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Sample records for mucosal blood perfusion

  1. Asynchronicity of facial blood perfusion in migraine.

    PubMed

    Zaproudina, Nina; Teplov, Victor; Nippolainen, Ervin; Lipponen, Jukka A; Kamshilin, Alexei A; Närhi, Matti; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI) technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology. PMID:24324592

  2. Noninvasive methods of measuring bone blood perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Dyke, J.P.; Aaron, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of bone blood flow and perfusion characteristics in a noninvasive and serial manner would be advantageous in assessing revascularization after trauma and the possible risk of avascular necrosis. Many disease states, including osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and bone neoplasms, result in disturbed bone perfusion. A causal link between bone perfusion and remodeling has shown its importance in sustained healing and regrowth following injury. Measurement of perfusion and permeability within the bone was performed with small and macromolecular contrast media, using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in models of osteoarthritis and the femoral head. Bone blood flow and remodeling was estimated using 18F-Fluoride positron emission tomography in fracture healing and osteoarthritis. Multimodality assessment of bone blood flow, permeability, and remodeling by using noninvasive imaging techniques may provide information essential in monitoring subsequent rates of healing and response to treatment as well as identifying candidates for additional therapeutic or surgical interventions. PMID:20392223

  3. Fluorescence endoscopic imaging for evaluation of gastric mucosal blood flow: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquillon, Nicolas; Mordon, Serge R.; Mathieu, D.; Maunoury, Vincent; Marechal, Xavier-Marie; Neviere, Remi; Wattel, Francis; Chopin, Claude

    1999-02-01

    Microcirculatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract appear to be a major compound of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome secondary to sepsis or septic shock. A better analysis of mucosal hypoperfusion in critically ill patients with sepsis may be helpful for the comprehension of this high mortality-associated syndrome. Fluorescence endoscopy has been recognized as a non-invasive method for both spatial and temporal evaluation of gastrointestinal mucosal perfusion. We performed this imaging technique during routine gastric endoscopy in patients with sepsis criteria. The study included gastric observation and appearance time of gastric fluorescence after an intravenous 10% sodium - fluorescein bolus. Qualitative analysis of high fluorescence areas was compared with mucosal blood flow measurements by laser - Doppler flowmetry. We concluded that the fluorescence endoscopic imaging in critically ill patients with sepsis may reveal spacial and temporal differences in the mucosal microcirculation distribution.

  4. Effects of laser acupuncture on blood perfusion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-ju; Zeng, Chang-chun; Liu, Han-ping; Liu, Song-hao; Liu, Liang-gang

    2006-09-01

    Based on Pennes equation, the influences of the intensity and the impulse frequency of laser acupuncture on the point tissues' blood flow perfusion rate are discussed. We find that the blood perfusion rate of point tissue increases with the intensity of laser acupuncture increasing. After impulse laser acupuncture the point tissue blood perfusion rate increase little, but after continuum laser acupuncture the point tissues blood perfusion rate increase much.

  5. Noncontact blood perfusion mapping in clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakovlev, Dmitry; Dwyer, Vincent; Hu, Sijung; Silberschmidt, Vadim

    2016-04-01

    Non-contact imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) to detect pulsatile blood microcirculation in tissue has been selected as a successor to low spatial resolution and slow scanning blood perfusion techniques currently employed by clinicians. The proposed iPPG system employs a novel illumination source constructed of multiple high power LEDs with narrow spectral emission, which are temporally modulated and synchronised with a high performance sCMOS sensor. To ensure spectrum stability and prevent thermal wavelength drift due to junction temperature variations, each LED features a custom-designed thermal management system to effectively dissipate generated heat and auto-adjust current flow. The use of a multi-wavelength approach has resulted in simultaneous microvascular perfusion monitoring at various tissue depths, which is an added benefit for specific clinical applications. A synchronous detection algorithm to extract weak photoplethysmographic pulse-waveforms demonstrated robustness and high efficiency when applied to even small regions of 5 mm2. The experimental results showed evidences that the proposed system could achieve noticeable accuracy in blood perfusion monitoring by creating complex amplitude and phase maps for the tissue under examination.

  6. Hemangioma of the tongue demonstrating a perfusion blood pool mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Groshar, D.; Israel, O.; Robinson, E.

    1986-02-01

    Perfusion blood pool mismatch using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells (RBCs) in a hemangioma of the tongue is described. The method is useful in the evaluation of size of the residual blood pool after irradiation of the tumor.

  7. Endotracheal cuff pressure and tracheal mucosal blood flow: endoscopic study of effects of four large volume cuffs.

    PubMed Central

    Seegobin, R D; van Hasselt, G L

    1984-01-01

    Large volume, low pressure endotracheal tube cuffs are claimed to have less deleterious effect on tracheal mucosa than high pressure, low volume cuffs. Low pressure cuffs, however, may easily be overinflated to yield pressures that will exceed capillary perfusion pressure. Various large volume cuffed endotracheal tubes were studied, including Portex Profile, Searle Sensiv, Mallinkrodt Hi-Lo, and Lanz. Tracheal mucosal blood flow in 40 patients undergoing surgery was assessed using an endoscopic photographic technique while varying the cuff inflation pressure. It was found that these cuffs when overpressurised impaired mucosal blood flow. This impairment of tracheal mucosal blood flow is an important factor in tracheal morbidity associated with intubation. Hence it is recommended that a cuff inflation pressure of 30 cm H2O (22 mm Hg) should not be exceeded. Images FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 PMID:6423162

  8. Laser Doppler perfusion monitoring and imaging of blood microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Gert E.; Wardell, Karin

    1994-07-01

    Laser Doppler perfusion monitoring is a method of assessing tissue perfusion based on measurements performed using Doppler broadening of monochromatic light scattered in moving blood cells. Ever since laser Doppler perfusion monitors became available about 15 years ago they have been used in numerous applications in both clinical and laboratory settings. The high spatial resolution has in practice manifested itself as one of the main limitations of the method. The reason for this is the difficulty in attaining reproducible values at successive measurement sites because most skin tissue possesses a substantial variation in blood flow even at adjacent measurement sites. In order to overcome this difficulty the laser Doppler perfusion imager was developed. In this camera-like device, the laser beam successively scans the tissue and the Doppler components of the backscattered light are detected by a remote photodiode. After a scanning procedure is complete, a color-coded perfusion map showing the spatial variation of skin blood flow is displayed on a monitor. The operating principle and early applications of this emerging technology are addressed in further detail.

  9. Vascularized organoid engineered by modular assembly enables blood perfusion

    PubMed Central

    McGuigan, Alison P.; Sefton, Michael V.

    2006-01-01

    Tissue engineering is one approach to address the donor-organ shortage, but to attain clinically significant viable cell densities in thick tissues, laboratory-constructed tissues must have an internal vascular supply. We have adopted a biomimetic approach and assembled microscale modular components, consisting of submillimeter-sized collagen gel rods seeded with endothelial cells (ECs) into a (micro)vascularized tissue; in some prototypes the gel contained HepG2 cells to illustrate the possibilities. The EC-covered modules then were assembled into a larger tube and perfused with medium or whole blood. The interstitial spaces among the modules formed interconnected channels that enabled this perfusion. Viable cell densities were high, within an order of magnitude of cell densities within tissues, and the percolating nature of the flow through the construct was evident in microcomputed tomography and Doppler ultrasound measurements. Most importantly, the ECs retained their nonthrombogenic phenotype and delayed clotting times and inhibited the loss of platelets associated with perfusion of whole blood through the construct. Unlike the conventional scaffold and cell-seeding paradigm of other tissue-engineering approaches, this modular construct has the potential to be scalable, uniform, and perfusable with whole blood, circumventing the limitations of other approaches. PMID:16864785

  10. Reflectance Photoplethysmography as Noninvasive Monitoring of Tissue Blood Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Abay, Tomas Ysehak; Kyriacou, Panayiotis A

    2015-09-01

    In the last decades, photoplethysmography (PPG) has been used as a noninvasive technique for monitoring arterial oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry (PO), whereas near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been employed for monitoring tissue blood perfusion. While NIRS offers more parameters to evaluate oxygen delivery and consumption in deep tissues, PO only assesses the state of oxygen delivery. For a broader assessment of blood perfusion, this paper explores the utilization of dual-wavelength PPG by using the pulsatile (ac) and continuous (dc) PPG for the estimation of arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) by conventional PO. Additionally, the Beer-Lambert law is applied to the dc components only for the estimation of changes in deoxyhemoglobin (HHb), oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), and total hemoglobin (tHb) as in NIRS. The system was evaluated on the forearm of 21 healthy volunteers during induction of venous occlusion (VO) and total occlusion (TO). A reflectance PPG probe and NIRS sensor were applied above the brachioradialis, PO sensors were applied on the fingers, and all the signals were acquired simultaneously. While NIRS and forearm SpO2 indicated VO, SpO2 from the finger did not exhibit any significant drop from baseline. During TO, all the indexes indicated the change in blood perfusion. HHb, HbO2, and tHb changes estimated by PPG presented high correlation with the same parameters obtained by NIRS during VO (r(2) = 0.960, r(2) = 0.821, and r(2) = 0.974, respectively) and during TO (r(2) = 0.988, r(2) = 0.940, and r(2) = 0.938, respectively). The system demonstrated the ability to extract valuable information from PPG signals for a broader assessment of tissue blood perfusion. PMID:25838515

  11. Changes in human colonic mucosal-submucosal blood flow after body surface cooling.

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, D W; Davison, J S; Spence, V A; Walker, W F

    1981-01-01

    Mucosal-submucosal blood flow in the human colostomy was measured by a radioisotopic washout technique. Changes in blood flow were recorded in 10 subjects after peripheral vasoconstriction evoked by surface cooling of the body. Accompanying the vasoconstriction was a rise in mucosal-submucosal blood flow of approximately 40%. An interpretation of the blood flow changes and the associated alterations in mean arterial blood pressure provide evidence for vasomotor and local regulatory control in the colostomy microcirculation. We believe, therefore that the colostomy is a suitable preparation for studying the human colonic microcirculation. PMID:7262624

  12. Endoscopic measurements of canine colonic mucosal blood flow using hydrogen gas clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Soybel, D.I.; Wan, Y.L.; Ashley, S.W.; Yan, Z.Y.; Ordway, F.S.; Cheung, L.Y.

    1987-04-01

    We have examined the feasibility of hydrogen (H/sub 2/) clearance for endoscopic measurements of colonic mucosal blood flow in anesthetized dogs. In 6 animals, measurements of H2 clearance did not differ significantly in different regions of the sigmoid colon and they were highly reproducible on different days. In a total of 12 dogs, measurements of H2 clearance correlated closely with those obtained using radioactive microspheres under resting conditions and, in 4 dogs, during infusion of vasopressin. In 8 dogs, ligation of the major arteries supplying the sigmoid colon resulted in an acute 60% decrease in sigmoid mucosal blood flow; however, in 5 animals that survived the procedure, mucosal blood flow returned nearly to control levels as early as 3 days after operation. Endoscopic H/sub 2/ clearance thus appears to be feasible for measuring mucosal blood flow in the colon. Serial measurements of H/sub 2/ clearance may prove useful in characterizing the role of mucosal blood flow in the pathogenesis of various forms of human colonic disease.

  13. Noninvasive Blood Perfusion Measurements of an Isolated Rat Liver and an Anesthetized Rat Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Mudaliar, Ashvinikumar V.; Ellis, Brent E.; Ricketts, Patricia L.; Lanz, Otto I.; Lee, Charles Y.; Diller, Thomas E.; Scott, Elaine P.

    2008-01-01

    A simple, cost effective, and noninvasive blood perfusion system is tested in animal models. The system uses a small sensor to measure the heat transfer response to a thermal event (convective cooling) imposed on the tissue surface. Heat flux data are compared with a mathematical model of the tissue to estimate both blood perfusion and thermal contact resistance between the tissue and the probe. The perfusion system was evaluated for repeatability and sensitivity using isolated rat liver and exposed rat kidney tests. Perfusion in the isolated liver tests was varied by controlling the flow of the perfusate into the liver, and the perfusion in the exposed kidney tests was varied by temporarily occluding blood flow through the renal artery and vein. The perfusion estimated by the convective perfusion probe was in good agreement with that of the metered flow of the perfusate into the liver model. The liver tests indicated that the probe can be used to detect small changes in perfusion (0.005 ml/ml/s). The probe qualitatively tracked the changes in the perfusion in the kidney model due to occlusion of the renal artery and vein. PMID:19045542

  14. Acute effects of Helicobacter pylori extracts on gastric mucosal blood flow in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Henriksnäs, Johanna; Atuma, Christer; Phillipson, Mia; Sandler, Stellan; Engstrand, Lars; Holm, Lena

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanisms underlying the reduction in gastric blood flow induced by a luminal water extract of Helicobacter pylori (HPE). METHODS: The stomachs of isoflurane-anesthetized mice were exteriorized, and the mucosal surface exposed. Blood flow was measured with the laser-Doppler technique, and systemic arterial blood pressure monitored. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to water extract produced from H pylori strain 88-23. To investigate the role of a nerve- or iNOS-mediated pathway, we used intraluminal lidocaine and iNOS-/- mice. Blood flow response to the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA) was also assessed. RESULTS: In wild-type mice, HPE decreased mucosal blood flow by approximately 30%. This reduction was abolished in iNOS-deficient mice, and by pre-treatment with lidocaine. Luminally applied ADMA resulted in reduction in blood flow similar to that observed in wild-type mice exposed to HPE. CONCLUSION: A H pylori water extract reduces gastric mucosal blood flow acutely through iNOS- and nerve-mediated pathways. PMID:19132773

  15. Mucosal acid causes gastric mucosal microcirculatory disturbance in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Funatsu, Toshiyuki; Chono, Koji; Hirata, Takuya; Keto, Yoshihiro; Kimoto, Aishi; Sasamata, Masao

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism by which nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) suppress gastric mucosal blood flow is not fully understood, although the depletion of mucosal prostaglandin E2 has been proposed as one possible explanation. We investigated the role of gastric acid on gastric mucosal blood flow in NSAID-treated rats. A rat stomach was mounted in an ex vivo chamber, and gastric mucosal blood flow was measured sequentially in a 5-mm2 area of the gastric corpus using a scanning laser Doppler perfusion image system. Results showed that diclofenac (5 mg/kg s.c.) and indomethacin (10 mg/kg s.c.) did not affect gastric mucosal blood flow, although both strongly decreased mucosal prostaglandin E2 when saline was instilled into the gastric chamber. On replacement of the saline in the chamber with 100 mM hydrochloric acid, these drugs caused a decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow levels within 30 min. The specific cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors celecoxib (50 mg/kg s.c.) and rofecoxib (25 mg/kg s.c.) did not affect mucosal prostaglandin E2 level, nor did they decrease gastric mucosal blood flow, even when hydrochloric acid was added to the chamber. Furthermore, measurement of vasoconstrictive factors present in the mucosa showed that endothelin-1 levels increased after administration of diclofenac s.c. in the presence of intragastric hydrochloric acid. This indicates that the presence of mucosal hydrochloric acid plays an important role in the NSAID-induced decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow, while the COX-1-derived basal prostaglandin E2, which is unlikely to control gastric mucosal blood flow itself, protects microcirculatory systems from mucosal hydrochloric acid.

  16. Effect of shed blood retransfusion on pulmonary perfusion after total knee arthroplasty: a prospective controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Eser; Kose, Kamil Cagri; Fidan, Fatma; Ergan, Volkan; Fidan, Hüseyin

    2006-01-01

    Postoperative shed blood retransfusion (autotransfusion) is a commonly used salvage method following major surgical operations, such as total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The systemic effects of shed blood are still unclear. We studied the effect of residual substances in the retransfused shed blood, on lung perfusion after TKA. Fifteen unilateral and one bilateral TKAs were performed with autotransfusion (the study group) and 15 unilateral and three bilateral TKAs were performed in a control group. Lung X-rays, arterial blood gases (ABG), D-dimer values, and lung perfusion scintigraphies were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. A mean of 300.0 ± 335.6 ml of bank blood was needed in the autotransfusion group and a mean of 685.7 ± 365.5 ml of bank blood was needed in the control group (p=0.001). There was a postoperative segmental perfusion defect at the lateral segment of the superior lobe of the left lung in one patient of the control group and he also had risk factors for thrombosis. Although both groups had a decrease in lung perfusion postoperatively, there were no significant differences among the groups regarding the lung perfusion scintigraphy, chest X-rays, ABG, and D-dimer values. In conclusion, although pulmonary perfusion diminishes following TKA, shed blood retransfusion does not add any risk to pulmonary perfusion. PMID:17115155

  17. Strong mucosal immune responses in SIV infected macaques contribute to viral control and preserved CD4+ T-cell levels in blood and mucosal tissues

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Since there is still no protective HIV vaccine available, better insights into immune mechanism of persons effectively controlling HIV replication in the absence of any therapy should contribute to improve further vaccine designs. However, little is known about the mucosal immune response of this small unique group of patients. Using the SIV-macaque-model for AIDS, we had the rare opportunity to analyze 14 SIV-infected rhesus macaques durably controlling viral replication (controllers). We investigated the virological and immunological profile of blood and three different mucosal tissues and compared their data to those of uninfected and animals progressing to AIDS-like disease (progressors). Results Lymphocytes from blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and duodenal and colonic biopsies were phenotypically characterized by polychromatic flow cytometry. In controllers, we observed higher levels of CD4+, CD4+CCR5+ and Gag-specific CD8+ T-cells as well as lower immune activation in blood and all mucosal sites compared to progressors. However, we could also demonstrate that immunological changes are distinct between these three mucosal sites. Intracellular cytokine staining demonstrated a significantly higher systemic and mucosal CD8+ Gag-specific cellular immune response in controllers than in progressors. Most remarkable was the polyfunctional cytokine profile of CD8+ lymphocytes in BAL of controllers, which significantly dominated over their blood response. The overall suppression of viral replication in the controllers was confirmed by almost no detectable viral RNA in blood and all mucosal tissues investigated. Conclusion A strong and complex virus-specific CD8+ T-cell response in blood and especially in mucosal tissue of SIV-infected macaques was associated with low immune activation and an efficient suppression of viral replication. This likely afforded a repopulation of CD4+ T-cells in different mucosal compartments to almost normal levels. We

  18. Radionuclide Tracers for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging and Blood Flow Quantification.

    PubMed

    deKemp, Robert A; Renaud, Jennifer M; Klein, Ran; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2016-02-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging is performed most commonly using Tc-99m-sestamibi or tetrofosmin SPECT as well as Rb-82-rubidium or N-13-ammonia PET. Diseased-to-normal tissue contrast is determined by the tracer retention fraction, which decreases nonlinearly with flow. Reduced tissue perfusion results in reduced tracer retention, but the severity of perfusion defects is typically underestimated by 20% to 40%. Compared to SPECT, retention of the PET tracers is more linearly related to flow, and therefore, the perfusion defects are measured more accurately using N-13-ammonia or Rb-82. PMID:26590778

  19. Effects of ebrotidine on aspirin-induced gastric mucosal damage and blood flow in humans.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Kwiecien, N; Sito, E; Obtulowicz, W; Kaminski, K; Oleksy, J

    1993-12-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) such as aspirin (ASA) damage the gastric mucosa both in normal subjects and in arthritic patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective action of a new H2-receptor antagonist, ebrotidine, in the prevention of ASA-induced acute mucosal injury in the stomach of healthy volunteers. In a double-blind randomized crossover study 10 male volunteers received treatment with either placebo plus ASA (500 mg) or ebrotidine (800 mg) plus ASA twice daily for 3 days with 10 days' washout period between treatments. The mean number of gastric erosions seen at endoscopy after treatment with ebrotidine plus ASA (2.0 +/- 0.3) was significantly lower than that after placebo plus ASA (3.7 +/- 0.2). This reduction in lesion core by ebrotidine was accompanied by a significant increase in gastric blood flow (by 15% in corpus and 26% in antrum), by a rise in transmucosal potential difference (by 12%), and by a decrease of mucosal microbleeding. Ebrotidine afforded substantial protection from ASA-induced injury to the gastric mucosa, and this was accompanied by increase of the mucosal blood flow. We conclude that ebrotidine provides mucosal protection for patients taking NSAIDs.

  20. [Study on optimal selection of structure of vaneless centrifugal blood pump with constraints on blood perfusion and on blood damage indexes].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhaoyan; Pan, Youlian; Chen, Zhenglong; Zhang, Tianyi; Lu, Lijun

    2012-12-01

    This paper is aimed to study the optimal selection of structure of vaneless centrifugal blood pump. The optimal objective is determined according to requirements of clinical use. Possible schemes are generally worked out based on structural feature of vaneless centrifugal blood pump. The optimal structure is selected from possible schemes with constraints on blood perfusion and blood damage indexes. Using an optimal selection method one can find the optimum structure scheme from possible schemes effectively. The results of numerical simulation of optimal blood pump showed that the method of constraints of blood perfusion and blood damage is competent for the requirements of selection of the optimal blood pumps.

  1. Measuring blood delivery to solitary pulmonary nodules using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zhifeng; Shen, Li; Gao, Ling; Ford, James C.; Makedon, Fillia S.; Pearlman, Justin D.

    2006-03-01

    With perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI), perfusion describes the amount of blood passing through a block of tissue in a certain period of time. In pMRI, the tissue having more blood passing through will show higher intensity value as more contrast-labeled blood arrives. Perfusion reflects the delivery of essential nutrients to a block of tissue, and is an important parameter for the tissue status. Considering solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN), perfusion differences between malignant and benign nodules have been studied by different techniques. Much effort has been put into its characterization. In this paper, we proposed and implemented extraction of the SPN time intensity profile to measure blood delivery to solitary pulmonary nodules, describing their perfusion effects. In this method, a SPN time intensity profile is created based on intensity values of the solitary pulmonary nodule in lung pMRI images over time. This method has two steps: nodule tracking and profile clustering. Nodule tracking aligns the solitary pulmonary nodule in pMRI images taken at different time points, dealing with nodule movement resulted from breathing and body movement. Profile clustering implements segmentation of the nodule region and extraction of the time intensity profile of a solitary pulmonary nodule. SPN time intensity profiles reflect patterns of blood delivery to solitary pulmonary nodules, giving us a description of perfusion effect and indirect evidence of tumor angiogenesis. Analysis on SPN time intensity profiles will help the diagnosis of malignant nodules for early lung cancer detection.

  2. Normothermic blood perfusion of isolated rabbit kidneys. III. In vitro physiology of kidneys after perfusion with Euro-Collins solution or 7.5 M cryoprotectant (VS4).

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Françoise G; Khirabadi, Bijan S; Fahy, Gregory M

    2002-06-01

    Cryopreservation of solid organs might be possible using a mixture of cell-permeable agents, cryoprotectants (CPA), which are designed to completely preclude ice crystal formation during cooling to cryogenic temperatures. The effects of a specific prototype solution (VS4) were evaluated by normothermic blood perfusion in vitro. Rabbit kidneys were divided into three groups: untreated controls ( n=7), Euro-Collins (EC)-perfused controls ( n=6) and VS4 (49%, w/v) CPA-perfused kidneys ( n=7). After a 2-h blood perfusion, five of the seven CPA-perfused kidneys developed polyuria (0.21 mlxmin(-1)xg(-1)) relative to untreated controls (0.07 mlxmin(-1)xg(-1)) or EC-perfused kidneys (0.06 mlxmin(-1)xg(-1)), owing to the lower reabsorption of water (34.3%), Na(+) (34.2%) and glucose (35.6%). Furthermore, two kidneys were non-functional with virtually no urine production. Reduced tubular function was associated with reduced oxygen consumption (3.6 versus 2.3 versus 2.0 micromolexmin(-1)xg(-1) for controls, EC- and CPA-perfused kidneys, respectively) and increased weight gain (17% versus 20% versus 30%, respectively) after blood perfusion. Therefore, the current results provide insight into both the physiological effects of VS4 and the limits of reversibility of renal pathophysiological states. Our results also indicate that in vitro monitoring of oxygen consumption and weight gain of perfused organs could be used as predictors of renal function.

  3. Quantitative assessment of angiogenesis, perfused blood vessels and endothelial tip cells in the postnatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wälchli, Thomas; Mateos, José María; Weinman, Oliver; Babic, Daniela; Regli, Luca; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Gerhardt, Holger; Schwab, Martin E; Vogel, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    During development and in various diseases of the CNS, new blood vessel formation starts with endothelial tip cell selection and vascular sprout migration, followed by the establishment of functional, perfused blood vessels. Here we describe a method that allows the assessment of these distinct angiogenic steps together with antibody-based protein detection in the postnatal mouse brain. Intravascular and perivascular markers such as Evans blue (EB), isolectin B4 (IB4) or laminin (LN) are used alongside simultaneous immunofluorescence on the same sections. By using confocal laser-scanning microscopy and stereological methods for analysis, detailed quantification of the 3D postnatal brain vasculature for perfused and nonperfused vessels (e.g., vascular volume fraction, vessel length and number, number of branch points and perfusion status of the newly formed vessels) and characterization of sprouting activity (e.g., endothelial tip cell density, filopodia number) can be obtained. The entire protocol, from mouse perfusion to vessel analysis, takes ∼10 d.

  4. A low-cost, small volume circuit for autologous blood normothermic perfusion of rabbit organs.

    PubMed

    Worner, Murray; Poore, Samuel; Tilkorn, Daniel; Lokmic, Zerina; Penington, Anthony J

    2014-04-01

    We have designed a laboratory extracorporeal normothermic blood perfusion system for whole organs (e.g., kidney) that achieves pulsatile flow, low levels of hemolysis, and a blood priming volume of 60 mL or less. Using this uniquely designed extracorporeal circuit, we have achieved perfusion of two isolated ex vivo constructs. In the first experiment, we successfully perfused a rabbit epigastric flap based on the femoral vessels. In the second experiment, we were able to perfuse the isolated rabbit kidney for 48 h (range for all kidneys was 12-48 h) with excellent urine output, normal arterial blood gasses at 24 h, and normal ex vivo kidney histology at the conclusion of the experiments. These parameters have not been achieved before with any known or previously published laboratory extracorporeal circuits. The study has implications for prolonged organ perfusion prior to transplantation and for tissue engineering of vascularized tissues, such as by the perfusion of decellularized organs.

  5. Near Infrared Voltage Sensitive Fluorescent Dyes Optimized for Optical Mapping in Blood-Perfused Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Matiukas, Arvydas; Mitrea, Bogdan G.; Qin, Maochun; Pertsov, Arkady M.; Shvedko, Alexander G.; Warren, Mark D.; Zaitsev, Alexey V.; Wuskell, Joseph P.; Wei, Mei-de; Watras, James; Loew, Leslie M.

    2007-01-01

    Background Styryl voltage-sensitive dyes (e.g. di-4-ANEPPS) have been successfully used for optical mapping in cardiac cells and tissues. However, their utility for probing electrical activity deep inside the myocardial wall and in blood-perfused myocardium has been limited because of light scattering and high absorption by endogenous chromophores and hemoglobin at blue-green excitation wavelengths. Objectives The purpose of this study was to characterize two new styryl dyes Di-4-ANBDQPQ (JPW-6003) and Di-4-ANBDQBS (JPW-6033) optimized for blood-perfused tissue and intramural optical mapping. Methods Voltage-dependent spectra were recorded in a model lipid bilayer. Optical mapping experiments were conducted in 4 species (mouse, rat, guinea pig, and pig). Hearts were Langendorff-perfused using Tyrode’s solution and blood (pig). Dyes were loaded via bolus injection into perfusate. Transillumination experiments were conducted in isolated coronary-perfused pig right ventricular wall preparations. Results The optimal excitation wavelength in cardiac tissues (650nm) was >70nm beyond the absorption maximum of hemoglobin. Voltage-sensitivity of both dyes was ~10–20%. Signal decay half-life due to dye internalization was 80–210 minutes, which is 5–7 times slower than for di-4-ANEPPS. In transillumination mode, ΔF/F was as high as 20%. In blood-perfused tissues, ΔF/F reached 5.5% (1.8 times higher than for di-4-ANEPPS). Conclusion We have synthesized and characterized two new NIR dyes with excitation/emission wavelengths shifted >100nm to the red. They provide both high voltage-sensitivity, and 5–7 times slower internalization rate compared to conventional dyes. The dyes are optimized for deeper tissue probing and optical mapping of blood-perfused tissue, and can also be used for conventional applications. PMID:17954405

  6. Relative indexes of cutaneous blood perfusion measured by real-time laser Doppler imaging (LDI) in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Seyed Jafari, S Morteza; Schawkat, Megir; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Shafighi, Maziar

    2014-07-01

    We used real-time LDI to study regional variations in microcirculatory perfusion in healthy candidates to establish a new methodology for global perfusion body mapping that is based on intra-individual perfusion index ratios. Our study included 74 (37 female) healthy volunteers aged between 22 and 30 years (mean 24.49). Imaging was performed using a recent microcirculation-imaging camera (EasyLDI) for different body regions of each volunteer. The perfusion values were reported in Arbitrary Perfusion Units (APU). The relative perfusion indexes for each candidate's body region were then obtained by normalization with the perfusion value of the forehead. Basic parameters such as weight, height, and blood pressure were also measured and analyzed. The highest mean perfusion value was reported in the forehead area (259.21APU). Mean perfusion in the measured parts of the body correlated positively with mean forehead value, while there was no significant correlation between forehead blood perfusion values and room temperature, BMI, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure (p=0.420, 0.623, 0.488, 0.099, respectively). Analysis of the data showed that perfusion indexes were not significantly different between male and female volunteers except for the ventral upper arm area (p=.001). LDI is a non-invasive, fast technique that opens several avenues for clinical applications. The mean perfusion indexes are useful in clinical practice for monitoring patients before and after surgical interventions. Perfusion values can be predicted for different body parts for patients only by taking the forehead perfusion value and using the perfusion index ratios to obtain expected normative perfusion values. PMID:24788075

  7. Relative indexes of cutaneous blood perfusion measured by real-time laser Doppler imaging (LDI) in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Seyed Jafari, S Morteza; Schawkat, Megir; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Shafighi, Maziar

    2014-07-01

    We used real-time LDI to study regional variations in microcirculatory perfusion in healthy candidates to establish a new methodology for global perfusion body mapping that is based on intra-individual perfusion index ratios. Our study included 74 (37 female) healthy volunteers aged between 22 and 30 years (mean 24.49). Imaging was performed using a recent microcirculation-imaging camera (EasyLDI) for different body regions of each volunteer. The perfusion values were reported in Arbitrary Perfusion Units (APU). The relative perfusion indexes for each candidate's body region were then obtained by normalization with the perfusion value of the forehead. Basic parameters such as weight, height, and blood pressure were also measured and analyzed. The highest mean perfusion value was reported in the forehead area (259.21APU). Mean perfusion in the measured parts of the body correlated positively with mean forehead value, while there was no significant correlation between forehead blood perfusion values and room temperature, BMI, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure (p=0.420, 0.623, 0.488, 0.099, respectively). Analysis of the data showed that perfusion indexes were not significantly different between male and female volunteers except for the ventral upper arm area (p=.001). LDI is a non-invasive, fast technique that opens several avenues for clinical applications. The mean perfusion indexes are useful in clinical practice for monitoring patients before and after surgical interventions. Perfusion values can be predicted for different body parts for patients only by taking the forehead perfusion value and using the perfusion index ratios to obtain expected normative perfusion values.

  8. In vitro fabrication of functional three-dimensional tissues with perfusable blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Sakaguchi, Katsuhisa; Dobashi, Izumi; Wada, Masanori; Yamato, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Eiji; Umezu, Mitsuo; Okano, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    In vitro fabrication of functional vascularized three-dimensional tissues has been a long-standing objective in the field of tissue engineering. Here we report a technique to engineer cardiac tissues with perfusable blood vessels in vitro. Using resected tissue with a connectable artery and vein as a vascular bed, we overlay triple-layer cardiac cell sheets produced from coculture with endothelial cells, and support the tissue construct with media perfused in a bioreactor. We show that endothelial cells connect to capillaries in the vascular bed and form tubular lumens, creating in vitro perfusable blood vessels in the cardiac cell sheets. Thicker engineered tissues can be produced in vitro by overlaying additional triple-layer cell sheets. The vascularized cardiac tissues beat and can be transplanted with blood vessel anastomoses. This technique may create new opportunities for in vitro tissue engineering and has potential therapeutic applications. PMID:23360990

  9. Pattern of brain blood perfusion in tinnitus patients using technetium-99m SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudian, Saeid; Farhadi, Mohammad; Gholami, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaei, Mohammad; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Lenarz, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Tinnitus is associated with an increased activity in central auditory system as demonstrated by neuroimaging studies. Brain perfusion scanning using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was done to understand the pattern of brain blood perfusion of tinnitus subjects and find the areas which are mostly abnormal in these patients. Materials and Methods: A number of 122 patients with tinnitus were enrolled to this cross-sectional study. They underwent SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain, and the images were fused to find the regions with abnormal perfusion. Results: SPECT scan results were abnormal in 101 patients (83%). Most patients had bilateral abnormal perfusion (N = 65, 53.3%), and most subjects had abnormality in middle-temporal gyrus (N = 83, 68%) and temporoparietal cortex (N = 46, 37.7%). Patients with multifocal involvement had the least mean age than other 2 groups (patients with no abnormality and unifocal abnormality) (P value = 0.045). Conclusions: Brain blood perfusion pattern differs in patient with tinnitus than others. These patients have brain perfusion abnormality, mostly in auditory gyrus (middle temporal) and associative cortex (temporoparietal cortex). Multifocal abnormalities might be due to more cognitive and emotional brain centers involvement due to tinnitus or more stress and anxiety of tinnitus in the young patients. PMID:23267375

  10. The relationship between red blood cell deformability metrics and perfusion of an artificial microvascular network

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Jose M.; Nielsen, Nathan D.; Vignes, Seth M.; Chen, Tanya G.; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of red blood cells (RBC) to undergo a wide range of deformations while traversing the microvasculature is crucial for adequate perfusion. Interpretation of RBC deformability measurements performed in vitro in the context of microvascular perfusion has been notoriously difficult. This study compares the measurements of RBC deformability performed using micropore filtration and ektacytometry with the RBC ability to perfuse an artificial microvascular network (AMVN). Human RBCs were collected from healthy consenting volunteers, leukoreduced, washed and exposed to graded concentrations (0% – 0.08%) of glutaraldehyde (a non-specific protein cross-linker) and diamide (a spectrin-specific protein cross-linker) to impair the deformability of RBCs. Samples comprising cells with two different levels of deformability were created by adding non-deformable RBCs (hardened by exposure to 0.08% glutaraldehyde) to the sample of normal healthy RBCs. Ektacytometry indicated a nearly linear decline in RBC deformability with increasing glutaraldehyde concentration. Micropore filtration showed a significant reduction only for concentrations of glutaraldehyde higher than 0.04%. Neither micropore filtration nor ektacytometry measurements could accurately predict the AMVN perfusion. Treatment with diamide reduced RBC deformability as indicated by ektacytometry, but had no significant effect on either micropore filtration or the AMVN perfusion. Both micropore filtration and ektacytometry showed a linear decline in effective RBC deformability with increasing fraction of non-deformable RBCs in the sample. The corresponding decline in the AMVN perfusion plateaued above 50%, reflecting the innate ability of blood flow in the microvasculature to bypass occluded capillaries. Our results suggest that in vitro measurements of RBC deformability performed using either micropore filtration or ektacytometry may not represent the ability of same RBCs to perfuse microvascular networks

  11. The Relationship Between Some Complete Blood Count Parameters and Myocardial Perfusion: A Scintigraphic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ozdemir, Semra; Barutcu, Ahmet; Gazi, Emine; Tan, Yusuf Ziya; Turkon, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that there is a relationship between some inflammatory and biochemical markers derived from complete blood count (CBC) such as neutrophil/lymphocyte (N/L) ratio, platelet/lymphocyte (P/L) ratio, platelet distribution width (PDW), red blood cell distribution width (RDW), and coronary artery disease (CAD). The aim of this study was to determine N/L ratio, P/L ratio, PDW values, and RDW values, which are associated with myocardial perfusion in patients diagnosed with CAD. This study included 262 patients (149 with myocardial ischemia/infarction and 113 with normal myocardial perfusion) undergoing myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) with CBC within 90 days of MPS. Myocardial perfusion parameters such as summed stress score and summed difference score (SDS) were compared with N/L ratio, P/L ratio, PDW values, and RDW values. Neutrophil counts and N/L ratios were significantly higher in patients diagnosed with myocardial ischemia and/or infarct. However, there was no statistically significant relationship between myocardial perfusion abnormalities and P/L ratio, PDW values, and RDW values. This study showed that N/L ratio is related to myocardial ischemia/infarction and correlated to left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). PMID:26420991

  12. Effect of oxymetazoline on nasal and sinus mucosal blood flow in the rabbit as measured with laser-Doppler flowmetry.

    PubMed

    Akerlund, A; Arfors, K E; Bende, M; Intaglietta, M

    1993-02-01

    The effect of topical oxymetazoline hydrochloride on the blood flow of the nasal and sinus mucosa of the rabbit was measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry. Oxymetazoline, the active component in clinically used nose drops, induced a dose-dependent decrease of the nasal mucosal blood flow. This effect has previously been shown in humans and suggests the presence of alpha 2-adrenoceptors in the nasal mucosa of the rabbit. Doses of oxymetazoline used clinically in humans induced a 50% reduction of blood flow in rabbits. Rhythmic variations in blood flow were seen in 30% of the rabbits after administration of oxymetazoline. Additionally, oxymetazoline induced a dose-dependent decrease of the mucosal blood flow in the maxillary sinus when the drug was applied in the nose. A vasoconstricting effect of oxymetazoline on the arteries penetrating the maxillary sinus ostium is a possible explanation. This can have positive as well as negative consequences on acute sinus infections.

  13. Blood temperature and perfusion to exercising and non‐exercising human limbs

    PubMed Central

    Calbet, José A. L.; Boushel, Robert; Helge, Jørn W.; Søndergaard, Hans; Munch‐Andersen, Thor; van Hall, Gerrit; Mortensen, Stefan P.; Secher, Niels H.

    2015-01-01

    New Findings What is the central question of this study? Temperature‐sensitive mechanisms are thought to contribute to blood‐flow regulation, but the relationship between exercising and non‐exercising limb perfusion and blood temperature is not established. What is the main finding and its importance? The close coupling among perfusion, blood temperature and aerobic metabolism in exercising and non‐exercising extremities across different exercise modalities and activity levels and the tight association between limb vasodilatation and increases in plasma ATP suggest that both temperature‐ and metabolism‐sensitive mechanisms are important for the control of human limb perfusion, possibly by activating ATP release from the erythrocytes. Temperature‐sensitive mechanisms may contribute to blood‐flow regulation, but the influence of temperature on perfusion to exercising and non‐exercising human limbs is not established. Blood temperature (T B), blood flow and oxygen uptake (V˙O2) in the legs and arms were measured in 16 healthy humans during 90 min of leg and arm exercise and during exhaustive incremental leg or arm exercise. During prolonged exercise, leg blood flow (LBF) was fourfold higher than arm blood flow (ABF) in association with higher T B and limb V˙O2. Leg and arm vascular conductance during exercise compared with rest was related closely to T B (r 2 = 0.91; P < 0.05), plasma ATP (r 2 = 0.94; P < 0.05) and limb V˙O2 (r 2 = 0.99; P < 0.05). During incremental leg exercise, LBF increased in association with elevations in T B and limb V˙O2, whereas ABF, arm T B and V˙O2 remained largely unchanged. During incremental arm exercise, both ABF and LBF increased in relationship to similar increases in V˙O2. In 12 trained males, increases in femoral T B and LBF during incremental leg exercise were mirrored by similar pulmonary artery T B and cardiac output dynamics, suggesting that processes in active limbs dominate central

  14. Optical microangiography reveals collateral blood perfusion dynamics in mouse cerebral cortex after focal stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Utku; Li, Yuandong; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-03-01

    Arteriolo-arteriolar anastomosis's role in regulating blood perfusion through penetrating arterioles during stroke is yet to be discovered. We apply ultra-high sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) and Doppler optical microangiography (DOMAG) techniques to evaluate vessel diameter and red blood cell velocity changes in large number of pial and penetrating arterioles in relation with arteriolo-arteriolar anastomosis (AAA) during and after focal stroke. Thanks to the high sensitivity of UHS-OMAG, we were able to image pial microvasculature up to capillary level through a cranial window (9 mm2), and DOMAG provided clear image of penetrating arterioles up to 500μm depth. Results showed that penetrating arterioles close to a strong AAA connection dilate whereas penetrating arterioles constrict significantly in weaker AAA regions. These results suggest that AAA plays a major role in active regulation of the pial arterioles, and weaker AAA connections lead to poor blood perfusion to penumbra through penetrating arterioles.

  15. Pulmonary Perfused Blood Volume with Dual-Energy CT as Surrogate for Pulmonary Perfusion Assessed with Dynamic Multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Fuld, Matthew K.; Halaweish, Ahmed F.; Haynes, Susan E.; Divekar, Abhay A.; Guo, Junfeng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare measurements of regional pulmonary perfused blood volume (PBV) and pulmonary blood flow (PBF) obtained with computed tomography (CT) in two pig models. Materials and Methods: The institutional animal care and use committee approved all animal studies. CT-derived PBF and PBV were determined in four anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, supine swine by using two methods for creating pulmonary parenchymal perfusion heterogeneity. Two animals were examined after sequentially moving a pulmonary arterial balloon catheter from a distal to a central location, and two others were examined over a range of static airway pressures, which varied the extents of regional PBF. Lung sections were divided into blocks and Pearson correlation coefficients calculated to compare matching regions between the two methods. Results: CT-derived PBF, CT-derived PBV, and their associated coefficients of variation (CV) were closely correlated on a region-by-region basis in both the balloon occlusion (Pearson R = 0.91 and 0.73 for animals 1 and 2, respectively; Pearson R = 0.98 and 0.87 for comparison of normalized mean and CV for animals 1 and 2, respectively) and lung inflation studies (Pearson R = 0.94 and 0.74 for animals 3 and 4, respectively; Pearson R = 0.94 and 0.69 for normalized mean and CV for animals 3 and 4, respectively). When accounting for region-based effects, correlations remained highly significant at the P < .001 level. Conclusion: CT-derived PBV heterogeneity is a suitable surrogate for CT-derived PBF heterogeneity. ©RSNA, 2012 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.12112789/-/DC1 PMID:23192773

  16. The blood perfusion and NADH/FAD content combined analysis in patients with diabetes foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremin, Victor V.; Sidorov, Victor V.; Krupatkin, Alexander I.; Galstyan, Gagik R.; Novikova, Irina N.; Zherebtsova, Angelina I.; Zherebtsov, Evgeny A.; Dunaev, Andrey V.; Abdulvapova, Zera N.; Litvinova, Karina S.; Rafailov, Ilya E.; Sokolovski, Sergei G.; Rafailov, Edik U.

    2016-03-01

    Skin blood microcirculation and the metabolism activity of tissue were examined on the patients with type 2 diabetes. Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) with 1064 nm laser light source and fluorescence spectroscopy (FS) with excitation light of 365 nm and 450 nm have been used to monitor the blood perfusion and the content of coenzymes NADH and FAD. Concluding, the proposed combined LDF and tissue FS approach allows to identify the significant violations in the blood microcirculation and metabolic activity for type 2 diabetes patients.

  17. Photoacoustic imaging of blood perfusion in tissue and phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilatou, Magdalena C.; Kolkman, Roy G. M.; Hondebrink, Erwin; Bolt, Rene A.; de Mul, Frits F. M.

    2001-06-01

    To localize and monitor the blood content in tissue we developed a very sensitive photo-acoustical detector. PVDF has been used as piezo-electric material. In this detector also fibers for the illumination of the sample are integrated. Resolution is about 20 (m in depth and about 50-100 m laterally). We use 532 nm light. We will show how photoacoustics can be used for measuring the thickness of tissue above bone. We will also report measurements on tissue phantoms: e.g. a vessel delta from the epigastric artery branching of a Wistar rat, filled with an artificial blood-resembling absorber. The measurements have been carried out on phantoms containing vessels at several depths. Signal processing was enhanced by Fourier processing of the data.

  18. Superficial nasal mucosal blood flow and nasal patency following topical oxymetazoline hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Witek, T J; Canestrari, D A; Hernandez, J R; Miller, R D; Yang, J Y; Riker, D K

    1992-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of 60 micrograms oxymetazoline on nasal mucosal blood flow (NMBF) measured by laser Doppler velocimetry. Nasal airflow (measured by anterior rhinomanometry) and subjectively perceived airflow (measured by visual analog scales) were also evaluated. A reduction of NMBF (mL/100 g tissue/min) was observed following local application of 60 micrograms oxymetazoline that was not observed after the vehicle was applied. For example, NMBF at baseline was measured at 78.8 +/- 10.3 mL/100 g tissue/min (mean +/- SEM). During the five minutes following vehicle application, mean values remained at 81.8 +/- 8.8 mL/100 g tissue/min. Five minutes after topical oxymetazoline treatment, NMBF was reduced 49% to 38.3 +/- 10.2 mL/100 g tissue/min. Nasal airflow (mL/sec), which was measured before and after LDV probe placement, was not significantly increased in either the ipsilateral (281.4 +/- 33.1 to 314.3 +/- 31.6) or contralateral nostril (335.7 +/- 26.9 to 262.1 +/- 36.4), probably due to the limited surface application of drug. Subjective assessments of congestion by both the investigator and the subject showed significant improvements in the ipsilateral nostril. We conclude that, under the conditions of our study, localized application of 60 micrograms oxymetazoline significantly reduces superficial nasal blood flow and provides subjectively perceived improvements in nasal stuffiness.

  19. The influence of hydralazine on the vasculature, blood perfusion and chemosensitivity of MAC tumours.

    PubMed

    Quinn, P K; Bibby, M C; Cox, J A; Crawford, S M

    1992-08-01

    We have studied the influence of the peripheral vasodilator hydralazine (HDZ) on the vasculature and blood perfusion of two members of a series of subcutaneous murine adenocarcinomata of the colon (MAC tumours), and the influence of HDZ on the efficacy and/or toxicity of TCNU and melphalan. The fluorescent DNA stain Hoechst 33342, showed that HDZ caused a shutdown of tumour vasculature, related in magnitude to both dose and tumour differentiation state; 10 mg kg-1 caused an 80% vascular shutdown of well differentiated MAC 26 tumours, but only a 50% shutdown of the poorly differentiated MAC 15A tumours. 2.5 mg kg-1 was ineffective. The blood perfusion marker 99mTc-HMPAO showed that the normal perfusion of MAC tumours was consistently markedly less than that of lung, liver or kidneys (4-5% of lung perfusion). HDZ (10 mg kg-1) decreased MAC 26 perfusion by 63%, and that of MAC 15A by 20%. Again, 2.5 mg kg-1) was ineffective. Use of in vivo to in vitro clonogenic assays showed that HDZ (10 mg kg-1) potentiated the efficacy of melphalan (1-10 mg kg-1 i.p.) by a factor of 2.1, and increased the efficacy of TCNU (1-10 mg kg-1 i.v., factor = 1.7) when given 10 or 15 min respectively after dosing. However, the addition of HDZ increased the acute bone marrow toxicity of melphalan, but not that of TCNU. The clinical relevance of these results is discussed.

  20. Anastomotic leakage in rectal cancer surgery: The role of blood perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Rutegård, Martin; Rutegård, Jörgen

    2015-01-01

    Anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer remains a common and often devastating complication. Preoperative risk factors for anastomotic leakage have been studied extensively and are used for patient selection, especially whether to perform a diverting stoma or not. From the current literature, data suggest that perfusion in the rectal stump rather than in the colonic limb may be more important for the integrity of the colorectal anastomosis. Moreover, available research suggests that the mid and upper rectum is considerably more vascularized than the lower part, in which the posterior compartment seems most vulnerable. These data fit neatly with the observation that anastomotic leaks are far more frequent in patients undergoing total compared to partial mesorectal excision, and also that most leaks occur dorsally. Clinical judgment has been shown to ineffectively assess anastomotic viability, while promising methods to measure blood perfusion are evolving. Much interest has recently been turned to near-infrared light technology, enhanced with fluorescent agents, which enables intraoperative perfusion assessment. Preliminary data are promising, but large-scale controlled trials are lacking. With maturation of such technology, perfusion measurements may in the future inform the surgeon whether anastomoses are at risk. In high colorectal anastomoses, anastomotic revision might be feasible, while a diverting stoma could be fashioned selectively instead of routinely for low anastomoses. PMID:26649151

  1. Enteral Arginine Does Not Increase Superior Mesenteric Arterial Blood Flow but Induces Mucosal Growth in Neonatal Pigs123

    PubMed Central

    Puiman, Patrycja J.; Stoll, Barbara; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Burrin, Douglas G.

    2011-01-01

    Arginine is an essential amino acid in neonates synthesized by gut epithelial cells and a precursor for NO that regulates vasodilatation and blood flow. Arginine supplementation has been shown to improve intestinal integrity in ischemia-reperfusion models and low plasma levels are associated with necrotizing enterocolitis. We hypothesized that enteral arginine is a specific stimulus for neonatal intestinal blood flow and mucosal growth under conditions of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) or partial enteral nutrition (PEN). We first tested the dose dependence and specificity of acute (3 h) enteral arginine infusion on superior mesenteric artery (SMA) blood flow in pigs fed TPN or PEN. We then determined whether chronic (4 d) arginine supplementation of PEN increases mucosal growth and if this was affected by treatment with the NO synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Acute enteral arginine infusion increased plasma arginine dose dependently in both TPN and PEN groups, but the plasma response was markedly higher (100–250%) in the PEN group than in the TPN group at the 2 highest arginine doses. Baseline SMA blood flow was 90% higher in the PEN (2.37 ± 0.32 L⋅kg−1⋅h−1) pigs than in the TPN pigs (1.23 ± 0.17 L⋅kg−1⋅h−1), but was not affected by acute infusion individually of arginine, citrulline, or other major gut fuels. Chronic dietary arginine supplementation in PEN pigs induced mucosal growth in the intestine, but this effect was not prevented by treatment with L-NAME. Intestinal crypt cell proliferation, protein synthesis, and phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin and p70S6 kinase were not affected by dietary arginine. We conclude that partial enteral feeding, but not acute enteral arginine, increases SMA blood flow in the neonatal pig. Furthermore, supplementing arginine in partial enteral feeding modestly increases intestinal mucosal growth and was NO independent. PMID:21106927

  2. Cerebral blood flow is an earlier indicator of perfusion abnormalities than cerebral blood volume in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lacalle-Aurioles, María; Mateos-Pérez, José M; Guzmán-De-Villoria, Juan A; Olazarán, Javier; Cruz-Orduña, Isabel; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Martino, María-Elena; Desco, Manuel

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate whether cerebral blood flow (CBF) can better characterize perfusion abnormalities in predementia stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) than cerebral blood volume (CBV) and whether cortical atrophy is more associated with decreased CBV or with decreased CBF. We compared measurements of CBV, CBF, and mean cortical thickness obtained from magnetic resonance images in a group of healthy controls, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who converted to AD after 2 years of clinical follow-up (MCI-c), and patients with mild AD. A significant decrease in perfusion was detected in the parietal lobes of the MCI-c patients with CBF parametric maps but not with CBV maps. In the MCI-c group, a negative correlation between CBF values and cortical thickness in the right parahippocampal gyrus suggests an increase in CBF that depends on cortical atrophy in predementia stages of AD. Our study also suggests that CBF deficits appear before CBV deficits in the progression of AD, as CBV abnormalities were only detected at the AD stage, whereas CBF changes were already detected in the MCI stage. These results confirm the hypothesis that CBF is a more sensitive parameter than CBV for perfusion abnormalities in MCI-c patients.

  3. Cerebral blood flow is an earlier indicator of perfusion abnormalities than cerebral blood volume in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lacalle-Aurioles, María; Mateos-Pérez, José M; Guzmán-De-Villoria, Juan A; Olazarán, Javier; Cruz-Orduña, Isabel; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Martino, María-Elena; Desco, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate whether cerebral blood flow (CBF) can better characterize perfusion abnormalities in predementia stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) than cerebral blood volume (CBV) and whether cortical atrophy is more associated with decreased CBV or with decreased CBF. We compared measurements of CBV, CBF, and mean cortical thickness obtained from magnetic resonance images in a group of healthy controls, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who converted to AD after 2 years of clinical follow-up (MCI-c), and patients with mild AD. A significant decrease in perfusion was detected in the parietal lobes of the MCI-c patients with CBF parametric maps but not with CBV maps. In the MCI-c group, a negative correlation between CBF values and cortical thickness in the right parahippocampal gyrus suggests an increase in CBF that depends on cortical atrophy in predementia stages of AD. Our study also suggests that CBF deficits appear before CBV deficits in the progression of AD, as CBV abnormalities were only detected at the AD stage, whereas CBF changes were already detected in the MCI stage. These results confirm the hypothesis that CBF is a more sensitive parameter than CBV for perfusion abnormalities in MCI-c patients. PMID:24424381

  4. Investigation of source-detector separation optimization for an implantable perfusion and oxygenation sensor for liver blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Akl, Tony; Cote, Gerard L.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, Milton Nance

    2011-01-01

    An implanted system is being developed to monitor transplanted liver health during the critical 7-10 day period posttransplantation. The unit will monitor organ perfusion and oxygen consumption using optically-based probes placed on both the inflow and outflow blood vessels, and on the liver parenchymal surface. Sensing probes are based on a 3- wavelength LED source and a photodiode detector. Sample diffuse reflectance is measured at 735, 805, and 940 nm. To ascertain optimal source-to-photodetector spacing for perfusion measurement in blood vessels, an ex vivo study was conducted. In this work, a dye mixture simulating 80% blood oxygen saturation was developed and perfused through excised porcine arteries while collecting data for various preset probe source-to-photodetector spacings. The results from this study demonstrate a decrease in the optical signal with decreasing LED drive current and a reduction in perfusion index signal with increasing probe spacing. They also reveal a 2- to 4-mm optimal range for blood vessel perfusion probe source-to-photodetector spacing that allows for sufficient perfusion signal modulation depth with maximized signal to noise ratio (SNR). These findings are currently being applied to guide electronic configuration and probe placement for in vivo liver perfusion porcine model studies.

  5. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ogami, M; Kulkarni, R; Wang, H; Reif, R; Wang, R K

    2014-08-31

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing. (laser biophotonics)

  6. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogami, M.; Kulkarni, R.; Wang, H.; Reif, R.; Wang, R. K.

    2014-08-01

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing.

  7. Adrenergic mechanism responsible for pathological alteration in gastric mucosal blood flow in rats with ulcer bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O. V.; Pavlov, A. N.; Semyachkin-Glushkovskiy, I. A.; Gekalyuk, A. S.; Ulanova, M. V.; Lychagov, V. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    The adrenergic system plays an important role in regulation of central and peripheral circulation in normal state and during hemorrhage. Because the impaired gastric mucosal blood flow (GMBF) is the major cause of gastroduodenal lesions, including ulcer bleeding (UB), we studied the adrenergic mechanism responsible for regulation of GMBF in rats with a model of stress-induced UB (SUB) using the laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). First, we examined the effect of adrenaline on GMBF in rats under normal state and during UB. In all healthy animals the submucosal adrenaline injection caused a decrease in local GMBF. During UB the submucosal injection of adrenaline was accompanied by less pronounced GMBF suppression in 30,3% rats with SUB vs. healthy ones. In 69,7% rats with SUB we observed the increase in local GMBF after submucosal injection of adrenaline. Second, we studied the sensitivity of gastric β2-adrenoreceptors and the activity of two factors which are involved in β2-adrenomediated vasorelaxation-KATP -channels and NO. The effects of submucosal injection of isoproterenol, ICI118551 and glybenclamide on GMBF as well as NO levels in gastric tissue were significantly elevated in rats with SUB vs. healthy rats. Thus, our results indicate that high activation of gastric β2-adrenoreceptors associated with the increased vascular KATP -channels activity and elevated NO production is the important adrenergic mechanism implicated in the pathogenesis of UB.

  8. Mastication induces long-term increases in blood perfusion of the trigeminal principal nucleus.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, A; Manara, R; Conforti, R; Paccone, A; Secondulfo, C; Lorusso, L; Sbordone, L; Di Salle, F; Monda, M; Tedeschi, G; Esposito, F

    2015-12-17

    Understanding mechanisms for vessel tone regulation within the trigeminal nuclei is of great interest because some headache syndromes are due to dysregulation of such mechanisms. Previous experiments on animal models suggest that mastication may alter neuron metabolism and blood supply in these nuclei. To investigate this hypothesis in humans, arterial spin-labeling magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to measure blood perfusion within the principal trigeminal nucleus (Vp) and in the dorsolateral-midbrain (DM, including the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus) in healthy volunteers, before and immediately after a mastication exercise consisting of chewing a gum on one side of the mouth for 1 h at 1 bite/s. The side preference for masticating was evaluated with a chewing test and the volume of the masseter muscle was measured on T1-weighted MRI scans. The results demonstrated that the mastication exercise caused a perfusion increase within the Vp, but not in the DM. This change was correlated to the preference score for the side where the exercise took place. Moreover, the basal Vp perfusion was correlated to the masseter volume. These results indicate that the local vascular tone of the trigeminal nuclei can be constitutively altered by the chewing practice and by strong or sustained chewing. PMID:26477983

  9. Cilostazol improves hepatic blood perfusion, microcirculation, and liver regeneration after major hepatectomy in rats.

    PubMed

    von Heesen, Maximilian; Dold, Stefan; Müller, Simon; Scheuer, Claudia; Kollmar, Otto; Schilling, Martin K; Menger, Michael D; Moussavian, Mohammed R

    2015-06-01

    Major hepatectomy or small-for-size liver transplantation may result in postoperative liver failure. So far, no treatment is available to improve liver regeneration. Herein, we studied whether cilostazol, a selective phosphodiesterase III inhibitor, is capable of improving liver regeneration after major hepatectomy. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 74) were treated with cilostazol (5 mg/kg daily) or a glucose solution and underwent either 70% liver resection or a sham operation. Before and after surgery, hepatic arterial and portal venous blood flow and hepatic microvascular perfusion were analyzed. Liver morphology, function, and regeneration were studied with histology, immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and bile excretion analysis. Cilostazol significantly increased hepatic blood flow and microcirculation before and after hepatectomy in comparison with sham-operated controls. This was associated with an elevation of hepatic vascular endothelial growth factor expression, an increase of hepatocellular proliferation, and an acceleration of liver regeneration. Furthermore, cilostazol protected the tissue of the remnant liver as indicated by an attenuation of hepatocellular disintegration. In conclusion, cilostazol increases hepatic blood perfusion, microcirculation, and liver regeneration after a major hepatectomy. Thus, cilostazol may represent a novel strategy to reduce the rate of liver failure after both extended hepatectomy and small-for-size liver transplantation.

  10. Application of porous glycosaminoglycan-based scaffolds for expansion of human cord blood stem cells in perfusion culture.

    PubMed

    Cho, Cheul H; Eliason, James F; Matthew, Howard W T

    2008-07-01

    In vitro expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has been employed to obtain sufficient numbers of stem cells for successful engraftment after HSC transplantation. A three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor system with a heparin-chitosan scaffold was designed and evaluated for its capability to support maintenance and expansion of HSCs. Porous chitosan scaffolds were fabricated by a freeze-drying technique and N-desulfated heparin was covalently immobilized within the scaffolds using carbodiimide chemistry. CD34+ HSCs isolated from umbilical cord blood by immunomagnetic separation were cultured within the porous scaffold in a perfusion bioreactor system. Control cultures were maintained on dishes coated with similar heparin-chitosan films. Oxygen uptake was measured during the culture period. After 7 days of culture, scaffolds were harvested for analysis. Cellular phenotype and HSC characteristics were evaluated via flow cytometry and colony forming unit assays. The results indicate good cell retention and proliferation within the perfused scaffolds. Oxygen consumption in the perfusion bioreactor system increased continuously during the culture, indicating steady cell growth. Cells from the perfused scaffold cultures showed higher percentages of primitive progenitors and exhibited superior colony forming unit performance as compared to cells from static cultures. In addition, perfusion culture at low oxygen (5%) enhanced the expansion of CD34+ cells and colony-forming activity compared to high oxygen (19%) cultures. The results suggest that perfusion culture of cord blood CD34+ cells under bone marrow-like conditions enhances HSC expansion compared to static cultures.

  11. Evaluation of hemangiomas with technetium 99m-labeled RBCs: the perfusion-blood pool mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Israel, O.; Joachims, H.; Brown, Y.; Eliachar, I.

    1983-03-18

    A case report is presented of a woman with a tumor mass in the nasopharynx. Early and delayed scintigraphy with Technetium 99m-labeled RBCs showed a large area of increased uptake which was later shown to be a hemangioma by contrast angiography. The perfusion-blood pool mismatch observed in hemangiomas is characteristic of these lesions and has not been described in any other abnormalities. The Tc-RBC using both early and delayed scintigraphy is a simple, noninvasive method for assessing the vascular characteristics of these tumors. (JMT)

  12. Ocular Perfusion Pressure and Pulsatile Ocular Blood Flow in Normal and Systemic Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Carlos R; Miranda, Rafaela Morais; Cunha, Patricia LT; M Kanadani, Tereza Cristina; Dorairaj, Syril

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Glaucomatous neuropathy can be a consequence of insufficient blood supply, increase in intraocular pressure (IOP), or other risk factors that diminish the ocular blood flow. To determine the ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) in normal and systemic hypertensive patients. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty-one patients were enrolled in this prospective and comparative study and underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination including slit lamp examination, Goldmann applanation tonometry, stereoscopic fundus examination, and pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) measurements. The OPP was calculated as being the medium systemic arterial pressure (MAP) less the IOP. Only right eye values were considered for calculations using Student’s t-test. Results: The mean age of the patients was 57.5 years (36-78), and 68.5% were women. There was a statistically significant difference in the OPP of the normal and systemic hypertensive patients (p < 0.05). The difference in the OPP between these groups varied between 8.84 and 17.9 mm Hg. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that although the systemic hypertensive patients have a higher OPP in comparison to normal patients, this increase does not mean that they also have a higher OBF (as measured by POBF tonograph). This may be caused by chronic changes in the vascular network and in the blood hemodynamics in patients with systemic hypertension. How to cite this article: Kanadani FN, Figueiredo CR, Miranda RM, Cunha PLT, Kanadani TCM, Dorairaj S. Ocular Perfusion Pressure and Pulsatile Ocular Blood Flow in Normal and Systemic Hypertensive Patients. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(1):16-19. PMID:26997827

  13. The effects of angiotensin II on blood perfusion in the rat renal papilla

    PubMed Central

    Walker, L L; Rajaratne, A A J; Blair-West, J R; Harris, P J

    1999-01-01

    Systemic infusion of angiotensin II (AII) increased papillary blood perfusion (PBP) measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry in rats, aged about 5 weeks. The mechanisms involved in this response were determined by infusion of AII in the presence of systemic doses of losartan (a type 1 AII receptor antagonist), HOE-140 (a bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist), and an inhibitor of NO production - Nω -nitro-L-arginine (NOLA). Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and PBP increased in a dose-dependent manner in response to intravenous infusions of AII. Infusion of losartan abolished these responses to AII but HOE-140 was without effect. Infusion of NOLA abolished the increase in PBP but did not affect the pressor response to AII. Systemic infusion of sodium nitroprusside restored the response to AII in experiments with NOLA infusion. The results indicate that the increase in PBP caused by AII is mediated via angiotensin AT1 receptors and does not involve bradykinin B2 receptors. The AII-induced increase in PBP is dependent upon the presence of NO, thus providing a mechanism for maintenance of papillary perfusion in the face of generalized renal vasoconstriction due to AII. PMID:10432357

  14. Blood Perfusion in Microfluidic Models of Pulmonary Capillary Networks: Role of Geometry and Hematocrit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauber, Hagit; Waisman, Dan; Sznitman, Josue; Technion-IIT Team; Department of Neonatology Carmel Medical Center; Faculty of Medicine-Technion IIT Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Microfluidic platforms are increasingly used to study blood microflows at true physiological scale due to their ability to overcome manufacturing obstacle of complex anatomical morphologies, such as the organ-specific architectures of the microcirculation. In the present work, we utilize microfluidic platforms to devise in vitro models of the underlying pulmonary capillary networks (PCN), where capillary lengths and diameters are similar to the size of RBCs (~ 5-10 μm). To better understand flow characteristics and dispersion of red blood cells (RBCs) in PCNs, we have designed microfluidic models of alveolar capillary beds inspired by the seminal ``sheet flow'' model of Fung and Sobin (1969). Our microfluidic PCNs feature confined arrays of staggered pillars with diameters of ~ 5,7 and 10 μm, mimicking the dense structure of pulmonary capillary meshes. The devices are perfused with suspensions of RBCs at varying hematocrit levels under different flow rates. Whole-field velocity patterns using micro-PIV and single-cell tracking using PTV are obtained with fluorescently-labelled RBCs and discussed. Our experiments deliver a real-scale quantitative description of RBC perfusion characteristics across the pulmonary capillary microcirculation.

  15. Quantifying single microvessel permeability in isolated blood-perfused rat lung preparation.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Kathirvel; Parthasarathi, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    The isolated blood-perfused lung preparation is widely used to visualize and define signaling in single microvessels. By coupling this preparation with real time imaging, it becomes feasible to determine permeability changes in individual pulmonary microvessels. Herein we describe steps to isolate rat lungs and perfuse them with autologous blood. Then, we outline steps to infuse fluorophores or agents via a microcatheter into a small lung region. Using these procedures described, we determined permeability increases in rat lung microvessels in response to infusions of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. The data revealed that lipopolysaccharide increased fluid leak across both venular and capillary microvessel segments. Thus, this method makes it possible to compare permeability responses among vascular segments and thus, define any heterogeneity in the response. While commonly used methods to define lung permeability require postprocessing of lung tissue samples, the use of real time imaging obviates this requirement as evident from the present method. Thus, the isolated lung preparation combined with real time imaging offers several advantages over traditional methods to determine lung microvascular permeability, yet is a straightforward method to develop and implement.

  16. Distribution of lung blood on modified bilateral Glenn shunt evaluated by Tc-99m-MAA lung perfusion scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Si, Biao; Luan, Zhao-sheng; Wang, Tong-jian; Ning, Yan-song; Li, Na; Zhu, Meng; Liu, Zhong-min; Ding, Guang-hong; Qiao, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to determine the distribution of lung blood in a modified bilateral Glenn procedure designed in our institute with lung perfusion scintigraphy. Sixteen consecutive patients who underwent modified bilateral Glenn operation from 2011 to 2014 were enrolled in the study. The control group consisted of 7 patients who underwent bidirectional Glenn shunt. Radionuclide lung perfusion scintigraphy was performed using Tc-99m-macro aggregated albumin (MAA) in all patients. For the patients in modified bilateral Glenn group, the time at which the radioactivity accumulation peaked did not differ significantly between the right and left lung field (t = 0.608, P = 0.554). The incidence of perfusion abnormality in each lung lobe also did not differ significantly (P = 0.426 by Fisher exact test). The radioactive counts were higher in the right lung than in the left lung, but the difference was not statistically significant (t = 1.502, P = 0.157). Radioactive perfusion in the lower lung field was significantly greater than that in the upper field (t = 4.368, P < 0.001). Compared with that in the bidirectional Glenn group, the ratio of radioactivity in the right lung to that in left lung was significantly lower in the modified bilateral Glenn group (t = 3.686, P = 0.002). Lung perfusion scintigraphy confirmed the benefit of the modified bilateral Glenn shunt with regard to more balanced blood perfusion in both lungs. PMID:27661042

  17. Xueshuantong improves cerebral blood perfusion in elderly patients with lacunar infarction.

    PubMed

    Gui, Qifeng; Yang, Yunmei; Ying, Shihong; Zhang, Minming

    2013-03-25

    A total of 64 patients with acute lacunar infarction were enrolled within 24 hours of onset. The patients received conventional therapy (antiplatelet drugs and hypolipidemic drugs) alone or conventional therapy plus 450 mg Xueshuantong once a day. The main ingredient of the Xueshuantong lyophilized powder used for injection was Panax notoginseng saponins. Assessments were made at admission and at discharge using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, the Activity of Daily Living and the Mini-Mental State Examination. Additionally, the relative cerebral blood flow, relative cerebral blood volume and relative mean transit time in the region of interest were calculated within 24 hours after the onset of lacunar infarction, using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance perfusion imaging technology. Patients underwent a follow-up MRI scan after 4 weeks of treatment. There was an improvement in the Activity of Daily Living scores and a greater reduction in the scores on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale in the treatment group than in the control group. However, the Mini-Mental State Examination scores showed no significant differences after 4 weeks of treatment. Compared with the control group, the relative cerebral blood flow at discharge had increased and showed a greater improvement in the treatment group. Furthermore, there was a reduction in the relative mean transit time at discharge and the value was lower in the treatment group than in the control group. The experimental findings indicate that Xueshuantong treatment improves neurological deficits in elderly patients with lacunar infarction, and the mechanism may be related to increased cerebral perfusion.

  18. Paeonol Protects Rat Heart by Improving Regional Blood Perfusion during No-Reflow

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lina; Chuang, Chia-Chen; Weng, Weiliang; Zhao, Le; Zheng, Yongqiu; Zhang, Jinyan; Zuo, Li

    2016-01-01

    No-reflow phenomenon, defined as inadequate perfusion of myocardium without evident artery obstruction, occurs at a high incidence after coronary revascularization. The mechanisms underlying no-reflow is only partially understood. It is commonly caused by the swelling of endothelial cells, neutrophil accumulation, and vasoconstriction, which are all related to acute inflammation. Persistent no-reflow can lead to hospitalization and mortality. However, an effective preventive intervention has not yet been established. We have previously found that paeonol, an active extraction from the root of Paeonia suffruticosa, can benefit the heart function by inhibiting tissue damage after ischemia, reducing inflammation, and inducing vasodilatation. To further investigate the potential cardioprotective action of paeonol on no-reflow, healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham, ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury (left anterior descending coronary artery was ligated for 4 h followed by reperfusion for 8 h), and I/R injury pretreated with paeonol at two different doses. Real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography was used to monitor regional blood perfusion and cardiac functions. Our data indicated that paeonol treatment significantly reduces myocardial infarct area and no-reflow area (n = 8; p < 0.05). Regional myocardial perfusion (A·β) and cardiac functions such as ejection fraction, stroke volume, and fractional shortening were elevated by paeonol (n = 8; p < 0.05). Paeonol also lowered the serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, cardiac troponin T, and C-reactive protein, as indices of myocardial injury. Paeonol exerts beneficial effects on attenuating I/R-associated no-reflow injuries, and may be considered as a potential preventive treatment for cardiac diseases or post-coronary revascularization in which no-reflow often occurs. PMID:27493631

  19. Experimentally determined blood and water flow limitations for hydrophobic compounds using perfused gills of trout

    SciTech Connect

    Sijm, D.T.H.M.; Verberne, M.E.; Paert, P.; Opperhuizen, A.

    1995-12-31

    The influence of physiologically relevant water and blood flows on the uptake of a number of hydrophobic compounds was investigated using perfused gills of rainbow trout. For all compounds studied, the uptake rate constants increased with water flow at lower flow and remained constant at higher flow. The uptake rate constants did not change when blood flow decreased at lower flow, while they increased at higher flow. Both water and blood flows thus influence the uptake of hydrophobic chemicals. using these experimental data and allometric relations, it was established that the water flow can limit the uptake of hydrophobic chemicals for fish weighing more than 5 g. The flow of water will not limit uptake in fish < 5 g, irrespective of physiological conditions and oxygen concentration. At low oxygen concentration, which will increase the water flow in large fish, the uptake of hydrophobic chemicals may increase with a factor of 5 or more. Increasing the blood flow may maximally increase the uptake of hydrophobic chemicals two-fold, in small as well as in large fish.

  20. Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells in the Human Gastric Mucosa and Blood: Role in Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Jayaum S.; Salerno-Goncalves, Rosangela; Blanchard, Thomas G.; Patil, Seema A.; Kader, Howard A.; Safta, Anca M.; Morningstar, Lindsay M.; Czinn, Steven J.; Greenwald, Bruce D.; Sztein, Marcelo B.

