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Sample records for mucosal epithelial barrier

  1. Inflammation and the Intestinal Barrier: Leukocyte–Epithelial Cell Interactions, Cell Junction Remodeling, and Mucosal Repair

    PubMed Central

    Luissint, Anny-Claude; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal tract is lined by a single layer of columnar epithelial cells that forms a dynamic, permeable barrier allowing for selective absorption of nutrients, while restricting access to pathogens and food-borne antigens. Precise regulation of epithelial barrier function is therefore required for maintaining mucosal homeostasis and depends, in part, on barrier-forming elements within the epithelium and a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory factors in the mucosa. Pathologic states, such as inflammatory bowel disease, are associated with a leaky epithelial barrier, resulting in excessive exposure to microbial antigens, recruitment of leukocytes, release of soluble mediators, and ultimately mucosal damage. An inflammatory microenvironment affects epithelial barrier properties and mucosal homeostasis by altering the structure and function of epithelial intercellular junctions through direct and indirect mechanisms. We review our current understanding of complex interactions between the intestinal epithelium and immune cells, with a focus on pathologic mucosal inflammation and mechanisms of epithelial repair. We discuss leukocyte–epithelial interactions, as well as inflammatory mediators that affect the epithelial barrier and mucosal repair. Increased knowledge of communication networks between the epithelium and immune system will lead to tissue-specific strategies for treating pathologic intestinal inflammation. PMID:27436072

  2. Gata4 is critical to maintain gut barrier function and mucosal integrity following epithelial injury

    PubMed Central

    Lepage, David; Bélanger, Élise; Jones, Christine; Tremblay, Sarah; Allaire, Joannie M.; Bruneau, Joannie; Asselin, Claude; Perreault, Nathalie; Menendez, Alfredo; Gendron, Fernand-Pierre; Boudreau, Francois

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial barrier is critical to limit potential harmful consequences from exposure to deleterious luminal contents on the organism. Although this barrier is functionally important along the entire gut, specific regional regulatory mechanisms involved in the maintenance of this barrier are poorly defined. Herein, we identified Gata4 as a crucial regulator of barrier integrity in the mouse proximal intestinal epithelium. Conditional deletion of Gata4 in the intestine led to a drastic increase in claudin-2 expression that was associated with an important increase of gut barrier permeability without causing overt spontaneous inflammation. Administration of indomethacin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that causes enteritis, led to rapid and restricted proximal small intestinal injuries in Gata4 mutant mice as opposed to control mice. Comparative analysis of gene transcript profiles from indomethacin-challenged control and Gata4 mutant mice identified defects in epithelial cell survival, inflammatory cell recruitment and tissue repair mechanisms. Altogether, these observations identify Gata4 as a novel crucial regulator of the intestinal epithelial barrier and as a critical epithelial transcription factor implicated in the maintenance of proximal intestinal mucosal integrity after injury. PMID:27827449

  3. Mucosal injuries due to ribosome-inactivating stress and the compensatory responses of the intestinal epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Moon, Yuseok

    2011-10-01

    Ribosome-inactivating (ribotoxic) xenobiotics are capable of using cleavage and modification to damage 28S ribosomal RNA, which leads to translational arrest. The blockage of global protein synthesis predisposes rapidly dividing tissues, including gut epithelia, to damage from various pathogenic processes, including epithelial inflammation and carcinogenesis. In particular, mucosal exposure to ribotoxic stress triggers integrated processes that are important for barrier regulation and re-constitution to maintain gut homeostasis. In the present study, various experimental models of the mucosal barrier were evaluated for their response to acute and chronic exposure to ribotoxic agents. Specifically, this review focuses on the regulation of epithelial junctions, epithelial transporting systems, epithelial cytotoxicity, and compensatory responses to mucosal insults. The primary aim is to characterize the mechanisms associated with the intestinal epithelial responses induced by ribotoxic stress and to discuss the implications of ribotoxic stressors as chemical modulators of mucosa-associated diseases such as ulcerative colitis and epithelial cancers.

  4. Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Disruption through Altered Mucosal MicroRNA Expression in Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gaulke, Christopher A.; Porter, Matthew; Han, Yan-Hong; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Grishina, Irina; George, Michael D.; Dang, Angeline T.; Ding, Shou-Wei; Jiang, Guochun; Korf, Ian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epithelial barrier dysfunction during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has largely been attributed to the rapid and severe depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Although it is known that changes in mucosal gene expression contribute to intestinal enteropathy, the role of small noncoding RNAs, specifically microRNA (miRNA), has not been investigated. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected nonhuman primate model of HIV pathogenesis, we investigated the effect of viral infection on miRNA expression in intestinal mucosa. SIV infection led to a striking decrease in the expression of mucosal miRNA compared to that in uninfected controls. This decrease coincided with an increase in 5′-3′-exoribonuclease 2 protein and alterations in DICER1 and Argonaute 2 expression. Targets of depleted miRNA belonged to molecular pathways involved in epithelial proliferation, differentiation, and immune response. Decreased expression of several miRNA involved in maintaining epithelial homeostasis in the gut was localized to the proliferative crypt region of the intestinal epithelium. Our findings suggest that SIV-induced decreased expression of miRNA involved in epithelial homeostasis, disrupted expression of miRNA biogenesis machinery, and increased expression of XRN2 are involved in the development of epithelial barrier dysfunction and gastroenteropathy. IMPORTANCE MicroRNA (miRNA) regulate the development and function of intestinal epithelial cells, and many viruses disrupt normal host miRNA expression. In this study, we demonstrate that SIV and HIV disrupt expression of miRNA in the small intestine during infection. The depletion of several key miRNA is localized to the proliferative crypt region of the gut epithelium. These miRNA are known to control expression of genes involved in inflammation, cell death, and epithelial maturation. Our data indicate that this disruption might be caused by altered expression of mi

  5. The Insect Peptide CopA3 Increases Colonic Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Mucosal Barrier Function to Prevent Inflammatory Responses in the Gut*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Lee, Ik Hwan; Nam, Seung Taek; Hong, Ji; Zhang, Peng; Lu, Li Fang; Lee, Junguee; Seok, Heon; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Lamont, John Thomas; Kim, Ho

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial cells of the gut form a physical barrier against the luminal contents. The collapse of this barrier causes inflammation, and its therapeutic restoration can protect the gut against inflammation. EGF enhances mucosal barrier function and increases colonocyte proliferation, thereby ameliorating inflammatory responses in the gut. Based on our previous finding that the insect peptide CopA3 promotes neuronal growth, we herein tested whether CopA3 could increase the cell proliferation of colonocytes, enhance mucosal barrier function, and ameliorate gut inflammation. Our results revealed that CopA3 significantly increased epithelial cell proliferation in mouse colonic crypts and also enhanced colonic epithelial barrier function. Moreover, CopA3 treatment ameliorated Clostridium difficile toxin As-induced inflammation responses in the mouse small intestine (acute enteritis) and completely blocked inflammatory responses and subsequent lethality in the dextran sulfate sodium-induced mouse model of chronic colitis. The marked CopA3-induced increase of colonocyte proliferation was found to require rapid protein degradation of p21Cip1/Waf1, and an in vitro ubiquitination assay revealed that CopA3 directly facilitated ubiquitin ligase activity against p21Cip1/Waf1. Taken together, our findings indicate that the insect peptide CopA3 prevents gut inflammation by increasing epithelial cell proliferation and mucosal barrier function. PMID:26655716

  6. The Insect Peptide CopA3 Increases Colonic Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Mucosal Barrier Function to Prevent Inflammatory Responses in the Gut.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Lee, Ik Hwan; Nam, Seung Taek; Hong, Ji; Zhang, Peng; Lu, Li Fang; Lee, Junguee; Seok, Heon; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Lamont, John Thomas; Kim, Ho

    2016-02-12

    The epithelial cells of the gut form a physical barrier against the luminal contents. The collapse of this barrier causes inflammation, and its therapeutic restoration can protect the gut against inflammation. EGF enhances mucosal barrier function and increases colonocyte proliferation, thereby ameliorating inflammatory responses in the gut. Based on our previous finding that the insect peptide CopA3 promotes neuronal growth, we herein tested whether CopA3 could increase the cell proliferation of colonocytes, enhance mucosal barrier function, and ameliorate gut inflammation. Our results revealed that CopA3 significantly increased epithelial cell proliferation in mouse colonic crypts and also enhanced colonic epithelial barrier function. Moreover, CopA3 treatment ameliorated Clostridium difficile toxin As-induced inflammation responses in the mouse small intestine (acute enteritis) and completely blocked inflammatory responses and subsequent lethality in the dextran sulfate sodium-induced mouse model of chronic colitis. The marked CopA3-induced increase of colonocyte proliferation was found to require rapid protein degradation of p21(Cip1/Waf1), and an in vitro ubiquitination assay revealed that CopA3 directly facilitated ubiquitin ligase activity against p21(Cip1/Waf1). Taken together, our findings indicate that the insect peptide CopA3 prevents gut inflammation by increasing epithelial cell proliferation and mucosal barrier function.

  7. HIV and mucosal barrier interactions: consequences for transmission and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Burgener, Adam; McGowan, Ian; Klatt, Nichole R

    2015-10-01

    The mucosal barrier plays an integral function in human health as it is the primary defense against pathogens, and provides a critical transition between the external environment and the human internal body. In the context of HIV infection, the most relevant mucosal surfaces include those of the gastrointestinal (GI) and genital tract compartments. Several components help maintain the effectiveness of this mucosal surface, including the physical anatomy of the barrier, cellular immunity, soluble factors, and interactions between the epithelial barrier and the local microenvironment, including mucus and host microbiota. Any defects in barrier integrity or function can rapidly lead to an increase in acquisition risk, or with established infection may result in increased pathogenesis, morbidities, or mortality. Indeed, a key feature to all aspects of HIV infection from transmission to pathogenesis is disruption and/or dysfunction of mucosal barriers. Herein, we will detail the host-pathogen relationship of HIV and mucosal barriers in both of these scenarios.

  8. The impact of lactoferrin with different levels of metal saturation on the intestinal epithelial barrier function and mucosal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Majka, Grzegorz; Więcek, Grażyna; Śróttek, Małgorzata; Śpiewak, Klaudyna; Brindell, Małgorzata; Koziel, Joanna; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Strus, Magdalena

    2016-12-01

    Translocation of bacteria, primarily Gram-negative pathogenic flora, from the intestinal lumen into the circulatory system leads to sepsis. In newborns, and especially very low birth weight infants, sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The results of recently conducted clinical trials suggest that lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein that is abundant in mammalian colostrum and milk, may be an effective agent in preventing sepsis in newborns. However, despite numerous basic studies on lactoferrin, very little is known about how metal saturation of this protein affects a host's health. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to elucidate how iron-depleted, iron-saturated, and manganese-saturated forms of lactoferrin regulate intestinal barrier function via interactions with epithelial cells and macrophages. For these studies, a human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2, was used. In this model, none of the tested lactoferrin forms induced higher levels of apoptosis or necrosis. There was also no change in the production of tight junction proteins regardless of lactoferrin metal saturation status. None of the tested forms induced a pro-inflammatory response in Caco-2 cells or in macrophages either. However, the various lactoferrin forms did effectively inhibit the pro-inflammatory response in macrophages that were activated with lipopolysaccharide with the most potent effect observed for apolactoferrin. Lactoferrin that was not bound to its cognate receptor was able to bind and neutralize lipopolysaccharide. Lactoferrin was also able to neutralize microbial-derived antigens, thereby potentially reducing their pro-inflammatory effect. Therefore, we hypothesize that lactoferrin supplementation is a relevant strategy for preventing sepsis.

  9. Intestinal epithelial cells and their role in innate mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Contreras, A L; McCormick, Beth A

    2011-01-01

    The mucosal surfaces of the respiratory, gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts are covered by a layer of epithelial cells that are responsible for sensing and promoting a host immune response in order to establish the limits not only for commensal microorganisms but also for foreign organisms or particles. This is a remarkable task as the human body represents a composite of about 10 trillion human-self cells plus non-self cells from autochthonous or indigenous microbes that outnumber human cells 10:1. Hence, the homeostasis of epithelial cells that line mucosal surfaces relies on a fine-tuned immune system that patrols the boundaries between human and microbial cells. In the case of the intestine, the epithelial layer is composed of at least six epithelial cell lineages that act as a physiological barrier in addition to aiding digestion and the absorption of nutrients, water and electrolytes. In this review, we highlight the immense role of the intestinal epithelium in coordinating the mucosal innate immune response.

  10. Zinc reduces epithelial barrier compromise induced by human seminal plasma

    PubMed Central

    Mullin, James M.; Diguilio, Katherine M.; Valenzano, Mary C.; Deis, Rachael; Thomas, Sunil; Zurbach, E. Peter; Abdulhaqq, Shaheed; Montaner, Luis J.

    2017-01-01

    Human semen has the potential to modulate the epithelial mucosal tissues it contacts, as seminal plasma (SP) is recognized to contain both pro- and anti-barrier components, yet its effects on epithelial barrier function are largely unknown. We addressed the role of human SP when exposed to the basal-lateral epithelial surface, a situation that would occur clinically with prior mechanical or disease-related injury of the human epithelial mucosal cell layers in contact with semen. The action of SP on claudins-2, -4, -5, and -7 expression, as well as on a target epithelium whose basolateral surface has been made accessible to SP, showed upregulation of claudins-4 and -5 in CACO-2 human epithelial cell layers, despite broad variance in SP-induced modulation of transepithelial electrical resistance and mannitol permeability. Upregulation of claudin-2 by SP also exhibited such variance by SP sample. We characterize individual effects on CACO-2 barrier function of nine factors known to be present abundantly in seminal plasma (zinc, EGF, citrate, spermine, fructose, urea, TGF, histone, inflammatory cytokines) to establish that zinc, spermine and fructose had significant potential to raise CACO-2 transepithelial resistance, whereas inflammatory cytokines and EGF decreased this measure of barrier function. The role of zinc as a dominant factor in determining higher levels of transepithelial resistance and lower levels of paracellular leak were confirmed by zinc chelation and exogenous zinc addition. As expected, SP presentation to the basolateral cell surface also caused a very dramatic yet transient elevation of pErk levels. Results suggest that increased zinc content in SP can compete against the barrier-compromising effect of negative modulators in SP when SP gains access to that epithelium’s basolateral surface. Prophylactic elevation of zinc in an epithelial cell layer prior to contact by SP may help to protect an epithelial barrier from invasion by SP-containing STD

  11. Microbes and microbial Toxins: paradigms for microbial-mucosal toxins. V. Cholera: invasion of the intestinal epithelial barrier by a stably folded protein toxin.

    PubMed

    Lencer, W I

    2001-05-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) produced by Vibrio cholerae is the virulence factor responsible for the massive secretory diarrhea seen in Asiatic cholera. To cause disease, CT enters the intestinal epithelial cell as a stably folded protein by co-opting a lipid-based membrane receptor, ganglioside G(M1). G(M1) sorts the toxin into lipid rafts and a retrograde trafficking pathway to the endoplasmic reticulum, where the toxin unfolds and transfers its enzymatic subunit to the cytosol, probably by dislocation through the translocon sec61p. The molecular determinants that drive entry of CT into this pathway are encoded entirely within the structure of the protein toxin itself.

  12. Physiology and immunology of mucosal barriers in catfish (Ictalurus spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mucosal barriers of catfish (Ictalurus spp.) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient adsorption, osmoregulation, waste excretion, and environmental sensing. Catf...

