronic infections. However, there is no report concerning the role of Tim-3 in diseases of domestic animals. In this study, cDNA encoding for bovine Tim-3 and Gal-9 were cloned and sequenced, and their expression and role in immune reactivation were analyzed in bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-infected cattle. Predicted amino acid sequences of Tim-3 and Gal-9 shared high homologies with human and mouse homologues. Functional domains, including tyrosine kinase phosphorylation motif in the intracellular domain of Tim-3 were highly conserved among cattle and other species. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that bovine Tim-3 mRNA is mainly expressed in T cells such as CD4+ and CD8+ cells, while Gal-9 mRNA is mainly expressed in monocyte and T cells. Tim-3 mRNA expression in CD4+ and CD8+ cells was upregulated during disease progression of BLV infection. Interestingly, expression levels for Tim-3 and Gal-9 correlated positively with viral load in infected cattle. Furthermore, Tim-3 expression level closely correlated with up-regulation of IL-10 in infected cattle. The expression of IFN-γ and IL-2 mRNA was upregulated when PBMC from BLV-infected cattle were cultured with Cos-7 cells expressing Tim-3 to inhibit the Tim-3/Gal-9 pathway. Moreover, combined blockade of the Tim-3/Gal-9 and PD-1/PD-L1 pathways significantly promoted IFN-γ mRNA expression compared with blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway alone. These results suggest that Tim-3 is involved in the suppression of T cell function during BLV infection. PMID:22621175

  12. Tim-3: an emerging target in the cancer immunotherapy landscape.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ana C

    2014-05-01

    The cancer immunotherapy field has grown exponentially in the past few years, largely driven by the success of immune checkpoint blockade. Therapies targeting the immune checkpoint molecules CTLA-4 and PD-1 have achieved objective responses in melanoma, renal cancer, and lung cancer; however, a large number of patients are still suffering with these cancers that are not benefiting from these therapies. Moreover, several cancers have proved to be largely refractory to therapies that target CTLA-4 and PD-1. This has catalyzed interest in targeting novel immune checkpoint receptors with the goal of realizing the full potential of checkpoint blockade for treating cancer. In this regard, the immune checkpoint receptor Tim-3 exhibits several unique features that make it an intriguing candidate for the next wave of therapies that target immune checkpoints in cancer. PMID:24795351

  13. Tim-3 identifies exhausted follicular helper T cells in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shiguang; Lin, Jun; Qiao, Guangdong; Wang, Xingmiao; Xu, Yanping

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in women worldwide. Although a series of treatment options have improved the overall 5-year survival rate to 90%, individual responses still vary from patient to patient. New evidence suggested that the infiltration of CXCL13-expressing CD4(+) follicular helper cells (Tfh) in breast tumor predicted better survival. Here, we examined the regulation of Tfh function in breast cancer patients in depth. We found that the frequencies of circulating Tfh cells were not altered in breast cancer patients compared to healthy controls. However, the expression of PD-1 and Tim-3 in Tfh cells was significantly elevated in breast cancer patients. Interestingly, we observed a preferential upregulation of PD-1 in Tim-3(+) Tfh cells compared to Tim-3(-) Tfh cells. Coexpression of PD-1 and Tim-3 is typically a hallmark of functional exhaustion in chronic virus infections and tumor. To examine whether Tim-3(+) identifies exhausted Tfh cells, we stimulated Tfh cells with anti-CD3/CD28, and found that Tim-3(+) T cells expressed reduced frequencies of chemokine CXCL13 and cytokine interleukin 21 (IL-21), and contained fewer proliferating cells, than Tim-3(-) Tfh cells. Compared to those cocultured with Tim-3(-) Tfh cells, naive B cells cocultured with Tim-3(+) Tfh cells resulted in significantly less IgM, IgG and IgA production after 12 day incubation, demonstrating a reduction in Tim-3(+) Tfh-mediated B cell help. Moreover, the frequencies of Tim-3(+) Tfh cells in resected breast tumor were further upregulated than autologous blood, suggesting a participation of Tim-3(+) Tfh cells in tumor physiology. Overall, the data presented here provided new insight in the regulation of Tfh cells in breast cancer patients.

  14. Phosphotyrosine-dependent coupling of Tim-3 to T-cell receptor signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Judong; Su, Ee Wern; Zhu, Chen; Hainline, Sarah; Phuah, Jiayao; Moroco, Jamie A; Smithgall, Thomas E; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Kane, Lawrence P

    2011-10-01

    The transmembrane protein Tim-3 has been shown to negatively regulate T-cell-dependent immune responses and was recently demonstrated to be associated with the phenomenon of immune exhaustion, which can occur as a consequence of chronic viral infection. Unlike other negative regulators of T-cell function (e.g., PD-1), Tim-3 does not contain any obvious inhibitory signaling motifs. We have found that ectopic expression of Tim-3 in T cells leads to enhancement of T-cell receptor (TCR)-dependent signaling pathways, which was observed at the level of transcriptional reporters and endogenous cytokine production. We have exploited this observation to dissect what elements within the cytoplasmic tail of Tim-3 are required for coupling to downstream signaling pathways. Here we have demonstrated that two of the more membrane-proximal cytoplasmic tail tyrosines are required for Tim-3 signaling to T-cell activation pathways in a redundant fashion. Furthermore, we show that Tim-3 can directly bind to the Src family tyrosine kinase Fyn and the p85 phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) adaptor. Thus, at least under conditions of short-term stimulation, Tim-3 can augment T-cell activation, although this effect can be blocked by the inclusion of an agonistic antibody to Tim-3. These findings should help further the study of Tim-3 function in other physiological settings, such as those that lead to immune exhaustion.

  15. Tim-3 enhances FcεRI-proximal signaling to modulate mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Phong, Binh L; Avery, Lyndsay; Sumpter, Tina L; Gorman, Jacob V; Watkins, Simon C; Colgan, John D; Kane, Lawrence P

    2015-12-14

    T cell (or transmembrane) immunoglobulin and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3) has attracted significant attention as a novel immune checkpoint receptor (ICR) on chronically stimulated, often dysfunctional, T cells. Antibodies to Tim-3 can enhance antiviral and antitumor immune responses. Tim-3 is also constitutively expressed by mast cells, NK cells and specific subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells. There is ample evidence for a positive role for Tim-3 in these latter cell types, which is at odds with the model of Tim-3 as an inhibitory molecule on T cells. At this point, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which Tim-3 regulates the function of T cells or other cell types. We have focused on defining the effects of Tim-3 ligation on mast cell activation, as these cells constitutively express Tim-3 and are activated through an ITAM-containing receptor for IgE (FcεRI), using signaling pathways analogous to those in T cells. Using a variety of gain- and loss-of-function approaches, we find that Tim-3 acts at a receptor-proximal point to enhance Lyn kinase-dependent signaling pathways that modulate both immediate-phase degranulation and late-phase cytokine production downstream of FcεRI ligation.

  16. Tim-3 promotes intestinal homeostasis in DSS colitis by inhibiting M1 polarization of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xingwei; Yu, Jiahui; Shi, Qingzhu; Xiao, Yan; Wang, Wei; Chen, Guojiang; Zhao, Zhi; Wang, Renxi; Xiao, He; Hou, Chunmei; Feng, Jiannan; Ma, Yuanfang; Shen, Beifen; Wang, Lili; Li, Yan; Han, Gencheng

    2015-10-01

    Tim-3 is involved in the physiopathology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we demonstrated that, in mouse with DSS colitis, Tim-3 inhibited the polarization of pathogenic pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages, while Tim-3 downregulation or blockade resulted in an increased M1 response. Adoptive transfer of Tim-3-silenced macrophages worsened DSS colitis and enhanced inflammation, while Tim-3 overexpression attenuated DSS colitis by decreasing the M1 macrophage response. Co-culture of Tim-3-overexpressing macrophages with intestinal lymphocytes decreased the pro-inflammatory response. Tim-3 shaped intestinal macrophage polarization may be TLR-4 dependent since Tim-3 blockade failed to exacerbate colitis or increase M1 macrophage response in the TLR-4 KO model. Finally, Tim-3 signaling inhibited phosphorylation of IRF3, a TLR-4 downstream transcriptional factor regulating macrophage polarization. A better understanding of this pathway may shed new light on colitis pathogenesis and result in a new therapeutic strategy.

  17. Tim-3 enhances FcεRI-proximal signaling to modulate mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Phong, Binh L.; Avery, Lyndsay; Sumpter, Tina L.; Gorman, Jacob V.; Watkins, Simon C.; Colgan, John D.

    2015-01-01

    T cell (or transmembrane) immunoglobulin and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3) has attracted significant attention as a novel immune checkpoint receptor (ICR) on chronically stimulated, often dysfunctional, T cells. Antibodies to Tim-3 can enhance antiviral and antitumor immune responses. Tim-3 is also constitutively expressed by mast cells, NK cells and specific subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells. There is ample evidence for a positive role for Tim-3 in these latter cell types, which is at odds with the model of Tim-3 as an inhibitory molecule on T cells. At this point, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which Tim-3 regulates the function of T cells or other cell types. We have focused on defining the effects of Tim-3 ligation on mast cell activation, as these cells constitutively express Tim-3 and are activated through an ITAM-containing receptor for IgE (FcεRI), using signaling pathways analogous to those in T cells. Using a variety of gain- and loss-of-function approaches, we find that Tim-3 acts at a receptor-proximal point to enhance Lyn kinase-dependent signaling pathways that modulate both immediate-phase degranulation and late-phase cytokine production downstream of FcεRI ligation. PMID:26598760

  18. Microglia activity modulated by T cell Ig and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-wei; Zhu, Xin-li; Qin, Li-ming; Qian, Hai-jun; Wang, Yiner

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are the main innate immune cells in the central nervous system that are actively involved in maintaining brain homeostasis and diseases. T cell Ig and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3) plays critical roles in both the adaptive and the innate immune system and is an emerging therapeutic target for treatment of various disorders. In the brain Tim-3 is specifically expressed on microglia but its functional role is unclear. Here, we showed that Tim-3 was up-regulated on microglia by ATP or LPS stimulation. Tim-3 activation with antibodies increased microglia expression of TGF-β, TNF-α and IL-1β. Blocking of Tim-3 with antibodies decreased the microglial phagocytosis of apoptotic neurons. Tim-3 blocking alleviated the detrimental effect of microglia on neurons and promoted NG2 cell differentiation in co-cultures. Finally, MAPKs namely ERK1/2 and JNK proteins were phosphorylated upon Tim-3 activation in microglia. Data indicated that Tim-3 modulates microglia activity and regulates the interaction of microglia-neural cells.

  19. A highly conserved tyrosine of Tim-3 is phosphorylated upon stimulation by its ligand galectin-9

    SciTech Connect

    Weyer, Philipp S. van de; Muehlfeit, Michael; Klose, Christoph; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Walz, Gerd; Kuehn, E. Wolfgang . E-mail: wolfgang.kuehn@uniklinik-freiburg.de

    2006-12-15

    Tim-3 is a member of the TIM family of proteins (T-cell immunoglobulin mucin) involved in the regulation of CD4+ T-cells. Tim-3 is a T{sub H}1-specific type 1 membrane protein and regulates T{sub H}1 proliferation and the development of tolerance. Binding of galectin-9 to the extracellular domain of Tim-3 results in apoptosis of T{sub H}1 cells, but the intracellular pathways involved in the regulatory function of Tim-3 are unknown. Unlike Tim-1, which is expressed in renal epithelia and cancer, Tim-3 has not been described in cells other than neuronal or T-cells. Using RT-PCR we demonstrate that Tim-3 is expressed in malignant and non-malignant epithelial tissues. We have cloned Tim-3 from an immortalized liver cell carcinoma line and identified a highly conserved tyrosine in the intracellular tail of Tim-3 (Y265). We demonstrate that Y265 is specifically phosphorylated in vivo by the interleukin inducible T cell kinase (ITK), a kinase which is located in close proximity of the TIM genes on the allergy susceptibility locus 5q33.3. Stimulation of Tim-3 by its ligand galectin-9 results in increased phosphorylation of Y265, suggesting that this tyrosine residue plays an important role in downstream signalling events regulating T-cell fate. Given the role of TIM proteins in autoimmunity and cancer, the conserved SH2 binding domain surrounding Y265 could represent a possible target site for pharmacological intervention.

  20. Circulating and tumor-infiltrating Tim-3 in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Benling; Yuan, Long; Gao, Quanli; Yuan, Peng; Zhao, Peng; Yuan, Huijuan; Fan, Huijie; Li, Tiepeng; Qin, Peng; Han, Lu; Fang, Weijia; Suo, Zhenhe

    2015-08-21

    T-cell exhaustion represents a progressive loss of T-cell function. The inhibitory receptor PD-1 is known to negatively regulate CD8+ T cell responses directed against tumor antigen, but the blockades of PD-1 pathway didn't show the objective responses in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Thus, further exploring the molecular mechanism responsible for inducing T-cell dysfunction in CRC patients may reveal effective strategies for immune therapy. This study aims to characterize co-inhibitory receptors on T cells in CRC patients to identify novel targets for immunotherapy. In this study, peripheral blood samples from 20 healthy controls and 54 consented CRC patients, and tumor and matched paraneoplastic tissues from 7 patients with advanced CRC, subjected to multicolor flow cytometric analysis of the expression of PD-1 and Tim-3 receptors on CD8+ T cells. It was found that CRC patients presented with significantly higher levels of circulating Tim-3+PD-1+CD8+ T cells compared to the healthy controls (medians of 3.12% and 1.99%, respectively, p = 0.0403). A similar increase of Tim-3+PD-1+CD8+ T cells was also observed in the tumor tissues compared to paraneoplastic tussues. Tim-3+PD-1+CD8+ T cells in tumor tissues produced even less cytokine than that in paraneoplastic tissues. Functional ex vivo experiments showed that Tim-3+PD-1+CD8+ T cells produced significantly less IFN-γ than Tim-3-PD-1-CD8+ T cells, followed by Tim-3+PD-1-CD8+ T cells, and Tim-3-PD-1+CD8+ T cells, indicating a stronger inhibition of IFN-γ production of Tim-3+CD8+ T cells . It is also found in this study that Tim-3+PD-1+CD8+ T cell increase in circulation was correlated with clinical cancer stage but not histologic grade and serum concentrations of cancer biomarker CEA. Our results indicate that upregulation of the inhibitory receptor Tim-3 may restrict T cell responses in CRC patients, and therefore blockage of Tim-3 and thus restoring T cell responses may be a potential therapeutic

  1. Expression of human T cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin-3 (TIM-3) and TIM-3 ligands in peripheral blood from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qingqing; Qian, Qihong; Zhao, Zuotao; Fang, Fumin; Hu, Xiaohan; An, Jingnan; Wu, Jian; Liu, Cuiping

    2016-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic systemic autoimmune disease. The T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM) family is associated with autoimmune diseases, but its level of expression in the immune cells of patients with SLE is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to examine whether TIM-3 and Galectin-9 (Gal-9) contribute to the pathogenesis of SLE. In total, 30 patients with SLE and 30 healthy controls were recruited, and their levels of TIM-3 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were examined via flow cytometry. Meanwhile, the levels of Gal-9 expression in serum and in PBMCs were measured via an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit and immunofluorescence staining, respectively. The relation between the level of TIM-3 or Gal-9 expression and the SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) was also studied. Finally, the function of the TIM-3 and Gal-9 pathway in the pathogenesis of SLE was explored. Our results showed that the levels of expression of TIM-3 and Gal-9 on CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, CD56(+) T cells and in serum in patients with SLE were significantly higher than those of healthy controls. We found that the level of Gal-9 expression was significantly higher in both serum and PMBCs of patients with SLE than in healthy controls. The up-regulation of TIM-3 and Gal-9 expression in patients with SLE was closely related to the SLEDAI scores. In addition, Gal-9 blocking antibody significantly inhibited CD3-stimulated PBMC proliferation and Th1-derived cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α), Th2-derived cytokines (IL-4, IL-10), a Th17-derived cytokine (IL-17A), and release of a pro-inflammatory factor (IL-6) in patients with SLE. The results suggest that increased expression of TIM-3 and Gal-9 may be a biomarker for SLE diagnosis and that the TIM-3 pathway may be a target for SLE treatment.

  2. Tim-3 blocking rescue macrophage and T cell function against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in HIV+ patients

    PubMed Central

    Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Pérez-Patrigeón, Santiago; Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Addo, Marylyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (Tim) 3 and programmed death 1 (PD-1) are co-inhibitory receptors involved in the so-called T cell exhaustion, and in vivo blockade of these molecules restores T cell dysfunction. High expression of Tim-3 and PD-1 is induced after chronic antigen-specific stimulation of T cells during HIV infection. We have previously demonstrated that the interaction of Tim-3 with its ligand galectin-9 induces macrophage activation and killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our aim in this study was to analyze the Tim-3 expression profile before and after six months of antiretroviral therapy and the impact of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking on immunity against M. tuberculosis. Materials and methods HIV+ patients naïve to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) were followed up for six months. Peripheral immune-cell phenotype (CD38/HLA-DR/galectin-9/Tim-3 and PD-1) was assessed by flow cytometry. Supernatants were analyzed with a multiplex cytokine detection system (human Th1/Th2 cytokine Cytometric Bead Array) by flow cytometry. Control of bacterial growth was evaluated by using an in vitro experimental model in which virulent M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages were cultured with T cells in the presence or absence of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking antibodies. Interleukin-1 beta treatment of infected macrophages was evaluated by enumerating colony-forming units. Results We showed that HIV+ patients had an increased expression of Tim-3 in T cells and were able to control bacterial growth before ART administration. By blocking Tim-3 and PD-1, macrophages and T cells recovered their functionality and had a higher ability to control bacterial growth; this result was partially dependent on the restitution of cytokine production. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that increased Tim-3 expression can limit the ability of the immune system to control the infection of intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. The use of ART and the in vitro

  3. Tim-3 pathway affects NK cell impairment in patients with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Hou, Hongyan; Wu, Shiji; Tang, Qing; Huang, Min; Yin, Botao; Huang, Jing; Liu, Weiyong; Mao, Lie; Lu, Yanfang; Sun, Ziyong

    2015-12-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) patients show impaired NK cell function, and the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. In this study, we confirmed the decrease in activation, cytokine secretion, and degranulation potential of NK cells in active TB patients. We further investigated whether coinhibitory receptor Tim-3 was involved with impairment of NK cells. Our results revealed that the expression of Tim-3 on NK cells was increased in active TB patients. Tim-3 expression was inversely correlated with IL-12-stimualted IFN-γ production. Moreover, blocking the Tim-3 pathway restored IFN-γ secretion and degranulation of NK cells. Blocking this pathway also increased NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 target cells, and improved the ability of NK cells to control Mtb growth in monocyte-derived macrophages. The Tim-3 expression on NK cells was also observed to be significantly decreased in TB patients post-treatment. In this study, we have identified that Tim-3 is involved with NK cell impairment in TB patients.

  4. Expression of Tim-3 in gastric cancer tissue and its relationship with prognosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gui; Li, Min; Wu, Jun; Ji, Mei; Fang, Cheng; Shi, Hongbing; Zhu, Danxia; Chen, Lujun; Zhao, Jiemin; Shi, Liangrong; Xu, Bin; Zheng, Xiao; Wu, Changping; Jiang, Jingting

    2015-01-01

    As a negative regulatory molecule, T-cell immunoglobulin-and mucin domain-3 (Tim-3) plays a crucial role in the tumor immunological tolerance. In the present study, we aimed to determine the Tim-3 expression in gastric cancer tissue and its relationship with clinicopathological parameters and prognosis. The Tim-3 expression was assessed in 52 gastric cancer specimens and 15 gastritis tissues by flow cytometry, and gastritis tissues served as the control. As a result, we found that the Tim-3 expressions on CD4(+)T cells and CD8(+)T cells in gastric cancer tissue was significantly higher than those in gastritis tissue (P=0.022, P=0.047, respectively). The median expression level of Tim-3 on CD4(+)T cells were significantly correlated with clinicopathological parameters, such as tumor size, lymph node metastasis, the depth of tumor invasion and TNM staging (P=0.042, P=0.026, P=0.001, P=0.003, respectively), while it was not correlated with sex, age and histological subtype (all P>0.05). In CD8(+)T cells, the Tim-3 expression was relevant to tumor invasion and TNM staging (P=0.035, P=0.017, respectively), while it was irrelevant to other clinicopathological parameters (all P>0.05). Additionally, Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that the median overall survival time of patients with lower Tim-3 expression was greater than that of patients with higher Tim-3 expression in CD4(+)T cells and CD8(+)T cells (χ(2)=18.036, P<0.001 and χ(2)=18.036, P<0.001, respectively). Moreover, the multivariate analysis revealed that the Tim-3 expression and TNM stage were independent prognostic factors for gastric cancer patients (P=0.029, P=0.043 and P=0.003, respectively). These results suggest that Tim-3 played an important role in the development and progression of gastric cancer, and it could be used as an independent prognostic factor for gastric cancer patients.

  5. Role of Tim-3 in hepatitis B virus infection: An overview.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Gao, Li-Fen; Liang, Xiao-Hong; Ma, Chun-Hong

    2016-02-21

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has received increasing public attention. HBV is the prototypical member of hepadnaviruses, which naturally infect only humans and great apes and induce the acute and persistent chronic infection of hepatocytes. A large body of evidence has demonstrated that dysfunction of the host anti-viral immune response is responsible for persistent HBV replication, unresolved inflammation and disease progression. Many regulatory factors are involved in immune dysfunction. Among these, T cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain-3 (Tim-3), one of the immune checkpoint proteins, has attracted increasing attention due to its critical role in regulating both adaptive and innate immune cells. In chronic HBV infection, Tim-3 expression is elevated in many types of immune cells, such as T helper cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, macrophages and natural killer cells. Tim-3 over-expression is often accompanied by impaired function of the above-mentioned immunocytes, and Tim-3 inhibition can at least partially rescue impaired immune function and thus promote viral clearance. A better understanding of the regulatory role of Tim-3 in host immunity during HBV infection will shed new light on the mechanisms of HBV-related liver disease and suggest new therapeutic methods for intervention.

  6. Role of Tim-3 in hepatitis B virus infection: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Gao, Li-Fen; Liang, Xiao-Hong; Ma, Chun-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has received increasing public attention. HBV is the prototypical member of hepadnaviruses, which naturally infect only humans and great apes and induce the acute and persistent chronic infection of hepatocytes. A large body of evidence has demonstrated that dysfunction of the host anti-viral immune response is responsible for persistent HBV replication, unresolved inflammation and disease progression. Many regulatory factors are involved in immune dysfunction. Among these, T cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain-3 (Tim-3), one of the immune checkpoint proteins, has attracted increasing attention due to its critical role in regulating both adaptive and innate immune cells. In chronic HBV infection, Tim-3 expression is elevated in many types of immune cells, such as T helper cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, macrophages and natural killer cells. Tim-3 over-expression is often accompanied by impaired function of the above-mentioned immunocytes, and Tim-3 inhibition can at least partially rescue impaired immune function and thus promote viral clearance. A better understanding of the regulatory role of Tim-3 in host immunity during HBV infection will shed new light on the mechanisms of HBV-related liver disease and suggest new therapeutic methods for intervention. PMID:26900291

  7. Too much of a good thing? Tim-3 and TCR signaling in T cell exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Robert L; Lu, Binfeng; Kane, Lawrence P

    2014-08-15

    T cell exhaustion is thought to be a natural mechanism for limiting immune pathology, although it may be desirable to circumvent this mechanism to help eliminate viral reservoirs or tumors. Although there are no definitive markers, a fingerprint for exhausted T cells has been described that includes the transmembrane proteins PD-1, LAG3, and Tim-3. However, apart from the recruitment of tyrosine phosphatases to PD-1, little is known about the biochemical mechanisms by which these proteins contribute to the development or maintenance of exhaustion. Tim-3 contains no known motifs for the recruitment of inhibitory phosphatases, but it may actually increase signaling downstream of TCR/CD3, at least under acute conditions. Other studies showed that T cell exhaustion results from chronic stimulation that extends the effector phase of T cell activation, at the expense of T cell memory. We suggest that Tim-3 may contribute to T cell exhaustion by enhancing TCR-signaling pathways.

  8. Upregulated Tim-3/galectin-9 expressions in acute lung injury in a murine malarial model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinfeng; Xiao, Siyu; Huang, Shiguang; Pei, Fuquan; Lu, Fangli

    2016-02-01

    Malaria is the most relevant parasitic disease worldwide, and severe malaria is characterized by cerebral edema, acute lung injury (ALI), and multiple organ dysfunctions; however, the mechanisms of lung damage need to be better clarified. In this study, we used Kunming outbred mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbANKA) to elucidate the profiles of T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-3 (Tim-3) and its ligand galecin-9 (Gal-9) in the development of ALI. Mice were injected intraperitoneally with 10(6) PbANKA-infected red blood cells. The lungs and mediastinal lymph nodes (MLNs) were harvested at days 5, 10, 15, and 20 post infections (p.i.). The grade of lung injury was histopathologically evaluated. Tim-3- and Gal-9-positive cells in the lungs and MLNs were stained by immunohistochemistry, and the messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of Tim-3, Gal-9, and related cytokines were assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) analyses were performed from days 18 to 20 p.i. The results showed that the pathological severities in the lungs were increased with times and the total protein level in the BALFs was significantly elevated in PbANKA-infected mice. The numbers of Gal-9(+) and Tim-3(+) cells in the lungs were significantly increased, and the mRNA levels of both Gal-9 and Tim-3 in the lungs and MLNs were over-expressed in PbANKA-infected mice. In conclusion, our data suggested that Tim-3/Gal-9 may play a role in PbANKA-induced ALI. PMID:26494364

  9. Increased Gal-9 and Tim-3 expressions during liver damage in a murine malarial model.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Siyu; Liu, Jinfeng; Huang, Shiguang; Lu, Fangli

    2016-02-01

    Malaria has been one of the most devastating tropical parasite infectious diseases popular around the world. Severe malaria is characterized by multiple organ dysfunctions, especially liver damage. However, the mechanisms of malarial liver injury remain to be better clarified. In this study, Kunming mice inoculated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 10(6) Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbANKA)-infected red blood cells (iRBCs) were investigated at days 5, 10, 15, and 20 post-infection (p.i.) to elucidate the profiles of T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-3 (Tim-3) and its ligand galecin-9 (Gal-9) in the development of liver injury. The histopathology of livers and spleens from PbANKA-infected mice were observed, the parasite burdens of the livers and spleens using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), Tim-3- and Gal-9-positive cells in the livers and spleens using immunohistochemical staining, and the mRNA levels of Tim-3, Gal-9, and cytokines in both the livers and spleens using qRT-PCR were examined. Our results showed that parasite burdens in the livers and spleens were significantly increased with time after PbANKA infection. Histological scores of both the liver and spleen tissues were significantly increased with time; the numbers of Tim-3- and Gal-9-positive cells were significantly increased in both the livers and spleens using immunohistochemical staining, and the mRNA levels of Tim-3 and Gal-9 in the livers and spleens were also significantly increased after infection. Our data suggests that the increase of Tim-3/Gal-9 expressions may play an important role in the liver damage during P. berghei infection.

  10. Upregulated Tim-3/galectin-9 expressions in acute lung injury in a murine malarial model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinfeng; Xiao, Siyu; Huang, Shiguang; Pei, Fuquan; Lu, Fangli

    2016-02-01

    Malaria is the most relevant parasitic disease worldwide, and severe malaria is characterized by cerebral edema, acute lung injury (ALI), and multiple organ dysfunctions; however, the mechanisms of lung damage need to be better clarified. In this study, we used Kunming outbred mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbANKA) to elucidate the profiles of T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-3 (Tim-3) and its ligand galecin-9 (Gal-9) in the development of ALI. Mice were injected intraperitoneally with 10(6) PbANKA-infected red blood cells. The lungs and mediastinal lymph nodes (MLNs) were harvested at days 5, 10, 15, and 20 post infections (p.i.). The grade of lung injury was histopathologically evaluated. Tim-3- and Gal-9-positive cells in the lungs and MLNs were stained by immunohistochemistry, and the messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of Tim-3, Gal-9, and related cytokines were assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) analyses were performed from days 18 to 20 p.i. The results showed that the pathological severities in the lungs were increased with times and the total protein level in the BALFs was significantly elevated in PbANKA-infected mice. The numbers of Gal-9(+) and Tim-3(+) cells in the lungs were significantly increased, and the mRNA levels of both Gal-9 and Tim-3 in the lungs and MLNs were over-expressed in PbANKA-infected mice. In conclusion, our data suggested that Tim-3/Gal-9 may play a role in PbANKA-induced ALI.

  11. Decreased TIM-3 mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from nephropathy patients.

    PubMed

    Cai, X Z; Liu, N; Qiao, Y; Du, S Y; Chen, Y; Chen, D; Yu, S; Jiang, Y

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that TIM-1 and TIM-3 in-fluence chronic autoimmune diseases, and their expression levels in immune cells from nephritic patients are still unknown. Real-time transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to deter-mine expression levels of TIM-1 and TIM-3 mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 36 patients with minimal change glo-merulopathy (MCG), 65 patients with lupus nephritis (LN), 78 patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN), 55 patients with membranous nephropa-thy (MN), 22 patients with crescentic glomerulonephritis (CGN), 26 patients with anaphylactoid purpura nephritis (APN), and 63 healthy controls. TIM-3 mRNA expression significantly decreased in PBMCs from nephritic patients (LN, P < 0.0001; MCG, P < 0.0001; MN, P = 0.0031; CGN, P = 0.0464; IgAN, P = 0.0002; APN, P = 0.0392) com-pared with healthy controls. In contrast, there was no significant differ-ence in TIM-1 mRNA expression between the patients and the healthy controls. Our results suggest that insufficient expression of TIM-3 mRNA may be involved in the pathogenesis of nephropathy.

  12. Identification of TIM3 2′-fluoro oligonucleotide aptamer by HT-SELEX for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Soldevilla, Mario M.; Villanueva, Helena; Mancheño, Uxua; Bendandi, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    TIM3 belongs to a family of receptors that are involved in T-cell exhaustion and Treg functions. The development of new therapeutic agents to block this type of receptors is opening a new avenue in cancer immunotherapy. There are currently several clinical trials ongoing to combine different immune-checkpoint blockades to improve the outcome of cancer patients. Among these combinations we should underline PD1:PDL1 axis and TIM3 blockade, which have shown very promising results in preclinical settings. Most of these types of therapeutic agents are protein cell-derived products, which, although broadly used in clinical settings, are still subject to important limitations. In this work we identify by HT-SELEX TIM3 non-antigenic oligonucleotide aptamers (TIM3Apt) that bind with high affinity and specificity to the extracellular motives of TIM3 on the cell surface. The TIM3Apt1 in its monomeric form displays a potent antagonist capacity on TIM3-expressing lymphocytes, determining the increase of IFN-γ secretion. In colon carcinoma tumor-bearing mice, the combinatorial treatment of TIM3Apt1 and PDL1-antibody blockade is synergistic with a remarkable antitumor effect. Immunotherapeutic aptamers could represent an attractive alternative to monoclonal antibodies, as they exhibit important advantages; namely, lower antigenicity, being chemically synthesized agents with a lower price of manufacture, providing higher malleability, and antidote availability. PMID:26683225

  13. Differential expression and biochemical activity of the immune receptor Tim-3 in healthy and malignant human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Bardelli, Marco; Varani, Luca; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2015-10-20

    The T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (Tim-3) is a plasma membrane-associated receptor which is involved in a variety of biological responses in human immune cells. It is highly expressed in most acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells and therefore may serve as a possible target for AML therapy. However, its biochemical activities in primary human AML cells remain unclear. We therefore analysed the total expression and surface presence of the Tim-3 receptor in primary human AML blasts and healthy primary human leukocytes isolated from human blood. We found that Tim-3 expression was significantly higher in primary AML cells compared to primary healthy leukocytes. Tim-3 receptor molecules were distributed largely on the surface of primary AML cells, whereas in healthy leukocytes Tim-3 protein was mainly expressed intracellularly. In primary human AML blasts, both Tim-3 agonistic antibody and galectin-9 (a Tim-3 natural ligand) significantly upregulated mTOR pathway activity. This was in line with increased accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) and secretion of VEGF and TNF-α. Similar results were obtained in primary human healthy leukocytes. Importantly, in both types of primary cells, Tim-3-mediated effects were compared with those induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and stem cell factor (SCF). Tim-3 induced comparatively moderate responses in both AML cells and healthy leukocytes. However, Tim-3, like LPS, mediated the release of both TNF-α and VEGF, while SCF induced mostly VEGF secretion and did not upregulate TNF-α release.

  14. TIM-3 Genetic Variations Affect Susceptibility to Osteoarthritis by Interfering with Interferon Gamma in CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shufeng; Ren, Yanjun; Peng, Dayong; Yuan, Zhen; Shan, Shiying; Sun, Huaqiang; Yan, Xinfeng; Xiao, Hong; Li, Guang; Song, Haihan

    2015-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis, in which T cell responses and cytokines may play critical roles in the development of the disease. TIM-3 may affect immune responses and is correlated with decreased expression of interferon gamma (INF-γ) in CD4+ T cells. In the current study, we investigated the association between polymorphisms in the TIM-3 gene and susceptibility to OA. Two polymorphisms in TIM-3, -574G/T and +4259T/G polymorphisms, were identified in OA cases and healthy donors by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Data revealed that the prevalence of TIM-3 +4259T/G genotype was significantly elevated in OA patients than in the healthy donors after adjustment (Odds ratio [OR] = 2.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.32-5.11, P < 0.001). Similarly, the TIM-3 +4259G allele presented a positive association with the risk of OA after adjustment (OR = 2.58, 95% CI 1.29-4.82, P = 0.003). The TIM-3 -574G/T polymorphism did not show any correlation with the disease. We further examined whether the two TIM-3 polymorphisms could affect INF-γ expression in CD4+ T cells. Data revealed that subjects carrying polymorphic +4259TG genotype had significantly higher mRNA and protein levels of INF-γ in CD4+ T cells compared to wild-type GG genotype (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01). These results indicated that TIM-3 polymorphism is associated with increased susceptibility to OA possibly by upregulating INF-γ expression in CD4+ T cells.

  15. Downregulation of IL-10 secretion by Treg cells in osteoarthritis is associated with a reduction in Tim-3 expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Shufeng; Wan, Jinliang; Anderson, William; Sun, Huaqiang; Zhang, Hu; Peng, Xianbo; Yu, Zhaolong; Wang, Teng; Yan, Xinfeng; Smith, Wendy

    2016-04-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability in the knee. Though traditionally thought a mechanical wear-and-tear disease, in recent years, knee OA as a low-grade, chronic inflammatory disease has been increasingly recognized. In this study, we examined the Treg responses in non-obese knee OA patients at different stages. Significantly elevated frequencies of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs were found in OA patients, while on the other hand, lower IL-10 secretion from Tregs in OA patients was observed. Importantly, this decrease in IL-10 was associated with reduced Tim-3 expression on Tregs. Although both Tim-3(-) and Tim3(+) Tregs could secrete IL-10, the majority of IL-10 was observed in Tim-3(+) Tregs. Reduction of Tim-3(+) Tregs in OA patients resulted in less IL-10-producing Tregs. Interestingly, the OA patients in more advanced stages showed further reductions in IL-10 and Tim-3 expression. In conclusion, our results revealed an immunoregulatory disorder in OA independent of obesity, and demonstrated a potential mechanism in establishing the proinflammatory status of OA patients.

  16. Cis Association of Galectin-9 with Tim-3 Differentially Regulates IL-12/IL-23 Expressions in Monocytes via TLR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cheng J.; Li, Guang Y.; Cheng, Yong Q.; Wang, Jia M.; Ying, Ruo S.; Shi, Lei; Wu, Xiao Y.; Niki, Toshiro; Hirashima, Mitsumi; Li, Chuan F.; Moorman, Jonathan P.; Yao, Zhi Q.

    2013-01-01

    Human monocytes/macrophages (M/MФ) of the innate immunity sense and respond to microbial products via specific receptor coupling with stimulatory (such as TLR) and inhibitory (such as Tim-3) receptors. Current models imply that Tim-3 expression on M/MØ can deliver negative signaling to TLR-mediated IL-12 expression through trans association with its ligand Galectin-9 (Gal-9) presented by other cells. However, Gal-9 is also expressed within M/MØ, and the effect of intracellular Gal-9 on Tim-3 activities and inflammatory responses in the same M/MØ remains unknown. In this study, our data suggest that Tim-3 and IL-12/IL-23 gene transcriptions are regulated by enhanced or silenced Gal-9 expression within monocytes through synergizing with TLR signaling. Additionally, TLR activation facilitates Gal-9/Tim-3 cis association within the same M/MØ to differentially regulate IL-12/IL-23 expressions through STAT-3 phosphorylation. These results reveal a ligand (Gal-9) compartment-dependent regulatory effect on receptor (Tim-3) activities and inflammatory responses via TLR pathways—a novel mechanism underlying cellular responses to external or internal cues. PMID:23967307

  17. Negative CD4 + TIM-3 signaling confers resistance against cold preservation damage in mouse liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Ji, H; Zhang, Y; Shen, X-D; Gao, F; Nguyen, T T; Shang, X; Lee, N; Busuttil, R W; Kupiec-Weglinski, J W

    2015-04-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), an innate immunity-driven local inflammation, remains the major problem in clinical organ transplantation. T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM-3)-Galectin-9 (Gal-9) signaling regulates CD4+ Th1 immune responses. Here, we explored TIM-3-Gal-9 function in a clinically relevant murine model of hepatic cold storage and orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). C57BL/6 livers, preserved for 20 h at 4°C in UW solution, were transplanted to syngeneic mouse recipients. Up-regulation of TIM-3 on OLT-infiltrating activated CD4+ T cells was observed in the early IRI phase (1 h). By 6 h of reperfusion, OLTs in recipients treated with a blocking anti-TIM-3 Ab were characterized by: (1) enhanced hepatocellular damage (sALT levels, liver Suzuki's histological score); (2) polarized cell infiltrate towards Th1/Th17-type phenotype; (3) depressed T cell exhaustion markers (PD-1, LAG3); and (4) elevated neutrophil and macrophage infiltration/activation. In parallel studies, adoptive transfer of CD4+ T cells from naïve WT, but not from TIM-3 Tg donors, readily recreated OLT damage in otherwise IR-resistant RAG(-/-) test recipients. Furthermore, pre-treatment of mice with rGal-9 promoted hepatoprotection against preservation-association liver damage, accompanied by enhanced TIM-3 expression in OLTs. Thus, CD4+ T cell-dependent "negative" TIM-3 costimulation is essential for hepatic homeostasis and resistance against IR stress in OLTs.

  18. Tim-3 protects decidual stromal cells from toll-like receptor-mediated apoptosis and inflammatory reactions and promotes Th2 bias at the maternal-fetal interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, SongCun; Cao, ChunMei; Piao, HaiLan; Li, YanHong; Tao, Yu; Zhang, XiaoMing; Zhang, Di; Sun, Chan; Zhu, Rui; Wang, Yan; Yuan, MinMin; Li, DaJin; Du, MeiRong

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important in mediating immune responses against various pathogens during pregnancy. However, uncontrolled TLR-triggered inflammation will endanger normal pregnancy, resulting in pregnancy loss. Therefore, maintenance of a moderate inflammatory response is crucial for successful pregnancy under conditions of infection. Here, we demonstrated significantly lowered expression of T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (Tim-3) in miscarried decidual stromal cells (DSCs), indicating that Tim-3 might play important roles in maintaining successful pregnancies. Activation of TLR signaling induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production and apoptosis of DSCs, which was accompanied by up-regulated Tim-3 expression. Tim-3, in turn, protected DSCs from TLR-mediated apoptosis in an ERK1/2 pathway-dependent manner. In addition, Tim-3 inhibited TLR signaling-induced inflammatory cytokine production by DSCs through suppressing NF-κB activation. Tim-3 increased production of T helper 2 (Th2)-type cytokines by DSCs and reversed the inhibitory effect of LPS on Th2 cytokine generation by up-regulation of interferon regulatory factor 4 expression. Tim-3 blockade abolished the effect of Tim-3 on the inflammatory response to LPS stimulation. Thus, Tim-3 signaling could represent a "self-control" mechanism in TLR-triggered inflammation during pregnancy. These findings identify Tim-3 as a key regulator of DSCs and suggest its potential as a target for the treatment of spontaneous abortion.

  19. Modulation of TIM-3 expression on NK and T cell subsets in HIV immunological non-responders.

    PubMed

    de Kivit, Sander; Lempsink, Ludwijn J R; Plants, Jill; Martinson, Jeffrey; Keshavarzian, Ali; Landay, Alan L

    2015-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the treatment of HIV infection sustains viral suppression and increases CD4(+) T cells in HIV patients. However, in 10-25% of subjects, known as immunological non-responders (INRs), HAART does not increase CD4 count. We investigated a potential role for galectin-9 and TIM-3 in INRs as galectin-9 and TIM-3 have been described to modulate NK and T cell function. PBMCs were isolated from healthy controls, HIV immunological responders (IRs, >350CD4(+) cells/mm(3)) and HIV INRs (<350CD4(+) cells/mm(3)) and TIM-3 and galectin-9 expressions on NK cell subsets and CD4(+) T cells were assessed. HIV INRs and HIV IRs showed increased galectin-9 expression on CD16(-)CD56(bright) and CD16(+)CD56(+) NK cells and CD4(+) T cells. Only HIV INRs showed a reduced frequency of TIM-3-expressing CD16(+)CD56(+), CD16(+)CD56(-) and CD4(+) cells, which correlated with low peripheral CD4 counts. These data suggest that TIM-3 expression may be characteristic for HIV INRs. PMID:25450337

  20. The amelioration of composite tissue allograft rejection by TIM-3-modified dendritic cell: Regulation of the balance of regulatory and effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaojun; Zheng, Zhao; Zhu, Xiongxiang; Han, Juntao; Dong, Maolong; Tao, Ke; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Yunchuan; Hu, Dahai

    2016-01-01

    T cell-dependent immune responses play a central role in allograft rejection. Exploring ways to disarm alloreactive T cells represents a potential strategy to promote long-term allograft acceptance and survival. T cell Ig domain and mucin domain 3 (TIM-3) has previously been demonstrated as a central regulator of T helper 1 (Th1) responses and immune tolerance. Hence, TIM-3 may be an important molecule for decreasing immunological rejection during composite tissue allotransplantation (CTA). In this study, BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were chosen as the experimental animals. The effects of TIM-3 on allograft rejection were explored using TIM-3-modified mature dendritic cells (TIM-3 mDCs). A laser speckle blood flow (LSBF) imager was used to evaluate blood distribution of the BALB/c mice. ELISA, MTT, ELISPOT assays and flow cytometry analysis were carried out for further researches. We found that TIM-3 could obviously prolong the survival time of the transplanted limbs. And TIM-3 could mitigate the immune response and thus enhance immune tolerance after CTA. Also, TIM-3 can induce lymphocyte hyporesponsiveness, including facilitating lymphocyte apoptosis, decreasing lymphocyte proliferation, and influencing the secretion of inflammatory cytokines by CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, TIM-3 overexpression could induce CD4(+) T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells (Tregs), which recalibrate the effector and regulatory arms of the alloimmune response. In summary, we concluded that TIM-3 can mitigate allograft rejection and thus enhance immune tolerance by inducing lymphocyte hyporesponsiveness and increasing the number of Tregs of the alloimmune response. TIM-3 may be a potential therapeutic molecule for allograft rejection in CTA.

  1. The correlation of Tim-3 and IFN-γ expressions in mice infected with Toxoplasma gondii during gestation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoyin; Wu, Bin; Huang, Bo; Zheng, Huanqin; Huang, Shiguang; Gan, Yan; Shen, Jilong; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Lu, Fangli

    2015-01-01

    The immunoinhibitory receptor T cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain-1 (Tim-1) and Tim-3 participate in the regulation of Th immune response as well as innate immunity. However, there is no report about the expression of Tim genes in Toxoplasma gondii-infected experimental models during pregnancy. In this study, Kunming outbred pregnant mice were infected with RH strain of T. gondii through vagina at days 10 to 16 of gestation, and the mRNA expressions of Tim-1, Tim-3, interleukin (IL)-4, and interferon (IFN)-γ in the placentas, uteri, and draining lumber aortic lymph nodes (LALNs) at day 18 of gestation were analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Compared with uninfected pregnant controls, significantly increased levels of IFN-γ and Tim-3 were detected in the placentas (P < 0.001), uteri (P = 0.003 and P = 0.017, respectively), and LALNs (P = 0.003 and P = 0.025, respectively) of T. gondii-infected mice; there were positive and significant correlations between Tim-3 and IFN-γ mRNA expression levels in the placentas (R(2) = 0.6331, P = 0.0011), uteri (R(2) = 0.5658, P = 0.003), and LALNs (R(2) = 0.5583, P = 0.0033) of infected mice. Tim-1 (P = 0.002) and IL-4 (P = 0.003) expressions were significantly increased in the placentas, but Tim-1 were significantly decreased in the uteri (P = 0.013) and LALNs (P < 0.001) of infected pregnant mice in comparison of uninfected pregnant controls. Our data suggested that Tim-3 may play a regulatory role in T. gondii-infected pregnant mouse model.

  2. PD-1 and Tim-3 pathways are associated with regulatory CD8+ T-cell function in decidua and maintenance of normal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wang, S-C; Li, Y-H; Piao, H-L; Hong, X-W; Zhang, D; Xu, Y-Y; Tao, Y; Wang, Y; Yuan, M-M; Li, D-J; Du, M-R

    2015-01-01

    CD8+ T cells are critical in the balance between fetal tolerance and antiviral immunity. T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (Tim-3) and programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) are important negative immune regulatory molecules involved in viral persistence and tumor metastasis. Here, we demonstrate that Tim-3+PD-1+CD8+ T cells from decidua greatly outnumbered those from peripheral blood during human early pregnancy. Co-culture of trophoblasts with CD8+ T cells upregulated PD-1+ and/or Tim-3+ immune cells. Furthermore, the population of CD8+ T cells co-expressing PD-1 and Tim-3 was enriched within the intermediate memory subset in decidua. This population exhibited high proliferative activity and Th2-type cytokine producing capacity. Blockade of Tim-3 and PD-1 resulted in decreased in vitro proliferation and Th2-type cytokine production while increased trophoblast killing and IFN-γ producing capacities of CD8+ T cells. Pregnant CBA/J females challenged with Tim-3 and/or PD-1 blocking antibodies were more susceptible to fetal loss, which was associated with CD8+ T-cell dysfunction. Importantly, the number and function of Tim-3+PD-1+CD8+ T cells in decidua were significantly impaired in miscarriage. These findings underline the important roles of Tim-3 and PD-1 pathways in regulating decidual CD8+ T-cell function and maintaining normal pregnancy.

  3. [A TIM-3/galectin-9 autocrine stimulatory loop drives self-renewal of human myeloid leukemia stem cells and leukemia progression].

    PubMed

    Kikushige, Yoshikane

    2016-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) originates from self-renewing leukemic stem cells (LSCs), an ultimate therapeutic target for AML. We previously reported that the T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (TIM-3) is expressed on the LCS surface in most types of AML. Since only the TIM-3(+), i.e. not the TIM-3(-), fraction of human AML cells can reconstitute human AML in immunodeficient mice, we hypothesized that the TIM-3 has an essential function in maintaining AML LSCs. Herein, we show that TIM-3 and its ligand, galectin-9 (Gal-9), constitute an autocrine loop critical for human AML LSC development. Serum Gal-9 was significantly elevated in primary AML patients and in mice xenografted with human AML. Neutralization of Gal-9 inhibited xenogeneic reconstitution of human AML, as well as Gal-9 ligation of TIM-3 co-activated NF-κB and β-catenin signaling, suggesting that TIM-3 signaling is necessary for LSC self-renewal. Interestingly, identical changes were found to be involved in the progressive transformation of a variety of pre-leukemic disorders into myeloid leukemia. Thus, molecules constituting the TIM-3/Gal-9 autocrine loop are potential therapeutic targets applicable to most types of myeloid leukemia.

  4. [A TIM-3/galectin-9 autocrine stimulatory loop drives self-renewal of human myeloid leukemia stem cells and leukemia progression].

    PubMed

    Kikushige, Yoshikane

    2016-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) originates from self-renewing leukemic stem cells (LSCs), an ultimate therapeutic target for AML. We previously reported that the T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (TIM-3) is expressed on the LCS surface in most types of AML. Since only the TIM-3(+), i.e. not the TIM-3(-), fraction of human AML cells can reconstitute human AML in immunodeficient mice, we hypothesized that the TIM-3 has an essential function in maintaining AML LSCs. Herein, we show that TIM-3 and its ligand, galectin-9 (Gal-9), constitute an autocrine loop critical for human AML LSC development. Serum Gal-9 was significantly elevated in primary AML patients and in mice xenografted with human AML. Neutralization of Gal-9 inhibited xenogeneic reconstitution of human AML, as well as Gal-9 ligation of TIM-3 co-activated NF-κB and β-catenin signaling, suggesting that TIM-3 signaling is necessary for LSC self-renewal. Interestingly, identical changes were found to be involved in the progressive transformation of a variety of pre-leukemic disorders into myeloid leukemia. Thus, molecules constituting the TIM-3/Gal-9 autocrine loop are potential therapeutic targets applicable to most types of myeloid leukemia. PMID:27169443

  5. Preferential Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8(+) T cells, supported by tumor-associated macrophages, is associated with worse prognosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Pinying; Yue, Rongxi; Tang, Jiahong; Si, Haige; Shen, Liqun; Guo, Changsheng; Zhang, Lixin; Han, Huaizhong; Song, Haihan K; Zhao, Pengfei; Wang, Ning; Song, Zongchang; Guo, Chunliang

    2016-01-01

    While infection with H. pylori is a strong risk factor for gastric cancer, most H. pylori-colonized individuals, even those with the high-risk CagA(+)VacA(+) strain, remain asymptomatic over their lifetime. We hypothesized that the discordant outcomes were due to differences in the host immune responses. Previously, Tim-3-mediated immune modulation was observed in H. pylori-challenged mice. In this study, we compared Tim-3-related responses in CagA(+)VacA(+) H. pylori-infected asymptomatic individuals and H. pylori-associated gastric adenocarcinoma patients. We showed that compared to H. pylori-uninfected individuals, both H. pylori-infected asymptomatic and gastric cancer patients upregulated Tim-3 overall. However, the Tim-3 upregulation was enriched on Th1 cells in asymptomatic patients and on Treg and CD8(+) T cells in gastric cancer patients, with respective differences in T cell subset functions. In gastric cancer patients, high Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8(+) T cells, but not on Th1 cells, was associated with worse prognosis. H. pylori-antigen presentation by tumor-associated macrophages upregulated Tim-3 expression more effectively than by blood monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro. The upregulation of Tim-3 in vitro depended on the concentration of H. pylori antigen but not on whether the cells were from asymptomatic or cancer patients. These data suggest that the discrepancy in Tim-3 upregulation in asymptomatic and cancer subjects is induced by cancer but not the other way around. Once gastric cancer is developed, Tim-3 expression is associated with worse prognosis.

  6. Preferential Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8+ T cells, supported by tumor-associated macrophages, is associated with worse prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Pinying; Yue, Rongxi; Tang, Jiahong; Si, Haige; Shen, Liqun; Guo, Changsheng; Zhang, Lixin; Han, Huaizhong; Song, Haihan K; Zhao, Pengfei; Wang, Ning; Song, Zongchang; Guo, Chunliang

    2016-01-01

    While infection with H. pylori is a strong risk factor for gastric cancer, most H. pylori-colonized individuals, even those with the high-risk CagA+VacA+ strain, remain asymptomatic over their lifetime. We hypothesized that the discordant outcomes were due to differences in the host immune responses. Previously, Tim-3-mediated immune modulation was observed in H. pylori-challenged mice. In this study, we compared Tim-3-related responses in CagA+VacA+ H. pylori-infected asymptomatic individuals and H. pylori-associated gastric adenocarcinoma patients. We showed that compared to H. pylori-uninfected individuals, both H. pylori-infected asymptomatic and gastric cancer patients upregulated Tim-3 overall. However, the Tim-3 upregulation was enriched on Th1 cells in asymptomatic patients and on Treg and CD8+ T cells in gastric cancer patients, with respective differences in T cell subset functions. In gastric cancer patients, high Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8+ T cells, but not on Th1 cells, was associated with worse prognosis. H. pylori-antigen presentation by tumor-associated macrophages upregulated Tim-3 expression more effectively than by blood monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro. The upregulation of Tim-3 in vitro depended on the concentration of H. pylori antigen but not on whether the cells were from asymptomatic or cancer patients. These data suggest that the discrepancy in Tim-3 upregulation in asymptomatic and cancer subjects is induced by cancer but not the other way around. Once gastric cancer is developed, Tim-3 expression is associated with worse prognosis. PMID:27648132

  7. Preferential Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8+ T cells, supported by tumor-associated macrophages, is associated with worse prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Pinying; Yue, Rongxi; Tang, Jiahong; Si, Haige; Shen, Liqun; Guo, Changsheng; Zhang, Lixin; Han, Huaizhong; Song, Haihan K; Zhao, Pengfei; Wang, Ning; Song, Zongchang; Guo, Chunliang

    2016-01-01

    While infection with H. pylori is a strong risk factor for gastric cancer, most H. pylori-colonized individuals, even those with the high-risk CagA+VacA+ strain, remain asymptomatic over their lifetime. We hypothesized that the discordant outcomes were due to differences in the host immune responses. Previously, Tim-3-mediated immune modulation was observed in H. pylori-challenged mice. In this study, we compared Tim-3-related responses in CagA+VacA+ H. pylori-infected asymptomatic individuals and H. pylori-associated gastric adenocarcinoma patients. We showed that compared to H. pylori-uninfected individuals, both H. pylori-infected asymptomatic and gastric cancer patients upregulated Tim-3 overall. However, the Tim-3 upregulation was enriched on Th1 cells in asymptomatic patients and on Treg and CD8+ T cells in gastric cancer patients, with respective differences in T cell subset functions. In gastric cancer patients, high Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8+ T cells, but not on Th1 cells, was associated with worse prognosis. H. pylori-antigen presentation by tumor-associated macrophages upregulated Tim-3 expression more effectively than by blood monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro. The upregulation of Tim-3 in vitro depended on the concentration of H. pylori antigen but not on whether the cells were from asymptomatic or cancer patients. These data suggest that the discrepancy in Tim-3 upregulation in asymptomatic and cancer subjects is induced by cancer but not the other way around. Once gastric cancer is developed, Tim-3 expression is associated with worse prognosis.

  8. Preferential Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8(+) T cells, supported by tumor-associated macrophages, is associated with worse prognosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Pinying; Yue, Rongxi; Tang, Jiahong; Si, Haige; Shen, Liqun; Guo, Changsheng; Zhang, Lixin; Han, Huaizhong; Song, Haihan K; Zhao, Pengfei; Wang, Ning; Song, Zongchang; Guo, Chunliang

    2016-01-01

    While infection with H. pylori is a strong risk factor for gastric cancer, most H. pylori-colonized individuals, even those with the high-risk CagA(+)VacA(+) strain, remain asymptomatic over their lifetime. We hypothesized that the discordant outcomes were due to differences in the host immune responses. Previously, Tim-3-mediated immune modulation was observed in H. pylori-challenged mice. In this study, we compared Tim-3-related responses in CagA(+)VacA(+) H. pylori-infected asymptomatic individuals and H. pylori-associated gastric adenocarcinoma patients. We showed that compared to H. pylori-uninfected individuals, both H. pylori-infected asymptomatic and gastric cancer patients upregulated Tim-3 overall. However, the Tim-3 upregulation was enriched on Th1 cells in asymptomatic patients and on Treg and CD8(+) T cells in gastric cancer patients, with respective differences in T cell subset functions. In gastric cancer patients, high Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8(+) T cells, but not on Th1 cells, was associated with worse prognosis. H. pylori-antigen presentation by tumor-associated macrophages upregulated Tim-3 expression more effectively than by blood monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro. The upregulation of Tim-3 in vitro depended on the concentration of H. pylori antigen but not on whether the cells were from asymptomatic or cancer patients. These data suggest that the discrepancy in Tim-3 upregulation in asymptomatic and cancer subjects is induced by cancer but not the other way around. Once gastric cancer is developed, Tim-3 expression is associated with worse prognosis. PMID:27648132

  9. Characterization of age-associated exhausted CD8⁺ T cells defined by increased expression of Tim-3 and PD-1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoo-A; Shin, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Ga-Young; Song, You Chan; Bae, Eun-Ah; Kim, Il-Kyu; Koh, Choong-Hyun; Kang, Chang-Yuil

    2016-04-01

    Aging is accompanied by altered T-cell responses that result in susceptibility to various diseases. Previous findings on the increased expression of inhibitory receptors, such as programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), in the T cells of aged mice emphasize the importance of investigations into the relationship between T-cell exhaustion and aging-associated immune dysfunction. In this study, we demonstrate that T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 (Tim-3), another exhaustion marker, is up-regulated on aged T cells, especially CD8(+) T cells. Tim-3-expressing cells also produced PD-1, but Tim-3(+) PD-1(+) CD8(+) T cells had a distinct phenotype that included the expression of CD44 and CD62L, from Tim-3(-) PD-1(+) cells. Tim-3(+) PD-1(+) CD8(+) T cells showed more evident properties associated with exhaustion than Tim-3(-) PD-1(+) CD8(+) T cells: an exhaustion-related marker expression profile, proliferative defects following homeostatic or TCR stimulation, and altered production of cytokines. Interestingly, these cells produced a high level of IL-10 and induced normal CD8(+) T cells to produce IL-10, which might contribute to immune dysregulation in aged mice. The generation of Tim-3-expressing CD8(+) T cells in aged mice seems to be mediated by encounters with antigens but not by specific infection, based on their high expression of CD49d and their unbiased TCR Vβ usage. In conclusion, we found that a CD8(+) T-cell population with age-associated exhaustion was distinguishable by its expression of Tim-3. These results provide clues for understanding the alterations that occur in T-cell populations with age and for improving dysfunctions related to the aging of the immune system.

  10. MicroRNA-155 regulates interferon-γ production in natural killer cells via Tim-3 signalling in chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yong Q; Ren, Jun P; Zhao, Juan; Wang, Jia M; Zhou, Yun; Li, Guang Y; Moorman, Jonathan P; Yao, Zhi Q

    2015-08-01

    Host immune responses must be tightly regulated by an intricate balance between positive and negative signals while fighting pathogens; persistent pathogens may usurp these regulatory mechanisms to dampen host immunity to facilitate survival in vivo. Here we report that Tim-3, a negative signalling molecule expressed on monocytes and T cells, is up-regulated on natural killer (NK) cells in individuals chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Additionally, the transcription factor T-bet was also found to be up-regulated and associated with Tim-3 expression in NK cells during chronic HCV infection. MicroRNA-155 (miR-155), an miRNA that inhibits signalling proteins involved in immune responses, was down-regulated in NK cells by HCV infection. This Tim-3/T-bet over-expression and miR-155 inhibition were recapitulated in vitro by incubating primary NK cells or NK92 cell line with Huh-7 hepatocytes expressing HCV. Reconstitution of miR-155 in NK cells from HCV-infected patients led to a decrease in T-bet/Tim-3 expression and an increase in interferon-γ production. Blocking Tim-3 signalling also enhanced interferon-γ production in NK cells by improving signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 phosphorylation. These data indicate that HCV-induced, miR-155-regulated Tim-3 expression regulates NK cell function, suggesting a novel mechanism for balancing immune clearance and immune injury during chronic viral infection.

  11. Association of TIM-1 5383-5397ins/del and TIM-3 -1541C>T polymorphisms with multiple sclerosis in Isfahan population.

    PubMed

    Mazrouei, F; Ganjalikhani-Hakemi, M; Salehi, R; Alesahebfosoul, F; Etemadifar, M; Pouladian, M; Meshkat, R; Nekoueian, Sh; Zarkesh-Esfahani, H; Ziyaee-Ghahnaviyeh, M

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease in central nervous system, affecting about 2.5 million people around the world. Probable involvement of two newly identified immunoregulator molecules, TIM-1 and TIM-3, has been reported in autoimmune diseases. In this study, for the first time, the association of TIM-1 5383-5397ins/del and TIM-3 -1541C>T polymorphisms with MS in an Iranian population was considered. The results of our study showed that there is no significant association between TIM-1 5383-5397ins/del and MS (P = 0.38); however, the frequency of CT genotype of TIM-3 -1541C>T in patient group was significantly higher than the control group, and there was a significant association between CT genotype and MS (P = 0.009, OR = 4.08).