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells represent a class of antimicrobial innate-like T cells that have been characterized in human blood, liver, lungs, and intestine. Here, we investigated, for the first time, the presence of MAIT cells in the stomach of children, adults, and the elderly undergoing routine endoscopy and assessed their reactivity to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori – Hp), a major gastric pathogen. We observed that MAIT cells are present in the lamina propria compartment of the stomach and display a similar memory phenotype to blood MAIT cells. We then demonstrated that gastric and blood MAIT cells are able to recognize H. pylori. We found that CD8+ and CD4−CD8− (double negative) MAIT cell subsets respond to H. pylori-infected macrophages stimulation in a MR-1 restrictive manner by producing cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17A) and exhibiting cytotoxic activity. Interestingly, we observed that blood MAIT cell frequency in Hp+ve individuals was significantly lower than in Hp−ve individuals. However, gastric MAIT cell frequency was not significantly different between Hp+ve and Hp−ve individuals, demonstrating a dichotomy between blood and gastric tissues. Further, we observed that the majority of gastric MAIT cells (>80%) expressed tissue-resident markers (CD69+ CD103+), which were only marginally present on PBMC MAIT cells (<3%), suggesting that gastric MAIT cells are readily available to respond quickly to pathogens. These results contribute important new information to the understanding of MAIT cells function on peripheral and mucosal tissues and its possible implications in the host response to H. pylori. PMID:26441971

  1. Investigation of photoplethysmography and near infrared spectroscopy for the assessment of tissue blood perfusion.

    PubMed

    Abay, T Y; Kyriacou, P A

    2014-01-01

    Pulse Oximetry (PO) and Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) are among the most widely adopted optical techniques for the assessment of tissue perfusion. PO estimates arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) by exploiting light attenuations due to pulsatile arterial blood (AC) and constant absorbers (DC) at two different wavelengths. NIRS processes the attenuations of at least two wavelengths to calculate concentrations of Deoxygenated ([HHb]), Oxygenated ([HbO2]), Total Haemoglobin ([tHb]) and Tissue Oxygenation Index (TOI). In this work we present the development and evaluation of a reflectance PPG probe and processing system for the assessment of tissue perfusion. The system adopts both Pulse Oximetry and NIRS principles to calculate SpO2, [HHb], and [HbO2] and [tHb]. The system has been evaluated on the forearm of 10 healthy volunteers during cuff-induced vascular occlusions. The presented system was able to estimate SpO2, [HHb], [HbO2] and [tHb], showing good agreement with state-of-the-art NIRS and conventional PO. PMID:25571205

  2. Estimation of blood perfusion using phase shift in temperature response to sinusoidal heating at the skin surface.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Xu, L X

    1999-09-01

    A closed form analytical solution of the Pennes' bio-heat equation was obtained for temperature distributions in the skin tissue subject to the sinusoidal heat flux. Phase shifts in the surface temperature response were revealed to be related to local blood perfusion rate and heating frequency. The influence of the thermal contact resistance on the perfusion estimation was investigated. It has been proved that this influence is relatively small because of the phase shift based estimation and can be effectively eliminated by application of highly conductive grease. This analysis provides the theoretical foundation for a new noninvasive modality of blood perfusion estimation based on the surface temperature measurement which can have significant applications in future clinical practices.

  3. Effects of permanent magnets on resting skin blood perfusion in healthy persons assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry and imaging.

    PubMed

    Mayrovitz, H N; Groseclose, E E; Markov, M; Pilla, A A

    2001-10-01

    Effects on skin blood perfusion of permanent ceramic magnets [0.1 T (1000 G) surface field], individually (disk shaped, 4 cm diameter x 1 cm thick) or in the form of a 11 x 7 in pad ( approximately 28 x 17.8 cm) with an array of 16 rectangular magnets (4.5 x 2.2 cm), were investigated in 16 female volunteers (27.4 +/- 1.7 years, range 21-48 years) using three separate protocols. In protocol A, a disk magnet was placed on the palmar surface of the hand in contact with the thenar eminence (n = 5). In protocol B, the magnet was placed on the hand dorsum overlying the thenar eminence (n = 5). In protocol C, the entire palm and fingers rested on the magnetic pad (n = 6). Magnets were in place for 36 min on one hand, and a sham was in place on the other hand. Blood perfusion was measured on the middle finger dorsum by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and on the index finger by laser Doppler imaging (LDI). Perfusion measurements were simultaneously taken in sham and magnet exposed hands, before and during the entire magnet exposure interval. Magnetic field effects were tested by comparing skin blood perfusion sequences in magnet and sham exposed regions. Results showed no significant changes in either LDF or LDI perfusion at magnet or sham sites during exposure, nor were there any significant differences between sham and magnet sites for any protocol. Measurements of skin temperature at the LDF measurement sites also showed no significant change. It is concluded that in the healthy subjects studied with normal, unstressed circulation, magnets of the type and for the duration used, showed no detectible effect on skin blood perfusion in the anatomical area studied.

  4. Fade responses at neuroeffector junction to vagal stimulation in the isolated, blood-perfused dog atrium.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Y; Saegusa, K; Ogiwara, Y; Chiba, S

    1988-01-01

    Effects of physostigmine and of beating rate on the negative chronotropic and inotropic responses to tonic intramural parasympathetic nerve stimulation at a frequency of 5 Hz for 2 min were investigated, using the isolated, blood-perfused dog atrium which was pretreated with propranolol. The responses to stimulation reached a maximum, and then "faded" back toward the control levels during stimulation. Before physostigmine, the fade of the inotropic response was consistently observed but the fade of the chronotropic response was minimal. Both the maximum effect and the fade of the chronotropic response were augmented dose-dependently by physostigmine in spontaneously beating atria. Physostigmine increased the maximum chronotropic response to infusion of acetylcholine (ACh) but did not potentiate the fade response. These results suggest that the potentiation of the fade of the chronotropic response to stimulation after physostigmine is due to decreases in the amount of ACh at the neuroeffector junction. The maximum negative inotropic responses were dose-dependently potentiated similarly by physostigmine in isolated spontaneously beating or paced atria. The fade of the inotropic response in spontaneously beating atria was decreased along with reduction of the rate by physostigmine, whereas the fades in paced atria at 2 and 3 Hz were not changed, showing that decreases in rate during stimulation influenced the reduction of the fade. Increases in contractile force induced by infusion of CaCl2 did not alter the maximum and fade responses to stimulation in 2 Hz paced atria. The blood flow into an isolated atrium was not changed detectably during stimulation. These results suggest that the fade of the inotropic response to parasympathetic nerve stimulation is related subsidiarily to acetylcholinesterase or washout of ACh at the neuroeffector junction in isolated perfused atria.

  5. A comparative study of the effects of prostaglandins and H2-receptor antagonists on gastric acid secretion, mucosal blood flow and ulcer formation.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, A K; Christmas, A J; Hall, C E

    1979-01-01

    The prostaglandins E2 and 16,16-dimethyl-PGE2 methyl ester were compared with the H2-receptor antagonists burimamide and metiamide for their effects on gastric acid secretion (GAS) and gastric mucosal blood flow (MBF) in rats and dogs, and on ulcer formation in rats. Orally, both 16,16-dimethyl-PGE2 methyl ester (20 microgram/kg) and metiamide (6 mg/kg) were markedly effective inhibitors of GAS stimulated by histamine acid phosphate or pentagastrin in Heidenhain pouch dogs, producing a reduction both in volume of gastric juice and in the concentration of titratable acid. In anaesthetised rats, however, the H2-receptor antagonists, when perfused into the gastric lumen, did not consistently inhibit the increased GAS caused by various secretagogues. In contrast, the prostaglandins, under the same conditions, caused marked inhibition of GAS provoked by all secretagogues. Intravenously, both burimamide and metiamide were effective in inhibiting GAS in rats but were less potent than the prostaglandins. The order of potency was: 16,16-dimethyl-PGE2 methyl ester greater than PGE2 greater than metiamide greater than burimamide. By the oral route, the H2-receptor antagonists were found to be very weak inhibitors of indometacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats, as compared to the prostaglandins. MBF studies in rats and in Heidenhain dogs showed that i.v. or p.o. administration inhibited both GAS and MBF in most cases. The ratio r = [MBF (ml/min)/GAS (mumol H+/min)] was generally increased by both types of compounds, suggesting a preferential effect on GAS.

  6. Effect of Dipyridamole Injected for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging on Blood Glucose Concentration; A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Arabi, Mohsen; Akhavein, Alireza; Seyedabadi, Mohammad; Eftekhari, Mansooreh; Javadi, Hamid; Nabipour, Iraj; Assadi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dipyridamole inhibits adenosine reuptake and increases cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP) levels in platelets, erythrocytes and endothelial cells, all of which influence blood glucose. Acute hyperglycaemia reduces endothelium-dependent vasodilation and suppresses coronary microcirculation; which, in theory, can alter the outcome of a radionuclide scan. Aim The present study was conducted with the aim to investigate the changes in blood glucose level of patients receiving dipyridamole for cardiac scan. Materials and Methods A total of 293 patients (85 men and 208 women, age: 60.59±10.43 years) were included in the study. Fasting Blood Glucose (FBG) was measured before and 8 min after dipyridamole (0.568 mg/kg) injection during myocardial perfusion imaging. The data in different groups were analysed by paired t-test. Results There was not a significant difference between first (106.89 ± 19.21mg/dL) and second (107.98 ± 17.57 mg/dL) FBG measurements (p= 0.293). However, when the patients were grouped based on the quartiles of first measurement, there was an increase in FBG following dipyridamole injection in the first quartile (mean difference: 7.15±21.27 mg/dL, p<0.01); in contrast, FBG levels showed a significant decrease after dipyridamole administration in the 4th quartile (mean difference: -9.53±18.20 mg/dL, p<0.001). The differences in 2nd and 3rd quartiles were negligible. The patients were divided into normal, ischemic and fixed lesions based on the outcome of scans, then the possible correlation of dipyridamole-induced FBG alteration and scan results were investigated. There were no significant difference between the FBG values before and after dipyridamole injection and the final outcome of scan. Conclusion The effects of dipyridamole on blood glucose highly depend on the initial blood glucose level. PMID:27656528

  7. Permeabilization of the Blood-Brain Barrier via Mucosal Engrafting: Implications for Drug Delivery to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bleier, Benjamin S.; Kohman, Richie E.; Feldman, Rachel E.; Ramanlal, Shreshtha; Han, Xue

    2013-01-01

    Utilization of neuropharmaceuticals for central nervous system(CNS) disease is highly limited due to the blood-brain barrier(BBB) which restricts molecules larger than 500Da from reaching the CNS. The development of a reliable method to bypass the BBB would represent an enormous advance in neuropharmacology enabling the use of many potential disease modifying therapies. Previous attempts such as transcranial catheter implantation have proven to be temporary and associated with multiple complications. Here we describe a novel method of creating a semipermeable window in the BBB using purely autologous tissues to allow for high molecular weight(HMW) drug delivery to the CNS. This approach is inspired by recent advances in human endoscopic transnasal skull base surgical techniques and involves engrafting semipermeable nasal mucosa within a surgical defect in the BBB. The mucosal graft thereby creates a permanent transmucosal conduit for drugs to access the CNS. The main objective of this study was to develop a murine model of this technique and use it to evaluate transmucosal permeability for the purpose of direct drug delivery to the brain. Using this model we demonstrate that mucosal grafts allow for the transport of molecules up to 500 kDa directly to the brain in both a time and molecular weight dependent fashion. Markers up to 40 kDa were found within the striatum suggesting a potential role for this technique in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. This proof of principle study demonstrates that mucosal engrafting represents the first permanent and stable method of bypassing the BBB thereby providing a pathway for HMW therapeutics directly into the CNS. PMID:23637885

  8. Esophageal wall blood perfusion during contraction and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanfen; Bhargava, Valmik; Kim, Young Sun

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported that esophageal contraction reduces esophageal wall perfusion in an animal study. Our aim was to determine esophageal wall blood perfusion (EWBP) during esophageal contraction and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) in humans. We studied 12 healthy volunteers. A custom-designed laser Doppler probe was anchored to the esophageal wall, 4–6 cm above the LES, by use of the Bravo pH system so that the laser light beam stay directed toward the esophageal mucosa. A high-resolution manometry equipped with impedance electrodes recorded esophageal pressures and reflux events. Synchronized pressure, impedance, pH, and EWBP recordings were obtained during dry and wet swallows and following a meal. Stable recordings of laser Doppler EWBP were only recorded when the laser Doppler probe was firmly anchored to the esophageal wall. Esophageal contractions induced by dry and wet swallows resulted in 46 ± 9% and 60 ± 10% reduction in the EWBP, respectively (compared to baseline). Reduction in EWBP was directly related to the amplitude (curvilinear fit) and duration of esophageal contraction. Atropine reduced the esophageal contraction amplitude and decreased the EWBP reduction associated with esophageal contraction. TLESRs were also associated with reduction in the EWBP, albeit of smaller amplitude (29 ± 3%) but longer duration (19 ± 2 s) compared with swallow-induced esophageal contractions. We report 1) an innovative technique to record EWBP for extended time periods in humans and 2) contraction of circular and longitudinal muscle during peristalsis and selective longitudinal muscle contraction during TLESR causes reduction in the EWBP; 3) using our innovative technique, future studies may determine whether esophageal wall ischemia is the cause of esophageal pain/heartburn. PMID:22790599

  9. Resting quantitative cerebral blood flow in schizophrenia measured by pulsed arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Pinkham, Amy; Loughead, James; Ruparel, Kosha; Wu, Wen-Chau; Overton, Eve; Gur, Raquel; Gur, Ruben

    2011-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling imaging (ASL) perfusion MRI is a relatively novel technique that can allow for quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by using magnetically labeled arterial blood water as an endogenous tracer. Available data on resting CBF in schizophrenia primarily comes from invasive and expensive nuclear medicine techniques that are often limited to small samples and yield mixed results. The noninvasive nature of ASL offers promise for larger-scale studies. The utility of this approach was examined in 24 healthy controls and 30 patients with schizophrenia. Differences between groups in quantitative CBF were assessed, as were relationships between CBF and psychiatric symptoms. Group comparisons demonstrated greater CBF for controls in several regions including bilateral precuneus and middle frontal gyrus. Patients showed increased CBF in left putamen/superior corona radiata and right middle temporal gyrus. For patients, greater severity of negative symptoms was associated with reduced CBF in bilateral superior temporal gyrus, cingulate gyrus, and left middle frontal gyrus. Increased severity of positive symptoms was related to both higher CBF in cingulate gyrus and superior frontal gyrus and decreased CBF in precentral gyrus/middle frontal gyrus. These findings support the feasibility and utility of implementing ASL in schizophrenia research and expand upon previous results. PMID:21831608

  10. Myocardial apoptosis and injury of donor hearts kept in completely beating status with normothermic blood perfusion for transplants

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Jun; Sun, Yanpeng; Wang, Wei; Ke, Han; Ye, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Normothermic blood perfusion is the developing trend of donor heart preservation. Theoretically, donor hearts preserved in a beating status may be the perfect method to reduce time-dependent ischemic injury, resuscitate marginal hearts expanding the donor pool and potentially improve the function of isolated hearts. In this study, to investigate the protective effect of normothermic blood perfusion, we maintained the donor hearts in a beating status and compared the changes of myocardial apoptosis and injury with standard hypothermic and static storage. Methods: Thirty rat hearts were preserved in static cold storage (Group A, n=10, stored in 4°C histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution), or in static normothermic blood perfusion (Group B, n=10, perfused with normothermic blood) or in beating status (Group C, n=10, perfused continuously with normothermic blood) for 9 hours. Myocardial injury markers including creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI), myocardial metabolic rate related indicators including Methane Dicarboxylic Aldehyde (MDA) and Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) were investigated before and after preservation. And also TUNEL staining and mRNA and protein expression of apoptosis markers such as Bax, Bcl-2, Caspase-3 and Cleaved Caspase-3 were used to evaluated the degree of myocardial apoptosis. Results: It is found that the levels of CK-MB and cTnI in Group C were significantly lower than those of Group A and Group B (P<0.05). However, there was no significant statistical difference of ATP content among three groups. When compared with Group A and B, the quality of MDA in Group C was obviously lower. In addition, it showed that a remarkable reduction in TUNEL-positive nuclear staining in Group C but higher in other two groups. And inhibited apoptosis was also confirmed by the results of mRNA and protein expression of apoptosis markers including Bax and Bcl-2. Conclusions: It is an effective and appropriate approach to

  11. Effect of 2 corpora lutea on blood perfusion, peripheral progesterone, and hepatic steroid-inactivating enzymes in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Voelz, B E; Cline, G F; Hart, C G; Lemley, C O; Larson, J E

    2015-01-01

    The luteal structure that develops postovulation is critical to the facilitation and maintenance of pregnancy in dairy cattle. The objectives of this experiment were to determine if the induction of an accessory corpus luteum (CL), via human chorionic gonadotropin, altered blood perfusion of CL, peripheral concentrations of progesterone, or hepatic steroid-inactivating enzymes. Twenty-eight late-lactation Holstein cows were synchronized using the Ovsynch protocol and randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups. Cows received either an injection of human chorionic gonadotropin (1,000IU, i.m.) to induce an accessory CL (cows had exactly 2CL in 1 ovary) or no treatment (cows had exactly 1CL). Corpora lutea were examined daily from d 10 to 18 (d 0 was induced ovulation) via Doppler ultrasonography and a blood sample was collected. Volume of the CL was recorded, as well as images and videos of each CL, which were analyzed for blood perfusion. On d 13, a liver biopsy was performed to analyze hepatic steroid-inactivating enzymes. Cows with 1 or 2CL had similar peripheral concentrations of progesterone. Cows with 2CL had similar luteal volumes to cows with 1CL but cows with 2CL had greater total luteal blood perfusion. Hepatic enzyme [cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A, 3A, and 2C, aldo-keto reductase 1C, and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase] activities did not differ between cows with 1 and 2CL. Overall, the observed increase in total luteal blood perfusion in cows with 2CL did not correspond to differences in peripheral concentrations of progesterone or clearance of progesterone measured by the hepatic enzyme activity. This could indicate that induction of an accessory CL would not affect concentrations of progesterone necessary to maintain pregnancy.

  12. Compact Laser Doppler Flowmeter (LDF) Fundus Camera for the Assessment of Retinal Blood Perfusion in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Chiquet, Christophe; Godin-Ribuot, Diane; Amoos, Serge; Loeuillet, Corinne; Bernabei, Mario; Geiser, Martial

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Noninvasive techniques for ocular blood perfusion assessment are of crucial importance for exploring microvascular alterations related to systemic and ocular diseases. However, few techniques adapted to rodents are available and most are invasive or not specifically focused on the optic nerve head (ONH), choroid or retinal circulation. Here we present the results obtained with a new rodent-adapted compact fundus camera based on laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Methods A confocal miniature flowmeter was fixed to a specially designed 3D rotating mechanical arm and adjusted on a rodent stereotaxic table in order to accurately point the laser beam at the retinal region of interest. The linearity of the LDF measurements was assessed using a rotating Teflon wheel and a flow of microspheres in a glass capillary. In vivo reproducibility was assessed in Wistar rats with repeated measurements (inter-session and inter-day) of retinal arteries and ONH blood velocity in six and ten rats, respectively. These parameters were also recorded during an acute intraocular pressure increase to 150 mmHg and after heart arrest (n = 5 rats). Results The perfusion measurements showed perfect linearity between LDF velocity and Teflon wheel or microsphere speed. Intraclass correlation coefficients for retinal arteries and ONH velocity (0.82 and 0.86, respectively) indicated strong inter-session repeatability and stability. Inter-day reproducibility was good (0.79 and 0.7, respectively). Upon ocular blood flow cessation, the retinal artery velocity signal substantially decreased, whereas the ONH signal did not significantly vary, suggesting that it could mostly be attributed to tissue light scattering. Conclusion We have demonstrated that, while not adapted for ONH blood perfusion assessment, this device allows pertinent, stable and repeatable measurements of retinal blood perfusion in rats. PMID:26226150

  13. Perfusion functional MRI reveals cerebral blood flow pattern under psychological stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiongjiong; Rao, Hengyi; Wetmore, Gabriel S.; Furlan, Patricia M.; Korczykowski, Marc; Dinges, David F.; Detre, John A.

    2005-12-01

    Despite the prevalence of stress in everyday life and its impact on happiness, health, and cognition, little is known about the neural substrate of the experience of everyday stress in humans. We use a quantitative and noninvasive neuroimaging technique, arterial spin-labeling perfusion MRI, to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes associated with mild to moderate stress induced by a mental arithmetic task with performance monitoring. Elicitation of stress was verified by self-report of stress and emotional state and measures of heart rate and salivary-cortisol level. The change in CBF induced by the stress task was positively correlated with subjective stress rating in the ventral right prefrontal cortex (RPFC) and left insula/putamen area. The ventral RPFC along with right insula/putamen and anterior cingulate showed sustained activation after task completion in subjects reporting a high stress level during arithmetic tasks. Additionally, variations of baseline CBF in the ventral RPFC and right orbitofrontal cortex were found to correlate with changes in salivary-cortisol level and heart rate caused by undergoing stress tasks. We further demonstrated that the observed right prefrontal activation could not be attributed to increased cognitive demand accompanying stress tasks and extended beyond neural pathways associated with negative emotions. Our results provide neuroimaging evidence that psychological stress induces negative emotion and vigilance and that the ventral RPFC plays a key role in the central stress response. anterior cingulate cortex | arterial spin labeling | right prefrontal cortex

  14. Fade of the responses of the isolated, blood-perfused dog atrium to cholinergic interventions.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Y; Martin, P; Levy, M N

    1984-05-01

    In the isolated, blood-perfused, canine right atrium, intramural parasympathetic nerve stimulation and intra-arterial infusions of acetylcholine induced substantial negative chronotropic and inotropic responses. The responses to parasympathetic stimulation reached their maximum values quickly, and then usually faded back toward control levels over the next 1 or 2 min of stimulation. The fade of the responses at high stimulation frequencies (greater than or equal to 30 Hz) was significantly greater than that at lower frequencies. The inotropic responses to acetylcholine infusion (1 microgram/min) faded slightly but significantly, whereas the chronotropic responses did not fade at all. These results suggest that the fade of the cardiac responses to parasympathetic stimulation is mainly ascribable to a progressive reduction in the rate of acetylcholine release from the nerve endings, especially at higher stimulation frequencies. The fade of the inotropic responses was more pronounced and had a longer time course than that of the chronotropic responses. Furthermore, the fade of the inotropic responses diminished significantly as the response magnitude was augmented by an increase in stimulation voltage. Conversely, the fade of chronotropic responses was not significantly affected by this intervention. These differences in the inotropic and chronotropic responses to neural stimulation, and the occurrence of a slight fade of the inotropic response to acetylcholine infusion, suggest that in addition to the predominant prejunctional mechanism, a postjunctional phenomenon may also be partly responsible for the fade of the inotropic response to cholinergic interventions.

  15. Perfusion functional MRI reveals cerebral blood flow pattern under psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiongjiong; Rao, Hengyi; Wetmore, Gabriel S.; Furlan, Patricia M.; Korczykowski, Marc; Dinges, David F.; Detre, John A.

    2005-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of stress in everyday life and its impact on happiness, health, and cognition, little is known about the neural substrate of the experience of everyday stress in humans. We use a quantitative and noninvasive neuroimaging technique, arterial spin-labeling perfusion MRI, to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes associated with mild to moderate stress induced by a mental arithmetic task with performance monitoring. Elicitation of stress was verified by self-report of stress and emotional state and measures of heart rate and salivary-cortisol level. The change in CBF induced by the stress task was positively correlated with subjective stress rating in the ventral right prefrontal cortex (RPFC) and left insula/putamen area. The ventral RPFC along with right insula/putamen and anterior cingulate showed sustained activation after task completion in subjects reporting a high stress level during arithmetic tasks. Additionally, variations of baseline CBF in the ventral RPFC and right orbitofrontal cortex were found to correlate with changes in salivary-cortisol level and heart rate caused by undergoing stress tasks. We further demonstrated that the observed right prefrontal activation could not be attributed to increased cognitive demand accompanying stress tasks and extended beyond neural pathways associated with negative emotions. Our results provide neuroimaging evidence that psychological stress induces negative emotion and vigilance and that the ventral RPFC plays a key role in the central stress response. PMID:16306271

  16. Flow Measurements in a Blood-Perfused Collagen Vessel Using X-Ray Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, Elizabeth; Buchanan, Cara; Fezzaa, Kamel; Lee, Wah-Keat; Rylander, M. Nichole; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2013-01-01

    Blood-perfused tissue models are joining the emerging field of tumor engineering because they provide new avenues for modulation of the tumor microenvironment and preclinical evaluation of the therapeutic potential of new treatments. The characterization of fluid flow parameters in such in-vitro perfused tissue models is a critical step towards better understanding and manipulating the tumor microenvironment. However, traditional optical flow measurement methods are inapplicable because of the opacity of blood and the thickness of the tissue sample. In order to overcome the limitations of optical method we demonstrate the feasibility of using phase-contrast x-ray imaging to perform microscale particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of flow in blood perfused hydrated tissue-representative microvessels. However, phase contrast x-ray images significantly depart from the traditional PIV image paradigm, as they have high intensity background, very low signal-to-noise ratio, and volume integration effects. Hence, in order to achieve accurate measurements special attention must be paid to the image processing and PIV cross-correlation methodologies. Therefore we develop and demonstrate a methodology that incorporates image preprocessing as well as advanced PIV cross-correlation methods to result in measured velocities within experimental uncertainty. PMID:24260559

  17. Flow measurements in a blood-perfused collagen vessel using x-ray micro-particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Elizabeth; Buchanan, Cara; Fezzaa, Kamel; Lee, Wah-Keat; Rylander, M Nichole; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2013-01-01

    Blood-perfused tissue models are joining the emerging field of tumor engineering because they provide new avenues for modulation of the tumor microenvironment and preclinical evaluation of the therapeutic potential of new treatments. The characterization of fluid flow parameters in such in-vitro perfused tissue models is a critical step towards better understanding and manipulating the tumor microenvironment. However, traditional optical flow measurement methods are inapplicable because of the opacity of blood and the thickness of the tissue sample. In order to overcome the limitations of optical method we demonstrate the feasibility of using phase-contrast x-ray imaging to perform microscale particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of flow in blood perfused hydrated tissue-representative microvessels. However, phase contrast x-ray images significantly depart from the traditional PIV image paradigm, as they have high intensity background, very low signal-to-noise ratio, and volume integration effects. Hence, in order to achieve accurate measurements special attention must be paid to the image processing and PIV cross-correlation methodologies. Therefore we develop and demonstrate a methodology that incorporates image preprocessing as well as advanced PIV cross-correlation methods to result in measured velocities within experimental uncertainty.

  18. Detection of the intercellular adhesion gene cluster (ica) and phase variation in Staphylococcus epidermidis blood culture strains and mucosal isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Ziebuhr, W; Heilmann, C; Götz, F; Meyer, P; Wilms, K; Straube, E; Hacker, J

    1997-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a common cause of catheter-associated infections and septicemia in immunocompromised patients. To answer the question whether S. epidermidis skin isolates differ from isolates causing septicemic diseases, 51 strains obtained from blood cultures, 1 strain from shunt-associated meningitis, and 36 saprophytic isolates were characterized. The study demonstrates that most of the blood culture strains formed a multilayered biofilm on plastic material, whereas skin and mucosal isolates did not. Moreover, biofilm-producing strains were found to generate large bacterial autoaggregates in liquid culture. Autoaggregation and biofilm formation on polymer surfaces was associated with the presence of a DNA sequence encoding an intercellular adhesion gene cluster (ica) that mediates the production of a polysaccharide intercellular adhesin. The presence of the intercellular adhesion genes in blood culture isolates was also found to be correlated with the exhibition of black colonies on Congo red agar, whereas the adhesin-negative strains formed red colonies. Upon subcultivation on Congo red agar, the black colony forms of the blood culture strains exhibited red colony variants which were biofilm and autoaggregation negative and occurred at a frequency of 10(-5). The DNA analysis of these S. epidermidis variants by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization with an ica-specific gene probe revealed no detectable difference between the black and red colony types. Moreover, after repeated passage, the phenotype of the parent strain could be restored. Therefore, these colony forms were regarded as phase variants. This phenotypic change was observed exclusively in adhesin-positive clinical isolates and not in adhesin-negative saprophytic strains of S. epidermidis. PMID:9038293

  19. Mucosal Blood Group Antigen Expression Profiles and HIV Infections: A Study among Female Sex Workers in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Chanzu, Nadia Musimbi; Mwanda, Walter; Oyugi, Julius; Anzala, Omu

    2015-01-01

    Background The ABO blood group antigens are carbohydrate moieties expressed on human red blood cells however; these antigens can also be expressed on some other cells particularly the surface of epithelial cells and may be found in mucosal secretions. In many human populations 80% secrete ABO antigens (termed ‘secretors’) while 20% do not (termed ‘non-secretors’). Furthermore, there are disease conditions that are associated with secretor status. Objective To investigate correlations between secretor status and HIV infection among female sex workers in Nairobi, Kenya. Methodology This cross-sectional study recruited 280 female sex workers aged 18–65 years from the Pumwani Majengo cohort, Kenya. Blood typing was determined by serological techniques using monoclonal antibodies to the ABO blood group antigens. Secretor phenotyping was determined using anti-H specific lectins specific to salivary, vaginal and cervical blood group H antigen using the agglutination inhibition technique and correlated to individual HIV sero-status. Participants were additionally screened for Bacterial vaginosis, Neisseria gonorrhoea and Trichomonas vaginalis. Results Out of the 280 participants, 212 (75.7%) were secretors and 68 (24.3%) were non-secretors. The incidence of all infections: HIV, Bacterial vaginosis, Neisseria gonorrhoea and Trichomonas vaginalis was higher among secretors compared to non-secretors. However, this difference was only statistically significant for HIV infection incidence rates: HIV infected secretors (83.7%) versus HIV un-infected secretors (71.8%) (p = 0.029) Based on ABO phenotype stratification, the incidence of HIV infection was higher among blood group A secretors (26/52 = 50%), in comparison to B (12/39 = 33.3%: p = 0.066), AB (3/9 = 33.3%: p = 0.355), and O secretors (36/112 = 32.1%: p = 0.028). Conclusion This is the first report to document the variable expression of the ABH blood group antigens profiling secretor and non-secretor phenotypes

  20. Parametric investigation of heating due to magnetic fluid hyperthermia in a tumor with blood perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liangruksa, Monrudee; Ganguly, Ranjan; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a cancer treatment that can selectively elevate the tumor temperature without significantly damaging the surrounding healthy tissue. Optimal MFH design requires a fundamental parametric investigation of the heating of soft materials by magnetic fluids. We model the problem of a spherical tumor and its surrounding healthy tissue that are heated by exciting a homogeneous dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles infused only into the tumor with an external AC magnetic field. The key dimensionless parameters influencing thermotherapy are the Péclet, Fourier, and Joule numbers. Analytical solutions for transient and steady hyperthermia provide correlations between these parameters and the portions of tumor and healthy tissue that are subjected to a threshold temperature beyond which they are damaged. Increasing the ratio of the Fourier and Joule numbers also increases the tumor temperature, but doing so can damage the healthy tissue. Higher magnetic heating is required for larger Péclet numbers due to the larger convection heat loss that occurs through blood perfusion. A comparison of the model predictions with previous experimental data for MFH applied to rabbit tumors shows good agreement. The optimal MFH conditions are identified based on two indices, the fraction IT of the tumor volume in which the local temperature is above a threshold temperature and the ratio IN of the damaged normal tissue volume to the tumor tissue volume that also lies above it. The spatial variation in the nanoparticle concentration is also considered. A Gaussian distribution provides efficacy while minimizing the possibility of generating a tumor hot spot. Varying the thermal properties of tumor and normal tissue alters ITand IN but the nature of the temperature distribution remains unchanged.

  1. Carbon dioxide induced changes in cerebral blood flow and flow velocity: role of cerebrovascular resistance and effective cerebral perfusion pressure

    PubMed Central

    Grüne, Frank; Kazmaier, Stephan; Stolker, Robert J; Visser, Gerhard H; Weyland, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In addition to cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) zero flow pressure (ZFP), effective cerebral perfusion pressure (CPPe) and the resistance area product (RAP) are supplemental determinants of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Until now, the interrelationship of PaCO2-induced changes in CBF, CVR, CPPe, ZFP, and RAP is not fully understood. In a controlled crossover trial, we investigated 10 anesthetized patients aiming at PaCO2 levels of 30, 37, 43, and 50 mm Hg. Cerebral blood flow was measured with a modified Kety-Schmidt-technique. Zero flow pressure and RAP was estimated by linear regression analysis of pressure–flow velocity relationships of the middle cerebral artery. Effective cerebral perfusion pressure was calculated as the difference between mean arterial pressure and ZFP, CVR as the ratio CPPe/CBF. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way RM-ANOVA. When comparing hypocapnia with hypercapnia, CBF showed a significant exponential reduction by 55% and mean VMCA by 41%. Effective cerebral perfusion pressure linearly decreased by 17% while ZFP increased from 14 to 29 mm Hg. Cerebrovascular resistance increased by 96% and RAP by 39% despite these concordant changes in mean CVR and Doppler-derived RAP correlation between these variables was weak (r=0.43). In conclusion, under general anesthesia hypocapnia-induced reduction in CBF is caused by both an increase in CVR and a decrease in CPPe, as a consequence of an increase in ZFP. PMID:25873428

  2. Dual effects of zinc sulphate on ethanol-induced gastric injury in rats: possibly mediated by an action on mucosal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Cho, C H; Chen, B W; Poon, Y K; Ng, M M; Hui, W M; Lam, S K; Ogle, C W

    1989-10-01

    The present study examines the protective effect of zinc sulphate against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal ulcers in rats. Absolute ethanol decreased the gastric mucosal blood flow and produced haemorrhagic lesions in the glandular mucosa. Zinc sulphate preincubation in an ex-vivo stomach chamber preparation prevented the formation of ethanol-induced lesions and attenuated the decrease of blood flow produced by ethanol. Subcutaneous injection of the same doses of the drug at 15 and 30 min before ethanol exposure, markedly reduced the blood flow and also aggravated ethanol-induced gastric injury; however, when injected at 23 and 24 h before ethanol administration, zinc sulphate protected against lesion formation but had no effect on the vascular changes induced by ethanol in the gastric glandular mucosa. These findings show that the antiulcer effect of zinc sulphate occurs only when the drug is given orally, or injected s.c. 23 and 24 h before ethanol challenge. Furthermore, this protective action is probably not entirely mediated by preservation of the gastric mucosal blood flow.

  3. TIPS bilateral noise reduction in 4D CT perfusion scans produces high-quality cerebral blood flow maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendrik, Adriënne M.; Vonken, Evert-jan; van Ginneken, Bram; de Jong, Hugo W.; Riordan, Alan; van Seeters, Tom; Smit, Ewoud J.; Viergever, Max A.; Prokop, Mathias

    2011-07-01

    Cerebral computed tomography perfusion (CTP) scans are acquired to detect areas of abnormal perfusion in patients with cerebrovascular diseases. These 4D CTP scans consist of multiple sequential 3D CT scans over time. Therefore, to reduce radiation exposure to the patient, the amount of x-ray radiation that can be used per sequential scan is limited, which results in a high level of noise. To detect areas of abnormal perfusion, perfusion parameters are derived from the CTP data, such as the cerebral blood flow (CBF). Algorithms to determine perfusion parameters, especially singular value decomposition, are very sensitive to noise. Therefore, noise reduction is an important preprocessing step for CTP analysis. In this paper, we propose a time-intensity profile similarity (TIPS) bilateral filter to reduce noise in 4D CTP scans, while preserving the time-intensity profiles (fourth dimension) that are essential for determining the perfusion parameters. The proposed TIPS bilateral filter is compared to standard Gaussian filtering, and 4D and 3D (applied separately to each sequential scan) bilateral filtering on both phantom and patient data. Results on the phantom data show that the TIPS bilateral filter is best able to approach the ground truth (noise-free phantom), compared to the other filtering methods (lowest root mean square error). An observer study is performed using CBF maps derived from fifteen CTP scans of acute stroke patients filtered with standard Gaussian, 3D, 4D and TIPS bilateral filtering. These CBF maps were blindly presented to two observers that indicated which map they preferred for (1) gray/white matter differentiation, (2) detectability of infarcted area and (3) overall image quality. Based on these results, the TIPS bilateral filter ranked best and its CBF maps were scored to have the best overall image quality in 100% of the cases by both observers. Furthermore, quantitative CBF and cerebral blood volume values in both the phantom and the

  4. Paradox: increased blood perfusion to the face enhances protection against frostbite while it lowers wind chill equivalent temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2007-05-01

    A model of facial heat exchange in cold and windy environments is presented. The tissue is depicted as a hollow cylinder and the model includes heat conduction and heat transport by blood circulation from the warmer core. A steady-state solution facilitating the estimation of wind chill equivalent temperature (WCET) as a function of the effective wind velocity, air temperature and blood perfusion rate was obtained. The results quantify and demonstrate the elevation of skin temperatures caused by increased flow of warmer blood from the inner core to the face. Elevated facial temperatures, while enhancing protection against frostbite and other cold-related injuries, also increase heat loss to the colder environment. Paradoxically, such elevated facial temperatures cause WCETs, as estimated by the prevailing definition, to attain lower rather than higher values, indicating, in fact, increased risk of frostbite. The results of this study should be useful in understanding and quantifying the effects of blood perfusion in protection against cold-related injuries. They should also be considered in the re-evaluation and re-formulation of the concept of wind chill, which has been a useful cold weather indicator for decades. PMID:17333290

  5. Abolished ventilation and perfusion of lung caused by blood clot in the left main bronchus: auto-downregulation of pulmonary arterial blood supply.

    PubMed

    Afzelius, P; Bergmann, A; Henriksen, J H

    2015-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the lungs possess arterial autoregulation associated with bronchial obstruction. A patient with pneumonia and congestive heart failure unexpectedly developed frequent haemoptysis. High-resolution CT and diagnostic CT were performed as well as ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy with single-photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT. V/Q SPECT/CT demonstrated abolished ventilation due to obstruction of the left main bronchus and markedly reduced perfusion of the entire left lung, a condition that was completely reversed after removal of a blood clot. We present the first pictorially documented case of hypoxia-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction and flow shift in a main pulmonary artery due to a complete intrinsic obstruction of the ipsilateral main bronchus. The condition is reversible, contingent on being relieved within a few days. PMID:26374773

  6. Comparison of blood flow models and acquisitions for quantitative myocardial perfusion estimation from dynamic CT.

    PubMed

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R; La Riviere, Patrick J; Alessio, Adam M

    2014-04-01

    Myocardial blood flow (MBF) can be estimated from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) cardiac CT acquisitions, leading to quantitative assessment of regional perfusion. The need for low radiation dose and the lack of consensus on MBF estimation methods motivates this study to refine the selection of acquisition protocols and models for CT-derived MBF. DCE cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (MBF = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml (min g)(-1), cardiac output = 3, 5, 8 L min(-1)). Patient kinetics were generated by a mathematical model of iodine exchange incorporating numerous physiological features including heterogenenous microvascular flow, permeability and capillary contrast gradients. CT acquisitions were simulated for multiple realizations of realistic x-ray flux levels. CT acquisitions that reduce radiation exposure were implemented by varying both temporal sampling (1, 2, and 3 s sampling intervals) and tube currents (140, 70, and 25 mAs). For all acquisitions, we compared three quantitative MBF estimation methods (two-compartment model, an axially-distributed model, and the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneous model) and a qualitative slope-based method. In total, over 11 000 time attenuation curves were used to evaluate MBF estimation in multiple patient and imaging scenarios. After iodine-based beam hardening correction, the slope method consistently underestimated flow by on average 47.5% and the quantitative models provided estimates with less than 6.5% average bias and increasing variance with increasing dose reductions. The three quantitative models performed equally well, offering estimates with essentially identical root mean squared error (RMSE) for matched acquisitions. MBF estimates using the qualitative slope method were inferior in terms of bias and RMSE compared to the quantitative methods. MBF estimate error was equal at matched dose reductions for all quantitative methods and range of techniques evaluated. This

  7. Comparison of blood flow models and acquisitions for quantitative myocardial perfusion estimation from dynamic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2014-04-01

    Myocardial blood flow (MBF) can be estimated from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) cardiac CT acquisitions, leading to quantitative assessment of regional perfusion. The need for low radiation dose and the lack of consensus on MBF estimation methods motivates this study to refine the selection of acquisition protocols and models for CT-derived MBF. DCE cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (MBF = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml (min g)-1, cardiac output = 3, 5, 8 L min-1). Patient kinetics were generated by a mathematical model of iodine exchange incorporating numerous physiological features including heterogenenous microvascular flow, permeability and capillary contrast gradients. CT acquisitions were simulated for multiple realizations of realistic x-ray flux levels. CT acquisitions that reduce radiation exposure were implemented by varying both temporal sampling (1, 2, and 3 s sampling intervals) and tube currents (140, 70, and 25 mAs). For all acquisitions, we compared three quantitative MBF estimation methods (two-compartment model, an axially-distributed model, and the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneous model) and a qualitative slope-based method. In total, over 11 000 time attenuation curves were used to evaluate MBF estimation in multiple patient and imaging scenarios. After iodine-based beam hardening correction, the slope method consistently underestimated flow by on average 47.5% and the quantitative models provided estimates with less than 6.5% average bias and increasing variance with increasing dose reductions. The three quantitative models performed equally well, offering estimates with essentially identical root mean squared error (RMSE) for matched acquisitions. MBF estimates using the qualitative slope method were inferior in terms of bias and RMSE compared to the quantitative methods. MBF estimate error was equal at matched dose reductions for all quantitative methods and range of techniques evaluated. This suggests that

  8. Investigation of Hepatic Blood Perfusion by Laser Speckle Imaging and Changes of Hepatic Vasoactive Substances in Mice after Electroacupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiao-jing; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Shu-you; Li, Shun-yue

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on hepatic blood perfusion (HBP) and vascular regulation. We investigated 60 male anesthetized mice under the following 3 conditions: without EA stimulation (control group); EA stimulation at Zusanli (ST36 group); EA stimulation at nonacupoint (NA group) during 30 min. The HBP was measured using the laser speckle perfusion imaging (LSPI). The level of nitric oxide (NO), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and noradrenaline (NE) in liver tissue was detected by biochemical methods. Results were as follows. At each time point, HBP increase in ST36 group was higher than that in the NA group in anesthetized mice. HBP gradually decreased during 30 min in control group. The level of NO in ST36 group was higher than that in NA group. The level of both ET-1 and NE was the highest in control group, followed by NA group and ST36 group. It is concluded that EA at ST36 could increase HBP possibly by increasing the blood flow velocity (BFV), changing vascular activity, increasing the level of NO, and inhibiting the level of ET-1 in liver tissue. PMID:25140188

  9. A high performance biometric signal and image processing method to reveal blood perfusion towards 3D oxygen saturation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imms, Ryan; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Trico, Michaël.; Summers, Ron

    2014-03-01

    Non-contact imaging photoplethysmography (PPG) is a recent development in the field of physiological data acquisition, currently undergoing a large amount of research to characterize and define the range of its capabilities. Contact-based PPG techniques have been broadly used in clinical scenarios for a number of years to obtain direct information about the degree of oxygen saturation for patients. With the advent of imaging techniques, there is strong potential to enable access to additional information such as multi-dimensional blood perfusion and saturation mapping. The further development of effective opto-physiological monitoring techniques is dependent upon novel modelling techniques coupled with improved sensor design and effective signal processing methodologies. The biometric signal and imaging processing platform (bSIPP) provides a comprehensive set of features for extraction and analysis of recorded iPPG data, enabling direct comparison with other biomedical diagnostic tools such as ECG and EEG. Additionally, utilizing information about the nature of tissue structure has enabled the generation of an engineering model describing the behaviour of light during its travel through the biological tissue. This enables the estimation of the relative oxygen saturation and blood perfusion in different layers of the tissue to be calculated, which has the potential to be a useful diagnostic tool.

  10. Potential of optical microangiography to monitor cerebral blood perfusion and vascular plasticity following traumatic brain injury in mice in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yali; Alkayed, Nabil; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2009-07-01

    Optical microanglography (OMAG) is a recently developed imaging modality capable of volumetric imaging of dynamic blood perfusion, down to capillary level resolution, with an imaging depth up to 2.00 mm beneath the tissue surface. We report the use of OMAG to monitor the cerebral blood flow (CBF) over the cortex of mouse brain upon traumatic brain injury (TBI), with the cranium left intact, for a period of two weeks on the same animal. We show the ability of OMAG to repeatedly image 3-D cerebral vasculatures during pre- and post-traumatic phases, and to visualize the changes of regulated CBF and the vascular plasticity after TBI. The results indicate the potential of OMAG to explore the mechanism involved in the rehabilitation of TBI.

  11. Topical use of Rectogesic® and Emla® to improve cutaneous blood perfusion following thermal injury. A comparative experimental study.

    PubMed

    Tagkalakis, P; Dionyssopoulos, A; Karkavelas, G; Demiri, E

    2015-06-30

    Early post-burn ischemic necrosis of the skin is of particular interest in modern burn research. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that blood perfusion could be improved by the topical application of vasoactive substances. A sample of 55 wistar rats was used to investigate the effect of 0,4% nitroglycerin ointment (Rectogesic(®)) comparatively to no application and placebo. The beneficiary action of 5% prilocaine/lidocaine cream (EMLA(®)) in burn blood perfusion was also tested comparatively to Rectogesic(®). Both preparations were tested respectively to non burned controls. Laser Doppler assessment of blood flow at 15, 30, 45, 60, 120 and 180 minutes after preparation application, demonstrated that the use of Rectogesic(®) improved perfusion at all measurements compared to placebo and to no preparation application (p&0,05). There was no statistical significant difference in the effect of the two preparations. PMID:27252612

  12. Topical use of Rectogesic® and Emla® to improve cutaneous blood perfusion following thermal injury. A comparative experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Tagkalakis, P.; Dionyssopoulos, A.; Karkavelas, G.; Demiri, E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Early post-burn ischemic necrosis of the skin is of particular interest in modern burn research. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that blood perfusion could be improved by the topical application of vasoactive substances. A sample of 55 wistar rats was used to investigate the effect of 0,4% nitroglycerin ointment (Rectogesic®) comparatively to no application and placebo. The beneficiary action of 5% prilocaine/lidocaine cream (EMLA®) in burn blood perfusion was also tested comparatively to Rectogesic®. Both preparations were tested respectively to non burned controls. Laser Doppler assessment of blood flow at 15, 30, 45, 60, 120 and 180 minutes after preparation application, demonstrated that the use of Rectogesic® improved perfusion at all measurements compared to placebo and to no preparation application (p&0,05). There was no statistical significant difference in the effect of the two preparations. PMID:27252612

  13. Blood Pressure is Associated With Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations in Patients With T2DM as Revealed by Perfusion Functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wenqing; Rao, Hengyi; Spaeth, Andrea M; Huang, Rong; Tian, Sai; Cai, Rongrong; Sun, Jie; Wang, Shaohua

    2015-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension are both associated with cognitive impairment and brain function abnormalities. We investigated whether abnormal cerebral blood flow (CBF) patterns exists in T2DM patients and possible relationships between aberrant CBF and cognitive performance. Furthermore, we examined the influence of hypertension on CBF alterations in T2DM patients. T2DM patients (n = 38) and non-T2DM subjects (n = 40) were recruited from clinics, hospitals, and normal community health screenings. Cerebral blood flow images were collected and analyzed using arterial spin labeling perfusion functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Regions with major CBF differences between T2DM patients and non-T2DM controls were detected via 1-way ANOVA. The interaction effects between hypertension and T2DM for CBF alterations were also examined. Correlation analyses illustrated the association between CBF values and cognitive performance and between CBF and blood pressure. Compared with non-T2DM controls, T2DM patients exhibited decreased CBF, primarily in the visual area and the default mode network (DMN); decreased CBF in these regions was correlated with cognitive performance. There was a significant interaction effect between hypertension and diabetes for CBF in the precuneus and the middle occipital gyrus. Additionally, blood pressure correlated negatively with CBF in T2DM patients.T2DM patients exhibited reduced CBF in the visual area and DMN. Hypertension may facilitate a CBF decrease in the setting of diabetes. T2DM patients may benefit from blood pressure control to maintain their brain perfusion through CBF preservation. PMID:26632913

  14. Distribution of lung blood on modified bilateral Glenn shunt evaluated by Tc-99m-MAA lung perfusion scintigraphy: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Si, Biao; Luan, Zhao-Sheng; Wang, Tong-Jian; Ning, Yan-Song; Li, Na; Zhu, Meng; Liu, Zhong-Min; Ding, Guang-Hong; Qiao, Bin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the distribution of lung blood in a modified bilateral Glenn procedure designed in our institute with lung perfusion scintigraphy. Sixteen consecutive patients who underwent modified bilateral Glenn operation from 2011 to 2014 were enrolled in the study. The control group consisted of 7 patients who underwent bidirectional Glenn shunt. Radionuclide lung perfusion scintigraphy was performed using Tc-99m-macro aggregated albumin (MAA) in all patients. For the patients in modified bilateral Glenn group, the time at which the radioactivity accumulation peaked did not differ significantly between the right and left lung field (t = 0.608, P = 0.554). The incidence of perfusion abnormality in each lung lobe also did not differ significantly (P = 0.426 by Fisher exact test). The radioactive counts were higher in the right lung than in the left lung, but the difference was not statistically significant (t = 1.502, P = 0.157). Radioactive perfusion in the lower lung field was significantly greater than that in the upper field (t = 4.368, P < 0.001). Compared with that in the bidirectional Glenn group, the ratio of radioactivity in the right lung to that in left lung was significantly lower in the modified bilateral Glenn group (t = 3.686, P = 0.002). Lung perfusion scintigraphy confirmed the benefit of the modified bilateral Glenn shunt with regard to more balanced blood perfusion in both lungs. PMID:27661042

  15. Distribution of lung blood on modified bilateral Glenn shunt evaluated by Tc-99m-MAA lung perfusion scintigraphy: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Si, Biao; Luan, Zhao-Sheng; Wang, Tong-Jian; Ning, Yan-Song; Li, Na; Zhu, Meng; Liu, Zhong-Min; Ding, Guang-Hong; Qiao, Bin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the distribution of lung blood in a modified bilateral Glenn procedure designed in our institute with lung perfusion scintigraphy. Sixteen consecutive patients who underwent modified bilateral Glenn operation from 2011 to 2014 were enrolled in the study. The control group consisted of 7 patients who underwent bidirectional Glenn shunt. Radionuclide lung perfusion scintigraphy was performed using Tc-99m-macro aggregated albumin (MAA) in all patients. For the patients in modified bilateral Glenn group, the time at which the radioactivity accumulation peaked did not differ significantly between the right and left lung field (t = 0.608, P = 0.554). The incidence of perfusion abnormality in each lung lobe also did not differ significantly (P = 0.426 by Fisher exact test). The radioactive counts were higher in the right lung than in the left lung, but the difference was not statistically significant (t = 1.502, P = 0.157). Radioactive perfusion in the lower lung field was significantly greater than that in the upper field (t = 4.368, P < 0.001). Compared with that in the bidirectional Glenn group, the ratio of radioactivity in the right lung to that in left lung was significantly lower in the modified bilateral Glenn group (t = 3.686, P = 0.002). Lung perfusion scintigraphy confirmed the benefit of the modified bilateral Glenn shunt with regard to more balanced blood perfusion in both lungs.

  16. Intravital lectin perfusion analysis of vascular permeability in human micro- and macro- blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Debbage, P L; Sölder, E; Seidl, S; Hutzler, P; Hugl, B; Ofner, D; Kreczy, A

    2001-10-01

    We previously applied intravital lectin perfusion in mouse models to elucidate mechanisms underlying vascular permeability. The present work transfers this technique to human models, analysing vascular permeability in macro- and microvessels. Human vascular endothelial surface carbohydrate biochemistry differs significantly from its murine counterpart, lacking alpha-galactosyl epitopes and expressing the L-fucose moiety in the glycocalyx; the poly-N-lactosamine glycan backbone is common to all mammals. We examined extensively lectin binding specificities in sections and in vivo, and then applied the poly-N-lactosamine-specific lectin LEA and the L-fucose-specific lectin UEA-I in human intravital perfusions. Transendothelial transport differed in macrovessels and microvessels. In microvessels of adult human fat tissue, rectal wall and rectal carcinomas, slow transendothelial transport by vesicles was followed by significant retention at the subendothelial basement membrane; paracellular passage was not observed. Passage time exceeded 1 h. Thus we found barrier mechanisms resembling those we described previously in murine tissues. In both adult and fetal macrovessels, the vena saphena magna and the umbilical vein, respectively, rapid passage across the endothelial lining was observed, the tracer localising completely in the subendothelial tissues within 15 min; vesicular transport was more rapid than in microvessels, and retention at the subendothelial basement membrane briefer.

  17. Modeling function-perfusion behavior in liver lobules including tissue, blood, glucose, lactate and glycogen by use of a coupled two-scale PDE-ODE approach.

    PubMed

    Ricken, T; Werner, D; Holzhütter, H G; König, M; Dahmen, U; Dirsch, O

    2015-06-01

    This study focuses on a two-scale, continuum multicomponent model for the description of blood perfusion and cell metabolism in the liver. The model accounts for a spatial and time depending hydro-diffusion-advection-reaction description. We consider a solid-phase (tissue) containing glycogen and a fluid-phase (blood) containing glucose as well as lactate. The five-component model is enhanced by a two-scale approach including a macroscale (sinusoidal level) and a microscale (cell level). The perfusion on the macroscale within the lobules is described by a homogenized multiphasic approach based on the theory of porous media (mixture theory combined with the concept of volume fraction). On macro level, we recall the basic mixture model, the governing equations as well as the constitutive framework including the solid (tissue) stress, blood pressure and solutes chemical potential. In view of the transport phenomena, we discuss the blood flow including transverse isotropic permeability, as well as the transport of solute concentrations including diffusion and advection. The continuum multicomponent model on the macroscale finally leads to a coupled system of partial differential equations (PDE). In contrast, the hepatic metabolism on the microscale (cell level) was modeled via a coupled system of ordinary differential equations (ODE). Again, we recall the constitutive relations for cell metabolism level. A finite element implementation of this framework is used to provide an illustrative example, describing the spatial and time-depending perfusion-metabolism processes in liver lobules that integrates perfusion and metabolism of the liver.

  18. Intrathoracic Pressure Regulation Improves Cerebral Perfusion and Cerebral Blood Flow in a Porcine Model of Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Anja; Rees, Jennifer; Kwon, Young; Matsuura, Timothy; McKnite, Scott; Lurie, Keith G

    2015-08-01

    Brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability in children and adults in their most productive years. Use of intrathoracic pressure regulation (IPR) to generate negative intrathoracic pressure during the expiratory phase of positive pressure ventilation improves mean arterial pressure and 24-h survival in porcine models of hemorrhagic shock and cardiac arrest and has been demonstrated to decrease intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) in these models. Application of IPR for 240 min in a porcine model of intracranial hypertension (ICH) will increase CPP when compared with controls. Twenty-three female pigs were subjected to focal brain injury by insertion of an epidural Foley catheter inflated with 3 mL of saline. Animals were randomized to treatment for 240 min with IPR set to a negative expiratory phase pressure of -12 cmH2O or no IPR therapy. Intracranial pressure, mean arterial pressure, CPP, and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were evaluated. Intrathoracic pressure regulation significantly improved mean CPP and CBF. Specifically, mean CPP after 90, 120, 180, and 240 min of IPR use was 43.7 ± 2.8 mmHg, 44.0 ± 2.7 mmHg, 44.5 ± 2.8 mmHg, and 43.1 ± 1.9 mmHg, respectively; a significant increase from ICH study baseline (39.5 ± 1.7 mmHg) compared with control animals in which mean CPP was 36.7 ± 1.4 mmHg (ICH study baseline) and then 35.9 ± 2.1 mmHg, 33.7 ± 2.8 mmHg, 33.9 ± 3.0 mmHg, and 36.0 ± 2.7 mmHg at 90, 120, 180, and 240 min, respectively (P < 0.05 for all time points). Cerebral blood flow, as measured by an invasive CBF probe, increased in the IPR group (34 ± 4 mL/100 g-min to 49 ± 7 mL/100 g-min at 90 min) but not in controls (27 ± 1 mL/100 g-min to 25 ± 5 mL/100 g-min at 90 min) (P = 0.01). Arterial pH remained unchanged during the entire period of IPR compared with baseline values and control values. In this anesthetized pig model of ICH, treatment with IPR significantly improved CPP and CBF. This therapy may be

  19. The isolated blood-perfused pig ear: an inexpensive and animal-saving model for skin penetration studies.

    PubMed

    de Lange, J; van Eck, P; Elliott, G R; de Kort, W L; Wolthuis, O L

    1992-04-01

    To overcome most of the disadvantages of current models to investigate percutaneous penetration of drugs or toxic substances, a model is proposed here based on the isolated pig ear, which is obtained at the slaughterhouse, and perfused with oxygenated blood from the same pig. To determine the viability of the preparations, we measured glucose consumption and lactate production as metabolic parameters, Na+ and K+ ions, as well as lactate dehydrogenase activity in blood as markers for cell damage, whereas vasomotor reactivity was assessed by administering noradrenaline and isoxsuprine. After 60 min of equilibration, only insignificant changes in these parameters were observed during the subsequent 3-hr test period (longer periods were not tested). A slight weight increase was noted during the total period 4 hr, presumably due to slight edema formation. On the basis of several types of measurements, such as in vivo blood flow and ear temperature and in vitro glucose metabolism, standard procedures were developed. It is concluded that this technique offers an easy to handle, cost-efficient, and animal-saving model for skin penetration studies that lacks most of the disadvantages of existing models.

  20. Towards quantification of blood-flow changes during cognitive task activation using perfusion-based fMRI.

    PubMed

    Mildner, Toralf; Zysset, Stefan; Trampel, Robert; Driesel, Wolfgang; Möller, Harald E

    2005-10-01

    Multi-slice perfusion-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (p-fMRI) is demonstrated with a color-word Stroop task as an established cognitive paradigm. Continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) of the blood in the left common carotid artery was applied for all repetitions of the functional run in a quasi-continuous fashion, i.e., it was interrupted only during image acquisition. For comparison, blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) contrast was detected using conventional gradient-recalled echo (GE) echo planar imaging (EPI). Positive activations in BOLD imaging appeared in p-fMRI as negative signal changes corresponding to an enhanced transport of inverted water spins into the region of interest, i.e., increased cerebral blood flow (CBF). Regional differences between the localization of activations and the sensitivity of p-fMRI and BOLD-fMRI were observed as, for example, in the inferior frontal sulcus and in the intraparietal sulcus. Quantification of CBF changes during cognitive task activation was performed on a multi-subject basis and yielded CBF increases of the order of 20-30%.

  1. Rapid onset of perfused blood vessels after implantation of ECFCs and MPCs in collagen, PuraMatrix and fibrin provisional matrices.

    PubMed

    Allen, Patrick; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Bischoff, Joyce

    2015-05-01

    We developed an in vivo vascularization model in which human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and human mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) form blood vessel networks when co-injected (ECFC + MPC) into nude mice in rat tail type I collagen, bovine fibrin or synthetic peptide PuraMatrix matrices. We used three approaches to determine the onset of functional vascularization when ECFC + MPC suspended in these matrices were implanted in vivo. The first was immunohistochemistry to detect vessels lined by human endothelial cells and filled with red blood cells. The second was in vivo vascular staining by tail vein injection of a mixture of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), a lectin specific for human endothelium, and Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 (GS-IB4 ), a lectin specific for rodent endothelium. The third approach employed contrast-enhanced ultrasound to measure the perfusion volumes of implants in individual animals over time. Human endothelial-lined tubular structures were detected in vivo on days 1 and 2 after implantation, with perfused human vessels detected on days 3 and 4. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound revealed significant perfusion of ECFC + MPC/collagen implants on days 1-4, at up to 14% perfused vascular volume. ECFC + MPC implanted in fibrin and PuraMatrix matrices also supported perfusion at day 1, as assessed by ultrasound (at 12% and 23% perfused vascular volume, respectively). This model demonstrates that ECFC + MPC suspended in any of the three matrices initiated a rapid onset of vascularization. We propose that ECFC + MPC delivered in vivo provide a means to achieve rapid perfusion of tissue-engineered organs or for in situ tissue repair.

  2. [Abnormal cerebral blood flow distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus in three pediatric patients measured by arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Keiko; Fukuda, Tokiko

    2016-05-01

    The ability to visualize brain perfusion is important for identifying epileptic foci. We present three pediatric cases showing asymmetrical cerebral blood flow (CBF) distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus measured by arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion MRI. During the acute phase, regional CBF measurements in the areas considered including epileptic foci were higher than in the corresponding area of the contralateral hemisphere, though the exact quantitative value varied between cases. We could not identify the correct epileptogenic foci, because those ASL images were taken after the prolonged and extraordinary activation of neurons in the affected area. During the recovery phase, the differences reduced and the average regional CBF measurement was 54.6 ± 6.1 ml/100 g per minute, which was a little less than the number of previous ASL studies. ASL perfusion MRI imaging provides a method for evaluating regional CBF by using magnetically labeled arterial blood water as an endogenous tracer. With this technique, we can repeatedly evaluate both the brain structure and the level of perfusion at the same time. ASL is noninvasive and easily accessible, and therefore it could become a routine tool for assessment of perfusion in daily practice of pediatric neurology. PMID:27349086

  3. Assay of lysergic acid diethylamide and its passage from blood into the perfused cerebral ventricles.

    PubMed

    DRASKOCI, M

    1960-03-01

    On the isolated rat uterus, lysergic acid diethylamide had an oxytocic action in a concentration of 2x10(-8); in smaller concentrations (10(-9) to 10(-10)), which had no stimulating effect of their own, it potentiated acetylcholine-induced contractions. This potentiating effect was made the basis for assaying minute amounts of lysergic acid diethylamide. The method was used to assay this substance in plasma of cats during its intravenous infusion at a rate of 10 mug./min./kg. During these infusions 0.4 to 2 ng./min. of lysergic acid diethylamide passed into the cerebral ventricles perfused with a salt solution of a composition resembling that of cerebrospinal fluid.

  4. Mucosal adjuvants: Opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lingbin

    2016-09-01

    Most pathogens access the body via mucosal surfaces. Mucosal vaccination is a highly effective and recommended method to prevent mucosally transmitted infections. Compared with immunization via intramuscular injection, mucosal immunization offers remarkable advantages, including non-invasiveness, low costs and reduced risk of transmission of blood-borne diseases, which make it more acceptable to human beings, especially to young children. However, only few mucosal vaccines are licensed for human, which is mainly due to the deficiency of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants. Adjuvants, as important components of most vaccines, are essential to enhance immunity and induce immune memory. The development of mucosal adjuvants, unfortunately, has been severely hampered by research strategies based on empiric trials and non-comprehensive methods for safety evaluation. Therefore, changing the research and development strategies of mucosal adjuvant field from empiricism based discovery to rational design based invention is highly demanded. The change of strategies mainly depends upon clarification of mechanism of mucosal adjuvant activity though a combination of life science, information science and materials science. PMID:27159278

  5. Full-field laser Doppler imaging and its physiological significance for tissue blood perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binzoni, T.; Van DeVille, D.

    2008-12-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations for a semi-infinite medium representing a skeletal muscle tissue, it is demonstrated that the zero- and first-order moments of the power spectrum for a representative pixel of a full-field laser-Doppler imager behave differently from classical laser-Doppler flowmetry. In particular, the zero-order moment has a very low sensitivity to tissue blood volume changes, and it becomes completely insensitive if the probability for a photon to interact with a moving red blood cell is above 0.05. It is shown that the loss in sensitivity is due to the strong forward scatter of the propagating photons in biological tissues (i.e., anisotropy factor g = 0.9). The first-order moment is linearly related to the root mean square of the red blood cell velocity (the Brownian component), and there is also a positive relationship with tissue blood volume. The most common physiological interpretation of the first-order moment is as tissue blood volume times expectation of the blood velocity (in probabilistic terms). In this sense, the use of the first-order moment appears to be a reasonable approach for qualitative real-time blood flow monitoring, but it does not allow us to obtain information on blood velocity or volume independently. Finally, it is shown that the spatial and temporal resolution trade-off imposed by the CMOS detectors, used in full-field laser-Doppler hardware, may lead to measurements that vary oppositely with the underlying physiological quantities. Further improvements on detectors' sampling rate will overcome this limitation.

  6. Small-Scale Perfusion Bioreactor of Red Blood Cells for Dynamic Studies of Cellular Pathways: Proof-of-Concept

    PubMed Central

    Prudent, Michel; Stauber, Frédéric; Rapin, Alexis; Hallen, Sonia; Pham, Nicole; Abonnenc, Mélanie; Marvin, Laure; Rochat, Bertrand; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Lion, Niels

    2016-01-01

    To date, the development of bioreactors for the study of red blood cells (RBCs, daily transfused in the case of disease or hemorrhage) has focused on hematopoietic stem cells. Despite the fact that mature RBCs are enucleated and do not expand, they possess complex cellular and metabolic pathways, as well as post-translation modification signaling and gas-exchange regulation. In order to dynamically study the behavior of RBCs and their signaling pathways under various conditions, a small-scale perfusion bioreactor has been developed. The most advanced design developed here consists of a fluidized bed of 7.6 mL containing 3·109 cells and perfused at 8.5 μL/min. Mimicking RBC storage conditions in transfusion medicine, as a proof-of-concept, we investigated the ex vivo aging of RBCs under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Hence, RBCs stored in saline-adenine-glucose-mannitol (SAGM) were injected in parallel into two bioreactors and perfused with a modified SAGM solution over 14 days at room temperature under air or argon. The formation of a fluidized bed enabled easy sampling of the extracellular medium over the storage period used for the quantitation of glucose consumption and lactate production. Hemolysis and microvesiculation increased during aging and were reduced under anaerobic (argon) conditions, which is consistent with previously reported findings. Glucose and lactate levels showed expected trends, i.e., decreased and increased during the 2-week period, respectively; whereas extracellular glucose consumption was higher under aerobic conditions. Metabolomics showed depletion of glycolsis and pentose phosphate pathway metabolites, and an accumulation of purine metabolite end-products. This novel approach, which takes advantage of a fluidized bed of cells in comparison to traditional closed bags or tubes, does not require agitation and limit shear stress, and constantly segragates extracellular medium from RBCs. It thus gives access to several difficult

  7. Cyclic Helix B Peptide in Preservation Solution and Autologous Blood Perfusate Ameliorates Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Isolated Porcine Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cheng; Hosgood, Sarah A.; Meeta, Patel; Long, Yaqiu; Zhu, Tongyu; Nicholson, Michael L.; Yang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a critical need to better preserve isolated organs before transplantation. We developed a novel nonerythropoiesis cyclic helix B peptide (CHBP) derived from erythropoietin, which has potent tissue protection and prolonged serum stability. The renoprotection and potential mechanism of CHBP were evaluated in a kidney preservation model. Materials and Methods Porcine kidneys (n = 5) subjected to 20-minute warm ischemia were retrieved and flushed with hyperosmolar citrate to mimic deceased donation. The kidneys and autologous blood ± 10.56 nmol/L CHBP were placed in cold storage (CS) for 18 hours. These kidneys were then normothermically hemoreperfused for 3 hours using an isolated organ perfusion system. The renal function and structure, apoptosis, inflammation, and expression of caspase-3 and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) were assessed. Results Cyclic helix B peptide significantly increased the renal blood flow, oxygen consumption, and urine output during reperfusion, but decreased serum potassium and renal tissue damage. Apoptotic cells were significantly decreased in the tubular areas, but increased in the lumens and interstitial areas in the post-CS and postreperfused kidneys, whereas myeloperoxidase+ cells were reduced. In addition, the expression of both caspase-3 precursor and active subunits was downregulated by CHBP in reperfused kidneys. However, HSP70 was upregulated in the post-CS and postreperfused kidneys treated with CHBP. Conclusions Cyclic helix B peptide administered into preservation and reperfusion solutions ameliorated renal ischemia-reperfusion injury, which might be associated with decreased apoptosis, inflammation and caspase-3, but increased HSP70. This novel preservation approach using CHBP may be applied in a porcine kidney transplant model and potential human donor kidney preservation. PMID:27500213

  8. Platelet deposition on von Willebrand factor-deficient vessels. Extracorporeal perfusion studies in swine with von Willebrand's disease using native and heparinized blood.

    PubMed

    Badimon, L; Badimon, J J; Rand, J; Turitto, V T; Fuster, V

    1987-11-01

    Native (nonanticoagulated) and heparinized blood from both normal swine and swine with von Willebrand's disease was exposed to de-endothelialized thoracic aorta from normal pigs under controlled flow conditions. We have shown that these normal de-endothelialized vessel segments do not contain von Willebrand factor (vWF) in the subendothelial surface; thus, the vascular model that we are using here is representative of the conditions in severe von Willebrand's disease. The blood was recirculated for selected periods of time through an extracorporeal circuit (carotid-jugular shunt), containing a tubular perfusion chamber that held the vessel segment. Flow rates and chamber diameters were selected such that the wall shear rates at the vascular segment were 212 to 3380 sec-1. Platelets were labeled with indium 111 and their total deposition determined by a gamma counter; selected areas were also observed by electron microscopy. When native blood was perfused, the deposition of platelets depended on platelet-plasma vWF only at high wall shear rates (1690 sec-1 or greater) typical of the microcirculation, but not at the lower shear rates (212 and 424 sec-1), more characteristic of the larger arteries and veins. In contrast, when heparinized blood was perfused, platelet deposition on the vascular segments depended on the presence of vWF over the entire range of shear conditions studied. These findings demonstrate in an extracorporeal perfusion system that the defect in platelet-vessel wall interaction in swine with von Willebrand's disease is influenced by both the local flow conditions and the level of activation of the coagulation system. In the presence of an intact coagulation system a synergistic interaction between procoagulant moieties and vWF was observed at high shear rates.

  9. [Changes in the natural killer activity of lymphocytes in peripheral blood of patients with purulent-septic diseases under the effect of extracorporeal perfusion of pig spleen sections].

    PubMed

    Zhidkov, K P; Malygin, A M; Dmitriev, N V; Borison, A E; Shevchenko, E V

    1989-01-01

    23 patients with pyo-septic diseases resistant to conservative therapy were treated by extracorporeal perfusion of xenospleen (EPXS). In 17 patients on EPXS a persistent detoxicating effect was achieved. 6 patients died. EPXS procedure was accompanied by a drop in medium-molecular lipid blood level and normalization of natural killer activity that was decreased considerably prior to EPXS. It is concluded that EPXS has a normalizing effect on the natural killer activity, which may be essential for resistance to infectious complications.

  10. Corrections of arterial input function for dynamic H215O PET to assess perfusion of pelvic tumours: arterial blood sampling versus image extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüdemann, L.; Sreenivasa, G.; Michel, R.; Rosner, C.; Plotkin, M.; Felix, R.; Wust, P.; Amthauer, H.

    2006-06-01

    Assessment of perfusion with 15O-labelled water (H215O) requires measurement of the arterial input function (AIF). The arterial time activity curve (TAC) measured using the peripheral sampling scheme requires corrections for delay and dispersion. In this study, parametrizations with and without arterial spillover correction for fitting of the tissue curve are evaluated. Additionally, a completely noninvasive method for generation of the AIF from a dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) acquisition is applied to assess perfusion of pelvic tumours. This method uses a volume of interest (VOI) to extract the TAC from the femoral artery. The VOI TAC is corrected for spillover using a separate tissue TAC and for recovery by determining the recovery coefficient on a coregistered CT data set. The techniques were applied in five patients with pelvic tumours who underwent a total of 11 examinations. Delay and dispersion correction of the blood TAC without arterial spillover correction yielded in seven examinations solutions inconsistent with physiology. Correction of arterial spillover increased the fitting accuracy and yielded consistent results in all patients. Generation of an AIF from PET image data was investigated as an alternative to arterial blood sampling and was shown to have an intrinsic potential to determine the AIF noninvasively and reproducibly. The AIF extracted from a VOI in a dynamic PET scan was similar in shape to the blood AIF but yielded significantly higher tissue perfusion values (mean of 104.0 ± 52.0%) and lower partition coefficients (-31.6 ± 24.2%). The perfusion values and partition coefficients determined with the VOI technique have to be corrected in order to compare the results with those of studies using a blood AIF.