  13. Autologous Transplantation of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cell Sheets Cultured on an Amniotic Membrane Substrate for Intraoral Mucosal Defects

    PubMed Central

    Amemiya, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Kanamura, Narisato

    2015-01-01

    The human amniotic membrane (AM) is a thin intrauterine placental membrane that is highly biocompatible and possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-scarring properties. Using AM, we developed a novel method for cultivating oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets. We investigated the autologous transplantation of oral mucosal epithelial cells cultured on AM in patients undergoing oral surgeries. We obtained specimens of AM from women undergoing cesarean sections. This study included five patients without any history of a medical disorder who underwent autologous cultured oral epithelial transplantation following oral surgical procedures. Using oral mucosal biopsy specimens obtained from these patients, we cultured oral epithelial cells on an AM carrier. We transplanted the resultant cell sheets onto the oral mucosal defects. Patients were followed-up for at least 12 months after transplantation. After 2–3 weeks of being cultured on AM, epithelial cells were well differentiated and had stratified into five to seven layers. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the cultured cells expressed highly specific mucosal epithelial cell markers and basement membrane proteins. After the surgical procedures, no infection, bleeding, rejection, or sheet detachment occurred at the reconstructed sites, at which new oral mucous membranes were evident. No recurrence was observed in the long-term follow-up, and the postoperative course was excellent. Our results suggest that AM-cultured oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets represent a useful biomaterial and feasible method for oral mucosal reconstruction. However, our primary clinical study only evaluated their effects on a limited number of small oral mucosal defects. PMID:25915046

  14. Epithelial-specific A2B adenosine receptor signaling protects the colonic epithelial barrier during acute colitis

    PubMed Central

    Aherne, CM; Saeedi, B; Collins, CB; Masterson, JC; McNamee, EN; Perrenoud, L; Rapp, CR; Curtis, VF; Bayless, A; Fletcher, A; Glover, LE; Evans, CM; Jedlicka, P; Furuta, GT; de Zoeten, EF; Colgan, SP; Eltzschig, HK

    2015-01-01

    Central to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) pathogenesis is loss of mucosal barrier function. Emerging evidence implicates extracellular adenosine signaling in attenuating mucosal inflammation. We hypothesized that adenosine-mediated protection from intestinal barrier dysfunction involves tissue-specific signaling through the A2B adenosine receptor (Adora2b) at the intestinal mucosal surface. To address this hypothesis, we combined pharmacologic studies and studies in mice with global or tissue-specific deletion of the Adora2b receptor. Adora2b−/− mice experienced a significantly heightened severity of colitis, associated with a more acute onset of disease and loss of intestinal epithelial barrier function. Comparison of mice with Adora2b deletion on vascular endothelial cells (Adora2bfl/flVeCadCre+) or intestinal epithelia (Adora2bfl/flVillinCre+) revealed a selective role for epithelial Adora2b signaling in attenuating colonic inflammation. In vitro studies with Adora2b knockdown in intestinal epithelial cultures or pharmacologic studies highlighted Adora2b-driven phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a specific barrier repair response. Similarly, in vivo studies in genetic mouse models or treatment studies with an Adora2b agonist (BAY 60-6583) recapitulate these findings. Taken together, our results suggest that intestinal epithelial Adora2b signaling provides protection during intestinal inflammation via enhancing mucosal barrier responses. PMID:25850656

  15. Berberine Reduces Uremia-Associated Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Damage.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Tan, Shanjun; Zhou, Chunyu; Zhu, Cuilin; Kang, Xin; Liu, Shuai; Zhao, Shuang; Fan, Shulin; Yu, Zhen; Peng, Ai; Wang, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Berberine is one of the main active constituents of Rhizoma coptidis, a traditional Chinese medicine, and has long been used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of berberine on the intestinal mucosal barrier damage in a rat uremia model induced by the 5/6 kidney resection. Beginning at postoperative week 4, the uremia rats were treated with daily 150 mg/kg berberine by oral gavage for 6 weeks. To assess the intestinal mucosal barrier changes, blood samples were collected for measuring the serum D-lactate level, and terminal ileum tissue samples were used for analyses of intestinal permeability, myeloperoxidase activity, histopathology, malondialdehyde (MDA) level, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Berberine treatment resulted in significant decreases in the serum D-lactate level, intestinal permeability, intestinal myeloperoxidase activity, and intestinal mucosal and submucosal edema and inflammation, and the Chiu's scores assessed for intestinal mucosal injury. The intestinal MDA level was reduced and the intestinal SOD activity was increased following berberine treatment. In conclusion, berberine reduces intestinal mucosal barrier damage induced by uremia, which is most likely due to its anti-oxidative activity. It may be developed as a potential treatment for preserving intestinal mucosal barrier function in patients with uremia.

  16. Pathogen induced chemo-attractant hepoxilin A3 drives neutrophils, but not eosinophils across epithelial barriers.

    PubMed

    Kubala, S A; Patil, S U; Shreffler, W G; Hurley, B P

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen induced migration of neutrophils across mucosal epithelial barriers requires epithelial production of the chemotactic lipid mediator, hepoxilin A3 (HXA3). HXA3 is an eicosanoid derived from arachidonic acid. Although eosinophils are also capable of penetrating mucosal surfaces, eosinophilic infiltration occurs mainly during allergic processes whereas neutrophils dominate mucosal infection. Both neutrophils and eosinophils can respond to chemotactic gradients of certain eicosanoids, however, it is not known whether eosinophils respond to pathogen induced lipid mediators such as HXA3. In this study, neutrophils and eosinophils were isolated from human blood and placed on the basolateral side of polarized epithelial monolayers grown on permeable Transwell filters and challenged by various chemotactic gradients of distinct lipid mediators. We observed that both cell populations migrated across epithelial monolayers in response to a leukotriene B4 (LTB4) gradient, whereas only eosinophils migrated toward a prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) gradient. Interestingly, while pathogen induced neutrophil trans-epithelial migration was substantial, pathogen induced eosinophil trans-epithelial migration was not observed. Further, gradients of chemotactic lipids derived from pathogen infected epithelial cells known to be enriched for HXA3 as well as purified HXA3 drove significant numbers of neutrophils across epithelial barriers, whereas eosinophils failed to respond to these gradients. These data suggest that although the eicosanoid HXA3 serves as an important neutrophil chemo-attractant at mucosal surfaces during pathogenic infection, HXA3 does not appear to exhibit chemotactic activity toward eosinophils.

  17. Epithelial barrier function: at the frontline of asthma immunology and allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Georas, Steve N.; Rezaee, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells form a barrier to the outside world, and are at the frontline of mucosal immunity. Epithelial apical junctional complexes are multi-protein subunits that promote cell-cell adhesion and barrier integrity. Recent studies in the skin and GI tract suggest that disruption of cell-cell junctions is required to initiate epithelial immune responses, but how this applies to mucosal immunity in the lung is not clear. Increasing evidence indicates that defective epithelial barrier function is a feature of airway inflammation in asthma. One challenge in this area is that barrier function and junctional integrity are difficult to study in the intact lung, but innovative approaches should provide new knowledge in this area in the near future. In this article, we review the structure and function of epithelial apical junctional complexes, emphasizing how regulation of the epithelial barrier impacts innate and adaptive immunity. We discuss why defective epithelial barrier function may be linked to Th2 polarization in asthma, and propose a rheostat model of barrier dysfunction that implicates the size of inhaled allergen particles as an important factor influencing adaptive immunity. PMID:25085341

  18. Breaking barriers. New insights into airway epithelial barrier function in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Fariba; Georas, Steve N

    2014-05-01

    Epithelial permeability is a hallmark of mucosal inflammation, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. A key component of the epithelial barrier is the apical junctional complex that forms between neighboring cells. Apical junctional complexes are made of tight junctions and adherens junctions and link to the cellular cytoskeleton via numerous adaptor proteins. Although the existence of tight and adherens junctions between epithelial cells has long been recognized, in recent years there have been significant advances in our understanding of the molecular regulation of junctional complex assembly and disassembly. Here we review the current thinking about the structure and function of the apical junctional complex in airway epithelial cells, emphasizing the translational aspects of relevance to cystic fibrosis and asthma. Most work to date has been conducted using cell culture models, but technical advancements in imaging techniques suggest that we are on the verge of important new breakthroughs in this area in physiological models of airway diseases.

  19. Physiology and immunology of mucosal barriers in catfish (Ictalurus spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Peatman, Eric; Lange, Miles; Zhao, Honggang; Beck, Benjamin H

    2015-01-01

    The mucosal barriers of catfish (Ictalurus spp) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient adsorption, osmoregulation, waste excretion, and environmental sensing. Catfish depend more heavily on mucosal barriers than their terrestrial counterparts as they are continuously interacting with the aquatic microbiota. Our understanding of these barriers, while growing, is still limited relative to that of mammalian model systems. Nevertheless, a combination of molecular and cellular studies in catfish over the last few decades, and particularly within the last few years, has helped to elucidate many of the primary actors and pathways critical to their mucosal health. Here we describe aspects of innate and adaptive immune responses in the primary mucosal tissues (skin, gill, and intestine) of catfish, focusing on mucus-driven responses, pathogen recognition, soluble mediators, and immunoglobulin and T-cell derived immunity. Modulation of mucosal barriers will be critical moving forward for crafting better diets, improving vaccine delivery, enhancing water quality, and ensuring sustainable production practices in catfish. PMID:26716071

  20. Epithelial Microvilli Establish an Electrostatic Barrier to Microbial Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Kaila M.; Walker, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    Microvilli are membrane extensions on the apical surface of polarized epithelia, such as intestinal enterocytes and tubule and duct epithelia. One notable exception in mucosal epithelia is M cells, which are specialized for capturing luminal microbial particles; M cells display a unique apical membrane lacking microvilli. Based on studies of M cell uptake under different ionic conditions, we hypothesized that microvilli may augment the mucosal barrier by providing an increased surface charge density from the increased membrane surface and associated glycoproteins. Thus, electrostatic charges may repel microbes from epithelial cells bearing microvilli, while M cells are more susceptible to microbial adhesion. To test the role of microvilli in bacterial adhesion and uptake, we developed polarized intestinal epithelial cells with reduced microvilli (“microvillus-minus,” or MVM) but retaining normal tight junctions. When tested for interactions with microbial particles in suspension, MVM cells showed greatly enhanced adhesion and uptake of particles compared to microvillus-positive cells. This preference showed a linear relationship to bacterial surface charge, suggesting that microvilli resist binding of microbes by using electrostatic repulsion. Moreover, this predicts that pathogen modification of electrostatic forces may contribute directly to virulence. Accordingly, the effacement effector protein Tir from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 expressed in epithelial cells induced a loss of microvilli with consequent enhanced microbial binding. These results provide a new context for microvillus function in the host-pathogen relationship, based on electrostatic interactions. PMID:24778113

  1. Th17 Cytokines Disrupt the Airway Mucosal Barrier in Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Ramezanpour, Mahnaz; Moraitis, Sophia; Smith, Jason L. P.; Wormald, P. J.; Vreugde, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Cytokine mediated changes in paracellular permeability contribute to a multitude of pathological conditions including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of interferons and of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines on respiratory epithelium barrier function. Cytokines and interferons were applied to the basolateral side of air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures of primary human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs) from CRS with nasal polyp patients. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability of FITC-conjugated dextrans were measured over time. Additionally, the expression of the tight junction protein Zona Occludens-1 (ZO-1) was examined via immunofluorescence. Data was analysed using ANOVA, followed by Tukey HSD post hoc test. Our results showed that application of interferons and of Th1 or Th2 cytokines did not affect the mucosal barrier function. In contrast, the Th17 cytokines IL-17, IL-22, and IL-26 showed a significant disruption of the epithelial barrier, evidenced by a loss of TEER, increased paracellular permeability of FITC-dextrans, and discontinuous ZO-1 immunolocalisation. These results indicate that Th17 cytokines may contribute to the development of CRSwNP by promoting a leaky mucosal barrier. PMID:26903715

  2. Release of HIV-1 sequestered in the vesicles of oral and genital mucosal epithelial cells by epithelial-lymphocyte interaction

    PubMed Central

    Yasen, Aizezi; Herrera, Rossana; Rosbe, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Oropharyngeal mucosal epithelia of fetuses/neonates/infants and the genital epithelia of adults play a critical role in HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission and sexual transmission of virus, respectively. To study the mechanisms of HIV-1 transmission through mucosal epithelium, we established polarized tonsil, cervical and foreskin epithelial cells. Analysis of HIV-1 transmission through epithelial cells showed that approximately 0.05% of initially inoculated virions transmigrated via epithelium. More than 90% of internalized virions were sequestered in the endosomes of epithelial cells, including multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and vacuoles. Intraepithelial HIV-1 remained infectious for 9 days without viral release. Release of sequestered intraepithelial HIV-1 was induced by the calcium ionophore ionomycin and by cytochalasin D, which increase intracellular calcium and disrupt the cortical actin of epithelial cells, respectively. Cocultivation of epithelial cells containing HIV-1 with activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and CD4+ T lymphocytes led to the disruption of epithelial cortical actin and spread of virus from epithelial cells to lymphocytes. Treatment of epithelial cells with proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon gamma also induced reorganization of cortical actin and release of virus. Inhibition of MVB formation by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of its critical protein hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) expression reduced viral sequestration in epithelial cells and its transmission from epithelial cells to lymphocytes by ~60–70%. Furthermore, inhibition of vacuole formation of epithelial cells by siRNA-inactivated rabankyrin-5 expression also significantly reduced HIV-1 sequestration in epithelial cells and spread of virus from epithelial cells to lymphocytes. Interaction of the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 of epithelial cells with the function-associated antigen-1

  3. The epithelial barrier is maintained by in vivo tight junction expansion during pathologic intestinal epithelial shedding

    PubMed Central

    Marchiando, Amanda M.; Shen, Le; Graham, W. Vallen; Edelblum, Karen L.; Duckworth, Carrie A.; Guan, Yanfang; Montrose, Marshall H.; Turner, Jerrold R.; Watson, Alastair J.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) increases intestinal epithelial cell shedding and apoptosis, potentially challenging the barrier between the gastrointestinal lumen and internal tissues. We investigated the mechanism of tight junction remodeling and barrier maintenance, as well as the roles of cytoskeletal regulatory molecules during TNF-induced shedding. METHODS We studied wild-type and transgenic mice that express the fluorescent-tagged proteins enhanced green fluorescent protein–occludin or monomeric red fluorescent protein1–ZO-1. After injection of high doses of TNF (7.5µg, i.p.), laparotomies were performed and segments of small intestine were opened to visualize the mucosa by video confocal microscopy. Pharmacologic inhibitors and knockout mice were used to determine the roles of caspase activation, actomyosin, and microtubule remodeling and membrane trafficking in epithelial shedding. RESULTS Changes detected included redistribution of the tight junction proteins ZO-1 and occluding to lateral membranes of shedding cells. These proteins ultimately formed a funnel around the shedding cell that defined the site of barrier preservation. Claudins, E-cadherin, F-actin, myosin II, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) were also recruited to lateral membranes. Caspase activity, myosin motor activity, and microtubules were required to initiate shedding, whereas completion of the process required microfilament remodeling and ROCK, MLCK, and dynamin II activities. CONCLUSIONS Maintenance of the epithelial barrier during TNF-induced cell shedding is a complex process that involves integration of microtubules, microfilaments, and membrane traffic to remove apoptotic cells. This process is accompanied by redistribution of apical junctional complex proteins to form intercellular barriers between lateral membranes and maintain mucosal function. PMID:21237166