  12. PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) T cells associate with and predict leukemia relapse in AML patients post allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Y; Zhang, J; Claxton, D F; Ehmann, W C; Rybka, W B; Zhu, L; Zeng, H; Schell, T D; Zheng, H

    2015-07-31

    Prognosis of leukemia relapse post allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) is poor and effective new treatments are urgently needed. T cells are pivotal in eradicating leukemia through a graft versus leukemia (GVL) effect and leukemia relapse is considered a failure of GVL. T-cell exhaustion is a state of T-cell dysfunction mediated by inhibitory molecules including programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain 3 (TIM-3). To evaluate whether T-cell exhaustion and inhibitory pathways are involved in leukemia relapse post alloSCT, we performed phenotypic and functional studies on T cells from peripheral blood of acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving alloSCT. Here we report that PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) cells are strongly associated with leukemia relapse post transplantation. Consistent with exhaustion, PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) T cells are functionally deficient manifested by reduced production of interleukin 2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). In addition, these cells demonstrate a phenotype consistent with exhausted antigen-experienced T cells by losing TN and TEMRA subsets. Importantly, increase of PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) cells occurs before clinical diagnosis of leukemia relapse, suggesting their predictive value. Results of our study provide an early diagnostic approach and a therapeutic target for leukemia relapse post transplantation.

  13. The immune receptor Tim-3 mediates activation of PI3 kinase/mTOR and HIF-1 pathways in human myeloid leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Prokhorov, Alexandr; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Bardelli, Marco; Rüegg, Laura; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Varani, Luca; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2015-02-01

    The T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (Tim-3) is a plasma membrane-associated protein that is highly expressed in human acute myeloid leukaemia cells. As an acute myeloid leukaemia antigen, it could therefore be considered as a potential target for immune therapy and highly-specific drug delivery. However, a conceptual understanding of its biological role is required before consideration of this protein for therapeutic settings. Here, we reveal the detailed mechanism of action underlying the biological responses mediated by the Tim-3 receptor in myeloid cells. Our studies demonstrate that Tim-3 triggers growth factor type responses in acute myeloid leukaemia cells by activating a phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. In addition, the receptor activates hypoxic signalling pathways upregulating glycolysis and pro-angiogenic responses. These findings suggest that Tim-3 could be used as a potential therapeutic target for immune therapy and drug delivery in human acute myeloid leukaemia cells.

  14. A TIM-3/Gal-9 Autocrine Stimulatory Loop Drives Self-Renewal of Human Myeloid Leukemia Stem Cells and Leukemic Progression.

    PubMed

    Kikushige, Yoshikane; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Yuda, Junichiro; Jabbarzadeh-Tabrizi, Siamak; Shima, Takahiro; Takayanagi, Shin-ichiro; Niiro, Hiroaki; Yurino, Ayano; Miyawaki, Kohta; Takenaka, Katsuto; Iwasaki, Hiromi; Akashi, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    Signaling mechanisms underlying self-renewal of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) are poorly understood, and identifying pathways specifically active in LSCs could provide opportunities for therapeutic intervention. T-cell immunoglobin mucin-3 (TIM-3) is expressed on the surface of LSCs in many types of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but not on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Here, we show that TIM-3 and its ligand, galectin-9 (Gal-9), constitute an autocrine loop critical for LSC self-renewal and development of human AML. Serum Gal-9 levels were significantly elevated in AML patients and in mice xenografted with primary human AML samples, and neutralization of Gal-9 inhibited xenogeneic reconstitution of human AML. Gal-9-mediated stimulation of TIM-3 co-activated NF-κB and β-catenin signaling, pathways known to promote LSC self-renewal. These changes were further associated with leukemic transformation of a variety of pre-leukemic disorders and together highlight that targeting the TIM-3/Gal-9 autocrine loop could be a useful strategy for treating myeloid leukemias. PMID:26279267

  15. IL-15 induces strong but short-lived tumor-infiltrating CD8 T cell responses through the regulation of Tim-3 in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Heon, Elise K.; Wulan, Hasi; Macdonald, Loch P.; Malek, Adel O.; Braunstein, Glenn H.; Eaves, Connie G.; Schattner, Mark D.; Allen, Peter M.; Alexander, Michael O.; Hawkins, Cynthia A.; McGovern, Dermot W.; Freeman, Richard L.; Amir, Eitan P.; Huse, Jason D.; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S.; Kauff, Noah P.; Meyers, Paul G.; Gleason, Michelle H.; Overholtzer, Michael G.; Wiseman, Sam S.; and others

    2015-08-14

    IL-15 has pivotal roles in the control of CD8{sup +} memory T cells and has been investigated as a therapeutic option in cancer therapy. Although IL-15 and IL-2 share many functions together, including the stimulation of CD8 T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production, the different in vivo roles of IL-15 and IL-2 have been increasingly recognized. Here, we explored the different effects of IL-15 and IL-2 on tumor-infiltrating (TI) T cells from resected breast tumors. We found that neither IL-2 nor IL-15 induced intratumoral CD8 T cell proliferation by itself, but after CD3/CD28-stimulation, IL-15 induced significantly higher proliferation than IL-2 during early time points, at day 2, day 3 and day 6. However, the IL-15-induced proliferation leveled off at day 9 and day 12, whereas IL-2 induced lower but progressive proliferation at each time point. Furthermore, IL-15 caused an early and robust increase of IFN-γ in the supernatant of TI cell cultures, which diminished at later time points, while the IL-2-induced IFN-γ production remained constant over time. In addition, the IL-15-costimulated CD8 T cells presented higher frequencies of apoptotic cells. The diminishing IL-15-induced response was possibly due to regulatory and/or exhaustion mechanisms. We did not observe increased IL-10 or PD-1 upregulation, but we have found an increase of Tim-3 upregulation on IL-15-, but not IL-2-stimulated cells. Blocking Tim-3 function using anti-Tim-3 antibodies resulted in increased IL-15-induced proliferation and IFN-γ production for a prolonged period of time, whereas adding Tim-3 ligand galectin 9 led to reduced proliferation and IFN-γ production. Our results suggest that IL-15 in combination of Tim-3 blocking antibodies could potentially act as an IL-2 alternative in tumor CD8 T cell expansion in vitro, a crucial step in adoptive T cell therapy. - Highlights: • We explored the effects of IL-15 and IL-2 on tumor-infiltrating (TI) T cells of breast cancer. • IL-15

  16. PD-1 and Tim-3 regulate the expansion of tumor antigen-specific CD8⁺ T cells induced by melanoma vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fourcade, Julien; Sun, Zhaojun; Pagliano, Ornella; Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Sander, Cindy; Janjic, Bratislav; Tarhini, Ahmad A; Tawbi, Hussein A; Kirkwood, John M; Moschos, Stergios; Wang, Hong; Guillaume, Philippe; Luescher, Immanuel F; Krieg, Arthur; Anderson, Ana C; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Zarour, Hassane M

    2014-02-15

    Although melanoma vaccines stimulate tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells, objective clinical responses are rarely observed. To investigate this discrepancy, we evaluated the character of vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells with regard to the inhibitory T-cell coreceptors PD-1 and Tim-3 in patients with metastatic melanoma who were administered tumor vaccines. The vaccines included incomplete Freund's adjuvant, CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG), and the HLA-A2-restricted analog peptide NY-ESO-1 157-165V, either by itself or in combination with the pan-DR epitope NY-ESO-1 119-143. Both vaccines stimulated rapid tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses detected ex vivo, however, tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells produced more IFN-γ and exhibited higher lytic function upon immunization with MHC class I and class II epitopes. Notably, the vast majority of vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells upregulated PD-1 and a minority also upregulated Tim-3. Levels of PD-1 and Tim-3 expression by vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells at the time of vaccine administration correlated inversely with their expansion in vivo. Dual blockade of PD-1 and Tim-3 enhanced the expansion and cytokine production of vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells in vitro. Collectively, our findings support the use of PD-1 and Tim-3 blockades with cancer vaccines to stimulate potent antitumor T-cell responses and increase the likelihood of clinical responses in patients with advanced melanoma. PMID:24343228

  17. IL-15 induces strong but short-lived tumor-infiltrating CD8 T cell responses through the regulation of Tim-3 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Heon, Elise K; Wulan, Hasi; Macdonald, Loch P; Malek, Adel O; Braunstein, Glenn H; Eaves, Connie G; Schattner, Mark D; Allen, Peter M; Alexander, Michael O; Hawkins, Cynthia A; McGovern, Dermot W; Freeman, Richard L; Amir, Eitan P; Huse, Jason D; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S; Kauff, Noah P; Meyers, Paul G; Gleason, Michelle H; Overholtzer, Michael G; Wiseman, Sam S; Streutker, Catherine D; Asa, Sylvia W; McAlindon, Timothy P; Newcomb, Polly O; Sorensen, Poul M; Press, Oliver A

    2015-08-14

    IL-15 has pivotal roles in the control of CD8(+) memory T cells and has been investigated as a therapeutic option in cancer therapy. Although IL-15 and IL-2 share many functions together, including the stimulation of CD8 T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production, the different in vivo roles of IL-15 and IL-2 have been increasingly recognized. Here, we explored the different effects of IL-15 and IL-2 on tumor-infiltrating (TI) T cells from resected breast tumors. We found that neither IL-2 nor IL-15 induced intratumoral CD8 T cell proliferation by itself, but after CD3/CD28-stimulation, IL-15 induced significantly higher proliferation than IL-2 during early time points, at day 2, day 3 and day 6. However, the IL-15-induced proliferation leveled off at day 9 and day 12, whereas IL-2 induced lower but progressive proliferation at each time point. Furthermore, IL-15 caused an early and robust increase of IFN-γ in the supernatant of TI cell cultures, which diminished at later time points, while the IL-2-induced IFN-γ production remained constant over time. In addition, the IL-15-costimulated CD8 T cells presented higher frequencies of apoptotic cells. The diminishing IL-15-induced response was possibly due to regulatory and/or exhaustion mechanisms. We did not observe increased IL-10 or PD-1 upregulation, but we have found an increase of Tim-3 upregulation on IL-15-, but not IL-2-stimulated cells. Blocking Tim-3 function using anti-Tim-3 antibodies resulted in increased IL-15-induced proliferation and IFN-γ production for a prolonged period of time, whereas adding Tim-3 ligand galectin 9 led to reduced proliferation and IFN-γ production. Our results suggest that IL-15 in combination of Tim-3 blocking antibodies could potentially act as an IL-2 alternative in tumor CD8 T cell expansion in vitro, a crucial step in adoptive T cell therapy.

  18. Targeting PD-1 and Tim-3 Pathways to Reverse CD8 T-Cell Exhaustion and Enhance Ex Vivo T-Cell Responses to Autologous Dendritic/Tumor Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingwei; Zhang, Shurong; Hu, Yuefeng; Yang, Zhaomin; Li, Jingpo; Liu, Xuesong; Deng, Lijuan; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Ting; Lu, Xu

    2016-05-01

    The paradoxical coexistence of spontaneous tumor antigen-specific immune response with progressive disease in cancer patients need to dissect the molecular pathways involved in tumor-induced T-cell dysfunction or exhaustion. Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) has been identified as a marker of exhausted T cells in chronic disease states, and blockade of PD-1-PD-L1 interactions has been shown to partially restore T-cell function. We have found that T-cell immunoglobulin mucin (Tim) 3 is expressed on CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) isolated from patients with colorectal cancer. All T-cell immunoglobulin mucin 3 (Tim-3+) TILs coexpress PD-1, and Tim-3+ PD-1+ CD8+ TILs represent the predominant fraction of Tcells infiltrating tumors. Tim-3+PD-1+ CD8+ TILs exhibit the most severe exhausted phenotype as defined by failure to produce cytokines, such as interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-2. We further find that combined targeting of the Tim-3 and PD-1 pathways increased the frequencies of not only interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α but also frequencies of proliferating tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells than targeting either pathway alone. A concomitant decrease in regulatory T cells and enhanced killing in a cytotoxicity assay was observed. Collectively, our findings support the use of Tim-3-Tim-3L blockade together with PD-1-PD-L1 blockade to reverse tumor-induced T-cell exhaustion/dysfunction in patients with colorectal cancer.

  19. TIM-3 promotes the metastasis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma by targeting epithelial-mesenchymal transition via the Akt/GSK-3β/Snail signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Shan, Baoen; Man, Hongwei; Liu, Junfeng; Wang, Ling; Zhu, Tienian; Ma, Ming; Xv, Zhili; Chen, Xinran; Yang, Xingxiao; Li, Pengfei

    2016-09-01

    T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-con-taining protein-3 (TIM-3), a negative regulator of antitumor immune response, has been demonstrated to be involved in the onset and progression of several types of malignancies. The present study aimed to determine whether and how TIM‑3 plays such a role in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). TIM-3 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and real‑time fluorescence quantitative PCR (qRT‑PCR) in ESCC and matched adjacent normal tissues. Functional experiments in vitro were performed to elucidate the effect of TIM‑3 knockdown on the proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in Eca109 and TE‑1 cell lines. Our data revealed that TIM‑3 expression was significantly elevated at both the mRNA and protein levels in ESCC tissues compared with the levels in the matched adjacent normal tissues (both P<0.001). TIM‑3 expression was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (P=0.008), tumor‑node‑metastasis (TNM) stage (P=0.042) and depth of tumor invasion (P=0.042). In addition, we observed a strong correlation between high TIM‑3 expression and a worse overall survival of ESCC patients (P=0.001). Functional study demonstrated that TIM‑3 knockdown markedly inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of ESCC cell lines without affecting apoptosis. In addition, TIM‑3 depletion was associated with downregulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and upregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, and with reversion of EMT, as reflected by higher levels of the epithelial marker E‑cadherin and lower levels of the mesenchymal markers N‑cadherin and vimentin. Further study found that TIM‑3 depletion suppressed the signaling pathway involving p‑Akt, p‑GSK‑3β and Snail. Taken together, these results suggest that TIM‑3 is a novel therapeutic target and prognostic biomarker for ESCC and promotes metastasis of

  20. Levels of CD56+TIM-3- effector CD8 T cells distinguish HIV natural virus suppressors from patients receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Poonia, Bhawna; Pauza, C David

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged antiretroviral therapy (ART) with effective HIV suppression and reconstitution of CD4 T cells, fails to restore CD8 T cell lytic effector function that is needed to eradicate the viral reservoir. Better understanding of the phenotype and function of circulating CD8 cells in HIV patients will contribute to new targeted therapies directed at increasing CD8 T cell lytic effector function and destruction of the viral reservoir. We show that CD8 T cells from ART treated patients had sharply reduced expression of CD56 (neural cell adhesion molecule-1), a marker associated with cytolytic function whereas elite patients who control HIV in the absence of ART had CD56+ CD8 T cell levels similar to uninfected controls. The CD56+ CD8 T cells had higher perforin upregulation as well as degranulation following stimulation with HIV gag peptides compared with CD56 negative CD8 T cells. Elite patients had the highest frequencies of perforin producing CD56+ CD8 T cells among all HIV+ groups. In patients receiving ART we noted high levels of the exhaustion marker TIM-3 on CD56+ CD8 T cells, implying that defective effector function was related to immune exhaustion. CD56+ CD8 T cells from elite or treated HIV patients responded to PMA plus ionomycin stimulation, and expressed transcription factors T-bet and EOMES at levels similar to uninfected controls. Consequently, the lytic effector defect in chronic HIV disease is due to immune exhaustion and quantitative loss of CD56+ CD8 T cells and this defect is not repaired in patients where viremia is suppressed and CD4 T cells are recovered after ART. Reconstituting the cytotoxic CD56+ subset of CD8+ T cells through new interventions might improve the lytic effector capacity and contribute to reducing the viral reservoir. Our initial studies indicate that IL-15 treatment partly reverses the CD56 defect, implying that myeloid cell defects could be targeted for immune therapy during chronic HIV disease.

  1. A Cinnamon-Derived Procyanidin Compound Displays Anti-HIV-1 Activity by Blocking Heparan Sulfate- and Co-Receptor- Binding Sites on gp120 and Reverses T Cell Exhaustion via Impeding Tim-3 and PD-1 Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Bridgette Janine; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Yousfi, Rahima; Mohan, Viswaraman; Posch, Wilfried; Wilflingseder, Doris; Moog, Christiane; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Clayette, Pascal; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    Amongst the many strategies aiming at inhibiting HIV-1 infection, blocking viral entry has been recently recognized as a very promising approach. Using diverse in vitro models and a broad range of HIV-1 primary patient isolates, we report here that IND02, a type A procyanidin polyphenol extracted from cinnamon, that features trimeric and pentameric forms displays an anti-HIV-1 activity against CXCR4 and CCR5 viruses with 1–7 μM ED50 for the trimer. Competition experiments, using a surface plasmon resonance-based binding assay, revealed that IND02 inhibited envelope binding to CD4 and heparan sulphate (HS) as well as to an antibody (mAb 17b) directed against the gp120 co-receptor binding site with an IC50 in the low μM range. IND02 has thus the remarkable property of simultaneously blocking gp120 binding to its major host cell surface counterparts. Additionally, the IND02-trimer impeded up-regulation of the inhibitory receptors Tim-3 and PD-1 on CD4+ and CD8+ cells, thereby demonstrating its beneficial effect by limiting T cell exhaustion. Among naturally derived products significantly inhibiting HIV-1, the IND02-trimer is the first component demonstrating an entry inhibition property through binding to the viral envelope glycoprotein. These data suggest that cinnamon, a widely consumed spice, could represent a novel and promising candidate for a cost-effective, natural entry inhibitor for HIV-1 which can also down-modulate T cell exhaustion markers Tim-3 and PD-1. PMID:27788205

  2. Investigation into the mechanism(s) of antithrombotic effects of carbon monoxide releasing molecule-3 (CORM-3).

    PubMed

    Soni, Hitesh; Jain, Mukul; Mehta, Anita A

    2011-06-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) like nitric oxide (NO) has been recognized as activator of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) in many physiological functions. Studies, which demonstrate the mechanisms by which CO inhibits platelet aggregation in in vivo models, are few. Here we investigated the possible involvement of sGC, NO, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) and p38 MAP Kinase in antithrombotic effects of CO released by a novel, water-soluble, CO releasing molecule-3 (CORM-3) using rat. The effects of CORM-3 on in vitro and ex vivo platelet aggregation induced by thrombin as well as in in vivo thrombosis models were studied. When added to rat washed platelets in in vitro study, CORM-3 (100 and 200 μM) inhibited thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. Similarly, antiplatelet effect was also observed when 3mg/kg i.v. infusion of CORM-3 administered for 10 minutes in ex vivo study using rat. Interestingly, in presence of inhibitor of sGC (ODQ, 10mg/kg,i.p.) and inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (L-NAME, 30 mg/kg,i.p.), inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation by CORM-3 was significantly blocked. Notably, in presence of inhibitor of K(ATP) channel (glibenclamide, 10mg/kg,i.p.) and p38 MAP Kinase (SCIO-469, 1mg/kg, i.p.), inhibition of aggregation by CORM-3 was not blocked. In in vivo studies using animal models of thrombosis, we found that CORM-3-mediated antithrombotic effect was dependent on activation of sGC, NO and suppression of PAI-1 in arterial thrombosis and Arterio-Venous (A-V) shunt models. Therefore, we concluded that antithrombotic activity of CORM-3 may be mediated by activation of sGC, NO and inhibition of PAI-1.

  3. Vitamin C Attenuates Hemorrhagic Shock-induced Dendritic Cell-specific Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 3-grabbing Nonintegrin Expression in Tubular Epithelial Cells and Renal Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Fei, Jian; Chen, Ying; Zhao, Bing; Yang, Zhi-Tao; Wang, Lu; Sheng, Hui-Qiu; Chen, Er-Zhen; Mao, En-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background: The expression of dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) in renal tubular epithelial cells has been thought to be highly correlated with the occurrence of several kidney diseases, but whether it takes place in renal tissues during hemorrhagic shock (HS) is unknown. The present study aimed to investigate this phenomenon and the inhibitory effect of Vitamin C (VitC). Methods: A Sprague–Dawley rat HS model was established in vivo in this study. The expression level and location of DC-SIGN were observed in kidneys. Also, the degree of histological damage, the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in the renal tissues, and the serum concentration of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine at different times (2–24 h) after HS (six rats in each group), with or without VitC treatment before resuscitation, were evaluated. Results: HS induced DC-SIGN expression in rat tubular epithelial cells. The proinflammatory cytokine concentration, histological damage scores, and functional injury of kidneys had increased. All these phenomena induced by HS were relieved when the rats were treated with VitC before resuscitation. Conclusions: The results of the present study illustrated that HS could induce tubular epithelial cells expressing DC-SIGN, and the levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the kidney tissues improved correspondingly. The results also indicated that VitC could suppress the DC-SIGN expression in the tubular epithelial cells induced by HS and alleviate the inflammation and functional injury in the kidney. PMID:27411463

  4. The human intercellular adhesion molecule 3 (ICAM3) gene is located in the 19p13.2-p13.3 region, close to the ICAM1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bossy, D.; Simmons, D.L.; Mattei, M.G.

    1994-10-01

    The chromosomal location of the intercellular adhesion molecule 3 (ICAM3) gene, coding for a lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 counterreceptor and selectively expressed by human leukocytes, was analyzed by in situ hybridization with the cDNA coding sequence as a probe. This sequence mapped to the p13.2-p13.3 region of chromosome 19, close to the ICAM1 gene chromosomal location. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Immune checkpoint inhibitors enhance cytotoxicity of cytokine-induced killer cells against human myeloid leukaemic blasts.

    PubMed

    Poh, Su Li; Linn, Yeh Ching

    2016-05-01

    We studied whether blockade of inhibitory receptors on cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells by immune checkpoint inhibitors could increase its anti-tumour potency against haematological malignancies. CIK cultures were generated from seven normal donors and nine patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or multiple myeloma (MM). The inhibitory receptors B and T lymphocyte attenuator, CD200 receptor, lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3) and T cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain-containing-3 (TIM-3) were present at variable percentages in most CIK cultures, while cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4), programmed death-1 (PD-1) and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR2DL1/2/3) were expressed at low level in most cultures. Without blockade, myeloid leukaemia cells were susceptible to autologous and allogeneic CIK-mediated cytotoxicity. Blockade of KIR, LAG-3, PD-1 and TIM-3 but not CTLA-4 resulted in remarkable increase in killing against these targets, even in those with poor baseline cytotoxicity. ALL and MM targets were resistant to CIK-mediated cytotoxicity, and blockade of receptors did not increase cytotoxicity to a meaningful extent. Combination of inhibitors against two receptors did not further increase cytotoxicity. Interestingly, potentiation of CIK killing by blocking antibodies was not predicted by expression of receptors on CIK and their respective ligands on the targets. Compared to un-activated T and NK cells, blockade potentiated the cytotoxicity of CIK cells to a greater degree and at a lower E:T ratio, but without significant increase in cytotoxicity against normal white cell. Our findings provide the basis for clinical trial combining autologous CIK cells with checkpoint inhibitors for patients with AML.

  6. Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) recognizes a novel ligand, Mac-2-binding protein, characteristically expressed on human colorectal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Motohiro; Ma, Bruce Yong; Imaeda, Hirotsugu; Kawabe, Keiko; Kawasaki, Nobuko; Hodohara, Keiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Andoh, Akira; Fujiyama, Yoshihide; Kawasaki, Toshisuke

    2011-06-24

    Dendritic cell (DC)-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) is a type II transmembrane C-type lectin expressed on DCs such as myeloid DCs and monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs). Recently, we have reported that DC-SIGN interacts with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) expressed on colorectal carcinoma cells. CEA is one of the most widely used tumor markers for gastrointestinal cancers such as colorectal cancer. On the other hand, other groups have reported that the level of Mac-2-binding protein (Mac-2BP) increases in patients with pancreatic, breast, and lung cancers, virus infections such as human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus, and autoimmune diseases. Here, we first identified Mac-2BP expressed on several colorectal carcinoma cell lines as a novel DC-SIGN ligand through affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry. Interestingly, we found that DC-SIGN selectively recognizes Mac-2BP derived from some colorectal carcinomas but not from the other ones. Furthermore, we found that the α1-3,4-fucose moieties of Le glycans expressed on DC-SIGN-binding Mac-2BP were important for recognition. DC-SIGN-dependent cellular interactions between immature MoDCs and colorectal carcinoma cells significantly inhibited MoDC functional maturation, suggesting that Mac-2BP may provide a tolerogenic microenvironment for colorectal carcinoma cells through DC-SIGN-dependent recognition. Importantly, Mac-2BP was detected as a predominant DC-SIGN ligand expressed on some primary colorectal cancer tissues from certain parts of patients in comparison with CEA from other parts, suggesting that DC-SIGN-binding Mac-2BP bearing tumor-associated Le glycans may become a novel potential colorectal cancer biomarker for some patients instead of CEA.

  7. Restoring homeostasis of CD4+ T cells in hepatitis-B-virus-related liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Li-Sha; Liu, Yun; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Immune-mediated liver injury is widely seen during hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Unsuccessful immune clearance of HBV results in chronic hepatitis and increases the risk of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HBV-related liver fibrosis (HBVLF), occurring as a result of HBV-induced chronic hepatitis, is a reversible, intermediate stage of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and liver cirrhosis. Therefore, defining the pathogenesis of HBVLF is of practical significance for achieving better clinical outcomes. Recently, the homeostasis of CD4+ T cells was considered to be pivotal in the process of HBVLF. To better uncover the underlying mechanisms, in this review, we systematically retrospect the impacts of different CD4+ T-cell subsets on CHB and HBVLF. We emphasize CD4+ T-cell homeostasis and the important balance between regulatory T (Treg) and T helper 17 (Th17) cells. We discuss some cytokines associated with Treg and Th17 cells such as interleukin (IL)-17, IL-22, IL-21, IL-23, IL-10, IL-35 and IL-33, as well as surface molecules such as programmed cell death protein 1, cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4, T cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain-containing molecule 3 and cannabinoid receptor 2 that have potential therapeutic implications for the homeostasis of CD4+ T cells in CHB and HBVLF. PMID:26478664

  8. Tiling patterns from ABC star molecules: 3-colored foams?

    PubMed

    Kirkensgaard, Jacob J K; Pedersen, Martin C; Hyde, Stephen T

    2014-10-01

    We present coarse-grained simulations of the self-assembly of 3-armed ABC star polyphiles. In systems of star polyphiles with two arms of equal length the simulations corroborate and expand previous findings from related miktoarm star terpolymer systems on the formation of patterns containing columnar domains whose sections are 2D planar tilings. However, the systematic variation of face topologies as the length of the third (unequal) arm is varied differs from earlier findings regarding the compositional dependence. We explore 2D 3-colored foams to establish the optimal patterns based on interfacial energy alone. A generic construction algorithm is described that accounts for all observed 2D tiling patterns and suggests other patterns likely to be found beyond the range of the simulations reported here. Patterns resulting from this algorithm are relaxed using Surface Evolver calculations to form 2D foams with minimal interfacial length as a function of composition. This allows us to estimate the interfacial enthalpic contributions to the free energy of related star molecular assemblies assuming strong segregation. We compare the resulting phase sequence with a number of theoretical results from particle-based simulations and field theory, allowing us to tease out relative enthalpic and entropic contributions as a function of the chain lengths making up the star molecules. Our results indicate that a richer polymorphism is to be expected in systems not dominated by chain entropy. Further, analysis of corresponding planar tiling patterns suggests that related two-periodic columnar structures are unlikely hypothetical phases in 4-arm star polyphile melts in the absence of sufficient arm configurational freedom for minor domains to form lens-shaped di-gons, which require higher molecular weight polymeric arms. Finally, we discuss the possibility of forming a complex tiling pattern that is a quasi-crystalline approximant for 3-arm star polyphiles with unequal arm lengths.

  9. Tumor-induced senescent T cells promote the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors by human monocytes/macrophages through a mechanism that involves Tim-3 and CD40L

    PubMed Central

    Ramello, M C; Tosello Boari, J; Canale, F P; Mena, H A; Negrotto, S; Gastman, B; Gruppi, A; Acosta Rodríguez, E V; Montes, C L

    2014-01-01

    Solid tumors are infiltrated by immune cells where macrophages and senescent T cells are highly represented. Within the tumor microenvironment, a cross-talk between the infiltrating cells may occur conditioning the characteristic of the in situ immune response. Our previous work showed that tumors induce senescence of T cells, which are powerful suppressors of lympho-proliferation. In this study, we report that Tumor-Induced Senescent (TIS)-T cells may also modulate monocyte activation. To gain insight into this interaction, CD4+ or CD8+TIS-T or control-T cells were co-incubated with autologous monocytes under inflammatory conditions. After co-culture with CD4+ or CD8+TIS-T cells, CD14+ monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) exhibit a higher expression of CD16+ cells and a reduced expression of CD206. These Mo/Ma produce nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species; however, TIS-T cells do not modify phagocyte capacity of Mo/Ma. TIS-T modulated-Mo/Ma show a higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF, IL-1β and IL-6) and angiogenic factors (MMP-9, VEGF-A and IL-8) and a lower IL-10 and IP-10 secretion than monocytes co-cultured with controls. The mediator(s) present in the supernatant of TIS-T cell/monocyte-macrophage co-cultures promote(s) tubulogenesis and tumor-cell survival. Monocyte-modulation induced by TIS-T cells requires cell-to-cell contact. Although CD4+ shows different behavior from CD8+TIS-T cells, blocking mAbs against T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin protein 3 and CD40 ligand reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors production, indicating that these molecules are involved in monocyte/macrophage modulation by TIS-T cells. Our results revealed a novel role for TIS-T cells in human monocyte/macrophage modulation, which may have deleterious consequences for tumor progression. This modulation should be considered to best tailor the immunotherapy against cancer. PMID:25375372

  10. Tumor-induced senescent T cells promote the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors by human monocytes/macrophages through a mechanism that involves Tim-3 and CD40L.

    PubMed

    Ramello, M C; Tosello Boari, J; Canale, F P; Mena, H A; Negrotto, S; Gastman, B; Gruppi, A; Acosta Rodríguez, E V; Montes, C L

    2014-01-01

    Solid tumors are infiltrated by immune cells where macrophages and senescent T cells are highly represented. Within the tumor microenvironment, a cross-talk between the infiltrating cells may occur conditioning the characteristic of the in situ immune response. Our previous work showed that tumors induce senescence of T cells, which are powerful suppressors of lympho-proliferation. In this study, we report that Tumor-Induced Senescent (TIS)-T cells may also modulate monocyte activation. To gain insight into this interaction, CD4+ or CD8+TIS-T or control-T cells were co-incubated with autologous monocytes under inflammatory conditions. After co-culture with CD4+ or CD8+TIS-T cells, CD14+ monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) exhibit a higher expression of CD16+ cells and a reduced expression of CD206. These Mo/Ma produce nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species; however, TIS-T cells do not modify phagocyte capacity of Mo/Ma. TIS-T modulated-Mo/Ma show a higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF, IL-1β and IL-6) and angiogenic factors (MMP-9, VEGF-A and IL-8) and a lower IL-10 and IP-10 secretion than monocytes co-cultured with controls. The mediator(s) present in the supernatant of TIS-T cell/monocyte-macrophage co-cultures promote(s) tubulogenesis and tumor-cell survival. Monocyte-modulation induced by TIS-T cells requires cell-to-cell contact. Although CD4+ shows different behavior from CD8+TIS-T cells, blocking mAbs against T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin protein 3 and CD40 ligand reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors production, indicating that these molecules are involved in monocyte/macrophage modulation by TIS-T cells. Our results revealed a novel role for TIS-T cells in human monocyte/macrophage modulation, which may have deleterious consequences for tumor progression. This modulation should be considered to best tailor the immunotherapy against cancer.

  11. Small-molecule 3D structure prediction using open crystallography data.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, Peter; Baldi, Pierre

    2013-12-23

    Predicting the 3D structures of small molecules is a common problem in chemoinformatics. Even the best methods are inaccurate for complex molecules, and there is a large gap in accuracy between proprietary and free algorithms. Previous work presented COSMOS, a novel data-driven algorithm that uses knowledge of known structures from the Cambridge Structural Database and demonstrates performance that was competitive with proprietary algorithms. However, dependence on the Cambridge Structural Database prevented its widespread use. Here, we present an updated version of the COSMOS structure predictor, complete with a free structure library derived from open data sources. We demonstrate that COSMOS performs better than other freely available methods, with a mean RMSD of 1.16 and 1.68 Å for organic and metal-organic structures, respectively, and a mean prediction time of 60 ms per molecule. This is a 17% and 20% reduction, respectively, in RMSD compared to the free predictor provided by Open Babel, and it is 10 times faster. The ChemDB Web portal provides a COSMOS prediction Web server, as well as downloadable copies of the COSMOS executable and library of molecular substructures.

  12. Single Molecule 3D Orientation in Time and Space: A 6D Dynamic Study on Fluorescently Labeled Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Börner, Richard; Ehrlich, Nicky; Hohlbein, Johannes; Hübner, Christian G

    2016-05-01

    Interactions between single molecules profoundly depend on their mutual three-dimensional orientation. Recently, we demonstrated a technique that allows for orientation determination of single dipole emitters using a polarization-resolved distribution of fluorescence into several detection channels. As the method is based on the detection of single photons, it additionally allows for performing fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) as well as dynamical anisotropy measurements thereby providing access to fast orientational dynamics down to the nanosecond time scale. The 3D orientation is particularly interesting in non-isotropic environments such as lipid membranes, which are of great importance in biology. We used giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) labeled with fluorescent dyes down to a single molecule concentration as a model system for both, assessing the robustness of the orientation determination at different timescales and quantifying the associated errors. The vesicles provide a well-defined spherical surface, such that the use of fluorescent lipid dyes (DiO) allows to establish a a wide range of dipole orientations experimentally. To complement our experimental data, we performed Monte Carlo simulations of the rotational dynamics of dipoles incorporated into lipid membranes. Our study offers a comprehensive view on the dye orientation behavior in a lipid membrane with high spatiotemporal resolution representing a six-dimensional fluorescence detection approach. PMID:26972111

  13. Mode of action uncovered for the specific reduction of methane emissions from ruminants by the small molecule 3-nitrooxypropanol.

    PubMed

    Duin, Evert C; Wagner, Tristan; Shima, Seigo; Prakash, Divya; Cronin, Bryan; Yáñez-Ruiz, David R; Duval, Stephane; Rümbeli, Robert; Stemmler, René T; Thauer, Rudolf Kurt; Kindermann, Maik

    2016-05-31

    Ruminants, such as cows, sheep, and goats, predominantly ferment in their rumen plant material to acetate, propionate, butyrate, CO2, and methane. Whereas the short fatty acids are absorbed and metabolized by the animals, the greenhouse gas methane escapes via eructation and breathing of the animals into the atmosphere. Along with the methane, up to 12% of the gross energy content of the feedstock is lost. Therefore, our recent report has raised interest in 3-nitrooxypropanol (3-NOP), which when added to the feed of ruminants in milligram amounts persistently reduces enteric methane emissions from livestock without apparent negative side effects [Hristov AN, et al. (2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 112(34):10663-10668]. We now show with the aid of in silico, in vitro, and in vivo experiments that 3-NOP specifically targets methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR). The nickel enzyme, which is only active when its Ni ion is in the +1 oxidation state, catalyzes the methane-forming step in the rumen fermentation. Molecular docking suggested that 3-NOP preferably binds into the active site of MCR in a pose that places its reducible nitrate group in electron transfer distance to Ni(I). With purified MCR, we found that 3-NOP indeed inactivates MCR at micromolar concentrations by oxidation of its active site Ni(I). Concomitantly, the nitrate ester is reduced to nitrite, which also inactivates MCR at micromolar concentrations by oxidation of Ni(I). Using pure cultures, 3-NOP is demonstrated to inhibit growth of methanogenic archaea at concentrations that do not affect the growth of nonmethanogenic bacteria in the rumen. PMID:27140643

  14. Characterization of a Distinct Population of Circulating Human Non-Adherent Endothelial Forming Cells and Their Recruitment via Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-3

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Emma J.; Barrett, Jeffrey M.; Tooley, Katie; Sen, Shaundeep; Sun, Wai Yan; Grose, Randall; Nicholson, Ian; Levina, Vitalina; Cooke, Ira; Talbo, Gert; Lopez, Angel F.; Bonder, Claudine S.

    2012-01-01

    Circulating vascular progenitor cells contribute to the pathological vasculogenesis of cancer whilst on the other hand offer much promise in therapeutic revascularization in post-occlusion intervention in cardiovascular disease. However, their characterization has been hampered by the many variables to produce them as well as their described phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. Herein we have isolated, enriched for and then characterized a human umbilical cord blood derived CD133+ population of non-adherent endothelial forming cells (naEFCs) which expressed the hematopoietic progenitor cell markers (CD133, CD34, CD117, CD90 and CD38) together with mature endothelial cell markers (VEGFR2, CD144 and CD31). These cells also expressed low levels of CD45 but did not express the lymphoid markers (CD3, CD4, CD8) or myeloid markers (CD11b and CD14) which distinguishes them from ‘early’ endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Functional studies demonstrated that these naEFCs (i) bound Ulex europaeus lectin, (ii) demonstrated acetylated-low density lipoprotein uptake, (iii) increased vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) surface expression in response to tumor necrosis factor and (iv) in co-culture with mature endothelial cells increased the number of tubes, tubule branching and loops in a 3-dimensional in vitro matrix. More importantly, naEFCs placed in vivo generated new lumen containing vasculature lined by CD144 expressing human endothelial cells (ECs). Extensive genomic and proteomic analyses of the naEFCs showed that intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-3 is expressed on their cell surface but not on mature endothelial cells. Furthermore, functional analysis demonstrated that ICAM-3 mediated the rolling and adhesive events of the naEFCs under shear stress. We suggest that the distinct population of naEFCs identified and characterized here represents a new valuable therapeutic target to control aberrant vasculogenesis. PMID:23144795

  15. A comparative study of the vibrational spectra of the anticancer drug melphalan and its fundamental molecules 3-phenylpropionic acid and L-phenylalanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Khan, Ibrahim

    2016-04-01

    The structural stability and the vibrational spectra of the anticancer drug melphalan and its parent compounds 3-phenylpropionic acid and L-phenylalanine were investigated by the DFT B3LYP/6-311G** calculations. Melphalan and its fundamental compounds were predicted to exist predominantly in non-planar structures. The vibrational frequencies of the low energy structures of melphalan, 3-phenylpropionic acid, and phenylalanine were computed at the DFT B3LYP level of theory. Complete vibrational assignments of the normal modes of melphalan, 3-phenylpropionic acid, and phenylalanine were provided by combined theoretical and experimental data of the molecules. The experimental infrared spectra of phenylalanine and melphalan show a significantly different pattern of the Cdbnd O stretching mode as compared to those of normal carboxylic acids. A comparison of the 3700-2000 cm-1 infrared spectral region of the three molecules suggests the presence of similar intermolecular H-bonding in their condensed phases. The observed infrared and Raman spectra are consistent with the presence of one predominant melphalan conformation at room temperature.

  16. Moesin Interacts with the Cytoplasmic Region of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-3 and Is Redistributed to the Uropod of T Lymphocytes during Cell Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Serrador, Juan M.; Alonso-Lebrero, José L.; Pozo, Miguel A. del; Furthmayr, Heinz; Schwartz-Albiez, Reinhard; Calvo, Javier; Lozano, Francisco; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    1997-01-01

    During activation, T lymphocytes become motile cells, switching from a spherical to a polarized shape. Chemokines and other chemotactic cytokines induce lymphocyte polarization with the formation of a uropod in the rear pole, where the adhesion receptors intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), ICAM-3, and CD44 redistribute. We have investigated membrane–cytoskeleton interactions that play a key role in the redistribution of adhesion receptors to the uropod. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that the ERM proteins radixin and moesin localized to the uropod of human T lymphoblasts treated with the chemokine RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed, and secreted), a polarization-inducing agent; radixin colocalized with arrays of myosin II at the neck of the uropods, whereas moesin decorated the most distal part of the uropod and colocalized with ICAM-1, ICAM-3, and CD44 molecules. Two other cytoskeletal proteins, β-actin and α-tubulin, clustered at the cell leading edge and uropod, respectively, of polarized lymphocytes. Biochemical analysis showed that moesin coimmunoprecipitates with ICAM-3 in T lymphoblasts stimulated with either RANTES or the polarization- inducing anti–ICAM-3 HP2/19 mAb, as well as in the constitutively polarized T cell line HSB-2. In addition, moesin is associated with CD44, but not with ICAM-1, in polarized T lymphocytes. A correlation between the degree of moesin–ICAM-3 interaction and cell polarization was found as determined by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation analysis done in parallel. The moesin–ICAM-3 interaction was specifically mediated by the cytoplasmic domain of ICAM-3 as revealed by precipitation of moesin with a GST fusion protein containing the ICAM-3 cytoplasmic tail from metabolically labeled Jurkat T cell lysates. The interaction of moesin with ICAM-3 was greatly diminished when RANTES-stimulated T lymphoblasts were pretreated with the myosin-disrupting drug butanedione monoxime, which prevents lymphocyte polarization. Altogether, these data indicate that moesin interacts with ICAM-3 and CD44 adhesion molecules in uropods of polarized T cells; these data also suggest that these interactions participate in the formation of links between membrane receptors and the cytoskeleton, thereby regulating morphological changes during cell locomotion. PMID:9298994

  17. Enhanced Expression of T-Cell Immunoglobulin and Mucin Domain Protein 3 in Endothelial Cells Facilitates Intracellular Killing of Rickettsia heilongjiangensis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaomei; Jiao, Jun; Han, Gencheng; Gong, Wenping; Wang, Pengcheng; Xiong, Xiaolu; Wen, Bohai

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsia heilongjiangensis is the pathogen of Far eastern spotted fever, and T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3) is expressed in human vascular endothelial cells, the major target cells of rickettsiae. In the present study, we investigated the effects of altered Tim-3 expression in vivo in mice and in vitro in human endothelial cells, on day 3 after R. heilongjiangensis infection. Compared with corresponding controls, rickettsial burdens both in vivo and in vitro were significantly higher with blocked Tim-3 signaling or silenced Tim-3 and significantly lower with overexpressed Tim-3. Additionally, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and interferon γ in endothelial cells with blocked Tim-3 signaling or silenced Tim-3 was significantly lower, while the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, interferon γ, and tumor necrosis factor α in transgenic mice with Tim-3 overexpression was significantly higher. These results reveal that enhanced Tim-3 expression facilitates intracellular rickettsial killing in a nitric oxide-dependent manner in endothelial cells during the early phase of rickettsial infection.

  18. CEACAM1 regulates TIM–3–mediated tolerance and exhaustion

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Hwa; Zhu, Chen; Kondo, Yasuyuki; Anderson, Ana C.; Gandhi, Amit; Russell, Andrew; Dougan, Stephanie K.; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Melum, Espen; Pertel, Thomas; Clayton, Kiera L.; Raab, Monika; Chen, Qiang; Beauchemin, Nicole; Yazaki, Paul J.; Pyzik, Michal; Ostrowski, Mario A.; Glickman, Jonathan N.; Rudd, Christopher E.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Franke, Andre; Petsko, Gregory A.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain-3 (TIM-3, also known as HAVCR2) is an activation-induced inhibitory molecule involved in tolerance and shown to induce T-cell exhaustion in chronic viral infection and cancers1–5. Under some conditions, TIM-3 expression has also been shown to be stimulatory. Considering that TIM-3, like cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1), is being targeted for cancer immunotherapy, it is important to identify the circumstances under which TIM-3 can inhibit and activate T-cell responses. Here we show that TIM-3 is co-expressed and forms a heterodimer with carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1), another well-known molecule expressed on activated T cells and involved in T-cell inhibition6–10. Biochemical, biophysical and X-ray crystallography studies show that the membrane-distal immunoglobulin-variable (IgV)-like amino-terminal domain of each is crucial to these interactions. The presence of CEACAM1 endows TIM-3 with inhibitory function. CEACAM1 facilitates the maturation and cell surface expression of TIM-3 by forming a heterodimeric interaction in cis through the highly related membrane-distal N-terminal domains of each molecule. CEACAM1 and TIM-3 also bind in trans through their N-terminal domains. Both cis and trans interactions between CEACAM1 and TIM-3 determine the tolerance-inducing function of TIM-3. In a mouse adoptive transfer colitis model, CEACAM1-deficient T cells are hyper-inflammatory with reduced cell surface expression of TIM-3 and regulatory cytokines, and this is restored by T-cell-specific CEACAM1 expression. During chronic viral infection and in a tumour environment, CEACAM1 and TIM-3 mark exhausted T cells. Co-blockade of CEACAM1 and TIM-3 leads to enhancement of anti-tumour immune responses with improved elimination of tumours in mouse colorectal cancer models. Thus, CEACAM1 serves as a heterophilic ligand for TIM-3 that is required for its ability to

  19. Decreased serum levels of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-1 and T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Yuan, H; Yao, Y S; Chen, G M; Sheng, J; Xu, L; Pan, H F

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the serum T-cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM)-1 and TIM-3 levels in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and analyze their correlations with clinical features. Sixtyone SLE patients and 69 healthy controls were enrolled, serum TIM-1 and TIM-3 levels were detected by ELISA. Results demonstrated that both serum TIM-1 and TIM-3 levels were significantly decreased in SLE patients compared with controls (both P less than 0.05). Lower serum TIM-3 levels in SLE patients with nephritis were observed when compared to those without nephritis, with a marginal statistical significance (P=0.059). However, both serum TIM-1 and TIM-3 levels had no significant correlation with SLE disease activity (both >0.05). In summary, decreased serum TIM-1 and TIM-3 levels and association of TIM-3 with nephritis suggest their possible role in the development and pathogenesis of SLE. However, further studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results. PMID:27049082

  20. Downregulation of T cell immunoglobulin and mucin protein 3 in the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Ming-Guang; Liang, Guo-Biao; Yu, Chun-Yong; Li, Zhi-Qing; Gao, Xu

    2015-02-01

    Evidence has shown that inflammation acts as a critical contributor to the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysm (IA), a potentially devastating clinical problem. T cell immunoglobulin and mucin protein 3 (Tim-3) is a negative regulatory molecule and plays important roles in the inflammation process. In the current study, we investigated the expression of Tim-3 and its correlation with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in IA patients. Data showed that both messenger RNA (mRNA) level and protein level of Tim-3 were significantly decreased in CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells from IA patients than from healthy controls (P < 0.001). However, expression of Tim-3 was not altered in monocytes between patients and healthy donors. Further analyses revealed that patients with ruptured aneurysm had significantly lower level of Tim-3 in CD8+ T cells than those with un-ruptured aneurysm. In addition, a negative correlation between serum level of TNF-α and the expression of Tim-3 in CD4+ T cells was observed in IA patients. Similar correlation was also identified in CD8+ T cells from IA patients. Our study suggests that Tim-3 may participate in the development and progression of IA by probably its negative regulation on TNF-α.

  1. T Cell/Transmembrane, Ig, and Mucin-3 Allelic Variants Differentially Recognize Phosphatidylserine and Mediate Phagocytosis of Apoptotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Bu, Xia; Ballesteros, Angela; Santiago, César; Chim, Yee-Ling E.; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Karisola, Piia; Pichavant, Muriel; Kaplan, Gerardo G.; Umetsu, Dale T.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Casasnovas, José M.

    2011-01-01

    T cell/transmembrane, Ig, and mucin (TIM) proteins, identified using a congenic mouse model of asthma, critically regulate innate and adaptive immunity. TIM-1 and TIM-4 are receptors for phosphatidylserine (PtdSer), exposed on the surfaces of apoptotic cells. Herein, we show with structural and biological studies that TIM-3 is also a receptor for PtdSer that binds in a pocket on the N-terminal IgV domain in coordination with a calcium ion. The TIM-3/PtdSer structure is similar to that of TIM-4/PtdSer, reflecting a conserved PtdSer binding mode by TIM family members. Fibroblastic cells expressing mouse or human TIM-3 bound and phagocytosed apoptotic cells, with the BALB/c allelic variant of mouse TIM-3 showing a higher capacity than the congenic C.D2 Es-Hba–allelic variant. These functional differences were due to structural differences in the BC loop of the IgV domain of the TIM-3 polymorphic variants. In contrast to fibroblastic cells, T or B cells expressing TIM-3 formed conjugates with but failed to engulf apoptotic cells. Together these findings indicate that TIM-3–expressing cells can respond to apoptotic cells, but the consequence of TIM-3 engagement of PtdSer depends on the polymorphic variants of and type of cell expressing TIM-3. These findings establish a new paradigm for TIM proteins as PtdSer receptors and unify the function of the TIM gene family, which has been associated with asthma and autoimmunity and shown to modulate peripheral tolerance. PMID:20083673

  2. Iron uptake mediated by binding of H-ferritin to the TIM-2 receptor in mouse cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Jian; Seaman, William E; Di, Xiumin; Wang, Wei; Willingham, Mark; Torti, Frank M; Torti, Suzy V

    2011-01-01

    Ferritin binds specifically and saturably to a variety of cell types, and recently several ferritin receptors have been cloned. TIM-2 is a specific receptor for H ferritin (HFt) in the mouse. TIM-2 is a member of the T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain containing (TIM) protein family and plays an important role in immunity. The expression of TIM-2 outside of the immune system indicates that this receptor may have broader roles. We tested whether ferritin binding to TIM-2 can serve as an iron delivery mechanism. TIM-2 was transfected into normal (TCMK-1) mouse kidney cells, where it was appropriately expressed on the cell surface. HFt was labeled with (55)Fe and (55)Fe-HFt was incubated with TIM-2 positive cells or controls. (55)Fe-HFt uptake was observed only in TIM-2 positive cells. HFt uptake was also seen in A20 B cells, which express endogenous TIM-2. TIM-2 levels were not increased by iron chelation. Uptake of (55)Fe-HFt was specific and temperature-dependent. HFt taken up by TIM-2 positive cells transited through the endosome and eventually entered a lysosomal compartment, distinguishing the HFt pathway from that of transferrin, the classical vehicle for cellular iron delivery. Iron delivered following binding of HFt to TIM-2 entered the cytosol and became metabolically available, resulting in increased levels of endogenous intracellular ferritin. We conclude that TIM-2 can function as an iron uptake pathway.

  3. Tim-2 is the receptor for H-ferritin on oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Todorich, Bozho; Zhang, Xuesheng; Slagle-Webb, Becky; Seaman, William E; Connor, James R

    2008-12-01

    Oligodendrocytes stain more strongly for iron than any other cell in the CNS, and they require iron for the production of myelin. For most cell types transferrin is the major iron delivery protein, yet neither transferrin receptor protein nor mRNA are detectable in mature oligodendrocytes. Thus an alternative iron delivery mechanism must exist. Given the significant long term consequences of developmental iron deficiency and the iron requirements for normal myelination, identification of the iron delivery mechanism for oligodendrocytes is important. Previously we have reported that oligodendrocytes bind H-ferritin and that H-ferritin binds to white matter tracts in vivo. Recently, T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing protein-2 (Tim-2) was shown to bind and internalize H-ferritin. In the present study we show that Tim-2 is expressed on oligodendrocytes both in vivo and in vitro. Further, the onset of saturable H-ferritin binding in CG4 oligodendrocyte cell line is accompanied by Tim-2 expression. Application of a blocking antibody to the extracellular domain of Tim-2 significantly reduces H-ferritin binding to the differentiated CG4 cells and primary oligodendrocytes. Tim-2 expression on CG4 cells is responsive to iron; decreasing with iron loading and increasing with iron chelation. Taken together, these data provide compelling evidence that Tim-2 is the H-ferritin receptor on oligodendrocytes suggesting it is the primary mechanism for iron acquisition by these cells.

  4. Molecular characterization of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 and Galectin-9 genes of swamp- and riverine-type water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Duran, P L H; Padiernos, R B C; Abella, E A; Konnai, S; Mingala, C N

    2015-12-01

    Molecular characterization of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 (TIM-3) and Galectin-9 (GAL-9) genes of swamp- and riverine-type water buffaloes was conducted to compare these genes with other species; determine the unique characteristic specific in water buffalo; and provide baseline information for the assessment of disease progression in buffalo species. TIM-3 and GAL-9 genes were amplified, purified, sequenced and characterized. The sequence result of TIM-3 in both types of water buffaloes contained 843 nucleotides encoding to 280 amino acids while GAL-9 of swamp-type and riverine-type water buffaloes contained 1023 and 972 nucleotides encoding to 340 and 323 amino acids, respectively. Meanwhile, the nucleotide and amino sequence of TIM-3 in water buffalo were 83-98% and 94-97% identical with other artiodactyl species, respectively. On the other hand, GAL-9 nucleotide and amino acid sequence in water buffalo were 85-98% and 76-96% identical with other artiodactyl species. The tyrosine-kinase phosphorylation motif and potential glycosylation sites were conserved within the tribe Bovinae. It is imperative to have further studies in the assessment of the role of these genes in disease progression in water buffalo during chronic infection. The study is the first report that describes the genetic characteristic of TIM-3 and GAL-9 genes in water buffalo. PMID:26441033

  5. Molecular characterization of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 and Galectin-9 genes of swamp- and riverine-type water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Duran, P L H; Padiernos, R B C; Abella, E A; Konnai, S; Mingala, C N

    2015-12-01

    Molecular characterization of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 (TIM-3) and Galectin-9 (GAL-9) genes of swamp- and riverine-type water buffaloes was conducted to compare these genes with other species; determine the unique characteristic specific in water buffalo; and provide baseline information for the assessment of disease progression in buffalo species. TIM-3 and GAL-9 genes were amplified, purified, sequenced and characterized. The sequence result of TIM-3 in both types of water buffaloes contained 843 nucleotides encoding to 280 amino acids while GAL-9 of swamp-type and riverine-type water buffaloes contained 1023 and 972 nucleotides encoding to 340 and 323 amino acids, respectively. Meanwhile, the nucleotide and amino sequence of TIM-3 in water buffalo were 83-98% and 94-97% identical with other artiodactyl species, respectively. On the other hand, GAL-9 nucleotide and amino acid sequence in water buffalo were 85-98% and 76-96% identical with other artiodactyl species. The tyrosine-kinase phosphorylation motif and potential glycosylation sites were conserved within the tribe Bovinae. It is imperative to have further studies in the assessment of the role of these genes in disease progression in water buffalo during chronic infection. The study is the first report that describes the genetic characteristic of TIM-3 and GAL-9 genes in water buffalo.

  6. Galectin-9-Mediated Protection from Allo-Specific T Cells as a Mechanism of Immune Privilege of Corneal Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Shimmura-Tomita, Machiko; Wang, Mingcong; Taniguchi, Hiroko; Akiba, Hisaya; Yagita, Hideo; Hori, Junko

    2013-01-01

    The eye is an immune-privileged organ, and corneal transplantation is therefore one of the most successful organ transplantation. The immunosuppressive intraocular microenvironment is known as one of the mechanisms underlying immune privilege in the eye. T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (Tim)-3 is a regulatory molecule for T-cell function, and galectin (Gal)-9 is a Tim-3 ligand. We investigated the role of this pathway in establishing the immune-privileged status of corneal allografts in mice. Gal-9 is constitutively expressed on the corneal epithelium, endothelium and iris-ciliary body in normal mouse eyes and eyes bearing surviving allografts, and Tim-3 was expressed on CD8 T cells infiltrating the allografts. Allograft survival in recipients treated with anti-Tim-3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) or anti-Gal-9 mAb was significantly shorter than that in control recipients. In vitro, destruction of corneal endothelial cells by allo-reactive T cells was enhanced when the cornea was pretreated with anti-Gal-9 mAb. Blockade of Tim-3 or Gal-9 did not abolish anterior chamber-associated immune deviation. We propose that constitutive expression of Gal-9 plays an immunosuppressive role in corneal allografts. Gal-9 expressed on corneal endothelial cells protects them from destruction by allo-reactive T cells within the cornea. PMID:23667648

  7. Replacement of Oxygen by Sulfur in Small Organic Molecules. 3. Theoretical Studies on the Tautomeric Equilibria of the 2OH and 4OH-Substituted Oxazole and Thiazole and the 3OH and 4OH-Substituted Isoxazole and Isothiazole in the Isolated State and in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Peter I.

