Science.gov

Sample records for muckle-wells syndrome mws

  1. Somatic NLRP3 mosaicism in Muckle-Wells syndrome. A genetic mechanism shared by different phenotypes of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kenji; Gonzalez-Roca, Eva; Souto, Alejandro; Kawai, Toshinao; Umebayashi, Hiroaki; Campistol, Josep María; Cañellas, Jeronima; Takei, Syuji; Kobayashi, Norimoto; Callejas-Rubio, Jose Luis; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Ruiz-Ortiz, Estíbaliz; Rius, Fina; Anton, Jordi; Iglesias, Estibaliz; Jimenez-Treviño, Santiago; Vargas, Carmen; Fernandez-Martin, Julian; Calvo, Inmaculada; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Mendez, María; Dordal, María Teresa; Basagaña, Maria; Bujan, Segundo; Yashiro, Masato; Kubota, Tetsuo; Koike, Ryuji; Akuta, Naoko; Shimoyama, Kumiko; Iwata, Naomi; Saito, Megumu K; Ohara, Osamu; Kambe, Naotomo; Yasumi, Takahiro; Izawa, Kazushi; Kawai, Tomoki; Heike, Toshio; Yagüe, Jordi; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Aróstegui, Juan I

    2015-03-01

    : Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and chronic, infantile, neurological, cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome are dominantly inherited autoinflammatory diseases associated to gain-of-function NLRP3 mutations and included in the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). A variable degree of somatic NLRP3 mosaicism has been detected in ≈35% of patients with CINCA. However, no data are currently available regarding the relevance of this mechanism in other CAPS phenotypes. To evaluate somatic NLRP3 mosaicism as the disease-causing mechanism in patients with clinical CAPS phenotypes other than CINCA and NLRP3 mutation-negative. NLRP3 analyses were performed by Sanger sequencing and by massively parallel sequencing. Apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC)-dependent nuclear factor kappa-light chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) activation and transfection-induced THP-1 cell death assays determined the functional consequences of the detected variants. A variable degree (5.5-34.9%) of somatic NLRP3 mosaicism was detected in 12.5% of enrolled patients, all of them with a MWS phenotype. Six different missense variants, three novel (p.D303A, p.K355T and p.L411F), were identified. Bioinformatics and functional analyses confirmed that they were disease-causing, gain-of-function NLRP3 mutations. All patients treated with anti-interleukin1 drugs showed long-lasting positive responses. We herein show somatic NLRP3 mosaicism underlying MWS, probably representing a shared genetic mechanism in CAPS not restricted to CINCA syndrome. The data here described allowed definitive diagnoses of these patients, which had serious implications for gaining access to anti-interleukin 1 treatments under legal indication and for genetic counselling. The detection of somatic mosaicism is difficult when using conventional methods. Potential candidates should benefit from the use of modern genetic tools. Published by the

  2. Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes: otolaryngologic and audiologic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Neda; Brewer, Carmen C; Zalewski, Christopher; King, Kelly A; Butman, John A; Plass, Nicole; Henderson, Cailin; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Kim, H Jeffrey

    2011-08-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) represent a spectrum of CIAS1 gene-mediated autoinflammatory diseases characterized by recurrent systemic inflammation. The clinical spectrum of CAPS varies from mild to severe and includes the syndromes historically described as familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID). This article presents the largest cohort of patients with CAPS. The objective is to describe the pathogenesis, otolaryngologic, and audiologic manifestations of CAPS. Prospective (2003-2009). National Institutes of Health. Fifty-seven patients with a diagnosis of CAPS were identified (31 NOMID, 11 NOMID/MWS, 9 MWS, and 6 FCAS). Comprehensive data regarding clinical manifestations, audiologic phenotype, and fluid attenuation inversion recovery MRI (FLAIR-MRI) of the brain and inner ear were obtained. Complete audiologic data obtained on 70% of ears revealed conductive hearing loss in 4 (11%) NOMID ears and mixed hearing loss in 5 (13%) NOMID and 2 (14%) NOMID/MWS ears. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), worse in higher frequencies, was the most common type of hearing loss and was present in 23 (61%) NOMID, 10 (71%) NOMID/MWS, and 4 (33%) MWS ears. All of the patients with FCAS had normal hearing except 2, who had SNHL from 4 to 8 kHz. On FLAIR-MRI sequence, cochlear enhancement was noted in 26 of 29 (90%) NOMID, 6 of 11 (55%) NOMID/MWS, 3 of 9 (33%) MWS, and 1 of 6 (17%) FCAS patients and was significantly associated with the presence of hearing loss. Maxillary sinus hypoplasia and mucosal thickening were found in 39% and 86% of the cohort, respectively. CIAS1 pathway–mediated CAPS is associated with unregulated autoinflammation mediated by interleukin-1 in the cochlea and hearing loss. Timely diagnosis is crucial to initiate early treatment with interleukin-1 receptor antagonists.

  3. Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes: Otolaryngologic and Audiologic Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Neda; Brewer, Carmen C.; Zalewski, Christopher; King, Kelly A.; Butman, John A.; Plass, Nicole; Henderson, Cailin; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Kim, H. Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Objective Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) represent a spectrum of CIAS1 gene-mediated autoinflammatory diseases characterized by recurrent systemic inflammation. The clinical spectrum of CAPS varies from mild to severe and includes the syndromes historically described as familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID). This article presents the largest cohort of patients with CAPS. The objective is to describe the pathogenesis, otolaryngologic, and audiologic manifestations of CAPS. Study Design Prospective (2003–2009). Setting National Institutes of Health. Subjects and Methods Fifty-seven patients with a diagnosis of CAPS were identified (31 NOMID, 11 NOMID/MWS, 9 MWS, and 6 FCAS). Comprehensive data regarding clinical manifestations, audiologic phenotype, and fluid attenuation inversion recovery MRI (FLAIR-MRI) of the brain and inner ear were obtained. Results Complete audiologic data obtained on 70% of ears revealed conductive hearing loss in 4 (11%) NOMID ears and mixed hearing loss in 5 (13%) NOMID and 2 (14%) NOMID/MWS ears. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), worse in higher frequencies, was the most common type of hearing loss and was present in 23 (61%) NOMID, 10 (71%) NOMID/MWS, and 4 (33%) MWS ears. All of the patients with FCAS had normal hearing except 2, who had SNHL from 4 to 8 kHz. On FLAIR-MRI sequence, cochlear enhancement was noted in 26 of 29 (90%) NOMID, 6 of 11 (55%) NOMID/MWS, 3 of 9 (33%) MWS, and 1 of 6 (17%) FCAS patients and was significantly associated with the presence of hearing loss. Maxillary sinus hypoplasia and mucosal thickening were found in 39% and 86% of the cohort, respectively. Conclusion CIAS1 pathway–mediated CAPS is associated with unregulated autoinflammation mediated by interleukin-1 in the cochlea and hearing loss. Timely diagnosis is crucial to initiate early treatment with interleukin-1 receptor antagonists

  4. Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome in Australian children and adults: Epidemiological, clinical and treatment characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mehr, Sam; Allen, Roger; Boros, Christina; Adib, Navid; Kakakios, Alyson; Turner, Paul J; Rogers, Maureen; Zurynski, Yvonne; Singh-Grewal, Davinder

    2016-09-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) encapsulate three auto-inflammatory conditions, ranging in severity from mild (familial cold auto-inflammatory syndrome: FCAS), moderate (Muckle-Wells syndrome: MWS) and severe (neonatal onset multi-inflammatory disorder: NOMID). We aimed to describe the epidemiology, clinical features and outcomes of Australian children and adults with CAPS. Patients were identified and clinical data collected through a questionnaire sent during 2012-2013 to clinicians reporting to the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit and subscribing to the Australasian Societies for Allergy/Immunology, Rheumatology and Dermatology. Eighteen cases of CAPS were identified (8 NOMID; 8 MWS, 2 FCAS); 12 in children <18 years of age. The estimated population prevalence of CAPS was 1 per million persons. Diagnostic delay was frequent, particularly in those with milder phenotypes (median diagnostic delay in MWS/FCAS 20.6 years compared with NOMID 2.1 years; P = 0.04). Common presenting features included urticaria (100%), periodic fever (78%), arthralgia (72%) and sensorineural hearing loss (61%). Almost all (90%) MWS patients had a family member similarly affected compared with none in the NOMID group (P = 0.004). A significant proportion of patients on anti-interleukin (IL)-1 therapy (n = 13) no longer had systemic inflammation. Only 50% with sensorineural hearing loss had hearing restored on anti-IL-1 therapy. Although CAPS are rare, patients often endured prolonged periods of systemic inflammation. This is despite almost all MWS patients having family members with similar symptoms and children with NOMID presenting with chronic infantile urticaria associated with multi-system inflammation. Hearing loss in NOMID/MWS was frequent, and reversible in only 50% of cases. © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  5. Anakinra use during pregnancy in patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS).

    PubMed

    Chang, Zenas; Spong, Catherine Y; Jesus, Adriana A; Davis, Michael A; Plass, Nicole; Stone, Deborah L; Chapelle, Dawn; Hoffmann, Patrycja; Kastner, Daniel L; Barron, Karyl; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela T; Stratton, Pamela

    2014-11-01

    Objective: To describe the pregnancy course and outcome, and use of anakinra, a recombinant selective IL-1 receptor blocker, during pregnancy in patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), including familial cold auto-inflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) and neonatal onset multi-system inflammatory disease (NOMID). Methods: Women currently enrolled in natural history protocols (NCT00059748, and/or NCT00069329 under IND) who have been pregnant were included. Subjects underwent a structured, standardized interview with regards to maternal health, pregnancy and fetal outcomes. Medical records were reviewed. Results: Nine women (four with FCAS, one with MWS and four with NOMID) reported one to four pregnancies, each resulting in a total of fifteen FCAS, three MWS, and six NOMID pregnancies. Six births from FCAS mothers and three births from NOMID mothers occurred while patients were receiving anakinra. If a woman became pregnant while taking anakinra, the pre-pregnancy anakinra dose was continued. Anakinra dose was increased during one twin pregnancy. No preterm births or serious complications of pregnancy were observed. One fetus of the twin pregnancy had renal agenesis and suffered fetal demise. Genetic testing showed the deceased twin carried the same NLRP3 c.785T>C, p.V262A mutation as the mother. The other twin is healthy and mutation negative. Conclusions: Anakinra was continued during pregnancy in women with CAPS and provided significant, persistent CAPS symptom relief while continuing to prevent the long-term sequelae of CAPS. Anakinra was well tolerated. Although a causal relation between anakinra and renal agenesis seems unlikely, further safety data are needed.

  6. Long term management of patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS): focus on rilonacept (IL-1 Trap).

    PubMed

    Church, Leigh D; Savic, Sinisa; McDermott, Michael F

    2008-12-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) are a group of inherited inflammatory disorders consisting of familial cold-induced autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID; also known as chronic infantile neurologic, cutaneous, articular [CINCA] syndrome). These rare disorders are associated with heterozygous mutations in the NLRP3 (CIAS1) gene, which encodes the protein NALP3 or cryopyrin, and inflammation driven by excessive production of the cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). Amyloidosis is a serious complication with 25% of MWS patients developing amyloidosis, with occasional fatal consequences, whilst up to 20% of CINCA/NOMID patients die from various complications, before reaching the early adulthood. In some CINCA/NOMID adult survivors amyloidosis can also occur. Prior to the discovery of the CIAS1 gene mutations and the advent of IL-1 targeted therapy, treatment was aimed at suppressing inflammation, with limited success. The selective blockade of IL-1beta, with anakinra (IL-1 receptor antagonist), not only provided supportive evidence for the role of IL-1beta in CAPS, but also demonstrated the efficacy of targeting IL-1beta for treatment of these conditions. In February, 2008, 'Orphan Drug' approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for rilonacept (IL-1 Trap/Arcalyst(), Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc) was given for the treatment of two CAPS disorders, FCAS and MWS in adults and children 12 years and older, making rilonacept the first therapy approved for the treatment of CAPS.

  7. Long term management of patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS): focus on rilonacept (IL-1 Trap)

    PubMed Central

    Church, Leigh D; Savic, Sinisa; McDermott, Michael F

    2008-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) are a group of inherited inflammatory disorders consisting of familial cold-induced autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID; also known as chronic infantile neurologic, cutaneous, articular [CINCA] syndrome). These rare disorders are associated with heterozygous mutations in the NLRP3 (CIAS1) gene, which encodes the protein NALP3 or cryopyrin, and inflammation driven by excessive production of the cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Amyloidosis is a serious complication with 25% of MWS patients developing amyloidosis, with occasional fatal consequences, whilst up to 20% of CINCA/NOMID patients die from various complications, before reaching the early adulthood. In some CINCA/NOMID adult survivors amyloidosis can also occur. Prior to the discovery of the CIAS1 gene mutations and the advent of IL-1 targeted therapy, treatment was aimed at suppressing inflammation, with limited success. The selective blockade of IL-1β, with anakinra (IL-1 receptor antagonist), not only provided supportive evidence for the role of IL-1β in CAPS, but also demonstrated the efficacy of targeting IL-1β for treatment of these conditions. In February, 2008, ‘Orphan Drug’ approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for rilonacept (IL-1 Trap/Arcalyst™, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc) was given for the treatment of two CAPS disorders, FCAS and MWS in adults and children 12 years and older, making rilonacept the first therapy approved for the treatment of CAPS. PMID:19707454

  8. Anakinra Use During Pregnancy in Patients with Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes (CAPS)

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Zenas; Spong, Catherine; Jesus, Adriana A.; Davis, Michael; Plass, Nicole; Stone, Deborah L.; Chapelle, Dawn; Hoffmann, Patrycja; Kastner, Daniel L.; Barron, Karyl; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela T.; Stratton, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the pregnancy course and outcome, and use of anakinra, a recombinant selective IL-1 receptor blocker, during pregnancy in patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), including familial cold auto-inflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) and neonatal onset multi-system inflammatory disease (NOMID). Methods Women currently enrolled in natural history protocols (NCT00059748, and/or NCT00069329 under IND) who have been pregnant were included. Subjects underwent a structured, standardized interview with regards to maternal health, pregnancy and fetal outcomes. Medical records were reviewed. Results Nine women (four with FCAS, one with MWS and four with NOMID) reported one to four pregnancies, each resulting in a total of fifteen FCAS, three MWS, and six NOMID pregnancies. Six births from FCAS mothers and three births from NOMID mothers occurred while patients were receiving anakinra. If a woman became pregnant while taking anakinra, the pre-pregnancy anakinra dose was continued. Anakinra dose was increased during one twin pregnancy. No preterm births or serious complications of pregnancy were observed. One fetus of the twin pregnancy had renal agenesis and suffered fetal demise. Genetic testing showed the deceased twin carried the same NLRP3 c.785T>C, p.V262A mutation as the mother. The other twin is healthy and mutation negative. Conclusions Anakinra was continued during pregnancy in women with CAPS and provided significant, persistent CAPS symptom relief while continuing to prevent the long-term sequelae of CAPS. Anakinra was well tolerated. Although a causal relation between anakinra and renal agenesis seems unlikely, further safety data are needed. PMID:25223501

  9. MRP8 and MRP14, phagocyte-specific danger signals, are sensitive biomarkers of disease activity in cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Wittkowski, Helmut; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin B; Austermann, Judith; Holzinger, Dirk; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Gramlich, Katharina; Lohse, Peter; Jung, Thomas; Roth, Johannes; Benseler, Susanne M; Foell, Dirk

    2011-12-01

    To assess the sensitivity of the phagocyte-specific molecules myeloid-related protein (MRP) 8 and MRP14 (calprotectin) for monitoring disease activity during anti-interleukin (IL)-1 therapies in patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), including familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) and chronic infantile neurological, cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome. A total of 39 patients with CAPS, including 5 FCAS, 16 MWS and 18 CINCA syndrome, received anti-IL-1 therapy. All patients with CINCA and 12 with MWS were treated with IL-1Ra (anakinra), 14 patients with MWS with a monoclonal anti-IL-1β antibody (canakinumab) and patients with FCAS received IL-1 Trap (rilonacept). During serial clinical visits serum amyloid A, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and MRP8/14 serum levels were analysed. Untreated patients with CAPS had significantly elevated MRP8/14 values. In response to treatment there was a significant reduction of MRP8/14 levels in CINCA (2,830 (range 690 - 8,480) ng/ml to 670 ng/ml, p < 0.001) and MWS patients (anakinra-treated: 4,390 (1790 - 9780) ng/ml to 1,315 ng/ml (p = 0.003); canakinumab-treated: 3,000 (500 - 13060) ng/ml to 630 ng/ml (p=0.001)). However, in many patients with CAPS, MRP8/14 levels were still elevated compared with healthy individuals, reflecting residual disease activity. However, canakinumab-treated patients with CAPS showed normalised MRP8/14 levels, suggesting control of phagocyte activation. Monitoring of cellular systems involved in inflammatory cascades of the innate immunity was successfully applied to the IL-1-driven CAPS diseases. This is the first study illustrating different states of subclinical disease activity in all types of CAPS depending on the type of anti-IL-1 therapy. MRP8/14 is a sensitive biomarker for monitoring disease activity, status of inflammation and response to IL-1 blockade in patients with CAPS.

  10. NLRP3 A439V Mutation in a Large Family with Cryopyrin-associated Periodic Syndrome: Description of Ophthalmologic Symptoms in Correlation with Other Organ Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sobolewska, Bianka; Angermair, Eva; Deuter, Christoph; Doycheva, Deshka; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; Zierhut, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) is a group of inherited autoinflammatory disorders caused by mutations in the NLRP3 gene resulting in the overproduction of interleukin 1β. NLRP3 mutations cause a broad clinical phenotype of CAPS. The aims of the study were to evaluate clinical, laboratory, and genetic features of a 5-generation family with CAPS focusing in detail on ocular symptoms. In a retrospective observational cohort study, consecutive family members were screened for the presence of the NLRP3 mutation. Patients underwent standardized clinical, laboratory, and ophthalmological assessments. The genotype-specific risk of ophthalmological findings and other organ symptoms was determined. Twenty-nine patients were clinically affected. The A439V mutation encoded by exon 3 of the NLRP3 gene was found in 15 of 37 family members (41%). The most common clinical features were musculoskeletal symptoms, headaches, and ophthalmological symptoms. The mutation-positive patients were characterized by more frequent skin rashes, ocular symptoms, arthralgia, arthritis, and severe Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) Disease Activity Score. Rosacea was diagnosed in 8 patients. The NLRP3 mutation A439V is associated with a heterogeneous clinical spectrum of familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome/MWS-overlap syndrome. Skin rash and eye diseases, such as conjunctivitis and uveitis, were positively correlated with this mutation.

  11. Impact of IL-1 inhibition on fatigue associated with autoinflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed

    Yadlapati, Sujani; Efthimiou, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) is a rare group of autoinflammatory disorders that includes familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome or FCAS, Muckle-wells syndrome or MWS, and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease or NOMID. CAPS is caused by a mutation in the NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) gene. This ultimately leads to increased production of interleukin (IL)-1β. IL-1β is a biologically active member of the IL-1 family. It is not only a pro-inflammatory cytokine responsible for features such as fever, rash, and arthritis, but is also a major mediator in the central pathways of fatigue. Fatigue is a major component of CAPS and is associated with severely compromised quality of life. In clinical studies, fatigue was measured using functional assessment of chronic illness therapy-fatigue or FACIT-F and short form-36 or SF-36, physical component score instruments. These questionnaires can also be used to monitor improvement of fatigue following initiation of therapy. IL-1 inhibitors block the IL-1 signaling cascade, thereby preventing systemic inflammation in CAPS. The decrease in systemic inflammation is accompanied by improvement in fatigue.

  12. [An approach to the patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) : a new biologic response modifier, canakinumab].

    PubMed

    Yokota, Shumpei; Kikuchi, Masako; Nozawa, Tomo; Kizawa, Toshiatsu; Kanetaka, Taichi; Miyamae, Takako; Mori, Masa-aki; Nishikomori, Ryohta; Takata, Hidetoshi; Heike, Toshio; Hara, Toshiro; Imagawa, Tomoyuki

    2012-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) comprises a group of rare, but severe, autoinflammatory syndrome, and includes 3 distinct conditions, familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (MONID). These syndromes are characterized by urticarial-like rash, periodic fever, central nervous system inflammation, an arthropathy, and the risk of amyloidosis. About 20% die by age 20 years in the most severe cases. The disease is associated with mutations in the NLRP3 gene that encodes for the protein cryopyrin, a component of the inflammasome complex that regulates the production and secretion of IL-1β. Canakinumab is a human IgG monoclonal antibody targeting IL-1β. The clinical trials of canakinumab for patients with CAPS in both western countries and Japan were well-tolerated in most patients, and provided significant advantages over existing competitive therapies. Although no serious adverse effects have been reported, the frequencies of common infectious diseases including nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infections, and gastroenteritis were reported presumably due to the blockade of proinflammatory cytokine, IL-1β. For us pediatrician, it will be important to be more careful for infectious diseases to provide the maximum safety of canakinumab for these patients.

  13. The schedule of administration of canakinumab in cryopyrin associated periodic syndrome is driven by the phenotype severity rather than the age

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Interleukin-1 (IL-1) blockade is the treatment of choice of cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). Anti-IL-1 monoclonal antibody (canakinumab) was recently registered. However no clear data are available on the optimal schedule of administration of this drug. The aim of the present study was to analyse the impact of canakinumab on CAPS patients in daily clinical practice and to identify the best schedule of administration according to age and phenotype. Methods 13 CAPS patients (10 children and 3 young adults) treated with canakinumab were followed for 12 months. Clinical and laboratory parameters were collected at each visit. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was recorded at month 12. Complete response was defined as absence of clinical manifestations and normal examinations. Clinical and laboratory variables at last follow-up were compared with those registered at the moment of anakinra discontinuation. Results seven patients with chronic infantile neurological cutaneous articular (CINCA) syndrome, four patients with Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) and two patients with an overlapping MWS/CINCA phenotype were analysed. CINCA patients experienced a higher number of modifications of the treatment (increased dosage or decreased dosing interval) in respect to MWS patients. At the end of the follow-up CINCA patients displayed a higher frequency of administration with a median dose of 3.7 mg/kg (2.1 mg/kg for MWS patients). Canakinumab was withdrawn in a patient with CINCA for incomplete response and poor compliance. The effect of canakinumab on HRQoL was similar to that observed during treatment with anakinra, with the exception of an improvement of the psychosocial concepts after the introduction of canakinumab. Conclusions The use of canakinumab in daily practice is associated with persistent satisfactory control of disease activity but needs progressive dose adjustments in more severe patients. The clinical phenotype, rather than the age

  14. [Cryopyrine-associated periodic syndrome: CAPS seen from adulthood].

    PubMed

    Koné-Paut, I

    2015-04-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome is a rare hereditary periodic fever syndrome for which, the genetic mechanism, mutation in the NLRP3 gene, has allowed to gather 3 clinical phenotypes (familial cold urticaria [FCAS], Muckle-Wells syndrome [MWS], and chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular syndrome [CINCA]) initially described independently, and to discover the NLRP3 inflammasome, a key receptor of the innate immunity, which regulates the interleukine-1β secretion into the mononuclear cells. The clinical manifestation of CAPS : urticaria-like skin rash, eyes redness, myalgia and sensory deafness are not specific, if considered separately, and that often leads to a wandering diagnosis through a complex medical journey including various specialists. The diagnostic delay is deleterious to patients compromising their quality of life and exposing them to neurosensory complications and renal failure by secondary amyloidosis. The paediatric onset of disease, the family history, the trigger of symptoms by the cold, and the recognition of the skin rash as neutrophilic are important clues before diagnostic confirmation by genetic testing. Interleukine-1 blockade is the only effective treatment of CAPS symptoms which often may stabilize (rarely regression) the sensory involvement and in some cases may allow the regression of secondary amyloidosis. Copyright © 2014 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Methodological challenges in monitoring new treatments for rare diseases: lessons from the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome registry.

    PubMed

    Tilson, Hugh; Primatesta, Paola; Kim, Dennis; Rauer, Barbara; Hawkins, Philip N; Hoffman, Hal M; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; van der Poll, Tom; Walker, Ulrich A

    2013-09-10

    The Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes (CAPS) are a group of rare hereditary autoinflammatory diseases and encompass Familial Cold Autoinflammatory Syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells Syndrome (MWS), and Neonatal Onset Multisystem Inflammatory Disease (NOMID). Canakinumab is a monoclonal antibody directed against IL-1 beta and approved for CAPS patients but requires post-approval monitoring due to low and short exposures during the licensing process. Creative approaches to observational methodology are needed, harnessing novel registry strategies to ensure Health Care Provider reporting and patient monitoring. A web-based registry was set up to collect information on long-term safety and effectiveness of canakinumab for CAPS. Starting in November 2009, this registry enrolled 241 patients in 43 centers and 13 countries by December 31, 2012. One-third of the enrolled population was aged < 18; the overall population is evenly divided by gender. Enrolment is ongoing for children. Innovative therapies in orphan diseases require post-approval structures to enable in depth understanding of safety and natural history of disease. The rarity and distribution of such diseases and unpredictability of treatment require innovative methods for enrolment and follow-up. Broad international practice-based recruitment and web-based data collection are practical.

  16. Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes and the eye.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Thomas J; Vitale, Albert T; Hoffman, Robert O; Bohnsack, John F; Warner, Judith E

    2013-08-01

    To describe the ophthalmologic findings in two patients with Muckle-Wells Syndrome, a phenotype of the Cryopyrin Associated Periodic Syndromes (CAPS) spectrum. There is currently sparse ophthalmic literature regarding the ocular manifestations of CAPS. We hope to increase awareness of this spectrum of diseases and the importance of proper treatment amongst eye care professionals. Interventional Case Series. Patient 1 experienced resolution of aseptic meningitis, papilledema, and anterior uveitis following treatment with anikinra. Patient 2 experienced resolution of panuveitis following treatment with anikinra. The severe ocular manifestations of the most severe CAPS phenotype, Chronic Infantile Neurological Cutaneous and Articular Syndrome/Neonatal Onset Multisystem Inflammatory Disease Syndrome (CINCA/NOMID) have been previously described. There is increasing evidence that patients may experience similar ocular disease with the milder phenotype of Muckle-Wells Sydnrome. There is also increasing evidence that appropriate therapy can have a profound effect on patient prognosis.

  17. Methodological challenges in monitoring new treatments for rare diseases: lessons from the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome registry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes (CAPS) are a group of rare hereditary autoinflammatory diseases and encompass Familial Cold Autoinflammatory Syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells Syndrome (MWS), and Neonatal Onset Multisystem Inflammatory Disease (NOMID). Canakinumab is a monoclonal antibody directed against IL-1 beta and approved for CAPS patients but requires post-approval monitoring due to low and short exposures during the licensing process. Creative approaches to observational methodology are needed, harnessing novel registry strategies to ensure Health Care Provider reporting and patient monitoring. Methods A web-based registry was set up to collect information on long-term safety and effectiveness of canakinumab for CAPS. Results Starting in November 2009, this registry enrolled 241 patients in 43 centers and 13 countries by December 31, 2012. One-third of the enrolled population was aged < 18; the overall population is evenly divided by gender. Enrolment is ongoing for children. Conclusions Innovative therapies in orphan diseases require post-approval structures to enable in depth understanding of safety and natural history of disease. The rarity and distribution of such diseases and unpredictability of treatment require innovative methods for enrolment and follow-up. Broad international practice-based recruitment and web-based data collection are practical. PMID:24016338

  18. Efficacy and safety of canakinumab therapy in paediatric patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome: a single-centre, real-world experience.

    PubMed

    Russo, Ricardo A G; Melo-Gomes, Sonia; Lachmann, Helen J; Wynne, Karen; Rajput, Kaukab; Eleftheriou, Despina; Edelsten, Clive; Hawkins, Philip N; Brogan, Paul A

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the short- and long-term efficacy and safety of 8-weekly canakinumab therapy in children with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) in routine clinical practice. A single-centre observational study was performed. Patients were assessed every 8 weeks at a dedicated clinic. Standardized assessments were the 10-domains DAS for CAPS, acute phase reactants (APRs), physician's global assessment of disease activity, Child Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ) and Child Health Questionnaire Parent Form 28 (CHQPF-28). The primary endpoint was clinical improvement, defined as a reduction of DAS score 8 weeks after commencing therapy. Secondary endpoints included sustained clinical improvement in APRs, relapses, CHAQ score and CHQPF-28 score. Ten children with CAPS [eight Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), two chronic infantile cutaneous neurological articular (CINCA); median age 6.3 years] received 8-weekly canakinumab treatments at 2-8.7 mg/kg for a median of 21 months (range 12-31 months). Nine of 10 patients improved after the first dose: baseline median DAS of 7.5/20 decreased to 3.5/20 at 8 weeks (P = 0.04). This clinical improvement was sustained at a median follow-up of 21 months (range 12-31 months). Children with CINCA required higher doses of canakinumab than those with MWS. CHAQ and CHQ scores indicated improvement in functioning and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Treatment was well tolerated, with no injection site reactions and no serious infections. Canakinumab, although costly, is a safe and effective treatment for CAPS in children, leading to sustained improvement in disease activity, serological markers, functional ability and HRQoL.

  19. Monogenic Autoinflammatory Diseases: Concept And Clinical Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    De Jesus, Adriana Almeida; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this review are to describe the clinical manifestations of the growing spectrum of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases including recently described syndromes. The autoinflammatory diseases can be grouped based on clinical findings: 1. the three classic hereditary “periodic fever syndromes”, familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF); TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS); and mevalonate kinase deficiency/hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS); 2. the cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), comprising familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID) or CINCA, and; 3. pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA); 4. disorders presenting with skin pustules, including deficiency of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (DIRA); Majeed syndrome; pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome; deficiency of interleukin 36 receptor antagonist (DITRA); CARD14 mediated psoriasis (CAMPS), and early-onset inflammatory bowel diseases (EO-IBD); 5. inflammatory disorders caused by mutations in proteasome components, the proteasome associated autoinflammatory syndromes (PRAAS) 6. very rare conditions presenting with autoinflammation and immunodeficiency. PMID:23711932

  20. [Genetics of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kümmerle-Deschner, J B; Lohse, P

    2017-05-01

    Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) and chronic infantile neurological, cutaneous and articular syndrome/neonatal onset multisystem inflammatory disease (CINCA/NOMID) were originally described as three distinct diseases. After the identification of their common genetic origin in 2001 and 2002, they are now perceived as a continuum of one disease entity and labelled cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). Mutations in the NLRP3 gene on chromosome 1q44 can be detected in many affected patients. These lead to the synthesis of an altered gene product named cryopyrin. This is part of the NLRP3 inflammasome and causes the activation of caspase 1 and an excess production of IL-1β, which is the driving force behind the inflammatory reactions observed in CAPS patients. In symptomatic patients, confirmation of a mutation using traditional methods of genetic analysis may not always be successful (up to 40% in the case of CINCA/NOMID phenotypes); however, in many cases somatic mutations can be found using modern methods, such as next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. In contrast, low-penetrance NLRP3 variants may also be identified in healthy family members and are present in low frequencies in the general population. Some of the mutation carriers nevertheless present with typical signs of autoinflammation; however, their phenotype is different compared to the classical CAPS presentation. These patients display unspecific systemic inflammatory signs more frequently but show an organ involvement less often. While the detection of NLRP3 gene mutations may be viewed as confirmatory, CAPS is still predominantly a clinical diagnosis; therefore, recently published diagnostic criteria do not require the demonstration of a mutation.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Muckle-Wells syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... a site of injury or disease to fight microbial invaders and facilitate tissue repair. When this has ... is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR-Cas9? What is precision medicine? ...

  2. CAPS--pathogenesis, presentation and treatment of an autoinflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin B

    2015-07-01

    The cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) is a severity spectrum of rare diseases. CAPS comprises the three conditions previously described as familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disorder (NOMID), also known as chronic infantile neurologic, cutaneous, and articular (CINCA) syndrome. The clinical phenotype of CAPS is characterized by systemic inflammation. General symptoms are fatigue and fever. Local manifestations affect multiple tissues such as skin, joints, muscles, eyes, and the central nervous system. Distinct clinical features are characteristic for each subphenotype. In FCAS, these are cold-induced urticaria and fever, in MWS systemic amyloidosis and hearing loss and in NOMID/CINCA central nervous system inflammation and bone deformities. CAPS is caused by single heterozygous germline or somatic gain of function mutations in the NLRP3 gene encoding the protein cryopyrin. Cryopyrin nucleates an NLRP3 inflammasome, which regulates the activation and cleavage of caspase-1 that cleaves the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β and IL-18. IL-1β plays the key role in the induction of inflammation in CAPS. This has been confirmed by the application of IL-1 blocking agents, which lead not only to a rapid and sustained reversal of daily symptoms but also to some extent of long-term disease sequelae. To prevent CAPS-induced organ damage, early diagnosis and swift initiation of effective treatment are mandatory.

  3. [Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Quartier, P; Rodrigues, F; Georgin-Lavialle, S

    2018-04-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) are linked to one single gene mutations, however they are associated with 3 syndromes, which are, from the mildest to the most severe phenotype familial cold urticaria, Muckle-Wells syndrome and chronic, infantile, neurologic, cutaneous, articular (CINCA) syndrome also called neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID). Autosomic dominant inheritance is present in most cases but in CINCA/NOMID syndrome where neomutations are more common. Mutations in the gene encoding cryopyrin, NLRP3, are associated with deregulation of caspase-1 activity, excessive interleukin-1 production and an autoinflammatory syndrome, which in familial cold urticaria and Muckle-Wells syndrome may be triggered or worsened by exposure to coldness. More and more mutations are described and even somatic mutations that can explain some clinical signs beginning in adulthood. Patients disclose a pseudo-urticarial rash, arthralgia, headaches, sometimes fever, biological inflammation but also, in severe forms of the disease, neurologic inflammation with central deafness, ophthalmologic inflammation, chronic meningitis. Some CINCA/NOMID patients also develop growth cartilage pseudo-tumoral hypertrophy. Natural disease history is usually benign in familial cold urticarial but severe in the other forms, particularly regarding neuro-sensorial involvement. In addition, secondary AA amyloidosis may develop in all forms in the absence of control of chronic inflammation. Anti-interleukin-1 treatment with anakinra, rilonacept or canakinumab induces in most cases complete remission, however sequelae may be present, particularly if central deafness or cartilage bone hypertrophy have already developed. This treatment is also important to prevent secondary amyloidosis or stabilize and even sometimes allow improvement of amyloidosis lesions. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights

  4. Increased Neutrophil Secretion Induced by NLRP3 Mutation Links the Inflammasome to Azurophilic Granule Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jennifer L.; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Haimovich, Ariela; McGeough, Matthew D.; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hoffman, Hal M.; Catz, Sergio D.

    2017-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the NLRP3 gene in patients with cryopyrin associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) lead to hyper-responsive inflammasome function. CAPS is a systemic auto-inflammatory syndrome characterized by the activation of the innate immune system induced by elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines, but the involvement of selective innate immune cells in this process is not fully understood. Neutrophil secretion and the toxic components of their granules are mediators of inflammation associated with several human diseases and inflammatory conditions. Here, using the Nlrp3A350V inducible mouse model (MWS CreT) that recapitulates human patients with the A352V mutation in NLRP3 observed in the Muckle-Wells sub-phenotype of CAPS, we studied the relationship between hyper-activation of the inflammasome and neutrophil exocytosis. Using a flow cytometry approach, we show that Nlrp3A350V (MWS) neutrophils express normal basal levels of CD11b at the plasma membrane and that the upregulation of CD11b from secretory vesicles in response to several plasma membrane or endocytic agonist including the bacterial-derived mimetic peptide formyl-Leu-Met-Phe (fMLF) and the unmethylated oligonucleotide CpG is normal in MWS neutrophils. Significant but modest CD11b upregulation in MWS neutrophils compared to wild type was only observed in response to GM-CSF and CpG. The same pattern was observed for the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) from gelatinase granules in that MMP-9 secretion in MWS neutrophils was not different from that observed in wild-type neutrophils except when stimulated with GM-CSF and CpG. In contrast, azurophilic granule secretion, whose cargoes constitute the most toxic secretory and pro-inflammatory factors of the neutrophil, was markedly dysregulated in MWS neutrophils under both basal and stimulated conditions. This could not be attributed to paracrine effects of secretory cytokines because IL-1β secretion by neutrophils was undetectable under

  5. Hearing improvement in a patient with variant Muckle‐Wells syndrome in response to interleukin 1 receptor antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Rynne, M; Maclean, C; Bybee, A; McDermott, M F; Emery, P

    2006-01-01

    Background Muckle‐Wells syndrome (MWS), familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, and neonatal onset multisystem inflammatory disease, also called chronic, infantile, neurological, cutaneous, and articular syndrome, are three hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes caused by mutations affecting the CIAS1/NALP3 gene on chromosome 1q44. The proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin 1β, is believed to have a fundamental role in their pathogenesis. Case report The case is described of a 59 year old white woman who presented with increasingly severe MWS‐type features over a 15 year period. The response to interleukin 1β inhibition with anakinra was dramatic, including a reduction in intracranial pressure with associated auditory improvement, as demonstrated by serial audiometry. Conclusions The confirmed improvement in hearing after initiation of interleukin 1 receptor antagonism corroborates previous reports that specific blockade of this single cytokine reverses most of the symptoms of this group of CIAS1/NALP3 related autoinflammatory conditions, including the sensorineural deafness, which has not been previously reported. PMID:16531551

  6. Rilonacept in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Michael F

    2009-06-01

    Rilonacept (IL-1 Trap/Arcalyst) is a long-acting interleukin-1 (IL-1) blocker developed by Regeneron Pharmaceuticals. Initially, Regeneron entered into a joint development effort with Novartis to develop rilonacept for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) but this was discontinued following the review of phase II clinical data showing that IL-1 blockade appeared to have limited benefit in RA. In February 2008, Regeneron received Orphan Drug approval from the Food and Drug Administration for rilonacept in the treatment of two cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) disorders, namely, familial cold-induced autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS) and Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), for children and adults 12 years and older. CAPS is a group of inherited inflammatory disorders consisting of FCAS, MWS, neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID), also known as chronic infantile neurologic, cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome, all associated with heterozygous mutations in the NLRP3 (CIAS1) gene, which encodes the protein NLRP3 or cryopyrin. Prior to the discovery of the NLRP3 (CIAS1) mutations and the advent of IL-1-targeted therapy, treatment was aimed at suppressing inflammation but with limited success. The dramatic success of selective blockade of IL-1beta, initially with the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra; Kineret(R) or anakinra/ Amgen, Inc.), not only provided supportive evidence for the role of IL-1beta in CAPS but also demonstrated the efficacy of targeting IL-1beta for treatment of these conditions. A high-affinity protein called rilonacept has been produced by cytokine Trap technology and was developed by Regeneron. The desirable longer half-life of rilonacept offers potential alternatives to patients who do not tolerate daily injections very well or have difficulty with drug compliance. The initial evidence for the beneficial effects of rilonacept for MWS and FCAS suggests that it would also be a suitable treatment for CNICA/NOMID. It is

  7. Diagnosis of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome: challenges, recommendations and emerging concepts.

    PubMed

    Sarrabay, Guillaume; Grandemange, Sylvie; Touitou, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome are rare autosomal dominantly inherited diseases. They include three overlapping phenotypes: familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome, and chronic infantile neurological cutaneous articular syndrome/neonatal onset multisystem autoinflammatory syndrome (NOMID/CINCA). Recurrent fevers, joint pain, and urticarial skin rash are the main clinical features of these conditions. Renal amyloidosis and sensorineural complications may occur. Gain-of-function mutations in NLRP3 gene are responsible for the overactivation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, a multimolecular complex involved in the inflammatory process. Missense mutations are almost always encountered, particularly in exon 3, which encodes the nucleotide-binding domain. Mosaicism is not rare, especially in CINCA/NOMID. Next-generation sequencing will grant access to new insights about NLRP3 implication in oligogenic and multifactorial diseases.

  8. Canakinumab (ACZ885, a fully human IgG1 anti-IL-1β mAb) induces sustained remission in pediatric patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS).

    PubMed

    Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin B; Ramos, Eduardo; Blank, Norbert; Roesler, Joachim; Felix, Sandra D; Jung, Thomas; Stricker, Kirstin; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Tannenbaum, Stacey; Wright, Andrew M; Rordorf, Christiane

    2011-02-28

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) represents a spectrum of three auto-inflammatory syndromes, familial cold auto-inflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease/chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular syndrome (NOMID/CINCA) with etiology linked to mutations in the NLRP3 gene resulting in elevated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) release. CAPS is a rare hereditary auto-inflammatory disease, which may start early in childhood and requires a life-long treatment. Canakinumab, a fully human anti-IL-1β antibody, produces sustained selective inhibition of IL-1β. This study was conducted to assess the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of canakinumab in the treatment of pediatric CAPS patients. Seven pediatric patients (five children and two adolescents) with CAPS were enrolled in a phase II, open-label study of canakinumab in patients with CAPS. Canakinumab was administered at a dose of 2 mg/kg subcutaneously (s.c.) (for patients with body weight ≤ 40 kg) or 150 mg s.c. (for patients with body weight > 40 kg) with re-dosing upon each relapse. The primary efficacy variable was time to relapse following achievement of a complete response (defined as a global assessment of no or minimal disease activity and no or minimal rash and values for serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and/or serum amyloid A (SAA) within the normal range, < 10 mg/L). All patients achieved a complete response within seven days after the first dose of canakinumab and responses were reinduced on retreatment following relapse. Improvements in symptoms were evident within 24 hours after the first dose, according to physician assessments. The estimated median time to relapse was 49 days (95% CI 29 to 68) in children who received a dose of 2 mg/kg. Canakinumab was well tolerated. One serious adverse event, vertigo, was reported, but resolved during treatment. Canakinumab, 2 mg/kg or 150 mg s.c., induced rapid and sustained

  9. Work environments of people with mobility impairments and limitations: Mobility Device User Work Survey (MWS).

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kerri A; Gottlieb, Meghan; Hollingsworth, Holly H; Gray, David B

    2014-01-01

    Few studies of employed people who use wheelchairs, canes, crutches or walkers have been reported in the literature. One reason for this paucity of research reports is that surveys are most often made of unemployed individuals with disabilities a defined broadly. Understanding the work site of successfully employed people who use mobility devices requires the development of as survey that can be used to examine the important features of worksite from employees who use mobility devices at their worksites. This article describes the development and psychometrics of a survey on currently employed people with lower limb impairments and mobility limitations who use mobility devices. The items in the Mobility Device User Work Survey (MWS) were based on interviews and survey items pilot tested on employed mobility device users. A sample of 183 employed people who use mobility devices including wheelchairs, canes, crutches or walkers was recruited using internet postings on disability-related organizations. The average age of the sample was 46.3, most were college educated, 72% used wheelchairs and the average number of years of employment was 24. The MWS was completed by 183 people who met the inclusion criteria. The survey was sent to these same people a second time and 132 of them returned the second survey. The MWS consists of 106 questions on demographic, work and worksite characteristics and 58 subjective evaluation items that were organized into five scales. The internal consistencies (Cronbach's alpha) of the five scales were moderate (0.72) to good (0.93). Stability values of the five scales were calculated using correlations between forms and ranged from 0.70 to 0.80. The evaluative scales were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis. The MWS provides a tool for studying the variables that influence employed people who use mobility devices. Future studies of unemployed people who use mobility devices may benefit from using the results of the MWS to plan

  10. Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Takako

    2012-04-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) are a group of rare autoinflammatory disorders; many cases of CAPS are caused by mutations in the NLRP3 gene. In these conditions, interleukin (IL)-1 is overproduced, and this overproduction plays a major role in disease onset and progression. CAPS include three variants, ranging in order of increasing severity from familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, previously termed familial cold urticaria, through Muckle-Wells syndrome, to chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous articular syndrome, also known as neonatal onset multisystemic inflammatory disease. Diagnosis of CAPS is initially based on clinical manifestations and medical history, and later confirmed genetically. CAPS should be suspected when characteristic skin lesions, typical periodic fever episodes, bone/joint manifestations, and CNS involvement are recognized. CAPS are life-long diseases, and early diagnosis and early treatment with IL-1-targeted therapies may improve prognosis.

  11. Bridging the gap between the clinician and the patient with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cantarini, L; Lucherini, O M; Frediani, B; Brizi, M G; Bartolomei, B; Cimaz, R; Galeazzi, M; Rigante, D

    2011-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes are categorized as a spectrum of three autoinflammatory diseases, namely familial cold auto-inflammatory syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome and chronic infantile neurological cutaneous articular syndrome. All are caused by mutations in the NLRP3 gene coding for cryopyrin and result in active interleukin-1 release: their rarity and shared clinical indicators involving skin, joints, central nervous system and eyes often mean that correct diagnosis is delayed. Onset occurs early in childhood, and life-long therapy with interleukin-1 blocking agents usually leads to tangible clinical remission and inflammatory marker normalization in a large number of patients, justifying the need to facilitate early diagnosis and thus avoid irreversible negative consequences for tissues and organs.

  12. MRP8 and MRP14, phagocyte-specific danger signals, are sensitive biomarkers of disease activity in cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Austermann, Judith; Holzinger, Dirk; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Gramlich, Katharina; Lohse, Peter; Jung, Thomas; Roth, Johannes; Benseler, Susanne M; Foell, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the sensitivity of the phagocyte-specific molecules myeloid-related protein (MRP) 8 and MRP14 (calprotectin) for monitoring disease activity during anti-interleukin (IL)-1 therapies in patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), including familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle–Wells syndrome (MWS) and chronic infantile neurological, cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome. Methods A total of 39 patients with CAPS, including 5 FCAS, 16 MWS and 18 CINCA syndrome, received anti-IL-1 therapy. All patients with CINCA and 12 with MWS were treated with IL-1Ra (anakinra), 14 patients with MWS with a monoclonal anti-IL-1β antibody (canakinumab) and patients with FCAS received IL-1 Trap (rilonacept). During serial clinical visits serum amyloid A, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and MRP8/14 serum levels were analysed. Results Untreated patients with CAPS had significantly elevated MRP8/14 values. In response to treatment there was a significant reduction of MRP8/14 levels in CINCA (2,830 (range 690 – 8,480) ng/ml to 670 ng/ml, p < 0.001) and MWS patients (anakinra-treated: 4,390 (1790 – 9780) ng/ml to 1,315 ng/ml (p = 0.003); canakinumab-treated: 3,000 (500 – 13060) ng/ml to 630 ng/ml (p=0.001)). However, in many patients with CAPS, MRP8/14 levels were still elevated compared with healthy individuals, reflecting residual disease activity. However, canakinumab-treated patients with CAPS showed normalised MRP8/14 levels, suggesting control of phagocyte activation. Conclusions Monitoring of cellular systems involved in inflammatory cascades of the innate immunity was successfully applied to the IL-1-driven CAPS diseases. This is the first study illustrating different states of subclinical disease activity in all types of CAPS depending on the type of anti-IL-1 therapy. MRP8/14 is a sensitive biomarker for monitoring disease activity, status of inflammation and response to IL-1 blockade in

  13. Canakinumab (ACZ885, a fully human IgG1 anti-IL-1β mAb) induces sustained remission in pediatric patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) represents a spectrum of three auto-inflammatory syndromes, familial cold auto-inflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease/chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular syndrome (NOMID/CINCA) with etiology linked to mutations in the NLRP3 gene resulting in elevated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) release. CAPS is a rare hereditary auto-inflammatory disease, which may start early in childhood and requires a life-long treatment. Canakinumab, a fully human anti-IL-1β antibody, produces sustained selective inhibition of IL-1β. This study was conducted to assess the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of canakinumab in the treatment of pediatric CAPS patients. Methods Seven pediatric patients (five children and two adolescents) with CAPS were enrolled in a phase II, open-label study of canakinumab in patients with CAPS. Canakinumab was administered at a dose of 2 mg/kg subcutaneously (s.c.) (for patients with body weight ≤ 40 kg) or 150 mg s.c. (for patients with body weight > 40 kg) with re-dosing upon each relapse. The primary efficacy variable was time to relapse following achievement of a complete response (defined as a global assessment of no or minimal disease activity and no or minimal rash and values for serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and/or serum amyloid A (SAA) within the normal range, < 10 mg/L). Results All patients achieved a complete response within seven days after the first dose of canakinumab and responses were reinduced on retreatment following relapse. Improvements in symptoms were evident within 24 hours after the first dose, according to physician assessments. The estimated median time to relapse was 49 days (95% CI 29 to 68) in children who received a dose of 2 mg/kg. Canakinumab was well tolerated. One serious adverse event, vertigo, was reported, but resolved during treatment. Conclusions Canakinumab, 2 mg/kg or

  14. Critical appraisal of canakinumab in the treatment of adults and children with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS)

    PubMed Central

    Toker, Ori; Hashkes, Philip J

    2010-01-01

    The cryopyrin-associated syndromes (CAPS) include three autosomal-dominant syndromes, that are caused by a mutation in the NLRP3 gene on chromosome 1, encoding the cryopyrin protein. These syndromes, familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease, are characterized by urticaria-like rash, fever, central nervous system inflammation, an arthropathy and a risk of the development of amyloidosis in a respectively escalating degree of severity between the various syndromes. Recently the role of cryopyrin in the regulation of interleukin (IL)-1 production and activation was described and anti IL-1 therapies were found to be very effective in treating these syndromes. There are several types of anti IL-1 medications based on different mechanisms of antagonizing IL-1. This paper focuses on the efficacy and safety of canakinumab, a long-acting humanized anti IL-1 antibody, in treating these syndromes. PMID:20531965

  15. [Pathophysiological mechanisms underlying cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes: genetic and molecular basis and the inflammasome].

    PubMed

    Aróstegui, Juan I

    2011-01-01

    NLRP3 gene (formerly known as CIAS1) encodes for cryopyrin (Nalp3) protein, which belongs to the Nod-like family of innate immune receptors. Cryopyrin recruits different adaptor and effectors proteins into a cytosolic macromolecular complex termed Nalp3-inflammasome, which senses both several pathogen-associated and damage-associated molecular patterns as well as inorganic particles (asbestos, silica), and triggers innate immune and inflammatory responses. Gain-of-function NLRP3 mutations are the common molecular basis of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), which encompasses three clinical entities along a spectrum of disease severity (familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome and CINCA-NOMID syndrome). This hypermorphic cryopyrin provokes an increased, unregulated secretion of different inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-18, IL-33) in patients with CAPS, and in vivo administration of IL-1 blocking agents results in excellent therapeutic responses in these patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Disease dynamics of Montipora white syndrome within Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii: distribution, seasonality, virulence, and transmissibility.

    PubMed

    Aeby, G S; Ross, M; Williams, G J; Lewis, T D; Works, T M

    2010-07-26

    We report on an investigation of Montipora white syndrome (MWS), which is a coral disease reported from Hawaii, U.S.A., that results in tissue loss. Disease surveys of Montipora capitata within Kaneohe Bay (Oahu) found colonies that were affected by MWS on 9 reefs within 3 regions of Kaneohe Bay (south, central, north). Mean MWS prevalence ranged from 0.02 to 0.87% and average number of MWS cases per survey site ranged from 1 to 28 colonies. MWS prevalence and number of cases were significantly lower in the central region as compared to those in the north and south regions of Kaneohe Bay. There was a positive relationship between host abundance and MWS prevalence, and differences in host abundance between sites explained approximately 27% of the variation in MWS prevalence. Reefs in central Kaneohe Bay had lower M. capitata cover and lower MWS levels. MWS prevalence on reefs was neither significantly different between seasons (spring versus fall) nor among 57 tagged colonies that were monitored through time. MWS is a chronic and progressive disease causing M. capitata colonies to lose an average of 3.1% of live tissue mo(-1). Case fatality rate was 28% after 2 yr but recovery occurred in some colonies (32%). Manipulative experiments showed that the disease is acquired through direct contact. This is the first study to examine the dynamics of MWS within Hawaii, and our findings suggest that MWS has the potential to degrade Hawaii's reefs through time.

  17. Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome: an update on diagnosis and treatment response.

    PubMed

    Yu, Justin R; Leslie, Kieron S

    2011-02-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) is a rare hereditary inflammatory disorder encompassing a continuum of three phenotypes: familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome, and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease. Distinguishing features include cutaneous, neurological, ophthalmologic, and rheumatologic manifestations. CAPS results from a gain-of-function mutation of the NLRP3 gene coding for cryopyrin, which forms intracellular protein complexes known as inflammasomes. Defects of the inflammasomes lead to overproduction of interleukin-1, resulting in inflammatory symptoms seen in CAPS. Diagnosis is often delayed and requires a thorough review of clinical symptoms. Remarkable advances in our understanding of the genetics and the molecular pathway that is responsible for the clinical phenotype of CAPS has led to the development of effective treatments. It also has become clear that the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in innate immune defense and therefore has wider implications for other inflammatory disease states.

  18. Description of a new family with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome: risk of visual loss in patients bearing the R260W mutation.

    PubMed

    Alejandre, Nicolás; Ruiz-Palacios, Ana; García-Aparicio, Angel M; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Bermúdez, Sandra; Fernández-Sanz, Guillermo; Romero, Fredeswinda I; Aróstegui, Juan I; Ayuso, Carmen; Jiménez-Alfaro, Ignacio; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Sánchez-Pernaute, Olga

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a family with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) in which the disease was unveiled after the ophthalmologic evaluation. Family and personal histories from each of the patients were recorded. Each underwent a full ophthalmological examination along with the physical examination. The mutational analysis of the NLRP3 gene was performed by means of direct sequencing. The proband was admitted during an episode of unilateral anterior uveitis. She had a history of recurrent red eye and had been suffering episodes of skin rash and arthralgia induced by cold since childhood. At examination, she showed a reticulated corneal mid-stroma. Her mother and her younger sister also suffered from relapsing episodes of skin rash and fever triggered by cold as well as flares of red eye. They had developed premature hearing loss. In both cases, opacities in the corneal mid-stroma were evidenced with a slit lamp. The genetic analysis detected the heterozygous germline p.R260W mutation in the NLRP3 gene in the three women, confirming the diagnosis of CAPS. Treatment with anakinra resulted in complete remission of flares. In this family, a structural NLRP3 mutation was associated with classic MuckleWells features of different degrees of severity. Interstitial keratitis with corneal opacification, usually ascribed to neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease, was found. We underscore that ocular involvement in MuckleWells syndrome should be carefully assessed, since it can lead to visual impairment.

  19. Clinical and genetic characterization of the autoinflammatory diseases diagnosed in an adult reference center.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Ruíz-Ortiz, Estíbaliz; Tomé, Adrià; Espinosa, Gerard; González-Roca, Eva; Mensa-Vilaró, Anna; Prieto-González, Sergio; Espígol-Frigolé, Georgina; Mensa, Josep; Cardellach, Francesc; Grau, Josep M; Cid, Maria C; Yagüe, Jordi; Aróstegui, Juan I; Cervera, Ricard

    2016-01-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases (AID) are usually diagnosed during the pediatric age. However, adult-onset disease or diagnosis during adulthood has been occasionally described. To assess the clinical and genetic characteristics of adult patients diagnosed with an AID in an adult referral center for AID. We retrospectively evaluated clinical and genetic features of adult patients (≥16 years) diagnosed with an AID or referred after AID diagnosis to the Clinical Unit of AID, at the Department of Autoimmune Diseases, Hospital Clínic of Barcelona, from 2008 to 2014. During the study period, a genetic study for suspected AID was requested to 90 patients at the Department of Autoimmune Diseases. A final diagnosis of monogenic AID was achieved in 17 patients (19% of patients tested). Five additional cases were diagnosed with periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome and 10 patients with AID were referred from other adult departments. Finally, a total of 32 patients with AID were finally diagnosed or monitored in our Clinical Unit. These included 12 (37.5%) familial Mediterranean fever, 6 (18.8%) tumour necrosis factor-receptor associated periodic syndrome, 8 (25%) cryopirin-associated periodic syndromes (Muckle-Wells syndrome [MWS] or overlap familial cold-associated periodic syndrome/MWS), 1 (3.1%) mevalonate kinase deficiency, and 5 (15.6%) PFAPA. Clinical evidence of disease-onset during childhood and adulthood was observed in 15 (47%) and 17 (53%) patients, respectively. Overall, the final diagnosis was obtained after a delay of a mean of 12 years (range 0-47 years). Compared to children, adult patients with AID in our series presented more frequently with non-severe manifestations and none of them developed amyloidosis during follow-up. Adult patients also carried higher proportion of low-penetrance mutations or polymorphisms and all genetic variants were presented in heterozygosis or as heterozygous compounds. Adult disease

  20. Electrical Evaluation of RCA MWS5001D Random Access Memory, Volume 5, Appendix D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klute, A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical characterization and qualification test results are presented for the RCA MWS 5001D random access memory. The tests included functional tests, AC and DC parametric tests, AC parametric worst-case pattern selection test, determination of worst-case transition for setup and hold times, and a series of schmoo plots. Average input high current, worst case input high current, output low current, and data setup time are some of the results presented.

  1. Electrical Evaluation of RCA MWS5001D Random Access Memory, Volume 4, Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klute, A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical characterization and qualification test results are presented for the RCA MWS5001D random access memory. The tests included functional tests, AC and DC parametric tests, AC parametric worst-case pattern selection test, determination of worst-case transition for setup and hold times, and a series of schmoo plots. Statistical analysis data is supplied along with write pulse width, read cycle time, write cycle time, and chip enable time data.

  2. Electrical Evaluation of RCA MWS5501D Random Access Memory, Volume 2, Appendix a

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klute, A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical characterization and qualification test results are presented for the RCA MWS5001D random access memory. The tests included functional tests, AC and DC parametric tests, AC parametric worst-case pattern selection test, determination of worst-case transition for setup and hold times, and a series of schmoo plots. The address access time, address readout time, the data hold time, and the data setup time are some of the results surveyed.

  3. Canakinumab for the treatment of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Garry M

    2009-10-01

    Familial cold-induced autoinflammatory syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease make up cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). These are autoinflammatory inherited disorders caused by autosomal dominant gain-of-function mutations in the NLRP3 gene, located on chromosome 1q44. Cryopyrin/NALP3/NLRP3 is an essential component of intracellular inflammasomes that activate caspase-1, which in turn converts interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) to its active form. IL-1beta is a potent cytokine that activates diverse elements of the immune and inflammatory systems leading to the pathogenic changes characteristic of CAPS. There is therefore much interest in the development of IL-1beta blocking agents as novel biologic treatments for these conditions. Canakinumab (ACZ-885; Ilaris, Novartis Pharma) is a fully humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for IL-1beta and is indicated for a wide range of inflammatory disorders including CAPS. This review will assess the utility of canakinumab as a treatment for CAPS. Copyright 2009 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  4. Wells syndrome and its relationship to Churg-Strauss syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ratzinger, Gudrun; Zankl, Julia; Zelger, Bernhard

    2013-08-01

    Wells syndrome has been described as an inflammatory disorder based on typical clinical appearance combined with the histopathological presence of eosinophilic infiltrates and flame figures in the absence of vasculitis. Churg-Strauss syndrome, on the other hand, is primarily a diffuse, necrotizing vasculitis but is also typically displaying eosinophils and flame figures. Despite several parallels, the present understanding of these two diseases excludes any pathogenetic relationship.   We describe the clinical course and histopathological appearance of three patients who had initially been diagnosed with Wells syndrome that developed into Churg-Strauss syndrome during the course of their disease.   The clinical presentation of all three patients led to the diagnosis of Wells syndrome by independent specialists. Histopathology showed an eosinophilic infiltrate and flame figures next to features of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Detailed examination revealed asthma bronchiale and additional symptoms indicating Churg-Strauss syndrome. The initial diagnosis of Wells syndrome had to be revised to Churg-Strauss syndrome.   We conclude that Wells syndrome could be the starting point of a pathogenetic process that might reach its maximum in Churg-Strauss syndrome. As a clinical consequence, patients with Wells syndrome should be evaluated and followed for Churg-Strauss syndrome. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  5. Rilonacept in the management of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS).

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Justin; Mathews, Rebeccah; McDermott, Michael F

    2010-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) are a subgroup of the hereditary periodic fever syndromes, which are rare autoinflammatory and inherited disorders, characterized by recurrent inflammation and varying degrees of severity. CAPS are thought to be driven by excessive production of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), through over-activation of the inflammasome by gain of function mutations in the gene encoding cryopyrin (NLRP3). This conclusion is supported by the remarkable efficacy of IL-1β blockade in these conditions. Rilonacept (Arcalyst(TM); Regeneron) is the first us Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome and Muckle-Wells syndrome and the first in a new line of drugs designed for longer-acting IL-1 blockade. Rilonacept has been associated with a decrease in disease activity, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) in the treatment of CAPS. The clinical safety and efficacy of rilonacept in CAPS and non-CAPS populations will be summarized in this review. Rilonacept is also beneficial for patients who tolerate injections poorly, due to an extended half-life over the unapproved CAPS treatment, anakinra, requiring weekly rather than daily self-administration. Other autoinflammatory disorders may also benefit from rilonacept treatment, with clinical trials in progress for systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, gout and familial mediterranean fever.

  6. Eosinophilic leukocytoclastic vasculitis - a spectrum ranging from Wells' syndrome to Churg-Strauss syndrome?

    PubMed

    Ratzinger, Gudrun; Zankl, Julia; Eisendle, Klaus; Zelger, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Wells' syndrome is defined as an inflammatory disorder with the histopathological presence of eosinophilic infiltrates and flame figures in the absence of vasculitis. Eosinophilic leukocytoclastic vasculitis shows eosinophilic infiltrates in combination with vasculitic changes. And Churg Strauss Syndrome comprises all three characteristics - eosinophilic infiltrates, vasculitis and flame figures. To determine whether these three diseases are distinct entities or different manifestations of a similar clinicopathologic process. Histopathological samples and clinical courses of 17 patients with eosinophilic infiltrates, flame figures and clinical features of Wells' syndrome were re-evaluated. Histopathologically, we focused on the presence or absence of vasculitic features. Clinically, we included only patients who were diagnosed with Wells' syndrome at least once in the course of their disease. 4 patients were finally diagnosed with Wells' syndrome, 5 with eosinophilic leukocytoclastic vasculitis and 6 with Churg Strauss syndrome. Further, we had one case of an overlap between Wells' syndrome and eosinophilic vasculitis and one case of Wegener granulomatosis. Vasculitic features were found in the samples of all patients. Histologically, we find vasculitic features in typical presentations of Wells' syndrome. Clinically, we find typical features of Wells' syndrome in patients finally diagnosed with eosinophilic leukocytoclastic vasculitis or Churg Strauss syndrome. Furthermore, we have observed and formerly reported 3 patients with progression from Wells' syndrome to Churg Strauss syndrome. Thus, we assume that eosinophilic leukocytoclastic vasculitis might form a bridge between Wells' syndrome and Churg Strauss syndrome.

  7. Combined use of clips and nylon snare ("tulip-bundle") as a rescue endoscopic bleeding control in a mallory-weiss syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ivekovic, Hrvoje; Radulovic, Bojana; Jankovic, Suzana; Markos, Pave; Rustemovic, Nadan

    2014-01-01

    Mallory-Weiss syndrome (MWS) accounts for 6-14% of all cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Prognosis of patients with MWS is generally good, with a benign course and rare recurrence of bleeding. However, no strict recommendations exist in regard to the mode of action after a failure of primary endoscopic hemostasis. We report a case of an 83-year-old male with MWS and rebleeding after the initial endoscopic treatment with epinephrine and clips. The final endoscopic control of bleeding was achieved by a combined application of clips and a nylon snare in a "tulip-bundle" fashion. The patient had an uneventful postprocedural clinical course and was discharged from the hospital five days later. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report showing the "tulip-bundle" technique as a rescue endoscopic bleeding control in the esophagus.

  8. Neurologic manifestations of the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kitley, Joanna L; Lachmann, Helen J; Pinto, Ashwin; Ginsberg, Lionel

    2010-04-20

    The cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) is a rare but treatable hereditary autoinflammatory condition. Without treatment, one third of patients develop amyloidosis with consequent renal failure and death. CAPS encompasses 3 conditions: familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome, and chronic infantile, neurologic, cutaneous, and articular syndrome. Neurologic complications are common in children with the chronic infantile, neurologic, cutaneous, and articular phenotype, but there are no previous published reports of neurologic features in adults with milder phenotypes. In this case series, we report in detail an adult case of CAPS and summarize the neurologic features seen in 12 other adults with genetically proven CAPS. These patients participated in a recent randomized study of canakinumab in CAPS and we used pretreatment data collected in this study. Twelve of the 13 patients (92%) had headache, of whom 10 (77%) had features of migraine. Seven patients (54%) had sensorineural deafness. Nine patients (69%) reported myalgia. Six patients (46%) had papilledema and a further 2 (15%) had optic disc pallor. MRI brain scan was normal in all patients. CAPS is a rare but treatable condition that may be encountered by neurologists in adult clinical practice since it can present with headache, myalgia, papilledema, sensorineural deafness, and aseptic meningitis. Unrecognized and untreated, it can lead to significant morbidity and mortality from renal failure. Treatment with anti-interleukin-1 therapy leads to complete resolution of symptoms and should also prevent progression to amyloidosis and subsequent renal failure.

  9. Canakinumab in patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome: an update for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Haug, Iris

    2013-01-01

    The cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) is a very rare disease. It is estimated that there are 1–2 cases for every 1 million people in the US and 1 in every 360,000 in France. However, many patients are diagnosed very late or not at all, meaning the real prevalence is likely to be higher. CAPS encompasses the three entities of familial cold auto-inflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle–Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID)/chronic infantile neurologic, cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome. They have in common a causative mutation in the NLRP3 gene. The altered gene product cryopyrin leads to activation of the inflammasome which in turn is responsible for excessive production of interleukin (IL)-1β. IL-1β causes the inflammatory manifestations in CAPS. These appear as systemic inflammation including fever, headache or fatigue, rash, eye disease, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, musculoskeletal manifestations and central nervous system (CNS) symptoms (NOMID/CINCA only). With the advent of IL-1 Inhibitors, safe and effective therapeutic options became available for this devastating disease. To prevent severe and possible life-threatening disease sequelae, early and correct diagnosis and immediate initiation of therapy are mandatory in most patients. Canakinumab is a fully human monoclonal IgG1 anti-IL-1β antibody. It provides selective and prolonged IL-1β blockade and has demonstrated a rapid (within hours), complete and sustained response in most CAPS patients without any consistent pattern of side effects. Long-term follow-up trials have demonstrated sustained efficacy, safety and tolerability. Canakinumab is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for FCAS and MWS and by European Medicines Agency for treatment of all three phenotypes of CAPS. PMID:24294305

  10. Electrical Evaluation of RCA MWS5001D Random Access Memory, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klute, A.