  11. Dynamic markers based on blood perfusion fluctuations for selecting skin melanocytic lesions for biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Gemma; Stefanovska, Aneta; Pesce, Margherita; Marco Vezzoni, Gian; Loggini, Barbara; Pingitore, Raffaele; Ghiara, Fabrizio; Barachini, Paolo; Cervadoro, Gregorio; Romanelli, Marco; Rossi, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Skin malignant melanoma is a highly angiogenic cancer, necessitating early diagnosis for positive prognosis. The current diagnostic standard of biopsy and histological examination inevitably leads to many unnecessary invasive excisions. Here, we propose a non-invasive method of identification of melanoma based on blood flow dynamics. We consider a wide frequency range from 0.005-2 Hz associated with both local vascular regulation and effects of cardiac pulsation. Combining uniquely the power of oscillations associated with individual physiological processes we obtain a marker which distinguishes between melanoma and atypical nevi with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 90.9%. The method reveals valuable functional information about the melanoma microenvironment. It also provides the means for simple, accurate, in vivo distinction between malignant melanoma and atypical nevi, and may lead to a substantial reduction in the number of biopsies currently undertaken.

  12. Dynamic markers based on blood perfusion fluctuations for selecting skin melanocytic lesions for biopsy.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Gemma; Stefanovska, Aneta; Pesce, Margherita; Marco Vezzoni, Gian; Loggini, Barbara; Pingitore, Raffaele; Ghiara, Fabrizio; Barachini, Paolo; Cervadoro, Gregorio; Romanelli, Marco; Rossi, Marco

    2015-08-11

    Skin malignant melanoma is a highly angiogenic cancer, necessitating early diagnosis for positive prognosis. The current diagnostic standard of biopsy and histological examination inevitably leads to many unnecessary invasive excisions. Here, we propose a non-invasive method of identification of melanoma based on blood flow dynamics. We consider a wide frequency range from 0.005-2 Hz associated with both local vascular regulation and effects of cardiac pulsation. Combining uniquely the power of oscillations associated with individual physiological processes we obtain a marker which distinguishes between melanoma and atypical nevi with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 90.9%. The method reveals valuable functional information about the melanoma microenvironment. It also provides the means for simple, accurate, in vivo distinction between malignant melanoma and atypical nevi, and may lead to a substantial reduction in the number of biopsies currently undertaken.

  13. Validation of Perfusion Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Blood Pool Contrast Agent in Skeletal Swine Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hindel, Stefan; Sauerbrey, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Maderwald, Stefan; Schlamann, Marc; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to validate perfusion quantification in a low-perfused tissue by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with shared k-space sampling using a blood pool contrast agent. Perfusion measurements were performed in a total of seven female pigs. An ultrasonic Doppler probe was attached to the right femoral artery to determine total flow in the hind leg musculature. The femoral artery was catheterized for continuous local administration of adenosine to increase blood flow up to four times the baseline level. Three different stable perfusion levels were induced. The MR protocol included a 3D gradient-echo sequence with a temporal resolution of approximately 1.5 seconds. Before each dynamic sequence, static MR images were acquired with flip angles of 5°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Both static and dynamic images were used to generate relaxation rate and baseline magnetization maps with a flip angle method. 0.1 mL/kg body weight of blood pool contrast medium was injected via a central venous catheter at a flow rate of 5 mL/s. The right hind leg was segmented in 3D into medial, cranial, lateral, and pelvic thigh muscles, lower leg, bones, skin, and fat. The arterial input function (AIF) was measured in the aorta. Perfusion of the different anatomic regions was calculated using a one- and a two-compartment model with delay- and dispersion-corrected AIFs. The F-test for model comparison was used to decide whether to use the results of the one- or two-compartment model fit. Total flow was calculated by integrating volume-weighted perfusion values over the whole measured region. The resulting values of delay, dispersion, blood volume, mean transit time, and flow were all in physiologically and physically reasonable ranges. In 107 of 160 ROIs, the blood signal was separated, using a two-compartment model, into a capillary and an arteriolar signal contribution, decided by the F-test. Overall flow in hind leg muscles, as measured by the

  14. Validation of Perfusion Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Blood Pool Contrast Agent in Skeletal Swine Muscle.

    PubMed

    Hindel, Stefan; Sauerbrey, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Maderwald, Stefan; Schlamann, Marc; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to validate perfusion quantification in a low-perfused tissue by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with shared k-space sampling using a blood pool contrast agent. Perfusion measurements were performed in a total of seven female pigs. An ultrasonic Doppler probe was attached to the right femoral artery to determine total flow in the hind leg musculature. The femoral artery was catheterized for continuous local administration of adenosine to increase blood flow up to four times the baseline level. Three different stable perfusion levels were induced. The MR protocol included a 3D gradient-echo sequence with a temporal resolution of approximately 1.5 seconds. Before each dynamic sequence, static MR images were acquired with flip angles of 5°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Both static and dynamic images were used to generate relaxation rate and baseline magnetization maps with a flip angle method. 0.1 mL/kg body weight of blood pool contrast medium was injected via a central venous catheter at a flow rate of 5 mL/s. The right hind leg was segmented in 3D into medial, cranial, lateral, and pelvic thigh muscles, lower leg, bones, skin, and fat. The arterial input function (AIF) was measured in the aorta. Perfusion of the different anatomic regions was calculated using a one- and a two-compartment model with delay- and dispersion-corrected AIFs. The F-test for model comparison was used to decide whether to use the results of the one- or two-compartment model fit. Total flow was calculated by integrating volume-weighted perfusion values over the whole measured region. The resulting values of delay, dispersion, blood volume, mean transit time, and flow were all in physiologically and physically reasonable ranges. In 107 of 160 ROIs, the blood signal was separated, using a two-compartment model, into a capillary and an arteriolar signal contribution, decided by the F-test. Overall flow in hind leg muscles, as measured by the

  15. Validation of Perfusion Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Blood Pool Contrast Agent in Skeletal Swine Muscle.

    PubMed

    Hindel, Stefan; Sauerbrey, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Maderwald, Stefan; Schlamann, Marc; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to validate perfusion quantification in a low-perfused tissue by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with shared k-space sampling using a blood pool contrast agent. Perfusion measurements were performed in a total of seven female pigs. An ultrasonic Doppler probe was attached to the right femoral artery to determine total flow in the hind leg musculature. The femoral artery was catheterized for continuous local administration of adenosine to increase blood flow up to four times the baseline level. Three different stable perfusion levels were induced. The MR protocol included a 3D gradient-echo sequence with a temporal resolution of approximately 1.5 seconds. Before each dynamic sequence, static MR images were acquired with flip angles of 5°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Both static and dynamic images were used to generate relaxation rate and baseline magnetization maps with a flip angle method. 0.1 mL/kg body weight of blood pool contrast medium was injected via a central venous catheter at a flow rate of 5 mL/s. The right hind leg was segmented in 3D into medial, cranial, lateral, and pelvic thigh muscles, lower leg, bones, skin, and fat. The arterial input function (AIF) was measured in the aorta. Perfusion of the different anatomic regions was calculated using a one- and a two-compartment model with delay- and dispersion-corrected AIFs. The F-test for model comparison was used to decide whether to use the results of the one- or two-compartment model fit. Total flow was calculated by integrating volume-weighted perfusion values over the whole measured region. The resulting values of delay, dispersion, blood volume, mean transit time, and flow were all in physiologically and physically reasonable ranges. In 107 of 160 ROIs, the blood signal was separated, using a two-compartment model, into a capillary and an arteriolar signal contribution, decided by the F-test. Overall flow in hind leg muscles, as measured by the

  16. Mucosal immunology

    PubMed Central

    Bienenstock, J.; Befus, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    In this review, we shall highlight some recent advances in mucosal immunology and also those concepts which seem to us to merit more attention than they normally receive. Since we cannot hope to be all inclusive, we recommend the following articles and books to the reader (Tomasi & Bienenstock, 1968; Tomasi & Grey, 1972; Bienenstock, 1974; Heremans, 1974; Mestecky & Lawton, 1974; Lamm, 1976; Tomasi, 1976; Waksman & Ozer, 1976; Porter & Knight, 1977; McGhee, Mestecky & Babb, 1978; Ogra & Dayton, 1979; Befus & Bienenstock, 1980). PMID:7002769

  17. Detection and analysis of temperature-sensitive dermal blood perfusion dynamics and distribution by a hybrid camera system.

    PubMed

    Blanik, N; Paul, M; Blazek, V; Leonhardt, S

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we present an application of two optical imaging modalities for non-invasive assessment of dermal perfusion. This hybrid setup consists of a photo-plethysmographic camera sensing in the visible spectrum and a thermal camera sensing in the infrared-C-band. This allows to combine the information of both sources complementarily: The extracted perfusion index as well as the skin surface temperature. The feasibility of the presented system is tested in two studies with local temperature stress on the forehead of a subject. In the first, a local cooling on the subject's forehead is monitored and further analyzed. In the second, skin perfusion reactions to heat are considered. For both experiments the results are compared to baseline measurements and non-affected areas in the field of view of the cameras. As results, the dependencies between temperature and perfusion change are presented. Further, influences of the stressor can be visualized in functional mappings of calculated perfusion indices. For the performed test, a linear correlation between temperature and perfusion change is obtained. PMID:26736773

  18. Simultaneous Myocardial Strain and Dark-Blood Perfusion Imaging Using a Displacement-Encoded MRI Pulse Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Le, Yuan; Stein, Ashley; Berry, Colin; Kellman, Peter; Bennett, Eric E.; Taylor, Joni; Lucas, Katherine; Kopace, Rael; Chefd’Hotel, Christophe; Lorenz, Christine H.; Croisille, Pierre; Wen, Han

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a displacement-encoded pulse sequence for simultaneous perfusion and strain imaging. Displacement-encoded images in 2–3 myocardial slices were repeatedly acquired using a single shot pulse sequence for 3 to 4 minutes, which covers a bolus infusion of Gd. The magnitudes of the images were T1 weighted and provided quantitative measures of perfusion, while the phase maps yielded strain measurements. In an acute coronary occlusion swine protocol (n=9), segmental perfusion measurements were validated against microsphere reference standard with a linear regression (slope 0.986, R2 = 0.765, Bland-Altman standard deviation = 0.15 ml/min/g). In a group of ST-elevation myocardial infarction(STEMI) patients (n=11), the scan success rate was 76%. Short-term contrast washout rate and perfusion are highly correlated (R2=0.72), and the pixel-wise relationship between circumferential strain and perfusion was better described with a sigmoidal Hill curve than linear functions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring strain and perfusion from a single set of images. PMID:20544714

  19. Simultaneous myocardial strain and dark-blood perfusion imaging using a displacement-encoded MRI pulse sequence.

    PubMed

    Le, Yuan; Stein, Ashley; Berry, Colin; Kellman, Peter; Bennett, Eric E; Taylor, Joni; Lucas, Katherine; Kopace, Rael; Chefd'Hotel, Christophe; Lorenz, Christine H; Croisille, Pierre; Wen, Han

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a displacement-encoded pulse sequence for simultaneous perfusion and strain imaging. Displacement-encoded images in two to three myocardial slices were repeatedly acquired using a single-shot pulse sequence for 3 to 4 min, which covers a bolus infusion of Gadolinium contrast. The magnitudes of the images were T(1) weighted and provided quantitative measures of perfusion, while the phase maps yielded strain measurements. In an acute coronary occlusion swine protocol (n = 9), segmental perfusion measurements were validated against microsphere reference standard with a linear regression (slope 0.986, R(2) = 0.765, Bland-Altman standard deviation = 0.15 mL/min/g). In a group of ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients (n = 11), the scan success rate was 76%. Short-term contrast washout rate and perfusion are highly correlated (R(2) = 0.72), and the pixelwise relationship between circumferential strain and perfusion was better described with a sigmoidal Hill curve than linear functions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring strain and perfusion from a single set of images. PMID:20544714

  20. Detection and analysis of temperature-sensitive dermal blood perfusion dynamics and distribution by a hybrid camera system.

    PubMed

    Blanik, N; Paul, M; Blazek, V; Leonhardt, S

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an application of two optical imaging modalities for non-invasive assessment of dermal perfusion. This hybrid setup consists of a photo-plethysmographic camera sensing in the visible spectrum and a thermal camera sensing in the infrared-C-band. This allows to combine the information of both sources complementarily: The extracted perfusion index as well as the skin surface temperature. The feasibility of the presented system is tested in two studies with local temperature stress on the forehead of a subject. In the first, a local cooling on the subject's forehead is monitored and further analyzed. In the second, skin perfusion reactions to heat are considered. For both experiments the results are compared to baseline measurements and non-affected areas in the field of view of the cameras. As results, the dependencies between temperature and perfusion change are presented. Further, influences of the stressor can be visualized in functional mappings of calculated perfusion indices. For the performed test, a linear correlation between temperature and perfusion change is obtained.

  1. Microcirculation Perfusion Monitor on the Back of the Health Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanqi; Li, Xiaomei; Zhou, Dan; Wang, Kang; Liu, Yangyang; Guo, Yi; Qiu, Shuang; Zhai, Tianchen; Liu, Shuang; Liu, Jingjing; Ming, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To observe the dermal microcirculation blood perfusion characterization of meridians channels (acupoints). Methods. 20 healthy human subjects were monitored using Pericam Perfusion Speckle Imager (PSI) for the changes in dermal microcirculation blood perfusion on governor meridian and other respective dermal regions as a control. Result. The microcirculation blood perfusion on Governor Meridian is higher than its control area. Conclusion. The dermal microcirculation blood perfusion on certain parts of Governor Meridian of healthy human subjects showed specifics. PMID:24371463

  2. Enteral arginine does not increase superior mesenteric arterial blood flow and but induces mucosal growth in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arginine is an essential amino acid in neonates synthesized by gut epithelial cells and a precursor for nitric oxide (NO) that regulates vasodilatation and blood flow. Arginine supplementation has been shown to improve intestinal integrity in ischemia-reperfusion models and low plasma levels are ass...

  3. [Extracorporeal perfusion of the sheep rumen].

    PubMed

    Leng, L; Bajo, M; Várady, J; Szányiová, M

    1977-06-01

    We constructed a modified perfusion apparatus and elaborated a method of extracorporal perfusion of the rumen of sheep. As perfusates we used the bovine plasma diluted in a ratio of 1:1 of an isotonic sodium chloride (NaCl) solution and the whole autologous blood. Transaminases GOT and GPT, ammonia and pH were determined in the perfusate. The different perfusions were evaluated according to previously determined perfusion conditions and criteria. A subject for discussion is the question of suitability of the parameters under examination for judging the state of the perfused organ. The described method is suitable for the study of metabolical processes in the rumen wal.

  4. Compilation of basal metabolic and blood perfusion rates in various multi-compartment, whole-body thermoregulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitzer, Avraham; Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui

    2016-07-01

    The assignments of basal metabolic rates (BMR), basal cardiac output (BCO), and basal blood perfusion rates (BBPR) were compared in nine multi-compartment, whole-body thermoregulation models. The data are presented at three levels of detail: total body, specific body regions, and regional body tissue layers. Differences in the assignment of these quantities among the compared models increased with the level of detail, in the above order. The ranges of variability in the total body BMR was 6.5 % relative to the lowest value, with a mean of 84.3 ± 2 W, and in the BCO, it was 8 % with a mean of 4.70 ± 0.13 l/min. The least variability among the body regions is seen in the combined torso (shoulders, thorax, and abdomen: ±7.8 % BMR and ±5.9 % BBPR) and in the combined head (head, face, and neck ±9.9 % BMR and ±10.9 % BBPR), determined by the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean. Much more variability is apparent in the extremities with the most showing in the BMR of the feet (±117 %), followed by the BBPR in the arms (±61.3 %). In the tissue layers, most of the bone layers were assigned zero BMR and BBPR, except in the shoulders and in the extremities that were assigned non-zero values in a number of models. The next lowest values were assigned to the fat layers, with occasional zero values. Skin basal values were invariably non-zero but involved very low values in certain models, e.g., BBPR in the feet and the hands. Muscle layers were invariably assigned high values with the highest found in the thorax, abdomen, and legs. The brain, lung, and viscera layers were assigned the highest of all values of both basal quantities with those of the brain layers showing rather tight ranges of variability in both basal quantities. Average basal values of the "time-seasoned" models presented in this study could be useful as a first step in future modeling efforts subject to appropriate adjustment of values to conform to most recently available and reliable data.

  5. Effect of LACK and KMP11 on IFN-gamma production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis patients.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, L P; Passos, S; Dutra, W O; Soto, M; Alonso, C; Gollob, K J; Carvalho, E M; Ribeiro de Jesus, A

    2005-04-01

    The immune modulatory properties of recombinant antigens Kinetoplasmid membrane protein-11 (KMP11) and Leishmania homologue of receptors for activated C kinase (LACK) in cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) and mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) patients were evaluated. The mean levels of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in soluble leishmania antigen (SLA) stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of ML and CL patients were 5625 +/- 2333 pg/ml and 4422 +/- 3665 pg/ml, respectively. IFN-gamma was not detected in cultures stimulated with KMP11 or LACK. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) concentration in SLA, KMP11 and LACK-stimulated PBMC of ML patients was 13 +/- 12 pg/ml, 285 +/- 388 pg/ml and 802 +/- 483 pg/ml, respectively. Addition of KMP11 or LACK to SLA-stimulated PBMC of CL and ML patients enhanced IL-10 production (P < 0.05). Addition of KMP11 decreased IFN-gamma levels by 52% in CL patients and by 19% in ML patients. Addition of LACK to SLA-stimulated cultures decreased IFN-gamma levels by 58% in CL patients and by 30% in ML patients. Neutralization of IL-10 abrogated the downregulatory effect of LACK and KMP11. The modulatory properties of LACK and KMP11 are due to induction of IL-10 production and may be helpful for attenuating chronic inflammatory diseases. However, in some clinical conditions, as demonstrated for ML, these molecules are not able to suppress the IFN-gamma response, even inducing IL-10 production.

  6. Semi-automated and automated glioma grading using dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI relative cerebral blood volume measurements

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, S N; Bambrough, P J; Kotsarini, C; Khandanpour, N; Hoggard, N

    2012-01-01

    Objective Despite the established role of MRI in the diagnosis of brain tumours, histopathological assessment remains the clinically used technique, especially for the glioma group. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) is a dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI parameter that has been shown to correlate to tumour grade, but assessment requires a specialist and is time consuming. We developed analysis software to determine glioma gradings from perfusion rCBV scans in a manner that is quick, easy and does not require a specialist operator. Methods MRI perfusion data from 47 patients with different histopathological grades of glioma were analysed with custom-designed software. Semi-automated analysis was performed with a specialist and non-specialist operator separately determining the maximum rCBV value corresponding to the tumour. Automated histogram analysis was performed by calculating the mean, standard deviation, median, mode, skewness and kurtosis of rCBV values. All values were compared with the histopathologically assessed tumour grade. Results A strong correlation between specialist and non-specialist observer measurements was found. Significantly different values were obtained between tumour grades using both semi-automated and automated techniques, consistent with previous results. The raw (unnormalised) data single-pixel maximum rCBV semi-automated analysis value had the strongest correlation with glioma grade. Standard deviation of the raw data had the strongest correlation of the automated analysis. Conclusion Semi-automated calculation of raw maximum rCBV value was the best indicator of tumour grade and does not require a specialist operator. Advances in knowledge Both semi-automated and automated MRI perfusion techniques provide viable non-invasive alternatives to biopsy for glioma tumour grading. PMID:23175486

  7. Low local blood perfusion, high white blood cell and high platelet count are associated with primary tumor growth and lung metastasis in a 4T1 mouse breast cancer metastasis model

    PubMed Central

    WANG, CHUAN; CHEN, YING-GE; GAO, JIAN-LI; LYU, GUI-YUAN; SU, JIE; ZHANG, QI; JI, XIN; YAN, JI-ZHONG; QIU, QIAO-LI; ZHANG, YUE-LI; LI, LIN-ZI; XU, HAN-TING; CHEN, SU-HONG

    2015-01-01

    It was originally thought that no single routine blood test result would be able to indicate whether or not a patient had cancer; however, several novel studies have indicated that the median survival and prognosis of cancer patients were markedly associated with the systemic circulation features of cancer patients. In addition, certain parameters, such as white blood cell (WBC) count, were largely altered in malignant tumors. In the present study, routine blood tests were performed in order to observe the change of blood cells in tumor-bearing mice following the implantation of 4T1 breast cancer cells into the mammary fat pad; in addition, blood flow in breast tumor sites was measured indirectly using laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI), in an attempt to explain the relevance between the blood circulation features and the growth or metastasis of breast cancer in mice model. The LDPI and blood test results indicated that the implantation of 4T1 breast cancer cells into BALB/c mice led to thrombosis as well as high WBC count, high platelet count, high plateletcrit and low blood perfusion. Following implantation of the 4T1 cells for four weeks, the lung metastatic number was determined and the Pearson correlation coefficient revealed that the number of visceral lung metastatic sites had a marked negative association with the ratio of basophils (BASO%; r=-0.512; P<0.01) and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin was significantly correlated with primary tumor weight (r=0.425; P<0.05). In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that tumor growth led to thrombosis and acute anemia in mice; in addition, when blood BASO% was low, an increased number of lung metastases were observed in tumor-bearing mice. PMID:26622565

  8. The Effects of Oral Cryotherapy on Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Autologous Transplantation of Blood Stem Cells: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Askarifar, Marzieh; Lakdizaji, Sima; Ramzi, Mani; Rahmani, Azad; Jabbarzadeh, Faranak

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral mucositis is one of the irritating side effects of chemotherapy in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. However, up until now, the common methods of oral mucositis therapy have failed to show significant effects. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of local cryotherapy on the intensity of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in autologous bone marrow transplantation patients. Patients and Methods In this single, blinded, randomized clinical trial, 29 patients undergoing stem cell transplantation in Iran were selected by convenience sampling, and randomly allocated to control (n = 13) and intervention groups (n = 16). In the intervention group, cryotherapy was applied, while the control group received a normal saline mouthwash. The severity of the mucositis and neutrophil rate were investigated in five periods, based on the world health organization (WHO) scales. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney test, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), and linear regression. Results In both groups, the mucositis reached its peak intensity on the 7th day, and the least intensity was obtained on the 21st day. The neutrophil rate reached the minimum value on the 7th day, then increased up to the 21st day. The two groups showed no significant differences between the mucositis severity on the 14th and 21st days (P = 0.164), while the severity of the mucositis in the cryotherapy group was significantly less than that in the saline mouthwash group (1.81 < 2.54 and 0.13 < 0.92, respectively) on the 7th and 14th days (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the neutrophil rate between the groups. Conclusions The results showed that cryotherapy is more effective than the saline mouthwash in reducing the severity of mucositis. This method is recommended for the prevention of mucositis in bone marrow transplantation. PMID:27257512

  9. The endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan restores gut oxygen delivery and reverses intestinal mucosal acidosis in porcine endotoxin shock

    PubMed Central

    Oldner, A; Wanecek, M; Goiny, M; Weitzberg, E; Rudehill, A; Alving, K; Sollevi, A

    1998-01-01

    Background—Endothelin-1, the most potent vasoconstrictor known, is produced in septic states and may be involved in the pathophysiology of the deteriorated splanchnic circulation seen in septic shock. 
Aims—To elucidate the capability of bosentan, a non-peptide mixed endothelin receptor antagonist, to attenuate splanchnic blood flow disturbances and counteract intestinal mucosal acidosis in endotoxic shock. 
Methods—In 16 anaesthetised pigs, central and regional haemodynamics were monitored by thermodilution and ultrasonic flow probes, respectively. A tonometer in the ileum was used for measurement of mucosal pH. Onset of endotoxin challenge was followed by bosentan administration (to eight pigs) two hours later. 
Results—Endotoxin infusion reduced cardiac index and systemic oxygen delivery; bosentan restored these parameters. The reduced mean arterial blood pressure and renal blood flow remained unaffected by bosentan. The profound reduction in gut oxygen delivery in response to endotoxin was completely abolished by bosentan. Bosentan significantly improved the notably deteriorated intestinal mucosal pH and mucosal-arterial PCO2 gap. The mucosal-portal vein PCO2 gap, used to monitor the mucosa in relation to the gut as a whole (including the spleen and pancreas), was also greatly increased by endotoxaemia and significantly reversed by bosentan. 
Conclusion—Bosentan completely restored the profound endotoxin induced reductions in systemic and gut oxygen delivery with a concomitant reversal of intestinal mucosal acidosis. Results suggest that endothelin is involved in the pronounced perfusion disturbances seen in the gut in endotoxic shock. Bosentan may prove useful in reducing gut ischaemia in septic shock. 

 Keywords: splanchnic circulation; septic shock; tonometry; pHi; PCO2 gap; endothelin-1 PMID:9659167

  10. Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan? A lung ventilation/perfusion scan, or VQ scan, is a ... that measures air and blood flow in your lungs. A VQ scan most often is used to ...

  11. 3D discrete angiogenesis dynamic model and stochastic simulation for the assessment of blood perfusion coefficient and impact on heat transfer between nanoparticles and malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Yifat, Jonathan; Gannot, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Early detection of malignant tumors plays a crucial role in the survivability chances of the patient. Therefore, new and innovative tumor detection methods are constantly searched for. Tumor-specific magnetic-core nano-particles can be used with an alternating magnetic field to detect and treat tumors by hyperthermia. For the analysis of the method effectiveness, the bio-heat transfer between the nanoparticles and the tissue must be carefully studied. Heat diffusion in biological tissue is usually analyzed using the Pennes Bio-Heat Equation, where blood perfusion plays an important role. Malignant tumors are known to initiate an angiogenesis process, where endothelial cell migration from neighboring vasculature eventually leads to the formation of a thick blood capillary network around them. This process allows the tumor to receive its extensive nutrition demands and evolve into a more progressive and potentially fatal tumor. In order to assess the effect of angiogenesis on the bio-heat transfer problem, we have developed a discrete stochastic 3D model & simulation of tumor-induced angiogenesis. The model elaborates other angiogenesis models by providing high resolution 3D stochastic simulation, capturing of fine angiogenesis morphological features, effects of dynamic sprout thickness functions, and stochastic parent vessel generator. We show that the angiogenesis realizations produced are well suited for numerical bio-heat transfer analysis. Statistical study on the angiogenesis characteristics was derived using Monte Carlo simulations. According to the statistical analysis, we provide analytical expression for the blood perfusion coefficient in the Pennes equation, as a function of several parameters. This updated form of the Pennes equation could be used for numerical and analytical analyses of the proposed detection and treatment method.

  12. 3D discrete angiogenesis dynamic model and stochastic simulation for the assessment of blood perfusion coefficient and impact on heat transfer between nanoparticles and malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Yifat, Jonathan; Gannot, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Early detection of malignant tumors plays a crucial role in the survivability chances of the patient. Therefore, new and innovative tumor detection methods are constantly searched for. Tumor-specific magnetic-core nano-particles can be used with an alternating magnetic field to detect and treat tumors by hyperthermia. For the analysis of the method effectiveness, the bio-heat transfer between the nanoparticles and the tissue must be carefully studied. Heat diffusion in biological tissue is usually analyzed using the Pennes Bio-Heat Equation, where blood perfusion plays an important role. Malignant tumors are known to initiate an angiogenesis process, where endothelial cell migration from neighboring vasculature eventually leads to the formation of a thick blood capillary network around them. This process allows the tumor to receive its extensive nutrition demands and evolve into a more progressive and potentially fatal tumor. In order to assess the effect of angiogenesis on the bio-heat transfer problem, we have developed a discrete stochastic 3D model & simulation of tumor-induced angiogenesis. The model elaborates other angiogenesis models by providing high resolution 3D stochastic simulation, capturing of fine angiogenesis morphological features, effects of dynamic sprout thickness functions, and stochastic parent vessel generator. We show that the angiogenesis realizations produced are well suited for numerical bio-heat transfer analysis. Statistical study on the angiogenesis characteristics was derived using Monte Carlo simulations. According to the statistical analysis, we provide analytical expression for the blood perfusion coefficient in the Pennes equation, as a function of several parameters. This updated form of the Pennes equation could be used for numerical and analytical analyses of the proposed detection and treatment method. PMID:24462603

  13. Beta-adrenoceptor blocking effects of a selective beta 2-agonist, mabuterol, on the isolated, blood-perfused right atrium of the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Akahane, K.; Furukawa, Y.; Ogiwara, Y.; Haniuda, M.; Chiba, S.

    1989-01-01

    1. Effects of (+/-)-1-(4-amino-3-chloro-5-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-2-tert.- butylamino-ethanol hydrochloride (mabuterol) on pacemaker activity and atrial contractility were investigated in the isolated and blood-perfused right atrium of the dog. 2. Mabuterol, injected into the sinus node artery of the isolated atrium, dose-dependently increased atrial rate and contractile force at doses of 0.01-10 nmol but the responses to over 10 nmol of mabuterol gradually decreased and mabuterol at higher doses induced biphasic cardiac responses, i.e., negative followed by positive cardiac responses. 3. The maximal increases in atrial rate and contractile force induced by mabuterol were 41.4% and 12.9%, respectively, of the maximal chronotropic and inotropic effects of isoprenaline. 4. Positive chronotropic and inotropic responses to mabuterol were dose-dependently inhibited by a selective beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, ICI 118,551. These responses were only slightly attenuated by atenolol. 5. Mabuterol (1-300 nmol) dose-dependently inhibited both dobutamine- and procaterol-induced positive chronotropic and inotropic responses. 6. These results indicate that mabuterol causes weak positive chronotropic and inotropic effects on the perfused canine right atrium by activating beta 2-adrenoceptors, and that higher concentrations non-selectively block both beta 1-and beta 2-adrenoceptors. PMID:2474351

  14. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of oligonucleotides to the blood-brain barrier: in vitro and in situ brain perfusion studies on the uptake mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young Tag

    2013-11-01

    Except for the few exceptions where topical administration is feasible, progress towards broad clinical application of nucleic acid therapeutics requires development of effective systemic delivery strategies. The central nervous system represents a particularly difficult organ for systemic delivery due to the blood-brain barrier. We previously reported a nanoparticulate delivery system for targeted brain delivery of oligonucleotides upon systemic administration, i.e. liposome-encapsulated polyethylenimine/oligonucleotides polyplexes. In this study, cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of the nanoparticles were further investigated using in situ brain perfusion technique followed by colocalization and fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques. The brain endothelial uptake and possibly parenchymal accumulation were readily visualized upon administration via internal carotid artery perfusion. The nanoparticles were colocalized with early-endosome antigen, which confirms the brain endothelial uptake through transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis also suggested the nanoparticles entered the brain endothelial cells while maintaining their integrity. Together, the enhanced brain uptake, as claimed previously, of the antibody-targeted nanoparticles was clearly confirmed with more convincing evidences. In addition, the experimental techniques described here should be applicable to the studies involving nanoparticle-mediated brain delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics.

  15. Improvements in the Quantitative Assessment of Cerebral Blood Volume and Flow with the Removal of Vessel Voxels from MR Perfusion Images

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Michael Mu Huo; Cho, I-Chieh; Kao, Yi-Hsuan; Chuang, Chi-Shuo; Chiu, Fang-Ying; Chang, Feng-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To improve the quantitative assessment of cerebral blood volume (CBV) and flow (CBF) in the brain voxels from MR perfusion images. Materials and Methods. Normal brain parenchyma was automatically segmented with the time-to-peak criteria after cerebrospinal fluid removal and preliminary vessel voxel removal. Two scaling factors were calculated by comparing the relative CBV and CBF of the segmented normal brain parenchyma with the absolute values in the literature. Using the scaling factors, the relative values were converted to the absolute CBV and CBF. Voxels with either CBV > 8 mL/100 g or CBF > 100 mL/100 g/min were characterized as vessel voxels and were excluded from the quantitative measurements. Results. The segmented brain parenchyma with normal perfusion was consistent with the angiographic findings for each patient. We confirmed the necessity of dual thresholds including CBF and CBV for proper removal of vessel voxels. The scaling factors were 0.208 ± 0.041 for CBV, and 0.168 ± 0.037, 0.172 ± 0.037 for CBF calculated using standard and circulant singular value decomposition techniques, respectively. Conclusion. The automatic scaling and vessel removal techniques provide an alternative method for obtaining improved quantitative assessment of CBV and CBF in patients with thromboembolic cerebral arterial disease. PMID:23586033

  16. Extracorporeal shock-wave therapy enhanced wound healing via increasing topical blood perfusion and tissue regeneration in a rat model of STZ-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yur-Ren; Wang, Chun-Ting; Wang, Feng-Sheng; Chiang, Yuan-Cheng; Wang, Ching-Jen

    2009-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock-wave therapy (ESWT) has a significant positive effect in accelerating chronic wound healing. However, the bio-mechanisms operating during ESWT of wounds remain unclear. This study investigated the effectiveness of ESWT in the enhancement of diabetic wound healing. A dorsal skin defect (area, 6 x 5 cm) in a streptozotocin-induced diabetes rodent model was used. Fifty male Wistar rats were divided into five groups. Group I consisted of nondiabetic control; group II included diabetic control receiving no ESWT; group III included rats that underwent one session of ESWT (ESW-1) on day 3 (800 impulses at 0.09 mJ/mm(2)) postwounding; group IV included rats that underwent two sessions of ESWT (ESW-2) on days 3 and 7; and group V included rats that underwent three sessions of ESWT (ESW-3) on days 3, 7, and 10. The wound healing was assessed clinically. Blood perfusion scan was performed with laser Doppler. The VEGF, eNOS, and PCNA were analyzed with immunohistochemical stain. The results revealed that the wound size was significantly reduced in the ESWT-treated rats, especially in the ESW-2 and ESW-3 groups, as compared with the control (p<0.01). Blood perfusion was significantly increased after ESWT compared with the controls. Histological findings revealed a significant reduction in the topical pro-inflammatory reaction in the ESWT group as compared with the control. In immunohistochemical stain, significant increases in VEGF, eNOS, and PCNA expressions were observed in the ESWT group, especially in the ESW-2 and ESW-3 groups, as compared with the control. In conclusion, treatment with an optimal session of ESWT significantly enhanced diabetic wound healing associated with increased neo-angiogenesis and tissue regeneration, and topical anti-inflammatory response.

  17. A novel non-invasive trans-reflectance photoplethysmographic probe for use in cases of low peripheral blood perfusion.

    PubMed

    Shafique, Muhammad; Phillips, Justin P; Kyriacou, Panayiotis A

    2009-01-01

    The acquisition of reliable and meaningful photo-plethysmographic (PPG) signals using conventional pulse oxime-try technology may be compromised by conditions of low tissue perfusion. We have developed a novel 'trans-reflectance' PPG measurement system which combines reflectance and transmit-tance together into a single mode. For comparison purposes the system also enables the independent display of reflectance and transmittance PPG signals simultaneously. Preliminary experiments were performed on volunteers to assess the performance of the probe, where, artificial hypoperfusion was created in individuals and data was recorded with the newly developed trans-reflectance photoplethysmographic mode, and the conventional transmittance and reflectance PPG modes. The PPG signals recorded during hypoperfusion using the trans-reflectance mode were of good quality with higher signal-to-noise ratio than those obtained from the transmittance and reflectance modes.

  18. How does alteration of hepatic blood flow affect liver perfusion and radiofrequency-induced thermal lesion size in rabbit liver?

    PubMed

    Aschoff, A J; Merkle, E M; Wong, V; Zhang, Q; Mendez, M M; Duerk, J L; Lewin, J S

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that decreasing liver perfusion in rabbits results in an increase in thermal lesion size and that these effects can be accurately monitored using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We additionally tested the hypothesis that the increase in thermal lesion size would depend on the particular vessel or vessels occluded (hepatic artery, portal vein, or both). Using an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee approved protocol, 20 New Zealand white rabbits were randomly assigned to four treatment groups (five in each group): control and ligation of portal vein (PV), hepatic artery (HA), or both PV and HA (HAPV). Surgical ligation of the appropriate vessel was performed under general anesthesia. Immediately after ligation, the rabbits were placed in a 0.2-T open MR system, and an 18-G copper radiofrequency (RF) electrode with a 2-cm exposed tip was inserted into the liver. RF was applied for 10 minutes with the tip temperature maintained at 90 degrees +/- 2 degrees C. Before and after ablation, perfusion data were obtained for 90 seconds using 30 3-second sequential single oblique-slice fast imaging with steady-state progression (FISP) acquisitions after injection of gadolinium-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) via the inferior vena cava. Postablation scanning included axial and oblique turbo spin-echo (TSE) T2-weighted (T2w), STIR, and Gd-enhanced T1w sequences. Lesion size was determined perpendicular to the RF electrode using software calipers on the imager. The rabbits were sacrificed after completion of the post-therapy scans, and their livers were harvested for histologic analysis. The liver showed a mean increase in signal amplitude (SA) of 76% 24 seconds after Gd contrast injection in the control group. After contrast injection, the SA increased to a mean of only 66% in the group with ligated hepatic arteries, with no difference in the time to peak compared with the control group. No significant

  19. Blood circulation in the fingers is aggravated after creating a vascular access for dialysis: assessment using skin perfusion pressure.

    PubMed

    Sato, Makoto; Tahara, Shinya; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Terashi, Hiroto

    2014-10-01

    Internal vascular shunts for haemodialysis can cause different complications. One of the most serious complications is steal syndrome, which can result in disturbed peripheral circulation causing finger necrosis and lead to amputation. Thus, prevention of these complications is important. Measurement of skin perfusion pressure (SPP) has been used in various clinical settings, including wound-healing management, and its usefulness has been increasingly unveiled. The present study was undertaken to evaluate changes in haemodynamics after internal shunt creation by measuring SPP of the thumb and the little finger before and after surgery in five patients undergoing shunt surgery using the radial artery and the cephalic vein. The study revealed average changes of -22.8 mmHg in thumb SPP. The change in the thumb was statistically significant (p < 0.05). If the effect of surgery and the threshold for wound healing are taken into account, the present results indicate the necessity to pay extra attention to fingers with extremely low preoperative SPP values. For the prevention of serious disturbances of peripheral circulation (e.g. steal syndrome), routine preoperative SPP measurement seems effective for screening of high-risk patients.

  20. Laser Doppler flowmetry for bone blood flow measurements: helium-neon laser light attenuation and depth of perfusion assessment.

    PubMed

    Nötzli, H P; Swiontkowski, M F; Thaxter, S T; Carpenter, G K; Wyatt, R

    1989-01-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) has been successfully used in clinical and experimental settings to evaluate bone perfusion but unanswered questions regarding its capabilities and limitations still remain. This study was undertaken to determine absorption of He-Ne laser light (632.8 nm) and maximum depth for flow assessment (threshold thickness) under optimal conditions in bone. Light transmittance in bovine bone samples of femora and tibia was measured after each step of grinding and depth of penetration calculated. The threshold thickness was obtained by placing the same samples in a flow chamber where a solution of 2% latex circulated beneath; flow was detected by a laser Doppler probe resting on top of the sample. The results showed a significantly higher depth of penetration for trabecular than for cortical bone. A regression analysis showed a high correlation between the inorganic fraction of the bone and the depth of penetration. The maximum depth at which the laser Doppler probe can evaluate flow in bone conditions was found to be 2.9 +/- 0.2 mm in cortical bone, 3.5 +/- 0.3 mm in bone covered by 1 mm cartilage and 3.5 +/- 0.2 mm in trabecular bone. The study showed the limitations of LDF in bone and their correlations to various bone properties.

  1. Ultrasound perfusion signal processing for tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, MinWoo; Abbey, Craig K.; Insana, Michael F.

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced blood perfusion in a tissue mass is an indication of neo-vascularity and a sign of a potential malignancy. Ultrasonic pulsed-Doppler imaging is a preferred modality for noninvasive monitoring of blood flow. However, the weak blood echoes and disorganized slow flow make it difficult to detect perfusion using standard methods without the expense and risk of contrast enhancement. Our research measures the efficiency of conventional power-Doppler (PD) methods at discriminating flow states by comparing measurement performance to that of an ideal discriminator. ROC analysis applied to the experimental results shows that power Doppler methods are just 30-50 % efficient at perfusion flows less than 1ml/min, suggesting an opportunity to improve perfusion assessment through signal processing. A new perfusion estimator is proposed by extending the statistical discriminator approach. We show that 2-D perfusion color imaging may be enhanced using this approach.

  2. Computational micro-scale model of control of extravascular water and capillary perfusion in the air blood barrier.

    PubMed

    Mazzuca, Enrico; Aliverti, Andrea; Miserocchi, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    A computational model of a morphologically-based alveolar capillary unit (ACU) in the rabbit is developed to relate lung fluid balance to mechanical forces between capillary surface and interstitium during development of interstitial edema. We hypothesize that positive values of interstitial liquid pressure Pliq impact on capillary transmural pressure and on blood flow. ACU blood flow, capillary recruitment and filtration are computed by modulating vascular and interstitial pressures. Model results are compared with experimental data of Pliq increasing from ~-10 (control) up to ~4cmH2O in two conditions, hypoxia and collagenase injection. For hypoxia exposure, fitting data requires a linear increase in hydraulic conductivity Lp and capillary pressure PC, that fulfils the need of increase in oxygen delivery. For severe fragmentation of capillary endothelial barrier (collagenase injection), fitting requires a rapid increase in both hydraulic and protein permeability, causing ACU de-recruitment, followed by an increase in PC as a late response to restore blood flow. In conclusion, the model allows to describe the lung adaptive response to edemagenic perturbations; the increase in Pliq, related to the low interstitial compliance, provides an efficient control of extravascular water, by limiting microvascular filtration. PMID:27059893

  3. Hydrostatic determinants of cerebral perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.M.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    We examined the cerebral blood flow response to alterations in perfusion pressure mediated through decreases in mean arterial pressure, increases in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, and increases in jugular venous (JV) pressure in 42 pentobarbital anesthetized dogs. Each of these three pressures was independently controlled. Cerebral perfusion pressure was defined as mean arterial pressure minus JV or CSF pressure, depending on which was greater. Mean hemispheric blood flow was measured with the radiolabeled microsphere technique. Despite 30-mm Hg reductions in mean arterial pressure or increases in CSF or JV pressure, CBF did not change as long as the perfusion pressure remained greater than approximately 60 mm Hg. However, whenever perfusion pressure was reduced to an average of 48 mm Hg, cerebral blood flow decreased 27% to 33%. These results demonstrate the capacity of the cerebral vascular bed to respond similarly to changes in the perfusion pressure gradient obtained by decreasing mean arterial pressure, increasing JV pressure or increasing CSF pressure, and thereby support the above definition of cerebral perfusion pressure.

  4. Renal perfusion scintiscan

    MedlinePlus

    Renal perfusion scintigraphy; Radionuclide renal perfusion scan; Perfusion scintiscan - renal; Scintiscan - renal perfusion ... supply the kidneys. This is a condition called renal artery stenosis. Significant renal artery stenosis may be ...

  5. [Absorption of amino acids from the perfused ovine rumen].

    PubMed

    L' Leng; Tomás, J; Várady, J; Szányiová, M

    1978-06-01

    The experiments with extracoroporeal perfusion of sheep rumen were performed [Leng et al., 1977]. Bovine plasma, diluted in a 1:1ratio with an isotonic solution of sodium chloride, was used for four perfusions, and autologous blood was used for two perfusions in the course of 150 minutes. After 60 minutes perfusion 20 g enzymatic casein hydrolyzate were applied to the rumen. The levels of free amino acids in the perfusate were recorded after 60 minutes' perfusion [the first phase of perfusion] and at the end of the experiment [the second phase]. The levels of lysine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid increased after perfusions with bovine plasma during the first phase, the levels of glutamic acid, phenylalanine, and in one case of alanine, increased after perfusions with autologus blood. Simultaneously the level of valine decreased after perfusions with bovine plasma, and after perfusions with blood the levels of arginine and valine, and/or lysine, dropped. During the second phase of perfusion, the levels of all the observed amino acids except methionine [bovine plasma], and/or orginine and methionine [blood] rose in the perfusate. The experiments showed that the level of amino acids in the rumen content presented a decisive factor affecting amino acid absorption from the rumen into the blood. Transformation of the amino acids during their passage through the remen wall may be assumed, and glutamic acid is one of the chief products of this process.

  6. A quantitative high resolution voxel-wise assessment of myocardial blood flow from contrast-enhanced first-pass magnetic resonance perfusion imaging: microsphere validation in a magnetic resonance compatible free beating explanted pig heart model

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Andreas; Sinclair, Matthew; Zarinabad, Niloufar; Ishida, Masaki; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P.H.M.; Paul, Matthias; van Horssen, Pepijn; Hussain, Shazia T.; Perera, Divaka; Schaeffter, Tobias; Spaan, Jos A.E.; Siebes, Maria; Nagel, Eike; Chiribiri, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    Aims To assess the feasibility of high-resolution quantitative cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) voxel-wise perfusion imaging using clinical 1.5 and 3 T sequences and to validate it using fluorescently labelled microspheres in combination with a state of the art imaging cryomicrotome in a novel, isolated blood-perfused MR-compatible free beating pig heart model without respiratory motion. Methods and results MR perfusion imaging was performed in pig hearts at 1.5 (n = 4) and 3 T (n = 4). Images were acquired at physiological flow (‘rest’), reduced flow (‘ischaemia’), and during adenosine-induced hyperaemia (‘stress’) in control and coronary occlusion conditions. Fluorescently labelled microspheres and known coronary myocardial blood flow represented the reference standards for quantitative perfusion validation. For the comparison with microspheres, the LV was divided into 48 segments based on a subdivision of the 16 AHA segments into subendocardial, midmyocardial, and subepicardial subsegments. Perfusion quantification of the time-signal intensity curves was performed using a Fermi function deconvolution. High-resolution quantitative voxel-wise perfusion assessment was able to distinguish between occluded and remote myocardium (P < 0.001) and between rest, ischaemia, and stress perfusion conditions at 1.5 T (P < 0.001) and at 3 T (P < 0.001). CMR-MBF estimates correlated well with the microspheres at the AHA segmental level at 1.5 T (r = 0.94, P < 0.001) and at 3 T (r = 0.96, P < 0.001) and at the subendocardial, midmyocardial, and subepicardial level at 1.5 T (r = 0.93, r = 0.9, r = 0.88, P < 0.001, respectively) and at 3 T (r = 0.91, r = 0.95, r = 0.84, P < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion CMR-derived voxel-wise quantitative blood flow assessment is feasible and very accurate compared with microspheres. This technique is suitable for both clinically used field strengths and may provide the tools to assess extent and severity of myocardial

  7. Oral mucositis - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer treatment - mucositis; Cancer treatment - mouth pain; Cancer treatment - mouth sores; Chemotherapy - mucositis; Chemotherapy - mouth pain; Chemotherapy - mouth sores; Radiation therapy - mucositis; Radiation therapy - mouth pain; Radiation therapy - mouth ...

  8. Meta-analysis of the independent and cumulative effects of multiple genetic modifications on pig lung xenograft performance during ex vivo perfusion with human blood

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Donald G.; Quinn, Kevin J.; French, Beth M.; Schwartz, Evan; Kang, Elizabeth; Dahi, Siamak; Phelps, Carol J.; Ayares, David L.; Burdorf, Lars; Azimzadeh, Agnes M.; Pierson, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetically modified pigs are a promising potential source of lung xenografts. Ex-vivo xenoperfusion is an effective platform for testing the effect of new modifications, but typical experiments are limited by testing of a single genetic intervention and small sample sizes. The purpose of this study was to analyze the individual and aggregate effects of donor genetic modifications on porcine lung xenograft survival and injury in an extensive pig lung xenoperfusion series. Methods Data from 157 porcine lung xenoperfusion experiments using otherwise unmodified heparinized human blood were aggregated as either continuous or dichotomous variables. Lungs were wild type in 17 perfusions (11% of the study group), while 31 lungs (20% of the study group) had 1 genetic modification, 40 lungs (39%) had 2, and 47 lungs (30%) had 3 or more modifications. The primary endpoint was functional lung survival to 4 hours of perfusion. Secondary analyses evaluated previously identified markers associated with known lung xenograft injury mechanisms. In addition to comparison among all xenografts grouped by survival status, a subgroup analysis was performed of lungs incorporating the GalTKO.hCD46 genotype. Results Each increase in the number of genetic modifications was associated with additional prolongation of lung xenograft survival. Lungs that exhibited survival to 4 hours generally had reduced platelet activation and thrombin generation. GalTKO and the expression of hCD46, HO-1, hCD55 or hEPCR were associated with improved survival. hTBM, HLA-E, and hCD39 were associated with no significant effect on the primary outcome. Conclusion This meta-analysis of an extensive lung xenotransplantation series demonstrates that increasing the number of genetic modifications targeting known xenogeneic lung injury mechanisms is associated with incremental improvements in lung survival. While more detailed mechanistic studies are needed to explore the relationship between gene expression

  9. Method for measurement of the blood-brain barrier permeability in the perfused mouse brain: application to amyloid-beta peptide in wild type and Alzheimer's Tg2576 mice.

    PubMed

    LaRue, Barbra; Hogg, Elizabeth; Sagare, Abhay; Jovanovic, Suzana; Maness, Lawrence; Maurer, Calvin; Deane, Rashid; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2004-09-30

    The role of transport exchanges of neuroactive solutes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is increasingly recognized. To take full advantage of genetically altered mouse models of neurodegenerative disorders for BBB transport studies, we adapted a brain perfusion technique to the mouse. During a carotid brain perfusion with a medium containing sheep red blood cells and mock plasma, the physiological parameters in the arterial inflow, regional cerebral blood flow (14C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography), ultrastructural integrity of the tissue, barrier to lanthanum, brain water content, energy metabolites and lactate levels remain unchanged. Amyloid-beta peptides (Abeta) were iodinated by lactoperoxidase method. Non-oxidized mono-iodinated Abeta monomers were separated by HPLC (as confirmed by MALDI-TOF spectrometry) and used in transport measurements. Transport of intact 125I-Abeta40 across the BBB was time- and concentration-dependent in contrast to negligible 14C-inulin uptake. In 5-6 months old Alzheimer's Tg2576 mice, Abeta40 BBB transport was increased by >eight-fold compared to age-matched littermate controls, and was mediated via the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts. We conclude the present arterial brain perfusion method provides strictly controlled environment in cerebral microcirculation suitable for examining transport of rapidly and slowly penetrating molecules across the BBB in normal and transgenic mice.

  10. Why mucosal health?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaculture species depend more heavily on mucosal barriers than their terrestrial agricultural counterparts as they are continuously interacting with the aquatic microbiota. Unlike classical immune centers, such as the spleen and kidney, the accessibility of mucosal surfaces through immersion/dip t...

  11. Mucosal immunization and adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideki; van Reit, Elly; Kida, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the influenza vaccine is to prevent influenza virus infection and control the yearly seasonal epidemic and pandemic. However, the presently available parenteral influenza vaccine induces only systemic humoral immunity, which does not prevent influenza virus infection on the mucosal surface. Secretary IGA antibodies play an important role in preventing natural infection. Moreover, the IgA antibody response mediates cross-protection against variant viruses in animal models. Thus, a mucosal influenza vaccine that induces mucosal immunity would be a powerful tool to protect individuals from the influenza virus. Although the function of the mucosal immune system, especially in the respiratory tract, is not completely understood, there are several studies underway to develop mucosal influenza vaccines. Here, we will review current knowledge concerning the induction of IgA, the role of B-cell production of influenza virus specific IgA antibodies in anti-influenza immunity, and the role of humoral memory responses induced upon vaccination.

  12. Chlamydia trachomatis Antibody Testing in Vaginal Mucosal Material versus Blood Samples of Women Attending a Fertility Clinic and an STI Clinic.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Ingrid V F; Land, Jolande A; van Bergen, Jan E A M; Morré, Servaas A; van der Sande, Marianne A B

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chlamydia infections often follow an asymptomatic course but may damage the reproductive tract. Chlamydia antibodies in serum are used as markers for past infections and can relate to tubal pathology and infertility. This "proof of principle" study aimed to assess whether Chlamydia antibodies are detectable in easier to obtain, noninvasive, vaginal mucosa samples and relate to current or past infection. Methods. We compared outcomes of Chlamydia IgG and IgA antibody tests in serum and vaginal mucosal swabs in (a) 77 women attending a fertility clinic, of whom 25 tested positive for serum-IgG and (b) 107 women visiting an STI centre, including 30 Chlamydia PCR-positive subjects. Results. In the STI clinic, active Chlamydia infections were linked to serum-IgG and serum-IgA (P < 0.001) and mucosa-IgA (P < 0.001), but not mucosa-IgG. In the fertility clinic, mucosa-IgG had stronger correlations with serum-IgG (P = 0.02) than mucosa-IgA (P = 0.06). Women with tubal pathology or Chlamydia history more commonly had serum-IgG and mucosa-IgA (both P < 0.001), whereas this link was weaker for mucosa-IgG (P = 0.03). Conclusion. Chlamydia IgG and IgA are detectable in vaginal mucosal material. Serum-IgG had stronger associations with current or past infections. Mucosa-IgA also showed associations with (past) infection and complications. IgA presence in vaginal mucosa warrants further epidemiological studies.

  13. Validation of color Doppler ultrasonography for evaluating the uterine blood flow and perfusion during late normal pregnancy and uterine torsion in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Hassan A

    2013-04-15

    placentomal blood perfusion. In conclusion, depicting blood flow within the middle uterine artery using color Doppler sonography could be helpful in correct diagnosis of duration and degree of uterine torsion and concurrently predicting the viability of the fetus and dam.

  14. Prognostic accuracy of cerebral blood flow measurement by perfusion computed tomography, at the time of emergency room admission, in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Wintermark, Max; Reichhart, Marc; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Maeder, Philippe; Chalaron, Marc; Schnyder, Pierre; Bogousslavsky, Julien; Meuli, Reto

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic accuracy of perfusion computed tomography (CT), performed at the time of emergency room admission, in acute stroke patients. Accuracy was determined by comparison of perfusion CT with delayed magnetic resonance (MR) and by monitoring the evolution of each patient's clinical condition. Twenty-two acute stroke patients underwent perfusion CT covering four contiguous 10mm slices on admission, as well as delayed MR, performed after a median interval of 3 days after emergency room admission. Eight were treated with thrombolytic agents. Infarct size on the admission perfusion CT was compared with that on the delayed diffusion-weighted (DWI)-MR, chosen as the gold standard. Delayed magnetic resonance angiography and perfusion-weighted MR were used to detect recanalization. A potential recuperation ratio, defined as PRR = penumbra size/(penumbra size + infarct size) on the admission perfusion CT, was compared with the evolution in each patient's clinical condition, defined by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). In the 8 cases with arterial recanalization, the size of the cerebral infarct on the delayed DWI-MR was larger than or equal to that of the infarct on the admission perfusion CT, but smaller than or equal to that of the ischemic lesion on the admission perfusion CT; and the observed improvement in the NIHSS correlated with the PRR (correlation coefficient = 0.833). In the 14 cases with persistent arterial occlusion, infarct size on the delayed DWI-MR correlated with ischemic lesion size on the admission perfusion CT (r = 0.958). In all 22 patients, the admission NIHSS correlated with the size of the ischemic area on the admission perfusion CT (r = 0.627). Based on these findings, we conclude that perfusion CT allows the accurate prediction of the final infarct size and the evaluation of clinical prognosis for acute stroke patients at the time of emergency evaluation. It may also provide

  15. Sumatriptan and cerebral perfusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Scott, A K; Grimes, S; Ng, K; Critchley, M; Breckenridge, A M; Thomson, C; Pilgrim, A J

    1992-04-01

    1. The effect of sumatriptan on regional cerebral perfusion was studied in healthy volunteers. 2. Intravenous sumatriptan (2 mg) had no detectable effect on regional cerebral perfusion as measured using a SPECT system with 99technetiumm labelled hexemethylpropyleneamineoxime. 3. Sumatriptan had no effect on pulse, blood pressure or ECG indices. 4. All six volunteers experienced minor adverse effects during the intravenous infusion.

  16. Interhemispheric Cerebral Blood Flow Balance during Recovery of Motor Hand Function after Ischemic Stroke—A Longitudinal MRI Study Using Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Missimer, John; Schroth, Gerhard; Hess, Christian W.; Sturzenegger, Matthias; Wang, Danny J. J.; Weder, Bruno; Federspiel, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background Unilateral ischemic stroke disrupts the well balanced interactions within bilateral cortical networks. Restitution of interhemispheric balance is thought to contribute to post-stroke recovery. Longitudinal measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes might act as surrogate marker for this process. Objective To quantify longitudinal CBF changes using arterial spin labeling MRI (ASL) and interhemispheric balance within the cortical sensorimotor network and to assess their relationship with motor hand function recovery. Methods Longitudinal CBF data were acquired in 23 patients at 3 and 9 months after cortical sensorimotor stroke and in 20 healthy controls using pulsed ASL. Recovery of grip force and manual dexterity was assessed with tasks requiring power and precision grips. Voxel-based analysis was performed to identify areas of significant CBF change. Region-of-interest analyses were used to quantify the interhemispheric balance across nodes of the cortical sensorimotor network. Results Dexterity was more affected, and recovered at a slower pace than grip force. In patients with successful recovery of dexterous hand function, CBF decreased over time in the contralesional supplementary motor area, paralimbic anterior cingulate cortex and superior precuneus, and interhemispheric balance returned to healthy control levels. In contrast, patients with poor recovery presented with sustained hypoperfusion in the sensorimotor cortices encompassing the ischemic tissue, and CBF remained lateralized to the contralesional hemisphere. Conclusions Sustained perfusion imbalance within the cortical sensorimotor network, as measured with task-unrelated ASL, is associated with poor recovery of dexterous hand function after stroke. CBF at rest might be used to monitor recovery and gain prognostic information. PMID:25191858

  17. Regional Cerebral Blood-Flow with 99mTc-ECD Brain Perfusion SPECT in Landau-Kleffner Syndrome: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Nemati, Reza; Nabipour, Iraj; Javadi, Hamid; Chabi, Negar; Assadi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) is a rare childhood disorder characterized by acquired aphasia and epilepsy. 99mTc-ECD SPECT imaging was performed in two right-handed children with LKS. A relative decrease in perfusion was found in the left frontal-temporal cortices of both patients as well as in the left and right parietal cortices of one patient with aphasia, without clinical epilepsy. The degree of regional cerebral perfusion impairment did not correlate with the severity of the clinical and EEG abnormalities, but the area of hypoperfusion was compatible with the speech area of the brain. Overall, although asymmetrical temporoparietal perfusion appears as a common finding in LKS, SPECT findings in LKS alone cannot elucidate the pathogenic features of the disorder in the brain. Here, we present two cases of LKS in which we investigated SPECT perfusion scans.

  18. Nasal mucosal biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - nasal mucosa; Nose biopsy ... to fast for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Nasal mucosal biopsy is usually done when abnormal tissue is seen during examination of the nose. It may also be done ...

  19. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells (RBC) deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and organs. White blood cells (WBC) fight infection and are part of your ...

  20. Luminal l-glutamate enhances duodenal mucosal defense mechanisms via multiple glutamate receptors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Chikako; Mizumori, Misa; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2009-01-01

    Presence of taste receptor families in the gastrointestinal mucosa suggests a physiological basis for local and early detection of a meal. We hypothesized that luminal l-glutamate, which is the primary nutrient conferring fundamental umami or proteinaceous taste, influences mucosal defense mechanisms in rat duodenum. We perfused the duodenal mucosa of anesthetized rats with l-glutamate (0.1–10 mM). Intracellular pH (pHi) of the epithelial cells, blood flow, and mucus gel thickness (MGT) were simultaneously and continuously measured in vivo. Some rats were pretreated with indomethacin or capsaicin. Duodenal bicarbonate secretion (DBS) was measured with flow-through pH and CO2 electrodes. We tested the effects of agonists or antagonists for metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) 1 or 4 or calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) on defense factors. Luminal l-glutamate dose dependently increased pHi and MGT but had no effect on blood flow in the duodenum. l-glutamate (10 mM)-induced cellular alkalinization and mucus secretion were inhibited by pretreatment with indomethacin or capsaicin. l-glutamate effects on pHi and MGT were mimicked by mGluR4 agonists and inhibited by an mGluR4 antagonist. CaSR agonists acidified cells with increased MGT and DBS, unlike l-glutamate. Perfusion of l-glutamate with inosinate (inosine 5′-monophosphate, 0.1 mM) enhanced DBS only in combination, suggesting synergistic activation of the l-glutamate receptor, typical of taste receptor type 1. l-leucine or l-aspartate had similar effects on DBS without any effect on pHi and MGT. Preperfusion of l-glutamate prevented acid-induced cellular injury, suggesting that l-glutamate protects the mucosa by enhancing mucosal defenses. Luminal l-glutamate may activate multiple receptors and afferent nerves and locally enhance mucosal defenses to prevent subsequent injury attributable to acid exposure in the duodenum. PMID:19643955

  1. Microfluidic perfusion culture.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Koji; Sugiura, Shinji; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic perfusion culture is a novel technique to culture animal cells in a small-scale microchamber with medium perfusion. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is the most popular material to fabricate a microfluidic perfusion culture chip. Photolithography and replica molding techniques are generally used for fabrication of a microfluidic perfusion culture chip. Pressure-driven perfusion culture system is convenient technique to carry out the perfusion culture of animal cells in a microfluidic device. Here, we describe a general theory on microfluid network design, microfabrication technique, and experimental technique for pressure-driven perfusion culture in an 8 × 8 microchamber array on a glass slide-sized microchip made out of PDMS. PMID:24297421

  2. Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Imaging in the Study of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a brief review of various uses of magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in the investigation of brain/language relationships. The reviewed studies illustrate how perfusion imaging can reveal areas of brain where dysfunction due to low blood flow is associated with specific language deficits, and where restoration of blood flow…

  3. Endobronchial mucosal blanching due to a post-lung transplantation pulmonary artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Wolff, Rienhart F E; van der Bij, Wim

    2011-03-01

    A 45-year-old woman underwent a bronchoscopy shortly after lung transplantation. The airway mucosal appearance significantly differed between both lungs, with a pale aspect of the left bronchial tree. Computed tomography (CT) and perfusion scan confirmed a left pulmonary artery stenosis, improving with conservative treatment.

  4. Mucosal immunology and probiotics.

    PubMed

    Dongarrà, Maria Luisa; Rizzello, Valeria; Muccio, Letizia; Fries, Walter; Cascio, Antonio; Bonaccorsi, Irene; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2013-02-01

    The cross-talk between the mucosa-associated immune system and microbiota is critical in mucosal tissue homeostasis as well as in protection against infectious and inflammatory diseases occurring at mucosal sites. This recent evidence has paved the way to therapeutic approaches aimed at modulating the mucosa-associated immune system using probiotics. Different strains of probiotics possess the ability to finely regulate dendritic cell (DC) activation, polarizing the subsequent T cell activity toward Th1 (e.g. Lactobacillus (Lb) acidophilus), Th2 (Lb.reuteri and Bifidobacterium bifidum) or, as more recently demonstrated, Th17 responses induced by specific strains such as Lb.rhamnosus GG and Lac23a, the latter isolated in our laboratory. Here, we review some recent advances in our understanding of probiotics effects on mucosal immunology, particularly on cells of the innate immunity such as DCs. We also highlight our own experiences in modulating DC functions by commensal bacteria and discuss the relevance of probiotics administration in the treatment of human immunopathologies.

  5. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health care ...

  6. Tissue blood flow mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    The operating principles of Laser Doppler Perfusion Imaging (LDPI) for visualization of the tissue blood perfusion are explained. Using this emerging technology skin perfusion has been investigated in healthy volunteers and in patients with various conditions that affect skin blood flow. LDPI is anticipated to be particularly useful in evaluation of peripheral circulation in diabetics, as an objective tool in irritancy patch testing, assessment of burnt skin and visualization of spot-wise hyperperfusion in breast skin in association with carcinoma.

  7. A Phantom Tissue System for the Calibration of Perfusion Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mudaliar, Ashvinikumar V.; Ellis, Brent E.; Ricketts, Patricia L.; Lanz, Otto I.; Scott, Elaine P.; Diller, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    A convenient method for testing and calibrating surface perfusion sensors has been developed. A phantom tissue model is used to simulate the nondirectional blood flow of tissue perfusion. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was constructed in Fluent® to design the phantom tissue and validate the experimental results. The phantom perfusion system was used with a perfusion sensor based on clearance of thermal energy. A heat flux gage measures the heat flux response of tissue when a thermal event (convective cooling) is applied. The blood perfusion and contact resistance are estimated by a parameter estimation code. From the experimental and analytical results, it was concluded that the probe displayed good measurement repeatability and sensitivity. The experimental perfusion measurements in the tissue were in good agreement with those of the CFD models and demonstrated the value of the phantom tissue system. PMID:19045509

  8. A method of thymic perfusion and its evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ekwueme, O.

    1973-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a method of isolated ex vivo perfusion of the rabbit thymus using diluted autologous blood is described. The data indicate that the viability of the preparation is maintained at a satisfactory level during the period of perfusion. These results suggest that the isolated perfused thymus would be a useful new approach to studies of thymus function. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:4747584

  9. Measurement of continuous distributions of ventilation-perfusion ratios - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, P. D.; Saltzman, H. A.; West, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    The resolution of the technique considered is sufficient to describe smooth distributions containing blood flow to unventilated regions (shunt), ventilation to unperfused regions (dead space), and up to three additional modes over the range of finite ventilation-perfusion ratios. In particular, areas whose ventilation-perfusion ratios are low can be separated from unventilated regions and those whose ventilation-perfusion ratios are high can similarly be distinguished from unperfused areas.

  10. Effects of Topical Bimatoprost 0.01% and Timolol 0.5% on Circadian IOP, Blood Pressure and Perfusion Pressure in Patients with Glaucoma or Ocular Hypertension: A Randomized, Double Masked, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tanga, Lucia; Berardo, Francesca; Ferrazza, Manuela; Michelessi, Manuele; Roberti, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the 24-hour (24h) effects on intraocular pressure (IOP) and cardiovascular parameters of timolol 0.5% and bimatoprost 0.01% in open angle glaucoma and ocular hypertensive subjects. Methods In this prospective, randomized, double masked, crossover, clinical trial, after washout from previous medications enrolled subjects underwent 24h IOP, blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) measurements and were randomized to either topical bimatoprost 0.01% at night plus placebo in the morning or to timolol 0.5% bid. After 8 weeks of treatment a second 24h assessment of IOP, BP and HR was performed and then subjects switched to the opposite treatment for additional 8 weeks when a third 24h assessment was performed. The primary endpoint was the comparison of the mean 24h IOP after each treatment. Secondary endpoints included the comparisons of IOP at each timepoint of the 24h curve and the comparison of BP, HR, ocular perfusion pressure and tolerability. Results Mean untreated 24h IOP was 20.3 mmHg (95%CI 19.0 to 21.6). Mean 24h IOP was significantly lower after 8 weeks of treatment with bimatoprost 0.01% than after 8 weeks of treatment with timolol 0.5% bid (15.7 vs 16.8 mmHg, p = 0.0003). Mean IOP during the day hours was significantly reduced from baseline by both drugs while mean IOP during the night hours was reduced by -2.3 mmHg (p = 0.0002) by bimatoprost 0.01% plus placebo and by -1.1 mmHg by timolol 0.5% bid (p = 0.06). Timolol 0.5% significantly reduced the mean 24h systolic BP from baseline, the diastolic BP during the day hours, the HR during the night hours, and the mean 24h systolic ocular perfusion pressure. Conclusion Both Bimatoprost 0.01% and Timolol 0.5% are effective in reducing the mean 24h IOP from an untreated baseline but Bimatoprost 0.01% is more effective than timolol 0.5% throughout the 24h. Timolol 0.5% effect on IOP is reduced during the night hours and is associated with reduced BP, HR and ocular perfusion pressure. Trial

  11. Kidneys From α1,3-Galactosyltransferase Knockout/Human Heme Oxygenase-1/Human A20 Transgenic Pigs Are Protected From Rejection During Ex Vivo Perfusion With Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Hellen E.; Petersen, Björn; Ramackers, Wolf; Petkov, Stoyan; Herrmann, Doris; Hauschild-Quintern, Janet; Lucas-Hahn, Andrea; Hassel, Petra; Ziegler, Maren; Baars, Wiebke; Bergmann, Sabine; Schwinzer, Reinhard; Winkler, Michael; Niemann, Heiner

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple modifications of the porcine genome are required to prevent rejection after pig-to-primate xenotransplantation. Here, we produced pigs with a knockout of the α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene (GGTA1-KO) combined with transgenic expression of the human anti-apoptotic/anti-inflammatory molecules heme oxygenase-1 and A20, and investigated their xenoprotective properties. Methods The GGTA1-KO/human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1)/human A20 (hA20) transgenic pigs were produced in a stepwise approach using zinc finger nuclease vectors targeting the GGTA1 gene and a Sleeping Beauty vector coding for hA20. Two piglets were analyzed by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, and sequencing. The biological function of the genetic modifications was tested in a 51Chromium release assay and by ex vivo kidney perfusions with human blood. Results Disruption of the GGTA1 gene by deletion of few basepairs was demonstrated in GGTA1-KO/hHO-1/hA20 transgenic pigs. The hHO-1 and hA20 mRNA expression was confirmed by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Ex vivo perfusion of 2 transgenic kidneys was feasible for the maximum experimental time of 240 minutes without symptoms of rejection. Conclusions Results indicate that GGTA1-KO/hHO-1/hA20 transgenic pigs are a promising model to alleviate rejection and ischemia-reperfusion damage in porcine xenografts and could serve as a background for further genetic modifications toward the production of a donor pig that is clinically relevant for xenotransplantation. PMID:27500225

  12. Effect of Defocused CO2 Laser on Equine Tissue Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Bergh, A; Nyman, G; Lundeberg, T; Drevemo, S

    2006-01-01

    Treatment with defocused CO2 laser can have a therapeutic effect on equine injuries, but the mechanisms involved are unclear. A recent study has shown that laser causes an increase in equine superficial tissue temperature, which may result in an increase in blood perfusion and a stimulating effect on tissue regeneration. However, no studies have described the effects on equine tissue perfusion. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of defocused CO2 laser on blood perfusion and to correlate it with temperature in skin and underlying muscle in anaesthetized horses. Differences between clipped and unclipped haircoat were also assessed. Eight horses and two controls received CO2 laser treatment (91 J/cm2) in a randomised order, on a clipped and unclipped area of the hamstring muscles, respectively. The significant increase in clipped skin perfusion and temperature was on average 146.3 ± 33.4 perfusion units (334%) and 5.5 ± 1.5°C, respectively. The significant increase in perfusion and temperature in unclipped skin were 80.6 ± 20.4 perfusion units (264%) and 4.8 ± 1.4°C. No significant changes were seen in muscle perfusion or temperature. In conclusion, treatment with defocused CO2 laser causes a significant increase in skin perfusion, which is correlated to an increase in skin temperature. PMID:16722304

  13. Canine gastric mucosal vasodilation with prostaglandins and histamine analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, J.G.; Nies, A.S.

    1982-10-01

    The effect of direct intragastric artery infusion of prostaglandins E2 and I2, arachidonic acid, dimaprit (histamine H2 agonist), and 2',2'-pyridylethylamine (histamine H1 agonist) on gastric mucosal blood flow was examined in dogs to elucidate the relationship between gastric secretory state and mucosal blood flow in dogs. These compounds were chosen because of their diverse effect on gastric acid secretion. Gastric fundus blood flow was measured both electromagnetically with a flow probe around the left gastric artery which supplies the fundus almost exclusively, and by the radioactive microsphere technique. Intraarterial infusion of all the compounds resulted in gastric mucosal vasodilation even though PGE2, PGI2, and arachidonic acid inhibit gastric acid secretion, dimaprit stimulated gastric acid secretion, and 2',2'-pyridylethylamine does not affect gastric acid secretion. There was total agreement in the blood flow measurements by the two different techniques. Our data suggest that gastric acid secretion and gastric vasodilation are independently regulated. In addition, the validity of the studies in which the aminopyrine clearance indicates that prostaglandins are mucosal vasoconstrictors needs to be questioned because of the reliance of those measurements on the secretory state of the stomach.