    2016-01-01

    This follow-up paper completes the author’s investigations to explore the in-solution structural preferences and relative free energies of all OH-substituted oxazole, thiazole, isoxazole, and isothiazole systems. The polarizable continuum dielectric solvent method calculations in the integral-equation formalism (IEF-PCM) were performed at the DFT/B97D/aug-cc-pv(q+(d))z level for the stable neutral tautomers with geometries optimized in dichloromethane and aqueous solution. With the exception of the predictions for the predominant tautomers of the 3OH isoxazole and isothiazole, the results of the IEF-PCM calculations for identifying the most stable tautomer of the given species in the two selected solvents agreed with those from experimental investigations. The calculations predict that the hydroxy proton, with the exception for the 4OH isoxazole and 4OH isothiazole, moves preferentially to the ring nitrogen or to a ring carbon atom in parallel with the development of a C=O group. The remaining, low-fraction OH tautomers will not be observable in the equilibrium compositions. Relative solvation free energies obtained by the free energy perturbation method implemented in Monte Carlo simulations are in moderate accord with the IEF-PCM results, but consideration of the ΔGsolv/MC values in calculating ΔGstot maintains the tautomeric preferences. It was revealed from the Monte Carlo solution structure analyses that the S atom is not a hydrogen-bond acceptor in any OH-substituted thiazole or isothiazole, and the OH-substituted isoxazole and oxazole ring oxygens may act as a weak hydrogen-bond acceptor at most. The molecules form 1.0−3.4 solute−water hydrogen bonds in generally unexplored numbers at some specific solute sites. Nonetheless, hydrogen-bond formation is favorable with the NH, C=O and OH groups. PMID:27409605

  8. Replacement of Oxygen by Sulfur in Small Organic Molecules. 3. Theoretical Studies on the Tautomeric Equilibria of the 2OH and 4OH-Substituted Oxazole and Thiazole and the 3OH and 4OH-Substituted Isoxazole and Isothiazole in the Isolated State and in Solution.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Peter I

    2016-01-01

    This follow-up paper completes the author's investigations to explore the in-solution structural preferences and relative free energies of all OH-substituted oxazole, thiazole, isoxazole, and isothiazole systems. The polarizable continuum dielectric solvent method calculations in the integral-equation formalism (IEF-PCM) were performed at the DFT/B97D/aug-cc-pv(q+(d))z level for the stable neutral tautomers with geometries optimized in dichloromethane and aqueous solution. With the exception of the predictions for the predominant tautomers of the 3OH isoxazole and isothiazole, the results of the IEF-PCM calculations for identifying the most stable tautomer of the given species in the two selected solvents agreed with those from experimental investigations. The calculations predict that the hydroxy proton, with the exception for the 4OH isoxazole and 4OH isothiazole, moves preferentially to the ring nitrogen or to a ring carbon atom in parallel with the development of a C=O group. The remaining, low-fraction OH tautomers will not be observable in the equilibrium compositions. Relative solvation free energies obtained by the free energy perturbation method implemented in Monte Carlo simulations are in moderate accord with the IEF-PCM results, but consideration of the ΔGsolv/MC values in calculating ΔG(s)tot maintains the tautomeric preferences. It was revealed from the Monte Carlo solution structure analyses that the S atom is not a hydrogen-bond acceptor in any OH-substituted thiazole or isothiazole, and the OH-substituted isoxazole and oxazole ring oxygens may act as a weak hydrogen-bond acceptor at most. The molecules form 1.0-3.4 solute-water hydrogen bonds in generally unexplored numbers at some specific solute sites. Nonetheless, hydrogen-bond formation is favorable with the NH, C=O and OH groups. PMID:27409605

  9. On-demand erythrocyte disposal and iron recycling requires transient macrophages in the liver.

    PubMed

    Theurl, Igor; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Nairz, Manfred; Tymoszuk, Piotr; Haschka, David; Asshoff, Malte; He, Shun; Gerhardt, Louisa M S; Holderried, Tobias A W; Seifert, Markus; Sopper, Sieghart; Fenn, Ashley M; Anzai, Atsushi; Rattik, Sara; McAlpine, Cameron; Theurl, Milan; Wieghofer, Peter; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Weber, Georg F; Harder, Nina K; Chousterman, Benjamin G; Arvedson, Tara L; McKee, Mary; Wang, Fudi; Lutz, Oliver M D; Rezoagli, Emanuele; Babitt, Jodie L; Berra, Lorenzo; Prinz, Marco; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Weiss, Guenter; Weissleder, Ralph; Lin, Herbert Y; Swirski, Filip K

    2016-08-01

    Iron is an essential component of the erythrocyte protein hemoglobin and is crucial to oxygen transport in vertebrates. In the steady state, erythrocyte production is in equilibrium with erythrocyte removal. In various pathophysiological conditions, however, erythrocyte life span is compromised severely, which threatens the organism with anemia and iron toxicity. Here we identify an on-demand mechanism that clears erythrocytes and recycles iron. We show that monocytes that express high levels of lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus C1 (LY6C1, also known as Ly-6C) ingest stressed and senescent erythrocytes, accumulate in the liver via coordinated chemotactic cues, and differentiate into ferroportin 1 (FPN1, encoded by SLC40A1)-expressing macrophages that can deliver iron to hepatocytes. Monocyte-derived FPN1(+)Tim-4(neg) macrophages are transient, reside alongside embryonically derived T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain containing 4 (Timd4, also known as Tim-4)(high) Kupffer cells (KCs), and depend on the growth factor Csf1 and the transcription factor Nrf2 (encoded by Nfe2l2). The spleen, likewise, recruits iron-loaded Ly-6C(high) monocytes, but these do not differentiate into iron-recycling macrophages, owing to the suppressive action of Csf2. The accumulation of a transient macrophage population in the liver also occurs in mouse models of hemolytic anemia, anemia of inflammation, and sickle cell disease. Inhibition of monocyte recruitment to the liver during stressed erythrocyte delivery leads to kidney and liver damage. These observations identify the liver as the primary organ that supports rapid erythrocyte removal and iron recycling, and uncover a mechanism by which the body adapts to fluctuations in erythrocyte integrity. PMID:27428900

  10. A Bioinformatics Approach Identifies Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3 and Checkpoint Kinase 1 as Upstream Regulators of Kidney Injury Molecule-1 after Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ajay, Amrendra Kumar; Kim, Tae-Min; Ramirez-Gonzalez, Victoria; Park, Peter J.; Frank, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1)/T cell Ig and mucin domain-containing protein-1 (TIM-1) is upregulated more than other proteins after AKI, and it is highly expressed in renal damage of various etiologies. In this capacity, KIM-1/TIM-1 acts as a phosphatidylserine receptor on the surface of injured proximal tubular epithelial cells, mediating phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, and it may also act as a costimulatory molecule for immune cells. Despite recognition of KIM-1 as an important therapeutic target for kidney disease, the regulators of KIM-1 transcription in the kidney remain unknown. Using a bioinformatics approach, we identified upstream regulators of KIM-1 after AKI. In response to tubular injury in rat and human kidneys or oxidant stress in human proximal tubular epithelial cells (HPTECs), KIM-1 expression increased significantly in a manner that corresponded temporally and regionally with increased phosphorylation of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) and STAT3. Both ischemic and oxidant stress resulted in a dramatic increase in reactive oxygen species that phosphorylated and activated Chk1, which subsequently bound to STAT3, phosphorylating it at S727. Furthermore, STAT3 bound to the KIM-1 promoter after ischemic and oxidant stress, and pharmacological or genetic induction of STAT3 in HPTECs increased KIM-1 mRNA and protein levels. Conversely, inhibition of STAT3 using siRNAs or dominant negative mutants reduced KIM-1 expression in a kidney cancer cell line (769-P) that expresses high basal levels of KIM-1. These observations highlight Chk1 and STAT3 as critical upstream regulators of KIM-1 expression after AKI and may suggest novel approaches for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24158981

  11. Betamethasone, but Not Tacrolimus, Suppresses the Development of Th2 Cells Mediated by Langerhans Cell-Like Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Katsuhiko; Tamai, Saki; Ikeda, Reiko

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that Langerhans cells (LCs) work as the primary orchestrators in the polarization of the immune milieu towards a T helper type 1 (Th1) or T helper type 2 (Th2) response. In this study, we investigated the effects of tacrolimus and betamethasone, each used as topical applications in atopic dermatitis (AD), on Th2 cell development mediated by LCs. LC-like dendritic cells (LDCs) were generated from mouse bone marrow cells and used as substitutes for LCs. Mice were primed with ovalbumin (OVA) peptide-pulsed LDCs, which had been treated with tacrolimus or betamethasone, via the hind footpad. After 5 d, the cytokine response in the popliteal lymph nodes was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of cell surface molecules on LDCs was investigated via reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Administration of OVA peptide-pulsed LDCs, which had been treated with betamethasone, inhibited Th2 cell development, as represented by the down-regulation of interleukin-4 production, and also inhibited Th1 cell development, represented by the down-regulation of interferon-γ production. However, tacrolimus-treated LDCs did not induce such inhibition of the development of Th1 and Th2 cells. The inhibition of Th1 and Th2 cell development was associated with the suppression of CD40 and T-cell immunoglobulin, and mucin domain-containing protein (TIM)-4 expression, respectively, in LDCs. These results suggest that the topical application of betamethasone to skin lesions of patients with AD acts on epidermal LCs, and may inhibit the development of Th2 cells, thus being of benefit for the control of AD. PMID:27374298

  12. T Cell Immunoglobulin Mucin-3 Crystal Structure Reveals a Galectin-9-Independent Ligand-Binding Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Cao,E.; Zang, X.; Ramagopal, U.; Mukhopadhaya, A.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Zencheck, W.; Lary, J.; Cole, J.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    The T cell immunoglobulin mucin (Tim) family of receptors regulates effector CD4+ T cell functions and is implicated in autoimmune and allergic diseases. Tim-3 induces immunological tolerance, and engagement of the Tim-3 immunoglobulin variable (IgV) domain by galectin-9 is important for appropriate termination of T helper 1-immune responses. The 2 {angstrom} crystal structure of the Tim-3 IgV domain demonstrated that four cysteines, which are invariant within the Tim family, form two noncanonical disulfide bonds, resulting in a surface not present in other immunoglobulin superfamily members. Biochemical and biophysical studies demonstrated that this unique structural feature mediates a previously unidentified galectin-9-independent binding process and suggested that this structural feature is conserved within the entire Tim family. The current work provided a graphic example of the relationship between sequence, structure, and function and suggested that the interplay between multiple Tim-3-binding activities contributes to the regulated assembly of signaling complexes required for effective Th1-mediated immunity.

  13. Adaptive resistance to therapeutic PD-1 blockade is associated with upregulation of alternative immune checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shohei; Akbay, Esra A; Li, Yvonne Y; Herter-Sprie, Grit S; Buczkowski, Kevin A; Richards, William G; Gandhi, Leena; Redig, Amanda J; Rodig, Scott J; Asahina, Hajime; Jones, Robert E; Kulkarni, Meghana M; Kuraguchi, Mari; Palakurthi, Sangeetha; Fecci, Peter E; Johnson, Bruce E; Janne, Pasi A; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Gangadharan, Sidharta P; Costa, Daniel B; Freeman, Gordon J; Bueno, Raphael; Hodi, F Stephen; Dranoff, Glenn; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Hammerman, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    Despite compelling antitumour activity of antibodies targeting the programmed death 1 (PD-1): programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) immune checkpoint in lung cancer, resistance to these therapies has increasingly been observed. In this study, to elucidate mechanisms of adaptive resistance, we analyse the tumour immune microenvironment in the context of anti-PD-1 therapy in two fully immunocompetent mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma. In tumours progressing following response to anti-PD-1 therapy, we observe upregulation of alternative immune checkpoints, notably T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (TIM-3), in PD-1 antibody bound T cells and demonstrate a survival advantage with addition of a TIM-3 blocking antibody following failure of PD-1 blockade. Two patients who developed adaptive resistance to anti-PD-1 treatment also show a similar TIM-3 upregulation in blocking antibody-bound T cells at treatment failure. These data suggest that upregulation of TIM-3 and other immune checkpoints may be targetable biomarkers associated with adaptive resistance to PD-1 blockade. PMID:26883990

  14. Chronicle of Higher Education. Volume 51, Number 25, February 25, 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    "Chronicle of Higher Education" presents an abundant source of news and information for college and university faculty members and administrators. This February 25, 2005 issue of "Chronicle of Higher Education" includes the following articles: (1) "Sins of Admission" (Sumner, James); (2) "Admissions Today: 6 Experts Speak Out" (Foley, Tim); (3)…

  15. Adaptive resistance to therapeutic PD-1 blockade is associated with upregulation of alternative immune checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Shohei; Akbay, Esra A.; Li, Yvonne Y.; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Buczkowski, Kevin A.; Richards, William G.; Gandhi, Leena; Redig, Amanda J.; Rodig, Scott J.; Asahina, Hajime; Jones, Robert E.; Kulkarni, Meghana M.; Kuraguchi, Mari; Palakurthi, Sangeetha; Fecci, Peter E.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Janne, Pasi A.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Gangadharan, Sidharta P.; Costa, Daniel B.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Bueno, Raphael; Hodi, F. Stephen; Dranoff, Glenn; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Hammerman, Peter S.

    2016-01-01

    Despite compelling antitumour activity of antibodies targeting the programmed death 1 (PD-1): programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) immune checkpoint in lung cancer, resistance to these therapies has increasingly been observed. In this study, to elucidate mechanisms of adaptive resistance, we analyse the tumour immune microenvironment in the context of anti-PD-1 therapy in two fully immunocompetent mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma. In tumours progressing following response to anti-PD-1 therapy, we observe upregulation of alternative immune checkpoints, notably T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (TIM-3), in PD-1 antibody bound T cells and demonstrate a survival advantage with addition of a TIM-3 blocking antibody following failure of PD-1 blockade. Two patients who developed adaptive resistance to anti-PD-1 treatment also show a similar TIM-3 upregulation in blocking antibody-bound T cells at treatment failure. These data suggest that upregulation of TIM-3 and other immune checkpoints may be targetable biomarkers associated with adaptive resistance to PD-1 blockade. PMID:26883990

  16. Development of Timd2 as a reporter gene for MRI

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, P. Stephen; Rodrigues, Tiago B.; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Lyons, Scott K.; Neves, André A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the potential of an MRI gene reporter based on the ferritin receptor Timd2 (T‐cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain containing protein 2), using T1‐ and T2‐weighted imaging. Methods Pellets of cells that had been modified to express the Timd2 transgene, and incubated with either iron‐loaded or manganese‐loaded ferritin, were imaged using T1‐ and T2‐weighted MRI. Mice were also implanted subcutaneously with Timd2‐expressing cells and the resulting xenograft tissue imaged following intravenous injection of ferritin using T2‐weighted imaging. Results Timd2‐expressing cells, but not control cells, showed a large increase in both R2 and R1 in vitro following incubation with iron‐loaded and manganese‐loaded ferritin, respectively. Expression of Timd2 had no effect on cell viability or proliferation; however, manganese‐loaded ferritin, but not iron‐loaded ferritin, was toxic to Timd2‐expressing cells. Timd2‐expressing xenografts in vivo showed much smaller changes in R2 following injection of iron‐loaded ferritin than the same cells incubated in vitro with iron‐loaded ferritin. Conclusion Timd2 has demonstrated potential as an MRI reporter gene, producing large increases in R2 and R1 with ferritin and manganese‐loaded ferritin respectively in vitro, although more modest changes in R2 in vivo. Manganese‐loaded apoferritin was not used in vivo due to the toxicity observed in vitro. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Magn Reson Med 75:1697–1707, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society

  17. Blockage of Galectin-receptor Interactions by α-lactose Exacerbates Plasmodium berghei-induced Pulmonary Immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinfeng; Huang, Shiguang; Su, Xin-Zhuan; Song, Jianping; Lu, Fangli

    2016-01-01

    Malaria-associated acute lung injury (ALI) is a frequent complication of severe malaria that is often caused by "excessive" immune responses. To better understand the mechanism of ALI in malaria infection, here we investigated the roles of galectin (Gal)-1, 3, 8, 9 and the receptors of Gal-9 (Tim-3, CD44, CD137, and PDI) in malaria-induced ALI. We injected alpha (α)-lactose into mice-infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbANKA) to block galectins and found significantly elevated total proteins in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, higher parasitemia and tissue parasite burden, and increased numbers of CD68(+) alveolar macrophages as well as apoptotic cells in the lungs after blockage. Additionally, mRNA levels of Gal-9, Tim-3, CD44, CD137, and PDI were significantly increased in the lungs at day 5 after infection, and the levels of CD137, IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-10 in the lungs were also increased after α-lactose treatment. Similarly, the levels of Gal-9, Tim-3, IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, and IL-10 were all significantly increased in murine peritoneal macrophages co-cultured with PbANKA-infected red blood cells in vitro; but only IFN-α and IFN-β were significantly increased after α-lactose treatment. Our data indicate that Gal-9 interaction with its multiple receptors play an important role in murine malaria-associated ALI. PMID:27554340

  18. TIM genes: a family of cell surface phosphatidylserine receptors that regulate innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Gordon J.; Casasnovas, Jose M.; Umetsu, Dale T.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The TIM (T cell/transmembrane, immunoglobulin, and mucin) gene family plays a critical role in regulating immune responses, including allergy, asthma, transplant tolerance, autoimmunity, and the response to viral infections. The unique structure of TIM immunoglobulin variable region domains allows highly specific recognition of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer), exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells. TIM-1, TIM-3, and TIM-4 all recognize PtdSer but differ in expression, suggesting that they have distinct functions in regulating immune responses. TIM-1, an important susceptibility gene for asthma and allergy, is preferentially expressed on T-helper 2 (Th2) cells and functions as a potent costimulatory molecule for T-cell activation. TIM-3 is preferentially expressed on Th1 and Tc1 cells, and generates an inhibitory signal resulting in apoptosis of Th1 and Tc1 cells. TIM-3 is also expressed on some dendritic cells and can mediate phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and cross-presentation of antigen. In contrast, TIM-4 is exclusively expressed on antigen-presenting cells, where it mediates phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and plays an important role in maintaining tolerance. TIM molecules thus provide a functional repertoire for recognition of apoptotic cells, which determines whether apoptotic cell recognition leads to immune activation or tolerance, depending on the TIM molecule engaged and the cell type on which it is expressed. PMID:20536563

  19. RepSox slows decay of CD34+ acute myeloid leukemia cells and decreases T cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 expression.

    PubMed

    Jajosky, Audrey N; Coad, James E; Vos, Jeffrey A; Martin, Karen H; Senft, Jamie R; Wenger, Sharon L; Gibson, Laura F

    2014-07-01

    Despite initial response to therapy, most acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients relapse. To eliminate relapse-causing leukemic stem/progenitor cells (LPCs), patient-specific immune therapies may be required. In vitro cellular engineering may require increasing the "stemness" or immunogenicity of tumor cells and activating or restoring cancer-impaired immune-effector and antigen-presenting cells. Leukapheresis samples provide the cells needed to engineer therapies: LPCs to be targeted, normal hematopoietic stem cells to be spared, and cancer-impaired immune cells to be repaired and activated. This study sought to advance development of LPC-targeted therapies by exploring nongenetic ways to slow the decay and to increase the immunogenicity of primary CD34(+) AML cells. CD34(+) AML cells generally displayed more colony-forming and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity than CD34(-) AML cells. Along with exposure to bone marrow stromal cells and low (1%-5%) oxygen, culture with RepSox (a reprogramming tool and inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β receptor 1) consistently slowed decline of CD34(+) AML and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) cells. RepSox-treated AML cells displayed higher CD34, CXCL12, and MYC mRNA levels than dimethyl sulfoxide-treated controls. RepSox also accelerated loss of T cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (Tim-3), an immune checkpoint receptor that impairs antitumor immunity, from the surface of AML and MDS cells. Our results suggest RepSox may reduce Tim-3 expression by inhibiting transforming growth factor-β signaling and slow decay of CD34(+) AML cells by increasing CXCL12 and MYC, two factors that inhibit AML cell differentiation. By prolonging survival of CD34(+) AML cells and reducing Tim-3, RepSox may promote in vitro immune cell activation and advance development of LPC-targeted therapies.

  20. Tr1-Like T Cells – An Enigmatic Regulatory T Cell Lineage

    PubMed Central

    White, Anna Malgorzata; Wraith, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The immune system evolved to respond to foreign invaders and prevent autoimmunity to self-antigens. Several types of regulatory T cells facilitate the latter process. These include a subset of Foxp3− CD4+ T cells able to secrete IL-10 in an antigen-specific manner, type 1 regulatory (Tr1) T cells. Although their suppressive function has been confirmed both in vitro and in vivo, their phenotype remains poorly defined. It has been suggested that the surface markers LAG-3 and CD49b are biomarkers for murine and human Tr1 cells. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of our data regarding the expression pattern of inhibitory receptors (IRs) CD49b, TIM-3, PD-1, TIGIT, LAG-3, and ICOS on Tr1-like human T cells generated in vitro from CD4+ memory T cells stimulated with αCD3 and αCD28 antibodies. We found that there were no differences in IR expression between IL-10+ and IL-10− T cells. However, CD4+IL-10+ T cells isolated ex vivo, following a short stimulation and cytokine secretion assay, contained significantly higher proportions of TIM-3+ and PD-1+ cells. They also expressed significantly higher TIGIT mRNA and showed a trend toward increased TIM-3 mRNA levels. These data led us to conclude that large pools of IRs may be stored intracellularly; hence, they may not represent ideal candidates as cell surface biomarkers for Tr1-like T cells. PMID:27683580

  1. Tr1-Like T Cells – An Enigmatic Regulatory T Cell Lineage

    PubMed Central

    White, Anna Malgorzata; Wraith, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The immune system evolved to respond to foreign invaders and prevent autoimmunity to self-antigens. Several types of regulatory T cells facilitate the latter process. These include a subset of Foxp3− CD4+ T cells able to secrete IL-10 in an antigen-specific manner, type 1 regulatory (Tr1) T cells. Although their suppressive function has been confirmed both in vitro and in vivo, their phenotype remains poorly defined. It has been suggested that the surface markers LAG-3 and CD49b are biomarkers for murine and human Tr1 cells. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of our data regarding the expression pattern of inhibitory receptors (IRs) CD49b, TIM-3, PD-1, TIGIT, LAG-3, and ICOS on Tr1-like human T cells generated in vitro from CD4+ memory T cells stimulated with αCD3 and αCD28 antibodies. We found that there were no differences in IR expression between IL-10+ and IL-10− T cells. However, CD4+IL-10+ T cells isolated ex vivo, following a short stimulation and cytokine secretion assay, contained significantly higher proportions of TIM-3+ and PD-1+ cells. They also expressed significantly higher TIGIT mRNA and showed a trend toward increased TIM-3 mRNA levels. These data led us to conclude that large pools of IRs may be stored intracellularly; hence, they may not represent ideal candidates as cell surface biomarkers for Tr1-like T cells.

  2. Tr1-Like T Cells - An Enigmatic Regulatory T Cell Lineage.

    PubMed

    White, Anna Malgorzata; Wraith, David C

    2016-01-01

    The immune system evolved to respond to foreign invaders and prevent autoimmunity to self-antigens. Several types of regulatory T cells facilitate the latter process. These include a subset of Foxp3(-) CD4(+) T cells able to secrete IL-10 in an antigen-specific manner, type 1 regulatory (Tr1) T cells. Although their suppressive function has been confirmed both in vitro and in vivo, their phenotype remains poorly defined. It has been suggested that the surface markers LAG-3 and CD49b are biomarkers for murine and human Tr1 cells. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of our data regarding the expression pattern of inhibitory receptors (IRs) CD49b, TIM-3, PD-1, TIGIT, LAG-3, and ICOS on Tr1-like human T cells generated in vitro from CD4(+) memory T cells stimulated with αCD3 and αCD28 antibodies. We found that there were no differences in IR expression between IL-10(+) and IL-10(-) T cells. However, CD4(+)IL-10(+) T cells isolated ex vivo, following a short stimulation and cytokine secretion assay, contained significantly higher proportions of TIM-3(+) and PD-1(+) cells. They also expressed significantly higher TIGIT mRNA and showed a trend toward increased TIM-3 mRNA levels. These data led us to conclude that large pools of IRs may be stored intracellularly; hence, they may not represent ideal candidates as cell surface biomarkers for Tr1-like T cells. PMID:27683580

  3. Blockage of Galectin-receptor Interactions by α-lactose Exacerbates Plasmodium berghei-induced Pulmonary Immunopathology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinfeng; Huang, Shiguang; Su, Xin-zhuan; Song, Jianping; Lu, Fangli

    2016-01-01

    Malaria-associated acute lung injury (ALI) is a frequent complication of severe malaria that is often caused by “excessive” immune responses. To better understand the mechanism of ALI in malaria infection, here we investigated the roles of galectin (Gal)-1, 3, 8, 9 and the receptors of Gal-9 (Tim-3, CD44, CD137, and PDI) in malaria-induced ALI. We injected alpha (α)-lactose into mice-infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbANKA) to block galectins and found significantly elevated total proteins in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, higher parasitemia and tissue parasite burden, and increased numbers of CD68+ alveolar macrophages as well as apoptotic cells in the lungs after blockage. Additionally, mRNA levels of Gal-9, Tim-3, CD44, CD137, and PDI were significantly increased in the lungs at day 5 after infection, and the levels of CD137, IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-10 in the lungs were also increased after α-lactose treatment. Similarly, the levels of Gal-9, Tim-3, IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, and IL-10 were all significantly increased in murine peritoneal macrophages co-cultured with PbANKA-infected red blood cells in vitro; but only IFN-α and IFN-β were significantly increased after α-lactose treatment. Our data indicate that Gal-9 interaction with its multiple receptors play an important role in murine malaria-associated ALI. PMID:27554340

  4. Type I Interferon Elevates Co-Regulatory Receptor Expression on CMV- and EBV-Specific CD8 T Cells in Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Owusu Sekyere, Solomon; Suneetha, Pothakamuri Venkata; Hardtke, Svenja; Falk, Christine Susanne; Hengst, Julia; Manns, Michael Peter; Cornberg, Markus; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Schlaphoff, Verena

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) readily sets up persistence in a large fraction of infected hosts. Mounting epidemiological and immunological evidence suggest that HCV’s persistence could influence immune responses toward unrelated pathogens and vaccines. Nonetheless, the fundamental contribution of the inflammatory milieu during persistent HCV infection in impacting immune cells specific for common pathogens such as CMV and EBV has not been fully studied. As the co-regulatory receptors PD-1, Tim-3, and 2B4 have all been shown to be vital in regulating CD8+ T cell function, we assessed their expression on CMV/EBV-specific CD8+ T cells from patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and healthy controls ex vivo and upon stimulation with virus-specific peptides in vitro. Total and CMV/EBV-specific CD8+ T cells expressing PD-1, Tim-3, and 2B4 were highly enriched in patients with CHC compared to healthy individuals ex vivo. In vitro peptide stimulation further potentiated the differential co-regulatory receptor expression of PD-1, Tim-3, and 2B4, which then culminated in an enhanced functionality of CMV/EBV-specific CD8+ T cells in CHC patients. Comprehensively analyzing plasma cytokines between the two cohorts, we observed that not only was IFNα-2a dominant among 21 other inflammatory mediators elevated in CHC patients but it also correlated with PD-1 and Tim-3 expressions ex vivo. Importantly, IFNα-2a further caused upregulation of these markers upon in vitro peptide stimulation. Finally, we could prospectively study patients receiving novel IFN-free antiviral therapy. Here, we observed that treatment-induced clearance of HCV resulted in a partial reversion of the phenotype of CMV/EBV-specific CD8+ T cells in patients with CHC. These data reveal an alteration of the plasma concentrations of IFNα-2a together with other inflammatory mediators during CHC, which appeared to pervasively influence co-regulatory receptor expression on CMV/EBV-specific CD8+ T cells. PMID:26113847

  5. Progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia is associated with pro-inflammatory mediators and chronic activation of prostate-infiltrating lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, Berit; Mattsson, Jonas; Henningsohn, Lars; Levitsky, Victor; Uhlin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common chronic non-malignant condition whose prevalence substantially increases with age. Immune cell infiltration and pro-inflammatory mediators have been implicated in the pathogenesis. Here, we characterized 21 extracellular markers on prostate-infiltrating lymphocytes (PILs) and analyzed expression of 26 soluble proteins in prostate tissue obtained from BPH patients (n = 31). These data were correlated with clinical parameters and compared with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) (n = 10). Increased frequencies of T cells expressing co-inhibitory receptors LAG-3, PD-1, TIM-3 or CTLA-4, and co-stimulatory receptors CD28, OX40 or 4-1BB were observed in BPH tissue compared to PBMCs. These findings are consistent with chronic activation and possible functional exhaustion of PILs that may be further augmented by several identified pro-inflammatory factors, such as IL-8 and MCP-1, promoting inflammation and chemotaxis of immune cells to the prostate. Prostate size and plasma prostate-specific antigen levels positively correlated with IL-8 and MCP-1 concentrations, and frequencies of T cells expressing CTLA-4 and TIM-3. It remains to be established whether the link between inflammation and BPH progression supported by our findings reflects a progressive failure of the immune system leading to decreased immune surveillance and development of prostate cancer. PMID:26993768

  6. Follicular Regulatory CD8 T Cells Impair the Germinal Center Response in SIV and Ex Vivo HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Folkvord, Joy M.; Levy, David N.; Rakasz, Eva G.; Connick, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    During chronic HIV infection, viral replication is concentrated in secondary lymphoid follicles. Cytotoxic CD8 T cells control HIV replication in extrafollicular regions, but not in the follicle. Here, we show CXCR5hiCD44hiCD8 T cells are a regulatory subset differing from conventional CD8 T cells, and constitute the majority of CD8 T cells in the follicle. This subset, CD8 follicular regulatory T cells (CD8 TFR), expand in chronic SIV infection, exhibit enhanced expression of Tim-3 and IL-10, and express less perforin compared to conventional CD8 T cells. CD8 TFR modestly limit HIV replication in follicular helper T cells (TFH), impair TFH IL-21 production via Tim-3, and inhibit IgG production by B cells during ex vivo HIV infection. CD8 TFR induce TFH apoptosis through HLA-E, but induce less apoptosis than conventional CD8 T cells. These data demonstrate that a unique regulatory CD8 population exists in follicles that impairs GC function in HIV infection. PMID:27716848

  7. Progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia is associated with pro-inflammatory mediators and chronic activation of prostate-infiltrating lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Norström, Melissa M; Rådestad, Emelie; Sundberg, Berit; Mattsson, Jonas; Henningsohn, Lars; Levitsky, Victor; Uhlin, Michael

    2016-04-26

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common chronic non-malignant condition whose prevalence substantially increases with age. Immune cell infiltration and pro-inflammatory mediators have been implicated in the pathogenesis. Here, we characterized 21 extracellular markers on prostate-infiltrating lymphocytes (PILs) and analyzed expression of 26 soluble proteins in prostate tissue obtained from BPH patients (n = 31). These data were correlated with clinical parameters and compared with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) (n = 10). Increased frequencies of T cells expressing co-inhibitory receptors LAG-3, PD-1, TIM-3 or CTLA-4, and co-stimulatory receptors CD28, OX40 or 4-1BB were observed in BPH tissue compared to PBMCs. These findings are consistent with chronic activation and possible functional exhaustion of PILs that may be further augmented by several identified pro-inflammatory factors, such as IL-8 and MCP-1, promoting inflammation and chemotaxis of immune cells to the prostate. Prostate size and plasma prostate-specific antigen levels positively correlated with IL-8 and MCP-1 concentrations, and frequencies of T cells expressing CTLA-4 and TIM-3. It remains to be established whether the link between inflammation and BPH progression supported by our findings reflects a progressive failure of the immune system leading to decreased immune surveillance and development of prostate cancer. PMID:26993768

  8. 2D:4D finger ratio positively correlates with total cerebral cortex in males.

    PubMed

    Darnai, Gergely; Plózer, Enikő; Perlaki, Gábor; Orsi, Gergely; Nagy, Szilvia Anett; Horváth, Réka; Schwarcz, Attila; Kovács, Norbert; Altbäcker, Anna; Janszky, József; Clemens, Zsófia

    2016-02-26

    Although there is evidence that the ratio of 2nd-4th digit length (2D:4D) correlates with prenatal testosterone level, psychological and health traits only two studies have assessed the relationship with brain morphological features. Here we investigated the association between the 2D:4D ratio and several brain subvolumes. Seventy-five subjects between the ages of 18 and 30 were included in the study. The length of the 2nd and 4th digits were measured with an electronic vernier caliper while MRI measurements were performed on a Siemens Magnetom Trio Tim (3T) system. Freesurfer software suite was used for volumetric segmentation. Finger ratio significantly positively correlated with total cerebral cortex, total cerebellar white matter and total cerebellar cortex in males but not in females. Our results indicate that prenatal testosterone, as estimated by the 2D:4D ratio has an effect on adult brain morphology in males. PMID:26780566

  9. Milk and dairy consumption correlates with cerebral cortical as well as cerebral white matter volume in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Darnai, Gergely; Plózer, Enikő; Perlaki, Gábor; Orsi, Gergely; Nagy, Szilvia Anett; Horváth, Réka; Schwarcz, Attila; Kovács, Norbert; Altbäcker, Anna; Janszky, József; Clemens, Zsófia

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between habitual milk and dairy consumption and brain morphology as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigations in 119 young healthy university students. MRI measurements were performed on a Siemens Magnetom Trio Tim (3T) system while FreeSurfer software suite was used for volumetric segmentation. Dietary habits related to milk and dairy consumption were assessed by a structured questionnaire. Total cerebral cortex, total cerebral white matter, and total cerebral parenchyma were significantly related with cottage cheese and total protein intake from milk and dairy also when controlled for age and gender in the multivariate model. Our results indicate that dietary habits related with milk and dairy are proportionally associated with volumes of both cerebral cortex and cerebral white matter. PMID:26436708

  10. Short Communication: Low Expression of Activation and Inhibitory Molecules on NK Cells and CD4(+) T Cells Is Associated with Viral Control.

    PubMed

    Taborda, Natalia A; Hernández, Juan C; Lajoie, Julie; Juno, Jennifer A; Kimani, Joshua; Rugeles, María T; Fowke, Keith R

    2015-06-01

    Chronic HIV-1 infection induces severe immune alterations, including hyperactivation, exhaustion, and apoptosis. In fact, viral control has been associated with low frequencies of these processes. Here, we evaluated the expression of activation and inhibitory molecules on natural killer (NK) and CD4(+) T cells and plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines in individuals exhibiting viral control: a cohort of HIV-1-exposed-seronegative individuals (HESN) and a cohort of HIV controllers. There was lower expression of CD69, LAG-3, PD-1, and TIM-3 in both cohorts when compared to a low-risk population or HIV progressors. In addition, HIV controllers exhibited lower plasma levels of proinflamatory molecules TNF-α and IP-10. These findings suggest that individuals exhibiting viral control have lower basal expression of markers associated with cellular activation and particularly immune exhaustion.

  11. Immunological biomarkers predict HIV-1 viral rebound after treatment interruption

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Jacob; Hoffmann, Matthias; Pace, Matthew; Williams, James P.; Thornhill, John; Hamlyn, Elizabeth; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Chris; Koelsch, Kersten K.; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Cooper, David A.; Schechter, Mauro; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Fidler, Sarah; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan; Kelleher, Anthony D.; Phillips, Rodney E.; Frater, John

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of HIV-1 infection with antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the weeks following transmission may induce a state of ‘post-treatment control' (PTC) in some patients, in whom viraemia remains undetectable when ART is stopped. Explaining PTC could help our understanding of the processes that maintain viral persistence. Here we show that immunological biomarkers can predict time to viral rebound after stopping ART by analysing data from a randomized study of primary HIV-1 infection incorporating a treatment interruption (TI) after 48 weeks of ART (the SPARTAC trial). T-cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Tim-3 and Lag-3 measured prior to ART strongly predict time to the return of viraemia. These data indicate that T-cell exhaustion markers may identify those latently infected cells with a higher proclivity to viral transcription. Our results may open new avenues for understanding the mechanisms underlying PTC, and eventually HIV-1 eradication. PMID:26449164

  12. Immunological biomarkers predict HIV-1 viral rebound after treatment interruption.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Jacob; Hoffmann, Matthias; Pace, Matthew; Williams, James P; Thornhill, John; Hamlyn, Elizabeth; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Chris; Koelsch, Kersten K; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Cooper, David A; Schechter, Mauro; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Fidler, Sarah; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan; Kelleher, Anthony D; Phillips, Rodney E; Frater, John

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of HIV-1 infection with antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the weeks following transmission may induce a state of 'post-treatment control' (PTC) in some patients, in whom viraemia remains undetectable when ART is stopped. Explaining PTC could help our understanding of the processes that maintain viral persistence. Here we show that immunological biomarkers can predict time to viral rebound after stopping ART by analysing data from a randomized study of primary HIV-1 infection incorporating a treatment interruption (TI) after 48 weeks of ART (the SPARTAC trial). T-cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Tim-3 and Lag-3 measured prior to ART strongly predict time to the return of viraemia. These data indicate that T-cell exhaustion markers may identify those latently infected cells with a higher proclivity to viral transcription. Our results may open new avenues for understanding the mechanisms underlying PTC, and eventually HIV-1 eradication.

  13. T lymphocyte surface expression of exhaustion markers as biomarkers of the efficacy of chemotherapy for tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Irwin, Scott M.; Shang, Shaobin; Ordway, Diane; Orme, Ian M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Predictive biomarkers illustrating the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic regimens for tuberculosis still remain elusive. To date, most are predicated on assays using sputum or serum; as a result, if not predictive, treatment failure in patients may not be evident for some time. We report here the results of a simple screening study in which T cell surface markers were examined in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and then treated with drugs. These studies identified certain markers, the exhaustion markers PD-1 and TIM-3, as well as the marker KLRG-1, particularly on CD8 T cells, that changed in concert with reduction of the bacterial load in the lungs. While there is no guarantee these changes would also be seen on T cells in the blood, this approach should be further investigated. PMID:21530406

  14. Leukemia Stem Cell-Released Microvesicles Promote the Survival and Migration of Myeloid Leukemia Cells and These Effects Can Be Inhibited by MicroRNA34a Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Jing; Dong, Min

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) play the major role in relapse of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recent evidence indicates that microvesicles (MVs) released from cancer stem cells can promote tumor growth and invasion. In this study, we investigated whether LSCs-released MVs (LMVs) can regulate the malignance of AML cells and whether overexpression of tumor suppressive microRNA (miR), miR34a, is able to interrupt this process. LSCs were transfected with miRNA control (miRCtrl) or miR34a mimic for producing LMVs, respectively, defined as LMVsmiRCtrl and LMVsmiR34a. The effect of miR34a transfection on LSC proliferation and the effects of LMVsmiRCtrl or LMVsmiR34a on the proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of AML cells (after LSC depletion) were determined. The levels of miR34a targets, caspase-3 and T cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (Tim-3), were analyzed. Results showed that (1) LMVsmiRCtrl promoted proliferation and migration and inhibited apoptosis of AML cells, which were associated with miR34a deficit; (2) transfection of miR34a mimic inhibited LSC proliferation and increased miR34a level in LMVsmiR34a; (3) LMVsmiR34a produced opposite effects as compared with LMVsmiRCtrl, which were associated with the changes of caspase-3 and Tim-3 levels. In summary, LMVs support AML cell malignance and modulating miR34a could offer a new approach for the management of AML. PMID:27127521

  15. Intraepithelial macrophage infiltration is related to a high number of regulatory T cells and promotes a progressive course of HPV-induced vulvar neoplasia.

    PubMed

    van Esch, Edith M G; van Poelgeest, Mariette I E; Trimbos, J Baptist M Z; Fleuren, Gert Jan; Jordanova, Ekaterina S; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2015-02-15

    Human papilloma virus (HPV)-induced usual-type vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (uVIN) is infiltrated by myeloid cells but the type and role of these cells is unclear. We used triple immunofluorescent confocal microscopy to locate, identify and quantify myeloid cells based on their staining pattern for CD14, CD33 and CD163 in a cohort of 43 primary and 20 recurrent uVIN lesions, 21 carcinomas and 26 normal vulvar tissues. The progressive course of uVIN is characterized by an increase in both intraepithelial and stromal mature M1 and M2 macrophages. While the M2 macrophages outnumber M1 macrophages in healthy controls and uVIN, they are matched in number by M1 macrophages in cancer. Importantly, uVIN patients with a dense intraepithelial infiltration with mature CD14+ macrophages (irrespective of M1 or M2 type) displayed approximately a six times higher risk to develop a recurrence and a high number of these cells constituted an independent prognostic factor for recurrence. In addition, a dense intraepithelial CD14+ cell infiltration was associated with high numbers of intraepithelial CD4+ Tregs and low numbers of stromal CD8+TIM3+ T cells. Patients with low numbers of intraepithelial CD14+ cells and high numbers of stromal CD8+TIM3+ cells showed the best recurrence-free survival. These data clearly show the importance of the local immune response in HPV-induced vulvar neoplasia and may be of help in predicting the prognosis of patients or their response to immunotherapy.

  16. Antigen spreading-induced CD8+T cells confer protection against the lethal challenge of wild-type malignant mesothelioma by eliminating myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Boon Kiat; Tang, Jiansong; Wu, Xilin; Cheung, Ka-Wai; Lok Lo, Nathan Tin; Man, Kwan; Liu, Li; Chen, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    A key focus in cancer immunotherapy is to investigate the mechanism of efficacious vaccine responses. Using HIV-1 GAG-p24 in a model PD1-based DNA vaccine, we recently reported that vaccine-elicited CD8+ T cells conferred complete prevention and therapeutic cure of AB1-GAG malignant mesothelioma in immunocompetent BALB/c mice. Here, we further investigated the efficacy and correlation of protection on the model vaccine-mediated antigen spreading against wild-type AB1 (WT-AB1) mesothelioma. We found that this vaccine was able to protect mice completely from three consecutive lethal challenges of AB1-GAG mesothelioma. Through antigen spreading these animals also developed tumor-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, but neither CD4+ T cells nor antibodies, rejecting WT-AB1 mesothelioma. A majority of these protected mice (90%) were also completely protected against the lethal WT-AB1 challenge. Adoptive cell transfer experiments further demonstrated that antigen spreading-induced CD8+ T cells conferred efficacious therapeutic effects against established WT-AB1 mesothelioma and prevented the increase of exhausted PD-1+ and Tim-3+ CD8+ T cells. A significant inverse correlation was found between the frequency of functional PD1−Tim3− CD8+ T cells and that of MDSCs or tumor mass in vivo. Mechanistically, we found that WT-AB1 mesothelioma induced predominantly polymorphonuclear (PMN) MDSCs in vivo. In co-cultures with efficacious CD8+ T cells, a significant number of PMN-MDSCs underwent apoptosis in a dose-dependent way. Our findings indicate that efficacious CD8+ T cells capable of eliminating both tumor cells and MDSCs are likely necessary for fighting wild-type malignant mesothelioma. PMID:26431275

  17. Suppression of Glut1 and Glucose Metabolism by Decreased Akt/mTORC1 Signaling Drives T Cell Impairment in B Cell Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Siska, Peter J; van der Windt, Gerritje J W; Kishton, Rigel J; Cohen, Sivan; Eisner, William; MacIver, Nancie J; Kater, Arnon P; Weinberg, J Brice; Rathmell, Jeffrey C

    2016-09-15

    Leukemia can promote T cell dysfunction and exhaustion that contributes to increased susceptibility to infection and mortality. The treatment-independent mechanisms that mediate leukemia-associated T cell impairments are poorly understood, but metabolism tightly regulates T cell function and may contribute. In this study, we show that B cell leukemia causes T cells to become activated and hyporesponsive with increased PD-1 and TIM3 expression similar to exhausted T cells and that T cells from leukemic hosts become metabolically impaired. Metabolic defects included reduced Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, decreased expression of the glucose transporter Glut1 and hexokinase 2, and reduced glucose uptake. These metabolic changes correlated with increased regulatory T cell frequency and expression of PD-L1 and Gal-9 on both leukemic and stromal cells in the leukemic microenvironment. PD-1, however, was not sufficient to drive T cell impairment, as in vivo and in vitro anti-PD-1 blockade on its own only modestly improved T cell function. Importantly, impaired T cell metabolism directly contributed to dysfunction, as a rescue of T cell metabolism by genetically increasing Akt/mTORC1 signaling or expression of Glut1 partially restored T cell function. Enforced Akt/mTORC1 signaling also decreased expression of inhibitory receptors TIM3 and PD-1, as well as partially improved antileukemia immunity. Similar findings were obtained in T cells from patients with acute or chronic B cell leukemia, which were also metabolically exhausted and had defective Akt/mTORC1 signaling, reduced expression of Glut1 and hexokinase 2, and decreased glucose metabolism. Thus, B cell leukemia-induced inhibition of T cell Akt/mTORC1 signaling and glucose metabolism drives T cell dysfunction. PMID:27511728

  18. Leukemia Stem Cell-Released Microvesicles Promote the Survival and Migration of Myeloid Leukemia Cells and These Effects Can Be Inhibited by MicroRNA34a Overexpression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Jing; Dong, Min

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) play the major role in relapse of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recent evidence indicates that microvesicles (MVs) released from cancer stem cells can promote tumor growth and invasion. In this study, we investigated whether LSCs-released MVs (LMVs) can regulate the malignance of AML cells and whether overexpression of tumor suppressive microRNA (miR), miR34a, is able to interrupt this process. LSCs were transfected with miRNA control (miRCtrl) or miR34a mimic for producing LMVs, respectively, defined as LMVs(miRCtrl) and LMVs(miR34a). The effect of miR34a transfection on LSC proliferation and the effects of LMVs(miRCtrl) or LMVs(miR34a) on the proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of AML cells (after LSC depletion) were determined. The levels of miR34a targets, caspase-3 and T cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (Tim-3), were analyzed. Results showed that (1) LMVs(miRCtrl) promoted proliferation and migration and inhibited apoptosis of AML cells, which were associated with miR34a deficit; (2) transfection of miR34a mimic inhibited LSC proliferation and increased miR34a level in LMVs(miR34a); (3) LMVs(miR34a) produced opposite effects as compared with LMVs(miRCtrl), which were associated with the changes of caspase-3 and Tim-3 levels. In summary, LMVs support AML cell malignance and modulating miR34a could offer a new approach for the management of AML. PMID:27127521

  19. Impaired T cell function in malignant pleural effusion is caused by TGF-β derived predominantly from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Yang, Li; Wang, Liping; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Jieyao; Yue, Dongli; Chen, Xinfeng; Ping, Yu; Huang, Lan; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Yi

    2016-11-15

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is an indication of advanced cancer. Immune dysfunction often occurs in MPE. We aimed to identify the reason for impaired T cell activity in MPE from lung cancer patients and to provide clues toward potential immune therapies for MPE. The surface inhibitory molecules and cytotoxic activity of T cells in MPE and peripheral blood (PB) were analyzed using flow cytometry. Levels of inflammatory cytokines in MPE and PB were tested using ELISA. TGF-β expression in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) was also analyzed. The effect of TAMs on T cells was verified in vitro. Lastly, changes in T cells were evaluated following treatment with anti-TGF-β antibody. We found that expression levels of Tim-3, PD-1 and CTLA-4 in T cells from MPE were upregulated compared with those from PB, but levels of IFN-γ and Granzyme B were downregulated (p < 0.05). The amount of TGF-β was significantly higher in MPE than in PB (p < 0.05). TGF-β was mainly produced by TAMs in MPE. When T cells were co-cultured with TAMs, expression levels of Tim-3, PD-1 and CTLA-4 were significantly higher than controls, whereas levels of IFN-γ and Granzyme B were significantly decreased, in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). In vitro treatment with anti-TGF-β antibody restored the impaired T cell cytotoxic activity in MPE. Our results indicate that macrophage-derived TGF-β plays an important role in impaired T cell cytotoxicity. It will therefore be valuable to develop therapeutic strategies against TGF-β pathway for MPE therapy of lung cancer. PMID:27459735

  20. Regulation of HBV-specific CD8(+) T cell-mediated inflammation is diversified in different clinical presentations of HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Dinney, Colin M; Zhao, Lu-Dong; Conrad, Charles D; Duker, Jay M; Karas, Richard O; Hu, Zhibin; Hamilton, Michele A; Gillis, Thomas R; Parker, Thomas M; Fan, Bing; Advani, Andrew H; Poordad, Fred B; Fauceglia, Paulette L; Kirsch, Kathrin M; Munk, Peter T; Ladanyi, Marc P; Bochner, Bernard A; Bekelman, Justin A; Grandori, Carla M; Olson, James C; Lechan, Ronald D; Abou, Ghassan M A; Goodarzi, Mark A

    2015-10-01

    Chronic HBV infection is the leading cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatic cancer, but the individual responses toward HBV infection are highly variable, ranging from asymptomatic to chronic active hepatitis B inflammation. In this study, we hypothesized that the different individual responses to HBV infection was associated with differences in HBV-specific CD8(+) T cell-mediated inflammation and cytotoxicity. Blood samples were collected from subjects with asymptomatic HBV-infection, subjects undergoing active chronic HBV flares (active CHB), and subjects with HBV-infected hepatocellular carcinoma (HBV-HCC). By tetramer staining, we found that all three groups had similar frequencies of HBVspecific CD8(+) T cells. However, after HBV peptide stimulation, the HBV-specific CD8(+) T cells in asymptomatic subjects had significantly stronger interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and CD107a expression than those in active CHB and HBV-HCC patients. Examination of surface marker expression revealed that the PD-1(-)Tim-3(-) double-negative cell population was the main contributor to HBV-specific inflammation. In active CHB patients and HBV-HCC patients, however, the frequencies of activated PD-1(-)Tim-3(-) cells were significantly reduced. Moreover, the serum HBV DNA titer was not correlated with the frequencies of HBV-specific CD8(+) T cells but was inversely correlated with the frequencies of IFN-g-expressing and CD107a-express cells in response to HBV stimulation. Together, our data demonstrated that the status of HBVspecific CD8(+) T cell exhaustion was associated with different clinical outcomes of chronic HBV infection.

  1. Impaired T cell function in malignant pleural effusion is caused by TGF-β derived predominantly from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Yang, Li; Wang, Liping; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Jieyao; Yue, Dongli; Chen, Xinfeng; Ping, Yu; Huang, Lan; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Yi

    2016-11-15

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is an indication of advanced cancer. Immune dysfunction often occurs in MPE. We aimed to identify the reason for impaired T cell activity in MPE from lung cancer patients and to provide clues toward potential immune therapies for MPE. The surface inhibitory molecules and cytotoxic activity of T cells in MPE and peripheral blood (PB) were analyzed using flow cytometry. Levels of inflammatory cytokines in MPE and PB were tested using ELISA. TGF-β expression in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) was also analyzed. The effect of TAMs on T cells was verified in vitro. Lastly, changes in T cells were evaluated following treatment with anti-TGF-β antibody. We found that expression levels of Tim-3, PD-1 and CTLA-4 in T cells from MPE were upregulated compared with those from PB, but levels of IFN-γ and Granzyme B were downregulated (p < 0.05). The amount of TGF-β was significantly higher in MPE than in PB (p < 0.05). TGF-β was mainly produced by TAMs in MPE. When T cells were co-cultured with TAMs, expression levels of Tim-3, PD-1 and CTLA-4 were significantly higher than controls, whereas levels of IFN-γ and Granzyme B were significantly decreased, in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). In vitro treatment with anti-TGF-β antibody restored the impaired T cell cytotoxic activity in MPE. Our results indicate that macrophage-derived TGF-β plays an important role in impaired T cell cytotoxicity. It will therefore be valuable to develop therapeutic strategies against TGF-β pathway for MPE therapy of lung cancer.

  2. Exhaustion of Activated CD8 T Cells Predicts Disease Progression in Primary HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hickling, Stephen; Hurst, Jacob; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Christian B.; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Kinloch, Sabine; Babiker, Abdel; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie; Fidler, Sarah; Phillips, Rodney; Frater, John

    2016-01-01

    The rate at which HIV-1 infected individuals progress to AIDS is highly variable and impacted by T cell immunity. CD8 T cell inhibitory molecules are up-regulated in HIV-1 infection and associate with immune dysfunction. We evaluated participants (n = 122) recruited to the SPARTAC randomised clinical trial to determine whether CD8 T cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Lag-3 and Tim-3 were associated with immune activation and disease progression. Expression of PD-1, Tim-3, Lag-3 and CD38 on CD8 T cells from the closest pre-therapy time-point to seroconversion was measured by flow cytometry, and correlated with surrogate markers of HIV-1 disease (HIV-1 plasma viral load (pVL) and CD4 T cell count) and the trial endpoint (time to CD4 count <350 cells/μl or initiation of antiretroviral therapy). To explore the functional significance of these markers, co-expression of Eomes, T-bet and CD39 was assessed. Expression of PD-1 on CD8 and CD38 CD8 T cells correlated with pVL and CD4 count at baseline, and predicted time to the trial endpoint. Lag-3 expression was associated with pVL but not CD4 count. For all exhaustion markers, expression of CD38 on CD8 T cells increased the strength of associations. In Cox models, progression to the trial endpoint was most marked for PD-1/CD38 co-expressing cells, with evidence for a stronger effect within 12 weeks from confirmed diagnosis of PHI. The effect of PD-1 and Lag-3 expression on CD8 T cells retained statistical significance in Cox proportional hazards models including antiretroviral therapy and CD4 count, but not pVL as co-variants. Expression of ‘exhaustion’ or ‘immune checkpoint’ markers in early HIV-1 infection is associated with clinical progression and is impacted by immune activation and the duration of infection. New markers to identify exhausted T cells and novel interventions to reverse exhaustion may inform the development of novel immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:27415828

  3. Exhaustion of Activated CD8 T Cells Predicts Disease Progression in Primary HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Matthias; Pantazis, Nikos; Martin, Genevieve E; Hickling, Stephen; Hurst, Jacob; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Christian B; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie; Fidler, Sarah; Phillips, Rodney; Frater, John

    2016-07-01

    The rate at which HIV-1 infected individuals progress to AIDS is highly variable and impacted by T cell immunity. CD8 T cell inhibitory molecules are up-regulated in HIV-1 infection and associate with immune dysfunction. We evaluated participants (n = 122) recruited to the SPARTAC randomised clinical trial to determine whether CD8 T cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Lag-3 and Tim-3 were associated with immune activation and disease progression. Expression of PD-1, Tim-3, Lag-3 and CD38 on CD8 T cells from the closest pre-therapy time-point to seroconversion was measured by flow cytometry, and correlated with surrogate markers of HIV-1 disease (HIV-1 plasma viral load (pVL) and CD4 T cell count) and the trial endpoint (time to CD4 count <350 cells/μl or initiation of antiretroviral therapy). To explore the functional significance of these markers, co-expression of Eomes, T-bet and CD39 was assessed. Expression of PD-1 on CD8 and CD38 CD8 T cells correlated with pVL and CD4 count at baseline, and predicted time to the trial endpoint. Lag-3 expression was associated with pVL but not CD4 count. For all exhaustion markers, expression of CD38 on CD8 T cells increased the strength of associations. In Cox models, progression to the trial endpoint was most marked for PD-1/CD38 co-expressing cells, with evidence for a stronger effect within 12 weeks from confirmed diagnosis of PHI. The effect of PD-1 and Lag-3 expression on CD8 T cells retained statistical significance in Cox proportional hazards models including antiretroviral therapy and CD4 count, but not pVL as co-variants. Expression of 'exhaustion' or 'immune checkpoint' markers in early HIV-1 infection is associated with clinical progression and is impacted by immune activation and the duration of infection. New markers to identify exhausted T cells and novel interventions to reverse exhaustion may inform the development of novel immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:27415828

  4. Characterizing Functional Domains for TIM-Mediated Enveloped Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Moller-Tank, Sven; Albritton, Lorraine M.; Rennert, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1) and other TIM family members were recently identified as phosphatidylserine (PtdSer)-mediated virus entry-enhancing receptors (PVEERs). These proteins enhance entry of Ebola virus (EBOV) and other viruses by binding PtdSer on the viral envelope, concentrating virus on the cell surface, and promoting subsequent internalization. The PtdSer-binding activity of the immunoglobulin-like variable (IgV) domain is essential for both virus binding and internalization by TIM-1. However, TIM-3, whose IgV domain also binds PtdSer, does not effectively enhance virus entry, indicating that other domains of TIM proteins are functionally important. Here, we investigate the domains supporting enhancement of enveloped virus entry, thereby defining the features necessary for a functional PVEER. Using a variety of chimeras and deletion mutants, we found that in addition to a functional PtdSer-binding domain PVEERs require a stalk domain of sufficient length, containing sequences that promote an extended structure. Neither the cytoplasmic nor the transmembrane domain of TIM-1 is essential for enhancing virus entry, provided the protein is still plasma membrane bound. Based on these defined characteristics, we generated a mimic lacking TIM sequences and composed of annexin V, the mucin-like domain of α-dystroglycan, and a glycophosphatidylinositol anchor that functioned as a PVEER to enhance transduction of virions displaying Ebola, Chikungunya, Ross River, or Sindbis virus glycoproteins. This identification of the key features necessary for PtdSer-mediated enhancement of virus entry provides a basis for more effective recognition of unknown PVEERs. IMPORTANCE T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1) and other TIM family members are recently identified phosphatidylserine (PtdSer)-mediated virus entry-enhancing receptors (PVEERs). These proteins enhance virus entry by binding the phospholipid, PtdSer, present on the viral

  5. Targeting immune checkpoints: New opportunity for mesothelioma treatment?

    PubMed

    Marcq, Elly; Pauwels, Patrick; van Meerbeeck, Jan P; Smits, Evelien L J

    2015-12-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma is an aggressive cancer linked to asbestos exposure in most patients. Due to the long latency between exposure and presentation, incidence is expected to further increase in the next decade, despite the ban on asbestos import which occurred at the end of last century in industrialized countries. Platinum-based palliative chemotherapy is the only treatment with proven benefit on outcome, resulting in selected patients in a median overall survival of about 1 year. Therefore, there is room for therapeutic improvement using a new strategy to prolong survival. Dealing with cancer cell induced immunosuppression is a promising approach. Reactivating immune responses that are silenced by immune checkpoints recently gained a lot of interest. Checkpoint blockade has already shown promising preclinical and clinical results in several cancer types and is currently also being investigated in mesothelioma. Here, we discuss the expression patterns and mechanisms of action of CTLA-4 and PD-1 as the two most studied and of TIM-3 and LAG-3 as two interesting upcoming immune checkpoints. Furthermore, we review the clinical results of molecules blocking these immune checkpoints and point out their future opportunities with a special focus on mesothelioma. PMID:26433514

  6. IL2Rβ-dependent signals drive terminal exhaustion and suppress memory development during chronic viral infection.

    PubMed

    Beltra, Jean-Christophe; Bourbonnais, Sara; Bédard, Nathalie; Charpentier, Tania; Boulangé, Moana; Michaud, Eva; Boufaied, Ines; Bruneau, Julie; Shoukry, Naglaa H; Lamarre, Alain; Decaluwe, Hélène

    2016-09-13

    Exhaustion of CD8(+) T cells severely impedes the adaptive immune response to chronic viral infections. Despite major advances in our understanding of the molecular regulation of exhaustion, the cytokines that directly control this process during chronicity remain unknown. We demonstrate a direct impact of IL-2 and IL-15, two common gamma-chain-dependent cytokines, on CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion. Common to both cytokine receptors, the IL-2 receptor β (IL2Rβ) chain is selectively maintained on CD8(+) T cells during chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and hepatitis C virus infections. Its expression correlates with exhaustion severity and identifies terminally exhausted CD8(+) T cells both in mice and humans. Genetic ablation of the IL2Rβ chain on CD8(+) T cells restrains inhibitory receptor induction, in particular 2B4 and Tim-3; precludes terminal differentiation of highly defective PD-1(hi) effectors; and rescues memory T-cell development and responsiveness to IL-7-dependent signals. Together, we ascribe a previously unexpected role to IL-2 and IL-15 as instigators of CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion during chronic viral infection.

  7. Evidence for carbohydrate recognition and homotypic and heterotypic binding by the TIM family.

    PubMed

    Wilker, Peter R; Sedy, John R; Grigura, Vadim; Murphy, Theresa L; Murphy, Kenneth M

    2007-06-01

    The T cell Ig domain and mucin domain (TIM) proteins form a conserved family of transmembrane cell-surface glycoproteins expressed by a variety of tissues. Each TIM protein contains a single V-type Ig domain, a glycosylated mucin-like domain, a transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic domain. TIM proteins recognize a diverse array of ligands, including H-ferritin, galectin-9 as well as other TIM family members. In this study, we demonstrate that the Ig domains of murine TIM-1, -3 and -4 display calcium-dependent binding to ligands expressed by murine splenocytes and several non-murine cell lines, indicating non-species-specific ligand recognition. Further, the intrafamilial interaction of various TIM family Ig domains with surface-expressed TIM-1 and TIM-4 requires an intact TIM-1 and TIM-4 glycosylated mucin stalk. Importantly, we also uncovered the previously unrecognized potential for homotypic TIM interactions in forming ligand-receptor pairs. Using a glycan array screen, we identified the novel capacity of the TIM-3 Ig domain to recognize specific carbohydrate moieties, suggesting a role for carbohydrate modification along with protein epitopes in TIM ligand recognition. Identification of the carbohydrate-binding capacity of TIM proteins helps explain the diversity of ligands recognized by this family and adds to our understanding of homotypic and heterotypic interactions between TIM family members.

  8. Implication of combined PD-L1/PD-1 blockade with cytokine-induced killer cells as a synergistic immunotherapy for gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Dai, Congqi; Lin, Fengjuan; Geng, Ruixuan; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Tang, Wenbo; Chang, Jinjia; Wu, Zheng; Liu, Xinyang; Lin, Ying; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Jin

    2016-03-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells represent a realistic approach in cancer immunotherapy with confirmed survival benefits in the context of metastatic solid tumors. However, therapeutic effects are limited to a fraction of patients. In this study, immune-resistance elements and ideal combination therapies were explored. Initially, phenotypic analysis was performed to document CD3, CD56, NKG2D, DNAM-1, PD-L1, PD-1, CTLA-4, TIM-3, 2B4, and LAG-3 on CIK cells. Upon engagement of CIK cells with the tumor cells, expression of PD-1 on CIK cells and PD-L1 on both cells were up-regulated. Over-expression of PD-L1 levels on tumor cells via lentiviral transduction inhibited tumoricidal activity of CIK cells, and neutralizing of PD-L1/PD-1 signaling axis could enhance their tumor-killing effect. Conversely, blockade of NKG2D, a major activating receptor of CIK cells, largely caused dysfunction of CIK cells. Functional study showed an increase of NKG2D levels along with PD-L1/PD-1 blockade in the presence of other immune effector molecule secretion. Additionally, combined therapy of CIK infusion and PD-L1/PD-1 blockade caused a delay of in vivo tumor growth and exhibited a survival advantage over untreated mice. These results provide a preclinical proof-of-concept for simultaneous PD-L1/PD-1 pathways blockade along with CIK infusion as a novel immunotherapy for unresectable cancers.

  9. Molecular analysis of tumor-promoting CD8+ T cells in two-stage cutaneous chemical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Bernice Y; Roberts, Scott J; Silberzahn, Tobias; Filler, Renata B; Neustadter, Jason H; Galan, Anjela; Reddy, Swapna; Lin, William M; Ellis, Peter D; Langford, Cordelia F; Hayday, Adrian C; Girardi, Michael

    2010-06-01

    T-pro are tumor-infiltrating TCRalphabeta(+)CD8(+) cells of reduced cytotoxic potential that promote experimental two-stage chemical cutaneous carcinogenesis. Toward understanding their mechanism of action, this study uses whole-genome expression analysis to compare T-pro with systemic CD8(+) T cells from multiple groups of tumor-bearing mice. T-pro show an overt T helper 17-like profile (high retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-(ROR)gammat, IL-17A, IL-17F; low T-bet and eomesodermin), regulatory potential (high FoxP3, IL-10, Tim-3), and transcripts encoding epithelial growth factors (amphiregulin, Gro-1, Gro-2). Tricolor flow cytometry subsequently confirmed the presence of TCRbeta(+) CD8(+) IL-17(+) T cells among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). Moreover, a time-course analysis of independent TIL isolates from papillomas versus carcinomas exposed a clear association of the "T-pro phenotype" with malignant progression. This molecular characterization of T-pro builds a foundation for elucidating the contributions of inflammation to cutaneous carcinogenesis, and may provide useful biomarkers for cancer immunotherapy in which the widely advocated use of tumor-specific CD8(+) cytolytic T cells should perhaps accommodate the cells' potential corruption toward the T-pro phenotype. The data are also likely germane to psoriasis, in which the epidermis may be infiltrated by CD8(+) IL-17-producing T cells.