    1979-01-01

    Electrical characterization and qualification tests were performed on the RCA MWS5001D, 1024 by 1-bit, CMOS, random access memory. Characterization tests were performed on five devices. The tests included functional tests, AC parametric worst case pattern selection test, determination of worst-case transition for setup and hold times and a series of schmoo plots. The qualification tests were performed on 32 devices and included a 2000 hour burn in with electrical tests performed at 0 hours and after 168, 1000, and 2000 hours of burn in. The tests performed included functional tests and AC and DC parametric tests. All of the tests in the characterization phase, with the exception of the worst-case transition test, were performed at ambient temperatures of 25, -55 and 125 C. The worst-case transition test was performed at 25 C. The preburn in electrical tests were performed at 25, -55, and 125 C. All burn in endpoint tests were performed at 25, -40, -55, 85, and 125 C.

  11. Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Giat, Eitan; Lidar, Merav

    2014-10-01

    CAPS is a rare autoinflammatory disease associated with mutations in the NLRP3 gene that result in overactivation of the inflammasome, increased secretion of IL-1beta and IL-18, and systemic inflammation. Genetic testing has allowed for grouping of the three, previously distinct clinical syndromes of FCAS, MWS and NOMID, into a single syndrome termed CAPS. The clinical features include urticarial rash and fever, CNS and musculoskeletal involvement, ocular disorders and progressive deafness. Onset, severity and complications (mainly retardation, seizures, destructive arthropathy and amyloidosis) depend on the specific mutation. Diagnosis is determined by genetic tests but is often delayed due to lack of awareness. In Israel, the relative abundance of other autoinflammatory disorders (FMF, Behçet's disease) may result in misdiagnosis. Treatment is based on IL-1 antagonism, which usually results in prompt clinical response and may prevent amyloidosis.

  12. Cryopyrin-associated Periodic Syndromes in Italian Patients: Evaluation of the Rate of Somatic NLRP3 Mosaicism and Phenotypic Characterization.

    PubMed

    Lasigliè, Denise; Mensa-Vilaro, Anna; Ferrera, Denise; Caorsi, Roberta; Penco, Federica; Santamaria, Giuseppe; Di Duca, Marco; Amico, Giulia; Nakagawa, Kenji; Antonini, Francesca; Tommasini, Alberto; Consolini, Rita; Insalaco, Antonella; Cattalini, Marco; Obici, Laura; Gallizzi, Romina; Santarelli, Francesca; Del Zotto, Genny; Severino, Mariasavina; Rubartelli, Anna; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Martini, Alberto; Ceccherini, Isabella; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Gattorno, Marco; Arostegui, Juan I; Borghini, Silvia

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the rate of somatic NLRP3 mosaicism in an Italian cohort of mutation-negative patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS). The study enrolled 14 patients with a clinical phenotype consistent with CAPS in whom Sanger sequencing of the NLRP3 gene yielded negative results. Patients' DNA were subjected to amplicon-based NLRP3 deep sequencing. Low-level somatic NLRP3 mosaicism has been detected in 4 patients, 3 affected with chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular syndrome and 1 with Muckle-Wells syndrome. Identified nucleotide substitutions encode for 4 different amino acid exchanges, with 2 of them being novel (p.Y563C and p.G564S). In vitro functional studies confirmed the deleterious behavior of the 4 somatic NLRP3 mutations. Among the different neurological manifestations detected, 1 patient displayed mild loss of white matter volume on brain magnetic resonance imaging. The allele frequency of somatic NLRP3 mutations occurs generally under 15%, considered the threshold of detectability using the Sanger method of DNA sequencing. Consequently, routine genetic diagnostic of CAPS should be currently performed by next-generation techniques ensuring high coverage to identify also low-level mosaicism, whose actual frequency is yet unknown and probably underestimated.

  13. Psychological Well-Being of Mothers of Youth with Fragile X Syndrome: Syndrome Specificity and within-Syndrome Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, P.; Abbeduto, L.; Murphy, M.; Richmond, E.; Giles, N.; Bruno, L.; Schroeder, S.; Anderson, J.; Orsmond, G.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Research on parental well-being has focused largely on Down syndrome and autism; however, fragile X syndrome is likely to pose different challenges for parents compared with these other diagnostic conditions. Moreover, there is considerable variability among youth with fragile X syndrome; for example, 25% to 33% of affected youth meet…

  14. Musculoskeletal symptoms in patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes: a large database study.

    PubMed

    Houx, Laetitia; Hachulla, Eric; Kone-Paut, Isabelle; Quartier, Pierre; Touitou, Isabelle; Guennoc, Xavier; Grateau, Gilles; Hamidou, Mohamed; Neven, Bénédicte; Berthelot, Jean-Marie; Lequerré, Thierry; Pillet, Pascal; Lemelle, Irène; Fischbach, Michel; Duquesne, Agnès; Le Blay, Pierre; Le Jeunne, Claire; Stirnemann, Jérome; Bonnet, Christine; Gaillard, Dominique; Alix, Lilian; Touraine, Renaud; Garcier, François; Bedane, Christophe; Jurquet, Anne-Laure; Duffau, Pierre; Smail, Amar; Frances, Camille; Grall-Lerosey, Martine; Cathebras, Pascal; Tran, Tu Anh; Morell-Dubois, Sandrine; Pagnier, Anne; Richez, Christophe; Cuisset, Laurence; Devauchelle-Pensec, Valérie

    2015-11-01

    To determine the type and frequency of musculoskeletal symptoms at onset and during followup of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). We retrospectively recorded the articular and muscular symptoms of patients with CAPS followed up in French hospitals. Data were presented as frequencies or the median (range), and patient groups were compared using chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and Mann-Whitney test. The study included 133 patients (33 children), 20 with familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, 88 with Muckle-Wells syndrome, 22 with chronic infantile neurologic, cutaneous, articular syndrome, and 3 with unclassified CAPS. The median age was 35 years (range 0-78 years) at the time of the study, 1 year (range 0-41 years) at symptom onset, and 23 years (range 0-58 years) at diagnosis. The disease was sporadic in 17% of the patients. Cutaneous symptoms predominated at onset (77%), followed by articular symptoms (30%). The p.Thr348Met and p.Arg260Trp NLRP3 mutations were significantly associated with the presence and absence of articular symptoms at onset, respectively. During followup, 86% of the patients had musculoskeletal symptoms, 88% had arthralgia, and 58% had arthritis, but only 9% had joint destruction. Tendinopathies occurred in 21.5% of the patients, tender points in 16.5%, and myalgia in 33%. Only 3 patients had typical knee deformities. Radiographs were rarely obtained. Except for bone deformities, osteoarticular symptoms occurred at similar frequencies in the different CAPS phenotypes. Joint manifestations were frequent in all CAPS phenotypes. Bone deformities were rare. Musculoskeletal manifestations varied within given families but tended to worsen over time. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate blocks the NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Yun-Hee; Nguyen, Kim Y.; Grant, Ryan W.; Goldberg, Emily L.; Bodogai, Monica; Kim, Dongin; D'Agostino, Dominic; Planavsky, Noah; Lupfer, Christopher; Kanneganti, Thirumala D.; Kang, Seokwon; Horvath, Tamas L.; Fahmy, Tarek M.; Crawford, Peter A.; Biragyn, Arya; Alnemri, Emad; Dixit, Vishwa Deep

    2015-01-01

    Ketone bodies , β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and acetoacetate support mammalian survival during states of energy deficit by serving as alternative source of ATP1. BHB levels are elevated during starvation, high-intensity exercise or by the low carbohydrate ketogenic diet2. Prolonged caloric restriction or fasting reduces inflammation as immune system adapts to low glucose supply and energy metabolism switches towards mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, ketogenesis and ketolysis2-6. However, role of ketones bodies in regulation of innate immune response is unknown. We report that BHB, but neither acetoacetate nor structurally-related short chain fatty acids, butyrate and acetate, suppresses activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to several structurally unrelated NLRP3 activators, without impacting NLRC4, AIM2 or non-canonical caspase-11 inflammasome activation. Mechanistically, BHB inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome by preventing K+ efflux and reducing ASC oligomerization and speck formation. The inhibitory effects of BHB on NLRP3 were not dependent on chirality or classical starvation regulated mechanisms like AMPK, reactive oxygen species (ROS), autophagy or glycolytic inhibition. BHB blocked NLRP3 inflammasome without undergoing oxidation in TCA cycle, independently of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2), Sirt2, receptor Gpr109a and inhibition of NLRP3 did not correlate with magnitude of histone acetylation in macrophages. BHB reduced the NLRP3 inflammasome mediated IL-1β and IL-18 production in human monocytes. In vivo, BHB attenuates caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion in mouse models of NLRP3-mediated diseases like Muckle-Wells Syndrome (MWS), Familial Cold Autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS) and urate crystal induce body cavity inflammation. Taken together, these findings suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of caloric restriction or ketogenic diets may be mechanistically linked to BHB-mediated inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome, and point to the potential

  16. Canakinumab

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Canakinumab (ACZ885, Ilaris) is a human anti-IL-1β monoclonal antibody developed by Novartis. its mode of action is based on the neutralization of 1β signaling, resulting in suppression of inflammation in patients with disorders of autoimmune origin. In June 2009 the drug was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of familial cold auto-inflammatory syndrome and Muckle-wells syndrome, which are inflammatory diseases related to cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes. The drug is currently being evaluated for its potential in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, type 1 and 2 diabetes and ocular diseases. Reports from clinical trials suggest that canakinumab is well-tolerated in most patients, and no serious adverse effects have been reported. The drug provides significant advantages over existing competitive therapies, including bimonthly administration and approved use in children. PMID:20065636

  17. Preschool children with intellectual disability: syndrome specificity, behaviour problems, and maternal well-being.

    PubMed

    Eisenhower, A S; Baker, B L; Blacher, J

    2005-09-01

    Children with intellectual disability (ID) are at heightened risk for behaviour problems and diagnosed mental disorder. Likewise, mothers of children with ID are more stressed than mothers of typically developing children. Research on behavioural phenotypes suggests that different syndromes of ID may be associated with distinct child behavioural risks and maternal well-being risks. In the present study, maternal reports of child behaviour problems and maternal well-being were examined for syndrome-specific differences. The present authors studied the early manifestation and continuity of syndrome-specific behaviour problems in 215 preschool children belonging to 5 groups (typically developing, undifferentiated developmental delays, Down syndrome, autism, cerebral palsy) as well as the relation of syndrome group to maternal well-being. At age 3, children with autism and cerebral palsy showed the highest levels of behaviour problems, and children with Down syndrome and typically developing children showed the lowest levels. Mothers of children with autism reported more parenting stress than all other groups. These syndrome-specific patterns of behaviour and maternal stress were stable across ages 3, 4 and 5 years, except for relative increases in behaviour problems and maternal stress in the Down syndrome and cerebral palsy groups. Child syndrome contributed to maternal stress even after accounting for differences in behaviour problems and cognitive level. These results, although based on small syndrome groups, suggest that phenotypic expressions of behaviour problems are manifested as early as age 3. These behavioural differences were paralleled by differences in maternal stress, such that mothers of children with autism are at elevated risk for high stress. In addition, there appear to be other unexamined characteristics of these syndromes, beyond behaviour problems, which also contribute to maternal stress.

  18. Inhibition of the NF-κB pathway as a candidate therapeutic strategy for cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shimogaki, Satoka; Ito, Sayaka; Komatsu, Sachiyo; Koike, Ryuji; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Umezawa, Kazuo; Kubota, Tetsuo

    2014-05-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) is caused by unrestricted IL-1β release due to mutation of the gene coding NLRP3. This study aimed to clarify whether NLRP3-related IL-1β release is dependent on the NF-κB pathway. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy subjects or patients with Muckle-Wells syndrome were primed with LPS and subsequently stimulated by ATP. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured with the supernatant obtained from LPS-plus ATP-stimulated PBMCs. Expression of proinflammatory molecules was estimated using RT-PCR, ELISA or immunochemical staining, in the presence or absence of an NF-κB inhibitor (-)-dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ). DHMEQ inhibited expression of proIL-1β and NLRP3 by normal PBMCs primed with LPS, resulting in inhibition of caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion by the cells after subsequent stimulation with ATP. DHMEQ also inhibited expression of IL-1β, TNFα, IL-6 and VCAM-1 by HUVECs. Patient cells released IL-1β spontaneously or by ATP-stimulation even without LPS-priming. Both the spontaneous and stimulated IL-1β releases were inhibited by DHMEQ without affecting viability of the cells. These results clearly indicate that IL-1β production through the NLRP3 inflammasome is dependent on the NF-κB pathway, which could be a good target for the development of a novel therapeutic strategy for CAPS.

  19. The group of epidermal nevus syndromes Part I. Well defined phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Happle, Rudolf

    2010-07-01

    The epidermal nevus syndromes represent a group of distinct disorders that can be distinguished by the type of associated epidermal nevus and by the criterion of presence or absence of heritability. Well defined syndromes characterized by organoid epidermal nevi include Schimmelpenning syndrome, phacomatosis pigmentokeratotica, nevus comedonicus syndrome, angora hair nevus syndrome, and Becker nevus syndrome. The molecular basis of these disorders has so far not been identified. By contrast, the group of syndromes characterized by keratinocytic nevi comprises three phenotypes with a known molecular etiology in the form of CHILD (congenital hemidysplasia with ichthyosiform nevus and limb defects) syndrome, type 2 segmental Cowden disease, and fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 epidermal nevus syndrome (García-Hafner-Happle syndrome), whereas Proteus syndrome is still of unknown origin. From this overview, it is clear that a specific type of these disorders cannot be classified by the name "epidermal nevus syndrome" nor by the terms "organoid nevus syndrome" or "keratinocytic nevus syndrome." After completing this learning activity, participants should be able to distinguish nine different epidermal nevus syndromes by their characteristic features, understand the practical significance of avoiding terms like "epidermal nevus syndrome" or "keratinocytic nevus syndrome" to define any specific entity within this group of disorders, and differentiate between nonhereditary traits and those bearing a genetic risk because of either Mendelian or non-Mendelian inheritance. Copyright (c) 2010 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Psychological Well-Being in Fathers of Adolescents and Young Adults with Down Syndrome, Fragile X Syndrome, and Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Sigan L.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Head, Lara; Abbeduto, Leonard

    2012-01-01

    The psychological well-being of fathers of children with developmental disabilities remains poorly understood. The present study examined depressive symptoms, pessimism, and coping in fathers of adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome (DS;n = 59), autism spectrum disorders (ASDs;n = 135), and Fragile X syndrome (n = 46). Fathers of sons or…

  1. Measuring resident well-being: impostorism and burnout syndrome in residency.

    PubMed

    Legassie, Jenny; Zibrowski, Elaine M; Goldszmidt, Mark A

    2008-07-01

    Assessing resident well-being is becoming increasingly important from a programmatic standpoint. Two measures that have been used to assess this are the Clance Impostor Scale (CIS) and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS). However, little is known about the relationship between the two phenomena. To explore the prevalence and association between impostorism and burnout syndrome in a sample of internal medicine residents. Anonymous, cross-sectional postal survey. Forty-eight internal medicine residents (postgraduate year [PGY] 1-3) at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry (62.3% response rate). Short demographic questionnaire, CIS and MBI-HSS. Impostorism and burnout syndrome were identified in 43.8% and 12.5% of residents, respectively. With the exception of a negative correlation between CIS scores and the MBI's personal accomplishment subscale (r = -.30; 95% CI -.54 to -.02), no other significant relations were identified. Foreign-trained residents were more likely to score as impostors (odds ratio [OR] 10.7; 95% CI 1.2 to 98.2) while senior residents were more likely to experience burnout syndrome (OR 16.5 95% CI 1.6 to 168.5). Both impostorism and burnout syndrome appear to be threats to resident well-being in our program. The lack of relationship between the two would suggest that programs and researchers wishing to address the issue of resident distress should consider using both measures. The finding that foreign-trained residents appear to be more susceptible to impostorism warrants further study.

  2. Periodic Fever: A Review on Clinical, Management and Guideline for Iranian Patients - Part II

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Mansouri, Sedigeh; Ziaee, Vahid; Aghighi, Yahya; Moradinejad, Mohammad-Hassan; Fereshteh-Mehregan, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Periodic fever syndromes are a group of diseases characterized by episodes of fever with healthy intervals between febrile episodes. In the first part of this paper, we presented a guideline for approaching patients with periodic fever and reviewed two common disorders with periodic fever in Iranian patients including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and periodic fever syndromes except for periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA). In this part, we review other autoinflammatory disorders including hyper IgD, tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes, autoinflammatory bone disorders and some other rare autoinflammatory disorders such as Sweet’s and Blau syndromes. In cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes group, we discussed chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome and familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome. Autoinflammatory bone disorders are categorized to monogenic disorders such as pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma ;gangraenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome, the deficiency of interleukine-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA) and Majeed syndrome and polygenic background or sporadic group such as chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) or synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome are classified in sporadic group. Other autoinflammatory syndromes are rare causes of periodic fever in Iranian system registry. PMID:25562014

  3. Polymorphisms and variants in the prion protein sequence of European moose (Alces alces), reindeer (Rangifer tarandus), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and fallow deer (Dama dama) in Scandinavia

    PubMed Central

    Wik, Lotta; Mikko, Sofia; Klingeborn, Mikael; Stéen, Margareta; Simonsson, Magnus; Linné, Tommy

    2012-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) sequence of European moose, reindeer, roe deer and fallow deer in Scandinavia has high homology to the PrP sequence of North American cervids. Variants in the European moose PrP sequence were found at amino acid position 109 as K or Q. The 109Q variant is unique in the PrP sequence of vertebrates. During the 1980s a wasting syndrome in Swedish moose, Moose Wasting Syndrome (MWS), was described. SNP analysis demonstrated a difference in the observed genotype proportions of the heterozygous Q/K and homozygous Q/Q variants in the MWS animals compared with the healthy animals. In MWS moose the allele frequencies for 109K and 109Q were 0.73 and 0.27, respectively, and for healthy animals 0.69 and 0.31. Both alleles were seen as heterozygotes and homozygotes. In reindeer, PrP sequence variation was demonstrated at codon 176 as D or N and codon 225 as S or Y. The PrP sequences in roe deer and fallow deer were identical with published GenBank sequences. PMID:22441661

  4. Measuring Resident Well-Being: Impostorism and Burnout Syndrome in Residency

    PubMed Central

    Legassie, Jenny; Zibrowski, Elaine M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Assessing resident well-being is becoming increasingly important from a programmatic standpoint. Two measures that have been used to assess this are the Clance Impostor Scale (CIS) and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS). However, little is known about the relationship between the two phenomena. Objectives To explore the prevalence and association between impostorism and burnout syndrome in a sample of internal medicine residents. Design Anonymous, cross-sectional postal survey. Participants Forty-eight internal medicine residents (postgraduate year [PGY] 1–3) at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry (62.3% response rate). Measurements and Main Results Short demographic questionnaire, CIS and MBI-HSS. Impostorism and burnout syndrome were identified in 43.8% and 12.5% of residents, respectively. With the exception of a negative correlation between CIS scores and the MBI’s personal accomplishment subscale (r = −.30; 95% CI −.54 to −.02), no other significant relations were identified. Foreign-trained residents were more likely to score as impostors (odds ratio [OR] 10.7; 95% CI 1.2 to 98.2) while senior residents were more likely to experience burnout syndrome (OR 16.5 95% CI 1.6 to 168.5). Conclusions Both impostorism and burnout syndrome appear to be threats to resident well-being in our program. The lack of relationship between the two would suggest that programs and researchers wishing to address the issue of resident distress should consider using both measures. The finding that foreign-trained residents appear to be more susceptible to impostorism warrants further study. PMID:18612750

  5. Human NACHT, LRR, and PYD domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activity is regulated by and potentially targetable through Bruton tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Pichulik, Tica; Wolz, Olaf-Oliver; Dang, Truong-Minh; Stutz, Andrea; Dillen, Carly; Delmiro Garcia, Magno; Kraus, Helene; Dickhöfer, Sabine; Daiber, Ellen; Münzenmayer, Lisa; Wahl, Silke; Rieber, Nikolaus; Kümmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; Yazdi, Amir; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Macek, Boris; Radsak, Markus; Vogel, Sebastian; Schulte, Berit; Walz, Juliane Sarah; Hartl, Dominik; Latz, Eicke; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Grimbacher, Bodo; Miller, Lloyd; Brunner, Cornelia; Wolz, Christiane; Weber, Alexander N R

    2017-10-01

    The Nod-like receptor NACHT, LRR, and PYD domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) and Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) are protagonists in innate and adaptive immunity, respectively. NLRP3 senses exogenous and endogenous insults, leading to inflammasome activation, which occurs spontaneously in patients with Muckle-Wells syndrome; BTK mutations cause the genetic immunodeficiency X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). However, to date, few proteins that regulate NLRP3 inflammasome activity in human primary immune cells have been identified, and clinically promising pharmacologic targeting strategies remain elusive. We sought to identify novel regulators of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human cells with a view to exploring interference with inflammasome activity at the level of such regulators. After proteome-wide phosphoproteomics, the identified novel regulator BTK was studied in human and murine cells by using pharmacologic and genetic BTK ablation. Here we show that BTK is a critical regulator of NLRP3 inflammasome activation: pharmacologic (using the US Food and Drug Administration-approved inhibitor ibrutinib) and genetic (in patients with XLA and Btk knockout mice) BTK ablation in primary immune cells led to reduced IL-1β processing and secretion in response to nigericin and the Staphylococcus aureus toxin leukocidin AB (LukAB). BTK affected apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) speck formation and caspase-1 cleavage and interacted with NLRP3 and ASC. S aureus infection control in vivo and IL-1β release from cells of patients with Muckle-Wells syndrome were impaired by ibrutinib. Notably, IL-1β processing and release from immune cells isolated from patients with cancer receiving ibrutinib therapy were reduced. Our data suggest that XLA might result in part from genetic inflammasome deficiency and that NLRP3 inflammasome-linked inflammation could potentially be targeted pharmacologically through BTK. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy

  6. Emerging coral diseases in Kāne'ohe Bay, O'ahu, Hawai'i (USA): two major disease outbreaks of acute Montipora white syndrome

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aeby, Greta S.; Callahan, Sean; Cox, Evelyn F.; Runyon, Christina M.; Smith, Ashley; Stanton, Frank G.; Ushijima, Blake; Work, Thierry M.

    2016-01-01

    In March 2010 and January 2012, we documented 2 widespread and severe coral disease outbreaks on reefs throughout Kāne‘ohe Bay, Hawai‘i (USA). The disease, acute Montipora white syndrome (aMWS), manifested as acute and progressive tissue loss on the common reef coral M. capitata. Rapid visual surveys in 2010 revealed 338 aMWS-affected M. capitata colonies with a disease abundance of (mean ± SE) 0.02 ± 0.01 affected colonies per m of reef surveyed. In 2012, disease abundance was significantly higher (1232 aMWS-affected colonies) with 0.06 ± 0.02 affected colonies m-1. Prior surveys found few acute tissue loss lesions in M. capitata in Kāne‘ohe Bay; thus, the high number of infected colonies found during these outbreaks would classify this as an emerging disease. Disease abundance was highest in the semi-enclosed region of south Kāne‘ohe Bay, which has a history of nutrient and sediment impacts from terrestrial runoff and stream discharge. In 2010, tagged colonies showed an average tissue loss of 24% after 1 mo, and 92% of the colonies continued to lose tissue in the subsequent month but at a slower rate (chronic tissue loss). The host-specific nature of this disease (affecting only M. capitata) and the apparent spread of lesions between M. capitatacolonies in the field suggest a potential transmissible agent. The synchronous appearance of affected colonies on multiple reefs across Kāne‘ohe Bay suggests a common underlying factor. Both outbreaks occurred during the colder, rainy winter months, and thus it is likely that some parameter(s) associated with winter environmental conditions are linked to the emergence of disease outbreaks on these reefs.

  7. Emerging coral diseases in Kāne'ohe Bay, O'ahu, Hawai'i (USA): two major disease outbreaks of acute Montipora white syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aeby, Greta S; Callahan, Sean; Cox, Evelyn F; Runyon, Christina; Smith, Ashley; Stanton, Frank G; Ushijima, Blake; Work, Thierry M

    2016-05-26

    In March 2010 and January 2012, we documented 2 widespread and severe coral disease outbreaks on reefs throughout Kāne'ohe Bay, Hawai'i (USA). The disease, acute Montipora white syndrome (aMWS), manifested as acute and progressive tissue loss on the common reef coral M. capitata. Rapid visual surveys in 2010 revealed 338 aMWS-affected M. capitata colonies with a disease abundance of (mean ± SE) 0.02 ± 0.01 affected colonies per m of reef surveyed. In 2012, disease abundance was significantly higher (1232 aMWS-affected colonies) with 0.06 ± 0.02 affected colonies m(-1). Prior surveys found few acute tissue loss lesions in M. capitata in Ka¯ne'ohe Bay; thus, the high number of infected colonies found during these outbreaks would classify this as an emerging disease. Disease abundance was highest in the semi-enclosed region of south Kāne'ohe Bay, which has a history of nutrient and sediment impacts from terrestrial runoff and stream discharge. In 2010, tagged colonies showed an average tissue loss of 24% after 1 mo, and 92% of the colonies continued to lose tissue in the subsequent month but at a slower rate (chronic tissue loss). The host-specific nature of this disease (affecting only M. capitata) and the apparent spread of lesions between M. capitata colonies in the field suggest a potential transmissible agent. The synchronous appearance of affected colonies on multiple reefs across Kāne'ohe Bay suggests a common underlying factor. Both outbreaks occurred during the colder, rainy winter months, and thus it is likely that some parameter(s) associated with winter environmental conditions are linked to the emergence of disease outbreaks on these reefs.

  8. Distinctive aspects of peptic ulcer disease, Dieulafoy's lesion, and Mallory-Weiss syndrome in patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease or cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nojkov, Borko; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To systematically review the data on distinctive aspects of peptic ulcer disease (PUD), Dieulafoy’s lesion (DL), and Mallory-Weiss syndrome (MWS) in patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease (aALD), including alcoholic hepatitis or alcoholic cirrhosis. METHODS: Computerized literature search performed via PubMed using the following medical subject heading terms and keywords: “alcoholic liver disease”, “alcoholic hepatitis”,“ alcoholic cirrhosis”, “cirrhosis”, “liver disease”, “upper gastrointestinal bleeding”, “non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding”, “PUD”, ‘‘DL’’, ‘‘Mallory-Weiss tear”, and “MWS’’. RESULTS: While the majority of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with aALD is related to portal hypertension, about 30%-40% of acute GI bleeding in patients with aALD is unrelated to portal hypertension. Such bleeding constitutes an important complication of aALD because of its frequency, severity, and associated mortality. Patients with cirrhosis have a markedly increased risk of PUD, which further increases with the progression of cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis or aALD and peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) have worse clinical outcomes than other patients with PUB, including uncontrolled bleeding, rebleeding, and mortality. Alcohol consumption, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, and portal hypertension may have a pathogenic role in the development of PUD in patients with aALD. Limited data suggest that Helicobacter pylori does not play a significant role in the pathogenesis of PUD in most cirrhotic patients. The frequency of bleeding from DL appears to be increased in patients with aALD. DL may be associated with an especially high mortality in these patients. MWS is strongly associated with heavy alcohol consumption from binge drinking or chronic alcoholism, and is associated with aALD. Patients with aALD have more severe MWS bleeding and are more likely to rebleed when compared to non

  9. Reducing Metabolic Syndrome Risk Using a Personalized Wellness Program.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Gregory; Scott, Adam; Honcz, Joseph; Spettell, Claire; Pradhan, Susil

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a targeted, personalized wellness program on reducing employees' future risk of metabolic syndrome. Aetna piloted a year-long program that included a limited genetic profile, a traditional psychosocial assessment, and high-intensity coaching in a randomized controlled study of Aetna employees with an increased risk for metabolic syndrome. Sustained employee engagement of 50% over the course of 1 year; 76% of participating employees lost an average of 10 pounds (4.5 kg) (P < 0.001 vs baseline weight), and there were trends in improved clinical outcomes relative to three of five metabolic factors. Average health care costs were reduced by $122 per participant per month, resulting in a positive return on investment in the program's first year. At scale, such programs would be expected to lead to significant downstream reduction in major clinical events and costs.

  10. A small molecule inhibitior of the NLRP3 inflammasome is a potential therapeutic for inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Coll, Rebecca C.; Robertson, Avril A. B.; Chae, Jae Jin; Higgins, Sarah C.; Muñoz-Planillo, Raúl; Inserra, Marco C.; Vetter, Irina; Dungan, Lara S.; Monks, Brian G.; Stutz, Andrea; Croker, Daniel E.; Butler, Mark S.; Haneklaus, Moritz; Sutton, Caroline E.; Núñez, Gabriel; Latz, Eicke; Kastner, Daniel L.; Mills, Kingston H. G.; Masters, Seth L.; Schroder, Kate; Cooper, Matthew A.; O’Neill, Luke A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is a component of the inflammatory process and its aberrant activation is pathogenic in inherited disorders such as the cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) and complex diseases such as multiple sclerosis, type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. We describe the development of MCC950, a potent, selective, small molecule inhibitor of NLRP3. MCC950 blocks canonical and non-canonical NLRP3 activation at nanomolar concentrations. MCC950 specifically inhibits NLRP3 but not AIM2, NLRC4 or NLRP1 activation. MCC950 reduces Interleukin-1p (IL-1β) production in vivo and attenuates the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a disease model of multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, MCC950 treatment rescues neonatal lethality in a mouse model of CAPS and is active in ex vivo samples from individuals with Muckle-Wells syndrome. MCC950 is thus a potential therapeutic for NLRP3-associated syndromes, including autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases, and a tool for the further study of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human health and disease. PMID:25686105

  11. Psychosocial well-being and health-related quality of life in a UK population with Usher syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Gavin; Orford, Amy; Staines, Roy; McGee, Anna; Smith, Kimberley J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether psychosocial well-being is associated with the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of people with Usher syndrome. Setting The survey was advertised online and through deafblind-related charities, support groups and social groups throughout the UK. Participants 90 people with Usher syndrome took part in the survey. Inclusion criteria are having a diagnosis of Usher syndrome, being 18 or older and being a UK resident. Primary and secondary outcome measures All participants took part in a survey that measured depressive symptoms, loneliness and social support (predictors) and their physical and mental HRQOL (outcomes). Measured confounders included age-related, sex-related and health-related characteristics. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses examined the association of each psychosocial well-being predictor with the physical and mental HRQOL outcomes while controlling for confounders in a stepwise manner. Results After adjusting for all confounders, psychosocial well-being was shown to predict physical and mental HRQOL in our population with Usher syndrome. Increasing depressive symptoms were predictive of poorer physical (β=−0.36, p<0.01) and mental (β=−0.60, p<0.001) HRQOL. Higher levels of loneliness predicted poorer mental HRQOL (β=−0.20, p<0.05). Finally, increasing levels of social support predicted better mental HRQOL (β=0.19, p<0.05). Conclusions Depression, loneliness and social support all represent important issues that are linked with HRQOL in a UK population with Usher syndrome. Our results add to the growing body of evidence that psychosocial well-being is an important factor to consider in people with Usher syndrome alongside functional and physical impairment within research and clinical practice. PMID:28082366

  12. Guidelines for the management and treatment of periodic fever syndromes: Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (cryopyrinopathies - CAPS).

    PubMed

    Terreri, Maria Teresa R A; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; Len, Claudio Arnaldo; da Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida; de Magalhães, Cristina Medeiros Ribeiro; Sacchetti, Silvana B; Ferriani, Virgínia Paes Leme; Piotto, Daniela Gerent Petry; Cavalcanti, André de Souza; de Moraes, Ana Júlia Pantoja; Sztajnbok, Flavio Roberto; de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp Feitosa; Campos, Lucia Maria Arruda; Bandeira, Marcia; Santos, Flávia Patricia Sena Teixeira; Magalhães, Claudia Saad

    2016-01-01

    To establish guidelines based on cientific evidences for the management of cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes. The Guideline was prepared from 4 clinical questions that were structured through PICO (Patient, Intervention or indicator, Comparison and Outcome), to search in key primary scientific information databases. After defining the potential studies to support the recommendations, these were graduated considering their strength of evidence and grade of recommendation. 1215 articles were retrieved and evaluated by title and abstract; from these, 42 articles were selected to support the recommendations. 1. The diagnosis of CAPS is based on clinical history and clinical manifestations, and later confirmed by genetic study. CAPS may manifest itself in three phenotypes: FCAS (mild form), MWS (intermediate form) and CINCA (severe form). Neurological, ophthalmic, otorhinolaryngological and radiological assessments may be highly valuable in distinguishing between syndromes; 2. The genetic diagnosis with NLRP3 gene analysis must be conducted in suspected cases of CAPS, i.e., individuals presenting before 20 years of age, recurrent episodes of inflammation expressed by a mild fever and urticaria; 3. Laboratory abnormalities include leukocytosis and elevated serum levels of inflammatory proteins; and 4. Targeted therapies directed against interleukin-1 lead to rapid remission of symptoms in most patients. However, there are important limitations on the long-term safety. None of the three anti-IL-1β inhibitors prevents progression of bone lesions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Psychosocial well-being and health-related quality of life in a UK population with Usher syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dean, Gavin; Orford, Amy; Staines, Roy; McGee, Anna; Smith, Kimberley J

    2017-01-12

    To determine whether psychosocial well-being is associated with the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of people with Usher syndrome. The survey was advertised online and through deafblind-related charities, support groups and social groups throughout the UK. 90 people with Usher syndrome took part in the survey. Inclusion criteria are having a diagnosis of Usher syndrome, being 18 or older and being a UK resident. All participants took part in a survey that measured depressive symptoms, loneliness and social support (predictors) and their physical and mental HRQOL (outcomes). Measured confounders included age-related, sex-related and health-related characteristics. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses examined the association of each psychosocial well-being predictor with the physical and mental HRQOL outcomes while controlling for confounders in a stepwise manner. After adjusting for all confounders, psychosocial well-being was shown to predict physical and mental HRQOL in our population with Usher syndrome. Increasing depressive symptoms were predictive of poorer physical (β=-0.36, p<0.01) and mental (β=-0.60, p<0.001) HRQOL. Higher levels of loneliness predicted poorer mental HRQOL (β=-0.20, p<0.05). Finally, increasing levels of social support predicted better mental HRQOL (β=0.19, p<0.05). Depression, loneliness and social support all represent important issues that are linked with HRQOL in a UK population with Usher syndrome. Our results add to the growing body of evidence that psychosocial well-being is an important factor to consider in people with Usher syndrome alongside functional and physical impairment within research and clinical practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. A Simple and Universal Gel Permeation Chromatography Technique for Precise Molecular Weight Characterization of Well-Defined Poly(ionic liquid)s

    SciTech Connect

    He, Hongkun; Zhong, Mingjiang; Adzima, Brian

    2013-03-20

    Poly(ionic liquid)s (PILs) are an important class of technologically relevant materials. However, characterization of well-defined polyionic materials remains a challenge. Herein, we have developed a simple and versatile gel permeation chromatography (GPC) methodology for molecular weight (MW) characterization of PILs with a variety of anions. PILs with narrow MW distributions were synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization, and the MWs obtained from GPC were further confirmed via nuclear magnetic resonance end group analysis.

  15. Psychosocial risk among migrant workers: what we can learn from literature and field experiences.

    PubMed

    Porru, S; Elmetti, S; Arici, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Mental health problems are possible in migrant workers (MWs), who are mainly employed in dangerous jobs and face many barriers to prevention and care. To outline current scientific evidence about psychosocial risk among MWs; to present data from clinical and field experiences. Non-systematic literature review (PubMed, last 10 years); case series of 20 MWs, evaluated for mental and/or behavioural disorders at a public occupational health unit; applied field research, in enterprise contexts. A relatively low number of publications about psychosocial risk among MWs was found. Individual migrants may find the experience of migration to be stressful, with increased rates of depression and/or anxiety disorders. Data from clinical case series suggest that MWs from some ethnic groups, with a medium-high level of education, employed in metal or manufacturing industries, might have an increased risk of developing psychiatric disorders. Preliminary data from our field study seem to confirm that MWs, predominantly employed in unskilled/manual jobs and more prone to work overtime, tend to present higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders. There is a growing need to improve the scientific knowledge on migration, work, and mental health, as well as to promote workplace prevention of mental disorders in MWs. This can be achieved also by reducing structural barriers to mental wellbeing: in particular, occupational physicians should answer to MWs' mental health needs, contributing both to diagnosis and management of MWs' work-related psychiatric disorders.

  16. A Mindfulness-Based Health Wellness Program for Individuals with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Ashvind N. A.; Winton, Alan S. W.; Singh, Angela D. A.; Singh, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) are often overweight or obese because of their delayed satiety response. Three individuals with PWS participated in a long-term, multicomponent mindfulness-based health wellness program to reduce their obesity by changing their lifestyles. The components included (a) physical exercise, (b) food…

  17. A small-molecule inhibitor of the NLRP3 inflammasome for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Coll, Rebecca C; Robertson, Avril A B; Chae, Jae Jin; Higgins, Sarah C; Muñoz-Planillo, Raúl; Inserra, Marco C; Vetter, Irina; Dungan, Lara S; Monks, Brian G; Stutz, Andrea; Croker, Daniel E; Butler, Mark S; Haneklaus, Moritz; Sutton, Caroline E; Núñez, Gabriel; Latz, Eicke; Kastner, Daniel L; Mills, Kingston H G; Masters, Seth L; Schroder, Kate; Cooper, Matthew A; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2015-03-01

    The NOD-like receptor (NLR) family, pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a component of the inflammatory process, and its aberrant activation is pathogenic in inherited disorders such as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) and complex diseases such as multiple sclerosis, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis. We describe the development of MCC950, a potent, selective, small-molecule inhibitor of NLRP3. MCC950 blocked canonical and noncanonical NLRP3 activation at nanomolar concentrations. MCC950 specifically inhibited activation of NLRP3 but not the AIM2, NLRC4 or NLRP1 inflammasomes. MCC950 reduced interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in vivo and attenuated the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a disease model of multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, MCC950 treatment rescued neonatal lethality in a mouse model of CAPS and was active in ex vivo samples from individuals with Muckle-Wells syndrome. MCC950 is thus a potential therapeutic for NLRP3-associated syndromes, including autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases, and a tool for further study of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human health and disease.

  18. Psychological Well-being in Fathers of Adolescents and Young Adults with Down Syndrome, Fragile X Syndrome, and Autism.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Sigan L; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Head, Lara; Abbeduto, Leonard

    2012-04-01

    The psychological well-being of fathers of children with developmental disabilities remains poorly understood. The present study examined depressive symptoms, pessimism, and coping in fathers of adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome (DS; n = 59), autism spectrum disorders (ASDs; n = 135), and fragile X syndrome (FXS; n = 46) Fathers of sons/daughters with ASDs reported a higher level of depressive symptoms than the other groups of fathers. Fathers of sons/daughters with DS reported a lower level of pessimism than the other groups of fathers. There were no group differences in paternal coping style. Group differences in paternal depressive symptoms and pessimism were, in part, related to differences in paternal age, the child's behavior problems, risk of having additional children with a disability, and maternal depressive symptoms. Findings from this study can be used to educate providers and design services for fathers during the later parenting years.

  19. Psychological Well-being in Fathers of Adolescents and Young Adults with Down Syndrome, Fragile X Syndrome, and Autism

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Sigan L.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Head, Lara; Abbeduto, Leonard

    2011-01-01

    The psychological well-being of fathers of children with developmental disabilities remains poorly understood. The present study examined depressive symptoms, pessimism, and coping in fathers of adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome (DS; n = 59), autism spectrum disorders (ASDs; n = 135), and fragile X syndrome (FXS; n = 46) Fathers of sons/daughters with ASDs reported a higher level of depressive symptoms than the other groups of fathers. Fathers of sons/daughters with DS reported a lower level of pessimism than the other groups of fathers. There were no group differences in paternal coping style. Group differences in paternal depressive symptoms and pessimism were, in part, related to differences in paternal age, the child’s behavior problems, risk of having additional children with a disability, and maternal depressive symptoms. Findings from this study can be used to educate providers and design services for fathers during the later parenting years. PMID:22611299

  20. Psychological Well-Being of Mothers and Siblings in Families of Girls and Women with Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cianfaglione, Rina; Hastings, Richard P.; Felce, David; Clarke, Angus; Kerr, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Few published studies have reported on the psychological well-being of family members of individuals with Rett syndrome (RTT). Eighty-seven mothers of girls and women with RTT completed a questionnaire survey about their daughters' behavioral phenotype, current health, and behavior problems, and their own and a sibling's well-being. Mothers…

  1. Long-term safety and efficacy of canakinumab in cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome: results from an open-label, phase III pivotal study in Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Shumpei; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Takada, Hidetoshi; Abrams, Ken; Lheritier, Karine; Heike, Toshio; Hara, Toshiro

    2017-01-01

    To assess the long-term safety and efficacy of canakinumab in Japanese patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS). In this open-label phase 3 study, Japanese patients aged ≥2 years with CAPS received canakinumab 2-8 mg/kg subcutaneously every 8 weeks. The duration of the core treatment phase was 24 weeks followed by 22 months extension phase. The primary objective was the proportion of patients free of clinical and serologic relapse at week 24. The study enrolled 19 Japanese patients (median age, 14 years; range, 2-48 years) with CAPS [MWS, 7 (36.8%); NOMID, 12 (63.2%)] for a median of 109 weeks. Fifteen patients (79%) achieved a complete response by day 15, 18 (94.7%) by week 24 and all by week 48. At the end of the study, 18 (95%) were free from relapse and 11 (57.9%) were assessed as having no disease activity by the PGA. Thirteen (68%) patients (MWS, 4; NOMID, 9) had their canakinumab dose increased during the trial. All patients experienced at least one adverse event (AE), the most common being infections (100%) and 5 (26.3%) reported serious AEs. No deaths were reported and the only patient who discontinued the study early withdrew consent. Regular canakinumab treatment every 8 weeks at dose levels from 2-8 mg/kg, based on the clinical need, represents a successful strategy to induce rapid and complete response while maintain long-term disease control in Japanese patients with CAPS. The safety profile of canakinumab was consistent with that observed from previous studies.

  2. Well-being in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Relationship to Symptoms and Psychological Distress.

    PubMed

    Jackson, H; MacLeod, A K

    2017-07-01

    There is growing recognition in psychology that wellness is more than the absence of disease and distress. Well-being has been defined in numerous ways. Two dominant models include Diener, Eunkook, Suh, Lucas and Smith's (1999) model of subjective well-being (SWB) and Ryff's (1989) model of psychological well-being (PWB). In contrast to the abundance of research investigating negative constructs and psychopathology in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), there has been a paucity of positive psychology studies. This study had two aims: to examine PWB and SWB and their relationship to symptoms in CFS and to compare PWB scores in a subgroup of the CFS sample to a matched control group. Chronic fatigue syndrome participants (n = 60) completed self-report scales of PWB, SWB, fatigue, anxiety and depression. PWB scores in a subgroup of the CFS sample (n = 42) were compared with those of a matched nonclinical control group (n = 42). Correlations between scales of symptoms and well-being were complex. Well-being dimensions were largely independent of physical components of fatigue but strongly related to psychological components of fatigue and psychological distress. Multiple regression indicated that five dimensions of well-being uniquely predicted symptomatology. Compared with the control group, the CFS group scored significantly lower on five of Ryff's six PWB dimensions, with particularly marked deficits in personal growth, environmental mastery and self-acceptance. This multidimensional assessment of well-being advances our understanding of CFS and offers new treatment targets. Future research must investigate whether interventions targeting theses well-being deficits can boost the efficacy of symptom-focused treatments. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Previous psychological research into CFS has largely focused on the identification of negative constructs and CBT, a treatment that targets evidenced-based negative constructs, has demonstrated efficacy

  3. Belief in a just world and subjective well-being: mothers of normal and Down syndrome children.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Iram; Suhail, Kausar

    2010-12-01

    A cross-sectional study examined the relationship between three dimensions of the belief in a just world and the subjective well-being of Pakistani mothers of normal and Down syndrome children (n = 100 each). Personal belief in a just world and two dimensions of general belief in a just world-beliefs in immanent and ultimate justice-were assessed along with four dimensions of subjective well-being: life satisfaction, mood, state anxiety, and depression. It was hypothesized that personal belief in a just world and belief in ultimate justice would be positively associated with subjective well-being for both groups of mothers. Results were obtained through moderated regression analyses. In line with our hypothesis, personal belief in a just world positively predicted life satisfaction and mood level and negatively predicted state anxiety and depression in both groups of mothers. In contrast, beliefs in immanent and ultimate justice were not consistently adaptive. In particular, the more the mothers of a Down syndrome child believed in immanent justice, the more anxiety they experienced the previous week. In addition, the more the mothers of normal children believed in ultimate justice, the more they experienced anxiety. The pattern of results persisted when controlled for mothers' education, the total number of their children and marital status. Overall, the results support the role of personal belief in a just world as a personal resource in adverse as well as normal life circumstances.

  4. Sexual life and sexual wellness in individuals with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome (MRKHS).

    PubMed

    Fliegner, Maike; Krupp, Kerstin; Brunner, Franziska; Rall, Katharina; Brucker, Sara Y; Briken, Peer; Richter-Appelt, Hertha

    2014-03-01

    Sexual wellness depends on a person's physical and psychological constitution. Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (CAIS) and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome (MRKHS) can compromise sexual well-being. To compare sexual well-being in CAIS and MRKHS using multiple measures: To assess sexual problems and perceived distress. To gain insight into participants' feelings of inadequacy in social and sexual situations, level of self-esteem and depression. To determine how these psychological factors relate to sexual (dys)function. To uncover what participants see as the source of their sexual problems. Data were collected using a paper-and-pencil questionnaire. Eleven individuals with CAIS and 49 with MRKHS with/without neovagina treatment were included. Rates of sexual dysfunctions, overall sexual function, feelings of inadequacy in social and sexual situations, self-esteem and depression scores were calculated. Categorizations were used to identify critical cases. Correlations between psychological variables and sexual function were computed. Sexually active subjects were compared with sexually not active participants. A qualitative content analysis was carried out to explore causes of sexual problems. An extended list of sexual problems based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed., text revision, by the American Psychiatric Association and related distress. Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), German Questionnaire on Feelings of Inadequacy in Social and Sexual Situations (FUSS social scale, FUSS sexual scale), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE), Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) subscale depression. Open question on alleged causes of sexual problems. The results point to a far-reaching lack of sexual confidence and sexual satisfaction in CAIS. In MRKHS apprehension in sexual situations is a source of distress, but sexual problems seem to be more focused on issues of vaginal functioning. MRKHS women report being satisfied with their

  5. A Rare Variant of Wallenberg’s Syndrome: Opalski syndrome

    PubMed Central

    KK, Parathan; P, Chitrambalam; Aiyappan, Senthil Kumar; N, Deepthi

    2014-01-01

    Lateral Medullary Syndrome (LMS) is a well-documented vascular syndrome of the posterior circulation territory. This syndrome is easily localised because of characteristic presentation, unique territory of blood supply and very small area of involvement. We present a case of Wallenberg’s syndrome which did not have all the classical components of the syndrome, like Horner’s syndrome. Opalski syndrome is a rare variant of Wallenberg syndrome, where lateral medullary syndrome is associated with ipsilateral hemiparesis. This case report highlights how differential involvement of the lateral part of medulla can result in varied presentation. PMID:25177595

  6. A cross-sectional study comparing lateral and diagonal maximum weight shift in people with stroke and healthy controls and the correlation with balance, gait and fear of falling

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Sarah; Beyens, Hilde; Dejaeger, Eddy; Verheyden, Geert

    2017-01-01

    Impaired balance is common post stroke and can be assessed by means of force-platforms measuring center of pressure (COP) displacements during static standing, or more dynamically during lateral maximum weight shift (MWS). However, activities of daily life also include diagonal MWS and since force platforms are nowadays commercially available, investigating lateral and diagonal MWS in a clinical setting might be feasible and clinically relevant. We investigated lateral and diagonal MWS while standing in patients with stroke (PwS) and healthy controls (HC), evaluated MWS towards the affected and the non-affected side for PwS and correlated MWS with measures of balance, gait and fear of falling. In a cross-sectional observational study including 36 ambulatory sub-acute inpatients and 32 age-matched HC, a force platform (BioRescue, RM Ingénierie, France) was used to measure lateral and diagonal MWS in standing. Clinical outcome measures collected were Berg Balance Scale and Community Balance and Mobility Scale (CBMS) for balance, 10-meter walk test (10MWT) for gait speed and Falls Efficacy Scale–international version for fear of falling. MWS for PwS towards the affected side was significantly smaller compared to HC (lateral: p = 0.029; diagonal-forward: p = 0.000). MWS for PwS was also significantly reduced towards the affected side in the diagonal-forward direction (p = 0.019) compared to the non-affected side of PwS. Strong correlations were found for MWS for PwS in the diagonal-forward direction towards the affected side, and clinical measures of balance (CBMS: r = 0.66) and gait speed (10MWT: r = 0.66). Our study showed that ambulatory sub-acute PwS, in comparison to HC, have decreased ability to shift their body weight diagonally forward in standing towards their affected side. This reduced ability is strongly related to clinical measures of balance and gait speed. Our results suggest that MWS in a diagonal-forward direction should receive attention in

  7. A cross-sectional study comparing lateral and diagonal maximum weight shift in people with stroke and healthy controls and the correlation with balance, gait and fear of falling.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Margaretha M; Meyer, Sarah; Sandstad, Solveig; Wiskerke, Evelyne; Thuwis, Rhea; Vandekerckhove, Chesny; Myny, Charlotte; Ghosh, Nitesh; Beyens, Hilde; Dejaeger, Eddy; Verheyden, Geert

    2017-01-01

    Impaired balance is common post stroke and can be assessed by means of force-platforms measuring center of pressure (COP) displacements during static standing, or more dynamically during lateral maximum weight shift (MWS). However, activities of daily life also include diagonal MWS and since force platforms are nowadays commercially available, investigating lateral and diagonal MWS in a clinical setting might be feasible and clinically relevant. We investigated lateral and diagonal MWS while standing in patients with stroke (PwS) and healthy controls (HC), evaluated MWS towards the affected and the non-affected side for PwS and correlated MWS with measures of balance, gait and fear of falling. In a cross-sectional observational study including 36 ambulatory sub-acute inpatients and 32 age-matched HC, a force platform (BioRescue, RM Ingénierie, France) was used to measure lateral and diagonal MWS in standing. Clinical outcome measures collected were Berg Balance Scale and Community Balance and Mobility Scale (CBMS) for balance, 10-meter walk test (10MWT) for gait speed and Falls Efficacy Scale-international version for fear of falling. MWS for PwS towards the affected side was significantly smaller compared to HC (lateral: p = 0.029; diagonal-forward: p = 0.000). MWS for PwS was also significantly reduced towards the affected side in the diagonal-forward direction (p = 0.019) compared to the non-affected side of PwS. Strong correlations were found for MWS for PwS in the diagonal-forward direction towards the affected side, and clinical measures of balance (CBMS: r = 0.66) and gait speed (10MWT: r = 0.66). Our study showed that ambulatory sub-acute PwS, in comparison to HC, have decreased ability to shift their body weight diagonally forward in standing towards their affected side. This reduced ability is strongly related to clinical measures of balance and gait speed. Our results suggest that MWS in a diagonal-forward direction should receive attention in

  8. Educator Toolkits on Second Victim Syndrome, Mindfulness and Meditation, and Positive Psychology: The 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit

    PubMed Central

    Smart, Jon; Zdradzinski, Michael; Roth, Sarah; Gende, Alecia; Conroy, Kylie; Battaglioli, Nicole

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Burnout, depression, and suicidality among residents of all specialties have become a critical focus of attention for the medical education community. Methods As part of the 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit in Las Vegas, Nevada, resident participants from 31 programs collaborated in the Educator Toolkit workgroup. Over a seven-month period leading up to the summit, this workgroup convened virtually in the Wellness Think Tank, an online resident community, to perform a literature review and draft curricular plans on three core wellness topics. These topics were second victim syndrome, mindfulness and meditation, and positive psychology. At the live summit event, the workgroup expanded to include residents outside the Wellness Think Tank to obtain a broader consensus of the evidence-based toolkits for these three topics. Results Three educator toolkits were developed. The second victim syndrome toolkit has four modules, each with a pre-reading material and a leader (educator) guide. In the mindfulness and meditation toolkit, there are three modules with a leader guide in addition to a longitudinal, guided meditation plan. The positive psychology toolkit has two modules, each with a leader guide and a PowerPoint slide set. These toolkits provide educators the necessary resources, reading materials, and lesson plans to implement didactic sessions in their residency curriculum. Conclusion Residents from across the world collaborated and convened to reach a consensus on high-yield—and potentially high-impact—lesson plans that programs can use to promote and improve resident wellness. These lesson plans may stand alone or be incorporated into a larger wellness curriculum. PMID:29560061

  9. Educator Toolkits on Second Victim Syndrome, Mindfulness and Meditation, and Positive Psychology: The 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit.

    PubMed

    Chung, Arlene S; Smart, Jon; Zdradzinski, Michael; Roth, Sarah; Gende, Alecia; Conroy, Kylie; Battaglioli, Nicole

    2018-03-01

    Burnout, depression, and suicidality among residents of all specialties have become a critical focus of attention for the medical education community. As part of the 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit in Las Vegas, Nevada, resident participants from 31 programs collaborated in the Educator Toolkit workgroup. Over a seven-month period leading up to the summit, this workgroup convened virtually in the Wellness Think Tank, an online resident community, to perform a literature review and draft curricular plans on three core wellness topics. These topics were second victim syndrome, mindfulness and meditation, and positive psychology. At the live summit event, the workgroup expanded to include residents outside the Wellness Think Tank to obtain a broader consensus of the evidence-based toolkits for these three topics. Three educator toolkits were developed. The second victim syndrome toolkit has four modules, each with a pre-reading material and a leader (educator) guide. In the mindfulness and meditation toolkit, there are three modules with a leader guide in addition to a longitudinal, guided meditation plan. The positive psychology toolkit has two modules, each with a leader guide and a PowerPoint slide set. These toolkits provide educators the necessary resources, reading materials, and lesson plans to implement didactic sessions in their residency curriculum. Residents from across the world collaborated and convened to reach a consensus on high-yield-and potentially high-impact-lesson plans that programs can use to promote and improve resident wellness. These lesson plans may stand alone or be incorporated into a larger wellness curriculum.

  10. Psychological Well-Being in Parents of Children with Angelman, Cornelia de Lange and Cri du Chat Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, G. M.; Hastings, R. P.; Oliver, C.; Howlin, P.; Moss, J.; Petty, J.; Tunnicliffe, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The current study focuses on mothers and fathers of children with three rare genetic syndromes that are relatively unexplored in terms of family experience: Angelman syndrome, Cornelia de Lange syndrome and Cri du Chat syndrome. Method: Parents of children with Angelman syndrome (n = 15), Cornelia de Lange syndrome (n = 16) and Cri du…

  11. Maternal Well-Being and Child Behavior in Families with Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Claire T.; Kover, Sara T.; Abbeduto, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the bidirectional relationshipsnetres behavioral functioning of children with fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability. Children with FXS commonly demonstrate challenging behavior related to anxiety, attention, and aggression, whereas mothers of children with FXS have been identified as susceptible to mental health disorders due to their status as genetic carriers of the FXS premutation, as well as the environmental stressors of raising children with special needs. The longitudinal design of this study builds upon prior work that established a concurrent relationship among these factors in families of children with other intellectual disorders. Findings indicated that maternal mental health status was not significantly related to changes in levels of child challenging behavior, child challenging behavior was related to changes in maternal depression over time, and heightened levels of child challenging behavior was related to increased feelings of maternal closeness toward the child over time. The unexpected nature of the result regarding maternal closeness provides new and more complex hypotheses about how mothers of special needs children demonstrate adaptation and resilience. The findings have implications for maternal and familial mental health treatment as well as future research. PMID:24984053

  12. Three-Dimensional Simulation of Traveling-Wave Tube Cold-Test Characteristics Using CST MICROWAVE STUDIO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, Christine T.; Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Kory, Carol L.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Cross, Andrew W.; Santana , Samuel

    2003-01-01

    The electromagnetic field simulation software package CST MICROWAVE STUDIO (MWS) was used to compute the cold-test parameters - frequency-phase dispersion, on-axis impedance, and attenuation - for a traveling-wave tube (TWT) slow-wave circuit. The results were compared to experimental data, as well as to results from MAFIA, another three-dimensional simulation code from CST currently used at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The strong agreement between cold-test parameters simulated with MWS and those measured experimentally demonstrates the potential of this code to reduce the time and cost of TWT development.

  13. Safe sleep practices and sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction: NICU and well-baby nursery graduates.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Aja J; Evans, Patricia W; Etchegaray, Jason M; Ottenbacher, Allison; Arnold, Cody

    2013-11-01

    Our primary objective was to compare parents of infants cared for in newborn intensive care units (NICUs) and infants cared for in well-baby ("general") nurseries with regard to knowledge and practice of safe sleep practices/sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction measures and guidelines. Our secondary objective was to obtain qualitative data regarding reasons for noncompliance in both populations. Sixty participants (30 from each population) completed our survey measuring safe sleep knowledge and practice. Parents of NICU infants reported using 2 safe sleep practices-(a) always placing baby in crib to sleep and (b) always placing baby on back to sleep-significantly more frequently than parents of well infants. Additional findings and implications for future studies are discussed.

  14. Mean wind speed persistence over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lei

    2018-07-01

    The wind speed persistence is an important factor in the assessment of wind energy potential. In this paper, we explore the persistence of Mean Wind Speed (MWS) with many years of record using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) over China. The results illustrate that there exist irregular high-frequency fluctuations for daily MWS anomaly records. Long-term persistence of MWS is found for all meteorological observed sites. We also make some numerical tests in order to verify the significance of long-term persistence by shuffling the data records many times. These facts prove that the MWS anomaly records have long-term persistence over all the stations in China. The mean value 0.64 in DFA-exponents for all stations over China is also obviously higher than the value 0.53 according to interval threshold of 95% confidence level after shuffling the MWS records many times. In addition, the values of scaling exponent vary from station to station over China. Long-term persistence of MWS in spatial distributions seems to be downward trends from east to west China. Many factors may affect long-term persistence of MWS such as southwest monsoon, Tibetan Plateau landform and atmosphere-ocean-land interaction and so on. Possible physical mechanism need further analysis in the future.

  15. Analysis of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) in German children: epidemiological, clinical and genetic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lainka, E; Neudorf, U; Lohse, P; Timmann, C; Bielak, M; Stojanov, S; Huss, K; von Kries, R; Niehues, T

    2010-11-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) are rare disorders belonging to the group of hereditary periodic fever (HPF)syndromes. These auto-inflammatory diseases(AID) are characterized by recurrent episodes of inflammation with attacks of fever variably associated with serosal, synovial and / or cutaneous inflammation, usually in a self-limiting manner, and with a mostly monogenic origin. The aims were to determine the incidence of CAPS and the spectrum of mutations in the NLRP3 (formerly= CIAS1) gene and to describe the clinical manifestations. A prospective surveillance of children with CAPS was conducted in Germany during a time period of 3 years(2003-2006). Monthly inquiries were sent to 370 children's hospitals by the German Paediatric Surveillance Unit (Clinic-ESPED, n1) and to 2 laboratories (Laboratory-ESPED, n2). Inclusion criteria were children ≤ 16 years of age, disease-associated NLRP3 mutation, more than 3 self-limiting episodes of fever > 38.5 ° C, and increased inflammation markers. Clinical, epidemiological and genetic data were evaluated via questionnaires. 6 out of 14 patients were identified in Clinic-ESPED (n1) and 13 / 14 in Laboratory-ESPED(n2). Clinical and laboratory surveys overlapped in 5 of 14 cases. The incidence of CAPS in German children was estimated to be 3.43 per 10⁷ person-years. The patients carried 11 different NLRP3 mutations and were classified as MWS(n = 6), CINCA (n = 4), FCAS (n = 1) and undefined CAPS (n = 3). The incidence of CAPS in Germany is very low and corresponds to 2-7 newly diagnosed patients ≤ 16 years per year. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Mathematical Working Space and Paradigms as an Analysis Tool for the Teaching and Learning of Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgadillo, Elizabeth Montoya; Vivier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical working space (MWS) is a model that is used in research in mathematics education, particularly in the field of geometry. Some MWS elements are independent of the field while other elements must be adapted to the field in question. In this paper, we develop the MWS model for the field of analysis with an identification of paradigms. We…

  17. A Comparison of Three-Dimensional Simulations of Traveling-Wave Tube Cold-Test Characteristics Using CST MICROWAVE STUDIO and MAFIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, C. T.; Herrmann, K. A.; Kory, C. L.; Wilson, J. D.; Cross, A. W.; Williams, W. D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Previously, it was shown that MAFIA (solutions of Maxwell's equations by the Finite Integration Algorithm), a three-dimensional simulation code, can be used to produce accurate cold-test characteristics including frequency-phase dispersion, interaction impedance, and attenuation for traveling-wave tube (TWT) slow-wave structures. In an effort to improve user-friendliness and simulation time, a model was developed to compute the cold-test parameters using the electromagnetic field simulation software package CST MICROWAVE STUDIO (MWS). Cold-test parameters were calculated for several slow-wave circuits including a ferruled coupled-cavity, a folded waveguide, and a novel finned-ladder circuit using both MWS and MAFIA. Comparisons indicate that MWS provides more accurate cold-test data with significantly reduced simulation times. Both MAFIA and MWS are based on the finite integration (FI) method; however, MWS has several advantages over MAFIA. First, it has a Windows based interface for PC operation, making it very user-friendly, whereas MAFIA is UNIX based. MWS uses a new Perfect Boundary Approximation (PBA), which increases the accuracy of the simulations by avoiding stair step approximations associated with MAFIA's representation of structures. Finally, MWS includes a Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) compatible macro language that enables the simulation process to be automated and allows for the optimization of user-defined goal functions, such as interaction impedance.

  18. [Gardner syndrome--parent alienation syndrome (PAS). Diagnosis or family reality?].

    PubMed

    Namysłowska, Irena; Heitzman, Janusz; Siewierska, Anna

    2009-01-01

    The authors present characteristics of Parental Alienation Syndrome (PAS) proposed by Gardner as well as data, which may help to differentiate that syndrome with real psychological, physical and sexual abuse. The consequences of Gardner Syndrome for legal decisions in the court cases of child custody and the critique of this syndrome in forensic and psychiatric literature are also discussed, and several questions posed. Authors propose to treat Gardner Syndrome not as as a child disorder but as a specific, dynamic family situation, which occurs sometimes, during divorce and fight about child custody.

  19. Maternal well-being and child behavior in families with fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Claire T; Kover, Sara T; Abbeduto, Leonard

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the bidirectional relationships relationship between maternal mental health status, maternal stress, family environment and behavioral functioning of children with fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability. Children with FXS commonly demonstrate challenging behavior related to anxiety, attention, and aggression, whereas mothers of children with FXS have been identified as susceptible to mental health challenges due to their status as genetic carriers of the FXS premutation, as well as the environmental stressors of raising children with special needs. The longitudinal design of this study builds upon prior work that established a concurrent relationship among these factors in families of children with other intellectual disorders. Findings indicated that maternal mental health status was not significantly related to changes in levels of child challenging behavior, heightened child challenging behavior was related to improvements in maternal depression over time, and heightened levels of child challenging behavior was related to increased feelings of maternal closeness toward the child over time. The unexpected nature of the results regarding maternal depression and closeness provides new and more complex hypotheses about how mothers of special needs children demonstrate adaptation and resilience. The findings have implications for maternal and familial mental health treatment as well as future research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bilateral symmetrical adrenal hypermetabolism on FDG PET/CT due to Cushing syndrome in well differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aktas, G E; Soyluoglu Demir, S; Sarikaya, A

    2016-01-01

    The (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan has been suggested for whole-body imaging to identify ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone secreting tumours, but there are some challenges involved. The case of a patient is presented, who was admitted with the pre-diagnosis of ectopic ACTH syndrome. On the CT, a nodular lesion was detected in the medial segment of the right lung. The FDG uptake of the lesion seemed to be increased visually, but was not pathological quantitatively (SUVmax: 1.8) on the PET/CT. There was also diffuse increased uptake (SUVmax: 14.2) in the enlarged adrenal glands. The lesion was reported as a possible malignant lesion with low FDG affinity, such as a low grade neuroendocrine tumour, while the diffuse enlarged adrenal glands with high uptake were interpreted as diffusely hyperplasic, due to Cushing's syndrome. The patient was treated with a surgical wedge resection. The histopathological diagnosis confirmed that the tumour was a grade 1 well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  1. Concurrent Van der Woude syndrome and Turner syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Los, Evan; Baines, Hayley; Guttmann-Bauman, Ines

    2017-01-01

    Most cases of Van der Woude syndrome are caused by a mutation to interferon regulatory factor 6 on chromosome 1. Turner syndrome is caused by complete or partial absence of the second sex chromosome in girls. We describe a unique case of the two syndromes occurring concurrently though apparently independently in a girl with Van der Woude syndrome diagnosed at birth and Turner syndrome at 14 years 9 months. Short stature was initially misattributed to Van der Woude syndrome and pituitary insufficiency associated with clefts before correctly diagnosing Turner syndrome. We discuss the prevalence of delayed diagnosis of Turner syndrome, the rarity of reports of concurrent autosomal chromosome mutation and sex chromosome deletion, as well as the need to consider the diagnosis of Turner syndrome in all girls with short stature regardless of prior medical history.

  2. [Prevention of the refeeding syndrome].

    PubMed

    Martínez Núñez, Maria E; Hernández Muniesa, B

    2010-01-01

    The refeeding syndrome can be defined as the metabolic alterations developed by the rapid nutrition repletion (oral, enteral as well as parenteral feeding) of severaly malnourished patients. Refeeding syndrome is a potentially fatal clinical condition and it is often underdiagnosed on non-specialized nutrition units. The most important key for its prevention is to identify patients at high risk for developing refeeding syndrome, before nutrition repletion. The present case describes the steps to prevent the refeeding syndrome as well as the clinical recommendations to restart nutrition support.

  3. Perinatal features of the RASopathies: Noonan syndrome, cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome and Costello syndrome.