  4. Vitamin D Enhances Corneal Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhaohong; Pintea, Victorina; Lin, Yanping; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine whether 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) and/or its active metabolite, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), can enhance corneal epithelial barrier function. The authors also determined if corneas contain mRNA for the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and 1α-hydroxylase, the enzyme required to convert 25(OH)D3 to 1,25(OH)2D3, and measured vitamin D metabolite concentrations in aqueous and vitreous humor. Methods. RT-PCR was used to examine mouse, rabbit, and human corneal epithelial VDR and 1α-hydroxylase mRNA. Vitamin D metabolites were measured using a selective vitamin D derivatizing agent and mass spectroscopy. Barrier function experiments were performed by measuring inulin permeability (IP) and/or transepithelial resistance (TER) in control, 25(OH)D3-, and 1,25(OH)2D3-treated human and rabbit corneal epithelial monolayers cultured on permeable inserts. Ca2+ was removed, then reintroduced to the culture medium while IP and TER readings were taken. Occludin levels were examined using Western blotting. Results. All corneal samples were positive for both VDR and 1α-hydroxylase mRNA. All vitamin D metabolites except for unhydroxylated vitamin D3 were detected in aqueous and vitreous humor. Epithelial cells showed increased TER, decreased IP, and increased occludin levels when cultured with 25(OH)D3 and 1,25(OH)2D3. Conclusions. We conclude that corneas contain mRNA for VDR and 1α-hydroxylase as well as significant vitamin D concentrations. 25(OH)D3 and its active metabolite 1,25(OH)2D3, both enhance corneal epithelial barrier function. PMID:21715350

  5. Intestinal Epithelial Stem/Progenitor Cells Are Controlled by Mucosal Afferent Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, Ove; Jodal, Mats; Jansson, Madeleine; Ryberg, Anders T.; Svensson, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    Background The maintenance of the intestinal epithelium is of great importance for the survival of the organism. A possible nervous control of epithelial cell renewal was studied in rats and mice. Methods Mucosal afferent nerves were stimulated by exposing the intestinal mucosa to capsaicin (1.6 mM), which stimulates intestinal external axons. Epithelial cell renewal was investigated in the jejunum by measuring intestinal thymidine kinase (TK) activity, intestinal 3H-thymidine incorporation into DNA, and the number of crypt cells labeled with BrdU. The influence of the external gut innervation was minimized by severing the periarterial nerves. Principal Findings Luminal capsaicin increased all the studied variables, an effect nervously mediated to judge from inhibitory effects on TK activity or 3H-thymidine incorporation into DNA by exposing the mucosa to lidocaine (a local anesthetic) or by giving four different neurotransmitter receptor antagonists i.v. (muscarinic, nicotinic, neurokinin1 (NK1) or calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) receptors). After degeneration of the intestinal external nerves capsaicin did not increase TK activity, suggesting the involvement of an axon reflex. Intra-arterial infusion of Substance P (SP) or CGRP increased intestinal TK activity, a response abolished by muscarinic receptor blockade. Immunohistochemistry suggested presence of M3 and M5 muscarinic receptors on the intestinal stem/progenitor cells. We propose that the stem/progenitor cells are controlled by cholinergic nerves, which, in turn, are influenced by mucosal afferent neuron(s) releasing acetylcholine and/or SP and/or CGRP. In mice lacking the capsaicin receptor, thymidine incorporation into DNA and number of crypt cells labeled with BrdU was lower than in wild type animals suggesting that nerves are important also in the absence of luminal capsaicin, a conclusion also supported by the observation that atropine lowered thymidine incorporation into DNA by 60% in control

  6. Restoring airway epithelial barrier dysfunction: a new therapeutic challenge in allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Steelant, B; Seys, S F; Boeckxstaens, G; Akdis, C A; Ceuppens, J L; Hellings, P W

    2016-09-01

    An intact functional mucosal barrier is considered to be crucial for the maintenance of airway homeostasis as it protects the host immune system from exposure to allergens and noxious environmental triggers. Recent data provided evidence for the contribution of barrier dysfunction to the development of inflammatory diseases in the airways, skin and gut. A defective barrier has been documented in chronic rhinosinusitis, allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis and inflammatory bowel diseases. However, it remains to be elucidated to what extent primary (genetic) versus secondary (inflammatory) mechanisms drive barrier dysfunction. The precise pathogenesis of barrier dysfunction in patients with chronic mucosal inflammation and its implications on tissue inflammation and systemic absorption of exogenous particles are only partly understood. Since epithelial barrier defects are linked with chronicity and severity of airway inflammation, restoring the barrier integrity may become a useful approach in the treatment of allergic diseases. We here provide a state-of-the-art review on epithelial barrier dysfunction in upper and lower airways as well as in the intestine and the skin and on how barrier dysfunction can be restored from a therapeutic perspective.

  7. A physical identity for the gastric mucosal barrier.

    PubMed

    Hills, B A

    1990-07-16

    An oligolamellar lining which is probably phospholipid has been demonstrated on the gastric mucosal surface of the rat by transmission electron microscopy using fixation procedures specially developed to avoid the destruction of hydrophobic surfaces. This structure is unlikely to be an artefact since the use of two hydrophobic probes in epifluorescence microscopy gave emissions characteristic of oligolamellar phospholipid prepared in vitro. Moreover, lipid solvents almost eliminated both the fluorescence and the hydrophobicity. An oligolamellar lining was seen also on deeper structures, including oxyntic ducts and canaliculi in parietal cells, and it might offer a physical basis for the hitherto elusive gastric mucosal barrier. Parietal cells were also found to contain multilamellar bodies which, in the lung at least, represent phospholipid (surfactant) in a particularly surface-active form and one conducive to its deposition on tissue surfaces. This suggests that the parietal cell could gear the protection (surfactant) to the potential insult (acid) by secreting both together. The demonstration of a simple physical barrier preventing the stomach from digesting itself is discussed in regard to suggesting the use of certain surface-active foods which could be beneficial in preventing gastric ulcers and their recurrence after the acute phase has been treated using conventional therapies.

  8. Fabrication of transplantable corneal epithelial and oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets using a novel temperature-responsive closed culture device.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Ryota; Kobayashi, Toyoshige; Kikuchi, Tetsutaro; Kitano, Yuriko; Watanabe, Hiroya; Mizutani, Manabu; Nozaki, Takayuki; Senda, Naoko; Saitoh, Kazuo; Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Takeda, Shizu

    2015-05-01

    Temperature-responsive culture surfaces make it possible to harvest transplantable carrier-free cell sheets. Here, we applied temperature-responsive polymer for polycarbonate surfaces with previously developed closed culture devices for an automated culture system in order to fabricate transplantable stratified epithelial cell sheets. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses and colony-forming assays revealed that corneal epithelial and oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets could be harvested with the temperature-responsive closed culture devices. The results were similar to those obtained using temperature-responsive culture inserts. These results indicate that the novel temperature-responsive closed culture device is useful for fabricating transplantable stratified epithelial cell sheets.

  9. Intestinal barrier function in response to abundant or depleted mucosal glutathione in Salmonella-infected rats

    PubMed Central

    van Ampting, Marleen TJ; Schonewille, Arjan J; Vink, Carolien; Brummer, Robert Jan M; Meer, Roelof van der; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg MJ

    2009-01-01

    Background Glutathione, the main antioxidant of intestinal epithelial cells, is suggested to play an important role in gut barrier function and prevention of inflammation-related oxidative damage as induced by acute bacterial infection. Most studies on intestinal glutathione focus on oxidative stress reduction without considering functional disease outcome. Our aim was to determine whether depletion or maintenance of intestinal glutathione changes susceptibility of rats to Salmonella infection and associated inflammation. Rats were fed a control diet or the same diet supplemented with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO; glutathione depletion) or cystine (glutathione maintenance). Inert chromium ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (CrEDTA) was added to the diets to quantify intestinal permeability. At day 4 after oral gavage with Salmonella enteritidis (or saline for non-infected controls), Salmonella translocation was determined by culturing extra-intestinal organs. Liver and ileal mucosa were collected for analyses of glutathione, inflammation markers and oxidative damage. Faeces was collected to quantify diarrhoea. Results Glutathione depletion aggravated ileal inflammation after infection as indicated by increased levels of mucosal myeloperoxidase and interleukin-1β. Remarkably, intestinal permeability and Salmonella translocation were not increased. Cystine supplementation maintained glutathione in the intestinal mucosa but inflammation and oxidative damage were not diminished. Nevertheless, cystine reduced intestinal permeability and Salmonella translocation. Conclusion Despite increased infection-induced mucosal inflammation upon glutathione depletion, this tripeptide does not play a role in intestinal permeability, bacterial translocation and diarrhoea. On the other hand, cystine enhances gut barrier function by a mechanism unlikely to be related to glutathione. PMID:19374741

  10. Neutrophil Interactions with Epithelial Expressed ICAM-1 Enhances Intestinal Mucosal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Sumagin, R; Brazil, JC; Nava, P; Nishio, H; Alam, A; Luissint, AC; Weber, DA; Neish, AS; Nusrat, A; Parkos, CA

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of gastrointestinal tract inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease, is polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) transepithelial migration (TEM) and accumulation in the gut lumen. PMN accumulation within the intestinal mucosa contributes to tissue injury. While epithelial infiltration by large numbers of PMNs results in mucosal injury, we found that PMN interactions with luminal epithelial membrane receptors may also play a role in wound healing. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a PMN ligand that is upregulated on apical surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells under inflammatory conditions. In our study, increased expression of ICAM-1 resulted in enhanced PMN binding to the apical epithelium, which was associated with reduced PMN apoptosis. Following TEM, PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 resulted in activation of Akt and β-catenin signaling, increased epithelial-cell proliferation, and wound healing. Such responses were ICAM-1 dependent as engagement of epithelial ICAM-1 by antibody-mediated cross-linking yielded similar results. Furthermore, using an in-vivo biopsy-based, colonic-mucosal-injury model, we demonstrated epithelial ICAM-1 plays an important role in activation of epithelial Akt and β-catenin signaling and wound healing. These findings suggest that post-migrated PMNs within the intestinal lumen can regulate epithelial homeostasis, thereby identifying ICAM-1 as a potential therapeutic target for promoting mucosal wound healing. PMID:26732677

  11. Neutrophil interactions with epithelial-expressed ICAM-1 enhances intestinal mucosal wound healing.

    PubMed

    Sumagin, R; Brazil, J C; Nava, P; Nishio, H; Alam, A; Luissint, A C; Weber, D A; Neish, A S; Nusrat, A; Parkos, C A

    2016-09-01

    A characteristic feature of gastrointestinal tract inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease, is polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) transepithelial migration (TEM) and accumulation in the gut lumen. PMN accumulation within the intestinal mucosa contributes to tissue injury. Although epithelial infiltration by large numbers of PMNs results in mucosal injury, we found that PMN interactions with luminal epithelial membrane receptors may also play a role in wound healing. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a PMN ligand that is upregulated on apical surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells under inflammatory conditions. In our study, increased expression of ICAM-1 resulted in enhanced PMN binding to the apical epithelium, which was associated with reduced PMN apoptosis. Following TEM, PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 resulted in activation of Akt and β-catenin signaling, increased epithelial-cell proliferation, and wound healing. Such responses were ICAM-1 dependent as engagement of epithelial ICAM-1 by antibody-mediated cross-linking yielded similar results. Furthermore, using an in-vivo biopsy-based, colonic-mucosal-injury model, we demonstrated epithelial ICAM-1 has an important role in activation of epithelial Akt and β-catenin signaling and wound healing. These findings suggest that post-migrated PMNs within the intestinal lumen can regulate epithelial homeostasis, thereby identifying ICAM-1 as a potential therapeutic target for promoting mucosal wound healing.

  12. Barrier Epithelial Cells and the Control of Type 2 Immunity.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Hamida; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2015-07-21

    Type-2-cell-mediated immunity, rich in eosinophils, basophils, mast cells, CD4(+) T helper 2 (Th2) cells, and type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s), protects the host from helminth infection but also drives chronic allergic diseases like asthma and atopic dermatitis. Barrier epithelial cells (ECs) represent the very first line of defense and express pattern recognition receptors to recognize type-2-cell-mediated immune insults like proteolytic allergens or helminths. These ECs mount a prototypical response made up of chemokines, innate cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-25, IL-33, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), as well as the alarmins uric acid, ATP, HMGB1, and S100 proteins. These signals program dendritic cells (DCs) to mount Th2-cell-mediated immunity and in so doing boost ILC2, basophil, and mast cell function. Here we review the general mechanisms of how different stimuli trigger type-2-cell-mediated immunity at mucosal barriers and how this leads to protection or disease.

  13. [Changes of rat gastric mucosal barrier under stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xianbao; Li, Zhaoshen; Cui, Zhongmin; Duan, Yimin; Nie, Shinan; Liu, Jing; Xu, Guoming

    2002-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the changes of rat gastric mucosal barrier under conditions of water immersion restraint stress. METHODS Eighty rats were randomly divided into Group A (20 rats), B (40 rats) and C (20 rats) after being fasted for 24 hours. And then Group A was divided into two subgroups with ten rats in each. The two subgroups in Group A were given normal saline or omeprazole respectively while under the stress condition. The changes of gastric acid or bicarbonate secretion were determined. Group B (40 rats) were randomly divided into four subgroups,which were subgroup control, 1h, 2h and 4h after beginning of the stress. The quantity of glandular mucosal adherent mucus, the thickness of mucus gel layer and ulcer index were measured after stress in Group B. The glandular mucosal samples were labeled by Lanthanum and observed by transmission electromicroscopy. Group C was randomly divided into two subgroups in the same way with Group A. And each subgroup received normal saline or omeprazole respectively H(+) loss in gastric lumen was calculated by determining the difference of acidity between lavage and drainage fluid H(+) concentration. RESULTS It was found that gastric alkaline secretion decreased progressively (P < 0.05), while gastric acid secretion increased progressively under stress conditions (P < 0.05). The mucus quantity(A/g) in the four subgroups in Group B were 0.137 +/- 0.030, 0.143 +/- 0.012, 0.066 +/- 0.016 and 0.016 +/- 0.016 respectively. The mucus gel thickness(microm) were 71.08 +/- 5.85, 74.50 +/- 12.85, 57.63 +/- 6.45 and 51.35 +/- 2.84 respectively. The ulcer index were 0.2 +/- 0.1,0.4 +/- 0.1,5.2 +/- 1.3 and 10.0 +/- 0.5 respectively. Statistics showed that the mucus quantity was correlated with the mucus gel thickness positively(r = 0.89), while either of them was correlated with the ulcer index negatively(r = 0.85 and "r = 0.83). And it was also found that Lanthanum rarely stained the glandular mucosa in control subgroup, while heavily

  14. Protelytic Regulation of the Intestinal Epithelial Barrier: Mechanisms and Interventions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    gene that is required for epithelial barrier homeostasis . The project uses the St14 hypomorphic mouse model of matriptase deficiency to 1) determine...Tumorigenicity-14 (ST14) that is required for epithelial barrier homeostasis . Here, we are investigating matriptase dysregulation and its contribution

  15. Cigarette smoke impairs airway epithelial barrier function and cell-cell contact recovery.

    PubMed

    Heijink, I H; Brandenburg, S M; Postma, D S; van Oosterhout, A J M

    2012-02-01

    Cigarette smoking, the major cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), induces aberrant airway epithelial structure and function. The underlying mechanisms are unresolved so far. We studied effects of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on epithelial barrier function and wound regeneration in human bronchial epithelial 16HBE cells and primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs) from COPD patients, nonsmokers and healthy smokers. We demonstrate that CSE rapidly and transiently impairs 16HBE barrier function, largely due to disruption of cell-cell contacts. CSE induced a similar, but stronger and more sustained, defect in PBECs. Application of the specific epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor AG1478 showed that EGFR activation contributes to the CSE-induced defects in both 16HBE cells and PBECs. Furthermore, our data indicate that the endogenous protease calpain mediates these defects through tight junction protein degradation. CSE also delayed the reconstitution of 16HBE intercellular contacts during wound healing and attenuated PBEC barrier function upon wound regeneration. These findings were comparable between PBECs from smokers, healthy smokers and COPD patients. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that CSE reduces epithelial integrity, probably by EGFR and calpain-dependent disruption of intercellular contacts. This may increase susceptibility to environmental insults, e.g. inhaled pathogens. Thus, EGFR may be a promising target for therapeutic strategies to improve mucosal barrier function in cigarette smoking-related disease.