  10. Broad Spectrum Activity of a Lectin-Like Bacterial Serine Protease Family on Human Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Lujan, Jorge Luis; Vijayakumar, Vidhya; Gong, Mei; Smith, Rachel; Santiago, Araceli E.; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The serine protease autotransporter from Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE) family, which number more than 25 proteases with apparent diverse functions, have been phylogenetically divided into two distinct classes, designated 1 and 2. We recently demonstrated that Pic and Tsh, two members of the class-2 SPATE family produced by intestinal and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, were able to cleave a number of O-glycosylated proteins on neutrophils and lymphocytes resulting in impaired leukocyte functions. Here we show that most members of the class-2 SPATE family have lectin-like properties and exhibit differential protease activity reliant on glycoprotein type and cell lineage. Protease activity was seen in virtually all tested O-glycosylated proteins including CD34, CD55, CD164, TIM1, TIM3, TIM4 and C1-INH. We also show that although SPATE proteins bound and cleaved glycoproteins more efficiently on granulocytes and monocytes, they also targeted glycoproteins on B, T and natural killer lymphocytes. Finally, we found that the characteristic domain-2 of class-2 SPATEs is not required for glycoprotease activity, but single amino acid mutations in Pic domain-1 to those residues naturally occurring in domain-1 of SepA, were sufficient to hamper Pic glycoprotease activity. This study shows that most class-2 SPATEs have redundant activities and suggest that they may function as immunomodulators at several levels of the immune system. PMID:25251283

  11. Interleukin-35 Limits Anti-Tumor Immunity.

    PubMed

    Turnis, Meghan E; Sawant, Deepali V; Szymczak-Workman, Andrea L; Andrews, Lawrence P; Delgoffe, Greg M; Yano, Hiroshi; Beres, Amy J; Vogel, Peter; Workman, Creg J; Vignali, Dario A A

    2016-02-16

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells pose a major barrier to effective anti-tumor immunity. Although Treg cell depletion enhances tumor rejection, the ensuing autoimmune sequelae limits its utility in the clinic and highlights the need for limiting Treg cell activity within the tumor microenvironment. Interleukin-35 (IL-35) is a Treg cell-secreted cytokine that inhibits T cell proliferation and function. Using an IL-35 reporter mouse, we observed substantial enrichment of IL-35(+) Treg cells in tumors. Neutralization with an IL-35-specific antibody or Treg cell-restricted deletion of IL-35 production limited tumor growth in multiple murine models of human cancer. Limiting intratumoral IL-35 enhanced T cell proliferation, effector function, antigen-specific responses, and long-term T cell memory. Treg cell-derived IL-35 promoted the expression of multiple inhibitory receptors (PD1, TIM3, LAG3), thereby facilitating intratumoral T cell exhaustion. These findings reveal previously unappreciated roles for IL-35 in limiting anti-tumor immunity and contributing to T cell dysfunction in the tumor microenvironment.

  12. CEACAM1 mediates B cell aggregation in central nervous system autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Rovituso, Damiano M; Scheffler, Laura; Wunsch, Marie; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Dörck, Sebastian; Ulzheimer, Jochen; Bayas, Antonios; Steinman, Lawrence; Ergün, Süleyman; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    B cell aggregates in the central nervous system (CNS) have been associated with rapid disease progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Here we demonstrate a key role of carcinoembryogenic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule1 (CEACAM1) in B cell aggregate formation in MS patients and a B cell-dependent mouse model of MS. CEACAM1 expression was increased on peripheral blood B cells and CEACAM1(+) B cells were present in brain infiltrates of MS patients. Administration of the anti-CEACAM1 antibody T84.1 was efficient in blocking aggregation of B cells derived from MS patients. Along these lines, application of the monoclonal anti-CEACAM1 antibody mCC1 was able to inhibit CNS B cell aggregate formation and significantly attenuated established MS-like disease in mice in the absence of any adverse effects. CEACAM1 was co-expressed with the regulator molecule T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain -3 (TIM-3) on B cells, a novel molecule that has recently been described to induce anergy in T cells. Interestingly, elevated coexpression on B cells coincided with an autoreactive T helper cell phenotype in MS patients. Overall, these data identify CEACAM1 as a clinically highly interesting target in MS pathogenesis and open new therapeutic avenues for the treatment of the disease. PMID:27435215

  13. Inhibitory receptor expression on memory CD8 T cells following Ad vector immunization.

    PubMed

    Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Alayo, Quazim A; Ra, Joshua; Provine, Nicholas M; Larocca, Rafael; Lee, Benjamin; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-09-22

    T cells are an important component of immune responses, and their function is influenced by their expression of inhibitory receptors. Immunization with alternative serotype adenovirus (Ad) vectors induces highly functional T cell responses with lower programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) expression and increased boostability relative to Ad5 vectors. However, a detailed phenotypic characterization of other inhibitory receptors is lacking, and it is unknown whether Ad5-induced CD8 T cells eventually recover function with time. In this report, we measure the expression of various inhibitory receptors and memory markers during early and late time points following vaccination with Ad5 and alternative serotype Ad vectors. CD8 T cells induced by Ad5 exhibited increased expression of the inhibitory receptor Tim-3 and showed decreased central memory differentiation as compared with alternative serotype Ad vectors, even a year following immunization. Moreover, relative to Ad5-primed mice, Ad26-primed mice exhibited substantially improved recall of SIV Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses following heterologous boosting with MVA or Ad35 vectors. We also demonstrate that low doses of Ad5 priming resulted in more boostable immune responses with lower PD-1 expression as compared to high Ad5 doses, suggesting a role for vector dose in influencing immune dysfunction following Ad5 vaccination. These data suggest that Ad5 vectors induce a long-term pattern of immune exhaustion that can be partly overcome by lowering vector dose and modulating inhibitory signals. PMID:27566899

  14. CD3(bright)CD56(+) T cells associate with pegylated interferon-alpha treatment nonresponse in chronic hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chuang; Shen, Xiaokun; Fu, Binqing; Liu, Yanyan; Chen, Yongyan; Ni, Fang; Ye, Ying; Sun, Rui; Li, Jiabin; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is a serious and prevalent health concern worldwide, and the development of effective drugs and strategies to combat this disease is urgently needed. Currently, pegylated interferon-alpha (peg-IFNα) and nucleoside/nucleotide analogues (NA) are the most commonly prescribed treatments. However, sustained response rates in patients remain low, and the reasons are not well understood. Here, we observed that CHB patients preferentially harbored CD3(bright)CD56(+) T cells, a newly identified CD56(+) T cell population. Patients with this unique T cell population exhibited relatively poor responses to peg-IFNα treatment. CD3(bright)CD56(+) T cells expressed remarkably high levels of the inhibitory molecule NKG2A as well as low levels of CD8. Even if patients were systematically treated with peg-IFNα, CD3(bright)CD56(+) T cells remained in an inhibitory state throughout treatment and exhibited suppressed antiviral function. Furthermore, peg-IFNα treatment rapidly increased inhibitory TIM-3 expression on CD3(bright)CD56(+) T cells, which negatively correlated with IFNγ production and might have led to their dysfunction. This study identified a novel CD3(bright)CD56(+) T cell population preferentially shown in CHB patients, and indicated that the presence of CD3(bright)CD56(+) T cells in CHB patients may be useful as a new indicator associated with poor therapeutic responses to peg-IFNα treatment. PMID:27174425

  15. Specific CD8+ T cell response immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma and viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Cubero, Elia; Larrubia, Juan-Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC) are characterized by exhaustion of the specific CD8+ T cell response. This process involves enhancement of negative co-stimulatory molecules, such as programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), 2B4, Tim-3, CD160 and LAG-3, which is linked to intrahepatic overexpression of some of the cognate ligands, such as PD-L1, on antigen presenting cells and thereby favouring a tolerogenic environment. Therapies that disrupt these negative signalling mechanisms represent promising therapeutic tools with the potential to restore reactivity of the specific CD8+ T cell response. In this review we discuss the impressive in vitro and in vivo results that have been recently achieved in HCC, CHB and CHC by blocking these negative receptors with monoclonal antibodies against these immune checkpoint modulators. The article mainly focuses on the role of CTLA-4 and PD-1 blocking monoclonal antibodies, the first ones to have reached clinical practice. The humanized monoclonal antibodies against CTLA-4 (tremelimumab and ipilimumab) and PD-1 (nivolumab and pembrolizumab) have yielded good results in testing of HCC and chronic viral hepatitis patients. Trelimumab, in particular, has shown a significant increase in the time to progression in HCC, while nivolumab has shown a remarkable effect on hepatitis C viral load reduction. The research on the role of ipilimumab, nivolumab and pembrolizumab on HCC is currently underway.

  16. Galectin-9 Ameliorates Con A-Induced Hepatitis by Inducing CD4+CD25low/int Effector T-Cell Apoptosis and Increasing Regulatory T Cell Number

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mengying; Zhong, Min; Suo, Qifeng

    2012-01-01

    Background T cell-mediated liver damage is a key event in the pathogenesis of many chronic human liver diseases, such as liver transplant rejection, primary biliary cirrhosis, and sclerosing cholangitis. We and other groups have previously reported that galectin-9, one of the β-galactoside binding animal lectins, might be potentially useful in the treatment of T cell-mediated diseases. To evaluate the direct effect of galectin-9 on hepatitis induced by concanavalin A (Con A) administration in mice and to clarify the mechanisms involved, we administered galectin-9 into mice, and evaluated its therapeutic effect on Con A-induced hepatitis. Methodology/Principal Findings Galectin-9 was administrated i.v. to Balb/c mice 30 min before Con A injection. Compared with no treatment, galectin-9 pretreatment significantly reduced serum ALT and AST levels and improved liver histopathology, suggesting an ameliorated hepatitis. This therapeutic effect was not only attributable to a blunted Th1 immune response, but also to an increased number in regulatory T cells, as reflected in a significantly increased apoptosis of CD4+CD25low/int effector T cells and in reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels. Conclusion/Significance Our findings constitute the first preclinical data indicating that interfering with TIM-3/galectin-9 signaling in vivo could ameliorate Con A-induced hepatitis. This strategy may represent a new therapeutic approach in treating human diseases involving T cell activation. PMID:23118999

  17. VEGF-A modulates expression of inhibitory checkpoints on CD8+ T cells in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Voron, Thibault; Colussi, Orianne; Marcheteau, Elie; Pernot, Simon; Nizard, Mevyn; Pointet, Anne-Laure; Latreche, Sabrina; Bergaya, Sonia; Benhamouda, Nadine; Tanchot, Corinne; Stockmann, Christian; Combe, Pierre; Berger, Anne; Zinzindohoue, Franck; Yagita, Hideo; Tartour, Eric; Terme, Magali

    2015-01-01

    Immune escape is a prerequisite for tumor development. To avoid the immune system, tumors develop different mechanisms, including T cell exhaustion, which is characterized by expression of immune inhibitory receptors, such as PD-1, CTLA-4, Tim-3, and a progressive loss of function. The recent development of therapies targeting PD-1 and CTLA-4 have raised great interest since they induced long-lasting objective responses in patients suffering from advanced metastatic tumors. However, the regulation of PD-1 expression, and thereby of exhaustion, is unclear. VEGF-A, a proangiogenic molecule produced by the tumors, plays a key role in the development of an immunosuppressive microenvironment. We report in the present work that VEGF-A produced in the tumor microenvironment enhances expression of PD-1 and other inhibitory checkpoints involved in CD8+ T cell exhaustion, which could be reverted by anti-angiogenic agents targeting VEGF-A–VEGFR. In view of these results, association of anti-angiogenic molecules with immunomodulators of inhibitory checkpoints may be of particular interest in VEGF-A-producing tumors. PMID:25601652

  18. Molecular signatures of T-cell inhibition in HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cellular immune responses play a crucial role in the control of viral replication in HIV-infected individuals. However, the virus succeeds in exploiting the immune system to its advantage and therefore, the host ultimately fails to control the virus leading to development of terminal AIDS. The virus adopts numerous evasion mechanisms to hijack the host immune system. We and others recently described the expression of inhibitory molecules on T cells as a contributing factor for suboptimal T-cell responses in HIV infection both in vitro and in vivo. The expression of these molecules that negatively impacts the normal functions of the host immune armory and the underlying signaling pathways associated with their enhanced expression need to be discussed. Targets to restrain the expression of these molecular markers of immune inhibition is likely to contribute to development of therapeutic interventions that augment the functionality of host immune cells leading to improved immune control of HIV infection. In this review, we focus on the functions of inhibitory molecules that are expressed or secreted following HIV infection such as BTLA, CTLA-4, CD160, IDO, KLRG1, LAG-3, LILRB1, PD-1, TRAIL, TIM-3, and regulatory cytokines, and highlight their significance in immune inhibition. We also highlight the ensemble of transcriptional factors such as BATF, BLIMP-1/PRDM1, FoxP3, DTX1 and molecular pathways that facilitate the recruitment and differentiation of suppressor T cells in response to HIV infection. PMID:23514593

  19. Galectin-9 is Involved in Immunosuppression Mediated by Human Bone Marrow-derived Clonal Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si-Na; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Jeon, Myung-Shin; Yi, TacGhee; Song, Sun U

    2015-10-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have immunomodulatory properties and can suppress exaggerated pro-inflammatory immune responses. Although the exact mechanisms remain unclear, a variety of soluble factors are known to contribute to MSC-mediated immunosuppression. However, functional redundancy in the immunosuppressive properties of MSCs indicates that other uncharacterized factors could be involved. Galectin-9, a member of the β-galactoside binding galectin family, has emerged as an important regulator of innate and adaptive immunity. We examined whether galectin-9 contributes to MSC-mediated immunosuppression. Galectin-9 was strongly induced and secreted from human MSCs upon stimulation with pro-inflammatory cytokines. An in vitro immunosuppression assay using a knockdown approach revealed that galectin-9-deficient MSCs do not exert immunosuppressive activity. We also provided evidence that galectin-9 may contribute to MSC-mediated immunosuppression by binding to its receptor, TIM-3, expressed on activated lymphocytes, leading to apoptotic cell death of activated lymphocytes. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that galectin-9 is involved in MSC-mediated immunosuppression and represents a potential therapeutic factor for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:26557808

  20. CEACAM1 mediates B cell aggregation in central nervous system autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rovituso, Damiano M.; Scheffler, Laura; Wunsch, Marie; Dörck, Sebastian; Ulzheimer, Jochen; Bayas, Antonios; Steinman, Lawrence; Ergün, Süleyman; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    B cell aggregates in the central nervous system (CNS) have been associated with rapid disease progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Here we demonstrate a key role of carcinoembryogenic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule1 (CEACAM1) in B cell aggregate formation in MS patients and a B cell-dependent mouse model of MS. CEACAM1 expression was increased on peripheral blood B cells and CEACAM1+ B cells were present in brain infiltrates of MS patients. Administration of the anti-CEACAM1 antibody T84.1 was efficient in blocking aggregation of B cells derived from MS patients. Along these lines, application of the monoclonal anti-CEACAM1 antibody mCC1 was able to inhibit CNS B cell aggregate formation and significantly attenuated established MS-like disease in mice in the absence of any adverse effects. CEACAM1 was co-expressed with the regulator molecule T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain −3 (TIM-3) on B cells, a novel molecule that has recently been described to induce anergy in T cells. Interestingly, elevated coexpression on B cells coincided with an autoreactive T helper cell phenotype in MS patients. Overall, these data identify CEACAM1 as a clinically highly interesting target in MS pathogenesis and open new therapeutic avenues for the treatment of the disease. PMID:27435215

  1. IL2Rβ-dependent signals drive terminal exhaustion and suppress memory development during chronic viral infection.

    PubMed

    Beltra, Jean-Christophe; Bourbonnais, Sara; Bédard, Nathalie; Charpentier, Tania; Boulangé, Moana; Michaud, Eva; Boufaied, Ines; Bruneau, Julie; Shoukry, Naglaa H; Lamarre, Alain; Decaluwe, Hélène

    2016-09-13

    Exhaustion of CD8(+) T cells severely impedes the adaptive immune response to chronic viral infections. Despite major advances in our understanding of the molecular regulation of exhaustion, the cytokines that directly control this process during chronicity remain unknown. We demonstrate a direct impact of IL-2 and IL-15, two common gamma-chain-dependent cytokines, on CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion. Common to both cytokine receptors, the IL-2 receptor β (IL2Rβ) chain is selectively maintained on CD8(+) T cells during chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and hepatitis C virus infections. Its expression correlates with exhaustion severity and identifies terminally exhausted CD8(+) T cells both in mice and humans. Genetic ablation of the IL2Rβ chain on CD8(+) T cells restrains inhibitory receptor induction, in particular 2B4 and Tim-3; precludes terminal differentiation of highly defective PD-1(hi) effectors; and rescues memory T-cell development and responsiveness to IL-7-dependent signals. Together, we ascribe a previously unexpected role to IL-2 and IL-15 as instigators of CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion during chronic viral infection. PMID:27573835

  2. Specific CD8(+) T cell response immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Cubero, Elia; Larrubia, Juan-Ramón

    2016-07-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC) are characterized by exhaustion of the specific CD8(+) T cell response. This process involves enhancement of negative co-stimulatory molecules, such as programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), 2B4, Tim-3, CD160 and LAG-3, which is linked to intrahepatic overexpression of some of the cognate ligands, such as PD-L1, on antigen presenting cells and thereby favouring a tolerogenic environment. Therapies that disrupt these negative signalling mechanisms represent promising therapeutic tools with the potential to restore reactivity of the specific CD8(+) T cell response. In this review we discuss the impressive in vitro and in vivo results that have been recently achieved in HCC, CHB and CHC by blocking these negative receptors with monoclonal antibodies against these immune checkpoint modulators. The article mainly focuses on the role of CTLA-4 and PD-1 blocking monoclonal antibodies, the first ones to have reached clinical practice. The humanized monoclonal antibodies against CTLA-4 (tremelimumab and ipilimumab) and PD-1 (nivolumab and pembrolizumab) have yielded good results in testing of HCC and chronic viral hepatitis patients. Trelimumab, in particular, has shown a significant increase in the time to progression in HCC, while nivolumab has shown a remarkable effect on hepatitis C viral load reduction. The research on the role of ipilimumab, nivolumab and pembrolizumab on HCC is currently underway. PMID:27605882

  3. Assessing Immune-Related Adverse Events of Efficacious Combination Immunotherapies in Preclinical Models of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Blake, Stephen J; Harjunpää, Heidi; Fairfax, Kirsten A; Yong, Michelle C R; Allen, Stacey; Kohrt, Holbrook E; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Smyth, Mark J; Teng, Michele W L

    2016-09-15

    New combination immunotherapies are displaying both efficacy and immune-related adverse events (irAE) in humans. However, grade 3/4 irAEs occur in a high proportion, which can lead to discontinuation of treatment and can result in fatalities if not promptly treated. Prolonged T regulatory cell (Treg) depletion in tumor-bearing Foxp3-DTR mice using diphtheria toxin (DT) mirrored the spectrum of antitumor responses and severity of irAEs that can occur in ipilimumab/nivolumab-treated patients. In contrast, transient Treg depletion or anti-CTLA-4/PD-1 therapy had equivalent effects in mice, lowering the immune tolerance threshold and allowing irAEs to be more easily induced following treatment with additional immunomodulatory antibodies. Transient Treg depletion of DT in combination with anti-PD-1 or anti-TIM-3 monoclonal antibodies had a high therapeutic window compared with DT plus anti-CD137. In contrast, DT plus anti-CD137-treated mice developed severe irAEs similar to grade 3/4 clinical symptoms. These irAEs appeared because of an infiltration of activated proliferating effector T cells in the tissues producing IFNγ and TNF; however, TNF blockade decreased irAEs severity without impacting on tumor growth. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5288-301. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27503925

  4. Combinatorial approach to cancer immunotherapy: strength in numbers.

    PubMed

    Vilgelm, Anna E; Johnson, Douglas B; Richmond, Ann

    2016-08-01

    Immune-checkpoint blockade therapy with antibodies targeting CTLA-4 and PD-1 has revolutionized melanoma treatment by eliciting responses that can be remarkably durable and is now advancing to other malignancies. However, not all patients respond to immune-checkpoint inhibitors. Extensive preclinical evidence suggests that combining immune-checkpoint inhibitors with other anti-cancer treatments can greatly improve the therapeutic benefit. The first clinical success of the combinatorial approach to cancer immunotherapy was demonstrated using a dual-checkpoint blockade with CTLA-4 and PD-1 inhibitors, which resulted in accelerated FDA approval of this therapeutic regimen. In this review, we discuss the combinations of current and emerging immunotherapeutic agents in clinical and preclinical development and summarize the insights into potential mechanisms of synergistic anti-tumor activity gained from animal studies. These promising combinatorial partners for the immune-checkpoint blockade include therapeutics targeting additional inhibitory receptors of T cells, such as TIM-3, LAG-3, TIGIT, and BTLA, and agonists of T cell costimulatory receptors 4-1BB, OX40, and GITR, as well as agents that promote cancer cell recognition by the immune system, such as tumor vaccines, IDO inhibitors, and agonists of the CD40 receptor of APCs. We also review the therapeutic potential of regimens combining the immune-checkpoint blockade with therapeutic interventions that have been shown to enhance immunogenicity of cancer cells, including oncolytic viruses, RT, epigenetic therapy, and senescence-inducing therapy. PMID:27256570

  5. Immunotherapy of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Dirk; Halama, Niels; Zörnig, Inka; Klug, Paula; Krauss, Jürgen; Haag, Georg-Martin

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the immune response, reflected by high T cell infiltrates in primary tumors and metastases, influences the clinical course of colorectal cancer (CRC). Therefore, immunotherapy concepts have been adapted from other tumor entities, which typically rely on the activation of T cells in the tumor microenvironment (e.g. blockade of the immune checkpoint molecules PD-1 and CTLA-4). However, most of the strategies using the approved checkpoint inhibitors and/or combination strategies have more or less failed to produce impressive results in early phase trials in CRC. Therefore, a number of novel targets for checkpoint inhibition are currently in early phase clinical testing (TIM-3, Lag-3, OX40, GITR, 4-1BB, CD40, CD70). A simple activation of infiltrating T cells will not, however, lead to a meaningful anti-tumor response without modulating the environmental factors in CRC. Thus, it is absolutely necessary to improve our understanding of the complex regulation of the tumor microenvironment in CRC to design individual combination treatments leading to effective immune control. PMID:27259331

  6. CD3brightCD56+ T cells associate with pegylated interferon-alpha treatment nonresponse in chronic hepatitis B patients

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chuang; Shen, Xiaokun; Fu, Binqing; Liu, Yanyan; Chen, Yongyan; Ni, Fang; Ye, Ying; Sun, Rui; Li, Jiabin; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is a serious and prevalent health concern worldwide, and the development of effective drugs and strategies to combat this disease is urgently needed. Currently, pegylated interferon-alpha (peg-IFNα) and nucleoside/nucleotide analogues (NA) are the most commonly prescribed treatments. However, sustained response rates in patients remain low, and the reasons are not well understood. Here, we observed that CHB patients preferentially harbored CD3brightCD56+ T cells, a newly identified CD56+ T cell population. Patients with this unique T cell population exhibited relatively poor responses to peg-IFNα treatment. CD3brightCD56+ T cells expressed remarkably high levels of the inhibitory molecule NKG2A as well as low levels of CD8. Even if patients were systematically treated with peg-IFNα, CD3brightCD56+ T cells remained in an inhibitory state throughout treatment and exhibited suppressed antiviral function. Furthermore, peg-IFNα treatment rapidly increased inhibitory TIM-3 expression on CD3brightCD56+ T cells, which negatively correlated with IFNγ production and might have led to their dysfunction. This study identified a novel CD3brightCD56+ T cell population preferentially shown in CHB patients, and indicated that the presence of CD3brightCD56+ T cells in CHB patients may be useful as a new indicator associated with poor therapeutic responses to peg-IFNα treatment. PMID:27174425

  7. Specific CD8+ T cell response immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma and viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Cubero, Elia; Larrubia, Juan-Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC) are characterized by exhaustion of the specific CD8+ T cell response. This process involves enhancement of negative co-stimulatory molecules, such as programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), 2B4, Tim-3, CD160 and LAG-3, which is linked to intrahepatic overexpression of some of the cognate ligands, such as PD-L1, on antigen presenting cells and thereby favouring a tolerogenic environment. Therapies that disrupt these negative signalling mechanisms represent promising therapeutic tools with the potential to restore reactivity of the specific CD8+ T cell response. In this review we discuss the impressive in vitro and in vivo results that have been recently achieved in HCC, CHB and CHC by blocking these negative receptors with monoclonal antibodies against these immune checkpoint modulators. The article mainly focuses on the role of CTLA-4 and PD-1 blocking monoclonal antibodies, the first ones to have reached clinical practice. The humanized monoclonal antibodies against CTLA-4 (tremelimumab and ipilimumab) and PD-1 (nivolumab and pembrolizumab) have yielded good results in testing of HCC and chronic viral hepatitis patients. Trelimumab, in particular, has shown a significant increase in the time to progression in HCC, while nivolumab has shown a remarkable effect on hepatitis C viral load reduction. The research on the role of ipilimumab, nivolumab and pembrolizumab on HCC is currently underway. PMID:27605882

  8. Polyfunctional Melan-A-specific tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cells elicited by dacarbazine treatment before peptide-vaccination depends on AKT activation sustained by ICOS.

    PubMed

    Franzese, Ornella; Palermo, Belinda; Di Donna, Cosmo; Sperduti, Isabella; Ferraresi, Virginia; Stabile, Helena; Gismondi, Angela; Santoni, Angela; Nisticò, Paola

    2016-05-01

    The identification of activation pathways linked to antitumor T-cell polyfunctionality in long surviving patients is of great relevance in the new era of immunotherapy. We have recently reported that dacarbazine (DTIC) injected one day before peptide-vaccination plus IFN-α improves the antitumor lytic activity and enlarges the repertoire of Melan-A-specific T-cell clones, as compared with vaccination alone, impacting the overall survival of melanoma patients. To identify the mechanisms responsible for this improvement of the immune response, we have analyzed the endogenous and treatment-induced antigen (Ag)-specific response in a panel of Melan-A-specific CD8(+) T-cell clones in terms of differentiation phenotype, inhibitory receptor profile, polyfunctionality and AKT activation. Here, we show that Melan-A-specific CD8(+) T cells isolated from patients treated with chemoimmunotherapy possess a late differentiated phenotype as defined by the absence of CD28 and CD27 co-stimulatory molecules and high levels of LAG-3, TIM-3 and PD-1 inhibitory receptors. Nevertheless, they show higher proliferative potential and an improved antitumor polyfunctional effector profile in terms of co-production of TNF-α, IFNγ and Granzyme-B (GrB) compared with cells derived from patients treated with vaccination alone. Polyfunctionality is dependent on an active AKT signaling related to the engagement of the co-stimulatory molecule ICOS. We suggest that this phenotypic and functional signature is dictated by a fine-tuned balance between TCR triggering, AKT activation, co-stimulatory and inhibitory signals induced by chemoimmunotherapy and may be associated with antitumor T cells able to protect patients from tumor recurrence. PMID:27467927

  9. Galectin-9 Protein Is Up-regulated in Astrocytes by Tumor Necrosis Factor and Promotes Encephalitogenic T-cell Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Steelman, Andrew J.; Smith, Roger; Welsh, C. Jane; Li, Jianrong

    2013-01-01

    Demyelination and axonal damage in multiple sclerosis (MS) are thought to be a consequence of inflammatory processes that are perpetuated by activated glia and infiltrating leukocytes. Galectin-9 is a β-galactoside binding lectin capable of modulating immune responses and appears to be up-regulated in MS. However, its role in the pathogenesis of MS has yet to be determined. Here, we report that proinflammatory cytokines induce galectin-9 (Gal-9) expression in primary astrocytes and the mechanism by which TNF up-regulates Gal-9. Astrocytes did not express Gal-9 under basal conditions nor did IL-6, IL-10, or IL-13 trigger Gal-9 expression. In contrast, IL-1β, IFN-γ, and particularly TNF up-regulated Gal-9 in astrocytes. TNF-induced Gal-9 expression was dependent on TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) as TNF failed to induce Gal-9 in TNFR1−/− astrocytes. Blockade of the JNK MAP kinase pathway with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 abrogated TNF-induced Gal-9, whereas p38 and MEK inhibitors had minimal effects. Furthermore, specific knockdown of c-Jun via siRNA in astrocytes before TNF treatment greatly suppressed Gal-9 transcription, suggesting that TNF induces astroglial Gal-9 through the TNF/TNFR1/JNK/cJun signaling pathway. Finally, utilizing astrocytes from Lgals9 mutant (Gal-9−/−) mice as well as a myelin basic protein-specific Tim-3+ encephalitogenic T-cell clone (LCN-8), we found that conditioned medium from TNF-stimulated Gal-9+/+ but not Gal-9−/− astrocytes increased the percentage of apoptotic encephalitogenic T-cells. Together, our results suggest that Gal-9 is induced in astrocytes by TNF via the JNK/c-Jun pathway and that astrocyte-derived Gal-9 may function as an immunoregulatory protein in response to ongoing neuroinflammation. PMID:23836896

  10. TIGIT and PD-1 impair tumor antigen–specific CD8+ T cells in melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Pagliano, Ornella; Fourcade, Julien; Sun, Zhaojun; Wang, Hong; Sander, Cindy; Kirkwood, John M.; Chen, Tseng-hui Timothy; Maurer, Mark; Korman, Alan J.; Zarour, Hassane M.

    2015-01-01

    T cell Ig and ITIM domain (TIGIT) is an inhibitory receptor expressed by activated T cells, Tregs, and NK cells. Here, we determined that TIGIT is upregulated on tumor antigen–specific (TA-specific) CD8+ T cells and CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from patients with melanoma, and these TIGIT-expressing CD8+ T cells often coexpress the inhibitory receptor PD-1. Moreover, CD8+ TILs from patients exhibited downregulation of the costimulatory molecule CD226, which competes with TIGIT for the same ligand, supporting a TIGIT/CD226 imbalance in metastatic melanoma. TIGIT marked early T cell activation and was further upregulated by T cells upon PD-1 blockade and in dysfunctional PD-1+TIM-3+ TA-specific CD8+ T cells. PD-1+TIGIT+, PD-1–TIGIT+, and PD-1+TIGIT– CD8+ TILs had similar functional capacities ex vivo, suggesting that TIGIT alone, or together with PD-1, is not indicative of T cell dysfunction. However, in the presence of TIGIT ligand–expressing cells, TIGIT and PD-1 blockade additively increased proliferation, cytokine production, and degranulation of both TA-specific CD8+ T cells and CD8+ TILs. Collectively, our results show that TIGIT and PD-1 regulate the expansion and function of TA-specific CD8+ T cells and CD8+ TILs in melanoma patients and suggest that dual TIGIT and PD-1 blockade should be further explored to elicit potent antitumor CD8+ T cell responses in patients with advanced melanoma. PMID:25866972

  11. Manipulation of Regulatory Cells’ Responses to Treatments for Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tavakolpour, Soheil; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Sali, Shahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of effective treatments in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a controversial topic. Although the currently approved drugs for HBV control the disease’s progression and also limit associated outcomes, these drugs may not fully eradicate HBV infection. In addition to better managing patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection, the induction of seroclearance by these drugs has been a commonly discussed topic in recent years. Objectives In this study, we focused on treating CHB infection via the manipulation of T cells’ responses to identify possible approaches to cure CHB. Materials and Methods All studies relevant to the role of cellular and humoral responses in HBV infection (especially regulatory cells) were investigated via a systematic search of different databases, including PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Considering extracted data and also our unpublished data regarding the association between regulatory cytokines and CHB, we introduced a novel approach for the induction of seroclearance. Results Considering the increased levels of regulatory cytokines and also regulatory T cells (Tregs) during CHB, it seems that these cells are deeply involved in CHB infection. The inhibition of regulatory T cells may reverse the dysfunction of effector T cells in patients with CHB infection. In order to inhibit Tregs’ responses, different types of approaches could be employed to restore the impaired function of effector T cells. The blockade of IL-10, IL-35, CTLA-4, PD-1, and TIM-3 were discussed throughout this study. Regardless of the efficacy of these methods, CHB patients may experience serious liver injuries due to the cytotoxic action of CD8+ T cells. Antiviral therapy and a decrease in HBV DNA to undetectable levels could also significantly reduce the risk of the hepatitis B flare. Conclusions The inhibition of Tregs is a novel therapeutic approach to cure chronically HBV infected patients. However, further studies are

  12. Multiparametric profiling of non–small-cell lung cancers reveals distinct immunophenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lizotte, Patrick H.; Ivanova, Elena V.; Awad, Mark M.; Jones, Robert E.; Keogh, Lauren; Liu, Hongye; Dries, Ruben; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Santos, Abigail; Feeney, Nora B.; Paweletz, Cloud P.; Kulkarni, Meghana M.; Bass, Adam J.; Rustgi, Anil K.; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Kufe, Donald W.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Sholl, Lynette M.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Richards, William G.; Bueno, Raphael; English, Jessie M.; Bittinger, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Immune checkpoint blockade improves survival in a subset of patients with non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but robust biomarkers that predict response to PD-1 pathway inhibitors are lacking. Furthermore, our understanding of the diversity of the NSCLC tumor immune microenvironment remains limited. METHODS. We performed comprehensive flow cytometric immunoprofiling on both tumor and immune cells from 51 NSCLCs and integrated this analysis with clinical and histopathologic characteristics, next-generation sequencing, mRNA expression, and PD-L1 immunohistochemistry (IHC). RESULTS. Cytometric profiling identified an immunologically “hot” cluster with abundant CD8+ T cells expressing high levels of PD-1 and TIM-3 and an immunologically “cold” cluster with lower relative abundance of CD8+ T cells and expression of inhibitory markers. The “hot” cluster was highly enriched for expression of genes associated with T cell trafficking and cytotoxic function and high PD-L1 expression by IHC. There was no correlation between immunophenotype and KRAS or EGFR mutation, or patient smoking history, but we did observe an enrichment of squamous subtype and tumors with higher mutation burden in the “hot” cluster. Additionally, approximately 20% of cases had high B cell infiltrates with a subset producing IL-10. CONCLUSIONS. Our results support the use of immune-based metrics to study response and resistance to immunotherapy in lung cancer. FUNDING. The Robert A. and Renée E. Belfer Family Foundation, Expect Miracles Foundation, Starr Cancer Consortium, Stand Up to Cancer Foundation, Conquer Cancer Foundation, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, National Cancer Institute (R01 CA205150), and the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation.

  13. Intravenous injection of MVA virus targets CD8+ lymphocytes to tumors to control tumor growth upon combinatorial treatment with a TLR9 agonist.

    PubMed

    Fend, Laetitia; Gatard-Scheikl, Tanja; Kintz, Jacqueline; Gantzer, Murielle; Schaedler, Emmanuelle; Rittner, Karola; Cochin, Sandrine; Fournel, Sylvie; Préville, Xavier

    2014-12-01

    Effector T-cell access to tumor tissue is a limiting step for clinical efficacy of antigen-specific T cell-based immunotherapies. Ectopic mouse tumor models, in which a subcutaneously (s.c.) implanted tumor is treated with s.c. or intramuscular therapeutic immunization, may not be optimal for targeting effector T cells to an organ-borne tumor. We used an orthotopic renal carcinoma model to evaluate the impact of injection routes on therapeutic efficacy of a Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara viral vector expressing the human mucin 1 tumor-associated xeno-antigen (MVA-MUC1). We show that intravenous (i.v.) administration of MVA-MUC1 displayed enhanced efficacy when compared with s.c. injection. Therapeutic efficacy of MVA-MUC1 was further enhanced by i.v. injection of a TLR9 agonist. In all cases, infiltration of tumor-bearing kidney by CD8(+) lymphocytes was associated with control of tumor growth. Biodistribution experiments indicate that, following i.v. injection, MVA-encoded antigens are quickly expressed in visceral organs and, in particular, in splenic antigen-presenting cells, compared with those following s.c. injection. This appears to result in a faster generation of MUC1-specific CD8(+) T cells. Lymphocytes infiltrating tumor-bearing kidneys are characterized by an effector memory phenotype and express PD-1 and Tim3 immune checkpoint molecules. Therapeutic efficacy was associated with a modification of the tumor microenvironment toward a Th1-type immune response and recruitment of activated lymphocytes. This study supports the clinical evaluation of MVA-based immunotherapies via the i.v. route. PMID:25168392

  14. Impaired NK Cell Activation and Chemotaxis toward Dendritic Cells Exposed to Complement-Opsonized HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Ellegård, Rada; Crisci, Elisa; Andersson, Jonas; Shankar, Esaki M.; Nyström, Sofia; Hinkula, Jorma

    2015-01-01

    Mucosa resident dendritic cells (DCs) may represent one of the first immune cells that HIV-1 encounters during sexual transmission. The virions in body fluids can be opsonized with complement factors because of HIV-mediated triggering of the complement cascade, and this appears to influence numerous aspects of the immune defense targeting the virus. One key attribute of host defense is the ability to attract immune cells to the site of infection. In this study, we investigated whether the opsonization of HIV with complement (C-HIV) or a mixture of complement and Abs (CI-HIV) affected the cytokine and chemokine responses generated by DCs, as well as their ability to attract other immune cells. We found that the expression levels of CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL3, and CCL17 were lowered after exposure to either C-HIV or CI-HIV relative to free HIV (F-HIV). DCs exposed to F-HIV induced higher cell migration, consisting mainly of NK cells, compared with opsonized virus, and the chemotaxis of NK cells was dependent on CCL3 and CXCL10. NK cell exposure to supernatants derived from HIV-exposed DCs showed that F-HIV induced phenotypic activation (e.g., increased levels of TIM3, CD69, and CD25) and effector function (e.g., production of IFNγ and killing of target cells) in NK cells, whereas C-HIV and CI-HIV did not. The impairment of NK cell recruitment by DCs exposed to complement-opsonized HIV and the lack of NK activation may contribute to the failure of innate immune responses to control HIV at the site of initial mucosa infection. PMID:26157174

  15. Alterations of specific biomarkers of metabolic pathways in vascular tree from patients with Type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to check whether different biomarkers of inflammatory, apoptotic, immunological or lipid pathways had altered their expression in the occluded popliteal artery (OPA) compared with the internal mammary artery (IMA) and femoral vein (FV) and to examine whether glycemic control influenced the expression of these genes. The study included 20 patients with advanced atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes mellitus, 15 of whom had peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD), from whom samples of OPA and FV were collected. PAOD patients were classified based on their HbA1c as well (HbA1c ≤ 6.5) or poorly (HbA1c > 6.5) controlled patients. Controls for arteries without atherosclerosis comprised 5 IMA from patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM). mRNA, protein expression and histological studies were analyzed in IMA, OPA and FV. After analyzing 46 genes, OPA showed higher expression levels than IMA or FV for genes involved in thrombosis (F3), apoptosis (MMP2, MMP9, TIMP1 and TIM3), lipid metabolism (LRP1 and NDUFA), immune response (TLR2) and monocytes adhesion (CD83). Remarkably, MMP-9 expression was lower in OPA from well-controlled patients. In FV from diabetic patients with HbA1c ≤6.5, gene expression levels of BCL2, CDKN1A, COX2, NDUFA and SREBP2 were higher than in FV from those with HbA1c >6.5. The atherosclerotic process in OPA from diabetic patients was associated with high expression levels of inflammatory, lipid metabolism and apoptotic biomarkers. The degree of glycemic control was associated with gene expression markers of apoptosis, lipid metabolism and antioxidants in FV. However, the effect of glycemic control on pro-atherosclerotic gene expression was very low in arteries with established atherosclerosis. PMID:22828168

  16. Significant association between TIM1 promoter polymorphisms and protection against cerebral malaria in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Nuchnoi, P; Ohashi, J; Kimura, R; Hananantachai, H; Naka, I; Krudsood, S; Looareesuwan, S; Tokunaga, K; Patarapotikul, J

    2008-05-01

    Although cerebral malaria is a major life-threatening complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection, its pathophysiology is not well understood. Prolonged activation of the T helper type 1 (Th1) response characterized by the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha has been suggested to be responsible for immunopathological process leading to cerebral malaria unless they are downregulated by the anti-inflamatory cytokines produced by the Th2 response. The T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM) family of proteins are cell surface proteins involved in regulating Th1 and Th2 immune responses. In this study, the possible association between the polymorphisms of TIM1, TIM3, and TIMD4 genes and the severity of malaria was examined in 478 adult Thai patients infected with P. falciparum malaria. The TIM1 promoter haplotype comprising three derived alleles, -1637A (rs7702919), -1549C (rs41297577) and -1454A (rs41297579), which were in complete linkage disequilibrium, was significantly associated with protection against cerebral malaria (OR = 0.41; 95% CI = 0.24-0.71; P= 0.0009). Allele-specific transcription quantification analysis revealed that the level of mRNA transcribed from TIM1 was higher for the protective promoter haplotype than for the other promoter haplotype (P= 0.004). Engagement with TIM1 in combination with T cell receptor stimulation induces anti-inflammatory Th2 cytokine production, which can protect the development of cerebral malaria caused by overproduction of pro-inflammatory Th1 cytokines. The present results suggest that the higher TIM1 expression associated with the protective TIM1 promoter haplotype confers protection against cerebral malaria.

  17. Immunotherapy: Beyond Anti-PD-1 and Anti-PD-L1 Therapies.

    PubMed

    Antonia, Scott J; Vansteenkiste, Johan F; Moon, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer are cancers in which chemotherapy produces a survival benefit, although it is small. We now know that anti-PD-1/PD-L1 has substantial clinical activity in both of these diseases, with an overall response rate (ORR) of 15%-20%. These responses are frequently rapid and durable, increase median overall survival (OS) compared with chemotherapy, and produce long-term survivors. Despite these very significant results, many patients do not benefit from anti-PD-1/PD-L1. This is because of the potential for malignancies to co-opt myriad immunosuppressive mechanisms other than aberrant expression of PD-L1. Conceptually, these can be divided into three categories. First, for some patients there is likely a failure to generate sufficient functional tumor antigen-specific T cells. Second, for others, tumor antigen-specific T cells may be generated but fail to enter into the tumor parenchyma. Finally, there are a large number of immunosuppressive mechanisms that have the potential to be operational within the tumor microenvironment: surface membrane immune checkpoint proteins PD-1, CTLA-4, LAG3, TIM3, BTLA, and adenosine A2AR; soluble factors and metabolic alterations interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, adenosine, IDO, and arginase; and inhibitory cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and tumor-associated macrophages. In this article, we discuss three strategies to generate more tumor-reactive T cells for patients: anti-CTLA-4, therapeutic tumor vaccination, and adoptive cellular therapy, with T cells redirected to tumor antigens using T-cell receptor (TCR) or chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) gene modification. We also review some of the various strategies in development to thwart tumor microenvironment immunosuppressive mechanisms. Strategies to drive more T cells into tumors remain a significant challenge.

  18. Manipulation of Regulatory Cells’ Responses to Treatments for Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tavakolpour, Soheil; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Sali, Shahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of effective treatments in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a controversial topic. Although the currently approved drugs for HBV control the disease’s progression and also limit associated outcomes, these drugs may not fully eradicate HBV infection. In addition to better managing patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection, the induction of seroclearance by these drugs has been a commonly discussed topic in recent years. Objectives In this study, we focused on treating CHB infection via the manipulation of T cells’ responses to identify possible approaches to cure CHB. Materials and Methods All studies relevant to the role of cellular and humoral responses in HBV infection (especially regulatory cells) were investigated via a systematic search of different databases, including PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Considering extracted data and also our unpublished data regarding the association between regulatory cytokines and CHB, we introduced a novel approach for the induction of seroclearance. Results Considering the increased levels of regulatory cytokines and also regulatory T cells (Tregs) during CHB, it seems that these cells are deeply involved in CHB infection. The inhibition of regulatory T cells may reverse the dysfunction of effector T cells in patients with CHB infection. In order to inhibit Tregs’ responses, different types of approaches could be employed to restore the impaired function of effector T cells. The blockade of IL-10, IL-35, CTLA-4, PD-1, and TIM-3 were discussed throughout this study. Regardless of the efficacy of these methods, CHB patients may experience serious liver injuries due to the cytotoxic action of CD8+ T cells. Antiviral therapy and a decrease in HBV DNA to undetectable levels could also significantly reduce the risk of the hepatitis B flare. Conclusions The inhibition of Tregs is a novel therapeutic approach to cure chronically HBV infected patients. However, further studies are

  19. Immunotherapy: Beyond Anti-PD-1 and Anti-PD-L1 Therapies.

    PubMed

    Antonia, Scott J; Vansteenkiste, Johan F; Moon, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer are cancers in which chemotherapy produces a survival benefit, although it is small. We now know that anti-PD-1/PD-L1 has substantial clinical activity in both of these diseases, with an overall response rate (ORR) of 15%-20%. These responses are frequently rapid and durable, increase median overall survival (OS) compared with chemotherapy, and produce long-term survivors. Despite these very significant results, many patients do not benefit from anti-PD-1/PD-L1. This is because of the potential for malignancies to co-opt myriad immunosuppressive mechanisms other than aberrant expression of PD-L1. Conceptually, these can be divided into three categories. First, for some patients there is likely a failure to generate sufficient functional tumor antigen-specific T cells. Second, for others, tumor antigen-specific T cells may be generated but fail to enter into the tumor parenchyma. Finally, there are a large number of immunosuppressive mechanisms that have the potential to be operational within the tumor microenvironment: surface membrane immune checkpoint proteins PD-1, CTLA-4, LAG3, TIM3, BTLA, and adenosine A2AR; soluble factors and metabolic alterations interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, adenosine, IDO, and arginase; and inhibitory cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and tumor-associated macrophages. In this article, we discuss three strategies to generate more tumor-reactive T cells for patients: anti-CTLA-4, therapeutic tumor vaccination, and adoptive cellular therapy, with T cells redirected to tumor antigens using T-cell receptor (TCR) or chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) gene modification. We also review some of the various strategies in development to thwart tumor microenvironment immunosuppressive mechanisms. Strategies to drive more T cells into tumors remain a significant challenge. PMID

  20. The adaptive evolution divergence of triosephosphate isomerases between parasitic and free-living flatworms and the discovery of a potential universal target against flatworm parasites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Wen, Jian-Fan

    2011-08-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) is an important drug target or vaccine candidate for pathogenetic organisms such as schistosomes. Parasitic and free-living flatworms shared their last common ancestor but diverged from each other for adapting to parasitic and free-living lives afterwards, respectively. Therefore, adaptive evolution divergence must have occurred between them. Here, for the first time, TIMs were identified from three free-living planarian flatworms, namely Dugesia japonica, Dugesia ryukyuensis, and Schmidtea mediterranea. When these were compared with parasitic flatworms and other organisms, the following results were obtained: (1) planarian TIM genes each contain only one intron, while parasitic flatworm genes each contain other four introns, which are usually present in common metazoans, suggesting planarian-specific intron loss must have occurred; (2) planarian TIM protein sequences are more similar to those of vertebrates rather than to their parasitic relatives or other invertebrates. This implies that relatively rapid evolution occurred in parasitic flatworm TIMs; (3) All the investigated parasitic flatworm TIMs contain a unique tripeptide insert (SXD/E), which may imply its insertion importance to the adaptation of parasitic life. Moreover, our homology modeling results showed the insert region was largely surface-exposed and predicted to be of a B cell epitope location. Finally, the insert is located within one of the three regions previously suggested to be promising immunogenic epitopes in Schistosoma mansoni TIM. Therefore, this unique insert might be significant to developing new effective vaccines or specific drugs against all parasitic flatworm diseases such as schistosomiasis and taeniosis/cysticercosis.

  1. Impaired NK Cell Activation and Chemotaxis toward Dendritic Cells Exposed to Complement-Opsonized HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Ellegård, Rada; Crisci, Elisa; Andersson, Jonas; Shankar, Esaki M; Nyström, Sofia; Hinkula, Jorma; Larsson, Marie

    2015-08-15

    Mucosa resident dendritic cells (DCs) may represent one of the first immune cells that HIV-1 encounters during sexual transmission. The virions in body fluids can be opsonized with complement factors because of HIV-mediated triggering of the complement cascade, and this appears to influence numerous aspects of the immune defense targeting the virus. One key attribute of host defense is the ability to attract immune cells to the site of infection. In this study, we investigated whether the opsonization of HIV with complement (C-HIV) or a mixture of complement and Abs (CI-HIV) affected the cytokine and chemokine responses generated by DCs, as well as their ability to attract other immune cells. We found that the expression levels of CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL3, and CCL17 were lowered after exposure to either C-HIV or CI-HIV relative to free HIV (F-HIV). DCs exposed to F-HIV induced higher cell migration, consisting mainly of NK cells, compared with opsonized virus, and the chemotaxis of NK cells was dependent on CCL3 and CXCL10. NK cell exposure to supernatants derived from HIV-exposed DCs showed that F-HIV induced phenotypic activation (e.g., increased levels of TIM3, CD69, and CD25) and effector function (e.g., production of IFNγ and killing of target cells) in NK cells, whereas C-HIV and CI-HIV did not. The impairment of NK cell recruitment by DCs exposed to complement-opsonized HIV and the lack of NK activation may contribute to the failure of innate immune responses to control HIV at the site of initial mucosa infection. PMID:26157174

  2. Multiparametric profiling of non–small-cell lung cancers reveals distinct immunophenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lizotte, Patrick H.; Ivanova, Elena V.; Awad, Mark M.; Jones, Robert E.; Keogh, Lauren; Liu, Hongye; Dries, Ruben; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Santos, Abigail; Feeney, Nora B.; Paweletz, Cloud P.; Kulkarni, Meghana M.; Bass, Adam J.; Rustgi, Anil K.; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Kufe, Donald W.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Sholl, Lynette M.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Richards, William G.; Bueno, Raphael; English, Jessie M.; Bittinger, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Immune checkpoint blockade improves survival in a subset of patients with non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but robust biomarkers that predict response to PD-1 pathway inhibitors are lacking. Furthermore, our understanding of the diversity of the NSCLC tumor immune microenvironment remains limited. METHODS. We performed comprehensive flow cytometric immunoprofiling on both tumor and immune cells from 51 NSCLCs and integrated this analysis with clinical and histopathologic characteristics, next-generation sequencing, mRNA expression, and PD-L1 immunohistochemistry (IHC). RESULTS. Cytometric profiling identified an immunologically “hot” cluster with abundant CD8+ T cells expressing high levels of PD-1 and TIM-3 and an immunologically “cold” cluster with lower relative abundance of CD8+ T cells and expression of inhibitory markers. The “hot” cluster was highly enriched for expression of genes associated with T cell trafficking and cytotoxic function and high PD-L1 expression by IHC. There was no correlation between immunophenotype and KRAS or EGFR mutation, or patient smoking history, but we did observe an enrichment of squamous subtype and tumors with higher mutation burden in the “hot” cluster. Additionally, approximately 20% of cases had high B cell infiltrates with a subset producing IL-10. CONCLUSIONS. Our results support the use of immune-based metrics to study response and resistance to immunotherapy in lung cancer. FUNDING. The Robert A. and Renée E. Belfer Family Foundation, Expect Miracles Foundation, Starr Cancer Consortium, Stand Up to Cancer Foundation, Conquer Cancer Foundation, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, National Cancer Institute (R01 CA205150), and the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation. PMID:27699239

  3. Increase in frequencies of circulating Th-17 cells correlates with microbial translocation, immune activation and exhaustion in HIV-1 infected patients with poor CD4 T-cell reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Valiathan, Ranjini; Asthana, Deshratn

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed the association of circulating Th-17 cells (cTh-17) with immune activation (IA), immune exhaustion (IE) and regulatory T-cells (T-regs) in 20 human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infected patients with impaired restoration of CD4 T-cell counts despite prolonged suppression of plasma viremia (discordant) and compared it with 20 HIV-1 infected patients showing good immunologic and virologic responses (concordant) following highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Discordant HIV-1 infected patients showed significantly higher frequencies of cTh-17 cells compared to concordant patients and healthy controls after PMA+Ionomicin stimulation. Discordant patients also showed higher CD4 T-cell immune activation (HLA-DR+CD38+) than concordant patients which directly correlated with microbial translocation. Additionally, CD4 T-cells of discordant patients showed higher frequencies of CD4 T-cells expressing multiple immune exhaustion markers (Tim3+PD-1+) which correlated with immune activation indicating that combined analysis of inhibitory molecules along with PD-1 might be a better predictor for immune exhaustion of CD4 T-cells. Increased cTh-17 cell frequency correlated inversely with CD4 T-cell percentages and absolute counts and directly with CD4 T-cell immune activation and T-reg frequencies. Persistent CD4 T-cell immune activation might favor differentiation of activated CD4 T-cells toward cTh-17 phenotype in discordant patients. Discordant patients had significantly lower baseline CD4 T-cell counts and higher viral load at the initiation of HAART and higher immune activation and immune exhaustion after being on HAART for long time indicating that these factors might be associated with an increase in cTh-17 cell frequency, thus, increasing the risk of disease progression despite virologic control.

  4. CD4+ T Cells Expressing PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 Contribute to HIV Persistence during ART

    PubMed Central

    Fromentin, Rémi; Bakeman, Wendy; Lawani, Mariam B.; Khoury, Gabriela; Hartogensis, Wendy; DaFonseca, Sandrina; Killian, Marisela; Epling, Lorrie; Hoh, Rebecca; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Hecht, Frederick M.; Bacchetti, Peter; Deeks, Steven G.; Lewin, Sharon R.; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre; Chomont, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    HIV persists in a small pool of latently infected cells despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). Identifying cellular markers expressed at the surface of these cells may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to reduce the size of the HIV reservoir. We hypothesized that CD4+ T cells expressing immune checkpoint molecules would be enriched in HIV-infected cells in individuals receiving suppressive ART. Expression levels of 7 immune checkpoint molecules (PD-1, CTLA-4, LAG-3, TIGIT, TIM-3, CD160 and 2B4) as well as 4 markers of HIV persistence (integrated and total HIV DNA, 2-LTR circles and cell-associated unspliced HIV RNA) were measured in PBMCs from 48 virally suppressed individuals. Using negative binomial regression models, we identified PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 as immune checkpoint molecules positively associated with the frequency of CD4+ T cells harboring integrated HIV DNA. The frequency of CD4+ T cells co-expressing PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 independently predicted the frequency of cells harboring integrated HIV DNA. Quantification of HIV genomes in highly purified cell subsets from blood further revealed that expressions of PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 were associated with HIV-infected cells in distinct memory CD4+ T cell subsets. CD4+ T cells co-expressing the three markers were highly enriched for integrated viral genomes (median of 8.2 fold compared to total CD4+ T cells). Importantly, most cells carrying inducible HIV genomes expressed at least one of these markers (median contribution of cells expressing LAG-3, PD-1 or TIGIT to the inducible reservoir = 76%). Our data provide evidence that CD4+ T cells expressing PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 alone or in combination are enriched for persistent HIV during ART and suggest that immune checkpoint blockers directed against these receptors may represent valuable tools to target latently infected cells in virally suppressed individuals. PMID:27415008

  5. Polyfunctional Melan-A-specific tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells elicited by dacarbazine treatment before peptide-vaccination depends on AKT activation sustained by ICOS

    PubMed Central

    Franzese, Ornella; Palermo, Belinda; Di Donna, Cosmo; Sperduti, Isabella; Ferraresi, Virginia; Stabile, Helena; Gismondi, Angela; Santoni, Angela; Nisticò, Paola

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The identification of activation pathways linked to antitumor T-cell polyfunctionality in long surviving patients is of great relevance in the new era of immunotherapy. We have recently reported that dacarbazine (DTIC) injected one day before peptide-vaccination plus IFN-α improves the antitumor lytic activity and enlarges the repertoire of Melan-A-specific T-cell clones, as compared with vaccination alone, impacting the overall survival of melanoma patients. To identify the mechanisms responsible for this improvement of the immune response, we have analyzed the endogenous and treatment-induced antigen (Ag)-specific response in a panel of Melan-A-specific CD8+ T-cell clones in terms of differentiation phenotype, inhibitory receptor profile, polyfunctionality and AKT activation. Here, we show that Melan-A-specific CD8+ T cells isolated from patients treated with chemoimmunotherapy possess a late differentiated phenotype as defined by the absence of CD28 and CD27 co-stimulatory molecules and high levels of LAG-3, TIM-3 and PD-1 inhibitory receptors. Nevertheless, they show higher proliferative potential and an improved antitumor polyfunctional effector profile in terms of co-production of TNF-α, IFNγ and Granzyme-B (GrB) compared with cells derived from patients treated with vaccination alone. Polyfunctionality is dependent on an active AKT signaling related to the engagement of the co-stimulatory molecule ICOS. We suggest that this phenotypic and functional signature is dictated by a fine-tuned balance between TCR triggering, AKT activation, co-stimulatory and inhibitory signals induced by chemoimmunotherapy and may be associated with antitumor T cells able to protect patients from tumor recurrence. PMID:27467927

  6. TLR3 deficiency induces chronic inflammatory cardiomyopathy in resistant mice following coxsackievirus B3 infection: role for IL-4

    PubMed Central

    Abston, Eric D.; Coronado, Michael J.; Bucek, Adriana; Onyimba, Jennifer A.; Brandt, Jessica E.; Frisancho, J. Augusto; Kim, Eunyong; Bedja, Djahida; Sung, Yoon-kyu; Radtke, Andrea J.; Gabrielson, Kathleen L.; Mitzner, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that TLR3 polymorphisms increase susceptibility to enteroviral myocarditis and inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (iDCM) in patients. TLR3 signaling has been found to inhibit coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) replication and acute myocarditis in mouse models, but its role in the progression from myocarditis to iDCM has not been previously investigated. In this study we found that TLR3 deficiency increased acute (P = 5.9 × 10−9) and chronic (P = 6.0 × 10−7) myocarditis compared with WT B6.129, a mouse strain that is resistant to chronic myocarditis and iDCM. Using left ventricular in vivo hemodynamic assessment, we found that TLR3-deficient mice developed progressively worse chronic cardiomyopathy. TLR3 deficiency significantly increased viral replication in the heart during acute myocarditis from day 3 through day 12 after infection, but infectious virus was not detected in the heart during chronic disease. TLR3 deficiency increased cytokines associated with a T helper (Th)2 response, including IL-4 (P = 0.03), IL-10 (P = 0.008), IL-13 (P = 0.002), and TGF-β1 (P = 0.005), and induced a shift to an immunoregulatory phenotype in the heart. However, IL-4-deficient mice had improved heart function during acute CVB3 myocarditis by echocardiography and in vivo hemodynamic assessment compared with wild-type mice, indicating that IL-4 impairs cardiac function during myocarditis. IL-4 deficiency increased regulatory T-cell and macrophage populations, including FoxP3+ T cells (P = 0.005) and Tim-3+ macrophages (P = 0.004). Thus, TLR3 prevents the progression from myocarditis to iDCM following CVB3 infection by reducing acute viral replication and IL-4 levels in the heart. PMID:23255589

  7. Biology Labs That Work: The Best of How-To-Do-Its. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Suzanne, Ed.; Moore, Randy, Ed.; Haugen, Heidi, Ed.

    This selected collection of How-To-Do-It articles published in the American Biology Teacher during the past six years presents experiments that can be conducted safely under properly trained and responsible teacher supervision. Contents include: (1) "General Biology and the Nature of Science"; (2) "Cells and Molecules"; (3) "Microbes and Fungi";…

  8. Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Charge and Excitation Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Piotrowiak

    2004-09-28

    We report the and/or state of several subprojects of our DOE sponsored research on Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Electron and Excitation Transfer: (1) Construction of an ultrafast Ti:sapphire amplifier. (2) Mediation of electronic interactions in host-guest molecules. (3) Theoretical models of electrolytes in weakly polar media. (4) Symmetry effects in intramolecular excitation transfer.