    PubMed

    Myers, Angela; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Brennan, Marie-Luise; Curry, Cynthia; Esplin, Edward D; Fisher, Jamie; Homeyer, Margaret; Manning, Melanie A; Muller, Eric A; Niemi, Anna-Kaisa; Seaver, Laurie H; Hintz, Susan R; Hudgins, Louanne

    2014-11-01

    The RASopathies are a family of developmental disorders caused by heritable defects of the RAS/MAPK signaling pathway. While the postnatal presentation of this group of disorders is well known, the prenatal and neonatal findings are less widely recognized. We report on the perinatal presentation of 10 patients with Noonan syndrome (NS), nine with Cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFCS) and three with Costello syndrome (CS), in conjunction with the results of a comprehensive literature review. The majority of perinatal findings in NS, CS, and CFCS are shared: polyhydramnios; prematurity; lymphatic dysplasia; macrosomia; relative macrocephaly; respiratory distress; hypotonia, as well as cardiac and renal anomalies. In contrast, fetal arrhythmia and neonatal hypoglycemia are relatively specific to CS. NS, CS, and CFCS should all be considered as a possible diagnosis in pregnancies with a normal karyotype and ultrasound findings of a RASopathy. Recognition of the common perinatal findings of these disorders should facilitate both their prenatal and neonatal diagnosis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Prostatitis Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, J. Curtis

    1991-01-01

    The many prostatitis syndromes remain a frustrating enigma to family physicians as well as specialists. An understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of these syndromes and a rigorous diagnostic plan to properly classify the patients at first presentation are essential to a successful treatment outcome. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:21229071

  5. Polycystic ovary syndrome and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ali, Aus Tariq

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous disorder, where the main clinical features include menstrual irregularities, sub-fertility, hyperandrogenism, and hirsutism. The prevalence of PCOS depends on ethnicity, environmental and genetic factors, as well as the criteria used to define it. On the other hand, metabolic syndrome is a constellation of metabolic disorders which include mainly abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, impaired glucose metabolism, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. These associated disorders directly increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DMT2), coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and endometrial cancer. Many patients with PCOS have features of metabolic syndrome such as visceral obesity, hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance. These place patients with PCOS under high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), Type 2 diabetes (DMT2) and gynecological cancer, in particular, endometrial cancer. Metabolic syndrome is also increased in infertile women with PCOS. The aim of this review is to provide clear and up to date information about PCOS and its relationship with metabolic syndrome, and the possible interaction between different metabolic disorders.

  6. Orographic effects related to deep convection events over the Andes region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hierro, R.; Pessano, H.; Llamedo, P.; de la Torre, A.; Alexander, P.; Odiard, A.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we analyze a set of 39 storms which took place between 2006 and 2011 over the South of Mendoza, Argentina. This is a semiarid region situated at mid-latitudes (roughly between 32S and 36S) at the east of the highest Andes tops which constitutes a natural laboratory where diverse sources of gravity waves usually take place. We consider a cultivated subregion near San Rafael district, where every summer a systematic generation of deep convection events is registered. We propose that the lift mechanism required to raise a parcel to its level of free convection is partially supplied by mountain waves (MWs). From Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model simulations and radar network data, we calculate the evolution of convective available potential energy and convective inhibition indices during the development of each storm. Global Final Analysis is used to construct initial and boundary conditions. Convective inhibition indices are compared with the vertical kinetic energy capable of being supplied by the MWs, in order to provide a rough estimation of this possible triggering mechanism. Vertical velocity is chosen as an appropriate dynamical variable to evidence the presence of MWs in the vicinity of each detected first radar echo. After establishing a criterion based on a previous work to represent MWs, the 39 storms are split into two subsets: with and without the presence of MWs. 12 cases with considerable MWs amplitude are retained and considered. Radar data differences between the two samples are analyzed and the simulated MWs are characterized.

  7. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.

  8. Physiological Traits Associated with Wheat Yield Potential and Performance under Water-Stress in a Mediterranean Environment

    PubMed Central

    del Pozo, Alejandro; Yáñez, Alejandra; Matus, Iván A.; Tapia, Gerardo; Castillo, Dalma; Sanchez-Jardón, Laura; Araus, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Different physiological traits have been proposed as key traits associated with yield potential as well as performance under water stress. The aim of this paper is to examine the genotypic variability of leaf chlorophyll, stem water-soluble carbohydrate content and carbon isotope discrimination (Δ13C), and their relationship with grain yield (GY) and other agronomical traits, under contrasting water conditions in a Mediterranean environment. The study was performed on a large collection of 384 wheat genotypes grown under water stress (WS, rainfed), mild water stress (MWS, deficit irrigation), and full irrigation (FI). The average GY of two growing seasons was 2.4, 4.8, and 8.9 Mg ha−1 under WS, MWS, and FI, respectively. Chlorophyll content at anthesis was positively correlated with GY (except under FI in 2011) and the agronomical components kernels per spike (KS) and thousand kernel weight (TKW). The WSC content at anthesis (WSCCa) was negatively correlated with spikes per square meter (SM2), but positively correlated with KS and TKW under WS and FI conditions. As a consequence, the relationships between WSCCa with GY were low or not significant. Therefore, selecting for high stem WSC would not necessary lead to genotypes of GY potential. The relationship between Δ13C and GY was positive under FI and MWS but negative under severe WS (in 2011), indicating higher water use under yield potential and MWS conditions. PMID:27458470

  9. Physiological Traits Associated with Wheat Yield Potential and Performance under Water-Stress in a Mediterranean Environment.

    PubMed

    Del Pozo, Alejandro; Yáñez, Alejandra; Matus, Iván A; Tapia, Gerardo; Castillo, Dalma; Sanchez-Jardón, Laura; Araus, José L

    2016-01-01

    Different physiological traits have been proposed as key traits associated with yield potential as well as performance under water stress. The aim of this paper is to examine the genotypic variability of leaf chlorophyll, stem water-soluble carbohydrate content and carbon isotope discrimination (Δ(13)C), and their relationship with grain yield (GY) and other agronomical traits, under contrasting water conditions in a Mediterranean environment. The study was performed on a large collection of 384 wheat genotypes grown under water stress (WS, rainfed), mild water stress (MWS, deficit irrigation), and full irrigation (FI). The average GY of two growing seasons was 2.4, 4.8, and 8.9 Mg ha(-1) under WS, MWS, and FI, respectively. Chlorophyll content at anthesis was positively correlated with GY (except under FI in 2011) and the agronomical components kernels per spike (KS) and thousand kernel weight (TKW). The WSC content at anthesis (WSCCa) was negatively correlated with spikes per square meter (SM2), but positively correlated with KS and TKW under WS and FI conditions. As a consequence, the relationships between WSCCa with GY were low or not significant. Therefore, selecting for high stem WSC would not necessary lead to genotypes of GY potential. The relationship between Δ(13)C and GY was positive under FI and MWS but negative under severe WS (in 2011), indicating higher water use under yield potential and MWS conditions.

  10. [Klinefelter's syndrome associated with mixed connective tissue disease (Sharp's syndrome) and thrombophilia with postthrombotic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kasten, Robert; Pfirrmann, Gudrun; Voigtländer, Volker

    2005-08-01

    A 43-year-old male with eunuchoid body proportions and a history of deep venous thromboses in the right leg presented with recurrent ulcers in the right perimalleolar region for 6 years. Karyotyping revealed a 47 XXY Klinefelter's syndrome, while serologic testing showed protein S deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia and positive lupus anticoagulant. He also had mixed connective tissue disease (Sharp's syndrome) with acrosclerosis, proximal finger edema, Raynaud's phenomenon, and high titers of ANA and U1-RNP-antibodies, as well as osteoporosis. There is evidence that patients with Klinefelter's syndrome are prone to develop connective tissue diseases and thrombophilia as a result of low androgen levels. Substitution of testosterone in Klinefelter's syndrome can have a favorable therapeutic effect on the associated connective tissue disease, thrombophilia and osteoporosis.

  11. Munchausen syndrome and Munchausen syndrome by proxy: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Sousa Filho, Daniel de; Kanomata, Elton Yoji; Feldman, Ricardo Jonathan; Maluf Neto, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    The Munchausen syndrome and Munchausen syndrome by proxy are factitious disorders characterized by fabrication or induction of signs or symptoms of a disease, as well as alteration of laboratory tests. People with this syndrome pretend that they are sick and tend to seek treatment, without secondary gains, at different care facilities. Both syndromes are well-recognized conditions described in the literature since 1951. They are frequently observed by health teams in clinics, hospital wards and emergency rooms. We performed a narrative, nonsystematic review of the literature, including case reports, case series, and review articles indexed in MEDLINE/PubMed from 1951 to 2015. Each study was reviewed by two psychiatry specialists, who selected, by consensus, the studies to be included in the review. Although Munchausen syndrome was first described more than 60 years ago, most of studies in the literature about it are case reports and literature reviews. Literature lacks more consistent studies about this syndrome epidemiology, therapeutic management and prognosis. Undoubtedly, these conditions generate high costs and unnecessary procedures in health care facilities, and their underdiagnose might be for lack of health professional's knowledge about them, and to the high incidence of countertransference to these patients and to others, who are exposed to high morbidity and mortality, is due to symptoms imposed on self or on others.

  12. Munchausen syndrome and Munchausen syndrome by proxy: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Daniel; Kanomata, Elton Yoji; Feldman, Ricardo Jonathan; Maluf, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Munchausen syndrome and Munchausen syndrome by proxy are factitious disorders characterized by fabrication or induction of signs or symptoms of a disease, as well as alteration of laboratory tests. People with this syndrome pretend that they are sick and tend to seek treatment, without secondary gains, at different care facilities. Both syndromes are well-recognized conditions described in the literature since 1951. They are frequently observed by health teams in clinics, hospital wards and emergency rooms. We performed a narrative, nonsystematic review of the literature, including case reports, case series, and review articles indexed in MEDLINE/PubMed from 1951 to 2015. Each study was reviewed by two psychiatry specialists, who selected, by consensus, the studies to be included in the review. Although Munchausen syndrome was first described more than 60 years ago, most of studies in the literature about it are case reports and literature reviews. Literature lacks more consistent studies about this syndrome epidemiology, therapeutic management and prognosis. Undoubtedly, these conditions generate high costs and unnecessary procedures in health care facilities, and their underdiagnose might be for lack of health professional's knowledge about them, and to the high incidence of countertransference to these patients and to others, who are exposed to high morbidity and mortality, is due to symptoms imposed on self or on others. PMID:29364370

  13. Three patients with hemophagocytic syndrome who developed acute organic brain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shinno, Hideto; Hikasa, Satoshi; Matsuoka, Tatsuo; Fujita, Hidekazu; Yamamoto, Osamu; Takebayashi, Minoru; Uchida, Youzou; Nishiura, Tetsuo; Horiguchi, Jun

    2006-01-01

    We describe three patients with hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) who developed acute organic brain syndrome. All three presented with high-grade fever and twilight state, and were admitted to our hospital. After admission, delirium developed in all three. As delirium improved, various other psychiatric symptoms, including hallucinations, agitation, hypoactivity, affective lability and insomnia, were noted. When treated with steroid hormones, immunoglobulin and neuroleptics, all patients demonstrated improvement in their psychiatric symptoms, as well as in their general condition and laboratory findings. Ultimately, they all recovered and were discharged. It needs to be noted that organic brain syndrome might be observed at the onset of HPS. Consequently, early diagnosis and treatment for psychiatric symptoms, as well as for HPS, are crucial.

  14. Optical and structural properties of individual Co-doped ZnO microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomys, O. F.; Strelchuk, V. V.; Rarata, S. V.; Hayn, R.; Savoyant, A.; Giovannelli, F.; Delorme, F.; Tkach, V.

    2018-06-01

    The Co-doped ZnO microwires (MWs) were grown using the optical furnace method. We used Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarized micro-Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) and optical absorption spectroscopy to systematic investigation of the optical and structural properties of Co-doped ZnO MWs. The SEM analysis reveals that Co-doped ZnO MWs has hexagonal facets and cavity inside. The EDS results confirmed the presence and non-uniform distribution of Co impurities in the samples. Co doping of ZnO MWs leads to the decreased intensity, drastically broadening and high-energy shift of the NBE PL band. The red emission band at 1.85 eV originates from 2E(2G) → 4A2 (4F) intra-3d-transition of Co2+ in the ZnO lattice has been observed. The intense structured absorption bands within the near infrared ranges 3800-4800 and 5500-9000 cm-1 are caused by electronic spin-allowed transitions 4T2(F) ← 4A2(F) and 4T1(F) ← 4A2(F) of the tetrahedrally coordinated Co2+ (3 d7) ions substituting Zn2+ ions in Co-doped ZnO MWs. Micro-Raman studies of Co doped ZnO MWs show doping/disorder induced additional modes as compared to the undoped sample. The resonant enhancement of the additional local Co-related A1-symmetry Raman mode is observed in the parallel polarization geometry y(z , z) ybar . For the Co doped ZnO MWs, the enhancement of the additional Co-related local vibration mode with an increase in the excitation photon energy is also observed in the Raman spectra.

  15. Telotristat ethyl: proof of principle and the first oral agent in the management of well-differentiated metastatic neuroendocrine tumor and carcinoid syndrome diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Masab, Muhammad; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2017-12-01

    Metastatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are associated with carcinoid syndrome that is typically characterized by diarrhea, cutaneous flushing and bronchospasm. Treatment with somatostatin analogues (SSA) improves the symptom burden but a significant proportion of patients stop responding to SSA therapy eventually. Novel agents with the potential to effectively control the symptoms are urgently needed. This article reviews an in-depth analysis of the phase I-III clinical trials determining the clinical rationale for the use of tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, telotristat ethyl in patients with well-differentiated metastatic NETs and uncontrolled carcinoid syndrome. Telotristat ethyl has already been approved for the treatment of inadequately controlled carcinoid syndrome symptoms in metastatic NET patients on SSA therapy. Results from multiple phase I-III clinical studies of telotristat ethyl therapy have reported a significant decrease in the daily bowel movement frequency, increase in quality of life and the subsequent decrease in annual health costs related to carcinoid syndrome symptoms in NET patients. The associated decrease in urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (u5-HIAA) provides evidence that telotristat ethyl effectively decreases serotonin production, and therefore, offers a rationale to investigate this agent to mitigate serotonin-mediated complications in this patient population, especially cardiac valvular disease or mesenteric fibrosis.

  16. Gorlin-goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Dn; Raval, N; Patadiya, H; Tarsariya, V

    2014-03-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused due to mutations in the patched gene found on chromosome arm 9 q. It shows high penetrance and variable expressivity; is characterized by basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts, palmar and/or plantar pits and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri. Until date, very few cases of GGS have been reported in India. Early diagnosis and treatment as well as genetic counseling are essential for this syndrome. A rare case report of a patient with characteristic features of GGS diagnosed at a rural dental college of Gujarat, India is presented here. This case report draws attention of the valuable role of dentist in diagnosis and early management of this syndrome.

  17. [Hypovitaminosis D and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Miñambres, Inka; de Leiva, Alberto; Pérez, Antonio

    2014-12-23

    Metabolic syndrome and hypovitaminosis D are 2 diseases with high prevalence that share several risk factors, while epidemiological evidence shows they are associated. Although the mechanisms involved in this association are not well established, hypovitaminosis D is associated with insulin resistance, decreased insulin secretion and activation of the renin-angiotensin system, mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome. However, the apparent ineffectiveness of vitamin D supplementation on metabolic syndrome components, as well as the limited information about the effect of improving metabolic syndrome components on vitamin D concentrations, does not clarify the direction and the mechanisms involved in the causal relationship between these 2 pathologies. Overall, because of the high prevalence and the epidemiological association between both diseases, hypovitaminosis D could be considered a component of the metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, DN; Raval, N; Patadiya, H; Tarsariya, V

    2014-01-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused due to mutations in the patched gene found on chromosome arm 9 q. It shows high penetrance and variable expressivity; is characterized by basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts, palmar and/or plantar pits and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri. Until date, very few cases of GGS have been reported in India. Early diagnosis and treatment as well as genetic counseling are essential for this syndrome. A rare case report of a patient with characteristic features of GGS diagnosed at a rural dental college of Gujarat, India is presented here. This case report draws attention of the valuable role of dentist in diagnosis and early management of this syndrome. PMID:24761254

  19. Evaluation of high-temperature and short-time sterilization of injection ampules by microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, K; Honda, W; Miyake, Y

    1998-01-01

    The high-temperature and short-time sterilization by microwave heating with a continuous microwave sterilizer (MWS) was evaluated. The evaluation were performed with respect to: [1] lethal effect against microorganisms corresponding to F-value, and [2] reliability of MWS sterilization process. Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 spores were used as the biological indicator and the heat-resistance of spores was evaluated with conventional heating method (121-129 degrees C). In MWS sterilization (125-135 degrees C), the actual lethal effect against B. stearothermophilus spores was almost in agreement with the F-value and the survival curve against the F-value was quite consistent with that for the autoclave. These results suggest that the actual lethal effect could be estimated by the F-value with heat-resistance parameters of spores from lower than actual temperatures and that there was no nonthermal effect of the microwave on B. stearothermophilus spores. The reliability of sterilization with the MWS was confirmed using more than 25,000 test ampules containing biological indicators. All biological indicators were killed, thus the present study shows that the MWS was completely reliable for all ampules.

  20. Refeeding syndrome: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Ormerod, Clare; Farrer, Kirstine; Harper, Lindsay; Lal, Simon

    2010-12-01

    Refeeding syndrome can result in a wide variety of complications and may be life threatening. Although well described in hospital practice, refeeding syndrome is often under-recognized and inadequately treated.

  1. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other major and minor traumas — such as surgery, heart attacks, infections and even sprained ankles — can also lead to complex regional pain syndrome. It's not well-understood why these injuries can trigger complex regional pain syndrome. Not everyone who has ...

  2. Obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome in adults with Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Key points Adults with Down syndrome are predisposed to obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) due to overlap between the Down syndrome phenotype and OSAHS risk factors. The prevalence of OSAHS in adults with Down syndrome is estimated at 35–42%. This is up to ten-times higher than in the general adult population. Symptoms of OSAHS, including behavioural and emotional disturbances as well as standard symptoms such as sleepiness, should be monitored as part of regular health surveillance in adults with Down syndrome. There is evidence that the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in adults with Down syndrome and comorbid OSAHS can lead to significant improvements in subjective sleepiness, behaviour and cognitive function, though further large-scale trials are required. Educational aims To discuss the relationship between the phenotypic features of Down syndrome and the risk factors for obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS). To examine the prevalence of OSAHS in adults with Down syndrome. To review recent research into the effectiveness of treatment of OSAHS in adults with Down syndrome using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) is characterised by repeated cycles of upper airway obstruction during sleep, leading to diurnal symptoms. Individuals with Down syndrome are predisposed to OSAHS due to overlap between the Down syndrome phenotype and OSAHS risk factors. Recent large studies using subjective and objective measures estimate that OSAHS affects around 40% of adults with Down syndrome, in contrast to 2–4% of the general adult population. The “double-hit” of comorbid Down syndrome and OSAHS may accelerate cognitive decline in adults with Down syndrome. However, with the appropriate care and support, OSAHS can be treated effectively in this group using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, improving daytime function and behaviour

  3. Obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome in adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hill, Elizabeth A

    2016-12-01

    Adults with Down syndrome are predisposed to obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) due to overlap between the Down syndrome phenotype and OSAHS risk factors.The prevalence of OSAHS in adults with Down syndrome is estimated at 35-42%. This is up to ten-times higher than in the general adult population.Symptoms of OSAHS, including behavioural and emotional disturbances as well as standard symptoms such as sleepiness, should be monitored as part of regular health surveillance in adults with Down syndrome.There is evidence that the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in adults with Down syndrome and comorbid OSAHS can lead to significant improvements in subjective sleepiness, behaviour and cognitive function, though further large-scale trials are required. To discuss the relationship between the phenotypic features of Down syndrome and the risk factors for obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS).To examine the prevalence of OSAHS in adults with Down syndrome.To review recent research into the effectiveness of treatment of OSAHS in adults with Down syndrome using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) is characterised by repeated cycles of upper airway obstruction during sleep, leading to diurnal symptoms. Individuals with Down syndrome are predisposed to OSAHS due to overlap between the Down syndrome phenotype and OSAHS risk factors. Recent large studies using subjective and objective measures estimate that OSAHS affects around 40% of adults with Down syndrome, in contrast to 2-4% of the general adult population. The "double-hit" of comorbid Down syndrome and OSAHS may accelerate cognitive decline in adults with Down syndrome. However, with the appropriate care and support, OSAHS can be treated effectively in this group using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, improving daytime function and behaviour. Symptoms of OSAHS should be routinely

  4. Serotonin syndrome versus neuroleptic malignant syndrome: a challenging clinical quandary

    PubMed Central

    Dosi, Rupal; Ambaliya, Annirudh; Joshi, Harshal; Patell, Rushad

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome are two drug toxidromes that have often overlapping and confusing clinical pictures. We report a case of a young man who presented with alteration of mental status, autonomic instability and neuromuscular hyperexcitability following ingestion of multiple psychiatric and antiepileptic medications. The patient satisfied criteria for serotonin syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and based on the characteristic clinical features, laboratory findings and clinical course it was concluded that the patient had both toxidromes. The patient was managed with cyproheptadine and supportive measures, and recovered over the course of 3 weeks. A brief review of literature highlighting the diagnostic clues as well as the importance of recognising and distinguishing the often missed and confounding diagnoses follows. PMID:24957740

  5. Syndromic Disorders with Short Stature

    PubMed Central

    Şıklar, Zeynep; Berberoğlu, Merih

    2014-01-01

    Short stature is one of the major components of many dysmorphic syndromes. Growth failure may be due to a wide variety of mechanisms, either related to the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor axis or to underlying unknown pathologies. In this review, the relatively more frequently seen syndromes with short stature (Noonan syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Silver-Russell syndrome and Aarskog-Scott syndrome) were discussed. These disorders are associated with a number of endocrinopathies, as well as with developmental, systemic and behavioral issues. At present, GH therapy is used in most syndromic disorders, although long-term studies evaluating this treatment are insufficient and some controversies exist with regard to GH dose, optimal age to begin therapy and adverse effects. Before starting GH treatment, patients with syndromic disorders should be evaluated extensively. PMID:24637303

  6. Management of postpolio syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thorsteinsson, G

    1997-07-01

    Recent research has shed light on the pathogenesis of the postpolio syndrome and has helped explain its symptoms and the rationale for management. The aim of this article is to familiarize physicians with this syndrome. The history, acute infection, definition, and diagnosis are discussed, as well as the various symptoms and their management. People with postpolio syndrome can educate health professionals about this condition and can help others inflicted with this syndrome. Thus far, no cure is available. A correct diagnosis is important, and the physician must realize that severe comorbidities tend to afflict people with this syndrome. Numerous management options are available to help these people enjoy a high quality of life.

  7. Poland's syndrome and military personnel.

    PubMed

    Phaltankar, P M; Langdon, J; Clasper, J

    2003-12-01

    We describe three cases of undiagnosed Poland's syndrome in Army personnel and discuss their fitness according to the PULHHEEMS system. This syndrome has variable clinical features that include unilateral chest wall and upper limb abnormalities. The syndrome is not hereditary and is of unknown origin. If the syndrome was diagnosed prior to enlistment the potential recruit would normally be graded P8, and unfit to enlist. However, these individuals had managed to pass routine medical examination as well as successfully complete basic training. The suitability of continuation in the army of personnel with Poland's syndrome is discussed.

  8. Laugier-Hunziker-Baran syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yago, Kaori; Tanaka, Yoichi; Asanami, Soichiro

    2008-08-01

    Laugier-Hunziker-Baran syndrome represents a rare acquired pigmentary disorder which has no relevance to internal disorders and has no familial association. There are few reports on histopathologic studies of this syndrome concerning Japanese individuals. The differential diagnosis of oral and pigmented lesions between Laugier-Hunziker-Baran syndrome and other disorders, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome in particular, requires our utmost consideration. Biopsy specimens of 2 cases were taken from pigmented maculae on the lower lips, buccal mucosa, tongue, and palate. Similar histopathologic findings were observed for all locations. The histopathologic examination showed that there was an accumulation of melanin in the basal layer as well as an increase in the number of melanophages in the subepithelial area. Oral scientists and clinicians must be familiar with Laugier-Hunziker-Baran syndrome, because this syndrome is probably more common than is generally recognized.

  9. Musical ear syndrome in adult cochlear implant patients.

    PubMed

    Low, W-K; Tham, C A; D'Souza, V-D; Teng, S-W

    2013-09-01

    Except for a single case report, musical ear syndrome in cochlear implantees has not been studied. We aimed to study the prevalence and nature of musical ear syndrome among adult cochlear implant patients, as well as the effect on their emotional well-being. STUDY DESIGN, PATIENTS AND INTERVENTION: A cross-sectional survey of patients aged 18 years and above who had received cochlear implants for profound hearing loss between 1997 and 2010. Of the 82 patients studied, 18 (22 per cent) were found to have experienced musical ear syndrome. Seven and 11 patients had musical ear syndrome prior to and after cochlear implantation, respectively. The character of musical ear syndrome symptoms was described as instrumental music (n = 2), singing (6) or both (10). Fourteen patients reported an adverse emotional effect, with three expressing ‘intolerance’. In this study, 22 per cent of cochlear implantees experienced musical ear syndrome. These symptoms affected patients’ emotional state, but most coped well. Musical ear syndrome can occur prior to and after cochlear implantation.

  10. Cognitive and behavioral heterogeneity in genetic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, Luiz F L; Steiner, Carlos E; Celeri, Eloisa H R V; Banzato, Claudio E M; Dalgalarrondo, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    this study aimed to investigate the cognitive and behavioral profiles, as well as the psychiatric symptoms and disorders in children with three different genetic syndromes with similar sociocultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. thirty-four children aged 6 to 16 years, with Williams-Beuren syndrome (n=10), Prader-Willi syndrome (n=11), and Fragile X syndrome (n=13) from the outpatient clinics of Child Psychiatry and Medical Genetics Department were cognitively assessed through the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-III). Afterwards, a full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ), verbal IQ, performance IQ, standard subtest scores, as well as frequency of psychiatric symptoms and disorders were compared among the three syndromes. significant differences were found among the syndromes concerning verbal IQ and verbal and performance subtests. Post-hoc analysis demonstrated that vocabulary and comprehension subtest scores were significantly higher in Williams-Beuren syndrome in comparison with Prader-Willi and Fragile X syndromes, and block design and object assembly scores were significantly higher in Prader-Willi syndrome compared with Williams-Beuren and Fragile X syndromes. Additionally, there were significant differences between the syndromes concerning behavioral features and psychiatric symptoms. The Prader-Willi syndrome group presented a higher frequency of hyperphagia and self-injurious behaviors. The Fragile X syndrome group showed a higher frequency of social interaction deficits; such difference nearly reached statistical significance. the three genetic syndromes exhibited distinctive cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric patterns. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. [The refeeding syndrome].

    PubMed

    Lambers, Wietske M; Kraaijenbrink, Bastiaan; Siegert, Carl E H

    2015-01-01

    The refeeding syndrome may occur during reintroduction of carbohydrates in malnourished patients. This syndrome is characterized by reduced plasma electrolyte levels, hypophosphataemia being most prevalent. The symptoms can vary from minor symptoms to severe neurological or cardiac symptoms. The pathophysiological mechanism comprises an increase in insulin levels, resulting in shifts of phosphate, potassium and magnesium into the intracellular environment, as well as fluid retention and relative deficiency of vitamin B1. There is growing interest in the screening and treatment of patients with malnutrition, due to which the incidence of refeeding syndrome is probably increasing. Currently, there is no single definition of this syndrome and therefore there is no solid scientific basis for screening and treatment. In this article we describe the rationale for screening and additional laboratory investigations. A prospective, controlled trial is important to define the clinical relevance of the refeeding syndrome and optimize its treatment.

  12. A Mindfulness-Based Health Wellness Program for an Adolescent with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Ashvind N.; Winton, Alan S. W.; Singh, Judy; McAleavey, Kristen M.; Adkins, Angela D.

    2008-01-01

    Individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome have hyperphagia, a characteristic eating disorder defined by a marked delay in the satiety response when compared to controls. This eating disorder has been particularly difficult to control. The authors taught and evaluated effectiveness of regular exercise alone, regular exercise plus healthy eating, and…

  13. Preschool Children with Intellectual Disability: Syndrome Specificity, Behaviour Problems, and Maternal Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenhower, A. S.; Baker, B. L.; Blacher, J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Children with intellectual disability (ID) are at heightened risk for behaviour problems and diagnosed mental disorder. Likewise, mothers of children with ID are more stressed than mothers of typically developing children. Research on behavioural phenotypes suggests that different syndromes of ID may be associated with distinct child…

  14. Usher syndrome type III can mimic other types of Usher syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pennings, Ronald J E; Fields, Randall R; Huygen, Patrick L M; Deutman, August F; Kimberling, William J; Cremers, Cor W R J

    2003-06-01

    Clinical and genetic characteristics are presented of 2 patients from a Dutch Usher syndrome type III family who have a new homozygous USH3 gene mutation: 149-152delCAGG + insTGTCCAAT. One individual (IV:1) is profoundly hearing impaired and has normal vestibular function and retinitis punctata albescens (RPA). The other individual is also profoundly hearing impaired, but has well-developed speech, vestibular areflexia, and retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento (RPSP). These findings suggest that Usher syndrome type III can be clinically misdiagnosed as either Usher type I or II; that Usher syndrome patients who are profoundly hearing impaired and have normal vestibular function should be tested for USH3 mutations; and that RPA and RPSP can occur as fundoscopic manifestations of pigmentary retinopathy in Usher syndrome.

  15. DRESS syndrome with thrombotic microangiopathy revealing a Noonan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bobot, Mickaël; Coen, Matteo; Simon, Clémentine; Daniel, Laurent; Habib, Gilbert; Serratrice, Jacques

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: The life-threatening drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome occurs most commonly after exposure to drugs, clinical features mimic those found with other serious systemic disorders. It is rarely associated with thrombotic microangiopathy. Patient concerns: We describe the unique case of a 44-year-old man who simultaneously experienced DRESS syndrome with thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) after a 5 days treatment with fluindione. Diagnoses: Clinical evaluation leads to the discovery of an underlying lymphangiomatosis, due to a Noonan syndrome. Intervetions: The anticoagulant was withdrawn, and corticosteroids (1 mg/kg/day) and acenocoumarol were started. Outcomes: Clinical improvement ensued. At follow-up the patient is well. Lessons: The association of DRESS with TMA is a rare condition; we believe that the presence of the underlying Noonan syndrome could have been the trigger. Moreover, we speculate about the potential interrelations between these entities. PMID:29642153

  16. [Congenital sensorineural deafness and associated syndromes].

    PubMed

    Moatti, L; Garabedian, E N; Lacombe, H; Spir-Jacob, C

    1990-01-01

    The etiology of perceptive deafness, especially the congenital variety, requires investigation. The presence of a variety of signs associated with deafness constitutes an "associated syndrome" and helps to define a possible genetic origin. These syndromes only represent a small percentage of overall causes of deafness in children, since at most they account for only 10% of cases. Certain syndromes are encountered more often or are well known, others are extremely rare or have only been described recently. The authors report six of these very rare syndromes discovered among their patients: a KID syndrome, a Leopard syndrome, a Norrie syndrome, a Jervell and Lange Nielsen syndrome, a recently described entity called CEE with deafness and an External Neuro-Cochleo-Pancreatic syndrome which would not appear to have been previously described.

  17. Red ear syndrome.

    PubMed

    Purdy, R Allan; Dodick, David W

    2007-08-01

    The red ear syndrome is a rare syndrome originally described by Lance in 1994. It involves pain in and around the ear and associated autonomic phenomena, the most significant of which is cutaneous erythema of the ear ipsilateral to the pain and obvious to the patient and examiner during the attack. It may well represent an auriculo-autonomic cephalgia and/or be part of the group of disorders recognized as trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias. As a syndrome, it still lacks specificity in regard to etiology, mechanisms, and treatment but is important to recognize clinically because of its associations.

  18. Congenital heart diseases and cardiovascular abnormalities in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: From well-established knowledge to new frontiers.

    PubMed

    Unolt, Marta; Versacci, Paolo; Anaclerio, Silvia; Lambiase, Caterina; Calcagni, Giulio; Trezzi, Matteo; Carotti, Adriano; Crowley, Terrence Blaine; Zackai, Elaine H; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Gaynor, James William; Digilio, Maria Cristina; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Marino, Bruno

    2018-04-16

    Congenital heart diseases (CHDs) and cardiovascular abnormalities are one of the pillars of clinical diagnosis of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) and still represent the main cause of mortality in the affected children. In the past 30 years, much progress has been made in describing the anatomical patterns of CHD, in improving their diagnosis, medical treatment, and surgical procedures for these conditions, as well as in understanding the underlying genetic and developmental mechanisms. However, further studies are still needed to better determine the true prevalence of CHDs in 22q11.2DS, including data from prenatal studies and on the adult population, to further clarify the genetic mechanisms behind the high variability of phenotypic expression of 22q11.2DS, and to fully understand the mechanism responsible for the increased postoperative morbidity and for the premature death of these patients. Moreover, the increased life expectancy of persons with 22q11.2DS allowed the expansion of the adult population that poses new challenges for clinicians such as acquired cardiovascular problems and complexity related to multisystemic comorbidity. In this review, we provide a comprehensive review of the existing literature about 22q11.2DS in order to summarize the knowledge gained in the past years of clinical experience and research, as well as to identify the remaining gaps in comprehension of this syndrome and the possible future research directions. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. SAPHO syndrome associated spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Masato; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Misawa, Haruo; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Takahata, Tomohiro; Nakahara, Hiroyuki; Nakahara, Shinnosuke; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2008-01-01

    The concept of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome has been well clarified, after Chamot et al. suggested this peculiar disorder in 1987. The most commonly affected site in SAPHO syndrome is the anterior chest, followed by the spine. However, the clinical course and taxonomic concept of SAPHO spinal lesions are poorly understood. This study was performed to analyze: (1) the detailed clinical course of spinal lesions in SAPHO syndrome, and (2) the relationship between SAPHO syndrome with spinal lesions and seronegative spondyloarthropathy. Thirteen patients with spondylitis in SAPHO syndrome were analyzed. The features of spinal lesions were a chronic onset with a slight inflammatory reaction, and slowly progressing non-marginal syndesmophytes at multi spinal levels, besides the coexistence of specific skin lesions. SAPHO syndrome, especially spinal lesions related to palmoplantar pustulosis, can be recognized as a subtype of seronegative spondyloarthropathy. PMID:18642032

  20. Accounting for the Down syndrome advantage?

    PubMed

    Esbensen, Anna J; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined factors that could explain the higher levels of psychosocial well being observed in past research in mothers of individuals with Down syndrome compared with mothers of individuals with other types of intellectual disabilities. The authors studied 155 mothers of adults with Down syndrome, contrasting factors that might validly account for the ?Down syndrome advantage? (behavioral phenotype) with those that have been portrayed in past research as artifactual (maternal age, social supports). The behavioral phenotype predicted less pessimism, more life satisfaction, and a better quality of the mother?child relationship. However, younger maternal age and fewer social supports, as well as the behavioral phenotype, predicted higher levels of caregiving burden. Implications for future research on families of individuals with Down syndrome are discussed.

  1. Management of moyamoya syndrome in patients with Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mihir; Choudhri, Omar A; Feroze, Abdullah H; Do, Huy M; Grant, Gerald A; Steinberg, Gary K

    2016-06-01

    A few isolated reports have described an association between Noonan syndrome and cerebrovascular abnormalities, including moyamoya syndrome. These reports have been limited to pediatric patients presenting with recurrent transient ischemic attacks (TIA) or headaches. Management has primarily been pharmacologic, with only one prior report of surgical revascularization to our knowledge. We report four cases of Noonan syndrome patients presenting with headaches and/or sensorimotor strokes in childhood that caused unilateral sensorimotor impairment. Cerebral angiography and MRI revealed bilateral moyamoya syndrome. All patients underwent successful bilateral extracranial-to-intracranial revascularization. The first patient was a 10-year-old girl who presented following a hemorrhagic stroke and recovered well after indirect bypass. The second patient was an adult with a history of childhood stroke whose symptoms progressed in adulthood. She underwent a direct bypass and improved, but continued to experience TIA at her 4 year follow-up. The third patient was a 7-year-old girl with headaches and a new onset TIA who failed pharmacological therapy and subsequently underwent bilateral indirect bypass. The fourth patient was a 24-year-old woman with worsening headaches and an occluded left middle cerebral artery from unilateral moyamoya syndrome. A left sided direct bypass was completed given delayed MRI perfusion with poor augmentation. To our knowledge these are the first reported surgical cases of combined Noonan and moyamoya syndrome. These cases highlight the need to recognize moyamoya syndrome in patients with Noonan syndrome. Early surgical revascularization should be pursued in order to prevent symptom progression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Vismodegib hedgehog-signaling inhibition and treatment of basal cell carcinomas as well as keratocystic odontogenic tumors in Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Booms, Patrick; Harth, Marc; Sader, Robert; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Vismodegib hedgehog signaling inhibition treatment has potential for reducing the burden of multiple skin basal cell carcinomas and jaw keratocystic odontogenic tumors. They are major criteria for the diagnosis of Gorlin syndrome, also called nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Clinical features of Gorlin syndrome are reported, and the relevance of hedgehog signaling pathway inhibition by oral vismodegib for maxillofacial surgeons is highlighted. In summary, progressed basal cell carcinoma lesions are virtually inoperable. Keratocystic odontogenic tumors have an aggressive behavior including rapid growth and extension into adjacent tissues. Interestingly, nearly complete regression of multiple Gorlin syndrome-associated keratocystic odontogenic tumors following treatment with vismodegib. Due to radio-hypersensitivity in Gorlin syndrome, avoidance of treatment by radiotherapy is strongly recommended for all affected individuals. Vismodegib can help in those instances where radiation is contra-indicated, or the lesions are inoperable. The effect of vismodegib on basal cell carcinomas was associated with a significant decrease in hedgehog-signaling and tumor proliferation. Vismodegib, a new and approved drug for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma, is a specific oncogene inhibitor. It also seems to be effective for treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors and basal cell carcinomas in Gorlin syndrome, rendering the surgical resections less challenging.

  3. Re-examining Nelson's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Nadine E; Ananthakrishnan, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    Nelson's syndrome is a rare complication that can occur during the course of management of Cushing's disease. This article summarizes the recent literature on the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of this potentially life-threatening outcome. Nelson's syndrome, with rising adrenocorticotropin hormone levels and corticotroph tumor progression on diagnostic imaging, can develop following treatment of refractory Cushing's disease with total bilateral adrenalectomy with/without radiotherapy. However, data showing that radiotherapy prevents Nelson's syndrome is inconsistent. In addition to the treatment of Nelson's syndrome with neurosurgery with/without adjuvant radiotherapy, selective somatostatin analogs and dopamine agonists, as well as other novel agents, have been used with increasing frequency in treating cases of Nelson's syndrome with limited benefit. The risk-benefit profile of each of these therapies is still not completely understood. Consensus guidelines on the evaluation and management of Nelson's syndrome are lacking. This article highlights areas in the surveillance of Cushing's disease patients, and diagnostic criteria and treatment regimens for Nelson's syndrome that require further research and review by experts in the field.

  4. Calcineurin-inhibitor pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prommer, Eric

    2012-07-01

    There has been increased recognition of calcineurin, a phosphoprotein serine/threonine phosphatase enzyme, in the regulation of many physiologic systems. Calcineurin mediates activation of lymphocytes, which play a role in immune response. Widely distributed in the central nervous system, calcinuerin also plays an important role in sensory neural function, via its role in the regulation of newly discovered 2-pore potassium channels, which greatly influence neuronal resting membrane potentials. Calcinuerin inhibition is the mechanism of action of immunomodulatory drugs such as cyclosporine and tacrolimus, which are widely used in transplantation medicine to prevent rejection. While important for immunosuppression, the use of calcineurin inhibitors has been associated with the development of a new pain syndrome called the calcineurin pain syndrome, which appears to be an untoward complication of the interruption of the physiologic function of calcineurin. This is a narrative review focusing on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, characterization of a newly recognized pain syndrome associated with the use of calcineurin inhibitors. The use of immunosuppressants however is associated with several well-known toxicities to which the calcineurin pain syndrome can be added. The development of this syndrome most likely involves altered nociceptive processing due to the effect of calcineurin inhibition on neuronal firing, as well as effects of calcineurin on vascular tone. The most striking aspect of the treatment of this syndrome is the response to calcium channel blockers, which suggest that the effects of calcineurin inhibition on vascular tone play an important role in the development of the calcineurin pain syndrome. The calcineurin syndrome is a newly recognized complication associated with the use of calcineurin inhibitors. There is no standard therapy at this time but anecdotal reports suggest the effectiveness of calcium channel blockers.

  5. Rett syndrome and menstruation.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Amy; Marshal, Michael P; Sucato, Gina S; Murray, Pamela J

    2012-04-01

    Describe the experience that girls with Rett syndrome have with menstruation including menstrual hygiene, dysmenorrhea, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), and attempts at treatment. Anonymous web-based survey. Convenience sample recruited from Rett syndrome LISTSERV in July of 2009. Mothers of girls with Rett syndrome between the ages of 10-25 who have had at least one menses. Prevalence, frequency, and severity of dysmenorrhea and PMS; hygiene concerns; and treatments attempts and perceived effectiveness. Dysmenorrhea and PMS are common problems among young women with Rett syndrome. Despite their frequency and severity they do not routinely limit activities. Multiple treatment attempts are common. Hormonal contraception is used mostly for menstrual cycle control with oral contraceptive pills the most commonly used method. Young women with Rett syndrome have standard symptoms of dysmenorrhea and PMS as well as autism spectrum specific PMS symptoms. Hormonal contraception is commonly used for menstrual management. Copyright © 2012 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor therapy to prevent complications as well as therapy for Ehler-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sastry, P S R K

    2002-09-01

    Matrixmetalloproteinase inhibitors have been developed as anti-cancer agents. Their usage in pancreatic cancer and other such malignancies is under trial at present. An interesting undesired-effect of one of these agents is contracture of the hand. Ehler-Danlos syndrome is an inherited group of diseases with varying types. At present there is no known treatment or prevention for the complications associated with this inherited condition. Sometimes it is the adverse events of a drug, which provides an insight into its efficacy for another indication. It is hereby being hypothesized that the matrixmetalloproteinase inhibitors especially marimastat may be an effective drug for treatment of Ehler-Danlos syndrome and/or prevention of its major complications.

  7. [Antisynthetase syndrome without muscle involvement].

    PubMed

    Júdez Navarro, Enrique; Martínez Carretero, Myriam; Martínez Jiménez, Gonzalo Fidel

    2007-11-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome is a well defined syndrome characterized by the presence of interstitial lung disease in association with arthritis, miositis, mechanic's hands and Ruynaud's phenomenon in the presence of antisynthetase antibodies, especially Ac anti-Jo1. We described the case of a 68-year-old man with this syndrome in the absence of inflammatory muscle disease. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier España S.L Barcelona. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Connecting Our Gut Feeling and How Our Gut Feels: The Role of Well-being Attributes in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Ashkan; Banton, Dwaine; Keefer, Laurie

    2018-04-30

    There is a close relationship between the mind and gut in the pathogenesis of functional bowel disorders. Common psychological disturbances such as depression and anxiety are not uncommon in those with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). There is little research investigating the role of positive psychology and gastrointestinal (GI) conditions. In this pilot study we investigated the well-being attributes in those with and without IBS. We used an anonymous online survey and recruited 416 study subjects using social media as the main method of recruitment. We gathered demographic information, GI symptoms, history of mental health issues such as anxiety and depression, assessed several well-being attributes, and finally assessed subjective well-being. We hypothesized that those with GI symptoms and IBS have lower scores in their well-being attributes compared to healthy controls. We observed that a history of anxiety and depression is significantly associated with GI symptoms and IBS. In addition, sense of subjective well-being and several well-being attributes are negatively associated with GI symptoms and/or IBS. Of interest, the household income showed a negative correlation with the prevalence of GI symptoms and IBS. Subjective well-being, and several well-being attributes that contribute to the sense of overall contentment, are negatively associated with GI symptoms and IBS. The link between subjective well-being, and GI symptoms and IBS are independent of anxiety and depression. Well-being attributes and sense of subjective well-being may be a contributory factor in clinical expression of GI symptoms or IBS consistent with the biopsychosocial model of the disease.

  9. Temperament in Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antshel, K. M.; Stallone, K.; AbdulSabur, N.; Shprintzen, R.; Roizen, N.; Higgins, A. M.; Kates, W. R.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) is a microdeletion syndrome caused by a 22q11.2 chromosomal deletion. Methods: In this study, parents reported on their own temperament as well as the temperament of their child. Sixty-seven children with VCFS (mean age = 10.8, SD = 2.8; range 6-15), and age-, race- and gender-ratio matched samples of…

  10. Optic disc dysplasia in poland syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maxfield, Steven D; Strominger, Mitchell B

    2014-06-01

    To report optic disc dysplasia in a case of Poland syndrome. Non-interventional case report. A 2-year-old boy with Poland syndrome was referred for ophthalmic evaluation after abnormal optic discs were found on exam. Physical exam at birth revealed right-sided aplasia of the pectoralis major muscle, symbrachydactyly, hypoplastic scapula, and an abnormal third rib. On dilated examination the optic nerve heads were dysplastic. The findings included multiple cilioretinal vessels, situs inversus, inferotemporal excavation, and surrounding pigmentary disturbances. Only one case of optic disc anomaly has been reported in Poland syndrome and was described as morning glory syndrome. The optic discs in our patient do not fit well with other optic disc excavation syndromes but are most reminiscent of those in papillorenal syndrome. As both Poland syndrome and papillorenal syndrome share vascular dysfunction as a possible etiology, this case adds to the literature of vascular dysgenesis in Poland syndrome.

  11. Fluency disorders in genetic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of these syndromes indicated clients diagnosed with these syndromes do show evidence of nonfluency patterns, but not all would be considered stuttering. Many of the syndromes are marked by degrees of mental retardation that probably contribute to a higher than average prevalence of stuttering, as well as a higher than average prevalence of other fluency disorders (when compared to the population at large). An in-depth analysis of the available data indicates that some of these genetic syndromes show patterns of stuttering that may be indicative of only that syndrome (or similar syndromes) that can be differentially diagnosed from developmental stuttering. Among these patterns are the word-final nonfluencies noted in Prader-Willi syndrome; the presence of stuttering in the absence of secondary behaviors noted in Prader-Willi syndrome and; the presence of palilalia, word-final and word-medial nonfluencies, and word-medial and word-final nonfluencies in Tourette syndrome. Implications for future research are discussed in light of these findings. The reader will be able to: (1) describe the various different genetic syndromes that are associated with fluency disorders; (2) describe the types of nonfluencies that are associated with the major types of genetic syndromes that have fluency disorders; (3) describe the behaviors that may assist in differentially diagnosing different types of speech characteristics associated with various genetic syndromes.

  12. [Refeeding syndrome: practical issues].

    PubMed

    Buzzi, M; Limonta, A; Pichard, C; Stirnemann, J

    2015-10-14

    The refeeding syndrome is frequent and potentially deadly, still it is underdiagnosed. It is defined by clinical and biological manifestations that are seen upon refeeding of malnourished patients. It is the consequence of the transition from catabolism to anabolism. Ions intracellular shift caused by insulin and B1 vitamin deficiency are fundamental in the development of this syndrome. Riskconditions are well summarized by the NICE criteria. To avoid refeeding syndrome, it is fundamental to find and correct any electrolytic deficiency and to give thiamine before starting a slow and progressive oral, enteral or parenteral refeeding.

  13. Mathematical Working Spaces in Schooling: An Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuzniak, Alain; Tanguay, Denis; Elia, Iliada

    2016-01-01

    The theoretical and methodological model of Mathematical Working Space (MWS) is introduced in this paper. For over 10 years, the model has been the object of collaborative research among various researchers, generally coming from French and Spanish speaking countries. Articulating epistemological and cognitive aspects, the MWS model is aimed at…

  14. Scleral lens use in dry eye syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bavinger, J Clay; DeLoss, Karen; Mian, Shahzad I

    2015-07-01

    Dry eye syndrome can be difficult to manage in severe or refractory cases. In patients in whom traditional treatments have limited efficacy, alternative treatments may be considered for dry eye syndrome, including scleral lenses. The present review summarizes the evidence regarding scleral lens use in dry eye syndrome. Scleral lenses have become a viable option for severe dry eye syndrome, and have been shown to be efficacious and well tolerated, with most reports citing improved visual acuity and relief of symptoms. Currently, there are 18 manufacturers of scleral lenses, although published reports on scleral lenses primarily focus on the BostonSight PROSE and the Jupiter Lens. Scleral lenses are efficacious and well tolerated for use in severe dry eye syndrome. Further research is needed to compare different sizes and types of lenses, and to standardize outcome measures.

  15. DRESS syndrome with thrombotic microangiopathy revealing a Noonan syndrome: Case report.

    PubMed

    Bobot, Mickaël; Coen, Matteo; Simon, Clémentine; Daniel, Laurent; Habib, Gilbert; Serratrice, Jacques

    2018-04-01

    The life-threatening drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome occurs most commonly after exposure to drugs, clinical features mimic those found with other serious systemic disorders. It is rarely associated with thrombotic microangiopathy. We describe the unique case of a 44-year-old man who simultaneously experienced DRESS syndrome with thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) after a 5 days treatment with fluindione. Clinical evaluation leads to the discovery of an underlying lymphangiomatosis, due to a Noonan syndrome. The anticoagulant was withdrawn, and corticosteroids (1 mg/kg/day) and acenocoumarol were started. Clinical improvement ensued. At follow-up the patient is well. The association of DRESS with TMA is a rare condition; we believe that the presence of the underlying Noonan syndrome could have been the trigger. Moreover, we speculate about the potential interrelations between these entities.

  16. Marfan Syndrome: A Clinical Update.

    PubMed

    Bitterman, Adam D; Sponseller, Paul D

    2017-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a connective tissue disorder that can affect many organ systems. Affected patients present with orthopaedic manifestations of the syndrome during all phases of life. Pain caused by musculoskeletal abnormalities often requires definitive orthopaedic treatment. Orthopaedic surgeons must understand the phenotypes of Marfan syndrome so they can recognize when screening is warranted and can appropriately address the skeletal manifestations. Through medical advancements, patients with Marfan syndrome are living longer and more active lives. Knowledge of the latest diagnostic criteria for the disorder, as well as of advances in understanding the skeletal phenotype, clinical trials of medication therapy, and lifestyle considerations is important for orthopaedic surgeons who treat these patients because these clinicians often are the first to suspect Marfan syndrome and recommend screening.

  17. Overall Management of Patients with Dravet Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceulemans, Berten

    2011-01-01

    Dravet syndrome, or as it was called in the past "severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy", is a drug-resistant epilepsy first described by Charlotte Dravet in 1978. Besides the well-known and well-described therapy resistance, Dravet syndrome dramatically impacts the development and behaviour of the affected children. As it is still not a curable…

  18. Kindler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ashton, G H S

    2004-03-01

    Kindler syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive skin fragility disorder characterized by blistering in infancy, followed by photosensitivity and progressive poikiloderma. Ultrastructural examination reveals marked basement membrane reduplication and variable levels of cleavage at the dermal-epidermal junction. The molecular pathology underlying Kindler syndrome has recently been shown to involve loss-of-function mutations in a novel gene, KIND1, encoding kindlin-1. Immunofluorescence, gene expression and cell biology studies have shown that kindlin-1 is expressed mainly in basal keratinocytes and plays a role in the attachment of the actin cytoskeleton via focal contacts to the extracellular matrix. Thus, Kindler syndrome is the first genodermatosis caused by a defect in actin-extracellular matrix linkage rather than the classic keratin-extracellular matrix linkage underlying the pathology of other inherited skin fragility disorders such as epidermolysis bullosa. This article reviews the clinical features as well as the molecular and cellular pathology of Kindler syndrome and highlights the importance of the new protein, kindlin-1, in cell-matrix adhesion and its intriguing link to photosensitivity.

  19. Episodic Syndromes That May Be Associated With Migraine: A.K.A. "the Childhood Periodic Syndromes".

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Amy A

    2015-01-01

    Previously called "childhood periodic syndromes that are commonly precursors of migraine" in International Headache Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD)-II, these disorders were renamed "episodic syndromes that may be associated with migraine" in ICHD-III beta. The specific disorders reviewed in this article include: benign paroxysmal torticollis, benign paroxysmal vertigo, abdominal migraine, and cyclical vomiting syndrome, as well as infantile colic, which was recently added under the appendix section in ICHD-III beta. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  20. Calcium-Alkali Syndrome in the Modern Era

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ami M.; Adeseun, Gbemisola A.; Goldfarb, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    The ingestion of calcium, along with alkali, results in a well-described triad of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and renal insufficiency. Over time, the epidemiology and root cause of the syndrome have shifted, such that the disorder, originally called the milk-alkali syndrome, is now better described as the calcium-alkali syndrome. The calcium-alkali syndrome is an important cause of morbidity that may be on the rise, an unintended consequence of shifts in calcium and vitamin D intake in segments of the population. We review the pathophysiology of the calcium-alkali syndrome. PMID:24288027

  1. The Role of Government and NGO in Promoting Wellness of People with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiar, Yeo Kee; Handayani, Lina; Xi, Lu

    2014-01-01

    People with Down Syndrome (PWDS) experience cognitive delays indicated by difficulties with cognition, long-term memory and non-verbal problem solving skills. PWDS have specific speech and language impairments which affect all aspects of development. Some children develop difficult behaviors which cause family stress and affect social and…

  2. Correlates of HIV Testing Experience among Migrant Workers from Myanmar Residing in Thailand: A Secondary Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Musumari, Patou Masika; Chamchan, Chalermpol

    2016-01-01

    Background Thailand continues to attract an increasing number of migrant workers (MW) from neighboring countries including mainly Myanmar, Cambodia, and Laos; however, little is known about the extent to which MWs from these countries have access to HIV prevention, treatment, and care services. We used data from the baseline survey of the Prevention of HIV/AIDS among MWs in Thailand (PHAMIT-2) project to document the prevalence of, and factors associated with, HIV testing among MWs from Myanmar, the largest group of MWs in Thailand. Methods and Findings The baseline survey of PHAMIT-2 was conducted in 2010 among MWs from Myanmar, Cambodia, and Laos in 10 purposely-selected provinces of Thailand. Of the 1,034 participants who qualified for the analysis to identify correlates of HIV testing, only 5.3% reported ever having been tested for HIV. Factors associated with HIV testing included having a secondary or higher education level (AOR, 2.58; CI, 1.36–4.90; P = 0.004), being female (AOR, 1.96; CI, 1.05–3.66; P = 0.033), knowing someone who died of AIDS (AOR, 1.81; CI, 1.00–3.27; P = 0.048), working in the fishery sector (AOR, 2.51; CI, 1.28–4.92; P = 0.007), and not having a work permit (AOR, 3.71; CI, 1.36–10.13; P = 0.010). Conclusion Our study, in addition to revealing significantly low HIV testing among MWs from Myanmar, identifies important barriers to HIV testing which could be addressed through interventions that promote migrants’ culturally-sensitive and friendly service, for example by facilitating flow of information about places for HIV testing, availability of language assistance, and ensuring confidentiality of HIV testing. PMID:27138960

  3. L-3 Com AVISYS civil aviation self-protection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Jim

    2006-05-01

    In early 2004, L-3 Com AVISYS Corporation (hereinafter referred to as L-3 AVISYS or AVISYS) completed a contract for the integration and deployment of an advanced Infrared Countermeasures self-protection suite for a Head of State Airbus A340 aircraft. This initial L-3 AVISYS IRCM Suite was named WIPPS (Widebody Integrated Platform Protection System). The A340 WIPPS installation provisions were FAA certified with the initial deployment of the modified aircraft. WIPPS is unique in that it utilizes a dual integrated missile warning subsystem to produce a robust, multi-spectral, ultra-low false alarm rate threat warning capability. WIPPS utilizes the Thales MWS-20 Pulsed Doppler Radar Active MWS and the EADS AN/AAR-60 Ultraviolet Passive MWS. These MWS subsystems are integrated through an L-3 AVISYS Electronic Warfare Control Set (EWCS). The EWCS also integrates the WIPPS MWS threat warning information with the A340 flight computer data to optimize ALE-47 Countermeasure Dispensing System IR decoy dispensing commands, program selection and timing. WIPPS utilizes standard and advanced IR Decoys produced by ARMTEC Defense and Alloy Surfaces. WIPPS demonstrated that when IR decoy dispensing is controlled by threat range and time-to-go information provided by an Active MWS, unsurpassed self protection levels are achievable. Recognizing the need for high volume civil aviation protection, L-3 AVISYS configured a variant of WIPPS optimized for commercial airline reliability requirements, safety requirements, supportability and most importantly, affordability. L-3 AVISYS refers to this IRCM suite as CAPS (Commercial Airliner Protection System). CAPS has been configured for applications to all civil aircraft ranging from the small Regional Jets to the largest Wide-bodies. This presentation and paper will provide an overview of the initial WIPPS IRCM Suite and the important factors that were considered in defining the CAPS configuration.

  4. Genetic Modifiers of the Physical Malformations in Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome/DiGeorge Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2008-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS), the most common micro-deletion disorder in humans, is characterized by craniofacial, parathyroid, and thymic defects as well as cardiac outflow tract malformations. Most patients have a similar hemizygous 3 million base pair deletion on 22q11.2. Studies in mouse have shown that "Tbx1", a…

  5. [A patient with Noonan syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bins, A; Gortzak, R A Th

    2013-12-01

    Noonan syndrome is a relatively common autosomal dominant genetic disorder which is characterised by typical facial features, congenital heart diseases and small stature. In 50% of the cases the syndrome is caused by a mutation on the PTPN11-gen. The expression of symptoms associated with Noonan syndrome can be very mild in nature and facial features usually become less pronounced with age, which can sometimes make a correct diagnosis more difficult. Despite a wide range of associated symptoms most adults with Noonan syndrome can be self-sustaining, with a good quality of life. It is important that the dentist is well-informed about this syndrome due to the heart diseases and bleeding disorders which can be present with these patients and may influence a dentist's choice of therapy when invasive treatment is indicated.

  6. The Medicare Annual Wellness Visit.

    PubMed

    Colburn, Jessica L; Nothelle, Stephanie

    2018-02-01

    The Medicare Annual Wellness Visit is an annual preventive health benefit, which was created in 2011 as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The visit provides an opportunity for clinicians to review preventive health recommendations and screen for geriatric syndromes. In this article, the authors review the requirements of the Annual Wellness Visit, discuss ways to use the Annual Wellness Visit to improve the care of geriatric patients, and provide suggestions for how to incorporate this benefit into a busy clinic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Heart transplantation for Churg-Strauss syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, D; Chamsi-Pasha, H; Hasleton, P

    1989-01-01

    A patient with heart failure caused by Churg-Strauss syndrome was successfully treated with transplantation. The case was unusual because there was little evidence of Churg-Strauss syndrome in the lung. The patient remains well on standard transplant immunotherapy. Images Figure PMID:2590597

  8. Catatonia, Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome, and Cotard Syndrome in a 22-Year-Old Woman: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, C.; Santander, J.; Torres, R.

    2013-01-01

    The following case study describes a 22-year-old woman with depression and symptoms of psychosis who developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome after using Risperidone, thus requiring life support equipment and Bromocriptine, later recovering after seven days. From a psychiatric and neurological point of view, however, the persistence of catatonic syndrome and Cotard syndrome delusions was observed, based on assertions such as “I do not have a heart,” “my heart is not beating,” “I can not breathe,” “I am breaking apart,” “I have no head” (ideas of negation) and statements about the patient being responsible for the “death of the whole world” (ideas of enormity). Brain NMR revealed leukoencephalopathy, interpreted as scar lesions caused by perinatal neurological damage, after discarding other pathologies. The patient responded well to electroconvulsive therapy after 11 sessions. Organic vulnerability to these syndromes, as well as their coexistence and clinical differentiation is discussed in the light of the data observed. PMID:24093068

  9. Catatonia, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and cotard syndrome in a 22-year-old woman: a case report.

    PubMed

    Weiss, C; Santander, J; Torres, R

    2013-01-01

    The following case study describes a 22-year-old woman with depression and symptoms of psychosis who developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome after using Risperidone, thus requiring life support equipment and Bromocriptine, later recovering after seven days. From a psychiatric and neurological point of view, however, the persistence of catatonic syndrome and Cotard syndrome delusions was observed, based on assertions such as "I do not have a heart," "my heart is not beating," "I can not breathe," "I am breaking apart," "I have no head" (ideas of negation) and statements about the patient being responsible for the "death of the whole world" (ideas of enormity). Brain NMR revealed leukoencephalopathy, interpreted as scar lesions caused by perinatal neurological damage, after discarding other pathologies. The patient responded well to electroconvulsive therapy after 11 sessions. Organic vulnerability to these syndromes, as well as their coexistence and clinical differentiation is discussed in the light of the data observed.

  10. Exploding head syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sharpless, Brian A

    2014-12-01

    Exploding head syndrome is characterized by the perception of abrupt, loud noises when going to sleep or waking up. They are usually painless, but associated with fear and distress. In spite of the fact that its characteristic symptomatology was first described approximately 150 y ago, exploding head syndrome has received relatively little empirical and clinical attention. Therefore, a comprehensive review of the scientific literature using Medline, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, and PubMed was undertaken. After first discussing the history, prevalence, and associated features, the available polysomnography data and five main etiological theories for exploding head syndrome are summarized. None of these theories has yet reached dominance in the field. Next, the various methods used to assess and treat exploding head syndrome are discussed, as well as the limited outcome data. Finally, recommendations for future measure construction, treatment options, and differential diagnosis are provided. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Does the Well-Being of Individuals with Down Syndrome and Dementia Improve When Using Life Story Books and Rummage Boxes? A Randomized Single Case Series Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crook, Nicola; Adams, Malcolm; Shorten, Nicola; Langdon, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study investigated whether a personalized life story book and rummage box enhanced well-being and led to changes in behaviour for people with Down syndrome (DS) who have dementia. Materials and Methods: A randomized single case series design was used with five participants who had DS and a diagnosis of dementia. Participants were…

  12. Burnout syndrome prevalence in physiotherapists.

    PubMed

    González-Sánchez, Blanca; López-Arza, María Victoria González; Montanero-Fernández, Jesús; Varela-Donoso, Enrique; Rodríguez-Mansilla, Juan; Mingote-Adán, José Carlos

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate burnout syndrome in its three aspects, jointly as well as independently, in physiotherapists from the Extremadura region (Spain). Analytic descriptive epidemiological transversal trial in primary care and institutional practice, with physiotherapists practicing in Extremadura who met the inclusion criteria, after having signed an informed consent form. Emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low professional accomplishment were the outcomes measured. Physiotherapists from Extremadura show a 65.23 point level of burnout syndrome, according to the Maslach Burnout Inventory questionnaire. Therefore, they are positioned in the middle of the rating scale for the syndrome, and very near to the high level at starting score of 66 points. Physiotherapists in Extremadura present moderate scores for the three dimensions of burnout syndrome, namely, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low professional accomplishment. For this reason, they are in the moderate level of the syndrome and very near to the high level, which starts at a score of 66 points. No relation between burnout syndrome and age has been found in our study.

  13. Genetic modifiers of Velo- cardio- facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2009-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS), the most common micro-deletion disorder in humans, is characterized by craniofacial, parathyroid and thymic defects as well as cardiac outflow tract malformations. Most patients have a similar hemizygous 3 million base pair deletion on 22q11.2. Studies in mouse have shown that Tbx1, a T- box containing transcription factor present on the deleted region, is likely responsible for the etiology of the syndrome. Furthermore, mutations in TBX1 have been found in rare non-deleted patients. Despite having the same sized deletion, most VCFS/DGS patients exhibit significant clinical variability. Stochastic, environmental and genetic factors likely modify the phenotype of patients with the disorder. Here, we review mouse genetics studies which may help identify genetic modifiers for VCFS/DGS. PMID:18636633

  14. [Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gvozdenović, Ljiljana; Pasternak, Janko; Milovanović, Stanislav; Ivanov, Dejan; Milić, Sasa

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella presented roughly 2-4 weeks later with a clinical syndrome highly suggestive of toxic shock syndrome. It is characterized by a sudden onset of fever, chills, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches and rash. It can rapidly progress to severe and intractable hypotension and multisystem dysfunction. Almost every organ system can he involved. Complications of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome may include kidney failure, liver failure (and even death. Crystalloids and inotropic agents are used to treat the hypovolemic shock aggressively, with close monitoring of the patient's mean arterial pressure and central venous pressure. An immediate and aggressive management of hypovolemic shock is essential in streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Targeted antibiotics are indicated: penicillin or a beta-lactam antibiotic is used for treating group A streptococci, and clindamycin has emerged as a key portion of the standard treatment.

  15. Cochlear implants in Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Robert D; Zdanski, Carlton; Roush, Patricia; Brown, Carolyn; Teagle, Holly; Pillsbury, Harold C; Buchman, Craig

    2006-07-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an autosomal-dominant syndrome characterized by dystopia canthorum, hyperplasia of the eyebrows, heterochromia irides, a white forelock, and sensorineural hearing loss in 20% to 55% of patients. This patient population accounts for approximately 2% of congenitally deaf children. The purpose of this retrospective case review was to describe the outcomes for those children with Waardenburg syndrome who have undergone cochlear implantation. Pediatric cochlear implant recipients with documented evidence of Waardenburg syndrome underwent retrospective case review. All patients received their cochlear implants at the study institution followed by outpatient auditory habilitation. Charts were reviewed for etiology and duration of deafness, age at time of cochlear implantation, perioperative complications, duration of use, and performance outcomes. Results of standard tests batteries for speech perception and production administered as a part of the patients' auditory habilitation were reviewed. Seven patients with Waardenburg syndrome and cochlear implants were identified. The average age at implantation was 37 months (range, 18-64 months) and the average duration of use was 69 months (range, 12-143 months). All of these patients are active users of their devices and perform very well after implantation. There were no major complications in this small group of patients. Children with congenital sensorineural hearing loss without other comorbidities (e.g., developmental delay, inner ear malformations) perform well when they receive cochlear implantation and auditory habilitation. Patients with Waardenburg syndrome can be expected to have above-average performance after cochlear implantation.