  14. Hepatic Perfusion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Rahul; Gamblin, T Clark; Turaga, Kiran K

    2016-04-01

    Isolated hepatic perfusion uses the unique vascular supply of hepatic malignancies to deliver cytotoxic chemotherapy. The procedure involves vascular isolation of the liver and delivery of chemotherapy via the hepatic artery and extraction from retrohepatic vena cava. Benefits of hepatic perfusion have been observed in hepatic metastases of ocular melanoma and colorectal cancer and primary hepatocellular carcinoma. Percutaneous and prophylactic perfusions are avenues of ongoing research.

  15. Duodenal Chemosensing and Mucosal Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Akiba, Yasutada; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    The duodenal mucosa is exposed to endogenous and exogenous chemicals, including acid, CO2, bile acids and nutrients. Mucosal chemical sensors are necessary to exert physiological responses such as secretion, digestion, absorption, and motility. We propose a mucosal chemosensing system by which luminal chemicals are sensed via mucosal acid sensors and G-protein-coupled receptors. Luminal acid/CO2 sensing consists of ecto- and cytosolic carbonic anhydrases, epithelial ion transporters, and acid sensors expressed on the afferent nerves in the duodenum. Furthermore, a luminal L-glutamate signal is mediated via mucosal L-glutamate receptors, including metabotropic glutamate receptors and taste receptor 1 family heterodimers, with activation of afferent nerves and cyclooxygenase, whereas luminal Ca2+ is differently sensed via the calcium-sensing receptor in the duodenum. Recent studies also show the involvement of enteroendocrine G-protein-coupled receptors in bile acid and fatty acid sensing in the duodenum. These luminal chemosensors help activate mucosal defense mechanisms in or- der to maintain the mucosal integrity and physiological responses. Stimulation of luminal chemosensing in the duodenal mucosa may prevent mucosal injury, affect nutrient metabolism, and modulate sensory nerve activity. PMID:21389725

  16. Perfusion visualization and analysis for pulmonary embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Michael S.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Naidich, David P.; Novak, Carol L.

    2005-04-01

    Given the nature of pulmonary embolism (PE), timely and accurate diagnosis is critical. Contrast enhanced high-resolution CT images allow physicians to accurately identify segmental and sub-segmental emboli. However, it is also important to assess the effect of such emboli on the blood flow in the lungs. Expanding upon previous research, we propose a method for 3D visualization of lung perfusion. The proposed method allows users to examine perfusion throughout the entire lung volume at a single glance, with areas of diminished perfusion highlighted so that they are visible independent of the viewing location. This may be particularly valuable for better accuracy in assessing the extent of hemodynamic alterations resulting from pulmonary emboli. The method also facilitates user interaction and may help identify small peripheral sub-segmental emboli otherwise overlooked. 19 patients referred for possible PE were evaluated by CT following the administration of IV contrast media. An experienced thoracic radiologist assessed the 19 datasets with 17 diagnosed as being positive for PE with multiple emboli. Since anomalies in lung perfusion due to PE can alter the distribution of parenchymal densities, we analyzed features collected from histograms of the computed perfusion maps and demonstrate their potential usefulness as a preliminary test to suggest the presence of PE. These histogram features also offer the possibility of distinguishing distinct patterns associated with chronic PE and may even be useful for further characterization of changes in perfusion or overall density resulting from associated conditions such as pneumonia or diffuse lung disease.

  17. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-08-01

    In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed.

  18. Perfusion harmonic imaging of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, Volker H.; Seidel, Guenter; Wiesmann, Martin; Meyer, Karsten; Aach, Til

    2003-05-01

    The fast visualisation of cerebral microcirculation supports diagnosis of acute cerebrovascular diseases. However, the commonly used CT/MRI-based methods are time consuming and, moreover, costly. Therefore we propose an alternative approach to brain perfusion imaging by means of ultrasonography. In spite of the low signal/noise-ratio of transcranial ultrasound and the high impedance of the skull, flow images of cerebral blood flow can be derived by capturing the kinetics of appropriate contrast agents by harmonic ultrasound image sequences. In this paper we propose three different methods for human brain perfusion imaging, each of which yielding flow images indicating the status of the patient's cerebral microcirculation by visualising local flow parameters. Bolus harmonic imaging (BHI) displays the flow kinetics of bolus injections, while replenishment (RHI) and diminution harmonic imaging (DHI) compute flow characteristics from contrast agent continuous infusions. RHI measures the contrast agents kinetics in the influx phase and DHI displays the diminution kinetics of the contrast agent acquired from the decay phase. In clinical studies, BHI- and RHI-parameter images were found to represent comprehensive and reproducible distributions of physiological cerebral blood flow. For DHI it is shown, that bubble destruction and hence perfusion phenomena principally can be displayed. Generally, perfusion harmonic imaging enables reliable and fast bedside imaging of human brain perfusion. Due to its cost efficiency it complements cerebrovascular diagnostics by established CT/MRI-based methods.

  19. DIGESTIVE PHYSIOLOGY OF THE PIG SYMPOSIUM: Involvement of gut chemosensing in the regulation of mucosal barrier function and defense mechanisms1,2

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, I.; Akiba, Y.; Kaunitz, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    Meal ingestion is followed by release of numerous hormones from enteroendocrine cells interspersed among the epithelial cells lining the intestine. Recently, the de-orphanization of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-type nutrient receptors, expressed on the apical membranes of enteroendocrine cells, has suggested a plausible mechanism whereby luminal nutrients trigger the release of gut hormones. Activation of nutrient receptors triggers intracellular signaling mechanisms that promote exocytosis of hormone-containing granules into the submucosal space. Hormones released by foregut enteroendocrine cells include the glucagon-like peptides (GLP) affecting glycemic control (GLP-1) and releasing pro-proliferative, hypertrophy-inducing growth factors (GLP-2). The foregut mucosa, being exposed to pulses of concentrated HCl, is protected by a system of defense mechanisms, which includes epithelial bicarbonate and mucus secretion and augmentation of mucosal blood flow. We have reported that luminal co-perfusion of AA with nucleotides in anesthetized rats releases GLP-2 into the portal vein, associated with increased bicarbonate and mucus secretion and mucosal blood flow. The GLP-2 increases bicarbonate secretion via release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) from myenteric nerves. Luminal bile acids also release gut hormones due to activation of the bile-acid receptor known as G Protein-Coupled Receptor (GPR) 131, G Protein Bile Acid Receptor (GPBAR) 1, or Takeda G Protein-Coupled Receptor (TGR) 5, also expressed on enteroendocrine cells. The GLP are metabolized by dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV), an enzyme of particular interest to pharmaceutical, because its inhibition increases plasma concentrations of GLP-1 to treat diabetes. We have also reported that DPPIV inhibition enhances the secretory effects of nutrient-evoked GLP-2. Understanding the release mechanism and the metabolic pathways of gut hormones is of potential utility to the formulation of feedstuff

  20. Comparing Normothermic Machine Perfusion Preservation With Different Perfusates on Porcine Livers From Donors After Circulatory Death.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Nassar, A; Farias, K; Buccini, L; Mangino, M J; Baldwin, W; Bennett, A; O'Rourke, C; Iuppa, G; Soliman, B G; Urcuyo-Llanes, D; Okamoto, T; Uso, T D; Fung, J; Abu-Elmagd, K; Miller, C; Quintini, C

    2016-03-01

    The utilization of normothermic machine perfusion (NMP) may be an effective strategy to resuscitate livers from donation after circulatory death (DCD). There is no consensus regarding the efficacy of different perfusates on graft and bile duct viability. The aim of this study was to compare, in an NMP porcine DCD model, the preservation potential of three different perfusates. Twenty porcine livers with 60 min of warm ischemia were separated into four preservation groups: cold storage (CS), NMP with Steen solution (Steen; XVIVO Perfusion Inc., Denver, CO), Steen plus red blood cells (RBCs), or whole blood (WB). All livers were preserved for 10 h and reperfused to simulate transplantation for 24 h. During preservation, the NMP with Steen group presented the highest hepatocellular injury. At reperfusion, the CS group had the lowest bile production and the worst hepatocellular injury compared with all other groups, followed by NMP with Steen; the Steen plus RBC and WB groups presented the best functional and hepatocellular injury outcomes, with WB livers showing lower aspartate aminotransferase release and a trend toward better results for most parameters. Based on our results, a perfusate that contains an oxygen carrier is most effective in a model of NMP porcine DCD livers compared with Steen solution. Specifically, WB-perfused livers showed a trend toward better outcomes compared with Steen plus RBCs. PMID:26663737

  1. Treatment of Oral Mucositis in Hematologic Patients Undergoing Autologous or Allogeneic Transplantation of Peripheral Blood Stem Cells: a Prospective, Randomized Study with a Mouthwash Containing Camelia Sinensis Leaf Extract

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Giovanni; Rocco, Melania; Panichi, Alessia; Chios, Chiara Feira; Ciurli, Ester; Mannucci, Chiara; Sordi, Elisabetta; Caracciolo, Francesco; Papineschi, Federico; Benedetti, Edoardo; Petrini, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucositis is an important side effect of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCST), mainly due to toxicity of conditioning regimens. It produces significant pain and morbidity. The present study reports a prospective, randomized, non-blinded study testing the efficacy of a new mouthwash, called Baxidil Onco® (Sanitas Farmaceutici Srl, Tortona, Italy) in 60 hematologic patients undergoing HCST (28 autologous, 32 allogeneic). Baxidil Onco®, used three times a day from Day -1 to Day +30, in addition to standard prophylactic schedules, was administered to 14 patients undergoing autologous and 14 patients undergoing allogeneic HCST. The remaining 32 patients (14 autologous and 18 HCST) were treated only with standard prophylactic schedules and served as control. In our study, the overall incidence of oral mucositis, measured according to the World Health Organization 0-4 scale, was 50% in the Baxidl Onco® group versus 82% in the control group (P=0.022). In addition, a significant reduction in scale 2-4 oral mucositis was observed in the Baxidil Onco® group (25% vs 56.2%; P=0.0029). The results obtained indicate that incidence, severity and duration of oral mucositis induced by conditioning regimens for HCST can be significantly reduced by oral rinsing with Baxidil Onco®, in addition to the standard prophylaxis scheme. Since Camelia Sinensin extract, which is used to produce green tea, is the main agent in this mouthwash, we hypothesize that the anti-oxidative properties of polyphenolic compounds of tea might exert protective effects on oral mucosa. PMID:23888242

  2. Absolute Cerebral Blood Flow Infarction Threshold for 3-Hour Ischemia Time Determined with CT Perfusion and 18F-FFMZ-PET Imaging in a Porcine Model of Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, Neil; Kovacs, Michael

    2016-01-01

    CT Perfusion (CTP) derived cerebral blood flow (CBF) thresholds have been proposed as the optimal parameter for distinguishing the infarct core prior to reperfusion. Previous threshold-derivation studies have been limited by uncertainties introduced by infarct expansion between the acute phase of stroke and follow-up imaging, or DWI lesion reversibility. In this study a model is proposed for determining infarction CBF thresholds at 3hr ischemia time by comparing contemporaneously acquired CTP derived CBF maps to 18F-FFMZ-PET imaging, with the objective of deriving a CBF threshold for infarction after 3 hours of ischemia. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the brain of Duroc-Cross pigs (n = 11) through a burr hole in the skull. CTP images were acquired 10 and 30 minutes post ET-1 injection and then every 30 minutes for 150 minutes. 370 MBq of 18F-FFMZ was injected ~120 minutes post ET-1 injection and PET images were acquired for 25 minutes starting ~155–180 minutes post ET-1 injection. CBF maps from each CTP acquisition were co-registered and converted into a median CBF map. The median CBF map was co-registered to blood volume maps for vessel exclusion, an average CT image for grey/white matter segmentation, and 18F-FFMZ-PET images for infarct delineation. Logistic regression and ROC analysis were performed on infarcted and non-infarcted pixel CBF values for each animal that developed infarct. Six of the eleven animals developed infarction. The mean CBF value corresponding to the optimal operating point of the ROC curves for the 6 animals was 12.6 ± 2.8 mL·min-1·100g-1 for infarction after 3 hours of ischemia. The porcine ET-1 model of cerebral ischemia is easier to implement then other large animal models of stroke, and performs similarly as long as CBF is monitored using CTP to prevent reperfusion. PMID:27347877

  3. Absolute Cerebral Blood Flow Infarction Threshold for 3-Hour Ischemia Time Determined with CT Perfusion and 18F-FFMZ-PET Imaging in a Porcine Model of Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wright, Eric A; d'Esterre, Christopher D; Morrison, Laura B; Cockburn, Neil; Kovacs, Michael; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-01-01

    CT Perfusion (CTP) derived cerebral blood flow (CBF) thresholds have been proposed as the optimal parameter for distinguishing the infarct core prior to reperfusion. Previous threshold-derivation studies have been limited by uncertainties introduced by infarct expansion between the acute phase of stroke and follow-up imaging, or DWI lesion reversibility. In this study a model is proposed for determining infarction CBF thresholds at 3hr ischemia time by comparing contemporaneously acquired CTP derived CBF maps to 18F-FFMZ-PET imaging, with the objective of deriving a CBF threshold for infarction after 3 hours of ischemia. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the brain of Duroc-Cross pigs (n = 11) through a burr hole in the skull. CTP images were acquired 10 and 30 minutes post ET-1 injection and then every 30 minutes for 150 minutes. 370 MBq of 18F-FFMZ was injected ~120 minutes post ET-1 injection and PET images were acquired for 25 minutes starting ~155-180 minutes post ET-1 injection. CBF maps from each CTP acquisition were co-registered and converted into a median CBF map. The median CBF map was co-registered to blood volume maps for vessel exclusion, an average CT image for grey/white matter segmentation, and 18F-FFMZ-PET images for infarct delineation. Logistic regression and ROC analysis were performed on infarcted and non-infarcted pixel CBF values for each animal that developed infarct. Six of the eleven animals developed infarction. The mean CBF value corresponding to the optimal operating point of the ROC curves for the 6 animals was 12.6 ± 2.8 mL·min-1·100g-1 for infarction after 3 hours of ischemia. The porcine ET-1 model of cerebral ischemia is easier to implement then other large animal models of stroke, and performs similarly as long as CBF is monitored using CTP to prevent reperfusion. PMID:27347877

  4. Mucosal barrier injury, fever and infection in neutropenic patients with cancer: introducing the paradigm febrile mucositis.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, Walter J F M; Herbers, Alexandra H E; Netea, Mihai G; Blijlevens, Nicole M A

    2014-11-01

    Infection remains one of the most prominent complications after cytotoxic treatment for cancer. The connection between neutropenia and both infections and fever has long been designated as 'febrile neutropenia', but treatment with antimicrobial agents and haematopoietic growth factors has failed to significantly reduce its incidence. Moreover, emerging antimicrobial resistance is becoming a concern that necessitates the judicious use of available antimicrobial agents. In addition to neutropenia, patients who receive cytotoxic therapy experience mucosal barrier injury (MBI) or 'mucositis'. MBI creates a port-de-entrée for resident micro-organisms to cause blood stream infections and contributes directly to the occurrence of fever by disrupting the highly regulated host-microbe interactions, which, even in the absence of an infection, can result in strong inflammatory reactions. Indeed, MBI has been shown to be a pivotal factor in the occurrence of inflammatory complications after cytotoxic therapy. Hence, the concept 'febrile neutropenia' alone may no longer suffice and a new concept 'febrile mucositis' should be recognized as the two are at least complementary. This review we summarizes the existing evidence for both paradigms and proposes new therapeutic approaches to tackle the perturbed host-microbe interactions arising from cytotoxic therapy-induced tissue damage in order to reduce fever in neutropenic patients with cancer.

  5. Effect of carprofen and indomethacin on gastric function, mucosal integrity and generation of prostaglandins in men.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Kwiecien, N; Obtulowicz, W; Kiec-Dembinska, A; Polanski, M; Kopp, B; Sito, E; Oleksy, J

    1982-12-01

    The effects of indomethacin and carprofen on gastric secretion, serum gastrin level, electropotential difference, gastric microbleeding, DNA loss, mucosal blood flow and the production of mucosal prostaglandins (PGs) were investigated in a double-blind cross-over study in 18 healthy volunteers after one week of treatment. We did not observe any significant changes in basal and pentagastrin-stimulated gastric secretory parameters, serum gastrin level and electro-potential difference before and after treatment with these drugs. Mucosal blood flow was significantly reduced following indomethacin treatment. The most pronounced differences were found in endoscopic score studies of gastric mucosa. After indomethacin all subjects developed multiple erosions, submucosal haemorrhages, and half of them showed diffuse antral erythema. These effects were accompanied by a significant increase in both gastric microbleeding and DNA loss, and significant decrease in the production of PGE2. We concluded that carprofen, in contrast to indomethacin, did not alter gastric mucosal integrity and production of PGE2. This study indicates that the gastric mucosal damage by non-steroid anti-inflammatory compounds (NOSAC) depends upon the suppression of PGE2 biosynthesis, and that endogenous PGE2 is involved in the control of mucosal blood flow and mucosal integrity.

  6. Mucosal integrity and sensitivity to acid in the proximal esophagus in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Weijenborg, Pim W; van den Bergh Weerman, Marius A; van den Wijngaard, René M J G J; Verheij, J; Smout, André J P M; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-07-01

    Acid reflux episodes that extend to the proximal esophagus are more likely to be perceived. This suggests that the proximal esophagus is more sensitive to acid than the distal esophagus, which could be caused by impaired mucosal integrity in the proximal esophagus. Our aim was to explore sensitivity to acid and mucosal integrity in different segments of the esophagus. We used a prospective observational study, including 12 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). After stopping acid secretion-inhibiting medication, two procedures were performed: an acid perfusion test and an upper endoscopy with electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and esophageal biopsies. Proximal and distal sensitivity to acid and tissue impedance were measured in vivo, and mucosal permeability and epithelial intercellular spaces at different esophageal levels were measured in vitro. Mean lag time to heartburn perception was much shorter after proximal acid perfusion (0.8 min) than after distal acid perfusion (3.9 min) (P = 0.02). Median in vivo tissue impedance was significantly lower in the distal esophagus (4,563 Ω·m) compared with the proximal esophagus (8,170 Ω·m) (P = 0.002). Transepithelial permeability, as measured by the median fluorescein flux was significantly higher in the distal (2,051 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) than in the proximal segment (368 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) (P = 0.033). Intercellular space ratio and maximum heartburn intensity were not significantly different between the proximal and distal esophagus. In GERD patients off acid secretion-inhibiting medication, acid exposure in the proximal segment of the esophagus provokes symptoms earlier than acid exposure in the distal esophagus, whereas mucosal integrity is impaired more in the distal esophagus. These findings indicate that the enhanced sensitivity to proximal reflux episodes is not explained by increased mucosal permeability. PMID:27198192

  7. Towards robust deconvolution of low-dose perfusion CT: Sparse perfusion deconvolution using online dictionary learning

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ruogu; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is an important functional imaging modality in the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases, particularly in acute stroke and vasospasm. However, the post-processed parametric maps of blood flow tend to be noisy, especially in low-dose CTP, due to the noisy contrast enhancement profile and the oscillatory nature of the results generated by the current computational methods. In this paper, we propose a robust sparse perfusion deconvolution method (SPD) to estimate cerebral blood flow in CTP performed at low radiation dose. We first build a dictionary from high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation on the low-dose CTP data. Our method is validated on clinical data of patients with normal and pathological CBF maps. The results show that we achieve superior performance than existing methods, and potentially improve the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissue in the brain. PMID:23542422

  8. Radionuclide cerebral perfusion imaging: Normal pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, S.J.; Stritzke, P.; Losonczy, M.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Holan, V.; DaCosta, M.; Muzinic, M.

    1991-12-31

    Regional cerebral perfusion imaging using a new class of {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I labeled compounds which traverse the blood brain barrier and SPECT imaging technology provides an opportunity to assess this physiologic phenomenon during normal cerebral function and as a manifestation of disease in the central nervous system disease. These applications pose a challenge to the nuclear medicine physician for several reasons: (a) the complex and somewhat unfamiliar functional anatomy, (b) the marked regional differences in regional cerebral perfusion at rest, (c) the lack of understanding of the effect of variations in ambient conditions on regional cerebral perfusion. The difficulties in interpretation are augmented by the display itself. There is frequently no difficulty in differentiating between gray and white matter. However, the frequently used {open_quotes}hot body{close_quotes} color maps, introduce a good deal of contrast, producing displays with apparent interruption in regional cortical perfusion whereas black and white displays provide minimal contrast in the regional cortical activity. The authors sought to define how much variation in regional cerebral perfusion is {open_quotes}allowed{close_quotes} under controlled conditions, to establish a basis to interpret if changes in the environment, psychological interventions, or disease states are accompanied by a measurable change. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Mucosal immunoglobulins at respiratory surfaces mark an ancient association that predates the emergence of tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Takizawa, Fumio; Parra, David; Gómez, Daniela; von Gersdorff Jørgensen, Louise; LaPatra, Scott E; Sunyer, J Oriol

    2016-01-01

    Gas-exchange structures are critical for acquiring oxygen, but they also represent portals for pathogen entry. Local mucosal immunoglobulin responses against pathogens in specialized respiratory organs have only been described in tetrapods. Since fish gills are considered a mucosal surface, we hypothesized that a dedicated mucosal immunoglobulin response would be generated within its mucosa on microbial exposure. Supporting this hypothesis, here we demonstrate that following pathogen exposure, IgT(+) B cells proliferate and generate pathogen-specific IgT within the gills of fish, thus providing the first example of locally induced immunoglobulin in the mucosa of a cold-blooded species. Moreover, we demonstrate that gill microbiota is predominantly coated with IgT, thus providing previously unappreciated evidence that the microbiota present at a respiratory surface of a vertebrate is recognized by a mucosal immunoglobulin. Our findings indicate that respiratory surfaces and mucosal immunoglobulins are part of an ancient association that predates the emergence of tetrapods. PMID:26869478

  10. Mucosal immunoglobulins at respiratory surfaces mark an ancient association that predates the emergence of tetrapods

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen; Takizawa, Fumio; Parra, David; Gómez, Daniela; von Gersdorff Jørgensen, Louise; LaPatra, Scott E.; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2016-01-01

    Gas-exchange structures are critical for acquiring oxygen, but they also represent portals for pathogen entry. Local mucosal immunoglobulin responses against pathogens in specialized respiratory organs have only been described in tetrapods. Since fish gills are considered a mucosal surface, we hypothesized that a dedicated mucosal immunoglobulin response would be generated within its mucosa on microbial exposure. Supporting this hypothesis, here we demonstrate that following pathogen exposure, IgT+ B cells proliferate and generate pathogen-specific IgT within the gills of fish, thus providing the first example of locally induced immunoglobulin in the mucosa of a cold-blooded species. Moreover, we demonstrate that gill microbiota is predominantly coated with IgT, thus providing previously unappreciated evidence that the microbiota present at a respiratory surface of a vertebrate is recognized by a mucosal immunoglobulin. Our findings indicate that respiratory surfaces and mucosal immunoglobulins are part of an ancient association that predates the emergence of tetrapods. PMID:26869478

  11. Mathematical Modelling of a Brain Tumour Initiation and Early Development: A Coupled Model of Glioblastoma Growth, Pre-Existing Vessel Co-Option, Angiogenesis and Blood Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yan; Wu, Jie; Li, Zhiyong; Long, Quan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a coupled mathematical modelling system to investigate glioblastoma growth in response to dynamic changes in chemical and haemodynamic microenvironments caused by pre-existing vessel co-option, remodelling, collapse and angiogenesis. A typical tree-like architecture network with different orders for vessel diameter is designed to model pre-existing vasculature in host tissue. The chemical substances including oxygen, vascular endothelial growth factor, extra-cellular matrix and matrix degradation enzymes are calculated based on the haemodynamic environment which is obtained by coupled modelling of intravascular blood flow with interstitial fluid flow. The haemodynamic changes, including vessel diameter and permeability, are introduced to reflect a series of pathological characteristics of abnormal tumour vessels including vessel dilation, leakage, angiogenesis, regression and collapse. Migrating cells are included as a new phenotype to describe the migration behaviour of malignant tumour cells. The simulation focuses on the avascular phase of tumour development and stops at an early phase of angiogenesis. The model is able to demonstrate the main features of glioblastoma growth in this phase such as the formation of pseudopalisades, cell migration along the host vessels, the pre-existing vasculature co-option, angiogenesis and remodelling. The model also enables us to examine the influence of initial conditions and local environment on the early phase of glioblastoma growth.

  12. Mathematical Modelling of a Brain Tumour Initiation and Early Development: A Coupled Model of Glioblastoma Growth, Pre-Existing Vessel Co-Option, Angiogenesis and Blood Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yan; Wu, Jie; Li, Zhiyong; Long, Quan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a coupled mathematical modelling system to investigate glioblastoma growth in response to dynamic changes in chemical and haemodynamic microenvironments caused by pre-existing vessel co-option, remodelling, collapse and angiogenesis. A typical tree-like architecture network with different orders for vessel diameter is designed to model pre-existing vasculature in host tissue. The chemical substances including oxygen, vascular endothelial growth factor, extra-cellular matrix and matrix degradation enzymes are calculated based on the haemodynamic environment which is obtained by coupled modelling of intravascular blood flow with interstitial fluid flow. The haemodynamic changes, including vessel diameter and permeability, are introduced to reflect a series of pathological characteristics of abnormal tumour vessels including vessel dilation, leakage, angiogenesis, regression and collapse. Migrating cells are included as a new phenotype to describe the migration behaviour of malignant tumour cells. The simulation focuses on the avascular phase of tumour development and stops at an early phase of angiogenesis. The model is able to demonstrate the main features of glioblastoma growth in this phase such as the formation of pseudopalisades, cell migration along the host vessels, the pre-existing vasculature co-option, angiogenesis and remodelling. The model also enables us to examine the influence of initial conditions and local environment on the early phase of glioblastoma growth. PMID:26934465

  13. Mathematical Modelling of a Brain Tumour Initiation and Early Development: A Coupled Model of Glioblastoma Growth, Pre-Existing Vessel Co-Option, Angiogenesis and Blood Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yan; Wu, Jie; Li, Zhiyong; Long, Quan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a coupled mathematical modelling system to investigate glioblastoma growth in response to dynamic changes in chemical and haemodynamic microenvironments caused by pre-existing vessel co-option, remodelling, collapse and angiogenesis. A typical tree-like architecture network with different orders for vessel diameter is designed to model pre-existing vasculature in host tissue. The chemical substances including oxygen, vascular endothelial growth factor, extra-cellular matrix and matrix degradation enzymes are calculated based on the haemodynamic environment which is obtained by coupled modelling of intravascular blood flow with interstitial fluid flow. The haemodynamic changes, including vessel diameter and permeability, are introduced to reflect a series of pathological characteristics of abnormal tumour vessels including vessel dilation, leakage, angiogenesis, regression and collapse. Migrating cells are included as a new phenotype to describe the migration behaviour of malignant tumour cells. The simulation focuses on the avascular phase of tumour development and stops at an early phase of angiogenesis. The model is able to demonstrate the main features of glioblastoma growth in this phase such as the formation of pseudopalisades, cell migration along the host vessels, the pre-existing vasculature co-option, angiogenesis and remodelling. The model also enables us to examine the influence of initial conditions and local environment on the early phase of glioblastoma growth. PMID:26934465

  14. Management of Liver Cancer Argon-helium Knife Therapy with Functional Computer Tomography Perfusion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongbo; Shu, Shengjie; Li, Jinping; Jiang, Huijie

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the change in blood perfusion of liver cancer following argon-helium knife treatment with functional computer tomography perfusion imaging. Twenty-seven patients with primary liver cancer treated with argon-helium knife and were included in this study. Plain computer tomography (CT) and computer tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging were conducted in all patients before and after treatment. Perfusion parameters including blood flows, blood volume, hepatic artery perfusion fraction, hepatic artery perfusion, and hepatic portal venous perfusion were used for evaluating therapeutic effect. All parameters in liver cancer were significantly decreased after argon-helium knife treatment (p < 0.05 to all). Significant decrease in hepatic artery perfusion was also observed in pericancerous liver tissue, but other parameters kept constant. CT perfusion imaging is able to detect decrease in blood perfusion of liver cancer post-argon-helium knife therapy. Therefore, CTP imaging would play an important role for liver cancer management followed argon-helium knife therapy.

  15. Cerebral blood flow in patients with peritoneal dialysis by an easy Z-score imaging system for brain perfusion single-photon emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, Rei; Kobayashi, Shuzo; Iwagami, Masao; Tsutumi, Daimu; Mochida, Yasuhiro; Ishioka, Kunihiro; Oka, Machiko; Maesato, Kyoko; Moriya, Hidekazu; Ohtake, Takayasu; Hidaka, Sumi

    2014-06-01

    Cognitive impairment has long been recognized as a complication of chronic kidney disease. However, there is little information available regarding regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with peritoneal dialysis (PD). Therefore, we evaluated rCBF using brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We conducted a cross-sectional study in our hospital. Eighteen consecutive PD patients who could visit the hospital by themselves without any history of stroke were examined by Technetium-99 m-labeled ethylcrysteinate dimer brain SPECT. An easy Z-score imaging system (eZIS) was used to compare rCBF in PD patients with those in age-matched healthy controls. We also evaluated cognitive dysfunction with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) questionnaire. Only one patient showed an MMSE score of 18 points, and the remaining 14 patients were considered as normal (MMSE ≥ 27), and three patients were considered to have mild cognitive impairment (24 ≤ MMSE ≤ 26). In all patients, rCBF in the posterior cingulated gyri, precunei, and parietal cortices was significantly decreased. The ratio of the reduction of rCBF in each region relative to that of rCBF across the whole brain correlated positively with the PD duration (r = 0.559; P < 0.05). The serum β2-microglobulin level was significantly higher in patients who had a higher ratio of rCBF reduction compared with those with lower ratios. In conclusion, all PD patients in the present study had decreased rCBF irrespective of MMSE scores.

  16. The Therapeutic Effect of PLAG against Oral Mucositis in Hamster and Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ha-Reum; Yoo, Nina; Kim, Joo Heon; Sohn, Ki-Young; Kim, Heung-Jae; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Han, Mi Young; Yoon, Sun Young; Kim, Jae Wha

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis can limit the effectiveness of cancer therapy and increase the risk of infections. However, no specific therapy for protection against mucositis is currently available. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of PLAG (1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-3-acetyl-rac-glycerol, acetylated diglyceride) in 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced oral mucositis animal models. Hamsters were administered 5-FU (80 mg/kg) intraperitoneally on days 0, 6, and 9. The animals’ cheek pouches were then scratched equally with the tip of an 18-gage needle on days 1, 2, and 7. PLAG was administered daily at 250 mg/kg/day. PLAG administration significantly reduced 5-FU/scratching-induced mucositis. Dramatic reversal of weight loss in PLAG-treated hamsters with mucositis was observed. Histochemical staining data also revealed newly differentiated epidermis and blood vessels in the cheek pouches of PLAG-treated hamsters, indicative of recovery. Whole blood analyses indicated that PLAG prevents 5-FU-induced excessive neutrophil transmigration to the infection site and eventually stabilizes the number of circulating neutrophils. In a mouse mucositis model, mice with 5-FU-induced disease treated with PLAG exhibited resistance to body-weight loss compared with mice that received 5-FU or 5-FU/scratching alone. PLAG also dramatically reversed mucositis-associated weight loss and inhibited mucositis-induced inflammatory responses in the tongue and serum. These data suggest that PLAG enhances recovery from 5-FU-induced oral mucositis and may therefore be a useful therapeutic agent for treating side effects of chemotherapy, such as mucositis and cachexia. PMID:27800302

  17. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed. PMID:23942635

  18. Immunoglobulin Responses at the Mucosal Interface

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kang; Chorny, Alejo

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are colonized by large communities of commensal bacteria and represent the primary site of entry for pathogenic agents. To prevent microbial intrusion, mucosal B cells release large amounts of immunoglobulin (Ig) molecules through multiple follicular and extrafollicular pathways. IgA is the most abundant antibody isotype in mucosal secretions and owes its success in frontline immunity to its ability to undergo transcytosis across epithelial cells. In addition to translocating IgA onto the mucosal surface, epithelial cells educate the mucosal immune system as to the composition of the local microbiota and instruct B cells to initiate IgA responses that generate immune protection while preserving immune homeostasis. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the cellular interactions and signaling pathways governing IgA production at mucosal surfaces and discuss new findings on the regulation and function of mucosal IgD, the most enigmatic isotype of our mucosal antibody repertoire. PMID:21219173

  19. Multislice CT brain image registration for perfusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhong Min; Pohlman, Scott; Chandra, Shalabh

    2002-04-01

    During the last several years perfusion CT techniques have been developed as an effective technique for clinically evaluating cerebral hemodynamics. Perfusion CT techniques are capable of measurings functional parameters such as tissue perfusion, blood flow, blood volume, and mean transit time and are commonly used to evaluate stroke patients. However, the quality of functional images of the brain frequently suffers from patient head motion. Because the time window for an effective treatment of stroke patient is narrow, a fast motion correction is required. The purpose of the paper is to present a fast and accurate registration technique for motion correction of multi-slice CT and to demonstrate the effects of the registration on perfusion calculation.

  20. Developing a benchmarking process in perfusion: a report of the Perfusion Downunder Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Baker, Robert A; Newland, Richard F; Fenton, Carmel; McDonald, Michael; Willcox, Timothy W; Merry, Alan F

    2012-03-01

    Improving and understanding clinical practice is an appropriate goal for the perfusion community. The Perfusion Downunder Collaboration has established a multi-center perfusion focused database aimed at achieving these goals through the development of quantitative quality indicators for clinical improvement through benchmarking. Data were collected using the Perfusion Downunder Collaboration database from procedures performed in eight Australian and New Zealand cardiac centers between March 2007 and February 2011. At the Perfusion Downunder Meeting in 2010, it was agreed by consensus, to report quality indicators (QI) for glucose level, arterial outlet temperature, and pCOz management during cardiopulmonary bypass. The values chosen for each QI were: blood glucose > or =4 mmol/L and < or =10 mmol/L; arterial outlet temperature < or = 37 degrees C; and arterial blood gas pCO2 > or =35 and < or =45 mmHg. The QI data were used to derive benchmarks using the Achievable Benchmark of Care (ABC) methodology to identify the incidence of QIs at the best performing centers. Five thousand four hundred and sixty-five procedures were evaluated to derive QI and benchmark data. The incidence of the blood glucose QI ranged from 37-96% of procedures, with a benchmark value of 90%. The arterial outlet temperature QI occurred in 16-98% of procedures with the benchmark of 94%; while the arterial pCO2 QI occurred in 21-91%, with the benchmark value of 80%. We have derived QIs and benchmark calculations for the management of several key aspects of cardiopulmonary bypass to provide a platform for improving the quality of perfusion practice.

  1. Immediate effect of benzalkonium chloride in decongestant nasal spray on the human nasal mucosal temperature.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, J; Leiacker, R; Wiesmiller, K; Rettinger, G; Keck, T

    2004-08-01

    Benzalkonium chloride is a preservative commonly used in nasal decongestant sprays. It has been suggested that benzalkonium chloride may be harmful to the nasal mucosa. Decongestion with the vasoconstrictor xylometazoline containing benzalkonium chloride has been shown to cause a significant reduction of the nasal mucosal temperature. The purpose of the present study was to determine the short-term influence of xylometazoline nasal spray with and without benzalkonium chloride on the nasal mucosal temperature. Healthy volunteers (30) were included in the study. Fifteen volunteers received xylometazoline nasal spray (1.0 mg/mL) containing benzalkonium chloride (0.1 mg/mL) and 15 age-matched subjects, received xylometazoline nasal spray without benzalkonium chloride. Using a miniaturized thermocouple the septal mucosal temperature was continuously measured at defined intranasal detection sites before and after application of the nasal spray. The mucosal temperature values did not significantly differ between the group receiving xylometazoline containing benzalkonium chloride and the group receiving xylometazoline spray without benzalkonium chloride before and after decongestion (P > 0.05). In both study groups septal mucosal temperatures significantly decreased after decongestion (P < 0.05) because of a reduction of the nasal mucosal blood flow following vasoconstriction. This study indicates that benzalkonium chloride itself does not seem to influence nasal blood flow and nasal mucosal temperature in topical nasal decongestants. PMID:15270822

  2. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  3. Seatbelt syndrome with gastric mucosal breaks and intra-gastric wall air leakage.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hirohito; Tsushimi, Takaaki; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Fujihara, Shintaro; Matsunaga, Tae; Ayaki, Maki; Chiyo, Taiga; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    As numerous reports were published regarding the so-called seatbelt syndrome involved in car crashes, most of them were mentioned about small intestine, duodenum and colon perforations and solid organ bleeding. No reports have been published regarding multiple gastric mucosal tears with intra-gastric wall air leakage with massive bleeding. A 65-year-old woman was admitted after a motor vehicle crash. She vomited massive fresh blood. Gastric mucosal breaks, approximately 5 cm in length, were observed. Computed tomography imaging revealed multiple gastric mucosal breaks. We report a rare case wherein a traffic accident caused a serious condition associated with massive digestive bleeding. PMID:26466695

  4. C-Reactive Protein Levels and Radiation-Induced Mucositis in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Wontaek Nam, Jiho; Kim, Donghyun; Park, Dahl; Kim, Dongwon

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP) levels or the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and the grade of acute radiation-induced mucositis in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: This study was performed in 40 patients who received intensity-modulated radiation therapy as a radical treatment of primary laryngo-pharyngeal cancer. Serum CRP level and ESR were initially checked on the day of radiotherapy simulation and were measured every week during the irradiation schedule and two times biweekly after radiotherapy. Mucosal reactions were evaluated by radiation oncologists on days of blood sampling. Results: The distribution of the most severe mucositis was Grade I mucositis in 10% of the patients, Grade II in 60% of the patients and Grade III in 30% of the patients. Statistical analysis indicated a significant rise in the CRP level (p < 0.001) according to radiation fraction number and grade of mucositis. A change of the mean CRP level was correlated with progression of mean grade of mucositis according to fraction number. The ESR did not show any statistically significant relationship with radiotherapy fraction number and grade of acute mucositis. Conclusions: There was a significant correlation between the presence of acute mucositis and CRP level in this study. The CRP level could be conveniently determined along with evaluation of mucosal reactions during or after radiotherapy to provide further information on radiation-induced mucositis.

  5. Immunology of Gut Mucosal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pasetti, Marcela F.; Simon, Jakub K.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Understanding the mechanisms underlying the induction of immunity in the gastrointestinal mucosa following oral immunization and the cross-talk between mucosal and systemic immunity should expedite the development of vaccines to diminish the global burden caused by enteric pathogens. Identifying an immunological correlate of protection in the course of field trials of efficacy, animal models (when available), or human challenge studies is also invaluable. In industrialized country populations, live attenuated vaccines (e.g. polio, typhoid, and rotavirus) mimic natural infection and generate robust protective immune responses. In contrast, a major challenge is to understand and overcome the barriers responsible for the diminished immunogenicity and efficacy of the same enteric vaccines in underprivileged populations in developing countries. Success in developing vaccines against some enteric pathogens has heretofore been elusive (e.g. Shigella). Different types of oral vaccines can selectively or inclusively elicit mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and a variety of cell-mediated immune responses. Areas of research that require acceleration include interaction between the gut innate immune system and the stimulation of adaptive immunity, development of safe yet effective mucosal adjuvants, better understanding of homing to the mucosa of immunologically relevant cells, and elicitation of mucosal immunologic memory. This review dissects the immune responses elicited in humans by enteric vaccines. PMID:21198669

  6. Perfusion of nonventilated lung: failure of hypoxic vasoconstriction

    SciTech Connect

    Sostman, H.D.; Neumann, R.D.; Gottschalk, A.; Greenspan, R.H.

    1983-07-01

    Alveolar hypoxia is a well established cause of regional vasoconstriction such that nonventilated segments are not perfused. The paradoxical situation of retained perfusion of nonventilated lung has seldom been discussed. Three clinical examples are illustrated. In each case coexistent chronic obstructive lung disease may have contributed to this unexpected finding by reducing pulmonary vascular capacity such that blood flow diversion from hypoxic segments was not possible.

  7. Development of an Extracorporeal Perfusion Device for Small Animal Free Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Fichter, Andreas M.; Ritschl, Lucas M.; Borgmann, Anna; Humbs, Martin; Luppa, Peter B.; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Mücke, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal perfusion (ECP) might prolong the vital storage capabilities of composite free flaps, potentially opening a wide range of clinical applications. Aim of the study was the development a validated low-cost extracorporeal perfusion model for further research in small animal free flaps. Methods After establishing optimal perfusion settings, a specially designed extracorporeal perfusion system was evaluated during 8-hour perfusion of rat epigastric flaps followed by microvascular free flap transfer. Controls comprised sham-operation, ischemia and in vivo perfusion. Flaps and perfusate (diluted blood) were closely monitored by blood gas analysis, combined laser Doppler flowmetry and remission spectroscopy and Indocyanine-Green angiography. Evaluations were complemented by assessment of necrotic area and light microscopy at day 7. Results ECP was established and maintained for 8 hours with constant potassium and pH levels. Subsequent flap transfer was successful. Notably, the rate of necrosis of extracorporeally perfused flaps (27%) was even lower than after in vivo perfusion (49%), although not statistically significant (P = 0,083). After sham-operation, only 6% of the total flap area became necrotic, while 8-hour ischemia led to total flap loss (98%). Angiographic and histological findings confirmed these observations. Conclusions Vital storage capabilities of microvascular flaps can be prolonged by temporary ECP. Our study provides important insights on the pathophysiological processes during extracorporeal tissue perfusion and provides a validated small animal perfusion model for further studies. PMID:26808996

  8. CT Perfusion Characteristics Identify Metastatic Sites in Liver.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Hobbs, Brian P; Ng, Chaan S

    2015-01-01

    Tissue perfusion plays a critical role in oncology because growth and migration of cancerous cells require proliferation of new blood vessels through the process of tumor angiogenesis. Computed tomography (CT) perfusion is an emerging functional imaging modality that measures tissue perfusion through dynamic CT scanning following intravenous administration of contrast medium. This noninvasive technique provides a quantitative basis for assessing tumor angiogenesis. CT perfusion has been utilized on a variety of organs including lung, prostate, liver, and brain, with promising results in cancer diagnosis, disease prognostication, prediction, and treatment monitoring. In this paper, we focus on assessing the extent to which CT perfusion characteristics can be used to discriminate liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumors from normal liver tissues. The neuroendocrine liver metastases were analyzed by distributed parameter modeling to yield tissue blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), permeability (PS), and hepatic arterial fraction (HAF), for tumor and normal liver. The result reveals the potential of CT perfusion as a tool for constructing biomarkers from features of the hepatic vasculature for guiding cancer detection, prognostication, and treatment selection.

  9. Regulation of skeletal muscle perfusion during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, M. D.; Laughlin, M. H.

    1998-01-01

    For exercise to be sustained, it is essential that adequate blood flow be provided to skeletal muscle. The local vascular control mechanisms involved in regulating muscle perfusion during exercise include metabolic control, endothelium-mediated control, propagated responses, myogenic control, and the muscle pump. The primary determinant of muscle perfusion during sustained exercise is the metabolic rate of the muscle. Metabolites from contracting muscle diffuse to resistance arterioles and act directly to induce vasodilation, or indirectly to inhibit noradrenaline release from sympathetic nerve endings and oppose alpha-adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction. The vascular endothelium also releases vasodilator substances (e.g., prostacyclin and nitric oxide) that are prominent in establishing basal vascular tone, but these substances do not appear to contribute to the exercise hyperemia in muscle. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells may also be involved in propagating vasodilator signals along arterioles to parent and daughter vessels. Myogenic autoregulation does not appear to be involved in the exercise hyperemia in muscle, but the rhythmic propulsion of blood from skeletal muscle veins facilitates venous return to the heart and muscle perfusion. It appears that the primary determinants of sustained exercise hyperemia in skeletal muscle are metabolic vasodilation and increased vascular conductance via the muscle pump. Additionally, sympathetic neural control is important in regulating muscle blood flow during exercise.

  10. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Reeb, Jeremie; Cypel, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    Lung transplantation is an established life-saving therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Unfortunately, greater success in lung transplantation is hindered by a shortage of lung donors and the relatively poor early-, mid-, and long-term outcomes associated with severe primary graft dysfunction. Ex vivo lung perfusion has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for a more accurate lung assessment and improvement in lung quality. This review outlines the: (i) rationale behind the method; (ii) techniques and protocols; (iii) Toronto ex vivo lung perfusion method; (iv) devices available; and (v) clinical experience worldwide. We also highlight the potential of ex vivo lung perfusion in leading a new era of lung preservation. PMID:26700566

  11. Isolated lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-01-01

    Isolated lung perfusion (ILP) has been historically used as a method to study basic lung physiologic concepts using animal models. More recently, ILP has been applied in lung transplantation and thoracic oncology. In lung transplantation, ILP has been used to assess physiological integrity of donor lungs after the organ is removed from the donor. This procedure is called Ex vivo Lung Perfusion (EVLP), and it has also been proposed as a method for active treatment and repair of injured unsuitable donor organs ex vivo. In oncology, ILP is an attractive method to deliver high dose chemotherapy to treat pulmonary metastatic disease. Since the lung vasculature is isolated in vivo, this technique is called in vivo lung perfusion (IVLP). This review will focus on the rationale, technical aspects, experimental and clinical experience of EVLP and IVLP. A perspective on the future use of these techniques is described. PMID:22202033

  12. Other causes of GI mucosal injury: upper intestinal content.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, W P

    1987-05-01

    Factors in upper intestinal content that can produce acute injury to the gastric mucosa include lysolecithin and the bile acids. Both damage the gastric mucosal barrier by increasing mucosal permeability. The secondary and deconjugated bile acids are more toxic in this regard than are the primary or conjugated ones. The extent of injury is highly pH-dependent. Although the bile acids do not affect the gel properties of gastric mucus, they do produce significant inhibition of carbonic anhydrase activity and gastric bicarbonate secretion. In concert with other topical damaging agents, bile acids increase mucosal blood flow. However, gross mucosal lesions are rarely observed under these circumstances. Chronic exposure of acid-peptic-secreting mucosa to upper intestinal content results in the development of a severe atrophic gastritis within 6 months. The ability of atrophic mucosa to maintain an intraluminal pH gradient is impaired, and it ulcerates with great regularity when exposed to a highly acid environment. Clinically, excessive enterogastric reflux has been implicated in the pathogenesis of both benign gastric ulcer and the post-gastrectomy syndrome of alkaline reflux gastritis. The evidence to support this view for both disease entities is reviewed. PMID:3113802

  13. Primary mucosal melanomas: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Marija; Vlajkovic, Slobodan; Jovanovic, Predrag; Stefanovic, Vladisav

    2012-01-01

    Primary mucosal melanomas arise from melanocytes located in mucosal membranes lining respiratory, gastrointestinal and urogenital tract. Although a majority of mucosal melanomas originate from the mucosa of the nasal cavity and accessory sinuses, oral cavity, anorectum, vulva and vagina, they can arise in almost any part of mucosal membranes. Most of mucosal melanomas occur in occult sites, which together with the lack of early and specific signs contribute to late diagnosis, and poor prognosis. Because of their rareness the knowledge about their pathogenesis and risk factors is insufficient, and also there are not well established protocols for staging and treatment of mucosal melanomas. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, with trends toward more conservative treatment since radical surgery did not show an advantage for survival. Radiotherapy can provide better local control in some locations, but did not show improvement in survival. There is no effective systemic therapy for these aggressive tumors. Compared with cutaneous and ocular melanoma, mucosal melanomas have lowest percent of five-year survival. Recently revealed molecular changes underlying mucosal melanomas offer new hope for development of more effective systemic therapy for mucosal melanomas. Herein we presented a comprehensive review of various locations of primary melanoma along mucosal membranes, their epidemiological and clinical features, and treatment options. We also gave a short comparison of some characteristics of cutaneous and mucosal melanomas. PMID:23071856

  14. The Mucosal Immune System of Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish possess an adaptive immune system associated with each of their mucosal body surfaces. Evidence obtained from mucosal vaccination and mucosal infection studies reveal that adaptive immune responses take place at the different mucosal surfaces of teleost. The main mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) of teleosts are the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), the gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT) and the recently discovered nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Teleost MALT includes diffuse B cells and T cells with specific phenotypes different from their systemic counterparts that have co-evolved to defend the microbe-rich mucosal environment. Both B and T cells respond to mucosal infection or vaccination. Specific antibody responses can be measured in the gills, gut and skin mucosal secretions of teleost fish following mucosal infection or vaccination. Rainbow trout studies have shown that IgT antibodies and IgT+ B cells are the predominant B cell subset in all MALT and respond in a compartmentalized manner to mucosal infection. Our current knowledge on adaptive immunity in teleosts is limited compared to the mammalian literature. New research tools and in vivo models are currently being developed in order to help reveal the great intricacy of teleost mucosal adaptive immunity and help improve mucosal vaccination protocols for use in aquaculture. PMID:26274978

  15. A comparative study of lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty with buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty in urethral stricture disease: An institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Dilip Kumar; Gupta, Depak Kumar; Ghosh, Bastab; Bera, Malay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Aims: A prospective study to compare the outcomes of lingual versus buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty in patients with long segment anterior urethral strictures disease. Materials and Methods: The study included 30 patients for buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty (group I) and 30 patients for lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty (group II) for treatment of long segment (>3 cm) incomplete anterior urethral stricture disease using single-stage dorsal onlay free oral mucosal graft urethroplasty by Barbagli's technique between February 2013 to September 2014. All patients underwent complete evaluation of the stricture including inspection of the oral cavity. Results: The results of urethroplasty in between two group were not significant (P > 0.05) in terms of Qmax (P = 0.63), mean postoperative AUA symptom score (P = 0.83), operative time (P = 0.302) intra operative blood loss (P = 0.708), duration of postoperative hospitalization (P = 0.83), but slurring of speech complications was seen in group II, but not in group I. Long-term complications of salivary disturbance, tightness of the mouth, persistent pain at graft site, perioral numbness, seen only in group I (BMGU). Conclusion: LMG urethroplasty is an excellent alternative to BMG urethroplasty with comparable results of urethroplasty and minimal donor site complications. PMID:27141184

  16. Mucosal Immunology of Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Berin, M. Cecilia; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2013-01-01

    Food allergies are increasing in prevalence at a higher rate than can be explained by genetic factors, suggesting a role for as yet unidentified environmental factors. In this review, we summarize the state of knowledge about the healthy immune response to antigens in the diet and the basis of immune deviation that results in IgE sensitization and allergic reactivity to foods. The intestinal epithelium forms the interface between the external environment and the mucosal immune system, and emerging data suggest that the interaction between intestinal epithelial cells and mucosal dendritic cells is of particular importance in determining the outcome of immune responses to dietary antigens. Exposure to food allergens through non-oral routes, in particular through the skin, is increasingly recognized as a potentially important factor in the increasing rate of food allergy. There are many open questions on the role of environmental factors such as dietary factors and microbiota in the development of food allergy, but data suggest that both have an important modulatory effect on the mucosal immune system. Finally, we discuss recent developments in our understanding of immune mechanisms of clinical manifestations of food allergy. New experimental tools, particularly in the field of genomics and microbiome, are likely to shed light on factors responsible for the growing clinical problem of food allergy. PMID:23660362

  17. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zhiquan; Levy, Claire N.; Ferre, April L.; Hartig, Heather; Fang, Cifeng; Lentz, Gretchen; Fialkow, Michael; Kirby, Anna C.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Germann, Anja; von Briesen, Hagen; McElrath, M. Juliana; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Baker, Chris A. R.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Gao, Dayong; Hladik, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible. Methods and Findings To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10–15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension. Conclusions Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes. PMID:27232996

  18. Pulmonary artery perfusion versus no pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with COPD: a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Buggeskov, Katrine B; Sundskard, Martin M; Jonassen, Thomas; Andersen, Lars W; Secher, Niels H; Ravn, Hanne B; Steinbrüchel, Daniel A; Jakobsen, Janus C; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Absence of pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may be associated with reduced postoperative oxygenation. Effects of active pulmonary artery perfusion were explored in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods 90 patients were randomised to receive pulmonary artery perfusion during CPB with either oxygenated blood (n=30) or histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK) solution (n=29) compared with no pulmonary perfusion (n=31). The coprimary outcomes were the inverse oxygenation index compared at 21 hours after starting CPB and longitudinally in a mixed-effects model (MEM). Secondary outcomes were tracheal intubation time, serious adverse events, mortality, days alive outside the intensive care unit (ICU) and outside the hospital. Results 21 hours after starting CPB patients receiving pulmonary artery perfusion with normothermic oxygenated blood had a higher oxygenation index compared with no pulmonary perfusion (mean difference (MD) 0.94; 95% CI 0.05 to 1.83; p=0.04). The blood group had also a higher oxygenation index both longitudinally (MEM, p=0.009) and at 21 hours (MD 0.99; CI 0.29 to 1.69; p=0.007) compared with the HTK group. The latest result corresponds to a difference in the arterial partial pressure of oxygen of 23 mm Hg with a median fraction of inspired oxygen of 0.32. Yet the blood or HTK groups did not demonstrate a longitudinally higher oxygenation index compared with no pulmonary perfusion (MEM, p=0.57 and 0.17). Similarly, at 21 hours there was no difference in the oxygenation index between the HTK group and those no pulmonary perfusion (MD 0.06; 95% CI −0.73 to 0.86; p=0.87). There were no statistical significant differences between the groups for the secondary outcomes. Discussion Pulmonary artery perfusion with normothermic oxygenated blood during cardiopulmonary bypass appears to improve postoperative oxygenation in patients with COPD undergoing

  19. Pulmonary artery perfusion versus no pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with COPD: a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Buggeskov, Katrine B; Sundskard, Martin M; Jonassen, Thomas; Andersen, Lars W; Secher, Niels H; Ravn, Hanne B; Steinbrüchel, Daniel A; Jakobsen, Janus C; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Absence of pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may be associated with reduced postoperative oxygenation. Effects of active pulmonary artery perfusion were explored in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods 90 patients were randomised to receive pulmonary artery perfusion during CPB with either oxygenated blood (n=30) or histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK) solution (n=29) compared with no pulmonary perfusion (n=31). The coprimary outcomes were the inverse oxygenation index compared at 21 hours after starting CPB and longitudinally in a mixed-effects model (MEM). Secondary outcomes were tracheal intubation time, serious adverse events, mortality, days alive outside the intensive care unit (ICU) and outside the hospital. Results 21 hours after starting CPB patients receiving pulmonary artery perfusion with normothermic oxygenated blood had a higher oxygenation index compared with no pulmonary perfusion (mean difference (MD) 0.94; 95% CI 0.05 to 1.83; p=0.04). The blood group had also a higher oxygenation index both longitudinally (MEM, p=0.009) and at 21 hours (MD 0.99; CI 0.29 to 1.69; p=0.007) compared with the HTK group. The latest result corresponds to a difference in the arterial partial pressure of oxygen of 23 mm Hg with a median fraction of inspired oxygen of 0.32. Yet the blood or HTK groups did not demonstrate a longitudinally higher oxygenation index compared with no pulmonary perfusion (MEM, p=0.57 and 0.17). Similarly, at 21 hours there was no difference in the oxygenation index between the HTK group and those no pulmonary perfusion (MD 0.06; 95% CI −0.73 to 0.86; p=0.87). There were no statistical significant differences between the groups for the secondary outcomes. Discussion Pulmonary artery perfusion with normothermic oxygenated blood during cardiopulmonary bypass appears to improve postoperative oxygenation in patients with COPD undergoing

  20. Development of an Ex Vivo, Beating Heart Model for CT Myocardial Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Pelgrim, Gert Jan; Das, Marco; Haberland, Ulrike; Slump, Cees; Handayani, Astri; van Tuijl, Sjoerd; Stijnen, Marco; Klotz, Ernst; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To test the feasibility of a CT-compatible, ex vivo, perfused porcine heart model for myocardial perfusion CT imaging. Methods. One porcine heart was perfused according to Langendorff. Dynamic perfusion scanning was performed with a second-generation dual source CT scanner. Circulatory parameters like blood flow, aortic pressure, and heart rate were monitored throughout the experiment. Stenosis was induced in the circumflex artery, controlled by a fractional flow reserve (FFR) pressure wire. CT-derived myocardial perfusion parameters were analysed at FFR of 1 to 0.10/0.0. Results. CT images did not show major artefacts due to interference of the model setup. The pacemaker-induced heart rhythm was generally stable at 70 beats per minute. During most of the experiment, blood flow was 0.9–1.0 L/min, and arterial pressure varied between 80 and 95 mm/Hg. Blood flow decreased and arterial pressure increased by approximately 10% after inducing a stenosis with FFR ≤ 0.50. Dynamic perfusion scanning was possible across the range of stenosis grades. Perfusion parameters of circumflex-perfused myocardial segments were affected at increasing stenosis grades. Conclusion. An adapted Langendorff porcine heart model is feasible in a CT environment. This model provides control over physiological parameters and may allow in-depth validation of quantitative CT perfusion techniques. PMID:26185756

  1. USE OF A PROGRAMMABLE CALCULATOR IN CARDIOPULMONARY PERFUSION

    PubMed Central

    Mills, J. David; Tallent, Jerome H.

    1978-01-01

    This study describes a hand-held, battery-powered, programmable instrument (Calculator Model SR-52) that can be taken directly into the operating room by cardiopulmonary perfusionists. Three programs are described in detail: 1) Cardiopulmonary perfusion parameters and estimated blood volume; 2) blood gas parameters and saturations, with temperature corrections; and 3) cardiopulmonary oxygen transfer and oxygenator efficiency. This inexpensive calculator allows perfusion personnel to manipulate easily-derived data into values which heretofore have required elaborate nomograms or special slide rules—or were not available within a reasonable computational time. PMID:15216068

  2. Inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion during sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; West, John B.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion in man were studied by performing hyperventilation-breathhold single-breath measurements before, during and after 9 days of continuous exposure to microgravity. In microgravity the indicators of inhomogeneity of perfusion, especially the size of cardiogenic oscillations in expired CO2 and the height of phase 4, were both markedly reduced. Cardiogenic oscillations were reduced to approximately 60 of their preflight standing size, while the height of phase 4 was between 0 and -8% (a terminal fall became a small terminal rise) of preflights standing. The terminal change in CO2 was nearly abolished in microgravity indicating more uniformity of blood flow between lung units that close at the end of expiration and units that remain open. This may result from the disappearance of gravity-dependent topographical inequality of blood flow. The residual cardiographic oscillations in expired CO2 imply a persisting inhomogeneity of perfusion in the absence of gravity at a level larger than acinar.

  3. CT perfusion: principles, applications, and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ting-Yim

    2004-10-01

    The fast scanning speed of current slip-ring CT scanners has enabled the development of perfusion imaging techniques with intravenous injection of contrast medium. In a typical CT perfusion study, contrast medium is injected and rapid scanning at a frequency of 1-2 Hz is used to monitor the first circulation of the injected contrast medium through a 1-2 cm thick slab of tissue. From the acquired time-series of CT images, arteries can be identified within the tissue slab to derive the arterial contrast concentration curve, Ca(t) while each individual voxel produces a tissue residue curve, Q(t) for the corresponding tissue region. Deconvolution between the measured Ca(t) and Q(t) leads to the determination of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in brain studies. In this presentation, an important application of CT perfusion in acute stroke studies - the identification of the ischemic penumbra via the CBF/CBV mismatch and factors affecting the quantitative accuracy of deconvolution, including partial volume averaging, arterial delay and dispersion are discussed.

  4. Systemic and Mucosal Differences in HIV Burden, Immune and Therapeutic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Sharon M.; Redford, Maryann; Christensen, Shawna; Mack, Wendy; Cohn, Jon; Janoff, Edward N.; Mestecky, Jiri; Jenson, Hal B.; Navazesh, Mahvash; Cohen, Mardge; Reichelderfer, Patricia; Kovacs, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Background Mucosal tissues represent major targets for HIV transmission, but differ in susceptibility and reservoir function by unknown mechanisms. Methods In a cross-sectional study, HIV RNA and infectious virus were compared between oral and genital compartments and blood in HIV-infected women, in association with clinical parameters, co-pathogens and putative innate and adaptive HIV inhibitors. Results HIV RNA was detectable in 24.5% of women from all 3 compartments, whereas 45% had RNA in only one or two sites. By comparison, infectious HIV, present in blood of the majority, was rare in mucosal sites. Innate mediators, SLPI and TSP, were highest in mucosae. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was associated with an 80% decreased probability of shedding. Multivariate logistic regression models revealed that mucosal HIV RNA was associated with higher plasma RNA, infectious virus, and total mucosal IgA, but not IgG. There was a 37-fold increased probability of detecting RNA in both genital and oral specimens (P=0.008;P=0.02, respectively) among women in highest vs lowest IgA tertiles. Conclusions Mucosal sites exhibit distinct characteristics of infectious HIV, viral shedding and responses to therapy, dependent upon both systemic and local factors. Of the putative innate and adaptive mucosal defense factors examined, only IgA was associated with HIV RNA shedding. However, rather than being protective, there was a striking increase in probability of detectable HIV RNA shedding in women with highest total IgA. PMID:21239996

  5. Advances and challenges in mucosal adjuvant technology.

    PubMed

    Newsted, Daniel; Fallahi, Firouzeh; Golshani, Ashkan; Azizi, Ali

    2015-05-15

    Adjuvants play attractive roles in enhancement of immune response during vaccination; however, due to several challenges, only a limited number of adjuvants are licensed by health authorities. The lack of an effective mucosal adjuvant is even more significant as none of the licensed adjuvants revealed a strong enhancement in immune system after mucosal administration. Over the past two decades, several mucosal adjuvants have been developed to deliver antigens to the target cells in the mucosal immune system and increase specific immune responses. However, the safety and efficacy of these adjuvants for testing in human trials is still an important issue, requiring further study. In this article, we briefly review the challenges associated with most common mucosal adjuvants and discuss potential strategies for targeting the mucosal immune system.

  6. Assessment of mucosal immunity to HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Jespers, Vicky; Harandi, Ali M; Hinkula, Jorma; Medaglini, Donata; Le Grand, Roger; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Bogers, Willy; El Habib, Raphaelle; Wegmann, Frank; Fraser, Carol; Cranage, Martin; Shattock, Robin J; Spetz, Anna-Lena

    2010-04-01

    A key gap in the development and evaluation of HIV-1 vaccines is insufficient knowledge with regard to sampling techniques and assessment of mucosal immune responses required for early prevention and inhibition of viral dissemination. In an attempt to start bridging this gap, the EUROPRISE network of scientists working on HIV-1 vaccine and microbicide research organized a workshop with the aim to review the types of mucosal responses/biomarkers currently measured in mucosal immunology and to define how the mucosal responses/biomarkers are measured and/or the assays and sampling methods used. The Workshop addressed two critical questions: first whether, with current knowledge, it would be possible to define a consensus set of mucosal sampling methods to facilitate cross-species comparisons and ensure standardized implementation in clinical trials; second to determine the remaining challenges (technical and logistical) and their possible solutions for assessing mucosal responses to HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:20370549

  7. Imaging of drug effects in perfused liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammann, Marc; Mahlke, Christine; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2002-06-01

    Various medications affect the systemic circulation and organ oxygenation causing dilatation or constriction of blood vessels. Imminent liver failure can be generated by reduced perfusion of different origins. In this case hepatic vasodilatation would be a therapeutical approach for improving patient's condition. Our examinations have been performed in perfused rat liver using spectrometric methods. Two defined areas of the liver were measured punctually. We compared the influence of Tetramethylpyrazine and Glyceroltrinitrate on hemoglobin oxygenation (HbO2) and concentration (Hb-conc.) in rat liver after application of Norepinephrine, which caused a mid decrease in hemoglobin oxygenation of 47,9 %. Both increased the HbO2, but differed from each other in manner of time and extent. Tetramethylpyrazine indicated a longer effect than Glyceroltrinitrate. Furthermore, HbO2 and Hb-conc. showed a conversed relation. From the shape of the absorption spectra it is possible to derive the oxygenation of hemoglobin.

  8. Comparison of 2 techniques for regional antibiotic delivery to the equine forelimb: intraosseous perfusion vs. intravenous perfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Butt, T D; Bailey, J V; Dowling, P M; Fretz, P B

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the synovial fluid concentrations and pharmacokinetics of amikacin in the equine limb distal to the carpus following intraosseous and intravenous regional perfusion. The front limbs of 6 horses were randomly assigned to either intraosseous or intravenous perfusion. A tourniquet was placed distal to each carpus and the limb perfused with 500 mg of amikacin. Systemic blood samples and synovial fluid samples were collected over 70 min from the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint, metacarpophalangeal joint, and digital flexor sheath. The tourniquet was removed following the 30 min sample collection. The mean peak amikacin concentration for the DIP joint was significantly higher with intravenous perfusion. There were no significant differences in time to peak concentration or elimination half-life between methods at each synovial structure. Each technique produced mean peak concentrations ranging from 5 to 50 times that of recommended peak serum concentrations for therapeutic efficacy. PMID:11519271

  9. Chemotherapy or radiation-induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Lalla, Rajesh V; Saunders, Deborah P; Peterson, Douglas E

    2014-04-01

    Oral mucositis is a significant toxicity of systemic chemotherapy and of radiation therapy to the head and neck region. The morbidity of oral mucositis can include pain, nutritional compromise, impact on quality of life, alteration in cancer therapy, risk for infection, and economic costs. Management includes general symptomatic support and targeted therapeutic interventions for the prevention or treatment of oral mucositis. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines are available to guide clinicians in the selection of effective management strategies.

  10. Voice Disorders in Mucosal Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Ruas, Ana Cristina Nunes; Lucena, Márcia Mendonça; da Costa, Ananda Dutra; Vieira, Jéssica Rafael; de Araújo-Melo, Maria Helena; Terceiro, Benivaldo Ramos Ferreira; de Sousa Torraca, Tania Salgado; de Oliveira Schubach, Armando; Valete-Rosalino, Claudia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Leishmaniasis is considered as one of the six most important infectious diseases because of its high detection coefficient and ability to produce deformities. In most cases, mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) occurs as a consequence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. If left untreated, mucosal lesions can leave sequelae, interfering in the swallowing, breathing, voice and speech processes and requiring rehabilitation. Objective To describe the anatomical characteristics and voice quality of ML patients. Materials and Methods A descriptive transversal study was conducted in a cohort of ML patients treated at the Laboratory for Leishmaniasis Surveillance of the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases - Fiocruz, between 2010 and 2013. The patients were submitted to otorhinolaryngologic clinical examination by endoscopy of the upper airways and digestive tract and to speech-language assessment through directed anamnesis, auditory perception, phonation times and vocal acoustic analysis. The variables of interest were epidemiologic (sex and age) and clinic (lesion location, associated symptoms and voice quality. Results 26 patients under ML treatment and monitored by speech therapists were studied. 21 (81%) were male and five (19%) female, with ages ranging from 15 to 78 years (54.5+15.0 years). The lesions were distributed in the following structures 88.5% nasal, 38.5% oral, 34.6% pharyngeal and 19.2% laryngeal, with some patients presenting lesions in more than one anatomic site. The main complaint was nasal obstruction (73.1%), followed by dysphonia (38.5%), odynophagia (30.8%) and dysphagia (26.9%). 23 patients (84.6%) presented voice quality perturbations. Dysphonia was significantly associated to lesions in the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity. Conclusion We observed that vocal quality perturbations are frequent in patients with mucosal leishmaniasis, even without laryngeal lesions; they are probably associated to disorders of some resonance

  11. Regional pulmonary perfusion following human heart-lung transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lisbona, R.; Hakim, T.S.; Dean, G.W.; Langleben, D.; Guerraty, A.; Levy, R.D. )

    1989-08-01

    Ventilation and perfusion scans were obtained in six subjects who had undergone heart-lung transplantation with consequent denervation of the cardiopulmonary axis. Two of the subjects had developed obliterative bronchiolitis, which is believed to be a form of chronic rejection. Their pulmonary function tests demonstrated airflow obstruction and their scintigraphic studies were abnormal. In the remaining four subjects without obstructive airways disease, ventilation and planar perfusion scans were normal. Single photon emission computed tomography imaging of pulmonary perfusion in these patients revealed a layered distribution of blood flow indistinguishable from that of normal individuals. It is concluded that neurogenic mechanisms have little influence on the pattern of local pulmonary blood flow at rest.

  12. Whole-Brain Computed Tomographic Perfusion Imaging in Acute Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mokin, Maxim; Ciambella, Chelsey C.; Masud, Muhammad W.; Levy, Elad I.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (VST) can be difficult to diagnose because of its diverse clinical presentation. The utility of perfusion imaging for diagnosing VST is not well understood. Summary We retrospectively reviewed cases of acute VST in patients who underwent whole-brain (320-detector-row) computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging in combination with craniocervical CT venography. Perfusion maps that were analyzed included cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time, and time to peak. Among the 10 patients with acute VST included in this study, 9 had perfusion abnormalities. All perfusion abnormalities were localized in areas adjacent to the occluded sinus and did not match typical anterior or posterior circulation arterial territories. Bilateral perfusion deficits were seen in 4 cases. In 2 cases, parenchymal hemorrhage was diagnosed on noncontrast CT imaging; in those cases, focal CBV and CBF were reduced. Key Messages Whole-brain CT perfusion imaging with 320-detector-row scanners can further assist in establishing the diagnosis of VST by detecting perfusion abnormalities corresponding to venous and not arterial territories. CT perfusion could assist in the differentiation between focal reversible changes, such as those caused by vasogenic edema, and irreversible changes due to infarction. PMID:27051406

  13. An improved isolated working rabbit heart preparation using red cell enhanced perfusate.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, V.; Chen, Y. H.; Downing, S. E.