  16. Lactobacillus protects the integrity of intestinal epithelial barrier damaged by pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qinghua; Yuan, Lixia; Deng, Jun; Yang, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens invade intestinal mucosal barrier through phagocytosis of antigen presenting cells (dendritic cell, microfold cells), or through the invasion into the intestinal epithelial directly. Some pathogens could damage the cell junction between epithelial cells and use the paracellular pathway as an entrance to invade. Moreover, some Lactobacillus could inhibit the adhesion of the pathogens and protect the integrity of the cell junction and mucosal barrier. This research focused on the potential therapeutic effect of Lactobacillus fructosus (L. fructosus) C2 to attenuate ETEC K88 or S. typhimurium SL1344 induced changes to mucosal barrier. The results demonstrated that treatment of polarized Caco-2 cells with L. fructosus C2 reduced the permeation of dextran, and expression of IL-8, p-ERK, and p-JNK when cells were infected with pathogenic bacteria. The findings indicated that L. fructosus C2 exerted a protective effect against the damage to the integrity of Caco-2 cells by ETEC or S. typhimurium infection. PMID:25859435

  17. Plausibility of HIV-1 Infection of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Herzberg, M.C.; Vacharaksa, A.; Gebhard, K.H.; Giacaman, R.A.; Ross, K.F.

    2011-01-01

    The AIDS pandemic continues. Little is understood about how HIV gains access to permissive cells across mucosal surfaces, yet such knowledge is crucial to the development of successful topical anti-HIV-1 agents and mucosal vaccines. HIV-1 rapidly internalizes and integrates into the mucosal keratinocyte genome, and integrated copies of HIV-1 persist upon cell passage. The virus does not appear to replicate, and the infection may become latent. Interactions between HIV-1 and oral keratinocytes have been modeled in the context of key environmental factors, including putative copathogens and saliva. In keratinocytes, HIV-1 internalizes within minutes; in saliva, an infectious fraction escapes inactivation and is harbored and transferable to permissive target cells for up to 48 hours. When incubated with the common oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, CCR5− oral keratinocytes signal through protease-activated receptors and Toll-like receptors to induce expression of CCR5, which increases selective uptake of infectious R5-tropic HIV-1 into oral keratinocytes and transfer to permissive cells. Hence, oral keratinocytes—like squamous keratinocytes of other tissues—may be targets for low-level HIV-1 internalization and subsequent dissemination by transfer to permissive cells. PMID:21441479

  18. Hydrophobicity of mucosal surface and its relationship to gut barrier function.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaofa; Caputo, Francis J; Xu, Da-Zhong; Deitch, Edwin A

    2008-03-01

    Loss of the gut barrier has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and, thus, understanding the intestinal barrier is of potential clinical importance. An important, but relatively neglected, component of the gut barrier is the unstirred mucus layer, which through its hydrophobic and other properties serves as an important barrier to bacterial and other factors within the gut lumen. Thus, the goal of this study was to establish a reproducible method of measuring mucosal hydrophobicity and test the hypothesis that conditions that decrease mucosal hydrophobicity are associated with increased gut permeability. Hydrophobicity was measured in various segments of normal gut by measuring the contact angle of an aqueous droplet placed on the mucosal surface using a commercial goniometer. Second, the effect of the mucolytic agent N-acetyl cysteine on mucosal hydrophobicity and gut permeability was measured, as was the effects of increasing periods of in vivo gut ischemia on these parameters. Gut ischemia was induced by superior mesenteric artery occlusion, and gut permeability was measured by the mucosal-to-serosal passage of fluoresceine isothiocyanate-dextran (4.3 kDa) (FD4) across the everted sacs of ileum. Intestinal mucosal hydrophobicity showed a gradual increase from the duodenum to the end of the ileum and remained at high level in the cecum, colon, and rectum. Both N-acetyl cysteine treatment and ischemia caused a dose-dependent decrease in mucosal hydrophobicity, which significantly correlated increased gut permeability. Mucosal hydrophobicity of the intestine can be reproducibly measured, and decreases in mucosal hydrophobicity closely correlate with increased gut permeability. These results suggest that mucosal hydrophobicity can be a reliable method of measuring the barrier function of the unstirred mucus layer and a useful parameter in evaluating the pathogenesis of gut barrier dysfunction.

  19. Mucosal Barrier in Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dorofeyev, A. E.; Vasilenko, I. V.; Rassokhina, O. A.; Kondratiuk, R. B.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The mucus layer in the gastrointestinal tract plays important role in host innate defense, regulation of secretion, and absorption processes, maintaining colonization resistance, which composes the integrity of protective mucus barrier in the large intestine. Investigations of mucin expression in the colon mucosa can improve the understanding of protective function of mucosal barrier in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Materials and Methods. 77 patients with UC and CD were examined. Histological analysis of colon mucosa was done by standard method (haematoxylin-eosin, alcian blue at pH 1.0 and 2.5 to determine sulfated and nonsulfated glycosaminoglycans and glycoproteins, and goblet cells). To characterize the mucus production the PAS-reaction was performed. Immunohistochemistry was performed using monoclonal mouse antibodies raised against MUC2, MUC3, MUC4, and TFF3 (USBiological, USA). Results. The moderate expression of MUC2 and MUC3 (50.0% and 32.1%, P = 0.03) and high expression of MUC4 and TFF3 in the colon mucosa were observed in all patients with CD. The intensive labeling of MUC4 and TFF3 occurred more often (42.9% and 57.1%, P = 0.03) in patients with CD. The level of expression of secretory MUC2 and transmembrane MUC3 and MUC4 in all patients with UC was low, up to its complete absence (59.2% and 53.1% cases, P = 0.05). TFF3 expression had high and medium staining intensity in patients with UC. Conclusions. Different types of mucins synthesis, secretion, and expression were found in patients with UC and CD. The expression of mucin MUC2, MUC3, MUC4, and TFF3 correlated with the activity of disease and the extent of the inflammatory process in the large intestine. The most pronounced alteration of mucins expression was observed in patients with severe UC and CD. PMID:23737764

  20. Entamoeba histolytica contains an occludin-like protein that can alter colonic epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Goplen, Michael; Lejeune, Manigandan; Cornick, Steve; Moreau, France; Chadee, Kris

    2013-01-01

    The exact mechanism by which Entamoeba histolytica disrupts the human colonic epithelium and invades the mucosa has yet to be clearly elucidated. E. histolytica produces a diverse array of putative virulent factors such as glycosidase, cysteine proteinases and amebapore that can modulate and/or disrupt epithelial barrier functions. However, it is currently thought that E. histolytica produces numerous other molecules and strategies to disrupt colonic mucosal defenses. In this study, we document a putative mechanism whereby the parasite alters the integrity of human epithelium by expressing a cognate tight junction protein of the host. We detected this protein as "occludin-like" as revealed by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation studies and visualization by confocal microscopy using antibodies highly specific for human occludin. We propose that E. histolytica occludin-like protein might displace mucosal epithelial occludin-occludin tight junction interactions resulting in epithelial disruption analogous to sub mucosal human dendritic cells sampling luminal contents. These results indicate that E. histolytica occludin is a putative virulent component that can play a role in the pathogenesis of intestinal amebiasis.

  1. Significantly different proliferative potential of oral mucosal epithelial cells between six animal species.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Makoto; Yamato, Masayuki; Takagi, Ryo; Murakami, Daisuke; Namiki, Hideo; Okano, Teruo

    2014-06-01

    There has been an upsurge in regenerative medicine in recent years. In particular, because oral mucosal epithelial cells can be obtained noninvasively, cultured epithelial cell sheets have been used in a number of ectopic transplantations. Additionally, the verification of the properties of experimental animals' cultured cells has accelerated the application of regenerative medicine. In the present study, the properties of oral mucosal epithelial cells were compared between six animal species. The human and pig epithelia were relatively thicker than the epithelia of the other species. The colony-forming efficiency of the rat was the highest, followed by those of the dog, human, rabbit, and pig, whereas the colonies of the mouse cells were all paraclone and uncountable in the colony-forming assay. We also found that the rabbit and pig cells proliferated poorly and were unable to form cell sheets without feeder layers. In contrast, even in the absence of feeder layers and cholera toxin, cultured dog and mouse cells formed contiguous sheets, when the cell seeding density was high. These results indicate that interspecies variation is considerable in oral mucosal epithelial cells and that specific experimental animal or human cells must be chosen according to the intended use.

  2. A Novel Peptide to Treat Oral Mucositis Blocks Endothelial and Epithelial Cell Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaoyan; Chen Peili; Sonis, Stephen T.; Lingen, Mark W.; Berger, Ann; Toback, F. Gary

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: No effective agents currently exist to treat oral mucositis (OM) in patients receiving chemoradiation for the treatment of head-and-neck cancer. We identified a novel 21-amino acid peptide derived from antrum mucosal protein-18 that is cytoprotective, mitogenic, and motogenic in tissue culture and animal models of gastrointestinal epithelial cell injury. We examined whether administration of antrum mucosal protein peptide (AMP-p) could protect against and/or speed recovery from OM. Methods and Materials: OM was induced in established hamster models by a single dose of radiation, fractionated radiation, or fractionated radiation together with cisplatin to simulate conventional treatments of head-and-neck cancer. Results: Daily subcutaneous administration of AMP-p reduced the occurrence of ulceration and accelerated mucosal recovery in all three models. A delay in the onset of erythema after irradiation was observed, suggesting that a protective effect exists even before injury to mucosal epithelial cells occurs. To test this hypothesis, the effects of AMP-p on tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced apoptosis were studied in an endothelial cell line (human dermal microvascular endothelial cells) as well as an epithelial cell line (human adult low-calcium, high-temperature keratinocytes; HaCaT) used to model the oral mucosa. AMP-p treatment, either before or after cell monolayers were exposed to tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, protected against development of apoptosis in both cell types when assessed by annexin V and propidium iodide staining followed by flow cytometry or ligase-mediated polymerase chain reaction. Conclusions: These observations suggest that the ability of AMP-p to attenuate radiation-induced OM could be attributable, at least in part, to its antiapoptotic activity.

  3. In Vivo Rectal Mucosal Barrier Function Imaging in a Large-Animal Model by Using Confocal Endomicroscopy: Implications for Injury Assessment and Use in HIV Prevention Studies

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Kathleen Listiak; Zhu, Yong; Szafron, David; Brown, Tyra Caitlin; Villarreal, Paula Patricia; Bourne, Nigel; Milligan, Gregg N.; Motamedi, Massoud

    2016-01-01

    Injury occurring on the surface of the rectal mucosal lining that causes defects in barrier function may result in increased risk for transmission of infection by HIV and other pathogens. Such injury could occur from microbicidal or other topical agents, mechanical trauma during consensual or nonconsensual intercourse, or inflammatory conditions. Tools for evaluation of rectal mucosal barrier function for assessing the mucosa under these conditions are lacking, particularly those that can provide in vivo structural and functional barrier integrity assessment and are adaptable to longitudinal imaging. We investigated confocal endomicroscopy (CE) as a means for in vivo imaging of the rectal epithelial barrier in the ovine model following spatially confined injury to the surface at a controlled site using a topical application of the microbicide test agent benzalkonium chloride. Topical and intravenous (i.v.) fluorescent probes were used with CE to provide subcellular resolution imaging of the mucosal surface and assessment of barrier function loss. A 3-point CE grading system based on cellular structure integrity and leakage of dye through the mucosa showed significant differences in score between untreated (1.19 ± 0.53) and treated (2.55 ± 0.75) tissue (P < 0.0001). Histological grading confirmed findings of barrier compromise. The results indicate that CE is an effective means for detecting epithelial injury and barrier loss following localized trauma in a large-animal model. CE is promising for real-time rectal mucosal evaluation after injury or trauma or topical application of emerging biomedical prevention strategies designed to combat HIV. PMID:27185807

  4. Protective effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on epithelial barrier disruption caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yunpeng; Zhu, Cui; Chen, Zhuang; Chen, Zhongjian; Zhang, Weina; Ma, Xianyong; Wang, Li; Yang, Xuefen; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-04-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) play an important role in maintaining the mucosal barrier function and gastrointestinal health of animals. Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) was reported to protect the intestinal barrier function of early-weaned piglets against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 challenge; however, the underlying cellular mechanism of this protection was unclear. Here, an established intestinal porcine epithelia cell (IPEC-J2) model was used to investigate the protective effects and related mechanisms of L. plantarum on epithelial barrier damages induced by ETEC K88. Epithelial permeability, expression of inflammatory cytokines, and abundance of TJ proteins, were determined. Pre-treatment with L. plantarum for 6h prevented the reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) (P<0.05), inhibited the increased transcript abundances of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) (P<0.05), decreased expression of claudin-1, occludin and zonula occludens (ZO-1) (P<0.05) and protein expression of occludin (P<0.05) of IPEC-J2 cells caused by ETEC K88. Moreover, the mRNA expression of negative regulators of toll-like receptors (TLRs) [single Ig Il-1-related receptor (SIGIRR), B-cell CLL/lymphoma 3 (Bcl3), and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1)] in IPEC-J2 cells pre-treated with L. plantarum were higher (P<0.05) compared with those in cells just exposed to K88. Furthermore, L. plantarum was shown to regulate proteins of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. These results indicated that L. plantarum may improve epithelial barrier function by maintenance of TEER, inhibiting the reduction of TJ proteins, and reducing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines induced by ETEC K88, possibly through modulation of TLRs, NF-κB and MAPK pathways.

  5. Oral mucosal pellicle. Adsorption and transpeptidation of salivary components to buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bradway, S D; Bergey, E J; Jones, P C; Levine, M J

    1989-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to examine the mechanism(s) whereby salivary molecules interact with human buccal epithelial cells. By utilizing antiserum against human parotid saliva, selected salivary components were detected by electrophoretic-transfer analysis of 1.5% SDS extracts of epithelial cells. Incubation of the cells and their aqueous cell-free extracts with 125I-labelled parotid saliva resulted in the formation of an iodinated high-molecular-mass complex which was not present in 125I-labelled saline alone. Formation of this complex was time-dependent and was inhibited by treating the buccal epithelial cells or their cell-free extracts with EGTA, iodoacetamide, N-ethylmaleimide or by heating at 100 degrees C for 15 min. The epithelial cells also promoted incorporation of [14C]putrescine into high-molecular-mass complexes whose formation was inhibited by iodoacetamide, unlabelled putrescine and EGTA. Cell extracts mediated cross-linking of monodansylcadaverine into alpha-casein, and this interaction was inhibited by iodoacetamide. Significant amounts of radioactivity were recovered with the epithelial-cell envelopes after exhaustive extraction of 125I-saliva- or [14C]putrescine-treated epithelial cells with 4% (w/v) SDS/10% (v/v) beta-mercaptoethanol. The incorporation of radioactivity into epithelial-cell envelopes was inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with putrescine, EGTA, iodoacetamide, or heating at 100 degrees C for 15 min. These data suggest that: (1) oral mucosal pellicle is formed by the selective adsorption of saliva to the epithelial-cell plasma membrane and its associated cytoskeleton; and (2) the adsorbed salivary components may be cross-linked to each other or the epithelial cytoskeleton by epithelial transglutaminases. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2572218

  6. Effects of continuous renal replacement therapy on intestinal mucosal barrier function during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been recommended for treatment of acute, potentially reversible, life-threatening respiratory failure unresponsive to conventional therapy. Intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction is one of the most critical pathophysiological disorders during ECMO. This study aimed to determine whether combination with CRRT could alleviate damage of intestinal mucosal barrier function during VV ECMO in a porcine model. Methods Twenty-four piglets were randomly divided into control(C), sham(S), ECMO(E) and ECMO + CRRT(EC) group. The animals were treated with ECMO or ECMO + CRRT for 24 hours. After the experiments, piglets were sacrificed. Jejunum, ileum and colon were harvested for morphologic examination of mucosal injury and ultrastructural distortion. Histological scoring was assessed according to Chiu’s scoring standard. Blood samples were taken from the animals at -1, 2, 6, 12 and 24 h during experiment. Blood, liver, spleen, kidney and mesenteric lymphnode were collected for bacterial culture. Serum concentrations of diamine oxidase (DAO) and intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) were tested as markers to assess intestinal epithelial function and permeability. DAO levels were determined by spectrophotometry and I-FABP levels by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Results Microscopy findings showed that ECMO-induced intestinal microvillus shedding and edema, morphological distortion of tight junction between intestinal mucous epithelium and loose cell-cell junctions were significantly improved with combination of CRRT. No significance was detected on positive rate of serum bacterial culture. The elevated colonies of bacterial culture in liver and mesenteric lymphnode in E group reduced significantly in EC group (p < 0.05). Compared with E group, EC group showed significantly decreased level of serum DAO and I-FABP (p < 0.05). Conclusions CRRT can alleviate the intestinal mucosal dysfunction