  16. Oral mucosal manifestations in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome and dry mouth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Olewicz-Gawlik, Anna; Polańska, Adriana; Nowak-Gabryel, Michalina; Kocięcki, Jarosław; Witmanowski, Henryk; Sokalski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction One of the most important symptoms of Sjögren syndrome is xerostomia. The oral cavity deprived of saliva and its natural lubricative, protective and antibacterial properties is prone to a number of unfavourable consequences. Aim To present the most important lesions on the oral mucosa in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome and in dry mouth syndrome. Material and methods The study group comprised 55 patients including 52 women and 3 men aged 20–72 years (average: 28.25 years). Results Basing on the accepted criteria, primary Sjögren syndrome was diagnosed in 22 (40%) patients, secondary Sjögren syndrome in 18 (32.7%) patients, and dry mouth syndrome in 15 (27.27%) patients. The physical examination and the examination of the mouth were performed and history was elicited from every patient. Conclusions The most common pathologies appearing on the oral mucosa in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome are angular cheilitis, cheilitis, increased lip dryness as well as non-specific ulcerations, aphthae and aphthoid conditions. PMID:26985175

  17. Corneal endothelial dysfunction in Pearson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kasbekar, Shivani A; Gonzalez-Martin, Jose A; Shafiq, Ayad E; Chandna, Arvind; Willoughby, Colin E

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are associated with well recognized ocular manifestations. Pearson syndrome is an often fatal, multisystem, mitochondrial disorder that causes variable bone marrow, hepatic, renal and pancreatic exocrine dysfunction. Phenotypic progression of ocular disease in a 12-year-old male with Pearson syndrome is described. This case illustrates phenotypic drift from Pearson syndrome to Kearns-Sayre syndrome given the patient's longevity. Persistent corneal endothelial failure was noted in addition to ptosis, chronic external ophthalmoplegia and mid-peripheral pigmentary retinopathy. We propose that corneal edema resulting from corneal endothelial metabolic pump failure occurs within a spectrum of mitochondrial disorders.

  18. Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome in a patient with 47(XXX) syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chiappedi, Matteo; de Vincenzi, Silvia; Dolci, Roberta; De Luca, Sara; Bejor, Maurizio

    2011-11-05

    To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a comorbidity between Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome and 47 (XXX) syndrome. The clinical picture of Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome is well described, while 47 (XXX) syndrome is much more rare and has a broader spectrum of possible phenotypic presentations. An Italian Caucasian girl was referred at the age of 11 to our Rehabilitation Center for anxiety and learning difficulties. The girl had already been diagnosed as having 47(XXX) syndrome; she had some rather typical features of the chromosomal abnormality, but she also showed a high level of anxiety and the presence of motor and vocal tics. When an accurate history was taken, a diagnosis of Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome emerged. The possible interaction between peculiar features of these two syndromes in terms of neuropsychological and affective functioning is both interesting for the specific case and to hypothesize models of rehabilitation for patients with one or both syndromes. Executive functions are specifically reduced in both syndromes, therefore it might be hard to discriminate the contribution of each one to the general impairment; the same applies to anxiety. Moreover, mental retardation (with a significantly lower verbal cognitive functioning) poses relevant problems when suggesting cognitive behavioral or psychoeducational rehabilitative approaches.

  19. Infections in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Andréa; Fenaux, Pierre; Dreyfus, François; Cordonnier, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes are associated with a risk of severe infections. While neutropenia is likely to be the main predisposing factor, several other immune defects have been reported, including impaired neutrophil function, B-, T- and NK-cell defects and the possible consequences of iron overload due to red blood cell transfusions. The advanced age of most patients, their frequent comorbidities, and the fact that drugs such as hypomethylating agents and lenalidomide, which are effective in myelodysplastic syndromes but can transiently worsen neutropenia, may increase the risk of infection and their severity in this context. The majority of infections in myelodysplastic syndromes are bacterial, while the incidence of fungal infections is not well known and viral infections seem to be rare. No prophylactic measures against infections have demonstrated efficacy in myelodysplastic syndromes. However, pending more data, we propose here some recommendations for the management of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. In the future, an important contribution can be made by prospective trials testing the efficacy of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches to infection in these patients, especially in the context of the new drugs available for myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:22733024

  20. A Nonfatal Case of Dobrava Hantavirus Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome Combined with Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dreshaj, Shemsedin; Ajazaj, Lindita; Hasani, Nderim; Halili, Bahrije; Ponosheci, Albina; Jakupi, Xhevat

    2018-01-01

    Among hantaviruses (HTNV), 22 are known as pathogenic for humans. HTNV can cause two clinical entities: hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome or hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS). In most countries of Eastern Europe as well as in Kosovo, HTNV infection is presented mainly as HFRS. Here, we report a 20-year-old man with HFRS and HCPS caused by Dobrava hantavirus strain, successfully treated in Intensive Care Unit of Infectious Diseases Clinic, University Clinical Center of Kosovo. In HFRS endemic areas, patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome need to be evaluated for Dobrava hantavirus strain as a possible causative agent.

  1. "I have a good life": the meaning of well-being from the perspective of young adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scott, Melissa; Foley, Kitty-Rose; Bourke, Jenny; Leonard, Helen; Girdler, Sonya

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to explore what makes for a "good life" from the perspective of young adults with Down syndrome and to identify the barriers and facilitators to participation. Twelve young adults with Down syndrome participated in individual and group discussions. Each session began with individual discussions between a researcher and participant, allowing each individual to express their views in their own words. Following individual discussions, participants joined a larger group facilitated by the researchers which allowed for collective reflection and sharing of experiences. Individual discussions were recorded on large poster size pieces of paper through drawings and writing using colourful pens by the participants themselves or with assistance from researchers. Group discussions were audio recorded and one researcher recorded field notes on contextual information. Data were analyzed through open coding and constant comparison techniques to identify categories which were then collapsed into the main themes. Analysis of the transcripts revealed four main themes: "Relationships", "Community participation", "Independence" and "Hopes for the future". These findings highlighted the participants' desire for autonomy, particularly in the domains of living independently and employment. Family relationships and community services were described as both facilitators and barriers to their participation. Overall, the findings from this study revealed that the participants' life perspective was positive, with a general consensus of, "I have a good life". This study yielded many recommendations that could be integrated into transition models of service delivery for young adults with Down syndrome as they develop from adolescence into adulthood. IMPLICATIONS OF REHABILITATION: Young people with Down syndrome want to make decisions for themselves. Community participation is important for young adults with Down syndrome. Young people with Down syndrome have

  2. Comparing Parental Well-Being and Its Determinants across Three Different Genetic Disorders Causing Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mori, Yuka; Downs, Jenny; Wong, Kingsley; Heyworth, Jane; Leonard, Helen

    2018-01-01

    Using the Short Form 12 Health Survey this cross-sectional study examined parental well-being in caregivers of children with one of three genetic disorders associated with intellectual disability; Down syndrome, Rett syndrome and the CDKL5 disorder. Data were sourced from the Western Australian Down Syndrome (n = 291), Australian Rett Syndrome (n…

  3. Churg-strauss syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhdan, Vyacheslav М; Kitura, Yevdokiia М; Kitura, Oksana Ye; Babanina, Maryna Yu; Tkachenko, Maksym V; Lebid, Volodymyr G

    A clinical case of Churg-Strauss syndrome has been reported on the 53-year-old female patient Ts. with bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis. The main clinical signs and syndromes depending on the stage of the disease are presented, as well as therapeutic treatment of patients with this disease.

  4. Gorlin syndrome (nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome): update and literature review.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Katsunori; Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2014-10-01

    Gorlin syndrome, also called nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, is an autosomal dominant neurocutaneous disease characterized by developmental anomalies such as palmar pits and rib anomaly, and tumorigenesis such as medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma. This syndrome is mainly caused by a mutation of PTCH1, a human homologue of Drosophila patched, including frameshift, missense, or nonsense mutations. Genotype-phenotype correlation has not been established. PTCH1 is a member of hedgehog signaling, which is a highly conserved pathway in vertebrates, composed of hedgehog, SMO, and GLI proteins as well as PTCH1. Given that hedgehog signaling regulates cell growth and development, disorder of this pathway gives rise to not only developmental anomalies but also diverse tumors such as those seen in Gorlin syndrome. We recently reported, for the first time, a nationwide survey of Gorlin syndrome in Japan, noting that the frequency was 1/235,800 in the Japanese population, and that the frequency of basal cell carcinomas was significantly lower in Japan than in the USA and Europe, suggesting that ethnicity and genetic background contribute to these differences. Given that many clinical trials using newly discovered molecular inhibitors are still ongoing, these agents should become the new therapeutic options for hedgehog pathway-dependent tumors in patients with or without Gorlin syndrome. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  5. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome with juvenile dermatomyositis and calcinosis.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Bedangshu; Aneja, Himanshu; Jain, Jyoti; Puliyel, Jacob M

    2013-03-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a rare childhood disease with autoimmune association. Environmental factors are known to trigger JDM in genetically susceptible individuals (Schmieder et al., Dermatol Online 6:3, 2009). Calcinosis is a well-established complication of JDM. Prevalence is higher in children (30-70%; Özkaya et al., Erciyes Med J 30(1):40-43, 2008). Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency syndrome with multiple recurrent abscess formation and raised serum immunoglobulin E levels. We report a case of JDM with calcinosis cutis universalis with hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome. With a previous similar case report (Min et al., Korean J Intern Med 14:95-98, 1999), this could well be a new sequence syndrome where abscesses are the trigger for the onset of JDM.

  6. [Refeeding syndrome : Pathophysiology, risk factors, prevention, and treatment].

    PubMed

    Wirth, R; Diekmann, R; Janssen, G; Fleiter, O; Fricke, L; Kreilkamp, A; Modreker, M K; Marburger, C; Nels, S; Pourhassan, M; Schaefer, R; Willschrei, H-P; Volkert, D

    2018-04-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a life-threatening complication that may occur after initiation of nutritional therapy in malnourished patients, as well as after periods of fasting and hunger. Refeeding syndrome can be effectively prevented and treated if its risk factors and pathophysiology are known. The initial measurement of thiamine level and serum electrolytes, including phosphate and magnesium, their supplementation if necessary, and a slow increase in nutritional intake along with close monitoring of serum electrolytes play an important role. Since refeeding syndrome is not well known and the symptoms can be extremely heterogeneous, this complication is poorly recognized, especially against the background of severe disease and multimorbidity. This overview aims to summarize the current knowledge and increase awareness about refeeding syndrome.

  7. Horner syndrome: clinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kanagalingam, Sivashakthi; Miller, Neil R

    2015-01-01

    Horner syndrome consists of unilateral ptosis, an ipsilateral miotic but normally reactive pupil, and in some cases, ipsilateral facial anhidrosis, all resulting from damage to the ipsilateral oculosympathetic pathway. Herein, we review the clinical signs and symptoms that can aid in the diagnosis and localization of a Horner syndrome as well as the causes of the condition. We emphasize that pharmacologic testing can confirm its presence and direct further testing and management. PMID:28539793

  8. First implication of STRA6 mutations in isolated anophthalmia, microphthalmia and coloboma: a new dimension to the STRA6 phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Jillian; Kawaguchi, Riki; Morrissey, Maria; Sun, Hui; McGettigan, Paul; Nielsen, Jens Erik; Conroy, Judith; Regan, Regina; Kenny, Elaine; Cormican, Paul; Morris, Derek W; Tormey, Peter; Chróinín, Muireann Ní; Kennedy, Breandan N; Lynch, SallyAnn; Green, Andrew; Ennis, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Microphthalmia, anophthalmia and coloboma (MAC) are structural congenital eye malformations that cause a significant proportion of childhood visual impairments. Several disease genes have been identified but do not account for all MAC cases, suggesting that additional risk loci exist. We used SNP homozygosity mapping (HM) and targeted next-generation sequencing to identify the causative mutation for autosomal recessive isolated colobomatous micro-anophthalmia (MCOPCB) in a consanguineous Irish Traveller family. We identified a double nucleotide polymorphism (g.1157G>A and g.1156G>A; p.G304K) in STRA6 that was homozygous in all of the MCOPCB patients. The STRA6 p.G304K mutation was subsequently detected in additional MCOPCB patients, including one individual with Matthew-Wood syndrome (MWS; MCOPS9). STRA6 encodes a transmembrane receptor involved in vitamin A uptake, a process essential to eye development and growth. We have shown that the G304K mutant STRA6 protein is mislocalised and has severely reduced vitamin A uptake activity. Furthermore, we reproduced the MCOPCB phenotype in a zebrafish disease model by inhibiting retinoic acid synthesis, suggesting that diminished retinoic acid levels account for the eye malformations in STRA6 p.G304K patients. The current study demonstrates that STRA6 mutations can cause isolated eye malformations in addition to the congenital anomalies observed in MWS. PMID:21901792

  9. First implication of STRA6 mutations in isolated anophthalmia, microphthalmia, and coloboma: a new dimension to the STRA6 phenotype.

    PubMed

    Casey, Jillian; Kawaguchi, Riki; Morrissey, Maria; Sun, Hui; McGettigan, Paul; Nielsen, Jens E; Conroy, Judith; Regan, Regina; Kenny, Elaine; Cormican, Paul; Morris, Derek W; Tormey, Peter; Chróinín, Muireann Ní; Kennedy, Breandan N; Lynch, SallyAnn; Green, Andrew; Ennis, Sean

    2011-12-01

    Microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma (MAC) are structural congenital eye malformations that cause a significant proportion of childhood visual impairments. Several disease genes have been identified but do not account for all MAC cases, suggesting that additional risk loci exist. We used single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) homozygosity mapping (HM) and targeted next-generation sequencing to identify the causative mutation for autosomal recessive isolated colobomatous microanophthalmia (MCOPCB) in a consanguineous Irish Traveller family. We identified a double-nucleotide polymorphism (g.1157G>A and g.1156G>A; p.G304K) in STRA6 that was homozygous in all of the MCOPCB patients. The STRA6 p.G304K mutation was subsequently detected in additional MCOPCB patients, including one individual with Matthew-Wood syndrome (MWS; MCOPS9). STRA6 encodes a transmembrane receptor involved in vitamin A uptake, a process essential to eye development and growth. We have shown that the G304K mutant STRA6 protein is mislocalized and has severely reduced vitamin A uptake activity. Furthermore, we reproduced the MCOPCB phenotype in a zebrafish disease model by inhibiting retinoic acid (RA) synthesis, suggesting that diminished RA levels account for the eye malformations in STRA6 p.G304K patients. The current study demonstrates that STRA6 mutations can cause isolated eye malformations in addition to the congenital anomalies observed in MWS. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Predictors of Neurocognitive Syndromes in Combat Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Michael J; Gill, Jessica; Leaman, Suzanne; Law, Wendy; Ndiongue, Rochelle; Taylor, Patricia; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Bieler, Gayle S; Garge, Nikhil; Rapp, Paul E; Keyser, David; Nathan, Dominic; Xydakis, Michael; Pham, Dzung; Wassermann, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are neurocognitive syndromes often associated with impairment of physical and mental health, as well as functional status. These syndromes are also frequent in military service members (SMs) after combat, although their presentation is often delayed until months after their return. The objective of this prospective cohort study was the identification of independent predictors of neurocognitive syndromes upon return from deployment could facilitate early intervention to prevent disability. We completed a comprehensive baseline assessment, followed by serial evaluations at three, six, and 12 months, to assess for new-onset PTSD, depression, or postconcussive syndrome (PCS) in order to identify baseline factors most strongly associated with subsequent neurocognitive syndromes. On serial follow-up, seven participants developed at least one neurocognitive syndrome: five with PTSD, one with depression and PTSD, and one with PCS. On univariate analysis, 60 items were associated with syndrome development at p < 0.15. Decision trees and ensemble tree multivariate models yielded four common independent predictors of PTSD: right superior longitudinal fasciculus tract volume on MRI; resting state connectivity between the right amygdala and left superior temporal gyrus (BA41/42) on functional MRI; and single nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes coding for myelin basic protein as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Our findings require follow-up studies with greater sample size and suggest that neuroimaging and molecular biomarkers may help distinguish those at high risk for post-deployment neurocognitive syndromes. PMID:26251769

  11. Accounting for the "Down Syndrome Advantage"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esbensen, Anna J.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined factors that could explain the higher levels of psychosocial well being observed in past research in mothers of individuals with Down syndrome compared with mothers of individuals with other types of intellectual disabilities. The authors studied 155 mothers of adults with Down syndrome, contrasting factors that might validly…

  12. Streptococcus agalactiae Toxic Shock-Like Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Al Akhrass, Fadi; Abdallah, Lina; Berger, Steven; Hanna, Rami; Reynolds, Nina; Thompson, Shellie; Hallit, Rabih; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We present 2 patients with Streptococcus agalactiae toxic shock-like syndrome and review another 11 well-reported cases from the literature. Streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome is a devastating illness with a high mortality rate, therefore we stress the importance of early supportive management, antimicrobial therapy, and surgical intervention. Toxic shock-like syndrome is likely to be underestimated in patients with invasive Streptococcus agalactiae infection who present with shock. Early diagnosis requires high suspicion of the illness, along with a thorough mucocutaneous examination. Streptococcus agalactiae produces uncharacterized pyrogenic toxins, which explains the ability of the organism to cause toxic shock-like syndrome. PMID:23263717

  13. Comparing Psychiatric Service Use among Low-Income Women and Women in a General Household Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Daniel; Warner, Lynn A.; Tolman, Richard M.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the use of outpatient mental health services in a sample of low-income women (Mothers' Well-Being Study [MWS]) and compares the findings with a sample of similar-aged women in the general population (National Comorbidity Survey [NCS]). Overall, the prevalence of any 12-month mental health disorder was significantly greater…

  14. [Evaluation of the primary caregiver syndrome when caring for elderly adults with immobility syndrome].

    PubMed

    Morales-Cariño, Elizabeth María; Jiménez-Herrera, Blanca L; Serrano-Miranda, Tirzo A

    2012-01-01

    Caregiver syndrome may develop in caregivers of elderly adults. To evaluate the repercussions of the immobility syndrome present in elderly adults on their primary caregivers as well as to determine the clinical and socio-demographic characteristics of the elderly adult and caregiver. The study population included patients over 65 recruited in the Geriatric Rehabilitation Department, with the diagnosis of immobility syndrome and that required a primary caregiver. A questionnaire including socio-demographic variables was applied to all patients and caregivers, and the Zarit scale was also applied to caregivers in order to determine the presence of caregiver syndrome. Analysis was performed with descriptive statistical methods; Student's t test and Fisher's test were used for comparisons between strata. 75 patients and their caregivers were evaluated; patient average age was 75.9 years and 85.3% were female. 50.7% (38 cases) had mild immobility. The average caregiver's age was 50.6%, 70.7% were female and 57.3% were the patient's daughter. Caregiver syndrome was detected in 60% of them: 57.7% had mild symptoms and in 42.2%, symptoms were moderate to severe. No statistically significant association was established between the development of caregiver syndrome and the degree of patient immobility. Caregivers of patients with immobility syndrome are at high risk of developing caregiver syndrome, thus underscoring the need to include primary caregiver support programs.

  15. Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome in a patient with 47(XXX) syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a comorbidity between Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome and 47 (XXX) syndrome. The clinical picture of Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome is well described, while 47 (XXX) syndrome is much more rare and has a broader spectrum of possible phenotypic presentations. Case presentation An Italian Caucasian girl was referred at the age of 11 to our Rehabilitation Center for anxiety and learning difficulties. The girl had already been diagnosed as having 47(XXX) syndrome; she had some rather typical features of the chromosomal abnormality, but she also showed a high level of anxiety and the presence of motor and vocal tics. When an accurate history was taken, a diagnosis of Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome emerged. Conclusions The possible interaction between peculiar features of these two syndromes in terms of neuropsychological and affective functioning is both interesting for the specific case and to hypothesize models of rehabilitation for patients with one or both syndromes. Executive functions are specifically reduced in both syndromes, therefore it might be hard to discriminate the contribution of each one to the general impairment; the same applies to anxiety. Moreover, mental retardation (with a significantly lower verbal cognitive functioning) poses relevant problems when suggesting cognitive behavioral or psychoeducational rehabilitative approaches. PMID:22054059

  16. Adaptation of office workers to a new building - impaired well-being as part of the sick-building-syndrome.

    PubMed

    Neuner, Ralf; Seidel, Hans-Joachim

    2006-07-01

    The focus of our study was the assessment of the effects of spatial relocation on office staff. Our aim was to investigate whether psychosocial or personal factors are better predictors of the occurrence of impaired well-being. Before relocation the administration of the university hospital of Ulm (Germany) was located in ten different buildings. Chemical and physical parameters of the indoor air were measured. The employees were surveyed with a questionnaire for their health status and psychosocial determinants. After moving to a new wide-spaced building, the same procedure was reapplied shortly afterwards and half a year later. Only respondents who had taken part in all three surveys are taken into account (n=84). The definition of impaired well-being as defined by the ProKlimA-study group was used as the criterion variable. The overall prevalence of impaired well-being rose from 24% to 36% after relocation. Contrarily, persons who were formerly accommodated in a wide spaced-building showed a reduced risk (OR(post1)=0.3). Affected persons had at all times a more negative response pattern. Chemical and physical parameters did not have any influence in this context. The adaptation to a new environment is influenced by the old "socialization" of the former buildings. Impaired well-being is not limited to bodily complaints, it rather has a systemic character in the form of a distinctive overall response pattern. For an adequate analysis of impaired well-being - and the sick-building-syndrome in consequence - the elucidation of individual and other potentially intervening factors is essential. Taking this into consideration, the search for norm values or a framework seems to be of limited value.

  17. Microwaves from GSM mobile telephones affect 53BP1 and gamma-H2AX foci in human lymphocytes from hypersensitive and healthy persons.

    PubMed

    Markovà, Eva; Hillert, Lena; Malmgren, Lars; Persson, Bertil R R; Belyaev, Igor Y

    2005-09-01

    The data on biologic effects of nonthermal microwaves (MWs) from mobile telephones are diverse, and these effects are presently ignored by safety standards of the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). In the present study, we investigated effects of MWs of Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) at different carrier frequencies on human lymphocytes from healthy persons and from persons reporting hypersensitivity to electromagnetic fields (EMFs). We measured the changes in chromatin conformation, which are indicative of stress response and genotoxic effects, by the method of anomalous viscosity time dependence, and we analyzed tumor suppressor p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) and phosphorylated histone H2AX (gamma-H2AX), which have been shown to colocalize in distinct foci with DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), using immunofluorescence confocal laser microscopy. We found that MWs from GSM mobile telephones affect chromatin conformation and 53BP1/gamma-H2AX foci similar to heat shock. For the first time, we report here that effects of MWs from mobile telephones on human lymphocytes are dependent on carrier frequency. On average, the same response was observed in lymphocytes from hypersensitive and healthy subjects.

  18. Microwaves from GSM Mobile Telephones Affect 53BP1 and γ-H2AX Foci in Human Lymphocytes from Hypersensitive and Healthy Persons

    PubMed Central

    Markovà, Eva; Hillert, Lena; Malmgren, Lars; Persson, Bertil R. R.; Belyaev, Igor Y.

    2005-01-01

    The data on biologic effects of nonthermal microwaves (MWs) from mobile telephones are diverse, and these effects are presently ignored by safety standards of the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). In the present study, we investigated effects of MWs of Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) at different carrier frequencies on human lymphocytes from healthy persons and from persons reporting hypersensitivity to electromagnetic fields (EMFs). We measured the changes in chromatin conformation, which are indicative of stress response and genotoxic effects, by the method of anomalous viscosity time dependence, and we analyzed tumor suppressor p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) and phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX), which have been shown to colocalize in distinct foci with DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), using immunofluorescence confocal laser microscopy. We found that MWs from GSM mobile telephones affect chromatin conformation and 53BP1/γ-H2AX foci similar to heat shock. For the first time, we report here that effects of MWs from mobile telephones on human lymphocytes are dependent on carrier frequency. On average, the same response was observed in lymphocytes from hypersensitive and healthy subjects. PMID:16140623

  19. Scaffolds containing chitosan/carboxymethyl cellulose/mesoporous wollastonite for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sainitya, R; Sriram, M; Kalyanaraman, V; Dhivya, S; Saravanan, S; Vairamani, M; Sastry, T P; Selvamurugan, N

    2015-09-01

    Scaffold based bone tissue engineering utilizes a variety of biopolymers in different combinations aiming to deliver optimal properties required for bone regeneration. In the current study, we fabricated bio-composite scaffolds containing chitosan (CS), carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) with varied concentrations of mesoporous wollastonite (m-WS) particles by the freeze drying method. The CS/CMC/m-WS scaffolds were characterized by the SEM, EDS and FT-IR studies. Addition of m-WS particles had no effect on altering the porosity of the scaffolds. m-WS particles at 0.5% concentration in the CS/CMC scaffolds showed significant improvement in the bio-mineralization and protein adsorption properties. Addition of m-WS particles in the CS/CMC scaffolds significantly reduced their swelling and degradation properties. The CS/CMC/m-WS scaffolds also showed cyto-friendly nature to human osteoblastic cells. The osteogenic potential of CS/CMC/m-WS scaffolds was confirmed by calcium deposition and expression of an osteoblast specific microRNA, pre-mir-15b. Thus, the current investigations support the use of CS/CMC/m-WS scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Bilaterally cleft lip, limb defects, and haematological manifestations: Roberts syndrome versus TAR syndrome.

    PubMed

    Urban, M; Opitz, C; Bommer, C; Enders, H; Tinschert, S; Witkowski, R

    1998-09-23

    We report on a 13-year-old patient followed since birth. He is the only offspring of young, non-consanguineous German parents. His mother has an isolated left cleft of lip and a cleft palate. At birth, our patient presented with bilaterally cleft lip/cleft palate, phocomelia of upper limbs with normal hands, and mild symmetrical deficiencies of the long bones of the lower limbs. Haematological evaluation demonstrated a leukaemoid reaction during a urinary tract infection as well as intermittent thrombocytopenia and episodes of marked eosinophilia during the first two years of life. Intellectual development has been normal. Comparison with two similar cases from the literature suggests a non-random phenotypic overlap of Roberts syndrome (MIM 268300) and TAR syndrome (MIM 274000). Such clinical constellations may be key observations to understand the genetic relationship of Roberts syndrome and TAR syndrome in future phenotype-genotype correlations.

  1. Genetics of Prader-Willi syndrome and Prader-Will-Like syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a human imprinting disorder resulting from genomic alterations that inactivate imprinted, paternally expressed genes in human chromosome region 15q11-q13. This genetic condition appears to be a contiguous gene syndrome caused by the loss of at least 2 of a number of genes expressed exclusively from the paternal allele, including SNRPN, MKRN3, MAGEL2, NDN and several snoRNAs, but it is not yet well known which specific genes in this region are associated with this syndrome. Prader-Will-Like syndrome (PWLS) share features of the PWS phenotype and the gene functions disrupted in PWLS are likely to lie in genetic pathways that are important for the development of PWS phenotype. However, the genetic basis of these rare disorders differs and the absence of a correct diagnosis may worsen the prognosis of these individuals due to the endocrine-metabolic malfunctioning associated with the PWS. Therefore, clinicians face a challenge in determining when to request the specific molecular test used to identify patients with classical PWS because the signs and symptoms of PWS are common to other syndromes such as PWLS. This review aims to provide an overview of current knowledge relating to the genetics of PWS and PWLS, with an emphasis on identification of patients that may benefit from further investigation and genetic screening. PMID:27777904

  2. Genetics of Prader-Willi syndrome and Prader-Will-Like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Chong Kun

    2016-09-01

    The Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a human imprinting disorder resulting from genomic alterations that inactivate imprinted, paternally expressed genes in human chromosome region 15q11-q13. This genetic condition appears to be a contiguous gene syndrome caused by the loss of at least 2 of a number of genes expressed exclusively from the paternal allele, including SNRPN , MKRN3 , MAGEL2 , NDN and several snoRNAs , but it is not yet well known which specific genes in this region are associated with this syndrome. Prader-Will-Like syndrome (PWLS) share features of the PWS phenotype and the gene functions disrupted in PWLS are likely to lie in genetic pathways that are important for the development of PWS phenotype. However, the genetic basis of these rare disorders differs and the absence of a correct diagnosis may worsen the prognosis of these individuals due to the endocrine-metabolic malfunctioning associated with the PWS. Therefore, clinicians face a challenge in determining when to request the specific molecular test used to identify patients with classical PWS because the signs and symptoms of PWS are common to other syndromes such as PWLS. This review aims to provide an overview of current knowledge relating to the genetics of PWS and PWLS, with an emphasis on identification of patients that may benefit from further investigation and genetic screening.

  3. Shaken Baby Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Randell C.; Smith, Wilbur L.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the history, epidemiology, biomechanics, diagnosis, treatment, outcomes, long-term management, and prevention of shaken baby syndrome. It presents medical-legal issues as well as a discussion of programs aimed at prevention of physical abuse. (Author/DB)

  4. Understanding Bartter syndrome and Gitelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fremont, Oliver T; Chan, James C M

    2012-02-01

    We aim to review the clinical features of two renal tubular disorders characterized by sodium and potassium wasting: Bartter syndrome and Gitelman syndrome. Selected key references concerning these syndromes were analyzed, together with a PubMed search of the literature from 2000 to 2011. The clinical features common to both conditions and those which are distinct to each syndrome were presented. The new findings on the genetics of the five types of Bartter syndrome and the discrete mutations in Gitelman syndrome were reviewed, together with the diagnostic workup and treatment for each condition. Patients with Bartter syndrome types 1, 2 and 4 present at a younger age than classic Bartter syndrome type 3. They present with symptoms, often quite severe in the neonatal period. Patients with classic Bartter syndrome type 3 present later in life and may be sporadically asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic. The severe, steady-state hypokalemia in Bartter syndrome and Gitelman syndrome may abruptly become life-threatening under certain aggravating conditions. Clinicians need to be cognizant of such renal tubular disorders, and promptly treat at-risk patients.

  5. The Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, R.; Hennekam, R.

    2000-01-01

    The Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is one of the archetypical multiple congenital malformation syndromes. The recent discovery of the biochemical cause of SLOS and the subsequent redefinition of SLOS as an inborn error of cholesterol metabolism have led to important new treatment possibilities for affected patients. Moreover, the recent recognition of the important role of cholesterol in vertebrate embryogenesis, especially with regard to the hedgehog embryonic signalling pathway and its effects on the expression of homeobox genes, has provided an explanation for the abnormal morphogenesis in the syndrome. The well known role of cholesterol in the formation of steroid hormones has also provided a possible explanation for the abnormal behavioural characteristics of SLOS.


Keywords: Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome; cholesterol metabolism; 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase; clinical history; management PMID:10807690

  6. [The syndrome of Cotard: an overview].

    PubMed

    Van den Eynde, F; Debruyne, H; Portzky, M; De Saedeleer, S; Audenaert, K

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing controversy about whether psychiatric illnesses should be divided into categories. One of the reasons is that such a categorial system, by its very nature, cannot provide a detailed description of specific psychopathological symptoms. A patient with Cotard's syndrome, for instance, is characterised by a nihilistic delusion relating to his own body and the syndrome does not fit into any one category. We report on a case of Cotard's syndrome encountered at our clinic. To provide an overview of the characteristics of Cotard's syndrome, including its history, phenomenology, pathogenesis and treatment. A Medline search was conducted for the period 1980-2006 using the search term 'Cotard$'. This resulted in 68 publications, of which 18 were not used. Cross-references were used as well. Cotard's syndrome cannot be fitted unambiguously into any one category of the current classification system. Current evidence regarding Cotard's syndrome is based mainly on case studies and therefore no clarity can be obtained about the various aspects of the syndrome, such as prevalence, pathogenesis, treatment.

  7. Paraneoplastic syndromes associated with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Naoki; Kita, Nobuyuki; Bandoh, Shuji; Tadokoro, Akira; Ishii, Tomoya; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Matsunaga, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes are signs or symptoms that occur as a result of organ or tissue damage at locations remote from the site of the primary tumor or metastases. Paraneoplastic syndromes associated with lung cancer can impair various organ functions and include neurologic, endocrine, dermatologic, rheumatologic, hematologic, and ophthalmological syndromes, as well as glomerulopathy and coagulopathy (Trousseau’s syndrome). The histological type of lung cancer is generally dependent on the associated syndrome, the two most common of which are humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy in squamous cell carcinoma and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion in small cell lung cancer. The symptoms often precede the diagnosis of the associated lung cancer, especially when the symptoms are neurologic or dermatologic. The proposed mechanisms of paraneoplastic processes include the aberrant release of humoral mediators, such as hormones and hormone-like peptides, cytokines, and antibodies. Treating the underlying cancer is generally the most effective therapy for paraneoplastic syndromes, and treatment soon after symptom onset appears to offer the best potential for symptom improvement. In this article, we review the diagnosis, potential mechanisms, and treatments of a wide variety of paraneoplastic syndromes associated with lung cancer. PMID:25114839

  8. Molecular genetics of syndromic and non-syndromic forms of parathyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Luís; Stevenson, Mark; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2017-12-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma (PC) may occur as part of a complex hereditary syndrome or an isolated (i.e., non-syndromic) non-hereditary (i.e., sporadic) endocrinopathy. Studies of hereditary and syndromic forms of PC, which include the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome (HPT-JT), multiple endocrine neoplasia types 1 and 2 (MEN1 and MEN2), and familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism (FIHP), have revealed some genetic mechanisms underlying PC. Thus, cell division cycle 73 (CDC73) germline mutations cause HPT-JT, and CDC73 mutations occur in 70% of sporadic PC, but in only ∼2% of parathyroid adenomas. Moreover, CDC73 germline mutations occur in 20%-40% of patients with sporadic PC and may reveal unrecognized HPT-JT. This indicates that CDC73 mutations are major driver mutations in the etiology of PCs. However, there is no genotype-phenotype correlation and some CDC73 mutations (e.g., c.679_680insAG) have been reported in patients with sporadic PC, HPT-JT, or FIHP. Other genes involved in sporadic PC include germline MEN1 and rearranged during transfection (RET) mutations and somatic alterations of the retinoblastoma 1 (RB1) and tumor protein P53 (TP53) genes, as well as epigenetic modifications including DNA methylation and histone modifications, and microRNA misregulation. This review summarizes the genetics and epigenetics of the familial syndromic and non-syndromic (sporadic) forms of PC. © 2017 The Authors. Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Comparing Parental Well-Being and Its Determinants Across Three Different Genetic Disorders Causing Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yuka; Downs, Jenny; Wong, Kingsley; Heyworth, Jane; Leonard, Helen

    2018-05-01

    Using the Short Form 12 Health Survey this cross-sectional study examined parental well-being in caregivers of children with one of three genetic disorders associated with intellectual disability; Down syndrome, Rett syndrome and the CDKL5 disorder. Data were sourced from the Western Australian Down Syndrome (n = 291), Australian Rett Syndrome (n = 187) and International CDKL5 Disorder (n = 168) Databases. Among 596 mothers (median age, years 43.7; 24.6-72.2), emotional well-being was poorer than general female populations across age groups. Multivariate linear regression identified the poorest well-being in parents of children with the CDKL5 disorder, a rare but severe and complex encephalopathy, and negative associations with increased clinical severity irrespective of diagnosis. These findings are important for those providing healthcare and social services for these populations.

  10. Postpolio syndrome.

    PubMed

    Winters, R

    1991-01-01

    The recurrence of symptoms many years after the rehabilitation of individuals who survived the acute illness, poliomyelitis, is a major concern. The purpose of this article is to provide information to the nurse practitioner (NP), who, as a primary health care provider, may be the first health professional to encounter persons with such complaints. Although no cure has been identified, diagnosis and treatment is available and is important to the psychosocial well-being of those who suffer from postpolio syndrome. This article reviews research on the syndrome including etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms and management, psychological issues, and the role of the aging process. Some areas where further research is indicated are also identified.

  11. [About the Cotard's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nagy, Agnes; Vörös, Viktor; Tényi, Tamás

    2008-10-01

    INTRODUCTION, AIMS: The authors present the Cotard's syndrome, a rare psychiatric condition, pointing out the latest results in terms of etiology and psychoneurology. The central feature of the syndrome is a nihilistic delusion, in which the patient denies his or her own existence and that of the external world. We searched electronic databases using the appropriate search terms, relevant articles were carefully reviewed. We present three cases from our clinical practice. After the overview of the latest biological and neuropsychological findings, the historical aspects of the condition, the terminology, the nosology, the classification, the differential diagnostics and the etiology are discussed. The psychopathology and the phenomenology of Cotard's syndrome are also presented, shedding light on existential aspects as well. To sum up with useful information for the clinical practice, the possible treatment strategies, the course and the prognosis of the disease are also discussed. The presented theoretical and practical aspects give a lead on deeper understanding, easier recognition and more adequate therapy of the Cotard's syndrome.

  12. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome(s) mimicking child abuse: Is there an impact on clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders characterized by increased fragility of various non-ossified tissues. It is usually ascertained due to abnormal skin texture, scarring complications, vascular fragility, or chronic symptoms, such as fatigue and musculoskeletal pain. Sometimes, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome remains undetected until the patient, usually in the pediatric age, shows extensive or severe mucocutaneous injuries after only minor traumas. In this scenario, the misdiagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with child abuse is a possibility, as occasionally reported in the literature. Recently, more attention was posed by lay people between the possible association of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and bone fragility. Literature and personal experience show a strong association between Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, generalized joint hypermobility and reduced bone mass density in older children and adults, especially fertile women. The existence of a true increased risk of fracture in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is still a matter of debate in children and adults with little and conflicting evidence. In case of suspected child abuse, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is certainly on the differential for bruising, especially in EDS types with marked cutaneous and capillary involvement. In suspected child abuse cases, careful examination of the index case and her/his extended family is routine, as well as exclusion of other disorders such as osteogenesis imperfecta. The hypothesis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome as an alternative explanation for infantile fractures remains speculative. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Gulf War syndrome as a part of the autoimmune (autoinflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvant (ASIA).

    PubMed

    Israeli, E

    2012-02-01

    Gulf War syndrome (GWS) is a multi-symptom condition comprising a variety of signs and symptoms described in the literature, which not been fully resolved. The various symptoms of the condition include muscle fatigue and tiredness, malaise, myalgia, impaired cognition, ataxia, diarrhoea, bladder dysfunction, sweating disturbances, headaches, fever, arthralgia, skin rashes, and gastrointestinal and sleep disturbances. In addition, excessive chemical sensitivity and odour intolerance is reported. The aetiology of the condition is unclear, but many reviews and epidemiological analyses suggest association with pyridostigmine bromide (PB), certain vaccination regimes, a variety of possible chemical exposures, including smoke from oil-well fires or depleted uranium from shells, as well as physical and psychological stress. Recently, Shoenfeld et al. suggested that four conditions--siliconosis, macrophagic myofaciitis (MMF), GWS and post-vaccination phenomena--that share clinical and pathogenic resemblances, may be incorporated into common syndrome called 'Autoimmune (Autoinflammatory) Syndrome induced by Adjuvants' (ASIA). Symptoms and signs of the four conditions described by Shoenfeld et al. show that at least eight out of ten main symptoms are in correlation in all four conditions. Namely, myalgia, arthralgias, chronic fatigue, neurological cognitive impairment, gastrointestinal symptoms, respiratory symptoms, skin manifestations and appearance of autoantibodies. Regardless of the aetiology of GWS, be it exposure to environmental factors or chemical drugs, vaccinations or the adjuvants in them, GWS fits well with the definition of ASIA and is included as part of 'Shoenfeld's syndrome'.

  14. A tumor profile in Patau syndrome (trisomy 13).

    PubMed

    Satgé, Daniel; Nishi, Motoi; Sirvent, Nicolas; Vekemans, Michel; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Barnes, Ann

    2017-08-01

    Individuals with trisomic conditions like Down syndrome and Edwards syndrome are prone to certain types of malignancy. However, for Patau syndrome (constitutional trisomy 13), which occurs in 1/10,000-1/20,000 live births, the tumor profile has not been well characterized. An awareness of susceptibility to malignancies can improve care of affected individuals, as well as further our understanding of the contribution of trisomy to carcinogenesis. Therefore, we conducted an extensive review of the literature; we found 17 malignancies reported in individuals with Patau syndrome. These comprised eight embryonic tumors, three leukemias, two malignant germ cell tumors, two carcinomas, a malignant brain tumor, and a sarcoma. Benign tumors were mainly extragonadal teratomas. The small number of reported malignant tumors suggests that there is not an increased risk of cancer in the context of trisomy 13. The tumor profile in Patau syndrome differs from that observed in Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18) and Down syndrome (trisomy 21), suggesting that the supernumerary chromosome 13 could promote particular tumor formations as it does particular malformations. No general and direct relationships of tumor occurrence with organ weight, congenital malformations, histological changes, or presence of tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 13 were observed. However, some tumors were found in tissues whose growth and development are controlled by genes mapping to chromosome 13. Recent reports of successful outcomes following surgical treatment and adapted chemotherapy indicate that treatment of cancer is possible in Patau syndrome. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Caring for the caregivers: an investigation of factors related to well-being among parents caring for a child with Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Foster, Rebecca H; Kozachek, Stephanie; Stern, Marilyn; Elsea, Sarah H

    2010-04-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex disorder characterized by numerous challenges, including intellectual disability, speech delay, decreased pain sensitivity, sleep disturbances, hyperactivity, mood instability, and self-injury. Caregivers must readily adapt to the ever-changing needs of the child. Due to these demands, caregivers may encounter difficulties maintaining their own level of well-being. Thus, a total of 112 primary caregivers (i.e., parents) of individuals diagnosed with SMS responded to online questionnaires to assess demographic and psychosocial factors, such as perceptions of child health vulnerability, benefit finding, sleep behaviors, anxiety and depression symptomatology, and caregiver satisfaction and self-efficacy, which may be related to caregiver well-being. Results show that, among mothers, caregiver well-being was directly related to perceived child health vulnerability, caregiver satisfaction, and benefit finding, and a significant moderating effect was observed for depression/anxiety counseling after beginning the caregiver role on the relationship between anxiety symptomatology and caregiver well-being. Results further suggest that maternal caregivers who report high levels of anxiety but do not seek counseling fair the worst in terms of well-being. Among fathers, lower depression symptoms and greater benefit finding were related to higher levels of caregiver well-being. These data show that many factors play roles in influencing coping and well-being among SMS caregivers. Investigating these variables and relationships may reveal additional resources and interventions to assist primary caregivers.

  16. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Blei, Francine

    2015-04-01

    Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies encompass entities with a vascular anomaly as the predominant feature vs those syndromes with predominant somatic overgrowth and a vascular anomaly as a more minor component. The focus of this article is to categorize these syndromes phenotypically, including updated clinical criteria, radiologic features, evaluation, management issues, pathophysiology, and genetic information. A literature review was conducted in PubMed using key words "overgrowth syndromes and vascular anomalies" as well as specific literature reviews for each entity and supportive genetic information (e.g., somatic mosaicism). Additional searches in OMIM and Gene Reviews were conducted for each syndrome. Disease entities were categorized by predominant clinical features, known genetic information, and putative affected signaling pathway. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies are a heterogeneous group of disorders, often with variable clinical expression, due to germline or somatic mutations. Overgrowth can be focal (e.g., macrocephaly) or generalized, often asymmetrically (and/or mosaically) distributed. All germ layers may be affected, and the abnormalities may be progressive. Patients with overgrowth syndromes may be at an increased risk for malignancies. Practitioners should be attentive to patients having syndromes with overgrowth and vascular defects. These patients require proactive evaluation, referral to appropriate specialists, and in some cases, early monitoring for potential malignancies. Progress in identifying vascular anomaly-related overgrowth syndromes and their genetic etiology has been robust in the past decade and is contributing to genetically based prenatal diagnosis and new therapies targeting the putative causative genetic mutations. Copyright © 2015 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Savant Syndrome: Realities, Myths and Misconceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treffert, Darold A.

    2014-01-01

    It was 126 years ago that Down first described savant syndrome as a specific condition and 70 years ago that Kanner first described Early Infantile Autism. While as many as one in ten autistic persons have savant abilities, such special skills occur in other CNS conditions as well such that approximately 50% of cases of savant syndrome have autism…

  18. Middle lobe syndrome in children today.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Vittorio; Priftis, Kostas N; de Benedictis, Fernando M

    2014-06-01

    Middle lobe syndrome in children is a distinct clinical and radiographic entity that has been well described in the pediatric literature. However, issues regarding its etiology, clinical presentation, and management continue to puzzle the clinical practitioner. Pathophysiologically, there are two forms of middle lobe syndrome, namely obstructive and nonobstructive. Middle lobe syndrome may present as symptomatic or asymptomatic, as persistent or recurrent atelectasis, or as pneumonitis or bronchiectasis of the middle lobe and/or lingula. A lower threshold of performing a chest radiograph is warranted in children with persistent or recurrent nonspecific respiratory symptoms, particularly if there is clinical deterioration, in order to detect middle lobe syndrome and to initiate a further diagnostic and therapeutic workup. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The savant syndrome and autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Treffert, D A

    1999-12-01

    Savant syndrome, characterized by remarkable islands of mental ability in otherwise mentally handicapped persons, may occur in autistic as well as nonautistic individuals. Overall, approximately 10% of autistic persons exhibit savant abilities; roughly 50% of those with savant syndrome have autism, and the remaining 50% have other forms of developmental disability. Most commonly, savant syndrome takes the form of extraordinary musical abilities, but may also include calendar-calculation, artistic, mathematical, spatial, mechanical, and memory skills. While savant syndrome was first described more than a century ago, only recently have researchers begun to employ a more uniform nomenclature and more standardized testing in an effort to compare the abilities of savants with those of normal persons. Males show signs of savant syndrome approximately four times more often than females. Along with imaging study findings, this fact suggests the presence of a developmental disorder involving left-brain damage with right-brain compensation.

  20. Candidate gene association studies in syndromic and non-syndromic cleft lip and palate

    SciTech Connect

    Daack-Hirsch, S.; Basart, A.; Frischmeyer, P.

    1994-09-01

    Using ongoing case ascertainment through a birth defects registry, we have collected 219 nuclear families with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate and 111 families with a collection of syndromic forms. Syndromic cases include 24 with recognized forms and 72 with unrecognized syndromes. Candidate gene studies as well as genome-wide searches for evidence of microdeletions and isodisomy are currently being carried out. Candidate gene association studies, to date, have made use of PCR-based polymorphisms for TGFA, MSX1, CLPG13 (a CA repeat associated with a human homologue of a locus that results in craniofacial dysmorphogenesis in the mouse) and an STRP foundmore » in a Van der Woude syndrome microdeletion. Control tetranucleotide repeats, which insure that population-based differences are not responsible for any observed associations, are also tested. Studies of the syndromic cases have included the same list of candidate genes searching for evidence of microdeletions and a genome-wide search using tri- and tetranucleotide polymorphic markers to search for isodisomy or structural rearrangements. Significant associations have previously been identified for TGFA, and, in this report, identified for MSX1 and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (p = 0.04, uncorrected). Preliminary results of the genome-wide scan for isodisomy has returned no true positives and there has been no evidence for microdeletion cases.« less

  1. Paraneoplastic Cushing Syndrome Due To Wilm's Tumor.

    PubMed

    Faizan, Mahwish; Manzoor, Jaida; Saleem, Muhammad; Anwar, Saadia; Mehmood, Qaiser; Hameed, Ambreen; Ali, Agha Shabbir

    2017-05-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes are rare disorders that are triggered by an altered immune system response to neoplasm. Paraneoplastic syndromes may be the first or the most prominent manifestations of cancer. Wilm's tumor is the most frequent pediatric renal malignancy and usually presents with abdominal mass. Unusual presentations like acquired von Willebrand disease, sudden death due to pulmonary embolism and Cushing syndrome have been described in the literature. Cushing syndrome, as the presenting symptom of a malignant renal tumor in children, is a very rare entity. Few case reports are available in the literature exploring the option of preoperative chemotherapy as well as upfront nephrectomy. We report a rare case of paraneoplastic Cushing syndrome due to a Wilm's tumor. Based on gradual decrease of postoperative weight, blood pressure, serum adrenocorticotropic hormone, and plasma cortisol levels, along with histological confirmation of Wilm's tumor, paraneoplastic Cushing syndrome due to Wilm's tumor was confirmed.

  2. Reproductive Issues in Women with Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Folsom, Lisal J.; Fuqua, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis Turner syndrome is one of the most common chromosomal abnormalities affecting female infants. The severity of clinical manifestations generally varies and affects multiple organ systems. Women with Turner syndrome have a threefold increase in mortality, which becomes even more pronounced in pregnancy. There are several reproductive options available for women with Turner syndrome, including adoption or surrogacy, assisted reproductive techniques, and in rare cases spontaneous pregnancy. There are well-documented risks for women with Turner syndrome during pregnancy, including specific risks of aortic pathology, hepatic disease, thyroid disease, type 2 diabetes, and Cesarean section delivery. Several professional societies have published guidelines to aid in the care of women with Turner syndrome prior to and during pregnancy. It is important for providers who care for these women to be familiar with the specific risks and recommendations in caring for women with Turner syndrome of reproductive age. PMID:26568488

  3. Insulin Resistance, Metabolic Syndrome, and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Obese Youth.

    PubMed

    Platt, Adrienne M

    2015-07-01

    School nurses are well aware of the childhood obesity epidemic in the United States, as one in three youth are overweight or obese. Co-morbidities found in overweight or obese adults were not commonly found in youth three decades ago but are now increasingly "normal" as the obesity epidemic continues to evolve. This article is the second of six related articles discussing the co-morbidities of childhood obesity and discusses the complex association between obesity and insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and polycystic ovary syndrome. Insulin resistance increases up to 50% during puberty, which may help to explain why youth are more likely to develop co-morbidities as teens. Treatment of these disorders is focused on changing lifestyle habits, as a child cannot change his or her pubertal progression, ethnicity, or family history. School nurses and other personnel can assist youth with insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and polycystic ovary syndrome by supporting their efforts to make changes, reinforcing that insulin resistance is not necessarily type 2 diabetes even if the child is taking medication, and intervening with negative peer pressure. © 2015 The Author(s).

  4. Paraneoplastic syndromes and autoimmune encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Titulaer, Maarten J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We review novel findings in paraneoplastic syndromes including the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, and then focus on the novel disorders associated with antibodies against cell surface antigens, discussing the importance and caveats of antibody testing, and providing an algorithm for interpretation of results. In anti-NMDAR encephalitis 2 novel findings include the recognition of a characteristic EEG pattern (“extreme delta brush”) in 30% of patients and the demonstration of a fronto-temporo-occipital gradient of glucose metabolism that correlates with disease activity. In limbic encephalitis, antibodies to GABA(B) receptor are the most frequently detected in patients with small-cell lung cancer who are anti-Hu negative, and antibodies to mGluR5 distinctively associate with Hodgkin lymphoma (Ophelia syndrome). We also address the syndromes associated with “VGKC-complex antibodies,” a problematic term that groups well-characterized immune-mediated disorders (LGI1, Caspr2) with others that lack syndrome specificity, are less responsive to treatment, and for which the target antigens are unknown. PMID:23634368

  5. Polyangiitis overlap syndrome of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis) and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss syndrome).

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Hironori; Takata, Shohei; Sueishi, Katsuo; Inoue, Hiromasa

    2014-02-27

    Polyangiitis overlap syndrome is defined as systemic vasculitis that cannot be classified into one of the well-defined vasculitic syndromes. In this report, a female patient who presented with vasculitis-like and asthmatic symptoms was diagnosed as having polyangiitis overlap syndrome of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA; formerly known as Wegener's granulomatosis) and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA; formerly known as Churg-Strauss syndrome). The patient fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology diagnostic criteria for GPA and EGPA. She was successfully treated with immunosuppressants and steroids and has been in remission for 20 months. It is important to establish a proper diagnosis and introduce an appropriate treatment modality in patients with this rare and serious pathology to prevent irreversible organ damage.

  6. [Obesity and metabolic syndrome in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Cárdenas Villarreal, Velia Margarita; Rizo-Baeza, María M; Cortés Castell, Ernesto

    2009-03-01

    In spite of the lack of a uniform definition for metabolic syndrome in pediatry, recent studies have shown that it develops during childhood and is highly prevalent among children and adolescents who suffer from obesity. In light of the current epidemic of obesity in this age category in western countries, and specifically in Mexico, it becomes essential to know the means to prevent, detect and treat this syndrome. Nurses play an important role in promoting childhood health with regards to metabolic syndrome. To put into practice the strategies which resolve underlying problems related with this syndrome is a priority for the well-being of this age group. These strategies should include the application and management of public policies; the collaboration by health services, social services and schools; but, furthermore, the prevention and the management of this syndrome require a family commitment, while the changes in living habits benefit the entire family. This review article proposes to introduce prevention, diagnostic and treatment strategies which nursing personnel can carry out while dealing with metabolic syndrome in adolescents.

  7. Gingival fibromatosis with hypertrichosis syndrome: Case series of rare syndrome.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Preetha; Balaji, S M

    2017-01-01

    Gingival fibromatosis with hypertrichosis syndrome is an extremely rare genetic condition characterized by profound overgrowth of hair and gums, as well as other variable features. Gingival fibromatosis is characterized by a large increase in the gingival dimension which extends above the dental crowns, covering them partially or completely. They were found to have a genetic origin, may also occur in isolation or be part of a syndrome, or acquired origin, due to specific drugs administered systemically. Congenital generalized hypertrichosis is a heterogeneous group of diseases with continuing excessive growth of terminal hair without androgenic stimulation. It has informally been called werewolf syndrome because the appearance is similar to that of a werewolf. Various syndromes have been associated with these features such as epilepsy, mental retardation, cardiomegaly, or osteochondrodysplasia. As so far very few cases have been reported in literature, we are reporting a series of three cases with management of the same. The excess gingival tissues, in these cases, were removed by conventional gingivectomy under general anesthesia. The postoperative result was uneventful and the patient's appearance improved significantly. Good esthetic result was achieved to allow patient to practice oral hygiene measures. Though this is not a serious condition clinically, psychosocial trauma cannot be neglected owing to the cosmetic disfigurement it produces.

  8. Nephrotic syndrome and Guillan-Barré Syndrome: a rare association in child.

    PubMed

    Bouyahia, Olfa; Khelifi, Ibtissem; Gharsallah, Lamia; Harzallah, Kais; Mrad, Sonia Mazigh; Ghargah, Tahar; Boukthir, Samir; Azza, Sammoud El Gharbi

    2010-01-01

    Only few cases of nephrotic syndrome associated with Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) have been reported in the adult and pediatric literature. A 3-year-old boy was initially admitted to our hospital following five days of progressive weakness of his extremities, fatigue, right leg pain and numbness. There was no past history of renal or neurological disease. Cerebro-spinal fluid studies showed a protein level of 92 mg/dL and a white cell count of 1 per high-power field. The diagnosis of GBS was verified with a nerve conduction velocity test as well as. The GBS symptoms improved gradually on intravenous immunoglobulin. Three weeks later, he developed severe proteinuria and edema; laboratory investigation showed nephrotic syndrome which responded to steroid therapy. Renal biopsy showed minimal change glomerulonephritis. He remained free of proteinuria during his 20 months of follow-up.

  9. The effect of honey-coated bandages compared with silver-coated bandages on treatment of malignant wounds-a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Lund-Nielsen, Betina; Adamsen, Lis; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Rørth, Mikael; Tolver, Anders; Gottrup, Finn

    2011-11-01

    Malignant wounds (MWs) occur in 5-10% of all cancer patients. Malodor and exudation are the most common side effects. The aim was to determine the influence of honey-coated compared with silver-coated bandages on treatment of MWs. Patients were randomly selected to enter either group A (honey-coated bandages) or group B (silver-coated bandages). Parameters were the following: wound size, cleanliness, malodor, exudation, and wound pain. Digital photographs, visual analog scales (VAS), and wound morphology registration were used for measurement at baseline and following the 4-week intervention. Sixty-nine patients with MWs and advanced cancer, aged 47-90 (median 65.6), were included. No statistically significant difference was noted between the groups with respect to wound size, degree of cleanliness, exudation, malodor, and wound pain. There was a median decrease in wound size of 15 cm² and 8 cm² in group A and B, respectively (p = 0.63). Based on post-intervention pooled data from the groups, improvement was seen in 62% of the participants with respect to wound size and in 58% (n = 69) with respect to cleanliness. The VAS score for malodor (p = 0.007) and exudation (p < 0.0001) improved significantly post-intervention. Patients with reduced wound size had a median survival time of 387 days compared with 134 days in patients with no wound reduction (p = 0.003). The use of honey-coated and silver-coated bandages improved the outcome of MWs. No differences were found between the two regimens. Both types of bandages are recommended for use by patients with MWs containing tumor debris and necrosis. 2011 by the Wound Healing Society.

  10. Molecular Characterization of Copepod Photoreception.

    PubMed

    Porter, Megan L; Steck, Mireille; Roncalli, Vittoria; Lenz, Petra H

    2017-08-01

    Copepod crustaceans are an abundant and ecologically significant group whose basic biology is guided by numerous visually guided behaviors. These behaviors are driven by copepod eyes, including naupliar eyes and Gicklhorn's organs, which vary widely in structure and function among species. Yet little is known about the molecular aspects of copepod vision. In this study we present a general overview of the molecular aspects of copepod vision by identifying phototransduction genes from newly generated and publicly available RNA-sequencing data and assemblies from 12 taxonomically diverse copepod species. We identify a set of 10 expressed transcripts that serve as a set of target genes for future studies of copepod phototransduction. Our more detailed evolutionary analyses of the opsin gene responsible for forming visual pigments found that all of the copepod species investigated express two main groups of opsins: middle-wavelength-sensitive (MWS) opsins and pteropsins. Additionally, there is evidence from a few species (e.g., Calanus finmarchicus, Eurytemora affinis, Paracyclopina nana, and Lernaea cyprinacea) for the expression of two additional groups of opsins-the peropsins and rhodopsin 7 (Rh7) opsins-at low levels or distinct developmental stages. An ontogenetic analysis of opsin expression in Calanus finmarchicus found the expression of a single dominant MWS opsin, as well as evidence for differences in expression across development in some MWS, pteropsin, and Rh7 opsins, with expression peaking in early naupliar through early copepodite stages.

  11. Microscopic Structure of Metal Whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borra, Vamsi; Georgiev, Daniel G.; Karpov, V. G.; Shvydka, Diana

    2018-05-01

    We present TEM images of the interior of metal whiskers (MWs) grown on electroplated Sn films. Along with earlier published information, our observations focus on a number of questions, such as, why MWs' diameters are in the micron range (significantly exceeding the typical nanosizes of nuclei in solids), why the diameters remain practically unchanged in the course of MW growth, what the nature of MW diameter stochasticity is, and what the origin of the well-known striation structure of MW side surfaces is. In an attempt to address such questions, we perform an in-depth study of MW structure at the nanoscale by detaching a MW from its original film, reducing its size to a thin slice by cutting its sides by a focused ion beam, and performing TEM on that structure. Also, we examine the root of the MW and Cu-Sn interface for the intermetallic compounds. Our TEM observations reveal a rich nontrivial morphology suggesting that MWs may consist of many side-by-side grown filaments. This structure appears to extend to the outside whisker surface and be the reason for the striation. In addition, we put forward a theory where nucleation of multiple thin metal needles results in micron-scale and larger MW diameters. This theory is developed in the average field approximation similar to the roughening transitions of metal surfaces. The theory also predicts MW nucleation barriers and other observed features.

  12. Hallucinations Experienced by Visually Impaired: Charles Bonnet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pang, Linda

    2016-12-01

    : Charles Bonnet Syndrome is a condition where visual hallucinations occur as a result of damage along the visual pathway. Patients with Charles Bonnet Syndrome maintain partial or full insight that the hallucinations are not real, absence of psychological conditions, and absence of hallucinations affecting other sensory modalities, while maintaining intact intellectual functioning. Charles Bonnet Syndrome has been well documented in neurologic, geriatric medicine, and psychiatric literature, but there is lack of information in optometric and ophthalmologic literature. Therefore, increased awareness of signs and symptoms associated with Charles Bonnet Syndrome is required among practicing clinicians. This review of the literature will also identify other etiologies of visual hallucinations, pathophysiology of Charles Bonnet Syndrome, and effective management strategies.

  13. Hallucinations Experienced by Visually Impaired: Charles Bonnet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Linda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Charles Bonnet Syndrome is a condition where visual hallucinations occur as a result of damage along the visual pathway. Patients with Charles Bonnet Syndrome maintain partial or full insight that the hallucinations are not real, absence of psychological conditions, and absence of hallucinations affecting other sensory modalities, while maintaining intact intellectual functioning. Charles Bonnet Syndrome has been well documented in neurologic, geriatric medicine, and psychiatric literature, but there is lack of information in optometric and ophthalmologic literature. Therefore, increased awareness of signs and symptoms associated with Charles Bonnet Syndrome is required among practicing clinicians. This review of the literature will also identify other etiologies of visual hallucinations, pathophysiology of Charles Bonnet Syndrome, and effective management strategies. PMID:27529611

  14. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Pol, Chetan A; Ghige, Suvarna K; Kalaskar, Ritesh R; Gosavi, Suchitra R

    2013-10-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an uncommon autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by numerous basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) and musculoskeletal malformations. A rare case of this syndrome observed in a 13-year-old male patient is presented in which multiple OKCs were causing disfigurement of the lower jaw as well as displacement and malocclusion of the teeth. Early diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome is important to reduce the severity of complications including cutaneous and cerebral malignancy and oromaxillofacial deformation and destruction due to jaw cysts.

  15. Translational Research in Familial Colorectal Cancer Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ford, Molly M

    2018-05-01

    Growing knowledge of inherited colorectal cancer syndromes has led to better surveillance and better care of this subset of patients. The most well-known entities, including Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis, are continually being studied and with the advent of more sophisticated genetic testing, additional genetic discoveries have been made in the field of inherited cancer. This article will summarize many of the updates to both the familiar and perhaps less familiar syndromes that can lead to inherited or early-onset colorectal cancer.

  16. Field-Scale Evaluation of Monitored Natural Attenuation for Dissolved Chlorinated Solvent Plumes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    biological in-situ treatment, an air sparging pilot study, and a phytoremediation study. The innovative technology studies were conducted within the source... phytoremediation (June to September 1997), reductive anaerobic biological in-situ treatment technology (RABITT; 1998), and groundwater recirculation wells...u g / L ) Measured Concentrations in 1381MWS09 Air Sparge Pilot Test (1996/1997) Phytoremediation Pilot Test (1997) RABITT Pilot Test (1998

  17. The Tie retraction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Geerling, Gerd; Neppert, Birte; Hemmant, Bridget

    2012-12-01

    Tissue retraction is implicated in the pathogenesis of various ophthalmic disorders. Here we describe the clinical characteristics, epidemiology and pathophysiology of a form of retraction syndrome which - to the best of our knowledge - has not been reported in the ophthalmic literature so far. We have termed this condition - consisting of a slowly progressive pseudovertical shortening of tie length due to a horizontal extension of girth length - the "Tie retraction syndrome" (TRS). Other pathognomonic features include an increased tie tip to belt buckle distance and a prolapse of the subumbilical fat pad (SUFP). The syndrome has a clear male to female preponderance and shows an increasing incidence with age and income before tax. Based on a newly proposed grading scheme we discuss and illustrate the diagnosis as well as the medical and surgical management options of this abundant, but often undiagnosed condition. The authors have no explanation for the apparent lack of awareness for this widely preponderant syndrome and its severe cosmetically disfiguring potential. We thus would like to invite all fellow colleagues with expertise in the field to comment or present their views.

  18. Metabolic syndrome-associated osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Courties, Alice; Sellam, Jérémie; Berenbaum, Francis

    2017-03-01

    Interest in the metabolic syndrome-associated osteoarthritis phenotype is increasing. Here, we summarize recently published significant findings. Meta-analyses confirmed an association between type 2 diabetes and osteoarthritis and between cardiovascular diseases and osteoarthritis. Recent advances in the study of metabolic syndrome-associated osteoarthritis have focused on a better understanding of the role of metabolic diseases in inducing or aggravating joint damage. In-vivo models of obesity, diabetes, or dyslipidemia have helped to better decipher this association. They give emerging evidence that, beyond the role of common pathogenic mechanisms for metabolic diseases and osteoarthritis (i.e., low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress), metabolic diseases have a direct systemic effect on joints. In addition to the impact of weight, obesity-associated inflammation is associated with osteoarthritis severity and may modulate osteoarthritis progression in mouse models. As well, osteoarthritis synovium from type 2 diabetic patients shows insulin-resistant features, which may participate in joint catabolism. Finally, exciting data are emerging on the association of gut microbiota and circadian rhythm and metabolic syndrome-associated osteoarthritis. The systemic role of metabolic syndrome in osteoarthritis pathophysiology is now better understood, but new avenues of research are being pursued to better decipher the metabolic syndrome-associated osteoarthritis phenotype.

  19. Caries in Portuguese children with Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Areias, Cristina Maria; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita; Guimaraes, Hercilia; Melo, Paulo; Andrade, David

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Oral health in Down syndrome children has some peculiar aspects that must be considered in the follow-up of these patients. This study focuses on characterizing the environmental and host factors associated with dental caries in Portuguese children with and without Down syndrome. METHODS: A sibling-matched, population-based, cross-sectional survey was performed. RESULTS: Down syndrome children presented a significantly greater percentage of children without caries, 78% vs. 58% of non-Down syndrome siblings. This difference in the DMFT index (number of decayed, missing and filled teeth) essentially reflects data obtained from treated teeth, for which 91% of children with Down syndrome had never had a tooth treated vs. 67% of siblings. This result was statistically significant, whereas results for decayed and lost teeth did not differ between Down syndrome children and their unaffected siblings. Additionally, in Down syndrome children, a delayed eruption of the second molar occurs. Down syndrome children and their siblings have similar oral hygiene habits, but a higher percentage of Down syndrome children visit a dentist before the age of three years, in comparison to their siblings. Bruxism was also more common in Down syndrome children compared to their siblings. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that Portuguese children with Down syndrome have lower caries rates than children without Down syndrome. This reduced prevalence may be associated with the parents' greater concern about oral health care in Down syndrome children, resulting in their taking them sooner to visit a dentist, as well as to a higher bruxism prevalence and delayed tooth eruption. PMID:21876971

  20. Caries in Portuguese children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Areias, Cristina Maria; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita; Guimaraes, Hercilia; Melo, Paulo; Andrade, David

    2011-01-01

    Oral health in Down syndrome children has some peculiar aspects that must be considered in the follow-up of these patients. This study focuses on characterizing the environmental and host factors associated with dental caries in Portuguese children with and without Down syndrome. A sibling-matched, population-based, cross-sectional survey was performed. Down syndrome children presented a significantly greater percentage of children without caries, 78% vs. 58% of non-Down syndrome siblings. This difference in the DMFT index (number of decayed, missing and filled teeth) essentially reflects data obtained from treated teeth, for which 91% of children with Down syndrome had never had a tooth treated vs. 67% of siblings. This result was statistically significant, whereas results for decayed and lost teeth did not differ between Down syndrome children and their unaffected siblings. Additionally, in Down syndrome children, a delayed eruption of the second molar occurs. Down syndrome children and their siblings have similar oral hygiene habits, but a higher percentage of Down syndrome children visit a dentist before the age of three years, in comparison to their siblings. Bruxism was also more common in Down syndrome children compared to their siblings. Our results show that Portuguese children with Down syndrome have lower caries rates than children without Down syndrome. This reduced prevalence may be associated with the parents' greater concern about oral health care in Down syndrome children, resulting in their taking them sooner to visit a dentist, as well as to a higher bruxism prevalence and delayed tooth eruption.

  1. [Cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome, a Noonan syndrome related disorder: clinical and molecular findings in 11 patients].