  9. Theoretical and experimental investigations on molecular structure of 7-Chloro-9-phenyl-2,3-dihydroacridin-4(1H)-one with cytotoxic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheeshkumar, Rajendran; Shankar, Ramasamy; Kaminsky, Werner; Kalaiselvi, Sivalingam; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Rajendra Prasad, Karnam Jayarampillai

    2016-04-01

    7-Chloro-9-phenyl-2,3-dihydroacridin-4(1H)-one (3) is synthesized from 2-amino-5-chlorobenzophenone (1) and 1,2-cyclohexanedione (2) in the presence of catalyst InCl3. FT-IR, FT-Raman and FT-NMR spectra of molecule 3 have been recorded and the structure was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. CDCl3 and DMSO-d6 FT-NMR spectra and 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts have been measured in molecule 3 and calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) and MO6-2x/6-311G (d,p) levels of theory. Similarly calculated vibrational frequencies were found in good agreement with experimental findings. The optimized geometry of molecule 3 was compared with experimental XRD values. DFT calculations of the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and HOMO - LUMO frontier orbitals identified chemically active sites of molecule 3 responsible for its bioactivity. The title compound, 3 exhibits higher cytotoxicity in Human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) compared to human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549).

  10. First hyperpolarizabilities of dipolar, bis-dipolar, and octupolar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Si Kyung; Ahn, Hyun Cheol; Jeon, Seung-Joon; Asselberghs, Inge; Clays, Koen; Persoons, André; Cho, Bong Rae

    2005-02-01

    A series of dipolar ( 1), bis-dipolar ( 2), and octupolar molecules ( 3) containing 1, 2, and 6 dipolar units within a molecule has been synthesized and their hyperpolarizabilities were analyzed. The βHRS increases in the order, 1 < 2 < 3. The 'monomeric' βzzz increases by approximately twofold from 1 to 2, whereas βzzz of 2 and βxxx of 3 are similar. Noteworthy is the parallel increase in the hyperpolarizability tensor with the λmax.

  11. Mannosyl Glycodendritic Structure Inhibits DC-SIGN-Mediated Ebola Virus Infection in cis and in trans

    PubMed Central

    Lasala, Fátima; Arce, Eva; Otero, Joaquín R.; Rojo, Javier; Delgado, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    We have designed a glycodendritic structure, BH30sucMan, that blocks the interaction between dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and Ebola virus (EBOV) envelope. BH30sucMan inhibits DC-SIGN-mediated EBOV infection at nanomolar concentrations. BH30sucMan may counteract important steps of the infective process of EBOV and, potentially, of microorganisms shown to exploit DC-SIGN for cell entry and infection. PMID:14638512

  12. Discovery of 3-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide activators of the M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2).

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Saunders, Michael; Pearce, Scott; Foulks, Jason M; Parnell, K Mark; Clifford, Adrianne; Nix, Rebecca N; Bullough, Jeremy; Hendrickson, Thomas F; Wright, Kevin; McCullar, Michael V; Kanner, Steven B; Ho, Koc-Kan

    2014-01-15

    Activators of the pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) are currently attracting significant interest as potential anticancer therapies. They may achieve a novel antiproliferation response in cancer cells through modulation of the classic 'Warburg effect' characteristic of aberrant metabolism. In this Letter, we describe the optimization of a weakly active screening hit to a structurally novel series of small molecule 3-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamides as potent PKM2 activators. PMID:24374270

  13. MART-1 peptide vaccination plus IMP321 (LAG-3Ig fusion protein) in patients receiving autologous PBMCs after lymphodepletion: results of a Phase I trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunotherapy offers a promising novel approach for the treatment of cancer and both adoptive T-cell transfer and immune modulation lead to regression of advanced melanoma. However, the potential synergy between these two strategies remains unclear. Methods We investigated in 12 patients with advanced stage IV melanoma the effect of multiple MART-1 analog peptide vaccinations with (n = 6) or without (n = 6) IMP321 (LAG-3Ig fusion protein) as an adjuvant in combination with lymphodepleting chemotherapy and adoptive transfer of autologous PBMCs at day (D) 0 (Trial registration No: NCT00324623). All patients were selected on the basis of ex vivo detectable MART-1-specific CD8 T-cell responses and immunized at D0, 8, 15, 22, 28, 52, and 74 post-reinfusion. Results After immunization, a significant expansion of MART-1-specific CD8 T cells was measured in 83% (n = 5/6) and 17% (n = 1/6) of patients from the IMP321 and control groups, respectively (P < 0.02). Compared to the control group, the mean fold increase of MART-1-specific CD8 T cells in the IMP321 group was respectively >2-, >4- and >6-fold higher at D15, D30 and D60 (P < 0.02). Long-lasting MART-1-specific CD8 T-cell responses were significantly associated with IMP321 (P < 0.02). At the peak of the response, MART-1-specific CD8 T cells contained higher proportions of effector (CCR7− CD45RA+/−) cells in the IMP321 group (P < 0.02) and showed no sign of exhaustion (i.e. were mostly PD1−CD160−TIM3−LAG3−2B4+/−). Moreover, IMP321 was associated with a significantly reduced expansion of regulatory T cells (P < 0.04); consistently, we observed a negative correlation between the relative expansion of MART-1-specific CD8 T cells and of regulatory T cells. Finally, although there were no confirmed responses as per RECIST criteria, a transient, 30-day partial response was observed in a patient from the IMP321 group. Conclusions Vaccination with IMP321 as an

  14. Modulation of Innate Immune Mechanisms to Enhance Leishmania Vaccine-Induced Immunity: Role of Coinhibitory Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Bhattacharya, Parna; Ismail, Nevien; Kaul, Amit; Singh, Rakesh; Nakhasi, Hira L.

    2016-01-01

    No licensed human vaccines are currently available against any parasitic disease including leishmaniasis. Several antileishmanial vaccine formulations have been tested in various animal models, including genetically modified live-attenuated parasite vaccines. Experimental infection studies have shown that Leishmania parasites utilize a broad range of strategies to undermine effector properties of host phagocytic cells, i.e., dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MΦ). Furthermore, Leishmania parasites have evolved strategies to actively inhibit TH1 polarizing functions of DCs and to condition the infected MΦ toward anti-inflammatory/alternative/M2 phenotype. The altered phenotype of phagocytic cells is characterized by decreased production of antimicrobial reactive oxygen, nitrogen molecules, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-γ, IL-12, and TNF-α. These early events limit the activation of TH1-effector cells and set the stage for pathogenesis. Furthermore, this early control of innate immunity by the virulent parasites results in substantial alteration in the adaptive immunity characterized by reduced proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and TH2-biased immunity that results in production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as TGF-β, and IL-10. More recent studies have also documented the induction of coinhibitory ligands, such as CTLA-4, PD-L1, CD200, and Tim-3, that induce exhaustion and/or non-proliferation in antigen-experienced T cells. Most of these studies focus on viral infections in chronic phase, thus limiting the direct application of these results to parasitic infections and much less to parasitic vaccines. However, these studies suggest that vaccine-induced protective immunity can be modulated using strategies that enhance the costimulation that might reduce the threshold necessary for T cell activation and conversely by strategies that reduce or block inhibitory molecules, such as PD-L1 and CD200. In this review, we will focus on the

  15. Expansion of Tumor-reactive T Cells From Patients With Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingda; Liu, Zhenjiang; Rangelova, Elena; Poiret, Thomas; Ambati, Aditya; Rane, Lalit; Xie, Shanshan; Verbeke, Caroline; Dodoo, Ernest; Del Chiaro, Marco; Löhr, Matthias; Segersvärd, Ralf; Maeurer, Markus J

    2016-01-01

    Generation of T lymphocytes with reactivity against cancer is a prerequisite for effective adoptive cellular therapies. We established a protocol for tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Tumor samples from 17 pancreatic cancer specimens were cultured with cytokines (IL-2, IL-15, and IL-21) to expand TILs. After 10 days of culture, TILs were stimulated with an anti-CD3 antibody (OKT3) and irradiated allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Reactivity of TILs against tumor-associated antigens (mesothelin, survivin, or NY-ESO-1) was detected by intracellular cytokine production by flow cytometry. Cytotoxicity was measured using a Chromium 51 release assay, and reactivity of TILs against autologous tumor cells was detected by INF-[gamma] production (ELISA). TIL composition was tested by CD45RA, CCR7, 4-1BB, LAG-3, PD-1, TIM3, and CTLA-4 marker analysis. TCR V[beta] was determined by flow cytometry and TCR clonality was gauged measuring the CDR3 region length by PCR analysis and subsequent sequencing. We could reliably obtain TILs from 17/17 patients with a majority of CD8(+) T cells. CD3(+)CD8(+), CD3(+)CD4(+), and CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-)[double-negative (DN) T cells] resided predominantly in central (CD45RA(-)CCR7(+)) and effector (CD45RA-CCR7-) memory subsets. CD8(+) TILs tested uniformly positive for LAG-3 (about 100%), whereas CD4(+) TILs showed only up to 12% LAG-3(+) staining and PD-1 showed a broad expression pattern in TILs from different patients. TILs from individual patients recognized strongly (up to 11.9% and 8.2% in CD8(+)) NY-ESO-1, determined by ICS, or mesothelin, determined respectively by TNF-[alpha] and IFN-[gamma] production. Twelve of 17 of CD8(+) TILs showed preferential expansion of certain TCR V[beta] families (eg, 99.2% V[beta]13.2 in CD8(+) TILs, 77% in the V[beta]1, 65.9% in the V[beta]22, and 63.3% in the V[beta]14 family). TCR CDR3 analysis exhibited monoclonal or oligoclonal TCRs

  16. The Herpes Simplex Virus Latency-Associated Transcript Gene Is Associated with a Broader Repertoire of Virus-Specific Exhausted CD8+ T Cells Retained within the Trigeminal Ganglia of Latently Infected HLA Transgenic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Dervillez, Xavier; Khan, Arif A.; Chentoufi, Aziz A.; Chilukuri, Sravya; Shukr, Nora; Fazli, Yasmin; Ong, Nicolas N.; Afifi, Rasha E.; Osorio, Nelson; Geertsema, Roger; Nesburn, Anthony B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Persistent pathogens, such as herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), have evolved a variety of immune evasion strategies to avoid being detected and destroyed by the host's immune system. A dynamic cross talk appears to occur between the HSV-1 latency-associated transcript (LAT), the only viral gene that is abundantly transcribed during latency, and the CD8+ T cells that reside in HSV-1 latently infected human and rabbit trigeminal ganglia (TG). The reactivation phenotype of TG that are latently infected with wild-type HSV-1 or with LAT-rescued mutant (i.e., LAT+ TG) is significantly higher than TG latently infected with LAT-null mutant (i.e., LAT− TG). Whether LAT promotes virus reactivation by selectively shaping a unique repertoire of HSV-specific CD8+ T cells in LAT+ TG is unknown. In the present study, we assessed the frequency, function, and exhaustion status of TG-resident CD8+ T cells specific to 40 epitopes derived from HSV-1 gB, gD, VP11/12, and VP13/14 proteins, in human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A*0201) transgenic rabbits infected ocularly with LAT+ versus LAT– virus. Compared to CD8+ T cells from LAT– TG, CD8+ T cells from LAT+ TG (i) recognized a broader selection of nonoverlapping HSV-1 epitopes, (ii) expressed higher levels of PD-1, TIM-3, and CTLA-4 markers of exhaustion, and (iii) produced less tumor necrosis factor alpha, gamma interferon, and granzyme B. These results suggest a novel immune evasion mechanism by which the HSV-1 LAT may contribute to the shaping of a broader repertoire of exhausted HSV-specific CD8+ T cells in latently infected TG, thus allowing for increased viral reactivation. IMPORTANCE A significantly larger repertoire of dysfunctional (exhausted) HSV-specific CD8+ T cells were found in the TG of HLA transgenic rabbits latently infected with wild-type HSV-1 or with LAT-rescued mutant (i.e., LAT+ TG) than in a more restricted repertoire of functional HSV-specific CD8+ T cells in the TG of HLA transgenic rabbits latently

  17. Modulation of Innate Immune Mechanisms to Enhance Leishmania Vaccine-Induced Immunity: Role of Coinhibitory Molecules.

    PubMed

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Bhattacharya, Parna; Ismail, Nevien; Kaul, Amit; Singh, Rakesh; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2016-01-01

    No licensed human vaccines are currently available against any parasitic disease including leishmaniasis. Several antileishmanial vaccine formulations have been tested in various animal models, including genetically modified live-attenuated parasite vaccines. Experimental infection studies have shown that Leishmania parasites utilize a broad range of strategies to undermine effector properties of host phagocytic cells, i.e., dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MΦ). Furthermore, Leishmania parasites have evolved strategies to actively inhibit TH1 polarizing functions of DCs and to condition the infected MΦ toward anti-inflammatory/alternative/M2 phenotype. The altered phenotype of phagocytic cells is characterized by decreased production of antimicrobial reactive oxygen, nitrogen molecules, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-γ, IL-12, and TNF-α. These early events limit the activation of TH1-effector cells and set the stage for pathogenesis. Furthermore, this early control of innate immunity by the virulent parasites results in substantial alteration in the adaptive immunity characterized by reduced proliferation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and TH2-biased immunity that results in production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as TGF-β, and IL-10. More recent studies have also documented the induction of coinhibitory ligands, such as CTLA-4, PD-L1, CD200, and Tim-3, that induce exhaustion and/or non-proliferation in antigen-experienced T cells. Most of these studies focus on viral infections in chronic phase, thus limiting the direct application of these results to parasitic infections and much less to parasitic vaccines. However, these studies suggest that vaccine-induced protective immunity can be modulated using strategies that enhance the costimulation that might reduce the threshold necessary for T cell activation and conversely by strategies that reduce or block inhibitory molecules, such as PD-L1 and CD200. In this review, we will focus on

  18. Singlet oxygen detection in water by means of digital holography and digital holographic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belashov, A. V.; Petrov, N. V.; Semenova, I. V.; Vasyutinskii, O. S.

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents results on singlet oxygen detection in aqueous solutions of a photosensitizer based on the reconstruction of 3D temperature gradients resulting from nonradiative deactivation of excited oxygen molecules. 3D temperature distributions were reconstructed by means of the inverse Abel transformation from a single digital hologram in the case of cylindrically symmetric distribution of the temperature gradient and using holographic tomography algorithm with filtered back projection in the case of nonsymmetrical distribution. Major features of the applied techniques are discussed and results obtained by the two methods are compared.

  19. Applications of Group Theory to Atoms, Molecules, and Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfram, Thomas; Ellialtıǧlu, Şinasi

    2014-01-01

    Preface; 1. Introductory example: squarene; 2. Molecular vibrations of isotopically substituted AB2 molecules; 3. Spherical symmetry and the full rotation group; 4. Crystal field theory; 5. Electron spin and angular momentum; 6. Molecular electronic structure: the LCAO model; 7. Electronic states of diatomic molecules; 8. Transition metal complexes; 9. Space groups and crystalline solids; 10. Application of space group theory: energy bands for the perovskite structure; 11. Applications of space group theory: lattice vibrations; 12. Time reversal and magnetic groups; 13. Graphene; 14. Carbon nanotubes; Appendixes; Index.

  20. Crystal assembly based on 3,5-bis(2'-benzimidazole) pyridine and its complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Shan Ling; Tian, Zhao Yong; Wu, Ya Hong; Yan, Yan; Hu, Sheng; Yu, Jian

    2013-03-01

    Imdazole, pyridine and their derivatives have been considered as excellent ligands in supramolecular self-assembly. In this paper, a ligand molecule 3,5-bis (2'-benzimidazole) pyridine (BBP) was prepared, and two different crystal architectures based on the ligand molecule were self-assembled by diffusion/solvothermal ways. Furthermore, several crystal architectures of several relative complexes were also successfully assembled. These crystal structures were well defined by X-ray diffractions. Structural resolutions indicated that, as building blocks, this bibenzimidazole pyridine molecules exhibited coordination varieties in constructing the crystal architectures based on its related complexes.

  1. Computational chemistry and aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. M.; Jaffe, R. L.; Arnold, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the radiative heating phenomena encountered during a typical aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle (AOTV) trajectory was made to determine the potential impact of computational chemistry on AOTV design technology. Both equilibrium and nonequilibrium radiation mechanisms were considered. This analysis showed that computational chemistry can be used to predict (1) radiative intensity factors and spectroscopic data; (2) the excitation rates of both atoms and molecules; (3) high-temperature reaction rate constants for metathesis and charge exchange reactions; (4) particle ionization and neutralization rates and cross sections; and (5) spectral line widths.

  2. Life Sciences Issues for a Mission to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session MP5 includes short reports on: (1) Cardiovascular Concerns for a Mars Mission: Autonomic and Biomechanical Effects; (2) Reducing the Risk of Space Radiation Induced Bioeffects: Vehicle Design and Protectant Molecules; (3) Musculoskeletal Issues for Long Duration Mission: Muscle Mass Preservation, Renal Stone Risk Factors, Countermeasures, and Contingency Treatment Planning; (4) Psychological Issues and Crew Selection for a Mars Mission: Maximizing the Mix for the Long Haul; and (5) Issues in Crew Health, Medical Selection and Medical Officer (CMO) Training for a Mission to Mars.

  3. A Ferrocene-Quinoxaline Derivative as a Highly Selective Probe for Colorimetric and Redox Sensing of Toxic Mercury(II) Cations

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Fabiola; Caballero, Antonio; Molina, Pedro; Tarraga, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    A new chemosensor molecule 3 based on a ferrocene-quinoxaline dyad recognizes mercury (II) cations in acetonitrile solution. Upon recognition, an anodic shift of the ferrocene/ferrocenium oxidation peaks and a progressive red-shift (Δλ = 140 nm) of the low-energy band, are observed in its absorption spectrum. This change in the absorption spectrum is accompanied by a colour change from orange to deep green, which can be used for a “naked-eye” detection of this metal cation. PMID:22163528

  4. Highly-Immunogenic Virally-Vectored T-cell Vaccines Cannot Overcome Subversion of the T-cell Response by HCV during Chronic Infection.

    PubMed

    Swadling, Leo; Halliday, John; Kelly, Christabel; Brown, Anthony; Capone, Stefania; Ansari, M Azim; Bonsall, David; Richardson, Rachel; Hartnell, Felicity; Collier, Jane; Ammendola, Virginia; Del Sorbo, Mariarosaria; Von Delft, Annette; Traboni, Cinzia; Hill, Adrian V S; Colloca, Stefano; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Klenerman, Paul; Folgori, Antonella; Barnes, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    An effective therapeutic vaccine for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, as an adjunct to newly developed directly-acting antivirals (DAA), or for the prevention of reinfection, would significantly reduce the global burden of disease associated with chronic HCV infection. A recombinant chimpanzee adenoviral (ChAd3) vector and a modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), encoding the non-structural proteins of HCV (NSmut), used in a heterologous prime/boost regimen induced multi-specific, high-magnitude, durable HCV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses in healthy volunteers, and was more immunogenic than a heterologous Ad regimen. We now assess the immunogenicity of this vaccine regimen in HCV infected patients (including patients with a low viral load suppressed with interferon/ribavirin therapy), determine T-cell cross-reactivity to endogenous virus, and compare immunogenicity with that observed previously in both healthy volunteers and in HCV infected patients vaccinated with the heterologous Ad regimen. Vaccination of HCV infected patients with ChAd3-NSmut/MVA-NSmut was well tolerated. Vaccine-induced HCV-specific T-cell responses were detected in 8/12 patients; however, CD4+ T-cell responses were rarely detected, and the overall magnitude of HCV-specific T-cell responses was markedly reduced when compared to vaccinated healthy volunteers. Furthermore, HCV-specific cells had a distinct partially-functional phenotype (lower expression of activation markers, granzyme B, and TNFα production, weaker in vitro proliferation, and higher Tim3 expression, with comparable Tbet and Eomes expression) compared to healthy volunteers. Robust anti-vector T-cells and antibodies were induced, showing that there is no global defect in immunity. The level of viremia at the time of vaccination did not correlate with the magnitude of the vaccine-induced T-cell response. Full-length, next-generation sequencing of the circulating virus demonstrated that T-cells were

  5. Future perspectives in melanoma research: meeting report from the "Melanoma Bridge": Napoli, December 3rd-6th 2014.

    PubMed

    Ascierto, Paolo A; Atkins, Michael; Bifulco, Carlo; Botti, Gerardo; Cochran, Alistair; Davies, Michael; Demaria, Sandra; Dummer, Reinhard; Ferrone, Soldano; Formenti, Silvia; Gajewski, Thomas F; Garbe, Claus; Khleif, Samir; Kiessling, Rolf; Lo, Roger; Lorigan, Paul; Arthur, Grant Mc; Masucci, Giuseppe; Melero, Ignacio; Mihm, Martin; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Parmiani, Giorgio; Puzanov, Igor; Romero, Pedro; Schilling, Bastian; Seliger, Barbara; Stroncek, David; Taube, Janis; Tomei, Sara; Zarour, Hassane M; Testori, Alessandro; Wang, Ena; Galon, Jérôme; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Mozzillo, Nicola; Marincola, Francesco M; Thurin, Magdalena

    2015-11-30

    survival rates have also been observed with immune-targeted therapy for patients with metastatic melanoma. Immune-modulating antibodies came to the forefront with anti-CTLA-4, programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and PD-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathway blocking antibodies that result in durable responses in a subset of melanoma patients. Agents targeting other immune inhibitory (e.g., Tim-3) or immune stimulating (e.g., CD137) receptors and other approaches such as adoptive cell transfer demonstrate clinical benefit in patients with melanoma as well. These agents are being studied in combination with targeted therapies in attempt to produce longer-term responses than those more typically seen with targeted therapy. Other combinations with cytotoxic chemotherapy and inhibitors of angiogenesis are changing the evolving landscape of therapeutic options and are being evaluated to prevent or delay resistance and to further improve survival rates for this patient population. This meeting's specific focus was on advances in combination of targeted therapy and immunotherapy. Both combination targeted therapy approaches and different immunotherapies were discussed. Similarly to the previous meetings, the importance of biomarkers for clinical application as markers for diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of treatment response was an integral part of the meeting. The overall emphasis on biomarkers supports novel concepts toward integrating biomarkers into contemporary clinical management of patients with melanoma across the entire spectrum of disease stage. Translation of the knowledge gained from the biology of tumor microenvironment across different tumors represents a bridge to impact on prognosis and response to therapy in melanoma.

  6. Future perspectives in melanoma research: meeting report from the "Melanoma Bridge": Napoli, December 3rd-6th 2014.

    PubMed

    Ascierto, Paolo A; Atkins, Michael; Bifulco, Carlo; Botti, Gerardo; Cochran, Alistair; Davies, Michael; Demaria, Sandra; Dummer, Reinhard; Ferrone, Soldano; Formenti, Silvia; Gajewski, Thomas F; Garbe, Claus; Khleif, Samir; Kiessling, Rolf; Lo, Roger; Lorigan, Paul; Arthur, Grant Mc; Masucci, Giuseppe; Melero, Ignacio; Mihm, Martin; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Parmiani, Giorgio; Puzanov, Igor; Romero, Pedro; Schilling, Bastian; Seliger, Barbara; Stroncek, David; Taube, Janis; Tomei, Sara; Zarour, Hassane M; Testori, Alessandro; Wang, Ena; Galon, Jérôme; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Mozzillo, Nicola; Marincola, Francesco M; Thurin, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    survival rates have also been observed with immune-targeted therapy for patients with metastatic melanoma. Immune-modulating antibodies came to the forefront with anti-CTLA-4, programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and PD-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathway blocking antibodies that result in durable responses in a subset of melanoma patients. Agents targeting other immune inhibitory (e.g., Tim-3) or immune stimulating (e.g., CD137) receptors and other approaches such as adoptive cell transfer demonstrate clinical benefit in patients with melanoma as well. These agents are being studied in combination with targeted therapies in attempt to produce longer-term responses than those more typically seen with targeted therapy. Other combinations with cytotoxic chemotherapy and inhibitors of angiogenesis are changing the evolving landscape of therapeutic options and are being evaluated to prevent or delay resistance and to further improve survival rates for this patient population. This meeting's specific focus was on advances in combination of targeted therapy and immunotherapy. Both combination targeted therapy approaches and different immunotherapies were discussed. Similarly to the previous meetings, the importance of biomarkers for clinical application as markers for diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of treatment response was an integral part of the meeting. The overall emphasis on biomarkers supports novel concepts toward integrating biomarkers into contemporary clinical management of patients with melanoma across the entire spectrum of disease stage. Translation of the knowledge gained from the biology of tumor microenvironment across different tumors represents a bridge to impact on prognosis and response to therapy in melanoma. PMID:26619946

  7. Highly-Immunogenic Virally-Vectored T-cell Vaccines Cannot Overcome Subversion of the T-cell Response by HCV during Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Swadling, Leo; Halliday, John; Kelly, Christabel; Brown, Anthony; Capone, Stefania; Ansari, M. Azim; Bonsall, David; Richardson, Rachel; Hartnell, Felicity; Collier, Jane; Ammendola, Virginia; Del Sorbo, Mariarosaria; Von Delft, Annette; Traboni, Cinzia; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Colloca, Stefano; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Klenerman, Paul; Folgori, Antonella; Barnes, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    An effective therapeutic vaccine for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, as an adjunct to newly developed directly-acting antivirals (DAA), or for the prevention of reinfection, would significantly reduce the global burden of disease associated with chronic HCV infection. A recombinant chimpanzee adenoviral (ChAd3) vector and a modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), encoding the non-structural proteins of HCV (NSmut), used in a heterologous prime/boost regimen induced multi-specific, high-magnitude, durable HCV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses in healthy volunteers, and was more immunogenic than a heterologous Ad regimen. We now assess the immunogenicity of this vaccine regimen in HCV infected patients (including patients with a low viral load suppressed with interferon/ribavirin therapy), determine T-cell cross-reactivity to endogenous virus, and compare immunogenicity with that observed previously in both healthy volunteers and in HCV infected patients vaccinated with the heterologous Ad regimen. Vaccination of HCV infected patients with ChAd3-NSmut/MVA-NSmut was well tolerated. Vaccine-induced HCV-specific T-cell responses were detected in 8/12 patients; however, CD4+ T-cell responses were rarely detected, and the overall magnitude of HCV-specific T-cell responses was markedly reduced when compared to vaccinated healthy volunteers. Furthermore, HCV-specific cells had a distinct partially-functional phenotype (lower expression of activation markers, granzyme B, and TNFα production, weaker in vitro proliferation, and higher Tim3 expression, with comparable Tbet and Eomes expression) compared to healthy volunteers. Robust anti-vector T-cells and antibodies were induced, showing that there is no global defect in immunity. The level of viremia at the time of vaccination did not correlate with the magnitude of the vaccine-induced T-cell response. Full-length, next-generation sequencing of the circulating virus demonstrated that T-cells were

  8. Structure guided design of potential inhibitors of human calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV containing pyrimidine scaffold.

    PubMed

    Naz, Huma; Jameel, Ehtesham; Hoda, Nasimul; Shandilya, Ashutosh; Khan, Parvez; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Jayaram, B; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-02-01

    Calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV (CAMKIV) belongs to the serine/threonine protein kinase family and considered as an encouraging target for the development of novel anticancer agents. The interaction and binding behavior of three designed inhibitors of human CAMKIV, containing pyrimidine scaffold, was monitored by in vitro fluorescence titration and molecular docking calculations under physiological condition. In silico docking studies were performed to screen several compounds containing pyrimidine scaffold against CAMKIV. Molecular docking calculation predicted the binding of these ligands in active-site cavity of the CAMKIV structure correlating such interactions with a probable inhibition mechanism. Finally, three active pyrimidine substituted compounds (molecules 1-3) have been successfully synthesized and characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR. Molecule 3 is showing very high binding-affinity for the CAMKIV, with a binding constant of 2.2×10(8), M(-1) (±0.20). All three compounds are nontoxic to HEK293 cells up to 50 μM. The cell proliferation inhibition study showed that the molecule 3 has lowest IC50 value (46±1.08 μM). The theoretical and experimental observations are significantly correlated. This study reveals some important observations to generate an improved pyrimidine based compound that holds promise as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26783179

  9. Modification of ultrafiltration membrane with nanoscale zerovalent iron layers for humic acid fouling reduction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Baiwen; Yu, Wenzheng; Jefferson, William A; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-03-15

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) was layered onto ultrafiltration (UF) membrane surface and tested for antifouling properties using humic acid (HA). Scanning electron microscopy showed that a relatively homogeneous layer was formed across the membrane surface by NZVI particles. Strong adhesion was observed between NZVI and UF membrane used. HA was significantly removed and membrane flux was increased in the presence of NZVI layer. Increased loadings of NZVI onto the membrane surface increased resistance to fouling while slightly reducing the clean water permeability of the membrane. However, the pore size of the layer formed by pristine NZVI was large, resulting in more chances of HA molecules getting to the membrane surface even blocking the membrane pores at the beginning. Membrane loaded with NZVI layer performed much better under acidic conditions. During NZVI synthesis, specific surface area of NZVI particle increased with increasing the ratio of ethanol (Vethanol/Vsolution), which also gradually decreased the average pore size of NZVI layer. As a result, the corresponding membrane flux steadily increased. Additionally, the results for permeate samples under different conditions showed that large molecular weight (MW, >30 kDa) and medium MW HA molecules (3-30 kDa) were removed much faster than those of small MW HA molecules (<3 kDa). PMID:25613411

  10. Computational investigations of HNO in biology

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    HNO (nitroxyl) has been found to have many physiological effects in numerous biological processes. Computational investigations have been employed to help understand the structural properties of HNO complexes and HNO reactivities in some interesting biologically relevant systems. The following computational aspects were reviewed in this work: 1) structural and energetic properties of HNO isomers; 2) interactions between HNO and non-metal molecules; 3) structural and spectroscopic properties of HNO metal complexes; 4) HNO reactions with biologically important non-metal systems; 5) involvement of HNO in reactions of metal complexes and metalloproteins. Results indicate that computational investigations are very helpful to elucidate interesting experimental phenomena and provide new insights into unique structural, spectroscopic, and mechanistic properties of HNO involvement in biology. PMID:23103077

  11. Photochemically-induced fluorescence dosage of non-fluorescent pyrethroid (Etofenprox) in natural water using a cationic micellar medium.

    PubMed

    Adamou, Rabani; Coly, Atanasse; Abdoulaye, Alassane; Soumaila, Maimouna; Moussa, Idrissa; Ikhiri, Khalid; Tine, Alphonse

    2011-07-01

    An analytical method based on the use of UV-irradiation to produce fluorescent derivatives from Etofenprox a non-fluorescent pyrethroid insecticide is described. The impact of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) micellar medium on the Etofenprox photochemically-induced fluorescence (PIF) is reported. Parameters influencing the sensitivity and repeatability of the PIF method have been optimized. The alkaline medium (NaOH 6 × 10(-2) M) + CTAC surfactant molecules (3.84 mg/ml) in acetonitrile is found to be very suitable for this pyrethroid insecticide analysis in environment matrices. Linear dynamic range is established over more than two orders of magnitude. The limit of detection is lower than 5 ng/ml. The method seems to be suitable for environmental matrices quality control. Application to the analysis of spiked natural waters gave recoveries rate ranged from 94 to 104% and 107 to 115% respectively for river and pound water. PMID:21222143

  12. Improvement of morphology and performance of P3HT/ZnO hybrid solar cells induced by liquid crystal molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhenrong; Wei, Ying; Wang, Xiaofeng; Hu, Siwei; Yao, Kai; Li, Fan

    2016-09-01

    Herein, the liquid crystal molecule, 3,6-bis(5-(4-hexyl-phenyl)-2-thienyl)-2,5-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-2,5-dihydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4-dione (DPP-TP6), is introduced into P3HT/ZnO to control the morphology of the hybrid system. Induced by the self-assembly behavior of DPP-TP6 upon thermal treatment at the mesomorphase temperature, the dispersion of ZnO nanocrystals is effectively improved and the crystallinity and ordering of the P3HT is also enhanced, which provides more interfacial area for exciton dissociation and efficient path for carrier transport. On such basis, the power conversion efficiency of P3HT/ZnO hybrid solar cells is improved mainly due to the increase of Jsc.

  13. In Silico Molecular Docking and In Vitro Antidiabetic Studies of Dihydropyrimido[4,5-a]acridin-2-amines

    PubMed Central

    Bharathi, A.; Roopan, Selvaraj Mohana; Vasavi, C. S.; Munusami, Punnagai; Gayathri, G. A.; Gayathri, M.

    2014-01-01

    An in vitro antidiabetic activity on α-amylase and α–glucosidase activity of novel 10-chloro-4-(2-chlorophenyl)-12-phenyl-5,6-dihydropyrimido[4,5-a]acridin-2-amines (3a–3f) were evaluated. Structures of the synthesized molecules were studied by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, EI-MS, and single crystal X-ray structural analysis data. An in silico molecular docking was performed on synthesized molecules (3a–3f). Overall studies indicate that compound 3e is a promising compound leading to the development of selective inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase. PMID:24991576

  14. Binding of terbium complex to polymerizable hybrid materials constructed from molecular assembly and its optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Limin; Shao Xin; Yin Yibin; Li Wenzhi

    2009-06-03

    A new molecular precursor was synthesized by means of the amidation reaction of N-Phenylanthranilic acid with a cross-linking molecule (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane, and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy. Then, a chemically bonded rare-earth/inorganic polymeric hybrid material was constructed using the precursor as a bridge molecule that can both coordinate to rare-earth ions and form a Si-O network with tetraethoxysilane or polyvinyl alcohol after cohydrolysis and copolycondensation processes. Ultraviolet absorption and fluorescence spectra were applied to characterize the photophysical properties of the obtained hybrid material. The strong luminescence of Tb{sup 3+} substantiates optimum energy couple and effective intramolecular energy transfer between the triplet state energy of modified ligand bridge and emissive energy level of Tb{sup 3+}.

  15. Construction of hybrid material with double chemical bond from functional bridge ligand: Molecular modification, lotus root-like micromorphology and strong luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bing; Sui, Yu-Long

    2006-07-01

    Modifying benzoic acid with a cross-linking molecule (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (abbreviated as APES), a fictional molecular bridge with double reactivity was achieved by the amidation reaction between them. Then the modified functional molecule, which behaving as a bridge, both coordinate with terbium ion through amide's oxygen atom and form the Si-O chemical bond in an in situ sol-gel process with matrix precursor (tetraethoxysilane, TEOS). As a result, a novel molecular hybrid material (Tb-BA-APES) with double chemical bond (Tb-O coordination bond and Si-O covalent bond) was constructed. The strong luminescence of Tb 3+ substantiates optimum energy couple and effective intramolecular energy transfer between the triplet state energy of modified ligand bridge and emissive energy level of Tb 3+. Especially SEM of the molecular hybrid material exhibits unexpected microlotus root-like pore morphology.

  16. Unexpected interplay of bonding height and energy level alignment at heteromolecular hybrid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadtmüller, Benjamin; Lüftner, Daniel; Willenbockel, Martin; Reinisch, Eva M.; Sueyoshi, Tomoki; Koller, Georg; Soubatch, Serguei; Ramsey, Michael G.; Puschnig, Peter; Tautz, F. Stefan; Kumpf, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Although geometric and electronic properties of any physical or chemical system are always mutually coupled by the rules of quantum mechanics, counterintuitive coincidences between the two are sometimes observed. The coadsorption of the organic molecules 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride and copper-II-phthalocyanine on Ag(111) represents such a case, since geometric and electronic structures appear to be decoupled: one molecule moves away from the substrate while its electronic structure indicates a stronger chemical interaction, and vice versa for the other. Our comprehensive experimental and ab-initio theoretical study reveals that, mediated by the metal surface, both species mutually amplify their charge-donating and -accepting characters, respectively. This resolves the apparent paradox, and demonstrates with exceptional clarity how geometric and electronic bonding parameters are intertwined at metal-organic interfaces.

  17. Unexpected interplay of bonding height and energy level alignment at heteromolecular hybrid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Stadtmüller, Benjamin; Lüftner, Daniel; Willenbockel, Martin; Reinisch, Eva M; Sueyoshi, Tomoki; Koller, Georg; Soubatch, Serguei; Ramsey, Michael G; Puschnig, Peter; Tautz, F Stefan; Kumpf, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Although geometric and electronic properties of any physical or chemical system are always mutually coupled by the rules of quantum mechanics, counterintuitive coincidences between the two are sometimes observed. The coadsorption of the organic molecules 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride and copper-II-phthalocyanine on Ag(111) represents such a case, since geometric and electronic structures appear to be decoupled: one molecule moves away from the substrate while its electronic structure indicates a stronger chemical interaction, and vice versa for the other. Our comprehensive experimental and ab-initio theoretical study reveals that, mediated by the metal surface, both species mutually amplify their charge-donating and -accepting characters, respectively. This resolves the apparent paradox, and demonstrates with exceptional clarity how geometric and electronic bonding parameters are intertwined at metal-organic interfaces. PMID:24739211

  18. The Fe(III) and Ga(III) coordination chemistry of 3-(1-hydroxymethylidene) and 3-(1-hydroxydecylidene)-5-(2-hydroxyethyl)pyrrolidine-2,4-dione: Novel tetramic acid degradation products of homoserine lactone bacterial quorum sensing molecules

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Ariel A.; Hahn, Tobias; Davis, Nicole; Lowery, Colin A.; Struss, Anjali K.; Janda, Kim D.; Böttger, Lars H.; Matzanke, Berthold F.; Carrano, Carl J.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria use small diffusible molecules to exchange information in a process called quorum sensing (QS). An important class of quorum sensing molecules used by Gram-negative bacteria is the family of N-acylhomoserine lactones (HSL). It was recently discovered that a degradation product of the QS molecule 3-oxo-C12-homoserine lactone, the tetramic acid 3-(1-hydroxydecylidene)-5-(2-hydroxyethyl)pyrrolidine-2,4-dione, is a potent antibacterial agent, thus implying roles for QS outside of simply communication. Because these tetramic acids also appear to bind iron with appreciable affinity it was suggested that metal binding might contribute to their biological activity. Here, using a variety of spectroscopic tools, we describe the coordination chemistry of both the methylidene and decylidene tetramic acid derivatives with Fe(III) and Ga(III) and discuss the potential biological significance of such metal binding. PMID:22178671

  19. The Fe(III) and Ga(III) coordination chemistry of 3-(1-hydroxymethylidene) and 3-(1-hydroxydecylidene)-5-(2-hydroxyethyl)pyrrolidine-2,4-dione: novel tetramic acid degradation products of homoserine lactone bacterial quorum sensing molecules.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ariel A; Hahn, Tobias; Davis, Nicole; Lowery, Colin A; Struss, Anjali K; Janda, Kim D; Böttger, Lars H; Matzanke, Berthold F; Carrano, Carl J

    2012-02-01

    Bacteria use small diffusible molecules to exchange information in a process called quorum sensing (QS). An important class of quorum sensing molecules used by Gram-negative bacteria is the family of N-acylhomoserine lactones (HSL). It was recently discovered that a degradation product of the QS molecule 3-oxo-C(12)-homoserine lactone, the tetramic acid 3-(1-hydroxydecylidene)-5-(2-hydroxyethyl)pyrrolidine-2,4-dione, is a potent antibacterial agent, thus implying roles for QS outside of simply communication. Because these tetramic acids also appear to bind iron with appreciable affinity it was suggested that metal binding might contribute to their biological activity. Here, using a variety of spectroscopic tools, we describe the coordination chemistry of both the methylidene and decylidene tetramic acid derivatives with Fe(III) and Ga(III) and discuss the potential biological significance of such metal binding.

  20. A new alligator-clip compound for molecular electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Timo; Blanco, Mario; Goddard, William A.

    2004-06-01

    We used the B3LYP flavor of density functional calculations to study new alligator-clip compounds for molecular electronics with platinum electrodes. First, with commonly used S-based linkage molecule 3-methyl-1,2-dithiolane (MDTL) we find that after chemisorption on Pt(1 1 1) the most stable structure is ring-opened with a binding energy of 32.44 kcal/mol. Among several alternative alligator-clip compounds we find that P-based molecules lead to much higher binding energies. For the ring-closed structure of 3-methyl-1,2-diphospholane (MDPL) a binding energy of 47.72 kcal/mol was calculated and even 54.88 kcal/mol for the ring-opened molecule. Thus, MDPL provides a more stable link to the metal surface and might increase the conductance.

  1. Synthetic molecular machine based on reversible end-to-interior and end-to-end loop formation triggered by electrochemical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Wook; Hwang, Ilha; Jeon, Woo Sung; Ko, Young Ho; Sakamoto, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Kim, Kimoon

    2008-09-01

    We have designed and synthesized a novel [2]pseudorotaxane-based molecular machine in which the interconversion between end-to-interior and end-to-end loop structures is reversibly controlled by electrochemical stimuli. Cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) and the thread molecule 3(4+) with an electron-rich hydroxynaphthalene unit and two electron-deficient viologen units form the 1:1 complex 4(4+) with an end-to-interior loop structure, which is reversibly converted into an end-to-end structure upon reduction. Large changes in shape and size of the molecule accompany the reversible redox process. The key feature of the machine-like behavior is the reversible interconversion between an intramolecular charge-transfer complex and viologen cation radical dimer inside CB[8] triggered by electrochemical stimuli.

  2. Curiosities in drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H; Smith, Robert L

    2014-07-01

    1. It is inevitable that during some xenobiotic biotransformation studies, a certain metabolite or degradation product arises of which the identity is uncertain, the route of formation is ambiguous, or it is just a plain mystery. 2. The following communication draws attention to three drugs reported in the literature, chlorphentermine, phenothiazine and aminopyrine, where after many years of investigation there still exists uncertainty over some of their metabolites. Noticeably, these three examples probably involve (potential) interaction of a nitrogen centre within the drug molecule. 3. It is hoped that the resurrection and assemblage of these data will offer interesting reading and that these examples may prove sufficiently intriguing to motivate further exploration and some resolution of these lingering concerns. PMID:24779638

  3. Specific recognition of supercoiled plasmid DNA by affinity chromatography using a synthetic aromatic ligand.

    PubMed

    Caramelo-Nunes, Catarina; Tomaz, Cândida T

    2015-01-01

    Liquid chromatography is the method of choice for the purification of plasmid DNA (pDNA), since it is simple, robust, versatile, and highly reproducible. The most important features of a chromatographic procedure are the use of suitable stationary phases and ligands. As conventional purification protocols are being replaced by more sophisticated and selective procedures, the focus changes toward designing and selecting ligands of high affinity and specificity. In fact, the chemical composition of the chromatographic supports determines the interactions established with the target molecules, allowing their preferential retention over the undesirable ones. Here it is described the selective recognition and purification of supercoiled pDNA by affinity chromatography, using an intercalative molecule (3,8-diamino-6-phenylphenanthridine) as ligand. PMID:25749945

  4. Infrared spectroscopy of molecules with nanorod arrays: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Tardieu, Clément; Vincent, Grégory; Haïdar, Riad; Collin, Stéphane

    2016-04-15

    Nanorod arrays with diameters much smaller than the wavelength exhibit sharp resonances with strong electric-field enhancement and angular dependence. They are investigated for enhanced infrared spectroscopy of molecular bonds. The molecule 3-cyanopropyldimethylchlorosilane (CS) is taken as a reference, and its complex permittivity is determined experimentally in the 3-5 μm wavelength range. When grafted on silicon nitride nanorods, we show numerically that its weak absorption bands due to chemical bond vibrations can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude compared with unstructured thin film. We propose a figure of merit (FoM) to assess the performance of this spectroscopic scheme, and we study the impact of the nanorod cross section on the FoM.

  5. The Fe(III) and Ga(III) coordination chemistry of 3-(1-hydroxymethylidene) and 3-(1-hydroxydecylidene)-5-(2-hydroxyethyl)pyrrolidine-2,4-dione: novel tetramic acid degradation products of homoserine lactone bacterial quorum sensing molecules.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ariel A; Hahn, Tobias; Davis, Nicole; Lowery, Colin A; Struss, Anjali K; Janda, Kim D; Böttger, Lars H; Matzanke, Berthold F; Carrano, Carl J

    2012-02-01

    Bacteria use small diffusible molecules to exchange information in a process called quorum sensing (QS). An important class of quorum sensing molecules used by Gram-negative bacteria is the family of N-acylhomoserine lactones (HSL). It was recently discovered that a degradation product of the QS molecule 3-oxo-C(12)-homoserine lactone, the tetramic acid 3-(1-hydroxydecylidene)-5-(2-hydroxyethyl)pyrrolidine-2,4-dione, is a potent antibacterial agent, thus implying roles for QS outside of simply communication. Because these tetramic acids also appear to bind iron with appreciable affinity it was suggested that metal binding might contribute to their biological activity. Here, using a variety of spectroscopic tools, we describe the coordination chemistry of both the methylidene and decylidene tetramic acid derivatives with Fe(III) and Ga(III) and discuss the potential biological significance of such metal binding. PMID:22178671

  6. Co-assembled thin films of Ag nanowires and functional nanoparticles at the liquid-liquid interface by shaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shao-Yi; Liu, Jian-Wei; Zhang, Chuan-Ling; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we report the fabrication of co-assembled thin films composed of silver nanowires (NWs) and Au nanoparticles (NPs) at the liquid-liquid interface (water-chloroform) by vigorous shaking. The composition of co-assembled thin films can be controlled by adjusting the concentration of the nanosized building blocks. As a versatile interfacial assembly method, other nanoparticles such as Ag2S and Fe3O4 NPs can also be co-assembled with Ag NWs using the same procedure. Meanwhile, the co-assembly state of the obtained Au NPs and Ag NWs makes a significant contribution to the high sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) to model the molecule 3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI). The SERS intensities show high dependence on the molar ratio of Au NPs and Ag NWs and the layer number of the co-assembled thin films. This shaking-assisted liquid-liquid assembly system has been proved to be a facile way for co-assembling nanowires and nanoparticles, and will pave a way for further applications of the macroscopic co-assemblies with novel functionalities.In this paper, we report the fabrication of co-assembled thin films composed of silver nanowires (NWs) and Au nanoparticles (NPs) at the liquid-liquid interface (water-chloroform) by vigorous shaking. The composition of co-assembled thin films can be controlled by adjusting the concentration of the nanosized building blocks. As a versatile interfacial assembly method, other nanoparticles such as Ag2S and Fe3O4 NPs can also be co-assembled with Ag NWs using the same procedure. Meanwhile, the co-assembly state of the obtained Au NPs and Ag NWs makes a significant contribution to the high sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) to model the molecule 3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI). The SERS intensities show high dependence on the molar ratio of Au NPs and Ag NWs and the layer number of the co-assembled thin films. This shaking-assisted liquid-liquid assembly system

  7. Epoxidation of plasmalogens: source for long-chain alpha-hydroxyaldehydes in subcellular fractions of bovine liver.

    PubMed Central

    Loidl-Stahlhofen, A; Hannemann, K; Felde, R; Spiteller, G

    1995-01-01

    1. Masked long-chain alpha-hydroxyaldehydes were trapped in all subcellular fractions of bovine liver by application of pentafluorbenzyloxime derivatization [van Kuijk, Thomas, Stephens and Dratz (1986) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 139, 144-149] and quantified via GLC/MS using characteristic ion traces. 2. The chain-length profile of long-chain 2-hydroxyalkanales clearly indicates their relationship to plasmalogens as precursor molecules. 3. The previously postulated existence of alpha-acyloxyplasmalogens as precursor molecules of masked long-chain alpha-hydroxyaldehydes in bovine tissue lipids [Lutz and Spiteller (1991) Liebigs Ann. Chem. 1991, 563-567] was excluded. 4. The constant oxidation rate of plasmalogens in all subcellular fractions provides conclusive evidence for a non-enzymic plasmalogen epoxidation process (probably via hydroperoxy radicals). 5. The high reactivity of alpha-hydroxyaldehydes sheds some doubt on the postulation that plasmalogens protect mammalian cells against oxidative stress as postulated previously [Morand, Zoeller and Raetz (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 11590-11596; Morand, Zoeller and Raetz (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 11597-11606]. Images Figure 4 PMID:7639697

  8. Chemical stabilization of gold coated by silver core-shell nanoparticles via electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Cheshta; Dao, Anh T N; Singh, Prerna; Higashimine, Koichi; Mott, Derrick M; Maenosono, Shinya

    2012-06-22

    Silver nanoparticles are notoriously susceptible to oxidation, yet gold nanoparticles coated in silver exhibit a unique electronic interaction that occurs at the interface of the two metals, leading to enhanced stability properties for the silver shell. In order to probe the phenomenon, the stability of gold nanoparticles coated by silver was studied in the presence of various chloride-containing electrolytes. It was found that a critical silver shell thickness of approximately 1 nm exists that cannot be oxidatively etched from the particle surface: this is in contrast to the observation of complete oxidative etching for monometallic silver nanoparticles. The results are discussed in terms of particle composition, structure and morphology before and after exposing the particles to the electrolytes. Raman analysis of the reporter molecule 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-thiol adsorbed on the particle surface illustrates the feasibility of using gold coated by silver nanoparticle probes in sensing applications that require the presence of high levels of salt. The results provide insight into the manipulation of the electronic and stability properties for gold- and silver-based nanoparticles.

  9. Synthesis, photophysical and electrochemical properties of two novel carbazole-based dye molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing; Zhu, Weiju; Fang, Min; Yin, Fangfang; Li, Cun

    2015-01-01

    Two carbazole-based dye molecules: 3-(6-benzothiazol-2-yl-9H-hexylcarbazole-3-yl)-2-cyano-acylic acid (D3) and 3-[5-(6-benzothiazol-2-yl-9H-hexylcarbazole-3-yl)-thiophen-2-yl]-2-cyan-acylic acid (D4) were synthesized by an approach from carbazole derivate using Vilsmeier-Haack, Suzuki cross-coupling and Knoevenagel reactions. Their physical and electrochemical properties were investigated. D3 and D4 exhibit different optical properties, such as UV absorption, photoluminescence, fluorescence quantum yield and fluorescence lifetime in different solvents. Compared with D3 without a thiophene unit, the maximum absorption wavelength of D4 red-shift obviously and its fluorescence intensity is also enhanced. A shift of the EHOMO and ELUMO is observed for D3 (EHOMO = 2.06 V, ELUMO = -1.39 V vs. NHE) and D4 (EHOMO = 1.73 V, ELUMO = -1.33 V vs. NHE). D3 and D4 can be used as dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) with TiO2 nanomaterial because their EHOMO are lower than the conduction band edge of TiO2 [-0.5 V (vs. NHE)] and their ELUMO are higher than the I3-/I- redox potential [0.42 V (vs. NHE)].

  10. DNA-protein noncovalent cross-linking: ruthenium dipyridophenazine biotin complex for the assembly of proteins and gold nanoparticles on DNA templates.

    PubMed

    Slim, Mohamed; Durisic, Nela; Grutter, Peter; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2007-05-01

    We report the first example of a small molecule that can noncovalently cross-link DNA with streptavidin and streptavidin-labeled materials. Molecule 1 possesses a ruthenium dipyridophenazine DNA-intercalating moiety and a biotin unit; these two units are adequately separated to ensure efficient cross-linking of DNA with protein. Complex 1 is essentially nonemissive in aqueous solution and when bound to streptavidin, however, its luminescence is turned "on" when it binds to DNA. We have used these properties to establish that this complex can simultaneously bind to DNA and streptavidin, and can thus bring these two biomolecules together. We also synthesized a related molecule, 3, in which the biotin and DNA-intercalating moieties are covalently bound. While complex 3 can intercalate into DNA through a threading mechanism, luminescence experiments show that it cannot simultaneously bind DNA and streptavidin, most likely due to the proximity of its two molecular-recognition units. The cross-linking ability of molecule 1 was used to template the assembly of streptavidin molecules on circular plasmid DNA, as visualized by atomic force microscopy. In addition, using 1, we show the organization of discrete groups of gold nanoparticles labeled with streptavidin on a linear DNA template of finite size, with transmission electron microscopy. In these experiments the DNA template acted as a "molecular ruler" that dictated the number of particles in the assembly.

  11. Noninvasive detection of weapons of mass destruction using terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Matthew B.; Heilweil, Edwin J.

    2003-08-01

    The growing and immediate threat of biological and chemical weapons has placed urgency on the development of chemical and biological warfare agent (CWA/BWA) screening devices. Specifically, the ability to detect CWA/BWA prior to deployment is paramount to mitigating the threat without exposing individuals to its effects. SPARTA, Inc. and NIST are currently investigating the feasibility of using far-infrared radiation, or terahertz (THz, 1 THz = 1012 Hz) radiation, to non-invasively detect biological and chemical agents, explosives and drugs/narcotics inside sealed containers. Small-to-medium sized molecules (3-100 atoms) in gas, liquid and solid phases consistently exhibit identifiable spectral features in the far-IR portion of the spectrum. Many compounds associated with weapons of mass destruction are made up of molecules of this size. The THz portion of the spectrum lies between visible light and radio waves, allowing for partial transmission of 0.3-10.0 THz (30-1000 μm, 10-330 cm-1) light through most common materials. Therefore, transmission measurements of THz light can potentially be used to non-invasively detect the presence of CWA/BWA, explosives and drugs in the pathway of a THz radiation beam.

  12. Gut commensal microvesicles reproduce parent bacterial signals to host immune and enteric nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Al-Nedawi, Khalid; Mian, M Firoz; Hossain, Nazia; Karimi, Khalil; Mao, Yu-Kang; Forsythe, Paul; Min, Kevin K; Stanisz, Andrew M; Kunze, Wolfgang A; Bienenstock, John

    2015-02-01

    Ingestion of a commensal bacteria, Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1, has potent immunoregulatory effects, and changes nerve-dependent colon migrating motor complexes (MMCs), enteric nerve function, and behavior. How these alterations occur is unknown. JB-1 microvesicles (MVs) are enriched for heat shock protein components such as chaperonin 60 heat-shock protein isolated from Escherichia coli (GroEL) and reproduce regulatory and neuronal effects in vitro and in vivo. Ingested labeled MVs were detected in murine Peyer's patch (PP) dendritic cells (DCs) within 18 h. After 3 d, PP and mesenteric lymph node DCs assumed a regulatory phenotype and increased functional regulatory CD4(+)25(+)Foxp3+ T cells. JB-1, MVs, and GroEL similarly induced phenotypic change in cocultured DCs via multiple pathways including C-type lectin receptors specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin-related 1 and Dectin-1, as well as TLR-2 and -9. JB-1 and MVs also decreased the amplitude of neuronally dependent MMCs in an ex vivo model of peristalsis. Gut epithelial, but not direct neuronal application of, MVs, replicated functional effects of JB-1 on in situ patch-clamped enteric neurons. GroEL and anti-TLR-2 were without effect in this system, suggesting the importance of epithelium neuron signaling and discrimination between pathways for bacteria-neuron and -immune communication. Together these results offer a mechanistic explanation of how Gram-positive commensals and probiotics may influence the host's immune and nervous systems.

  13. Library enhancement through the wisdom of crowds.

    PubMed

    Hack, Michael D; Rassokhin, Dmitrii N; Buyck, Christophe; Seierstad, Mark; Skalkin, Andrew; ten Holte, Peter; Jones, Todd K; Mirzadegan, Taraneh; Agrafiotis, Dimitris K

    2011-12-27

    We present a novel approach for enhancing the diversity of a chemical library rooted on the theory of the wisdom of crowds. Our approach was motivated by a desire to tap into the collective experience of our global medicinal chemistry community and involved four basic steps: (1) Candidate compounds for acquisition were screened using various structural and property filters in order to eliminate clearly nondrug-like matter. (2) The remaining compounds were clustered together with our in-house collection using a novel fingerprint-based clustering algorithm that emphasizes common substructures and works with millions of molecules. (3) Clusters populated exclusively by external compounds were identified as "diversity holes," and representative members of these clusters were presented to our global medicinal chemistry community, who were asked to specify which ones they liked, disliked, or were indifferent to using a simple point-and-click interface. (4) The resulting votes were used to rank the clusters from most to least desirable, and to prioritize which ones should be targeted for acquisition. Analysis of the voting results reveals interesting voter behaviors and distinct preferences for certain molecular property ranges that are fully consistent with lead-like profiles established through systematic analysis of large historical databases.

  14. Host Langerin (CD207) is a receptor for Yersinia pestis phagocytosis and promotes dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Park, Chae G; Cheong, Cheolho; Bulgheresi, Silvia; Zhang, Shusheng; Zhang, Pei; He, Yingxia; Jiang, Lingyu; Huang, Hongping; Ding, Honghui; Wu, Yiping; Wang, Shaogang; Zhang, Lin; Li, Anyi; Xia, Lianxu; Bartra, Sara S; Plano, Gregory V; Skurnik, Mikael; Klena, John D; Chen, Tie

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes plague. After Y. pestis overcomes the skin barrier, it encounters antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as Langerhans and dendritic cells. They transport the bacteria from the skin to the lymph nodes. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in bacterial transmission are unclear. Langerhans cells (LCs) express Langerin (CD207), a calcium-dependent (C-type) lectin. Furthermore, Y. pestis possesses exposed core oligosaccharides. In this study, we show that Y. pestis invades LCs and Langerin-expressing transfectants. However, when the bacterial core oligosaccharides are shielded or truncated, Y. pestis propensity to invade Langerhans and Langerin-expressing cells decreases. Moreover, the interaction of Y. pestis with Langerin-expressing transfectants is inhibited by purified Langerin, a DC-SIGN (DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3 grabbing nonintegrin)-like molecule, an anti-CD207 antibody, purified core oligosaccharides and several oligosaccharides. Furthermore, covering core oligosaccharides reduces the mortality associated with murine infection by adversely affecting the transmission of Y. pestis to lymph nodes. These results demonstrate that direct interaction of core oligosaccharides with Langerin facilitates the invasion of LCs by Y. pestis. Therefore, Langerin-mediated binding of Y. pestis to APCs may promote its dissemination and infection. PMID:25829141

  15. Identification of new HLA-A*0201-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes from neuritin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhao; Zhao, Tianzhi; Liu, Yong; Gong, Zili; Cheng, Saiyu; Yang, Qingwu

    2013-08-01

    Identification of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes from additional tumor antigens is essential for the development of specific immunotherapy of malignant tumors. Neuritin, a recently discovered antigen overexpressed in astrocytoma, is considered to be a promising target for biological therapy. In the present study, we predicted and identified HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitopes from neuritin by using the following four-step procedure: (1) computer-based epitope prediction from the amino acid sequence of neuritin; (2) peptide-binding assay to determine the affinity of the predicted peptide with HLA-A2.1 molecule; (3) stimulation of primary T cell response against the predicted peptides in vitro; and (4) testing of the induced CTLs toward target cells expressing neuritin and HLA-A2.1. The results demonstrated that effectors induced by peptides of neuritin containing residues 13-21, 121-129 and 4-12 could specifically-secrete interferon-γ and lyse target cells. Our results indicate that these peptides are new HLA-A2.1-restricted CTL epitopes, and may serve as valuable tools for astrocytoma immunotherapy. PMID:23754640

  16. The mechanism of hydrogen uptake in [NiFe] hydrogenase: first-principles molecular dynamics investigation of a model compound.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Sara; La Penna, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The recent discovery of a model compounds of [NiFe] hydrogenase that catalyzes the heterolytic cleavage of the H(2) molecule into a proton and a stable hydride in water solution under room conditions opened up the possibility to understand the mechanism of H(2) uptake by this peculiar class of enzymes. The simplest model compound belongs to the class of NiRu bimetallic cationic complexes mimicking, in water solution and at room conditions, the hydrogenase active site. By using first-principles molecular dynamics computer simulations, in the Car-Parrinello scheme, we investigated models including the water solvent and nitrate counterions. Several simulations, starting from different initial configurations, provided information on the first step of the H(2) cleavage: (1) the pathway of H(2) approach towards the active site; (2) the role of the ruthenium-bonded water molecule in providing a base that extracts the proton from the activated H(2) molecule; (3) the minor role of Ni in activating the H(2) molecule and its role in stabilizing the hydride produced. PMID:21892688

  17. A comparison of force fields and calculation methods for vibration intervals of isotopic H3(+) molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carney, G. D.; Adler-Golden, S. M.; Lesseski, D. C.