  7. STAT3 links IL-22 signaling in intestinal epithelial cells to mucosal wound healing.

    PubMed

    Pickert, Geethanjali; Neufert, Clemens; Leppkes, Moritz; Zheng, Yan; Wittkopf, Nadine; Warntjen, Moritz; Lehr, Hans-Anton; Hirth, Sebastian; Weigmann, Benno; Wirtz, Stefan; Ouyang, Wenjun; Neurath, Markus F; Becker, Christoph

    2009-07-06

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 is a pleiotropic transcription factor with important functions in cytokine signaling in a variety of tissues. However, the role of STAT3 in the intestinal epithelium is not well understood. We demonstrate that development of colonic inflammation is associated with the induction of STAT3 activity in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). Studies in genetically engineered mice showed that epithelial STAT3 activation in dextran sodium sulfate colitis is dependent on interleukin (IL)-22 rather than IL-6. IL-22 was secreted by colonic CD11c(+) cells in response to Toll-like receptor stimulation. Conditional knockout mice with an IEC-specific deletion of STAT3 activity were highly susceptible to experimental colitis, indicating that epithelial STAT3 regulates gut homeostasis. STAT3(IEC-KO) mice, upon induction of colitis, showed a striking defect of epithelial restitution. Gene chip analysis indicated that STAT3 regulates the cellular stress response, apoptosis, and pathways associated with wound healing in IECs. Consistently, both IL-22 and epithelial STAT3 were found to be important in wound-healing experiments in vivo. In summary, our data suggest that intestinal epithelial STAT3 activation regulates immune homeostasis in the gut by promoting IL-22-dependent mucosal wound healing.

  8. STAT3 links IL-22 signaling in intestinal epithelial cells to mucosal wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Pickert, Geethanjali; Neufert, Clemens; Leppkes, Moritz; Zheng, Yan; Wittkopf, Nadine; Warntjen, Moritz; Lehr, Hans-Anton; Hirth, Sebastian; Weigmann, Benno; Wirtz, Stefan; Ouyang, Wenjun; Neurath, Markus F.

    2009-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 is a pleiotropic transcription factor with important functions in cytokine signaling in a variety of tissues. However, the role of STAT3 in the intestinal epithelium is not well understood. We demonstrate that development of colonic inflammation is associated with the induction of STAT3 activity in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). Studies in genetically engineered mice showed that epithelial STAT3 activation in dextran sodium sulfate colitis is dependent on interleukin (IL)-22 rather than IL-6. IL-22 was secreted by colonic CD11c+ cells in response to Toll-like receptor stimulation. Conditional knockout mice with an IEC-specific deletion of STAT3 activity were highly susceptible to experimental colitis, indicating that epithelial STAT3 regulates gut homeostasis. STAT3IEC-KO mice, upon induction of colitis, showed a striking defect of epithelial restitution. Gene chip analysis indicated that STAT3 regulates the cellular stress response, apoptosis, and pathways associated with wound healing in IECs. Consistently, both IL-22 and epithelial STAT3 were found to be important in wound-healing experiments in vivo. In summary, our data suggest that intestinal epithelial STAT3 activation regulates immune homeostasis in the gut by promoting IL-22–dependent mucosal wound healing. PMID:19564350

  9. Nitric Oxide and Airway Epithelial Barrier Function: Regulation of Tight Junction Proteins and Epithelial Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nels; Greul, Anne-Katrin; Hristova, Milena; Bove, Peter F.; Kasahara, David I.; van der Vliet, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Acute airway inflammation is associated with enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO•) and altered airway epithelial barrier function, suggesting a role of NO• or its metabolites in epithelial permeability. While high concentrations of S-nitrosothiols disrupted transepithelial resistance (TER) and increased permeability in 16HBE14o- cells, no significant barrier disruption was observed by NONOates, in spite of altered distribution and expression of some TJ proteins. Barrier disruption of mouse tracheal epithelial (MTE) cell monolayers in response to inflammatory cytokines was independent of NOS2, based on similar effects in MTE cells from NOS2-/- mice and a lack of effect of the NOS2-inhibitor 1400W. Cell pre-incubation with LPS protected MTE cells from TER loss and increased permeability by H2O2, which was independent of NOS2. However, NOS2 was found to contribute to epithelial wound repair and TER recovery after mechanical injury. Overall, our results demonstrate that epithelial NOS2 is not responsible for epithelial barrier dysfunction during inflammation, but may contribute to restoration of epithelial integrity. PMID:19100237

  10. The biomedical aspects of oral mucosal epithelial cell culture in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bryja, A; Dyszkiewicz-Konwińska, M; Budna, J; Kranc, W; Chachuła, A; Borys, S; Ciesiółka, S; Sokalski, J; Prylinski, M; Bukowska, D; Antosik, P; Bruska, M; Nowicki, M; Zabel, M; Kempisty, B

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in epithelial cell tissue culture, particularly oral mucosa and its application utilizing in vitro cell culture in medicine. This involves tests using animal models to better understand oral mucosa function, and the differences in its construction in various animal models. The use of buccal pouch mucosal cell culture provides insight into the processes of trans mucosal transport and regeneration of the oral epithelium. The processes associated with epithelium regeneration is the base for stem cell research and/or oral cancer investigation. These artificially cultured tissue equivalents are used in transplant surgery for the treatment of a variety of tissue dysfunctions, i.e. eye, esophagus, or urethra. In this review, the most recent results from studies carried out on in animal models, which may be applied in areas such as regenerative medicine and reconstructive surgery, were explored.

  11. Differential targeting of the E-Cadherin/β-Catenin complex by gram-positive probiotic lactobacilli improves epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Stephanie; Veltman, Katharina; Cichon, Christoph; Sonnenborn, Ulrich; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2012-02-01

    The intestinal ecosystem is balanced by dynamic interactions between resident and incoming microbes, the gastrointestinal barrier, and the mucosal immune system. However, in the context of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), where the integrity of the gastrointestinal barrier is compromised, resident microbes contribute to the development and perpetuation of inflammation and disease. Probiotic bacteria have been shown to exert beneficial effects, e.g., enhancing epithelial barrier integrity. However, the mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects are only poorly understood. Here, we comparatively investigated the effects of four probiotic lactobacilli, namely, Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. fermentum, L. gasseri, and L. rhamnosus, in a T84 cell epithelial barrier model. Results of DNA microarray experiments indicating that lactobacilli modulate the regulation of genes encoding in particular adherence junction proteins such as E-cadherin and β-catenin were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Furthermore, we show that epithelial barrier function is modulated by Gram-positive probiotic lactobacilli via their effect on adherence junction protein expression and complex formation. In addition, incubation with lactobacilli differentially influences the phosphorylation of adherence junction proteins and the abundance of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms such as PKCδ that thereby positively modulates epithelial barrier function. Further insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms triggered by these probiotics might also foster the development of novel strategies for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases (e.g., IBD).

  12. AMP-18 protects barrier function of colonic epithelial cells: role of tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh-Reitz, Margaret M.; Huang, Erick F.; Musch, Mark W.; Chang, Eugene B.; Martin, Terence E.; Kartha, Sreedharan; Toback, F. Gary

    2005-01-01

    AMP-18, a novel gastric antrum mucosal protein, and a synthetic peptide of amino acids 77-97, have mitogenic and motogenic properties for epithelial cells. The possibility that AMP-18 is also protective was evaluated in the colonic mucosa of mice and monolayer cultures of human colonic epithelial Caco2/bbe (C2) cells. Administration of AMP peptide to mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colonic injury delayed the onset of bloody diarrhea, and reduced weight loss. Treatment of C2 cells with AMP peptide protected monolayers against decreases in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) induced by the oxidant monochloramine, indomethacin, or DSS. A molecular mechanism for these barrier-protective effects was sought by asking if AMP peptide acted on specific tight junction (TJ) proteins. Immunoblots of detergent-insoluble fractions of C2 cells treated with AMP peptide exhibited increased accumulation of specific TJ proteins. Occludin immunoreactivity was also increased in detergent-insoluble fractions obtained from colonic mucosal cells of mice injected with AMP peptide. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (CF) supported the capacity of AMP peptide to enhance accumulation of occludin and ZO-1 in TJ domains of C2 cell monolayers, and together with immunoblot analysis showed that the peptide protected against loss of these TJ proteins following oxidant injury. AMP peptide also protected against a fall in TER during disruption of actin filaments by cytochalasin D, and stabilized perijunctional actin during oxidant injury when assessed by CF. These findings suggest that AMP-18 could protect the intestinal mucosal barrier by acting on specific TJ proteins and stabilizing perijunctional actin. PMID:15961882

  13. Human oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets imaging with high-resolution phase-diversity homodyne OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senda, Naoko; Osawa, Kentaro

    2015-03-01

    There is a need for development of non-invasive technique to evaluate regenerative tissues such as cell sheets for transplantation. We demonstrated non-invasive imaging inside living cell sheets of human oral mucosal epithelial cells by phase-diversity homodyne optical coherence tomography (OCT). The new method OCT developed in Hitachi enables cell imaging because of high resolution (axial resolution; ~2.6 μm, lateral resolution; ~1 μm, in the air). Nuclei inside cell sheets were imaged with sufficient spatial resolution to identify each cell. It suggested that the new method OCT could be useful for non-invasive cell sheet evaluation test.

  14. Cordyceps sinensis preserves intestinal mucosal barrier and may be an adjunct therapy in endotoxin-induced sepsis rat model: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Guo-Sheng; Ren, Jian-An; Li, Guan-Wei; Yuan, Yu-Jie; Li, Ning; Li, Jie-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cordyceps sinensis (C. sinensis), a traditional Chinese medicine, exhibits various pharmacological activities such as reparative, antioxidant, and apoptosis inhibitory effects. Intestinal barrier dysfunction plays a vital role in the progression of sepsis. We aimed to explore the effect of C. sinensis on the gut barrier and evaluate its efficacy in sepsis. Methods: A murine model of gut barrier dysfunction was created by intraperitoneal injection of endotoxin. C. sinensis or saline was administered orally after the induction of sepsis. Alterations of intestinal barrier were evaluated and compared in terms of epithelial cell apoptosis, proliferation index (PI), intercellular tight junction (TJ) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Results: C. sinensis significantly decreased the percentage of apoptotic cells and promoted mucosal cells proliferation indicated by enhanced PI and PCNA expression in the intestinal mucosa compared to control group. The TJs between epithelial cells which were disrupted in septic rats were also restored by treatment of C. sinensis. In survival studies, C. sinensis was demonstrated to confer a protection against the lethal effect of sepsis. Conclusion: These results suggest that C. sinensis has gut barrier-protection effect in endotoxin-induced sepsis by promoting the proliferation and inhibiting the apoptosis of intestinal mucosal cells, as well as restoring the TJs of intestinal mucosa. C. sinensis may have the potential to be a useful adjunct therapy for sepsis. PMID:26221273

  15. Intracellular mediators of JAM-A-dependent epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Ana C; Parkos, Charles A

    2012-06-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is a critical signaling component of the apical junctional complex, a structure composed of several transmembrane and scaffold molecules that controls the passage of nutrients and solutes across epithelial surfaces. Observations from JAM-A-deficient epithelial cells and JAM-A knockout animals indicate that JAM-A is an important regulator of epithelial paracellular permeability; however, the mechanism(s) linking JAM-A to barrier function are not understood. This review highlights recent findings relevant to JAM-A-mediated regulation of epithelial permeability, focusing on the role of upstream and downstream signaling candidates. We draw on what is known about proteins reported to associate with JAM-A in other pathways and on known modulators of barrier function to propose candidate effectors that may mediate JAM-A regulation of epithelial paracellular permeability. Further investigation of pathways highlighted in this review may provide ideas for novel therapeutics that target debilitating conditions associated with barrier dysfunction, such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  16. Host-microbial interactions and regulation of intestinal epithelial barrier function: From physiology to pathology

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Linda Chia-Hui; Wang, Jin-Town; Wei, Shu-Chen; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2012-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is the largest reservoir of commensal bacteria in the human body, providing nutrients and space for the survival of microbes while concurrently operating mucosal barriers to confine the microbial population. The epithelial cells linked by tight junctions not only physically separate the microbiota from the lamina propria, but also secrete proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species in response to pathogen invasion and metabolic stress and serve as a sentinel to the underlying immune cells. Accumulating evidence indicates that commensal bacteria are involved in various physiological functions in the gut and microbial imbalances (dysbiosis) may cause pathology. Commensal bacteria are involved in the regulation of intestinal epithelial cell turnover, promotion of epithelial restitution and reorganization of tight junctions, all of which are pivotal for fortifying barrier function. Recent studies indicate that aberrant bacterial lipopolysaccharide-mediated signaling in gut mucosa may be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis. Our perception of enteric commensals has now changed from one of opportunistic pathogens to active participants in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. This review attempts to explain the dynamic interaction between the intestinal epithelium and commensal bacteria in disease and health status. PMID:22368784

  17. Intestinal epithelial tuft cells initiate type 2 mucosal immunity to helminth parasites.

    PubMed

    Gerbe, François; Sidot, Emmanuelle; Smyth, Danielle J; Ohmoto, Makoto; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Dardalhon, Valérie; Cesses, Pierre; Garnier, Laure; Pouzolles, Marie; Brulin, Bénédicte; Bruschi, Marco; Harcus, Yvonne; Zimmermann, Valérie S; Taylor, Naomi; Maizels, Rick M; Jay, Philippe

    2016-01-14

    Helminth parasitic infections are a major global health and social burden. The host defence against helminths such as Nippostrongylus brasiliensis is orchestrated by type 2 cell-mediated immunity. Induction of type 2 cytokines, including interleukins (IL) IL-4 and IL-13, induce goblet cell hyperplasia with mucus production, ultimately resulting in worm expulsion. However, the mechanisms underlying the initiation of type 2 responses remain incompletely understood. Here we show that tuft cells, a rare epithelial cell type in the steady-state intestinal epithelium, are responsible for initiating type 2 responses to parasites by a cytokine-mediated cellular relay. Tuft cells have a Th2-related gene expression signature and we demonstrate that they undergo a rapid and extensive IL-4Rα-dependent amplification following infection with helminth parasites, owing to direct differentiation of epithelial crypt progenitor cells. We find that the Pou2f3 gene is essential for tuft cell specification. Pou2f3(-/-) mice lack intestinal tuft cells and have defective mucosal type 2 responses to helminth infection; goblet cell hyperplasia is abrogated and worm expulsion is compromised. Notably, IL-4Rα signalling is sufficient to induce expansion of the tuft cell lineage, and ectopic stimulation of this signalling cascade obviates the need for tuft cells in the epithelial cell remodelling of the intestine. Moreover, tuft cells secrete IL-25, thereby regulating type 2 immune responses. Our data reveal a novel function of intestinal epithelial tuft cells and demonstrate a cellular relay required for initiating mucosal type 2 immunity to helminth infection.