    1987-01-01

    The performance of isolated working rabbit hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit (KH) buffer was compared with those in which the buffer was supplemented with washed human red blood cells (KH + RBC) at a hematocrit of 15 percent. When perfused with KH alone at 70 cm H2O afterload and paced at 240 beats/minute, coronary flow was more than double, whereas aortic flow was 40-60 percent of that in hearts perfused with KH + RBC, regardless of left atrial filling pressures (LAFP). Peak systolic pressure reached a plateau at 120 mm Hg in KH + RBC, but at 95 mm Hg in the KH group. Stroke work, however, was similar in the two groups. Despite the high coronary flow, oxygen uptake by hearts perfused with KH was substantially less and did not respond to increases in LAFP as in those perfused with KH + RBC. There was a 20 percent drop in ATP and glycogen content after 90 minutes' perfusion. In contrast, isolated hearts perfused with RBC-enriched buffer remained stable for at least 150 minutes. Irrespective of the perfusate, triacylglycerol content of the muscle remained at similar levels throughout the course of study. Increasing RBC in the perfusate from 15 percent to 25 percent had no additional effect on cardiac performance or oxygen consumption. Our findings demonstrate that in the isolated working rabbit heart inclusion of RBC in the perfusate improves mechanical and metabolic stability by providing an adequate oxygen supply. PMID:3604287

  14. Mucosal Wave Measurement and Visualization Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Krausert, Christopher R.; Olszewski, Aleksandra E.; Taylor, Lindsay N.; McMurray, James S.; Dailey, Seth H.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2010-01-01

    Organized vibration of the vocal folds is critical to high quality voice production. When the vocal folds oscillate, the superficial tissue of the vocal fold is displaced in a wave-like fashion, creating the so called “mucosal wave”. Because the mucosal wave is dependent on vocal fold structure, physical alterations of that structure cause mucosal wave abnormalities. Visualization and quantification of mucosal wave properties have become useful parameters in diagnosing and managing vocal fold pathology. Mucosal wave measurement provides information about vocal fold characteristics that cannot be determined with other assessment techniques. Here, we discuss the benefits, disadvantages, and clinical applicability of the different mucosal wave measurement techniques, such as electroglottography (EGG), photoglottography (PGG), and ultrasound and visualization techniques that include videokymography (VKG), stroboscopy, and high-speed digital imaging (HSDI). The various techniques and their specific uses are reviewed with the intention of helping researchers and clinicians choose a method for a given situation and understand its limitations as well as its potential applications. Recent applications of these techniques for quantitative assessment demonstrate that additional research must be conducted to realize the full potential of these tools. Evaluations of existing research and recommendations for future research are given to promote both the quantitative study of the mucosal wave through accurate and standardized measurement of mucosal wave parameters and the development of reliable methods with which physicians can diagnose vocal disorders. PMID:20471798

  15. Vagal nerve and the gastric mucosal defense.

    PubMed

    Mózsik, G; Karádi, O; Király, A; Matus, Z; Sütö, G; Tóth, G; Vincze, A

    1993-01-01

    An essential role for an intact vagal nerve has been proven in the development of gastric mucosal cyto- and general protection. On the other hand, chemically-induced (ethanol, HCl, indomethacin) gastric mucosal damage is enhanced after acute surgical vagotomy. The aims of this paper were to study the possible mechanisms of the vagal nerve in the development of gastric mucosal defense. The following questions were addressed: 1) effect of surgical vagotomy on the development of ethanol- (ETOH), HCl-, and indomethacin (IND)-induced gastric mucosal damage: 2) changes in the gastric mucosal defense by scavengers, prostacyclin and other compounds (small doses of atropine and cimetidine; 3) changes in the gastric mucosal vascular permeability due to chemicals; 4) effect of indomethacin in the ETOH and HCl models with and without surgical vagotomy; 5) changes in the gastric mucosal content of prostacyclin and PGE2 in the ETOH and HCl models after surgical vagotomy; and 6) changes in the role of SH-groups in gastric mucosal defense after surgical vagotomy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Biology and Mucosal Immunity to Myxozoans

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Daniela; Bartholomew, Jerri; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2014-01-01

    Myxozoans are among the most abundant parasites in nature. Their life cycles involve two hosts: an invertebrate, usually an annelid, and a vertebrate, usually a fish. They affect fish species in their natural habitats but also constitute a menace for fish aquaculture. Using different strategies they are able to parasitize and cause damage in multiple organs, including mucosal tissues, which they use also as portals of entry. In fish, the main mucosal sites include the intestine, skin and gills. Recently the finding of a specific mucosal immunoglobulin in teleost (IgT), analogous to mammalian IgA, and the capacity of fish to develop a specific mucosal immune response against different pathogens, has highlighted the importance of studying immune responses at mucosal sites. In this review, we describe the major biological characteristics of myxozoan parasites and present the data available regarding immune responses for species that infect mucosal sites. As models for mucosal immunity we review the responses to Enteromyxum spp. and Ceratomyxa shasta, both of which parasitize the intestine. The immune response at the skin and gills is also described, as these mucosal tissues are used by myxozoans as attaching surfaces and portal of entry, and some species also parasitize these sites. Finally, the development of immunoprophylactic strategies is discussed. PMID:23994774

  17. Mucosal vaccines: a paradigm shift in the development of mucosal adjuvants and delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Atul; Gowda, Devegowda Vishakante; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V; Shinde, Chetan G; Iyer, Meenakshi

    2015-04-01

    Mucosal immune responses are the first-line defensive mechanisms against a variety of infections. Therefore, immunizations of mucosal surfaces from which majority of infectious agents make their entry, helps to protect the body against infections. Hence, vaccinization of mucosal surfaces by using mucosal vaccines provides the basis for generating protective immunity both in the mucosal and systemic immune compartments. Mucosal vaccines offer several advantages over parenteral immunization. For example, (i) ease of administration; (ii) non-invasiveness; (iii) high-patient compliance; and (iv) suitability for mass vaccination. Despite these benefits, to date, only very few mucosal vaccines have been developed using whole microorganisms and approved for use in humans. This is due to various challenges associated with the development of an effective mucosal vaccine that can work against a variety of infections, and various problems concerned with the safe delivery of developed vaccine. For instance, protein antigen alone is not just sufficient enough for the optimal delivery of antigen(s) mucosally. Hence, efforts have been made to develop better prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines for improved mucosal Th1 and Th2 immune responses using an efficient and safe immunostimulatory molecule and novel delivery carriers. Therefore, in this review, we have made an attempt to cover the recent advancements in the development of adjuvants and delivery carriers for safe and effective mucosal vaccine production.

  18. Mucosal vaccines: novel strategies and applications for the control of pathogens and tumors at mucosal sites.

    PubMed

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis Cs; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites.

  19. The effect of route of immunization on mucosal immunity and protection.

    PubMed

    Lehner, T; Wang, Y; Ping, L; Bergmeier, L; Mitchell, E; Cranage, M; Hall, G; Dennis, M; Cook, N; Doyle, C; Jones, I

    1999-05-01

    In macaques, the route of immunization has a profound effect on the immune response. Augmenting rectal or vaginal immunization with oral or nasal immunization enhanced the secretory IgA, serum IgG, and T cell responses. However, targeted iliac lymph node (TILN) immunization with recombinant simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) gp120 and p27 elicited the most consistent mucosal antibody responses in the rectum, vagina, urine, seminal fluid, and blood. Both mucosal and TILN immunization induced specific CD4+ T cell proliferative responses in the iliac lymph nodes, which drain these mucosal surfaces, and in the splenic and circulating T cells. Rectal mucosal challenge with cell-free SIV induced total protection in 4 of 7 macaques that were immunized by the TILN route, and, compared with unimmunized macaques or those immunized by the mucosal route (P<.001), it induced a >90% decrease in virus load in 3 of them. Protection from mucosal rectal infection with SIV was significantly associated with an increase in the CD8 suppressor factor (which was generated by the iliac lymph node), RANTES, and MIP-1beta (P<.01).

  20. Perfusion Bioreactor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1990-01-01

    Perfusion bioreactor module, self-contained, closed-loop cell-culture system that operates in microgravity or on Earth. Equipment supports growth or long-term maintenance of cultures of human or other fragile cells for experiments in basic cell biology or process technology. Designed to support proliferation (initially at exponential rates of growth) of cells in complex growth medium and to maintain confluent cells in defined medium under conditions optimized to permit or encourage selected functions of cells, including secretion of products of cells into medium.

  1. An altered intestinal mucosal microbiome in HIV-1 infection is associated with mucosal and systemic immune activation and endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, SM; Lee, EJ; Kotter, CV; Austin, GL; Dong, Z; Hecht, DK; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, DM; Landay, AL; Robertson, CE; Frank, DN; Wilson, CC

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 infection disrupts the intestinal immune system, leading to microbial translocation and systemic immune activation. We investigated the impact of HIV-1 infection on the intestinal microbiome and its association with mucosal T cell and dendritic cell (DC) frequency and activation, as well as with levels of systemic T cell activation, inflammation and microbial translocation. Bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing was performed on colon biopsies and fecal samples from subjects with chronic, untreated HIV-1 infection and uninfected control subjects. Colon biopsies of HIV-1 infected subjects had increased abundances of Proteobacteria and decreased abundances of Firmicutes compared to uninfected donors. Furthermore at the genus level, a significant increase in Prevotella and decrease in Bacteroides was observed in HIV-1 infected subjects, indicating a disruption in the Bacteroidetes bacterial community structure. This HIV-1-associated increase in Prevotella abundance was associated with increased numbers of activated colonic T cells and myeloid DCs. Principal coordinates analysis demonstrated an HIV-1-related change in the microbiome that was associated with increased mucosal cellular immune activation, microbial translocation and blood T cell activation. These observations suggest that an important relationship exists between altered mucosal bacterial communities and intestinal inflammation during chronic HIV-1 infection. PMID:24399150

  2. Effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kenya; Nanjo, Takafumi; Satoshi, Ii; Miyazaki, Shohei; Hirata, Masaaki; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Kudo, Masayuki; Sasaki, Kousuke; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies using multi-detector row CT (MDCT). Following the standard CT perfusion study protocol, continuous (cine) scans (1 s/rotation × 60 s) consisting of four 5 mm thick contiguous slices were performed using an MDCT scanner with a tube voltage of 80 kVp and a tube current of 200 mA. We generated the simulated images with tube currents of 50 mA, 100 mA and 150 mA by adding the corresponding noise to the raw scan data of the original image acquired above using a noise simulation tool. From the original and simulated images, we generated the functional images of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in seven patients with cerebrovascular disease, and compared the correlation coefficients (CCs) between the perfusion parameter values obtained from the original and simulated images. The coefficients of variation (CVs) in the white matter were also compared. The CC values deteriorated with decreasing tube current. There was a significant difference between 50 mA and 100 mA for all perfusion parameters. The CV values increased with decreasing tube current. There were significant differences between 50 mA and 100 mA and between 100 mA and 150 mA for CBF. For CBV and MTT, there was also a significant difference between 150 mA and 200 mA. This study will be useful for understanding the effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies using MDCT, and for selecting the tube current.

  3. The effect of honey on mucositis induced by chemoradiation in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Pradip Kumar; Ray, Amitabh; Mitra, Tarak Nath; Jana, Utpal; Bhattacharya, Jibak; Ganguly, Subir

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pure natural honey on radiation-induced mucositis. Fifty-five patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer requiring radiation to the oropharyngeal mucosal area were divided into two groups (study arm-28 and control arm-27) to receive either chemoradiation or chemoradiation plus topical application of honey. Patients were treated using a telecobalt machine at 2 Gy per day, five times a week up to a total dose of 66 Gy. in the study arm, patients were advised to take 20 ml of honey 15 minutes before, 15 minutes after and similar amount at bed time. Patients were evaluated every week for the development of radiation mucositis using the WHO grading system. There was significant reduction in the symptomatic grades 3 and 4 mucositis in honey-treated patients compared to controls ie, 18% versus 41% for grade 3 and 4% versus 22% for grade 4 mucositis. Seventy-one per cent of patients treated with topical honey showed no change or a positive gain in body weight. In the control group also 22% had no weight loss, though none showed weight gain. Furthermore, it didn't affect blood sugar level when initial fasting blood sugar level was < 150 mg%. Honey is a cheap, simple, easily available and effective agent in reducing radiation-induced mucositis. Within the limits of this study the results showed the application of natural honey is effective in managing radiation induced mucositis, which warrants further multicentric randomised trials to validate the findings. PMID:23520669

  4. Ex-vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Neyrinck, Arne; Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2015-06-01

    This review outlines the new and promising technique of ex vivo lung perfusion and its clinical potential to increase the number of transplantable lungs and to improve the early and late outcome after transplantation. The rationale, the experimental background, the technique and protocols, and available devices for ex vivo lung perfusion are discussed. The current clinical experience worldwide and ongoing clinical trials are reviewed.

  5. Treatment of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bagán-Sebastián, José V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of oral mucositis is a challenge, due to its complex biological nature. Over the last 10 years, different strategies have been developed for the management of oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Material and Methods An exhaustive search was made of the PubMed-Medline, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, crossing the key words “oral mucositis”, “prevention” and “treatment” with the terms “chemotherapy” and “radiotherapy” by means of the boolean operators “AND” and “NOT”. A total of 268 articles were obtained, of which 96 met the inclusion criteria. Results Several interventions for the prevention of oral mucositis, such as oral hygiene protocols, amifostine, benzidamine, calcium phosphate, cryotherapy and iseganan, among others, were found to yield only limited benefits. Other studies have reported a decrease in the appearance and severity of mucositis with the use of cytoprotectors (sucralfate, oral glutamine, hyaluronic acid), growth factors, topical polyvinylpyrrolidone, and low power laser irradiation. Conclusions Very few interventions of confirmed efficacy are available for the management of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy. However, according to the reviewed literature, the use of palifermin, cryotherapy and low power laser offers benefits, reducing the incidence and severity of oral mucositis – though further studies are needed to confirm the results obtained. Key words:Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis Treatment. PMID:27034762

  6. Vascular Tissue Engineering: Building Perfusable Vasculature for Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Liqiong; Niklason, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue and organ replacement is required when there are no alternative therapies available. Although vascular tissue engineering was originally developed to meet the clinical demands of small-diameter vascular conduits as bypass grafts, it has evolved into a highly advanced field where perfusable vasculatures are generated for implantation. Herein, we review several cutting-edge techniques that have led to implantable human blood vessels in clinical trials, the novel approaches that build complex perfusable microvascular networks in functional tissues, the use of stem cells to generate endothelial cells for vascularization, as well as the challenges in bringing vascular tissue engineering technologies into the clinics. PMID:24533306

  7. Brain neuropeptides in gastric mucosal protection.

    PubMed

    Gyires, Klára; Zádori, Zoltán S

    2014-12-01

    The centrally induced gastroprotective effect of neuropeptides has been intensively studied. Besides many similarities, however, differences can also be observed in their gastroprotective actions. The gastroprotective dose-response curve proved to be either sigmoid, or bell-shaped. Additional gastrointestinal effects of neuropeptides can contribute to their mucosal protective effect. Part of the neuropeptides induces gastroprotection by peripheral administration as well. Besides vagal nerve the sympathetic nervous system may also be involved in conveying the central effect to the periphery. Better understanding of the complex mechanism of the maintenance of gastric mucosal integrity may result in the development of new strategy to enhance gastric mucosal resistance against injury.

  8. Modelling Brain Temperature and Perfusion for Cerebral Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blowers, Stephen; Valluri, Prashant; Marshall, Ian; Andrews, Peter; Harris, Bridget; Thrippleton, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Brain temperature relies heavily on two aspects: i) blood perfusion and porous heat transport through tissue and ii) blood flow and heat transfer through embedded arterial and venous vasculature. Moreover brain temperature cannot be measured directly unless highly invasive surgical procedures are used. A 3D two-phase fluid-porous model for mapping flow and temperature in brain is presented with arterial and venous vessels extracted from MRI scans. Heat generation through metabolism is also included. The model is robust and reveals flow and temperature maps in unprecedented 3D detail. However, the Karmen-Kozeny parameters of the porous (tissue) phase need to be optimised for expected perfusion profiles. In order to optimise the K-K parameters a reduced order two-phase model is developed where 1D vessels are created with a tree generation algorithm embedded inside a 3D porous domain. Results reveal that blood perfusion is a strong function of the porosity distribution in the tissue. We present a qualitative comparison between the simulated perfusion maps and those obtained clinically. We also present results studying the effect of scalp cooling on core brain temperature and preliminary results agree with those observed clinically.

  9. Laser Doppler Perfusion Imaging with a high-speed CMOS-camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draijer, Matthijs J.; Hondebrink, Erwin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2007-07-01

    The technique of Laser Doppler Perfusion Imaging (LDPI) is widely used for determining cerebral blood flow or skin perfusion in the case of burns. The commonly used Laser Doppler Perfusion Imagers are scanning systems which point by point scan the area under investigation and use a single photo detector to capture the photoelectric current to obtain a perfusion map. In that case the imaging time for a perfusion map of 64 x 64 pixels is around 5 minutes. Disadvantages of a long imaging time for in-vivo imaging are the bigger chance of movement artifacts, reduced comfort for the patient and the inability to follow fast changing perfusion conditions. We present a Laser Doppler Perfusion Imager which makes use of a high speed CMOS-camera. By illuminating the area under investigation and simultaneously taking images at high speed with the camera, it is possible to obtain a perfusion map of the area under investigation in a shorter period of time than with the commonly used Laser Doppler Perfusion Imagers.

  10. Whole Ovine Ovaries as a Model for Human: Perfusion with Cryoprotectants In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Isachenko, Vladimir; Rahimi, Gohar; Dattena, Maria; Mallmann, Peter; Baikoshkarova, Saltanat; Kellerwessel, Elisabeth; Otarbaev, Marat; Shalakhmetova, Tamara; Isachenko, Evgenia

    2014-01-01

    These experiments were performed to test the perfusion of ovine as a model for human ovaries by cryoprotectants in vivo at high temperature when the permeability of capillaries is high and when blood is insensibly replaced by the solution of cryoprotectants. By our hypothetical supposition, ovaries could be saturated by cryoprotectants before their surgical removal. The objective was to examine the effectiveness of perfusion of ovine ovaries with vascular pedicle in vivo and in vitro. Arteria ovarica was cannuled and ovaries were perfused by Leibovitz L-15 medium + 100 IU/mL heparin + 5% bovine calf serum + 6% dimethyl sulfoxide + 6% ethylene glycol + 0.15 M sucrose + Indian ink in vivo and in vitro. In the first and second cycle of experiments, ovaries (n = 13 and n = 23) were perfused in vivo and in vitro, respectively, during 60 min with the rate of perfusion 50 mL/h (0.8 mL/min). It was established with in vivo perfusion that only about 10% of ovarian tissues were perfused due to an appearance of multiple anastomoses when the perfusion medium goes from arteria ovarica to arteria uterina without inflow into the ovaries. It was concluded that in vitro perfusion of ovine intact ovaries with vascular pedicle by freezing medium is more effective than this manipulation performed in vivo. PMID:24701576

  11. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Myocardial Perfusion Reserve Index Is Reduced in Women With Coronary Microvascular Dysfunction: A National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute-Sponsored Study From the Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation (WISE)

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Louise E.J.; Wei, Janet; Agarwal, Megha; Haft-Baradaran, Afsaneh; Shufelt, Chrisandra; Mehta, Puja K.; Gill, Edward; Johnson, B. Delia; Kenkre, Tanya; Handberg, Eileen; Li, Debiao; Sharif, Behzad; Berman, Daniel S.; Petersen, John; Pepine, Carl J.; Bairey Merz, C. Noel

    2015-01-01

    Background Women with signs and symptoms of ischemia and no obstructive coronary artery disease often have coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD), diagnosed by invasive coronary reactivity testing (CRT). While traditional noninvasive stress imaging is often normal in CMD, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) may be able to detect CMD in this population. Methods and Results Vasodilator stress CMRI was performed in 118 women with suspected CMD who had undergone CRT and 21 asymptomatic reference subjects. Semi quantitative evaluation of the first-pass perfusion images was completed to determine myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI). The relationship between CRT findings and MPRI was examined by Pearson correlations, logistic regression and sensitivity/specificity. Symptomatic women had lower mean pharmacologic stress MPRI compared to reference subjects (1.71±0.43 vs. 2.23±0.37, p<0.0001). Lower MPRI was predictive of one or more abnormal CRT variables (OR = 0.78 [0.70, 0.88], p<0.0001, c-statistic 0.78 [0.68, 0.88]). An MPRI threshold of 1.84 predicted CRT abnormality with sensitivity 73% and specificity 74%. Conclusions Noninvasive CMRI MPRI can detect CMD defined by invasive CRT. Further work is aimed to optimize the non-invasive identification and management of CMD patients. PMID:25801710

  12. Measuring perfusion with light (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Sanne M. A.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2016-03-01

    There is no gold standard test for perfusion evaluation in surgery. Optical Imaging techniques are able to image tissue at high resolution and in real-time. Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging, Optical Coherence Tomography, Sidestream Darkfield and Incident Darkfield all use the interaction of light with tissue to create an image. To test their feasibility and explore validity in a controlled setting, we created a phantom with the optical properties of tissue and microvascular channels of 30-400 micrometer. With a Hamilton Syringe Pump we mimicked blood flow velocities of 0-20 mm/sec. Images of all different modalities at different blood flow velocities were compared in terms of imaging depth, resoluation and hemodynamic parameters.

  13. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Machuca, Tiago N; Cypel, Marcelo

    2014-08-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  14. Ex vivo lung perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Machuca, Tiago N.

    2014-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  15. Microbiota and Mucosal Immunity in Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Bruno M.; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20 years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota. PMID:25821449

  16. Targeting Mucosal Healing in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Aarti; Wasan, Sharmeel K.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of medical treatment for Crohn's disease includes improving patients' quality of life while reducing the need for hospitalization and surgery. The current medical armamentarium includes 5-aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, immunomodulators, and biologic agents. In the past, response to treatment was measured by clinical improvement in symptoms; however, with the advent of disease-modifying medications, mucosal healing has emerged as an increasingly important goal of therapy. Mucosal healing, or endoscopic remission, is associated with increased rates of clinical remission, fewer hospitalizations, and fewer abdominal surgeries. Both the immunomodulator and biologic classes of medications are effective at inducing mucosal healing. Despite several limitations, mucosal healing has become a desirable and valid measure of disease activity. PMID:21869869

  17. Microbiota and mucosal immunity in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Bruno M; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20 years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota. PMID:25821449

  18. Transgenic killer commensal bacteria as mucosal protectants.

    PubMed

    Polonelli, L

    2001-05-01

    As first line of defense against the majority of infections and primary site for their transmission, mucosal surfaces of the oral cavity and genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and respiratory tracts represent the most suitable sites to deliver protective agents for the prevention of infectious diseases. Mucosal protection is important not only for life threatening diseases but also for opportunistic infections which currently represent a serious burden in terms of morbidity, mortality, and cost of cures. Candida albicans is among the most prevalent causes of mucosal infections not only in immuno-compromised patients, such as HIV-infected subjects who are frequently affected by oral and esophageal candidiasis, but also in otherwise healthy individuals, as in the case of acute vaginitis. Unfortunately, current strategies for mucosal protection against candidiasis are severely limited by the lack of effective vaccines and the relative paucity and toxicity of commercially available antifungal drugs.

  19. Cell mediated immunity in American cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, E M; Johnson, W D; Barreto, E; Marsden, P D; Costa, J L; Reed, S; Rocha, H

    1985-12-01

    Cellular immune responses were studied in 35 Brazilian patients with either active cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), active mucosal leishmaniasis (ML), or healed cutaneous leishmaniasis. The mean age and duration of illness in the two groups were as follows: 14 CL patients, age 28 +/- 13 yr, disease 5 +/- mo; and 16 ML patients, age 34 +/- 15 yr, disease 86 +/- 117 mo. Patients with CL and ML responded well to leishmania antigen in blastogenesis assays. However, the response of ML patients was over three times greater than the response of CL patients. There was a significant correlation between the magnitude of the lymphoproliferative response and the duration of disease activity. There were no significant differences between CL and ML patients in terms of the following parameters: lymphoproliferative responsiveness to mitogens (phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and pokeweed mitogen) and peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations (T and B cells, oKT8+ and OKT4+ cells, OKT4:OKT8 ratio). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from ML patients also generated interferon-gamma containing lymphokine in response to stimulation with leishmania antigen. This lymphokine was capable of inducing macrophages from ML patients to inhibit the intracellular multiplication of leishmania in vitro. These studies have determined that the parameters of lymphocyte and macrophage functions evaluated in ML and CL patients are comparable, except for an enhanced lymphoproliferative response, with leishmania antigen in ML patients. This later finding may be a function of the long duration of active disease in this population and unrelated to the pathogenesis of their mucosal lesions.

  20. [Method for Extracting Vascular Perfusion Region Based on Ultrasound Contrast Agent].

    PubMed

    Shan, Xin; Wen, Yingang; Lin, Tao; Zhu, Xinjian

    2015-10-01

    Vascular perfusion distribution in fibroids contrast-enhanced ultrasound images provides useful pathological and physiological information, because the extraction of the vascular perfusion area can be helpful to quantitative evaluation of uterine fibroids blood supply. The pixel gray scale in vascular perfusion area of fibroids contrast-enhanced ultrasound image sequences is different from that in other regions, and, based on this, we proposed a method of extracting vascular perfusion area of fibroids. Firstly, we denoised the image sequence, and then we used Brox optical flow method to estimate motion of two adjacent frames, based on the results of the displacement field for motion correction. Finally, we extracted vascular perfusion region from the surrounding background based on the differences in gray scale for the magnitude of the rich blood supply area and lack of blood supply area in ultrasound images sequence. The experimental results showed that the algorithm could accurately extract the vascular perfusion area, reach the precision of identification of clinical perfusion area, and only small amount of calculation was needed and the process was fairly simple.

  1. Nitric oxide permits hypoxia-induced lymphatic perfusion by controlling arterial-lymphatic conduits in zebrafish and glass catfish

    PubMed Central

    Dahl Ejby Jensen, Lasse; Cao, Renhai; Hedlund, Eva-Maria; Söll, Iris; Lundberg, Jon O.; Hauptmann, Giselbert; Steffensen, John Fleng; Cao, Yihai

    2009-01-01

    The blood and lymphatic vasculatures are structurally and functionally coupled in controlling tissue perfusion, extracellular interstitial fluids, and immune surveillance. Little is known, however, about the molecular mechanisms that underlie the regulation of bloodlymphatic vessel connections and lymphatic perfusion. Here we show in the adult zebrafish and glass catfish (Kryptopterus bicirrhis) that blood-lymphatic conduits directly connect arterial vessels to the lymphatic system. Under hypoxic conditions, arterial-lymphatic conduits (ALCs) became highly dilated and linearized by NO-induced vascular relaxation, which led to blood perfusion into the lymphatic system. NO blockage almost completely abrogated hypoxia-induced ALC relaxation and lymphatic perfusion. These findings uncover mechanisms underlying hypoxia-induced oxygen compensation by perfusion of existing lymphatics in fish. Our results might also imply that the hypoxia-induced NO pathway contributes to development of progression of pathologies, including promotion of lymphatic metastasis by modulating arterial-lymphatic conduits, in the mammalian system. PMID:19822749

  2. Evaluation of CT Perfusion Biomarkers of Tumor Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qi; Yeung, Timothy Pok Chi; Lee, Ting-Yim; Bauman, Glenn; Crukley, Cathie; Morrison, Laura; Hoffman, Lisa; Yartsev, Slav

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor hypoxia is associated with treatment resistance to cancer therapies. Hypoxia can be investigated by immunohistopathologic methods but such procedure is invasive. A non-invasive method to interrogate tumor hypoxia is an attractive option as such method can provide information before, during, and after treatment for personalized therapies. Our study evaluated the correlations between computed tomography (CT) perfusion parameters and immunohistopathologic measurement of tumor hypoxia. Methods Wistar rats, 18 controls and 19 treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), implanted with the C6 glioma tumor were imaged using CT perfusion on average every five days to monitor tumor growth. A final CT perfusion scan and the brain were obtained on average 14 days (8–22 days) after tumor implantation. Tumor hypoxia was detected immunohistopathologically with pimonidazole. The tumor, necrotic, and pimonidazole-positive areas on histology samples were measured. Percent necrotic area and percent hypoxic areas were calculated. Tumor volume (TV), blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), and permeability-surface area product (PS) were obtained from the CT perfusion studies. Correlations between CT perfusion parameters and histological parameters were assessed by Spearman’s ρ correlation. A Bonferroni-corrected P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results BF and BV showed significant correlations with percent hypoxic area ρ = -0.88, P < 0.001 and ρ = -0.81, P < 0.001, respectively, for control animals and ρ = -0.7, P < 0.001 and ρ = -0.6, P = 0.003, respectively, for all animals, while TV and BV were correlated (ρ = -0.64, P = 0.01 and ρ = -0.43, P = 0.043, respectively) with percent necrotic area. PS was not correlated with either percent necrotic or percent hypoxic areas. Conclusions Percent hypoxic area provided significant correlations with BF and BV, suggesting that CT perfusion parameters are potential non-invasive imaging biomarkers of tumor

  3. Influence of Thin Slice Reconstruction on CT Brain Perfusion Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bennink, Edwin; Oosterbroek, Jaap; Horsch, Alexander D.; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Viergever, Max A.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although CT scanners generally allow dynamic acquisition of thin slices (1 mm), thick slice (≥5 mm) reconstruction is commonly used for stroke imaging to reduce data, processing time, and noise level. Thin slice CT perfusion (CTP) reconstruction may suffer less from partial volume effects, and thus yield more accurate quantitative results with increased resolution. Before thin slice protocols are to be introduced clinically, it needs to be ensured that this does not affect overall CTP constancy. We studied the influence of thin slice reconstruction on average perfusion values by comparing it with standard thick slice reconstruction. Materials and Methods From 50 patient studies, absolute and relative hemisphere averaged estimates of cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTT), and permeability-surface area product (PS) were analyzed using 0.8, 2.4, 4.8, and 9.6 mm slice reconstructions. Specifically, the influence of Gaussian and bilateral filtering, the arterial input function (AIF), and motion correction on the perfusion values was investigated. Results Bilateral filtering gave noise levels comparable to isotropic Gaussian filtering, with less partial volume effects. Absolute CBF, CBV and PS were 22%, 14% and 46% lower with 0.8 mm than with 4.8 mm slices. If the AIF and motion correction were based on thin slices prior to reconstruction of thicker slices, these differences reduced to 3%, 4% and 3%. The effect of slice thickness on relative values was very small. Conclusions This study shows that thin slice reconstruction for CTP with unaltered acquisition protocol gives relative perfusion values without clinically relevant bias. It does however affect absolute perfusion values, of which CBF and CBV are most sensitive. Partial volume effects in large arteries and veins lead to overestimation of these values. The effects of reconstruction slice thickness should be taken into account when absolute perfusion values are

  4. [Clinical features and pathophysiology of acute esophageal mucosal lesion].

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yutaro; Hizawa, Kazuoki; Fujita, Kouhei; Matsuno, Yuichi; Sakuma, Tsutomu; Esaki, Motohiro; Iida, Mitsuo

    2016-04-01

    Acute esophageal mucosal lesions (AEMLs) are categorized into black esophagitis (type B) and non-black esophagitis (type NB) on endoscopy. To clarify the distinct pathophysiology, we compared the clinical features and hematological findings at onset among 17 patients with type B esophagitis and 6 patients with type NB esophagitis. In type B esophagitis, time to endoscopy after onset was significantly shorter, and blood levels of lactate, urea nitrogen, creatinine, and glucose were higher than in type NB esophagitis. However, there were no significant intergroup differences in the incidences of other predisposing factors, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or esophageal hernias. These findings suggest that AEMLs are caused by acid reflux and peripheral vascular insufficiency, the latter being more associated with type B esophagitis by its etiology. In addition, blood lactate may indicate the severity of AEML, leading to black esophagitis. PMID:27052393

  5. Tissue perfusion inhomogeneity during early tumor growth in rats.

    PubMed

    Endrich, B; Reinhold, H S; Gross, J F; Intaglietta, M

    1979-02-01

    Tissue perfusion in BA 1112 sarcomas of WAG inbred Rijswijk rats was determined from in vivo measurements of capillary density, length, and erythrocyte velocity in modified Algire chamber preparations. Studies were done with the use of television techniques in situ during a period of 26 days, both in control chambers and after implantation of a 0.1-mm3 piece of tumor tissue. Perfusion in control areas void of tumor tissue. Perfusion in control areas void of tumor was approximately 8-10 ml/minute/100 g of tissue. Flow in active tumor growth regions on the outward side of the tumor edge was through undifferentiated channels and had characteristics of flow through a porous medium. Despite enhanced arterial supply, the stabilized tumor microcirculation at the inward side of the growing tumor retained its perfusion rate constant (15-18 ml/min/100 g). Perfusion in central portions of the tumor was about 2-4 ml/minute/100 g during 12 days, whereas the tumor doubled in diameter. Our findings support the concept of temporal and functional blood flow inhomogeneity in the microcirculation of spreading tumors. PMID:283271

  6. Modelling of temperature and perfusion during scalp cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, F. E. M.; Van Leeuwen, G. M. J.; Van Steenhoven, A. A.

    2005-09-01

    Hair loss is a feared side effect of chemotherapy treatment. It may be prevented by cooling the scalp during administration of cytostatics. The supposed mechanism is that by cooling the scalp, both temperature and perfusion are diminished, affecting drug supply and drug uptake in the hair follicle. However, the effect of scalp cooling varies strongly. To gain more insight into the effect of cooling, a computer model has been developed that describes heat transfer in the human head during scalp cooling. Of main interest in this study are the mutual influences of scalp temperature and perfusion during cooling. Results of the standard head model show that the temperature of the scalp skin is reduced from 34.4 °C to 18.3 °C, reducing tissue blood flow to 25%. Based upon variations in both thermal properties and head anatomies found in the literature, a parameter study was performed. The results of this parameter study show that the most important parameters affecting both temperature and perfusion are the perfusion coefficient Q10 and the thermal resistances of both the fat and the hair layer. The variations in the parameter study led to skin temperature ranging from 10.1 °C to 21.8 °C, which in turn reduced relative perfusion to 13% and 33%, respectively.

  7. Perfusion computer tomography: imaging and clinical validation in acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Bivard, Andrew; Spratt, Neil; Levi, Christopher; Parsons, Mark

    2011-11-01

    Computed tomography perfusion imaging in acute stroke requires further validation. We aimed to establish the optimal computed tomography perfusion parameters defining the infarct core and critically hypoperfused tissue. Sub-6-h computed tomography perfusion and 24-h magnetic resonance imaging were analysed from 314 consecutive patients with ischaemic stroke. Diffusion-weighted imaging lesion volume at 24 h was used to define the extent of critically hypoperfused tissue (in patients without reperfusion between acute and 24-h time points), and infarct core (in patients with major reperfusion at 24 h). Pixel-based analysis of co-registered computed tomography perfusion and diffusion-weighted imaging was then used to define the optimum computed tomography perfusion thresholds for critically hypoperfused at-risk tissue and infarct core. These optimized acute computed tomography perfusion threshold-based lesion volumes were then compared with 24-h diffusion-weighted imaging infarct volume, as well as 24-h and 90-day clinical outcomes for validation. Relative delay time >2 s was the most accurate computed tomography perfusion threshold in predicting the extent of critically hypoperfused tissue with both receiver operating curve analysis (area under curve 0.86), and the volumetric validation (mean difference between computed tomography perfusion and 24-h diffusion-weighted imaging lesions = 2 cm(2), 95% confidence interval 0.5-3.2 cm(2)). Cerebral blood flow <40% (of contralateral) within the relative delay time >2 s perfusion lesion was the most accurate computed tomography perfusion threshold at defining infarct core with both receiver operating characteristic analysis (area under curve = 0.85) and the volumetric validation. Using these thresholds, the extent of computed tomography perfusion mismatch tissue (the volume of 'at-risk' tissue between the critically hypoperfused and core thresholds) salvaged from infarction correlated with clinical improvement at 24 h (R(2

  8. Distributed perfusion educational model: a shift in perfusion economic realities.

    PubMed

    Austin, Jon W; Evans, Edward L; Hoerr, Harry R

    2005-12-01

    In recent years, a steady decline in the number of perfusion education programs in the United States has been noted. At the same time, there has been a parallel decline in the number of students graduated from perfusion educational programs in the United States. Also, as noted by several authors, there has been an increase in demand for perfusion graduates. The decline in programs and graduates has also been noted in anesthesia and surgical residency programs. The shift is caused by a combination of economic and clinical factors. First, decreased reimbursement has led to reallocation of hospital resources. Second, the original enthusiasm for beating heart coronary artery bypass surgery was grossly overestimated and has led to further reallocation of hospital resources and denigration of cardiopulmonary bypass. This paper describes two models of perfusion education programs: serial perfusion education model (SPEM) and the distributed perfusion education model (DPEM). Arguments are presented that the SPEM has some serious limitations and challenges for long-term economic survival. The authors feel the DPEM along with dependence on tuition funding can survive the current clinical and economic conditions and allow the profession to adapt to changes in scope of practice. PMID:16524152

  9. Lactose maldigestion during methotrexate-induced gastrointestinal mucositis in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Fijlstra, M; Rings, E H H M; Verkade, H J; van Dijk, T H; Kamps, W A; Tissing, W J E

    2011-02-01

    Patients with chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis suffer from anorexia, diarrhea, and stomach pain, often causing weight loss and malnutrition. When the intestinal function during mucositis would be known, a rational feeding strategy might improve the nutritional state, accelerate recuperation, and increase survival of mucositis patients. We developed a methotrexate (MTX)-induced mucositis rat model to study nutrient digestion and absorption. To determine lactose digestion and absorption of its derivative glucose during mucositis, we injected Wistar rats intravenously with MTX (60 mg/kg) or 0.9% NaCl (controls). Four days later, we orally administered trace amounts of [1-(13)C]lactose and [U-(13)C]glucose and quantified the appearance of labeled glucose in the blood for 3 h. Finally, we determined plasma citrulline level and harvested the small intestine to assess histology, myeloperoxidase level, glycohydrolase activity, immunohistochemical protein, and mRNA expression. MTX-treated rats showed profound villus atrophy and epithelial damage. During the experimental period, the absorption of lactose-derived [1-(13)C]glucose was 4.2-fold decreased in MTX-treated rats compared with controls (P < 0.01). Lactose-derived [1-(13)C]glucose absorption correlated strongly with villus length (rho = 0.86, P < 0.001) and with plasma citrulline level (rho = 0.81, P < 0.001). MTX treatment decreased jejunal lactase activity (19.5-fold, P < 0.01) and immunohistochemical protein and mRNA expression (39.7-fold, P < 0.01) compared with controls. Interestingly, MTX treatment did not affect the absorption of [U-(13)C]glucose during the experimental period. We conclude that lactose digestion is severely decreased during mucositis while glucose absorption is still intact, when supplied in trace amounts. Plasma citrulline level might be a useful objective, noninvasive marker for lactose maldigestion during mucositis in clinic.

  10. Intragastric inulin as a measure of mucosal damage caused by aspirin

    SciTech Connect

    Wittmers, L.E. Jr.; Anderson, L.A.; Fall, M.M.; Alich, A.A. )

    1990-11-01

    In an attempt to find a method of gastric mucosal damage assessment that yields consistent results, the experiments presented here employed the measurement of the movement of inulin out of the gastric contents into the stomach wall and vascular compartment as an estimate of mucosal damage. Anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats were functionally nephrectomized and were administered a control or test solution containing 3H-inulin. The test solutions contained one of three doses of aspirin. Blood samples were taken at 15-min intervals over a 90-min exposure period. The stomach was removed from the animal and full-thickness tissue samples taken for measurement of 3H-inulin content. When the gastric mucosa was exposed to the test agents, there was a significantly greater accumulation of inulin in the body and antrum as well as in the plasma when compared to controls. We conclude that intragastric inulin can be employed to estimate gastric mucosal damage.

  11. Ex-vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Neyrinck, Arne; Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2015-06-01

    This review outlines the new and promising technique of ex vivo lung perfusion and its clinical potential to increase the number of transplantable lungs and to improve the early and late outcome after transplantation. The rationale, the experimental background, the technique and protocols, and available devices for ex vivo lung perfusion are discussed. The current clinical experience worldwide and ongoing clinical trials are reviewed. PMID:24629039

  12. SALSA: A Regulator of the Early Steps of Complement Activation on Mucosal Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Reichhardt, Martin Parnov; Meri, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    Complement is present mainly in blood. However, following mechanical damage or inflammation, serous exudates enter the mucosal surfaces. Here, the complement proteins interact with other endogenous molecules to keep microbes from entering the parenteral tissues. One of the mucosal proteins known to interact with the early complement components of both the classical and the lectin pathway is the salivary scavenger and agglutinin (SALSA). SALSA is also known as deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 and gp340. It is found both attached to the epithelium and secreted into the surrounding fluids of most mucosal surfaces. SALSA has been shown to bind directly to C1q, mannose-binding lectin, and the ficolins. Through these interactions SALSA regulates activation of the complement system. In addition, SALSA interacts with surfactant proteins A and D, secretory IgA, and lactoferrin. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are examples of diseases, where complement activation in mucosal tissues may occur. This review describes the latest advances in our understanding of how the early complement components interact with the SALSA molecule. Furthermore, we discuss how these interactions may affect disease propagation on mucosal surfaces in immunological and inflammatory diseases. PMID:27014265

  13. Monitoring Microcirculatory Blood Flow with a New Sublingual Tonometer in a Porcine Model of Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Palágyi, Péter; Kaszaki, József; Rostás, Andrea; Érces, Dániel; Németh, Márton; Boros, Mihály; Molnár, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    Tissue capnometry may be suitable for the indirect evaluation of regional hypoperfusion. We tested the performance of a new sublingual capillary tonometer in experimental hemorrhage. Thirty-six anesthetized, ventilated mini pigs were divided into sham-operated (n = 9) and shock groups (n = 27). Hemorrhagic shock was induced by reducing mean arterial pressure (MAP) to 40 mmHg for 60 min, after which fluid resuscitation started aiming to increase MAP to 75% of the baseline value (60-180 min). Sublingual carbon-dioxide partial pressure was measured by tonometry, using a specially coiled silicone rubber tube. Mucosal red blood cell velocity (RBCV) and capillary perfusion rate (CPR) were assessed by orthogonal polarization spectral (OPS) imaging. In the 60 min shock phase a significant drop in cardiac index was accompanied by reduction in sublingual RBCV and CPR and significant increase in the sublingual mucosal-to-arterial PCO2 gap (PSLCO2 gap), which significantly improved during the 120 min resuscitation phase. There was significant correlation between PSLCO2 gap and sublingual RBCV (r = -0.65, p < 0.0001), CPR (r = -0.64, p < 0.0001), central venous oxygen saturation (r = -0.50, p < 0.0001), and central venous-to-arterial PCO2 difference (r = 0.62, p < 0.0001). This new sublingual tonometer may be an appropriate tool for the indirect evaluation of circulatory changes in shock. PMID:26504837

  14. Monitoring Microcirculatory Blood Flow with a New Sublingual Tonometer in a Porcine Model of Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Palágyi, Péter; Kaszaki, József; Rostás, Andrea; Érces, Dániel; Németh, Márton; Boros, Mihály; Molnár, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    Tissue capnometry may be suitable for the indirect evaluation of regional hypoperfusion. We tested the performance of a new sublingual capillary tonometer in experimental hemorrhage. Thirty-six anesthetized, ventilated mini pigs were divided into sham-operated (n = 9) and shock groups (n = 27). Hemorrhagic shock was induced by reducing mean arterial pressure (MAP) to 40 mmHg for 60 min, after which fluid resuscitation started aiming to increase MAP to 75% of the baseline value (60–180 min). Sublingual carbon-dioxide partial pressure was measured by tonometry, using a specially coiled silicone rubber tube. Mucosal red blood cell velocity (RBCV) and capillary perfusion rate (CPR) were assessed by orthogonal polarization spectral (OPS) imaging. In the 60 min shock phase a significant drop in cardiac index was accompanied by reduction in sublingual RBCV and CPR and significant increase in the sublingual mucosal-to-arterial PCO2 gap (PSLCO2 gap), which significantly improved during the 120 min resuscitation phase. There was significant correlation between PSLCO2 gap and sublingual RBCV (r = −0.65, p < 0.0001), CPR (r = −0.64, p < 0.0001), central venous oxygen saturation (r = −0.50, p < 0.0001), and central venous-to-arterial PCO2 difference (r = 0.62, p < 0.0001). This new sublingual tonometer may be an appropriate tool for the indirect evaluation of circulatory changes in shock. PMID:26504837

  15. Susceptibility-Based Analysis Of Dynamic Gadolinium Bolus Perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bonekamp, David; Barker, Peter B.; Leigh, Richard; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Li, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An algorithm is developed for the reconstruction of dynamic, gadolinium (Gd) bolus MR perfusion images of the human brain, based on quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM). Methods The method is evaluated in 5 perfusion scans obtained from 4 different patients scanned at 3T, and compared to the conventional analysis based on changes in the transverse relaxation rate ΔR2* and to theoretical predictions. QSM images were referenced to ventricular CSF for each dynamic of the perfusion sequence. Results Images of cerebral blood flow and blood volume were successfully reconstructed from the QSM-analysis, and were comparable to those reconstructed using ΔR2*. The magnitudes of the Gd-associated susceptibility effects in gray and white matter were consistent with theoretical predictions. Conclusion QSM-based analysis may have some theoretical advantages compared to ΔR2*, including a simpler relationship between signal change and Gd concentration. However, disadvantages are its much lower contrast-to-noise ratio, artifacts due to respiration and other effects, and more complicated reconstruction methods. More work is required to optimize data acquisition protocols for QSM-based perfusion imaging. PMID:24604343

  16. A study on cerebral hemodynamic analysis of moyamoya disease by using perfusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the clinical applications of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with moyamoya disease (MMD). Twenty-two patients with moyamoya disease (9 men and 13 women) with a mean age of 9.3 years (range: 4-22 years) were enrolled in this study. Perfusion MRI was performed by scanning the patients7.5 cm upward from the base of the cerebellum before their being process for post-treatment. The scan led to the acquisition of the following four map images: the cerebral blood volume (CBV), the cerebral blood flow (CBF), the mean transit time (MTT) for the contrast medium, and the time to peak (TTP) for the contrast medium. The lesions were assessed using the CBV, the CBF, the MTT and the TTP maps of perfusion MRI; the MTT and the TTP were measured in the lesion areas, as well as in the normal and the symmetric areas. Perfusion defects were recognizable in all four perfusion MRI maps, and the MTT and the TTP showed a conspicuous delay in the parts where perfusion defects were recognized. The MTT and the TTP images of perfusion MRI reflected a significant correlation between the degrees of stenosis and occlusion in the posterior cerebral artery (PCA), as well as the development of collateral vessels. The four perfusion MRI maps could be used to predict the degrees of stenosis and occlusion in the posterior circulation, as well as the development of the collateral vessels, which enabled a hemodynamic evaluation of the parts with perfusion defects. Overall, perfusion MRI is useful for the diagnosis and the treatment of moyamoya disease and can be applied to clinical practice.

  17. Local Control of Blood Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Philip S.

    2011-01-01

    Organ blood flow is determined by perfusion pressure and vasomotor tone in the resistance vessels of the organ. Local factors that regulate vasomotor tone include myogenic and metabolic autoregulation, flow-mediated and conducted responses, and vasoactive substances released from red blood cells. The relative importance of each of these factors…

  18. A poroelastic model valid in large strains with applications to perfusion in cardiac modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapelle, D.; Gerbeau, J.-F.; Sainte-Marie, J.; Vignon-Clementel, I. E.

    2009-12-01

    This paper is motivated by the modeling of blood flows through the beating myocardium, namely cardiac perfusion. As in other works, perfusion is modeled here as a flow through a poroelastic medium. The main contribution of this study is the derivation of a general poroelastic model valid for a nearly incompressible medium which experiences finite deformations. A numerical procedure is proposed to iteratively solve the porous flow and the nonlinear poroviscoelastic problems. Three-dimensional numerical experiments are presented to illustrate the model. The first test cases consist of typical poroelastic configurations: swelling and complete drainage. Finally, a simulation of cardiac perfusion is presented in an idealized left ventricle embedded with active fibers. Results show the complex temporal and spatial interactions of the muscle and blood, reproducing several key phenomena observed in cardiac perfusion.

  19. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and Tmax, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  20. Pharmacokinetics of Antiretrovirals in Mucosal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, M.L.; Srinivas, N.; Kashuba, A.D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the absence of an HIV vaccine or cure, antiretroviral (ARV) based prevention strategies are being investigated to reduce HIV incidence. These prevention strategies depend on achieving effective drug concentrations at the site HIV exposure which is most commonly the mucosal tissues of the lower gastrointestinal tract and the female genital tract. Areas covered This article collates all known data regarding drug exposure in these vulnerable mucosal tissues, and reviews important mechanisms of ARV drug distribution. Research papers and abstracts describing antiretroviral pharmacokinetics in the female genital tract and lower gastrointestinal mucosal tissues available in MEDLINE® or presented at scientific conferences prior to December 2014 are reviewed in detail. Important influences on ARV mucosal tissue distribution, including protein binding, active drug transport, and endogenous hormones, are also reviewed. Expert opinion ARVs exhibit highly variable pharmacokinetics in mucosal tissues. In general, antiretroviral exposure is higher in the lower gastrointestinal tract compared to the female genital tract, but concentrations required for protective efficacy are largely unknown. The expected site of HIV exposure represents an important consideration when designing and optimizing antiretroviral based prevention strategies. PMID:25797064

  1. The transfer of calcium during perfusion of the placenta and intact and thyroparathyroidectomized sheep.

    PubMed

    Weatherley, A J; Ross, R; Pickard, D W; Care, A D

    1983-01-01

    Placental perfusions were carried out in six ewes during the last two weeks of gestation. Perfusions were carried out using autologous fetal blood and the flow rates adjusted to give a perfusion pressure of 50--70 mmHg. Perfusion plasma calcium concentrations rose steadily throughout the perfusions achieving a mean increase of 1.65 mmol/1 above initial concentration within 100 minutes. A further three ewes in the last two weeks of gestation were thyroparathyroidectomized and normal plasma calcium concentration maintained by an intravenous infusion of calcium borogluconate. After three days, placental perfusions were carried out as before. The mean perfusion plasma calcium concentration achieved by those three ewes in a period of 100 minutes showed an increase of 1.25 mmol/1. It is concluded that the presence of the fetus is not necessary for the continued active transfer of calcium across the placenta from mother to fetus. The reduced rate of accumulation of calcium in the perfusate in TXPTX ewes is attributed to a decline in 1,25-DHCC concentrations in both maternal and fetal circulations. The implications of these results in relation to fetal calcium homeostasis and the placental transfer of calcium are discussed.

  2. Voxel-wise quantification of myocardial perfusion by cardiac magnetic resonance. Feasibility and methods comparison.

    PubMed

    Zarinabad, Niloufar; Chiribiri, Amedeo; Hautvast, Gilion L T F; Ishida, Masaki; Schuster, Andreas; Cvetkovic, Zoran; Batchelor, Philip G; Nagel, Eike

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to enable high spatial resolution voxel-wise quantitative analysis of myocardial perfusion in dynamic contrast-enhanced cardiovascular MR, in particular by finding the most favorable quantification algorithm in this context. Four deconvolution algorithms--Fermi function modeling, deconvolution using B-spline basis, deconvolution using exponential basis, and autoregressive moving average modeling--were tested to calculate voxel-wise perfusion estimates. The algorithms were developed on synthetic data and validated against a true gold-standard using a hardware perfusion phantom. The accuracy of each method was assessed for different levels of spatial averaging and perfusion rate. Finally, voxel-wise analysis was used to generate high resolution perfusion maps on real data acquired from five patients with suspected coronary artery disease and two healthy volunteers. On both synthetic and perfusion phantom data, the B-spline method had the highest error in estimation of myocardial blood flow. The autoregressive moving average modeling and exponential methods gave accurate estimates of myocardial blood flow. The Fermi model was the most robust method to noise. Both simulations and maps in the patients and hardware phantom showed that voxel-wise quantification of myocardium perfusion is feasible and can be used to detect abnormal regions.

  3. First-pass perfusion imaging of solitary pulmonary nodules with 64-detector row CT: comparison of perfusion parameters of malignant and benign lesions.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Yang, Z-G; Chen, T-W; Yu, J-Q; Sun, J-Y; Chen, H-J

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the usefulness of first-pass whole nodule perfusion imaging in the differentiation of benign and malignant solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). 77 patients with non-calcified SPNs (46 malignant, 22 benign and 9 active inflammatory) underwent first-pass perfusion imaging with a 64-detector row CT scanner. Perfusion, peak enhancement intensity (PEI), time to peak (TTP) and blood volume (BV) were measured and statistically compared among different groups. Mean perfusion, PEI and BV for benign SPNs were significantly lower than those for malignant nodules (p<0.05) and active infections (p<0.05), but the differences were not statistically significant between malignant tumours and active infections (p>0.05). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that SPNs with perfusion greater than 30.6 ml min(-1) ml(-1), PEI higher than 23.3 HU or BV larger than 12.2 ml per 100 g were more likely to be malignant. In conclusion, first-pass perfusion imaging with 64-detector row CT is a feasible way of assessing whole nodule perfusion and helpful in differentiating benign from malignant SPNs.

  4. The mechanisms of gastric mucosal injury: focus on microvascular endothelium as a key target.

    PubMed

    Tarnawski, A S; Ahluwalia, A; Jones, M K

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews and updates current views on gastric mucosal injury with a focus on the microvascular endothelium as the key target and the role of the anti-apoptosis protein survivin. Under normal conditions, mucosal integrity is maintained by well structured and mutually amplifying defense mechanisms, which include pre-epithelial "barrier"--the first line of defense; and, an epithelial "barrier". Other important defense mechanisms of gastric mucosa include: continuous epithelial cell renewal, blood flow through mucosal microvessels (providing oxygen and nutrients), an endothelial microvascular "barrier," sensory innervation, and generation of PGs, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide. The microvascular endothelium lining gastric mucosal blood microvessels severs not only as a barrier but is a biologically active tissue involved in many synthetic and metabolic functions. It allows transport of oxygen and nutrients, and produces prostaglandins and leukotriens, procoagulant factors, nitric oxide, endothelin, ghrelin, HSP, growth factors such VEGF, bFGF, angiopoietin 2 and others, specific types of collagen, plasminogen activator, and can also actively contract. Accumulating evidence indicates that the gastric microvascular endothelium is a critical target for injury by ethanol, NSAIDs, free radicals, ischemia-reperfusion and other damaging factors. The injury--microvessel rupture, plasma and erythrocyte extravasation, platelet aggregation and fibrin deposition caused by these damaging factors--occurs early (1-5 min), precedes glandular epithelial cell injury and results in cessation of blood flow, ischemia, hypoxia and impaired oxygen and nutrient transport. As a consequence, mucosal necrosis develops. One of the main reasons for the increased susceptibility of gastric microvascular endothelial (vs. epithelial) cells to injury is reduced expression levels of survivin, an anti-apoptosis protein, which is a regulator of both proliferation and cell survival. PMID

  5. [Direct and indirect mucosal wave imaging techniques].

    PubMed

    Krasnodębska, Paulina; Szkiełkowska, Agata

    2016-04-01

    The vocal folds play a key role in the process of phonation. Cyclical movements of the vocal folds model a space called glottis, what leads to voice formation. The space contains surface between the vocal folds and the inner surface of the arytenoid cartilages. The best indicator of the vocal folds vibratory function is the mucosal wave. The presence and size of the mucosal wave is widely recognized as an indicator of tension and plasticity of vocal folds. It is also essential in the process of creating a proper, resonant voice. In the article, current knowledge of mucosal wave imaging techniques is given. Imaging can be carried out directly and indirectly. Among the direct methods, the following are distinguished: laryngostroboscopy, laryngovideostroboscopy, videokymography and high-speed digital imaging. Indirect methods include: electroglottography, photoglottography and ultrasonography. PMID:27137829

  6. Hemostatic Mechanisms, Independent of Platelet Aggregation, Arrest Gastric Mucosal Bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittle, Brendan J. R.; Kauffman, Gordon L.; Moncada, Salvador

    1986-08-01

    Platelet adhesion, aggregation, and subsequent plug formation play a major role in the control of cutaneous and vascular hemostasis. Little is known, however, about the hemostatic processes in gastric mucosal tissue. A method for evaluating bleeding from a standard incision in the gastric mucosa of the rat, rabbit, and dog has therefore been developed. By using pharmacological agents that interfere with platelet aggregation and blood coagulation, the mechanism of gastric hemostasis has been compared to that in the vasculature, using the rat mesenteric artery. Intravenous infusion of prostacyclin (0.5 μ g\\cdot kg-1\\cdot min-1), which inhibits platelet aggregation directly, or administration of the thromboxane synthase inhibitor 1-benzylimidazole (50 mg\\cdot kg-1) significantly prolonged bleeding in the mesenteric artery yet failed to alter gastric mucosal bleeding. In contrast, a low dose of heparin (100 units\\cdot kg-1), which interferes with the clotting process, had no effect on mesenteric bleeding but substantially prolonged bleeding from the gastric mucosa. These findings suggest that, unlike in the skin or vasculature, platelet aggregation plays a minimal role in the initial hemostatic events in the gastric mucosa and that the arrest of gastric hemorrhage is brought about largely by processes primarily involving the coagulation system.

  7. Mucosal immune function comparison between amenorrheic and eumenorrheic distance runners.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Natsumi; Nakamura, Mariko; Aizawa, Katsuji; Imai, Tomoko; Suzuki, Satomi; Eda, Nobuhiko; Hanaoka, Yukichi; Nakao, Kikuko; Suzuki, Naoto; Mesaki, Noboru; Kono, Ichiro; Akama, Takao

    2012-05-01

    This study examined the effects of amenorrhea on mucosal immune function and susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in elite female distance runners. Based on their menstrual cycles during the prior year, 21 elite, collegiate, female distance runners were designated as eumenorrheic runners (ERs; n = 8; 19.9 ± 0.8 years) or amenorrheic runners (ARs; n n = 13; 20.0 ± 0.3 years). Resting saliva and blood samples were collected in the morning. The secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) concentration was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The SIgA secretion rate was calculated. Serum 17β-estradiol concentrations and serum progesterone concentrations were measured using radioimmunoassay. Subjects reported the appearance of URTI symptoms (sore throat, headache, runny nose, coughing, or fever), if any, during the prior month. The serum estradiol concentration and salivary SIgA secretion rate were significantly lower for ARs than for ERs (p < 0.05). Serum progesterone concentration was not significantly different between groups. Higher frequencies of headache, runny nose, coughing, and fever were observed in ARs than in ERs. Results show that athletic amenorrhea with low estrogen might accelerate downregulation of mucosal immune function in athletes and enhance susceptibility to infection. PMID:22516912

  8. The effect of Aloe vera A. Berger (Liliaceae) on gastric acid secretion and acute gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Sadiq; Agunu, Abdulkarim; Diana, Mshelia

    2004-07-01

    The effect of varying doses of ethanol extract of Aloe vera (Liliaceae) on acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by 0.6 M HCl and acid output was studied in the pylorus ligated and lumen perfuse rats, respectively. Acid secretion was determined by titration of the collected gastric juice to pH 7.0. Intraperitoneal injection of Aloe vera, dose dependently inhibited gastric acid secretion. The plant was more active as a gastroprotective agent at lower concentration against mucosal injury induced by 0.6 M HCl. In conclusion, Aloe vera is endowed with gastric acid anti-secretory activity and could protect the gastric mucosa at low concentrations against injurious agents.

  9. Novel vaccine development strategies for inducing mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Fujkuyama, Yoshiko; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kataoka, Kosuke; Gilbert, Rebekah S; McGhee, Jerry R; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2012-01-01

    To develop protective immune responses against mucosal pathogens, the delivery route and adjuvants for vaccination are important. The host, however, strives to maintain mucosal homeostasis by responding to mucosal antigens with tolerance, instead of immune activation. Thus, induction of mucosal immunity through vaccination is a rather difficult task, and potent mucosal adjuvants, vectors or other special delivery systems are often used, especially in the elderly. By taking advantage of the common mucosal immune system, the targeting of mucosal dendritic cells and microfold epithelial cells may facilitate the induction of effective mucosal immunity. Thus, novel routes of immunization and antigen delivery systems also show great potential for the development of effective and safe mucosal vaccines against various pathogens. The purpose of this review is to introduce several recent approaches to induce mucosal immunity to vaccines, with an emphasis on mucosal tissue targeting, new immunization routes and delivery systems. Defining the mechanisms of mucosal vaccines is as important as their efficacy and safety, and in this article, examples of recent approaches, which will likely accelerate progress in mucosal vaccine development, are discussed. PMID:22380827

  10. Chemotherapy-induced and/or radiation therapy-induced oral mucositis--complicating the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Maddireddy Umameshwar Rao; Ramana, Gogula Venkat; Rani, Pingali Usha; Mohan, Iyyapu Krishna; Suman, Avula; Roy, Priyadarshni

    2004-01-01

    The term mucositis is coined to describe the adverse effects of radiation and chemotherapy treatments. Mucositis is one of the most common adverse reactions encountered in radiation therapy for head and neck cancers, as well as in chemotherapy, in particular with drugs affecting DNA synthesis (S-phase-specific agents such as fluorouracil, methotrexate, and cytarabine). Mucositis may limit the patient's ability to tolerate chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and nutritional status is compromised. It may drastically affect cancer treatment as well as the patient's quality of life. The incidence and severity of mucositis will vary from patient to patient. It will also vary from treatment to treatment. It is estimated that there is 40% incidence of mucositis in patients treated with standard chemotherapy and this will not only increase with the number of treatment cycles but also with previous episodes. Similarly, patients who undergo bone marrow transplantation and who receive high doses of chemotherapy have a 76% chance of getting mucositis. Patients receiving radiation, in particular to head and neck cancers, have a 30% to 60% chance. The exact pathophysiology of development is not known, but it is thought to be divided into direct and indirect mucositis. Chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy will interfere with the normal turnover of epithelial, cells leading to mucosal injury; subsequently, it can also occur due to indirect invasion of Gram-negative bacteria and fungal species because most of the cancer drugs will cause changes in blood counts. With the advancement in cytology, a more precise mechanism has been established. With this understanding, we can select and target particular mediators responsible for the mucositis. Risk factors such as age, nutritional status, type of malignancy, and oral care during treatment will play important roles in the development of mucositis. Many treatment options are available to prevent and treat this condition, but none of

  11. Regional lung perfusion estimated by electrical impedance tomography in a piglet model of lung collapse.

    PubMed

    Borges, João Batista; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando; Bohm, Stephan H; Tusman, Gerardo; Melo, Alexandre; Maripuu, Enn; Sandström, Mattias; Park, Marcelo; Costa, Eduardo L V; Hedenstierna, Göran; Amato, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of the regional match between alveolar ventilation and perfusion in critically ill patients requires simultaneous measurements of both parameters. Ideally, assessment of lung perfusion should be performed in real-time with an imaging technology that provides, through fast acquisition of sequential images, information about the regional dynamics or regional kinetics of an appropriate tracer. We present a novel electrical impedance tomography (EIT)-based method that quantitatively estimates regional lung perfusion based on first-pass kinetics of a bolus of hypertonic saline contrast. Pulmonary blood flow was measured in six piglets during control and unilateral or bilateral lung collapse conditions. The first-pass kinetics method showed good agreement with the estimates obtained by single-photon-emission computerized tomography (SPECT). The mean difference (SPECT minus EIT) between fractional blood flow to lung areas suffering atelectasis was -0.6%, with a SD of 2.9%. This method outperformed the estimates of lung perfusion based on impedance pulsatility. In conclusion, we describe a novel method based on EIT for estimating regional lung perfusion at the bedside. In both healthy and injured lung conditions, the distribution of pulmonary blood flow as assessed by EIT agreed well with the one obtained by SPECT. The method proposed in this study has the potential to contribute to a better understanding of the behavior of regional perfusion under different lung and therapeutic conditions.

  12. JAK-STAT and intestinal mucosal immunology

    PubMed Central

    Heneghan, Aaron F; Pierre, Joseph F; Kudsk, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal mucosal immune system is challenged with bacteria, viruses, and parasites, in addition to food and environmental antigens, that require dynamic immune responsiveness for homeostasis. One central signaling pathway is JAK-STAT, which regulates the adaptive and innate immune arms of mucosal immunity as well as epithelial repair and regeneration. Adaptive immunity includes lymphocyte mediated secretion of specific antibodies, while innate immune respones include secretion of non-antigen specific compounds. This review examines effects of specialized nutrition support on JAK-STAT in innate immune function and in lymphocyte modulation and epithelial antibody transport in gut-associated lymphoid tissue. PMID:24416649

  13. Photoacoustic perfusion measurements: a comparison with power Doppler in phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heres, H. M.; Arabul, M. Ü.; Tchang, B. C.; van de Vosse, F. N.; Rutten, M. C.; Lopata, R. G.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-based measurements using Doppler, contrast, and more recently photoacoustics (PA), have emerged as techniques for tissue perfusion measurements. In this study, the feasibility of in vitro perfusion measurements with a fully integrated, hand-held, photoacoustic probe was investigated and compared to Power Doppler (PD). Three cylindrical polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) phantoms were made (diameter = 15 mm) containing 100, 200 and 400 parallel polysulfone tubes (diameter = 0.2 mm), resulting in a perfused cross-sectional area of 1.8, 3.6 and 7.1% respectively. Each phantom was perfused with porcine blood (15 mL/min). Cross-sectional PA images (λ = 805nm, frame rate = 10Hz) and PD images (PRF = 750Hz) were acquired with a MyLab One and MyLab 70 scanner (Esaote, NL), respectively. Data were averaged over 70 frames. The average PA signal intensity was calculated in a region-of-interest of 4 mm by 6 mm. The percentage of colored PD pixels was measured in the entire phantom region. The average signal intensity of the PA images increased linearly with perfusion density, being 0.54 (+/- 0.01), 0.56 (+/- 0.01), 0.58 (+/- 0.01) with an average background signal of 0.53 in the three phantoms, respectively. For PD, the percentage of colored pixels in the phantom area (1.5% (+/- 0.2%), 4.4% (+/- 0.2%), 13.7% (+/- 0.8%)) also increased linearly. The preliminary results suggest that PA, like PD, is capable of detecting an increase of blood volume in tissue. In the future, in vivo measurements will be explored, although validation will be more complex.

  14. The effect of initial and dynamic liver conditions on RF ablation size: a study in perfused and non-perfused animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belous, Anna; Podhajsky, Ronald J.

    2009-02-01

    Investigators reporting RF ablation (RFA) studies often use different initial and dynamic conditions, often in porcine or bovine liver models. This study examines the effects of initial temperature, prior freezing, and perfusion in these models. Understanding how these variables affect RFA size provides some basis for comparing data from different studies. We obtained porcine and bovine livers from a slaughterhouse and divided them into experimental groups each with discrete initial temperatures set in the range of 12 to 37°C. The livers were used either the day of harvest or frozen within 1-3 days prior to RFA treatment. A perfused liver model was developed to simulate human blood flow rates and allowed accurate control of the temperature and flow rate. Saline (0.9%) was substituted for blood. The non-perfused liver model group included bovine and porcine tissue; whereas the perfused liver model group included only porcine tissue. One experiment included porcine livers that were perfused at different flow rates and with different saline concentrations. Harvested tissue from this group was examined under a light microscope and the level of edema was assessed using image processing software. The results demonstrate no significant difference in RF lesion sizes between porcine and bovine livers. Freezing the tissue prior to treatment has no significant effect but the initial temperature does significantly affect the size of ablation. The ablation size in perfused liver is similar to in vivo results (earlier study) but is significantly smaller then non-perfused liver. Morphological analysis indicates that perfusion, freezing, and saline concentration cause significant tissue edema.

  15. Acid-base and respiratory properties of a buffered bovine erythrocyte perfusion medium.

    PubMed

    Lindinger, M I; Heigenhauser, G J; Jones, N L

    1986-05-01

    Current research in organ physiology often utilizes in situ or isolated perfused tissues. We have characterized a perfusion medium associated with excellent performance characteristics in perfused mammalian skeletal muscle. The perfusion medium consisting of Krebs-Henseleit buffer, bovine serum albumin, and fresh bovine erythrocytes was studied with respect to its gas-carrying relationships and its response to manipulation of acid-base state. Equilibration of the perfusion medium at base excess of -10, -5, 0, 5, and 10 mmol X L-1 to humidified gas mixtures varying in their CO2 and O2 content was followed by measurements of perfusate hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, pH, Pco2, Cco2, Po2, and percent oxygen saturation. The oxygen dissociation curve was similar to that of mammalian bloods, having a P50 of 32 Torr (1 Torr = 133.3 Pa), Hill's constant n of 2.87 +/- 0.15, and a Bohr factor of -0.47, showing the typical Bohr shifts with respect to CO2 and pH. The oxygen capacity was calculated to be 190 mL X L-1 blood. The carbon dioxide dissociation curve was also similar to that of mammalian blood. The in vitro nonbicarbonate buffer capacity (delta [HCO3-] X delta pH-1) at zero base excess was -24.6 and -29.9 mmol X L-1 X pH-1 for the perfusate and buffer, respectively. The effects of reduced oxygen saturation on base excess and pH of the medium were quantified. The data were used to construct an acid-base alignment diagram for the medium, which may be used to quantify the flux of nonvolatile acid or base added to the venous effluent during tissue perfusions.

  16. Current techniques of hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion for malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, R; Kohno, H; Mayumi, H; Shiraishi, K; Nagae, S; Nakayama, J; Yasui, H

    2000-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted examining 25 patients with malignant melanoma who were treated by our new protocol for hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion. The characteristics of our techniques include: a lower priming volume of the extracorporeal circuit; a therapeutic temperature range of 40-41 degrees C with 60 min hyperthermic perfusion; a nominal perfusion flow rate of 500 ml/min in the lower limb and 200 ml/min in the upper limb; and combined carboplatin with interferon-beta as the adjuvant chemotherapy drug. In the lower extremity group, the arterial cannula size ranged from 8 to 14 F, while the venous cannula size ranged from 14 to 16 F. In the upper limb group, the arterial cannula size ranged from 6 to 8F and the venous cannula size ranged from 10 to 12F. No patient required any homologous blood transfusion postoperatively. No operative death or major complications occurred during the early postoperative period, confirming the safety of this treatment. Both optimal cannula size selection and maintaining perfusion temperature below 41 degrees C were judged to be important in elimination of vascular and deep tissue injury.

  17. Disposition kinetics of diclofenac in the dual perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Selma; Rowland, Malcolm

    2013-09-01

    This study investigates the hepatic disposition of diclofenac as a function of route of input: portal vein (PV) versus hepatic artery (HA) in the presence of its binding protein, albumin. The in situ dual perfused rat liver was performed using Krebs bicarbonate buffer containing human serum albumin (HSA, 0.25%-1%) at constant PV (12 mL/min) and HA (3 mL/min) flow rates. Bolus doses of [(14) C]-diclofenac and (125) I-labeled HSA were injected randomly into the HA or PV and then, after an appropriate interval, into the alternate vessel. Regardless of route of input and perfusion medium protein concentration, the hepatic outflow profile of diclofenac displayed a characteristic sharp peak followed by a slower eluting tail, indicating that its radial distribution is not instantaneous. Based on the estimated effective permeability-surface area product/blood flow ratio, hepatic uptake of diclofenac is governed by both perfusion and permeability. Fractional effluent recovery (F) increased as unbound diclofenac fraction in the perfusate decreased. Although no significant difference in hepatic clearance of diclofenac as a function of route of delivery at 0.5% and 1% HSA, it was demonstrable at 0.25% HSA (p < 0.001), when the extraction ratio is higher.

  18. Efficiency of U.S. Tissue Perfusion Estimators.

    PubMed

    Kim, MinWoo; Abbey, Craig K; Insana, Michael F

    2016-08-01

    We measure the detection and discrimination efficiencies of conventional power-Doppler estimation of perfusion without contrast enhancement. The measurements are made in a phantom with known blood-mimicking fluid flow rates in the presence of clutter and noise. Efficiency is measured by comparing functions of the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for Doppler estimators with those of the ideal discriminator, for which we estimate the temporal covariance matrix from echo data. Principal-component analysis is examined as a technique for increasing the accuracy of covariance matrices estimated from echo data. We find that Doppler estimators are <50% efficient at directed perfusion detection between 0.1 and 2.0 mL/min per 2 cm(2) flow area. The efficiency was 20%-40% for the task of discriminating between two perfusion rates in the same range. We conclude that there are reasons to search for more efficient perfusion estimators, one that incorporates covariance matrix information that could significantly enhance the utility of Doppler ultrasound without contrast enhancement. PMID:27244733

  19. Perfusion imaging with non-contrast ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, Jaime E.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Byram, Brett C.

    2016-04-01

    A Doppler ultrasound clutter filter that enables estimation of low velocity blood flow could considerably improve ultrasound as a tool for clinical diagnosis and monitoring, including for the evaluation of vascular diseases and tumor perfusion. Conventional Doppler ultrasound is currently used for visualizing and estimating blood flow. However, conventional Doppler is limited by frame rate and tissue clutter caused by involuntary movement of the patient or sonographer. Spectral broadening of the clutter due to tissue motion limits ultrasound's ability to detect blood flow less than about 5mm/s at an 8MHz center frequency. We propose a clutter filtering technique that may increase the sensitivity of Doppler measurements to at least as low as 0.41mm/s. The proposed filter uses an adaptive demodulation scheme that decreases the bandwidth of the clutter. To test the performance of the adaptive demodulation method at removing sonographer hand motion, six volunteer subjects acquired data from a basic quality assurance phantom. Additionally, to test initial in vivo feasibility, an arterial occlusion reactive hyperemia study was performed to assess the efficiency of the proposed filter at preserving signals from blood velocities 2mm/s or greater. The hand motion study resulted in initial average bandwidths of 577Hz (28.5mm/s), which were decreased to 7.28Hz (0.36mm/s) at -60 dB at 3cm using our approach. The in vivo power Doppler study resulted in 15.2dB and 0.15dB dynamic ranges between the lowest and highest blood flow time points for the proposed filter and conventional 50Hz high pass filter, respectively.