    1986-04-01

    This paper reports (1) improved values for low-lying vibration intervals of H3(+), H2D(+), D2H(+), and D3(+) calculated using the variational method and Simons-Parr-Finlan (1973) representations of the Carney-Porter (1976) and Dykstra-Swope (1979) ab initio H3(+) potential energy surfaces, (2) quartic normal coordinate force fields for isotopic H3(+) molecules, (3) comparisons of variational and second-order perturbation theory, and (4) convergence properties of the Lai-Hagstrom internal coordinate vibrational Hamiltonian. Standard deviations between experimental and ab initio fundamental vibration intervals of H3(+), H2D(+), D2H(+), and D3(+) for these potential surfaces are 6.9 (Carney-Porter) and 1.2/cm (Dykstra-Swope). The standard deviations between perturbation theory and exact variational fundamentals are 5 and 10/cm for the respective surfaces. The internal coordinate Hamiltonian is found to be less efficient than the previously employed 't' coordinate Hamiltonian for these molecules, except in the case of H2D(+).

  18. Action of reactive oxygen species in the antifungal mechanism of gemini-pyridinium salts against yeast.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Akihiro; Ueta, Shouko; Maseda, Hideaki; Kourai, Hiroki; Omasa, Takeshi

    2012-06-01

    We previously found that the gemini quaternary salt (gemini-QUAT) containing two pyridinium residues per molecule, 3,3'- (2,7-dioxaoctane) bis (1-decylpyridinium bromide) (3DOBP-4,10) , exerted fungicidal activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae and caused respiration inhibition and the cytoplasmic leakage of ATP, magnesium, and potassium ions. Here, we investigated how the gemini-QUAT, 3DOBP-4,10, exerts more powerful antimicrobial activity than the mono-QUAT N-cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and examined the association between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the antimicrobial mechanism. Antifungal assays showed that the activity of 3DOBP-4,10 against two yeasts, S. cerevisiae and Candida albicans, was significantly elevated under aerobic conditions, and largely reduced under anaerobic conditions (nitrogen atmosphere) . Adding radical scavengers such as superoxide dismutase, catalase and potassium iodide (KI) also decreased the fungicidal activity of 3DOBP-4,10 but negligibly affected that of CPC. We measured survival under static conditions and found that the rapid fungicidal profile of 3DOBP-4,10 was lost, whereas that of CPC was slightly affected in the presence of KI. Our results suggest that 3DOBP-4,10 exerts powerful antimicrobial activity by penetrating the cell wall and membrane, which then allows oxygen to enter the cells, where it participates in the generation of intracellular ROS. The activity could thus be attributable to a synergic antimicrobial combination of the disruption of organelle membranes by the QUAT and oxidative stress imposed by ROS.

  19. Electrolyte layering at the calcite(104)-water interface indicated by Rb+- and Se(VI) K-edge resonant interface diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Heberling, F.; Eng, P.; Denecke, M. A.; Lützenkirchen, J.; Geckeis, H.

    2014-09-22

    Calcite–water interface reactions are of major importance in various environmental settings as well as in industrial applications. Here we present resonant interface diffraction results on the calcite(104)–aqueous solution interface, measured in solutions containing either 10 mmol L-1 RbCl or 0.5 mmol L-1 Se(VI). Results indicate that Rb+ ions enter the surface adsorbed water layers and adsorb at the calcite(104)–water interface in an inner-sphere fashion. A detailed analysis based on specular and off-specular resonant interface diffraction data reveals three distinct Rb+ adsorption species: one 1.2 Å above the surface, the second associated with surface adsorbed water molecules 3.2 Å above the surface, and the third adsorbed in an outer-sphere fashion 5.6 Å above the surface. A peak in resonant amplitude between L = 1.5 and L = 3.0 is interpreted as signal from a layered electrolyte structure. The presence of a layered electrolyte structure seems to be confirmed by data measured in the presence of Se(VI).

  20. Effects of Almond- and Olive Oil-Based Docosahexaenoic- and Vitamin E-Enriched Beverage Dietary Supplementation on Inflammation Associated to Exercise and Age

    PubMed Central

    Capó, Xavier; Martorell, Miquel; Sureda, Antoni; Riera, Joan; Drobnic, Franchek; Tur, Josep Antoni; Pons, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    n-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols are potential key factors for the treatment and prevention of chronic inflammation associated to ageing and non-communicable diseases. The aim was to analyse effects of an almond and olive oil beverage enriched with α-tocopherol and docosahexaenoic, exercise and age on inflammatory plasma markers, and immune gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Five young and five senior athletes who were supplemented for five weeks with a functional beverage performed a stress test under controlled conditions before and after beverage supplementation. Blood samples were taken immediately before and 1 h after each test. Plasma, erythrocytes and PBMCs were isolated. Beverage supplementation increased plasmatic Tumour Necrosis Factor α (TNFα) levels depending on age and exercise. Exercise increased plasma non esterified fatty acids (NEFAs), soluble Intercellular adhesion molecule 3 (sICAM3) and soluble L-selectin (sL-Selectin), and this increase was attenuated by the supplementation. Exercise increased PGE2 plasma levels in supplemented young and in senior placebo athletes. Exercise increased NFkβ-activated levels in PBMCs, which are primed to a pro-inflammatory response increasing pro-inflammatory genes expression after the exercise mainly in the young group after the supplementation. The functional beverage supplementation to young athletes enhances a pro-inflammatory circulating environment in response to the exercise that was less evident in the senior group. PMID:27735833

  1. Magnetic moment enhancement and spin polarization switch of the manganese phthalocyanine molecule on an IrMn(100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Wang, B.; Pratt, A.; Yamauchi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    The geometric, electronic, and magnetic structures of a manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) molecule on an antiferromagnetic IrMn(100) surface are studied by density functional theory calculations. Two kinds of orientation of the adsorbed MnPc molecule are predicted to coexist due to molecular self-assembly on the surface—a top-site geometry with the Mn-N bonds aligned along the ⟨100⟩ direction, and a hollow-site orientation in which the Mn-N bonds are parallel to the ⟨110⟩ direction. The MnPc molecule is antiferromagnetically coupled to the substrate at the top site with a slight reduction in the magnetic moment of the Mn atom of the MnPc molecule (Mnmol). In contrast, the magnetic moment of the Mnmol is enhanced to 4.28 μB at the hollow site, a value larger than that in the free MnPc molecule (3.51 μB). Molecular distortion induced by adsorption is revealed to be responsible for the enhancement of the magnetic moment. Furthermore, the spin polarization of the Mnmol atom at around the Fermi level is found to change from negative to positive through an elongation of the Mn-N bonds of the MnPc. We propose that a reversible switch of the low/high magnetic moment and negative/positive spin polarization might be realized through some mechanical engineering methods.

  2. A 3′UTR-Associated RNA, FLJ11812 Maintains Stemness of Human Embryonic Stem Cells by Targeting miR-4459

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Han, Lei; Su, Le; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, ShangLi

    2015-01-01

    The 3′ untranslated region (UTR)-associated RNAs (uaRNAs) have important roles in various biological processes, especially in development. However, since they overlap with protein-coding mRNAs, uaRNAs are difficult to study by RNA interference techniques. We recently identified a chemical molecule, 3-benzyl-5-((2-nitrophenoxy) methyl)-dihydrofuran-2(3H)-one (3BDO), that could efficiently induce human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) differentiation, and meanwhile selectively and efficiently downregulate the uaRNA FLJ11812. By acting as a competing endogenous RNA, downregulated FLJ11812 by 3BDO further increased miR-4459 level in hESCs. miR-4459 could decrease the expression of its targets, CDC20B and ATG13, and thus altered stemness via cell cycle and autophagy. Our results revealed that FLJ11812 played a key role in maintenance of stemness of hESCs for the first time. The findings provide new clues and a powerful tool for investigating the action mechanism of FLJ11812 in early development. PMID:25437332

  3. The Consequences of Multiple Simultaneous C-Type Lectin–Ligand Interactions: DCIR Alters the Endo-Lysosomal Routing of DC-SIGN

    PubMed Central

    García-Vallejo, Juan J.; Bloem, Karien; Knippels, Léon M. J.; Garssen, Johan; van Vliet, Sandra J.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are equipped with multiple receptors to allow proper pathogen recognition and capture. C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) recognize glycan structures on pathogens and endogenous glycoproteins for internalization and antigen processing and presentation. Often, the glycan specificity of these receptors is overlapping and/or pathogens are decorated with ligands for multiple CLRs, posing the question whether interference or cooperativity within the CLR family exists. Here, we used imaging flow cytometry to investigate the internalization properties of four different CLRs [mannose receptor, DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), macrophage galactose-type lectin, and dendritic cell immunoreceptor (DCIR)] on different APCs, as well as their intracellular routing. Although the internalization score of the investigated CLRs was similar on monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs), DCIR internalization rates were lower compared to the other CLRs. Upon triggering, DCIR routed to intracellular compartments outside of the classical endo-lysosomal pathway, resulting in poor CD4+ T-cell stimulation. Although DC maturation reduced CLR expression levels, it did not affect their internalization rates. Although CLR internalization appeared to be independently regulated, DC-SIGN routing was affected when DCIR was triggered simultaneously. In conclusion, our results provide new insights for the design of DC-based immunotherapeutic strategies and suggest that DCIR is an inferior target in this respect. PMID:25806031

  4. Molecular structure, vibrational spectra, natural bond orbital and thermodynamic analysis of 3,6-dichloro-4-methylpyridazine and 3,6-dichloropyridazine-4-carboxylic acid by dft approach.

    PubMed

    Prabavathi, N; Senthil Nayaki, N; Venkatram Reddy, B

    2015-02-01

    Vibrational spectral analysis of the molecules 3,6-dichloro-4-methylpyridazine (DMP) and 3,6-dichloropyridazine-4-carboxylic acid (DPC) was carried out using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopic techniques. The molecular structure and vibrational spectra of DMP and DPC were obtained by the density functional theory (DFT) method, using B3LYP functional, with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. A detailed interpretation of the Infrared and Raman spectra of the two molecules were reported based on potential energy distribution (PED). The theoretically predicted FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of the titled molecules have been simulated and were compared with the experimental spectra. Determination of electric dipole moment (μ) and hyperpolarizability β0 helps to study the non-linear optical (NLO) behavior of DMP and DPC. Stability of the molecules arising from hyperconjugative interactions, charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. (13)C and (1)H NMR spectra were recorded and (13)C and (1)H NMR chemical shifts of the molecules were calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. UV-visible spectrum of the compounds was also recorded in the region 200-1100 nm and electronic properties, HOMO (Highest Occupied Molecular Orbitals) and LUMO (Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbitals) energies were measured by time-dependent TD-DFT approach. Charge density distribution and site of chemical reactivity of the molecule have been studied by mapping electron density isosurface with molecular electrostatic potential (MESP).

  5. Dendritic cells respond to nasopharygeal carcinoma cells through annexin A2-recognizing DC-SIGN

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chao-Wen; Hsu, Tin-Jui; Lin, Yun-Tien; Lai, Chang-Hao; Liao, Chen-Chung; Chen, Wei-Yu; Leung, Ting-Kai; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Yung-Feng; Chen, Chien-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an essential role in immunity and are used in cancer immunotherapy. However, these cells can be tuned by tumors with immunosuppressive responses. DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-Grabbing Nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), a C-type lectin expressed on DCs, recognizes certain carbohydrate structures which can be found on cancer cells. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is an epithelial cell-derived malignant tumor, in which immune response remains unclear. This research is to reveal the molecular link on NPC cells that induces the immunosuppressive responses in DCs. In this article, we report identification of annexin A2 (ANXA2) on NPC cells as a ligand for DC-SIGN on DCs. N-linked mannose-rich glycan on ANXA2 may mediate the interaction. ANXA2 was abundantly expressed in NPC, and knockdown of ANXA2 suppressed NPC xenograft in mice, suggesting a crucial role of ANXA2 in NPC growth. Interaction with NPC cells caused DC-SIGN activation in DCs. Consequently DC maturation and the proinflammatory interleukin (IL)-12 production were inhibited, and the immunosuppressive IL-10 production was promoted. Blockage of either DC-SIGN or ANXA2 eliminated the production of IL-10 from DCs. This report suggests that suppression of ANXA2 at its expression or glycosylation on NPC may improve DC-mediated immunotherapy for the tumor. PMID:25402728

  6. Structure-function relationships of scorpion neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Habersetzer-Rochat, C; Sampieri, F

    1976-06-01

    Chemical modification of some trifunctional amino acid residues in toxins I, II, and III of the scorpion Androctonus australis Hector have been performed. The results indicate: (1) Reduction and methylation of one disulfide bridge destroy toxic activity of toxin II. (2) The only tryptophan residue of toxin II (position 38) is not included in the active site of the molecule. (3) Modification of five carboxylates out of the seven contained in toxin II suppresses the toxic activity. (4) Acetylation of the lysine and tyrosine residues in toxin II leads to the loss of both toxic and antigenic activity. Treatment of the acetylated toxin by hydroxylamine restores partially the antigenic activity. In the case of toxin I, total acetylation abolishes only the toxic activity. It is concluded that at least one tyrosine residue must be involved in an antigenic site of toxin II. (5) Citraconylation of toxins II and III leads to complete loss of toxicity; decitraconylation restores full activity. (6) Guanidination of toxin II does not affect its toxicity significantly. (7) Alkylation of toxin II by iodoacetic acid affects both amino groups and histidine residues. The loss of toxicity is mainly due to the modification of the lysine residues. In the case of toxin I, the kinetics of toxicity loss closely parallel the covalent modification of one lysine residue.

  7. Proton and orientational mobility in ice nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlin, J. Paul; Buch, Victoria

    2001-03-01

    At temperatures below 150 K, molecular-level motion within pure ice is reduced to proton and orientational (Bjerrum) defect activity. The nature of point-defect activities within micron-thick films of cubic ice is known from FTIR observations of isotopic exchange induced by such motion (i.e., for crystalline H2O ice containing intact isolated D2O molecules [1,2]). Isotopic exchange can be similarly monitored for large ice clusters ranging from 6 to 40 nm in diameter (3400 to a million molecules) [3]. By adsorbing HCl on the cluster surface, or by including HCl within each cluster, irreversible isotopic exchange is induced at and above 110 K. Details of this exchange provide answers to two interesting questions: 1) how is the orientational activity influenced by the nearby cluster surfaces and 2) are protons confined to the ice surface region? Not surprisingly, the orientational activity increases significantly with decreasing particle size. Although subject to shallow trapping [2], protons released at the surface are observed to move effectively throughout the clusters. 1. W. B. Collier, G. Ritzhaupt and J. P. Devlin, J. Phys. Chem. 88, 363 (1984). 2. P. J. Wooldridge and J. P. Devlin, J. Chem. Phys. 88, 3086 (1988). 3. J. P. Devlin, C. Joyce and V. Buch, J. Phys. Chem. A 104, 1974 (2000).

  8. Contrast in the photoelectric effect of organic and biochemical surfaces. A first step towards selective labeling in photoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Birrell, G B; Burke, C; Dehlinger, P; Griffith, O H

    1973-05-01

    The photoelectric effect can provide the physical basis for a new method of mapping organic and biological surfaces. The technique, photoelectron microscopy, is similar to fluorescence microscopy using incident ultraviolet light except that photoejected electrons form the image of the specimen surface. In this work the minimum wavelengths of incident light required to produce an image were determined for the molecules 3,6-bis(dimethylamino)acridine (acridine orange) (I), benzo[a]pyrene (II), N,N,N',N'-tetraphenylbenzidine (III), and copper phthalocyanine (IV). The photoelectron image thresholds for these compounds are 220 (I), 215 (II), 220 (III), and 240 nm (IV), all +/-5 nm. Contrast of I-IV with respect to typical protein, lipid, nucleic acid, and polysaccharide surfaces was examined over the wavelength range 240-180 nm. The low magnification micrographs exhibited bright areas corresponding to I-IV but dark regions for the biochemical surfaces. The high contrast suggests the feasibility of performing extrinsic photoelectron microscopy experiments through selective labeling of sites on biological surfaces.

  9. MXene: a new family of promising hydrogen storage medium.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qianku; Sun, Dandan; Wu, Qinghua; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Libo; Liu, Baozhong; Zhou, Aiguo; He, Julong

    2013-12-27

    Searching for reversible hydrogen storage materials operated under ambient conditions is a big challenge for material scientists and chemists. In this work, using density functional calculations, we systematically investigated the hydrogen storage properties of the two-dimensional (2D) Ti2C phase, which is a representative of the recently synthesized MXene materials ( ACS Nano 2012 , 6 , 1322 ). As a constituent element of 2D Ti2C phase, the Ti atoms are fastened tightly by the strong Ti-C covalent bonds, and thus the long-standing clustering problem of transition metal does not exist. Combining with the calculated binding energy of 0.272 eV, ab initio molecular dynamic simulations confirmed the hydrogen molecules (3.4 wt % hydrogen storage capacity) bound by Kubas-type interaction can be adsorbed and released reversibly under ambient conditions. Meanwhile, the hydrogen storage properties of the other two MXene phases (Sc2C and V2C) were also evaluated, and the results were similar to those of Ti2C. Therefore, the MXene family including more than 20 members was expected to be a good candidate for reversible hydrogen storage materials under ambient conditions.

  10. Structure of dimethylphenyl betaine hydrochloride studied by X-ray diffraction, DFT calculation, NMR and FTIR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szafran, M.; Katrusiak, A.; Dega-Szafran, Z.; Kowalczyk, I.

    2013-01-01

    The structure of dimethylphenyl betaine hydrochloride (1) has been studied by X-ray diffraction, DFT calculations, NMR and FTIR spectra. The crystals are monoclinic, space group P21/c. In the crystal, the Cl- anion is connected with protonated betaine through the O-H⋯Cl- hydrogen bond of 2.943(2) Å. The structures in the gas phase (2) and water solution (3) have been optimized by the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) approach and the geometrical results have been compared with the X-ray data of 1. The FTIR spectrum of the solid compound is consistent with the X-ray results. The probable assignments of the anharmonic experimental vibrational frequencies of the investigated chloride (1) based on the calculated harmonic frequencies in water solution (3) are proposed. The correlations between the experimental 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts (δexp) of 1 in D2O and the magnetic isotropic shielding constants (σcalc) calculated by the GIAO/B3LYP/6-311G++(d,p) approach, using the screening solvation model (COSMO), δexp = a + b σcalc, for optimized molecule 3 in water solution are linear and correctly reproduce the experimental chemical shifts.

  11. Molecular photoionization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    This program is concerned with the study of the electronic structure of small molecules and clusters of molecules. Of particular interest is the interaction of discrete electronic states with one another and with the various ionization and dissociation continua. Since the Second Annual Meeting of the DOE-OHER Program on The Physics and Chemistry of Energy-Related Atmospheric Pollutants in April 1981, significant progress has been made in the following areas: (1) the study of the electronic structure of dimers and small clusters of rare gas atoms using photoionization techniques; (2) similar studies on clusters of CO/sub 2/ molecules; (3) the study of electronic structure of rare gas dimers and trimers using photoelectron and photoelectron-photoion coincidence techniques; (4) the investigation of the relationship between Rydberg states in atoms, van der Waals molecules, and chemically-bonded molecules; (5) the extension of the study of photoabsorption, photoionization, and predissociation processes in H/sub 2/ to the unsymmetric isotope HD; (6) the study of photoelectron spectra of H/sub 2/ and C/sub 2/H/sub 2/; (7) a review of some of the aspects of dissociation processes in small molecules; and (8) the creation of a new program to study the spectra and dynamics of the photoionization processes in small molecules using the technique of multiphoton ionization followed by mass and electron energy analysis of the product ions and electrons. Some of the highlights of this work are reviewed.

  12. Characterization of three amino-functionalized surfaces and evaluation of antibody immobilization for the multiplex detection of tumor markers involved in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhugen; Chevolot, Yann; Géhin, Thomas; Dugas, Vincent; Xanthopoulos, Nicolas; Laporte, Vincent; Delair, Thierry; Ataman-Önal, Yasemin; Choquet-Kastylevsky, Geneviève; Souteyrand, Eliane; Laurenceau, Emmanuelle

    2013-02-01

    Antibody microarrays are powerful and high-throughput tools for screening and identifying tumor markers from small sample volumes of only a few microliters. Optimization of surface chemistry and spotting conditions are crucial parameters to enhance antibodies' immobilization efficiency and to maintain their biological activity. Here, we report the implementation of an antibody microarray for the detection of tumor markers involved in colorectal cancer. Three-dimensional microstructured glass slides were functionalized with three different aminated molecules ((3-aminopropyl)dimethylethoxysilane (APDMES), Jeffamine, and chitosan) varying in their chain length, their amine density, and their hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance. The physicochemical properties of the resulting surfaces were characterized. Antibody immobilization efficiency through physical interaction was studied as a function of surface properties as well as a function of the immobilization conditions. The results show that surface energy, steric hindrance, and pH of spotting buffer have great effects on protein immobilization. Under optimal conditions, biological activities of four immobilized antitumor marker antibodies were evaluated in multiplex immunoassay for the detection of the corresponding tumor markers. Results indicated that the chitosan functionalized surface displayed the highest binding capacity and allowed to retain maximal biological activity of the four tested antibody/antigen systems. Thus, we successfully demonstrated the application of amino-based surface modification for antibody microarrays to efficiently detect tumor markers. PMID:23305497

  13. Glycolipid-based TLR4 Modulators and Fluorescent Probes: Rational Design, Synthesis, and Biological Properties.

    PubMed

    Ciaramelli, Carlotta; Calabrese, Valentina; Sestito, Stefania E; Pérez-Regidor, Lucia; Klett, Javier; Oblak, Alja; Jerala, Roman; Piazza, Matteo; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Peri, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    The cationic glycolipid IAXO-102, a potent TLR4 antagonist targeting both MD-2 and CD14 co-receptors, has been used as scaffold to design new potential TLR4 modulators and fluorescent labels for the TLR4 receptor complex (membrane TLR4.MD-2 dimer and CD14). The primary amino group of IAXO-102, not involved in direct interaction with MD-2 and CD14 receptors, has been exploited to covalently attach a fluorescein (molecules 1 and 2) or to link two molecules of IAXO-102 through diamine and diammonium spacers, obtaining 'dimeric' molecules 3 and 4. The structure-based rational design of compounds 1-4 was guided by the optimization of MD-2 and CD14 binding. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited TLR4 activation, in a concentration-dependent manner, and signaling in HEK-Blue TLR4 cells. The fluorescent labeling of murine macrophages by molecule 1 was inhibited by LPS and was also abrogated when cell surface proteins were digested by trypsin, thus suggesting an interaction of fluorescent probe 1 with membrane proteins of the TLR4 receptor system.

  14. HPLC Plasma Assay of a Novel Anti-MRSA Compound, Kaempferol-3-O-Alpha-L-(2",3"-di-p-coumaroyl)rhamnoside, from Sycamore Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiguan; Valeriote, Frederick; Swartz, Kenneth; Chen, Ben; Hamann, Mark T.; Rodenburg, Douglas L.; McChesney, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a serious pathogen that is resistant to current antibiotic therapy. Thus, there is an urgent need for novel antimicrobial agents that can effectively combat these new strains of drug-resistant “superbugs”. Recently, fractionation of an extract from Platanus occidentalis (American sycamore) leaves produced an active kaempferol molecule, 3-O-alpha-L-(2",3"-di-p-coumaroyl)rhamnoside (KCR), in four isomeric forms; all four isomers exhibit potent anti-MRSA activity. In order to further the preclinical development of KCR as a new antibiotic class, we developed and validated a simple analytical method for assaying KCR plasma concentration. Because KCR will be developed as a new drug, although comprising four stereoisomers, the analytical method was devised to assay the total amount of all four isomers. In the present work, both a plasma processing procedure and an HPLC method have been developed and validated. Mouse plasma containing KCR was first treated with ethanol and then centrifuged. The supernatant was dried, suspended in ethanol, centrifuged, and the supernatant was injected into an HPLC system comprising a Waters C18, a mobile phase composing methanol, acetonitrile, and trifluoroacetic acid and monitored at 313 nm. The method was validated by parameters including a good linear correlation, a limit of quantification of 0.27 µg/mL, and high accuracy. In summary, this method allows a rapid analysis of KCR in the plasma samples for pharmacokinetics studies. PMID:26434123

  15. Chiral Sensitivity in the Dissociative Electron Attachment of Halocamphor Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiling, Joan

    2016-05-01

    We have demonstrated chirally-dependent molecular destruction when incident longitudinally-spin-polarized (chiral) electrons break bonds in chiral molecules. This chiral sensitivity was observed through an asymmetry in the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) reaction rate with chiral 3-bromocamphor (C10 H15 BrO). Such an observation provides an unambiguous demonstration of the idea underlying the Vester-Ulbricht hypothesis, which attempts to explain the origins of the homochirality that is observed in many biological systems. While the lack of inversion symmetry in these reactions allows the effects we observe to occur, their dynamic causes are poorly understood. We have further studied the asymmetries in the DEA rates for two additional halocamphor molecules, 3-iodocamphor (C10 H15 IO) and 10-iodocamphor, in a systematic effort to illuminate the mechanisms responsible for the chiral sensitivity. The DEA signal depends on the sign of the incident electron helicity for a given target handedness in all molecules, and it varies with both the atomic number and the location of the heaviest atom in the molecule. Surprisingly, the DEA asymmetries for 10-iodocamphor, in which the heaviest atom is farther from a chiral center than for the other molecules, produced the largest asymmetries. This work was performed at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. This project was funded by NSF Grant PHY-1206067.

  16. A new class of hybrid anticancer agents inspired by the synergistic effects of curcumin and genistein: Design, synthesis, and anti-proliferative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiao-Hong; Yu, Kevin; Zhang, Xiaojie; Chen, Guanglin; Hoover, Andrew; Leon, Francisco; Wang, Rubing; Subrahmanyam, Nithya; Addo Mekuria, Ermias; Harinantenaina Rakotondraibe, Liva

    2015-10-15

    Inspired by the synergistic effects of dietary natural products with different scaffolds on the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, incorporation of central (1E,4E)-1,4-penta-dien-3-one linker (an optimal substitute for the central metabolically unstable diketone linker of curcumin), 1-alkyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl (a promising bioisostere of terminal aryl group in curcumin), and chromone (the common pharmacophore in genistein and quercetin) into one chemical entity resulted in ten new hybrid molecules, 3-((1E,4E)-5-(1-alkyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-3-oxopenta-1,4-dien-1-yl)-4H-chromen-4-ones. They were synthesized through a three-step transformation using acid-catalyzed aldol condensation as key step. The WST-1 cell proliferation assay showed that they have greater anti-proliferative potency than curcumin, quercetin, and genistein on both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent human prostate cancer cells.

  17. Virulence in Pectobacterium atrosepticum is regulated by a coincidence circuit involving quorum sensing and the stress alarmone, (p)ppGpp.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Steven D; Eyres, Alison; Chung, Jade C S; Monson, Rita E; Thompson, Arthur; Salmond, George P C; Spring, David R; Welch, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pca) is a Gram-negative phytopathogen which causes disease by secreting plant cell wall degrading exoenzymes (PCWDEs). Previous studies have shown that PCWDE production is regulated by (i) the intercellular quorum sensing (QS) signal molecule, 3-oxo-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (OHHL), and (ii) the intracellular 'alarmone', (p)ppGpp, which reports on nutrient limitation. Here we show that these two signals form an integrated coincidence circuit which ensures that metabolically costly PCWDE synthesis does not occur unless the population is simultaneously quorate and nutrient limited. A (p)ppGpp null ΔrelAΔspoT mutant was defective in both OHHL and PCWDE production, and nutritional supplementation of wild type cultures (which suppresses (p)ppGpp production) also suppressed OHHL and PCWDE production. There was a substantial overlap in the transcriptome of a (p)ppGpp deficient relA mutant and of a QS defective expI (OHHL synthase) mutant, especially with regards to virulence-associated genes. Random transposon mutagenesis revealed that disruption of rsmA was sufficient to restore PCWDE production in the (p)ppGpp null strain. We found that the ratio of RsmA protein to its RNA antagonist, rsmB, was modulated independently by (p)ppGpp and QS. While QS predominantly controlled virulence by modulating RsmA levels, (p)ppGpp exerted regulation through the modulation of the RsmA antagonist, rsmB.

  18. A ratiometric fluorescence nanosensor for highly selective and sensitive detection of selenite.

    PubMed

    Chen, Linfeng; Tian, Xike; Zhao, Yuan; Li, Yong; Yang, Chao; Zhou, Zhaoxin; Liu, Xiangwen

    2016-08-01

    The instant and on-site detection of selenium still remains a challenge for environmental monitoring and medical prevention. We herein developed a ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor for accurate and on-site sensing of SeO3(2-) by linking the recognition molecule 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) onto the surface of carboxyl group modified CdTe@SiO2. The fluorescence of DAB on the surface of silica nanospheres could be selectively and efficiently enhanced by SeO3(2-) through a surface chelating reaction between DAB and SeO3(2-). Thus, in the presence of SeO3(2-), the nanosensor would show two characteristic fluorescence emissions of Se-DAB and CdTe QDs under a single excitation wavelength. The selectivity and the optimal conditions for the detection of SeO3(2-) were carefully investigated. The ratio of F530/F635 linearly increased with increasing SeO3(2-) concentration in the range of 0 to 2.5 μM and the detection limit reaches as low as 6.68 nM (0.53 ppb). This developed nanosensor has the capability of on-site detection in an aqueous system without any separation step. The Se concentrations in selenium-rich food were detected and the results were consistent with the values determined by ICP-AES. PMID:27241591

  19. Histology-directed and imaging mass spectrometry: an emerging technology in ectopic calcification

    PubMed Central

    De Santis, Giorgio; Caprioli, Richard M; Quaglino, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to demonstrate the potential of an optimized histology directed protein identification combined with imaging mass spectrometry technology to reveal and identify molecules associated to ectopic calcification in human tissue. As a proof of concept, mineralized and non-mineralized areas were compared within the same dermal tissue obtained from a patient affected by Pseudoxanthoma elasticum, a genetic disorder characterized by calcification only at specific sites of soft connective tissues. Data have been technically validated on a contralateral dermal tissue from the same subject and compared with those from control healthy skin. Results demonstrate that this approach 1) significantly reduces the effects generated by techniques that, disrupting tissue organization, blend data from affected and unaffected areas; 2) demonstrates that, abolishing differences due to inter-individual variability, mineralized and non-mineralized areas within the same sample have a specific protein profile and have a different distribution of molecules; 3) avoiding the bias of focusing on already known molecules, reveals a number of proteins that have been never related to the disease nor to the calcification process, thus paving the way for the selection of new molecules to be validated as pathogenic or as potential pharmacological targets. PMID:25595835

  20. Band Spectra and Molecular Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronig, R. De L.

    2011-06-01

    Introduction; Part I. The Energy Levels of Diatomic Molecules and their Classification by Means of Quantum Numbers: 1. General foundations; 2. Wave mechanics of diatomic molecules; 3. Electronic levels; 4. Vibrational levels; 5. Rotational levels; 6. Stark and Zeeman effect; 7. Energy levels of polyatomic molecules; Part II. Fine Structure and Wave Mechanical Properties of the Energy Levels of Diatomic Molecules: 8. The perturbation function; 9. Rotational distortion of spin multiplets; 10. Fine structure; 11. Perturbations and predissociation; 12. Even and odd levels; 13. Symmetrical and antisymmetrical levels; Part III. Selection Rules and Intensities in Diatomic Molecules: 14. General foundations; 15. Electronic bands; 16. Vibrational bands; 17. Rotational bands; 18. Band spectra and nuclear structure; 19. Transitions in the Stark and Zeeman effect; Part IV. Macroscopic Properties of Molecular Gases: 20. Scattering; 21. Dispersion; 22. Kerr and Faraday effect; 23. Dielectric constants; 24. Magnetic susceptibilities; 25. Specific heats; Part V. Molecule Formation and Chemical Binding: 26. Heteropolar molecules; 27. Homopolar molecules. Chemical forces between two H-atoms and two He-atoms; 28. The general theory of homopolar compounds; Bibliography; Subject index.

  1. Synthesis and microarray-assisted binding studies of core xylose and fucose containing N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Brzezicka, Katarzyna; Echeverria, Begoña; Serna, Sonia; van Diepen, Angela; Hokke, Cornelis H; Reichardt, Niels-Christian

    2015-05-15

    The synthesis of a collection of 33 xylosylated and core-fucosylated N-glycans found only in nonmammalian organisms such as plants and parasitic helminths has been achieved by employing a highly convergent chemo-enzymatic approach. The influence of these core modifications on the interaction with plant lectins, with the human lectin DC-SIGN (Dendritic Cell-Specific Intercellular adhesion molecule-3-Grabbing Nonintegrin), and with serum antibodies from schistosome-infected individuals was studied. Core xylosylation markedly reduced or completely abolished binding to several mannose-binding plant lectins and to DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin receptor present on antigen presenting cells. Employing the synthetic collection of core-fucosylated and core-xylosylated N-glycans in the context of a larger glycan array including structures lacking these core modifications, we were able to dissect core xylose and core fucose specific antiglycan antibody responses in S. mansoni infection sera, and we observed clear and immunologically relevant differences between children and adult groups infected with this parasite. The work presented here suggests that, quite similar to bisecting N-acetylglucosamine, core xylose distorts the conformation of the unsubstituted glycan, with important implications for the immunogenicity and protein binding properties of complex N-glycans.

  2. HPLC Plasma Assay of a Novel Anti-MRSA Compound, Kaempferol-3-O-Alpha-L-(2",3"-di-p-coumaroyl)rhamnoside, from Sycamore Leaves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiguan; Valeriote, Frederick; Swartz, Kenneth; Chen, Ben; Hamann, Mark T; Rodenburg, Douglas L; McChesney, James D; Shaw, Jiajiu

    2015-08-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a serious pathogen that is resistant to current antibiotic therapy. Thus, there is an urgent need for novel antimicrobial agents that can effectively combat these new strains of drug-resistant "superbugs". Recently, fractionation of an extract from Platanus occidentalis (American sycamore) leaves produced an active kaempferol molecule, 3-O-alpha-L-(2",3"-di-p-coumaroyl)rhamnoside (KCR), in four isomeric forms; all four isomers exhibit potent anti-MRSA activity. In order to further the preclinical development of KCR as a new antibiotic class, we developed and validated a simple analytical method for assaying KCR plasma concentration. Because KCR will be developed as a new drug, although comprising four stereoisomers, the analytical method was devised to assay the total amount of all four isomers. In the present work, both a plasma processing procedure and an HPLC method have been developed and validated. Mouse plasma containing KCR was first treated with ethanol and then centrifuged. The supernatant was dried, suspended in ethanol, centrifuged, and the supernatant was injected into an HPLC system comprising a Waters C18, a mobile phase composing methanol, acetonitrile, and trifluoroacetic acid and monitored at 313 nm. The method was validated by parameters including a good linear correlation, a limit of quantification of 0.27 microg/mL, and high accuracy. In summary, this method allows a rapid analysis of KCR in the plasma samples for pharmacokinetics studies.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lasI/rhlI quorum sensing genes promote phagocytosis and aquaporin 9 redistribution to the leading and trailing regions in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Angelika; Karlsson, Thommie; Vikström, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa controls production of its multiple virulence factors and biofilm development via the quorum sensing (QS) system. QS signals also interact with and affect the behavior of eukaryotic cells. Host water homeostasis and aquaporins (AQP) are essential during pathological conditions since they interfere with the cell cytoskeleton and signaling, and hereby affect cell morphology and functions. We investigated the contribution of P. aeruginosa QS genes lasI/rhlI to phagocytosis, cell morphology, AQP9 expression, and distribution in human macrophages, using immunoblotting, confocal, and nanoscale imaging. Wild type P. aeruginosa with a functional QS system was a more attractive prey for macrophages than the lasI/rhlI mutant lacking the production of QS molecules, 3O-C12-HSL, and C4-HSL, and associated virulence factors. The P. aeruginosa infections resulted in elevated AQP9 expression and relocalization to the leading and trailing regions in macrophages, increased cell area and length; bacteria with a functional QS system lasI/rhlI achieved stronger responses. We present evidence for a new role of water fluxes via AQP9 during bacteria–macrophage interaction and for the QS system as an important stimulus in this process. These novel events in the interplay between P. aeruginosa and macrophages may influence on the outcome of infection, inflammation, and development of disease. PMID:26388857

  4. Recombination-stable multimeric green fluorescent protein for characterization of weak promoter outputs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rugbjerg, Peter; Knuf, Christoph; Förster, Jochen; Sommer, Morten O A

    2015-12-01

    Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) are widely used for visualization of proteins to track localization and expression dynamics. However, phenotypically important processes can operate at too low expression levels for routine detection, i.e. be overshadowed by autofluorescence noise. While GFP functions well in translational fusions, the use of tandem GFPs to amplify fluorescence signals is currently avoided in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and many other microorganisms due to the risk of loop-out by direct-repeat recombination. We increased GFP fluorescence by translationally fusing three different GFP variants, yeast-enhanced GFP, GFP+ and superfolder GFP to yield a sequence-diverged triple GFP molecule 3vGFP with 74-84% internal repeat identity. Unlike a single GFP, the brightness of 3vGFP allowed characterization of a weak promoter in S. cerevisiae. Utilizing 3vGFP, we further engineered a less leaky Cu(2+)-inducible promoter based on CUP1. The basal expression level of the new promoter was approximately 61% below the wild-type CUP1 promoter, thus expanding the absolute range of Cu(2+)-based gene control. The stability of 3vGFP towards direct-repeat recombination was assayed in S. cerevisiae cultured for 25 generations under strong and slightly toxic expression after which only limited reduction in fluorescence was detectable. Such non-recombinogenic GFPs can help quantify intracellular responses operating a low copy number in recombination-prone organisms.

  5. Phase I and phase II reductive metabolism simulation of nitro aromatic xenobiotics with electrochemistry coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bussy, Ugo; Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Li, Ke; Li, Weiming

    2014-11-01

    Electrochemistry combined with (liquid chromatography) high resolution mass spectrometry was used to simulate the general reductive metabolism of three biologically important nitro aromatic molecules: 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM), niclosamide, and nilutamide. TFM is a pesticide used in the Laurential Great Lakes while niclosamide and nilutamide are used in cancer therapy. At first, a flow-through electrochemical cell was directly connected to a high resolution mass spectrometer to evaluate the ability of electrochemistry to produce the main reduction metabolites of nitro aromatic, nitroso, hydroxylamine, and amine functional groups. Electrochemical experiments were then carried out at a constant potential of -2.5 V before analysis of the reduction products by LC-HRMS, which confirmed the presence of the nitroso, hydroxylamine, and amine species as well as dimers. Dimer identification illustrates the reactivity of the nitroso species with amine and hydroxylamine species. To investigate xenobiotic metabolism, the reactivity of nitroso species to biomolecules was also examined. Binding of the nitroso metabolite to glutathione was demonstrated by the observation of adducts by LC-ESI(+)-HRMS and the characteristics of their MSMS fragmentation. In conclusion, electrochemistry produces the main reductive metabolites of nitro aromatics and supports the observation of nitroso reactivity through dimer or glutathione adduct formation.

  6. Microbial biotransformation: a tool for drug designing (Review).

    PubMed

    Pervaiz, I; Ahmad, S; Madni, M A; Ahmad, H; Khaliq, F H

    2013-01-01

    For centuries microbial biotransformation has proved to be an imperative tool in alleviating the production of various chemicals used in food, pharmaceutical, agrochemical and other industries. In the field of phar- maceutical research and development, biotransformation studies have been extensively applied to investigate the metabolism of compounds (leads, lead candidates, etc.) using animal models. The microbial biotransfor- mation phenomenon is then commonly employed in comparing metabolic pathways of drugs and scaling up the metabolites of interest discovered in these animal models for further pharmacological and toxicological evaluation. Microorganisms can conveniently afford drugs difficult obtained via synthesis. The plethora of reported microbial biotransformations along with its added benefits has already invoked further research in bioconversion of novel and structurally complex drugs. This review alternatively discusses the prospect of microbial biotransformation studies as a significant element ameliorating drug discovery and design in terms of cost-effectiveness, environment protection and greater structural diversity as compared to animal models used to study metabolism. To explicate the microbial biotransformation paradigm in drug designing 3 main areas in this aspect have been analyzed: 1--lead expansion: obtaining pharmacologically improved metabo- lites from bioactive molecules; 2--biosynthesis of precursors/intermediates involved in the production of bioactive molecules; 3--resolution of racemic mixture to obtain enantiomers possessing different pharma- cological profiles.

  7. Understanding the movements of metal whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, V. G.

    2015-06-01

    Metal whiskers often grow across leads of electric equipment causing short circuits and raising significant reliability issues. Their nature remains a mystery after several decades of research. It was observed that metal whiskers exhibit large amplitude movements under gentle air flow or, according to some testimonies, without obvious stimuli. Understanding the physics behind that movements would give additional insights into the nature of metal whiskers. Here, we quantitatively analyze possible mechanisms of the observed movements: (1) minute air currents; (2) Brownian motion due to random bombardments with the air molecules; (3) mechanically caused movements, such as (a) transmitted external vibrations, and (b) torque exerted due to material propagation along curved whiskers (the garden hose instability); (4) time dependent electric fields due to diffusion of ions; and (5) non-equilibrium electric fields making it possible for some whiskers to move. For all these mechanisms, we provide numerical estimates. Our conclusion is that the observed movements are likely due to the air currents or electric recharging caused by external light or similar factors.

  8. High-Performance Silver Window Electrodes for Top-Illuminated Organic Photovoltaics Using an Organo-molybdenum Oxide Bronze Interlayer.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Martin S; Walker, Marc; Hatton, Ross A

    2016-05-18

    We report an organo-molybdenumn oxide bronze that enables the fabrication of high-performance silver window electrodes for top-illuminated solution processed organic photovoltaics without complicating the process of device fabrication. This hybrid material combines the function of wide-band-gap interlayer for efficient hole extraction with the role of metal electrode seed layer, enabling the fabrication of highly transparent, low-sheet-resistance silver window electrodes. Additionally it is also processed from ethanol, which ensures orthogonality with a large range of solution processed organic semiconductors. The key organic component is the low cost small molecule 3-mercaptopropionic acid, which (i) promotes metal film formation and imparts robustness at low metal thickness, (ii) reduces the contact resistance at the Ag/molybdenumn oxide bronze interface, (iii) and greatly improves the film forming properties. Silver electrodes with a thickness of 8 nm deposited by simple vacuum evaporation onto this hybrid interlayer have a sheet resistance as low as 9.7 Ohms per square and mean transparency ∼80% over the wavelength range 400-900 nm without the aid of an antireflecting layer, which makes them well-matched to the needs of organic photovoltaics and applicable to perovskite photovoltaics. The application of this hybrid material is demonstrated in two types of top-illuminated organic photovoltaic devices.

  9. Synthesis of an A-D-A type of molecule used as electron acceptor for improving charge transfer in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao-Zhi; Gu, Shu-Duo; Shen, Dan; Yuan, Yang; Zhang, Mingdao

    2016-08-01

    Electron-accepting molecules play an important role in developing organic solar cells. A new type of A-D-A molecule, 3,6-di([7-(5-bromothiophen-2-yl)-1,5,2,4,6,8-dithiotetrazocin-3-yl]thiophen-2-yl)-9-(2-ethylhexyl)carbazole, was synthesized. The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy levels are -3.55 and -5.85 eV, respectively. Therefore, the A-D-A type of compound could be used as electron acceptor for fabricating organic solar cell with a high open circuit voltage. Gibbs free energy (-49.2 kJ/mol) reveals that the process of A-D-A acceptor accepting an electron from poly(3-hexylthiophene) at excited state is spontaneous. The value of entropy (118 J/mol) in the process of an electron transferring from P3HT to the A-D-A acceptor at organic interface suggests that electrons generated from separation of electron-hole pairs at donor/acceptor interface would be delocalized efficiently. Therefore, the A-D-A molecule would be a potential acceptor for efficient organic BHJ solar cells.

  10. Synthesis of new liquid crystals embedded gold nanoparticles for photoswitching properties.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Lutfor; Biswas, Tapan Kumar; Sarkar, Shaheen M; Yusoff, Mashitah Mohd; Yuvaraj, A R; Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-09-15

    A new series of liquid crystals decorated gold nanoparticles is synthesized whose molecular architecture has azobenzenes moieties as the peripheral units connected to gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) via alkyl groups. The morphology and mesomorphic properties were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscope, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and polarizing optical microscopy. The thiolated ligand molecules (3a-c) showed enantiotropic smectic A phase, whereas gold nanoparticles (5a-c) exhibit nematic and smectic A phase with monotropic nature. HR-TEM measurement showed that the functionalized Au NPs are of the average size of 2nm and they are well dispersed without any aggregation. The trans-form of azo compounds showed a strong band in the UV region at ∼378nm for the π-π(∗) transition, and a weak band in the visible region at ∼472nm due to the n-π(∗) transition. These molecules exhibit attractive photoisomerization behaviour in which trans-cis transition takes about 15s whereas the cis-trans transition requires about 45min for compound 5c. The extent of reversible isomerization did not decay after 10 cycles, which proved that the photo-responsive properties of 5c were stable and repeatable. Therefore, these materials may be suitably exploited in the field of molecular switches and the optical storage devices. PMID:27341036

  11. Comprehensive Map of Molecules Implicated in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Jagannadham, Jaisri; Jaiswal, Hitesh Kumar; Agrawal, Stuti; Rawal, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic affecting over 1.5 billion people and is one of the risk factors for several diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. We have constructed a comprehensive map of the molecules reported to be implicated in obesity. A deep curation strategy was complemented by a novel semi-automated text mining system in order to screen 1,000 full-length research articles and over 90,000 abstracts that are relevant to obesity. We obtain a scale free network of 804 nodes and 971 edges, composed of 510 proteins, 115 genes, 62 complexes, 23 RNA molecules, 83 simple molecules, 3 phenotype and 3 drugs in "bow-tie" architecture. We classify this network into 5 modules and identify new links between the recently discovered fat mass and obesity associated FTO gene with well studied examples such as insulin and leptin. We further built an automated docking pipeline to dock orlistat as well as other drugs against the 24,000 proteins in the human structural proteome to explain the therapeutics and side effects at a network level. Based upon our experiments, we propose that therapeutic effect comes through the binding of one drug with several molecules in target network, and the binding propensity is both statistically significant and different in comparison with any other part of human structural proteome.

  12. Synthesis, photophysical and electrochemical properties of two novel carbazole-based dye molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Zhu, Weiju; Fang, Min; Yin, Fangfang; Li, Cun

    2015-01-25

    Two carbazole-based dye molecules: 3-(6-benzothiazol-2-yl-9H-hexylcarbazole-3-yl)-2-cyano-acylic acid (D3) and 3-[5-(6-benzothiazol-2-yl-9H-hexylcarbazole-3-yl)-thiophen-2-yl]-2-cyan-acylic acid (D4) were synthesized by an approach from carbazole derivate using Vilsmeier-Haack, Suzuki cross-coupling and Knoevenagel reactions. Their physical and electrochemical properties were investigated. D3 and D4 exhibit different optical properties, such as UV absorption, photoluminescence, fluorescence quantum yield and fluorescence lifetime in different solvents. Compared with D3 without a thiophene unit, the maximum absorption wavelength of D4 red-shift obviously and its fluorescence intensity is also enhanced. A shift of the EHOMO and ELUMO is observed for D3 (EHOMO=2.06 V, ELUMO=-1.39 V vs. NHE) and D4 (EHOMO=1.73 V, ELUMO=-1.33 V vs. NHE). D3 and D4 can be used as dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) with TiO2 nanomaterial because their EHOMO are lower than the conduction band edge of TiO2 [-0.5 V (vs. NHE)] and their ELUMO are higher than the I(3-)/I(-) redox potential [0.42 V (vs. NHE)]. PMID:25104283

  13. A benzothiadiazole end capped donor-acceptor based small molecule for organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Sonar, Prashant; Williams, Evan L; Singh, Samarendra P; Manzhos, Sergei; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2013-10-28

    A benzothiadiazole end-capped small molecule 3,6-bis(5-(benzo-[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl)thiophen-2-yl)-2,5-bis(2-butyloctyl)pyrrolo-[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4(2H,5H)-dione (BO-DPP-BTZ) using a fused aromatic moiety DPP (at the centre) is designed and synthesized. BO-DPP-BTZ is a donor–acceptor–donor (D–A–D) structure which possesses a band gap of 1.6 eV and exhibits a strong solid state ordering inferred from ~120 nm red shift of the absorption maxima from solution to thin film. Field-effect transistors utilizing a spin coated thin film of BO-DPP-BTZ as an active layer exhibited a hole mobility of 0.06 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). Solution-processed bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaics employing a blend of BO-DPP-BTZ and [70]PCBM demonstrated a power conversion efficiency of 0.9%.

  14. Action of reactive oxygen species in the antifungal mechanism of gemini-pyridinium salts against yeast.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Akihiro; Ueta, Shouko; Maseda, Hideaki; Kourai, Hiroki; Omasa, Takeshi

    2012-06-01

    We previously found that the gemini quaternary salt (gemini-QUAT) containing two pyridinium residues per molecule, 3,3'- (2,7-dioxaoctane) bis (1-decylpyridinium bromide) (3DOBP-4,10) , exerted fungicidal activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae and caused respiration inhibition and the cytoplasmic leakage of ATP, magnesium, and potassium ions. Here, we investigated how the gemini-QUAT, 3DOBP-4,10, exerts more powerful antimicrobial activity than the mono-QUAT N-cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and examined the association between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the antimicrobial mechanism. Antifungal assays showed that the activity of 3DOBP-4,10 against two yeasts, S. cerevisiae and Candida albicans, was significantly elevated under aerobic conditions, and largely reduced under anaerobic conditions (nitrogen atmosphere) . Adding radical scavengers such as superoxide dismutase, catalase and potassium iodide (KI) also decreased the fungicidal activity of 3DOBP-4,10 but negligibly affected that of CPC. We measured survival under static conditions and found that the rapid fungicidal profile of 3DOBP-4,10 was lost, whereas that of CPC was slightly affected in the presence of KI. Our results suggest that 3DOBP-4,10 exerts powerful antimicrobial activity by penetrating the cell wall and membrane, which then allows oxygen to enter the cells, where it participates in the generation of intracellular ROS. The activity could thus be attributable to a synergic antimicrobial combination of the disruption of organelle membranes by the QUAT and oxidative stress imposed by ROS. PMID:22790843

  15. Label-Free LC-MS/MS Proteomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Identifies Protein/Pathway Alterations and Candidate Biomarkers for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Mahlon A; An, Jiyan; Hood, Brian L; Conrads, Thomas P; Bowser, Robert P

    2015-11-01

    Analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome has proven valuable to the study of neurodegenerative disorders. To identify new protein/pathway alterations and candidate biomarkers for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we performed comparative proteomic profiling of CSF from sporadic ALS (sALS), healthy control (HC), and other neurological disease (OND) subjects using label-free liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 1712 CSF proteins were detected and relatively quantified by spectral counting. Levels of several proteins with diverse biological functions were significantly altered in sALS samples. Enrichment analysis was used to link these alterations to biological pathways, which were predominantly related to inflammation, neuronal activity, and extracellular matrix regulation. We then used our CSF proteomic profiles to create a support vector machines classifier capable of discriminating training set ALS from non-ALS (HC and OND) samples. Four classifier proteins, WD repeat-containing protein 63, amyloid-like protein 1, SPARC-like protein 1, and cell adhesion molecule 3, were identified by feature selection and externally validated. The resultant classifier distinguished ALS from non-ALS samples with 83% sensitivity and 100% specificity in an independent test set. Collectively, our results illustrate the utility of CSF proteomic profiling for identifying ALS protein/pathway alterations and candidate disease biomarkers.

  16. Comprehensive Map of Molecules Implicated in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Stuti

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic affecting over 1.5 billion people and is one of the risk factors for several diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. We have constructed a comprehensive map of the molecules reported to be implicated in obesity. A deep curation strategy was complemented by a novel semi-automated text mining system in order to screen 1,000 full-length research articles and over 90,000 abstracts that are relevant to obesity. We obtain a scale free network of 804 nodes and 971 edges, composed of 510 proteins, 115 genes, 62 complexes, 23 RNA molecules, 83 simple molecules, 3 phenotype and 3 drugs in “bow-tie” architecture. We classify this network into 5 modules and identify new links between the recently discovered fat mass and obesity associated FTO gene with well studied examples such as insulin and leptin. We further built an automated docking pipeline to dock orlistat as well as other drugs against the 24,000 proteins in the human structural proteome to explain the therapeutics and side effects at a network level. Based upon our experiments, we propose that therapeutic effect comes through the binding of one drug with several molecules in target network, and the binding propensity is both statistically significant and different in comparison with any other part of human structural proteome. PMID:26886906

  17. Synthesis of new liquid crystals embedded gold nanoparticles for photoswitching properties.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Lutfor; Biswas, Tapan Kumar; Sarkar, Shaheen M; Yusoff, Mashitah Mohd; Yuvaraj, A R; Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-09-15

    A new series of liquid crystals decorated gold nanoparticles is synthesized whose molecular architecture has azobenzenes moieties as the peripheral units connected to gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) via alkyl groups. The morphology and mesomorphic properties were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscope, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and polarizing optical microscopy. The thiolated ligand molecules (3a-c) showed enantiotropic smectic A phase, whereas gold nanoparticles (5a-c) exhibit nematic and smectic A phase with monotropic nature. HR-TEM measurement showed that the functionalized Au NPs are of the average size of 2nm and they are well dispersed without any aggregation. The trans-form of azo compounds showed a strong band in the UV region at ∼378nm for the π-π(∗) transition, and a weak band in the visible region at ∼472nm due to the n-π(∗) transition. These molecules exhibit attractive photoisomerization behaviour in which trans-cis transition takes about 15s whereas the cis-trans transition requires about 45min for compound 5c. The extent of reversible isomerization did not decay after 10 cycles, which proved that the photo-responsive properties of 5c were stable and repeatable. Therefore, these materials may be suitably exploited in the field of molecular switches and the optical storage devices.

  18. Microbial biotransformation: a tool for drug designing (Review).

    PubMed

    Pervaiz, I; Ahmad, S; Madni, M A; Ahmad, H; Khaliq, F H

    2013-01-01

    For centuries microbial biotransformation has proved to be an imperative tool in alleviating the production of various chemicals used in food, pharmaceutical, agrochemical and other industries. In the field of phar- maceutical research and development, biotransformation studies have been extensively applied to investigate the metabolism of compounds (leads, lead candidates, etc.) using animal models. The microbial biotransfor- mation phenomenon is then commonly employed in comparing metabolic pathways of drugs and scaling up the metabolites of interest discovered in these animal models for further pharmacological and toxicological evaluation. Microorganisms can conveniently afford drugs difficult obtained via synthesis. The plethora of reported microbial biotransformations along with its added benefits has already invoked further research in bioconversion of novel and structurally complex drugs. This review alternatively discusses the prospect of microbial biotransformation studies as a significant element ameliorating drug discovery and design in terms of cost-effectiveness, environment protection and greater structural diversity as compared to animal models used to study metabolism. To explicate the microbial biotransformation paradigm in drug designing 3 main areas in this aspect have been analyzed: 1--lead expansion: obtaining pharmacologically improved metabo- lites from bioactive molecules; 2--biosynthesis of precursors/intermediates involved in the production of bioactive molecules; 3--resolution of racemic mixture to obtain enantiomers possessing different pharma- cological profiles. PMID:25508645

  19. Microbial biotransformation: a tool for drug designing (Review).

    PubMed

    Pervaiz, I; Ahmad, S; Madni, M A; Ahmad, H; Khaliq, F H

    2013-01-01

    For centuries microbial biotransformation has proved to be an imperative tool in alleviating the production of various chemicals used in food, pharmaceutical, agrochemical and other industries. In the field of phar- maceutical research and development, biotransformation studies have been extensively applied to investigate the metabolism of compounds (leads, lead candidates, etc.) using animal models. The microbial biotransfor- mation phenomenon is then commonly employed in comparing metabolic pathways of drugs and scaling up the metabolites of interest discovered in these animal models for further pharmacological and toxicological evaluation. Microorganisms can conveniently afford drugs difficult obtained via synthesis. The plethora of reported microbial biotransformations along with its added benefits has already invoked further research in bioconversion of novel and structurally complex drugs. This review alternatively discusses the prospect of microbial biotransformation studies as a significant element ameliorating drug discovery and design in terms of cost-effectiveness, environment protection and greater structural diversity as compared to animal models used to study metabolism. To explicate the microbial biotransformation paradigm in drug designing 3 main areas in this aspect have been analyzed: 1--lead expansion: obtaining pharmacologically improved metabo- lites from bioactive molecules; 2--biosynthesis of precursors/intermediates involved in the production of bioactive molecules; 3--resolution of racemic mixture to obtain enantiomers possessing different pharma- cological profiles. PMID:25474866

  20. Selective labeling of proteins in biological systems by photosensitization of 5-iodonaphthalene-1-azide

    SciTech Connect

    Raviv, Y.; Salomon, Y.; Gitler, C.; Bercovici, T.

    1987-09-01

    The apolar azide of 5-iodonaphthalene-1-azide (Ina) partitions into the lipid bilayer of biological membranes. Upon photolysis at 314 nm, it is rapidly converted into the reactive nitrene, which efficiently attaches covalently to lipid-embedded domains of proteins and, to a lesser extent, to membrane phospholipids. Above 370 nm, Ina absorption is negligible and photolysis at these wavelengths does not occur. However, on addition of the photosensitizing molecule 3-aminopyrene, trifluoperazine, or 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate, followed by irradiation at 380 nm, efficient conversion of Ina to reactive species was observed, as measured by (/sup 125/I)Ina-labeling of membrane proteins and inactivation of the hormonal response of adenylate cyclase. Irradiation at 480 nm in the presence of a fluorescein derivative of n-undecylamine also resulted in a pattern of (/sup 125/I)Ina-labeled membrane proteins and hormone uncoupling indistinguishable from that obtained following direct photolysis at 314 nm. Photosensitization of the azide molecules is confined to the vicinity of the photosensitizer chromophore. This allowed selective labeling of chromophore-bearing proteins in solution or in membranes. Bovine serum albumin-fluorescein conjugate, in the presence of nonderivatized soluble proteins, was exclusively labeled by (/sup 125/I)Ina when irradiated at 480 nm, but random labeling occurred on photolysis at 314 nm. Likewise, rhodopsin in rod outer segment membranes from frog retina was exclusively labeled by (/sup 125/I)Ina upon photosensitization at 380 nm. Random labeling again occurred on direct irradiation at 314 nm. The results suggest that selective labeling in complex biological systems may be achieved by photosensitized activation of azides.

  1. Sieving characteristics of cytokine- and peroxide-induced epithelial barrier leak: Inhibition by berberine

    PubMed Central

    DiGuilio, Katherine M; Mercogliano, Christina M; Born, Jillian; Ferraro, Brendan; To, Julie; Mixson, Brittany; Smith, Allison; Valenzano, Mary Carmen; Mullin, James M

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study whether the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) colon which exhibits varying severity and cytokine levels across its mucosa create varying types of transepithelial leak. METHODS: We examined the effects of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-1-β (IL1β) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) - singly and in combinations - on barrier function of CACO-2 cell layers. Our focus was on the type (not simply the magnitude) of transepithelial leak generated by these agents as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and transepithelial flux of 14C-D-mannitol, 3H-Lactulose and 14C-Polyethylene glycol as radiolabeled probe molecules. The isoquinoline alkaloid, berberine, was then examined for its ability to reduce specific types of transepithelial leak. RESULTS: Exposure to TNF-α alone (200 ng/mL; 48 h) induced a 50% decrease in TER, i.e., increased leak of Na+ and Cl- - with only a marginal but statistically significant increase in transepithelial leak of 14C-mannitol (Jm). Exposure to TNF-α + IFN-γ (200 ng/mL; 48 h) + IL1β (50 ng/mL; 48 h) did not increase the TER change (from TNF-α alone), but there was now a 100% increase in Jm. There however was no increase in transepithelial leak of two larger probe molecules, 3H-lactulose and 14C-polyethylene glycol (PEG). However, exposure to TNF-α + IFN-γ + IL1β followed by a 5 h exposure to 2 mmol/L H2O2 resulted in a 500% increase in 14C-PEG leak as well as leak to the luminal mitogen, epidermal growth factor. CONCLUSION: This model of graded transepithelial leak is useful in evaluating therapeutic agents reducing IBD morbidity by reducing barrier leak to various luminal substances. PMID:27190695

  2. Identification and in vitro evaluation of new leads as selective and competitive glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitors through ligand and structure based drug design.