    PubMed

    Carcavilla, Atilano; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; Pérez-Aytés, Antonio; Vendrell, Teresa; Pinto, Isabel; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; González-Meneses, Antonio; Aoki, Yoko; Grinberg, Daniel; Ezquieta, Begoña

    2015-01-20

    To describe 11 patients with cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFC) and compare them with 130 patients with other RAS-MAPK syndromes (111 Noonan syndrome patients [NS] and 19 patients with LEOPARD syndrome). Clinical data from patients submitted for genetic analysis were collected. Bidirectional sequencing analysis of PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, BRAF, and MAP2K1 focused on exons carrying recurrent mutations, and of all KRAS exons were performed. Six different mutations in BRAF were identified in 9 patients, as well as 2 MAP2K1 mutations. Short stature, developmental delay, language difficulties and ectodermal anomalies were more frequent in CFC patients when compared with other neuro-cardio-faciocutaneous syndromes (P<.05). In at least 2 cases molecular testing helped reconsider the diagnosis. CFC patients showed a rather severe phenotype but at least one patient with BRAF mutation showed no developmental delay, which illustrates the variability of the phenotypic spectrum caused by BRAF mutations. Molecular genetic testing is a valuable tool for differential diagnosis of CFC and NS related disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Rothmund-Thomson syndrome and osteoma cutis in a patient previously diagnosed as COPS syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Rij, M C; Grijsen, M L; Appelman-Dijkstra, N M; Hansson, K B M; Ruivenkamp, C A L; Mulder, K; van Doorn, R; Oranje, A P; Kant, S G

    2017-02-01

    We present a patient with poikiloderma, severe osteoporosis and a mild intellectual disability. At the age of 9 years, this patient was proposed to suffer from a novel disease entity designated as calcinosis cutis, osteoma cutis, poikiloderma and skeletal abnormalities (COPS) syndrome. At the age of 35, he was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma. Recently, biallelic pathogenic variants in the RECQL4 gene were detected (c.1048_1049delAG and c.1391-1G>A), confirming a diagnosis of Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS). In the brother of this patient, who had a milder phenotype, a similar diagnosis was made. We conclude that COPS syndrome never existed as a separate syndrome entity. Instead, osteoma cutis may be regarded as a novel feature of RTS, whereas mild intellectual disability and lymphoma may be underreported parts of the phenotype. What is new: • Osteoma cutis was not a known feature in Rothmund-Thomson patients. • Intellectual disability may be considered a rare feature in RTS; more study is needed. What is known: • RTS is a well-described syndrome caused by mutations in the RECQL4 gene. • Patients with RTS frequently show chromosomal abnormalities like, e.g. mosaic trisomy 8.

  3. Further delineation of Malan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Priolo, Manuela; Schanze, Denny; Tatton-Brown, Katrin; Mulder, Paul A; Tenorio, Jair; Kooblall, Kreepa; Acero, Inés Hernández; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Arias, Pedro; Bernardini, Laura; Bijlsma, Emilia K; Cole, Trevor; Coubes, Christine; Dapia, Irene; Davies, Sally; Di Donato, Nataliya; Elcioglu, Nursel H; Fahrner, Jill A; Foster, Alison; González, Noelia García; Huber, Ilka; Iascone, Maria; Kaiser, Ann-Sophie; Kamath, Arveen; Liebelt, Jan; Lynch, Sally Ann; Maas, Saskia M; Mammì, Corrado; Mathijssen, Inge B; McKee, Shane; Menke, Leonie A; Mirzaa, Ghayda M; Montgomery, Tara; Neubauer, Dorothee; Neumann, Thomas E; Pintomalli, Letizia; Pisanti, Maria Antonietta; Plomp, Astrid S; Price, Sue; Salter, Claire; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; Sarda, Pierre; Segovia, Mabel; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Smithson, Sarah; Suri, Mohnish; Valdez, Rita Maria; Van Haeringen, Arie; Van Hagen, Johanna M; Zollino, Marcela; Lapunzina, Pablo; Thakker, Rajesh V; Zenker, Martin; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2018-06-13

    Malan syndrome is an overgrowth disorder described in a limited number of individuals. We aim to delineate the entity by studying a large group of affected individuals. We gathered data on 45 affected individuals with a molecularly confirmed diagnosis through an international collaboration and compared data to the 35 previously reported individuals. Results indicate that height is > 2 SDS in infancy and childhood but in only half of affected adults. Cardinal facial characteristics include long, triangular face, macrocephaly, prominent forehead, everted lower lip, and prominent chin. Intellectual disability is universally present, behaviorally anxiety is characteristic. Malan syndrome is caused by deletions or point mutations of NFIX clustered mostly in exon 2. There is no genotype-phenotype correlation except for an increased risk for epilepsy with 19p13.2 microdeletions. Variants arose de novo, except in one family in which mother was mosaic. Variants causing Malan and Marshall-Smith syndrome can be discerned by differences in the site of stop codon formation. We conclude that Malan syndrome has a well recognizable phenotype that usually can be discerned easily from Marshall-Smith syndrome but rarely there is some overlap. Differentiation from Sotos and Weaver syndrome can be made by clinical evaluation only. © 2018 The Authors. Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The developmental trajectory of disruptive behavior in Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome and Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rice, Lauren J; Gray, Kylie M; Howlin, Patricia; Taffe, John; Tonge, Bruce J; Einfeld, Stewart L

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the developmental trajectories of verbal aggression, physical aggression, and temper tantrums in four genetic syndrome groups. Participants were part of the Australian Child to Adult Development Study (ACAD), which collected information from a cohort of individuals with an intellectual disability at five time points over 18 years. Data were examined from a total of 248 people with one of the four following syndromes: Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, or Williams syndrome. Changes in behaviors were measured using validated items from the Developmental Behavior Checklist (DBC). The results indicate that, while verbal aggression shows no evidence of diminishing with age, physical aggression, and temper tantrums decline with age before 19 years for people with Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, and William syndrome; and after 19 years for people with Prader-Willi syndrome. These findings offer a somewhat more optimistic outlook for people with an intellectual disability than has previously been suggested. Research is needed to investigate the mechanisms predisposing people with PWS to persistence of temper tantrums and physical aggression into adulthood. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The role of religious and existential well-being in families with Lynch syndrome: prevention, family communication, and psychosocial adjustment.

    PubMed

    Morris, Bronwyn A; Hadley, Donald W; Koehly, Laura M

    2013-08-01

    This study explored the role of religious (RWB) and existential well-being (EWB) on psychosocial factors, support network characteristics, and screening practices in families with Lynch syndrome, also referred to as hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC). Participants were individuals with Lynch syndrome associated cancers and their first-degree relatives at risk of inheriting an identified deleterious mutation. Analyses considered both family RWB and EWB norms and individual deviations from that norm. Analyses controlled for age, gender, cancer diagnosis, number of respondents, and network size. Higher family RWB was associated with increased depressive symptoms (p < .05) and avoidant cognitions (p < .05). Higher family EWB was related to decreased depression symptoms (p < .001). Higher family EWB was associated with fecal occult blood testing (p < .01), and family communication about genetic counselling and testing (p < .01). Analyses pointed to individual effects of EWB above and beyond family-level effects. Individuals with lower EWB than their family had lower perceived risk for colorectal cancer (p < .05), communicated disease risk information to less family members (p < .05), and were less likely to undergo recent colonoscopies (p < .05). Participants with lower EWB than their family also had higher cancer worry (p < .01) and increased depressive symptoms (p < .001). Findings indicate the importance of assessing individuals within the context of their family network and being aware of family characteristics which may impact individual adjustment to disease risk. Interventions considering family-level factors may provide efficient pathways to improving psychosocial factors, screening practices, communication about disease risk and genetic testing, and cancer prevention.

  6. Wolfram syndrome: a clinicopathologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Saumil N.; Adams, Joe C.; Joseph, Jeffrey T.

    2009-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome or DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy as well as diabetes insipidus and deafness in many cases. We report the post-mortem neuropathologic findings of a patient with Wolfram syndrome and correlate them with his clinical presentation. In the hypothalamus, neurons in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei were markedly decreased and minimal neurohypophyseal tissue remained in the pituitary. The pontine base and inferior olivary nucleus showed gross shrinkage and neuron loss, while the cerebellum was relatively unaffected. The visual system had moderate to marked loss of retinal ganglion neurons, commensurate loss of myelinated axons in the optic nerve, chiasm and tract, and neuron loss in the lateral geniculate nucleus but preservation of the primary visual cortex. The patient’s inner ear showed loss of the organ of Corti in the basal turn of the cochleae and mild focal atrophy of the stria vascularis. These findings correlated well with the patient’s high-frequency hearing loss. The pathologic findings correlated closely with the patient’s clinical symptoms and further support the concept of Wolfram syndrome as a neurodegenerative disorder. Our findings extend prior neuropathologic reports of Wolfram syndrome by providing contributions to our understanding of eye, inner ear and olivopontine pathology in this disease. PMID:19449020

  7. The metabolic syndrome in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Essah, P A; Nestler, J E

    2006-03-01

    Much overlap is present between the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and the metabolic syndrome. This article reviews the existing data regarding the prevalence, characteristics, and treatment of the metabolic syndrome in women with PCOS. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in PCOS is approximately 43-47%, a rate 2-fold higher than that for women in the general population. High body mass index and low serum HDL cholesterol are the most frequently occurring components of the metabolic syndrome in PCOS. The pathogenic link between the metabolic syndrome and PCOS is most likely insulin resistance. Therefore, the presence of the metabolic syndrome in PCOS suggests a greater degree of insulin resistance compared to PCOS without the metabolic syndrome. Obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia, hypertension, impaired fasting glucose/impaired glucose tolerance, and vascular abnormalities are all common metabolic abnormalities present in PCOS. Lifestyle modification has proven benefit and pharmacological therapy with insulin-sensitizing agents has potential benefit in the treatment of the metabolic syndrome in women with PCOS.

  8. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Pol, Chetan A; Ghige, Suvarna K; Kalaskar, Ritesh R; Gosavi, Suchitra R

    2013-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an uncommon autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by numerous basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) and musculoskeletal malformations. A rare case of this syndrome observed in a 13-year-old male patient is presented in which multiple OKCs were causing disfigurement of the lower jaw as well as displacement and malocclusion of the teeth. Early diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome is important to reduce the severity of complications including cutaneous and cerebral malignancy and oromaxillofacial deformation and destruction due to jaw cysts. PMID:24403808

  9. [Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: malignant tumour as triggering factor].

    PubMed

    Guisado, J; Carbonell, C; Donaire, L; De Miguel, J; Vaz, F

    2001-01-01

    Gastrectomy, alcoholism and malignant tumour are three predisponing risk factors for the development of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. We described the clinical case of a patient with history of alcoholism that developed Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome 30 years after undergoing gastrectomy. This patient had, in the last year, a diagnostic for prostatic adenocarcinoma and changes in dietary habits. We presented the clinical and neuropathological features of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. As well as some aspects in the treatment and prognosis.

  10. Inter-specific coral chimerism: Genetically distinct multicellular structures associated with tissue loss in Montipora capitata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Forsman, Zac H.; Szabo, Zoltan; Lewis, Teresa D.; Aeby, Greta S.; Toonen, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Montipora white syndrome (MWS) results in tissue-loss that is often lethal to Montipora capitata, a major reef building coral that is abundant and dominant in the Hawai'ian Archipelago. Within some MWS-affected colonies in Kane'ohe Bay, Oahu, Hawai'i, we saw unusual motile multicellular structures within gastrovascular canals (hereafter referred to as invasive gastrovascular multicellular structure-IGMS) that were associated with thinning and fragmentation of the basal body wall. IGMS were in significantly greater densities in coral fragments manifesting tissue-loss compared to paired normal fragments. Mesenterial filaments from these colonies yielded typical M. capitata mitochondrial haplotypes (CO1, CR), while IGMS from the same colony consistently yielded distinct haplotypes previously only found in a different Montipora species (Montipora flabellata). Protein profiles showed consistent differences between paired mesenterial filaments and IGMS from the same colonies as did seven microsatellite loci that also exhibited an excess of alleles per locus inconsistent with a single diploid organism. We hypothesize that IGMS are a parasitic cellular lineage resulting from the chimeric fusion between M. capitata and M. flabellata larvae followed by morphological reabsorption of M. flabellata and subsequent formation of cell-lineage parasites. We term this disease Montiporaiasis. Although intra-specific chimerism is common in colonial animals, this is the first suspected inter-specific example and the first associated with tissue loss.

  11. Treatment of Neurosensory Disorders Improves Psychological Well-Being in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohlander, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Psychological well-being is the ultimate "quality of life" measure. The presence of a neurosensory disorder (NSD) in a child, such as ADD, ADHD, Asperger's syndrome, or autism, can rob the child of psychological well-being, or hamper the growth of well-being as the child develops. Fortunately, treatment of NSDs can remove obstacles to the…

  12. Neuropsychology and socioeconomic aspects of Klinefelter syndrome: new developments.

    PubMed

    Skakkebæk, Anne; Wallentin, Mikkel; Gravholt, Claus H

    2015-06-01

    To summarize recent important studies on neuropsychology and epidemiology of Klinefelter syndrome. PubMed was searched for 'Klinefelter', 'Klinefelter's' and 'XXY' in titles and abstracts. Relevant studies were obtained and reviewed, as well as other articles selected by the authors. Klinefelter syndrome is the most common sex-chromosome disorder in humans, affecting one in 660 men. The key findings in Klinefelter syndrome are small testes, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and cognitive impairment. Klinefelter syndrome scores significantly below education matched controls on a range of cognitive tests with verbal skills displaying the largest effects. Boys with Klinefelter syndrome are often in the need of speech therapy and many suffer from learning disability and may benefit from special education. New studies are elucidating aspects of cognitive functioning and suggesting that neuropsychological treatment may be of value. The socioeconomic status and educational level of Klinefelter syndrome is severely affected with many struggling to achieve any or only shorter education, resulting in low-income levels and early retirement. In addition, few become fathers and fewer live with a partner compared with controls. Medical treatment is mainly testosterone replacement therapy in order to alleviate acute and long-term consequences of hypogonadism, as well as, treating or preventing the frequent comorbidity. The neurocognitive phenotype of Klinefelter syndrome is being unraveled and the need for psychological and cognitive treatment in many cases is evident. The neurocognitive deficits no doubt influence the socioeconomic status of many Klinefelter syndrome patients, which is clearly inferior to age-matched controls.

  13. Increased overall cortical connectivity with syndrome specific local decreases suggested by atypical sleep-EEG synchronization in Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gombos, Ferenc; Bódizs, Róbert; Kovács, Ilona

    2017-07-21

    Williams syndrome (7q11.23 microdeletion) is characterized by specific alterations in neurocognitive architecture and functioning, as well as disordered sleep. Here we analyze the region, sleep state and frequency-specific EEG synchronization of whole night sleep recordings of 21 Williams syndrome and 21 typically developing age- and gender-matched subjects by calculating weighted phase lag indexes. We found broadband increases in inter- and intrahemispheric neural connectivity for both NREM and REM sleep EEG of Williams syndrome subjects. These effects consisted of increased theta, high sigma, and beta/low gamma synchronization, whereas alpha synchronization was characterized by a peculiar Williams syndrome-specific decrease during NREM states (intra- and interhemispheric centro-temporal) and REM phases of sleep (occipital intra-area synchronization). We also found a decrease in short range, occipital connectivity of NREM sleep EEG theta activity. The striking increased overall synchronization of sleep EEG in Williams syndrome subjects is consistent with the recently reported increase in synaptic and dendritic density in stem-cell based Williams syndrome models, whereas decreased alpha and occipital connectivity might reflect and underpin the altered microarchitecture of primary visual cortex and disordered visuospatial functioning of Williams syndrome subjects.

  14. Electrophysiological Correlates of Semantic Processing in Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinheiro, Ana P.; Galdo-Alvarez, Santaigo; Sampaio, Adriana; Niznikiewicz, Margaret; Goncalves, Oscar F.

    2010-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder due to microdeletion in chromosome 7, has been described as a syndrome with an intriguing socio-cognitive phenotype. Cognitively, the relative preservation of language and face processing abilities coexists with severe deficits in visual-spatial tasks, as well as in tasks involving…

  15. Does the Well-Being of Individuals with Down Syndrome and Dementia Improve When Using Life Story Books and Rummage Boxes? A Randomized Single Case Series Experiment.

    PubMed

    Crook, Nicola; Adams, Malcolm; Shorten, Nicola; Langdon, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether a personalized life story book and rummage box enhanced well-being and led to changes in behaviour for people with Down syndrome (DS) who have dementia. A randomized single case series design was used with five participants who had DS and a diagnosis of dementia. Participants were invited to take part in three conditions at random (i) life story book, (ii) rummage box and (iii) no-intervention condition. The two reminiscence conditions were significantly associated with enhanced well-being as compared to the no-intervention condition. However, for one participant, the life story book was associated with significantly higher well-being, while for another participant, the rummage box was associated with significantly higher well-being, suggesting some participants may prefer one method over another. Personalized life story books and rummage boxes are associated with higher levels of well-being for people with DS and dementia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Mani; Kurian, George; John, Jacob K.

    1996-01-01

    Psychological aspects of Irritable Bowel Syndrome have been well investigated in Western countries, but there is a paucity of Indian studies focusing on this area. A series of fifty patients with the Irritable Bowel Syndrome were studied with respect to their depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms and their personality traits. Patients had a mean score of 14.68 on Hamilton's depression rating scale and 11.22 on Hamilton's anxiety rating scale, and were more introverted and more neurotic than the general population. No association was found between psychological symptoms and severity of gastrointestinal symptoms. These findings suggest that psychological symptoms are a concomitant part of the Irritable Bowel Syndrome. PMID:21584134

  17. [Waardenburg's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gimñenez, F; Carbonell, R; Pérez, F; Lozano, I

    1994-01-01

    Reporting one case of this condition type-2 with heterochromia iridis and cochlear deafness. The AA. review the syndrome's components and it nomenclature as well. They discuss about the convenience of including this deviation in the chapter of "diseases of the embryonic neural crest". The specific place of the gene responsibly in the chromosome-2 and the possibilities of genetic counselling are considered.

  18. Parent-reported health-related quality of life of children with Down syndrome: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Shields, Nora; Leonard, Helen; Munteanu, Shannon; Bourke, Jennifer; Lim, Polly; Taylor, Nicholas F; Downs, Jenny

    2018-04-01

    To describe health-related quality of life of Australian children and adolescents with Down syndrome and compare it with norm-referenced data. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with parents of 75 children and adolescents (43 males, 32 females) with Down syndrome aged 5 to 18 years (mean age 13y 2mo, SD 4y 8mo). The proxy-report KIDSCREEN-27 questionnaire was administered and five dimensions of health-related quality of life were measured. Data were analysed descriptively and compared with normative data. Total group mean scores for psychological well-being, autonomy and parent relation, and school environment dimensions were within normal threshold values, whereas mean scores for physical well-being, and social support and peers dimensions, were poorer. For participants with Down syndrome aged 8 to 18 years, the difference with normative data for proxy-reported physical well-being, psychological well-being, and social support and peers dimensions favoured typically developing children. Adolescents (13-18y) with Down syndrome scored poorer on all dimensions than children (5-12y) with Down syndrome. Our findings assist a better understanding of the lived experiences of children and adolescents with Down syndrome, as perceived by their parents, and suggest aspects of health that could be influenced to optimize their quality of life. Proxy-reported psychological well-being and autonomy were within the normal range for children with Down syndrome. Physical well-being and social support scores were significantly lower than normative data. Proxy-reported scores for adolescents with Down syndrome were consistently poorer than for children with Down syndrome and the differences were clinically important. © 2018 Mac Keith Press.

  19. Anti-Toxoplasma activity of various molecular weights and concentrations of chitosan nanoparticles on tachyzoites of RH strain.

    PubMed

    Teimouri, Aref; Azami, Sanaz Jafarpour; Keshavarz, Hossein; Esmaeili, Fariba; Alimi, Rasoul; Mavi, Sara Ayazian; Shojaee, Saeedeh

    2018-01-01

    Natural polysaccharides such as chitosan (CS) are widely used as antimicrobial agents. In recent years, and considering that CS has a strong antimicrobial potential, interest has been focused on antimicrobial activity of chitosan nanoparticles (CS NPs). The main factors affecting the antibacterial activity of chitosan include molecular weight (MW) and concentration. In this regard, the aim of this study was to produce various MWs and concentrations of CS NPs, through the ionic gelation method, and investigate their potential anti-parasitic activity against tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii RH strain. The MWs and degree of deacetylation of the CS were characterized using viscometric and acid-base titration methods, respectively. The efficacy of various MWs and concentrations of NPs was assessed by performing in vitro experiments for tachyzoites of T. gondii RH strain, such as MTT assay, scanning electron microscopy, bioassay in mice and PCR. In vivo experiment was carried out in BALB/c mice which were inoculated with tachyzoites of T. gondii RH strain and treated with various MWs of CS NPs. The results of in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed that anti- Toxoplasma activity strengthened as the CS NPs concentration increased and the MW decreased. In vitro experiment showed 100% mortality of tachyzoites at 500 and 1,000 ppm concentrations of low molecular weight (LMW) CS NPs after 180 min and at 2,000 ppm after 120 min. Furthermore, a 100% mortality of tachyzoites was observed at 1,000 and 2,000 ppm concentrations of medium molecular weight (MMW) CS NPs and at 2,000 ppm concentration of high molecular weight (HMW) CS NPs after 180 min. Growth inhibition rates of tachyzoites in peritoneal exudates of mice receiving low, medium and high MWs of CS NPs were found to be 86%, 84% and 79% respectively, compared to those of mice in sulfadiazine treatment group (positive control). Various MWs of CS NPs exhibited great anti- Toxoplasma efficiency against tachyzoites of RH

  20. Report of a new syndrome: focus on differential diagnosis and review of Ellis-van Creveld, Curry-Hall, acrofacial dysostosis, and orofacial digital syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sujoy; Setty, Suhas; Sivakumar, A; Pai, Keerthilatha M

    2007-05-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) and Curry-Hall (CH) syndromes are rare syndromes that occur due to mutations of genes mapped to the chromosome 4p16 region. Hence, they both have few features that are common. The dental literature describing the oral manifestations and etiology of both syndromes is scarce. We report a case of a 7-year-old girl who appeared with features that are common to both syndromes, as well as with other features such as reduced cranial base flexure and toes of equal length with skeletal changes that have not been mentioned or described in earlier reports. The patient possibly represents a new syndromic entity that has not been reported until now. Further, we present a review of various other similar syndromes, such as various types of orofacial digital (OFD) syndrome and acrofacial dysostosis.

  1. New medical workstation for multimodality communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsopoulos, Stavros A.; Lymberopoulos, Dimitris C.

    1993-07-01

    The introduction of special teleworking and advanced remote expert consultation procedures in the modern multimodality medical communication systems, has an effective result in the way of confronting synchronous and asynchronous patient cases, by the physicians. The common denominator in developing the above procedures is to use special designated Medical Workstations (MWS). The present paper deals with the implementation of a MWS which facilitates the doctors of medicine to handle efficiently multimedia data in an ISDN communication environment.

  2. Intrinsic Remediation Treatability Study for Site ST-29 Patrick Air Force Base, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-08-01

    of the northeast/southwest (NE/SW) runway. The BX Service Station has been in operation since 1954. The site consists of a small food market (Building... UCg /1 0 86-4-MWD .09 12.4 1.47 0 86-5-MWS .17 23.6 6.86 86-7 .12 30.2 2.52 86-8 .10 44.7 8.51 86-9-MWD .11 34.7 15.3 86-9-MWD Dup .11 86-9-MWS .10

  3. Nelson syndrome: historical perspectives and current concepts.

    PubMed

    Hornyak, Mark; Weiss, Martin H; Nelson, Don H; Couldwell, William T

    2007-01-01

    The appearance of an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-producing tumor after bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing disease was first described by Nelson in 1958. The syndrome that now bears his name was characterized by hyperpigmentation, a sellar mass, and increased plasma ACTH levels. The treatment of Cushing disease has changed drastically since the 1950s, when the choice was adrenalectomy. Thus, the occurrence, diagnosis, and treatment of Nelson syndrome have changed as well. In the modern era of high-resolution neuroimaging, transsphenoidal microneurosurgery, and stereotactic radiosurgery, Nelson syndrome has become a rare entity. The authors describe the history of the diagnosis and treatment of Nelson syndrome. In light of the changes described, the authors believe this disease must be reevaluated in the contemporary era and a modern paradigm adopted.

  4. Rapid synthesis of tin oxide nanostructures by microwave-assisted thermal oxidation for sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadungdhitidhada, S.; Ruankham, P.; Gardchareon, A.; Wongratanaphisan, D.; Choopun, S.

    2017-09-01

    In the present work nanostructures of tin oxides were synthesized by a microwave-assisted thermal oxidation. Tin precursor powder was loaded into a cylindrical quartz tube and further radiated in a microwave oven. The as-synthesized products were characterized by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and x-ray diffractometer. The results showed that two different morphologies of SnO2 microwires (MWs) and nanoparticles (NPs) were obtained in one minute of microwave radiation under atmospheric ambient. A few tens of the SnO2 MWs with the length of 10-50 µm were found. Some parts of the MWs were decorated with the SnO2 NPs. However, most of the products were SnO2 NPs with the diameter ranging from 30-200 nm. Preparation under loosely closed system lead to mixed phase SnO-SnO2 NPs with diameter of 30-200 nm. The single-phase of SnO2 could be obtained by mixing the Sn precursor powders with CuO2. The products were mostly found to be SnO2 nanowires (NWs) and MWs. The diameter of SnO2 NWs was less than 50 nm. The SnO2 NPs, MWs, and NWs were in the cassiterite rutile structure phase. The SnO NPs was in the tetragonal structure phase. The growth direction of the SnO2 NWs was observed in (1 1 0) and (2 2 1) direction. The ethanol sensor performance of these tin oxide nanostructures showed that the SnO-SnO2 NPs exhibited extremely high sensitivity. Invited talk at 5th Thailand International Nanotechnology Conference (Nano Thailand-2016), 27-29 November 2016, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand.

  5. Investigation of Dysphagia After Antireflux Surgery by High-resolution Manometry: Impact of Multiple Water Swallows and a Solid Test Meal on Diagnosis, Management, and Clinical Outcome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu Tien; Tai, Ling Fung; Yazaki, Etsuro; Jafari, Jafar; Sweis, Rami; Tucker, Emily; Knowles, Kevin; Wright, Jeff; Ahmad, Saqib; Kasi, Madhavi; Hamlett, Katharine; Fox, Mark R; Sifrim, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Management of patients with dysphagia, regurgitation, and related symptoms after antireflux surgery is challenging. This prospective, case-control study tested the hypothesis that compared with standard high-resolution manometry (HRM) with single water swallows (SWS), adding multiple water swallows (MWS) and a solid test meal increases diagnostic yield and clinical impact of physiological investigations. Fifty-seven symptomatic and 12 asymptomatic patients underwent HRM with SWS, MWS, and a solid test meal. Dysphagia and reflux were assessed by validated questionnaires. Diagnostic yield of standard and full HRM studies with 24-hour pH-impedance monitoring was compared. Pneumatic dilatation was performed for outlet obstruction on HRM studies. Clinical outcome was assessed by questionnaires and an analogue scale with "satisfactory" defined as at least 40% symptom improvement requiring no further treatment. Postoperative esophagogastric junction pressure was similar in all groups. Abnormal esophagogastric junction morphology (double high pressure band) was more common in symptomatic than in control patients (13 of 57 vs 0 of 12, P = .004). Diagnostic yield of HRM was 11 (19%), 11 (19%), and 33 of 57 (58%), with SWS, MWS, and solids, respectively (P < .001); it was greatest for solids in patients with dysphagia (19 of 27, 70%). Outlet obstruction was present in 4 (7%), 11 (19%), and 15 of 57 patients (26%) with SWS, MWS, and solids, respectively (P < .009). No asymptomatic control had clinically relevant dysfunction on solid swallows. Dilatation was performed in 12 of 15 patients with outlet obstruction during the test meal. Symptom response was satisfactory, good, or excellent in 7 of 12 (58%) with no serious complications. The addition of MWS and a solid test meal increases the diagnostic yield of HRM studies in patients with symptoms after fundoplication and identifies additional patients with outlet obstruction who benefit from endoscopic dilatation. Copyright

  6. Marked regional left ventricular heterogeneity in hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy patients: a losartan intervention for endpoint reduction in hypertension (LIFE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance and echocardiographic substudy.

    PubMed

    Biederman, Robert W W; Doyle, Mark; Young, Alistair A; Devereux, Richard B; Kortright, Eduardo; Perry, Gilbert; Bella, Jonathan N; Oparil, Suzanne; Calhoun, David; Pohost, Gerald M; Dell'Italia, Louis J

    2008-08-01

    Concentric hypertensive left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy is presumed to be a symmetrical process. Using MRI-derived intramyocardial strain, we sought to determine whether segmental deformation was also symmetrical, as suggested by echocardiography. High echocardiographic LV relative wall thickness in hypertensive LV hypertrophy allows preserved endocardial excursion despite depressed LV midwall shortening (MWS). Depressed MWS is an adverse prognostic indicator, but whether this is related to global or regional myocardial depression is unknown. We prospectively compared MWS derived from linear echocardiographic dimensions with MR strain(in) in septal and posterior locations in 27 subjects with ECG LV hypertrophy in the Losartan Intervention for Endpoint Reduction in Hypertension Study. Although MRI-derived mass was higher in patients than in normal control subjects (124.0+/-38.6 versus 60.5+/-13.2g/m(2); P<0.001), fractional shortening (30+/-5% versus 33+/-3%) and end-systolic stress (175+/-22 versus 146+/-28 g/cm(2)) did not differ between groups. However, mean MR(in) was decreased in patients versus normal control subjects (13.9+/-6.8% versus 22.4+/-3.5%), as was echo MWS (13.4+/-2.8% versus 18.2+/-1.4%; both P<0.001). For patients versus normal control subjects, posterior wall(in) was not different (17.8+/-7.1% versus 21.6+/-4.0%), whereas septal(in) was markedly depressed (10.1+/-6.6% versus 23.2+/-3.4%; P<0.001). Although global MWS by echocardiography or MRI is depressed in hypertensive LV hypertrophy, MRI tissue tagging demonstrates substantial regional intramyocardial strain(in) heterogeneity, with most severely depressed strain patterns in the septum. Although posterior wall 2D principal strain was inversely related to radius of curvature, septal strain was not, suggesting that factors other than afterload are responsible for pronounced myocardial strain heterogeneity in concentric hypertrophy.

  7. Dyslipidaemia in nephrotic syndrome: mechanisms and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Shipra; Zaritsky, Joshua J.; Fornoni, Alessia; Smoyer, William E.

    2018-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome is a highly prevalent disease that is associated with high morbidity despite notable advances in its treatment. Many of the complications of nephrotic syndrome, including the increased risk of atherosclerosis and thromboembolism, can be linked to dysregulated lipid metabolism and dyslipidaemia. These abnormalities include elevated plasma levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and the apolipoprotein B containing lipoproteins VLDL and IDL; decreased lipoprotein lipase activity in the endothelium, muscle and adipose tissues; decreased hepatic lipase activity; and increased levels of the enzyme PCSK9. In addition, there is an increase in the plasma levels of immature HDL particles and reduced cholesterol efflux. Studies from the past few years have markedly improved our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of nephrotic syndrome associated dyslipidaemia, and also heightened our awareness of the associated exacerbated risks of cardiovascular complications, progressive kidney disease and thromboembolism. Despite the absence of clear guidelines regarding treatment, various strategies are being increasingly utilized, including statins, bile acid sequestrants, fibrates, nicotinic acid and ezetimibe, as well as lipid apheresis, which seem to also induce partial or complete clinical remission of nephrotic syndrome in a substantial percentage of patients. Future potential treatments will likely also include inhibition of PCSK9 using recently developed anti PCSK9 monoclonal antibodies and small inhibitory RNAs, as well as targeting newly identified molecular regulators of lipid metabolism that are dysregulated in nephrotic syndrome. PMID:29176657

  8. Metabolic syndrome after pediatric liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kosola, Silja; Lampela, Hanna; Makisalo, Heikki; Lohi, Jouko; Arola, Johanna; Jalanko, Hannu; Pakarinen, Mikko

    2014-10-01

    Half of adult liver transplantation (LT) recipients develop metabolic syndrome, but the prevalence after childhood LT remains unknown. We conducted a national cross-sectional study of all living patients who had undergone LT between 1987 and 2007 at an age less than 18 years. We gathered information on blood pressure, body composition, serum lipids, glucose metabolism, and histological liver fat content. The diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome of the American Heart Association and the International Diabetes Federation were used. After a median post-LT follow-up time of 12 years, half of all patients had no components of metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of overweight/obesity was 20%, and the prevalence of hypertension was 24%. Serum triglycerides were high in 9%, and high-density lipoprotein levels were low in 23%. Fasting glucose levels were impaired in 14%, but none had diabetes. Altogether, 9 patients (14%) had metabolic syndrome. Moderate liver steatosis found in protocol liver biopsy samples was associated with the accumulation of metabolic syndrome features (P = 0.01). No significant associations were found between immunosuppressive medications and metabolic syndrome. In conclusion, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome after childhood LT is similar to the prevalence in the general population of the same age. Guidelines for the general population, therefore, seem valid for the prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome after pediatric LT as well. © 2014 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  9. Duane Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Duane Syndrome? Duane syndrome, also called Duane retraction syndrome (DRS), is a congenital and non-progressive ... Is Duane syndrome congenital (present from birth)? Duane retraction syndrome is present from birth, even if it ...

  10. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase prevents metabolic syndrome in mice.

    PubMed

    Kaliannan, Kanakaraju; Hamarneh, Sulaiman R; Economopoulos, Konstantinos P; Nasrin Alam, Sayeda; Moaven, Omeed; Patel, Palak; Malo, Nondita S; Ray, Madhury; Abtahi, Seyed M; Muhammad, Nur; Raychowdhury, Atri; Teshager, Abeba; Mohamed, Mussa M Rafat; Moss, Angela K; Ahmed, Rizwan; Hakimian, Shahrad; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, José Luis; Hohmann, Elizabeth; Warren, H Shaw; Bhan, Atul K; Malo, Madhu S; Hodin, Richard A

    2013-04-23

    Metabolic syndrome comprises a cluster of related disorders that includes obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and fatty liver. Recently, gut-derived chronic endotoxemia has been identified as a primary mediator for triggering the low-grade inflammation responsible for the development of metabolic syndrome. In the present study we examined the role of the small intestinal brush-border enzyme, intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), in preventing a high-fat-diet-induced metabolic syndrome in mice. We found that both endogenous and orally supplemented IAP inhibits absorption of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides) that occurs with dietary fat, and oral IAP supplementation prevents as well as reverses metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, IAP supplementation improves the lipid profile in mice fed a standard, low-fat chow diet. These results point to a potentially unique therapy against metabolic syndrome in at-risk humans.

  11. Congenital heart disease and genetic syndromes: new insights into molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Calcagni, Giulio; Unolt, Marta; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Baban, Anwar; Versacci, Paolo; Tartaglia, Marco; Baldini, Antonio; Marino, Bruno

    2017-09-01

    Advances in genetics allowed a better definition of the role of specific genetic background in the etiology of syndromic congenital heart defects (CHDs). The identification of a number of disease genes responsible for different syndromes have led to the identification of several transcriptional regulators and signaling transducers and modulators that are critical for heart morphogenesis. Understanding the genetic background of syndromic CHDs allowed a better characterization of the genetic basis of non-syndromic CHDs. In this sense, the well-known association of typical CHDs in Down syndrome, 22q11.2 microdeletion and Noonan syndrome represent paradigms as chromosomal aneuploidy, chromosomal microdeletion and intragenic mutation, respectively. Area covered: For each syndrome the anatomical features, distinctive cardiac phenotype and molecular mechanisms are discussed. Moreover, the authors include recent genetic findings that may shed light on some aspects of still unclear molecular mechanisms of these syndromes. Expert commentary: Further investigations are needed to enhance the translational approach in the field of genetics of CHDs. When there is a well-established definition of genotype-phenotype (reverse medicine) and genotype-prognosis (predictive and personalized medicine) correlations, hopefully preventive medicine will make its way in this field. Subsequently a reduction will be achieved in the morbidity and mortality of children with CHDs.

  12. Sporadic Kindler syndrome with a novel mutation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Hiram Larangeira de; Heckler, Gláucia Thomas; Fong, Kenneth; Lai-Cheong, Joey; McGrath, John

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 28-year-old woman with Kindler syndrome, a rare form of epidermolysis bullosa. Clinically, since childhood, she had widespread pigmentary changes in her skin as well as photosensitivity and fragility of the skin and mucous membranes. The mucosal involvement led to an erosive stomatitis as well as esophageal, anal and vaginal stenoses, requiring surgical intervention. The diagnosis of Kindler syndrome was confirmed by DNA sequencing with compound heterozygosity for a nonsense/frameshift combination of mutations (p.Arg110X; p.Ala289GlyfsX7) in the FERMT1 gene.

  13. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome with situs oppositus

    PubMed Central

    Guruprasad, Yadavalli; Prabhu, Prashanth R.

    2010-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcicoma syndrome, is caused due to a genetic alteration produced by a mutation in the “Patched” tumor suppressor gene, and it is inherited in a dominant autosomal way, though sporadic cases have been found. This syndrome shows a high penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is a multisystemic process that is characterized by the presence of multiple pigmented basocellular carcinomas, keratocysts in the jaws, palmar and/or plantar pits and calcification of the falx cerebri. Together with these major features, a great number of processes considered as minor features have also been described. The latter include numerous skeletal, dermatology related and neurological anomalies, among others. In some occasions, the presence of very aggressive basocellular carcinomas has been described as well as other malignant neoplasia. Due to the importance of oral maxillofacial manifestations of this syndrome, it is fundamental to know its characteristics in order to make a diagnosis, to provide an early preventive treatment and to establish right genetic advice. We report a rare association of Gorlin–Goltz syndrome with situs oppositus. PMID:22442553

  14. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome with situs oppositus.

    PubMed

    Guruprasad, Yadavalli; Prabhu, Prashanth R

    2010-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcicoma syndrome, is caused due to a genetic alteration produced by a mutation in the "Patched" tumor suppressor gene, and it is inherited in a dominant autosomal way, though sporadic cases have been found. This syndrome shows a high penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is a multisystemic process that is characterized by the presence of multiple pigmented basocellular carcinomas, keratocysts in the jaws, palmar and/or plantar pits and calcification of the falx cerebri. Together with these major features, a great number of processes considered as minor features have also been described. The latter include numerous skeletal, dermatology related and neurological anomalies, among others. In some occasions, the presence of very aggressive basocellular carcinomas has been described as well as other malignant neoplasia. Due to the importance of oral maxillofacial manifestations of this syndrome, it is fundamental to know its characteristics in order to make a diagnosis, to provide an early preventive treatment and to establish right genetic advice. We report a rare association of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome with situs oppositus.

  15. Uveitis-Glaucoma-Hyphaema Syndrome. General review.

    PubMed

    Zemba, Mihail; Camburu, Georgiana

    2017-01-01

    Uveitis-Glaucoma-Hyphaema Syndrome (UGH syndrome, or "Ellingson" Syndrome) is a rare condition caused by the mechanical trauma of an intraocular lens malpositioned over adjacent structures (iris, ciliary body, iridocorneal angle), leading to a spectrum of iris transillumination defects, microhyphaemas and pigmentary dispersion, concomitant with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). UGH Syndrome can also be characterized by chronic inflammation, secondary iris neovascularization, cystoid macular edema (CME). The fundamental step in the pathogenesis of UGH syndrome appears to arise from repetitive mechanical iris trauma by a malpositioned or subluxed IOL. These patients have uncomplicated cataract implants and return for episodes of blurry vision weeks to months after surgery. This may be accompanied by pain, photophobia, erythropsia, anterior uveitis, hyphaema along with raised intraocular pressure. A careful history and examination, as well as appropriate investigations can confirm the diagnostic. Treatment options are IOL Explantation exchange, topical and systemic medication, and cyclophotocoagulation, the placement of a Capsular Tension Ring to redistribute zonular tension and Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) Therapy.

  16. Cushing's syndrome in childhood: update on genetics, treatment, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Maya

    2015-02-01

    To provide an update on the genes associated with Cushing's syndrome in children, as well as to familiarize the clinician with recent treatment guidelines and outcome data for children with Cushing's syndrome. The list of genes associated with Cushing's syndrome continues to grow. In addition, treatment for childhood Cushing's syndrome is evolving. As long-term follow-up data on children becomes available, clinicians need to be aware of the issues that require attention. Knowledge of the specific genetic causes of Cushing's syndrome has potential implications for treatment, surveillance, and counseling. Advances in surgical technique, radiation modalities, and medical therapies offer the potential for additional treatment options in Cushing's syndrome. Early identification and management of post-treatment morbidities in children treated for Cushing's syndrome is crucial in order to optimize care.

  17. Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Type III and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type): Clinical description and natural history.

    PubMed

    Tinkle, Brad; Castori, Marco; Berglund, Britta; Cohen, Helen; Grahame, Rodney; Kazkaz, Hanadi; Levy, Howard

    2017-03-01

    The hypermobile type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) is likely the most common hereditary disorder of connective tissue. It has been described largely in those with musculoskeletal complaints including joint hypermobility, joint subluxations/dislocations, as well as skin and soft tissue manifestations. Many patients report activity-related pain and some go on to have daily pain. Two undifferentiated syndromes have been used to describe these manifestations-joint hypermobility syndrome and hEDS. Both are clinical diagnoses in the absence of other causation. Current medical literature further complicates differentiation and describes multiple associated symptoms and disorders. The current EDS nosology combines these two entities into the hypermobile type of EDS. Herein, we review and summarize the literature as a better clinical description of this type of connective tissue disorder. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Conceptualizing neurodevelopmental disorders through a mechanistic understanding of fragile X syndrome and Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fung, Lawrence K; Quintin, Eve-Marie; Haas, Brian W; Reiss, Allan L

    2012-04-01

    The overarching goal of this review is to compare and contrast the cognitive-behavioral features of fragile X syndrome (FraX) and Williams syndrome and to review the putative neural and molecular underpinnings of these features. Information is presented in a framework that provides guiding principles for conceptualizing gene-brain-behavior associations in neurodevelopmental disorders. Abnormalities, in particular cognitive-behavioral domains with similarities in underlying neurodevelopmental correlates, occur in both FraX and Williams syndrome including aberrant frontostriatal pathways leading to executive function deficits, and magnocellular/dorsal visual stream, superior parietal lobe, inferior parietal lobe, and postcentral gyrus abnormalities contributing to deficits in visuospatial function. Compelling cognitive-behavioral and neurodevelopmental contrasts also exist in these two disorders, for example, aberrant amygdala and fusiform cortex structure and function occurring in the context of contrasting social behavioral phenotypes, and temporal cortical and cerebellar abnormalities potentially underlying differences in language function. Abnormal dendritic development is a shared neurodevelopmental morphologic feature between FraX and Williams syndrome. Commonalities in molecular machinery and processes across FraX and Williams syndrome occur as well - microRNAs involved in translational regulation of major synaptic proteins; scaffolding proteins in excitatory synapses; and proteins involved in axonal development. Although the genetic variations leading to FraX and Williams syndrome are different, important similarities and contrasts in the phenotype, neurocircuitry, molecular machinery, and cellular processes in these two disorders allow for a unique approach to conceptualizing gene-brain-behavior links occurring in neurodevelopmental disorders.

  19. Seckel syndrome: an overdiagnosed syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, E; Pembrey, M

    1985-01-01

    Five children in whom a diagnosis of Seckel syndrome had previously been made were re-examined in the genetic unit. One child had classical Seckel syndrome, a sib pair had the features of the syndrome with less severe short stature, and in two children the diagnosis was not confirmed. Seckel syndrome is only one of a group of low birth weight microcephalic dwarfism and careful attention should be paid to fulfillment of the major criteria defined by Seckel before the diagnosis is made. There remains a heterogeneous group of low birth weight microcephalic dwarfism yet to be defined. Images PMID:4040172

  20. [Takotsubo syndrome. Transient left ventricular dyskinesia].

    PubMed

    Pérez Pérez, F M; Sánchez Salado, J

    2014-03-01

    The Takotsubo syndrome, also called transient apical dyskinesia syndrome, was first described in Japan in the 1990s. It is a rare entity found in almost 1% of all patients with suspicion of acute coronary syndrome. It usually affects postmenopausal women with a few cardiovascular risk factors. It is characterized by angina-type chest pain, electrocardiographic changes, elevation of the enzymes of myocardial injury, absence of coronary obstruction on angiography, and a characteristic left ventricular anteroapical dyskinesia, which returns to normal within a few days. Severe emotional stress is the most common trigger for this syndrome. The aetiopathogenesis of this syndrome remains to be defined. This syndrome has been considered a clinical condition since 2001, when a series of 88 cases was published. It is a disease with a partially known mechanism, characterised by the morphology adopted by the left ventricle secondary to hypokinesis or dyskinesia of the apical segments, and hypercontractility of basal segments. Unlike acute coronary syndrome, patients with left ventricle dysfunction do not have atherothrombotic disease in the coronary arteries. In addition, the alterations described are reversible. Some clinical diagnostic criteria have been proposed, although they are still controversial, as well as in the complementary examinations required for diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Oral Rehabilitation for Amniotic Band Syndrome: An Unusual Presentation.

    PubMed

    Hotwani, Kavita; Sharma, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Amniotic band syndrome (ABS) is a congenital disorder caused by entrapment of fetal parts in fibrous amniotic bands while in utero. The syndrome is underdiagnosed and its presentation is variable. The syndrome has been well described in the pediatric, orthopedic and obstetric literature; however, despite the discernable craniomaxillofacial involvement, ABS has not been reported in the dental literature very often. The present report describes a case of a patient with ABS and concomitant dental findings. How to cite this article: Hotwani K, Sharma K. Oral Rehabilitation for Amniotic Band Syndrome: An Unusual Presentation. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(1):55-57.

  2. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome and neoplasms: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Nilza N F; Caran, Eliana M; Lee, Maria Lucia; Silva, Nasjla Saba; Rocha, André Caroli; Macedo, Carla R D

    2010-01-01

    Gorlin syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder exhibiting high penetrance and variable expressivity. It is characterized by facial dysmorphism, skeletal anomalies, multiple basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts (OKC), palmar and plantar pits, bifid ribs, vertebral anomalies and a variety of other malformations. Various neoplasms, such as medulloblastomas, meningiomas, ovarian and cardiac fibromas are also found in this syndrome. To describe a twelve-year-old patient with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, with basal cell carcinomas and promyelocytic leukemia developed after receiving craniospinal radiation for a medulloblastoma. Bifid ribs as well as mandibular and maxillar OKC were also diagnosed Conclusion: The patient with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome should receive close follow-up for early detection of malformations nd malignant neoplasias.

  3. Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Risk Factors after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Severe Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I (Hurler Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Braunlin, Elizabeth; Steinberger, Julia; DeFor, Todd; Orchard, Paul; Kelly, Aaron S

    2018-06-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation is a life-saving procedure, but one associated with increasing long-term cardiovascular risk requiring frequent long-term follow-up. This therapy has significantly lengthened survival in mucopolysaccharidosis type IH (Hurler syndrome), a disease with known coronary artery involvement. Metabolic syndrome-a constellation of central obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose-is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, and occurs when any 3 or more of these 5 components is present within a single individual. The incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components is poorly defined after transplantation for Hurler syndrome. Chart review of all long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome ≥9 years of age for factors comprising the metabolic syndrome: obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose. Sixty-three patients were evaluated, 20 of whom had components of the metabolic syndrome available for review. There was no significant difference in age at transplantation, sex, number of transplants, pretransplant radiation, or percent engraftment between those with and without these data. Median follow-up after transplantation for the 20 patients with data was 14.3 years. Only 1 (5%) patient of this group fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Fifty-three percent of the patients had 1 or more components of metabolic syndrome: the most common was high blood pressure occurring in 40%. Metabolic syndrome is uncommon in this cohort of long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome but almost half of the patients had 1 or more components of the syndrome, with high blood pressure being the most common. Further studies are needed to develop guidelines in this diagnosis as well as other nonmalignant diseases of children

  4. [Crush syndrome].

    PubMed

    Scapellato, S; Maria, S; Castorina, G; Sciuto, G

    2007-08-01

    Crush injuries and crush syndrome are common after natural (e.g. earthquake, land-slide, tornadoes, tsunami) or man-made catastrophes (e.g. wars, terrorist attacks), in fact the history of this disease is well reported both in earthquake rescue reviews and in military literature. However, there are instances due to conventional causes, such as building collapses, road traffic accident, accident at work or altered level of consciousness after stroke or drug overdose. These situations of ''big or small'' catastrophes can occur at any time and anywhere, for this reason every clinician should be prepared to address issues of crush syndrome quickly and aggressively. The treatment has to manage and to predict clinical conditions before they present themselves. In particular, acute renal failure is one of the few life-threatening complications that can be reversed. This article reviews the various evidences and summarizes the treatment strategies available. Fundamental targets in crush syndrome management are early aggressive hydration, urine alkalinization and, when possible, forced diuresis. Since electrolyte imbalance may be fatal due to arrhythmias secondary to hyperkalemia (especially associated with hypocalcemia), it's necessary to correct these abnormalities using insulin-glucose solution and/or potassium binders, and if nevertheless serum potassium levels remain high this serious disease will necessitate dialysis, which is often a vital procedure.

  5. Brief Report: Repetitive Behaviour Profiles in Williams syndrome: Cross Syndrome Comparisons with Prader-Willi and Down syndromes.

    PubMed

    Royston, R; Oliver, C; Moss, J; Adams, D; Berg, K; Burbidge, C; Howlin, P; Nelson, L; Stinton, C; Waite, J

    2018-01-01

    This study describes the profile of repetitive behaviour in individuals with Williams syndrome, utilising cross-syndrome comparisons with people with Prader-Willi and Down syndromes. The Repetitive Behaviour Questionnaire was administered to caregivers of adults with Williams (n = 96), Prader-Willi (n = 103) and Down (n = 78) syndromes. There were few group differences, although participants with Williams syndrome were more likely to show body stereotypies. Individuals with Williams syndrome also showed more hoarding and less tidying behaviours than those with Down syndrome. IQ and adaptive ability were negatively associated with repetitive questioning in people with Williams syndrome. The profile of repetitive behaviour amongst individuals with Williams syndrome was similar to the comparison syndromes. The cognitive mechanisms underlying these behaviours in genetic syndromes warrant further investigation.

  6. Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome caused by intranasal steroid use.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Fatma; Kirmizibekmez, Heves

    2017-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is common after oral steroid use and has also been reported following topical or inhaled use, but it is extremely uncommon after intranasal administration. This is the case of a 6-year-old child who developed Cushing's syndrome after intranasal application of dexamethasone sodium phosphate for a period of 6 months. Pediatricians and other clinical practitioners should be aware that high-dose and long-term nasal steroid administration may cause iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome characterized by complications of glucocorticoid excess as well as serious and even life-threatening complications of adrenal insufficiency.

  7. [Differential diagnosis of polyarthritis pain syndrome of the locomotor apparatus].

    PubMed

    Menninger, H

    1998-02-28

    Widespread pain syndromes of the musculoskeletal system present to general practitioners, internists, neurologists and orthopedic surgeons every day. The syndromes may result both from organic diseases (inflammatory joint diseases, rheumatic manifestations of organ diseases) as well as dysfunctional syndromes, the latter including mainly biomechanically induced syndromes and fibromyalgia. The approach is predominantly clinically oriented and requires laboratory means or technical procedures only in a limited extend. The duration of history, the recognition of synovitis and of myofascial trigger points or of integumental tender points allow in most patients to achieve appropriate diagnostic criteria.

  8. Loin pain hematuria syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Adeel S.; Salameh, Hassan; Erickson, Stephen B.; Prieto, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Loin pain hematuria syndrome (LPHS), first described in 1967, is a rare pain syndrome, which is not well understood. The syndrome is characterized by severe intermittent or persistent flank pain, either unilateral or bilateral, associated with gross or microscopic hematuria. LPHS is a diagnosis of exclusion as there still is not a consensus of validated diagnostic criteria, though several criteria have been proposed. The wide differential diagnosis would suggest a meticulous yet specific diagnostic work-up depending on the individual clinical features and natural history. Several mechanisms regarding the pathophysiology of LPHS have been proposed but without pinpointing the actual causative etiology, the treatment remains symptomatic. Treatment modalities for LPHS are diverse including simple analgesia, opioid analgesic and kidney autotransplantation. This review article summarizes the current understanding regarding the pathophysiology of LPHS along with the steps required for proper diagnosis and a discussion of the different therapeutic approaches for LPHS. PMID:26798473

  9. [Intraoperative floppy iris syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mazal, Z

    2007-04-01

    In the year 2005, Chang and Cambell described unusual reaction of the iris during the cataract surgery in patients treated with tamsulosine. This was named as IFIS, an acronym for the Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome. In its advanced stage, the syndrome is characterized by insufficient mydfiasis before the surgery, narrowing of the pupil during the surgery, its impossible dilatation during the surgery by means of stretching, unusual elasticity of the pupilar margin, surging and fluttering iris with tendency to prolapse. The same manifestations we observed in our patients and we confirm the direct connection with tamsulosine hydrochloride treatment. Tamsulosine is the antagonist of alpha 1A adrenergic receptors whose are present, except in the smooth musculature of the prostate gland and the urinary bladder, in the iris dilator as well. At the same time we observed this syndrome rarely in some patients not using tamsulosine. In most cases, these patients were treated with antipsychotic drugs.

  10. Myelodysplastic syndrome precedes the onset of remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Takafumi; Izumi, Yasumori; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Kawahara, Chieko; Shigemitsu, Yoshika; Yoshida, Shinichiro; Kawakami, Atsushi; Ogawa, Daisuke; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) syndrome is characterized by symmetrical synovitis predominantly involving the wrists, and is associated with marked pitting edema of the dorsum of the hands. Although the etiology of RS3PE syndrome is still unknown, several putative associations with malignancies and hematological disorders have been reported. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is characterized by infective hematopoiesis with possible transformation to leukemia; however, an association between RS3PE syndrome and MDS has been rarely reported. Here, we describe a 67-year-old man with MDS with refractory anemia who developed RS3PE syndrome 3 months after the diagnosis of MDS. The patient presented with polyarthritis with pitting edema at the dorsum of the hands, the elevated serum levels of C-reactive protein and a proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6, and the elevated plasma levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of RS3PE syndrome. Treatment with low doses of corticosteroids resulted in the regression of polyarthritis and pitting edema of the dorsum of the hands, as well as a reduction in the elevated levels of plasma VEGF. Partial resolution of refractory anemia was also observed with steroid therapy. In summary, RS3PE syndrome developed shortly after MDS was identified in this patient. The sequence of clinical events suggests that MDS-mediated immunological abnormalities including inflammatory cytokine induction may be responsible for the association between MDS and RS3PE syndrome. Patients with RS3PE syndrome should be screened for hematological disorders that promote proinflammatory mediators.

  11. Multiwavelength optical source at 12.5-GHz optical spacing based on a coupled optoelectronic oscillator with a whispering gallery mode resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossakovski, Dmitri; Solomatine, Iouri V.; Morozov, Nikolai; Ilchenko, Vladimir S.

    2004-06-01

    The evolution of optical networks calls for denser channel grids and increased number of channels. Additionally, there is a system architecture benefit to eliminate the banks of DFB lasers that act as light sources for individual channels, and use instead a single multi-wavelength source. We have demonstrated a compact multi-wavelength optical source (MWS) for 12.5 GHz DWDM. At least 16 channels are observed within 3 dB optical power bandwidth with optical spectrum contrast ratio exceeding 28 dB. The source is based on a coupled opto-electronic oscillator (COEO) with an optical whispering gallery mode (WGM) microresonator. Free spectral range of the resonator determines the spacing of the optical channels in the MWS. The spacing can be scaled up or down depending on design requirements. The resonator is robustly packaged and fiber pigtailed. In the RF domain the MWS acts as oscillator with operational frequency of 12.5 GHz.

  12. Reactor performance and microbial community dynamics during anaerobic co-digestion of municipal wastewater sludge with restaurant grease waste at steady state and overloading stages.

    PubMed

    Razaviarani, Vahid; Buchanan, Ian D

    2014-11-01

    Linkage between reactor performance and microbial community dynamics was investigated during mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of restaurant grease waste (GTW) with municipal wastewater sludge (MWS) using 10L completely mixed reactors and a 20day SRT. Test reactors received a mixture of GTW and MWS while control reactors received only MWS. Addition of GTW to the test reactors enhanced the biogas production and methane yield by up to 65% and 120%, respectively. Pyrosequencing revealed that Methanosaeta and Methanomicrobium were the dominant acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogen genera, respectively, during stable reactor operation. The number of Methanosarcina and Methanomicrobium sequences increased and that of Methanosaeta declined when the proportion of GTW in the feed was increased to cause an overload condition. Under this overload condition, the pH, alkalinity and methane production decreased and VFA concentrations increased dramatically. Candidatus cloacamonas, affiliated within phylum Spirochaetes, were the dominant bacterial genus at all reactor loadings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The impact of ethnic identity on changes in high risk HIV behaviors in sexually active migrant workers.

    PubMed

    Shehadeh, Nancy; Virginia McCoy, H; Rubens, Muni; Batra, Anamica; Renfrew, Roderick; Winter, Kelly

    2012-02-01

    Among migrant workers (MWs) in the US, HIV/AIDS prevalence may be as high as 13.5%. This serial cross-sectional study examines associations between Ethnic Identity (EI) in African American and Hispanic MWs and short-term changes in high-risk sexual behaviors. Baseline and 3-month follow-up data was collected from a larger HIV intervention study among MWs in Immokalee, Florida (n = 119) who reported unprotected sex in the past 30 days. The Multigroup Identity Measure was used to assess EI. A high EI score indicates less acculturation to one's new surroundings. Females had higher levels of positive behavior change. Lower EI was associated with higher levels of positive change in relation to HIV/AIDS risk behavior. Among Hispanics, education was negatively correlated with EI. Education was a predictor of behavior change. Future interventions should focus on reducing acculturation stress, which may prompt harmful coping behaviors, such as high-risk sex and substance abuse.

  14. Growth and Brilliant Photo-Emission of Crystalline Hexagonal Column of Alq3 Microwires

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seokho; Kim, Do Hyoung; Choi, Jinho; Lee, Hojin; Kim, Sun-Young; Park, Jung Woon; Park, Dong Hyuk

    2018-01-01

    We report the growth and nanoscale luminescence characteristics of 8-hydroxyquinolinato aluminum (Alq3) with a crystalline hexagonal column morphology. Pristine Alq3 nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared using a conventional reprecipitation method. Crystal hexagonal columns of Alq3 were grown by using a surfactant-assisted self-assembly technique as an adjunct to the aforementioned reprecipitation method. The formation and structural properties of the crystalline and non-crystalline Alq3 NPs were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The nanoscale photoluminescence (PL) characteristics and the luminescence color of the Alq3 single NPs and their crystal microwires (MWs) were evaluated from color charge-coupled device images acquired using a high-resolution laser confocal microscope. In comparison with the Alq3 NPs, the crystalline MWs exhibited a very bright and sharp emission. This enhanced and sharp emission from the crystalline Alq3 single MWs originated from effective π-π stacking of the Alq3 molecules due to strong interactions in the crystalline structure. PMID:29565306

  15. Evolution of Photoluminescence, Raman, and Structure of CH3NH3PbI3 Perovskite Microwires Under Humidity Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segovia, Rubén; Qu, Geyang; Peng, Miao; Sun, Xiudong; Shi, Hongyan; Gao, Bo

    2018-03-01

    Self-assembled organic-inorganic CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite microwires (MWs) upon humidity exposure along several weeks were investigated by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). We show that, in addition to the common perovskite decomposition into PbI2 and the formation of a hydrated phase, humidity induced a gradual PL redshift at the initial weeks that is stabilized for longer exposure ( 21 nm over the degradation process) and an intensity enhancement. Original perovskite Raman band and XRD reflections slightly shifted upon humidity, indicating defects formation and structure distortion of the MWs crystal lattice. By correlating the PL, Raman, and XRD results, it is believed that the redshift of the MWs PL emission was originated from the structural disorder caused by the incorporation of H2O molecules in the crystal lattice and radiative recombination through moisture-induced subgap trap states. Our study provides insights into the optical and structural response of organic-inorganic perovskite materials upon humidity exposure.

  16. [Association Budd Chiari syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome and Grave's disease].

    PubMed

    Mouelhi, Leila; Chaieb, Mouna; Debbeche, Radhouane; Salem, Mohamed; Sfar, Imene; Trabelsi, Sinda; Gorgi, Yosr; Najjar, Taoufik

    2009-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome in 5% of the cases. Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by venous or arterial thrombosis, foetal loss and positivity of antiphospholipid antibodies, namely lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies and anti-beta2-glycoprotein I. Anticardiolipin antibodies was reported in auto-immune thyroid disorders, particularly in Grave's disease. Antiphospholipid syndrome associated to Grave's disease was reported in only three cases. To describe a case report of association of Grave's disease and antiphospholipid syndrome. We report the first case of Grave's disease associated with antiphospholipid syndrome, revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome. Our observation is particular by the fact that it is about a patient presenting a Grave's disease associated with antiphospholipid syndrome revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome. This triple association has never been reported in literature. Although association between antiphospholipid syndrome and Grave's disease was previously described, further studies evaluating the coexistence of these two affections in the same patient would be useful.

  17. Pregnancy and mesenchimal dysplasias (Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia).

    PubMed

    Radetskaya, L S; Makatsariya, A D; Bitsadze, V O; Khizroeva, J K

    2018-07-01

    The objective of this article is to attract the attention of clinical physicians to the rare but extremely relevant clinical pathology of mesenchymal dysplasias (Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia) and especially specific characteristics of such diseases during pregnancy. Connective tissue pathology can cover different organs and systems, symptoms of the same disease can vary in different patients thus making diagnostics significantly difficult. Here clinical diagnostic criteria and methods of molecular diagnostics of diseases are described. The pathogenesis of mesenchymal dysplasias is not currently well understood. For the patients with mesenchymal dysplasias pregnancy is fraught with high risk of life-threatening complications. The preferred delivery method for such patients is caesarean section.

  18. Hypogonadism and metabolic syndrome: implications for testosterone therapy.

    PubMed

    Makhsida, Nawras; Shah, Jay; Yan, Grace; Fisch, Harry; Shabsigh, Ridwan

    2005-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome, characterized by central obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension, is highly prevalent in the United States. When left untreated, it significantly increases the risk of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. It has been suggested that hypogonadism may be an additional component of metabolic syndrome. This has potential implications for the treatment of metabolic syndrome with testosterone. We reviewed the available literature on metabolic syndrome and hypogonadism with a particular focus on testosterone therapy. A comprehensive MEDLINE review of the world literature from 1988 to 2004 on hypogonadism, testosterone and metabolic syndrome was performed. Observational data suggest that metabolic syndrome is strongly associated with hypogonadism in men. Multiple interventional studies have shown that exogenous testosterone has a favorable impact on body mass, insulin secretion and sensitivity, lipid profile and blood pressure, which are the parameters most often disturbed in metabolic syndrome. Hypogonadism is likely a fundamental component of metabolic syndrome. Testosterone therapy may not only treat hypogonadism, but may also have tremendous potential to slow or halt the progression from metabolic syndrome to overt diabetes or cardiovascular disease via beneficial effects on insulin regulation, lipid profile and blood pressure. Furthermore, the use of testosterone to treat metabolic syndrome may also lead to the prevention of urological complications commonly associated with these chronic disease states, such as neurogenic bladder and erectile dysfunction. Physicians must be mindful to evaluate hypogonadism in all men diagnosed with metabolic syndrome as well as metabolic syndrome in all men diagnosed with hypogonadism. Future research in the form of randomized clinical trials should focus on further defining the role of testosterone for metabolic syndrome.

  19. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated by Grave's disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ayumi; Tamura, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2002-12-01

    The report describes a woman with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated with Grave's disease. Developing symptoms included a small cutaneous nodule on her finger and subsequently ecchymotic purpura on the cheeks, ears, buttocks and lower legs. Histological examinations showed thrombosed vessels in the dermis without or with hemorrhage, respectively. Laboratory investigation revealed positive lupus anticoagulant and immunogenic hyperthyroidism due to Grave's disease. There is a close relationship between the cutaneous manifestation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and the activities of Grave's disease and a possible link of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with Grave's disease was suggested both by the etiology of the disease as well as the disease activity.

  20. Management of Behçet's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozguler, Yesim; Hatemi, Gulen

    2016-01-01

    Current trends in the management of Behçet's syndrome will be reviewed in this article. Biologic agents have gained increasing importance over the years in the management of Behçet's syndrome. Long-term results of observational studies have shown that anti-tumor necrosis factor agents may be effective in Behçet's syndrome patients with refractory eye involvement. Case series reporting about use of anti-tumor necrosis factor agents in vascular and gastrointestinal involvement have also shown good results. Caution is required for infectious complications with these agents. Apremilast is an immunomodulatory agent that works through phosphodiesterase 4 inhibition. A randomized controlled trial has shown that it is effective for the management of oral and genital ulcers and is generally well tolerated. The outcome of Behçet's syndrome with major organ involvement has improved with more effective management strategies, especially with the use of biologic agents in severe cases. Controlled trials are needed to guide physicians in making treatment decisions.

  1. [Refeeding syndrome in geriatric patients : A frequently overlooked complication].

    PubMed

    Wirth, Rainer; Diekmann, Rebecca; Fleiter, Olga; Fricke, Leonhardt; Kreilkamp, Annika; Modreker, Mirja Katrin; Marburger, Christian; Nels, Stefan; Schaefer, Rolf; Willschrei, Heinz-Peter; Volkert, Dorothee

    2018-01-01

    The refeeding syndrome is a life-threatening complication that can occur after initiation of a nutrition therapy in malnourished patients. If the risk factors and pathophysiology are known, the refeeding syndrome can effectively be prevented and treated, if recognized early. A slow increase of food intake and the close monitoring of serum electrolyte levels play an important role. Because the refeeding syndrome is not well known and the symptoms may vary extremely, this complication is poorly recognized, especially against the background of geriatric multimorbidity. This overview is intended to increase the awareness of the refeeding syndrome in the risk group of geriatric patients.

  2. Insulin and growth hormone secretion in the nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bridgman, J F; Summerskill, J; Buckler, J M; Hellman, B; Rosen, S M

    1975-01-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism was studied in a series of patients with the nephrotic syndrome and compared with a similar number of normal controls. The nephrotic syndrome was associated with a smaller secretion of insulin in response to intravenous glucose and tolbutamide than occurred in normals. In the syndrom fasting serum growth hormone (G.H.) concentrations were increased and did not show the characteristic suppression after glucose administration, and the disappearance rate of glucose (k value) was lower. well marked correlation existed between serum G.H. concentrations and the total urinary protein excreted. These abnormal findings returned to normal in a patient who underwent a repeat study when the nephrotic syndrome had resolved.