  20. Simulation evaluation of quantitative myocardial perfusion assessment from cardiac CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2014-03-01

    Contrast enhancement on cardiac CT provides valuable information about myocardial perfusion and methods have been proposed to assess perfusion with static and dynamic acquisitions. There is a lack of knowledge and consensus on the appropriate approach to ensure 1) sufficient diagnostic accuracy for clinical decisions and 2) low radiation doses for patient safety. This work developed a thorough dynamic CT simulation and several accepted blood flow estimation techniques to evaluate the performance of perfusion assessment across a range of acquisition and estimation scenarios. Cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (Flow = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml/g/min, cardiac output = 3,5,8 L/min). CT acquisitions were simulated with a validated CT simulator incorporating polyenergetic data acquisition and realistic x-ray flux levels for dynamic acquisitions with a range of scenarios including 1, 2, 3 sec sampling for 30 sec with 25, 70, 140 mAs. Images were generated using conventional image reconstruction with additional image-based beam hardening correction to account for iodine content. Time attenuation curves were extracted for multiple regions around the myocardium and used to estimate flow. In total, 2,700 independent realizations of dynamic sequences were generated and multiple MBF estimation methods were applied to each of these. Evaluation of quantitative kinetic modeling yielded blood flow estimates with an root mean square error (RMSE) of ~0.6 ml/g/min averaged across multiple scenarios. Semi-quantitative modeling and qualitative static imaging resulted in significantly more error (RMSE = ~1.2 and ~1.2 ml/min/g respectively). For quantitative methods, dose reduction through reduced temporal sampling or reduced tube current had comparable impact on the MBF estimate fidelity. On average, half dose acquisitions increased the RMSE of estimates by only 18% suggesting that substantial dose reductions can be employed in the context of quantitative myocardial

  1. The effect of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug choline magnesium trisalicylate on gastric mucosal cell exfoliation.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, K G; Hearns, J; Crean, G P

    1984-01-01

    Gastric mucosal cell exfoliation was measured in 10 normal subjects taking choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT), aspirin and placebo. Both drugs resulted in significantly elevated rates of exfoliation although the serum salicylate levels achieved with aspirin were lower than those achieved by CMT. Side-effects of tinnitus, nausea and increased faecal blood loss were more common while subjects were taking CMT. PMID:6691886

  2. Intestinal perfusion studies in tropical sprue. 1. Amino acid and dipeptide absorption.

    PubMed Central

    Hellier, M D; Radhakrishnan, A N; Ganapathy, V; Mathan, V I; Baker, S J

    1976-01-01

    Intestinal absorption of glycine 20 mmol/1, glycyl-glycine 10 mmol/1 plus L-leucine 10 mmol/1, and glycyl-L-leucine 10 mmol/1 has been studied by intestinal perfusion in 11 patients with tropical sprue and 10 control subjects. The patients with sprue had a significant reduction in the rate of absorption of glycine from a 20 mmol/1 solution, but there were no significant differences in the absorption of the other substances. The failure to demonstrate any difference in the absorption of these substances is probably related to their low concentration relative to the maximum absorptive capacity of the intestine. In both groups of subjects the kinetic advantage of glycyl-glycine absorption as compared with glycine absorption was maintained. When the dipeptides were perfused, free amino acids appeared in the perfusate presumably by "back diffusion" from the mucosal cells. In the case of glycyl-L-leucine considerably more glycine and leucine were found in the perfusate in patients with sprue than in the control subjects. There was no correlation between peptide absorption and the concentration of total glycly-glycine hydrolase and glycyl-L-leucine hydrolase, measured as combined brush border and cytosol enzymes. The concentrations of these enzymes were similar in both groups of subjects. PMID:964683

  3. Artificial tissues in perfusion culture.

    PubMed

    Sittinger, M; Schultz, O; Keyszer, G; Minuth, W W; Burmester, G R

    1997-01-01

    In the stagnant environment of traditional culture dishes it is difficult to generate long term experiments or artificial tissues from human cells. For this reason a perfusion culture system with a stable supply of nutrients was developed. Human chondrocytes were seeded three-dimensionally in resorbable polymer fleeces. The cell-polymer tissues were then mounted in newly developed containers (W.W. Minuth et al, Biotechniques, 1996) and continuously perfused by fresh medium for 40 days. Samples from the effluate were analyzed daily, and the pH of the medium and glucose concentration remained stable during this period. The lactid acid concentration increased from 0.17 mg/ml to 0.35 mg/ml, which was influenced by the degradation of the resorbable polymer fibers used as three dimensional support material for the cells. This perfusion system proved to be reliable especially in long term cultures. Any components in the culture medium of the cells could be monitored without disturbances as caused by manual medium replacement. These results suggest the described perfusion culture system to be a valuable and convenient tool for many applications in tissue engineering, especially in the generation of artificial connective tissue.

  4. Developing a tissue perfusion sensor.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S L R; Parker, K H; O'Hare, D

    2007-01-01

    The development of a electrochemical tissue perfusion sensor is presented. The sensor is a platinum/platinum ring-disc microelectrode that relies on the principle of collector-generator to monitor mass transport within its vicinity. Tissue perfusion is a mass transport mechanism that describes the movement of respiratory gases, nutrients and metabolites in tissue. The sensor's capability of detecting perfusion at the cellular level in a continuous fashion is unique. This sensor will provide insight into the way nutrients and metabolites are transported in tissue especially in cases were perfusion is low such as in wounds or ischemic tissue. We present experimental work for the development and testing of the sensors in vitro. Experimental flow recordings in free steam solutions as well as the flow through tissue-like media are shown. Tests on post operative human tissue are also presented. The sensor's feature such as the continuous recoding capacities, spatial resolution and the measurement range from ml/min to microl/min are highlighted. PMID:18002549

  5. Technical Pitfalls of Signal Truncation in Perfusion MRI of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin K; Fung, Steve H; New, Pamela Z; Wong, Stephen T C

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) is widely used in clinical settings for the radiological diagnosis of brain tumor. The signal change in brain tissue in gradient echo-based DSC PWI is much higher than in spin echo-based DSC PWI. Due to its exquisite sensitivity, gradient echo-based sequence is the preferred method for imaging of all tumors except those near the base of the skull. However, high sensitivity also comes with a dynamic range problem. It is not unusual for blood volume to increase in gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy-treated glioblastoma patients. The increase of fractional blood volume sometimes saturates the MRI signal during first-pass contrast bolus arrival and presents signal truncation artifacts of various degrees in the tumor when a significant amount of blood exists in the image pixels. It presents a hidden challenge in PWI, as this signal floor can be either close to noise level or just above and can go no lower. This signal truncation in the signal intensity time course is a significant issue that deserves attention in DSC PWI. In this paper, we demonstrate that relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) are underestimated due to signal truncation in DSC perfusion, in glioblastoma patients. We propose the use of second-pass tissue residue function in rCBF calculation using least-absolute-deviation deconvolution to avoid the underestimation problem. PMID:27531989

  6. Technical Pitfalls of Signal Truncation in Perfusion MRI of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kelvin K.; Fung, Steve H.; New, Pamela Z.; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) is widely used in clinical settings for the radiological diagnosis of brain tumor. The signal change in brain tissue in gradient echo-based DSC PWI is much higher than in spin echo-based DSC PWI. Due to its exquisite sensitivity, gradient echo-based sequence is the preferred method for imaging of all tumors except those near the base of the skull. However, high sensitivity also comes with a dynamic range problem. It is not unusual for blood volume to increase in gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy-treated glioblastoma patients. The increase of fractional blood volume sometimes saturates the MRI signal during first-pass contrast bolus arrival and presents signal truncation artifacts of various degrees in the tumor when a significant amount of blood exists in the image pixels. It presents a hidden challenge in PWI, as this signal floor can be either close to noise level or just above and can go no lower. This signal truncation in the signal intensity time course is a significant issue that deserves attention in DSC PWI. In this paper, we demonstrate that relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) are underestimated due to signal truncation in DSC perfusion, in glioblastoma patients. We propose the use of second-pass tissue residue function in rCBF calculation using least-absolute-deviation deconvolution to avoid the underestimation problem. PMID:27531989

  7. Deeper Penetration of Erythrocytes into the Endothelial Glycocalyx Is Associated with Impaired Microvascular Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae Hyun; Dane, Martijn J. C.; van den Berg, Bernard M.; Boels, Margien G. S.; van Teeffelen, Jurgen W.; de Mutsert, Renée; den Heijer, Martin; Rosendaal, Frits R.; van der Vlag, Johan; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Vink, Hans; Rabelink, Ton J.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in endothelial glycocalyx are one of the earliest changes in development of cardiovascular disease. The endothelial glycocalyx is both an important biological modifier of interactions between flowing blood and the vessel wall, and a determinant of organ perfusion. We hypothesize that deeper penetration of erythrocytes into the glycocalyx is associated with reduced microvascular perfusion. The population-based prospective cohort study (the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity [NEO] study) includes 6,673 middle-aged individuals (oversampling of overweight and obese individuals). Within this cohort, we have imaged the sublingual microvasculature of 915 participants using sidestream darkfield (SDF) imaging together with a recently developed automated acquisition and analysis approach. Presence of RBC (as a marker of microvascular perfusion) and perfused boundary region (PBR), a marker for endothelial glycocalyx barrier properties for RBC accessibility, were assessed in vessels between 5 and 25 µm RBC column width. A wide range of variability in PBR measurements, with a mean PBR of 2.14 µm (range: 1.43–2.86 µm), was observed. Linear regression analysis showed a marked association between PBR and microvascular perfusion, reflected by RBC filling percentage (regression coefficient β: −0.034; 95% confidence interval: −0.037 to −0.031). We conclude that microvascular beds with a thick (“healthy”) glycocalyx (low PBR), reflects efficient perfusion of the microvascular bed. In contrast, a thin (“risk”) glycocalyx (high PBR) is associated with a less efficient and defective microvascular perfusion. PMID:24816787

  8. Arterial Spin Labeling Measurements of Cerebral Perfusion Territories in Experimental Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Renata F.; Paiva, Fernando F.; Kang, Byeong-Teck; Henning, Erica C.; Nascimento, George C.; Tannús, Alberto; De Araújo, Dráulio B.; Silva, Afonso C.

    2016-01-01

    Collateral circulation, defined as the supplementary vascular network that maintains cerebral blood flow (CBF) when the main vessels fail, constitutes one important defense mechanism of the brain against ischemic stroke. In the present study, continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) was used to quantify CBF and obtain perfusion territory maps of the major cerebral arteries in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and their normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) controls. Results show that both WKY and SHR have complementary, yet significantly asymmetric perfusion territories. Right or left dominances were observed in territories of the anterior (ACA), middle and posterior cerebral arteries, and the thalamic artery. Magnetic resonance angiography showed that some of the asymmetries were correlated with variations of the ACA. The leptomeningeal circulation perfusing the outer layers of the cortex was observed as well. Significant and permanent changes in perfusion territories were obtained after temporary occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery in both SHR and WKY, regardless of their particular dominance. However, animals with right dominance presented a larger volume change of the left perfusion territory (23 ± 9%) than animals with left dominance (7 ± 5%, P < 0.002). The data suggest that animals with contralesional dominance primarily safeguard local CBF values with small changes in contralesional perfusion territory, while animals with ipsilesional dominance show a reversal of dominance and a substantial increase in contralesional perfusion territory. These findings show the usefulness of CASL to probe the collateral circulation. PMID:24323754

  9. Deeper penetration of erythrocytes into the endothelial glycocalyx is associated with impaired microvascular perfusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae Hyun; Dane, Martijn J C; van den Berg, Bernard M; Boels, Margien G S; van Teeffelen, Jurgen W; de Mutsert, Renée; den Heijer, Martin; Rosendaal, Frits R; van der Vlag, Johan; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Vink, Hans; Rabelink, Ton J

    2014-01-01

    Changes in endothelial glycocalyx are one of the earliest changes in development of cardiovascular disease. The endothelial glycocalyx is both an important biological modifier of interactions between flowing blood and the vessel wall, and a determinant of organ perfusion. We hypothesize that deeper penetration of erythrocytes into the glycocalyx is associated with reduced microvascular perfusion. The population-based prospective cohort study (the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity [NEO] study) includes 6,673 middle-aged individuals (oversampling of overweight and obese individuals). Within this cohort, we have imaged the sublingual microvasculature of 915 participants using sidestream darkfield (SDF) imaging together with a recently developed automated acquisition and analysis approach. Presence of RBC (as a marker of microvascular perfusion) and perfused boundary region (PBR), a marker for endothelial glycocalyx barrier properties for RBC accessibility, were assessed in vessels between 5 and 25 µm RBC column width. A wide range of variability in PBR measurements, with a mean PBR of 2.14 µm (range: 1.43-2.86 µm), was observed. Linear regression analysis showed a marked association between PBR and microvascular perfusion, reflected by RBC filling percentage (regression coefficient β: -0.034; 95% confidence interval: -0.037 to -0.031). We conclude that microvascular beds with a thick ("healthy") glycocalyx (low PBR), reflects efficient perfusion of the microvascular bed. In contrast, a thin ("risk") glycocalyx (high PBR) is associated with a less efficient and defective microvascular perfusion.

  10. Ultrasonic fragmentation. A new technique for mucosal proctectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Heimann, T.M.; Kurtz, R.J.; Aufses, A.H. Jr.

    1985-10-01

    A new technique is reported for mucosal proctectomy that does not require manual separation of the mucosa and submucosa from the underlying muscularis. Mucosal proctectomy using ultrasonic fragmentation of the rectal mucosa was performed in four patients. Three had severe ulcerative colitis, and one patient had radiation proctitis with a rectal stricture. In all cases an endorectal pullthrough with anastomosis to the area of the dentate line was performed. Healing after ultrasonic mucosal proctectomy occurred without infection or retraction. Ultrasonic fragmentation offers an alternative to the standard technique of mucosal proctectomy. This new method is useful in those patients in whom separation of the rectal mucosal layer is difficult to perform.

  11. Perfusion and aortic surgery: patient directed cardiopulmonary bypass and quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Poullis, Mike

    2011-03-01

    Aortic surgery frequently extends the boundaries of perfusion knowledge learned from non aortic cardiac surgery.This is due to the extremes of temperature, prolonged bypass times, hypothermic arrest, and selective organ(s) perfusion. Suboptimal perfusion can potentially affect outcomes even after technically successful aortic surgery. We present the concepts of patient directed bypass with regard to blood pressure, flow-during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), oxygen delivery, cooling, and carbon dioxide levels on bypass. Quality of perfusion during aortic surgery is then addressed in the context of Perfusion Standards of Reporting Trials (PERFSORT, www.perfsort.net). PERFSORT analyses these variables during bypass: blood pressure, hematocrit, lactate, glucose, and temperature, all of which are known to affect outcomes. PERFSORT can be applied to individual cases or a series, and although primarily designed for research publications, is equally useful in a purely clinical setting. A new concept from engineering called Lissajous figures is then discussed to potentially retrospectively assess the effects of ischemia during aortic surgery. This may help identify why some patients despite flawless surgery, anesthesia, and perfusion, in the absence of bleeding, stroke, and obvious causes of organ damage at the time of aortic surgery develop multi organ dysfunction. PMID:21449244

  12. Computed Tomography Perfusion Assessment of Radiation Therapy Effects on Spinal Cord Hemodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Spampinato, Maria Vittoria; Bisdas, Sotirios; Sharma, Anand K.; McDonald, Daniel; Strojan, Primoz; Rumboldt, Zoran

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: We used computed tomography (CT) perfusion to evaluate the acute and late effect of radiation therapy (RT) on spinal cord (SC) hemodynamics in patients without symptoms of myelopathy. We hypothesized that SC perfusion could be acutely altered during RT. Methods and Materials: We analyzed neck CT perfusion studies of 36 head-and-neck cancer patients (N1), 16 of whom had previously undergone RT. In a separate group of 6 patients (N2), CT perfusion studies were obtained before RT, after 40 Gy, and after treatment completion. Results: In the N1 group, SC blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), and capillary permeability (CP) maps were not significantly different between RT-treated and RT-naive patients. In the N2 group, BF and CP were significantly increased during treatment compared with the baseline and post-RT studies. Conclusions: Radiation therapy of the head and neck may cause transient perturbations of SC perfusion that seem to reverse after treatment. There are no definite chronic effects of RT on SC perfusion observeable at the typical doses administered during treatment of head and neck malignancies.

  13. Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Comprehensive Update on Principles and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ka-Loh; Ostergaard, Leif; Calamante, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Perfusion is a fundamental biological function that refers to the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissue by means of blood flow. Perfusion MRI is sensitive to microvasculature and has been applied in a wide variety of clinical applications, including the classification of tumors, identification of stroke regions, and characterization of other diseases. Perfusion MRI techniques are classified with or without using an exogenous contrast agent. Bolus methods, with injections of a contrast agent, provide better sensitivity with higher spatial resolution, and are therefore more widely used in clinical applications. However, arterial spin-labeling methods provide a unique opportunity to measure cerebral blood flow without requiring an exogenous contrast agent and have better accuracy for quantification. Importantly, MRI-based perfusion measurements are minimally invasive overall, and do not use any radiation and radioisotopes. In this review, we describe the principles and techniques of perfusion MRI. This review summarizes comprehensive updated knowledge on the physical principles and techniques of perfusion MRI. PMID:25246817

  14. Characterising the mucosal and systemic immune responses to experimental human hookworm infection.

    PubMed

    Gaze, Soraya; McSorley, Henry J; Daveson, James; Jones, Di; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Oliveira, Luciana M; Speare, Richard; McCarthy, James S; Engwerda, Christian R; Croese, John; Loukas, Alex

    2012-02-01

    The mucosal cytokine response of healthy humans to parasitic helminths has never been reported. We investigated the systemic and mucosal cytokine responses to hookworm infection in experimentally infected, previously hookworm naive individuals from non-endemic areas. We collected both peripheral blood and duodenal biopsies to assess the systemic immune response, as well as the response at the site of adult worm establishment. Our results show that experimental hookworm infection leads to a strong systemic and mucosal Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, IL-9 and IL-13) and regulatory (IL-10 and TGF-β) response, with some evidence of a Th1 (IFN-γ and IL-2) response. Despite upregulation after patency of both IL-15 and ALDH1A2, a known Th17-inducing combination in inflammatory diseases, we saw no evidence of a Th17 (IL-17) response. Moreover, we observed strong suppression of mucosal IL-23 and upregulation of IL-22 during established hookworm infection, suggesting a potential mechanism by which Th17 responses are suppressed, and highlighting the potential that hookworms and their secreted proteins offer as therapeutics for human inflammatory diseases.

  15. Optical Microangiography: A Label Free 3D Imaging Technology to Visualize and Quantify Blood Circulations within Tissue Beds in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruikang K

    2009-01-01

    Optical microangiography (OMAG) is a recently developed volumetric imaging technique that is capable of producing 3D images of dynamic blood perfusion within microcirculatory tissue beds in vivo. The imaging contrast of OMAG image is based on the intrinsic optical scattering signals backscattered by the moving blood cells in patent blood vessels, thus it is a label free imaging technique. In this paper, I will first discuss its recent developments that use a constant modulation frequency introduced in the spectral interferograms to achieve the blood perfusion imaging. I will then introduce its latest development that utilizes the inherent blood flow to modulate the spectral interferograms to realize the blood perfusion imaging. Finally, examples of using OMAG to delineate the dynamic blood perfusion, down to capillary level resolution, within living tissues are given, including cortical blood perfusion in the brain of small animals and blood flow within human retina and choroids. PMID:20657761

  16. Optical Microangiography: A Label Free 3D Imaging Technology to Visualize and Quantify Blood Circulations within Tissue Beds in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruikang K

    2010-05-01

    Optical microangiography (OMAG) is a recently developed volumetric imaging technique that is capable of producing 3D images of dynamic blood perfusion within microcirculatory tissue beds in vivo. The imaging contrast of OMAG image is based on the intrinsic optical scattering signals backscattered by the moving blood cells in patent blood vessels, thus it is a label free imaging technique. In this paper, I will first discuss its recent developments that use a constant modulation frequency introduced in the spectral interferograms to achieve the blood perfusion imaging. I will then introduce its latest development that utilizes the inherent blood flow to modulate the spectral interferograms to realize the blood perfusion imaging. Finally, examples of using OMAG to delineate the dynamic blood perfusion, down to capillary level resolution, within living tissues are given, including cortical blood perfusion in the brain of small animals and blood flow within human retina and choroids.

  17. Use of CT perfusion to discriminate between brain metastases from different primaries.

    PubMed

    Dolgushin, Mikhail B; Pronin, Igor N; Holodny, Elena A; Fadeeva, Liudmila M; Holodny, Andrei I; Kornienko, Valeri N

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-six metastases in 22 patients were studied prospectively using computed tomography perfusion. Regions of interests were drawn around: the enhancing part of the tumor, necrotic central part, periphery, peritumoral edema, and normal white matter. Cerebral blood volume, cerebral blood flow, and mean transit time were calculated for each zone. The enhancing part of the tumor significantly differed from the other zones in 11 of 12. Metastases of different primaries can be differentiated from one another with statistically significance (P<.05) by at least one perfusion parameter in 57% of cases.

  18. Does machine perfusion decrease ischemia reperfusion injury?

    PubMed

    Bon, D; Delpech, P-O; Chatauret, N; Hauet, T; Badet, L; Barrou, B

    2014-06-01

    In 1990's, use of machine perfusion for organ preservation has been abandoned because of improvement of preservation solutions, efficient without perfusion, easy to use and cheaper. Since the last 15 years, a renewed interest for machine perfusion emerged based on studies performed on preclinical model and seems to make consensus in case of expanded criteria donors or deceased after cardiac death donations. We present relevant studies highlighted the efficiency of preservation with hypothermic machine perfusion compared to static cold storage. Machines for organ preservation being in constant evolution, we also summarized recent developments included direct oxygenation of the perfusat. Machine perfusion technology also enables organ reconditioning during the last hours of preservation through a short period of perfusion on hypothermia, subnormothermia or normothermia. We present significant or low advantages for machine perfusion against ischemia reperfusion injuries regarding at least one primary parameter: risk of DFG, organ function or graft survival.

  19. Sodium efflux from perfused giant algal cells.

    PubMed

    Clint, G M; Macrobbie, E A

    1987-06-01

    Internodal cells of the giant alga Chara corallina were perfused internally to replace the native cytoplasm, tonoplast and vacuole with artificial cytoplasm. Sodium efflux from perfused cells, measured by including (22)Na in the perfusion media, was increased by increasing the internal sodium concentration and by decreasing the external pH, and was inhibited by external application of the renal diuretic amiloride. The sodium efflux was markedly ATP-dependent, with a 50-fold decrease in efflux observed after perfusion with media lacking ATP. Efflux in the presence of ATP was reduced by 33% by inclusion of 10 μM N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide in the perfusion medium. The membrane potential of the perfused cells approximated that of intact cells from the same culture. It is suggested that sodium efflux in perfused Chara cells proceeds via a secondary antiporter with protons, regulated by ATP in a catalytic role and with the proton motive force acting as the energy source.

  20. Simulation model for contrast agent dynamics in brain perfusion scans.

    PubMed

    Bredno, Jörg; Olszewski, Mark E; Wintermark, Max

    2010-07-01

    Standardization efforts are currently under way to reduce the heterogeneity of quantitative brain perfusion methods. A brain perfusion simulation model is proposed to generate test data for an unbiased comparison of these methods. This model provides realistic simulated patient data and is independent of and different from any computational method. The flow of contrast agent solute and blood through cerebral vasculature with disease-specific configurations is simulated. Blood and contrast agent dynamics are modeled as a combination of convection and diffusion in tubular networks. A combination of a cerebral arterial model and a microvascular model provides arterial-input and time-concentration curves for a wide range of flow and perfusion statuses. The model is configured to represent an embolic stroke in one middle cerebral artery territory and provides physiologically plausible vascular dispersion operators for major arteries and tissue contrast agent retention functions. These curves are fit to simpler template curves to allow the use of the simulation results in multiple validation studies. A gamma-variate function with fit parameters is proposed as the vascular dispersion operator, and a combination of a boxcar and exponential decay function is proposed as the retention function. Such physiologically plausible operators should be used to create test data that better assess the strengths and the weaknesses of various analysis methods.

  1. Inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion during sustained microgravity on SLS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; West, John B.

    1994-01-01

    We studied the effects of gravity on the inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion in humans by performing hyperventilation-breath-hold single-breath measurements before, during, and after 9 days of continuous exposure to microgravity during the Spacelab Life Sciences-1 (SLS-1) mission. In microgravity the indicators of inhomogeneity of perfusion, especially the size of cardiogenic oscillations in expired CO2 and the height of phase IV, were markedly reduced. Cardiogenic oscillations were reduced to approximately 60% of their preflight standing size, and the height of phase IV was between 0 and -8% (a terminal fall became a small terminal rise) of the preflight standing value. The terminal change in expired CO2 was nearly abolished in microgravity, indicating more uniformity of blood flow between lung units that close and those that remain open at the end of expiration. A possible explanation of this observation is the disappearance of gravity-dependent topographic inequality of blood flow. The residual cardiogenic oscillations in expired CO2 imply a persisting inhomogeneity of perfusion in the absence of gravity, probably in lung regions that are not within the same acinus.

  2. Mucosal immunity: its role in defense and allergy.

    PubMed

    Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena; Tucková, Ludmila; Lodinová-Zádniková, Rája; Stepánková, Renata; Cukrowska, Bozena; Funda, David P; Striz, Ilja; Kozáková, Hana; Trebichavský, Ilja; Sokol, Dan; Reháková, Zuzana; Sinkora, Jirí; Fundová, Petra; Horáková, Dana; Jelínková, Lenka; Sánchez, Daniel

    2002-06-01

    The interface between the organism and the outside world, which is the site of exchange of nutrients, export of products and waste components, must be selectively permeable and at the same time, it must constitute a barrier equipped with local defense mechanisms against environmental threats (e.g. invading pathogens). The boundaries with the environment (mucosal and skin surfaces) are therefore covered with special epithelial layers which support this barrier function. The immune system, associated with mucosal surfaces covering the largest area of the body (200-300 m(2)), evolved mechanisms discriminating between harmless antigens and commensal microorganisms and dangerous pathogens. The innate mucosal immune system, represented by epithelial and other mucosal cells and their products, is able to recognize the conserved pathogenic patterns on microbes by pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors, CD14 and others. As documented in experimental gnotobiotic models, highly protective colonization of mucosal surfaces by commensals has an important stimulatory effect on postnatal development of immune responses, metabolic processes (e.g. nutrition) and other host activities; these local and systemic immune responses are later replaced by inhibition, i.e. by induction of mucosal (oral) tolerance. Characteristic features of mucosal immunity distinguishing it from systemic immunity are: strongly developed mechanisms of innate defense, the existence of characteristic populations of unique types of lymphocytes, colonization of the mucosal and exocrine glands by cells originating from the mucosal organized tissues ('common mucosal system') and preferential induction of inhibition of the responses to nondangerous antigens (mucosal tolerance). Many chronic diseases, including allergy, may occur as a result of genetically based or environmentally induced changes in mechanisms regulating mucosal immunity and tolerance; this leads to impaired mucosal barrier

  3. New Trends in Radionuclide Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Guang-Uei; Wang, Yuh-Feng; Su, Hung-Yi; Hsieh, Te-Chun; Ko, Chi-Lun; Yen, Ruoh-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been widely used clinically as one of the major functional imaging modalities for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) for decades. Ample evidence has supported the use of MPI as a useful and important tool in the diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment planning for CAD. Although popular in the United States, MPI has become the most frequently used imaging modality among all nuclear medicine tests in Taiwan. However, it should be acknowledged that MPI SPECT does have its limitations. These include false-positive results due to certain artifacts, false-negative due to balanced ischemia, complexity and adverse reaction arising from current pharmacological stressors, time consuming nature of the imaging procedure, no blood flow quantitation and relatively high radiation exposure. The purpose of this article was to review the recent trends in nuclear cardiology, including the utilization of positron emission tomography (PET) for MPI, new stressor, new SPECT camera with higher resolution and higher sensitivity, dynamic SPECT protocol for blood flow quantitation, new software of phase analysis for evaluation of LV dyssynchrony, and measures utilized for reducing radiation exposure of MPI. PMID:27122946

  4. Cardiac PET Perfusion: Prognosis, Risk Stratification, Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Dorbala, Sharmila; Di Carli, Marcelo F.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with positron emission tomography (PET) has expanded significantly over the past decade. With the wider availability of PET scanners and the routine use of quantitative blood flow imaging, the clinical use of PET MPI is expected to increase further. PET MPI is a powerful tool to identify risk, to quantify risk, and to guide therapy in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). A large body of evidence supports the prognostic value of PET MPI and ejection fraction in intermediate to high risk subjects, in women, in obese individuals and in post coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) individuals. A normal perfusion study indicates low risk (< 1% annualized rate of cardiac events of cardiac death and non-fatal myocardial infarction), while an abnormal study indicates high risk. With accurate risk stratification, high quality images, and quantitation PET MPI may transform the management of patients with known or suspected CAD. PMID:25234079

  5. Scalable Approach for Extrusion and Perfusion of Tubular, Heterotypic Biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeronimo, Mark David

    Soft material tubes are critical in the vasculature of mammalian tissues, forming networks of blood vessels and airways. Homogeneous and heterogeneous hydrogel tubes were extruded in a one-step process using a three layer microfluidic device. Co-axial cylindrical flow of crosslinking solutions and an alginate matrix is generated by a radial arrangement of microfluidic channels at the device's vertical extrusion outlet. The flow is confined and begins a sol-gel transition immediately as it extrudes at velocities upwards of 4 mm/s. This approach allows for predictive control over the dimensions of the rapidly formed tubular structures for outer diameters from 600 microm to 3 mm. A second microfluidic device hosts tube segments for controlled perfusion and pressurization using a reversible vacuum seal. On-chip tube deflection is observed and modeled as a measure of material compliance and circumferential elasticity. I anticipate applications of these devices for perfusion cell culture of cell-laden hydrogel tubes.

  6. {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceuticals for brain perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, E.; Volkert, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    It is well established that small, neutral, lipophilic technetium complexes can diffuse into the brain and then be trapped intracellularly by a variety of mechanisms. A more detailed understanding of the structural and chemical parameters which promote efficient diffusion into the brain, and which underlie the trapping mechanisms, will be necessary to delineate the clinical relevance of current agents, and to design improved technetium 99 pharmaceuticals. Current technetium 99 brain-perfusion imaging agents do not show ideal characteristics of brain uptake and retention. Furthermore, significant fractions of the technetium 99 complexes are lost between site of injection and the brain. Thus, it is difficult to use these current agents to quantitate regional cerebral blood flow. Nevertheless, these agents are proving extremely valuable for the SPECT evaluation of abnormalities in brain perfusion patients with neurological disorders.

  7. Inosculation and perfusion of pre-vascularized tissue patches containing aligned human microvessels after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Riemenschneider, Sonja B; Mattia, Donald J; Wendel, Jacqueline S; Schaefer, Jeremy A; Ye, Lei; Guzman, Pilar A; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2016-08-01

    A major goal of tissue engineering is the creation of pre-vascularized tissues that have a high density of organized microvessels that can be rapidly perfused following implantation. This is especially critical for highly metabolic tissues like myocardium, where a thick myocardial engineered tissue would require rapid perfusion within the first several days to survive transplantation. In the present work, tissue patches containing human microvessels that were either randomly oriented or aligned were placed acutely on rat hearts post-infarction and for each case it was determined whether rapid inosculation could occur and perfusion of the patch could be maintained for 6 days in an infarct environment. Patches containing self-assembled microvessels were formed by co-entrapment of human blood outgrowth endothelial cells and human pericytes in fibrin gel. Cell-induced gel contraction was mechanically-constrained resulting in samples with high densities of microvessels that were either randomly oriented (with 420 ± 140 lumens/mm(2)) or uniaxially aligned (with 940 ± 240 lumens/mm(2)) at the time of implantation. These patches were sutured onto the epicardial surface of the hearts of athymic rats following permanent ligation of the left anterior descending artery. In both aligned and randomly oriented microvessel patches, inosculation occurred and perfusion of the transplanted human microvessels was maintained, proving the in vivo vascularization potential of these engineered tissues. No difference was found in the number of human microvessels that were perfused in the randomly oriented (111 ± 75 perfused lumens/mm(2)) and aligned (173 ± 97 perfused lumens/mm(2)) patches. Our results demonstrate that tissue patches containing a high density of either aligned or randomly oriented human pre-formed microvessels achieve rapid perfusion in the myocardial infarct environment - a necessary first-step toward the creation of a thick, perfusable heart patch.

  8. Cough-induced Tracheobronchial Mucosal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hira, Harmanjit Singh

    2011-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with moderate hemoptysis. It was preceded by a severe bout of cough. Flexible bronchoscopy showed diffuse tracheobronchial mucosal petechiae and bleeding. The patient was not suffering with any coagulopathies. He did not receive antiplatelet drugs. Hemoptysis resolved with cough suppressant. Subsequent bronchoscopy revealed the complete resolution of petechiae. The mechanism of bleeding after the bout of coughing is discussed. PMID:23169019

  9. The beneficial effects of a thromboxane receptor antagonist on spinal cord perfusion following experimental cord injury.

    PubMed

    Tempel, G E; Martin, H F

    1992-06-01

    The eicosanoids thromboxane A2 and prostacyclin have opposing actions causing vasoconstriction and vasodilation respectively. The ratio of these two eicosanoids is thus an important determinant of circulatory homeostasis. An increase in this ratio occurs in certain inflammatory conditions with dramatic consequences in organ perfusion. In spinal cord trauma, in addition to direct physical perturbation of the spinal cord, it is likely that further structural and functional loss occurs as a result of decreased tissue perfusion precipitated by an increase in the thromboxane/prostacyclin ratio. This study evaluated hemodynamics and organ perfusion, 3 h following 24 g-cm spinal cord trauma in the rat. The role of thromboxane was investigated with an inhibitor of thromboxane synthesis (Dazoxiben) and with a receptor antagonist (13-APT). Cardiac output and blood pressure were unaffected by Dazoxiben, 13-APT, or spinal cord trauma. Injury effected approximately a 40% decrease in spinal cord perfusion from 0.41 to 0.25 ml/min/g which was not improved by the thromboxane synthase inhibitor, Dazoxiben. 13-ATP completely abrogated the decline in spinal cord blood flow flowing injury. Perfusion of other selected organs demonstrated little change as a result of the spinal trauma. Brain flow remained constant at 0.78 ml/min/g brain. Coronary blood flow, however, declined from 3.2 to 2.0 ml/min/g heart tissue. The data suggest consideration of the importance of thromboxane in therapeutic attempts to reduce secondary injury arising in spinal cord trauma. PMID:1386102

  10. Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scintigraphy performed before and after pulmonary embolectomy for saddle-type pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Shih, W J; Robinson, M C; Huber, C; Pulmano, C

    1995-02-01

    A 58-year-old man had shortness of breath, hypotension, and decreased partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) on the eighteenth day after undergoing craniotomy for a meningioma. Tc-99m MAA pulmonary perfusion scintigraphy showed little perfusion to the right lung and left lower lung and multiple perfusion defects in the left upper lung. Although the results of concurrent chest radiography were negative for pulmonary infiltrates, pulmonary angiography demonstrated a saddle-type embolism. The patient underwent emergency pulmonary artery embolectomy to remove blood clots and organized thromboemboli from the main pulmonary artery and the right and left pulmonary arteries. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and a second Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scan demonstrated marked improvement in lung perfusion.

  11. Hitting the mucosal road in tolerance induction.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    Within the last decades a dramatic increase in allergic diseases has been recognized in the Westernized societies, leading to the fact that meanwhile 25-30% of the population is afflicted by allergic disorders. Besides a hereditary disposition, other factors, including a reduced microbial contact early in life or changes in nutrition, might also have influenced this epidemiological development. So far the only causative treatment against type-I allergies is specific immunotherapy. In young and monosensitized patients this treatment is highly efficacious, while there are clear limitations in older or multisensitized patients. Allergy research therefore aims at establishing new and more efficacious treatment strategies in prophylactic as well as therapeutic settings. Our research programs focus on the development of novel allergy vaccines based on the induction of mucosal tolerance. In different mouse models of respiratory allergy mucosal treatment with genetically engineered allergen constructs proved to prevent the development of allergic mono- and multisensitivities. The additional use of mucosal adjuvants seems particularly important to improve therapeutic treatment approaches. Recent studies on the inverse relation of certain parasite infections and the development of allergy prompted us to search for selected parasitic molecules with immunosuppressive properties as potential adjuvant systems for novel allergy vaccines. An overview of our recent studies will be given.

  12. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as mucosal adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Iho, Sumiko; Maeyama, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Fumiko

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial DNA comprising palindromic sequences and containing unmethylated CpG is recognized by toll-like receptor 9 of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and induces the production of interferon-α and chemokines, leading to the activation of a Th1 immune response. Therefore, synthetic equivalents of bacterial DNA (CpG oligodeoxynucleotides) have been developed for clinical applications. They are usually phosphorothioated for in vivo use; this approach also leads to adverse effects as reported in mouse models.Mucosal vaccines that induce both mucosal and systemic immunity received substantial attention in recent years. For their development, phosphodiester-linked oligodeoxynucleotides, including the sequence of a palindromic CpG DNA may be advantageous as adjuvants because their target pDCs are present right there, in the mucosa of the vaccination site. In addition, the probability of adverse effects is believed to be low. Here, we review the discovery of such CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and their possible use as mucosal adjuvants. PMID:25751765

  13. Vasomotor tone does not affect perfusion heterogeneity and gas exchange in normal primate lungs during normoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenny, R. W.; Robertson, H. T.; Hlastala, M. P.

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether vasoregulation is an important cause of pulmonary perfusion heterogeneity, we measured regional blood flow and gas exchange before and after giving prostacyclin (PGI(2)) to baboons. Four animals were anesthetized with ketamine and mechanically ventilated. Fluorescent microspheres were used to mark regional perfusion before and after PGI(2) infusion. The lungs were subsequently excised, dried inflated, and diced into approximately 2-cm(3) pieces (n = 1,208-1,629 per animal) with the spatial coordinates recorded for each piece. Blood flow to each piece was determined for each condition from the fluorescent signals. Blood flow heterogeneity did not change with PGI(2) infusion. Two other measures of spatial blood flow distribution, the fractal dimension and the spatial correlation, did not change with PGI(2) infusion. Alveolar-arterial O(2) differences did not change with PGI(2) infusion. We conclude that, in normal primate lungs during normoxia, vasomotor tone is not a significant cause of perfusion heterogeneity. Despite the heterogeneous distribution of blood flow, active regulation of regional perfusion is not required for efficient gas exchange.

  14. Patient directed perfusion pressure on bypass, an analogy from electrical engineering--a new concept.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Richard; Poole, Robert; Palmer, Kenneth; Johnson, Ian; Poullis, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Organ ischemia, particularly mesenteric and renal, can occur despite a seemingly adequate perfusion flow and pressure during a period of cardiopulmonary bypass. The blood pressure to run bypass at remains a contentious issue. We present the concept that perfusion pressure during cardiopulmonary bypass should be patient specific, depending on an individual's resting pre-procedural blood pressure. Four simulated arterial traces with variable morphology, but identical systolic and diastolic blood pressures, were analyzed to calculate the medical mean, arithmetic mean, and root mean square of the blood pressure tracing. Using the standard medical formula for calculation of mean blood pressure, you can potentially underestimate perfusion pressure by 12 mmHg in a normotensive subject. The root mean square pressure calculates the equivalent non pulsatile pressure that will deliver the same hydraulic power to the circulation as its pulsatile equivalent. Patient specific perfusion pressures, calculated via root mean square may potentially help reduce the incidence of organ ischemia during cardiopulmonary bypass. Clinical trials are needed to confirm or refute this concept.

  15. Patient Directed Perfusion Pressure on Bypass, an Analogy from Electrical Engineering—A New Concept

    PubMed Central

    Warwick, Richard; Poole, Robert; Palmer, Kenneth; Johnson, Ian; Poullis, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Organ ischemia, particularly mesenteric and renal, can occur despite a seemingly adequate perfusion flow and pressure during a period of cardiopulmonary bypass. The blood pressure to run bypass at remains a contentious issue. We present the concept that perfusion pressure during cardiopulmonary bypass should be patient specific, depending on an individual’s resting pre-procedural blood pressure. Four simulated arterial traces with variable morphology, but identical systolic and diastolic blood pressures, were analyzed to calculate the medical mean, arithmetic mean, and root mean square of the blood pressure tracing. Using the standard medical formula for calculation of mean blood pressure, you can potentially underestimate perfusion pressure by 12 mmHg in a normotensive subject. The root mean square pressure calculates the equivalent non pulsatile pressure that will deliver the same hydraulic power to the circulation as its pulsatile equivalent. Patient specific perfusion pressures, calculated via root mean square may potentially help reduce the incidence of organ ischemia during cardiopulmonary bypass. Clinical trials are needed to confirm or refute this concept. PMID:20437793

  16. Effects of cold atmospheric plasma on mucosal tissue culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welz, Christian; Becker, Sven; Li, Yang-Fang; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Jeon, Jin; Schwenk-Zieger, Sabina; Thomas, Hubertus M.; Isbary, Georg; Morfill, Gregor E.; Harréus, Ulrich; Zimmermann, Julia L.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal plasmas have been commonly used in medical applications such as plasma ablation and blood coagulation. Newer developments show that plasmas can be generated with ion temperatures close to room temperature: these non-thermal or so-called cold atmospheric plasmas (CAPs) therefore open up a wide range of further biomedical applications. Based on the understanding of the bactericidal, virucidal and fungicidal properties of CAPs, information about the effects of CAP on mucosal cells and tissue is still lacking. Therefore this study focuses on the interaction of CAP with healthy head and neck mucosal cells on a molecular level. To analyse this interaction in detail, fresh tissue samples from healthy nasal and pharyngeal mucosa were harvested during surgery, assembled to a three-dimensional tissue culture model (mini organ cultures) and treated with CAP for different treatment times. Effects on the viability, necrosis induction and mutagenic activity were evaluated with the trypan blue exclusion test, Annexin-V/PI staining and alkaline microgel electrophoresis (comet assay). Trypan blue exclusion test revealed that the CAP treatment significantly decreases the cell viability for all tested treatment times (5, 10, 30, 60 and 120 s p < 0.05), but only a treatment time of 120 s showed a cytotoxic effect as the viability dropped below 90%. Annexin-V/PI staining revealed a significant increase in necrosis in CAP treated pharyngeal tissue cultures for treatment times of 60 and 120 s (p < 0.05). For nasal tissue this effect was already detected for a 30 s treatment (p < 0.05). Comet assay analysis showed no mutagenic effects after exposure to CAP.

  17. Chitosan-based mucosal adjuvants: Sunrise on the ocean.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yufei; Fan, Qingze; Hao, Dongxia; Wu, Jie; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2015-11-01

    Mucosal vaccination, which is shown to elicit systemic and mucosal immune responses, serves as a non-invasive and convenient alternative to parenteral administration, with stronger capability in combatting diseases at the site of entry. The exploration of potent mucosal adjuvants is emerging as a significant area, based on the continued necessity to amplify the immune responses to a wide array of antigens that are poorly immunogenic at the mucosal sites. As one of the inspirations from the ocean, chitosan-based mucosal adjuvants have been developed with unique advantages, such as, ability of mucosal adhesion, distinct trait of opening the junctions to allow the paracellular transport of antigen, good tolerability and biocompatibility, which guaranteed the great potential in capitalizing on their application in human clinical trials. In this review, the state of art of chitosan and its derivatives as mucosal adjuvants, including thermo-sensitive chitosan system as mucosal adjuvant that were newly developed by author's group, was described, as well as the clinical application perspective. After a brief introduction of mucosal adjuvants, chitosan and its derivatives as robust immune potentiator were discussed in detail and depth, in regard to the metabolism, safety profile, mode of actions and preclinical and clinical applications, which may shed light on the massive clinical application of chitosan as mucosal adjuvant.

  18. Electroporation mediated DNA vaccination directly to a mucosal surface results in improved immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kichaev, Gleb; Mendoza, Janess M; Amante, Dinah; Smith, Trevor R F; McCoy, Jay R; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2013-10-01

    In vivo electroporation (EP) has been shown to be a highly efficient non-viral method for enhancing DNA vaccine delivery and immunogenicity, when the site of immunization is the skin or muscle of animals and humans. However, the route of entry for many microbial pathogens is via the mucosal surfaces of the human body. We have previously reported on minimally invasive, surface and contactless EP devices for enhanced DNA delivery to dermal tissue. Robust antibody responses were induced following vaccine delivery in several tested animal models using these devices. Here, we investigated extending the modality of the surface device to efficiently deliver DNA vaccines to mucosal tissue. Initially, we demonstrated reporter gene expression in the epithelial layer of buccal mucosa in a guinea pig model. There was minimal tissue damage in guinea pig mucosal tissue resulting from EP. Delivery of a DNA vaccine encoding influenza virus nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza H1N1 elicited robust and sustained systemic IgG antibody responses following EP-enhanced delivery in the mucosa. Upon further analysis, IgA antibody responses were detected in vaginal washes and sustained cellular immune responses were detected in animals immunized at the oral mucosa with the surface EP device. This data confirms that DNA delivery and EP targeting mucosal tissue directly results in both robust and sustainable humoral as well as cellular immune responses without tissue damage. These responses are seen both in the mucosa and systemically in the blood. Direct DNA vaccine delivery enhanced by EP in mucosa may have important clinical applications for delivery of prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccines against diseases such as HIV, HPV and pneumonia that enter at mucosal sites and require both cellular and humoral immune responses for protection. PMID:23954979

  19. Nitric oxide as a mediator of gastrointestinal mucosal injury?—Say it ain't so

    PubMed Central

    Kubes, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide has been suggested as a contributor to tissue injury in various experimental models of gastrointestinal inflammation. However, there is overwhelming evidence that nitric oxide is one of the most important mediators of mucosal defence, influencing such factors as mucus secretion, mucosal blood flow, ulcer repair and the activity of a variety of mucosal immunocytes. Nitric oxide has the capacity to down-regulate inflammatory responses in the gastrointestinal tract, to scavenge various free radical species and to protect the mucosa from injury induced by topical irritants. Moreover, questions can be raised regarding the evidence purported to support a role for nitric oxide in producing tissue injury. In this review, we provide an overview of the evidence supporting a role for nitric oxide in protecting the gastrointestinal tract from injury. PMID:18475671

  20. Effects of lung ventilation–perfusion and muscle metabolism–perfusion heterogeneities on maximal O2 transport and utilization

    PubMed Central

    Cano, I; Roca, J; Wagner, P D

    2015-01-01

    Previous models of O2 transport and utilization in health considered diffusive exchange of O2 in lung and muscle, but, reasonably, neglected functional heterogeneities in these tissues. However, in disease, disregarding such heterogeneities would not be justified. Here, pulmonary ventilation–perfusion and skeletal muscle metabolism–perfusion mismatching were added to a prior model of only diffusive exchange. Previously ignored O2 exchange in non-exercising tissues was also included. We simulated maximal exercise in (a) healthy subjects at sea level and altitude, and (b) COPD patients at sea level, to assess the separate and combined effects of pulmonary and peripheral functional heterogeneities on overall muscle O2 uptake ( and on mitochondrial (). In healthy subjects at maximal exercise, the combined effects of pulmonary and peripheral heterogeneities reduced arterial () at sea level by 32 mmHg, but muscle by only 122 ml min−1 (–3.5%). At the altitude of Mt Everest, lung and tissue heterogeneity together reduced by less than 1 mmHg and by 32 ml min−1 (–2.4%). Skeletal muscle heterogeneity led to a wide range of potential among muscle regions, a range that becomes narrower as increases, and in regions with a low ratio of metabolic capacity to blood flow, can exceed that of mixed muscle venous blood. For patients with severe COPD, peak was insensitive to substantial changes in the mitochondrial characteristics for O2 consumption or the extent of muscle heterogeneity. This integrative computational model of O2 transport and utilization offers the potential for estimating profiles of both in health and in diseases such as COPD if the extent for both lung ventilation–perfusion and tissue metabolism–perfusion heterogeneity is known. PMID:25640017

  1. Pancreatic blood flow in experimental acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, A.R.; Millar, A.M.; Taylor, T.V.

    1982-05-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of acute necrotizing hemorrhagic pancreatitis remain controversial. Recent work has suggested that an early fall in pancreatic blood flow, causing ischemia, may be the initiating factor. Using an established rat model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis and the fractional indicator distribution technique with /sup 86/RbCl, pancreatic blood flow and tissue perfusion have been measured at various times in the condition. Six groups of ten rats were studied: control sham operation and pancreatitis groups were sacrificed at 1, 6, and 24 hr. Pancreatic blood flow (% of cardiac output) and perfusion (blood flow/g tissue) were measured. Blood flow was increased by a maximum of 53% at 1 hr (P less than 0.001) and remained elevated for 24 hr, and perfusion was increased by a maximum of 70% (P less than 0.001) at 1 hr and remained elevated at 6 hr. Pancreatic perfusion declines after 6 hr due to increasing gland edema. The results demonstrate a significant increase in pancreatic blood flow and perfusion in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis, suggesting a primary inflammatory response, and refute the ischemic etiological theory.

  2. [Peripheral circulation in critically ill patients: non-invasive methods for the assessment of the peripheral perfusion].

    PubMed

    van Genderen, Michel E; Lima, Alexandre; Bakker, Jan; van Bommel, Jasper

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral tissues, such as skin and muscles, are sensitive to alterations in perfusion. During circulatory shock, these tissues are the first to receive less blood and the last to recover after treatment. By monitoring peripheral circulation, disturbance of the systemic circulation can be detected at an early stage. Peripheral perfusion is often disturbed in critically ill patients. Peripheral perfusion may remain disturbed, even if conventional hemodynamic parameters such as blood pressure and heart frequency normalize after treatment. Persistent abnormal peripheral perfusion is related to a poorer clinical course. With current non-invasive methods, peripheral circulation in critically ill patients can easily be assessed at the bedside. Interventions that improve peripheral circulation may speed up recovery in critically ill patients.

  3. Simultaneous Noninvasive Determination of Regional Myocardial Perfusion and Oxygen Content in Rabbits: Toward Direct Measurement of Myocardial Oxygen Consumption at MR Imaging1

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Scott B.; Holmes, A. Alexander; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Forder, John R.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine whether myocardial arterial perfusion and oxygen concentration can be quantified simultaneously from the same images by using spin labeling and the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) effect with fast spin-echo (SE) imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS A T2-weighted fast SE pulse sequence was written to image isolated, arrested, blood-perfused rabbit hearts (n = 6) at 4.7 T. Perfusion images with intensity in units of milliliters per minute per gram that covered the entire left ventricle with 0.39 × 0.39 × 3.00-mm resolution were obtained in less than 15 minutes with a 32-fold reduction in imaging time from that of a previous study. Estimates of oxygen concentration were made from the same images acquired for calculation of perfusion images. RESULTS Estimates of regional myocardial oxygen content could be made from the perfusion images; this demonstrated the feasibility of three-dimensional calculation of regional oxygen consumption, which requires concomitant measurement of both oxygen content and flow. Fast SE imaging was shown to bas sensitive to hemoglobin desaturation as standard SE imaging. Perfusion abnormalities and oxygen deficits were easily identified and verified qualitatively with gadopentetate dimeglumine on both perfusion and BOLD images obtained after coronary arterial ligation. CONCLUSION T2-weighted fast SE imaging combined with perfusion-sensitive spin labeling can be used to measure myocardial arterial perfusion and oxygen concentration. This provides the groundwork for calculation of regional myocardial oxygen consumption. PMID:10478241

  4. Ectopic Osteogenesis of Macroscopic Tissue Constructs Assembled from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Laden Microcarriers through In Vitro Perfusion Culture

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Maiqin; Zhou, Min; Ye, Zhaoyang; Zhou, Yan; Tan, Wen-Song

    2014-01-01

    We had previously demonstrated the feasibility of preparing a centimeter-sized bone tissue construct by following a modular approach. In the present study, the objectives were to evaluate osteogenesis and tissue formation of human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells-laden CultiSpher S microcarriers during in vitro perfusion culture and after subcutaneous implantation. Microtissues were prepared in dynamic culture using spinner flasks in 28 days. In comparison with 1-week perfusion culture, microtissues became more obviously fused, demonstrating significantly higher cellularity, metabolic activity, ALP activity and calcium content while maintaining cell viability after 2-week perfusion. After subcutaneous implantation in nude mice for 6 and 12 weeks, all explants showed tight contexture, suggesting profound tissue remodeling in vivo. In addition, 12-week implantation resulted in slightly better tissue properties. However, in vitro perfusion culture time exerted great influence on the properties of corresponding explants. Degradation of microcarriers was more pronounced in the explants of 2-week perfused macrotissues compared to those of 1-week perfusion and directly implanted microtissues. Moreover, more blood vessel infiltration and bone matrix deposition with homogeneous spatial distribution were found in the explants of 2-week perfused macrotissues. Taken together, in vitro perfusion culture time is critical in engineering bone tissue replacements using such a modular approach, which holds great promise for bone regeneration. PMID:25275528

  5. Antibodies and Their Receptors: Different Potential Roles in Mucosal Defense

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Rachel E.; Vidarsson, Gestur

    2013-01-01

    Over recent years it has become increasingly apparent that mucosal antibodies are not only restricted to the IgM and IgA isotypes, but that also other isotypes and particularly IgG can be found in significant quantities at some mucosal surfaces, such as in the genital tract. Their role is more complex than traditionally believed with, among other things, the discovery of novel function of mucosal immunoglobulin receptors. A thorough knowledge in the source and function and mucosal immunoglobulins is particularly important in development of vaccines providing mucosal immunity, and also in the current climate of microbicide development, to combat major world health issues such as HIV. We present here a comprehensive review of human antibody mediated mucosal immunity. PMID:23882268

  6. Roles of M cells in infection and mucosal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Gao, Zeqian; Zhang, Zhongwang; Pan, Li; Zhang, Yongguang

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system plays a crucial part in the control of infection. Exposure of humans and animals to potential pathogens generally occurs through mucosal surfaces, thus, strategies that target the mucosa seem rational and efficient vaccination measures. Vaccination through the mucosal immune system can induce effective systemic immune responses simultaneously with mucosal immunity compared with parenteral vaccination. M cells are capable of transporting luminal antigens to the underlying lymphoid tissues and can be exploited by pathogens as an entry portal to invade the host. Therefore, targeting M-cell-specific molecules might enhance antigen entry, initiate the immune response, and induce protection against mucosal pathogens. Here, we outline our understanding of the distribution and function of M cells, and summarize the advances in mucosal vaccine strategies that target M cells. PMID:25483705

  7. Establishment of a hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension model by hepatic arterial perfusion with 80% alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; He, Fu-Liang; Liu, Fu-Quan; Yue, Zhen-Dong; Zhao, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the feasibility and safety of establishing a porcine hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension model by hepatic arterial perfusion with 80% alcohol. METHODS: Twenty-one healthy Guizhou miniature pigs were randomly divided into three experimental groups and three control groups. The pigs in the three experimental groups were subjected to hepatic arterial perfusion with 7, 12 and 17 mL of 80% alcohol, respectively, while those in the three control groups underwent hepatic arterial perfusion with 7, 12 and 17 mL of saline, respectively. Hepatic arteriography and direct portal phlebography were performed on all animals before and after perfusion, and the portal venous pressure and diameter were measured before perfusion, immediately after perfusion, and at 2, 4 and 6 wk after perfusion. The following procedures were performed at different time points: routine blood sampling, blood biochemistry, blood coagulation and blood ammonia tests before surgery, and at 2, 4 and 6 wk after surgery; hepatic biopsy before surgery, within 6 h after surgery, and at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 wk after surgery; abdominal enhanced computed tomography examination before surgery and at 6 wk after surgery; autopsy and multi-point sampling of various liver lobes for histological examination at 6 wk after surgery. RESULTS: In experimental group 1, different degrees of hepatic fibrosis were observed, and one pig developed hepatic cirrhosis. In experimental group 2, there were cases of hepatic cirrhosis, different degrees of increased portal venous pressure, and intrahepatic portal venous bypass, but neither extrahepatic portal-systemic bypass circulation nor death occurred. In experimental group 3, two animals died and three animals developed hepatic cirrhosis, and different degrees of increased portal venous pressure and intrahepatic portal venous bypass were also observed, but there was no extrahepatic portal-systemic bypass circulation. CONCLUSION: It is feasible to establish an

  8. The immune responses to bacterial antigens encountered in vivo at mucosal surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Dougan, G; Ghaem-Maghami, M; Pickard, D; Frankel, G; Douce, G; Clare, S; Dunstan, S; Simmons, C

    2000-01-01

    Mammals have evolved a sophisticated immune system for handling antigens encountered at their mucosal surfaces. The way in which mucosally delivered antigens are handled influences our ability to design effective mucosal vaccines. Live attenuated derivatives of pathogens are one route towards the development of mucosal vaccines. However, some molecules, described as mucosal immunogens, are inherently immunogenic at mucosal surfaces. Studies on mucosal immunogens may facilitate the identification of common characteristics that contribute to mucosal immunogenicity and aid the development of novel, non-living mucosal vaccines and immunostimulators. PMID:10874742

  9. Evidence for a common mucosal immune system in the pig.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Heather L; Obradovic, Milan R

    2015-07-01

    The majority of lymphocytes activated at mucosal sites receive instructions to home back to the local mucosa, but a portion also seed distal mucosa sites. By seeding distal sites with antigen-specific effector or memory lymphocytes, the foundation is laid for the animal's mucosal immune system to respond with a secondary response should to this antigen be encountered at this site in the future. The common mucosal immune system has been studied quite extensively in rodent models but less so in large animal models such as the pig. Reasons for this paucity of reported induction of the common mucosal immune system in this species may be that distal mucosal sites were examined but no induction was observed and therefore it was not reported. However, we suspect that the majority of investigators simply did not sample distal mucosal sites and therefore there is little evidence of immune response induction in the literature. It is our hope that more pig immunologists and infectious disease experts who perform mucosal immunizations or inoculations on pigs will sample distal mucosal sites and report their findings, whether results are positive or negative. In this review, we highlight papers that show that immunization/inoculation using one route triggers mucosal immune system induction locally, systemically, and within at least one distal mucosal site. Only by understanding whether immunizations at one site triggers immunity throughout the common mucosal immune system can we rationally develop vaccines for the pig, and through these works we can gather evidence about the mucosal immune system that may be extrapolated to other livestock species or humans.

  10. Is misery perfusion still a predictor of stroke in symptomatic major cerebral artery disease?

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Higashi, Tatsuya; Kagawa, Shinya; Nishii, Ryuichi; Kudo, Takashi; Sugimoto, Kanji; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2012-08-01

    Studies in the 1990s demonstrated that misery perfusion is a predictor of subsequent stroke in medically treated patients with symptomatic major cerebral artery disease. A recent randomized controlled trial demonstrated no benefit of bypass surgery for such patients. In this light, outcome in patients with misery perfusion has regained interest. The purpose of this study was to determine whether misery perfusion is still a predictor of subsequent stroke despite recent improvements in medical treatment for secondary prevention of stroke, and if so, whether the predictive value of misery perfusion has changed in recent years. We prospectively studied 165 non-disabled patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery occlusive diseases who underwent positron emission tomography from 1999 to 2008. Misery perfusion was defined as decreased cerebral blood flow, increased oxygen extraction fraction and decreased ratio of cerebral blood flow to blood volume in the hemisphere supplied by the diseased artery. All patients were followed up for 2 years until stroke recurrence or death. Bypass surgery was performed in 19 of 35 patients with and 16 of 130 patients without misery perfusion. The 2-year incidence of ipsilateral ischaemic stroke was six and four patients with and without misery perfusion, including two and one after surgery, respectively (P < 0.002). Total strokes occurred in nine patients with misery perfusion and 12 patients without (P < 0.01). The relative risk conferred by misery perfusion in whole sample was 6.3 (95% confidence interval 1.7-22.4, P < 0.005) for ipsilateral ischaemic stroke and 3.5 (95% confidence interval 1.4-8.9, P < 0.01) for all strokes, while the respective values in medically treated patients were 12.6 (95% confidence interval 2.7-57.8, P < 0.005) and 4.7 (95% confidence interval 1.3-16.3, P < 0.02). The all-stroke incidence in patients entering the study from 2004 to 2008

  11. Perfusion patterns of ischemic stroke on computed tomography perfusion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Longting; Bivard, Andrew; Parsons, Mark W

    2013-09-01

    CT perfusion (CTP) has been applied increasingly in research of ischemic stroke. However, in clinical practice, it is still a relatively new technology. For neurologists and radiologists, the challenge is to interpret CTP results properly in the context of the clinical presentation. In this article, we will illustrate common CTP patterns in acute ischemic stroke using a case-based approach. The aim is to get clinicians more familiar with the information provided by CTP with a view towards inspiring them to incorporate CTP in their routine imaging workup of acute stroke patients.

  12. Surface fluorescence studies of tissue mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Staniszewski, Kevin; Audi, Said H; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-04-01

    We designed a fiber-optic-based optoelectronic fluorometer to measure emitted fluorescence from the auto-fluorescent electron carriers NADH and FAD of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC). The ratio of NADH to FAD is called the redox ratio (RR = NADH/FAD) and is an indicator of the oxidoreductive state of tissue. We evaluated the fluorometer by measuring the fluorescence intensities of NADH and FAD at the surface of isolated, perfused rat lungs. Alterations of lung mitochondrial metabolic state were achieved by the addition of rotenone (complex I inhibitor), potassium cyanide (KCN, complex IV inhibitor) and/or pentachlorophenol (PCP, uncoupler) into the perfusate recirculating through the lung. Rotenone- or KCN-containing perfusate increased RR by 21 and 30%, respectively. In contrast, PCP-containing perfusate decreased RR by 27%. These changes are consistent with the established effects of rotenone, KCN, and PCP on the redox status of the ETC. Addition of blood to perfusate quenched NADH and FAD signal, but had no effect on RR. This study demonstrates the capacity of fluorometry to detect a change in mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused lungs, and suggests the potential of fluorometry for use in in vivo experiments to extract a sensitive measure of lung tissue health in real-time.

  13. Evaluation of pulmonary perfusion in lung regions showing isolated xenon-133 ventilation washout defects

    SciTech Connect

    Bushnell, D.L.; Sood, K.B.; Shirazi, P.; Pal, I. )

    1990-08-01

    Xenon-133 washout phase imaging is often used to help determine whether the etiology of a perfusion defect is embolic or due to pulmonary parenchymal pathology, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This study was designed to evaluate the pulmonary blood flow patterns associated with isolated defects on xenon washout images. Scintigraphic lung studies were reviewed until 100 cases with abnormal ventilation results were obtained. Ventilation abnormalities were compared with the corresponding perfusion scan results at the same anatomic site. Of the 208 individual lung regions with xenon abnormalities, 111 showed isolated washout defects (that is, with normal washin). Ninety-four of these 111 sites showed either normal perfusion or a small, nonsegmental corresponding perfusion defect. Three segmental perfusion defects were noted in association with isolated xenon retention. In each of these cases, however, the patient was felt actually to have pulmonary embolism. Thus, it is recommended that, for interpretation of scintigraphic images in the assessment of pulmonary embolism, lung pathology associated with isolated xenon retention not be considered a potential cause for large or segmental perfusion defects.

  14. Mucosal and systemic adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Collier, Martha L.; Richmond, Erin M. B.; Davis, Nancy L.; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2006-03-01

    Vaccination represents the most effective control measure in the fight against infectious diseases. Local mucosal immune responses are critical for protection from, and resolution of, infection by numerous mucosal pathogens. Antigen processing across mucosal surfaces is the natural route by which mucosal immunity is generated, as peripheral antigen delivery typically fails to induce mucosal immune responses. However, we demonstrate in this article that mucosal immune responses are evident at multiple mucosal surfaces after parenteral delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP). Moreover, coinoculation of null VRP (not expressing any transgene) with inactivated influenza virions, or ovalbumin, resulted in a significant increase in antigen-specific systemic IgG and fecal IgA antibodies, compared with antigen alone. Pretreatment of VRP with UV light largely abrogated this adjuvant effect. These results demonstrate that alphavirus replicon particles possess intrinsic systemic and mucosal adjuvant activity and suggest that VRP RNA replication is the trigger for this activity. We feel that these observations and the continued experimentation they stimulate will ultimately define the specific components of an alternative pathway for the induction of mucosal immunity, and if the activity is evident in humans, will enable new possibilities for safe and inexpensive subunit and inactivated vaccines. vaccine vector | Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus | viral immunology | RNA virus

  15. Uterine perfusion model for analyzing barriers to transport in fibroids.

    PubMed

    Stirland, Darren L; Nichols, Joseph W; Jarboe, Elke; Adelman, Marisa; Dassel, Mark; Janát-Amsbury, Margit-Maria; Bae, You Han

    2015-09-28

    This project uses an ex vivo human perfusion model for studying transport in benign, fibrous tumors. The uterine arteries were cannulated to perfuse the organ with a buffer solution containing blood vessel stain and methylene blue to analyze intratumoral transport. Gross examination revealed tissue expansion effects and a visual lack of methylene blue in the fibroids. Some fibroids exhibited regions with partial methylene blue penetration into the tumor environment. Histological analysis comparing representative sections of fibroids and normal myometrium showed a smaller number of vessels with decreased diameters within the fibroid. Imaging of fluorescently stained vessels exposed a stark contrast between fluorescence within the myometrium and relatively little within the fibroid tissues. Imaging at higher magnification revealed that fibroid blood vessels were indeed perfused and stained with the lipophilic membrane dye; however, the vessels were only the size of small capillaries and the blood vessel coverage was only 12% that of the normal myometrium. The majority of sampled fibroids had a strong negative correlation (Pearson's r=-0.68 or beyond) between collagen and methylene blue staining. As methylene blue was able to passively diffuse into fibroid tissue, the true barrier to transport in these fibroids is likely high interstitial fluid pressure, correlating with high collagen content and solid stress observed in the fibroid tissue. Fibroids had an average elevated interstitial fluid pressure of 4mmHg compared to -1mmHg in normal myometrium. Our findings signify relationships between drug distribution in fibroids and between vasculature characteristics, collagen levels, and interstitial fluid pressure. Understanding these barriers to transport can lead to developments in drug delivery for the treatment of uterine fibroids and tumors of similar composition. PMID:26184049

  16. Uterine perfusion model for analyzing barriers to transport in fibroids.

    PubMed

    Stirland, Darren L; Nichols, Joseph W; Jarboe, Elke; Adelman, Marisa; Dassel, Mark; Janát-Amsbury, Margit-Maria; Bae, You Han

    2015-09-28

    This project uses an ex vivo human perfusion model for studying transport in benign, fibrous tumors. The uterine arteries were cannulated to perfuse the organ with a buffer solution containing blood vessel stain and methylene blue to analyze intratumoral transport. Gross examination revealed tissue expansion effects and a visual lack of methylene blue in the fibroids. Some fibroids exhibited regions with partial methylene blue penetration into the tumor environment. Histological analysis comparing representative sections of fibroids and normal myometrium showed a smaller number of vessels with decreased diameters within the fibroid. Imaging of fluorescently stained vessels exposed a stark contrast between fluorescence within the myometrium and relatively little within the fibroid tissues. Imaging at higher magnification revealed that fibroid blood vessels were indeed perfused and stained with the lipophilic membrane dye; however, the vessels were only the size of small capillaries and the blood vessel coverage was only 12% that of the normal myometrium. The majority of sampled fibroids had a strong negative correlation (Pearson's r=-0.68 or beyond) between collagen and methylene blue staining. As methylene blue was able to passively diffuse into fibroid tissue, the true barrier to transport in these fibroids is likely high interstitial fluid pressure, correlating with high collagen content and solid stress observed in the fibroid tissue. Fibroids had an average elevated interstitial fluid pressure of 4mmHg compared to -1mmHg in normal myometrium. Our findings signify relationships between drug distribution in fibroids and between vasculature characteristics, collagen levels, and interstitial fluid pressure. Understanding these barriers to transport can lead to developments in drug delivery for the treatment of uterine fibroids and tumors of similar composition.