  18. Mechanism of intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction in a rat model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Xiaofeng; Dai, Wei; Wu, Jie; Fang, Liping; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Pengpeng; Chen, Min

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction in a rat model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Male Sprague Dawley rats (n=40) were evenly randomized into control and COPD groups and the COPD model was established by regulated exposure to cigarette smoke for 6 months. Histopathological changes of the lung and intestinal tissues were detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Expression of the tight junction proteins occludin and zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) in the intestinal tissues were analyzed by western blotting, serum diamine oxidase (DAO) activity was detected by spectrophotometry, the urinary lactulose to mannitol ratio (L/M) was evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography, and intestinal tissue secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-8 were detected by ELISA. Lung histopathology revealed thinned alveolar walls, ruptured alveolar septa, enlarged and deformed alveoli, and the formation of bullae and emphysema due to alveolar fusion in the COPD group, while intestinal histopathology indicated clearly swollen intestines with darkened and gray mucosa, neutrophil infiltration of the intestinal mucosal and regional epithelial shedding. The occludin and ZO-1 expression levels were significantly lower in the COPD group compared with those in the corresponding control group (P<0.05), while the urinary L/M ratio was significantly higher (P<0.05). Furthermore, the serum DAO activity and secretion of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-8 in the intestinal tissues were significantly higher in the COPD group than in the control group (each P<0.05). Dysfunctional and structural changes were observed in the intestinal mucosal barrier in COPD model rats, which may be associated with the increased intestinal inflammatory responses. PMID:27588054

  19. Pulmonary epithelial barrier function: some new players and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Brune, Kieran; Frank, James; Schwingshackl, Andreas; Finigan, James

    2015-01-01

    The pulmonary epithelium serves as a barrier to prevent access of the inspired luminal contents to the subepithelium. In addition, the epithelium dictates the initial responses of the lung to both infectious and noninfectious stimuli. One mechanism by which the epithelium does this is by coordinating transport of diffusible molecules across the epithelial barrier, both through the cell and between cells. In this review, we will discuss a few emerging paradigms of permeability changes through altered ion transport and paracellular regulation by which the epithelium gates its response to potentially detrimental luminal stimuli. This review is a summary of talks presented during a symposium in Experimental Biology geared toward novel and less recognized methods of epithelial barrier regulation. First, we will discuss mechanisms of dynamic regulation of cell-cell contacts in the context of repetitive exposure to inhaled infectious and noninfectious insults. In the second section, we will briefly discuss mechanisms of transcellular ion homeostasis specifically focused on the role of claudins and paracellular ion-channel regulation in chronic barrier dysfunction. In the next section, we will address transcellular ion transport and highlight the role of Trek-1 in epithelial responses to lung injury. In the final section, we will outline the role of epithelial growth receptor in barrier regulation in baseline, acute lung injury, and airway disease. We will then end with a summary of mechanisms of epithelial control as well as discuss emerging paradigms of the epithelium role in shifting between a structural element that maintains tight cell-cell adhesion to a cell that initiates and participates in immune responses. PMID:25637609

  20. Influences of nanomaterials on the barrier function of epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shariq; Rytting, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have led to exciting opportunities in medicine, energy, manufacturing, and other fields. Nevertheless, it is important to adequately assess the potential impacts of nanomaterial exposure. This chapter focuses on the interactions of nanomaterials with epithelial barriers in the lungs, intestine, kidneys, skin, and placenta. Methods for determining transepithelial electrical resistance and paracellular permeability are described. Effects on cell viability and barrier integrity depend on the chemical nature of the nanomaterial, nanoparticle size, surface coatings, and concentration. Disruption of tight junctions can affect permeability and interfere with normal regulatory processes of the epithelial barrier. Future research is needed to better understand the possibilities and the limits of novel approaches in nanotechnology.

  1. Glucagon-like peptide-2 protects impaired intestinal mucosal barriers in obstructive jaundice rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Dong, Jia-Tian; Li, Xiao-Jing; Gu, Ye; Cheng, Zhi-Jian; Cai, Yuan-Kun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To observe the protective effect of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) on the intestinal barrier of rats with obstructive jaundice and determine the possible mechanisms of action involved in the protective effect. METHODS: Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a sham operation group, an obstructive jaundice group, and a GLP-2 group; each group consisted of 12 rats. The GLP-2 group was treated with GLP-2 after the day of surgery, whereas the other two groups were treated with the same concentration of normal saline. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total bilirubin, and endotoxin levels were recorded at 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14 d. Furthermore, on the 14th day, body weight, the wet weight of the small intestine, pathological changes of the small intestine and the immunoglobulin A (IgA) expressed by plasma cells located in the small intestinal lamina propria were recorded for each group. RESULTS: In the rat model, jaundice was obvious, and the rats’ activity decreased 4-6 d post bile duct ligation. Compared with the sham operation group, the obstructive jaundice group displayed increased yellow staining of abdominal visceral serosa, decreased small intestine wet weight, thinning of the intestinal muscle layer and villi, villous atrophy, uneven height, fusion, partial villous epithelial cell shedding, substantial inflammatory cell infiltration and significantly reduced IgA expression. However, no significant gross changes were noted between the GLP-2 and sham groups. With time, the levels of ALT, endotoxin and bilirubin in the GLP-2 group were significantly increased compared with the sham group (P < 0.01). The increasing levels of the aforementioned markers were more significant in the obstructive jaundice group than in the GLP-2 group (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: GLP-2 reduces intestinal mucosal injuries in obstructive jaundice rats, which might be attributed to increased intestinal IgA and reduced bilirubin and endotoxin. PMID:25593463

  2. Research Advance in Intestinal Mucosal Barrier and Pathogenesis of Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Chuan-zi; Guan, Xin; Wu, Huan-gan

    2016-01-01

    To date, the etiology and pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) have not been fully elucidated. It is widely accepted that genetic, immune, and environment factors are closely related to the development of CD. As an important defensive line for human body against the environment, intestinal mucosa is able to protect the homeostasis of gut bacteria and alleviate the intestinal inflammatory and immune response. It is evident that the dysfunction of intestinal mucosa barriers plays a crucial role in CD initiation and development. Yet researches are insufficient on intestinal mucosal barrier's action in the prevention of CD onset. This article summarizes the research advances about the correlations between the disorders of intestinal mucosal barriers and CD. PMID:27651792

  3. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin reduces human alveolar epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin; Metcalf, Jordan Patrick

    2012-12-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness.

  4. Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Reduces Human Alveolar Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M.; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin

    2012-01-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness. PMID:23027535

  5. Vanadium toxicity in mice: possible impairment of lipid metabolism and mucosal epithelial cell necrosis in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Imura, Hitomi; Shimada, Akinori; Naota, Misaki; Morita, Takehito; Togawa, Masako; Hasegawa, Tatsuya; Seko, Yoshiyuki

    2013-08-01

    Because precise information as to the toxicity of vanadium is required for practical use of vanadium compounds as antidiabetic drugs, we examined vanadium toxicity in mice fed normal diet or high-fat diet (C57BL/6N, male, 7 weeks) by oral administration of ammonium metavanadate (AMV) with a maximum dose of 20 mgV/kg/day. Marked lipid accumulation in hepatocytes, renal epithelial cells, and mucosal epithelial cells of the small and large intestines and severe degeneration, necrosis, and loss of mucosal epithelial cells in the small intestine were observed. These pathological changes were more severe in mice fed high-fat diet than mice fed normal diet, and the intensity of the changes increased with increase in the administered dose of AMV. By electron microscopy, the number and size of lipid droplets in hepatocytes were increased. In the small intestine, a TUNEL assay showed a decreased number of positive cells, and positive cells for acrolein immunohistochemistry were observed specifically in the mucosal epithelial cells indicating degeneration and necrosis in the AMV-treated group, suggesting that a possible factor responsible for cell necrosis in the small intestine could be oxidative stress. In conclusion, AMV may impair cellular lipid metabolism, resulting in lipid accumulation, and induce mucosal epithelial cell necrosis in the small intestine.

  6. Diet-Derived Short Chain Fatty Acids Stimulate Intestinal Epithelial Cells To Induce Mucosal Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Goverse, Gera; Molenaar, Rosalie; Macia, Laurence; Tan, Jian; Erkelens, Martje N; Konijn, Tanja; Knippenberg, Marlene; Cook, Emma C L; Hanekamp, Diana; Veldhoen, Marc; Hartog, Anita; Roeselers, Guus; Mackay, Charles R; Mebius, Reina E

    2017-03-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is continuously exposed to many environmental factors that influence intestinal epithelial cells and the underlying mucosal immune system. In this article, we demonstrate that dietary fiber and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) induced the expression of the vitamin A-converting enzyme RALDH1 in intestinal epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro, respectively. Furthermore, our data showed that the expression levels of RALDH1 in small intestinal epithelial cells correlated with the activity of vitamin A-converting enzymes in mesenteric lymph node dendritic cells, along with increased numbers of intestinal regulatory T cells and a higher production of luminal IgA. Moreover, we show that the consumption of dietary fiber can alter the composition of SCFA-producing microbiota and SCFA production in the small intestines. In conclusion, our data illustrate that dietary adjustments affect small intestinal epithelial cells and can be used to modulate the mucosal immune system.

  7. Immune Cell Responses and Mucosal Barrier Disruptions in Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Khalmuratova, Roza; Park, Jong-Wan

    2017-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is one of the most common presentations of upper airway illness and severely affects patient quality of life. Its frequency is not surprising given levels of environmental exposure to microbes, pollutants, and allergens. Inflammatory cells, inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and airway remodeling have been detected in the sinonasal mucosae of CRS patients, although the precise pathophysiological mechanisms causing such persistent inflammation remain unclear. Given its high prevalence and considerable associated morbidity, continued research into CRS is necessary to increase our understanding of factors likely to contribute to its pathogenesis, and facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to improve treatment. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding immune cell responses and epithelial alterations in CRS. PMID:28261021

  8. Berberine Attenuates Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jing; Hu, Meilin; Huang, Zhaoyi; Fang, Ke; Wang, Dingkun; Chen, Qingjie; Li, Jingbin; Yang, Desen; Zou, Xin; Xu, Lijun; Wang, Kaifu; Dong, Hui; Lu, Fuer

    2017-01-01

    Background: Intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction plays an important role in the development of diabetes mellitus (DM). Berberine (BBR), a kind of isoquinoline alkaloid, is widely known to be effective for both DM and diarrhea. Here, we explored whether the anti-diabetic effect of BBR was related to the intestine mucosal barrier. Methods and Results: The rat model of T2DM was established by high glucose and fat diet feeding and intravenous injection of streptozocin. Then, those diabetic rats were treated with BBR at different concentrations for 9 weeks. The results showed, in addition to hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, diabetic rats were also characterized by proinflammatory intestinal changes, altered gut-derived hormones, and 2.77-fold increase in intestinal permeability. However, the treatment with BBR significantly reversed the above changes in diabetic rats, presenting as the improvement of the high glucose and triglyceride levels, the relief of the inflammatory changes of intestinal immune system, and the attenuation of the intestinal barrier damage. BBR treatment at a high concentration also decreased the intestinal permeability by 27.5% in diabetic rats. Furthermore, BBR regulated the expressions of the molecules involved in TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathways in intestinal tissue of diabetic rats. Conclusion: The hypoglycemic effects of BBR might be related to the improvement in gut-derived hormones and the attenuation of intestinal mucosal mechanic and immune barrier damages.

  9. Berberine Attenuates Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jing; Hu, Meilin; Huang, Zhaoyi; Fang, Ke; Wang, Dingkun; Chen, Qingjie; Li, Jingbin; Yang, Desen; Zou, Xin; Xu, Lijun; Wang, Kaifu; Dong, Hui; Lu, Fuer

    2017-01-01

    Background: Intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction plays an important role in the development of diabetes mellitus (DM). Berberine (BBR), a kind of isoquinoline alkaloid, is widely known to be effective for both DM and diarrhea. Here, we explored whether the anti-diabetic effect of BBR was related to the intestine mucosal barrier. Methods and Results: The rat model of T2DM was established by high glucose and fat diet feeding and intravenous injection of streptozocin. Then, those diabetic rats were treated with BBR at different concentrations for 9 weeks. The results showed, in addition to hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, diabetic rats were also characterized by proinflammatory intestinal changes, altered gut-derived hormones, and 2.77-fold increase in intestinal permeability. However, the treatment with BBR significantly reversed the above changes in diabetic rats, presenting as the improvement of the high glucose and triglyceride levels, the relief of the inflammatory changes of intestinal immune system, and the attenuation of the intestinal barrier damage. BBR treatment at a high concentration also decreased the intestinal permeability by 27.5% in diabetic rats. Furthermore, BBR regulated the expressions of the molecules involved in TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathways in intestinal tissue of diabetic rats. Conclusion: The hypoglycemic effects of BBR might be related to the improvement in gut-derived hormones and the attenuation of intestinal mucosal mechanic and immune barrier damages. PMID:28217099

  10. Effect of BML-111 on the intestinal mucosal barrier in sepsis and its mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huaizheng; Liu, Zuoliang; Zhao, Shangping; Sun, Chuanzheng; Yang, Mingshi

    2015-08-01

    5(S),6(R)-7-trihydroxymethyl heptanoate (BML-111) is an lipoxin A4 receptor agonist, which modulates the immune response and attenuates hemorrhagic shock-induced acute lung injury. However, the role of BML-111 in sepsis and in the intestinal mucosal barrier are not well understood. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the effect of BML-111 on the intestinal mucosal barrier in a rat model of sepsis. Furthermore, the molecular mechanism of action of BML-111 was evaluated. The cecal ligation and puncture-induced rat model of sepsis was constructed, and BML-111 was administered at three different doses. The results revealed that BML-111 suppressed the elevation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, while enhancing the elevation of the anti-inflammatory cytokine transforming growth factor-β in the intestine. In addition, BML-111 significantly upregulated rat defensin-5 mRNA expression levels and downregulated the induction of cell apoptosis as well as caspase-3 activity in the intestine. All these results demonstrated that BML-111 exerted protective effects on the intestinal mucosal barrier in sepsis. Further, it was indicated that alterations in the expression of toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 may be one of the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effect of BML-111. The present study therefore suggested that BML-111 may be a novel therapeutic agent for sepsis.

  11. Concise review: transplantation of cultured oral mucosal epithelial cells for treating limbal stem cell deficiency-current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2015-06-01

    A number of diseases and external factors can deplete limbal stem cells, causing pain and visual loss. Ten years have passed since the first transplantation of cultured oral mucosal epithelial cells in humans, representing the first autologous cell-based therapy for severe bilateral limbal stem cell deficiency. Its steady increase in popularity since then can be attributed to the accumulating evidence of its efficacy in reverting limbal stem cell deficiency. In this review, the focus is on clinical, and to a lesser degree laboratory, features of cultured oral mucosal epithelial transplants over the past 10 years. Comparisons with other available technologies are made. Avenues for research to stimulate further improvements in clinical results and allow worldwide distribution of limbal stem cell therapy based on oral mucosal cells are discussed. These include storage and transportation of cultured oral mucosal epithelial sheets and in vivo culture of oral mucosal epithelial cells.