  3. Oral Rehabilitation for Amniotic Band Syndrome: An Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Amniotic band syndrome (ABS) is a congenital disorder caused by entrapment of fetal parts in fibrous amniotic bands while in utero. The syndrome is underdiagnosed and its presentation is variable. The syndrome has been well described in the pediatric, orthopedic and obstetric literature; however, despite the discernable craniomaxillofacial involvement, ABS has not been reported in the dental literature very often. The present report describes a case of a patient with ABS and concomitant dental findings. How to cite this article: Hotwani K, Sharma K. Oral Rehabilitation for Amniotic Band Syndrome: An Unusual Presentation. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(1):55-57. PMID:26124582

  4. Conceptualizing neurodevelopmental disorders through a mechanistic understanding of fragile X syndrome and Williams syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Lawrence K.; Quintin, Eve-Marie; Haas, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review The overarching goal of this review is to compare and contrast the cognitive-behavioral features of fragile X syndrome (FraX) and Williams syndrome and to review the putative neural and molecular underpinnings of these features. Information is presented in a framework that provides guiding principles for conceptualizing gene-brain-behavior associations in neurodevelopmental disorders. Recent findings Abnormalities, in particular cognitive-behavioral domains with similarities in underlying neurodevelopmental correlates, occur in both FraX and Williams syndrome including aberrant frontostriatal pathways leading to executive function deficits, and magnocellular/dorsal visual stream, superior parietal lobe, inferior parietal lobe, and postcentral gyrus abnormalities contributing to deficits in visuospatial function. Compelling cognitive–behavioral and neurodevelopmental contrasts also exist in these two disorders, for example, aberrant amygdala and fusiform cortex structure and function occurring in the context of contrasting social behavioral phenotypes, and temporal cortical and cerebellar abnormalities potentially underlying differences in language function. Abnormal dendritic development is a shared neurodevelopmental morphologic feature between FraX and Williams syndrome. Commonalities in molecular machinery and processes across FraX and Williams syndrome occur as well – microRNAs involved in translational regulation of major synaptic proteins; scaffolding proteins in excitatory synapses; and proteins involved in axonal development. Summary Although the genetic variations leading to FraX and Williams syndrome are different, important similarities and contrasts in the phenotype, neurocircuitry, molecular machinery, and cellular processes in these two disorders allow for a unique approach to conceptualizing gene–brain–behavior links occurring in neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:22395002

  5. Fanconi syndrome and severe polyuria: an uncommon clinicobiological presentation of a Gitelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bouchireb, Karim; Boyer, Olivia; Mansour-Hendili, Lamisse; Garnier, Arnaud; Heidet, Laurence; Niaudet, Patrick; Salomon, Remi; Poussou, Rosa Vargas

    2014-08-11

    Gitelman syndrome is an autosomal recessive tubulopathy characterized by hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, metabolic alkalosis and hypocalciuria. The majority of patients do not present with symptoms until late childhood or adulthood, and the symptoms are generally mild. We report here the first case of Gitelman syndrome presenting with the biological features of Fanconi syndrome and an early polyuria since the neonatal period. We discuss in this article the atypical electrolytes losses found in our patient, as well as the possible mechanisms of severe polyuria. A 6-year-old Caucasian girl was admitted via the Emergency department for vomiting, and initial laboratory investigations found hyponatremia, hypokalemia, metabolic acidosis with normal anion gap, hypophosphatemia, and hypouricemia. Urinalysis revealed Na, K, Ph and uric acid losses. Thus, the initial biological profile was in favor of a proximal tubular defect. However, etiological investigations were inconclusive and the patient was discharged with potassium chloride and phosphorus supplementation. Three weeks later, further laboratory analysis indicated persistent hypokalemia, a metabolic alkalosis, hypomagnesemia, and hypocalciuria. We therefore sequenced the SLC12A3 gene and found a compound heterozygosity for 2 known missense mutations. Gitelman syndrome can have varying and sometimes atypical presentations, and should be suspected in case of hypokalemic tubular disorders that do not belong to any obvious syndromic entity. In this case, the proximal tubular dysfunction could be secondary to the severe hypokalemia. This report emphasizes the need for clinicians to repeat laboratory tests in undiagnosed tubular disorders, especially not during decompensation episodes.

  6. Kindler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kaviarasan, P K; Prasad, P V S; Shradda; Viswanathan, P

    2005-01-01

    Kindler syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder associated with skin fragility. It is characterized by blistering in infancy, photosensitivity and progressive poikiloderma. The syndrome involves the skin and mucous membrane with radiological changes. The genetic defect has been identified on the short arm of chromosome 20. This report describes an 18-year-old patient with classical features like blistering and photosensitivity in childhood and the subsequent development of poikiloderma. The differential diagnosis of Kindler syndrome includes diseases like Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, epidermolysis bullosa, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum. Our patient had classical cutaneous features of Kindler syndrome with phimosis as a complication.

  7. Brain functional networks in syndromic and non-syndromic autism: a graph theoretical study of EEG connectivity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Graph theory has been recently introduced to characterize complex brain networks, making it highly suitable to investigate altered connectivity in neurologic disorders. A current model proposes autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as a developmental disconnection syndrome, supported by converging evidence in both non-syndromic and syndromic ASD. However, the effects of abnormal connectivity on network properties have not been well studied, particularly in syndromic ASD. To close this gap, brain functional networks of electroencephalographic (EEG) connectivity were studied through graph measures in patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC), a disorder with a high prevalence of ASD, as well as in patients with non-syndromic ASD. Methods EEG data were collected from TSC patients with ASD (n = 14) and without ASD (n = 29), from patients with non-syndromic ASD (n = 16), and from controls (n = 46). First, EEG connectivity was characterized by the mean coherence, the ratio of inter- over intra-hemispheric coherence and the ratio of long- over short-range coherence. Next, graph measures of the functional networks were computed and a resilience analysis was conducted. To distinguish effects related to ASD from those related to TSC, a two-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was applied, using age as a covariate. Results Analysis of network properties revealed differences specific to TSC and ASD, and these differences were very consistent across subgroups. In TSC, both with and without a concurrent diagnosis of ASD, mean coherence, global efficiency, and clustering coefficient were decreased and the average path length was increased. These findings indicate an altered network topology. In ASD, both with and without a concurrent diagnosis of TSC, decreased long- over short-range coherence and markedly increased network resilience were found. Conclusions The altered network topology in TSC represents a functional correlate of structural abnormalities and may play a

  8. "Syndrome in syndrome": Wernicke syndrome due to afferent loop syndrome. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    D'Abbicco, D; Praino, S; Amoruso, M; Notarnicola, A; Margari, A

    2011-01-01

    Wernicke syndrome is a rare neurological pathology due to a deficit in vitamin B1. The syndrome is common among alcohol abusers, patients with malignant tumor or gastrointestinal diseases, those who undergo hemodialysis or long-term peritoneal dialysis, pregnant women with hyperemesis, women who breast-feed, patients with hyperthyroidism or anorexia nervosa or gastric or jejunal-ileal bypass surgery for obesity, patients submitted to gastric surgery or prolonged total parenteral nutrition or prolonged intravenous therapy. We report a case of Wernicke syndrome due to afferent loop syndrome characterized by incoercible vomiting.

  9. [Features of the periodontal pathology at patients with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ermolaeva, L A; Shishkin, A N; Sheveleva, N A; Penkovoi, E A; Sheveleva, M A; Sokolovich, N A; Khabarova, O V; Mihailova, E S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to familiarize readers on the relationship between metabolic syndrome and periodontitis, as well as common pathogenetic processes underlying these diseases. The data of modern researches, devoted to the correlation of lesions of periodontal and systemic diseases associated with metabolic syndrome. In the article analyzed also the data of the original study of the interaction of periodontitis and metabolic syndrome, which also used special methods of examination like Doppler ultrasound microcirculatory vasculature of the periodontal tissues and ultrasound densitometry. The possible methods of diagnostics of a condition of periodontal tissues in patients with metabolic syndrome are considered. Conclusions about the relationship of each component of metabolic syndrome with periodontitis are made.

  10. Refeeding syndrome in a cat with hepatic lipidosis.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Karen; KuKanich, Kate S; Smee, Nicole M

    2011-08-01

    Refeeding syndrome is characterized by severe hypophosphatemia occurring in patients given enteral or parenteral nutrition after severe weight loss. There are few veterinary reports that describe this syndrome but it is well documented in human medicine. This report describes a case of a domestic shorthair cat diagnosed with hepatic lipidosis following a 4-week history of decreased appetite and weight loss and in whom refeeding syndrome was documented after initiation of enteral nutrition. Clinical findings, blood work abnormalities and disease progression in this patient are described from the time of diagnosis through to recovery. A review of the current literature pertinent to this clinical syndrome is included. Copyright © 2011 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of movement system impairment syndromes.

    PubMed

    Sahrmann, Shirley; Azevedo, Daniel C; Dillen, Linda Van

    Diagnoses and treatments based on movement system impairment syndromes were developed to guide physical therapy treatment. This masterclass aims to describe the concepts on that are the basis of the syndromes and treatment and to provide the current research on movement system impairment syndromes. The conceptual basis of the movement system impairment syndromes is that sustained alignment in a non-ideal position and repeated movements in a specific direction are thought to be associated with several musculoskeletal conditions. Classification into movement system impairment syndromes and treatment has been described for all body regions. The classification involves interpreting data from standardized tests of alignments and movements. Treatment is based on correcting the impaired alignment and movement patterns as well as correcting the tissue adaptations associated with the impaired alignment and movement patterns. The reliability and validity of movement system impairment syndromes have been partially tested. Although several case reports involving treatment using the movement system impairment syndromes concept have been published, efficacy of treatment based on movement system impairment syndromes has not been tested in randomized controlled trials, except in people with chronic low back pain. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. 'Munchausen syndrome by proxy' presenting as battered child syndrome: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Sugandhan, Selvendran; Gupta, Somesh; Khandpur, Sujay; Khanna, Neena; Mehta, Manju; Inna, Prashanth

    2010-06-01

    Child abuse is a major public health crisis and is on the rise. Dermatologists are frequently involved in its evaluation in differentiating abusive injuries from accidental injuries and in excluding pathological conditions that may mimic abuse. Battered child syndrome or physical abuse is not only a common form of child abuse but can also result from a rarer form of child abuse known as Munchausen syndrome by proxy. In this form of abuse, mother, who is the usual perpetrator, induces an illness or abuses the child for her own self-serving psychological needs. We report two cases of battered child syndrome. In both the cases, Psychiatric evaluation was performed on both parents. Observation through one-way mirror was done with the mother and the child alone. Routine hematological and biochemical investigations were done. Diagnosis of Munchausen syndrome by proxy was firmly established in one case and was considered as a possibility in the other. A multidisciplinary team effort is essential in evaluating such cases, and dermatologists should be aware and be well informed about this condition that can be potentially lethal but easily overlooked.

  13. Structural brain abnormalities in Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bauduin, Stephanie E E C; van der Wee, Nic J A; van der Werff, Steven J A

    2018-05-08

    Alongside various physical symptoms, patients with Cushing's disease and Cushing's syndrome display a wide variety of neuropsychiatric and cognitive symptoms, which are indicative of involvement of the central nervous system. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the structural brain abnormalities that are associated with Cushing's disease and Cushing's syndrome and their relation to behavioral and cognitive symptomatology. In this review, we discuss the gray matter structural abnormalities found in patients with active Cushing's disease and Cushing's syndrome, the reversibility and persistence of these changes and the white matter structural changes related to Cushing's syndrome. Recent findings are of particular interest because they provide more detailed information on localization of the structural changes as well as possible insights into the underlying biological processes. Active Cushing's disease and Cushing's syndrome is related to volume reductions of the hippocampus and in a prefrontal region involving the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and medial frontal gyrus (MFG). Whilst there are indications that the reductions in hippocampal volume are partially reversible, the changes in the ACC and MFG appear to be more persistent. In contrast to the volumetric findings, changes in white matter connectivity are typically widespread involving multiple tracts.

  14. Pendred syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wémeau, Jean-Louis; Kopp, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Pendred syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder that is classically defined by the combination of sensorineural deafness/hearing impairment, goiter, and an abnormal organification of iodide with or without hypothyroidism. The hallmark of the syndrome is the impaired hearing, which is associated with inner ear malformations such as an enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA). The thyroid phenotype is variable and may be modified by the nutritional iodine intake. Pendred syndrome is caused by biallelic mutations in the SLC26A4/PDS gene, which encodes the multifunctional anion exchanger pendrin. Pendrin has affinity for chloride, iodide, and bicarbonate, among other anions. In the inner ear, pendrin functions as a chloride/bicarbonate exchanger that is essential for maintaining the composition and the potential of the endolymph. In the thyroid, pendrin is expressed at the apical membrane of thyroid cells facing the follicular lumen. Functional studies have demonstrated that pendrin can mediate iodide efflux in heterologous cells. This, together with the thyroid phenotype observed in humans (goiter, impaired iodine organification) suggests that pendrin could be involved in iodide efflux into the lumen, one of the steps required for thyroid hormone synthesis. Iodide efflux can, however, also occur in the absence of pendrin suggesting that other exchangers or channels are involved. It has been suggested that Anoctamin 1 (ANO1/TMEM16A), a calcium-activated anion channel, which is also expressed at the apical membrane of thyrocytes, could participate in mediating apical efflux. In the kidney, pendrin is involved in bicarbonate secretion and chloride reabsorption. While there is no renal phenotype under basal conditions, severe metabolic alkalosis has been reported in Pendred syndrome patients exposed to an increased alkali load. This review provides an overview on the clinical spectrum of Pendred syndrome, the functional data on pendrin with a focus on its potential role in

  15. Phantom eye syndrome: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Agda M; Goiato, Marcelo C; Pellizzer, Eduardo P; Pesqueira, Aldiéris A; Guiotti, Aimée M; Gennari-Filho, Humberto; dos Santos, Daniela M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review was to describe the main features of phantom eye syndrome in relation to their possible causes, symptoms, treatments, and influence of eye amputation on quality of life of anophthalmic patients. For this, a bibliographical research was performed in Pubmed database using the following terms: "eye amputation," "eye trauma," "phantom eye syndrome," "phantom pain," and "quality of life," associated or not. Thirteen studies were selected, besides some relevant references contained in the selected manuscripts and other studies hallowed in the literature. Thus, 56 articles were included in this review. The phantom eye syndrome is defined as any sensation reported by the patient with anophthalmia, originated anophthalmic cavity. In phantom eye syndrome, at least one of these three symptoms has to be present: phantom vision, phantom pain, and phantom sensations. This syndrome has a direct influence on the quality of life of the patients, and psychological support is recommended before and after the amputation of the eyeball as well as aid in the treatment of the syndrome. Therefore, it is suggested that, for more effective treatment of phantom eye syndrome, drug therapy should be associated with psychological approach.

  16. Psychoanatomical substrates of Bálint's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, M; Vecera, S

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: From a series of glimpses, we perceive a seamless and richly detailed visual world. Cerebral damage, however, can destroy this illusion. In the case of Bálint's syndrome, the visual world is perceived erratically, as a series of single objects. The goal of this review is to explore a range of psychological and anatomical explanations for this striking visual disorder and to propose new directions for interpreting the findings in Bálint's syndrome and related cerebral disorders of visual processing. Methods: Bálint's syndrome is reviewed in the light of current concepts and methodologies of vision research. Results: The syndrome affects visual perception (causing simultanagnosia/visual disorientation) and visual control of eye and hand movement (causing ocular apraxia and optic ataxia). Although it has been generally construed as a biparietal syndrome causing an inability to see more than one object at a time, other lesions and mechanisms are also possible. Key syndrome components are dissociable and comprise a range of disturbances that overlap the hemineglect syndrome. Inouye's observations in similar cases, beginning in 1900, antedated Bálint's initial report. Because Bálint's syndrome is not common and is difficult to assess with standard clinical tools, the literature is dominated by case reports and confounded by case selection bias, non-uniform application of operational definitions, inadequate study of basic vision, poor lesion localisation, and failure to distinguish between deficits in the acute and chronic phases of recovery. Conclusions: Studies of Bálint's syndrome have provided unique evidence on neural substrates for attention, perception, and visuomotor control. Future studies should address possible underlying psychoanatomical mechanisms at "bottom up" and "top down" levels, and should specifically consider visual working memory and attention (including object based attention) as well as systems for identification of object

  17. Syndrome disintegration: Exome sequencing reveals that Fitzsimmons syndrome is a co-occurrence of multiple events.

    PubMed

    Armour, Christine M; Smith, Amanda; Hartley, Taila; Chardon, Jodi Warman; Sawyer, Sarah; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Hennekam, Raoul; Majewski, Jacek; Bulman, Dennis E; Suri, Mohnish; Boycott, Kym M

    2016-07-01

    In 1987 Fitzsimmons and Guilbert described identical male twins with progressive spastic paraplegia, brachydactyly with cone shaped epiphyses, short stature, dysarthria, and "low-normal" intelligence. In subsequent years, four other patients, including one set of female identical twins, a single female child, and a single male individual were described with the same features, and the eponym Fitzsimmons syndrome was adopted (OMIM #270710). We performed exome analysis of the patient described in 2009, and one of the original twins from 1987, the only patients available from the literature. No single genetic etiology exists that explains Fitzsimmons syndrome; however, multiple different genetic causes were identified. Specifically, the twins described by Fitzsimmons had heterozygous mutations in the SACS gene, the gene responsible for autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix Saguenay (ARSACS), as well as a heterozygous mutation in the TRPS1, the gene responsible in Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type 1 (TRPS1 type 1) which includes brachydactyly as a feature. A TBL1XR1 mutation was identified in the patient described in 2009 as contributing to his cognitive impairment and autistic features with no genetic cause identified for his spasticity or brachydactyly. The findings show that these individuals have multiple different etiologies giving rise to a similar phenotype, and that "Fitzsimmons syndrome" is in fact not one single syndrome. Over time, we anticipate that continued careful phenotyping with concomitant genome-wide analysis will continue to identify the causes of many rare syndromes, but it will also highlight that previously delineated clinical entities are, in fact, not syndromes at all. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Fanconi syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome in ...

  19. [Molecular basis of Rett syndrome: A current look].

    PubMed

    Pantaleón F, Gretta; Juvier R, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that exclusively affects girls, and occurs along with autism. It is very uncommon, and has five distinct forms, one classic and the others atypical, which generally compromise manual skills, language, and mobility, and widely associated with the appearance of stereotypy and early epilepsy. With the aim of updating the information about RS, a search was performed in the computer data bases of PubMed, Hinari, SCIELO and Medline, as well as consulting other web sites including OMIM, ORPHANET, GeneMap, Genetests, Proteins and Gene, using the descriptors "Síndrome de Rett", "genes y Síndrome de Rett", "Rett Syndrome gene", "Rett Syndrome", "Rett Syndrome gene therapy", and "Rett Syndrome review". Of the 1,348 articles found, 42 articles were selected, which reported 3 genes causing the syndrome: MECP2, CDKL5 and FOXG. The MECP2 gene is mutated in 80% of patients with classic RS, as well as in 40% of those affected by any of its atypical forms. RS with early epilepsy and the congenital variant are mainly due to variations in the CDKL5 and FOXG1 genes, respectively. The diagnosis of RS is based on clinical criteria. However, the advances in molecular biology and genetics have opened a wide range of possibilities for diagnosing the different clinical forms that could not be classified before. Molecular analysis can help confirm the clinical criteria and provided information as regards the prognosis of the patient. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  20. Liver Transplantation for Budd-Chiari Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Charles W.; Porter, Kendrick A.; Well, Richard; Reid, H. A. S.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation was accomplished in a 22-year-old woman dying of the Budd-Chiarl syndrome. She Is well and has normal liver function 16 months postoperatively. In view of the good early result, it will be appropriate to consider liver replacement for this disease in further well-selected cases. PMID:781334

  1. Diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents with genetic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, F; Kapellen, T M; Wiegand, S; Herbst, A; Wolf, J; Fröhlich-Reiterer, E E; Rabl, W; Rohrer, T R; Holl, R W

    2012-11-01

    Several genetic syndromes are associated with diabetes mellitus (DM). This study aimed to analyse data from the DPV database with regard to frequency, treatment strategies and long-term complications in paediatric DM patients with genetic syndromes, including Turner syndrome (TS), Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), Friedreich ataxia (FA), Alström syndrome (AS), Klinefelter syndrome (KS), Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), Berardinelli-Seip syndrome (BSS) and Down syndrome (DS). Longitudinal data for 43 521 patients with DM onset at age < 20 years were collected from 309 treatment centres in Germany and Austria using the DPV software. Data included anthropometric parameters, type of diabetes, mean age, age at diabetes onset, daily insulin dose, HbA 1c , micro- and macroalbuminuria, retinopathy and dyslipidaemia. Descriptive statistics and standard statistical tests were used for data analysis. In total, 205 DM patients had one of the following syndromes: DS (141 patients), TS (24), PWS (23), FA (5), AS (5), KS (4), BBS (2) and BSS (1). Diabetes-specific antibodies were positive in the majority of patients with DS, TS and FA. Despite the well-known association between DM and certain syndromic disorders, the number of affected patients in the German and Austrian paediatric diabetic population is very low. Nevertheless, physicians should be aware of syndromic forms of diabetes. Joint multicentre analyses are needed to draw relevant conclusions. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Non-invasive ventilation for sleep-disordered breathing in Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Connor, Victoria; Zhao, Sizheng; Angus, Robert

    2016-08-05

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a rare genetic neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by behavioural disturbances, intellectual disability and early onset obesity. The physical features of this syndrome are well characterised; however, behavioural features, such as sleep disturbance, are less well understood and difficult to manage. Sleep issues in SMS are likely due to a combination of disturbed melatonin cycle, facial anatomy and obesity-related ventilatory problems. Sleep disorders can be very distressing to patients and their families, as exemplified by our patient's experience, and can worsen behavioural issues as well as general health. This case demonstrates the successful use of non-invasive ventilation in treating underlying obesity hypoventilation syndrome and obstructive sleep apnoea. As a consequence of addressing abnormalities in sleep patterns, some behavioural problems improved. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. Constitutional MLH1 methylation presenting with colonic polyposis syndrome and not Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kidambi, Trilokesh D; Blanco, Amie; Van Ziffle, Jessica; Terdiman, Jonathan P

    2016-04-01

    At least one-third of patients meeting clinical criteria for Lynch syndrome will have no germline mutation and constitutional epimutations leading to promoter methylation of MLH1 have been identified in a subset of these patients. We report the first case of constitutional MLH1 promoter methylation associated with a colonic polyposis syndrome in a 39 year-old man with a family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) and a personal history of 21 polyps identified over 8 years as well as the development of two synchronous CRCs over 16 months who was evaluated for a hereditary cancer syndrome. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) of multiple tumors showed absent MLH1 and PMS2 expression, though germline testing with Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification of these mismatch repair genes (MMR) genes was negative. A next generation sequencing panel of 29 genes also failed to identify a pathogenic mutation. Hypermethylation was identified in MLH1 intron 1 in tumor specimens along with buccal cells and peripheral white blood cells, confirming the diagnosis of constitutional MLH1 promoter methylation. This case highlights that constitutional MLH1 methylation should be considered in the differential diagnosis for a polyposis syndrome if IHC staining shows absent MMR gene expression.

  4. Management of fibromyalgia syndrome in 2016.

    PubMed

    Okifuji, Akiko; Gao, Jeff; Bokat, Christina; Hare, Bradford D

    2016-05-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic pain disorder and defies definitively efficacious therapy. In this review, we summarize the results from the early treatment research as well as recent research evaluating the pharmacological, interventional and nonpharmacological therapies. We further discuss future directions of fibromyalgia syndrome management; we specifically focus on the issues that are associated with currently available treatments, such as the need for personalized approach, new technologically oriented and interventional treatments, the importance of understanding and harnessing placebo effects and enhancement of patient engagement in therapy.

  5. Diagnosis and management of sleep apnea syndrome and restless legs syndrome in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Novak, Marta; Mendelssohn, David; Shapiro, Colin M; Mucsi, Istvan

    2006-01-01

    Sleep complaints are very common in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and contribute to their impaired quality of life. Both obstructive and central sleep apnea syndromes are reported more often in patients on dialysis than in the general population. Impaired daytime functioning, sleepiness, and fatigue, as well as cognitive problems, are well known in patients with sleep apnea. Increasing evidence supports the pathophysiological role of sleep apnea in cardiovascular disorders, which are the leading cause of death in ESRD patients. Uremic factors may be involved in the pathogenesis of sleep apnea in this patient population and optimal dialysis may reduce disease severity. Furthermore, treatment with continuous positive airway pressure may improve quality of life and may help to manage hypertension in these patients. Secondary restless legs syndrome is highly prevalent in patients on maintenance dialysis. The pathophysiology of the disorder may also involve uremia-related factors, iron deficiency, and anemia, but genetic and lifestyle factors might also play a role. The treatment of restless legs syndrome involves various pharmacologic approaches and might be challenging in severe cases. In this article we review the diagnosis and treatment of sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome, with a focus on dialysis patients. We also briefly review current data regarding sleep problems after transplantation, since these studies may indirectly shed light on the possible pathophysiological role of uremia or dialysis in the etiology of sleep disorders. Considering the importance of sleep disorders, more awareness among professionals involved in the care of patients on dialysis is necessary. Appropriate management of sleep disorders could improve the quality of life and possibly even impact upon survival of renal patients.

  6. Craniofacial morphology in patients with velocardiofacial syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dalben, Gisele da Silva; Richieri-Costa, Antonio; Taveira, Luís Antônio de Assis

    2010-05-01

    To compare cephalometric measurements of patients with and without velocardiofacial syndrome. Cross-sectional. Public tertiary craniofacial center. Lateral cephalograms of 18 patients with velocardiofacial syndrome and 18 controls without morphofunctional alterations, matched for gender and age; all cephalograms were obtained before orthodontic intervention. The cephalograms were manually traced and digitized for the achievement of linear and angular measurements. Individuals with velocardiofacial syndrome presented a reduced length of the skull base, retrusion of nasal bones, reduced posterior height of the maxilla, increased gonial angle, increased interincisal angle, greater lingual inclination of the mandibular incisors, reduced nasolabial angle, and reduced nasal depth compared with the control group. Patients with velocardiofacial syndrome presented morphological differences compared with individuals without morphofunctional alterations, which might be considered in the evaluation of patients with suspected diagnosis of the syndrome, as well as for the establishment of treatment protocols adequate to their needs. The present findings did not support the hypothesis of differences in pharyngeal dimensions mentioned by other authors, suggesting that the velopharyngeal insufficiency in these patients may be caused by functional alterations rather than by anatomical differences.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in congenital Brown syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2015-08-01

    Our aim was to elucidate the etiology of Brown syndrome by evaluating the trochlea position, morphologic characteristics of the extraocular muscles including superior oblique muscle/tendon complex, and the presence of the cranial nerves (CN) III, IV, and VI using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in eight patients with unilateral congenital Brown syndrome and one patient with bilateral congenital Brown syndrome. Nine consecutive patients diagnosed with congenital Brown syndrome had a comprehensive ocular examination and MRI for the CN III, CN VI, and the extraocular muscles. Five of the nine patients underwent additional high resolution MRI for CN IV. The distance from the annulus of Zinn to the trochlea was measured. Normal sized CN III, IV, and VI, as well as all extraocular muscles, could be identified bilaterally in all patients with available MRI. The distance from the annulus of Zinn to the trochlea was the same in both eyes. The findings for our patients, particularly in those who underwent additional high resolution MRI, did not provide evidence of a lack of CN IV as a cause of Brown syndrome.

  8. Computer and visual display terminals (VDT) vision syndrome (CVDTS).

    PubMed

    Parihar, J K S; Jain, Vaibhav Kumar; Chaturvedi, Piyush; Kaushik, Jaya; Jain, Gunjan; Parihar, Ashwini K S

    2016-07-01

    Computer and visual display terminals have become an essential part of modern lifestyle. The use of these devices has made our life simple in household work as well as in offices. However the prolonged use of these devices is not without any complication. Computer and visual display terminals syndrome is a constellation of symptoms ocular as well as extraocular associated with prolonged use of visual display terminals. This syndrome is gaining importance in this modern era because of the widespread use of technologies in day-to-day life. It is associated with asthenopic symptoms, visual blurring, dry eyes, musculoskeletal symptoms such as neck pain, back pain, shoulder pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, psychosocial factors, venous thromboembolism, shoulder tendonitis, and elbow epicondylitis. Proper identification of symptoms and causative factors are necessary for the accurate diagnosis and management. This article focuses on the various aspects of the computer vision display terminals syndrome described in the previous literature. Further research is needed for the better understanding of the complex pathophysiology and management.

  9. [Kenny-Caffey syndrome and its related syndromes].

    PubMed

    Isojima, Tsuyoshi; Kitanaka, Sachiko

    2015-11-01

    Kenny-Caffey syndrome (KCS) is a very rare dysmorphologic syndrome characterized by proportionate short stature, cortical thickening and medullary stenosis of tubular bones, delayed closure of anterior fontanelle, eye abnormalities, and hypoparathyroidism. Two types of KCS were known: the autosomal recessive form (KCS type 1), which is caused by mutations of the TBCE gene, and the autosomal dominant form (KCS type 2), which is caused by mutations of the FAM111A gene. TBCE mutation also causes hypoparathyroidism-retardation-dysmorphism syndrome, and FAM111A mutation also causes gracile bone dysplasia. These two diseases can be called as KCS-related syndromes. In this article, we review the clinical manifestations of KCS and discuss its related syndromes.

  10. An Integrated Soft Computing Approach to Hughes Syndrome Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Vilhena, João; Rosário Martins, M; Vicente, Henrique; Grañeda, José M; Caldeira, Filomena; Gusmão, Rodrigo; Neves, João; Neves, José

    2017-03-01

    The AntiPhospholipid Syndrome (APS) is an acquired autoimmune disorder induced by high levels of antiphospholipid antibodies that cause arterial and veins thrombosis, as well as pregnancy-related complications and morbidity, as clinical manifestations. This autoimmune hypercoagulable state, usually known as Hughes syndrome, has severe consequences for the patients, being one of the main causes of thrombotic disorders and death. Therefore, it is required to be preventive; being aware of how probable is to have that kind of syndrome. Despite the updated of antiphospholipid syndrome classification, the diagnosis remains difficult to establish. Additional research on clinically relevant antibodies and standardization of their quantification are required in order to improve the antiphospholipid syndrome risk assessment. Thus, this work will focus on the development of a diagnosis decision support system in terms of a formal agenda built on a Logic Programming approach to knowledge representation and reasoning, complemented with a computational framework based on Artificial Neural Networks. The proposed model allows for improving the diagnosis, classifying properly the patients that really presented this pathology (sensitivity higher than 85%), as well as classifying the absence of APS (specificity close to 95%).

  11. Recurrent unilateral headache associated with SAPHO syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsugawa, Jun; Ouma, Shinji; Fukae, Jiro; Tsuboi, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman was admitted with recurrent episodes of right frontal headache. Head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed extensive thickening and enhancement of the right frontal dura, muscle and fascia, as well as abnormal signal intensity and enhancement of bone marrow at the lesions. Synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis osteomyelitis (SAPHO) syndrome was diagnosed based on the patient's 8-year history of treatment of palmoplantar pustulosis and abnormal accumulations in the right temporal, sternum, and left medial clavicula on bone scintigraphy. SAPHO syndrome may be associated with skull lesions, which can contribute to the onset of repeated headache or dural thickening, thus these symptoms should be recognized as manifestations of this syndrome.

  12. Toxigenic and metabolic causes of ketosis and ketoacidotic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Martina M; Hajja, Waddah; Al-Khatib, Sofian; Hazeghazam, Maryam; Sreedhar, Dharmashree; Li, Rebecca Na; Wong-McKinstry, Edna; Carlson, Richard W

    2012-10-01

    Ketoacidotic syndromes are frequently encountered in acute care medicine. This article focuses on ketosis and ketoacidotic syndromes associated with intoxications, alcohol abuse, starvation, and certain dietary supplements as well as inborn errors of metabolism. Although all of these various processes are characterized by the accumulation of ketone bodies and metabolic acidosis, there are differences in the mechanisms, clinical presentations, and principles of therapy for these heterogeneous disorders. Pathophysiologic mechanisms that account for these disorders are presented, as well as guidance regarding identification and management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovary syndrome: an intriguing overlapping.

    PubMed

    Caserta, Donatella; Adducchio, Gloria; Picchia, Simona; Ralli, Eleonora; Matteucci, Eleonora; Moscarini, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome is an increasing pathology in adults and in children, due to a parallel rise of obesity. Sedentary lifestyle, food habits, cultural influences and also a genetic predisposition can cause dyslipidemia, hypertension, abdominal obesity and insulin resistance which are the two main features of metabolic syndrome. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition directly associated with obesity, insulin resistance (HOMA index) and metabolic syndrome, and it is very interesting for its relationship and overlap with the metabolic syndrome. The relationship between the two syndromes is mutual: PCOS women have a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome and also women with metabolic syndrome commonly present the reproductive/endocrine trait of PCOS. Prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome and PCOS are similar for various aspects. It is necessary to treat excess adiposity and insulin resistance, with the overall goals of preventing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes and improving reproductive failure in young women with PCOS. First of all, lifestyle changes, then pharmacological therapy, bariatric surgery and laparoscopic ovarian surgery represent the pillars for PCOS treatment.

  14. Axillary Brachial Plexus Blockade for the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribbers, G. M.; Geurts, A. C. H.; Rijken, R. A. J.; Kerkkamp, H. E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) is a neurogenic pain syndrome characterized by pain, vasomotor and dystrophic changes, and often motor impairments. This study evaluated the effectiveness of brachial plexus blockade with local anaesthetic drugs as a treatment for this condition. Three patients responded well; three did not. (DB)

  15. Spine deformities in rare congenital syndromes: clinical issues.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Robert M

    2009-08-01

    early onset scoliosis that is very rigid and requires early intervention. Cervical kyphosis and subluxation may be lethal in these patients and screening radiographs are important. Upper airway abnormalities are an anesthesia concern. Jarcho-Levin syndrome is a thoracic volume depletion deformity due to shortness of the thorax, either a spondylocostal dysostosis variant or spondylothoracic dysplasia. The former has a chaotic congenital scoliosis with varied combination of missing and fused ribs. Although spondylocostal dysostosis has a benign reputation in the literature for respiratory complications, respiratory insufficiency is nevertheless common and 1 death is known from respiratory failure. Spondylothoracic dysplasia seldom has significant scoliosis, but has a mortality rate approaching 50% from respiratory complications due to thoracic insufficiency syndrome. In spite of severe restrictive respiratory disease, adult survivors of spondylothoracic dysplasia appear to do well clinically for unknown reasons. Cerebrocostomandibular syndrome has scoliosis, micrognathia, and thoracic insufficiency syndrome, due to an "implosion" deformity of the thorax from congenital pseudarthrosis of the posterior ribs. For optimal patient care, it is necessary to have a clear understanding of exotic congenital syndromes and how they may impact on both the presentation of spinal deformity and the response to treatment, as well as how they may introduce additional morbidity into standard treatment plans. It is clear that with this understanding that preoperative strategies can be employed to enhance the safety of spinal treatment for these unique children.

  16. West syndrome in a patient with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Fuyu; Kuroda, Yukiko; Naruto, Takuya; Ohashi, Ikuko; Takano, Kyoko; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Schinzel-Giedion syndrome is a rare recognizable malformation syndrome defined by characteristic facial features, profound developmental delay, severe growth failure, and multiple congenital anomalies. The causative gene of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome, SETBP1, has been identified, but limited cases have been confirmed by molecular analysis. We present a 9-month-old girl affected by West syndrome with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome. Congenital severe hydronephrosis, typical facial features, and multiple anomalies suggested a clinical diagnosis of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome. Hypsarrhythmia occurred at 7 months of age and was temporarily controlled by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) therapy during 5 weeks. SETBP1 mutational analysis showed the presence of a recurrent mutation, p.Ile871Thr. The implications in management of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Fanconi syndrome and severe polyuria: an uncommon clinicobiological presentation of a Gitelman syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gitelman syndrome is an autosomal recessive tubulopathy characterized by hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, metabolic alkalosis and hypocalciuria. The majority of patients do not present with symptoms until late childhood or adulthood, and the symptoms are generally mild. We report here the first case of Gitelman syndrome presenting with the biological features of Fanconi syndrome and an early polyuria since the neonatal period. We discuss in this article the atypical electrolytes losses found in our patient, as well as the possible mechanisms of severe polyuria. Case presentation A 6-year-old Caucasian girl was admitted via the Emergency department for vomiting, and initial laboratory investigations found hyponatremia, hypokalemia, metabolic acidosis with normal anion gap, hypophosphatemia, and hypouricemia. Urinalysis revealed Na, K, Ph and uric acid losses. Thus, the initial biological profile was in favor of a proximal tubular defect. However, etiological investigations were inconclusive and the patient was discharged with potassium chloride and phosphorus supplementation. Three weeks later, further laboratory analysis indicated persistent hypokalemia, a metabolic alkalosis, hypomagnesemia, and hypocalciuria. We therefore sequenced the SLC12A3 gene and found a compound heterozygosity for 2 known missense mutations. Conclusions Gitelman syndrome can have varying and sometimes atypical presentations, and should be suspected in case of hypokalemic tubular disorders that do not belong to any obvious syndromic entity. In this case, the proximal tubular dysfunction could be secondary to the severe hypokalemia. This report emphasizes the need for clinicians to repeat laboratory tests in undiagnosed tubular disorders, especially not during decompensation episodes. PMID:25112827

  18. Management of fibromyalgia syndrome in 2016

    PubMed Central

    Okifuji, Akiko; Gao, Jeff; Bokat, Christina; Hare, Bradford D

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic pain disorder and defies definitively efficacious therapy. In this review, we summarize the results from the early treatment research as well as recent research evaluating the pharmacological, interventional and nonpharmacological therapies. We further discuss future directions of fibromyalgia syndrome management; we specifically focus on the issues that are associated with currently available treatments, such as the need for personalized approach, new technologically oriented and interventional treatments, the importance of understanding and harnessing placebo effects and enhancement of patient engagement in therapy. PMID:27306300

  19. Kindler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lai-Cheong, Joey E; McGrath, John A

    2010-01-01

    Kindler syndrome (MIM173650) is an autosomal recessive genodermatosis characterized by poikiloderma, trauma-induced skin blistering, mucosal inflammation, and photosensitivity. Loss-of-function mutations in the FERMT1 gene are the cause of Kindler syndrome. Kindler syndrome is categorized as a subtype of epidermolysis bullosa (EB). During infancy and childhood, there is clinical overlap between Kindler syndrome and dystrophic EB. Unlike other forms of EB, Kindler syndrome is characterized by impaired actin cytoskeleton-extracellular matrix interactions and a variable plane of blister formation at or close to the dermal-epidermal junction. This article reviews clinicopathologic and molecular features of Kindler syndrome and discusses patient management.

  20. Association between late-onset hypogonadism syndrome plus metabolic syndrome and prostate cancer and its aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Pastor, J; Pellejero, P; Ortiz, I; Ramírez-Backhaus, M; de Gracia, A; Marrugo, C; Gomez-Ferrer, A; Calatrava, A; Rubio-Briones, J; Rodriguez-Torreblanca, C; Solsona-Narbón, E

    2016-09-01

    To assess the relationship between prostate cancer (PC) and the presence of metabolic syndrome and late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) syndrome. A retrospective study was conducted on 686 patients who underwent prostate biopsy. We analysed the demographic variables, clinical data and biopsy results. To diagnose metabolic syndrome, we employed the criteria of the American Heart Association. For the diagnosis of LOH syndrome, we employed the Androgen Deficiency in the Aging Male questionnaire and testosterone levels (TT). We evaluated the relationship between free testosterone (FT) and bioavailable testosterone (BT) on one hand and PC and its aggressiveness on the other, as well as the usefulness of the TT to prostate specific antigen (TT/PSA) ratio in the PC diagnosis. The patient's median age was 65 years. Metabolic syndrome is not associated with PC (39.4% vs. 35%; P=.1) but is associated with a PC Gleason score >7 (50.4% vs. 29.44%; P=.002). LOH, low FT and low BT are associated with an increased presence of PC (51% vs. 35%, P=.02; 44.86% vs. 33.33%, P=.03; and 46.46% vs. 33.08%, P=.01, respectively) and with an increased probability of a PC Gleason score >7 (61.54% vs. 37.5%, P=.02; 54.17% vs. 34.12%, P=.02; 54.35% vs. 34.48%, P=.02, respectively). Additionally, the median TT/PSA ratio was significantly lower in patients with positive biopsies (P=.022). Metabolic syndrome was not associated with the probability of having PC but was associated with a PC Gleason score >7. Moreover, LOH syndrome had a higher percentage of PC and a greater presence of PC Gleason scores >7, as did low levels of FT and low levels of BT. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Ectopic ACTH syndrome caused by pulmonary carcinoid tumourlets.

    PubMed

    Povedano, S T; Pastor, C V; Seoane, C P; Reina, L J; Moreno, M A; Ortega, R P; López-Rubio, F; López, P B

    2001-06-01

    The differential diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome is a major challenge to clinical endocrinologists, especially those infrequent cases referred to as occult ectopic ACTH syndromes. Although bronchial carcinoids are well known to be a cause of Cushing's syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion, very few cases of carcinoid tumourlets causing an ACTH ectopic syndrome have been reported, and their origin remains controversial. For some authors, tumourlets and typical carcinoids represent distinct pathological entities, whilst others hold that tumourlets are merely microscopic carcinoid tumours. We report a patient with an aggressive Cushing's syndrome that required bilateral adrenalectomy, diagnosed 22 years before a 3-cm lung nodule became apparent on routine chest X-ray. The biopsy after lung surgery revealed a typical peripheral bronchial carcinoid surrounded by tumourlets. Both tumourlets and carcinoid tumour showed strongly positive ACTH immunostaining. Recently, Arioglu et al. (1998) reported a case of Cushing's syndrome caused by pulmonary carcinoid tumourlets, concluding that this entity should be considered in the differential diagnosis of occult ectopic ACTH syndrome. Furthermore, we consider that the carcinoid tumourlets found in our patient, were the initial source of ACTH, leading to Cushing's syndrome with a rapid onset, and that a loss of cell proliferation control in one of such tumourlets many years later, could have resulted in the development of a typical carcinoid tumour, reinforcing the theory of a common origin of these lesions.

  2. Long-Term Impact of Parental Well-Being on Adult Outcomes and Dementia Status in Individuals with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esbensen, Anna J.; Mailick, Marsha R.; Silverman, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Parental characteristics were significant predictors of health, functional abilities, and behavior problems in adults with Down syndrome ("n" ?=? 75) over a 22-year time span, controlling for initial levels and earlier changes in these outcomes. Lower levels of behavior problems were predicted by improvements in maternal depressive…

  3. Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hypercortisolism; Cortisol excess; Glucocorticoid excess - Cushing syndrome ... The most common cause of Cushing syndrome is taking too much ... Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, and prednisolone ...

  4. Current evidence for effectiveness of interventions for cubital tunnel syndrome, radial tunnel syndrome, instability, or bursitis of the elbow: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rinkel, Willem D; Schreuders, Ton A R; Koes, Bart W; Huisstede, Bionka M A

    2013-12-01

    To provide an evidence-based overview of the effectiveness of interventions for 4 nontraumatic painful disorders sharing the anatomic region of the elbow: cubital tunnel syndrome, radial tunnel syndrome, elbow instability, and olecranon bursitis. The Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, PEDro, and CINAHL were searched to identify relevant reviews and randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the quality of the methodology. A best-evidence synthesis was used to summarize the results. One systematic review and 6 RCTs were included. For the surgical treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome (1 review, 3 RCTs), comparing simple decompression with anterior ulnar nerve transposition, no evidence was found in favor of either one of these. Limited evidence was found in favor of medial epicondylectomy versus anterior transposition and for early postoperative therapy versus immobilization. No evidence was found for the effect of local steroid injection in addition to splinting. No RCTs were found for radial tunnel syndrome. For olecranon bursitis (1 RCT), limited evidence for effectiveness was found for methylprednisolone acetate injection plus naproxen. Concerning elbow instability, including 2 RCTs, one showed that nonsurgical treatment resulted in similar results compared with surgery, whereas the other found limited evidence for the effectiveness in favor of early mobilization versus 3 weeks of immobilization after surgery. In this review no, or at best, limited evidence was found for the effectiveness of nonsurgical and surgical interventions to treat painful cubital tunnel syndrome, radial tunnel syndrome, elbow instability, or olecranon bursitis. Well-designed and well-conducted RCTs are clearly needed in this field.

  5. Vestibular dysfunction in Turner syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Michael; Agrawal, Yuri

    2014-02-01

    Turner syndrome is a well-known cause of sensorineural hearing loss, and the lack of estrogen has been implicated in cochlear dysfunction. It has never been associated with vestibular dysfunction. We report a case of a patient with Turner syndrome who was found to have bilateral vestibular dysfunction based on video-oculography (VOG) testing. A single patient with a history of Turner syndrome who was found to have significant bilateral vestibular dysfunction. After noticing a deficit in the vestibulo-ocular reflexes on qualitative horizontal head impulse examination, the patient underwent VOG testing. VOG testing quantatively measures angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR) gain in the horizontal semicircular canal plane. AVOR gain represents the eye movement response to a head movement; in normal individuals the eye movement is fully compensatory and gain values are close to unity. VOG results showed AVOR gains of 0.29 and 0.36 on the right and left sides, respectively. We have presented a case of a woman with Turner syndrome with asymptomatic vestibular dysfunction demonstrated with VOG testing. Although there is a documented relationship between Turner syndrome and sensorineural hearing loss, there are no previous studies or case reports linking Turner syndrome and vestibular dysfunction. Additional research and added vigilance in monitoring Turner syndrome patients may be warranted.

  6. Surgical management of Gorlin syndrome: a 4-decade experience using local excision technique.

    PubMed

    Griner, Devan; Sutphin, Daniel; Sargent, Larry A

    2015-04-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (aka Gorlin syndrome, Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, and fifth phacomatosis) is a rare but well-described autosomal dominant condition with variable penetrance. We present a female patient who has been successfully treated using local surgical excision and diligent skin surveillance for more than 4 decades, demonstrating that simple local incision is an efficacious and reasonable surgical alternative that may circumvent the specialization and expense of Mohs technique.

  7. Brugada syndrome: two decades of progress.

    PubMed

    Veerakul, Gumpanart; Nademanee, Koonlawee

    2012-01-01

    Two decades ago, a series of 8 idiopathic ventricular fibrillation patients who each had an abnormal ECG (right bundle branch block with coved-type ECG), but otherwise had normal hearts were described by Brugada and Brugada. Since then, the clinical entity has become known as Brugada syndrome (BS). Shortly thereafter, mutations of the SCN5A gene that encodes for the α-subunit of the sodium channel were found, galvanizing the field of ion channelopathies following in the footsteps of the breakthrough in long QT syndrome. Over the past 20 years, extensive research in this field has produced major progress toward better understanding of BS and the gaining of knowledge of the genetic background, pathophysiology and new management. Two consensus reports were published to help define the diagnostic criteria, risk stratification and management of BS patients. However, there are controversies. In this review, we will share our experiences of BS patients in Thailand and discuss advances in many aspects of the syndrome (ie, genetics and pathophysiology) and some of these pertinent controversies, as well as new treatment of the syndrome with catheter ablation.

  8. Excess Metabolic Syndrome Risks Among Women Health Workers Compared With Men.

    PubMed

    Adeoye, Abiodun M; Adewoye, Ifeoluwa A; Dairo, David M; Adebiyi, Adewole; Lackland, Daniel T; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Tayo, Bamidele O

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with higher rates of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although significant disparities in the risks of metabolic syndrome by occupation type and sex are well documented, the factors associated with metabolic syndrome in low- to middle-income countries remain unclear. These gaps in evidence identify the need for patterns of metabolic syndrome among hospital personnel of both sexes in Nigeria. A total of 256 hospital workers comprising 32.8% men were studied. The mean age of the participants was 42.03 ± 9.4 years. Using International Diabetic Federation criteria, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 24.2%. Women were substantially and significantly more likely to be identified with metabolic syndrome compared with men (34.9% vs 2.4%, respectively; P=.0001). This study identified metabolic syndrome among health workers with over one third of women with metabolic syndrome compared with <10% of men. These results support the implementation of lifestyle modification programs for management of metabolic syndrome in the health care workplace. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Maladaptive and Compulsive Behavior in Prader-Willi Syndrome: New Insights from Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2004-01-01

    Although maladaptive and compulsive behaviors are increasingly well-described in young persons with Prader-Willi syndrome, it is unclear how these problems manifest in older adults with this syndrome. In Part I, I compared maladaptive and compulsive behaviors in 45 older adults with Prader-Willi syndrome (ages 30 to 50 years) to 195 children,…

  10. [Cockett's syndrome, May-Thurner syndrome, or iliac vein compression syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gil Martín, A R; Carreras Aja, M; Arrieta Ardieta, I; Labayen Azparren, I

    2014-01-01

    Iliac vein compression syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome or Cockett's syndrome) is a rare clinical entity in which the left common iliac vein is compressed when it passes between the right common iliac artery and the spine. The sustained compression and trauma caused by the pulsatile force of the artery on the vein damage the intima and lead to the formation of membranes or bands in the vascular lumen that hinder or obstruct the flow of blood in the vein, favoring thrombus formation. The current treatment strategy of choice is endovascular vein patch angioplasty and stenting with the aim of improving the caliber of the lumen and enabling normal venous drainage. We present two cases of May-Thurner syndrome and review the clinical and CT findings. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. LEOPARD syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Multiple lentigines syndrome; Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines ... Genetics Home Reference -- ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/noonan-syndrome-with-multiple-lentigines National Organization for Rare Disorders -- ...

  12. Phenotip - a web-based instrument to help diagnosing fetal syndromes antenatally.

    PubMed

    Porat, Shay; de Rham, Maud; Giamboni, Davide; Van Mieghem, Tim; Baud, David

    2014-12-10

    Prenatal ultrasound can often reliably distinguish fetal anatomic anomalies, particularly in the hands of an experienced ultrasonographer. Given the large number of existing syndromes and the significant overlap in prenatal findings, antenatal differentiation for syndrome diagnosis is difficult. We constructed a hierarchic tree of 1140 sonographic markers and submarkers, organized per organ system. Subsequently, a database of prenatally diagnosable syndromes was built. An internet-based search engine was then designed to search the syndrome database based on a single or multiple sonographic markers. Future developments will include a database with magnetic resonance imaging findings as well as further refinements in the search engine to allow prioritization based on incidence of syndromes and markers.

  13. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Irritable Bowel Syndrome KidsHealth / For Teens / Irritable Bowel Syndrome What's in ... intestinal disorder called irritable bowel syndrome. What Is Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common intestinal ...

  14. [Fetal atrioventricular septal defect associated with Patau and Edwards syndromes, as well as trisomy 22].

    PubMed

    Cesko, I; Hajdú, J; Marton, T; Tóth-Pál, E; Papp, C; Papp, Z

    1998-05-03

    The atrioventricular septal defect is usually associated with trisomy 21 and it may be observed in the heterotaxia syndromes. Atrioventricular septal defect may be associated with 8p deletion. There are reported cases of familial atrioventricular septal defect. Atrioventicular septal defect is rarely associated with other chromosomal abnormalities. We are reporting three unusual cases of atrioventricular septal defect that were associated with trisomy 13, 18 and 22. This association may be due to effect of genetic loci on the 13, 18 and 22 chromosome which could play the role in the development and fusion of endocardial cushion and atrioventricular septal defect.

  15. Screening of the USH1G gene among Spanish patients with Usher syndrome. Lack of mutations and evidence of a minor role in the pathogenesis of the syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aller, Elena; Jaijo, Teresa; Beneyto, Magdalena; Nájera, Carmen; Morera, Constantino; Pérez-Garrigues, Herminio; Ayuso, Carmen; Millán, Jose

    2007-09-01

    The Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder characterized by the association of sensorineural hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and, in some cases, vestibular dysfunction. The USH1G gene, encoding SANS, has been found to cause both Usher syndrome type I and atypical Usher syndrome. 109 Spanish unrelated patients suffering from Usher syndrome type I, type II, type III and unclassified Usher syndrome were screened for mutations in this gene, but only eight different changes without a clear pathogenic effect have been detected. Based on these results as well as previous studies in other populations where mutational analysis of this gene has been carried out, one can conclude that USH1G has a minor involvement in Usher syndrome pathogenesis.

  16. Non-syndromic odontogenic keratocysts: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Kurdekar, Raghavendra S.; Prakash, Jeevan; Rana, A. S.; Kalra, Puneet

    2013-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts are very well documented in the literature. Multiple odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are one of the most frequent features of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). It is linked with mutation in the PTCH gene (human homolog of the drosophila segment polarity gene, “patched”,). Partial expression of the gene may result in occurrence of only multiple recurring OKC without any associated systemic findings. A rare case of multiple odontogenic keratocysts unassociated with any syndrome is reported, so as to add to the growing number of such cases in the literature. The possibility of this case being a partial expression of the Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is discussed. PMID:24163561

  17. Cushing’s syndrome in childhood: update on genetics, treatment, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lodish, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an update on the genes associated with Cushing’s syndrome in children, as well as to familiarize the clinician with recent treatment guidelines and outcome data for children with Cushing’s syndrome. Recent findings The list of genes associated with Cushing’s syndrome continues to grow. In addition, treatment for childhood Cushing’s syndrome is evolving. As long-term follow-up data on children becomes available, clinicians need to be aware of the issues that require attention. Summary Knowledge of the specific genetic causes of Cushing’s syndrome has potential implications for treatment, surveillance, and counseling. Advances in surgical technique, radiation modalities, and medical therapies offer the potential for additional treatment options in Cushing’s syndrome. Early identification and management of post-treatment morbidities in children treated for Cushing’s syndrome is crucial in order to optimize care. PMID:25517021

  18. Savant syndrome: realities, myths and misconceptions.

    PubMed

    Treffert, Darold A

    2014-03-01

    It was 126 years ago that Down first described savant syndrome as a specific condition and 70 years ago that Kanner first described Early Infantile Autism. While as many as one in ten autistic persons have savant abilities, such special skills occur in other CNS conditions as well such that approximately 50 % of cases of savant syndrome have autism as the underlying developmental disability and 50 % are associated with other disabilities. This paper sorts out realities from myths and misconceptions about both savant syndrome and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) that have developed through the years. The reality is that low IQ is not necessarily an accompaniment of savant syndrome; in some cases IQ can be superior. Also, savants can be creative, rather than just duplicative, and the skills increase over time on a continuum from duplication, to improvisation to creation, rather than diminishing or suddenly disappearing. Genius and prodigy exist separate from savant syndrome and not all such highly gifted persons have Asperger's Disorder. This paper also emphasizes the critical importance of separating 'autistic-like' symptoms from ASD especially in children when the savant ability presents as hyperlexia (children who read early) or as Einstein syndrome (children who speak late), or have impaired vision (Blindisms) because prognosis and outcome are very different when that careful distinction is made. In those cases the term 'outgrowing autism' might be mistakenly applied when in fact the child did not have ASD in the first place.

  19. [Waardenburg syndrome--ophthalmic findings and criteria for diagnosis: case reports].

    PubMed

    Nasser, Luciano Sólia; Paranaíba, Lívia Maris Ribeiro; Frota, Ana Cláudia; Gomes, Andreia; Versiani, Gisele; Martelli Júnior, Hercílio

    2012-10-01

    To describe the clinical and imaginological features of two families with Waardenburg syndrome: type I and II, with emphasis on ophthalmic manifestations, as well as the pattern of genetic inheritance. We conducted a clinical study involving two families affected by Waardenburg syndrome, and through the pedigree, determined the present pattern of genetic inheritance. Analyses were performed including the measurement of visual acuity, the presence of dystopia cantorum (telecanthus), evaluation of iris color and retinal mapping, as well as dermatological and otological examinations. The pedigree of the family affected by the Waardenburg syndrome type I showed an autosomal dominant mode of transmission. The syndrome was present at 85.71% of patients. The dystopia cantorum was the most frequent feature, followed by the white streak on the skin of the forehead, hypopigmentation of the iris and retina and deafness. The Waardenburg syndrome family type II had 33.33% of family members affected by the syndrome. No member had dystopia cantorum and hypopigmentation of the iris. Three patients had sensorineural hearing loss (12.5%), associated with white forelock and achromatic spots confluent by the body. This study shows the importance of the ophthalmologist in aiding the diagnosis of this rare genetic condition, since it includes ocular disorders such as telecanthus, hypopigmentation of the iris and retina. The cantorum dystopia is the main diagnostic criterion to differentiate type I and II syndrome and should be done by a trained ophthalmologist. The families are in medical monitoring, receiving genetic guidelines and care related to eye protection.

  20. Burning mouth syndrome: the role of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Marino, R; Capaccio, P; Pignataro, L; Spadari, F

    2009-05-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a burning sensation or stinging disorder affecting the oral mucosa in the absence of any clinical signs or mucosal lesions. Some studies have suggested that burning mouth syndrome could be caused by the metals used in dental prostheses, as well as by acrylate monomers, additives and flavouring agents, although others have not found any aetiologic role for hypersensitivity to dental materials. To evaluate the extent and severity of adverse reactions to dental materials in a group of patients with burning mouth syndrome, and investigate the possible role of contact allergy in its pathogenesis. We prospectively studied 124 consecutive patients with burning mouth syndrome (108 males; mean age 57 years, range 41-83), all of whom underwent allergen patch testing between 2004 and 2007. Sixteen patients (13%) showed positive patch test reactions and were classified as having burning mouth syndrome type 3 or secondary burning mouth syndrome (Lamey's and Scala's classifications). Although we did not find any significant association between the patients and positive patch test reactions, it would be advisable to include hypersensitivity to dental components when evaluating patients experiencing intermittent oral burning without any clinical signs.

  1. A Chinese patient with pusher syndrome and unilateral spatial neglect syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Wei; Lin, Cheng-He; Zheng, Hua; Lin, Zhen-Lan

    2014-07-01

    To observe clinical manifestations, behavioral characteristics, and effects of rehabilitation on a patient with pusher syndrome and unilateral spatial neglect caused by right thalamic hemorrhage. Assessment of pusher syndrome was made by the Scale for Contraversive pushing (SCP), and unilateral spatial neglect syndrome was diagnosed using line cancellation, letter and star cancellation, line bisection tests and copy and continuation of graphic sequence test. Behavioral therapy, occupational therapy, reading training and traditional Chinese medicine methods were adopted for treatment of pusher syndrome and unilateral spatial neglect. The patient showed typical pusher syndrome and unilateral spatial neglect symptoms. The pusher syndrome and unilateral spatial neglect symptoms were significantly improved following rehabilitation treatments. Pusher syndrome and unilateral spatial neglect syndrome occurred simultaneously after right thalamic hemorrhage. Early rehabilitation therapy can reduce the symptoms of pusher syndrome and unilateral spatial neglect syndrome and improve motor function.

  2. Aarskog syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Aarskog disease; Aarskog-Scott syndrome; AAS; Faciodigitogenital syndrome; Gaciogenital dysplasia ... Aarskog syndrome is a genetic disorder that is linked to the X chromosome. It affects mainly males, but females ...

  3. Malabsorption Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... foods you eat. If you have a malabsorption syndrome, your small intestine cannot absorb nutrients from foods. Causes of malabsorption syndromes include Celiac disease Lactose intolerance Short bowel syndrome. ...

  4. [XYY syndrome (diplo-Y syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Braun-Scharm, H; Schroeder-Kurth, T M

    1986-01-01

    A case is reported of a 12-year-old boy with the XYY syndrome and unusual clinical symptoms. In addition, past research on the XYY syndrome and the current state of knowledge is reviewed, with special emphasis on psychopathology, psychiatry and genetic counseling.

  5. The intersection syndrome: Ultrasound findings and their diagnostic value

    PubMed Central

    Montechiarello, S.; Miozzi, F.; D’Ambrosio, I.; Giovagnorio, F.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The intersection syndrome is a well-known overuse syndrome of the distal forearm. It is characterized by noninfectious, inflammatory changes involving the area of intersection of the first (abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis) and second (extensor carpi radialis longus and extensor carpi radialis brevis) extensor compartments in the dorsoradial aspect of the distal forearm. Imaging modalities used to diagnosis this syndrome include ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of this report is to describe typical US findings in the intersection syndrome and to demonstrate the diagnostic value of this approach. Materials and methods We reviewed US findings in 4 patients (mean age 40 years) referred to our staff for symptoms suggestive of the intersection syndrome (pain, swelling, erythema, and edema of the wrist). Results In all 4 cases, the US examination revealed peritendinous edema and synovial fluid within the tendon sheaths at the intersection between the first and the second dorsal extensor tendon compartments. Discussion Our experience shows that the intersection syndrome is associated with typical signs on US. This imaging modality can be considered a reliable tool for diagnosing this syndrome and may eliminate the need for other more expensive tests. PMID:23396515

  6. Failure to respond to physiologic challenge characterizes esophageal motility in erosive gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Daum, C; Sweis, R; Kaufman, E; Fuellemann, A; Anggiansah, A; Fried, M; Fox, M

    2011-06-01

    Non-specific esophageal dysmotility with impaired clearance is often present in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), especially those with erosive disease; however the physio-mechanic basis of esophageal dysfunction is not well defined. Retrospective assessment of patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD; n=20) and endoscopy negative reflux disease (ENRD; n=20) with pathologic acid exposure on pH studies (>4.2% time/24 h) and also healthy controls (n=20) studied by high resolution manometry. Esophageal motility in response to liquid and solid bolus swallows and multiple water swallows (MWS) was analyzed. Peristaltic dysfunction was defined as failed peristalsis, spasm, weak or poorly coordinated esophageal contraction (>3cm break in 30 mmHg isocontour). Peristaltic dysfunction was present in 33% of water swallows in controls, 56% ENRD and 76% ERD respectively (P<0.023 vs controls, P=0.185 vs ENRD). The proportion of effective peristaltic contractions improved with solid compared to liquid bolus in controls (18%vs 33%, P=0.082) and ENRD (22%vs 54%, P=0.046) but not ERD (62%vs 76%, P=0.438). Similarly, MWS was followed by effective peristalsis in 83% of controls and 70% ENRD but only 30% ERD patients (P<0.017 vs controls and P<0.031 vs ENRD). The association between acid exposure and dysmotility was closer for solid than liquid swallows (r=0.52 vs 0.27). Peristaltic dysfunction is common in GERD. ERD patients are characterized by a failure to respond to the physiologic challenge of solid bolus and MWS that is likely also to impair clearance following reflux events and increase exposure to gastric refluxate. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Anosmia and hypogeusia in Churg-Strauss syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tallab, Hussam F; Doty, Richard L

    2014-05-13

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is a rare disorder that is often misdiagnosed. In this report we describe a 57-year-old man with Churg-Strauss syndrome who presented with symptoms of lessened smell and taste function that occurred approximately 3 months before the onset of his neurological symptoms. Psychophysical testing using a battery of well-validated smell and taste tests revealed that the patient had total anosmia and marked hypogeusia. While one anecdotal report exists in the Spanish literature that alludes to the presence of anosmia in a single case of this syndrome, no further confirmation of such dysfunction has appeared in the literature. These findings support the concept that smell and taste loss may be an early sign of this disorder. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Anosmia and hypogeusia in Churg-Strauss syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tallab, Hussam F; Doty, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is a rare disorder that is often misdiagnosed. In this report we describe a 57-year-old man with Churg-Strauss syndrome who presented with symptoms of lessened smell and taste function that occurred approximately 3 months before the onset of his neurological symptoms. Psychophysical testing using a battery of well-validated smell and taste tests revealed that the patient had total anosmia and marked hypogeusia. While one anecdotal report exists in the Spanish literature that alludes to the presence of anosmia in a single case of this syndrome, no further confirmation of such dysfunction has appeared in the literature. These findings support the concept that smell and taste loss may be an early sign of this disorder. PMID:24825557

  9. Alice in Wonderland Syndrome: A Historical and Medical Review.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Osman; Fine, Edward J

    2017-12-01

    Alice in Wonderland syndrome is a disorienting neurological condition that affects human perception to the senses of vision, hearing, touch, sensation, and the phenomenon of time. Individuals affected with Alice in Wonderland syndrome can experience alterations in their perception of the size of objects or their own body parts, known as metamorphopsias. It is known to occur in conditions including migraine, epilepsy, and certain intoxicants and infectious diseases. The name refers to Lewis Carrol's well-known children's book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, in which the title character experiences alterations of sensation in which she felt that her body had grown too tall or too small, or parts of her body were changing shape, size, or relationship to the rest of her body. The syndrome was described in 1952 by Caro Lippman, and given its name in 1955 by John Todd. The metamorphopsias characteristic of this condition are also sometimes referred to as Lilliputian hallucinations, a reference to the fictional island of Lilliput in the novel Gulliver's Travels, written by Jonathan Swift in 1726. As such, many literary and medical publications have roots in the description of this syndrome. The purpose of this review is to summarize the literary and historical significance of Alice in Wonderland syndrome, as well as to provide the reader with a medical overview of the condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Metabolic syndrome 2 years after laparoscopic gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Guilbert, Lizbeth; Ortiz, Cristian J; Espinosa, Omar; Sepúlveda, Elisa M; Piña, Tatiana; Joo, Paul; Zerrweck, Carlos

    2018-04-01

    The latest diabetes consensus identified obesity as key component of the metabolic syndrome. The role of bariatric surgery over such syndrome has been less explored with a lack of long term studies, and especially among Mexicans. Retrospective study including patients with metabolic syndrome submitted to laparoscopic gastric bypass at a single institution with complete data after 24 months. The objective was to analyze the improvement of the syndrome and each component. Demographic, anthropometric, biochemical and clinical parameters were analyzed at 12 and 24 months. Secondarily weight loss and other parameters were also analyzed. Finally, an analysis of syndrome improvement related to weight loss was performed. Sixty-three patients were included. The 2 most common components associated with obesity were reduced HDL and raised glucose or Type 2 diabetes. There was a significant improvement of metabolic syndrome and its components, as well as for the rest of the analyzed data, from the first check point and throughout follow-up. Prevalence of such syndrome was 6.3% at 12 and 24 months. Hypertension and raised glucose or Type 2 diabetes were the components with the greatest and fastest improvement; HDL levels and obesity were the least improved. There was a direct relationship between percentage of excess weight loss or percentage of excess BMI loss, and syndrome's improvement. Patients with metabolic syndrome improved after gastric bypass, with results lasting after 2 years; other metabolic parameters important for cardiovascular risk were also positively affected. There was a relationship between the amount of weight loss and improvement of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2018 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Polycystic ovary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vrbíková, Jana

    2015-10-01

    For diagnosing of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) it is currently recommended to follow the ESHRE criteria. For diagnosis according to them two of the following three symptoms are sufficient: 1. morphology of polycystic ovaria, 2. clinical manifestations of hyperandrogenism or laboratory proof of hyperandrogenemia, and 3. oligo-anovulation. PCOS is a complex disorder in whose pathogenesis genetic and environmental effects interact. It is not a gynecological disorder alone, the syndrome is accompanied by insulin resistance which leads to increased incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance (4 times and twice, independently of BMI). Also gestational DM occurs more frequently. Dyslipidemia, arterial hypertension, elevated CRP and homocysteine levels, endothelial dysfunction and greater intima-media thickness are also more frequent. It is not quite clear, however, whether women with PCOS suffer cardiovascular events more frequently as well. More often than is accidental PCOS is associated with depression, anxiety and eating disorders, further with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and with the sleep apnoea syndrome - especially in obese women. Therapeutic measures include non-pharmacological methods - lifestyle adjustments focused on weight reduction in obese individuals, cosmetic measures for dermatologic manifestation of hyperandrogenism, in particular laser and pharmacotherapy (combined hormonal contraceptives and antiandrogens). Menstrual irregularities can be treated with contraceptives or cyclical administration of gestagens, also metformin can be used.