  17. Multiscale modeling of mucosal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling techniques are playing increasingly important roles in advancing a systems-level mechanistic understanding of biological processes. Computer simulations guide and underpin experimental and clinical efforts. This study presents ENteric Immune Simulator (ENISI), a multiscale modeling tool for modeling the mucosal immune responses. ENISI's modeling environment can simulate in silico experiments from molecular signaling pathways to tissue level events such as tissue lesion formation. ENISI's architecture integrates multiple modeling technologies including ABM (agent-based modeling), ODE (ordinary differential equations), SDE (stochastic modeling equations), and PDE (partial differential equations). This paper focuses on the implementation and developmental challenges of ENISI. A multiscale model of mucosal immune responses during colonic inflammation, including CD4+ T cell differentiation and tissue level cell-cell interactions was developed to illustrate the capabilities, power and scope of ENISI MSM. Background Computational techniques are becoming increasingly powerful and modeling tools for biological systems are of greater needs. Biological systems are inherently multiscale, from molecules to tissues and from nano-seconds to a lifespan of several years or decades. ENISI MSM integrates multiple modeling technologies to understand immunological processes from signaling pathways within cells to lesion formation at the tissue level. This paper examines and summarizes the technical details of ENISI, from its initial version to its latest cutting-edge implementation. Implementation Object-oriented programming approach is adopted to develop a suite of tools based on ENISI. Multiple modeling technologies are integrated to visualize tissues, cells as well as proteins; furthermore, performance matching between the scales is addressed. Conclusion We used ENISI MSM for developing predictive multiscale models of the mucosal immune system during gut

  18. Noninvasive Cerebral Perfusion Imaging in High-Risk Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Goff, Donna A.; Buckley, Erin M.; Durduran, Turgut; Wang, Jiongjong; Licht, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in medical and surgical care of the high-risk neonate have led to increased survival. A significant number of these neonates suffer from neurodevelopmental delays and failure in school. The focus of clinical research has shifted to understanding events contributing to neurological morbidity in these patients. Assessing changes in cerebral oxygenation and regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is important in evaluating the status of the central nervous system. Traditional CBF imaging methods fail for both ethical and logistical reasons. Optical near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is increasingly being used for bedside monitoring of cerebral oxygenation and blood volume in both very low birth weight infants and neonates with congenital heart disease. Although trends in CBF may be inferred from changes in cerebral oxygenation and/or blood volume, NIRS does not allow a direct measure of CBF in these populations. Two relatively new modalities, arterial spin-labeled perfusion magnetic resonance imaging and optical diffuse correlation spectroscopy, provide direct, noninvasive measures of cerebral perfusion suitable for the high-risk neonates. Herein we discuss the instrumentation, applications, and limitations of these noninvasive imaging techniques for measuring and/or monitoring CBF. PMID:20109972

  19. Isolated perfused lung preparation for studying altered gaseous environments.

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, R A

    1984-01-01

    The isolated perfused lung (IPL) preparation is ideally suited to investigate lung dynamics and cellular function, and is easily adapted to investigating biochemical and physiological responses to environmental insults. The IPL offers several advantages which permit one to study endothelial/epithelial interactions that are often disrupted with other model systems (e.g., isolated cells, minces, slices, homogenates, etc.). The IPL developed in our laboratory was devised for the rat lung and allows four lungs to be perfused simultaneously in which control over ventilation, flow, pressure, pH, PO2 and PCO2 can be maintained. Isolated lungs perfused for 1 to 2 hr at a flow rate of 10 mL/min exhibit less that 2% weight gain, maintain normal ATP levels, and exhibit linear substrate uptake. Mechanisms leading to changes in vascular and airway resistance, lipid metabolism, vasoactive hormones, blood gases and changes in vascular permeability mediated by environmental insults can be quantified in the IPL preparation. PMID:6383801

  20. Enhanced Th1/Th17 Functions of CD161+ CD8+ T Cells in Mucosal Tissues of Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the C-type lectin-like receptor CD161 by human T cells is associated with type-17 responses, which play critical regulatory roles in immunity and inflammation at mucosal sites. However, the functions of CD161-expressing T cells in macaques, the pre-clinical model of several human diseases, remain unknown. This study examined the phenotypic and functional characteristics of CD161+ T cells in peripheral blood, mucosal tissues and lymph nodes of rhesus macaques. Majority of CD161-expressing T cells in peripheral blood and lung/intestinal mucosal tissues of rhesus macaques were found to be CD8+CD4– in phenotype. There was a significant enrichment of CD161+CD8+ T cells in the lungs and colonic mucosa (16.1%±6.6 and 16.8%±5.7) in comparison to peripheral blood (4.2%±1.2) and mesenteric lymph nodes (1.3%±0.8). Regardless of the tissue compartment, CD161+CD8+ T cells mainly comprised of γδ T cells and TCR Vα7.2+ MAIT cells (up to 80%), and displayed Th1 and Th17 cytokine responses to mitogen stimulation. Mucosal CD161+CD8+ T cells were characterized by very high expression of CD69, a recent activation marker that is preferentially expressed on tissue resident cells. Furthermore, lung and colonic mucosal CD161+CD8+ T cells showed enhanced IFN-γ, IL-17, and Perforin production in comparison to those in blood. Thus, macaque CD161+CD8+ T cells represent mucosal tissue-homing innate-like CD8+ T-cell populations with Th1/Th17 type cytokine and cytotoxic effector functions that can potentially enhance the recruitment of adaptive immune cells and control initial pathogen burden/dissemination in tissues. Analysis of their role in early immune responses to mucosal pathogens will be valuable in the design of vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:27309719

  1. Peptic activity and gastroduodenal mucosal damage.

    PubMed Central

    Raufman, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    This contribution reviews briefly the history of the discovery and characterization of peptic activity; secretory models and current concepts regarding the regulation of pepsinogen secretion; and evidence that pepsin is a necessary co-factor for gastroduodenal mucosal injury. Several animal studies indicate that peptic activity is required for acid- and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastroduodenal ulceration. A more vigorous approach to the development of anti-peptic drugs for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease is encouraged. Images Figure 1 PMID:9041694

  2. Small-volume hypertonic saline/pentastarch improves ileal mucosal microcirculation in experimental peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Assadi, Abdelnasser; Desebbe, Olivier; Rimmelé, Thomas; Florence, Arnal; Goudable, Joëlle; Chassard, Dominique; Allaouchiche, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    We compared the effects of hypertonic saline 7.2%/6% hydroxyethyl starch (HSS-HES) and isotonic saline 0.9%/6% hydroxyethyl starch (ISS-HES) on ileal microcirculatory blood flow (MBF) at the initial phase of septic shock. Pigs were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Catheters were inserted into right atrium, pulmonary artery, carotid artery, and portal vein for hemodynamic measurements and for blood sampling. Ileal mucosal and muscularis MBF was continuously measured by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Septic shock was obtained 240 min after induction of fecal peritonitis; then animals were randomized to receive 10 mL.kg−1 during 10 min of either HSS-HES or ISS-HES. Systemic and microcirculatory blood flow as well as systemic metabolism were assessed. Fecal peritonitis promoted a hypodynamic septic shock, with significant reduction of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and cardiac index (CI). Ileal mucosal MBF (−34%) and ileal muscularis MBF (−54%) significantly diminished from baseline. Contrary to ISS-HES group, mucosal MBF significantly augmented after HSS-HES (+192% at min 150 post-shock) despite low blood pressure. There was weak correlation with CI (r2= 0.2, P=0.01) . Muscularis MBF didn't change. HSS-HES-treated animals had a significantly higher osmolarity and sodium concentration than ISS-HES group. Other variables did not change. Small-volume resuscitation with HSS-HES, but not ISS-HES, improved ileal microcirculatory impairment in experimental peritonitis model of septic shock even when MAP was low. This beneficial microcirculatory effect could be valuable in the management of early severe sepsis. PMID:24470929

  3. Permissive hypotension does not reduce regional organ perfusion compared to normotensive resuscitation: animal study with fluorescent microspheres

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to investigate regional organ perfusion acutely following uncontrolled hemorrhage in an animal model that simulates a penetrating vascular injury and accounts for prehospital times in urban trauma. We set forth to determine if hypotensive resuscitation (permissive hypotension) would result in equivalent organ perfusion compared to normotensive resuscitation. Methods Twenty four (n=24) male rats randomized to 4 groups: Sham, No Fluid (NF), Permissive Hypotension (PH) (60% of baseline mean arterial pressure - MAP), Normotensive Resuscitation (NBP). Uncontrolled hemorrhage caused by a standardised injury to the abdominal aorta; MAP was monitored continuously and lactated Ringer’s was infused. Fluorimeter readings of regional blood flow of the brain, heart, lung, kidney, liver, and bowel were obtained at baseline and 85 minutes after hemorrhage, as well as, cardiac output, lactic acid, and laboratory tests; intra-abdominal blood loss was assessed. Analysis of variance was used for comparison. Results Intra-abdominal blood loss was higher in NBP group, as well as, lower hematocrit and hemoglobin levels. No statistical differences in perfusion of any organ between PH and NBP groups. No statistical difference in cardiac output between PH and NBP groups, as well as, in lactic acid levels between PH and NBP. NF group had significantly higher lactic acidosis and had significantly lower organ perfusion. Conclusions Hypotensive resuscitation causes less intra-abdominal bleeding than normotensive resuscitation and concurrently maintains equivalent organ perfusion. No fluid resuscitation reduces intra-abdominal bleeding but also significantly reduces organ perfusion. PMID:23531188

  4. Comparison of Regional Brain Perfusion Levels in Chronically Smoking and Non-Smoking Adults

    PubMed Central

    Durazzo, Timothy C.; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.; Murray, Donna E.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic cigarette smoking is associated with numerous abnormalities in brain neurobiology, but few studies specifically investigated the chronic effects of smoking (compared to the acute effects of smoking, nicotine administration, or nicotine withdrawal) on cerebral perfusion (i.e., blood flow). Predominately middle-aged male (47 ± 11 years of age) smokers (n = 34) and non-smokers (n = 27) were compared on regional cortical perfusion measured by continuous arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance studies at 4 Tesla. Smokers showed significantly lower perfusion than non-smokers in the bilateral medial and lateral orbitofrontal cortices, bilateral inferior parietal lobules, bilateral superior temporal gyri, left posterior cingulate, right isthmus of cingulate, and right supramarginal gyrus. Greater lifetime duration of smoking (adjusted for age) was related to lower perfusion in multiple brain regions. The results indicated smokers showed significant perfusion deficits in anterior cortical regions implicated in the development, progression, and maintenance of all addictive disorders. Smokers concurrently demonstrated reduced blood flow in posterior brain regions that show morphological and metabolic aberrations as well as elevated beta amyloid deposition demonstrated by those with early stage Alzheimer disease. The findings provide additional novel evidence of the adverse effects of cigarette smoking on the human brain. PMID:26193290

  5. Kinetics of reversible-sequestration of leukocytes by the isolated perfused rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Goliaei, B.

    1980-08-01

    The kinetics and morphology of sequestration and margination of rat leukocytes were studied using an isolated perfused and ventilated rat lung preparation. Whole rat blood, bone marrow suspension, or leukocyte suspensions, were used to perfuse the isolated rat lung. The lung was also perfused with latex particle suspensions and the passage of particles through the lung capillaries was studied. When a leukocyte suspension was perfused through the lung in the single-pass mode, the rate of sequestration decreased as more cells were perfused. In contrast, latex particles of a size comparable to that of leukocytes were totally stopped by the lung. When the leukocyte suspension was recirculated through the lung, cells were rapidly removed from circulation until a steady state was reached, after which no net removal of cells by the lung occurred. These results indicate that leukocytes are reversibly sequestered from circulation. The sequestered cells marginated and attached to the luminal surface of the endothelium of post-capillary venules and veins. A mathematical model was developed based on the assumption that the attachment and detachment of leukocytes to blood vessel walls follows first-order kinetics. The model correctly predicts the following characteristics of the system: (a) the kinetics of the sequestration of leukocytes by the lung; (b) the existence of a steady state when a suspension of leukocytes is recirculated through the lung; and (c) the independence of the fraction of cells remaining in circulation from the starting concentration for all values of starting concentration. (ERB)

  6. Comparison of Regional Brain Perfusion Levels in Chronically Smoking and Non-Smoking Adults.

    PubMed

    Durazzo, Timothy C; Meyerhoff, Dieter J; Murray, Donna E

    2015-07-16

    Chronic cigarette smoking is associated with numerous abnormalities in brain neurobiology, but few studies specifically investigated the chronic effects of smoking (compared to the acute effects of smoking, nicotine administration, or nicotine withdrawal) on cerebral perfusion (i.e., blood flow). Predominately middle-aged male (47 ± 11 years of age) smokers (n = 34) and non-smokers (n = 27) were compared on regional cortical perfusion measured by continuous arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance studies at 4 Tesla. Smokers showed significantly lower perfusion than non-smokers in the bilateral medial and lateral orbitofrontal cortices, bilateral inferior parietal lobules, bilateral superior temporal gyri, left posterior cingulate, right isthmus of cingulate, and right supramarginal gyrus. Greater lifetime duration of smoking (adjusted for age) was related to lower perfusion in multiple brain regions. The results indicated smokers showed significant perfusion deficits in anterior cortical regions implicated in the development, progression, and maintenance of all addictive disorders. Smokers concurrently demonstrated reduced blood flow in posterior brain regions that show morphological and metabolic aberrations as well as elevated beta amyloid deposition demonstrated by those with early stage Alzheimer disease. The findings provide additional novel evidence of the adverse effects of cigarette smoking on the human brain.

  7. Correlation of magnetic resonance signal characteristics and perfusion parameters assessed by volume perfusion computed tomography in hepatocellular carcinoma: Impact on lesion characterization

    PubMed Central

    Grözinger, Gerd; Bitzer, Michael; Syha, Roland; Ketelsen, Dominik; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Lauer, Ulrich; Horger, Marius

    2016-01-01

    AIM To find out if magnetic resonance (MR)-signal characteristics of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) correlate with perfusion parameters assessed by volume perfusion computed tomography (VPCT). METHODS From October 2009 to January 2014, 26 (mean age, 69.3 years) patients with 36 HCC lesions who underwent both VPCT and MR liver imaging were analysed. We compared signal intensity in the T1w- and T2w-images and wash-in/wash-out kinetics on post-contrast MR images with mean values of blood flow (BF, mL/100 mL per minute), blood volume (BV, mL/100 mL), k-trans (mL/100 mL per minute), arterial liver perfusion (mL/100 mL per minute), portal venous perfusion and hepatic perfusion index (HPI, %) obtained by VPCT. Signal intensity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was classified hyper/iso/hypointense compared with surrounding liver parenchyma. RESULTS Signal intensity on native T1w- and T2w-images was hyper/iso/hypo in 4/16/16 and 21/14/1 lesions, respectively. Wash-in and wash-out contrast kinetics were found on MRI in 33 of 36 lesions (91.7%) and 25 of 36 lesions (69.4%), respectively. The latter was observed significantly more often in higher graded lesions (P < 0.005). HPI was 94.7% ± 6.5%. There was no significant relationship between lesion’s MR-signal intensity, MR signal combinations, size and any of the VPCT-perfusion parameters. However HPI was constantly high in all HCC lesions. CONCLUSION VPCT parameters add limited value to MR-lesion characterization. However in HCC lesions with atypical MR signal characteristics HPI can add a parameter to ensure HCC diagnosis. PMID:27551338

  8. Rhubarb extract partially improves mucosal integrity in chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Bajic, Juliana E; Eden, Georgina L; Lampton, Lorrinne S; Cheah, Ker Y; Lymn, Kerry A; Pei, Jinxin V; Yool, Andrea J; Howarth, Gordon S

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of orally gavaged aqueous rhubarb extract (RE) on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis in rats. METHODS Female Dark Agouti rats (n = 8/group) were gavaged daily (1 mL) with water, high-dose RE (HDR; 200 mg/kg) or low-dose RE (LDR; 20mg/kg) for eight days. Intestinal mucositis was induced (day 5) with 5-FU (150 mg/kg) via intraperitoneal injection. Intestinal tissue samples were collected for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and histological examination. Xenopus oocytes expressing aquaporin 4 water channels were prepared to examine the effect of aqueous RE on cell volume, indicating a potential mechanism responsible for modulating net fluid absorption and secretion in the gastrointestinal tract. Statistical significance was assumed at P < 0.05 by one-way ANOVA. RESULTS Bodyweight was significantly reduced in rats administered 5-FU compared to healthy controls (P < 0.01). Rats administered 5-FU significantly increased intestinal MPO levels (≥ 307%; P < 0.001), compared to healthy controls. However, LDR attenuated this effect in 5-FU treated rats, significantly decreasing ileal MPO activity (by 45%; P < 0.05), as compared to 5-FU controls. 5-FU significantly reduced intestinal mucosal thickness (by ≥ 29% P < 0.001) as compared to healthy controls. LDR significantly increased ileal mucosal thickness in 5-FU treated rats (19%; P < 0.05) relative to 5-FU controls. In xenopus oocytes expressing AQP4 water channels, RE selectively blocked water influx into the cell, induced by a decrease in external osmotic pressure. As water efflux was unaltered by the presence of extracellular RE, the directional flow of water across the epithelial barrier, in the presence of extracellular RE, indicated that RE may alleviate water loss across the epithelial barrier and promote intestinal health in chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis. CONCLUSION In summary, low dose RE improves selected parameters of mucosal integrity and reduces ileal

  9. The efficiency of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in hemorrhagic mucositis and febrile neutropenia resulted from methotrexate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ozkol, Hatice Uce; Toptas, Tayfur; Calka, Omer; Akdeniz, Necmettin

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) remains one of the most frequently used anti-metabolite agents in dermatology. MTX is an analog of folate that competitively and irreversibly inhibits dihydrofolate reductase. Oral mucositis is a common side effect of chemotherapy drugs and is characterized by erythema, pain, poor oral intake, pseudomembranous destruction, open ulceration and hemorrhage of the oral mucosa. In this paper, we report a 32-year-old female with a case of mucositis due to MTX intoxication that resulted from an overdose for rheumatoid arthritis. The patient had abdominal pain, vomiting, and nausea. During follow-up, the patient's white blood cell count was found to be 0.9 × 10(9)/L (4-10 × 10(9)/L). The patient developed fever exceeding 40 °C. The patient was consulted to the hematology service. They suggested using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for febrile neutropenia. On the fifth day of treatment, the white blood cell count reached 5.3 × 10(9)/L and the patient's fever and mucositis started to resolve. Here, we presented a case of hemorrhagic mucositis and febrile neutropenia resulted from high-dose MTX that responded very well to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment and we reviewed the literature.

  10. Dopaminergic Therapy Modulates Cortical Perfusion in Parkinson Disease With and Without Dementia According to Arterial Spin Labeled Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Che; Chen, Pei-Chin; Huang, Yung-Cheng; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Wang, Hung-Chen; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lu, Cheng-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging analyses allow for the quantification of altered cerebral blood flow, and provide a novel means of examining the impact of dopaminergic treatments. The authors examined the cerebral perfusion differences among 17 Parkinson disease (PD) patients, 17 PD with dementia (PDD) patients, and 17 healthy controls and used ASL-MRI to assess the effects of dopaminergic therapies on perfusion in the patients. The authors demonstrated progressive widespread cortical hypoperfusion in PD and PDD and robust effects for the dopaminergic therapies. Specifically, dopaminergic medications further decreased frontal lobe and cerebellum perfusion in the PD and PDD groups, respectively. These patterns of hypoperfusion could be related to cognitive dysfunctions and disease severity. Furthermore, desensitization to dopaminergic therapies in terms of cortical perfusion was found as the disease progressed, supporting the concept that long-term therapies are associated with the therapeutic window narrowing. The highly sensitive pharmaceutical response of ASL allows clinicians and researchers to easily and effectively quantify the absolute perfusion status, which might prove helpful for therapeutic planning. PMID:26844450

  11. Dopaminergic Therapy Modulates Cortical Perfusion in Parkinson Disease With and Without Dementia According to Arterial Spin Labeled Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Che; Chen, Pei-Chin; Huang, Yung-Cheng; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Wang, Hung-Chen; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lu, Cheng-Hsien

    2016-02-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging analyses allow for the quantification of altered cerebral blood flow, and provide a novel means of examining the impact of dopaminergic treatments. The authors examined the cerebral perfusion differences among 17 Parkinson disease (PD) patients, 17 PD with dementia (PDD) patients, and 17 healthy controls and used ASL-MRI to assess the effects of dopaminergic therapies on perfusion in the patients. The authors demonstrated progressive widespread cortical hypoperfusion in PD and PDD and robust effects for the dopaminergic therapies. Specifically, dopaminergic medications further decreased frontal lobe and cerebellum perfusion in the PD and PDD groups, respectively. These patterns of hypoperfusion could be related to cognitive dysfunctions and disease severity. Furthermore, desensitization to dopaminergic therapies in terms of cortical perfusion was found as the disease progressed, supporting the concept that long-term therapies are associated with the therapeutic window narrowing. The highly sensitive pharmaceutical response of ASL allows clinicians and researchers to easily and effectively quantify the absolute perfusion status, which might prove helpful for therapeutic planning.

  12. Mucosal Imprinting of Vaccine-Induced CD8+ T Cells Is Crucial to Inhibit the Growth of Mucosal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Federico; Bureau, Michel-Francis; Freyburger, Ludovic; Clement, Olivier; Marcheteau, Elie; Gey, Alain; Fraisse, Guillaume; Bouguin, Cécilia; Merillon, Nathalie; Dransart, Estelle; Tran, Thi; Quintin-Colonna, Françoise; Autret, Gwennhael; Thiebaud, Marine; Suleman, Muhammad; Riffault, Sabine; Wu, Tzyy-Choou; Launay, Odile; Danel, Claire; Taieb, Julien; Richardson, Jennifer; Zitvogel, Laurence; Fridman, Wolf H.; Johannes, Ludger; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Although many human cancers are located in mucosal sites, most cancer vaccines are tested against subcutaneous tumors in preclinical models. We therefore wondered whether mucosa-specific homing instructions to the immune system might influence mucosal tumor outgrowth. We showed that the growth of orthotopic head and neck or lung cancers was inhibited when a cancer vaccine was delivered by the intranasal mucosal route but not the intramuscular route. This antitumor effect was dependent on CD8+ T cells. Indeed, only intranasal vaccination elicited mucosal-specific CD8+ T cells expressing the mucosal integrin CD49a. Blockade of CD49a decreased intratumoral CD8+ T cell infiltration and the efficacy of cancer vaccine on mucosal tumor. We then showed that after intranasal vaccination, dendritic cells from lung parenchyma, but not those from spleen, induced the expression of CD49a on cocultured specific CD8+ T cells. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes from human mucosal lung cancer also expressed CD49a, which supports the relevance and possible extrapolation of these results in humans. We thus identified a link between the route of vaccination and the induction of a mucosal homing program on induced CD8+ T cells that controlled their trafficking. Immunization route directly affected the efficacy of the cancer vaccine to control mucosal tumors. PMID:23408053

  13. Artificial perfusion of the fetal circulation of the in situ mouse placenta: methodology and validation.

    PubMed

    Bond, H; Baker, B; Boyd, R D H; Cowley, E; Glazier, J D; Jones, C J P; Sibley, C P; Ward, B S; Husain, S M

    2006-04-01

    Here we present methodology and validation (including measurement of unidirectional maternofetal clearance (Kmf) of (45)Ca and (14)C-mannitol) for in situ perfusion of the mouse placenta. On day 18 of gestation (term=19 days) mice were anaesthetised and the uterus delivered into a saline bath (40 degrees C). A fetus was selected, the umbilical artery and vein catheterised and perfused with Krebs Ringer (pH 7.4) at 60 microl/min. (45)Ca/(14)C-mannitol (2 microCi/5 microCi in 50 microl saline) was injected via maternal tail vein. Perfusate samples were collected every 5 min for 45 min. Maternal carotid artery pressure was monitored throughout perfusion. A terminal maternal cardiac blood sample was taken and analysed. Placentas were immersion fixed and processed for electron microscopy. Kmf for (45)Ca and (14)C-mannitol was calculated as perfusate [(45)Ca or (14)C-mannitol] x perfusion rate/maternal plasma [(45)Ca or (14)C-mannitol]xplacental weight. Maternal cardiac blood chemistry at termination (n=8-15, mean+/-SEM) was as follows: pH 7.153+/-0.016, PCO(2) 45.48+/-2.06 mmHg, PO(2) 66.47+/-7.10 mmHg, Na(+) 151.4+/-1.2 mmol/l, K(+) 5.54+/-0.17 mmol/l, Ca(2+) 1.15+/-0.03 mmol/l, glucose 7.2+/-0.5 mmol/l, and lactate 1.76+/-0.77 mmol/l. A successful 45 min perfusion in which perfusate recovery was >95% occurred in >50% of animals. Perfusion did not alter placental morphology or carotid pressure. Kmf (microl/min/g placenta) for (45)Ca (66.0+/-8.4 (n=7)) was significantly higher than Kmf for (14)C-mannitol (20.0+/-2.4 (n=5)) (p<0.01). These data demonstrate physiological perfusion of the mouse placenta in situ and its usefulness for measurement of solute transfer.

  14. Myocardial perfusion echocardiography and coronary microvascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Giuseppe; Del Bene, Maria Riccarda

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of coronary syndromes has evolved in the last two decades out of the obstructive atherosclerosis of epicardial coronary arteries paradigm to include anatomo-functional abnormalities of coronary microcirculation. No current diagnostic technique allows direct visualization of coronary microcirculation, but functional assessments of this circulation are possible. This represents a challenge in cardiology. Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) was a breakthrough in echocardiography several years ago that claimed the capability to detect myocardial perfusion abnormalities and quantify coronary blood flow. Research demonstrated that the integration of quantitative MCE and fractional flow reserve improved the definition of ischemic burden and the relative contribution of collaterals in non-critical coronary stenosis. MCE identified no-reflow and low-flow within and around myocardial infarction, respectively, and predicted the potential functional recovery of stunned myocardium using appropriate interventions. MCE exhibited diagnostic performances that were comparable to positron emission tomography in microvascular reserve and microvascular dysfunction in angina patients. Overall, MCE improved echocardiographic evaluations of ischemic heart disease in daily clinical practice, but the approval of regulatory authorities is lacking. PMID:26730291

  15. Chromium absorption in the vascularly perfused rat intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, H.J.; Offenbacher, E.G.; Pi-Sunyer, F.X.

    1986-03-01

    The mechanism of chromium (Cr) absorption by the rat small intestine was investigated using a double perfusion technique wherein the luman of the small intestine and the vasculature supplying it were separately perfused. The intestinal perfusate (IP) was a nutrient-rich tissue culture medium (TCM) with added inorganic Cr and /sup 51/Cr. The vascular perfusate (VP) was a Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution (KRB) containing 4.7% dextran, 0.1% glucose and 5% human serum. Cr absorption was calculated by the amount of /sup 51/Cr detected in the VP. To determine the transport mechanism for Cr, its absorption into the VP was measured at various Cr concentrations of the IP ranging from 10-400 ppb CrCl/sub 3/. The amount of Cr absorbed into the blood rose linearly with the intestinal Cr concentration suggesting a process of simple diffusion. Manipulations of the VP and IP constituents were made to investigate their effects on Cr absorption. When serum was omitted from the VP, Cr adsorption was suppressed, suggesting that serum component(s) are necessary for optimal Cr absorption. When either of 2 plasma transport proteins (apo-transferrin, albumin) were added to the serum-free VP at physiological levels, Cr absorption returned to, but did not exceed, control levels. When the TCM was replaced with a KRB solution; Cr absorption was suppressed indicating that there are nutrient(s) of the TCM which facilitate Cr absorption. Further suppression occurred when a Cr concentration gradient opposing Cr absorption was created (IP at 100 ppb Cr, VP at 400 ppb Cr).

  16. Quantification of brain perfusion with tracers retained by the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pupi, A.; Bacciottini, L.; De Cristofaro, M.T.R.; Formiconi, A.R.; Castagnoli, A.

    1991-12-31

    Almost a decade ago, tracers, labelled with {sup 123}I and {sup 99m}Tc, that are retained by the brain, started to be used for studies of regional brain perfusion (regional cerebral blood flow, rCBF). To date, these tracers have been used for brain perfusion imaging with SPECT in brain disorders as well as for physiological activation protocols. Only seldom, however, have they been used in protocols that quantitatively measure rCBF. Nevertheless, comparative studies with perfusion reference tracers have repeatedly demonstrated that the brain uptake of these brain-retained tracers is correlated to perfusion, the major determinant of the distribution of these tracers in the brain. The brain kinetics of {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO, which is the tracer most commonly used, was described with a two-compartment tissue model. The theoretical approach, which is, in itself, sufficient for modeling quantitative measurements with {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO, initially suggested the possibility of empirically narrowing the distance between the brain`s regional uptake of the tracer and rCBF with a linearization algorithm which uses the cerebellum as the reference region. The value of this empirical method is hampered by the fact that the cerebellum can be involved in cerebrovascular disease (i.e. cerebellar diaschisis) as well as in several other brain disorders (e.g. anxiety, and dementia of the Alzheimer type). It also was proposed that different reference regions (occipital, whole slice, or whole brain) should be selected in relation to the brain disorder under study. However, this approach does not solve the main problem because it does not equip us with a reliable tool to evaluate rCBF with a high predictive value, and, at the same time, to reduce intersubject variability. The solution would be to measure a quantitative parameter which directly reflects rCBF, such as the unidirectional influx constant of the freely diffusible flow-limited tracers. 45 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Regulatory tone and mucosal immunity in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Timothy J; Georas, Steve N

    2014-01-01

    The lung is constantly exposed to a variety of inhaled foreign antigens, many of which are harmless to the body. Therefore, the mucosal immune system must not only have the capacity to distinguish self from non-self, but also harmless versus dangerous non-self. To address this, mucosal immune cells establish an anti-inflammatory steady state in the lung that must be overcome by inflammatory signals in order to mount an effector immune response. In the case of inhaled allergens, the false detection of dangerous non-self results in inappropriate immune activation and eventual allergic asthma. Both basic and clinical studies suggest that the balance between tolerogenic and inflammatory immune responses is a key feature in the outcome of health or disease. This Review is focused on what we term ‘regulatory tone’: the immunosuppressive environment in the lung that must be overcome to induce inflammatory responses. We will summarize the current literature on this topic, with a particular focus on the role of regulatory T cells in preventing allergic disease of the lung. We propose that inter-individual differences in regulatory tone have the potential to not only establish the threshold for immune activation in the lung, but also shape the quality of resulting effector responses following tolerance breakdown. PMID:24975833

  18. Human Circulating Antibody-Producing B Cell as a Predictive Measure of Mucosal Immunity to Poliovirus

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Harish; Sharma, Prashant; Yang, Jae Seung; Saletti, Giulietta; Ahmad, Mohammad; Bahl, Sunil K.; Wierzba, Thomas F.; Nandy, Ranjan K.; Deshpande, Jagadish M.; Sutter, Roland W.; Czerkinsky, Cecil

    2016-01-01

    Background The “gold standard” for assessing mucosal immunity after vaccination with poliovirus vaccines consists in measuring virus excretion in stool after challenge with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). This testing is time and resource intensive, and development of alternative methods is a priority for accelerating polio eradication. We therefore evaluated circulating antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) as a potential means to evaluate mucosal immunity to poliovirus vaccine. Methods 199 subjects, aged 10 years, and previously immunized repeatedly with OPV, were selected. Subjects were assigned to receive either a booster dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV), bivalent OPV (bOPV), or no vaccine. Using a micro-modified whole blood-based ELISPOT assay designed for field setting, circulating poliovirus type-specific IgA- and IgG-ASCs, including gut homing α4β7+ ASCs, were enumerated on days 0 and 7 after booster immunization. In addition, serum samples collected on days 0, 28 and 56 were tested for neutralizing antibody titers against poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3. Stool specimens were collected on day 28 (day of bOPV challenge), and on days 31, 35 and 42 and processed for poliovirus isolation. Results An IPV dose elicited blood IgA- and IgG-ASC responses in 84.8 to 94.9% of subjects, respectively. In comparison, a bOPV dose evoked corresponding blood ASC responses in 20.0 to 48.6% of subjects. A significant association was found between IgA- and IgG-ASC responses and serum neutralizing antibody titers for poliovirus type 1, 2, 3 (p<0.001). In the IPV group, α4β7+ ASCs accounted for a substantial proportion of IgA-ASCs and the proportion of subjects with a positive α4β7+ IgA-ASC response to poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 was 62.7%, 89.8% and 45.8%, respectively. A significant association was observed between virus excretion and α4β7+ IgA- and/or IgG-ASC responses to poliovirus type 3 among immunized children; however, only a weak association was found for

  19. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Raja, Waseem K; Wang, Rebecca Y; Stinson, Jordan A; Glettig, Dean L; Burke, Kelly A; Kaplan, David L

    2015-08-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogenesis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight. PMID:25843606

  20. Personality factors correlate with regional cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, R L; Kumari, V; Williams, S C R; Zelaya, F O; Connor, S E J; Alsop, D C; Gray, J A

    2006-06-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence pointing to a neurobiological basis of personality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biological bases of the major dimensions of Eysenck's and Cloninger's models of personality using a noninvasive magnetic resonance perfusion imaging technique in 30 young, healthy subjects. An unbiased voxel-based analysis was used to identify regions where the regional perfusion demonstrated significant correlation with any of the personality dimensions. Highly significant positive correlations emerged between extraversion and perfusion in the basal ganglia, thalamus, inferior frontal gyrus and cerebellum and between novelty seeking and perfusion in the cerebellum, cuneus and thalamus. Strong negative correlations emerged between psychoticism and perfusion in the basal ganglia and thalamus and between harm avoidance and perfusion in the cerebellar vermis, cuneus and inferior frontal gyrus. These observations suggest that personality traits are strongly associated with resting cerebral perfusion in a variety of cortical and subcortical regions and provide further evidence for the hypothesized neurobiological basis of personality. These results may also have important implications for functional neuroimaging studies, which typically rely on the modulation of cerebral hemodynamics for detection of task-induced activation since personality effects may influence the intersubject variability for both task-related activity and resting cerebral perfusion. This technique also offers a novel approach for the exploration of the neurobiological correlates of human personality.

  1. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Rosalyn D.; Raja, Waseem K.; Wang, Rebecca Y.; Stinson, Jordan A.; Glettig, Dean L.; Burke, Kelly A.; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogensis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight. PMID:25843606

  2. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Raja, Waseem K; Wang, Rebecca Y; Stinson, Jordan A; Glettig, Dean L; Burke, Kelly A; Kaplan, David L

    2015-08-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogenesis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight.

  3. The asymmetric facial skin perfusion distribution of Bell's palsy discovered by laser speckle imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Cui, Han; Chen, Yi; Zhong, Weizheng; Yu, Haibo; Li, Zhifeng; He, Yuhai; Yu, Wenlong; Jin, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Bell's palsy is a kind of peripheral neural disease that cause abrupt onset of unilateral facial weakness. In the pathologic study, it was evidenced that ischemia of facial nerve at the affected side of face existed in Bell's palsy patients. Since the direction of facial nerve blood flow is primarily proximal to distal, facial skin microcirculation would also be affected after the onset of Bell's palsy. Therefore, monitoring the full area of facial skin microcirculation would help to identify the condition of Bell's palsy patients. In this study, a non-invasive, real time and full field imaging technology - laser speckle imaging (LSI) technology was applied for measuring facial skin blood perfusion distribution of Bell's palsy patients. 85 participants with different stage of Bell's palsy were included. Results showed that Bell's palsy patients' facial skin perfusion of affected side was lower than that of the normal side at the region of eyelid, and that the asymmetric distribution of the facial skin perfusion between two sides of eyelid is positively related to the stage of the disease (P <  0.001). During the recovery, the perfusion of affected side of eyelid was increasing to nearly the same with the normal side. This study was a novel application of LSI in evaluating the facial skin perfusion of Bell's palsy patients, and we discovered that the facial skin blood perfusion could reflect the stage of Bell's palsy, which suggested that microcirculation should be investigated in patients with this neurological deficit. It was also suggested LSI as potential diagnostic tool for Bell's palsy. PMID:26444618

  4. The asymmetric facial skin perfusion distribution of Bell's palsy discovered by laser speckle imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Cui, Han; Chen, Yi; Zhong, Weizheng; Yu, Haibo; Li, Zhifeng; He, Yuhai; Yu, Wenlong; Jin, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Bell's palsy is a kind of peripheral neural disease that cause abrupt onset of unilateral facial weakness. In the pathologic study, it was evidenced that ischemia of facial nerve at the affected side of face existed in Bell's palsy patients. Since the direction of facial nerve blood flow is primarily proximal to distal, facial skin microcirculation would also be affected after the onset of Bell's palsy. Therefore, monitoring the full area of facial skin microcirculation would help to identify the condition of Bell's palsy patients. In this study, a non-invasive, real time and full field imaging technology - laser speckle imaging (LSI) technology was applied for measuring facial skin blood perfusion distribution of Bell's palsy patients. 85 participants with different stage of Bell's palsy were included. Results showed that Bell's palsy patients' facial skin perfusion of affected side was lower than that of the normal side at the region of eyelid, and that the asymmetric distribution of the facial skin perfusion between two sides of eyelid is positively related to the stage of the disease (P <  0.001). During the recovery, the perfusion of affected side of eyelid was increasing to nearly the same with the normal side. This study was a novel application of LSI in evaluating the facial skin perfusion of Bell's palsy patients, and we discovered that the facial skin blood perfusion could reflect the stage of Bell's palsy, which suggested that microcirculation should be investigated in patients with this neurological deficit. It was also suggested LSI as potential diagnostic tool for Bell's palsy.

  5. [Assessing myocardial perfusion with positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    vom Dahl, J

    2001-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) of the heart has gained widespread scientific and clinical acceptance with regard to two indications: 1) The detection of perfusion abnormalities by qualitative and semiquantitative analyses of perfusion images at rest and during physical or pharmacological stress using well-validated perfusion tracers, such as N-13 ammonia, Rb-82 rubidium chloride, or O-15 labeled water. 2) Viability imaging of myocardial regions with reduced contractility by combining perfusion measurements with substrate metabolism as assessed from F-18 deoxyglucose utilization. This overview summarizes the use of PET as a perfusion imaging method. With a sensitivity > 90% in combination with high specificity, PET is today the best-validated available nuclear imaging technique for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). The short half-life of the perfusion tracers in combination with highly sophisticated hard- and software enables rapid PET studies with high patient throughput. The high diagnostic accuracy and the methological advantages as compared to conventional scintigraphy allows one to use PET perfusion imaging to detect subtle changes in the perfusion reserve for the detection of CAD in high risk but asymptomatic patients as well as in patients with proven CAD undergoing various treatment forms such as risk factor reduction or coronary revascularization. In patients following orthotopic heart transplantation, evolving transplant vasculopathy can be detected at an early stage. Quantitative PET imaging at rest allows for detection of myocardial viability since cellular survival is based on maintenance of a minimal perfusion and structural changes correlate to the degree of perfusion reduction. Furthermore, quantitative assessment of the myocardial perfusion reserve detects the magnitude and competence of collaterals in regions with occluded epicardial collaterals and, thus, imaging of several coronary distribution territories in one noninvasive

  6. Quantitative Perfusion Analysis of First-Pass Contrast Enhancement Kinetics: Application to MRI of Myocardial Perfusion in Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Binita; Storey, Pippa; Iqbal, Sohah; Slater, James; Axel, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Perfusion analysis from first-pass contrast enhancement kinetics requires modeling tissue contrast exchange. This study presents a new approach for numerical implementation of the tissue homogeneity model, incorporating flexible distance steps along the capillary (NTHf). Methods The proposed NTHf model considers contrast exchange in fluid packets flowing along the capillary, incorporating flexible distance steps, thus allowing more efficient and stable calculations of the transit of tracer through the tissue. We prospectively studied 8 patients (62 ± 13 years old) with suspected CAD, who underwent first-pass perfusion CMR imaging at rest and stress prior to angiography. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI) were estimated using both the NTHf and the conventional adiabatic approximation of the TH models. Coronary artery lesions detected at angiography were clinically assigned to one of three categories of stenosis severity (‘insignificant’, ‘mild to moderate’ and ‘severe’) and related to corresponding myocardial territories. Results The mean MBF (ml/g/min) at rest/stress and MPRI were 0.80 ± 0.33/1.25 ± 0.45 and 1.68 ± 0.54 in the insignificant regions, 0.74 ± 0.21/1.09 ± 0.28 and 1.54 ± 0.46 in the mild to moderate regions, and 0.79 ± 0.28/0.63 ± 0.34 and 0.85 ± 0.48 in the severe regions, respectively. The correlation coefficients of MBFs at rest/stress and MPRI between the NTHf and AATH models were r = 0.97/0.93 and r = 0.91, respectively. Conclusions The proposed NTHf model allows efficient quantitative analysis of the transit of tracer through tissue, particularly at higher flow. Results of initial application to MRI of myocardial perfusion in CAD are encouraging. PMID:27583385

  7. Testicular perfusion after standing laparoscopic peritoneal flap hernioplasty in stallions.

    PubMed

    Gracia-Calvo, L A; Duque, J; Balao da Silva, C; Ezquerra, J; Ortega-Ferrusola, C

    2015-09-15

    Acquired inguinal herniation is a very common condition in stallions, usually leading to unilateral or bilateral castration to prevent future recurrence. Recently, several surgical techniques such as the standing laparoscopic peritoneal flap hernioplasty (SLPFH) have been developed to avoid herniation recurrence and also preserve the breeding activity of high economic value stallions. However, studies on SLPFH lack more comprehensive and systematic data about reproductive-related adverse effects and outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether SLPFH of the internal inguinal rings produces changes in the testicular blood flow in a 1-year follow-up. For that purpose, six healthy stallions were used and testicular blood flow was assessed before, 3, 6, and 12 months (T0, T3, T6, and T12) after the procedure. Blood flow was evaluated ultrasonographically, using the pulsed-wave color Doppler mode. Peak systolic velocity, end-diastolic velocity, the time-averaged maximum velocity, and the derived indexes (resistive index) and pulsatility index) of the testicular artery were measured in two localizations: in the spermatic cord and on the caudal epididymal edge of the testicle. On the spermatic cord, the peak systolic velocity of the testicular artery increased significantly at T12. However, on the epididymal edge location of the artery, the pulsatility and resistive indexes were decreased at T12 (P < 0.05). This pattern of blood flow was related to a hyperemic process. Furthermore, SLPFH might have compressed the spermatic cord, causing a slight occlusion of the testicular artery and triggering a compensatory hyperemia to compensate the deficit of blood flow that supplies the testes. The SLPFH of the internal inguinal ring affected the testicular perfusion in stallions in a 1 year follow-up, although there was no effect on sperm production during this time. The spectral Doppler ultrasound is a useful tool to asses the testicular perfusion after reproductive

  8. Testicular perfusion after standing laparoscopic peritoneal flap hernioplasty in stallions.

    PubMed

    Gracia-Calvo, L A; Duque, J; Balao da Silva, C; Ezquerra, J; Ortega-Ferrusola, C

    2015-09-15

    Acquired inguinal herniation is a very common condition in stallions, usually leading to unilateral or bilateral castration to prevent future recurrence. Recently, several surgical techniques such as the standing laparoscopic peritoneal flap hernioplasty (SLPFH) have been developed to avoid herniation recurrence and also preserve the breeding activity of high economic value stallions. However, studies on SLPFH lack more comprehensive and systematic data about reproductive-related adverse effects and outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether SLPFH of the internal inguinal rings produces changes in the testicular blood flow in a 1-year follow-up. For that purpose, six healthy stallions were used and testicular blood flow was assessed before, 3, 6, and 12 months (T0, T3, T6, and T12) after the procedure. Blood flow was evaluated ultrasonographically, using the pulsed-wave color Doppler mode. Peak systolic velocity, end-diastolic velocity, the time-averaged maximum velocity, and the derived indexes (resistive index) and pulsatility index) of the testicular artery were measured in two localizations: in the spermatic cord and on the caudal epididymal edge of the testicle. On the spermatic cord, the peak systolic velocity of the testicular artery increased significantly at T12. However, on the epididymal edge location of the artery, the pulsatility and resistive indexes were decreased at T12 (P < 0.05). This pattern of blood flow was related to a hyperemic process. Furthermore, SLPFH might have compressed the spermatic cord, causing a slight occlusion of the testicular artery and triggering a compensatory hyperemia to compensate the deficit of blood flow that supplies the testes. The SLPFH of the internal inguinal ring affected the testicular perfusion in stallions in a 1 year follow-up, although there was no effect on sperm production during this time. The spectral Doppler ultrasound is a useful tool to asses the testicular perfusion after reproductive

  9. Phenolisation as a Mode of Treatment of Mucosal Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Sacchidanand, S; Sujaya, S N; Purohit, Venkatesh

    2012-01-01

    Mucous cysts are one of the common cystic lesions of minor salivary glands seen mostly on mucous surface of lower lip and buccal mucosa. Many modalities of treatment for mucosal cysts exist including excision and suturing, deroofing, marsupialization, radiosurgery and cryotherapy. We have used 88% phenol as a mode of treatment of mucosal cysts. PMID:23112522

  10. Amelioration of Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis by Orally Administered Probiotics in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chun-Bin; Cheng, Mei-Lien; Liu, Chia-Yuan; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chiang Chiau, Jen-Shiu; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Intestinal mucositis is a frequently encountered side effect in oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. No well-established or up to date therapeutic strategies are available. To study a novel way to alleviate mucositis, we investigate the effects and safety of probiotic supplementation in ameliorating 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. Methods Seventy-two mice were injected saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) intraperitoneally daily. Mice were either orally administrated daily saline, probiotic suspension of Lactobacillus casei variety rhamnosus (Lcr35) or Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum (LaBi). Diarrhea score, pro-inflammatory cytokines serum levels, intestinal villus height and crypt depth and total RNA from tissue were assessed. Samples of blood, liver and spleen tissues were assessed for translocation. Results Marked diarrhea developed in the 5-FU groups but was attenuated after oral Lcr35 and LaBi administrations. Diarrhea scores decreased significantly from 2.64 to 1.45 and 0.80, respectively (P<0.001). Those mice in 5-FU groups had significantly higher proinflammatory cytokine levels (TNF-α: 234.80 vs. 29.10, P<0.001, IL-6: 25.13 vs. 7.43, P<0.001, IFN-γ: 22.07 vs. 17.06, P = 0.137). A repairing of damage in jejunal villi was observed following probiotics administration. We also found TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expressions were up-regulated in intestinal mucositis tissues following 5-FU treatment (TNF-α: 4.35 vs. 1.18, IL-1β: 2.29 vs. 1.07, IL-6: 1.49 vs. 1.02) and that probiotics treatment suppressed this up-regulation (P<0.05). No bacterial translocation was found in this study. Conclusions In conclusion, our results show that oral administration of probiotics Lcr35 and LaBi can ameliorate chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. This suggests probiotics may serve as an alternative therapeutic strategy for the prevention or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in

  11. Mass Cytometry of the Human Mucosal Immune System Identifies Tissue- and Disease-Associated Immune Subsets.

    PubMed

    van Unen, Vincent; Li, Na; Molendijk, Ilse; Temurhan, Mine; Höllt, Thomas; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Verspaget, Hein W; Mearin, M Luisa; Mulder, Chris J; van Bergen, Jeroen; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; Koning, Frits

    2016-05-17

    Inflammatory intestinal diseases are characterized by abnormal immune responses and affect distinct locations of the gastrointestinal tract. Although the role of several immune subsets in driving intestinal pathology has been studied, a system-wide approach that simultaneously interrogates all major lineages on a single-cell basis is lacking. We used high-dimensional mass cytometry to generate a system-wide view of the human mucosal immune system in health and disease. We distinguished 142 immune subsets and through computational applications found distinct immune subsets in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and intestinal biopsies that distinguished patients from controls. In addition, mucosal lymphoid malignancies were readily detected as well as precursors from which these likely derived. These findings indicate that an integrated high-dimensional analysis of the entire immune system can identify immune subsets associated with the pathogenesis of complex intestinal disorders. This might have implications for diagnostic procedures, immune-monitoring, and treatment of intestinal diseases and mucosal malignancies.

  12. Ginsenoside Rb1 protects the intestinal mucosal barrier following peritoneal air exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feng; Zhang, Peichen; Chen, Xiaoxi; Yan, Jingyi; Yao, Jiangao; Yu, Zhen; Chen, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rb1 (GRb1), which is one of the main ingredients derived from Panax ginseng, has been widely used to treat various gastrointestinal disorders. The present study aimed to determine whether GRb1 was able to prevent intestinal mucosal barrier damage in rats following peritoneal air exposure for 3 h. GRb1 (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) was orally administrated via gavage four times prior to and following surgery. Blood and terminal ileum were sampled 24 h following surgery. Levels of serum D-lactate (D-LA) were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Intestinal permeability was assessed by determining the intestinal clearance of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD4). Activity of intestinal myeloperoxidase was measured to assess intestinal inflammation, and intestinal histopathology was assessed by light microscopy. The results showed that GRb1 reduced the level of serum D-LA, intestinal clearance of FD4, and the activity of intestinal myeloperoxidase. Intestinal edema and inflammation were also ameliorated by GRb1, and the Chiu's scores employed for assessing intestinal mucosal damage were also reduced in the GRb1-treated peritoneal air exposure group. In addition, GRb1 induced a significant difference at 10 and 20 mg/kg, indicating a dose-dependent effect. The results of the present study suggest that GRb1 may be able to protect the intestinal mucosal barrier against damage induced by peritoneal air exposure, which may be associated with its anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27703510

  13. Acute appendicitis following endoscopic mucosal resection of cecal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Yukako; Tokuhisa, Junya; Shimada, Nagasato; Gomi, Tatsuya; Maetani, Iruru

    2015-07-21

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) allows the removal of flat or sessile lesions, laterally spreading tumors, and carcinoma of the colon or the rectum limited to the mucosa or the superficial submucosa. Acute appendicitis is the most common abdominal emergency requiring emergency surgery, and it is also a rare complication of diagnostic colonoscopy and therapeutic endoscopy, including EMR. In the case presented here, a 53-year-old female underwent colonoscopy due to a positive fecal occult blood test and was diagnosed with cecal adenoma. She was referred to our hospital and admitted for treatment. The patient had no other symptoms. EMR was performed, and 7 h after the surgery, the patient experienced right -lower abdominal pain. Laboratory tests performed the following day revealed a WBC count of 16000/mm(3), a neutrophil count of 14144/mm(3), and a C-reactive protein level of 2.20 mg/dL, indicating an inflammatory response. Computed tomography also revealed appendiceal wall thickening and swelling, so acute appendicitis following EMR was diagnosed. Antibiotics were initiated leading to total resolution of the symptoms, and the patient was discharged on the sixth post-operative day. Pathological analysis revealed a high-grade cecal tubular adenoma. Such acute appendicitis following EMR is extremely rare, and EMR of the cecum may be a rare cause of acute appendicitis.

  14. Vaccines for mucosal immunity to combat emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed Central

    van Ginkel, F. W.; Nguyen, H. H.; McGhee, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    The mucosal immune system consists of molecules, cells, and organized lymphoid structures intended to provide immunity to pathogens that impinge upon mucosal surfaces. Mucosal infection by intracellular pathogens results in the induction of cell- mediated immunity, as manifested by CD4-positive (CD4 + ) T helper-type 1 cells, as well as CD8 + cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. These responses are normally accompanied by the synthesis of secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) antibodies, which provide an important first line of defense against invasion of deeper tissues by these pathogens. New-generation live, attenuated viral vaccines, such as the cold-adapted, recombinant nasal influenza and oral rotavirus vaccines, optimize this form of mucosal immune protection. Despite these advances, new and reemerging infectious diseases are tipping the balance in favor of the parasite; continued mucosal vaccine development will be needed to effectively combat these new threats. PMID:10756145

  15. Potential role for mucosally active vaccines against pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Jambo, Kondwani C.; Sepako, Enoch; Heyderman, Robert S.; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2010-01-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia is a life-threatening disease with high mortality and morbidity among children under 5 years of age, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals worldwide. Protection against pneumococcal pneumonia relies on successful regulation of colonisation in the nasopharynx and a brisk alveolar macrophage-mediated immune response in the lung. Therefore, enhancing pulmonary mucosal immunity (which includes a combination of innate, humoral and cell-mediated immunity) through mucosal vaccination might be the key to prevention of pneumococcal infection. Current challenges include a lack of information in humans on mucosal immunity against pneumococci and a lack of suitable adjuvants for new vaccines. Data from mouse models, however, suggest that mucosally active vaccines will enhance mucosal and systemic immunity for protection against pneumococcal infection. PMID:20031415

  16. HIV and mucosal barrier interactions: consequences for transmission and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Burgener, Adam; McGowan, Ian; Klatt, Nichole R

    2015-10-01

    The mucosal barrier plays an integral function in human health as it is the primary defense against pathogens, and provides a critical transition between the external environment and the human internal body. In the context of HIV infection, the most relevant mucosal surfaces include those of the gastrointestinal (GI) and genital tract compartments. Several components help maintain the effectiveness of this mucosal surface, including the physical anatomy of the barrier, cellular immunity, soluble factors, and interactions between the epithelial barrier and the local microenvironment, including mucus and host microbiota. Any defects in barrier integrity or function can rapidly lead to an increase in acquisition risk, or with established infection may result in increased pathogenesis, morbidities, or mortality. Indeed, a key feature to all aspects of HIV infection from transmission to pathogenesis is disruption and/or dysfunction of mucosal barriers. Herein, we will detail the host-pathogen relationship of HIV and mucosal barriers in both of these scenarios.

  17. Tracheal gas exchange: perfusion-related differences in inert gas elimination.

    PubMed

    Souders, J E; George, S C; Polissar, N L; Swenson, E R; Hlastala, M P

    1995-09-01

    Exchange of inert gases across the conducting airways has been demonstrated by using an isolated dog tracheal preparation and has been characterized by using a mathematical model (E. R. Swenson, H. T. Robertson, N. L. Polissar, M. E. Middaugh, and M. P. Hlastala, J. Appl. Physiol. 72: 1581-1588, 1992). Theory predicts that gas exchange is both diffusion and perfusion dependent, with gases with a higher blood-gas partition coefficient exchanging more efficiently. The present study evaluated the perfusion dependence of airway gas exchange in an in situ canine tracheal preparation. Eight dogs were studied under general anesthesia with the same isolated tracheal preparation. Tracheal perfusion (Q) was altered from control blood flow (Qo) by epinephrine or papaverine instilled into the trachea and was measured with fluorescent microspheres. Six inert gases of differing blood-gas partition coefficients were used to measure inert gas elimination. Gas exchange was quantified as excretion (E), equal to exhaled partial pressure divided by arterial partial pressure. Data were plotted as ln [E/(l-E)] vs. In (Q/Qo), and the slopes were determined by least squares. Excretion was a positive function of Q, and the magnitude of the response of each gas to changes in Q was similar and highly significant (P < or = 0.0002). These results confirm a substantial perfusion dependence of airway gas exchange.

  18. Drag-Reducing Polymer Enhances Microvascular Perfusion in the Traumatized Brain with Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bragin, Denis E; Thomson, Susan; Bragina, Olga; Statom, Gloria; Kameneva, Marina V; Nemoto, Edwin M

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for traumatic brain injury (TBI) have not focused on improving microvascular perfusion. Drag-reducing polymers (DRP), linear, long-chain, blood-soluble, nontoxic macromolecules, may offer a new approach to improving cerebral perfusion by primary alteration of the fluid dynamic properties of blood. Nanomolar concentrations of DRP have been shown to improve hemodynamics in animal models of ischemic myocardium and ischemic limb, but have not yet been studied in the brain. We recently demonstrated that DRP improved microvascular perfusion and tissue oxygenation in a normal rat brain. We hypothesized that DRP could restore microvascular perfusion in hypertensive brain after TBI. Using in vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy we examined the effect of DRP on microvascular blood flow and tissue oxygenation in hypertensive rat brains with and without TBI. DRP enhanced and restored capillary flow, decreased microvascular shunt flow, and, as a result, reduced tissue hypoxia in both nontraumatized and traumatized rat brains at high intracranial pressure. Our study suggests that DRP could constitute an effective treatment for improving microvascular flow in brain ischemia caused by high intracranial pressure after TBI. PMID:27165871

  19. Drag-Reducing Polymer Enhances Microvascular Perfusion in the Traumatized Brain with Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bragin, Denis E; Thomson, Susan; Bragina, Olga; Statom, Gloria; Kameneva, Marina V; Nemoto, Edwin M

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for traumatic brain injury (TBI) have not focused on improving microvascular perfusion. Drag-reducing polymers (DRP), linear, long-chain, blood-soluble, nontoxic macromolecules, may offer a new approach to improving cerebral perfusion by primary alteration of the fluid dynamic properties of blood. Nanomolar concentrations of DRP have been shown to improve hemodynamics in animal models of ischemic myocardium and ischemic limb, but have not yet been studied in the brain. We recently demonstrated that DRP improved microvascular perfusion and tissue oxygenation in a normal rat brain. We hypothesized that DRP could restore microvascular perfusion in hypertensive brain after TBI. Using in vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy we examined the effect of DRP on microvascular blood flow and tissue oxygenation in hypertensive rat brains with and without TBI. DRP enhanced and restored capillary flow, decreased microvascular shunt flow, and, as a result, reduced tissue hypoxia in both nontraumatized and traumatized rat brains at high intracranial pressure. Our study suggests that DRP could constitute an effective treatment for improving microvascular flow in brain ischemia caused by high intracranial pressure after TBI.

  20. Gut Dendritic Cell Activation Links an Altered Colonic Microbiome to Mucosal and Systemic T Cell Activation in Untreated HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, SM; Lee, EJ; Kotter, CV; Austin, GL; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, DM; Landay, AL; McManus, MC; Robertson, CE; Frank, DN; McCarter, MD; Wilson, CC

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1-associated disruption of intestinal homeostasis is a major factor contributing to chronic immune activation and inflammation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, but the impact of HIV-1 infection on intestinal DC number and function has not been extensively studied. We compared the frequency and activation/maturation status of colonic myeloid DC (mDC) subsets (CD1c+ and CD1cneg) and plasmacytoid DCs in untreated HIV-1-infected subjects with uninfected controls. Colonic mDCs in HIV-1-infected subjects had increased CD40 but decreased CD83 expression, and CD40 expression on CD1c+ mDCs positively correlated with mucosal HIV-1 viral load, with mucosal and systemic cytokine production, and with frequencies of activated colon and blood T cells. Percent of CD83+CD1c+ mDCs negatively correlated with frequencies of IFN-γ-producing colon CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. CD40 expression on CD1c+ mDCs positively associated with abundance of high prevalence mucosal Prevotella copri and P. stercorea, but negatively associated with a number of low prevalence mucosal species including Rumminococcus bromii. CD1c+ mDC cytokine production was greater in response to in vitro stimulation with Prevotella species relative to R. bromii. These findings suggest that during HIV infection, colonic mDCs become activated upon exposure to mucosal pathobiont bacteria leading to mucosal and systemic immune activation. PMID:25921339

  1. Evidence for Early Local Viral Replication and Local Production of Antiviral Immunity upon Mucosal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus SHIV89.6 Infection in Macaca nemestrina

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Zandrea; Larsen, Kay; Thompson, Jannelle; Stevens, Yvonne; Finn, Eric; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Bosch, Marnix L.

    2001-01-01

    Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is largely a result of heterosexual exposure, leading many investigators to evaluate mucosal vaccines for protection against intravaginal (i.vag.) transmission in macaque models of AIDS. Relatively little is known, however, about the dynamics of viral replication and the ensuing immune response following mucosal infection. We have utilized a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) to study the differences in viremia, CD4 T-cell percentages, and mucosal and systemic anti-SHIV humoral and cellular immune responses during primary infection of animals infected either intravenously (i.v.) or i.vag. Positive viral cocultures, peripheral blood mononuclear cell viral load peaks, and CD4 cell declines were delayed by 1 week in the i.vag. inoculated animals compared to the animals infected i.v., demonstrating delayed viral spreading to the periphery. In contrast, mucosal anti-SHIV antibody levels were greater in magnitude and arose more rapidly and mucosal CD8+ T-cell responses were enhanced in the i.vag. group animals, whereas both the magnitudes and times of onset of systemic immune responses for the animals in the two groups did not differ. These observations demonstrate that compartmentalization of viral replication and induction of local antiviral immunity occur in the genital tract early after i.vag. but not i.v. inoculation. Induction of mucosal immunity to target this local, contained replication should be a goal in HIV vaccine development. PMID:11507204

  2. Ethanol Promotes Arteriogenesis and Restores Perfusion to Chronically Ischemic Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Lassaletta, Antonio D.; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y.; Liu, Yuhong; Feng, Jun; Burgess, Thomas A.; Karlson, Nicholas W.; Laham, Roger J.; Sellke, Frank W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Moderate alcohol consumption is known to be cardioprotective as compared to either heavy drinking or complete abstinence. We assessed the hypothesis that ethanol supplementation would improve myocardial function in the setting of chronic ischemia. Methods and Results Sixteen male Yorkshire swine underwent placement of an ameroid constrictor to the left circumflex artery to induce chronic myocardial ischemia. Post-operatively animals were supplemented with either 90 ml of ethanol daily (50%/V, EtOH) or 80 g of sucrose of equal caloric value (SUC) serving as controls. Seven weeks after ameroid placement, arteriolar density (1.74 ± 0.210 vs. 3.11 ± 0.368 % area of arterioles per low-powered field in SUC vs. EtOH, p = 0.004), myocardial perfusion (ratio of blood flow to the at-risk myocardium compared to the normal ventricle during demand pacing was 0.585 ± 0.107 vs. 1.08 ± 0.138 for SUC vs. EtOH, p = 0.014), and microvascular reactivity were significantly increased in the ethanol-treated animals compared to controls in the at-risk myocardium. Analysis of VEGF and NOTCH pathway signaling suggested pro-neovascular and proliferative activity in the ischemic area. The average peak blood alcohol level in the treatment group was 40 ± 4 mg/dL consistent with levels of moderate drinking in humans. Conclusions Ethanol supplementation increased arteriolar density and significantly improved myocardial perfusion and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in chronically ischemic myocardium. These findings suggest that at moderate doses, ethanol directly promotes vasculogenesis and improves microvascular function resulting in significant improvements in myocardial perfusion in the setting of chronic ischemia. PMID:24030397

  3. Perfusion Imaging with a Freely Diffusible Hyperpolarized Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Aaron K.; Vinogradov, Elena; Wang, Xiaoen; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Alsop, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents that can diffuse freely into or within tissue have numerous attractive features for perfusion imaging. Here we present preliminary data illustrating the suitability of hyperpolarized 13C labeled 2-methylpropan-2-ol (also known as dimethylethanol, tertiary butyl alcohol and tert-butanol) as a freely diffusible contrast agent for magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. Dynamic 13C images acquired in rat brain with a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence following administration of hyperpolarized 2-methylpropan-2-ol show that this agent can be imaged with 2–4s temporal resolution, 2mm slice thickness, and 700 micron in-plane resolution while retaining adequate signal-to-noise ratio. 13C relaxation measurements on 2-methylpropan-2-ol in blood at 9.4T yield T1=46±4s and T2=0.55±0.03s. In the rat brain at 4.7T, analysis of the temporal dynamics of the bSSFP image intensity in tissue and venous blood indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol has a T2 of roughly 2–4s and a T1 of 43±24s. In addition, the images indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is freely diffusible in brain and hence has a long residence time in tissue; this in turn makes it possible to image the agent continuously for tens of seconds. These characteristics show that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is a promising agent for robust and quantitative perfusion imaging in the brain and body. PMID:21432901

  4. High-resolution renal perfusion mapping using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in ischemia-reperfusion injury monitors changes in renal microperfusion.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Krisztina; Meral, F Can; Zhang, Yongzhi; Vangel, Mark G; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Ichimura, Takaharu; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2016-06-01

    Alterations in renal microperfusion play an important role in the development of acute kidney injury with long-term consequences. Here we used contrast-enhanced ultrasonography as a novel method for depicting intrarenal distribution of blood flow. After infusion of microbubble contrast agent, bubbles were collapsed in the kidney and postbubble destruction refilling was measured in various regions of the kidney. Local perfusion was monitored in vivo at 15, 30, 45, 60 minutes and 24 hours after 28 minutes of bilateral ischemia in 12 mice. High-resolution, pixel-by-pixel analysis was performed on each imaging clip using customized software, yielding parametric perfusion maps of the kidney, representing relative blood volume in each pixel. These perfusion maps revealed that outer medullary perfusion decreased disproportionately to the reduction in the cortical and inner medullary perfusion after ischemia. Outer medullary perfusion was significantly decreased by 69% at 60 minutes postischemia and remained significantly less (40%) than preischemic levels at 24 hours postischemia. Thus, contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with high-resolution parametric perfusion maps can monitor changes in renal microvascular perfusion in space and time in mice. This novel technique can be translated to clinical use in man. PMID:27165821

  5. A preparation of perfused small intestine for the study of absorption in amphibia.

    PubMed

    Parsons, D S; Prichard, J S

    1968-09-01

    1. A preparation of amphibian small intestine perfused through its vascular system is described. Vascular perfusion with a bicarbonate Ringer solution containing a colloid is used to control the composition of the environment of the submucosal faces of the absorbing cells and to carry away for collection any material extruded from these cells. Oxygenation of the mucosal cells is derived primarily from fluid circulated through the intestinal lumen. The preparation exhibits physiological properties of transport for periods of up to 5 hr. After 5 hr perfusion the epithelial cells show no signs of gross cellular damage when examined either by light or by electron microscopy.2. The relationship between the hydrostatic pressure at the mesenteric artery and the rate of perfusion through the vascular bed is substantially linear. The pressure-flow relationships in the mesenteric bed, including an apparent ;critical closing pressure', are primarily determined by the hydrostatic pressure in the intestinal lumen. Alterations in the hydrostatic pressure in the intestinal lumen also change the relative proportions of the vascular infusate which appear in the portal venous effluent and in the fluid exuded from the serosal surface of the preparation (;sweat'). Hydrostatic distension pressures above about 10 cm H(2)O reduce the rate of collection of fluid from the portal vein and increase the rate of collection of ;sweat'.3. An increase in the rate of vascular perfusion increases the total rate of glucose appearance although the glucose concentrations in both the portal effluent and the ;sweat' are reduced.4. The glucose translocation rate is related in an alinear saturable fashion to the luminal concentration of glucose. By making a correction for metabolic loss of glucose during its passage through the intestinal cell, the relationship existing between the lumen concentration and the uptake of the sugar by the mucosal cells has been calculated. This relationship is found to fit

  6. Mucosal toxicity studies of a gel formulation of native pokeweed antiviral protein.

    PubMed

    D'Cruz, Osmond J; Waurzyniak, Barbara; Uckun, Fatih M

    2004-01-01

    Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a 29-kDa plant-derived protein isolated from Phytolacca americana, is a promising nonspermicidal broad-spectrum antiviral microbicide. This study evaluated the mucosal toxicity potential of native PAP in the in vivo rabbit vaginal irritation model as well as the in vitro reconstituted human vaginal epithelial tissue model. Twenty-two New Zealand white rabbits in 4 subgroups were exposed intravaginally to a gel with and without 0.01, 0.1, or 1.0% native PAP for 10 consecutive days. The dose of PAP used represented nearly 200- to 20,000 times its in vitro anti-HIV IC50 value. Animals were euthanized on day 11 and vaginal tissues were evaluated for histologic and immunohistochemical evidence of mucosal toxicity, cellular inflammation, and hyperplasia. Blood was analyzed for changes in hematology and clinical chemistry profiles. Reconstituted human vaginal epithelial tissue grown on membrane filters was exposed to 0.01, 0.1, or 1.0% native PAP in medium or topically via a gel for 24 hours and tissue damage was evaluated by histological assessment. In the in vivo rabbit vaginal irritation model, half of all PAP-treated rabbits (8/16) exhibited an acceptable range of vaginal mucosal irritation (total score <8 out of a possible 16), whereas nearly a third of PAP-treated rabbits (5/16) developed moderate to marked vaginal mucosal irritation (total score >11). However, no treatment-related adverse effects were seen in hematological or clinical chemistry measurements. Furthermore, in vitro exposure of a 3-dimensional human vaginal tissue grown on polycarbonate membrane filters to identical concentrations of PAP either added to culture medium or applied topically via gel formulation did not result in direct toxicity as determined by histologic evaluation. These findings indicate careful monitoring of vaginal irritation will be required in the clinical development of PAP as a nonspermicidal microbicide.

  7. Protective effect of histamine microinjected into cerebellar fastigial nucleus on stress gastric mucosal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xiao; Yang, Jun; Fei, Su-Juan; Zhu, Jin-Zhou; Zhu, Sheng-Ping; Liu, Zhang-Bo; Li, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Jian-Fu

    2015-12-10

    In the study, we investigated the effect of histamine microinjected into cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN) on stress gastric mucosal damage (SGMD), and its mechanisms in rats. The model of SGMD was established by restraining and water (21±1°C)-immersion for 3h. The gastric mucosal damage index (GMDI) indicated the severity of gastric mucosal damage. Histamine or receptor antagonist was microinjected into the FN. The decussation of superior cerebellar peduncle (DSCP) and the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) were destroyed, respectively. The pathological changes of gastric mucosa were evaluated using biological signal acquisition system, Laser-Doppler flowmeter, and western blotting. We found that the microinjection of histamine (0.05, 0.5, and 5μg) into FN significantly attenuated the SGMD, in a dose-dependent manner, whereas, the microinjection of histamine H2 receptor antagonist, ranitidine, and glutamic acid decarboxylase antagonist, 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA) exacerbated the SGMD. The protective effect of histamine on SGMD was abolished by electrical lesion of DSCP or chemical ablation of LHA. The microinjection of histamine decreased the discharge frequency of the greater splanchnic nerve, and the gastric mucosal blood flow was increased. In addition, the cellular proliferation was enhanced, but the cellular apoptosis was reduced in the gastric mucosa. Also the pro-apoptosis protein, Bax, and caspase-3 were down-regulated, and the anti-apoptosis protein, Bcl-2 was up-regulated following microinjection of histamine. In conclusion, the FN participated in the regulation of SGMD after histamine microinjected into FN, and cerebellar-hypothalamic circuits (include: DSCP, LHA) contribute to the process, which may provide a new therapeutic strategy for SGMD.

  8. Active skin perfusion and thermoregulatory response in the hand following nerve injury and repair in human upper extremities.

    PubMed

    Deng, Aidong; Liu, Dan; Gu, Chen; Gu, Xiaosong; Gu, Jianhui; Hu, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous vasoconstriction/vasodilatation occurs in response to whole body and local cooling/heating, and the vasomotor activities play a pivotal role in thermal control of the human body. The mechanisms underlying regulation of skin blood flow involve both neurogenic and humeral/local chemical influence, contributing to the initial response to thermal stimuli and the prolonged phase of response, respectively. Previous studies have suggested the impairment of cutaneous thermal regulation after nerve injury. However, the evidence regarding how the skin perfusion and thermoregulatory response evolve after nerve injury and repair remains limited. Here we observed, by utilizing laser-Doppler perfusion imaging, baseline skin perfusion and perfusion change in response to thermal stimuli after median and ulnar nerve injury, and the results showed that baseline perfusion in autonomous skin area profoundly decreased and active rewarming after clod stress dramatically diminished before sensory recovery of the skin became detectable. In addition, baseline cutaneous perfusion was recovered as the skin regained touch sensation, and exhibited positive correlation to touch sensibility of the skin. These data indicate that both active perfusion and thermoregulatory response of the skin are markedly compromised during skin denervation and can be recovered by re-innervation. This suggests the importance of timely repair of injured nerve, especially in the practice of replantation. PMID:26529641

  9. Active skin perfusion and thermoregulatory response in the hand following nerve injury and repair in human upper extremities.

    PubMed

    Deng, Aidong; Liu, Dan; Gu, Chen; Gu, Xiaosong; Gu, Jianhui; Hu, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous vasoconstriction/vasodilatation occurs in response to whole body and local cooling/heating, and the vasomotor activities play a pivotal role in thermal control of the human body. The mechanisms underlying regulation of skin blood flow involve both neurogenic and humeral/local chemical influence, contributing to the initial response to thermal stimuli and the prolonged phase of response, respectively. Previous studies have suggested the impairment of cutaneous thermal regulation after nerve injury. However, the evidence regarding how the skin perfusion and thermoregulatory response evolve after nerve injury and repair remains limited. Here we observed, by utilizing laser-Doppler perfusion imaging, baseline skin perfusion and perfusion change in response to thermal stimuli after median and ulnar nerve injury, and the results showed that baseline perfusion in autonomous skin area profoundly decreased and active rewarming after clod stress dramatically diminished before sensory recovery of the skin became detectable. In addition, baseline cutaneous perfusion was recovered as the skin regained touch sensation, and exhibited positive correlation to touch sensibility of the skin. These data indicate that both active perfusion and thermoregulatory response of the skin are markedly compromised during skin denervation and can be recovered by re-innervation. This suggests the importance of timely repair of injured nerve, especially in the practice of replantation.

  10. The correlation of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis in rabbit VX2 liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhiming; Liang, Qianwen; Liang, Changhong; Zhong, Guimian

    2014-12-01

    Our objective is to explore the value of liver cancer contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis in liver cancer and the correlation between these two analysis methods. Rabbit VX2 liver cancer model was established in this study. CEUS was applied. Sono Vue was applied in rabbits by ear vein to dynamically observe and record the blood perfusion and changes in the process of VX2 liver cancer and surrounding tissue. MRI perfusion quantitative analysis was used to analyze the mean enhancement time and change law of maximal slope increasing, which were further compared with the pathological examination results. Quantitative indicators of liver cancer CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis were compared, and the correlation between them was analyzed by correlation analysis. Rabbit VX2 liver cancer model was successfully established. CEUS showed that time-intensity curve of rabbit VX2 liver cancer showed "fast in, fast out" model while MRI perfusion quantitative analysis showed that quantitative parameter MTE of tumor tissue increased and MSI decreased: the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The diagnostic results of CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis were not significantly different (P > 0.05). However, the quantitative parameter of them were significantly positively correlated (P < 0.05). CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis can both dynamically monitor the liver cancer lesion and surrounding liver parenchyma, and the quantitative parameters of them are correlated. The combined application of both is of importance in early diagnosis of liver cancer.

  11. Feasibility of quantitative lung perfusion by 4D CT imaging by a new dynamic-scanning protocol in an animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Goldin, Jonathan G.; Abtin, Fereidoun G.; Brown, Matt; McNitt-Gray, Mike

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to test a new dynamic Perfusion-CT imaging protocol in an animal model and investigate the feasibility of quantifying perfusion of lung parenchyma to perform functional analysis from 4D CT image data. A novel perfusion-CT protocol was designed with 25 scanning time points: the first at baseline and 24 scans after a bolus injection of contrast material. Post-contrast CT scanning images were acquired with a high sampling rate before the first blood recirculation and then a relatively low sampling rate until 10 minutes after administrating contrast agent. Lower radiation techniques were used to keep the radiation dose to an acceptable level. 2 Yorkshire swine with pulmonary emboli underwent this perfusion- CT protocol at suspended end inspiration. The software tools were designed to measure the quantitative perfusion parameters (perfusion, permeability, relative blood volume, blood flow, wash-in & wash-out enhancement) of voxel or interesting area of lung. The perfusion values were calculated for further lung functional analysis and presented visually as contrast enhancement maps for the volume being examined. The results show increased CT temporal sampling rate provides the feasibility of quantifying lung function and evaluating the pulmonary emboli. Differences between areas with known perfusion defects and those without perfusion defects were observed. In conclusion, the techniques to calculate the lung perfusion on animal model have potential application in human lung functional analysis such as evaluation of functional effects of pulmonary embolism. With further study, these techniques might be applicable in human lung parenchyma characterization and possibly for lung nodule characterization.