    PubMed

    Darshit, B S; Balaji, B; Rani, P; Ramanathan, M

    2014-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β elicits multi-functional effects on intracellular signaling pathways, thereby making the kinase a therapeutic target in multiple pathologies. Hence, it is important to selectively inhibit GSK-3β over structurally and biologically similar targets, such as CDK5. The current study was designed to identify and evaluate novel ATP-competitive GSK-3β inhibitors. The study was designed to identify new leads by ligand based drug design, structure based drug design and in vitro evaluation. The best validated pharmacophore model (AADRRR) identified using LBDD was derived from a dataset of 135 molecules. There were 357 primary hits within the SPECS database using this pharmacophore model. A SBDD approach to the GSK-3β and CDK5 proteins was applied to all primary hits, and 5 selective inhibitors were identified for GSK-3β. GSK-3β and CDK5 in vitro kinase inhibition assays were performed with these molecules to confirm their selectivity for GSK-3β. The molecules showed IC50 values ranging from 0.825μM to 1.116μM and were 23- to 57-fold selective for GSK-3β. Of all the molecules, molecule 3 had the lowest IC50 value of 0.825μM. Our research identified molecules possessing benzothiophene, isoquinoline, thiazolidinedione imidazo-isoquinoline and quinazolinone scaffolds. Potency of these molecules may be due to H-bond interaction with backbone residues of Val135, Asp133 and side chain interaction with Tyr134. Selectivity over CDK5 may be due to side chain interactions with Asp200, backbone of Val61, ionic interaction with Lys60 and π-cationic interaction with Arg141. These selective molecules were also exhibited small atom hydrophobicity and H-bond interaction with water molecule.

  3. Weak Ergodicity Breaking of Receptor Motion in Living Cells Stemming from Random Diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzo, Carlo; Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Massignan, Pietro; Lapeyre, Gerald J.; Lewenstein, Maciej; Garcia Parajo, Maria F.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular transport in living systems regulates numerous processes underlying biological function. Although many cellular components exhibit anomalous diffusion, only recently has the subdiffusive motion been associated with nonergodic behavior. These findings have stimulated new questions for their implications in statistical mechanics and cell biology. Is nonergodicity a common strategy shared by living systems? Which physical mechanisms generate it? What are its implications for biological function? Here, we use single-particle tracking to demonstrate that the motion of dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), a receptor with unique pathogen-recognition capabilities, reveals nonergodic subdiffusion on living-cell membranes In contrast to previous studies, this behavior is incompatible with transient immobilization, and, therefore, it cannot be interpreted according to continuous-time random-walk theory. We show that the receptor undergoes changes of diffusivity, consistent with the current view of the cell membrane as a highly dynamic and diverse environment. Simulations based on a model of an ordinary random walk in complex media quantitatively reproduce all our observations, pointing toward diffusion heterogeneity as the cause of DC-SIGN behavior. By studying different receptor mutants, we further correlate receptor motion to its molecular structure, thus establishing a strong link between nonergodicity and biological function. These results underscore the role of disorder in cell membranes and its connection with function regulation. Because of its generality, our approach offers a framework to interpret anomalous transport in other complex media where dynamic heterogeneity might play a major role, such as those found, e.g., in soft condensed matter, geology, and ecology.

  4. N-Glycans on the Rift Valley Fever Virus Envelope Glycoproteins Gn and Gc Redundantly Support Viral Infection via DC-SIGN

    PubMed Central

    Phoenix, Inaia; Nishiyama, Shoko; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Hill, Terence E.; Huante, Matthew B.; Slack, Olga A.L.; Carpio, Victor H.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever is a mosquito-transmitted, zoonotic disease that infects humans and ruminants. Dendritic cell specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3 (ICAM-3) grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) acts as a receptor for members of the phlebovirus genus. The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) glycoproteins (Gn/Gc) encode five putative N-glycan sequons (asparagine (N)–any amino acid (X)–serine (S)/threonine (T)) at positions: N438 (Gn), and N794, N829, N1035, and N1077 (Gc). The N-glycosylation profile and significance in viral infection via DC-SIGN have not been elucidated. Gc N-glycosylation was first evaluated by using Gc asparagine (N) to glutamine (Q) mutants. Subsequently, we generated a series of recombinant RVFV MP-12 strain mutants, which encode N-to-Q mutations, and the infectivity of each mutant in Jurkat cells stably expressing DC-SIGN was evaluated. Results showed that Gc N794, N1035, and N1077 were N-glycosylated but N829 was not. Gc N1077 was heterogeneously N-glycosylated. RVFV Gc made two distinct N-glycoforms: “Gc-large” and “Gc-small”, and N1077 was responsible for “Gc-large” band. RVFV showed increased infection of cells expressing DC-SIGN compared to cells lacking DC-SIGN. Infection via DC-SIGN was increased in the presence of either Gn N438 or Gc N1077. Our study showed that N-glycans on the Gc and Gn surface glycoproteins redundantly support RVFV infection via DC-SIGN. PMID:27223297

  5. The molecular mechanism of fullerene-inhibited aggregation of Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide fragment.

    PubMed

    Xie, Luogang; Luo, Yin; Lin, Dongdong; Xi, Wenhui; Yang, Xinju; Wei, Guanghong

    2014-08-21

    Amyloid deposits are implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The inhibition of β-sheet formation has been considered as the primary therapeutic strategy for AD. Increasing data show that nanoparticles can retard or promote the fibrillation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides depending on the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. In this study, our replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations show that fullerene nanoparticle - C60 (with a fullerene :  peptide molar ratio greater than 1 : 8) can dramatically prevent β-sheet formation of Aβ(16-22) peptides. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments further confirm the inhibitory effect of C60 on Aβ(16-22) fibrillation, in support of our REMD simulations. An important finding from our REMD simulations is that fullerene C180, albeit with the same number of carbon atoms as three C60 molecules (3C60) and smaller surface area than 3C60, displays an unexpected stronger inhibitory effect on the β-sheet formation of Aβ(16-22) peptides. A detailed analysis of the fullerene-peptide interaction reveals that the stronger inhibition of β-sheet formation by C180 results from the strong hydrophobic and aromatic-stacking interactions of the fullerene hexagonal rings with the Phe rings relative to the pentagonal rings. The strong interactions between the fullerene nanoparticles and Aβ(16-22) peptides significantly weaken the peptide-peptide interaction that is important for β-sheet formation, thus retarding Aβ(16-22) fibrillation. Overall, our studies reveal the significant role of fullerene hexagonal rings in the inhibition of Aβ(16-22) fibrillation and provide novel insight into the development of drug candidates against Alzheimer's disease.

  6. A novel ICK peptide from the Loxosceles intermedia (brown spider) venom gland: cloning, heterologous expression and immunological cross-reactivity approaches.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Fernando Hitomi; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Meissner, Gabriel Otto; Constantino Lopes, Eduardo Soares; Gremski, Waldemiro; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Veiga, Silvio Sanches

    2013-09-01

    The venom of a Loxosceles spider is composed of a complex mixture of biologically active components, consisting predominantly of low molecular mass molecules (3-45 kDa). Transcriptome analysis of the Loxosceles intermedia venom gland revealed ESTs with similarity to the previously described LiTx peptides. Sequences similar to the LiTx3 isoform were the most abundant, representing approximately 13.9% of all ESTs and 32% of the toxin-encoding messengers. These peptides are grouped in the ICK (Inhibitor Cystine Knot) family, which contains single chain molecules with low molecular mass (3-10 kDa). Due to their high number of cysteine residues, ICK peptides form intramolecular disulfide bridges. The aims of this study were to clone and express a novel ICK peptide isoform, as well as produce specific hyperimmune serum for immunoassays. The corresponding cDNA was amplified by PCR using specific primers containing restriction sites for the XhoI and BamHI enzymes; this PCR product was then ligated in the pET-14b vector and transformed into E. coli AD494 (DE3) cells. The peptide was expressed by IPTG induction for 4 h at 30 °C and purified by affinity chromatography with Ni-NTA resin. Hyperimmune serum to the recombinant peptide was produced in rabbits and was able to specifically recognize both the purified recombinant peptide and the native form present in the venom. Furthermore, the recombinant peptide was recognized by antisera raised against L. intermedia, L. gaucho and L. laeta whole venoms. The recombinant peptide obtained will enable future studies to characterize its biological activity, as well as investigations regarding possible biotechnological applications.

  7. Synthesis of low color, atomic oxygen resistant polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacInnes, Dave

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop low color, atomic oxygen resistant polyimides for potential applications on spacecraft in low earth orbit. The material is needed in order to protect satellites and spacecraft from the gases and radiation found at those altitudes. Phosphorous containing polyimides have been shown to be especially resistant to corrosion and weight loss under oxygen plasma. Unfortunately the color of these phosphorous containing polyimides is still too high for them to be good heat insulators. While they are not as effective as teflon, the current material of choice. polyimides are much less dense than teflon and would be especially valuable if they could be made with low color. The approach taken was to synthesize a monomer which would contain the elements needed for giving the final polyimide its desired properties. In particular the monomer should incorporate phosphine or phosphine oxides and have bulky side groups to block any color forming charge transfer structures. The target molecule, 3,5-di-(trifluoromethylphenyl)-bis(3-aminophenyl) phosphine oxide, (containing both a phosphine oxide group and a bulky ditrifluoromethylphenyl group) was synthesized via three reactions in overall yield of 21 percent. In addition, a model compound, bis(3-phenylamine) phenyl phosphine oxide, was synthesized two different ways in order to establish the conditions for the nitration of phosphine oxides and their reduction to the amine. Finally, a trisubstituted phosphine oxide was synthesized. In all, seven phosphorus containing organic compounds were synthesized, purified and characterized. The model compound was reacted with oxydiphthalic anhydride to form a polyamic acid with inherent viscosity of 0.34. This material was cast into a film and heated, forming a normally colored fairly strong polyimide with a Tg of 240 C. The target compound was reacted with 6-fluorodiphthalic anhydride to give a polyamic acid with inherent viscosity of 0.19 and cast to

  8. Analysis of the magnetically induced current density of molecules consisting of annelated aromatic and antiaromatic hydrocarbon rings.

    PubMed

    Sundholm, Dage; Berger, Raphael J F; Fliegl, Heike

    2016-06-21

    Magnetically induced current susceptibilities and current pathways have been calculated for molecules consisting of two pentalene groups annelated with a benzene (1) or naphthalene (2) moiety. Current strength susceptibilities have been obtained by numerically integrating separately the diatropic and paratropic contributions to the current flow passing planes through chosen bonds of the molecules. The current density calculations provide novel and unambiguous current pathways for the unusual molecules with annelated aromatic and antiaromatic hydrocarbon moieties. The calculations show that the benzene and naphthalene moieties annelated with two pentalene units as in molecules 1 and 2, respectively, are unexpectedly antiaromatic sustaining only a local paratropic ring current around the ring, whereas a weak diatropic current flows around the C-H moiety of the benzene ring. For 1 and 2, the individual five-membered rings of the pentalenes are antiaromatic and a slightly weaker semilocal paratropic current flows around the two pentalene rings. Molecules 1 and 2 do not sustain any net global ring current. The naphthalene moiety of the molecule consisting of a naphthalene annelated with two pentalene units (3) does not sustain any strong ring current that is typical for naphthalene. Instead, half of the diatropic current passing the naphthalene moiety forms a zig-zag pattern along the C-C bonds of the naphthalene moiety that are not shared with the pentalene moieties and one third of the current continues around the whole molecule partially cancelling the very strong paratropic semilocal ring current of the pentalenes. For molecule 3, the pentalene moieties and the individual five-membered rings of the pentalenes are more antiaromatic than for 1 and 2. The calculated current patterns elucidate why the compounds with formally [4n + 2] π-electrons have unusual aromatic properties violating the Hückel π-electron count rule. The current density calculations also provide

  9. Identification of a novel MTOR activator and discovery of a competing endogenous RNA regulating autophagy in vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Di; Han, Lei; Huang, ShuYa; Peng, Nan; Wang, PengChong; Jiang, Zheng; Zhao, Jing; Su, Le; Zhang, ShangLi; Zhang, Yun; Kung, HsiangFu; Zhao, BaoXiang; Miao, JunYing

    2014-01-01

    MTOR, a central regulator of autophagy, is involved in cancer and cardiovascular and neurological diseases. Modulating the MTOR signaling balance could be of great significance for numerous diseases. No chemical activators of MTOR have been found, and the urgent challenge is to find novel MTOR downstream components. In previous studies, we found a chemical small molecule, 3-benzyl-5-((2-nitrophenoxy) methyl)–dihydrofuran-2(3H)-one (3BDO), that inhibited autophagy in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and neuronal cells. Here, we found that 3BDO activated MTOR by targeting FKBP1A (FK506-binding protein 1A, 12 kDa). We next used 3BDO to detect novel factors downstream of the MTOR signaling pathway. Activation of MTOR by 3BDO increased the phosphorylation of TIA1 (TIA1 cytotoxic granule-associated RNA binding protein/T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1). Finally, we used gene microarray, RNA interference, RNA-ChIP assay, bioinformatics, luciferase reporter assay, and other assays and found that 3BDO greatly decreased the level of a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) derived from the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of TGFB2, known as FLJ11812. TIA1 was responsible for processing FLJ11812. Further experiments results showed that FLJ11812 could bind with MIR4459 targeting ATG13 (autophagy-related 13), and ATG13 protein level was decreased along with 3BDO-decreased FLJ11812 level. Here, we provide a new activator of MTOR, and our findings highlight the role of the lncRNA in autophagy. PMID:24879147

  10. HLA-A2-Restricted Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitopes from Human Heparanase as Novel Targets for Broad-Spectrum Tumor Immunotherapy1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ting; Tang, Xu-Dong; Wan, Yin; Chen, Ling; Yu, Song-Tao; Xiong, Zhen; Fang, Dian-Chun; Liang, Guang-Ping

    2008-01-01

    Peptide vaccination for cancer immunotherapy requires identification of peptide epitopes derived from antigenic proteins associated with tumors. Heparanase (Hpa) is broadly expressed in various advanced tumors and seems to be an attractive new tumor-associated antigen. The present study was designed to predict and identify HLA-A2-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes in the protein of human Hpa. For this purpose, HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitopes were identified using the following four-step procedure: 1) a computer-based epitope prediction from the amino acid sequence of human Hpa, 2) a peptide-binding assay to determine the affinity of the predicted protein with the HLA-A2 molecule, 3) stimulation of the primary T-cell response against the predicted peptides in vitro, and 4) testing of the induced CTLs toward different kinds of carcinoma cells expressing Hpa antigens and/or HLA-A2. The results demonstrated that, of the tested peptides, effectors induced by peptides of human Hpa containing residues 525–533 (PAFSYSFFV, Hpa525), 277–285 (KMLKSFLKA, Hpa277), and 405–413 (WLSLLFKKL, Hpa405) could effectively lyse various tumor cell lines that were Hpa-positive and HLA-A2-matched. We also found that these peptide-specific CTLs could not lyse autologous lymphocytes with low Hpa activity. Further study revealed that Hpa525, Hpa277, and Hpa405 peptides increased the frequency of IFN-γ-producing T cells compared to a negative peptide. Our results suggest that Hpa525, Hpa277, and Hpa405 peptides are new HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitopes capable of inducing Hpa-specific CTLs in vitro. Because Hpa is expressed in most advanced malignant tumors, Hpa525, Hpa277, and Hpa405 peptide-based vaccines may be useful for the immunotherapy for patients with advanced tumors. PMID:18714399

  11. Matrix molecularly imprinted mesoporous sol-gel sorbent for efficient solid-phase extraction of chloramphenicol from milk.

    PubMed

    Samanidou, Victoria; Kehagia, Maria; Kabir, Abuzar; Furton, Kenneth G

    2016-03-31

    Highly selective and efficient chloramphenicol imprinted sol-gel silica based inorganic polymeric sorbent (sol-gel MIP) was synthesized via matrix imprinting approach for the extraction of chloramphenicol in milk. Chloramphenicol was used as the template molecule, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTES) and triethoxyphenylsilane (TEPS) as the functional precursors, tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) as the cross-linker, isopropanol as the solvent/porogen, and HCl as the sol-gel catalyst. Non-imprinted sol-gel polymer (sol-gel NIP) was synthesized under identical conditions in absence of template molecules for comparison purpose. Both synthesized materials were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and nitrogen adsorption porosimetry, which unambiguously confirmed their significant structural and morphological differences. The synthesized MIP and NIP materials were evaluated as sorbents for molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) of chloramphenicol in milk. The effect of critical extraction parameters (flow rate, elution solvent, sample and eluent volume, selectivity coefficient, retention capacity) was studied in terms of retention and desorption of chloramphenicol. Competition and cross reactivity tests have proved that sol-gel MIP sorbent possesses significantly higher specific retention and enrichment capacity for chloramphenicol compared to its non-imprinted analogue. The maximum imprinting factor (IF) was found as 9.7, whereas the highest adsorption capacity of chloramphenicol by sol-gel MIP was 23 mg/g. The sol-gel MIP was found to be adequately selective towards chloramphenicol to provide the necessary minimum required performance limit (MRPL) of 0.3 μg/kg set forth by European Commission after analysis by LC-MS even without requiring time consuming solvent evaporation and sample reconstitution step, often considered as an integral part in solid phase extraction work-flow. Intra and

  12. SKLB70326, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of cell-cycle progression, induces G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest and apoptosis in human hepatic carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yuanyuan; He, Haiyun; Peng, Feng; Liu, Jiyan; Dai, Xiaoyun; Lin, Hongjun; Xu, Youzhi; Zhou, Tian; Mao, Yongqiu; Xie, Gang; Yang, Shengyong; Yu, Luoting; Yang, Li; Zhao, Yinglan

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 is a novel compound and has activity of anti-HCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 induces G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest via inhibiting the activity of CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 induces apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway. -- Abstract: We previously reported the potential of a novel small molecule 3-amino-6-(3-methoxyphenyl)thieno[2.3-b]pyridine-2-carboxamide (SKLB70326) as an anticancer agent. In the present study, we investigated the anticancer effects and possible mechanisms of SKLB70326 in vitro. We found that SKLB70326 treatment significantly inhibited human hepatic carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro, and the HepG2 cell line was the most sensitive to its treatment. The inhibition of cell proliferation correlated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest, which was followed by apoptotic cell death. The SKLB70326-mediated cell-cycle arrest was associated with the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2, CDK4 and CDK6 but not cyclin D1 or cyclin E. The phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) was also observed. SKLB70326 treatment induced apoptotic cell death via the activation of PARP, caspase-3, caspase-9 and Bax as well as the downregulation of Bcl-2. The expression levels of p53 and p21 were also induced by SKLB70326 treatment. Moreover, SKLB70326 treatment was well tolerated. In conclusion, SKLB70326, a novel cell-cycle inhibitor, notably inhibits HepG2 cell proliferation through the induction of G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest and subsequent apoptosis. Its potential as a candidate anticancer agent warrants further investigation.

  13. A Molecular Approach Designed to Limit the Replication of Mature DENV2 in Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Muhsin; Zaidi, Najam Us Sahar Sadaf

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dengue virus (DENV) is an arthropod-borne virus, which belongs to the Flaviviridae family, and completes its life cycle in two hosts: humans and mosquitoes. For DENV maturation, the surface pre-membrane (prM) protein is cleaved to form a mature membrane protein (M) by furin, which is a cellular enzyme subsequently releasing the mature virus from the host dendritic cell. The objective of the current study was to inhibit mature DENV isotype 2 (DENV2) by RNA-interference in a Vero-81 cell line. Mature DENV2 was propagated in and isolated from U937 cells expressing dendritic cell-specific intracellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin. Maturation of DENV2 was confirmed by Western blot analysis, where virus stock lacking prM was considered mature. Inhibition studies were carried out by transfection of Vero-81 cells with six synthetic siRNAs along with a control siRNA. Reduction in cellular DENV2 was observed also by focus-reduction assay, immunofluorescence assay (IFA), and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Cells transfected with DENV2SsiRNA2, which was targeting the structural region M of mature DENV2, was able to reduce DENV2 titer by up to 85% in focus reduction assays. A significant reduction in mature DENV2 RNA load was observed by RT-qPCR, confirming the previous findings. IFA also revealed reduced levels of cellular DENV2. These results demonstrated that mature DENV2 can be effectively inhibited by synthetic siRNA targeting the structural region of the genome. Mature DENV2 can be successfully inhibited by siRNAs, and specifically high knock-down efficiency is observed by siRNAs against M region of mature DENV2. This study shows that M represents a potential target for RNAi based inhibitory approaches. PMID:26154890

  14. Activation of the Inflammasome and Enhanced Migration of Microparticle-Stimulated Dendritic Cells to the Draining Lymph Node

    PubMed Central

    Meraz, Ismail M.; Melendez, Brenda; Gu, Jianhua; Wong, Stephen T.C.; Liu, Xuewu; Andersson, Helen A.; Serda, Rita E.

    2012-01-01

    Porous silicon microparticles presenting pathogen-associated molecular patterns mimic pathogens, enhancing internalization of the microparticles and activation of antigen presenting dendritic cells. We demonstrate abundant uptake of microparticles bound by the TLR-4 ligands LPS and MPL by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC). Labeled microparticles induce concentration-dependent production of IL-1β, with inhibition by the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK supporting activation of the NLRP3-dependent inflammasome. Inoculation of BALB/c mice with ligand-bound microparticles induces a significant increase in circulating levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6. Stimulation of BMDC with ligand-bound microparticles increases surface expression of co-stimulatory and MHC molecules, and enhances migration of BMDC to the draining lymph node. LPS-microparticles stimulate in vivo C57BL/6 BMDC and OT-1 transgenic T cell interactions in the presence of OVA SIINFEKL peptide in lymph nodes, with intact nodes imaged using two-photon microscopy. Formation of in vivo and in vitro immunological synapses between BMDC, loaded with OVA peptide and LPS-microparticles, and OT-1 T cells are presented, as well as elevated intracellular interferon gamma levels in CD8+ T cells stimulated by BMDC carrying peptide-loaded microparticles. In short, ligand-bound microparticles enhance 1) phagocytosis of microparticles; 2) BMDC inflammasome activation and up-regulation of co-stimulatory and MHC molecules; 3) cellular migration of BMDC to lymphatic tissue; and 4) cellular interactions leading to T cell activation in the presence of antigen. PMID:22680980

  15. Janus Reversal and Coulomb Blockade in Ferrocene-Perylenebisimide and N,N,N',N'-Tetramethyl-para-phenylenediamine-Perylenebisimide D-σ-A Rectifiers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Marcus S; Kota, Rajesh; Mattern, Daniell L; Metzger, Robert M

    2016-07-12

    Sandwiches "EGaIn|Ga2O3|LB monolayer of 2|Au" and "EGaIn|Ga2O3|LB monolayer of 3|Au" rectify. They are formed from a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer of 2 or 3 transferred onto thermally evaporated gold. Molecules 2 and 3 are of the donor-sigma-acceptor (D-σ-A) type and have the same perylenebisimide (PBI) acceptor as previously studied molecule 1. Molecule 1 has the weak donor pyrene, 2 has the good donor ferrocene, and 3 has the very strong donor N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD). All three molecules have a long swallowtail ending in a thioacetyl group, which ensures slow chemisorption onto the Au electrode. These molecules were contacted directly by a gallium indium eutectic (EGaIn) drop, covered by a defective oxide Ga2O3 layer. As before for 1, the direction of rectification for 2 is bias-dependent. In the ±1.0 V range, the rectification is at positive V, with a rectification ratio (RR) that is initially greater than 5 and then decreases on successive scans to 2, while the currents decrease by as much as 2 orders of magnitude. In the ±2.5 V range, the rectification direction for 2 reverses, while upon repeated scanning the rectification ratio (in the negative direction) increases and the currents decrease. For molecule 3, both directions have a charge-trapped state (Coulomb blockade) leading to Voffset in both biases, but at high potentials rectification set is, with large RR (up to 2,800) at ±2.5 V. PMID:27238389

  16. Identification of a novel MTOR activator and discovery of a competing endogenous RNA regulating autophagy in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Di; Han, Lei; Huang, ShuYa; Peng, Nan; Wang, PengChong; Jiang, Zheng; Zhao, Jing; Su, Le; Zhang, ShangLi; Zhang, Yun; Kung, HsiangFu; Zhao, BaoXiang; Miao, JunYing

    2014-06-01

    MTOR, a central regulator of autophagy, is involved in cancer and cardiovascular and neurological diseases. Modulating the MTOR signaling balance could be of great significance for numerous diseases. No chemical activators of MTOR have been found, and the urgent challenge is to find novel MTOR downstream components. In previous studies, we found a chemical small molecule, 3-benzyl-5-((2-nitrophenoxy) methyl)-dihydrofuran-2(3H)-one (3BDO), that inhibited autophagy in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and neuronal cells. Here, we found that 3BDO activated MTOR by targeting FKBP1A (FK506-binding protein 1A, 12 kDa). We next used 3BDO to detect novel factors downstream of the MTOR signaling pathway. Activation of MTOR by 3BDO increased the phosphorylation of TIA1 (TIA1 cytotoxic granule-associated RNA binding protein/T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1). Finally, we used gene microarray, RNA interference, RNA-ChIP assay, bioinformatics, luciferase reporter assay, and other assays and found that 3BDO greatly decreased the level of a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) derived from the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of TGFB2, known as FLJ11812. TIA1 was responsible for processing FLJ11812. Further experiments results showed that FLJ11812 could bind with MIR4459 targeting ATG13 (autophagy-related 13), and ATG13 protein level was decreased along with 3BDO-decreased FLJ11812 level. Here, we provide a new activator of MTOR, and our findings highlight the role of the lncRNA in autophagy.

  17. AFM force spectroscopy reveals how subtle structural differences affect the interaction strength between Candida albicans and DC-SIGN.

    PubMed

    te Riet, Joost; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Figdor, Carl G; Cambi, Alessandra

    2015-11-01

    The fungus Candida albicans is the most common cause of mycotic infections in immunocompromised hosts. Little is known about the initial interactions between Candida and immune cell receptors, such as the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intracellular cell adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3)-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), because a detailed characterization at the structural level is lacking. DC-SIGN recognizes specific Candida-associated molecular patterns, that is, mannan structures present in the cell wall of Candida. The molecular recognition mechanism is however poorly understood. We postulated that small differences in mannan-branching may result in considerable differences in the binding affinity. Here, we exploit atomic force microscope-based dynamic force spectroscopy with single Candida cells to gain better insight in the carbohydrate recognition capacity of DC-SIGN. We demonstrate that slight differences in the N-mannan structure of Candida, that is, the absence or presence of a phosphomannan side chain, results in differences in the recognition by DC-SIGN as follows: (i) it contributes to the compliance of the outer cell wall of Candida, and (ii) its presence results in a higher binding energy of 1.6 kB T. The single-bond affinity of tetrameric DC-SIGN for wild-type C. albicans is ~10.7 kB T and a dissociation constant kD of 23 μM, which is relatively strong compared with other carbohydrate-protein interactions described in the literature. In conclusion, this study shows that DC-SIGN specifically recognizes mannan patterns on C. albicans with high affinity. Knowledge on the binding pocket of DC-SIGN and its pathogenic ligands will lead to a better understanding of how fungal-associated carbohydrate structures are recognized by receptors of the immune system and can ultimately contribute to the development of new anti-fungal drugs.

  18. Molecular Study of the Effects of Chemical Processing on Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation: Role of Active Sites and Product Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihvonen, S.; Schill, G. P.; Murphy, K. A.; Mueller, K.; Tolbert, M. A.; Freedman, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Mineral dust aerosol is the largest global source of ice nuclei, but the identity of the active sites for nucleation is unknown. During atmospheric transport, mineral dust aerosol can encounter and react with sulfuric acid, which affects the ice nucleation activity either due to changes to reactive surface sites or product formation. In this study, we reacted two types of clays found in mineral dust, kaolinite and montmorillonite, with sulfuric acid. Variation in the mineral due to acid treatment was separated from product formation through rinsing techniques. The samples were subsequently reacted with a probe molecule, (3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)dimethylchlorosilane, that selectively binds to edge hydroxyl groups that are bonded to a silicon atom with three bridging oxygens. Hydroxyl groups are considered potential active sites, because they can hydrogen bond with water and facilitate ice nucleation. Attachment to these sites was quantified by 19F magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) of the 19F atoms on the probe molecule, which provided a direct correlation of the number of hydroxyl groups. Our results indicate that the number of edge-site hydroxyl groups increases with exposure to acid. Ice nucleation measurements indicate that the sulfuric acid-treated mineral is less ice active than the untreated mineral. Surprisingly, no difference between the nucleation activity of the untreated mineral and acid-treated, rinsed mineral is observed. As a result, we hypothesize that once a critical density of active sites is reached for ice nucleation, there is no further change in nucleation activity despite a continued increase in active sites. We additionally propose that the reduced activity of the acid-treated mineral is due to product formation that blocks active sites on the mineral, rather than changes to active sites.

  19. MicroRNA Expression Profiles of Human Blood Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells and Macrophages Reveal miR-511 as Putative Positive Regulator of Toll-like Receptor 4*

    PubMed Central

    Tserel, Liina; Runnel, Toomas; Kisand, Kai; Pihlap, Maire; Bakhoff, Lairi; Kolde, Raivo; Peterson, Hedi; Vilo, Jaak; Peterson, Pärt; Rebane, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MFs) are important multifunctional immune cells. Like other cell types, they express hundreds of different microRNAs (miRNAs) that are recently discovered post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Here we present updated miRNA expression profiles of monocytes, DCs and MFs. Compared with monocytes, ∼50 miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in immature and mature DCs or MFs, with major expression changes occurring during the differentiation. Knockdown of DICER1, a protein needed for miRNA biosynthesis, led to lower DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) and enhanced CD14 protein levels, confirming the importance of miRNAs in DC differentiation in general. Inhibition of the two most highly up-regulated miRNAs, miR-511 and miR-99b, also resulted in reduced DC-SIGN level. Prediction of miRNA-511 targets revealed a number of genes with known immune functions, of which TLR4 and CD80 were validated using inhibition of miR-511 in DCs and luciferase assays in HEK293 cells. Interestingly, under the cell cycle arrest conditions, miR-511 seems to function as a positive regulator of TLR4. In conclusion, we have identified miR-511 as a novel potent modulator of human immune response. In addition, our data highlight that miRNA influence on gene expression is dependent on the cellular environment. PMID:21646346

  20. Mechanistic study on the oxidation of anthocyanidin synthase by quantum mechanical calculation.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Jun-ichiro; Sato, Yoshiharu; Hoshino, Tyuji; Yamazaki, Mami; Saito, Kazuki

    2006-07-28

    Anthocyanidin synthase (ANS), a member of the 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family in flavonoid biosynthesis, catalyzes the conversion of leucoanthocyanidins (e.g. 2R,3S,4S-cis-leucocyanidin, LCD) to flav-2-en-3,4-diols, a direct precursor of colored anthocyanidins via flavan-3,3,4-triols. The detailed oxygenation mechanism of 2R,3S,4S-cis-LCD to flav-2-en-3,4-diols was investigated using the density functional theory method. An initial model for the calculation was constructed from a structure obtained by a 100-ps molecular dynamics simulation of Arabidopsis ANS under physiological conditions. This model consisted of an LCD molecule as the substrate together with an iron atom, two histidine residues, an aspartic acid residue, a succinate, and an oxygen atom as ligands of the iron atom. The results of the calculation indicated that both the C-3 and C-4 positions of LCD can be oxidized, although C-4 oxidation is preferable. The C-3 oxidation required several steps to form flavan-3,3,4-triol: 1) formation of Fe(III)-OH and a substrate C-3 radical via hydrogen atom abstraction by Fe(IV)=O, 2) formation of a C-3 ketone and a water molecule, 3) addition of OH(-) into the C-3 position of the ketone, and 4) addition of H(+) to form flavan-3,3,4-triol. On the other hand, C-4 oxidation of 2R,3S,4S-cis-LCD resulted in the direct formation of 2R,3R-trans-dihydroquercetin. These results suggest that the oxidation at C-3 of LCD, a key reaction for coloring in anthocyanin biosynthesis, can be regarded as a "side reaction" from the viewpoint of quantum mechanics of enzymatic reactions. Molecular evolutional implications of ANS and related proteins are discussed in terms of reaction dynamics.

  1. Spectral and structural studies of dimethylphenyl betaine hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szafran, M.; Ostrowska, K.; Katrusiak, A.; Dega-Szafran, Z.

    2014-07-01

    Hydrates of betaines can be divided into four groups depending on the interactions of their water molecules with the carboxylate group. Dimethylphenyl betaine crystallizes as monohydrate (1), in which water molecules mediate in hydrogen bonds between the carboxylate groups. The water molecules are H-bonded only to one oxygen atom of the dimethylphenyl betaine molecules and link them into a chain via two O(1 W)sbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds of the lengths 2.779(2) and 2.846(2) Å. The structures of monomer (2) and dimer (4) hydrates in vacuum, and the structure of monomer (3) in an aqueous environment have been optimized by the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) approach and the geometrical results have been compared with the X-ray diffraction data of 1. The calculated IR frequencies for the optimized structure have been used for the assignments of FTIR bands, the broad absorption band in the range 3415-3230 cm-1 has been assigned to the O(1w)sbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The correlations between the experimental 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts (δexp) of 1 in D2O and the magnetic isotropic shielding constants (σcalc) calculated by the GIAO/B3LYP/6-311G++(d,p) approach, using the screening solvation model (COSMO), δexp = a + b σcalc, for optimized molecule 3 in water solution are linear and well reproduce the experimental chemical shifts.

  2. Reovirus genome segment assortment into progeny genomes studied by the use of monoclonal antibodies directed against reovirus proteins.

    PubMed

    Antczak, J B; Joklik, W K

    1992-04-01

    Using a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MABs) against reovirus proteins, we have identified proteins that associate with reovirus messenger RNA molecules prior to the generation of progeny double-stranded (ds) genome segments and proteins that are components of the structures within which progeny ds genome segments are generated. The following conclusions can be drawn from the results obtained. (1) Three proteins rapidly become associated with mRNA molecules to form single-stranded RNA-containing complexes (ssRCCs): the nonstructural protein microNS, the nonstructural protein sigma NS, and protein sigma 3. (2) Analysis of populations of ssRCCs in density gradients and by sequential exposure to various MABs indicates that some ssRCCs contain only microNS, others microNS and sigma NS or sigma 3, and others all three proteins. Each ssRCC contains one RNA molecule and, depending on the size of the RNA, 10-30 protein molecules. (3) The relative proportions of the individual RNA species in the ssRCC populations reflect the composition of the total mRNA population present in infected cells (which differs substantially from equimolarity). (4) RCCs that contain dsRNA, which become detectable as early as 4 hr after infection, contain not only microNS, sigma NS, and sigma 3, but also lambda 2. (5) The relative proportions of the 10 genome segments in dsRCCs are equimolar. This suggests that genome segment assortment into progeny genomes is linked to the transcription of plus strands into minus strands.

  3. Transcriptome of the NTS in exercise-trained spontaneously hypertensive rats: implications for NTS function and plasticity in regulating blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Waki, Hidefumi; Gouraud, Sabine S; Bhuiyan, Mohammad E R; Takagishi, Miwa; Yamazaki, Toshiya; Kohsaka, Akira; Maeda, Masanobu

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) controls the cardiovascular system during exercise, and alteration of its function may underlie exercise-induced cardiovascular adaptation. To understand the molecular basis of the NTS's plasticity in regulating blood pressure (BP) and its potential contribution to the antihypertensive effects, we characterized the gene expression profiles at the level of the NTS after long-term daily wheel running in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed to screen for differentially expressed genes in the NTS between exercise-trained (12 wk) and control SHRs. Pathway analysis using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database revealed that daily exercise altered the expression levels of NTS genes that are functionally associated with metabolic pathways (5 genes), neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions (4 genes), cell adhesion molecules (3 genes), and cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions (3 genes). One of the genes that belonged to the neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions category was histamine receptor H(1). Since we confirmed that the pressor response induced by activation of this receptor is increased after long-term daily exercise, it is suggested that functional plasticity in the histaminergic system may mediate the facilitation of blood pressure control in response to exercise but may not be involved in the lowered basal BP level found in exercise-trained SHRs. Since abnormal inflammatory states in the NTS are known to be prohypertensive in SHRs, altered gene expression of the inflammatory molecules identified in this study may be related to the antihypertensive effects in exercise-trained SHRs, although such speculation awaits functional validation.

  4. Magnetic moment enhancement and spin polarization switch of the manganese phthalocyanine molecule on an IrMn(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, X.; Wang, B.; Pratt, A.; Yamauchi, Y.

    2014-07-21

    The geometric, electronic, and magnetic structures of a manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) molecule on an antiferromagnetic IrMn(100) surface are studied by density functional theory calculations. Two kinds of orientation of the adsorbed MnPc molecule are predicted to coexist due to molecular self-assembly on the surface—a top-site geometry with the Mn–N bonds aligned along the 〈100〉 direction, and a hollow-site orientation in which the Mn–N bonds are parallel to the 〈110〉 direction. The MnPc molecule is antiferromagnetically coupled to the substrate at the top site with a slight reduction in the magnetic moment of the Mn atom of the MnPc molecule (Mn{sub mol}). In contrast, the magnetic moment of the Mn{sub mol} is enhanced to 4.28 μB at the hollow site, a value larger than that in the free MnPc molecule (3.51 μB). Molecular distortion induced by adsorption is revealed to be responsible for the enhancement of the magnetic moment. Furthermore, the spin polarization of the Mn{sub mol} atom at around the Fermi level is found to change from negative to positive through an elongation of the Mn–N bonds of the MnPc. We propose that a reversible switch of the low/high magnetic moment and negative/positive spin polarization might be realized through some mechanical engineering methods.

  5. A tandem mass spectrometric study of bile acids: interpretation of fragmentation pathways and differentiation of steroid isomers.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xue; Ye, Min; Liu, Chun-fang; Yang, Wen-zhi; Miao, Wen-juan; Dong, Jing; Guo, De-an

    2012-02-01

    Bile acids are steroids with a pentanoic acid substituent at C-17. They are the terminal products of cholesterol excretion, and play critical physiological roles in human and animals. Bile acids are easy to detect but difficult to identify by using mass spectrometry due to their poly-ring structure and various hydroxylation patterns. In this study, fragmentation pathways of 18 free and conjugated bile acids were interpreted by using tandem mass spectrometry. The analyses were conducted on ion trap and triple quadrupole mass spectrometers. Upon collision-induced dissociation, the conjugated bile acids could cleave into glycine or taurine related fragments, together with the steroid skeleton. Fragmentations of free bile acids were further elucidated, especially by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry in positive ion mode. Aside from universally observed neutral losses, eliminations occurred on bile acid carbon rings were proposed for the first time. Moreover, four isomeric 5β-cholanic acid hydroxyl derivatives (3α,6α-, 3α,7β-, 3α,7α-, and 3α,12α-) were differentiated using electrospray ionization in negative ion mode: 3α,7β-OH substituent inclined to eliminate H(2)O and CH(2)O(2) groups; 3α,6α-OH substituent preferred neutral loss of two H(2)O molecules; 3α,12α-OH substituent apt to lose the carboxyl in the form of CO(2) molecule; and 3α,7α-OH substituent exhibited no further fragmentation after dehydration. This study provided specific interpretation for mass spectra of bile acids. The results could contribute to bile acid analyses, especially in clinical assays and metabonomic studies.

  6. Engineering Graphene Conductivity for Flexible and High-Frequency Applications.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Alexander J; Carey, J David

    2015-10-14

    Advances in lightweight, flexible, and conformal electronic devices depend on materials that exhibit high electrical conductivity coupled with high mechanical strength. Defect-free graphene is one such material that satisfies both these requirements and which offers a range of attractive and tunable electrical, optoelectronic, and plasmonic characteristics for devices that operate at microwave, terahertz, infrared, or optical frequencies. Essential to the future success of such devices is therefore the ability to control the frequency-dependent conductivity of graphene. Looking to accelerate the development of high-frequency applications of graphene, here we demonstrate how readily accessible and processable organic and organometallic molecules can efficiently dope graphene to carrier densities in excess of 10(13) cm(-2) with conductivities at gigahertz frequencies in excess of 60 mS. In using the molecule 3,6-difluoro-2,5,7,7,8,8-hexacyanoquinodimethane (F2-HCNQ), a high charge transfer (CT) of 0.5 electrons per adsorbed molecule is calculated, resulting in p-type doping of graphene. n-Type doping is achieved using cobaltocene and the sulfur-containing molecule tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) with a CT of 0.41 and 0.24 electrons donated per adsorbed molecule, respectively. Efficient CT is associated with the interaction between the π electrons present in the molecule and in graphene. Calculation of the high-frequency conductivity shows dispersion-less behavior of the real component of the conductivity over a wide range of gigahertz frequencies. Potential high-frequency applications in graphene antennas and communications that can exploit these properties and the broader impacts of using molecular doping to modify functional materials that possess a low-energy Dirac cone are also discussed.

  7. TEMPERATURE ACTIVATION OF CERTAIN RESPIRATORY ENZYMES OF STENOTHERMOPHILIC BACTERIA

    PubMed Central

    Gaughran, Eugene R. L.

    1949-01-01

    The results of this study of the effect of temperature on the respiratory mechanism of five stenothermophilic bacteria may be summarized as follows:— 1. The respiratory mechanism and its various components of the stenothermophilic bacteria were found to function at temperatures below the minimum temperature for growth of these organisms. In every case the rates of the individual reactions involved in the respiratory chain increased exponentially with temperature until the temperature at which inactivation became apparent was reached. 2. The mean activation energies, calculated from the "best" value for the slope of the straight lines resulting from a plot of log rate against the reciprocal of the absolute temperature were: Dehydrogenases: 28,000 to 28,500 calories per gram molecule. Glucose, fructose, galactose, mannose, xylose, arabinose, maltose, lactose, sucrose, glycine, β-alanine, monosodium glutamate, (asparagine). 19,500 to 20,500 calories per gram molecule. Ethyl alcohol, succinate, pyruvate, lactate, acetate. 19,500 to 20,500 calories per gram molecule. Ethyl alcohol, succinate, pyruvate, lactate, acetate. 15,000 calories per gram molecule. Formate. Cytochrome oxidase and cytochrome b and c (substrate: p-phenylenediamine): 16,800 calories per gram molecule. Cytochrome oxidase and cytochrome c (substrate: hydroquinone): 20,200 calories per gram molecule. Catalase: 4,100 calories per gram molecule. Complete aerobic respiratory system (plus added glucose): 29,500 calories per gram molecule. 3. The identity of the energies of activation of the respiratory system and its enzymic components at temperatures above and below the minimum temperature for growth of the stenothermophilic bacteria was demonstrated. 4. An attempt has been made to indicate a relationship between the nature of the substrate and the activation energy by grouping substrates on the basis of common µ values obtained for their dehydrogenation by resting cell preparations of

  8. Molecular evolution and the role of oxidative stress in the expansion and functional diversification of cytosolic glutathione transferases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cytosolic glutathione transferases (cGST) are a large group of ubiquitous enzymes involved in detoxification and are well known for their undesired side effects during chemotherapy. In this work we have performed thorough phylogenetic analyses to understand the various aspects of the evolution and functional diversification of cGSTs. Furthermore, we assessed plausible correlations between gene duplication and substrate specificity of gene paralogs in humans and selected species, notably in mammalian enzymes and their natural substrates. Results We present a molecular phylogeny of cytosolic GSTs that shows that several classes of cGSTs are more ubiquitous and thus have an older ancestry than previously thought. Furthermore, we found that positive selection is implicated in the diversification of cGSTs. The number of duplicate genes per class is generally higher for groups of enzymes that metabolize products of oxidative damage. Conclusions 1) Protection against oxidative stress seems to be the major driver of positive selection in mammalian cGSTs, explaining the overall expansion pattern of this subfamily; 2) Given the functional redundancy of GSTs that metabolize xenobiotic chemicals, we would expect the loss of gene duplicates, but by contrast we observed a gene expansion of this family, which likely has been favored by: i) the diversification of endogenous substrates; ii) differential tissue expression; and iii) increased specificity for a particular molecule; 3) The increased availability of sequence data from diversified taxa is likely to continue to improve our understanding of the early origin of the different cGST classes. PMID:20843339

  9. Competition and selectivity in the reaction of nitriles on ge(100)-2x1.

    PubMed

    Filler, Michael A; Mui, Collin; Musgrave, Charles B; Bent, Stacey F

    2003-04-23

    We have experimentally investigated bonding of the nitrile functional group (R-Ctbd1;N:) on the Ge(100)-2x1 surface with multiple internal reflection infrared spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations are used to help explain trends in the data. Several probe molecules, including acetonitrile, 2-propenenitrile, 3-butenenitrile, and 4-pentenenitrile, were studied to elucidate the factors controlling selectivity and competition on this surface. It is found that acetonitrile does not react on the Ge(100)-2x1 surface at room temperature, a result that can be understood with thermodynamic and kinetic arguments. A [4+2] cycloaddition product through the conjugated pi system and a [2+2] C=C cycloaddition product through the alkene are found to be the dominant surface adducts for the multifunctional molecule 2-propenenitrile. These two surface products are evidenced, respectively, by an extremely intense nu(C=C=N), or ketenimine stretch, at 1954 cm(-)(1) and the nu(Ctbd1;N) stretch near 2210 cm(-)(1). While the non-conjugated molecules 3-butenenitrile and 4-pentenenitrile are not expected to form a [4+2] cycloaddition product, both show vibrational modes near 1954 cm(-)(1). Additional investigation suggests that 3-butenenitrile can isomerize to 2-butenenitrile, a conjugated nitrile, before introduction into the vacuum chamber, explaining the presence of the vibrational modes near 1954 cm(-)(1). Pathways directly involving only the nitrile functional group are thermodynamically unfavorable at room temperature on Ge(100)-2x1, demonstrating that this functional group may prove useful as a vacuum-compatible protecting group.

  10. Matrix molecularly imprinted mesoporous sol-gel sorbent for efficient solid-phase extraction of chloramphenicol from milk.

    PubMed

    Samanidou, Victoria; Kehagia, Maria; Kabir, Abuzar; Furton, Kenneth G

    2016-03-31

    Highly selective and efficient chloramphenicol imprinted sol-gel silica based inorganic polymeric sorbent (sol-gel MIP) was synthesized via matrix imprinting approach for the extraction of chloramphenicol in milk. Chloramphenicol was used as the template molecule, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTES) and triethoxyphenylsilane (TEPS) as the functional precursors, tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) as the cross-linker, isopropanol as the solvent/porogen, and HCl as the sol-gel catalyst. Non-imprinted sol-gel polymer (sol-gel NIP) was synthesized under identical conditions in absence of template molecules for comparison purpose. Both synthesized materials were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and nitrogen adsorption porosimetry, which unambiguously confirmed their significant structural and morphological differences. The synthesized MIP and NIP materials were evaluated as sorbents for molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) of chloramphenicol in milk. The effect of critical extraction parameters (flow rate, elution solvent, sample and eluent volume, selectivity coefficient, retention capacity) was studied in terms of retention and desorption of chloramphenicol. Competition and cross reactivity tests have proved that sol-gel MIP sorbent possesses significantly higher specific retention and enrichment capacity for chloramphenicol compared to its non-imprinted analogue. The maximum imprinting factor (IF) was found as 9.7, whereas the highest adsorption capacity of chloramphenicol by sol-gel MIP was 23 mg/g. The sol-gel MIP was found to be adequately selective towards chloramphenicol to provide the necessary minimum required performance limit (MRPL) of 0.3 μg/kg set forth by European Commission after analysis by LC-MS even without requiring time consuming solvent evaporation and sample reconstitution step, often considered as an integral part in solid phase extraction work-flow. Intra and

  11. Classical trajectory simulation of the cluster-atom association reaction I-Arn+I --> I2+nAr. II. Diffusion of captured iodine and evaporative cooling of I2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiche; Martens, Craig C.

    1993-12-01

    This is Part II of a series of papers in which we address the role of microscopic solvation in the association reaction between a free iodine atom and an iodine doped van der Waals cluster: I+I(Ar)n→I2+nAr. The influence of microscopic solvation on the I+I to I2 reactivity, reaction mechanism, energetics, and product energy partitioning is the major focus of our study. The overall reaction for I+I(Ar)12→I2+12Ar can be characterized by three fundamental processes: (1) capture of the incident iodine atom by the I(Ar)12 cluster; (2) diffusive migration of the captured I atom on the surface or in the interior of the cluster, leading ultimately to an encounter with the other I atom to form a highly excited I*2 molecule; (3) vibrational relaxation of the nascent I*2 product, leading to evaporative cooling and decomposition of the cluster. Part I [J. Chem. Phys. 98, 8551 (1993)] dealt with the capture process. This article focuses on the chemical dynamics of the subsequent processes of diffusion, vibrational energy transfer, and evaporative cooling. The stabilization of the chemically activated I*2 molecule through evaporative cooling eliminate the need of a third body collision as required in isolation gas phase recombination. The overall distribution of final energies is nonstatistical for the chemically activated I*2Arn. The final vibrational energy of I2 exhibits a nonthermal structure even after all the argon atoms are evaporated. In addition to monoatomic sequential evaporation, a ``fissioning'' mechanism, leading to the formation of at least one multiatom fragment, is observed. The relationship between structure and dynamics is explored. The dynamics of vibrational relaxation, diffusion of the captured iodine, evaporation, and fragmentation pattern, final I2 energy partitioning are found to be strongly dependent upon structure and temperature of the doped cluster. A spectroscopic experimental verification of the above observations is also proposed.

  12. Directed evolution of the quorum-sensing regulator EsaR for increased signal sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Shong, Jasmine; Huang, Yao-Ming; Bystroff, Christopher; Collins, Cynthia H

    2013-04-19

    The use of cell-cell communication or "quorum sensing (QS)" elements from Gram-negative Proteobacteria has enabled synthetic biologists to begin engineering systems composed of multiple interacting organisms. However, additional tools are necessary if we are to progress toward synthetic microbial consortia that exhibit more complex, dynamic behaviors. EsaR from Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii is a QS regulator that binds to DNA as an apoprotein and releases the DNA when it binds to its cognate signal molecule, 3-oxohexanoyl-homoserine lactone (3OC6HSL). In the absence of 3OC6HSL, EsaR binds to DNA and can act as either an activator or a repressor of transcription. Gene expression from P(esaR), which is repressed by wild-type EsaR, requires 100- to 1000-fold higher concentrations of signal than commonly used QS activators, such as LuxR and LasR. Here we have identified EsaR variants with increased sensitivity to 3OC6HSL using directed evolution and a dual ON/OFF screening strategy. Although we targeted EsaR-dependent derepression of P(esaR), our EsaR variants also showed increased 3OC6HSL sensitivity at a second promoter, P(esaS), which is activated by EsaR in the absence of 3OC6HSL. Here, the increase in AHL sensitivity led to gene expression being turned off at lower concentrations of 3OC6HSL. Overall, we have increased the signal sensitivity of EsaR more than 70-fold and generated a set of EsaR variants that recognize 3OC6HSL concentrations ranging over 4 orders of magnitude. QS-dependent transcriptional regulators that bind to DNA and are active in the absence of a QS signal represent a new set of tools for engineering cell-cell communication-dependent gene expression.

  13. Directed Evolution of the Quorum-Sensing Regulator EsaR for Increased Signal Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Shong, Jasmine; Huang, Yao-Ming; Bystroff, Christopher; Collins, Cynthia H.

    2015-01-01

    The use of cell–cell communication or “quorum sensing (QS)” elements from Gram-negative Proteobacteria has enabled synthetic biologists to begin engineering systems composed of multiple interacting organisms. However, additional tools are necessary if we are to progress toward synthetic microbial consortia that exhibit more complex, dynamic behaviors. EsaR from Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii is a QS regulator that binds to DNA as an apoprotein and releases the DNA when it binds to its cognate signal molecule, 3-oxohexanoyl-homoserine lactone (3OC6HSL). In the absence of 3OC6HSL, EsaR binds to DNA and can act as either an activator or a repressor of transcription. Gene expression from PesaR, which is repressed by wild-type EsaR, requires 100- to 1000-fold higher concentrations of signal than commonly used QS activators, such as LuxR and LasR. Here we have identified EsaR variants with increased sensitivity to 3OC6HSL using directed evolution and a dual ON/OFF screening strategy. Although we targeted EsaR-dependent derepression of PesaR, our EsaR variants also showed increased 3OC6HSL sensitivity at a second promoter, PesaS, which is activated by EsaR in the absence of 3OC6HSL. Here, the increase in AHL sensitivity led to gene expression being turned off at lower concentrations of 3OC6HSL. Overall, we have increased the signal sensitivity of EsaR more than 70-fold and generated a set of EsaR variants that recognize 3OC6HSL concentrations ranging over 4 orders of magnitude. QS-dependent transcriptional regulators that bind to DNA and are active in the absence of a QS signal represent a new set of tools for engineering cell–cell communication-dependent gene expression. PMID:23363022

  14. DC-SIGN–expressing macrophages trigger activation of mannosylated IgM B-cell receptor in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Rada; Mourcin, Frédéric; Uhel, Fabrice; Pangault, Céline; Ruminy, Philippe; Dupré, Loic; Guirriec, Marion; Marchand, Tony; Fest, Thierry; Lamy, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) results from the accumulation of malignant germinal center (GC) B cells leading to the development of an indolent and largely incurable disease. FL cells remain highly dependent on B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling and on a specific cell microenvironment, including T cells, macrophages, and stromal cells. Importantly, FL BCR is characterized by a selective pressure to retain surface immunoglobulin M (IgM) BCR despite an active class-switch recombination process, and by the introduction, in BCR variable regions, of N-glycosylation acceptor sites harboring unusual high-mannose oligosaccharides. However, the relevance of these 2 FL BCR features for lymphomagenesis remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that IgM+ FL B cells activated a stronger BCR signaling network than IgG+ FL B cells and normal GC B cells. BCR expression level and phosphatase activity could both contribute to such heterogeneity. Moreover, we underlined that a subset of IgM+ FL samples, displaying highly mannosylated BCR, efficiently bound dendritic cell–specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3–grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), which could in turn trigger delayed but long-lasting BCR aggregation and activation. Interestingly, DC-SIGN was found within the FL cell niche in situ. Finally, M2 macrophages induced a DC-SIGN–dependent adhesion of highly mannosylated IgM+ FL B cells and triggered BCR-associated kinase activation. Interestingly, pharmacologic BCR inhibitors abolished such crosstalk between macrophages and FL B cells. Altogether, our data support an important role for DC-SIGN–expressing infiltrating cells in the biology of FL and suggest that they could represent interesting therapeutic targets. PMID:26272216

  15. The relationship of interacting immunological components in dengue pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, David G

    2009-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that there are over 50 million cases of dengue fever reported annually and approximately 2.5 billion people are at risk. Mild dengue fever presents with headache, fever, rash, myalgia, osteogenic pain, and lethargy. Severe disease can manifest as dengue shock syndrome (DSS) or dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Symptoms of DSS/DHF are leukopenia, low blood volume and pressure encephalitis, cold and sweaty skin, gastrointestinal bleeding, and spontaneous bleeding from gums and nose. Currently, there are no therapeutics available beyond supportive care and untreated complicated dengue fever can have a 50% mortality rate. According to WHO DSS/DHF is the leading cause of childhood mortality in some Asian countries. Dendritic cells are professional antigen presenting cells that are primary targets in a dengue infection. Dengue binds to Dendritic Cell-Specific Intercellular adhesion molecule-3-Grabbing Non-integrin (DC-SIGN). DC-SIGN has a high affinity for ICAM3 which is expressed in activating T-cells. Previous studies have demonstrated an altered T-cell phenotype expressed in dengue infected patients that could be potentially mediated by dengue-infected DCs.Dengue is enhanced by three interacting components of the immune system. Dengue begins by infecting dendritic cells which in immature dendritic cells is mediated by DC-SIGN. In mature dendritic cells, antibodies can enhance dengue infection via Fc receptors. Downstream of dendritic cells T-cells become activated and generate the very cytokines implicated in vascular leak and shock in addition to activating effector cells. Both the virus and the antibodies are involved in release of complement and anaphylatoxins which can cause or exacerbate DHF/DSS. These systems are inextricable and strongly associated with dengue pathogenesis.

  16. Dermal CD14(+) Dendritic Cell and Macrophage Infection by Dengue Virus Is Stimulated by Interleukin-4.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Evelyne; Flacher, Vincent; Papageorgiou, Vasiliki; Decossas, Marion; Fauny, Jean-Daniel; Krämer, Melanie; Mueller, Christopher G

    2015-07-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is responsible for the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral infection in humans. Events decisive for disease development occur in the skin after virus inoculation by the mosquito. Yet, the role of human dermis-resident immune cells in dengue infection and disease remains elusive. Here we investigated how dermal dendritic cells (dDCs) and macrophages (dMs) react to DENV and impact on immunopathology. We show that both CD1c(+) and CD14(+) dDC subsets were infected, but viral load greatly increased in CD14(+) dDCs upon IL-4 stimulation, which correlated with upregulation of virus-binding lectins Dendritic Cell-Specific Intercellular adhesion molecule-3-Grabbing Nonintegrin (DC-SIGN/CD209) and mannose receptor (CD206). IL-4 also enhanced T-cell activation by dDCs, which was further increased upon dengue infection. dMs purified from digested dermis were initially poorly infected but actively replicated the virus and produced TNF-α upon lectin upregulation in response to IL-4. DC-SIGN(+) cells are abundant in inflammatory skin with scabies infection or Th2-type dermatitis, suggesting that skin reactions to mosquito bites heighten the risk of infection and subsequent immunopathology. Our data identify dDCs and dMs as primary arbovirus target cells in humans and suggest that dDCs initiate a potent virus-directed T-cell response, whereas dMs fuel the inflammatory cascade characteristic of dengue fever. PMID:25521455

  17. N-Acylhomoserine lactones are potent neutrophil chemoattractants that act via calcium mobilization and actin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Thommie; Musse, Farah; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Vikström, Elena

    2012-01-01

    In gram-negative bacteria, cell-cell communication based on HSL QS molecules is known to coordinate the production of virulence factors and biofilms. These bacterial signals can also modulate human immune cell behavior. Using a Transwell migration assay, we found that human primary neutrophils are strongly stimulated by 3O-C(12)-HSL and -C(10)-HSL but not C(4)-HSL in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, 3O-C(12)-HSL and -C(10)-HSL activate PLCγ1 but not -γ2, mobilize intracellular calcium, and up-regulate IP(3)R. These changes were paralleled by F-actin accumulation, primarily in the leading edge of neutrophils, as evidenced by phalloidin staining and confocal microscopy. F- and G-actin isolation and quantification by immunoblotting revealed that the F/G-actin ratio was increased significantly after treatment with all three HSLs. Furthemore, 3O-C(12)-HSL- and 3O-C(10)-HSL treatment resulted in phosphorylation of Rac1 and Cdc42. In contrast, C(4)-HSL had negligible influence on the phosphorylation status of PLC and Rac1/Cdc42 and failed to attract neutrophils and induce calcium release. The calcium inhibitor thapsigargin, which blocks ER calcium uptake, strongly prevented neutrophil migration toward 3O-C(12)-HSL and -C(10)-HSL. These findings show that the bacterial QS molecules 3O-C(12)-HSL and -C(10)-HSL may attract human neutrophils to the sites of bacterial infection and developing biofilms. Indeed, recognition of HSL QS signals by neutrophils may play a critical role in their recruitment during infections.

  18. Dengue virus binding and replication by platelets.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ayo Y; Sutherland, Michael R; Pryzdial, Edward L G

    2015-07-16

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes ∼200 million cases of severe flulike illness annually, escalating to life-threatening hemorrhagic fever or shock syndrome in ∼500,000. Although thrombocytopenia is typical of both mild and severe diseases, the mechanism triggering platelet reduction is incompletely understood. As a probable initiating event, direct purified DENV-platelet binding was followed in the current study by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and confirmed antigenically. Approximately 800 viruses specifically bound per platelet at 37°C. Fewer sites were observed at 25°C, the blood bank storage temperature (∼350 sites), or 4°C, known to attenuate virus cell entry (∼200 sites). Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and heparan sulfate proteoglycan were implicated as coreceptors because only the combination of anti-DC-SIGN and low-molecular-weight heparin prevented binding. Interestingly, at 37°C and 25°C, platelets replicated the positive sense single-stranded RNA genome of DENV by up to ∼4-fold over 7 days. Further time course experiments demonstrated production of viral NS1 protein, which is known to be highly antigenic in patient serum. The infectivity of DENV intrinsically decayed in vitro, which was moderated by platelet-mediated generation of viable progeny. This was shown using a transcription inhibitor and confirmed by freeze-denatured platelets being incapable of replicating the DENV genome. For the first time, these data demonstrate that platelets directly bind DENV saturably and produce infectious virus. Thus, expression of antigen encoded by DENV is a novel consideration in the pathogen-induced thrombocytopenia mechanism. These results furthermore draw attention to the possibility that platelets may produce permissive RNA viruses in addition to DENV.