  12. Childhood cancers in families with and without Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heath, John A; Reece, Jeanette C; Buchanan, Daniel D; Casey, Graham; Durno, Carol A; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Le Marchand, Loïc; Lindor, Noralane M; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Win, Aung Ko

    2015-12-01

    Inheritance of a germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes or the EPCAM gene is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and other adult malignancies (Lynch syndrome). The risk of childhood cancers in Lynch syndrome families, however, is not well studied. Using data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we compared the proportion of childhood cancers (diagnosed before 18 years of age) in the first-, second-, and third-degree relatives of 781 probands with a pathogenic mutation in one of the MMR genes; MLH1 (n = 275), MSH2 (n = 342), MSH6 (n = 99), or PMS2 (n = 55) or in EPCAM (n = 10) (Lynch syndrome families), with that of 5073 probands with MMR-deficient colorectal cancer (non-Lynch syndrome families). There was no evidence of a difference in the proportion of relatives with a childhood cancer between Lynch syndrome families (41/17,230; 0.24%) and non-Lynch syndrome families (179/94,302; 0.19%; p = 0.19). Incidence rate of all childhood cancers was estimated to be 147 (95% CI 107-206) per million population per year in Lynch syndrome families and 115 (95% CI 99.1-134) per million population per year in non-Lynch syndrome families. There was no evidence for a significant increase in the risk of all childhood cancers, hematologic cancers, brain and central nervous system cancers, Lynch syndrome-associated cancers, or other cancers in Lynch syndrome families compared with non-Lynch syndrome families. Larger studies, however, are required to more accurately define the risk of specific individual childhood cancers in Lynch syndrome families.

  13. Kabuki syndrome: expanding the phenotype to include microphthalmia and anophthalmia.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Terri P; Banka, Siddharth; Reardon, William

    2015-10-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a rare genetic malformation syndrome that is characterized by distinct facies, structural defects and intellectual disability. Kabuki syndrome may be caused by mutations in one of two histone methyltransferase genes: KMT2D and KDM6A. We describe a male child of nonconsanguineous Irish parents presenting with multiple malformations, including bilateral extreme microphthalmia; cleft palate; congenital diaphragmatic hernia; duplex kidney; as well as facial features of Kabuki syndrome, including interrupted eyebrows and lower lid ectropion. A de-novo germline mutation in KMT2D was identified. Whole-exome sequencing failed to reveal mutations in any of the known microphthalmia/anopthalmia genes. We also identified four other patients with Kabuki syndrome and microphthalmia. We postulate that Kabuki syndrome may produce this type of ocular phenotype as a result of extensive interaction between KMT2D, WAR complex proteins and PAXIP1. Children presenting with microphthalmia/anophthalmia should be examined closely for other signs of Kabuki syndrome, especially at an age where the facial gestalt might be less readily appreciable.

  14. MRI of lower extremity impingement and friction syndromes in children

    PubMed Central

    Aydıngöz, Üstün; Özdemir, Zeynep Maraş; Güneş, Altan; Ergen, Fatma Bilge

    2016-01-01

    Although generally more common in adults, lower extremity impingement and friction syndromes are also observed in the pediatric age group. Encompassing femoroacetabular impingement, iliopsoas impingement, subspine impingement, and ischiofemoral impingement around the hip; patellar tendon–lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome; iliotibial band friction syndrome; and medial synovial plica syndrome in the knee as well as talocalcaneal impingement on the hindfoot, these syndromes frequently cause pain and may mimic other, and occasionally more ominous, conditions in children. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal impingement and friction syndromes. Iliopsoas, subspine, and ischiofemoral impingements have been recently described, while some features of femoroacetabular and talocalcaneal impingements have recently gained increased relevance in the pediatric population. Fellowship-trained pediatric radiologists and radiologists with imaging workloads of exclusively or overwhelmingly pediatric patients (particularly those without a structured musculoskeletal imaging program as part of their imaging training) specifically need to be aware of these rare syndromes that mostly have quite characteristic imaging findings. This review highlights MRI features of lower extremity impingement and friction syndromes in children and provides updated pertinent pathophysiologic and clinical data. PMID:27538047

  15. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia clefting syndrome (EEC syndrome).

    PubMed

    Koul, Monika; Dwivedi, Rahul; Upadhyay, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia- clefting syndrome (also k/a. split hand- split foot malformation /split hand-split foot ectodermal dysplasia- cleft syndrome/ectodermal dysplasia cleft lip/cleft palate syndrome) a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal dominant disorder inherited as a genetic trait and characterized by a triad of (i) ectrodactyly, (ii) ectodermal dysplasia and, (iii) & facial clefts.

  16. [Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in children: beyond adenotonsillar hypertrophy].

    PubMed

    Esteller, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in the general childhood population is 1-2% and the most common cause is adenotonsillar hypertrophy. However, beyond adenotonsillar hypertrophy, there are other highly prevalent causes of this syndrome in children. The causes are often multifactorial and include muscular hypotonia, dentofacial abnormalities, soft tissue hypertrophy of the airway, and neurological disorders). Collaboration between different specialties involved in the care of these children is essential, given the wide variability of conditions and how frequently different factors are involved in their genesis, as well as the different treatments to be applied. We carried out a wide literature review of other causes of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in children, beyond adenotonsillar hypertrophy. We organised the prevalence of this syndrome in each pathology and the reasons that cause it, as well as their interactions and management, in a consistent manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  17. Spastic quadriplegia in Down syndrome with congenital duodenal stenosis/atresia.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Kenji; Enomoto, Keisuke; Tominaga, Makiko; Furuya, Noritaka; Sameshima, Kiyoko; Iai, Mizue; Take, Hiroshi; Shinkai, Masato; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Yamanaka, Michiko; Matsui, Kiyoshi; Masuno, Mitsuo

    2012-06-01

    Down syndrome is an autosomal chromosome disorder, characterized by intellectual disability and muscle hypotonia. Muscle hypotonia is observed from neonates to adulthood in Down syndrome patients, but muscle hypertonicity is extremely unusual in this syndrome. During a study period of nine years, we found three patients with severe spastic quadriplegia among 20 cases with Down syndrome and congenital duodenal stenosis/atresia (3/20). However, we could find no patient with spastic quadriplegia among 644 cases with Down syndrome without congenital duodenal stenosis/atresia during the same period (0/644, P < 0.05). Further, we did not find any cases with spastic quadriplegia among 17 patients with congenital duodenal stenosis/atresia without Down syndrome admitted during the same period to use as a control group (0/17, P < 0.05). Our results suggest that congenital duodenal stenosis/atresia is a potential risk factor for spastic quadriplegia in patients with Down syndrome. Long-term survival is improving, and the large majority of people with Down syndrome are expected to live well into adult life. Management and further study for the various problems, representing a low prevalence but serious and specific to patients with Down syndrome, are required to improve their quality of life. © 2012 The Authors. Congenital Anomalies © 2012 Japanese Teratology Society.

  18. Mirror syndrome after fetoscopic laser therapy for twin-twin transfusion syndrome due to transient donor hydrops that resolved before delivery. A case report.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Lung; Chao, An-Shine; Chang, Shuenn-Dyh; Wang, Chao-Nin

    2014-01-01

    Mirror syndrome is a rare complication of twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS). Its clinical picture includes massive edema, oliguria, and hemodilution in the context of fetal hydrops. The occurrence of mirror syndrome after fetoscopic laser therapy for TTTS has been well documented, but resolution of mirror syndrome before delivery has not been reported in the literature. A 33-year-old woman was referred to our institution at 23(6)/7 weeks' gestation for TTTS, which had been treated with amnioreduction twice: at 21 and 22 gestational weeks, respectively. Mirror syndrome was diagnosed after fetoscopic laser therapy for TTTS at 24 weeks' gestation due to maternal manifestations of pulmonary edema, skin edema, anemia, low blood protein concentration and proteinuria accompanied by donor hydrops. The maternal respiratory symptoms then gradually abated in <2 weeks along with improved fetal condition, resulting in a delivery with favorable outcomes at 36 weeks' gestation. Manifestation of mirror syndrome after fetoscopic laser therapy in twin-twin transfusion due to donor hydrops doesn't necessarily predict a poor perinatal outcome.

  19. Williams syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Williams syndrome may show: A flattened nasal bridge with small upturned nose Long ridges in the ... Alternative Names Williams-Beuren syndrome Images Low nasal bridge Chromosomes and DNA References Morris CA. Williams syndrome. ...

  20. Exogenous Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Cushing syndrome - corticosteroid induced; Corticosteroid-induced Cushing syndrome; Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome ... Cushing syndrome is a disorder that occurs when your body has a higher than normal level of the hormone ...

  1. Management of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mooar, Pekka A; Doherty, William J; Murray, Jayson N; Pezold, Ryan; Sevarino, Kaitlyn S

    2018-03-15

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) has developed Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for Management of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Evidence-based information, in conjunction with the clinical expertise of physicians, was used to develop the criteria to improve patient care and obtain best outcomes while considering the subtleties and distinctions necessary in making clinical decisions. To provide the evidence foundation for this AUC, the AAOS Evidence-Based Medicine Unit provided the writing panel and voting panel with the 2016 AAOS Clinical Practice Guideline titled Management of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline. The Management of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome AUC clinical patient scenarios were derived from indications typical of patients with suspected carpal tunnel syndrome in clinical practice, as well as from current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and supporting literature to identify the appropriateness of treatments. The 135 patient scenarios and 6 treatments were developed by the writing panel, a group of clinicians who are specialists in this AUC topic. Next, a separate, multidisciplinary, voting panel (made up of specialists and nonspecialists) rated the appropriateness of treatment of each patient scenario using a 9-point scale to designate a treatment as Appropriate (median rating, 7 to 9), May Be Appropriate (median rating, 4 to 6), or Rarely Appropriate (median rating, 1 to 3).

  2. LEOPARD syndrome: what are café noir spots?

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Bujaldón, Alfonso; Vazquez-Bayo, Carmen; Jimenez-Puya, Rafael; Galan-Gutierrez, Manuel; Moreno-Gimenez, José; Rodriguez-Garcia, Alfonso; Tercedor, Jesus; Velez-Garcia, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Lentigines, electrocardiographic abnormalities, ocular hypertelorism, pulmonary stenosis, abnormalities of genitalia, retarded growth, and deafness syndrome (multiple lentigines syndrome) is most often characterized by multiple lentigines and cardiac conduction defects. Café noir spot is a term proposed, by analogy to café au lait spots, for the larger and darkly pigmented patches that are frequently observed in patients with this syndrome. Although presumed by some authors to represent lentigines, the histologic features of café noir spots have not been well documented in the literature. Only two previous cases have been reported in which a biopsy of the café noir spots than melanocytic nevi. We describe the histologic characteristics of seven café noir spots in six patients with lentigines, electrocardiographic abnormalities, ocular hypertelorism, pulmonary stenosis, abnormalities of genitalia, retarded growth, and deafness syndrome. Three lesions represented melanocytic nevi (one with dysplastic features), and four were compatible with lentigo simplex. These findings help our understanding of the histologic spectrum of pigmented lesions in lentigines, electrocardiographic abnormalities, ocular hypertelorism, pulmonary stenosis, abnormalities of genitalia, retarded growth, and deafness syndrome.

  3. Targets to treat metabolic syndrome in polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingaiah, Shruthi; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Metabolic syndrome is comprised of a combination of the following states: increased insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, and increased abdominal obesity. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome over the course of their lives. Metabolic syndrome increases risk of major cardiovascular events, morbidity, quality of life, and overall health care costs. Though metabolic syndrome in women with PCOS is an area of great concern, there is no effective individual medical therapeutic to adequately treat this issue. Areas Covered This article will review key aspects of metabolic syndrome in PCOS. We will discuss classic and novel therapeutics to address metabolic syndrome in women with PCOS. We will conclude with the importance of developing strategic interventions to increase the compliance to lifestyle and dietary modification, in addition to appreciation of the emerging pharmaceutical therapeutics available. Expert Opinion Innovation in lifestyle modification, including diet, exercise, with and without dedicated stress reduction techniques is the future in treatment of metabolic syndrome in PCOS. Application of novel interventions, such as group medical care, may improve future adherence to lifestyle modification recommendations, in addition to or in combination with pharmaceutical therapeutics. PMID:26488852

  4. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood vessels, ... A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  5. Cauda equina syndrome: evaluation of the clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Tamburrelli, F C; Genitiempo, M; Bochicchio, M; Donisi, L; Ratto, C

    2014-01-01

    Cauda equina syndrome is a rare but highly impairing syndrome involving lower limbs as well as urinary, defecatory and sexual function. In the literature the most investigated sphincter dysfunction is the urinary. Bowel and sexual function are often overlooked since they become more relevant after the acute phase. Eight consecutive male patients affected by cauda equina syndrome with sphincter dysfunction due to herniated disc disease of lumbar spine were treated between 2007 and 2009. Five patients were followed-up for at least two years. Sexual function was evaluated by IIEF-5 questionnaire; bowel function was investigated by means of clinical and instrumental investigation and manometry. Although little clinical improved, patients still complained severe symptoms at first year follow-up while all but one improved significantly in the following year. At two years follow-up only the patient whose cauda equina syndrome was misdiagnosed and surgically treated late respect to the onset of the syndrome, complained a persistent severe sexual and bowel dysfunction. Our results show that a long-term follow-up is mandatory to evaluate the real outcome of surgical managed cauda equine syndrome because short-term evaluation could be misleading about the residual capacity of late neurologic improving. Despite the relatively low number of cases evaluated, our results confirm that early diagnosing and treating the syndrome are relevant for the final outcome.

  6. Prostaglandins E and F in endocrine diarrheagenic syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, B M; Condon, S

    1976-01-01

    The role of prostaglandins in endocrine diarrheagenic syndromes was evaluated by measuring peripheral concentration of immunoreactive PGE and PGF in patients with non-endocrine diarrhea as well as those with the Zollinger-Ellison (Z-E) syndrome, MCT, carcinoid tumors and the WDHA syndrome. In 21 normals, PGE and PGF levels averaged 272 +/- 18 and 119 +/- 14 pg/ml, respectively. Twenty eight patients with diarrhea of non-endocrine origin (mainly inflammatory bowel disease) had levels indistinguishable from normal, i.e. 353 +/- 25 and 77 +/- 37 pg/ml, respectively. Among 29 patients with the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (mean gastrin 6127 +/- 3267 pg/ml) only 2 had significantly elevated PGE levels; mean PGE levels, 382 +/- 32 pg/ml, were not significantly different from normal and did not correlate with either diarrhea or the serum gastrin concentration. In contrast, 18 of 22 patients with carcinoid tumors (mean blood serotonin concentration 1655 +/- 604 ng/ml; mean urinary excretion of 5 HIAA 66.8 +/- 16.7 mg/day) had elevated peripheral concentrations of PGE. The mean PGE level (1367 +/- 245 pg/ml) was significantly elevated (P less than 0.001). Nonetheless PGE levels did not correlate with diarrhea, blood concentrations of serotonin, or urinary indole excretion. MCT (mean serum calcitonin 24.5 +/- 6.3 ng/ml) was similarly associated with consistent (18/19) elevation in peripheral concentrations of PGE (mean 1922 +/- 541 pg/ml; P less than 0.001). Inthis syndrome, PGE levels were higher in patients with diarrhea and in those with markedly elevated serum thyrocalcitonin levels. Finally, 8 of 21 patients with the WDHA syndrome had increased levels of PGE. Although 13 of 17 patients had high levels of VIP (mean 8133 pg/ml), 2 patients had hyperprostaglandinemia in the face of normal peripheral concentrations of VIP. In one patient the serum PGE level was elevated prior to resection of the primary pancreatic neoplasm (9939 pg/ml) as well as the subsequent extirpation of

  7. Hypoglycemia-occipital syndrome: a specific neurologic syndrome following neonatal hypoglycemia?

    PubMed

    Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Tabarestani, Sepideh; Ghofrani, Mohammad

    2011-02-01

    This study attempted to elaborate the existence of a specific neurologic pattern observed in children who experienced neonatal hypoglycemia. Twenty-seven patients with seizure and history of neonatal hypoglycemia were compared with 28 children suffering from idiopathic occipital epilepsy. In both groups the most common type of seizure activities included eye movements and impaired consciousness responding well to treatment; however, ictal vomiting was more common in controls. Subjects were in epileptic and nonepileptic groups. Ninety percent of cases showed abnormal signal of the posterior head region on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A large number showed posterior abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG). Visual loss with abnormal visual evoked potential was the most frequent visual finding. Fifty-five percent showed mild psychomotor retardation. This study demonstrates that neonatal hypoglycemia can induce a syndrome with a specific clinical spectrum consisting of epilepsy, visual disturbances, and psychomotor retardation. Hypoglycemia-occipital syndrome is an entity without statistically significant semiologic differences from the idiopathic type.

  8. Brief Report: Repetitive Behaviour Profiles in Williams Syndrome: Cross Syndrome Comparisons with Prader-Willi and Down Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royston, R.; Oliver, C.; Moss, J.; Adams, D.; Berg, K.; Burbidge, C.; Howlin, P.; Nelson, L.; Stinton, C.; Waite, J.

    2018-01-01

    This study describes the profile of repetitive behaviour in individuals with Williams syndrome, utilising cross-syndrome comparisons with people with Prader-Willi and Down syndromes. The Repetitive Behaviour Questionnaire was administered to caregivers of adults with Williams (n = 96), Prader-Willi (n = 103) and Down (n = 78) syndromes. There were…

  9. Atypical development of configural face recognition in children with autism, Down syndrome and Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, D; Leonard, H C; Karmiloff-Smith, A; Johnson, M H; Thomas, M S C

    2015-05-01

    Configural processing in face recognition is a sensitivity to the spacing between facial features. It has been argued both that its presence represents a high level of expertise in face recognition, and also that it is a developmentally vulnerable process. We report a cross-syndrome investigation of the development of configural face recognition in school-aged children with autism, Down syndrome and Williams syndrome compared with a typically developing comparison group. Cross-sectional trajectory analyses were used to compare configural and featural face recognition utilising the 'Jane faces' task. Trajectories were constructed linking featural and configural performance either to chronological age or to different measures of mental age (receptive vocabulary, visuospatial construction), as well as the Benton face recognition task. An emergent inversion effect across age for detecting configural but not featural changes in faces was established as the marker of typical development. Children from clinical groups displayed atypical profiles that differed across all groups. We discuss the implications for the nature of face processing within the respective developmental disorders, and how the cross-sectional syndrome comparison informs the constraints that shape the typical development of face recognition. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. High prevalence of metabolic syndrome in antisynthetase syndrome.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Paula A O; Silva, Marilda Guimarães; Borba, Eduardo Ferreira; Shinjo, Samuel K

    2018-01-01

    A high frequency of metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been recently described in different idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, but not in antisynthetase syndrome (ASS). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of MetS in ASS and also its possible association with cardiovascular the risk factors and ASS-related disease characteristics. A cross-sectional single centre study of 42 consecutive ASS patients was conducted from 2012 to 2015 and compared to 84 healthy individuals matched for gender, age, ethnicity and body mass index-matched (control group). MetS was defined according to the 2009 Join Interim Statement. Clinical and laboratory data were assessed according to a standardised protocol. ASS patients had a median age of 41.1 years with a predominance of female gender and white race. ASS patients had a higher frequency of MetS (42.9% vs. 13.1%; p<0.001) as well as of insulin resistance than controls. Moreover, ASS patients had higher resistin, lower leptin and similar adiponectin levels in serum than controls. Further analysis of ASS patients with (n=18) and without (n=24) MetS revealed that older age at disease onset (48.7 vs. 35.4 years; p<0.001) was identified in those with the syndrome but were similar regarding disease duration, disease status, treatment, insulin resistance and serum adipocytokine levels. The prevalence of MetS was high in ASS patients that also had serum resistin and low leptin levels. As also identified in other idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, MetS in ASS is more prevalent in older patients.

  11. Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome Also known as Pickwickian Syndrome What ... your neck is larger than normal. Complications of Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome When left untreated, OHS can cause ...

  12. Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the signs and symptoms of Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Marfan syndrome is different from Loeys-Dietz syndrome in that the gene mutation which causes Marfan syndrome is in fibrillin-1 (FBN-1), a protein ...

  13. Episodic seasonal Pseudo-Bartter syndrome in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kintu, Brett; Brightwell, Alex

    2014-06-01

    Pseudo-Bartter syndrome (PBS) describes an uncommon but well recognised complication of cystic fibrosis leading to hypochloraemic, hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis. Pseudo-Bartter syndrome is usually seen at initial presentation or within the first two years of life in children with cystic fibrosis. Risk factors for development of PBS include warm weather conditions, severe respiratory or pancreatic disease and gastrointestinal losses (e.g. vomiting and diarrhoea). PBS is rare in older children and adolescents although epidemics have been associated with heat wave conditions in warmer climates. In this era of climate change, it is crucial that clinicians consider Pseudo-Bartter syndrome when patients with cystic fibrosis present unwell during summer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Trismus, pseudobulbar syndrome and cerebral deep venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Alecu, C; De Bray, J M; Penisson-Besnier, I; Pasco-Papon, A; Dubas, F

    2001-03-01

    We report a case of cerebral deep venous thrombosis that manifested clinically by a pseudobulbar syndrome with major trismus, abnormal movements and static cerebellar syndrome. To our knowledge, only three other cases of deep cerebral venous thrombosis associated with cerebellar or pseudobulbar syndrome have been published since 1985. The relatively good prognosis in our patient could be explained by the partially intact internal cerebral veins as well as use of early anticoagulant therapy. There was a spontaneous hyperdensity of the falx cerebri and the tentorium cerebelli on the brain CT scan, an aspect highly contributive to diagnosis. This hyperdensity of the falx cerebri was found in 19 out of 22 cases of deep venous thrombosis detailed in the literature.

  15. Elevated levels of psychophysiological arousal and cortisol in patients with somatization syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rief, W; Shaw, R; Fichter, M M

    1998-01-01

    This study investigates psychological and psychobiological processes in patients with somatization syndrome. We compared physiological measures (heart rate, finger pulse volume, electrodermal activity, electromyography), cortisol levels, and subjective well-being during rest and during a mental stress task as well as selective attention and memory for illness-related words in 58 patients with somatization syndrome and 21 healthy controls. The somatization group had higher morning salivary cortisol concentrations, higher heart rates, and lower levels of finger pulse volume. During the mental stress task, patients with somatization syndrome felt more distressed and had higher heart rates, whereas controls showed habituation to the experimental situation. We were unable to demonstrate an attention or memory bias specific for somatization. The results point to several psychological, psychophysiological, and psychobiological mechanisms that might be involved in the maintenance of somatization syndrome. These results are discussed from a cognitive-psychobiological perspective.

  16. Prevalence and correlates of loneliness among Chinese service industry migrant workers: A cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Baoliang; Xu, Yanmin; Jin, Dong; Zou, Xiaowei; Liu, Tiebang

    2016-06-01

    Chinese rural-to-urban migrant workers (MWs) who are employed in service industry are a rapidly growing population in urban China. Like other MWs, service industry MWs (SIMWs) are generally excluded from the mainstream of city societies, but unlike other MWs, they are more marginalized in cities. Social isolation increases the feelings of loneliness; however, there are little empirical data on the epidemiology of loneliness of SIMWs. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence and associated factors of loneliness among SIMWs in Shenzhen, China. By using respondent-driven sampling, 1979 SIMWs were recruited and administered with standardized questionnaires to collect data on sociodemographics, physical health, and migration-related characteristics. Loneliness and social support were measured with a single-item self-report question "Do you feel lonely often?" and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS), respectively. 18.3% of SIMWs reported feeling lonely often. Being aged 60 years or older (odds ratio [OR] = 2.30), marital status of "others" (OR = 2.77), being physically ill in the last 2 weeks (OR = 1.46), migrating alone (OR = 1.97), working >8 hours/day (OR = 1.06), MSPSS inside family subscale score ≤18 (OR = 1.80), and MSPSS outside family subscale score ≤38 (OR = 1.50) were significantly associated with increased risk of loneliness in SIMWs. Loneliness is prevalent in Chinese SIMWs and should be seen as a major public health issue. The high prevalence and many negative health consequences of loneliness highlight the importance of routine screening, evaluation, and treatment of loneliness in this vulnerable population.

  17. Cardiac Defects and Results of Cardiac Surgery in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carotti, Adriano; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Piacentini, Gerardo; Saffirio, Claudia; Di Donato, Roberto M.; Marino, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Specific types and subtypes of cardiac defects have been described in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome as well as in other genetic syndromes. The conotruncal heart defects occurring in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome include tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect, truncus arteriosus, interrupted aortic…

  18. Refeeding syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fernández López, M T; López Otero, M J; Alvarez Vázquez, P; Arias Delgado, J; Varela Correa, J J

    2009-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a complex syndrome that occurs as a result of reintroducing nutrition (oral, enteral or parenteral) to patients who are starved or malnourished. Patients can develop fluid-balance abnormalities, electrolyte disorders (hypophosphataemia, hypokalaemia and hypomagnesaemia), abnormal glucose metabolism and certain vitamin deficiencies. Refeeding syndrome encompasses abnormalities affecting multiple organ systems, including neurological, pulmonary, cardiac, neuromuscular and haematological functions. Pathogenic mechanisms involved in the refeeding syndrome and clinical manifestations have been reviewed. We provide suggestions for the prevention and treatment of refeeding syndrome. The most important steps are to identify patients at risk, reintroduce nutrition cautiously and correct electrolyte and vitamin deficiencies properly.

  19. Pre-Menstrual Syndrome in Women with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Linda; Cunningham, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) may be higher in women with Down syndrome due to syndrome specific characteristics in biochemistry, psychopathology and lifestyle. Recognition of PMS may be difficult for women with intellectual disabilities and their carers. Method: A daily diary, used to diagnose PMS with typical women, was…

  20. Ventriculomegaly in very-low-birthweight infants with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Movsas, Tammy Z; Spitzer, Alan R; Gewolb, Ira H

    2016-11-01

    The prevalence of Down syndrome in infants with fetal ventriculomegaly is 5% to 10%; however, the converse, the prevalence of cerebral ventriculomegaly in live-born infants with Down syndrome, is not well established. Because cranial ultrasounds are performed on most very-low-birthweight (VLBW) infants (birthweight <1500g), our aim was to examine ultrasound abnormalities of VLBW infants to determine prevalence of ventriculomegaly and intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in VLBW infants with Down syndrome, and whether VLBW infants with Down syndrome are at higher risk for cranial ultrasound abnormalities, compared with the already elevated risk in other VLBW infants. This study comprised retrospective analysis of data from Pediatrix BabySteps Clinical Data Warehouse. The study population consisted of 121 736 VLBW infants (61 869 males, 59 867 females), born between 1996 and 2013, of whom 441 had Down syndrome (233 males, 208 females; mean gestational age 30wks, standard deviation [SD] 2.8wks). Logistic regression was used to calculate odds of ventriculomegaly and IVH for Down syndrome. Prevalence of ventriculomegaly in Down syndrome was 5.2% compared with 0.8% in other VLBW infants. Multivariate analysis indicated 5.8× odds (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.4-9.7) of ventriculomegaly in Down syndrome and 0.9× odds (95% CI 0.7-1.1) of IVH for Down syndrome. Very preterm infants with Down syndrome are at increased risk for ventriculomegaly (but not for IVH) compared with other infants born very preterm. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  1. Incontinence in persons with Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Niemczyk, Justine; von Gontard, Alexander; Equit, Monika; Medoff, David; Wagner, Catharina; Curfs, Leopold

    2017-08-01

    To assess the rates of incontinence and associated psychological problems in children, adolescents and adults with Down Syndrome, a genetic syndrome caused by partial or complete triplication (trisomy) of chromosome 21 and characterized by typical facial features, a physical growth delay and mild or moderate intellectual disability. Three hundred and seventeen persons with Down Syndrome (4-51 years) were recruited through a German parent support group (59.6% male, mean age 19.2 years). The Parental Questionnaire: Enuresis/Urinary Incontinence, the Incontinence Questionnaire-Pediatric Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms, as well as the Developmental Behavior Checklist (DBC) for parents or for adults were filled out by parents or care-givers. 17.2% of the sample had nocturnal enuresis, 15.9% had daytime urinary incontinence, and 14.2% had fecal incontinence. Incontinence was present in 64.0% of young children (4-12 years), 10.3% of teens (13-17 years), 12.8% of young adults (18-30 years) and in 22.4% of older adults (>30 years). 13.6% of children and 8.4% of adults had a DBC score in the clinical range. 19.5% of children and 27.8% of adults with incontinence had behavioral problems. There was a significant association between nocturnal enuresis, daytime urinary incontinence and clinical DBC scores in adults. Incontinence in Down Syndrome is mainly present in young children and increases in older adults. Behavioral comorbidity is associated with incontinence only in adults with Down Syndrome. Screening and treatment of incontinence in individuals with Down Syndrome is recommended. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Ocular allergy and dry eye syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bielory, Leonard

    2004-10-01

    Ocular allergy is a common clinical disorder that includes dry eye syndrome in its differential diagnosis. While ocular allergy treatments have continued to evolve since the early 1990s when the new prescription topical agents became available, there have been no major advances in the treatment of dry eye syndrome other than changes in the chemical structures of various artificial tear formulations. This review is timely and relevant due to the recent FDA approval of several new agents for the treatment of dry eye syndrome. The literature reviewed brings the practicing allergist/clinical immunologist up to date on the recent understanding that T-cell activation plays a key role in dry eye syndrome immunopathophysiology. In addition, the parallel novel treatment developments are discussed, including new formulations for tear substitutes, topical cyclosporine A and purinergic receptor (P2Y2) agonists. The recent developments bode well for patients who are referred for ocular allergy, including dry eye syndrome. A new formulation for a tear substitute that generates a 'soft gel' covering the ocular surface (in situ) is ideal for early forms of dry syndrome, while topical cyclosporine is the first new real prescription treatment for patients with moderate to severe forms of dry eye. Another potential agent to revolutionize the treatment of various disorders is based on the discovery of the purinergic receptor agonists. This is not only relevant for the production of mucin and the change in tear fluid content, but it may also have implications for other sinopulmonary disorders such as cystic fibrosis and chronic sinusitis.

  3. [Antisynthetase syndrome - a case report].

    PubMed

    Prus, Visnja; Bedeković, Drazen; Milas-Ahić, Jasminka; Visević, Roberta; Segec, Branko; Jukić, Zlatica; Perić, Ljiljana

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-eight year-old woman with predominant signs of polymyositis, pulmonary interstitium involvement and with positive anti-Jo1 antibodies was suspected for antisynthetase syndrome. Over the next three months sores and ulcerations have appeared at the fingertips. In the later course of the disease clinical picture of mixed connective tissue disease associated with interstitial lung disease, with a dominant picture of systemic sclerosis have emerged. She was treated with glucocorticoides and immunosuppressive therapy. Patient condition was mostly stable, without significant progression of lung lesions. Early diagnosis and treatment antisynthetase syndrome significantly contributes to more favorable course and outcome of disease. A prerequisite for that are well-defined diagnostic criteria and an appropriate choice of treatment.

  4. Epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures (Doose syndrome): When video-EEG polygraphy holds the key to syndrome diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Dragoumi, Pinelopi; Chivers, Fiona; Brady, Megan; Craft, Sheila; Mushati, David; Venkatachalam, Gopalakrishnan; Cross, Judith Helen; Das, Krishna B

    2016-01-01

    An electroclinical epilepsy syndrome diagnosis enables physicians to predict outcomes as well as select appropriate treatment options. We report a child who presented with reflex myoclonus at the age of 9 months and was initially diagnosed with myoclonic epilepsy in infancy. After 9 years of medically resistant myoclonic seizures, extensive investigations, and emerging learning difficulties, she was referred for video-telemetry to characterize her seizures in an attempt to make a syndromic diagnosis. A three-day video-telemetry assessment was performed to document seizures. Neck and deltoid EMG channels were applied from the onset of the recording. Frequent generalized bursts of 3- to 5-Hz spike/polyspike and slow wave discharges, associated with clinical manifestations, mostly myoclonic seizures, were noted. In addition, definite atonic components were noted on the neck EMG as well as the deltoids associated with the slow component of the ictal discharges. The EEG and polygraphy findings are suggestive of a generalized epilepsy characterized by predominantly myoclonic seizures with atonic components. This raises the possibility whether a variant of epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures (Doose syndrome) may be the underlying diagnosis for this girl. A trial of the ketogenic diet would therefore be considered as an option in her future management in view of its beneficial effect in this condition.

  5. Protective Role of Angiogenin Against Hematopoietic Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome PRINCIPAL...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Protective Role of Angiogenin Against Hematopoietic Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15...protective role against hematopoietic syndrome of the acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS) and is able to attenuate the effect of residual bone marrow

  6. Living with Lowe's Syndrome. A Guide for Families, Friends, and Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe's Syndrome Association, Inc., West Lafayette, IN.

    The document describes Lowe's syndrome, a hereditary condition that affects only males and is typically diagnosed during the first year of life. Effects of Lowe's syndrome on the eyes (cataracts, glaucoma, corneal degeneration, and strabismus) are discussed, as well as related problems with the central nervous system, muscles, kidneys, bones, and…

  7. Upper airway resistance syndrome.

    PubMed

    Montserrat, J M; Badia, J R

    1999-03-01

    This article reviews the clinical picture, diagnosis and management of the upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS). Presently, there is not enough data on key points like the frequency of UARS and the morbidity associated with this condition. Furthermore, the existence of LIARS as an independent sleep disorder and its relation with snoring and obstructive events is in debate. The diagnosis of UARS is still a controversial issue. The technical limitations of the classic approach to monitor airflow with thermistors and inductance plethysmography, as well as the lack of a precise definition of hypopnea, may have led to a misinterpretation of UARS as an independent diagnosis from the sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome. The diagnosis of this syndrome can be missed using a conventional polysomnographic setting unless appropriate techniques are applied. The use of an esophageal balloon to monitor inspiratory effort is currently the gold standard. However, other sensitive methods such as the use of a pneumotachograph and, more recently, nasal cannula/pressure transducer systems or on-line monitoring of respiratory impedance with the forced oscillation technique may provide other interesting possibilities. Recognition and characterization of this subgroup of patients within sleep breathing disorders is important because they are symptomatic and may benefit from treatment. Management options to treat UARS comprise all those currently available for sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (SAHS). However, the subset of patients classically identified as LIARS that exhibit skeletal craneo-facial abnormalities might possibly obtain further benefit from maxillofacial surgery.

  8. Advances in the study of Lynch syndrome in China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun-Yu; Sheng, Jian-Qiu

    2015-06-14

    Lynch syndrome, also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, is an autosomal dominant genetic condition that has a high risk of colon cancer as well as other cancers due to inherited mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes. During the last decades, there have been great advances in research on Chinese Lynch syndrome. This review mainly focuses on the genetic basis, clinicopathologic features, diagnosis, intervention, chemoprevention, and surveillance of Lynch syndrome in China. In addition to frequently altered MMR genes, such as MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and MLH3, other MMR-associated genes, such as those encoding human exonuclease 1, transforming growth factor β receptor 2, and alanine aminopeptidase, metastasis-associated protein 2, adenomatosis polyposis coli down-regulated 1, and hepatic and glial cell adhesion molecule have also been implicated in Chinese Lynch syndrome. Most Chinese researchers focused on the clinicopathologic features of Lynch syndrome, and it is noticeable that the most frequent extracolonic tumor in northeast China is lung cancer, which is different from other areas in China. The Chinese diagnostic criteria for Lynch syndrome have been established to identify gene mutation or methylation. With regard to chemoprevention, celecoxib may be effective to prevent polyps relapse in Lynch syndrome carriers. Additionally, a colonoscopy-based surveillance strategy for the prevention and early detection of neoplasms in Lynch-syndrome carriers has been proposed.

  9. NTHL1 and MUTYH polyposis syndromes: two sides of the same coin?

    PubMed

    Weren, Robbert DA; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn Jl; Geurts van Kessel, Ad; De Voer, Richarda M; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Kuiper, Roland P

    2018-02-01

    It is now well established that germline genomic aberrations can underlie high-penetrant familial polyposis and colorectal cancer syndromes, but a genetic cause has not yet been found for the major proportion of patients with polyposis. Since next-generation sequencing has become widely accessible, several novel, but rare, high-penetrant risk factors for adenomatous polyposis have been identified, all operating in pathways responsible for genomic maintenance and DNA repair. One of these is the base excision repair pathway. In addition to the well-established role of the DNA glycosylase gene MUTYH, biallelic mutations in which predispose to MUTYH-associated polyposis, a second DNA glycosylase gene, NTHL1, has recently been associated with adenomatous polyposis and a high colorectal cancer risk. Both recessive polyposis syndromes are associated with increased risks for several other cancer types as well, but the spectrum of benign and malignant tumours in individuals with biallelic NTHL1 mutations was shown to be broader; hence the name NTHL1-associated tumour syndrome. Colorectal tumours encountered in patients with these syndromes show unique, clearly distinct mutational signatures that may facilitate the identification of these syndromes. On the basis of the prevalence of pathogenic MUTYH and NTHL1 variants in the normal population, we estimate that the frequency of the novel NTHL1-associated tumour syndrome is five times lower than that of MUTYH-associated polyposis. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Exome analysis in clinical practice: expanding the phenotype of Bartsocas-Papas syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gripp, Karen W; Ennis, Sara; Napoli, Joseph

    2013-05-01

    Exome analysis has had a dramatic impact on genetic research. We present the application of such newly generated information to patient care. The patient was a female, born with normal growth parameters to nonconsanguineous parents after an uneventful pregnancy. She had bilateral cleft lip/palate and ankyloblepharon. Sparse hair, dysplastic nails and hypohidrosis were subsequently noted. With exception of speech related issues, her development was normal. A clinical diagnosis of ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate or Hay-Wells syndrome resulted in TP63 sequence analysis. TP63 sequence and deletion/duplication analysis of all coding exons had a normal result, as did chromosome and SNP array analysis. Diagnostic exome analysis revealed a heterozygous nonsense mutation in KRT83 categorized as deleterious and associated with monilethrix. In addition, a homozygous missense variant of unknown clinical significance was reported in RIPK4. Using research based exome analysis, RIPK4 had just a few months prior been identified as pathogenic for Bartsocas-Papas syndrome. While the clinical diagnostic report implied the KRT83 mutation as a more likely cause for the patient's phenotype, clinical correlation, literature review and use of computerized mutation analysis programs allowed us to identify the homozygous RIPK4 (c.488G > A; p.Gly163Asp) mutation as the underlying pathogenic change. Consequently, we expand the phenotype of Bartsocas-Papas syndrome to an attenuated presentation resembling Hay-Wells syndrome, lacking lethality and pterygia. In contrast to the autosomal dominant Hay-Wells syndrome, Bartsocas-Papas syndrome is autosomal recessive, implying a 25% recurrence risk. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. [(P)FAPA syndrome: value of cimetidine].

    PubMed

    Pillet, P; Ansoborlo, S; Carrère, A; Perel, Y; Guillard, J M

    2000-01-01

    The (P)FAPA syndrome (periodic fever, adenitidis, pharyngitis, aphthous stomatitis) was described in 1987. The etiology of this periodic syndrome remains unknown. We report three new cases. Three girls, aged from 23 months to eight years, developed (P)FAPA. The other causes of periodic fevers were eliminated and the various treatments (antibiotics, antipyretics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents) proved ineffective. The repetition of the periodic bouts resulted in depressive disorders, absenteeism from school and a drop in weight in the youngest patient. Two of them suffered a sinusal involvement (chronic sinusitis, polyp) and had an increase in the level of immunoglobulin A. In all three cases, cimetidine at a dose of 20 mg/kg/d was well tolerated and resulted in a disappearance of the periodic fevers. Cimetidine, as an immunomodulating agent, appears to be beneficial in the in-depth treatment of (P)FAPA syndrome.

  12. Poland's syndrome: report of a variant.

    PubMed

    Legbo, Jacob Ndas

    2006-01-01

    Poland's syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly consisting of unilateral partial or total absence of a breast and/or pectoralis major muscle, and ipsilateral symbrachydactyly. Many structural and functional abnormalities have been described in association with the syndrome. However, only a few hemostatic disorders have been reported. The case of a 12-year-old secondary school girl with unilateral hypoplasia of the breast, absence of anterior axillary fold and absence of the pectoralis major muscle is hereby presented. She also had thrombocytopenia and several episodes of spontaneous bleeding from the ipsilateral anterior chest wall. She did well on medical treatment, with no recurrence of bleeding 10 months after treatment. The author is not aware of any previously reported case of Poland's syndrome associated with bleeding disorder in Africa. This case is presented to alert clinicians of its existence and possible association with hematological disorders.

  13. Poland's syndrome: report of a variant.

    PubMed Central

    Legbo, Jacob Ndas

    2006-01-01

    Poland's syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly consisting of unilateral partial or total absence of a breast and/or pectoralis major muscle, and ipsilateral symbrachydactyly. Many structural and functional abnormalities have been described in association with the syndrome. However, only a few hemostatic disorders have been reported. The case of a 12-year-old secondary school girl with unilateral hypoplasia of the breast, absence of anterior axillary fold and absence of the pectoralis major muscle is hereby presented. She also had thrombocytopenia and several episodes of spontaneous bleeding from the ipsilateral anterior chest wall. She did well on medical treatment, with no recurrence of bleeding 10 months after treatment. The author is not aware of any previously reported case of Poland's syndrome associated with bleeding disorder in Africa. This case is presented to alert clinicians of its existence and possible association with hematological disorders. Images Figure 1 PMID:16532987

  14. [Münchhausen syndrome by proxy between two adults].

    PubMed

    Krebs, M O; Bouden, A; Lôo, H; Olié, J P

    1996-04-06

    Münchhausen syndrome by proxy has been well described in the case of a women producing or pretending symptoms in one of her children, leading that child to have numerous medical interventions. The case of two adults has been seldom described and the differences in the psychopathological features of the two situations are not well known. We report our observation of a Münchhausen syndrome in a married couple where the wife injected tranquilizers to her husband, inducing repeated episodes of coma. Complex interactions between the pathological personalities of the husband and wife were present. Prominent features of the wife's personality included a narcissistic deficiency, poor defenses and signs of depression. Practioners should be aware of this peculiar pathology to avoid delayed diagnosis and its dramatic consequences. Appropriate medical, psychiatric, as well as legal measures must be taken.

  15. Management of Crush Syndrome Casualties after Disasters

    PubMed Central

    Sever, Mehmet Sukru; Vanholder, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    After direct impact of the trauma, crush syndrome is the second most frequent cause of death after mass disasters. However, since crush syndrome is quite rare in daily practice, mistakes are frequent in the treatment of these cases. This paper summarizes the etiopathogenesis of traumatic rhabdomyolysis and of crush syndrome-based acute kidney injury. The clinical and laboratory features, prophylaxis, and treatment of crush cases are described as well. The importance of early and energetic fluid resuscitation is underlined for prophylaxis of acute kidney injury. Since there is chaos, and an overwhelming number of victims, logistic drawbacks create a specific problem in the treatment of crush victims after mass disasters. Potential solutions for logistic hurdles and disaster preparedness scenarios have also been provided in this review article. PMID:23908797

  16. Multiple odontogenic keratocysts associated with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dixit, S; Acharya, S; Dixit, P B

    2009-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder with a predisposition to cancer. Features like basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocysts, calcification of falx cerebri, bifid ribs, pits on palms and soles and hypertelorism are evident. A case of this rare disease seen on a 13 year old female patient is presented here, where multiple odontogenic keratocysts were causing disfigurement of the lower jaw as well as displacement and malocclusion of the lower teeth.

  17. IL-1 Blockade in Autoinflammatory Syndromes1

    PubMed Central

    Jesus, Adriana A.; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2014-01-01

    Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes present with excessive systemic inflammation including fever, rashes, arthritis, and organ-specific inflammation and are caused by defects in single genes encoding proteins that regulate innate inflammatory pathways. Pathogenic variants in two interleukin-1 (IL-1)–regulating genes, NLRP3 and IL1RN, cause two severe and early-onset autoinflammatory syndromes, CAPS (cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes) and DIRA (deficiency of IL-1 receptor antagonist). The discovery of the mutations that cause CAPS and DIRA led to clinical and basic research that uncovered the key role of IL-1 in an extended spectrum of immune dysregulatory conditions. NLRP3 encodes cryopyrin, an intracellular “molecular sensor” that forms a multimolecular platform, the NLRP3 inflammasome, which links “danger recognition” to the activation of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β. The success and safety profile of drugs targeting IL-1 in the treatment of CAPS and DIRA have encouraged their wider use in other autoinflammatory syndromes including the classic hereditary periodic fever syndromes (familial Mediterranean fever, TNF receptor–associated periodic syndrome, and hyperimmunoglobulinemia D with periodic fever syndrome) and additional immune dysregulatory conditions that are not genetically well defined, including Still’s, Behcet’s, and Schnitzler diseases. The fact that the accumulation of metabolic substrates such as monosodium urate, ceramide, cholesterol, and glucose can trigger the NLRP3 inflammasome connects metabolic stress to IL-1β-mediated inflammation and provides a rationale for therapeutically targeting IL-1 in prevalent diseases such as gout, diabetes mellitus, and coronary artery disease. PMID:24422572

  18. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Danlos syndrome care at Mayo Clinic Symptoms Classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Signs and symptoms of the most common form ... but few or none of the skin symptoms. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, vascular type People who have Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, ...

  19. Wellness interventions for anesthesiologists.

    PubMed

    Saadat, Haleh; Kain, Zeev N

    2018-06-01

    The review examines the different preventive measures that have been found to be useful to abolish or decrease the negative effects of burnout and increase resilience in anesthesiologists. Studies in anesthesiology cite autonomy, control of the work environment, professional relationships, leadership, and organizational justice as the most important factors in job satisfaction. Factors such as difficulty in balancing personal and professional life, poor attention to wellness, work alcoholism, and genetic factors increase an individual's susceptibility to burnout. Exposure to chronic or repeated stress instigates a spectrum of autonomic, endocrine, immunologic, and behavioral responses that activate the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Investigating the difference in psychobiologic reactivity, as well as defining the psychological symptoms that are characteristic to individuals vulnerable to stress-induced illness, would enable scientists to better look into the modalities to eradicate the negative effects. Recent studies have shown that a combination of individual and structural changes in institutions can increase resilience in physicians. Burnout is a pathological syndrome that is triggered by constant levels of high stress. A combination of individual efforts as well as structural interventions can help to increase wellbeing in physicians.

  20. Kindler syndrome: a focal adhesion genodermatosis.

    PubMed

    Lai-Cheong, J E; Tanaka, A; Hawche, G; Emanuel, P; Maari, C; Taskesen, M; Akdeniz, S; Liu, L; McGrath, J A

    2009-02-01

    Kindler syndrome (OMIM 173650) is an autosomal recessive genodermatosis characterized by trauma-induced blistering, poikiloderma, skin atrophy, mucosal inflammation and varying degrees of photosensitivity. Although Kindler syndrome is classified as a subtype of epidermolysis bullosa, it has distinct clinicopathological and molecular abnormalities. The molecular pathology of Kindler syndrome involves loss-of-function mutations in a newly recognized actin cytoskeleton-associated protein, now known as fermitin family homologue 1, encoded by the gene FERMT1. This protein mediates anchorage between the actin cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix via focal adhesions, and thus the structural pathology differs from other forms of epidermolysis bullosa in which there is a disruption of the keratin intermediate filament-hemidesmosome network and the extracellular matrix. In the skin, fermitin family homologue 1 is mainly expressed in basal keratinocytes and binds to the cytoplasmic tails of beta1 and beta3 integrins as well as to fermitin family homologue 2 and filamin-binding LIM protein 1. It also plays a crucial role in keratinocyte migration, proliferation and adhesion. In this report, we review the clinical, cellular and molecular pathology of Kindler syndrome and discuss the role of fermitin family homologue 1 in keratinocyte biology.

  1. Insulin resistance and polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galluzzo, Aldo; Amato, Marco Calogero; Giordano, Carla

    2008-09-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders in humans, affecting approximately 7-8% of women of reproductive age. Despite the criteria adopted, PCOS is considered to be a predominantly hyperandrogenetic syndrome and the evaluation of metabolic parameters and insulin sensitivity is not mandatory. Most women with PCOS also exhibit features of the metabolic syndrome, including insulin resistance, obesity and dyslipidaemia. While the association with type 2 diabetes is well established, whether the incidence of cardiovascular disease is increased in women with PCOS remains unclear. Acknowledging the strong impact of insulin-resistance in the genesis of PCOS could be helpful not only to make the diagnosis more robust, but also for conferring better cardiovascular risk prevention. Several current studies support a strong recommendation that women with PCOS should undergo comprehensive evaluation for the metabolic syndrome and recognized cardiovascular risk factors, and receive appropriate treatment as needed. Lifestyle modifications remain the first-line therapy for all obese women with PCOS. However, many of these women do not lose weight easily. Insulin-sensitizing drugs are discussed as a promising and unique therapeutic option for the chronic treatment of PCOS.

  2. [Clinical implications of polycystic ovary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Dravecká, Ingrid

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous and complex endocrine disease which among the female population belongs to the most widespread endocrinopathies and it is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism, anticoagulation and infertility. Insulin resistance is one of the important diabetology factors impacting hyperglycaemia in a majority of women with PCOS (60-80 %). Clinical expressions of PCOS include reproduction disorders, metabolic characteristics and psychological implications. Reproduction disorders include hyperthyroidism, menstruation cycle disorders, infertility and pregnancy complications as well as early abortions, gestational diabetes and pregnancy induced hypertension. Long-term metabolic risks of PCOS include type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, arterial hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. The available data confirms higher incidence of cardiovascular diseases in women with PCOS. In particular among obese women PCOS is more frequently associated with non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis, sleep apnoea syndrome and endometrial cancer. The literature includes some controversial data about the relationship between PCOS and autoimmunity. Women with PCOS are more prone to suffer from insufficient confidence with higher incidence of anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder and eating disorders. autoimmunity - diabetes mellitus - pregnancy - insulin resistance - metabolic syndrome - menstrual disorders - polycystic ovary syndrome.

  3. [Kindler syndrome: clinical and ultra-structural particularities, a propos of three cases].

    PubMed

    El Fekih, Nadia; Mahfoudh, Anis; Zekri, Samy; Kharfi, Monia; Fazaa, Bécima; Jaafoura, Mohamed Habib; Kamoun, Mohamed Ridha

    2011-08-01

    Kindler's syndrome is a rare type of genetic skin condition belonging to the class of bullous poikilodermia. We report three new sibling cases of this rare syndrome. The condition was seen in three sisters aged 12, 16 and 20 years, born of a first-degree consanguineous marriage with no family history of Kindler's syndrome. The three patients presented spontaneously regressive bullous eruptions, poikilodermia of gradual onset, major cutaneous atrophy on the back of the hands and the feet, photosensitivity and gingival hypertrophy. Electron microscopy examination of poikilodermic skin showed normal anchoring filaments and intraepidermal cleavage. Diagnosis of Kindler's syndrome is based upon clinical evidence. Kidler's syndrome is a well defined clinical entity. Ultra-structural studies show intraepidermal, junctional, and dermal cleavage. This syndrome must be differentiated from congenital epidermolysis bullosa, Weary's syndrome, and other bullous hereditary poikilodermas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Metabolic syndrome and mammographic density in Mexican women

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Megan; Biessy, Carine; Lajous, Martin; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; López-Ridaura, Ruy; Romieu, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome has been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer; however little is known about the association between metabolic syndrome and percent mammographic density, a strong predictor of breast cancer. Methods We analyzed cross-sectional data from 789 premenopausal and 322 postmenopausal women in the Mexican Teacher's Cohort (ESMaestras). Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the harmonized definition. We measured percent density on mammograms using a computer-assisted thresholding method. Multivariable linear regression was used to estimate the association between density and metabolic syndrome, as well as its components by state (Jalisco, Veracruz) and menopausal status (premenopausal, postmenopausal). Results Among premenopausal women in Jalisco, women with metabolic syndrome had higher percent density compared to those without after adjusting for potential confounders including BMI (difference = 4.76, 95%CI: 1.72, 7.81). Among the metabolic syndrome components, only low high-density lipoprotein levels (<50mg/dl) were associated with significantly higher percent density among premenopausal women in Jalisco (difference=4.62, 95%CI: 1.73, 7.52). Metabolic syndrome was not associated with percent density among premenopausal women in Veracruz (difference=-2.91, 95% CI: -7.19, 1.38), nor among postmenopausal women in either state. Conclusion Metabolic syndrome was associated with higher percent density among premenopausal women in Jalisco, Mexico, but was not associated with percent density among premenopausal women in Veracruz, Mexico or among postmenopausal women in either Jalisco or Veracruz. These findings provide some support for a possible role of metabolic syndrome in mammographic density among premenopausal women; however results were inconsistent across states and require further confirmation in larger studies. PMID:23682074

  5. The short arm deletion syndrome of chromosome 4 (4p- syndrome).

    PubMed

    Zellweger, H; Bardach, J; Bordwell, J; Williams, K

    1975-01-01

    Partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 4 (4p-) represents another (rare) cause of cleft lip and cleft palate. Further characteristic manifestations of the syndrome (also called Wolf or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome) are growth failure, microcephaly, prominent glabella, hypertelorism, beaked nose, poorly differentiated and low set ears, cardiac and renal malformation and hypospadias. Life expectancy is often shortened. The 4p- syndrome has many features in common with another deletion syndrome, the cri-du-chat syndrome, and also with the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. The latter is a hereditary condition with normal karyotype. The cri-du-chat syndrome is characterized by a peculiar high-pitched, mewing cry and can be differentiated from the Wolf syndrome by the different staining characteristics (banding) of chromosomes 4 and 5.

  6. Cannabis smoking and acute coronary syndrome: two illustrative cases.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Shridhar; Kumar, Vivek; Aggarwal, Amitesh

    2008-08-18

    Cannabis is a common substance of drug abuse among the young adults because of its euphoric and addictive effects. The pathophysiological effects of cannabis smoking and its relation to adverse cardiovascular events are well known. However, the relative contribution of cannabis smoking when combined with tobacco smoking to coronary artery disease is unclear and has not been well emphasized. We describe two cases of acute coronary syndrome occurring in cannabis smokers who were tobacco smoker too. One, a 23 year old young boy who suffered from hypertension and acute coronary syndrome at a very young age and other, a 50 year old male admitted with acute coronary syndrome, developed asymptomatic dynamic electrocardiographic changes and had beta-blocker induced severe bronchospasm. The modifiable nature of cannabis smoking and cigarette smoking, which often go hand in hand, needs no over emphasis. The cessation of twin smoking habits along with correction of other coronary artery disease risk factors is an important part of primary and secondary prevention.

  7. The Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Different Obesity Phenotype in Iranian Male Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Payab, Moloud; Hasani-Ranjbar, Shirin; Merati, Yaser; Esteghamati, Alireza; Qorbani, Mostafa; Hematabadi, Mahboobeh; Rashidian, Hoda; Shirzad, Nooshin

    2017-03-01

    Obesity, especially when concentrated in the abdominal area, is often associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. Stress, particularly occupational stress, is one of the most important factors contributing to the increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome components among different populations. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of overweight and obesity as well as the criteria for metabolic syndrome and its risk factors and different obesity phenotype in a population of military personnel aged 20 to 65 years. This study is a retrospective cross-sectional study in which data are extracted from the database of a military hospital (2,200 participants). The records of participants contained information such as age, marital status, educational level, weight, height, body mass index, blood pressure, waist circumference, history of drug use and smoking, as well as the results of tests including lipid profile and fasting blood glucose. The Adult Treatment Panel III criteria as well as two national criteria were used to identify metabolic syndrome among participants. Data analysis was p1erformed using SPSS version 16. The average age of participants was 33.37 (7.75) years. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome according to Iranian cutoff was 26.6% for the waist circumference >90 cm (585 persons) and 19.6% for the waist circumference >95 cm (432 persons). The rate of metabolic syndrome was identified as 11.1% (432 cases) according to Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results of the current study identified that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among military individuals is less than other populations, but the prevalence of the syndrome is higher than other military personnel in other countries.

  8. The Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Different Obesity Phenotype in Iranian Male Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Payab, Moloud; Hasani-Ranjbar, Shirin; Merati, Yaser; Esteghamati, Alireza; Qorbani, Mostafa; Hematabadi, Mahboobeh; Rashidian, Hoda; Shirzad, Nooshin

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, especially when concentrated in the abdominal area, is often associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. Stress, particularly occupational stress, is one of the most important factors contributing to the increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome components among different populations. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of overweight and obesity as well as the criteria for metabolic syndrome and its risk factors and different obesity phenotype in a population of military personnel aged 20 to 65 years. This study is a retrospective cross-sectional study in which data are extracted from the database of a military hospital (2,200 participants). The records of participants contained information such as age, marital status, educational level, weight, height, body mass index, blood pressure, waist circumference, history of drug use and smoking, as well as the results of tests including lipid profile and fasting blood glucose. The Adult Treatment Panel III criteria as well as two national criteria were used to identify metabolic syndrome among participants. Data analysis was p1erformed using SPSS version 16. The average age of participants was 33.37 (7.75) years. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome according to Iranian cutoff was 26.6% for the waist circumference >90 cm (585 persons) and 19.6% for the waist circumference >95 cm (432 persons). The rate of metabolic syndrome was identified as 11.1% (432 cases) according to Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results of the current study identified that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among military individuals is less than other populations, but the prevalence of the syndrome is higher than other military personnel in other countries. PMID:28201955

  9. Fournier gangrene associated with hyper IgE syndrome (Job syndrome).

    PubMed

    Hori, Junichi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Watanabe, Masaki; Osanai, Hiroaki; Hori, Masako

    2008-04-01

    We report a case of a 32-year-old man with hyper IgE syndrome (Job syndrome) who developed Fournier gangrene due to infectious multiple atheromas of the scrotal skin that progressed to the right groin and thigh. The patient required surgical debridement and subsequent skin grafting. This is a rare case of Fournier gangrene associated with hyper IgE syndrome (Job syndrome). When a patient without diabetes mellitus has repeated infections and atopic-like dermatitis, Job syndrome should be considered.

  10. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Down syndrome increases as a woman gets older. Down syndrome cannot be cured. Early treatment programs can help improve skills. They may include ... occupational, and/or educational therapy. With support and treatment, many ... Down syndrome live happy, productive lives. NIH: National Institute of ...

  11. Autonomic Dysreflexia-Like Syndrome in a T12 Paraplegic During Thoracic Spine Surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    pheochromocytoma , carcinoid syndrome, or thyroid storm. This presentation differs from autonomic dysreflexia because the spinal cord lesion was well below T6...instability. The differential diagnosis of isolated, abrupt intraopera- tive hypertension includes pheochromocytoma , carcinoid syndrome, thyroid storm

  12. Behavioral features of CHARGE syndrome: parents' perspectives of three children with CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lauger, Kimberly; Cornelius, Nancy; Keedy, Wendy

    2005-03-15

    As the population first diagnosed with CHARGE Syndrome has aged, information has emerged about specific behavioral features of this syndrome. Once the medical features are managed, it is the behavioral features that interfere with our children's ability to form reciprocal relationships, to gain formal communication skills, to make the educational gains they are cognitively capable of, and to ultimately care for themselves. In telling the informal case studies of our children, we hope their behavioral commonalities, in spite of their medical and educational differences, will be apparent as well as the complexity of the multiple types of behavior observed. We remain hopeful that answers can be found that will help our children and our families cope with this very debilitating feature of CHARGE. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Clinical and electrographic features of sunflower syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baumer, Fiona M; Porter, Brenda E

    2018-05-01

    Sunflower Syndrome describes reflex seizures - typically eyelid myoclonia with or without absence seizures - triggered when patients wave their hands in front of the sun. While valproate has been recognized as the best treatment for photosensitive epilepsy, many clinicians now initially treat with newer medications; the efficacy of these medications in Sunflower Syndrome has not been investigated. We reviewed all cases of Sunflower Syndrome seen at our institution over 15 years to describe the clinical course, electroencephalogram (EEG), and treatment response in these patients. Search of the electronic medical record and EEG database, as well as survey of epilepsy providers at our institution, yielded 13 cases of Sunflower Syndrome between 2002 and 2017. We reviewed the records and EEG tracings. Patients were mostly young females, with an average age of onset of 5.5 years. Seven had intellectual, attentional or academic problems. Self-induced seizures were predominantly eyelid myoclonia ± absences and 6 subjects also had spontaneous seizures. EEG demonstrated a normal background with 3-4 Hz spike waves ± polyspike waves as well as a photoparoxysmal response. Based on both clinical and EEG response, valproate was the most effective treatment for reducing or eliminating seizures and improving the EEG; 9 patients tried valproate and 66% had significant improvement or resolution of seizures. None of the nine patients on levetiracetam or seven patients on lamotrigine monotherapy achieved seizure control, though three patients had improvement with polypharmacy. Valproate monotherapy continues to be the most effective treatment for Sunflower Syndrome and should be considered early. For patients who cannot tolerate valproate, higher doses of lamotrigine or polypharmacy should be considered. Levetiracetam monotherapy, even at high doses, is unlikely to be effective. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pregnancy complicated with Alport syndrome: a good obstetric outcome and failure to diagnose an infant born to a mother with Alport syndrome by umbilical cord immunofluorescence staining.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Shigeki; Ueda, Yoshihiko; Takahashi, Hisako; Nagai, Takashi; Kuwata, Tomoyuki; Muto, Shigeaki; Yamaguchi, Takehiko; Takizawa, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Mitsuaki

    2009-12-01

    Alport syndrome is a familial progressive nephritis. The most frequent type is X-linked Alport syndrome, caused by genetic abnormalities in the alpha 5 chain of type IV collagen. Skin biopsy is a useful tool for diagnosing this disease. It is not well known how this syndrome affects pregnancy and how it is affected by pregnancy, or whether the umbilical cord may provide material for detecting this collagen abnormality. We report a primigravida with Alport syndrome with mild proteinuria who gave birth abdominally to a term male infant without deteriorating renal function during pregnancy. The umbilical cord from not only this infant but also from an Alport (-) control infant showed negative immunofluorescence staining for the alpha 5 chain of type IV collagen. Women with Alport syndrome without renal dysfunction may follow an uneventful obstetrical course until term. The cord may not be suitable for diagnosing Alport syndrome with immunofluorescence staining.

  15. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic syndromes with intellectual disability: comparison of adaptive profiles.

    PubMed

    Di Nuovo, Santo; Buono, Serafino

    2011-10-30

    The study of distinctive and consistent behaviors in the most common genetic syndromes with intellectual disability is useful to explain abnormalities or associated psychiatric disorders. The behavioral phenotypes revealed outcomes totally or partially specific for each syndrome. The aim of our study was to compare similarities and differences in the adaptive profiles of the five most frequent genetic syndromes, i.e. Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, Angelman syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, and Fragile-X syndrome (fully mutated), taking into account the relation with chronological age and the overall IQ level. The research was carried out using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (beside the Wechsler Intelligence scales to obtain IQ) with a sample of 181 persons (107 males and 74 females) showing genetic syndromes and mental retardation. Syndrome-based groups were matched for chronological age and mental age (excluding the Angelman group, presenting with severe mental retardation). Similarities and differences in the adaptive profiles are described, relating them to IQs and maladaptive behaviors. The results might be useful in obtaining a global index of adjustment for the assessment of intellectual disability level as well as for educational guidance and rehabilitative plans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. TAFRO Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Igawa, Takuro; Sato, Yasuharu

    2018-02-01

    TAFRO syndrome is a newly recognized variant of idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease (iMCD) that involves a constellation of syndromes: thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), fever (F), reticulin fibrosis (R), and organomegaly (O). Thrombocytopenia and severe anasarca accompanied by relatively low serum immunoglobulin levels are characteristic clinical findings of TAFRO syndrome that are not present in iMCD-not otherwise specified (iMCD-NOS). Lymph node biopsy is recommended to exclude other diseases and to diagnose TAFRO syndrome, which reveals characteristic histopathological findings similar to hyaline vascular-type CD. TAFRO syndrome follows a more aggressive course, compared with iMCD-NOS, and there is no standard treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Understanding Gut Fermentation Syndrome in the Psychiatric Evaluation of Patients with Suspected Alcohol Use Disorder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-18

    Fermentation Syndrome in the Psychiatric Evaluation of Patients with Suspected Alcohol Use Disorder Sb. GRANT NUMBER Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Adobe Professional 7. 0 Introduction Gut Fermentation Syndrome, also known as auto- brewery syndrome, is a phenomenon not well...patient stated abstinence from alcohol use and that Gut Fermentation Syndrome was the cause of continually elevated blood alcohol levels. We will

  18. Simultaneous Bilateral Anterior and Posterior Lenticonus in Alport Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bamotra, Ravi Kant; Meenakshi; Kesarwani, Prem Chandra; Qayum, Shazia

    2017-08-01

    Alport syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by progressive renal failure, hearing loss, and ocular abnormalities like anterior lenticonus, corneal opacities, cataract, central perimacular and peripheral coalescing fleck retinopathies, and temporal retinal thinning. Although anterior lenticonus is common in Alport syndrome, simultaneous anterior and posterior lenticonus is a rare presentation. We report a case of a 22-year-old female with simultaneous anterior and posterior lenticonus presentation in which ocular examination lead to the detection of Alport syndrome. The patient had sensorineural deafness as well as microscopic haematuria. Clear lens extraction was performed in both eyes to eliminate lenticular irregular astigmatism for visual rehabilitation.