  12. Neutrophil priming by hypoxic preconditioning protects against epithelial barrier damage and enteric bacterial translocation in intestinal ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yen-Zhen; Wu, Chi-Chin; Huang, Yi-Chen; Huang, Ching-Ying; Yang, Chung-Yi; Lee, Tsung-Chun; Chen, Chau-Fong; Yu, Linda Chia-Hui

    2012-05-01

    Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) induces mucosal barrier dysfunction and bacterial translocation (BT). Neutrophil-derived oxidative free radicals have been incriminated in the pathogenesis of ischemic injury in various organs, but their role in the bacteria-containing intestinal tract is debatable. Primed neutrophils are characterized by a faster and higher respiratory burst activity associated with more robust bactericidal effects on exposure to a second stimulus. Hypoxic preconditioning (HPC) attenuates ischemic injury in brain, heart, lung and kidney; no reports were found in the gut. Our aim is to investigate whether neutrophil priming by HPC protects against intestinal I/R-induced barrier damage and bacterial influx. Rats were raised in normoxia (NM) or kept in a hypobaric hypoxic chamber (380 Torr) 17 h/day for 3 weeks for HPC, followed by sham operation or intestinal I/R. Gut permeability was determined by using an ex vivo macromolecular flux assay and an in vivo magnetic resonance imaging-based method. Liver and spleen homogenates were plated for bacterial culturing. Rats raised in HPC showed diminished levels of BT, and partially improved mucosal histopathology and epithelial barrier function compared with the NM groups after intestinal I/R. Augmented cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1 and -3 levels and myeloperoxidase activity correlated with enhanced infiltration of neutrophils in intestines of HPC-I/R compared with NM-I/R rats. HPC alone caused blood neutrophil priming, as shown by elevated production of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide on stimulation, increased membrane translocation of cytosolic p47(phox) and p67(phox), as well as augmented bacterial-killing and phagocytotic activities. Neutrophil depletion reversed the mucosal protection by HPC, and aggravated intestinal leakiness and BT following I/R. In conclusion, neutrophil priming by HPC protects against I/R-induced BT via direct antimicrobial activity by oxidative

  13. Potential benefits of pro- and prebiotics on intestinal mucosal immunity and intestinal barrier in short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoidis, Christos N; Misiakos, Evangelos P; Patapis, Paul; Fotiadis, Constantine I; Spyropoulos, Basileios G

    2011-06-01

    The mechanism of impaired gut barrier function in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) is poorly understood and includes decreased intestinal motility leading to bacterial overgrowth, a reduction in gut-associated lymphoid tissue following the loss of intestinal length, inhibition of mucosal immunity of the small intestine by intravenous total parental nutrition, and changes in intestinal permeability to macromolecules. Novel therapeutic strategies (i.e. nutritive and surgical) have been introduced in order to prevent the establishment or improve the outcome of this prevalent disease. Pre- and probiotics as a nutritive supplement are already known to be very active in the intestinal tract (mainly in the colon) by maintaining a healthy gut microflora and influencing metabolic, trophic and protective mechanisms, such as the production of SCFA which influence epithelial cell metabolism, turnover and apoptosis. Probiotics have been recommended for patients suffering from SBS in order to decrease bacterial overgrowth and prevent bacterial translocation, two major mechanisms in the pathogenesis of SBS. The present review discusses the research available in the international literature, clinical and experimental, regarding probiotic supplementation for this complicated group of patients based on the clinical spectrum and pathophysiological aspects of the syndrome. The clinical data that were collected for the purposes of the present review suggest that it is difficult to correctly characterise probiotics as a preventive or therapeutic measure. It is very challenging after all to examine the relationship of the bacterial flora, the intestinal barrier and the probiotics as, according to the latest knowledge, demonstrate an interesting interaction.

  14. Listeriolysin O affects barrier function and induces chloride secretion in HT-29/B6 colon epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Richter, Jan F; Gitter, Alfred H; Günzel, Dorothee; Weiss, Siegfried; Mohamed, Walid; Chakraborty, Trinad; Fromm, Michael; Schulzke, Jörg D

    2009-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen, which is able to induce diarrhea when residing in the intestine. We studied the effect of listeriolysin O (LLO), an extracellular virulence factor of L. monocytogenes, on intestinal transport and barrier function in monolayers of HT-29/B6 human colon cells using the Ussing technique to understand the pathomechanisms involved. Mucosal addition of LLO, but not a LLO mutant, induced a dose- and pH-dependent increase in short-circuit current (I(SC)). Sodium and chloride tracer flux and DIDS sensitivity studies revealed that I(SC) was mainly due to electrogenic chloride secretion. Barrier function was impaired by LLO, as assessed by transepithelial resistance (R(t)) and mannitol flux measurements. Intracellular signal transduction occurred through Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores and PKC activation. In conclusion, listeriolysin induces chloride secretion and perturbs epithelial barrier function, thus potentially contributing to Listeria-induced diarrhea.

  15. Postinjury Vagal Nerve Stimulation Protects Against Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzaniak, Michael; Peterson, Carrie; Loomis, William; Hageny, Ann-Marie; Wolf, Paul; Reys, Luiz; Putnam, James; Eliceiri, Brian; Baird, Andrew; Bansal, Vishal; Coimbra, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Background Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) can have a marked anti-inflammatory effect. We have previously shown that preinjury VNS prevented intestinal barrier breakdown and preserved epithelial tight junction protein expression. However, a pretreatment model has little clinical relevance for the care of the trauma patient. Therefore, we postulated that VNS conducted postinjury would also have a similar protective effect on maintaining gut epithelial barrier integrity. Methods Male balb/c mice were subjected to a 30% total body surface area, full-thickness steam burn followed by right cervical VNS at 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 minutes postinjury. Intestinal barrier dysfunction was quantified by permeability to 4 kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate-Dextran, histologic evaluation, gut tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and expression of tight junction proteins (myosin light chain kinase, occludin, and ZO-1) using immunoblot and immunoflourescence. Results Histologic examination documented intestinal villi appearance similar to sham if cervical VNS was performed within 90 minutes of burn insult. VNS done after injury decreased intestinal permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate-Dextran when VNS was ≤90 minutes after injury. Burn injury caused a marked increase in intestinal TNF-α levels. VNS-treated animals had TNF-α levels similar to sham when VNS was performed within 90 minutes of injury. Tight junction protein expression was maintained at near sham values if VNS was performed within 90 minutes of burn, whereas expression was significantly altered in burn. Conclusion Postinjury VNS prevents gut epithelial breakdown when performed within 90 minutes of thermal injury. This could represent a therapeutic window and clinically relevant strategy to prevent systemic inflammatory response distant organ injury after trauma. PMID:21610431

  16. Enteral feeding and its impact on the gut immune system and intestinal mucosal barrier

    PubMed Central

    Kruszewski, Wiesław J.; Buczek, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Enteral feeding is the preferred method of nutritional therapy. Mucosal lack of contact with nutrients leads do lymphoid tissue atrophy, immune system functional decline, and intensification in bacterial translocation. Currently, it is assumed that microbiome is one of the body organs that has a significant impact on health. The composition of microbiome is not affected by age, sex, or place of residence, although it changes rapidly after diet modification. The composition of the microbiome is determined by enterotype, which is specific for each organism. It has a significant impact on the risk of diabetes, cancer, atherosclerosis, and other diseases. This review gathers data on interaction between gut-associated lymphoid tissue, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, microbiome, and the intestinal mucosal barrier. Usually, the information on the aforementioned is scattered in specialist-subject magazines such as gastroenterology, microbiology, genetics, biochemistry, and others. PMID:26557936

  17. Rhinovirus Disrupts the Barrier Function of Polarized Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sajjan, Umadevi; Wang, Qiong; Zhao, Ying; Gruenert, Dieter C.; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Secondary bacterial infection following rhinovirus (RV) infection has been recognized in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Objectives: We sought to understand mechanisms by which RV infection facilitates secondary bacterial infection. Methods: Primary human airway epithelial cells grown at air–liquid interface and human bronchial epithelial (16HBE14o-) cells grown as polarized monolayers were infected apically with RV. Transmigration of bacteria (nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and others) was assessed by colony counting and transmission electron microscopy. Transepithelial resistance (RT) was measured by using a voltmeter. The distribution of zona occludins (ZO)-1 was determined by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Measurements and Main Results: Epithelial cells infected with RV showed 2-log more bound bacteria than sham-infected cultures, and bacteria were recovered from the basolateral media of RV- but not sham-infected cells. Infection of polarized airway epithelial cell cultures with RV for 24 hours caused a significant decrease in RT without causing cell death or apoptosis. Ultraviolet-treated RV did not decrease RT, suggesting a requirement for viral replication. Reduced RT was associated with increased paracellular permeability, as determined by flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-inulin. Neutralizing antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IFN-γ and IL-1β reversed corresponding cytokine-induced reductions in RT but not that induced by RV, indicating that the RV effect is independent of these proinflammatory cytokines. Confocal microscopy and immunoblotting revealed the loss of ZO-1 from tight junction complexes in RV-infected cells. Intranasal inoculation of mice with RV1B also caused the loss of ZO-1 from the bronchial epithelium tight junctions in vivo. Conclusions: RV facilitates binding, translocation, and persistence of bacteria by disrupting airway epithelial barrier function. PMID:18787220

  18. Mechanisms of Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction by Adherent-Invasive Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shawki, Ali; McCole, Declan F

    2017-01-01

    Pathobiont expansion, such as that of adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC), is an emerging factor associated with inflammatory bowel disease. The intestinal epithelial barrier is the first line of defense against these pathogens. Inflammation plays a critical role in altering the epithelial barrier and is a major factor involved in promoting the expansion and pathogenesis of AIEC. AIEC in turn can exacerbate intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction by targeting multiple elements of the barrier. One critical element of the epithelial barrier is the tight junction. Increasing evidence suggests that AIEC may selectively target protein components of tight junctions, leading to increased barrier permeability. This may represent one mechanism by which AIEC could contribute to the development of inflammatory bowel disease. This review article discusses potential mechanisms by which AIEC can disrupt epithelial tight junction function and intestinal barrier function.

  19. Cortactin deficiency causes increased RhoA/ROCK1-dependent actomyosin contractility, intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction, and disproportionately severe DSS-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Citalán-Madrid, A F; Vargas-Robles, H; García-Ponce, A; Shibayama, M; Betanzos, A; Nava, P; Salinas-Lara, C; Rottner, K; Mennigen, R; Schnoor, M

    2017-01-25

    The intestinal epithelium constitutes a first line of defense of the innate immune system. Epithelial dysfunction is a hallmark of intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). The actin cytoskeleton controls epithelial barrier integrity but the function of actin regulators such as cortactin is poorly understood. Given that cortactin controls endothelial permeability, we hypothesized that cortactin is also important for epithelial barrier regulation. We found increased permeability in the colon of cortactin-KO mice that was accompanied by reduced levels of ZO-1, claudin-1, and E-cadherin. By contrast, claudin-2 was upregulated. Cortactin deficiency increased RhoA/ROCK1-dependent actomyosin contractility, and inhibition of ROCK1 rescued the barrier defect. Interestingly, cortactin deficiency caused increased epithelial proliferation without affecting apoptosis. KO mice did not develop spontaneous colitis, but were more susceptible to dextran sulfate sodium colitis and showed severe colon tissue damage and edema formation. KO mice with colitis displayed strong mucus deposition and goblet cell depletion. In healthy human colon tissues, cortactin co-localized with ZO-1 at epithelial cell contacts. In IBDs patients, we observed decreased cortactin levels and loss of co-localization with ZO-1. Thus, cortactin is a master regulator of intestinal epithelial barrier integrity in vivo and could serve as a suitable target for pharmacological intervention in IBDs.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication, 25 January 2017; doi:10.1038/mi.2016.136.

  20. Convective diffusion of nanoparticles from the epithelial barrier towards regional lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Dukhin, Stanislav S; Labib, Mohamed E.

    2013-01-01

    Drug delivery using nanoparticles as drug carriers has recently attracted the attention of many investigators. Targeted delivery of nanoparticles to lymph nodes is especially important to prevent cancer metastasis or infection, and to diagnose disease stage. However, systemic injection of nanoparticles often results in organ toxicity because they reach and accumulate in all the lymph nodes in the body. An attractive strategy would be to deliver the drug-loaded nanoparticles to a subset of draining lymph nodes corresponding to a specific site or organ to minimize systemic toxicity. In this respect, mucosal delivery of nanoparticles to regional draining lymph nodes of a selected site creates a new opportunity to accomplish this task with minimal toxicity. One example is the delivery of nanoparticles from the vaginal lumen to draining lymph nodes to prevent the transmission of HIV in women. Other known examples include mucosal delivery of vaccines to induce immunity. In all cases, molecular and particle transport by means of diffusion and convective diffusion play a major role. The corresponding transport processes have common inherent regularities and are addressed in this review. Here we use nanoparticles delivery from the vaginal lumen to lymph nodes as an example to address the many aspects of associated transport processes. In this case, nanoparticles penetrate the epithelial barrier and move through the interstitium (tissue) to the initial lymphatics until they finally reach the lymph nodes. Since the movement of interstitial liquid near the epithelial barrier is retarded, nanoparticles transport was found to take place through special foci present in the epithelium. Immediately after nanoparticles emerge from the foci, they move through the interstitium due to diffusion affected by convection (convective diffusion). Specifically, the convective transport of nanoparticles occurs due to their convection together with interstitial fluid through the interstitium

  1. Convective diffusion of nanoparticles from the epithelial barrier toward regional lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Dukhin, Stanislav S; Labib, Mohamed E

    2013-11-01

    Drug delivery using nanoparticles as drug carriers has recently attracted the attention of many investigators. Targeted delivery of nanoparticles to the lymph nodes is especially important to prevent cancer metastasis or infection, and to diagnose disease stage. However, systemic injection of nanoparticles often results in organ toxicity because they reach and accumulate in all the lymph nodes in the body. An attractive strategy would be to deliver the drug-loaded nanoparticles to a subset of draining lymph nodes corresponding to a specific site or organ to minimize systemic toxicity. In this respect, mucosal delivery of nanoparticles to regional draining lymph nodes of a selected site creates a new opportunity to accomplish this task with minimal toxicity. One example is the delivery of nanoparticles from the vaginal lumen to draining lymph nodes to prevent the transmission of HIV in women. Other known examples include mucosal delivery of vaccines to induce immunity. In all cases, molecular and particle transport by means of diffusion and convective diffusion play a major role. The corresponding transport processes have common inherent regularities and are addressed in this review. Here we use nanoparticle delivery from the vaginal lumen to the lymph nodes as an example to address the many aspects of associated transport processes. In this case, nanoparticles penetrate the epithelial barrier and move through the interstitium (tissue) to the initial lymphatics until they finally reach the lymph nodes. Since the movement of interstitial liquid near the epithelial barrier is retarded, nanoparticle transport was found to take place through special foci present in the epithelium. Immediately after nanoparticles emerge from the foci, they move through the interstitium due to diffusion affected by convection (convective diffusion). Specifically, the convective transport of nanoparticles occurs due to their convection together with interstitial fluid through the

  2. PLEKHA7 modulates epithelial tight junction barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Paschoud, Serge; Jond, Lionel; Guerrera, Diego; Citi, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    PLEKHA7 is a recently identified protein of the epithelial zonula adhaerens (ZA), and is part of a protein complex that stabilizes the ZA, by linking it to microtubules. Since the ZA is important in the assembly and disassembly of tight junctions (TJ), we asked whether PLEKHA7 is involved in modulating epithelial TJ barrier function. We generated clonal MDCK cell lines in which one of four different constructs of PLEKHA7 was inducibly expressed. All constructs were localized at junctions, but constructs lacking the C-terminal region were also distributed diffusely in the cytoplasm. Inducible expression of PLEKHA7 constructs did not affect the expression and localization of TJ proteins, the steady-state value of transepithelial resistance (TER), the development of TER during the calcium switch, and the flux of large molecules across confluent monolayers. In contrast, expression of three out of four constructs resulted both in enhanced recruitment of E-cadherin and associated proteins at the apical ZA and at lateral puncta adherentia (PA), a decreased TER at 18 h after assembly at normal calcium, and an attenuation in the fall in TER after extracellular calcium removal. This latter effect was inhibited when cells were treated with nocodazole. Immunoprecipitation analysis showed that PLEKHA7 forms a complex with the cytoplasmic TJ proteins ZO-1 and cingulin, and this association does not depend on the integrity of microtubules. These results suggest that PLEKHA7 modulates the dynamics of assembly and disassembly of the TJ barrier, through E-cadherin protein complex- and microtubule-dependent mechanisms. PMID:24843844

  3. Dietary grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) improve weaned intestinal microbiota and mucosal barrier using a piglet model

    PubMed Central

    Han, Meng; Song, Peixia; Huang, Chang; Rezaei, Arash; Farrar, Shabnam; Brown, Michael A.; Ma, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins have been suggested as an effective antibiotic alternative, however their mechanisms are still unknown. The present study investigated the effects of grape seed proanthocyanidins on gut microbiota and mucosal barrier using a weaned piglet model in comparison with colistin. Piglets weaned at 28 day were randomly assigned to four groups treated with a control ration, or supplemented with 250 mg/kg proanthocyanidins, kitasamycin/colistin, or 250 mg/kg proanthocyanidins and half-dose antibiotics, respectively. On day 28, the gut chyme and tissue samples were collected to test intestinal microbiota and barrier function, respectively. Proanthocyanidins treated piglets had better growth performance and reduced diarrhea incidence (P < 0.05), accompanied with decreased intestinal permeability and improved mucosal morphology. Gene sequencing analysis of 16S rRNA revealed that dietary proanthocyanidins improved the microbial diversity in ileal and colonic digesta, and the most abundant OTUs belong to Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes spp. Proanthocyanidins treatment decreased the abundance of Lactobacillaceae, and increased the abundance of Clostridiaceae in both ileal and colonic lumen, which suggests that proanthocyanidins treatment changed the bacterial composition and distribution. Administration of proanthocyanidins increased the concentration of propionic acid and butyric acid in the ileum and colon, which may activate the expression of GPR41. In addition, dietary proanthocyanidins improved the antioxidant indices in serum and intestinal mucosa, accompanied with increasing expression of barrier occludin. Our findings indicated that proanthocyanidins with half-dose colistin was equivalent to the antibiotic treatment and assisted weaned animals in resisting intestinal oxidative stress by increasing diversity and improving balance of gut microbes. PMID:27880936

  4. Central Role of the Gut Epithelial Barrier in the Pathogenesis of Chronic Intestinal Inflammation: Lessons Learned from Animal Models and Human Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Pastorelli, Luca; De Salvo, Carlo; Mercado, Joseph R.; Vecchi, Maurizio; Pizarro, Theresa T.