  19. The Porphobilinogen Conundrum in Prebiotic Routes to Tetrapyrrole Macrocycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Masahiko; Ptaszek, Marcin; Chandrashaker, Vanampally; Lindsey, Jonathan S.

    2016-05-01

    Attempts to develop a credible prebiotic route to tetrapyrroles have relied on enzyme-free recapitulation of the extant biosynthesis, but this process has foundered from the inability to form the pyrrole porphobilinogen (PBG) in good yield by self-condensation of the precursor δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). PBG undergoes robust oligomerization in aqueous solution to give uroporphyrinogen (4 isomers) in good yield. ALA, PBG, and uroporphyrinogen III are universal precursors to all known tetrapyrrole macrocycles. The enzymic formation of PBG entails carbon-carbon bond formation between the less stable enolate/enamine of one ALA molecule (3-position) and the carbonyl/imine (4-position) of the second ALA molecule; without enzymes, the first ALA reacts at the more stable enolate/enamine (5-position) and gives the pyrrole pseudo-PBG. pseudo-PBG cannot self-condense, yet has one open α-pyrrole position and is proposed to be a terminator of oligopyrromethane chain-growth from PBG. Here, 23 analogues of ALA have been subjected to density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations, but no motif has been identified that directs reaction at the 3-position. Deuteriation experiments suggested 5-(phosphonooxy)levulinic acid would react preferentially at the 3- versus 5-position, but a hybrid condensation with ALA gave no observable uroporphyrin. The results suggest efforts toward a biomimetic, enzyme-free route to tetrapyrroles from ALA should turn away from structure-directed reactions and focus on catalysts that orient the two aminoketones to form PBG in a kinetically controlled process, thereby avoiding formation of pseudo-PBG.

  20. Engineering Graphene Conductivity for Flexible and High-Frequency Applications.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Alexander J; Carey, J David

    2015-10-14

    Advances in lightweight, flexible, and conformal electronic devices depend on materials that exhibit high electrical conductivity coupled with high mechanical strength. Defect-free graphene is one such material that satisfies both these requirements and which offers a range of attractive and tunable electrical, optoelectronic, and plasmonic characteristics for devices that operate at microwave, terahertz, infrared, or optical frequencies. Essential to the future success of such devices is therefore the ability to control the frequency-dependent conductivity of graphene. Looking to accelerate the development of high-frequency applications of graphene, here we demonstrate how readily accessible and processable organic and organometallic molecules can efficiently dope graphene to carrier densities in excess of 10(13) cm(-2) with conductivities at gigahertz frequencies in excess of 60 mS. In using the molecule 3,6-difluoro-2,5,7,7,8,8-hexacyanoquinodimethane (F2-HCNQ), a high charge transfer (CT) of 0.5 electrons per adsorbed molecule is calculated, resulting in p-type doping of graphene. n-Type doping is achieved using cobaltocene and the sulfur-containing molecule tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) with a CT of 0.41 and 0.24 electrons donated per adsorbed molecule, respectively. Efficient CT is associated with the interaction between the π electrons present in the molecule and in graphene. Calculation of the high-frequency conductivity shows dispersion-less behavior of the real component of the conductivity over a wide range of gigahertz frequencies. Potential high-frequency applications in graphene antennas and communications that can exploit these properties and the broader impacts of using molecular doping to modify functional materials that possess a low-energy Dirac cone are also discussed. PMID:26387636

  1. N-Glycans on the Rift Valley Fever Virus Envelope Glycoproteins Gn and Gc Redundantly Support Viral Infection via DC-SIGN.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, Inaia; Nishiyama, Shoko; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Hill, Terence E; Huante, Matthew B; Slack, Olga A L; Carpio, Victor H; Freiberg, Alexander N; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever is a mosquito-transmitted, zoonotic disease that infects humans and ruminants. Dendritic cell specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3 (ICAM-3) grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) acts as a receptor for members of the phlebovirus genus. The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) glycoproteins (Gn/Gc) encode five putative N-glycan sequons (asparagine (N)-any amino acid (X)-serine (S)/threonine (T)) at positions: N438 (Gn), and N794, N829, N1035, and N1077 (Gc). The N-glycosylation profile and significance in viral infection via DC-SIGN have not been elucidated. Gc N-glycosylation was first evaluated by using Gc asparagine (N) to glutamine (Q) mutants. Subsequently, we generated a series of recombinant RVFV MP-12 strain mutants, which encode N-to-Q mutations, and the infectivity of each mutant in Jurkat cells stably expressing DC-SIGN was evaluated. Results showed that Gc N794, N1035, and N1077 were N-glycosylated but N829 was not. Gc N1077 was heterogeneously N-glycosylated. RVFV Gc made two distinct N-glycoforms: "Gc-large" and "Gc-small", and N1077 was responsible for "Gc-large" band. RVFV showed increased infection of cells expressing DC-SIGN compared to cells lacking DC-SIGN. Infection via DC-SIGN was increased in the presence of either Gn N438 or Gc N1077. Our study showed that N-glycans on the Gc and Gn surface glycoproteins redundantly support RVFV infection via DC-SIGN. PMID:27223297

  2. Synthesis, superoxide dismutase, nuclease, and anticancer activities of copper(II) complexes incorporating bis(2-picolyl)amine with different counter anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed M.; Ramadan, Abdel-Motaleb M.; Mersal, Gaber A. M.; El-Shazly, Samir A.

    2011-07-01

    Interaction of the tridentate ligand bis(2-picolyl)amine L with copper(II) salts gave a series of copper(II) complexes with the formula types: [ LCu(X) 2] (X = Cl -1, = Br -2), [( LCu (H 2O)(μ-SO 4)( LCu(H 2O)]SO 43, [ LCu(OAc)](OAc )H 2O 4, [ LCu(H 2O) 2](Y) 2 (Y = NO3-5, = ClO4-6). Their structures and properties were characterized by elemental analysis, thermal analysis (TGA), IR, UV-vis and ESR spectroscopy, electrochemical measurements including cyclic voltammetry and electrical molar conductivity, and magnetic moment measurements. A square pyramidal geometry is proposed for the halogeno complexes 1 and 2 in monomeric structures. For sulfate complex, the sulfate group bridged two copper(II) ions of the two [N 3O] donor units to give the dimeric complex molecule 3 in square pyramidal environment around the copper(II) ions. In the case of complexes 4- 6, square planar stereochemistries in monomeric structures are suggested. The SOD biomimetic catalytic activity of the obtained complexes was assessed for their ability to inhibit the reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT). The catalytic efficiency of O2- scavenging by complexes depends on the nature of the particular acidic anion radical incorporated in the complex molecule and follows the order: NO3- > ClO4- > Br - ⩾ Cl - > SO4- > AcO -. A probable mechanistic implications for the catalytic dismutation of O2- by copper(II) complexes are proposed. Furthermore, complex 1 exhibits significant hydrolytic cleavage of the genomic DNA in the absence of any external additives. In addition, the in vitro study of cytotoxicity of complex 1 on colon cancer cell line (Caco-2) indicates that the complex has the potential to act as an effective anticancer drug with IC 50 value of 156 ± 0.35 μM.

  3. Microglia Transcriptome Changes in a Model of Depressive Behavior after Immune Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Pena, Dianelys; Nixon, Scott E.; O’Connor, Jason C.; Southey, Bruce R.; Lawson, Marcus A.; McCusker, Robert H.; Borras, Tania; Machuca, Debbie; Hernandez, Alvaro G.; Dantzer, Robert; Kelley, Keith W.; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Depression symptoms following immune response to a challenge have been reported after the recovery from sickness. A RNA-Seq study of the dysregulation of the microglia transcriptome in a model of inflammation-associated depressive behavior was undertaken. The transcriptome of microglia from mice at day 7 after Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) challenge was compared to that from unchallenged Control mice and to the transcriptome from peripheral macrophages from the same mice. Among the 562 and 3,851 genes differentially expressed between BCG-challenged and Control mice in microglia and macrophages respectively, 353 genes overlapped between these cells types. Among the most differentially expressed genes in the microglia, serum amyloid A3 (Saa3) and cell adhesion molecule 3 (Cadm3) were over-expressed and coiled-coil domain containing 162 (Ccdc162) and titin-cap (Tcap) were under-expressed in BCG-challenged relative to Control. Many of the differentially expressed genes between BCG-challenged and Control mice were associated with neurological disorders encompassing depression symptoms. Across cell types, S100 calcium binding protein A9 (S100A9), interleukin 1 beta (Il1b) and kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (Kmo) were differentially expressed between challenged and control mice. Immune response, chemotaxis, and chemokine activity were among the functional categories enriched by the differentially expressed genes. Functional categories enriched among the 9,117 genes differentially expressed between cell types included leukocyte regulation and activation, chemokine and cytokine activities, MAP kinase activity, and apoptosis. More than 200 genes exhibited alternative splicing events between cell types including WNK lysine deficient protein kinase 1 (Wnk1) and microtubule-actin crosslinking factor 1(Macf1). Network visualization revealed the capability of microglia to exhibit transcriptome dysregulation in response to immune challenge still after resolution of sickness symptoms

  4. The autoinducer synthase LqsA and putative sensor kinase LqsS regulate phagocyte interactions, extracellular filaments and a genomic island of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Tiaden, André; Spirig, Thomas; Sahr, Tobias; Wälti, Martin A; Boucke, Karin; Buchrieser, Carmen; Hilbi, Hubert

    2010-05-01

    The amoebae-resistant opportunistic pathogen Legionella pneumophila employs a biphasic life cycle to replicate in host cells and spread to new niches. Upon entering the stationary growth phase, the bacteria switch to a transmissive (virulent) state, which involves a complex regulatory network including the lqs gene cluster (lqsA-lqsR-hdeD-lqsS). LqsR is a putative response regulator that promotes host-pathogen interactions and represses replication. The autoinducer synthase LqsA catalyses the production of the diffusible signalling molecule 3-hydroxypentadecan-4-one (LAI-1) that is presumably recognized by the sensor kinase LqsS. Here, we analysed L. pneumophila strains lacking lqsA or lqsS. Compared with wild-type L. pneumophila, the DeltalqsS strain was more salt-resistant and impaired for the Icm/Dot type IV secretion system-dependent uptake by phagocytes. Legionella pneumophila strains lacking lqsS, lqsR or the alternative sigma factor rpoS sedimented more slowly and produced extracellular filaments. Deletion of lqsA moderately reduced the uptake of L. pneumophila by phagocytes, and the defect was complemented by expressing lqsA in trans. Unexpectedly, the overexpression of lqsA also restored the virulence defect and reduced filament production of L. pneumophila mutant strains lacking lqsS or lqsR, but not the phenotypes of strains lacking rpoS or icmT. These results suggest that LqsA products also signal through sensors not encoded by the lqs gene cluster. A transcriptome analysis of the DeltalqsA and DeltalqsS mutant strains revealed that under the conditions tested, lqsA regulated only few genes, whereas lqsS upregulated the expression of 93 genes at least twofold. These include 52 genes clustered in a 133 kb high plasticity genomic island, which is flanked by putative DNA-mobilizing genes and encodes multiple metal ion efflux pumps. Upon overexpression of lqsA, a cluster of 19 genes in the genomic island was also upregulated, suggesting that LqsA and Lqs

  5. The Legionella pneumophila orphan sensor kinase LqsT regulates competence and pathogen-host interactions as a component of the LAI-1 circuit.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Aline; Schell, Ursula; Sahr, Tobias; Tiaden, André; Harrison, Christopher; Buchrieser, Carmen; Hilbi, Hubert

    2013-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an amoeba-resistant opportunistic pathogen that performs cell-cell communication through the signalling molecule 3-hydroxypentadecane-4-one (LAI-1, Legionella autoinducer-1). The lqs (Legionella quorum sensing) gene cluster encodes the LAI-1 autoinducer synthase LqsA, the cognate sensor kinase LqsS and the response regulator LqsR. Here we show that the Lqs system includes an 'orphan' homologue of LqsS termed LqsT. Compared with wild-type L. pneumophila, strains lacking lqsT or both lqsS and lqsT show increased salt resistance, greatly enhanced natural competence for DNA acquisition and impaired uptake by phagocytes. Sensitive novel single round growth assays and competition experiments using Acanthamoeba castellanii revealed that ΔlqsT and ΔlqsS-ΔlqsT, as well as ΔlqsA and other lqs mutant strains are impaired for intracellular growth and cannot compete against wild-type bacteria upon co-infection. In contrast to the ΔlqsS strain, ΔlqsT does not produce extracellular filaments. The phenotypes of the ΔlqsS-ΔlqsT strain are partially complemented by either lqsT or lqsS, but are not reversed by overexpression of lqsA, suggesting that LqsT and LqsS are the sole LAI-1-responsive sensor kinases in L. pneumophila. In agreement with the different phenotypes of the ΔlqsT and ΔlqsS strains, lqsT and lqsS are differentially expressed in the post-exponential growth phase, and transcriptome studies indicated that 90% of the genes, which are downregulated in absence of lqsT, are upregulated in absence of lqsS. Reciprocally regulated genes encode components of a 133 kb genomic 'fitness island' or translocated effector proteins implicated in virulence. Together, these results reveal a unique organization of the L. pneumophila Lqs system comprising two partially antagonistic LAI-1-responsive sensor kinases, LqsT and LqsS, which regulate distinct pools of genes implicated in pathogen-host cell interactions, competence, expression of a

  6. Short-Chain Fatty Acid-Modified Hexosamine for Tissue-Engineering Osteoarthritic Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Jeannine M.; Wo, Luccie; Bernstein, Nicholas; Bhattacharya, Rahul; Aich, Udayanath; Bingham, Clifton O.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation and tissue degeneration play key roles in numerous rheumatic diseases, including osteoarthritis (OA). Efforts to reduce and effectively repair articular cartilage damage in an osteoarthritic environment are limited in their success due to the diseased environment. Treatment strategies focused on both reducing inflammation and increasing tissue production are necessary to effectively treat OA from a tissue-engineering perspective. In this work, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and tissue production capacity of a small molecule 3,4,6-O-tributanoylated-N-acetylglucosamine (3,4,6-O-Bu3GlcNAc) previously shown to inhibit the nuclear factor κB (NFκB) activity, a key transcription factor regulating inflammation. To mimic an inflammatory environment, chondrocytes were stimulated with interleukin-1β (IL-1β), a potent inflammatory cytokine. 3,4,6-O-Bu3GlcNAc exposure decreased the expression of NFκB target genes relevant to OA by IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes after 24 h of exposure. The capacity of 3,4,6-O-Bu3GlcNAc to stimulate extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation by IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes was evaluated in vitro utilizing a three-dimensional hydrogel culturing system. After 21 days, 3,4,6-O-Bu3GlcNAc exposure induced quantifiable increases in both sulfated glycosaminoglycan and total collagen. Histological staining for proteoglycans and type II collagen confirmed these findings. The increased ECM accumulation was not due to the hydrolysis products of the small molecule, n-butyrate and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), as the isomeric 1,3,4-O-tributanoylated N-acetylglucosamine (1,3,4-O-Bu3GlcNAc) did not elicit a similar response. These findings demonstrate that a novel butanoylated GlcNAc derivative, 3,4,6-O-Bu3GlcNAc, has the potential to stimulate new tissue production and reduce inflammation in IL-1β-induced chondrocytes with utility for OA and other forms of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:23638885

  7. Structural evaluation of three 2-phenylpyrazolo[4,3-c]quinolin-3-one monohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Vitor F.; Leal, Katia Z.; Lindgren, Eric B.; de Oliveira, Mara R. P.; de Souza, Maria Celia B. V.; Vasconcelos, Thatyana R. A.; Wardell, James L.; Wardell, Solange M. S. V.; Yoneda, Julliane D.

    2013-11-01

    A single crystal X-ray diffraction and theoretical study has been carried out on mono hydrates of three 2H-pyrazolo[4,3-c]quinolin-3(5H)-one derivatives, namely 6-methyl-2-phenylpyrazolo[4,3-c]quinolin-3-one, 3, 6-methyl-2-(4-chlorophenyl)pyrazolo[4,3-c]quinolin-3-one, 4, and 8-methyl-2-(4-nitrophenyl)pyrazolo[4,3-c]quinolin-3-one, 5. The monohydrates were obtained on recrystallization from moist solvents. While there are three tautomeric forms possible for such pyrazolo[4,3-c]quinolin-3-one molecules, the sole form isolated in the solid [(X)ṡ(H2O)] (X = 3, 4 and 5) compounds was the quinoloid form - the one calculated to be the most stable at the M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Excellent agreement was found between the calculated and X-ray determined structures. Molecule 5 in [(5)ṡ(H2O)] is very near planar while both molecules 3 and 4 in their respective hydrates are much less so as a consequence of angles about 24° between the two aromatic rings. In each hydrate, the pyrazolo[4,3-c]quinolin-3-one molecule is bonded to three water molecules and each water molecule is likewise H-bonded to three pyrazolo[4,3-c]quinolin-3-one molecules. While the water molecules are H-bonded to 3 and 4 via the pyridinyl N and 2x the carbonyl O atoms, in [(5)ṡ(H2O)] the H-bonds are to pyridinyl N, carbonyl O and a nitro O atoms. Calculations indicated that the found arrangement in [(5)ṡ(H2O)] is more stable than one using the connections as found in [(3)ṡ(H2O)] and [(4)ṡ(H2O)]. While each of the hydrates possess strong Nsbnd H⋯O and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds, and weaker Csbnd H⋯π and π⋯π interactions, the supramolecular arrays are very different.

  8. Mannosylated Mucin-Type Immunoglobulin Fusion Proteins Enhance Antigen-Specific Antibody and T Lymphocyte Responses

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Tomas; Nilsson, Anki; Chatzissavidou, Nathalie; Sjöblom, Magnus; Rova, Ulrika; Holgersson, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Targeting antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APC) improve their immunogenicity and capacity to induce Th1 responses and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). We have generated a mucin-type immunoglobulin fusion protein (PSGL-1/mIgG2b), which upon expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris became multivalently substituted with O-linked oligomannose structures and bound the macrophage mannose receptor (MMR) and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) with high affinity in vitro. Here, its effects on the humoral and cellular anti-ovalbumin (OVA) responses in C57BL/6 mice are presented. OVA antibody class and subclass responses were determined by ELISA, the generation of anti-OVA CTLs was assessed in 51Cr release assays using in vitro-stimulated immune spleen cells from the different groups of mice as effector cells and OVA peptide-fed RMA-S cells as targets, and evaluation of the type of Th cell response was done by IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5 ELISpot assays. Immunizations with the OVA − mannosylated PSGL-1/mIgG2b conjugate, especially when combined with the AbISCO®-100 adjuvant, lead to faster, stronger and broader (with regard to IgG subclass) OVA IgG responses, a stronger OVA-specific CTL response and stronger Th1 and Th2 responses than if OVA was used alone or together with AbISCO®-100. Also non-covalent mixing of mannosylated PSGL-1/mIgG2b, OVA and AbISCO®-100 lead to relatively stronger humoral and cellular responses. The O-glycan oligomannoses were necessary because PSGL-1/mIgG2b with mono- and disialyl core 1 structures did not have this effect. Mannosylated mucin-type fusion proteins can be used as versatile APC-targeting molecules for vaccines and as such enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses. PMID:23071675

  9. A Hybrid Chalcone Combining the Trimethoxyphenyl and Isatinyl Groups Targets Multiple Oncogenic Proteins and Pathways in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lili; Zhang, Lijun; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors that can simultaneously inhibit multiple oncogenic proteins in essential pathways are promising therapeutic chemicals for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To combine the anticancer effects of combretastatins, chalcones and isatins, we synthesized a novel hybrid molecule 3’,4’,5’-trimethoxy-5-chloro-isatinylchalcone (3MCIC). 3MCIC inhibited proliferation of cultured HepG2 cells, causing rounding-up of the cells and massive vacuole accumulation in the cytoplasm. Paxillin and focal adhesion plaques were downregulated by 3MCIC. Surprisingly, unlike the microtubule (MT)-targeting agent CA-4 that inhibits tubulin polymerization, 3MCIC stabilized tubulin polymers both in living cells and in cell lysates. 3MCIC treatment reduced cyclin B1, CDK1, p-CDK1/2, and Rb, but increased p53 and p21. Moreover, 3MCIC caused GSK3β degradation by promoting GSK3β-Ser9 phosphorylation. Nevertheless, 3MCIC inhibited the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by downregulating β-catenin, c-Myc, cyclin D1 and E2F1. 3MCIC treatment not only activated the caspase-3-dependent apoptotic pathway, but also caused massive autophagy evidenced by rapid and drastic changes of LC3 and p62. 3MCIC also promoted cleavage and maturation of the lysosomal protease cathepsin D. Using ligand-affinity chromatography (LAC), target proteins captured onto the Sephacryl S1000-C12-3MCIC resins were isolated and analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS). Some of the LAC-MS identified targets, i.e., septin-2, vimentin, pan-cytokeratin, nucleolin, EF1α1/2, EBP1 (PA2G4), cyclin B1 and GSK3β, were further detected by Western blotting. Moreover, both septin-2 and HIF-1α decreased drastically in 3MCIC-treated HepG2 cells. Our data suggest that 3MCIC is a promising anticancer lead compound with novel targeting mechanisms, and also demonstrate the efficiency of LAC-MS based target identification in anticancer drug development. PMID:27525972

  10. Brugia malayi Antigen (BmA) Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection but Neither BmA nor ES-62 Alter HIV-1 Infectivity of DC Induced CD4+ Th-Cells.

    PubMed

    Mouser, Emily E I M; Pollakis, Georgios; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Harnett, William; de Jong, Esther C; Paxton, William A

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of HIV-1 disease is the association of heightened CD4+ T-cell activation with HIV-1 replication. Parasitic helminths including filarial nematodes have evolved numerous and complex mechanisms to skew, dampen and evade human immune responses suggesting that HIV-1 infection may be modulated in co-infected individuals. Here we studied the effects of two filarial nematode products, adult worm antigen from Brugia malayi (BmA) and excretory-secretory product 62 (ES-62) from Acanthocheilonema viteae on HIV-1 infection in vitro. Neither BmA nor ES-62 influenced HIV-1 replication in CD4+ enriched T-cells, with either a CCR5- or CXCR4-using virus. BmA, but not ES-62, had the capacity to bind the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) thereby inhibiting HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ enriched T-cells. As for their effect on DCs, neither BmA nor ES-62 could enhance or inhibit DC maturation as determined by CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR expression, or the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α. As expected, due to the unaltered DC phenotype, no differences were found in CD4+ T helper (Th) cell phenotypes induced by DCs treated with either BmA or ES-62. Moreover, the HIV-1 susceptibility of the Th-cell populations induced by BmA or ES-62 exposed DCs was unaffected for both CCR5- and CXCR4-using HIV-1 viruses. In conclusion, although BmA has the potential capacity to interfere with HIV-1 transmission or initial viral dissemination through preventing the virus from interacting with DCs, no differences in the Th-cell polarizing capacity of DCs exposed to BmA or ES-62 were observed. Neither antigenic source demonstrated beneficial or detrimental effects on the HIV-1 susceptibility of CD4+ Th-cells induced by exposed DCs. PMID:26808476

  11. The effect of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 7 allergen (Der p 7) on dendritic cells and its role in T cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jaw-Ji; Wang, Hsin-Chieh; Chiu, Chih-Liang; Liao, En-Chih

    2016-11-01

    The innate signaling pathway for Th2 immunity activated by inhaled allergens has not been well defined. Dendritic cells (DCs) can use their innate pattern-recognition Toll-like receptors and C-type lectin receptors to generate innate immunity and influence adaptive responses. The aim of this study was to investigate the glycoform of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 7 allergen (Der p 7) and its functional interaction with dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN). Both bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) derived from mice and monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to investigate the function of Der p 7. Dendritic cells derived from THP1 were used to investigate the glycol form of Der p 7. Der p 7 interacted with DC-SIGN as recognized by immunoprecipitation and glycoprotein staining, and its function was partially inhibited by deglycosylation. When BMDCs were cultured with Der p 7, the secretion of IL-6 and gene expressions of IL-6, OX40L and Jagged-1 were increased. IL4(+)/CD4(+) T cells could be induced by Der p 7, however IFN-γ(+)/CD4(+) T cells were down-regulated. The effects of Der p 7 on DCs were down-regulated in the presence of DC-SIGN or TLR4 antibodies and deglycosylation. rDer p 7 enhanced the DC differentiation of CD80 and CD86. The effects of Der p 7 pulsed-MDDCs on IL4(+)/CD4(+) and IFN-γ(+)/CD4(+) T-cell differentiation of human PBMCs were significantly increased after Der p 7 stimulation and decreased by DC-SIGN antibody inhibition. In conclusion, the Der p 7 is a glycoprotein and its function was partially through glycan binding. BMDCs could be activated by Der p 7 through TLR4 and DC-SIGN, and followed by the expression of OX40 ligand (OX40L) and Jagged-1, the expressions of IL4(+)/CD4(+) cells were enhanced. These findings identify a previously unrecognized function of Der p 7 and establish a link between innate TLR4/C

  12. A Systematic Approach for Computing Zero-Point Energy, Quantum Partition Function, and Tunneling Effect Based on Kleinert's Variational Perturbation Theory.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Gao, Jiali

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, we describe an automated integration-free path-integral (AIF-PI) method, based on Kleinert's variational perturbation (KP) theory, to treat internuclear quantum-statistical effects in molecular systems. We have developed an analytical method to obtain the centroid potential as a function of the variational parameter in the KP theory, which avoids numerical difficulties in path-integral Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics simulations, especially at the limit of zero-temperature. Consequently, the variational calculations using the KP theory can be efficiently carried out beyond the first order, i.e., the Giachetti-Tognetti-Feynman-Kleinert variational approach, for realistic chemical applications. By making use of the approximation of independent instantaneous normal modes (INM), the AIF-PI method can readily be applied to many-body systems. Previously, we have shown that in the INM approximation, the AIF-PI method is accurate for computing the quantum partition function of a water molecule (3 degrees of freedom) and the quantum correction factor for the collinear H(3) reaction rate (2 degrees of freedom). In this work, the accuracy and properties of the KP theory are further investigated by using the first three order perturbations on an asymmetric double-well potential, the bond vibrations of H(2), HF, and HCl represented by the Morse potential, and a proton-transfer barrier modeled by the Eckart potential. The zero-point energy, quantum partition function, and tunneling factor for these systems have been determined and are found to be in excellent agreement with the exact quantum results. Using our new analytical results at the zero-temperature limit, we show that the minimum value of the computed centroid potential in the KP theory is in excellent agreement with the ground state energy (zero-point energy) and the position of the centroid potential minimum is the expectation value of particle position in wave mechanics. The fast convergent property

  13. Modeling Electrical Transport through Nucleic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jianqing

    Nucleic acids play a vital role in many biological systems and activities. In recent years, engineers and scientists have been interested in studying their electrical properties. The motivation for these studies stems from the following facts: (1) the bases, which form the building blocks of nucleic acids, have unique ionization potentials. Further, nucleic acids are one of the few nanomaterials that can be reproducibly manufactured with a high degree of accuracy (though admittedly their placement at desired locations remains a challenge). As a result, designed strands with specific sequences may offer unique device properties; (2) electrical methods offer potential for sequencing nucleic acids based on a single molecule; (3) electrical methods for disease detection based on the current flowing through nucleic acids are beginning to be demonstrated. While experiments in the above mentioned areas is promising, a deeper understanding of the electrical current flow through the nucleic acids needs to be developed. The modeling of current flowing in these molecules is complex because: (1) they are based on atomic scale contacts between nucleic acids and metal, which cannot be reproducibly built; (2) the conductivity of nucleic acids is easily influenced by the environment, which is constantly changing; and (3) the nucleic acids by themselves are floppy. This thesis focuses on the modeling of electrical transport through nucleic acids that are connected to two metal electrodes at nanoscale. We first develop a decoherent transport model for the double-stranded helix based on the Landauer-Buttiker framework. This model is rationalized by comparison with an experiment that measured the conductance of four different DNA strands. The developed model is then used to study the: (1) potential to make barriers and wells for quantum transport using specifically engineered sequences; (2) change in the electrical properties of a specific DNA strand with and without methylation; (3

  14. A Hybrid Chalcone Combining the Trimethoxyphenyl and Isatinyl Groups Targets Multiple Oncogenic Proteins and Pathways in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lili; Zhang, Lijun; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors that can simultaneously inhibit multiple oncogenic proteins in essential pathways are promising therapeutic chemicals for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To combine the anticancer effects of combretastatins, chalcones and isatins, we synthesized a novel hybrid molecule 3',4',5'-trimethoxy-5-chloro-isatinylchalcone (3MCIC). 3MCIC inhibited proliferation of cultured HepG2 cells, causing rounding-up of the cells and massive vacuole accumulation in the cytoplasm. Paxillin and focal adhesion plaques were downregulated by 3MCIC. Surprisingly, unlike the microtubule (MT)-targeting agent CA-4 that inhibits tubulin polymerization, 3MCIC stabilized tubulin polymers both in living cells and in cell lysates. 3MCIC treatment reduced cyclin B1, CDK1, p-CDK1/2, and Rb, but increased p53 and p21. Moreover, 3MCIC caused GSK3β degradation by promoting GSK3β-Ser9 phosphorylation. Nevertheless, 3MCIC inhibited the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by downregulating β-catenin, c-Myc, cyclin D1 and E2F1. 3MCIC treatment not only activated the caspase-3-dependent apoptotic pathway, but also caused massive autophagy evidenced by rapid and drastic changes of LC3 and p62. 3MCIC also promoted cleavage and maturation of the lysosomal protease cathepsin D. Using ligand-affinity chromatography (LAC), target proteins captured onto the Sephacryl S1000-C12-3MCIC resins were isolated and analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS). Some of the LAC-MS identified targets, i.e., septin-2, vimentin, pan-cytokeratin, nucleolin, EF1α1/2, EBP1 (PA2G4), cyclin B1 and GSK3β, were further detected by Western blotting. Moreover, both septin-2 and HIF-1α decreased drastically in 3MCIC-treated HepG2 cells. Our data suggest that 3MCIC is a promising anticancer lead compound with novel targeting mechanisms, and also demonstrate the efficiency of LAC-MS based target identification in anticancer drug development. PMID:27525972

  15. Microglia Transcriptome Changes in a Model of Depressive Behavior after Immune Challenge.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Pena, Dianelys; Nixon, Scott E; O'Connor, Jason C; Southey, Bruce R; Lawson, Marcus A; McCusker, Robert H; Borras, Tania; Machuca, Debbie; Hernandez, Alvaro G; Dantzer, Robert; Kelley, Keith W; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    Depression symptoms following immune response to a challenge have been reported after the recovery from sickness. A RNA-Seq study of the dysregulation of the microglia transcriptome in a model of inflammation-associated depressive behavior was undertaken. The transcriptome of microglia from mice at day 7 after Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) challenge was compared to that from unchallenged Control mice and to the transcriptome from peripheral macrophages from the same mice. Among the 562 and 3,851 genes differentially expressed between BCG-challenged and Control mice in microglia and macrophages respectively, 353 genes overlapped between these cells types. Among the most differentially expressed genes in the microglia, serum amyloid A3 (Saa3) and cell adhesion molecule 3 (Cadm3) were over-expressed and coiled-coil domain containing 162 (Ccdc162) and titin-cap (Tcap) were under-expressed in BCG-challenged relative to Control. Many of the differentially expressed genes between BCG-challenged and Control mice were associated with neurological disorders encompassing depression symptoms. Across cell types, S100 calcium binding protein A9 (S100A9), interleukin 1 beta (Il1b) and kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (Kmo) were differentially expressed between challenged and control mice. Immune response, chemotaxis, and chemokine activity were among the functional categories enriched by the differentially expressed genes. Functional categories enriched among the 9,117 genes differentially expressed between cell types included leukocyte regulation and activation, chemokine and cytokine activities, MAP kinase activity, and apoptosis. More than 200 genes exhibited alternative splicing events between cell types including WNK lysine deficient protein kinase 1 (Wnk1) and microtubule-actin crosslinking factor 1(Macf1). Network visualization revealed the capability of microglia to exhibit transcriptome dysregulation in response to immune challenge still after resolution of sickness symptoms

  16. The effect of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 7 allergen (Der p 7) on dendritic cells and its role in T cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jaw-Ji; Wang, Hsin-Chieh; Chiu, Chih-Liang; Liao, En-Chih

    2016-11-01

    The innate signaling pathway for Th2 immunity activated by inhaled allergens has not been well defined. Dendritic cells (DCs) can use their innate pattern-recognition Toll-like receptors and C-type lectin receptors to generate innate immunity and influence adaptive responses. The aim of this study was to investigate the glycoform of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 7 allergen (Der p 7) and its functional interaction with dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN). Both bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) derived from mice and monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to investigate the function of Der p 7. Dendritic cells derived from THP1 were used to investigate the glycol form of Der p 7. Der p 7 interacted with DC-SIGN as recognized by immunoprecipitation and glycoprotein staining, and its function was partially inhibited by deglycosylation. When BMDCs were cultured with Der p 7, the secretion of IL-6 and gene expressions of IL-6, OX40L and Jagged-1 were increased. IL4(+)/CD4(+) T cells could be induced by Der p 7, however IFN-γ(+)/CD4(+) T cells were down-regulated. The effects of Der p 7 on DCs were down-regulated in the presence of DC-SIGN or TLR4 antibodies and deglycosylation. rDer p 7 enhanced the DC differentiation of CD80 and CD86. The effects of Der p 7 pulsed-MDDCs on IL4(+)/CD4(+) and IFN-γ(+)/CD4(+) T-cell differentiation of human PBMCs were significantly increased after Der p 7 stimulation and decreased by DC-SIGN antibody inhibition. In conclusion, the Der p 7 is a glycoprotein and its function was partially through glycan binding. BMDCs could be activated by Der p 7 through TLR4 and DC-SIGN, and followed by the expression of OX40 ligand (OX40L) and Jagged-1, the expressions of IL4(+)/CD4(+) cells were enhanced. These findings identify a previously unrecognized function of Der p 7 and establish a link between innate TLR4/C

  17. New Al-MOFs based on sulfonyldibenzoate ions: a rare example of intralayer porosity.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Nele; Reinsch, Helge; Inge, A Ken; Stock, Norbert

    2015-01-20

    A new sulfone-functionalized metal-organic framework [Al(OH)(SDBA)]·0.25DMF, denoted CAU-11, was synthesized using a V-shaped linker molecule 4,4'-sulfonyldibenzoic acid (H2SDBA). The crystal structure was solved from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data. Chains of trans corner-sharing AlO6 octahedra are interconnected by the carboxylate groups to form layers (ABAB stacking). Within the layers, hydrophobic lozenge-shaped pores with a diameter of 6.4 × 7.1 Å(2) are present inducing permanent porosity (aBET = 350 m(2) g(-1) and Vmicro = 0.17 cm(3) g(-1)). With the application of HT-methods (HT = high throughput), the isoreticular carboxylate functionalized compound [Al(OH)(H2DPSTC)]·0.5H2O (CAU-11-COOH) was synthesized using the linker molecule 3,3',4,4'-diphenylsulfonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (DPSDA), which hydrolyzes under the reaction conditions. Due to the additional noncoordinating carboxylic acid groups the pores are hydrophilic. Changing the molar ratio of Al(3+) to linker lead to the discovery of a second new compound [Al2(OH)2(DPSTC)(H2O)2]·0.5H2O (CAU-12). In CAU-12 the linker molecule is fully deprotonated which leads to different connectivity compared to the structure of CAU-11-COOH. Thermal activation of CAU-12 leads to dehydration and transformation of the structure to [Al2(OH)2(DPSTC)]·nH2O (CAU-12-dehy). Coordinated water molecules were removed, and the coordination site is replaced by the previously noncoordinating O atom of the adjacent carboxylate group. The SO2-groups point into the pores resulting in a highly hydrophobic three-dimensional framework. The compounds exhibit high thermal stability in air at least up to 420 °C. Synthesis of CAU-11 can be easily scaled up in very high yields (98%). PMID:25539449

  18. FISH applications for genomics and plant breeding strategies in tomato and other solanaceous crops.

    PubMed

    Szinay, D; Bai, Y; Visser, R; de Jong, H

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes the use of advanced fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technologies for genomics and breeding of tomato and related Solanum species. The first part deals with the major determinants of FISH technology: (1) spatial resolution, which depends on the diffraction limit of the microscope and the type of chromosome, chromatin or isolated DNA fibres as target for the hybridisation; (2) the detection sensitivity, which is limited by the sensitivity and dynamic range of the CCD camera and the quality of the microscope, and the amplification system of the weak signals from tiny probe molecules; (3) simultaneous detection of multiple probes labelled directly or indirectly with up to 5 different fluorophores, whether or not in different combinations and/or mixed at different ratios. The power and usability of such multicolour FISH is indispensable when large numbers of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) or other vectors with genomic DNA are available. Mapping of multiple BACs on chromosomes are powerful instruments confirming their assumed genetic position, whereas pooled BACs for a given chromosome arm will reveal the gaps between the BACs or derived contigs of their physical maps. Tandem and dispersed repeats, which are abundant in the genomes of most species, can be analysed in repeat bar coding FISH, showing the major blocks of repeats in heterochromatin and euchromatin areas. Repeat-rich areas of the chromosomes can also be demonstrated by hybridisation of probed Cot fractions of sheared genomic DNA; a powerful method to elucidate the heterochromatin domains for genomic studies. In addition, unlabelled Cot DNA, as blocking agent in BAC-FISH painting, suppresses repetitive sequences from the BACs to hybridise on the chromosomes. Cross-species BAC-FISH painting with labelled probes from tomato and potato BACs and hybridised on the chromosomes of related species, under appropriate conditions, is a powerful instrument to demonstrate chromosomal

  19. A Systematic Approach for Computing Zero-Point Energy, Quantum Partition Function, and Tunneling Effect Based on Kleinert’s Variational Perturbation Theory

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Gao, Jiali

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an automated integration-free path-integral (AIF-PI) method, based on Kleinert’s variational perturbation (KP) theory, to treat internuclear quantum-statistical effects in molecular systems. We have developed an analytical method to obtain the centroid potential as a function of the variational parameter in the KP theory, which avoids numerical difficulties in path-integral Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics simulations, especially at the limit of zero-temperature. Consequently, the variational calculations using the KP theory can be efficiently carried out beyond the first order, i.e., the Giachetti-Tognetti-Feynman-Kleinert variational approach, for realistic chemical applications. By making use of the approximation of independent instantaneous normal modes (INM), the AIF-PI method can readily be applied to many-body systems. Previously, we have shown that in the INM approximation, the AIF-PI method is accurate for computing the quantum partition function of a water molecule (3 degrees of freedom) and the quantum correction factor for the collinear H3 reaction rate (2 degrees of freedom). In this work, the accuracy and properties of the KP theory are further investigated by using the first three order perturbations on an asymmetric double-well potential, the bond vibrations of H2, HF, and HCl represented by the Morse potential, and a proton-transfer barrier modeled by the Eckart potential. The zero-point energy, quantum partition function, and tunneling factor for these systems have been determined and are found to be in excellent agreement with the exact quantum results. Using our new analytical results at the zero-temperature limit, we show that the minimum value of the computed centroid potential in the KP theory is in excellent agreement with the ground state energy (zero-point energy) and the position of the centroid potential minimum is the expectation value of particle position in wave mechanics. The fast convergent property of

  20. Brugia malayi Antigen (BmA) Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection but Neither BmA nor ES-62 Alter HIV-1 Infectivity of DC Induced CD4+ Th-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mouser, Emily E. I. M.; Pollakis, Georgios; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Harnett, William

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of HIV-1 disease is the association of heightened CD4+ T-cell activation with HIV-1 replication. Parasitic helminths including filarial nematodes have evolved numerous and complex mechanisms to skew, dampen and evade human immune responses suggesting that HIV-1 infection may be modulated in co-infected individuals. Here we studied the effects of two filarial nematode products, adult worm antigen from Brugia malayi (BmA) and excretory-secretory product 62 (ES-62) from Acanthocheilonema viteae on HIV-1 infection in vitro. Neither BmA nor ES-62 influenced HIV-1 replication in CD4+ enriched T-cells, with either a CCR5- or CXCR4-using virus. BmA, but not ES-62, had the capacity to bind the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) thereby inhibiting HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ enriched T-cells. As for their effect on DCs, neither BmA nor ES-62 could enhance or inhibit DC maturation as determined by CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR expression, or the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α. As expected, due to the unaltered DC phenotype, no differences were found in CD4+ T helper (Th) cell phenotypes induced by DCs treated with either BmA or ES-62. Moreover, the HIV-1 susceptibility of the Th-cell populations induced by BmA or ES-62 exposed DCs was unaffected for both CCR5- and CXCR4-using HIV-1 viruses. In conclusion, although BmA has the potential capacity to interfere with HIV-1 transmission or initial viral dissemination through preventing the virus from interacting with DCs, no differences in the Th-cell polarizing capacity of DCs exposed to BmA or ES-62 were observed. Neither antigenic source demonstrated beneficial or detrimental effects on the HIV-1 susceptibility of CD4+ Th-cells induced by exposed DCs. PMID:26808476

  1. Resveratrol Induces Hepatic Mitochondrial Biogenesis Through the Sequential Activation of Nitric Oxide and Carbon Monoxide Production

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seul-Ki; Joe, Yeonsoo; Zheng, Min; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Yu, Jae-Kyoung; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Chang, Ki Churl; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Han, Jin; Ryter, Stefan W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Nitric oxide (NO) can induce mitochondrial biogenesis in cultured cells, through increased guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP), and activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). We sought to determine the role of NO, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and its reaction product (carbon monoxide [CO]) in the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis by the natural antioxidant resveratrol. Results: S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), an NO donor, induced mitochondrial biogenesis in HepG2 hepatoma cells, and in vivo, through stimulation of PGC-1α. NO-induced mitochondrial biogenesis required cGMP, and was mimicked by the cGMP analogue (8-bromoguanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate [8-Br-cGMP]). Activation of mitochondrial biogenesis by SNAP required HO-1, as it could be reversed by genetic interference of HO-1; and by treatment with the HO inhibitor tin-protoporphyrin-IX (SnPP) in vitro and in vivo. Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP)-IX, an HO-1 inducing agent, stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis in HepG2 cells, which could be reversed by the CO scavenger hemoglobin. Application of CO, using the CO-releasing molecule-3 (CORM-3), stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis in HepG2 cells, in a cGMP-dependent manner. Both CoPP and CORM-3-induced mitochondrial biogenesis required NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) activation and phosphorylation of Akt. The natural antioxidant resveratrol induced mitochondrial biogenesis in HepG2 cells, in a manner dependent on NO biosynthesis, cGMP synthesis, Nrf2-dependent HO-1 activation, and endogenous CO production. Furthermore, resveratrol preserved mitochondrial biogenesis during lipopolysaccharides-induced hepatic inflammation in vivo. Innovation and Conclusions: The complex interplay between endogenous NO and CO production may underlie the mechanism by which natural antioxidants induce mitochondrial biogenesis. Strategies aimed at improving mitochondrial biogenesis may be used as therapeutics

  2. Ab-initio study of transition-metal compounds through a consistent, linear-response LDA+U approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cococcioni, M.

    2007-12-01

    Hubbard U-corrected LDA or GGA have proven very effective in describing several systems characterized by strongly localized electronic states for which these standard approximations to DFT fail. I introduce here our scheme to evaluate the effective electronic interaction of the "+U" functional in a fully consistent way. This approach is based on the linear response of the considered system to a potential shift acting on the localized orbitals of the correlated sites. Using the occupations of these orbitals as the relevant electronic degrees of freedom we compute the needed on-site electronic coupling as the difference between the inverse of the bare and fully interacting response matrices. The computed U thus corresponds to the effective kernel of the electron-electron on-site interaction entering the second quantization expression of the "+U" energy functional. In this way the strength of the "+U" correction is consistently evaluated from the same DFT scheme we aim to correct and the LDA+U is transformed in a completely ab-initio method with no need for any semi-empirical or apriori evaluation of the effective coupling. The results are also largely independent on the choice of the localized orbitals: the same occupation matrix that enters the expression of the "+U" correction is consistently used to compute the effective interaction parameter. A further development in this approach also allowed us to obtain the the effective U "auto-consistently" from a correlated (LDA+U) ground state. With this approach we successfully studied the structural, electronic, chemical and electrochemical properties of several transition-metal compounds. Examples of applications will include minerals in the Earth's interior [1], cathode materials for next-generation lithium batteries [2] and catalytic reactions on molecules [3,4]. [1] M. Cococcioni and S. de Gironcoli, PRB (2005). [2] F. Zhou, M. Cococcioni, A. C. Marianetti, D. Morgan and G. Ceder, PRB (2004). [3] H. J. Kulik, M

  3. Microglia Transcriptome Changes in a Model of Depressive Behavior after Immune Challenge.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Pena, Dianelys; Nixon, Scott E; O'Connor, Jason C; Southey, Bruce R; Lawson, Marcus A; McCusker, Robert H; Borras, Tania; Machuca, Debbie; Hernandez, Alvaro G; Dantzer, Robert; Kelley, Keith W; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    Depression symptoms following immune response to a challenge have been reported after the recovery from sickness. A RNA-Seq study of the dysregulation of the microglia transcriptome in a model of inflammation-associated depressive behavior was undertaken. The transcriptome of microglia from mice at day 7 after Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) challenge was compared to that from unchallenged Control mice and to the transcriptome from peripheral macrophages from the same mice. Among the 562 and 3,851 genes differentially expressed between BCG-challenged and Control mice in microglia and macrophages respectively, 353 genes overlapped between these cells types. Among the most differentially expressed genes in the microglia, serum amyloid A3 (Saa3) and cell adhesion molecule 3 (Cadm3) were over-expressed and coiled-coil domain containing 162 (Ccdc162) and titin-cap (Tcap) were under-expressed in BCG-challenged relative to Control. Many of the differentially expressed genes between BCG-challenged and Control mice were associated with neurological disorders encompassing depression symptoms. Across cell types, S100 calcium binding protein A9 (S100A9), interleukin 1 beta (Il1b) and kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (Kmo) were differentially expressed between challenged and control mice. Immune response, chemotaxis, and chemokine activity were among the functional categories enriched by the differentially expressed genes. Functional categories enriched among the 9,117 genes differentially expressed between cell types included leukocyte regulation and activation, chemokine and cytokine activities, MAP kinase activity, and apoptosis. More than 200 genes exhibited alternative splicing events between cell types including WNK lysine deficient protein kinase 1 (Wnk1) and microtubule-actin crosslinking factor 1(Macf1). Network visualization revealed the capability of microglia to exhibit transcriptome dysregulation in response to immune challenge still after resolution of sickness symptoms

  4. Analyses at High Spatial Resolution of Organic Molecules in Extraterrestrial Samples: Two-Step Laser Mass Spectrometry: Search for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Antarctic Meteorite and Micrometeorite Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zare, Richard N.

    1998-01-01

    Perhaps the best way to summarize the past three-year grant period is to cite the publications and present a brief synopsis of each: 1. "Indigenous Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Molecules in Circumstellar Graphite Grains." Bulk C-12/C-13 isotope ratios observed in some graphite grains extracted from primitive meteorites point strongly to a circumstellar origin. By applying our technique of microprobe two-step laser desorption laser ionization mass spectrometry ((mu)L(sup 2)MS) to individual circumstellar graphite grains we have measured the C-12/C-13 isotope ratio of various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) found in these grains. 2. "Deuterium Enrichments in Cluster IDPS," Large enrichments in the D/H isotope ratios in IDPs likely arise from the preservation of presolar molecules. 3. "Evidence for thermalization of surface-disorder molecules at heating rates of 10(exp 8) K/s". A careful study of the ((mu)L(sup 2)MS) of aniline-d(sub 7) from a single-crystal surface (0001) of sapphire (al2O3) shows that all measured properties are consistent with a thermal mechanism for desorption. 4. "Search for past life on Mars; possible relic biogenic activity in Martian meteorite ALH 84001. The authors examined the Martian meteorite ALH 84001 and found several lines of evidence compatible with existence of past primitive (single-cell) life on early Mars. 5. "Microprobe two-step laser mass spectrometry as an analytical tool for meteorite samples". THis paper presents a comprehensive review of (mu)L(sup 2)MS and how this technique can be applied to meteoritic samples. 6. "Indigenous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in circumstellar graphite grains from primitive meteorites". The C-12/C-13 isotope ratios were measured for PAHs in a total of 89 spherical graphite grains. 7. "Observation of indigenous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in "Giant" carbonaceous antarctic micrometeorites." The (mu)L(sup 2)MS method was used to establish the nature and distribution of PAHs in

  5. The molecular mechanism of fullerene-inhibited aggregation of Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Luogang; Luo, Yin; Lin, Dongdong; Xi, Wenhui; Yang, Xinju; Wei, Guanghong

    2014-07-01

    Amyloid deposits are implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The inhibition of β-sheet formation has been considered as the primary therapeutic strategy for AD. Increasing data show that nanoparticles can retard or promote the fibrillation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides depending on the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. In this study, our replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations show that fullerene nanoparticle - C60 (with a fullerene : peptide molar ratio greater than 1 : 8) can dramatically prevent β-sheet formation of Aβ(16-22) peptides. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments further confirm the inhibitory effect of C60 on Aβ(16-22) fibrillation, in support of our REMD simulations. An important finding from our REMD simulations is that fullerene C180, albeit with the same number of carbon atoms as three C60 molecules (3C60) and smaller surface area than 3C60, displays an unexpected stronger inhibitory effect on the β-sheet formation of Aβ(16-22) peptides. A detailed analysis of the fullerene-peptide interaction reveals that the stronger inhibition of β-sheet formation by C180 results from the strong hydrophobic and aromatic-stacking interactions of the fullerene hexagonal rings with the Phe rings relative to the pentagonal rings. The strong interactions between the fullerene nanoparticles and Aβ(16-22) peptides significantly weaken the peptide-peptide interaction that is important for β-sheet formation, thus retarding Aβ(16-22) fibrillation. Overall, our studies reveal the significant role of fullerene hexagonal rings in the inhibition of Aβ(16-22) fibrillation and provide novel insight into the development of drug candidates against Alzheimer's disease.Amyloid deposits are implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The inhibition of

  6. One-electron oxidation and reduction of glycosaminoglycan chloramides: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Sibanda, S; Parsons, B J; Houee-Levin, C; Marignier, J-L; Paterson, A W J; Heyes, D J

    2013-10-01

    Hypochlorous acid and its acid-base counterpart, hypochlorite ions, produced under inflammatory conditions, may produce chloramides of glycosaminoglycans, these being significant components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). This may occur through the binding of myeloperoxidase directly to the glycosaminoglycans. The N-Cl group in the chloramides is a potential selective target for both reducing and oxidizing radicals, leading possibly to more efficient and damaging fragmentation of these biopolymers relative to the parent glycosaminoglycans. In this study, the fast reaction techniques of pulse radiolysis and nanosecond laser flash photolysis have been used to generate both oxidizing and reducing radicals to react with the chloramides of hyaluronan (HACl) and heparin (HepCl). The strong reducing formate radicals and hydrated electrons were found to react rapidly with both HACl and HepCl with rate constants of 1-1.7 × 10(8) and 0.7-1.2 × 10(8)M(-1)s(-1) for formate radicals and 2.2 × 10(9) and 7.2 × 10(8)M(-1)s(-1) for hydrated electrons, respectively. The spectral characteristics of the products of these reactions were identical and were consistent with initial attack at the N-Cl groups, followed by elimination of chloride ions to produce nitrogen-centered radicals, which rearrange subsequently and rapidly to produce C-2 radicals on the glucosamine moiety, supporting an earlier EPR study by M.D. Rees et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc.125: 13719-13733; 2003). The oxidizing hydroxyl radicals also reacted rapidly with HACl and HepCl with rate constants of 2.2 × 10(8) and 1.6 × 10(8)M(-1)s(-1), with no evidence from these data for any degree of selective attack on the N-Cl group relative to the N-H groups and other sites of attack. The carbonate anion radicals were much slower with HACl and HepCl than hydroxyl radicals (1.0 × 10(5) and 8.0 × 10(4)M(-1)s(-1), respectively) but significantly faster than with the parent molecules (3.5 × 10(4) and 5.0 × 10(4)M(-1)s(-1

  7. Controlling adsorbate interactions for advanced chemical patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra Garcia, Hector M.

    -situ esterification results in the creation of subtle chemical and structural defects that promote molecular exchange reactions to go to completion. The complementary hydrolysis reaction can be employed to quench the reacted monolayer, significantly hindering further displacement. The generality of reversible lability was tested by applying the in-situ esterification reaction to the structurally distinct carboxyl-functionalized molecule 3-mercapto-1-adamantane-carboxylic acid. In addition to the studies of manipulating the interactions in self-assembled monolayers, materials with tunable optical and electronic properties were fabricated using atomic clusters as building blocks. It was shown that materials assembled from the same cluster motif, in this case As3-7 , can result in materials with band gaps that vary predictably between 1.09 to 2.08 eV. The size and highest occupied molecular orbital of the alkali metal counter-cation used in the assembly was shown to affect the band gap of the cluster-assembled solids. Furthermore, the dimensionality of the cluster-cluster interactions played a crucial role in determining the resulting properties. These results demonstrate how complex surface assemblies, or novel solid materials, can be fabricated by manipulating the interactions between the individual components within the assemblies, paving the way for the fabrication of next-generation devices and materials.

  8. EDITORIAL: The best of both worlds The best of both worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-05-01

    This year marks 80 years since Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman was awarded the Nobel Prize for his investigations on the molecular scattering of light [1], work inspired during a trip to Europe by his first glimpse of the 'wonderful blue opalescence of the Mediterranean Sea' [2]. These studies led to the discovery of Raman scattering, now widely exploited for the unique spectral Raman 'fingerprint' associated with substances that facilitate their identification. However, one of the drawbacks of Raman spectroscopy has always been the low Raman scattering cross section, typically more than a 1000 times weaker than the Rayleigh scattering cross section, resulting in an extremely weak signal. Progress in nanotechnology revealed ways of enhancing Raman signals using metal nanoparticles, resulting in optical detection and spectroscopy at the level of a single molecule [3]. Surface plasmon resonances in metal nanoparticles have demonstrated great potential in a range of applications, including data storage, light generation, nonlinear optics, microscopy and biophotonics, and this has motivated many investigations aimed at optimising plasmonic properties. Researchers in Japan and China demonstrated how the self-assembly of gold nanoparticles can be used to tune plasmonic responses [4], and more recently researchers in America have demonstrated how nanocrescent structures can be tuned to respond in the infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum, lending these nanostructures to applications in cellular imaging in vivo [5]. At the time that Nanotechnology was launched 20 years ago, nanoscale research had been galvanized by developments in scanning probe techniques that pushed microscopic resolutions to unprecedented scales, enabling people to `see' atoms for the first time. The intrinsic awe of such images and the potency of these investigative tools naturally drove further research into refining techniques in scanning, tunnelling and atomic force microscopy [6, 7]. However

  9. 16th international conference on the physics of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Stephan; Stöhlker, Thomas; Surzhykov, Andrey

    2013-09-01

    physicists. The conference was held in the Physics Lecture Hall at the New Campus of Heidelberg University. On the evening of 2 September, the day before the opening of HCI 2012, all participants were welcomed warmly at the foyer of this lecture hall, whose decorative glass front provides a view upon artificial ponds and water lilies at this time of the year. For many colleagues and delegates, this evening offered a hearty re-encounter with each other, along with wine and other beverages. The conference then opened on the morning of 3 September, and an exciting program was organized by the local committee with the help of the International Advisory Board, including 5 invited talks, 10 progress reports as well as 26 selected talks. In addition, more than 230 posters were presented in two sessions, with beer and brezels aside. On Tuesday evening, an exciting public lecture on Heavy ions in therapy and space was given by Marco Durante from the GSI Helmholtz Center and Technical University in Darmstadt. Moreover, many of the participants joined the guided tour through the old city of Heidelberg with its famous (ruins of the) castle, and several the Solar Boat Trip. On Thursday night, we all enjoyed the conference dinner with home-brewed beer and regional specialties at the 'Kulturbrauerei' in the historic center of Heidelberg. Finally, scientific tours were also organized to GSI Darmstadt and the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg on the last day of the conference, and attracted much consideration. We here present the proceedings of this conference that contain a total of 104 contributions, including invited papers, progress reports and contributed papers. As previously, these papers are grouped into five categories. (1) Fundamental aspects, structure and spectroscopy. (2) Collisions with electrons, ions, atoms and molecules. (3) Interactions with clusters, surfaces and solids. (4) Interactions with photons, plasmas and strong field processes. (5) Production

  10. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Chikashi

    2009-07-01

    the morning of 1 September. In the evening we invited the foreign delegates to the Tokyo-EBIT laboratory and entertained them with sushi and YEBISU beer at the lab (YEBISU is a popular brand of beer in Japan and also the nickname of the Tokyo-EBIT project, Young Electron Beam Ion Source Unit). Cans of YEBISU beer also helped us to make the poster sessions lively, on the evenings of 2 and 4 September. The best poster of each session was selected by the vote of International Advisory Board, and two young scientists were awarded the prizes. On the afternoon of 3 September, we took an excursion to Lake Yamanaka near Mount Fuji for a conference outing. The conference dinner was then held at a hotel alongside Lake Yamanaka from where we really enjoyed the view of Mount Fuji. In the summer it is quite rare to have clear weather, but a teru-teru bozu (a Japanese paper doll with a wish for good weather) placed on the top page of the conference WEB site brought us clear skies for the dinner. About 200 scientists from 22 countries registered for the HCI2008. The number of invited talks was 18 and the contributed papers 206. These proceedings contain 9 invited talks and 107 contributed articles. Following the previous conference, they are grouped into the five categories of: (1) Fundamental aspects, structure and spectroscopy; (2) Collisions with electrons, ions, atoms and molecules; (3) Interactions with clusters, surfaces and solids; (4) Interactions with photons, plasmas and strong field processes, and (5) Production, experimental developments and applications. We are happy that the conference was completely successful, and this success owes much to the sponsors. We acknowledge the support from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), The International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), Matsuo Foundation, Iwatani Naoji Foundation, CASIO Science Promotion Foundation, and The Society for Atomic Collision Research. The next International Conference on the

  11. Optical Detection of Anomalous Nitrogen in Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-12-01

    studies will provide crucial information about the detailed composition of a much larger number of comets than hitherto possible and hence, more information about the primordial matter from which the solar system formed. A better understanding of the origins of the cometary material (in particular the HCN and CN molecules [3]) and the connection with heavier organic molecules is highly desirable. This is especially so in view of the probable rôle of comets in bringing to the young Earth materials essential for the subsequent formation of life on our planet . PR Photo 28a/03 : Comet LINEAR (C/2000 WM1) - direct image and UVES slit position. PR Photo 28b/03 : Part of the UVES spectrum of Comet LINEAR (C/2000 WM1) with CN-band. PR Photo 28c/03 : Identification of nitrogen-15 in the spectrum. Cometary material Knowledge of the abundance of the stable isotopes [2] of the light elements in different solar system objects provides critical clues to the origin and early evolution of these objects and of the system as a whole. In order to gain the best possible insight into the origins and formation of the niche in which we live, it is therefore important to determine such isotopic abundance ratios in as many members of the solar family as possible. This is particularly true for comets, believed to be carriers of well-preserved specimens of the pristine material from which the solar system was made, some 4,600 million years ago. However, the detailed study of cometary material is a difficult task. Measurements of isotopic ratios is an especially daunting undertaking, mainly because of the extreme weakness of the spectral signatures (emissions) of the less abundant species like carbon-13, nitrogen-15, etc.. Measurements of microwave emission from those atoms suffer from additional, inherent uncertainties connected to the much stronger emission of the more abundant species. Measurements in the optical spectral region thus take on particular importance in this context. However, it is