  19. Development and characteristics of children with Usher syndrome and CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dammeyer, Jesper

    2012-09-01

    Individuals with Usher syndrome or CHARGE syndrome are faced with a number of difficulties concerning hearing, vision, balance, and language development. The aim of the study is to describe the developmental characteristics of children with Usher syndrome and CHARGE syndrome, respectively. Data about the developmental characteristics of 26 children with Usher syndrome and 17 children with CHARGE syndrome was obtained. Associations between deafblindness (dual sensory loss), motor development (age of walking), language abilities, and intellectual outcome of these children were explored for each group independently. Both groups of children face a number of difficulties associated with vision, hearing, language, balance and intellectual outcome. Intellectual disability and/or language delay was found among 42% of the children with Usher syndrome and among 82% of the children with CHARGE syndrome. Intellectual disability was associated with language delay and age of walking for both groups. Even though Usher and CHARGE are two different genetic syndromes, both groups are challenged with a number of similar developmental delays. Clinicians need to be aware of several developmental issues in order to offer adequate support to children with Usher or CHARGE syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Breast cancer in a patient with Kindlers syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Itrat; Al Bahrani, Bassim Jaffar; Al Lawati, Taha Mohsin; Mandhari, Zahid Al; Al Lawati, Fatima Ramadhan

    2017-08-01

    Breast Cancer (BC) has associated risk factors and genetic factors like BRCA1, and BRCA2. Many benign and malignant disease processes are found concurrently with BC and believed to be additional risk factors like gall bladder stones (cholelithiasis), hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cerebrovascular lesions, arthritis, spine and spinal cord degenerative lesions, infertility, depression, sleep disturbances, obesity, autoimmune diseases (SLE), and thyroid diseases. There are some malignant disease associations like synchronous or metachronous ovarian, colonic and endometrial tumours with Breast cancer. Kindler Syndrome (KS) is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder manifesting as generalized dermatoses, described in 1954 by Theresa Kindler. KS is associated with acral skin blistering inducible by trauma, mucosal inflammation, photosensitivity, progressive pigmentation, telangiectasia, and skin atrophy (Poikiloderma). Repeated and progressive inflammation and subsequent fibrosis leads to ectropion, esophageal, anal, urethral, and vaginal stenosis and dryness. About 100 cases of Kindler syndrome have been reported in literature so far some from Arab World as well. Pathobiology of Kindler syndrome is not well understood. There are defects in KIND1 gene on chromosome 20. This gene expresses itself in basal keratinocytes, where it encodes a protein, called Kindlin 1. We report the second only case of Kindler's syndrome having breast cancer. These very very rare combinations have diagnostic issues, management restrictions, prognostic and follow up implications.

  1. Global and local music perception in children with Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Deruelle, Christine; Schön, Daniele; Rondan, Cécilie; Mancini, Josette

    2005-04-25

    Musical processing can be decomposed into the appreciation of global and local elements. This global/local dissociation was investigated with the processing of contour-violated and interval-violated melodies. Performance of a group of 16 children with Williams syndrome and a group of 16 control children were compared in a same-different task. Control participants were more accurate in detecting differences in the contour-violated than in the interval-violated condition while Williams syndrome individuals performed equally well in both conditions. This finding suggests that global precedence may occur at an early perceptual stage in normally developing children. In contrast, no such global precedence is observed in the Williams syndrome population. These data are discussed in the context of atypical cognitive profiles of individuals with Williams syndrome.

  2. Idiopathic ophthalmodynia and idiopathic rhinalgia: two topographic facial pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Pareja, Juan A; Cuadrado, María L; Porta-Etessam, Jesús; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Gili, Pablo; Caminero, Ana B; Cebrián, José L

    2010-09-01

    To describe 2 topographic facial pain conditions with the pain clearly localized in the eye (idiopathic ophthalmodynia) or in the nose (idiopathic rhinalgia), and to propose their distinction from persistent idiopathic facial pain. Persistent idiopathic facial pain, burning mouth syndrome, atypical odontalgia, and facial arthromyalgia are idiopathic facial pain syndromes that have been separated according to topographical criteria. Still, some other facial pain syndromes might have been veiled under the broad term of persistent idiopathic facial pain. Through a 10-year period we have studied all patients referred to our neurological clinic because of facial pain of unknown etiology that might deviate from all well-characterized facial pain syndromes. In a group of patients we have identified 2 consistent clinical pictures with pain precisely located either in the eye (n=11) or in the nose (n=7). Clinical features resembled those of other localized idiopathic facial syndromes, the key differences relying on the topographic distribution of the pain. Both idiopathic ophthalmodynia and idiopathic rhinalgia seem specific pain syndromes with a distinctive location, and may deserve a nosologic status just as other focal pain syndromes of the face. Whether all such focal syndromes are topographic variants of persistent idiopathic facial pain or independent disorders remains a controversial issue.

  3. Lung function in post-poliomyelitis syndrome: a cross-sectional study*

    PubMed Central

    de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa; Minozzo, Fábio Carderelli; Sousa, Bolivar Saldanha; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz; Andrade, Marília dos Santos; Quadros, Abrahão Augusto Juviniano; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; da Silva, Antonio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare lung function between patients with post-poliomyelitis syndrome and those with sequelae of paralytic poliomyelitis (without any signs or symptoms of post-poliomyelitis syndrome), as well as between patients with post-poliomyelitis syndrome and healthy controls. METHODS: Twenty-nine male participants were assigned to one of three groups: control; poliomyelitis (comprising patients who had had paralytic poliomyelitis but had not developed post-poliomyelitis syndrome); and post-poliomyelitis syndrome. Volunteers underwent lung function measurements (spirometry and respiratory muscle strength assessment). RESULTS: The results of the spirometric assessment revealed no significant differences among the groups except for an approximately 27% lower mean maximal voluntary ventilation in the post-poliomyelitis syndrome group when compared with the control group (p = 0.0127). Nevertheless, the maximal voluntary ventilation values for the post-poliomyelitis group were compared with those for the Brazilian population and were found to be normal. No significant differences were observed in respiratory muscle strength among the groups. CONCLUSIONS: With the exception of lower maximal voluntary ventilation, there was no significant lung function impairment in outpatients diagnosed with post-poliomyelitis syndrome when compared with healthy subjects and with patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis without post-poliomyelitis syndrome. This is an important clinical finding because it shows that patients with post-poliomyelitis syndrome can have preserved lung function. PMID:24068267

  4. Pregnancy outcome in joint hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sundelin, Heléne E K; Stephansson, Olof; Johansson, Kari; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2017-01-01

    An increased risk of preterm birth in women with joint hypermobility syndrome or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is suspected. In this nationwide cohort study from 1997 through 2011, women with either joint hypermobility syndrome or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome or both disorders were identified through the Swedish Patient Register, and linked to the Medical Birth Register. Thereby, 314 singleton births to women with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome before delivery were identified. These births were compared with 1 247 864 singleton births to women without a diagnosis of joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We used logistic regression, adjusted for maternal age, smoking, parity, and year of birth, to calculate adjusted odds ratios for adverse pregnancy outcomes. Maternal joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was not associated with any of our outcomes: preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio = 0.6, 95% confidence interval 0.3-1.2), preterm premature rupture of membranes (adjusted odds ratio = 0.8; 95% confidence interval 0.3-2.2), cesarean section (adjusted odds ratio = 0.9, 95% confidence interval 0.7-1.2), stillbirth (adjusted odds ratio = 1.1, 95% confidence interval 0.2-7.9), low Apgar score (adjusted odds ratio = 1.6, 95% confidence interval 0.7-3.6), small for gestational age (adjusted odds ratio = 0.9, 95% confidence interval 0.4-1.8) or large for gestational age (adjusted odds ratio = 1.2, 95% confidence interval 0.6-2.1). Examining only women with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (n = 62), we found a higher risk of induction of labor (adjusted odds ratio = 2.6; 95% confidence interval 1.4-4.6) and amniotomy (adjusted odds ratio = 3.8; 95% confidence interval 2.0-7.1). No excess risks for adverse pregnancy outcome were seen in joint hypermobility syndrome. Women with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome do not seem to be at increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. © 2016 Nordic Federation of

  5. Molecular epidemiology of Usher syndrome in Italy.

    PubMed

    Vozzi, Diego; Aaspõllu, Anu; Athanasakis, Emmanouil; Berto, Anna; Fabretto, Antonella; Licastro, Danilo; Külm, Maigi; Testa, Francesco; Trevisi, Patrizia; Vahter, Marju; Ziviello, Carmela; Martini, Alessandro; Simonelli, Francesca; Banfi, Sandro; Gasparini, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hearing and vision loss. Usher syndrome is divided into three clinical subclasses (type 1, type 2, and type 3), which differ in terms of the severity and progression of hearing loss and the presence or absence of vestibular symptoms. Usher syndrome is defined by significant genetic heterogeneity, with at least 12 distinct loci described and 9 genes identified. This study aims to provide a molecular epidemiology report of Usher syndrome in Italy. Molecular data have been obtained on 75 unrelated Italian patients using the most up-to date technology available for the screening of Usher syndrome gene mutations, i.e., the genotyping microarray developed by Asper Biotech (Tartu, Estonia), which simultaneously investigates 612 different marker positions using the well established arrayed primer extension methodology (APEX). Using this method, we found that 12% of cases (9 out of 75) harbored homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the gene positions analyzed, whereas 20% (15 out of 75) of the patients were characterized by the presence of only one mutated allele based on the positions analyzed. One patient was found to be compound heterozygous for mutations in two different genes and this represents an example of possible digenic inheritance in Usher syndrome. A total of 66.6% of cases (50 out of 75) were found to be completely negative for the presence of Usher syndrome gene mutations in the detected positions. Mutations detected by the array were confirmed by direct sequencing. These findings highlight the efficacy of the APEX-based genotyping approach in the molecular assessment of Usher patients, suggesting the presence of alleles not yet identified and/or the involvement of additional putative genes that may account for the pathogenesis of Usher syndrome.

  6. Molecular epidemiology of Usher syndrome in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Vozzi, Diego; Aaspõllu, Anu; Athanasakis, Emmanouil; Berto, Anna; Fabretto, Antonella; Licastro, Danilo; Külm, Maigi; Testa, Francesco; Trevisi, Patrizia; Vahter, Marju; Ziviello, Carmela; Martini, Alessandro; Simonelli, Francesca; Banfi, Sandro

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hearing and vision loss. Usher syndrome is divided into three clinical subclasses (type 1, type 2, and type 3), which differ in terms of the severity and progression of hearing loss and the presence or absence of vestibular symptoms. Usher syndrome is defined by significant genetic heterogeneity, with at least 12 distinct loci described and 9 genes identified. This study aims to provide a molecular epidemiology report of Usher syndrome in Italy. Methods Molecular data have been obtained on 75 unrelated Italian patients using the most up-to date technology available for the screening of Usher syndrome gene mutations, i.e., the genotyping microarray developed by Asper Biotech (Tartu, Estonia), which simultaneously investigates 612 different marker positions using the well established arrayed primer extension methodology (APEX). Results Using this method, we found that 12% of cases (9 out of 75) harbored homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the gene positions analyzed, whereas 20% (15 out of 75) of the patients were characterized by the presence of only one mutated allele based on the positions analyzed. One patient was found to be compound heterozygous for mutations in two different genes and this represents an example of possible digenic inheritance in Usher syndrome. A total of 66.6% of cases (50 out of 75) were found to be completely negative for the presence of Usher syndrome gene mutations in the detected positions. Mutations detected by the array were confirmed by direct sequencing. Conclusions These findings highlight the efficacy of the APEX-based genotyping approach in the molecular assessment of Usher patients, suggesting the presence of alleles not yet identified and/or the involvement of additional putative genes that may account for the pathogenesis of Usher syndrome. PMID:21738395

  7. Prenatal treatment of Down syndrome: a reality?

    PubMed

    Guedj, Fayçal; Bianchi, Diana W; Delabar, Jean-Maurice

    2014-04-01

    Down syndrome affects more than 5 million people globally. During the last 10 years, there has been a dramatic increase in the research efforts focused on therapeutic interventions to improve learning and memory in Down syndrome. This review summarizes the different functional abnormalities targeted by researchers in mouse models of Down syndrome. Three main strategies have been used: neural stem cell implantation; environmental enrichment and physical exercise; and pharmacotherapy. Pharmacological targets include the choline pathway, GABA and NMDA receptors, DYRK1A protein, oxidative stress and pathways involved in development and neurogenesis. Many strategies have improved learning and memory as well as electrophysiological and molecular alterations in affected animals. To date, eight molecules have been tested in human adult clinical trials. No studies have yet been performed on infants. However, compelling studies reveal that permanent brain alterations originate during fetal life in Down syndrome. Early prenatal diagnosis offers a 28 weeks window to positively impact brain development and improve postnatal cognitive outcome in affected individuals. Only a few approaches (Epigallocatechine gallate, NAP/SAL, fluoxetine, and apigenin) have been used to treat mice in utero; these showed therapeutic effects that persisted to adulthood. In this article, we discuss the challenges, recent progress, and lessons learned that pave the way for new therapeutic approaches in Down syndrome.

  8. Scoliosis in Steinert syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Themistocleous, George S; Sapkas, George S; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Stilianessi, Eugenia V; Papadopoulos, Elias Ch; Apostolou, Constantinos D

    2005-01-01

    Steinert syndrome is described as an autosomal dominant condition characterized by progressive muscular wasting, myotonia, musculoskeletal manifestations and rare spinal defects. Little is reported about spinal deformity associated with this syndrome. We present a patient with Steinert syndrome complicated by scoliosis. In the literature on muscular dystrophy, other than Duchenne, little mention is given to the problem of scoliosis in general and its treatment in particular. A case report of a patient with Steinert syndrome associated with thoracic scoliosis and hypokyphosis is presented. A 17-year-old boy presented with King type II right thoracic scoliosis (T5-T11, Cobb angle of 40 degrees) and hypokyphosis--10 degrees. He was treated with posterior stabilization and instrumentation at level T3-L2 with a postoperative correction of the scoliotic curve to 20 degrees. Histopathologic examination of the muscles confirmed the diagnosis of Steinert myotonic dystrophy. At 30-month follow-up, the patient was clinically pain free and well balanced. Plain radiographs showed solid spine fusion with no loss of deformity correction. Scoliosis in Steinert syndrome shares the characteristic of an arthrogrypotic neuromuscular curve and demands the extensive soft tissue release for optimal surgical correction. Intraoperative observations included profound tissue bleeding, abnormally tough soft tissues and a difficult recovery from anaesthesia.

  9. Narrative Representations of Asperger's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Julie

    2010-01-01

    This discussion focuses on literary works written by individuals with Asperger's Syndrome (AS), a Pervasive Developmental Disorder that causes severe impairment in social development. Individuals with AS have trouble understanding their own emotions as well as the feelings of others; they are not able to read social cues and facial expressions;…

  10. Richieri-Costa-Pereira syndrome: Expanding its phenotypic and genotypic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Bertola, D R; Hsia, G; Alvizi, L; Gardham, A; Wakeling, E L; Yamamoto, G L; Honjo, R S; Oliveira, L A N; Di Francesco, R C; Perez, B A; Kim, C A; Passos-Bueno, M R

    2018-04-01

    Richieri-Costa-Pereira syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive acrofacial dysostosis that has been mainly described in Brazilian individuals. The cardinal features include Robin sequence, cleft mandible, laryngeal anomalies and limb defects. A biallelic expansion of a complex repeated motif in the 5' untranslated region of EIF4A3 has been shown to cause this syndrome, commonly with 15 or 16 repeats. The only patient with mild clinical findings harbored a 14-repeat expansion in 1 allele and a point mutation in the other allele. This proband is described here in more details, as well as is his affected sister, and 5 new individuals with Richieri-Costa-Pereira syndrome, including a patient from England, of African ancestry. This study has expanded the phenotype in this syndrome by the observation of microcephaly, better characterization of skeletal abnormalities, less severe phenotype with only mild facial dysmorphisms and limb anomalies, as well as the absence of cleft mandible, which is a hallmark of the syndrome. Although the most frequent mutation in this study was the recurrent 16-repeat expansion in EIF4A3, there was an overrepresentation of the 14-repeat expansion, with mild phenotypic expression, thus suggesting that the number of these motifs could play a role in phenotypic delineation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leckman, James F.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This is a practical review of Tourette syndrome, including phenomenology, natural history, and state-of-the-art assessment and treatment. Method: Computerized literature searches were conducted under the keywords Tourette syndrome,tics, and children-adolescents. Results: Studies have documented the natural history of Tourette syndrome and its frequent co-occurrence with attention problems, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and a range of other mood and anxiety disorders, which are often of primary concern to patients and their families. Proper diagnosis and education are often very helpful for patients, parents, siblings, teachers, and peers. When necessary, available anti-tic treatments have proven efficacious. First-line options include the alpha adrenergic agents and the atypical neuroleptics, as well as behavioral interventions such as habit reversal. Conclusions: The study of tics and Tourette symdrome has led to the development of several pathophysiological models and helped in the development of management options. However, fully explanatory models are still needed that would allow for accurate prognostication in the course of illness and the development of improved treatments. PMID:21152158

  12. [Poland's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Slezak, R; Sasiadek, M

    2000-08-01

    Poland's syndrome consists of the variable clinical features, but always includes unilateral aplasia of the chest wall muscles and ipsilateral anomalies of upper extremity. The incidence of Poland's syndrome, reported by different authors ranges from 1:10,000 to 1:100,000 and is observed more frequently in males than in females with the right side of the body affected more often than the left. The etiology of this syndrome is still discussed. However most of described cases were sporadic, rare familial incidence of Poland's syndrome were also presented. Therefore different etiologic factors of the Poland's syndrome are taken into account: genetic, vascular compromise during early stages of embriogenesis but also teratogenic effect of environmental xenobiotics (e.g. cigarette smoking by pregnant women). The authors present also the case of 20-years old man with inherited bilateral syndactyly with the right side aplasia of major pectoralis muscle and face asymmetry. The familial history was negative in respect to the features, associated with Poland's syndrome.

  13. [Sturge-Weber syndrome].

    PubMed

    Maruani, Annabel

    2010-04-01

    Facial port-wine stains are capillary malformations, which can reveal, very rarely, Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS). SWS is a severe neurocutaneous syndrome, which involves a facial port-wine stain reaching the first branch of trigeminal nerve (V1), ophthalmologic abnormalities (especially congenital glaucoma) and neurologic signs (seizure, mental retardation, hemiparesis). Neuroimaging (CT-scan/angio-magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) provides the diagnosis of SWS, when it shows ipsilateral leptomeningeal angioma; the best age to perform the exam is not established. Extension to superior eyelid, to other territories of trigeminal nerve (V2, V3) or to the contralateral hemiface is statistically associated to SWS. When a new-born has a facial port-wine stain reaching V1, ophthalmologic examination must be performed in the first months of life, as well as neuroimaging (at the age of 6-12 months, earlier in case of neurologic signs); a treatment of the port-wine stain by pulsed dye laser must also be considered. (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. A Diagnosis to Consider in an Adult Patient with Facial Features and Intellectual Disability: Williams Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Özlem Akgün; Şimşek Kiper, Pelin Özlem; Utine, Gülen Eda; Alikaşifoğlu, Mehmet; Boduroğlu, Koray

    2017-03-01

    Williams syndrome (OMIM #194050) is a rare, well-recognized, multisystemic genetic condition affecting approximately 1/7,500 individuals. There are no marked regional differences in the incidence of Williams syndrome. The syndrome is caused by a hemizygous deletion of approximately 28 genes, including ELN on chromosome 7q11.2. Prenatal-onset growth retardation, distinct facial appearance, cardiovascular abnormalities, and unique hypersocial behavior are among the most common clinical features. Here, we report the case of a patient referred to us with distinct facial features and intellectual disability, who was diagnosed with Williams syndrome at the age of 37 years. Our aim is to increase awareness regarding the diagnostic features and complications of this recognizable syndrome among adult health care providers. Williams syndrome is usually diagnosed during infancy or childhood, but in the absence of classical findings, such as cardiovascular anomalies, hypercalcemia, and cognitive impairment, the diagnosis could be delayed. Due to the multisystemic and progressive nature of the syndrome, accurate diagnosis is critical for appropriate care and screening for the associated morbidities that may affect the patient's health and well-being.

  15. Caring for the student with wolff-Parkinson-white syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prenni, Patricia G

    2009-10-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a cardiac condition in which an extra electrical pathway within the heart causes an abnormal increase in heart rate. It affects one to three people of every 1,000 people worldwide, occurring more often in males. Diagnosis usually occurs during young adulthood, so it is important for school nurses to be familiar with the condition. Prophylactic treatments, as well as surgical intervention to permanently block the extra pathway, are options for people with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Tachycardia associated with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome can occur occasionally even when prophylactic treatment is administered. School nurses must know how to properly assess and treat episodes of tachycardia that may occur in the school setting. With proper education, school nurses can help provide a safe school environment for students with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and promote successful academic achievement.

  16. Protective Role of Angiogenin Against Hematopoietic Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0207 TITLE: “Protective Role of Angiogenin Against Hematopoietic Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome ...SUBTITLE Protective Role of Angiogenin Against Hematopoietic Syndrome 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER of the Acute Radiation Syndrome 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...hematopoietic syndrome of the acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS) and is able to attenuate the effect of residual bone marrow damage (RBMD) after

  17. Burning Mouth Syndrome and "Burning Mouth Syndrome".

    PubMed

    Rifkind, Jacob Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is distressing to both the patient and practitioner unable to determine the cause of the patient's symptoms. Burning mouth syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, which is used only after nutritional deficiencies, mucosal disease, fungal infections, hormonal disturbances and contact stomatitis have been ruled out. This article will explore the many causes and treatment of patients who present with a chief complaint of "my mouth burns," including symptomatic treatment for those with burning mouth syndrome.

  18. Fetuses with Down's Syndrome detected by prenatal screening are more likely to abort spontaneously than fetuses with Down's Syndrome not detected by prenatal screening.

    PubMed

    Leporrier, Nathalie; Herrou, Michel; Morello, Rémy; Leymarie, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Pregnancy with Down's Syndrome is often terminated by miscarriage. We have investigated whether prenatal screening would lead preferentially to the identification of fetuses with Down's Syndrome prone to abort spontaneously. A comparison between the observed and the expected decrease in the prevalence of Down's Syndrome at term following extensive prenatal screening. A study from 1990 to 1998 in a limited and well controlled area of western France (Basse Normandie), with a birth rate close to 20,000 a year. Women under 38 years of age among whom prenatal screening for Down's Syndrome using biochemical tests and ultrasound findings became progressively extensive in this era. Our study was based on the registration of Down's Syndrome cases detected prenatally from screening, and live births with Down's Syndrome. Fetal loss rate in the population of prenatally detectable Down's Syndrome was evaluated by comparing the increase in detection of cases of Down's Syndrome following prenatal screening with the expected decrease in the number of cases of Down's Syndrome at birth. The results obtained were compared with published data on the rates of fetal losses postulated to occur among fetuses with Down's Syndrome. Comparison of the potential fetal loss rate in a population in whom Down's Syndrome was detected prenatally with the expected fetal loss rate of unselected ones. Prenatal screening resulted in a significant (42%) decrease (P < 0.001) in the prevalence at term of the disorder. Among the 53 fetuses with Down's Syndrome detected prenatally during the last three years of the study, about 50% would have aborted spontaneously if the pregnancy had been allowed to continue. This figure was significantly higher (P < 0.002) than expected on the basis of results from the literature, indicating that current estimates of miscarriage rates among fetuses with Down's Syndrome do not apply to the selected group of cases detectable from prenatal screening. Our results suggest that

  19. Reproductive disturbances in multiple neuroendocrine tumor syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lytras, Aristides; Tolis, George

    2009-12-01

    In the context of multiple neuroendocrine tumor syndromes, reproductive abnormalities may occur via a number of different mechanisms, such as hyperprolactinemia, increased GH/IGF-1 levels, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypercortisolism, hyperandrogenism, hyperthyroidism, gonadotropin hypersecretion, as well as, tumorigenesis or functional disturbances in gonads or other reproductive organs. Precocious puberty and/or male feminization is a feature of McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS), neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), Carney complex (CNC), and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), while sperm maturation and ovulation defects have been described in MAS and CNC. Although tumorigenesis of reproductive organs due to a multiple neuroendocrine tumor syndrome is very rare, certain lesions are characteristic and very unusual in the general population. Awareness leading to their recognition is important especially when other endocrine abnormalities coexist, as occasionally they may even be the first manifestation of a syndrome. Lesions such as certain types of ovarian cysts (MAS, CNC), pseudogynecomastia due to neurofibromas of the nipple-areola area (NF1), breast disease (CNC and Cowden disease (CD)), cysts and 'hypernephroid' tumors of the epididymis or bilateral papillary cystadenomas (mesosalpinx cysts) and endometrioid cystadenomas of the broad ligament (von Hippel-Lindau disease), testicular Sertoli calcifying tumors (CNC, PJS) monolateral or bilateral macroochidism and microlithiasis (MAS) may offer diagnostic clues. In addition, multiple neuroendocrine tumor syndromes may be complicated by reproductive malignancies including ovarian cancer in CNC, breast and endometrial cancer in CD, breast malignancies in NF1, and malignant sex-cord stromal tumors in PJS.

  20. Lethal pallister-killian syndrome: Phenotypic similarity with fryns syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ignacio Rodriquez, J.; Garcia, I.; Alvarez, J.

    1994-11-01

    The Pallister-Killian syndrome is a sporadic multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by {open_quotes}coarse{close_quotes} face, profound mental retardation, and epilepsy. Chromosomes of peripheral lymphocytes are usually normal, but tissue cultures show varying degrees of mosaicism for isochromosome 12p. In babies who die neonatally of severe malformations, including diaphragmatic hernia, and who also have a {open_quotes}coarse{close_quotes} face, acral hypoplasia, and other internal anomalies, Fryns syndrome is more likely to be suspected than Pallister-Killian syndrome, especially if karyotyping is unavailable or if peripheral lumphocytes have a normal chromosome constitution. An initial diagnosis of Fryns syndrome had to be modified in 3 successive newbornmore » infants since chromosome analysis or in situ hybridization with a chromosome 12 probe on kidney tissue demonstrated the mosaic aneuploidy characteristic of Pallister-Killian syndrome. These 3 patients confirm that a similar pattern of malformations can be present in both conditions at birth. It consists of {open_quotes}coarse{close_quotes} face, acral hypoplasia, diaphragmatic hernia, and other defects. Newborn infants who present this phenotype, but lack a conclusively normal chromosome test, may not have Fryns syndrome. A diagnosis of Fryns syndrome should be made carefully to avoid the risk of inappropriate genetic counseling. 31 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.« less

  1. Selenium intake and metabolic syndrome: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Retondario, Anabelle; Fernandes, Ricardo; Rockenbach, Gabriele; Alves, Mariane de Almeida; Bricarello, Liliana Paula; Trindade, Erasmo Benicio Santos de Moraes; Vasconcelos, Francisco de Assis Guedes de

    2018-03-02

    Metabolic syndrome is a multi-causal disease. Its treatment includes lifestyle changes with a focus on weight loss. This systematic review assessed the association between Selenium intake and metabolic syndrome. Data were collected mainly from four databases: PubMed, CENTRAL (Cochrane), Scopus and Web of Knowledge. Keywords related to metabolic syndrome, selenium, as well as metabolic syndrome features were searched. This review followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) Statement. A systematic review protocol was registered at PROSPERO (n. 42016046321). Two reviewers independently screened 2957 abstracts. Six studies were included to perform data extraction with standardized spreadsheets. The risk of bias was assessed by using specific tools according to the design of the relevant studies. An assessment was carried out based on the appropriateness of the study reports accordingly to STROBE and the CONSORT-based checklist for each study design. Three studies found no association between Selenium intake and metabolic syndrome; two of them found an inverse association; and one study found a direct association between Selenium intake and metabolic syndrome. One study also showed an inverse association between Selenium intake and the prevalence of high waist circumference, high diastolic blood pressure, and hyperglycaemia in women. Overall, based on the argumentation and results of this study, it is possible to conclude that Selenium intake and metabolic syndrome are not clearly associated in adults and elderly. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  2. Relationship dimensions of the ‘Down syndrome advantage’

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, D. B.; Hauser-Cram, P.; Crossman, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Some researchers have proposed an ‘advantage’ for parents of children with Down syndrome over parents of children with other intellectual disabilities, especially in relation to experiencing less parenting stress. Others have maintained that these differences are an artefact of demographic and related differences. This study extends the investigation of possible differences in dimensions of parenting stress and also examines whether differences exist in maternal and child contingent responsiveness during mother–child interaction in these two groups. Method Mothers of children with Down syndrome (n = 43) and undifferentiated developmental disabilities (n = 54) completed measures of children's adaptive functioning and behaviour problems, parenting stress and maternal social support. Observers rated the contingent interactions between mothers and children using the Nursing Child Assessment Teaching Scale. Results Once mother's age, education and social support as well as child adaptive functioning and behaviour problems were considered, neither parent nor child related parenting stress demonstrated an advantage for parents of children with Down syndrome. However, a ‘Down syndrome advantage’ was apparent for both maternal and child contingent responsiveness after accounting for maternal demographic and contextual variables and child attributes. Conclusions Children with Down syndrome and their mothers have more positive interactions than children with other developmental disabilities, both in terms of the responsiveness of mothers and of child responses contingent on maternal behaviour. These findings suggest that both children with Down syndrome themselves and their mothers are contributing to a Down syndrome advantage. PMID:25070618

  3. Morvan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maskery, Mark; Chhetri, Suresh K.; Dayanandan, Rejith; Gall, Claire

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old gentleman was admitted to the regional neurosciences center with encephalopathy, myokymia, and dysautonomia. Chest imaging had previously identified an incidental mass in the anterior mediastinum, consistent with a primary thymic tumor. Antivoltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies were positive (titer 1273 pmol/L) and he was hypokalemic. Electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were in keeping with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome, and an electroencephalogram was consistent with encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Morvan syndrome was made, for which he was initially treated with high-dose steroids, followed by a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He also underwent thymectomy, followed by a postexcision flare of his symptoms requiring intensive care management. Further steroids, plasmapheresis, and IVIG achieved stabilization of his clinical condition, enabling transfer for inpatient neurorehabilitation. He was commenced on azathioprine and a prolonged oral steroid taper. A subsequent presumed incipient relapse responded well to further IVIG treatment. This case report documents a thymoma-associated presentation of anti-VGKC-positive Morvan syndrome supplemented by patient and carer narrative and video, both of which provide valuable further insights into this rare disorder. There are a limited number of publications surrounding this rare condition available in the English literature. This, combined with the heterogenous presentation, association with underlying malignancy, response to treatment, and prognosis, provides a diagnostic challenge. However, the association with anti-VGKC antibody-associated complexes and 2 recent case series have provided some scope for both accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26740856

  4. Current thinking about acute compartment syndrome of the lower extremity

    PubMed Central

    Shadgan, Babak; Menon, Matthew; Sanders, David; Berry, Gregg; Martin, Claude; Duffy, Paul; Stephen, David; O’Brien, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the lower extremity is a clinical condition that, although uncommon, is seen fairly regularly in modern orthopedic practice. The pathophysiology of the disorder has been extensively described and is well known to physicians who care for patients with musculoskeletal injuries. The diagnosis, however, is often difficult to make. In this article, we review the clinical risk factors of acute compartment syndrome of the lower extremity, identify the current concepts of diagnosis and discuss appropriate treatment plans. We also describe the Canadian medicolegal environment in regard to compartment syndrome of the lower extremity. PMID:20858378

  5. Histopathological features of Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hoey, S E H; Eastwood, D; Monsell, F; Kangesu, L; Harper, J I; Sebire, N J

    2008-05-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare, sporadic overgrowth disorder for which the underlying genetic defect remains unknown. Although the clinical course is well-described there is no systematic histopathological description of the lesional pathology. To describe the histopathological features encountered in a series of patients with Proteus syndrome from a single centre. Patients with Proteus syndrome who had undergone therapeutic surgical resection or biopsy were identified from a database and the histopathological findings were reviewed, with particular regard to descriptive features of the underlying tissue abnormality. There were 18 surgical specimens from nine patients, median age 4 years (range 1-9), classified into four main categories: soft-tissue swellings (lipomatous lesions), vascular anomalies (vascular malformation and haemangioma), macrodactyly (hamartomatous overgrowth) and others (sebaceous naevus and nonspecific features). In all cases, the clinical features of overgrowth were due to increased amounts of disorganized tissue, indicating a hamartomatous-type defect in which normal tissue constituents were present, but with an abnormal distribution and architecture. Vascular malformations represented a prominent category of lesions, accounting for 50% of the specimens, predominantly comprising lymphatic and lymphovascular malformations. No malignancy or cytological atypia was identified in any case. The histopathological features of lesions resected from children with Proteus syndrome predominantly include hamartomatous mixed connective tissue lesions, benign neoplasms such as lipomata, and lymphatic-rich vascular malformations.

  6. Marfan Syndrome (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic disorder called Marfan syndrome. What Is Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome is named after Antoine Marfan, the French ... immediately. What's Life Like for Teens With Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome affects people differently, so life is not ...

  7. Swyer-James syndrome associated with Noonan syndrome: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y M; Huang, W L; Hwang, J J; Ko, Y L; Lien, W P

    1995-12-01

    A 28-year-old man with Noonan syndrome associated with unilateral hyperlucent lung is reported. He had the typical craniofacial appearance and short stature of Noonan syndrome; he had mild mental retardation, atrophic testis, mild funnel chest and kyphosis. cardiovascular abnormalities included asymmetric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a significantly different caliber of the left and right pulmonary arteries. The unilateral hyperlucent lung was shown to result from acquired nondestructive emphysema caused by nonvalvular obstruction of the bronchi (Swyer-James syndrome or Macleod's syndrome). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of Noonan syndrome associated with Swyer-James syndrome.

  8. Divorce in families of children with Down Syndrome or Rett Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Vivian Renne Gerber; Alves, Bianca dos Santos; Negrão, Juliana; Maria, Juliana Negrão; Schwartzman, José Salomão; D'Antino, Maria Eloisa Famá; Brunoni, Decio

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluates the impact in the stability and management of the marriage of parents of a child with Down or Rett Syndrome. Morbidity of the syndromes and the marital status of the couples before and after the birth of the affected children were considered variables. The divorce rate in families with Down syndrome was 10%, similar to the Brazilian rate population. In Rett Syndrome, the divorce rate was significantly higher, 23.5%. The higher morbidity of Rett Syndrome, and the moment of diagnosis could be relevant factors for the increased divorce rate related to this syndrome.

  9. Noonan syndrome: crossed fused ectopic kidneys and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis-a rare association.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ankur; Khaira, Ambar; Lal, Charanjit; Mahajan, Sandeep; Tiwari, Suresh C

    2009-10-01

    Noonan syndrome is characterised by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. Urogenital abnormalities are reported in 10% of the cases. We present a 14-year-old girl with characteristic features of Noonan syndrome and nephrotic-range proteinuria. She had crossed fused ectopic kidneys. Renal biopsy showed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Oral steroids were instituted and she responded well. The case highlights this novel renal presentation of Noonan syndrome.

  10. Basal cell nevus syndrome or Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thalakoti, Srikanth; Geller, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) or Gorlin syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous syndrome sometimes known as the fifth phacomatosis, inherited in autosomal dominant fashion with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Gorlin syndrome is characterized by development of multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), jaw cysts, palmar or plantar pits, calcification of falx cerebri, various developmental skeletal abnormalities such as bifid rib, hemi- or bifid vertebra and predisposition to the development of various tumors. BCNS is caused by a mutation in the PTCH1 gene localized to 9q22.3. Its estimated prevalence varies between 1/55600 and 1/256000 with an equal male to female ratio. The medulloblastoma variant seen in Gorlin syndrome patients is of the desmoplastic type, characteristically presenting during the first 3 years of life. Therefore, children with desmoplastic medulloblastoma should be carefully screened for other features of BCNS. Radiation therapy for desmoplastic medulloblastoma should be avoided in BCNS patients as it may induce development of invasive BCCs and other tumors in the skin area exposed to radiation. This syndrome is a multisystem disorder so involvement of multiple specialists with a multimodal approach to detect and treat various manifestations at early stages will reduce the long-term sequelae and severity of the condition. Life expectancy is not significantly altered but morbidity from complications and cosmetic scarring can be substantial. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Primary Care for Adults with Down Syndrome: Adherence to Preventive Healthcare Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, K. M.; Taylor, L. C.; Davis, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Due to significant medical improvements, persons with Down syndrome now live well into adulthood. Consequently, primary care for adults with Down syndrome needs to incorporate routine care with screening for condition-specific comorbidities. This study seeks to evaluate the adherence of primary care physicians to age- and…

  12. Pathophysiology and Japanese clinical characteristics in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Daishi; Takeda, Norifumi; Imai, Yasushi; Inuzuka, Ryo; Komuro, Issei; Hirata, Yasunobu

    2014-08-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant heritable disorder of the connective tissue, caused by mutations of the gene FBN1, which encodes fibrillin-1, a major component of the microfibrils of the extracellular matrix. Fibrillin-1 interacts with transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and dysregulated TGF-β signaling plays a major role in the development of connective tissue disease and familial aortic aneurysm and dissection, including Marfan syndrome. Losartan, an angiotensin II blocker, has the potential to reduce TGF-β signaling and is expected to be an additional therapeutic option. Clinical diagnosis is made using the Ghent nosology, which requires comprehensive patient assessment and has been proven to work well, but evaluation of some of the diagnostic criteria by a single physician is difficult and time-consuming. A Marfan clinic was established at the University of Tokyo Hospital in 2005, together with cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, pediatricians, orthopedists, and ophthalmologists in one place, for the purpose of speedy and accurate evaluation and diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. In this review, we discuss the recent progress in diagnosis and treatment of Marfan syndrome, and the characteristics of Japanese patients with Marfan syndrome. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  13. Gorlin-goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pandeshwar, Padma; Jayanthi, K; Mahesh, D

    2012-01-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome-NBCCS) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused due to mutations in the PTCH (patched) gene found on chromosome arm 9q. The syndrome, characterized by increased predisposition to develop basal cell carcinoma and associated multiorgan anomalies, has a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. GGS is a multidisciplinary problem, early diagnosis of which allows introduction of secondary prophylaxis and following an appropriate treatment to delay the progress of the syndrome. The following report emphasizes the need for awareness of the diagnostic criteria of this syndrome in cases with no typical skin lesions.

  14. Syndromes with supernumerary teeth.

    PubMed

    Lubinsky, Mark; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2016-10-01

    While most supernumerary teeth are idiopathic, they can be associated with a number of Mendelian syndromes. However, this can also be a coincidental finding, since supernumerary teeth occur in 6% or more of the normal population. To better define this relationship, we analyzed the evidence for specific associations. We excluded conditions with a single affected patient reported, supernumerary teeth adjacent to clefts or other forms of alveolar disruption (as secondary rather than primary findings), and natal teeth, which can involve premature eruption of a normal tooth. Since, the cause of supernumerary teeth shows considerable heterogeneity, certain findings are less likely to be coincidental, such as five or more supernumerary teeth in a single patient, or locations outside of the premaxilla. We found only eight genetic syndromes with strong evidence for an association: cleidocranial dysplasia; familial adenomatous polyposis; trichorhinophalangeal syndrome, type I; Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome; Nance-Horan syndrome; Opitz BBB/G syndrome; oculofaciocardiodental syndrome; and autosomal dominant Robinow syndrome. There is also suggestive evidence of an association with two uncommon disorders, Kreiborg-Pakistani syndrome (craniosynostosis and dental anomalies), and insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus with acanthosisnigricans. An association of a Mendelian disorder with a low frequency manifestation of supernumerary teeth is difficult to exclude without large numbers, but several commonly cited syndromes lacked evidence for clear association, including Hallermann-Streiff syndrome, Fabry disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Apert and Crouzon syndromes, Zimmermann-Laband syndrome, and Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  16. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of…

  17. Advances in research on the neurological and neuropsychiatric phenotype of Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Savic, Ivanka

    2012-04-01

    Klinefelter syndrome, 47,XXY is the most common chromosomal aberration among men. It represents a naturally occurring human model for studies of both X-chromosome gene expression and potential androgen effects on brain development and function. The aim of this review is to combine available brain imaging and behavioral data to provide an overview of what we have learned about the neural underpinnings of cognitive, emotional and behavioral dysunctions in Klinefelter syndrome. The behavioral phenotype of 47,XXY is characterized by language, executive and psychomotor dysfunction, as well as socioemotional impairment. The prevalence of schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders and affective regulation problems is increased. Neuroimaging studies of children and adults with Klinefelter syndrome syndrome show characteristic structural changes from typical individuals. There are increases in the grey matter volume of the sensorimotor and parietooccipital regions, as well as significant reductions in amygdala, hippocampal, insular, temporal and inferior-frontal grey matter volumes. Widespread white matter abnormalities have been revealed, with reductions in some areas (including anterior cingulate, bilaterally) but increases in others (such as left parietal lobe). Mechanisms underlying these developmental anomalies could include imbalance in gene dosage relative to typical men or women, as well as the potential consequence of endocrinological deficits. Studies of Klinefelter syndrome could generate important information about the impact of anomalies in sex chromosome gene regulation on the development of cerebral grey and white matter and, ultimately, on human behavior.

  18. Pediatric condition falsification (Munchausen syndrome by Proxy) as a continuum of maternal factitious disorder (Munchausen syndrome).

    PubMed

    Kucuker, Hudaverdi; Demir, Tevfik; Oral, Resmiye

    2010-12-01

    Pediatric condition falsification (PCF), also known as Munchausen syndrome by Proxy or Medical Child Abuse, is a somewhat rare form of child abuse and neglect. Its association with a history of adult factitious disorder (AFD) or Munchausen syndrome in the perpetrator is also well known. Exogenous insulin injection to cause hypoglycemia both in the context of PCF and AFD has been reported in the literature. However, the coexistence of both conditions via insulin injection in the same family has not been reported in the literature. This paper presents a family, in which the mother was diagnosed with AFD and her three children with PCF perpetrated by their mother via exogenous insulin injection. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Growth hormone deficiency in treated acromegaly and active Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Formenti, Anna Maria; Maffezzoni, Filippo; Doga, Mauro; Mazziotti, Gherardo; Giustina, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in adults is characterized by reduced quality of life and physical fitness, skeletal fragility, increased weight and cardiovascular risk. It may be found in (over-) treated acromegaly as well as in active Cushing's syndrome. Hypopituitarism may develop in patients after definitive treatment of acromegaly, although the exact prevalence of GHD in this population is still uncertain because of limited awareness, and scarce and conflicting data so far available. Because GHD associated with acromegaly and Cushing's syndrome may yield adverse consequences on similar target systems, the final outcomes of some complications of both acromegaly and Cushing's syndrome may be further affected by the occurrence of GHD. It is still largely unknown, however, whether GHD in patients with post-acromegaly or active Cushing's syndrome (e.g. pharmacologic glucocorticoid treatment) may benefit from GH replacement. We review the diagnostic, clinical and therapeutic aspects of GHD in adults treated for acromegaly and in those with active Cushing's syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 'Refeeding syndrome' in a Kuwaiti child: clinical diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Al Sharkawy, Ibrahim; Ramadan, Dina; El-Tantawy, Amira

    2010-01-01

    To report a case of refeeding syndrome in a Kuwaiti child, its clinical presentation and management. A 13-month-old Kuwaiti boy presented with acute severe malnutrition in the form of marasmic kwashiorkor. On admission, blood sugar and serum electrolytes were normal but on the 3rd day he developed typical biochemical features of refeeding syndrome in the form of hyperglycemia, severe hypophosphatemia, hypokalemia, hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia. The child then received treatment appropriate for refeeding syndrome in the form of lower calorie intake with gradual increase, as well as supplementation of electrolytes, thiamine and vitamins and he eventually made a safe recovery. This case showed that during rehabilitation of a malnourished child, a severe potentially lethal electrolyte disturbance (refeeding syndrome) can occur. Careful monitoring of electrolytes before and during the refeeding phase was needed and helped to detect this syndrome early. We suggest that slow and gradual calorie increase in the 'at-risk' patient can help prevent its occurrence. Copyright (c) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Sequential Combination Therapy Leading to Sustained Remission in a Patient with SAPHO Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huber, C.E; Judex, A.G; Freyschmidt, J; Feuerbach, S; Schölmerich, J; Müller-Ladner, U

    2009-01-01

    The SAPHO syndrome represents a variety of clinically similar disorders with the key features of hyperostotic bone lesions in combination with chronic pustular skin disease. The respective pathophysiology of bone and joint manifestations in SAPHO syndrome is still a matter of discussion. For example it does not appear to represent reactive arthritis and HLA B27 antigen, with the latter being typically present in patients with spondyloarthopathies. Treatment of SAPHO syndrome is also not well established and consists of various antiinflammatory and antirheumatic drugs. Here, we report a female patient with active SAPHO syndrome suffering from sternal swelling of unknown origin that had been known for 10 years and a 4-year-history of severe lower back pain. Remarkable were also a typical pustulous palmar erythema associated with swelling and decreased motility of both MCP-I joints. Inflammation parameters were high with an ESR 68 mm/1st hour and a CRP of 19.6 mg/l. She was initially treated with rofecoxib and doxycycline, followed by sulfasalazine with only partial clinical response. Thereafter, both articular symptoms as well as cutaneous lesions responded well to a combination therapy with methotrexate and sulfasalazine. Thus, the case illustrates nicely that methotrexate in combination with another DMARD can be successfully applied to patients with long-term active SAPHO syndrome. PMID:19471601

  2. Sequential Combination Therapy Leading to Sustained Remission in a Patient with SAPHO Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huber, C E; Judex, A G; Freyschmidt, J; Feuerbach, S; Schölmerich, J; Müller-Ladner, U

    2009-03-27

    The SAPHO syndrome represents a variety of clinically similar disorders with the key features of hyperostotic bone lesions in combination with chronic pustular skin disease. The respective pathophysiology of bone and joint manifestations in SAPHO syndrome is still a matter of discussion. For example it does not appear to represent reactive arthritis and HLA B27 antigen, with the latter being typically present in patients with spondyloarthopathies. Treatment of SAPHO syndrome is also not well established and consists of various antiinflammatory and antirheumatic drugs. Here, we report a female patient with active SAPHO syndrome suffering from sternal swelling of unknown origin that had been known for 10 years and a 4-year-history of severe lower back pain. Remarkable were also a typical pustulous palmar erythema associated with swelling and decreased motility of both MCP-I joints. Inflammation parameters were high with an ESR 68 mm/1st hour and a CRP of 19.6 mg/l. She was initially treated with rofecoxib and doxycycline, followed by sulfasalazine with only partial clinical response. Thereafter, both articular symptoms as well as cutaneous lesions responded well to a combination therapy with methotrexate and sulfasalazine. Thus, the case illustrates nicely that methotrexate in combination with another DMARD can be successfully applied to patients with long-term active SAPHO syndrome.

  3. [Münchhausen syndrome].

    PubMed

    Robert, J C; Cremniter, D; Lejonc, J L

    1991-04-20

    Münchhausen's syndrome is characterized by fictitious illnesses associated with hospital peregrination, pseudologia fantastica with a mythomanic discourse that includes strongly structured medical elements, passivity and dependance at examinations, and aggressiveness. The whole picture is so typical that the syndrome can easily be recognized. Cases of Münchhausen's syndrome by proxy (Meadow's syndrome) have been reported during the last few years; the condition concerns children suffering from diseases which are entirely due to their parents and can be compared with the battered child syndrome. In terms of nosology, among pathomimias Münchhausen's syndrome figures as a borderline state. Since it is impossible to establish positive relations with these patients, treatment fails in almost every case.

  4. The Source for Syndromes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Angelman syndrome; (2) Asperger syndrome; (3) Down syndrome; (4) fetal alcohol syndrome; (5) fetal…

  5. Behçet's syndrome pathophysiology and potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Emmi, Giacomo; Silvestri, Elena; Squatrito, Danilo; D'Elios, Mario Milco; Ciucciarelli, Lucia; Prisco, Domenico; Emmi, Lorenzo

    2014-04-01

    Behçet syndrome is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by multiorgan involvement such as oral and genital ulcers, uveitis, skin lesions as well as by less frequent, but often more severe, central nervous system and vascular manifestations. The pathogenetic mechanisms are still incompletely known; however the interaction between a specific genetic background and environmental or infectious factors certainly contributes to the immune dysregulation that characterizes this disease. The discovery of new immunological pathways in Behçet syndrome pathogenesis may help us to set up new treatments. In this review, we will focus our attention on the possible mechanisms underlying Behçet syndrome pathogenesis and their potential role as novel therapeutic targets.

  6. Refeeding syndrome in a young girl with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Om; Ayub, Adil; Abid, Shahab

    2014-05-01

    We report the case of a 20-year-old anorexic girl (BMI=12.9), who was misdiagnosed the first time and developed severe electrolyte imbalances due to lack of awareness about refeeding syndrome. Few cases of RS have been reported in literature and protocols have been suggested for prevention and management of this syndrome, including the awareness of circumstances in which it is most likely to develop, refeeding slowly and building-up micronutrient content over several days. Improved awareness and understanding of refeeding syndrome along with a well-coordinated plan are vital in delivering safe and effective nutritional rehabilitation. We suggest a slow and gradual increase in nutrition along with nutritional counselling and psychotherapy.

  7. Noonan syndrome and related disorders: alterations in growth and puberty.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Jacqueline A

    2006-12-01

    Noonan syndrome is a relatively common multiple malformation syndrome with characteristic facies, short stature and congenital heart disease, most commonly pulmonary stenosis (Noonan, Clin Pediatr, 33:548-555, 1994). Recently, a mutation in the PTPN11 gene (Tartaglia, Mehler, Goldberg, Zampino, Brunner, Kremer et al., Nat Genet, 29:465-468, 2001) was found to be present in about 50% of individuals with Noonan syndrome. The phenotype noted in Noonan syndrome is also found in a number of other syndromes which include LEOPARD (Gorlin, Anderson, Blaw, Am J Dis Child, 17:652-662, 1969), Cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (Reynolds, Neri, Hermann, Blumberg, Coldwell, Miles et al., Am J Med Genet, 28:413-427, 1986) and Costello syndrome (Hennekam, Am J Med Genet, 117C(1):42-48, 2003). All three of these syndromes share similar cardiac defects and all have postnatal short stature. Very recently, HRAS mutations (Aoki, Niihori, Kawame, Kurosawa, Ohashi, Tanaka et al., Nat Genet, 37:1038-1040, 2005) have been found in the Costello syndrome and germline mutations in KRAS and BRAF genes (Rodriguez-Viciana, Tetsu, Tidyman, Estep, Conger, Santa Cruz et al., Nat Genet, 2006; Niihori, Aoki, Narumi, Neri, Cave, Verloes et al., Nat Genet, 38:294-296, 2006) in the Cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome. Phenotypic overlap between these genetic disorders can now be explained since each is caused by germline mutations that are major components of the RAS-MAPK pathway. This pathway plays an important role in growth factor and cytokine signaling as well as cancer pathogenesis.

  8. Noonan syndrome and related disorders: Alterations in growth and puberty

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a relatively common multiple malformation syndrome with characteristic facies, short stature and congenital heart disease, most commonly pulmonary stenosis (Noonan, Clin Pediatr, 33:548–555, 1994). Recently, a mutation in the PTPN11 gene (Tartaglia, Mehler, Goldberg, Zampino, Brunner, Kremer et al., Nat Genet, 29:465–468, 2001) was found to be present in about 50% of individuals with Noonan syndrome. The phenotype noted in Noonan syndrome is also found in a number of other syndromes which include LEOPARD (Gorlin, Anderson, Blaw, Am J Dis Child, 17:652–662, 1969), Cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (Reynolds, Neri, Hermann, Blumberg, Coldwell, Miles et al., Am J Med Genet, 28:413–427, 1986) and Costello syndrome (Hennekam, Am J Med Genet, 117C(1):42–48, 2003). All three of these syndromes share similar cardiac defects and all have postnatal short stature. Very recently, HRAS mutations (Aoki, Niihori, Kawame, Kurosawa, Ohashi, Tanaka et al., Nat Genet, 37:1038–1040, 2005) have been found in the Costello syndrome and germline mutations in KRAS and BRAF genes (Rodriguez-Viciana, Tetsu, Tidyman, Estep, Conger, Santa Cruz et al., Nat Genet,2006; Niihori, Aoki, Narumi, Neri, Cave, Verloes et al., Nat Genet, 38:294–296, 2006) in the Cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome. Phenotypic overlap between these genetic disorders can now be explained since each is caused by germline mutations that are major components of the RAS-MAPK pathway. This pathway plays an important role in growth factor and cytokine signaling as well as cancer pathogenesis. PMID:17177115

  9. Variations in High-frequency Oscillations of Tropical Cyclones over the Western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shumin; Li, Weibiao; Wen, Zhiping; Zhou, Mingsen; Lu, Youyu; Qian, Yu-Kun; Liu, Haoya; Fang, Rong

    2018-04-01

    Variations in the high-frequency oscillations of tropical cyclones (TCs) over the western North Pacific (WNP) are studied in numerical model simulations. Power spectrum analysis of maximum wind speeds at 10 m (MWS10) from an ensemble of 15 simulated TCs shows that oscillations are significant for all TCs. The magnitudes of oscillations in MWS10 are similar in the WNP and South China Sea (SCS); however, the mean of the averaged significant periods in the SCS (1.93 h) is shorter than that in the open water of the WNP (2.83 h). The shorter period in the SCS is examined through an ensemble of simulations, and a case simulation as well as a sensitivity experiment in which the continent is replaced by ocean for Typhoon Hagupit (2008). The analysis of the convergence efficiency within the boundary layer suggests that the shorter periods in the SCS are possibly due to the stronger terrain effect, which intensifies convergence through greater friction. The enhanced convergence strengthens the disturbance of the gradient and thermal wind balances, and then contributes to the shorter oscillation periods in the SCS.

  10. The 22q13.3 Deletion Syndrome (Phelan-McDermid Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, K.; McDermid, H.E.

    2012-01-01

    The 22q13.3 deletion syndrome, also known as Phelan-McDermid syndrome, is a contiguous gene disorder resulting from deletion of the distal long arm of chromosome 22. In addition to normal growth and a constellation of minor dysmorphic features, this syndrome is characterized by neurological deficits which include global developmental delay, moderate to severe intellectual impairment, absent or severely delayed speech, and neonatal hypotonia. In addition, more than 50% of patients show autism or autistic-like behavior, and therefore it can be classified as a syndromic form of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The differential diagnosis includes Angelman syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome, fragile X syndrome, and FG syndrome. Over 600 cases of 22q13.3 deletion syndrome have been documented. Most are terminal deletions of ∼100 kb to >9 Mb, resulting from simple deletions, ring chromosomes, and unbalanced translocations. Almost all of these deletions include the gene SHANK3 which encodes a scaffold protein in the postsynaptic densities of excitatory synapses, connecting membrane-bound receptors to the actin cytoskeleton. Two mouse knockout models and cell culture experiments show that SHANK3 is involved in the structure and function of synapses and support the hypothesis that the majority of 22q13.3 deletion syndrome neurological defects are due to haploinsufficiency of SHANK3, although other genes in the region may also play a role in the syndrome. The molecular connection to ASD suggests that potential future treatments may involve modulation of metabotropic glutamate receptors. PMID:22670140

  11. Autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (Shoenfeld's syndrome) - An update.

    PubMed

    Watad, A; Quaresma, M; Brown, S; Cohen Tervaert, J W; Rodríguez-Pint, I; Cervera, R; Perricone, C; Shoenfeld, Y

    2017-06-01

    Autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) has been widely described in many studies conducted thus far. The syndrome incorporates five immune-mediated conditions, all associated with previous exposure to various agents such as vaccines, silicone implants and several others. The emergence of ASIA syndrome is associated with individual genetic predisposition, for instance those carrying HLA-DRB1*01 or HLA-DRB4 and results from exposure to external or endogenous factors triggering autoimmunity. Such factors have been demonstrated as able to induce autoimmunity in both animal models and humans via a variety of proposed mechanisms. In recent years, physicians have become more aware of the existence of ASIA syndrome and the relationship between adjuvants exposure and autoimmunity and more cases are being reported. Accordingly, we have created a registry that includes at present more than 300 ASIA syndrome cases that have been reported by different physicians worldwide, describing various autoimmune conditions induced by diverse adjuvants. In this review, we have summarized the updated literature on ASIA syndrome and the knowledge accumulated since 2013 in order to elucidate the association between the exposure to various adjuvant agents and its possible clinical manifestations. Furthermore, we especially referred to the relationship between ASIA syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS).

  12. Neuroligins Provide Molecular Links Between Syndromic and Non-Syndromic Autism

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sandeep K.; Eroglu, Cagla

    2014-01-01

    Autism is a common and heritable neuropsychiatric disorder that can be categorized into two types: syndromic and non-syndromic, the former of which are associated with other neurological disorders or syndromes. Molecular and functional links between syndromic and non-syndromic autism genes were lacking until studies aimed at understanding role of trans-synaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin, which is associated with non-syndromic autism, provided important connections. Here, we integrate data from these studies into a model of how neuroligin functions to control synaptic connectivity in the central nervous system and how neuroligin dysfunction may participate in the pathophysiology of autism. Understanding the complex functional interactions between neuroligins and other autism-associated proteins at the synapse is crucial to understand the pathology of autism. This understanding might bring us closer to development of therapeutic approaches for autism. PMID:23838185

  13. [Prevalence of metabolic syndrome components in patients with acute coronary syndromes].

    PubMed

    Zaliūnas, Remigijus; Slapikas, Rimvydas; Luksiene, Dalia; Slapikiene, Birute; Statkeviciene, Audrone; Milvidaite, Irena; Gustiene, Olivija

    2008-01-01

    Many studies report that the components of the metabolic syndrome--arterial hypertension, abdominal obesity, diabetes mellitus, and atherogenic dyslipidemia--are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. We investigated the prevalence of different components of the metabolic syndrome and frequency of their combinations and acute hyperglycemia among patients with acute coronary syndromes. The study population consisted of 2756 patients (1670 men and 1086 women with a mean age of 63.3+/-11.3 years) with acute coronary syndromes: Q-wave myocardial infarction was present in 41.8% of patients; non-Q-wave MI, in 30.7%; and unstable angina pectoris, in 27.5%. The metabolic syndrome was found in 59.6% of the patients according to modified NCEP III guidelines. One component of the metabolic syndrome was found in 13.5% of patients; two, in 23.0%; and none, in 3.9%. Less than one-third (29.2%) of the patients had three components of the metabolic syndrome, and 30.4% of the patients had four or five components. Arterial hypertension and abdominal obesity were the most common components of the metabolic syndrome (82.2% and 65.8%, respectively). Nearly half of the patients had hypertriglyceridemia and decreased level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (55.0% and 51.1%, respectively), and 23.9% of patients had diabetes mellitus. Acute hyperglycemia (> or =6.1 mmol/L) without known diabetes mellitus was found in 38.1% of cases. The combination of arterial hypertension and abdominal obesity was reported in 57.8% of patients in the case of combinations of two-five metabolic syndrome components. More than half of patients with acute coronary syndromes had three or more components of the metabolic syndrome, and arterial hypertension and abdominal obesity were the most prevalent components of the metabolic syndrome.

  14. Hyperthyroidism due to thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion after surgery for Cushing's syndrome: a novel cause of the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Tamada, Daisuke; Onodera, Toshiharu; Kitamura, Tetsuhiro; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Murata, Yoshiharu; Otsuki, Michio; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2013-07-01

    Hyperthyroidism with the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of TSH (SITSH) occurred by a decrease in hydrocortisone dose after surgery for Cushing's syndrome. This is a novel cause of SITSH. The aim of this study was to describe and discuss 2 cases of SITSH patients that were found after surgery for Cushing's syndrome. We also checked whether SITSH occurred in 7 consecutive patients with Cushing's syndrome after surgery. A 45-year-old Japanese woman with ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome and a 37-year-old Japanese man with ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome presented SITSH caused by insufficient replacement of hydrocortisone for postoperative adrenal insufficiency. When the dose of hydrocortisone was reduced to less than 20 mg/d within 18 days after surgery, SITSH occurred in both cases. We examined whether the change of the hydrocortisone dose induced the secretion of TSH. Free T₃ and TSH were normalized by the hydrocortisone dose increase of 30 mg/d, and these were elevated by the dose decrease of 10 mg/d. We also checked TSH and thyroid hormone levels of the 7 consecutive patients with Cushing's syndrome after surgery. Six (66.6 %) of 9 patients showed SITSH. This is the first report that insufficient replacement of hydrocortisone after surgery for Cushing's syndrome caused SITSH. Hyperthyroidism by SITSH as well as adrenal insufficiency can contribute to withdrawal symptoms of hydrocortisone replacement. We need to consider the possibility of SITSH for the pathological evaluation of withdrawal syndrome of hydrocortisone replacement.

  15. Prevalence and correlates of loneliness among Chinese service industry migrant workers

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Baoliang; Xu, Yanmin; Jin, Dong; Zou, Xiaowei; Liu, Tiebang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chinese rural-to-urban migrant workers (MWs) who are employed in service industry are a rapidly growing population in urban China. Like other MWs, service industry MWs (SIMWs) are generally excluded from the mainstream of city societies, but unlike other MWs, they are more marginalized in cities. Social isolation increases the feelings of loneliness; however, there are little empirical data on the epidemiology of loneliness of SIMWs. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence and associated factors of loneliness among SIMWs in Shenzhen, China. By using respondent-driven sampling, 1979 SIMWs were recruited and administered with standardized questionnaires to collect data on sociodemographics, physical health, and migration-related characteristics. Loneliness and social support were measured with a single-item self-report question “Do you feel lonely often?” and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS), respectively. 18.3% of SIMWs reported feeling lonely often. Being aged 60 years or older (odds ratio [OR] = 2.30), marital status of “others” (OR = 2.77), being physically ill in the last 2 weeks (OR = 1.46), migrating alone (OR = 1.97), working >8 hours/day (OR = 1.06), MSPSS inside family subscale score ≤18 (OR = 1.80), and MSPSS outside family subscale score ≤38 (OR = 1.50) were significantly associated with increased risk of loneliness in SIMWs. Loneliness is prevalent in Chinese SIMWs and should be seen as a major public health issue. The high prevalence and many negative health consequences of loneliness highlight the importance of routine screening, evaluation, and treatment of loneliness in this vulnerable population. PMID:27310992

  16. Changes in rumen protozoal community by condensed tannin fractions of different molecular weights from a Leucaena leucocephala hybrid in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saminathan, M; Gan, H M; Abdullah, N; Wong, C M V L; Ramiah, S K; Tan, H Y; Sieo, C C; Ho, Y W

    2017-04-23

    To evaluate the effects of condensed tannins (CTs) fractions of differing molecular weights (MWs) from a Leucaena leucocephala hybrid-Rendang on the rumen protozoal community in vitro. The effects of unfractionated CTs (F0) and CT fractions of different MWs (F1 > F2 > F3 > F4 > F5) on protozoal population and community were evaluated in vitro using rumen microbes and ground guinea grass as the substrate. Higher-MW CT fractions F1 and F2 significantly (P < 0·05) decrease the number of ciliate protozoa. The real-time PCR analysis showed that the total protozoa was significantly (P < 0·05) lower in F0 and all CTs with fractions F1 and F2 having the lowest value. High-throughput sequencing of the partial 18S rRNA gene showed that the genus Entodinium significantly (P < 0·05) decreased with increasing MWs of CT, whereas Anoplodinium-Diplodinium were significantly (P < 0·05) increased. Inclusion of the highest MW CT fraction F1 decreased the relative abundance of the minor genera such as Eudiplodinium and Polyplastron compared to the control and CT fractions F2-F5. CTs of differing MWs could reduce and alter the rumen protozoa population in vitro. This effect was more pronounced for higher-MW CTs. The high MW CTs should be considered as a feed supplement in the ruminant diet to reduce the protozoal population which are known to be associated with methanogens as a means to mitigate methane production in the rumen. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Effects of condensed tannin fractions of different molecular weights from a Leucaena leucocephala hybrid on in vitro methane production and rumen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Saminathan, Mookiah; Sieo, Chin Chin; Abdullah, Norhani; Wong, Clemente Michael Vui Ling; Ho, Yin Wan

    2015-10-01

    Molecular weights (MWs) and their chemical structures are the primary factors determining the influence of condensed tannins (CTs) on animal nutrition and methane (CH4 ) production in ruminants. In this study the MWs of five CT fractions from Leucaena leucocephala hybrid-Rendang (LLR) were determined and the CT fractions were investigated for their effects on CH4 production and rumen fermentation. The number-average molecular weight (Mn ) of fraction F1 (1265.8 Da), which was eluted first, was the highest, followed by those of fractions F2 (1028.6 Da), F3 (652.2 Da), F4 (562.2 Da) and F5 (469.6 Da). The total gas (mL g(-1) dry matter (DM)) and CH4 production decreased significantly (P < 0.05) with increasing MWs of the CT fractions, but there were no significant (P > 0.05) differences between the CT fractions and control on DM degradation. However, the in vitro N disappearance decreased significantly (P < 0.05) with the inclusion of CT fraction F1 (highest MW) compared with the control and other fractions (F2-F5). The inclusion of CT fraction F1 also significantly decreased (P < 0.05) total volatile fatty acid and acetic acid concentrations compared with the control. The acetic/propionic acid ratio was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) by fraction F1 but not by the control and other fractions (F2-F5). The CT fractions of different MWs from LLR could affect rumen fermentation and CH4 production, and the impact was more pronounced for the CT fraction with a higher MW. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. [Peripubertal ovarian cyst torsion as an early complication of undiagnosed polycystic ovarian syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ságodi, László; Schmidt, Ildikó; Vámosi, Ildikó; Barkai, László

    2013-01-20

    The aim of the authors is to present two cases which raise the possibility of an association between polycystic ovarian syndrome/hyperandrogenism and ovarian cyst torsion in peripubertal girls. Androgen excess may cause more frequently ovarian cyst formation in premenarcheal or young adolescents with undiagnosed polycystic ovarian syndrome than in adults. The authors recommend that polycystic ovarian syndrome as well as late onset congenital adrenal hyperplasia should be considered in peripubertal adolescents with ovarian cyst torsion. In case polycystic ovarian syndrome is confirmed, adequate management according to age and pubertal development of the patients should be commenced.

  19. Are Numerical Impairments Syndrome Specific? Evidence from Williams Syndrome and Down's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Sarah J.; Girelli, Luisa; Butterworth, Brian; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2006-01-01

    Background: Several theorists maintain that exact number abilities rely on language-relevant processes whereas approximate number calls on visuo-spatial skills. We chose two genetic disorders, Williams syndrome and Down's syndrome, which differ in their relative abilities in verbal versus spatial skills, to examine this hypothesis. Five…

  20. Reye syndrome - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - Reye syndrome ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Reye Syndrome : National Reye's Syndrome Foundation, Inc. -- www.reyessyndrome.org National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke -- www. ...