  12. Brain perfusion in acute and chronic hyperglycemia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kikano, G.E.; LaManna, J.C.; Harik, S.I. )

    1989-08-01

    Recent studies show that acute and chronic hyperglycemia cause a diffuse decrease in regional cerebral blood flow and that chronic hyperglycemia decreases the brain L-glucose space. Since these changes can be caused by a decreased density of perfused brain capillaries, we used 30 adult male Wistar rats to study the effect of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on (1) the brain intravascular space using radioiodinated albumin, (2) the anatomic density of brain capillaries using alkaline phosphatase histochemistry, and (3) the fraction of brain capillaries that are perfused using the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran method. Our results indicate that acute and chronic hyperglycemia do not affect the brain intravascular space nor the anatomic density of brain capillaries. Also, there were no differences in capillary recruitment among normoglycemic, acutely hyperglycemic, and chronically hyperglycemic rats. These results suggest that the shrinkage of the brain L-glucose space in chronic hyperglycemia is more likely due to changes in the blood-brain barrier permeability to L-glucose.

  13. Cyclosporin metabolism by human gastrointestinal mucosal microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Webber, I R; Peters, W H; Back, D J

    1992-01-01

    The in vitro metabolism of the immunosuppressant cyclosporin (CsA) by human gastrointestinal mucosal microsomes has been studied. Macroscopically normal intestinal (n = 4) and liver (n = 2) tissue was obtained from kidney transplant donors, and microsomes prepared. Intestinal metabolism was most extensive with duodenal protein (15% conversion to metabolites M1/M17 after 2 h incubation at 37 degrees C; metabolite measurement by h.p.l.c). Western blotting confirmed the presence of P-4503A (enzyme subfamily responsible for CsA metabolism) in duodenum and ileum tissue, but not in colon tissue. The results of this study indicate that the gut wall may play a role in the first-pass metabolism of CsA, and could therefore be a contributory factor to the highly variable oral bioavailability of CsA. PMID:1389941

  14. Mucosal Immunity and acute viral gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Rose, Markus A

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a major killer of the very young worldwide. Rotavirus is the most common intestinal virus, causing acute gastroenteritis and extra-intestinal complications especially in young and chronically ill subjects. As early as 1991, the WHO recommended as high priority the development of a vaccine against rotavirus, the major pathogen causing enteric infections. Since the introduction of rotavirus vaccines for infant immunization programmes in different parts of the world in 2006, vaccination against rotavirus has resulted in substantial declines in severe gastroenteritis. The oral rotavirus vaccines RotaTeq(®) and Rotarix(®) are excellent examples for their unique features and principles of mucosal immunization. We elaborate on rotavirus immunity and the success of rotavirus vaccination and aspects also beyond infants' acute gastroenteritis.

  15. Helminthic therapy: improving mucosal barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Martin J.; Broadhurst, Mara J.

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiology of autoimmune diseases and helminth infections led to suggestions that helminths could improve inflammatory conditions, which was then tested using animal models. This has translated to clinical investigations aimed at the safe and controlled reintroduction of helminthic exposure to patients suffering from autoimmune diseases (so-called “helminthic therapy”) in an effort to mitigate the inflammatory response. In this review, we will summarize the results of recent clinical trials of helminthic therapy, with particular attention to mechanisms of action. Whereas previous reviews have emphasized immune regulatory mechanisms activated by helminths, we propose that enhancement of mucosal barrier function may have an equally important role in improving conditions of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:22464690

  16. Modeling laser speckle imaging of perfusion in the skin (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, Caitlin; Hayakawa, Carole K.; Choi, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Laser speckle imaging (LSI) enables visualization of relative blood flow and perfusion in the skin. It is frequently applied to monitor treatment of vascular malformations such as port wine stain birthmarks, and measure changes in perfusion due to peripheral vascular disease. We developed a computational Monte Carlo simulation of laser speckle contrast imaging to quantify how tissue optical properties, blood vessel depths and speeds, and tissue perfusion affect speckle contrast values originating from coherent excitation. The simulated tissue geometry consisted of multiple layers to simulate the skin, or incorporated an inclusion such as a vessel or tumor at different depths. Our simulation used a 30x30mm uniform flat light source to optically excite the region of interest in our sample to better mimic wide-field imaging. We used our model to simulate how dynamically scattered photons from a buried blood vessel affect speckle contrast at different lateral distances (0-1mm) away from the vessel, and how these speckle contrast changes vary with depth (0-1mm) and flow speed (0-10mm/s). We applied the model to simulate perfusion in the skin, and observed how different optical properties, such as epidermal melanin concentration (1%-50%) affected speckle contrast. We simulated perfusion during a systolic forearm occlusion and found that contrast decreased by 35% (exposure time = 10ms). Monte Carlo simulations of laser speckle contrast give us a tool to quantify what regions of the skin are probed with laser speckle imaging, and measure how the tissue optical properties and blood flow affect the resulting images.

  17. CAD system for automatic analysis of CT perfusion maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachaj, T.; Ogiela, M. R.

    2011-03-01

    In this article, authors present novel algorithms developed for the computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) system for analysis of dynamic brain perfusion, computer tomography (CT) maps, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and cerebral blood volume (CBV). Those methods perform both quantitative analysis [detection and measurement and description with brain anatomy atlas (AA) of potential asymmetries/lesions] and qualitative analysis (semantic interpretation of visualized symptoms). The semantic interpretation (decision about type of lesion: ischemic/hemorrhagic, is the brain tissue at risk of infraction or not) of visualized symptoms is done by, so-called, cognitive inference processes allowing for reasoning on character of pathological regions based on specialist image knowledge. The whole system is implemented in.NET platform (C# programming language) and can be used on any standard PC computer with.NET framework installed.

  18. A comparative analysis of the dependences of the hemodynamic parameters on changes in ROI's position in perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong-Seok; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Namgung, Jang-Sun; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Yoon, Dae-Young; Lee, Han-Joo

    2013-05-01

    This study performed a comparative analysis of cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTT), and mean time-to-peak (TTP) obtained by changing the region of interest's (ROI) anatomical positions, during CT brain perfusion. We acquired axial source images of perfusion CT from 20 patients undergoing CT perfusion exams due to brain trauma. Subsequently, the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP values were calculated through data-processing of the perfusion CT images. The color scales for the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP maps were obtained using the image data. Anterior cerebral artery (ACA) was taken as the standard ROI for the calculations of the perfusion values. Differences in the hemodynamic average values were compared in a quantitative analysis by placing ROI and the dividing axial images into proximal, middle, and distal segments anatomically. By performing the qualitative analysis using a blind test, we observed changes in the sensory characteristics by using the color scales of the CBV, CBF, and MTT maps in the proximal, middle, and distal segments. According to the qualitative analysis, no differences were found in CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP values of the proximal, middle, and distal segments and no changes were detected in the color scales of the the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP maps in the proximal, middle, and distal segments. We anticipate that the results of the study will useful in assessing brain trauma patients using by perfusion imaging.

  19. Topical and mucosal liposomes for vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Romero, Eder Lilia; Morilla, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal (and in minor extent transcutanous) stimulation can induce local or distant mucosa secretory IgA. Liposomes and other vesicles as mucosal and transcutaneous adjuvants are attractive alternatives to parenteral vaccination. Liposomes can be massively produced under good manufacturing practices and stored for long periods, at high antigen/vesicle mass ratios. However, their uptake by antigen-presenting cells (APC) at the inductive sites remains as a major challenge. As neurotoxicity is a major concern in intranasal delivery, complexes between archaeosomes and calcium as well as cationic liposomes complexed with plasmids encoding for antigenic proteins could safely elicit secretory and systemic antigen-specific immune responses. Oral bilosomes generate intense immune responses that remain to be tested against challenge, but the admixing with toxins or derivatives is mandatory to reduce the amount of antigen. Most of the current experimental designs, however, underestimate the mucus blanket 100- to 1000-fold thicker than a 100-nm diameter liposome, which has first to be penetrated to access the underlying M cells. Overall, designing mucoadhesive chemoenzymatic resistant liposomes, or selectively targeted to M cells, has produced less relevant results than tailoring the liposomes to make them mucus penetrating. Opposing, the nearly 10 µm thickness stratum corneum interposed between liposomes and underlying APC can be surpassed by ultradeformable liposomes (UDL), with lipid matrices that penetrate up to the limit with the viable epidermis. UDL made of phospholipids and detergents, proved to be better transfection agents than conventional liposomes and niosomes, without the toxicity of ethosomes, in the absence of classical immunomodulators. PMID:21360692

  20. [Examination of Visual Effect in Low-dose Cerebral CT Perfusion Phantom Image Using Iterative Reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Ohmura, Tomomi; Lee, Yongbum; Takahashi, Noriyuki; Sato, Yuichiro; Ishida, Takato; Toyoshima, Hideto

    2015-11-01

    CT perfusion (CTP) is obtained cerebrovascular circulation image for assessment of stroke patients; however, at the expense of increased radiation dose by dynamic scan. Iterative reconstruction (IR) method is possible to decrease image noise, it has the potential to reduce radiation dose. The purpose of this study is to assess the visual effect of IR method by using a digital perfusion phantom. The digital perfusion phantom was created by reconstructed filtered back projection (FBP) method and IR method CT images that had five exposure doses. Various exposure dose cerebral blood flow (CBF) images were derived from deconvolution algorithm. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and visual assessment were compared among the various exposure dose and each reconstructions. Result of low exposure dose with IR method showed, compared with FBP method, high CNR in severe ischemic area, and visual assessment was significantly improvement. IR method is useful for improving image quality of low-dose CTP. PMID:26596197

  1. Processing of pulse oximeter signals using adaptive filtering and autocorrelation to isolate perfusion and oxygenation components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibey, Bennett; Subramanian, Hariharan; Ericson, Nance; Xu, Weijian; Wilson, Mark; Cote, Gerard L.

    2005-03-01

    A blood perfusion and oxygenation sensor has been developed for in situ monitoring of transplanted organs. In processing in situ data, motion artifacts due to increased perfusion can create invalid oxygenation saturation values. In order to remove the unwanted artifacts from the pulsatile signal, adaptive filtering was employed using a third wavelength source centered at 810nm as a reference signal. The 810 nm source resides approximately at the isosbestic point in the hemoglobin absorption curve where the absorbance of light is nearly equal for oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin. Using an autocorrelation based algorithm oxygenation saturation values can be obtained without the need for large sampling data sets allowing for near real-time processing. This technique has been shown to be more reliable than traditional techniques and proven to adequately improve the measurement of oxygenation values in varying perfusion states.

  2. Dependence of Brain Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Perfusion Parameters on the Cardiac Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Federau, Christian; Hagmann, Patric; Maeder, Philippe; Müller, Markus; Meuli, Reto; Stuber, Matthias; O’Brien, Kieran

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of microvascular perfusion with Intravoxel Incoherent Motion (IVIM) MRI is gaining interest. Yet, the physiological influences on the IVIM perfusion parameters (“pseudo-diffusion” coefficient D*, perfusion fraction f, and flow related parameter fD*) remain insufficiently characterized. In this article, we hypothesize that D* and fD*, which depend on blood speed, should vary during the cardiac cycle. We extended the IVIM model to include time dependence of D* = D*(t), and demonstrate in the healthy human brain that both parameters D* and fD* are significantly larger during systole than diastole, while the diffusion coefficient D and f do not vary significantly. The results non-invasively demonstrate the pulsatility of the brain’s microvasculature. PMID:24023649

  3. Rapid casting of patterned vascular networks for perfusable engineered 3D tissues

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jordan S.; Stevens, Kelly R.; Yang, Michael T.; Baker, Brendon M.; Nguyen, Duc-Huy T.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Toro, Esteban; Chen, Alice A.; Galie, Peter A.; Yu, Xiang; Chaturvedi, Ritika; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2012-01-01

    In the absence of perfusable vascular networks, three-dimensional (3D) engineered tissues densely populated with cells quickly develop a necrotic core [1]. Yet the lack of a general approach to rapidly construct such networks remains a major challenge for 3D tissue culture [2–4]. Here, we 3D printed rigid filament networks of carbohydrate glass, and used them as a cytocompatible sacrificial template in engineered tissues containing living cells to generate cylindrical networks which could be lined with endothelial cells and perfused with blood under high-pressure pulsatile flow. Because this simple vascular casting approach allows independent control of network geometry, endothelialization, and extravascular tissue, it is compatible with a wide variety of cell types, synthetic and natural extracellular matrices (ECMs), and crosslinking strategies. We also demonstrated that the perfused vascular channels sustained the metabolic function of primary rat hepatocytes in engineered tissue constructs that otherwise exhibited suppressed function in their core. PMID:22751181

  4. Dopamine transporter SPECT/CT and perfusion brain SPECT imaging in idiopathic basal ganglia calcinosis.

    PubMed

    Paschali, Anna; Lakiotis, Velissarios; Messinis, Lambros; Markaki, Elli; Constantoyannis, Constantine; Ellul, John; Vassilakos, Pavlos

    2009-07-01

    A case of idiopathic basal ganglia calcification in a 56-year-old woman with parkinsonism and cognitive impairment is described. The nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway and regional cerebral blood flow were evaluated using dopamine transporter (DAT) brain single photon emission tomography combined with a low-dose x-ray computerized tomography transmission (hybrid SPECT/CT) and Tc-99m HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT study, respectively. DAT SPECT/CT imaging revealed a reduction in DAT binding in both striatum regions coinciding with bilateral calcifications in the basal ganglia. Brain perfusion scan showed hypoperfusion in basal ganglia regions, posterior parietal cortex bilaterally, left frontopolar and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and left temporal lobe. These findings correlated well with the clinical condition of the patient. Mineralization may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of neuronal degeneration. Cortical perfusion changes in patients may better explain the patient's altered cognitive and motor functions.

  5. A comparative assessment of maxillary perfusion between two different Le Fort I osteotomy techniques.

    PubMed

    Sakharia, A; Muthusekar, M R

    2015-03-01

    Compromised maxillary perfusion following Le Fort I osteotomy is a potentially serious complication resulting in hard and/or soft tissue loss. The aim of this study was to compare the change in perfusion between two techniques of posterior maxillary disjunction by intraoperative measurement of maxillary gingival blood flow (GBF). Further, we sought to correlate the association of the movement of the maxilla and estimated blood loss as factors. The study population comprised 38 individuals, divided equally into two groups: a pterygoid disjunction group and a third molar socket disjunction group. GBF was measured using Doppler flowmetry. A P-value of <0.05 was considered significant. There was a significant drop in GBF in both groups. However, there was no significant difference between the groups based on magnitude of blood flow drop. Superior repositioning of the osteotomized maxilla caused the greatest drop in GBF, which was statistically significant. There was significantly less blood loss in the pterygoid disjunction group. In conclusion, Le Fort I osteotomy causes a significant decrease in GBF. The technique used for posterior maxillary disjunction does not influence the magnitude of drop in perfusion. There is a significant correlation of other factors such as the effect of superior repositioning of the maxilla and blood loss with the osteotomy techniques.

  6. Optimal perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Glenn S; Hessel, Eugene A; Groom, Robert C

    2009-05-01

    In this review, we summarize the best available evidence to guide the conduct of adult cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) to achieve "optimal" perfusion. At the present time, there is considerable controversy relating to appropriate management of physiologic variables during CPB. Low-risk patients tolerate mean arterial blood pressures of 50-60 mm Hg without apparent complications, although limited data suggest that higher-risk patients may benefit from mean arterial blood pressures >70 mm Hg. The optimal hematocrit on CPB has not been defined, with large data-based investigations demonstrating that both severe hemodilution and transfusion of packed red blood cells increase the risk of adverse postoperative outcomes. Oxygen delivery is determined by the pump flow rate and the arterial oxygen content and organ injury may be prevented during more severe hemodilutional anemia by increasing pump flow rates. Furthermore, the optimal temperature during CPB likely varies with physiologic goals, and recent data suggest that aggressive rewarming practices may contribute to neurologic injury. The design of components of the CPB circuit may also influence tissue perfusion and outcomes. Although there are theoretical advantages to centrifugal blood pumps over roller pumps, it has been difficult to demonstrate that the use of centrifugal pumps improves clinical outcomes. Heparin coating of the CPB circuit may attenuate inflammatory and coagulation pathways, but has not been clearly demonstrated to reduce major morbidity and mortality. Similarly, no distinct clinical benefits have been observed when open venous reservoirs have been compared to closed systems. In conclusion, there are currently limited data upon which to confidently make strong recommendations regarding how to conduct optimal CPB. There is a critical need for randomized trials assessing clinically significant outcomes, particularly in high-risk patients. PMID:19372313

  7. Synergistic Effects of Hemoglobin and Tumor Perfusion on Tumor Control and Survival in Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Nina A. Wang, Jian Z.; Zhang Dongqing; Montebello, Joseph F.; Grecula, John C.; Lo, Simon S.; Fowler, Jeffery M.; Yuh, William T.C.

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: The tumor oxygenation status is likely influenced by two major factors: local tumor blood supply (tumor perfusion) and its systemic oxygen carrier, hemoglobin (Hgb). Each has been independently shown to affect the radiotherapy (RT) outcome in cervical cancer. This study assessed the effect of local tumor perfusion, systemic Hgb levels, and their combination on the treatment outcome in cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients with cervical cancer, Stage IB2-IVA, who were treated with RT/chemotherapy, underwent serial dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) before RT, at 20-22 Gy, and at 45-50 Gy. The DCE-MRI perfusion parameters, mean and lowest 10th percentile of the signal intensity distribution in the tumor pixels, and the Hgb levels, including pre-RT, nadir, and mean Hgb (average of weekly Hgb during RT), were correlated with local control and disease-specific survival. The median follow-up was 4.6 years. Results: Local recurrence predominated in the group with both a low mean Hgb (<11.2 g/dL) and low perfusion (lowest 10th percentile of signal intensity <2.0 at 20-22 Gy), with a 5-year local control rate of 60% vs. 90% for all other groups (p = .001) and a disease-specific survival rate of 41% vs. 72% (p = .008), respectively. In the group with both high mean Hgb and high perfusion, the 5-year local control rate and disease-specific survival rate was 100% and 78%, respectively. Conclusion: These results suggest that the compounded effects of Hgb level and tumor perfusion during RT influence the radioresponsiveness and survival in cervical cancer patients. The outcome was worst when both were impaired. The management of Hgb may be particularly important in patients with low tumor perfusion.

  8. Cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2016-07-01

    The flow of viscous fluid in the cochlea induces shear forces, which could provide benefit in clinical practice, for example to guide cochlear implant insertion or produce static pressure to the cochlear partition or wall. From a research standpoint, studying the effects of a viscous fluid in the cochlea provides data for better understanding cochlear fluid mechanics. However, cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid may damage the cochlea. In this work we studied the physiological and anatomical effects of perfusing the cochlea with a viscous fluid. Gerbil cochleae were perfused at a rate of 2.4 μL/min with artificial perilymph (AP) and sodium hyaluronate (Healon, HA) in four different concentrations (0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%). The different HA concentrations were applied either sequentially in the same cochlea or individually in different cochleae. The perfusion fluid entered from the round window and was withdrawn from basal scala vestibuli, in order to perfuse the entire perilymphatic space. Compound action potentials (CAP) were measured after each perfusion. After perfusion with increasing concentrations of HA in the order of increasing viscosity, the CAP thresholds generally increased. The threshold elevation after AP and 0.0625% HA perfusion was small or almost zero, and the 0.125% HA was a borderline case, while the higher concentrations significantly elevated CAP thresholds. Histology of the cochleae perfused with the 0.0625% HA showed an intact Reissner's membrane (RM), while in cochleae perfused with 0.125% and 0.25% HA RM was torn. Thus, the CAP threshold elevation was likely due to the broken RM, likely caused by the shear stress produced by the flow of the viscous fluid. Our results and analysis indicate that the cochlea can sustain, without a significant CAP threshold shift, up to a 1.5 Pa shear stress. Beside these finding, in the 0.125% and 0.25% HA perfusion cases, a temporary CAP threshold shift was observed, perhaps due to the presence and

  9. Cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2016-07-01

    The flow of viscous fluid in the cochlea induces shear forces, which could provide benefit in clinical practice, for example to guide cochlear implant insertion or produce static pressure to the cochlear partition or wall. From a research standpoint, studying the effects of a viscous fluid in the cochlea provides data for better understanding cochlear fluid mechanics. However, cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid may damage the cochlea. In this work we studied the physiological and anatomical effects of perfusing the cochlea with a viscous fluid. Gerbil cochleae were perfused at a rate of 2.4 μL/min with artificial perilymph (AP) and sodium hyaluronate (Healon, HA) in four different concentrations (0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%). The different HA concentrations were applied either sequentially in the same cochlea or individually in different cochleae. The perfusion fluid entered from the round window and was withdrawn from basal scala vestibuli, in order to perfuse the entire perilymphatic space. Compound action potentials (CAP) were measured after each perfusion. After perfusion with increasing concentrations of HA in the order of increasing viscosity, the CAP thresholds generally increased. The threshold elevation after AP and 0.0625% HA perfusion was small or almost zero, and the 0.125% HA was a borderline case, while the higher concentrations significantly elevated CAP thresholds. Histology of the cochleae perfused with the 0.0625% HA showed an intact Reissner's membrane (RM), while in cochleae perfused with 0.125% and 0.25% HA RM was torn. Thus, the CAP threshold elevation was likely due to the broken RM, likely caused by the shear stress produced by the flow of the viscous fluid. Our results and analysis indicate that the cochlea can sustain, without a significant CAP threshold shift, up to a 1.5 Pa shear stress. Beside these finding, in the 0.125% and 0.25% HA perfusion cases, a temporary CAP threshold shift was observed, perhaps due to the presence and

  10. Temperature controlled machine perfusion system for liver.

    PubMed

    Obara, H; Matsuno, N; Shigeta, T; Hirano, T; Enosawa, S; Mizunuma, H

    2013-06-01

    Organ preservation using machine perfusion is an effective method compared with conventional preservation techniques using static cold storage. A newly developed MP preservation system to control perfusate temperatures from hypothermic to subnormothermic conditions is introduced. This system is useful not only for liver preservation, but also for evaluation of graft viability for recovery. This novel method has been proposed for preservation of porcine liver grafts. An innovative preservation system is especially important to obtain viable organs from extended criteria or donation after cardiac death donors. In this study, we introduce a new machine perfusion preservation system (NES-01) to evaluate graft viability for recovery of liver functions, using porcine grafts.

  11. Quantification of myocardial perfusion based on signal intensity of flow sensitized MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeykoon, Sumeda B.

    The quantitative assessment of perfusion is important for early recognition of a variety of heart diseases, determination of disease severity and their cure. In conventional approach of measuring cardiac perfusion by arterial spin labeling, the relative difference in the apparent T1 relaxation times in response to selective and non-selective inversion of blood entering the region of interest is related to perfusion via a two-compartment tissue model. But accurate determination of T1 in small animal hearts is difficult and prone to errors due to long scan times. The purpose of this study is to develop a fast, robust and simple method to quantitatively assess myocardial perfusion using arterial spin labeling. The proposed method is based on signal intensities (SI) of inversion recovery slice-select, non-select and steady-state images. Especially in this method data are acquired at a single inversion time and at short repetition times. This study began by investigating the accuracy of assessment of perfusion using a two compartment system. First, determination of perfusion by T1 and SI were implemented to a simple, two-compartment phantom model. Mathematical model developed for full spin exchange models (in-vivo experiments) by solving a modified Bloch equation was modified to develop mathematical models (T1 and SI) for a phantom (zero spin exchange). The phantom result at different flow rates shows remarkable evidence of accuracy of the two-compartment model and SI, T1 methods: the SI method has less propagation error and less scan time. Next, twelve healthy C57BL/6 mice were scanned for quantitative perfusion assessment and three of them were repeatedly scanned at three different time points for a reproducibility test. The myocardial perfusion of healthy mice obtained by the SI-method, 5.7+/-1.6 ml/g/min, was similar (p=0.38) to that obtained by the conventional T1 method, 5.6+/- 2.3 ml/g/min. The reproducibility of the SI method shows acceptable results: the

  12. Whole-Brain CT Perfusion to Quantify Acute Ischemic Penumbra and Core.

    PubMed

    Lin, Longting; Bivard, Andrew; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh; Levi, Christopher R; Parsons, Mark W

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To validate the use of perfusion computed tomography (CT) with whole-brain coverage to measure the ischemic penumbra and core and to compare its performance to that of limited-coverage perfusion CT. Materials and Methods Institutional ethics committee approval and informed consent were obtained. Patients (n = 296) who underwent 320-detector CT perfusion within 6 hours of the onset of ischemic stroke were studied. First, the ischemic volume at CT perfusion was compared with the penumbra and core reference values at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to derive CT perfusion penumbra and core thresholds. Second, the thresholds were tested in a different group of patients to predict the final infarction at diffusion-weighted imaging 24 hours after CT perfusion. Third, the change in ischemic volume delineated by the optimal penumbra and core threshold was determined as the brain coverage was gradually reduced from 160 mm to 20 mm. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test, concordance correlation coefficient (CCC), and analysis of variance were used for the first, second, and third steps, respectively. Results CT perfusion at penumbra and core thresholds resulted in the least volumetric difference from MR imaging reference values with delay times greater than 3 seconds and delay-corrected cerebral blood flow of less than 30% (P = .34 and .33, respectively). When the thresholds were applied to the new group of patients, prediction of the final infarction was allowed with delay times greater than 3 seconds in patients with no recanalization of the occluded artery (CCC, 0.96 [95% confidence interval: 0.92, 0.98]) and with delay-corrected cerebral blood flow less than 30% in patients with complete recanalization (CCC, 0.91 [95% confidence interval: 0.83, 0.95]). However, the ischemic volume with a delay time greater than 3 seconds was underestimated when the brain coverage was reduced to 80 mm (P = .04) and the core volume measured as cerebral blood flow less than 30% was

  13. Modeling mucosal candidiasis in larval zebrafish by swimbladder injection.

    PubMed

    Gratacap, Remi L; Bergeron, Audrey C; Wheeler, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Early defense against mucosal pathogens consists of both an epithelial barrier and innate immune cells. The immunocompetency of both, and their intercommunication, are paramount for the protection against infections. The interactions of epithelial and innate immune cells with a pathogen are best investigated in vivo, where complex behavior unfolds over time and space. However, existing models do not allow for easy spatio-temporal imaging of the battle with pathogens at the mucosal level. The model developed here creates a mucosal infection by direct injection of the fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, into the swimbladder of juvenile zebrafish. The resulting infection enables high-resolution imaging of epithelial and innate immune cell behavior throughout the development of mucosal disease. The versatility of this method allows for interrogation of the host to probe the detailed sequence of immune events leading to phagocyte recruitment and to examine the roles of particular cell types and molecular pathways in protection. In addition, the behavior of the pathogen as a function of immune attack can be imaged simultaneously by using fluorescent protein-expressing C. albicans. Increased spatial resolution of the host-pathogen interaction is also possible using the described rapid swimbladder dissection technique. The mucosal infection model described here is straightforward and highly reproducible, making it a valuable tool for the study of mucosal candidiasis. This system may also be broadly translatable to other mucosal pathogens such as mycobacterial, bacterial or viral microbes that normally infect through epithelial surfaces.

  14. Modeling Mucosal Candidiasis in Larval Zebrafish by Swimbladder Injection

    PubMed Central

    Gratacap, Remi L.; Bergeron, Audrey C.; Wheeler, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Early defense against mucosal pathogens consists of both an epithelial barrier and innate immune cells. The immunocompetency of both, and their intercommunication, are paramount for the protection against infections. The interactions of epithelial and innate immune cells with a pathogen are best investigated in vivo, where complex behavior unfolds over time and space. However, existing models do not allow for easy spatio-temporal imaging of the battle with pathogens at the mucosal level. The model developed here creates a mucosal infection by direct injection of the fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, into the swimbladder of juvenile zebrafish. The resulting infection enables high-resolution imaging of epithelial and innate immune cell behavior throughout the development of mucosal disease. The versatility of this method allows for interrogation of the host to probe the detailed sequence of immune events leading to phagocyte recruitment and to examine the roles of particular cell types and molecular pathways in protection. In addition, the behavior of the pathogen as a function of immune attack can be imaged simultaneously by using fluorescent protein-expressing C. albicans. Increased spatial resolution of the host-pathogen interaction is also possible using the described rapid swimbladder dissection technique. The mucosal infection model described here is straightforward and highly reproducible, making it a valuable tool for the study of mucosal candidiasis. This system may also be broadly translatable to other mucosal pathogens such as mycobacterial, bacterial or viral microbes that normally infect through epithelial surfaces. PMID:25490695

  15. Oral Mucosal Lesions in Indians From Northeast Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Patricia Ramos; Porto, Lia Pontes Arruda; dos Santos, Jean Nunes; e Ribeiro, Livia Silva Figueiredo; de Aquino Xavier, Flavia Caló; Figueiredo, Andreia Leal; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions, and their risk indicators in adult Kiriri Indians from Northeast Brazil. Clinical oral examination was performed on a representative sample of 223 Indians (age ≥19 years). A systematic evaluation of lips, labial mucosa and sulcus, commissures, buccal mucosa and sulcus, gingiva and alveolar ridge, tongue, floor of the mouth, and soft and hard palate was performed. Bivariate analysis was conducted to assess associations between mucosal conditions and age, gender, income, educational level, diabetic status, and smoking status. Mucosal lesions were found in 50 participants (22.4%). The most prevalent lesions were fistulae (6.2%) and traumatic ulcers (4.48%). Oral mucosal was associated with higher age (≥35 years; odds ratio [OR] = 1.99, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05–3.76, P = 0.03) and lower education level (<9 years; OR = 2.13, 95% CI: 0.96–4.71, P = 0.06). Mucosal conditions are prevalent in Kiriri Indians and the presence of mucosal lesions is associated with advanced age and lower education. A public health program aimed at preventing and treating mucosal lesions and targeted toward the high-risk group is vital to improve the oral health status of this population. PMID:25501053

  16. Mucosal healing in inflammatory bowel diseases: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Neurath, Markus F; Travis, Simon P L

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies have identified mucosal healing on endoscopy as a key prognostic parameter in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), thus highlighting the role of endoscopy for monitoring of disease activity in IBD. In fact, mucosal healing has emerged as a key treatment goal in IBD that predicts sustained clinical remission and resection-free survival of patients. The structural basis of mucosal healing is an intact barrier function of the gut epithelium that prevents translocation of commensal bacteria into the mucosa and submucosa with subsequent immune cell activation. Thus, mucosal healing should be considered as an initial event in the suppression of inflammation of deeper layers of the bowel wall, rather than as a sign of complete healing of gut inflammation. In this systematic review, the clinical studies on mucosal healing are summarised and the effects of anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive drugs such as 5-aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, azathioprine, ciclosporin and anti-TNF antibodies (adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, infliximab) on mucosal healing are discussed. Finally, the implications of mucosal healing for subsequent clinical management in patients with IBD are highlighted. PMID:22842618

  17. Mucosal adenosine stimulates chloride secretion in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, A.D.; Clancy, G.; Welsh, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    Adenosine is a local regulator of a variety of physiological functions in many tissues and has been observed to stimulate secretion in several Cl-secreting epithelia. In canine tracheal epithelium the authors found that adenosine stimulates Cl secretion from both the mucosal and submucosal surfaces. Addition of adenosine, or its analogue 2-chloroadenosine, to the mucosal surface potently stimulated Cl secretion with no effect on the rate of Na absorption. Stimulation resulted from an interaction of adenosine with adenosine receptors, because it was blocked by the adenosine receptor blocker, 8-phenyltheophylline. The adenosine receptor was a stimulatory receptor as judged by the rank-order potency of adenosine and its analogues and by the increase in cellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels produced by 2-chloroadenosine. Adenosine also stimulated Cl secretion when it was added to the submucosal surface, although the maximal increase in secretion was less and it was much less potent. The observation that mucosal 8-phenyletheophylline blocked the effect of submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, whereas submucosal 8-phenyltheophylline did not prevent a response to mucosal or submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, suggests that adenosine receptors are located on the mucosal surface. Thus submucosal adenosine may stimulate secretion by crossing the epithelium and interacting with receptors located on the mucosal surface. Because adenosine can be released from mast cells located in the airway lumen in response to inhaled material, and because adenosine stimulated secretion from the mucosal surface, it may be in a unique position to control the epithelium on a regional level.

  18. The mucosal immune system: From dentistry to vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    KIYONO, Hiroshi; AZEGAMI, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is the beginning of the aero-digestive tract, which is covered by mucosal epithelium continuously under the threat of invasion of pathogens, it is thus protected by the mucosal immune system. In the early phase of our scientific efforts for the demonstration of mucosal immune system, dental science was one of major driving forces due to their foreseeability to use oral immunity for the control of oral diseases. The mucosal immune system is divided functionally into, but interconnected inductive and effector sites. Intestinal Peyer’s patches (PPs) are an inductive site containing antigen-sampling M cells and immunocompetent cells required to initiate antigen-specific immune responses. At effector sites, PP-originated antigen-specific IgA B cells become plasma cells to produce polymeric IgA and form secretory IgA by binding to poly-Ig receptor expressed on epithelial cells for protective immunity. The development of new-generation mucosal vaccines, including the rice-based oral vaccine MucoRice, on the basis of the coordinated mucosal immune system is a promising strategy for the control of mucosal infectious diseases. PMID:26460320

  19. Oral mucosal status and major salivary gland function

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, A.; Fox, P.C.; Ship, J.A.; Atkinson, J.C.; Macynski, A.A.; Baum, B.J. )

    1990-07-01

    Normal salivary function is considered to be critical for the maintenance of healthy oral mucosa. However, few studies have examined mucosal changes in patients with objectively documented salivary gland performance. In the present report, the mucosal status of 298 subjects being evaluated in a dry mouth clinic was assessed. A complete oral examination was performed and unstimulated and stimulated salivary samples were collected separately from the parotid and submandibular/sublingual glands. Data were analyzed according to diagnosis and salivary output after the assignment of an oral mucosal rating to each subject. In general, the mucosal surfaces were well preserved and infections were not seen. Patients evaluated for Sjoegren's syndrome and radiation-induced xerostomia had the lowest salivary gland performance but displayed a mucosal status similar to denture-wearing healthy subjects or patients with normal salivary flow who had idiopathic xerostomia. However, those patients with a total lack of salivary flow rarely had normal-appearing oral mucosa. These results confirm a role for saliva in oral mucosal preservation and also suggest that other factors may act to maintain oral mucosal integrity.

  20. Estimation of bone perfusion as a function of intramedullary pressure in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.S.; Lehner, C.E.; Pearson, D.W.; Kanikula, T.M.; Adler, G.G.; Venci, R.; Lanphier, E.H.; De Luca, P.M.

    1985-05-01

    It has been reported previously that following decompression (i.e. diving ascents) the intramedullary pressure (IMP) in bone can rise dramatically and possibly by the mechanism which can induce dysbaric osteonecrosis or the ''silent bends''. If the blood supply for the bone transverses the marrow compartment, than an increase in IMP could cause a temporary decrease in perfusion or hemostasis and hence ischemia leading to bone necrosis. To test this hypothesis, the authors measured the perfusion of bone in sheep as a function of IMP. The bone perfusion was estimated by measuring the perfusion-limited clearance of Ar-41 (E..gamma..=1293 keV, T/sub 1/2/=1.83 h) from the bone mineral matrix of sheep's tibia. The argon gas was formed in vivo by the fast neutron activation of Ca-44 to Ar-41 following the Ca-44(n,..cap alpha..) reaction. Clearance of Ar-41 was measured by time gated gamma-ray spectroscopy. These results indicate that an elevation of intramedullary pressure can decrease perfusion in bone and may cause bone necrosis.

  1. Repeatability and reproducibility of optic nerve head perfusion measurements using optical coherence tomography angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Bojikian, Karine D.; Xin, Chen; Wen, Joanne C.; Gupta, Divakar; Zhang, Qinqin; Mudumbai, Raghu C.; Johnstone, Murray A.; Chen, Philip P.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) has increasingly become a clinically useful technique in ophthalmic imaging. We evaluate the repeatability and reproducibility of blood perfusion in the optic nerve head (ONH) measured using optical microangiography (OMAG)-based OCTA. Ten eyes from 10 healthy volunteers are recruited and scanned three times with a 68-kHz Cirrus HD-OCT 5000-based OMAG prototype system (Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc., Dublin, California) centered at the ONH involving two separate visits within six weeks. Vascular images are generated with OMAG processing by detecting the differences in OCT signals between consecutive B-scans acquired at the same retina location. ONH perfusion is quantified as flux, vessel area density, and normalized flux within the ONH for the prelaminar, lamina cribrosa, and the full ONH. Coefficient of variation (CV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) are used to evaluate intravisit and intervisit repeatability, and interobserver reproducibility. ONH perfusion measurements show high repeatability [CV≤3.7% (intravisit) and ≤5.2% (intervisit)] and interobserver reproducibility (ICC≤0.966) in all three layers by three metrics. OCTA provides a noninvasive method to visualize and quantify ONH perfusion in human eyes with excellent repeatability and reproducibility, which may add additional insight into ONH perfusion in clinical practice.

  2. In situ perfusion in rodents to explore intestinal drug absorption: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Stappaerts, Jef; Brouwers, Joachim; Annaert, Pieter; Augustijns, Patrick

    2015-01-30

    The in situ intestinal perfusion technique in rodents is a very important absorption model, not only because of its predictive value, but it is also very suitable to unravel the mechanisms underlying intestinal drug absorption. This literature overview covers a number of specific applications for which the in situ intestinal perfusion set-up can be applied in favor of established in vitro absorption tools, such as the Caco-2 cell model. Qualities including the expression of drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes relevant for human intestinal absorption and compatibility with complex solvent systems render the in situ technique the most designated absorption model to perform transporter-metabolism studies or to evaluate the intestinal absorption from biorelevant media. Over the years, the in situ intestinal perfusion model has exhibited an exceptional ability to adapt to the latest challenges in drug absorption profiling. For instance, the introduction of the mesenteric vein cannulation allows determining the appearance of compounds in the blood and is of great use, especially when evaluating the absorption of compounds undergoing intestinal metabolism. Moreover, the use of the closed loop intestinal perfusion set-up is interesting when compounds or perfusion media are scarce. Compatibility with emerging trends in pharmaceutical profiling, such as the use of knockout or transgenic animals, generates unparalleled possibilities to gain mechanistic insight into specific absorption processes. Notwithstanding the fact that the in situ experiments are technically challenging and relatively time-consuming, the model offers great opportunities to gain insight into the processes determining intestinal drug absorption.

  3. Self-driven perfusion culture system using a paper-based double-layered scaffold.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Ai; Arisaka, Yoshinori; Takeda, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Shear stress caused by fluid flow is known to promote tissue development from cells in vivo. Therefore, perfusion cultures have been studied to investigate the mechanisms involved and to fabricate engineered tissues in vitro, particularly those that include blood vessels. Microfluidic devices, which function with fine machinery of chambers and microsyringes for fluid flow and have small culture areas, are conventionally used for perfusion culture. In contrast, we have developed a self-driven perfusion culture system by using a paper-based double-layered scaffold as the fundamental component. Gelatin microfibers were electrospun onto a paper material to prepare the scaffold system, in which the constant perfusion of the medium and the scaffold for cell adhesion/proliferation were functionally divided into a paper and a gelatin microfiber layer, respectively. By applying both the capillary action and siphon phenomenon of the paper-based scaffold, which bridged two medium chambers at different height levels, a self-driven medium flow was achieved and the flow rate was also stable, constant, and quantitatively controllable. Moreover, the culture area was enlargeable to the cm(2) scale. The endothelial cells cultivated on this system oriented along the medium-flow direction, suggesting that the shear stress caused by medium flow was effectively applied. This perfusion culture system is expected to be useful for fabricating three-dimensional and large engineered tissues in the future. PMID:27550929

  4. 3D perfusion mapping in the intact mouse heart after myocardial infarction using myocardial contrast echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinbo; Yang, Zequan; French, Brent A.; Hossack, John A.

    2005-04-01

    An intact mouse model of surgically-induced myocardial infarction (MI) caused by permanent occlusion of the Left Anterior Descending (LAD) coronary artery was studied. Normal mice with no occlusion were also studied as controls. For each mouse, contrast enhanced ultrasound images of the heart were acquired in parallel cross-sections perpendicular to the sternum at millimeter increments. For accurate 3D reconstruction, ECG gating and a tri-axial adjustable micromanipulator were used for temporal and spatial registration. Ultrasound images at steady-state of blood refilling were color-coded in each slice to show relative perfusion. Myocardial perfusion defects and necrosis were also examined postmortem by staining with Phthalo blue and TTC red dyes. Good correlation (R>0.93) in perfused area size was observed between in vivo measurements and histological staining. A 3D multi-slice model and a 3D rendering of perfusion distribution were created and showed a promising match with postmortem results, lending further credence to its use as a more comprehensive and more reliable tool for in vivo assessment of myocardial perfusion than 2D tomographic analysis.

  5. Increased hippocampal blood volume and normal blood flow in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Talati, Pratik; Rane, Swati; Skinner, Jack; Gore, John; Heckers, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have provided compelling evidence for abnormal hippocampal activity in schizophrenia. Most studies made inferences about baseline hippocampal activity using a single hemodynamic parameter (e.g., blood volume or blood flow). Here we studied several hemodynamic measures in the same cohort to test the hypothesis of increased hippocampal activity in schizophrenia. We used dynamic susceptibility contrast- (DSC-) magnetic resonance imaging to assess blood volume, blood flow, and mean transit time in the hippocampus of 15 patients with chronic schizophrenia and 15 healthy controls. Left and right hippocampal measurements were combined for absolute measures of cerebral blood volume (CBV), blood flow (CBF), and mean transit time (MTT). We found significantly increased hippocampal CBV, but normal CBF and MTT, in schizophrenia. The uncoupling of CBV and CBF could be due to several factors, including antipsychotic medication, loss of cerebral perfusion pressure, or angiogenesis. Further studies need to incorporate several complementary imaging modalities to better characterize hippocampal dysfunction in schizophrenia. PMID:25896442

  6. Renal blood flow and oxygenation drive nephron progenitor differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rymer, Christopher; Paredes, Jose; Halt, Kimmo; Schaefer, Caitlin; Wiersch, John; Zhang, Guangfeng; Potoka, Douglas; Vainio, Seppo; Gittes, George K; Bates, Carlton M; Sims-Lucas, Sunder

    2014-08-01

    During kidney development, the vasculature develops via both angiogenesis (branching from major vessels) and vasculogenesis (de novo vessel formation). The formation and perfusion of renal blood vessels are vastly understudied. In the present study, we investigated the regulatory role of renal blood flow and O2 concentration on nephron progenitor differentiation during ontogeny. To elucidate the presence of blood flow, ultrasound-guided intracardiac microinjection was performed, and FITC-tagged tomato lectin was perfused through the embryo. Kidneys were costained for the vasculature, ureteric epithelium, nephron progenitors, and nephron structures. We also analyzed nephron differentiation in normoxia compared with hypoxia. At embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5), the major vascular branches were perfused; however, smaller-caliber peripheral vessels remained unperfused. By E15.5, peripheral vessels started to be perfused as well as glomeruli. While the interior kidney vessels were perfused, the peripheral vessels (nephrogenic zone) remained unperfused. Directly adjacent and internal to the nephrogenic zone, we found differentiated nephron structures surrounded and infiltrated by perfused vessels. Furthermore, we determined that at low O2 concentration, little nephron progenitor differentiation was observed; at higher O2 concentrations, more differentiation of the nephron progenitors was induced. The formation of the developing renal vessels occurs before the onset of blood flow. Furthermore, renal blood flow and oxygenation are critical for nephron progenitor differentiation. PMID:24920757

  7. Renal blood flow and oxygenation drive nephron progenitor differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rymer, Christopher; Paredes, Jose; Halt, Kimmo; Schaefer, Caitlin; Wiersch, John; Zhang, Guangfeng; Potoka, Douglas; Vainio, Seppo; Gittes, George K; Bates, Carlton M; Sims-Lucas, Sunder

    2014-08-01

    During kidney development, the vasculature develops via both angiogenesis (branching from major vessels) and vasculogenesis (de novo vessel formation). The formation and perfusion of renal blood vessels are vastly understudied. In the present study, we investigated the regulatory role of renal blood flow and O2 concentration on nephron progenitor differentiation during ontogeny. To elucidate the presence of blood flow, ultrasound-guided intracardiac microinjection was performed, and FITC-tagged tomato lectin was perfused through the embryo. Kidneys were costained for the vasculature, ureteric epithelium, nephron progenitors, and nephron structures. We also analyzed nephron differentiation in normoxia compared with hypoxia. At embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5), the major vascular branches were perfused; however, smaller-caliber peripheral vessels remained unperfused. By E15.5, peripheral vessels started to be perfused as well as glomeruli. While the interior kidney vessels were perfused, the peripheral vessels (nephrogenic zone) remained unperfused. Directly adjacent and internal to the nephrogenic zone, we found differentiated nephron structures surrounded and infiltrated by perfused vessels. Furthermore, we determined that at low O2 concentration, little nephron progenitor differentiation was observed; at higher O2 concentrations, more differentiation of the nephron progenitors was induced. The formation of the developing renal vessels occurs before the onset of blood flow. Furthermore, renal blood flow and oxygenation are critical for nephron progenitor differentiation.

  8. Protective effect of histamine microinjected into the cerebellar fastigial nucleus on stress-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Xiao; Tang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Jianfu; Chen, Ke; Zhang, Yanming; Wang, Changcheng; Fei, Sujuan; Zhu, Jinzhou; Zhu, Shengping; Liu, Zhangbo; Li, Tingting; Lv, Shengxiang; Liang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We investigated the effffects and the possible mechanism of microinjection of histamine into cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN) on stress-induced gastric mucosal damage (SGMD) in rats. The effect of microinjection of histamine into FN on SGMD was observed. Methods: The model of SGMD was established by restraint and water (21 ± 1°C)-immersion (RWI) for 3 h in rats. The gastric mucosal damage index indicated the severity of SGMD. Western blotting was performed to assess gastric mucosal cell apoptosis and proliferation. Results: We observed that histamine microinjection into the FN markedly attenuated SGMD in a dose-dependent manner, and was prevented by pre-treatment with the ranitidine (a selective histamine H2 receptor antagonist) into the FN. The effect of histamine was abolished by pre-treatment with 3-MPA (a glutamic acid decarboxylase antagonist) into the FN. There was a decrease in the discharge frequency of greater splanchnic nerve, and an increase in gastric mucosal blood flow after histamine injection into the FN. Additionally, anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative factors of gastric mucosa might be involved in this process. Conclusion: The exogenous histamine in FN participates in the regulation of SGMD, and our results may help to provide new ideas on the treatment of gastroenterological diseases. PMID:26550464

  9. Tolerance of gastric mucosal flap to postoperative irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Devineni, V.R.; Hayden, R.; Fredrickson, J.; Sicard, G. )

    1991-05-01

    When malignant lesions of the oral cavity, base of tongue, and oropharynx are treated with radical resection, adequate reconstruction is required. The free gastric mucosal flap with microvascular transfer is being used with increasing frequency at Washington University Medical Center. Because of the advanced nature of the primary lesions, most patients also require postoperative radiation therapy. In this paper the tolerance of the gastric mucosal flap to postoperative radiation therapy is reviewed. The changes resulting from radiation therapy in the mucosal flap were found to be acceptable, and no major complications were encountered.

  10. Optic nerve head perfusion in normal eyes and eyes with glaucoma using optical coherence tomography-based microangiography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Bojikian, Karine D.; Gupta, Divakar; Wen, Joanne C.; Zhang, Qinqin; Xin, Chen; Kono, Rei; Mudumbai, Raghu C.; Johnstone, Murray A.; Chen, Philip P.

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the differences of perfusion in the optic nerve head (ONH) between normal and glaucomatous eyes using optical microangiography (OMAG) based optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography technique. Methods One eye from each subject was scanned with a 68 kHz Cirrus 5000 HD-OCT-based OMAG prototype system centered at the ONH (Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc, Dublin, CA, USA). Microvascular images were generated from the OMAG dataset by detecting the differences in OCT signal between consecutive B-scans. The pre-laminar layer (preLC) was isolated by a semi-automatic segmentation program. En face OMAG images for preLC were generated using signals with highest blood flow signal intensity. ONH perfusion was quantified as flux, vessel area density, and normalized flux within the ONH. Standard t-tests were performed to analyze the ONH perfusion differences between normal and glaucomatous eyes. Linear regression models were constructed to analyze the correlation between ONH perfusion and other clinical measurements. Results Twenty normal and 21 glaucoma subjects were enrolled. Glaucomatous eyes had significantly lower ONH perfusion in preLC in all three perfusion metrics compared to normal eyes (P≤0.0003). Significant correlations between ONH perfusion and disease severity as well as structural changes were detected in glaucomatous eyes (P≤0.012). Conclusions ONH perfusion detected by OMAG showed significant differences between glaucoma and normal controls and was significantly correlated with disease severity and structural defects in glaucomatous eyes. ONH perfusion measurement using OMAG may provide useful information for detection and monitoring of glaucoma. PMID:27190764

  11. Luminal distension as a possible consequence of experimental intestinal perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Wingate, David; Hyams, Ashley; Phillips, Sidney

    1974-01-01

    In an experimental jejunal perfusion study, distress in healthy subjects occurred during eight out of 16 perfusions in which intestinal secretion was provoked. Calculation demonstrates the volumetric consequences of inadequate recovery of secretory perfusates, and analysis of the perfusion studies shows that distress was significantly associated with poor recovery of the perfusate. These observations are pertinent to increasing interest in the phenomenon of intestinal fluid secretion. PMID:4435588

  12. Ex vivo lung perfusion and reconditioning.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Cypel, Marcelo; Massad, Ehab; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2011-01-01

    Normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion can act as a platform for the evaluation and repair of donor lungs. An acellular hyperosmolar solution is perfused anterograde through the donor lungs at 40% of the estimated cardiac output. Following oxygenation of the perfusate by the lung, it passes through a hollow fiber oxygenator supplied with a hypoxic gas mixture to remove oxygen and to maintain physiological carbon dioxide levels. Flow through a heat exchanger to maintain normothermia and a leukocyte filter to remove demarginated leukocytes completes the circuit. Lung function can be measured by the difference in PO2 between the perfusate postlung and postmembrane and by physiological parameters. Utilization of this method of ex vivo donor lung evaluation should reduce concerns of primary graft dysfunction and increase utilization rates of donor lungs. PMID:24412979

  13. Bubble dynamics in perfused tissue undergoing decompression.

    PubMed

    Meisel, S; Nir, A; Kerem, D

    1981-02-01

    A mathematical model describing bubble dynamics in a perfused tissue undergoing decompression is presented, taking into account physical expansion and inward diffusion from surrounding supersaturated tissue as growth promoting factors and tissue gas elimination by perfusion, tissue elasticity, surface tension and inherent unsaturation as resolving driving forces. The expected behavior after a step reduction of pressure of a bubble initially existing in the tissue, displaying both growth and resolution has been demonstrated. A strong perfusion-dependence of bubble resolution time at low perfusion rates is apparent. The model can account for various exposure pressures and saturation fractions of any inert gas-tissue combination for which a set of physical and physiological parameters is available.

  14. Comparison of Two Algorithms for Analysis of Perfusion Computed Tomography Data for Evaluation of Cerebral Microcirculation in Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Trofimov, Alexey O; Kalentiev, George; Voennov, Oleg; Yuriev, Michail; Agarkova, Darya; Trofimova, Svetlana; Bragin, Denis E

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was comparison of two algorithms of perfusion computed tomography (PCT) data analysis for evaluation of cerebral microcirculation in the perifocal zone of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Twenty patients with CSDH after polytrauma were included in the study. The same PCT data were assessed quantitatively in cortical brain region beneath the CSDH (zone 1), and in the corresponding contralateral brain hemisphere (zone 2) without and with the use of perfusion calculation mode excluding vascular pixel 'Remote Vessels' (RV); 1st and 2nd analysis method, respectively. Comparison with normal values for perfusion indices in the zone 1 in the 1st analysis method showed a significant (p < 0.01) increase in CBV and CBF, and no significant increase in MTT and TTP. Use of the RV mode (2nd analysis method) showed no statistically reliable change of perfusion parameters in the microcirculatory blood flow of the 2nd zone. Maintenance of microcirculatory blood flow perfusion reflects the preservation of cerebral blood flow autoregulation in patients with CSDH. PMID:27526170

  15. Disorders of cochlear blood flow.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Tsutomu; Naganawa, Shinji; Sone, Michihiko; Tominaga, Mitsuo; Hayashi, Hideo; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Liu, Xiuli; Nuttall, Alfred L

    2003-09-01

    The cochlea is principally supplied from the inner ear artery (labyrinthine artery), which is usually a branch of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. Cochlear blood flow is a function of cochlear perfusion pressure, which is calculated as the difference between mean arterial blood pressure and inner ear fluid pressure. Many otologic disorders such as noise-induced hearing loss, endolymphatic hydrops and presbycusis are suspected of being related to alterations in cochlear blood flow. However, the human cochlea is not easily accessible for investigation because this delicate sensory organ is hidden deep in the temporal bone. In patients with sensorineural hearing loss, magnetic resonance imaging, laser-Doppler flowmetry and ultrasonography have been used to investigate the status of cochlear blood flow. There have been many reports of hearing loss that were considered to be caused by blood flow disturbance in the cochlea. However, direct evidence of blood flow disturbance in the cochlea is still lacking in most of the cases.

  16. Induction of Murine Mucosal CCR5-Reactive Antibodies as an Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Barassi, C.; Soprana, E.; Pastori, C.; Longhi, R.; Buratti, E.; Lillo, F.; Marenzi, C.; Lazzarin, A.; Siccardi, A. G.; Lopalco, L.

    2005-01-01

    The genital mucosa is the main site of initial human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) contact with its host. In spite of repeated sexual exposure, some individuals remain seronegative, and a small fraction of them produce immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA autoantibodies directed against CCR5, which is probably the cause of the CCR5-minus phenotype observed in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of these subjects. These antibodies recognize the 89-to-102 extracellular loop of CCR5 in its native conformation. The aim of this study was to induce infection-preventing mucosal anti-CCR5 autoantibodies in individuals at high risk of HIV infection. Thus, we generated chimeric immunogens containing the relevant CCR5 peptide in the context of the capsid protein of Flock House virus, a presentation system in which it is possible to engineer conformationally constrained peptide in a highly immunogenic form. Administered in mice via the systemic or mucosal route, the immunogens elicited anti-CCR5 IgG and IgA (in sera and vaginal fluids). Analogous to exposed seronegative individuals, mice producing anti-CCR5 autoantibodies express significantly reduced levels of CCR5 on the surfaces of CD4+ cells from peripheral blood and vaginal washes. In vitro studies have shown that murine IgG and IgA (i) specifically bind human and mouse CD4+ lymphocytes and the CCR5-transfected U87 cell line, (ii) down-regulate CCR5 expression of CD4+ cells from both humans and untreated mice, (iii) inhibit Mip-1β chemotaxis of CD4+ CCR5+ lymphocytes, and (iv) neutralize HIV R5 strains. These data suggest that immune strategies aimed at generating anti-CCR5 antibodies at the level of the genital mucosa might be feasible and represent a strategy to induce mucosal HIV-protective immunity. PMID:15890924

  17. Designer blood vessels and therapeutic revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Joseph D; Galis, Zorina S

    2003-01-01

    Inadequate vascular perfusion leads to fatal heart attacks, chronic ulcers, and other serious clinical conditions. The body's capacity to restore vascular perfusion through angiogenesis and arteriogenesis is often impaired by pre-existing disease, and availability of native replacements for nonfunctional arteries is limited in many patients. Thus, recreating blood vessels of various calibres through novel engineering technologies has emerged as a radical option among therapeutic strategies for revascularization. Ranging from artificial, recycled or reassembled natural conduits to sophisticated microdevices, we refer to these as ‘designer blood vessels'. Our common efforts to continuously improve vascular replacement design have provided many clues about our own blood vessels, but nature's ability to create nonthrombogenic, immunocompatible, strong, yet biologically responsive blood vessels remains unparalleled. Just as art reproductions never equal the original masterpiece, designer blood vessels may never attain nature's perfection. Nevertheless, they will provide a valuable option as long as they come close enough and are available to many. PMID:14534146

  18. Vicarious Audiovisual Learning in Perfusion Education

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Thomas E.; Holt, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Perfusion technology is a mechanical and visual science traditionally taught with didactic instruction combined with clinical experience. It is difficult to provide perfusion students the opportunity to experience difficult clinical situations, set up complex perfusion equipment, or observe corrective measures taken during catastrophic events because of patient safety concerns. Although high fidelity simulators offer exciting opportunities for future perfusion training, we explore the use of a less costly low fidelity form of simulation instruction, vicarious audiovisual learning. Two low fidelity modes of instruction; description with text and a vicarious, first person audiovisual production depicting the same content were compared. Students (n = 37) sampled from five North American perfusion schools were prospectively randomized to one of two online learning modules, text or video. These modules described the setup and operation of the MAQUET ROTAFLOW standalone centrifugal console and pump. Using a 10 question multiple-choice test, students were assessed immediately after viewing the module (test #1) and then again 2 weeks later (test #2) to determine cognition and recall of the module content. In addition, students completed a questionnaire assessing the learning preferences of today’s perfusion student. Mean test scores from test #1 for video learners (n = 18) were significantly higher (88.89%) than for text learners (n = 19) (74.74%), (p < .05). The same was true for test #2 where video learners (n = 10) had an average score of 77% while text learners (n = 9) scored 60% (p < .05). Survey results indicated video learners were more satisfied with their learning module than text learners. Vicarious audiovisual learning modules may be an efficacious, low cost means of delivering perfusion training on subjects such as equipment setup and operation. Video learning appears to improve cognition and retention of learned content and may play an important

  19. Pancreas transplants: Evaluation using perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuni, C.C.; du Cret, R.P.; Boudreau, R.J.

    1989-07-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphic perfusion studies in evaluating pancreas transplant patients, we reviewed 56 of these studies in 22 patients who had 27 transplants. Seventeen patients underwent two or more studies. The perfusion studies were performed with 20 mCi (740 MBq) of 99mTc-DTPA injected as a bolus followed by eight to 16 serial 2-sec images and a 500,000-count immediate static image. Images were evaluated for (1) the time and intensity of pancreatic peak radioactivity relative to the time and intensity of the iliac arterial peak; (2) relative pancreatic to iliac arterial intensity on the static image; and (3) size, homogeneity, and definition of the pancreas. Clinical diagnoses at the time of scintigraphy of normal function (n = 36), rejection (n = 13), pancreatitis (n = 6), or arterial thrombosis (n = 1) were based on insulin requirement, urine amylase, serum glucose, serum amylase, response to therapy, cultures, CT, MR, sonography, scintigraphy with 67Ga or 111In-WBCs, percutaneous drainage results, angiography, surgery, and pathologic examination of resected transplants. Three 99mTc-DTPA perfusion studies showed no pancreatic perfusion, four showed decreasing perfusion on serial studies, and five showed progressive loss of definition of the pancreas on serial studies. Of the three patients with no detectable perfusion, one had a normally functioning transplant, one had arterial thrombosis with transplant infarction, and one had severe rejection with minimal function. Decreasing perfusion was associated with rejection in three patients and pancreatitis in one. Decreasing definition was seen in four patients with rejection and one with pancreatitis. We conclude that perfusion scintigraphy is useful, primarily when performed serially, although nonspecific for evaluating pancreas transplants.

  20. Improved exercise myocardial perfusion during lidoflazine therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, W.; Narahara, K.A.; Park, J.

    1983-11-01

    Lidoflazine is a synthetic drug with calcium-channel blocking effects. In a study of 6 patients with severe classic angina pectoris, single-blind administration of lidoflazine was associated with improved myocardial perfusion during exercise as determined by thallium-201 stress scintigraphy. These studies demonstrate that lidoflazine therapy is associated with relief of angina, an increased physical work capacity, and improved regional myocardial perfusion during exercise.

  1. Sub-band denoising and spline curve fitting method for hemodynamic measurement in perfusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong-Dun; Huang, Hsiao-Ling; Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Chen, Chi-Chen; Chen, Ing-Yi; Wu, Liang-Chi; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Lin, Kang-Ping

    2003-05-01

    In clinical research, non-invasive MR perfusion imaging is capable of investigating brain perfusion phenomenon via various hemodynamic measurements, such as cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and mean trasnit time (MTT). These hemodynamic parameters are useful in diagnosing brain disorders such as stroke, infarction and periinfarct ischemia by further semi-quantitative analysis. However, the accuracy of quantitative analysis is usually affected by poor signal-to-noise ratio image quality. In this paper, we propose a hemodynamic measurement method based upon sub-band denoising and spline curve fitting processes to improve image quality for better hemodynamic quantitative analysis results. Ten sets of perfusion MRI data and corresponding PET images were used to validate the performance. For quantitative comparison, we evaluate gray/white matter CBF ratio. As a result, the hemodynamic semi-quantitative analysis result of mean gray to white matter CBF ratio is 2.10 +/- 0.34. The evaluated ratio of brain tissues in perfusion MRI is comparable to PET technique is less than 1-% difference in average. Furthermore, the method features excellent noise reduction and boundary preserving in image processing, and short hemodynamic measurement time.

  2. Initial testing of a 3D printed perfusion phantom using digital subtraction angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Rachel P.; Khobragade, Parag; Ying, Leslie; Snyder, Kenneth; Wack, David; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2015-03-01

    Perfusion imaging is the most applied modality for the assessment of acute stroke. Parameters such as Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF), Cerebral Blood volume (CBV) and Mean Transit Time (MTT) are used to distinguish the tissue infarct core and ischemic penumbra. Due to lack of standardization these parameters vary significantly between vendors and software even when provided with the same data set. There is a critical need to standardize the systems and make them more reliable. We have designed a uniform phantom to test and verify the perfusion systems. We implemented a flow loop with different flow rates (250, 300, 350 ml/min) and injected the same amount of contrast. The images of the phantom were acquired using a Digital Angiographic system. Since this phantom is uniform, projection images obtained using DSA is sufficient for initial validation. To validate the phantom we measured the contrast concentration at three regions of interest (arterial input, venous output, perfused area) and derived time density curves (TDC). We then calculated the maximum slope, area under the TDCs and flow. The maximum slope calculations were linearly increasing with increase in flow rate, the area under the curve decreases with increase in flow rate. There was 25% error between the calculated flow and measured flow. The derived TDCs were clinically relevant and the calculated flow, maximum slope and areas under the curve were sensitive to the measured flow. We have created a systematic way to calibrate existing perfusion systems and assess their reliability.

  3. Use of Ex Vivo Normothermic Perfusion for Quality Assessment of Discarded Human Donor Pancreases.

    PubMed

    Barlow, A D; Hamed, M O; Mallon, D H; Brais, R J; Gribble, F M; Scott, M A; Howat, W J; Bradley, J A; Bolton, E M; Pettigrew, G J; Hosgood, S A; Nicholson, M L; Saeb-Parsy, K

    2015-09-01

    A significant number of pancreases procured for transplantation are deemed unsuitable due to concerns about graft quality and the associated risk of complications. However, this decision is subjective and some declined grafts may be suitable for transplantation. Ex vivo normothermic perfusion (EVNP) prior to transplantation may allow a more objective assessment of graft quality and reduce discard rates. We report ex vivo normothermic perfusion of human pancreases procured but declined for transplantation, with ABO-compatible warm oxygenated packed red blood cells for 1-2 h. Five declined human pancreases were assessed using this technique after a median cold ischemia time of 13 h 19 min. One pancreas, with cold ischemia over 30 h, did not appear viable and was excluded. In the remaining pancreases, blood flow and pH were maintained throughout perfusion. Insulin secretion was observed in all four pancreases, but was lowest in an older donation after cardiac death pancreas. Amylase levels were highest in a gland with significant fat infiltration. This is the first study to assess the perfusion, injury, as measured by amylase, and exocrine function of human pancreases using EVNP and demonstrates the feasibility of the approach, although further refinements are required.

  4. Blood flow changes coincide with cellular rearrangements during blood vessel pruning in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Kochhan, Eva; Lenard, Anna; Ellertsdottir, Elin; Herwig, Lukas; Affolter, Markus; Belting, Heinz-Georg; Siekmann, Arndt F

    2013-01-01

    After the initial formation of a highly branched vascular plexus, blood vessel pruning generates a hierarchically structured network with improved flow characteristics. We report here on the cellular events that occur during the pruning of a defined blood vessel in the eye of developing zebrafish embryos. Time-lapse imaging reveals that the connection of a new blood vessel sprout with a previously perfused multicellular endothelial tube leads to the formation of a branched, Y-shaped structure. Subsequently, endothelial cells in parts of the previously perfused branch rearrange from a multicellular into a unicellular tube, followed by blood vessel detachment. This process is accompanied by endothelial cell death. Finally, we show that differences in blood flow between neighboring vessels are important for the completion of the pruning process. Our data suggest that flow induced changes in tubular architecture ensure proper blood vessel pruning. PMID:24146748

  5. Selected contribution: redistribution of pulmonary perfusion during weightlessness and increased gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenny, R. W.; Lamm, W. J.; Bernard, S. L.; An, D.; Chornuk, M.; Pool, S. L.; Wagner, W. W. Jr; Hlastala, M. P.; Robertson, H. T.

    2000-01-01

    To compare the relative contributions of gravity and vascular structure to the distribution of pulmonary blood flow, we flew with pigs on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration KC-135 aircraft. A series of parabolas created alternating weightlessness and 1.8-G conditions. Fluorescent microspheres of varying colors were injected into the pulmonary circulation to mark regional blood flow during different postural and gravitational conditions. The lungs were subsequently removed, air dried, and sectioned into approximately 2 cm(3) pieces. Flow to each piece was determined for the different conditions. Perfusion heterogeneity did not change significantly during weightlessness compared with normal and increased gravitational forces. Regional blood flow to each lung piece changed little despite alterations in posture and gravitational forces. With the use of multiple stepwise linear regression, the contributions of gravity and vascular structure to regional perfusion were separated. We conclude that both gravity and the geometry of the pulmonary vascular tree influence regional pulmonary blood flow. However, the structure of the vascular tree is the primary determinant of regional perfusion in these animals.

  6. Physiology and immunology of mucosal barriers in catfish (Ictalurus spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mucosal barriers of catfish (Ictalurus spp.) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient adsorption, osmoregulation, waste excretion, and environmental sensing. Catf...

  7. Patterns of postictal cerebral perfusion in idiopathic generalized epilepsy: a multi-delay multi-parametric arterial spin labelling perfusion MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangxiang; Lei, Du; Ren, Jiechuan; Zuo, Panli; Suo, Xueling; Wang, Danny J. J.; Wang, Meiyun; Zhou, Dong; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral haemodynamic status of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) is a very complicated process. Little attention has been paid to cerebral blood flow (CBF) alterations in IGE detected by arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the selection of an optimal delay time is difficult for single-delay ASL. Multi-delay multi-parametric ASL perfusion MRI overcomes the limitations of single-delay ASL. We applied multi-delay multi-parametric ASL perfusion MRI to investigate the patterns of postictal cerebral perfusion in IGE patients with absence seizures. A total of 21 IGE patients with absence seizures and 24 healthy control subjects were enrolled. IGE patients exhibited prolonged arterial transit time (ATT) in the left superior temporal gyrus. The mean CBF of IGE patients was significantly increased in the left middle temporal gyrus, left parahippocampal gyrus and left fusiform gyrus. Prolonged ATT in the left superior temporal gyrus was negatively correlated with the age at onset in IGE patients. This study demonstrated that cortical dysfunction in the temporal lobe and fusiform gyrus may be related to epileptic activity in IGE patients with absence seizures. This information can play an important role in elucidating the pathophysiological mechanism of IGE from a cerebral haemodynamic perspective. PMID:27374369

  8. Training methods and models for colonoscopic insertion, endoscopic mucosal resection, and endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Naohisa; Fernandopulle, Nilesh; Inada, Yutaka; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito

    2014-09-01

    Colonoscopic examination is considered an effective examination for the detection of colorectal cancers. Additionally, early colorectal cancers can be resected using endoscopic techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection. However, those examinations and treatments need special techniques. Various training methods are practiced to acquire such endoscopic techniques throughout the world. In clinical cases, magnetic positioning devices help endoscopic insertion by less experienced endoscopists. There is a physical model made by polyvinyl chloride and a virtual simulator for training of colonoscopic insertion. Various techniques including a method to apply pressure to the abdomen and consideration for patient's pain can be trained using these models. In view of extensive training of endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection, animal models are useful and actually used. Live animal models of minipig, which entails blood flow, are ideal and used frequently, but are cumbersome to prepare. On the other hand, ex vivo animal models using intestine of porcine and bovine are convenient for preparation and less expensive. Unique ex vivo animal models with blood flow have been developed recently and techniques for hemostasis can be practiced. With respect to a method of training for colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection, a stepwise system has been adopted throughout the world. Thus, first they observe the expert's technique, then practice training of animal models, and finally, they perform clinical rectal cases. The system is useful for a safe and definite procedure. In this review, we reveal various training methods for colonoscopic examinations and treatments.

  9. Visualization of mucosal vasculature with narrow band imaging: a theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quanzeng; Le, Du; Ramella-Roman, Jessica; Pfefer, Joshua

    2012-03-01

    Narrow band imaging (NBI) is a spectrally-selective reflectance imaging technique that is used as an adjunctive approach to endoscopic detection of mucosal abnormalities such as neoplastic lesions. While numerous clinical studies in tissue sites such as the esophagus, oral cavity and lung indicate the efficacy of this approach, it is not well theoretically understood. In this study, we performed Monte Carlo simulations to elucidate the factors that affect NBI device performance. The model geometry involved a two-layer turbid medium based on mucosal tissue optical properties and embedded cylindrical, blood-filled vessels at varying diameters and depths. Specifically, we studied the effect of bandpass filters (415+/-15 nm, 540+/-10 nm versus white light), blood vessel diameter (20-400 μm) and depth (30 - 450 μm), wavelength, and bandwidth on vessel contrast. Our results provide a quantitative evaluation of the two mechanisms that are commonly believed to be the primary components of NBI: (i) the increased contrast provided by high hemoglobin absorption and (ii) increase in the penetration depth produced by the decrease in scattering with increasing wavelength. Our MC model can provide novel, quantitative insight into NBI, may lead to improvements in its performance.

  10. Divergent mucosal and systemic responses in children in response to acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, D; Pichichero, M E

    2014-10-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM), induced by respiratory bacteria, is a significant cause of children seeking medical attention worldwide. Some children are highly prone to AOMs, suffering three to four recurrent infections per year (prone). We previously determined that this population of children could have diminished anti-bacterial immune responses in peripheral blood that could fail to limit bacterial colonization in the nasopharynx (NP). Here, we examined local NP and middle ear (ME) responses and compared them to peripheral blood to examine whether the mucosa responses were similar to the peripheral blood responses. Moreover, we examined differences in effector cytokine responses between these two populations in the NP, ME and blood compartments at the onset of an AOM caused by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae. We found that plasma effector cytokines patterned antigen-recall responses of CD4 T cells, with lower responses detected in prone children. ME cytokine levels did not mirror blood, but were more similar to the NP. Interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17 in the NP were similar in prone and non-prone children, while IL-2 production was higher in prone children. The immune responses diverged in the mucosal and blood compartments at the onset of a bacterial ME infection, thus highlighting differences between local and systemic immune responses that could co-ordinate anti-bacterial immune responses in young children.

  11. Role of mucus in gastric mucosal injury induced by local ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Seno, K; Joh, T; Yokoyama, Y; Itoh, M

    1995-09-01

    The role of gastric mucus was evaluated in a rat model of gastric epithelial damage induced by local ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) stress. In this model, blood-to-lumen chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (51Cr-EDTA) clearance served as an index of injury. Tetraprenyl acetone (TPA; 100 mg, 200 mg/kg IP) was used to stimulate mucus production. Administration of TPA increased both the hexosamine content in gastric tissue and the amount of alcian blue-periodic acid Schiff (AB-PAS) stained mucus in the mucosa in a dose-dependent manner. Increases