    2013-01-01

    The gut mucosa is constantly challenged by a bombardment of foreign antigens and environmental microorganisms. As such, the precise regulation of the intestinal barrier allows the maintenance of mucosal immune homeostasis and prevents the onset of uncontrolled inflammation. In support of this concept, emerging evidence points to defects in components of the epithelial barrier as etiologic factors in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). In fact, the integrity of the intestinal barrier relies on different elements, including robust innate immune responses, epithelial paracellular permeability, epithelial cell integrity, as well as the production of mucus. The purpose of this review is to systematically evaluate how alterations in the aforementioned epithelial components can lead to the disruption of intestinal immune homeostasis, and subsequent inflammation. In this regard, the wealth of data from mouse models of intestinal inflammation and human genetics are pivotal in understanding pathogenic pathways, for example, that are initiated from the specific loss of function of a single protein leading to the onset of intestinal disease. On the other hand, several recently proposed therapeutic approaches to treat human IBD are targeted at enhancing different elements of gut barrier function, further supporting a primary role of the epithelium in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation and emphasizing the importance of maintaining a healthy and effective intestinal barrier. PMID:24062746

  5. Gut permeability and mucosal inflammation: bad, good or context dependent.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, R; Sorrell, M F; Batra, S K; Dhawan, P; Singh, A B

    2017-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disease. A breach in the mucosal barrier, otherwise known as "leaky gut," is alleged to promote mucosal inflammation by intensifying immune activation. However, interaction between the luminal antigen and mucosal immune system is necessary to maintain mucosal homeostasis. Furthermore, manipulations leading to deregulated gut permeability have resulted in susceptibility in mice to colitis as well as to creating adaptive immunity. These findings implicate a complex but dynamic association between mucosal permeability and immune homeostasis; however, they also emphasize that compromised gut permeability alone may not be sufficient to induce colitis. Emerging evidence further supports the role(s) of proteins associated with the mucosal barrier in epithelial injury and repair: manipulations of associated proteins also modified epithelial differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Taken together, the role of gut permeability and proteins associated in regulating mucosal inflammatory diseases appears to be more complex than previously thought. Herein, we review outcomes from recent mouse models where gut permeability was altered by direct and indirect effects of manipulating mucosal barrier-associated proteins, to highlight the significance of mucosal permeability and the non-barrier-related roles of these proteins in regulating chronic mucosal inflammatory conditions.

  6. Effects of phenol on barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line correlate with altered tight junction protein localization

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, Ingrid C.; Betanzos, Abigail; Weber, Dominique A.; Nava, Porfirio; Miller, Gary W.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2009-11-15

    Phenol contamination of soil and water has raised concerns among people living near phenol-producing factories and hazardous waste sites containing the chemical. Phenol, particularly in high concentrations, is an irritating and corrosive substance, making mucosal membranes targets of toxicity in humans. However, few data on the effects of phenol after oral exposure exist. We used an in vitro model employing human intestinal epithelial cells (SK-CO15) cultured on permeable supports to examine effects of phenol on epithelial barrier function. We hypothesized that phenol disrupts epithelial barrier by altering tight junction (TJ) protein expression. The dose-response effect of phenol on epithelial barrier function was determined using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran permeability measurements. We studied phenol-induced changes in cell morphology and expression of several tight junction proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT, Trypan blue, propidium iodide and TUNEL staining. Exposure to phenol resulted in decreased TER and increased paracellular flux of FITC-dextran in a dose-dependent manner. Delocalization of claudin-1 and ZO-1 from TJs to cytosol correlated with the observed increase in permeability after phenol treatment. Additionally, the decrease in TER correlated with changes in the distribution of a membrane raft marker, suggesting phenol-mediated effects on membrane fluidity. Such observations were independent of effects of phenol on cell viability as enhanced permeability occurred at doses of phenol that did not cause cell death. Overall, these findings suggest that phenol may affect transiently the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thus destabilizing TJ-containing microdomains.

  7. Effects of phenol on barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line correlate with altered tight junction protein localization

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Ingrid C.; Betanzos, Abigail; Weber, Dominique A.; Nava, Porfirio; Miller, Gary W.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Phenol contamination of soil and water has raised concerns among people living near phenol-producing factories and hazardous waste sites containing the chemical. Phenol, particularly in high concentrations, is an irritating and corrosive substance, making mucosal membranes targets of toxicity in humans. However, few data on the effects of phenol after oral exposure exist. We used an in vitro model employing human intestinal epithelial cells (SK-CO15) cultured on permeable supports to examine effects of phenol on epithelial barrier function. We hypothesized that phenol disrupts epithelial barrier by altering tight junction (TJ) protein expression. The dose-response effect of phenol on epithelial barrier function was determined using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran permeability measurements. We studied phenol-induced changes in cell morphology and expression of several tight junction proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT, Trypan blue, propidium iodide and TUNEL staining. Exposure to phenol resulted in decreased TER and increased paracellular flux of FITC-dextran in a dose-dependent manner. Delocalization of claudin-1 and ZO-1 from TJs to cytosol correlated with the observed increase in permeability after phenol treatment. Additionally, the decrease in TER correlated with changes in the distribution of a membrane raft marker, suggesting phenol-mediated effects on membrane fluidity. Such observations were independent of effects of phenol on cell viability as enhanced permeability occurred at doses of phenol that did not cause cell death. Overall, these findings suggest that phenol may affect transiently the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thus destabilizing TJ-containing microdomains. PMID:19679145

  8. Enhanced intranasal delivery of mRNA vaccine by overcoming the nasal epithelial barrier via intra- and paracellular pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Zhao, Mengnan; Fu, Yao; Li, You; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhirong; Sun, Xun

    2016-04-28

    Facing the threat of highly variable virus infection, versatile vaccination systems are urgently needed. Intranasal mRNA vaccination provides a flexible and convenient approach. However, the nasal epithelium remains a major biological barrier to deliver antigens to nasal associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). To address this issue, a potent polymer-based intranasal mRNA vaccination system for HIV-1 treatment was synthesized using cationic cyclodextrin-polyethylenimine 2k conjugate (CP 2k) complexed with anionic mRNA encoding HIV gp120. The delivery vehicle containing CP 2k and mRNA overcame the epithelial barrier by reversibly opening the tight junctions, enhanced the paracellular delivery of mRNA and consequently minimized absorption of toxins in the nasal cavity. Together with the excellent intracellular delivery and prolonged nasal residence time, strong system and mucosal anti-HIV immune responses as well as cytokine productions were achieved with a balanced Th1/Th2/Th17 type. Our study provided the first proof of evidence that cationic polymers can be used as safe and potent intranasal mRNA vaccine carriers to overcome the nasal epithelial barrier. The safe and versatile polymeric delivery system represents a promising vaccination platform for infectious diseases.

  9. NDRG1 is important to maintain the integrity of airway epithelial barrier through claudin-9 expression.

    PubMed

    Gon, Yasuhiro; Maruoka, Shuichiro; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Kozu, Yutaka; Kazumichi, Kuroda; Nomura, Yasuyuki; Takeshita, Ikuko; Oshima, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Shu

    2017-02-13

    Impairment of epithelial barrier integrity caused by environmental triggers is associated with the pathogenesis of airway inflammation. Using human airway epithelial cells, we attempted to identify molecule(s) that promote airway epithelial barrier integrity. Microarray analyses were conducted using the Affimetrix human whole genome gene chip, and we identified the N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) gene, which was induced during the development of the epithelial cell barrier. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed strong NDRG1 expression in ciliated epithelial cells in nasal tissues sampled from patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), and the low expression of NDRG1 was observed in goblet cells or damaged epithelial cells. NDRG1 gene knockdown with its specific siRNA decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance and increased the dextran permeability. Immunocytochemistry revealed that NDRG1 knockdown disrupted tight junctions of airway epithelial cells. Next, we analyzed the effects of NDRG1 knockdown on the expression of tight and adhesion junction molecules. NDRG1 knockdown significantly decreased only claudin-9 expression, but did not decrease other claudin family molecules, such as E-cadherin, and ZO-1, -2, or -3. Knockdown of claudin-9 markedly impaired the barrier function in airway epithelial cells. These results suggest that NDRG1 is important for the barrier integrity in airway epithelial cells.

  10. [Effect of curcumin on intestinal mucosal mechanical barrier in rats with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Hou, H T; Qiu, Y M; Zhao, H W; Li, D H; Liu, Y T; Wang, Y Z; Su, S H

    2017-02-20

    , and the endoplasmic reticulum was dilated; the curcumin intervention group had improvements in the structure of tight junction of the intestinal mucosa, intercellular space, edema in the mitochondria, and dilation of the endoplasmic reticulum. Compared with the control group, the model group had significant increases in the serum levels of AST, ALT, DAO, TNFα, and LPS (q = -15.918, -14.402, -33.700, -8.944, and -10.832, P < 0.05); compared with the model group, the curcumin intervention group had significant reductions in the serum levels of AST, ALT, DAO, TNFα, and LPS (q = 10.457, 7.752, 18.802, 5.202, and 4.279, P < 0.05). In the control group, occludin showed a linear distribution along the top of small intestinal mucosal epithelial cells. The model group had a significant reduction in positive staining compared with the control group, and the curcumin intervention group had a significant increase in positive staining compared with the model group. The relative expression of occludin was 0.29±0.03 in the control group, 0.12±0.02 in the model group, and 0.21±0.02 in the curcumin intervention group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Intestinal mucosal mechanical barrier is impaired in rats with NAFLD. Curcumin can reduce such damage, and its mechanism of action may be related to up-regulating the expression of occludin in the intestinal mucosa and reducing the levels of TNFα and LPS.

  11. The role of intestinal epithelial barrier function in the development of NEC

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Melissa D; Denning, Patricia W

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial barrier plays an important role in maintaining host health. Breakdown of intestinal barrier function is known to play a role in many diseases such as infectious enteritis, idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease, and neonatal inflammatory bowel diseases. Recently, increasing research has demonstrated the importance of understanding how intestinal epithelial barrier function develops in the premature neonate in order to develop strategies to promote its maturation. Optimizing intestinal barrier function is thought to be key to preventing neonatal inflammatory bowel diseases such as necrotizing enterocolitis. In this review, we will first summarize the key components of the intestinal epithelial barrier, what is known about its development, and how this may explain NEC pathogenesis. Finally, we will review what therapeutic strategies may be used to promote optimal development of neonatal intestinal barrier function in order to reduce the incidence and severity of NEC. PMID:25927016

  12. Eosinophilic esophagitis–linked calpain 14 is an IL-13–induced protease that mediates esophageal epithelial barrier impairment

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Benjamin P.; Stucke, Emily M.; Khorki, M. Eyad; Litosh, Vladislav A.; Rymer, Jeffrey K.; Rochman, Mark; Travers, Jared; Kottyan, Leah C.

    2016-01-01

    We recently identified a genome-wide genetic association of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) at 2p23 spanning the calpain 14 (CAPN14) gene, yet the causal mechanism has not been elucidated. We now show that recombinant CAPN14 cleaves a calpain-specific substrate and is inhibited by 4 classical calpain inhibitors: MDL-28170, acetyl-calpastatin, E-64, and PD151746. CAPN14 is specifically induced (>100-fold) in esophageal epithelium after IL-13 treatment. Epithelial cells overexpressing CAPN14 display impaired epithelial architecture, characterized by acantholysis, epidermal clefting, and epidermolysis. CAPN14 overexpression impairs epithelial barrier function, as demonstrated by decreased transepithelial resistance (2.1-fold) and increased FITC-dextran flux (2.6-fold). Epithelium with gene-silenced CAPN14 demonstrates increased dilated intercellular spaces (5.5-fold) and less organized basal cell layering (1.5-fold) following IL-13 treatment. Finally, CAPN14 overexpression results in loss of desmoglein 1 (DSG1) expression, whereas the IL-13–induced loss of DSG1 is normalized by CAPN14 gene silencing. Importantly, these findings were specific to CAPN14, as they were not observed with modulation of CAPN1 expression. These results, along with the potent induction of CAPN14 by IL-13 and genetic linkage of EoE to the CAPN14 gene locus, demonstrate a molecular and cellular pathway that contributes to T helper type 2 responses in mucosal epithelium. PMID:27158675

  13. High glucose induces dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier through down-regulation of connexin 43.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongmei; Yang, Juan; Zhou, Xiangdong; Xiao, Qian; Lü, Yang; Xia, Li

    2016-03-01

    The airway epithelium is a barrier to the inhaled antigens and pathogens. Connexin 43 (Cx43) has been found to play critical role in maintaining the function of airway epithelial barrier and be involved in the pathogenesis of the diabetic retinal vasculature, diabetes nephropathy and diabetes skin. Hyperglycemia has been shown to be an independent risk factor for respiratory infections. We hypothesize that the down-regulation of Cx43 induced by HG alters the expression of tight junctions (zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin) and contributes to dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier, and Cx43 plays a critical role in the process in human airway epithelial cells (16 HBE). We show that high glucose (HG) decreased the expression of ZO-1 and occludin, disassociated interaction between Cx43 and tight junctions, and then increased airway epithelial transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and permeability by down-regulation of Cx43 in human airway epithelial cells. These observations demonstrate an important role for Cx43 in regulating HG-induced dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier. These findings may bring new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of pulmonary infection related to diabetes mellitus and lead to novel therapeutic intervention for the dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier in chronic inflammatory airway diseases.

  14. Vocal Fold Epithelial Barrier in Health and Injury A Research Review

    PubMed Central

    Levendoski, Elizabeth Erickson; Leydon, Ciara; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Vocal fold epithelium is composed of layers of individual epithelial cells joined by junctional complexes constituting a unique interface with the external environment. This barrier provides structural stability to the vocal folds and protects underlying connective tissue from injury while being nearly continuously exposed to potentially hazardous insults including environmental or systemic-based irritants such as pollutants and reflux, surgical procedures, and vibratory trauma. Small disruptions in the epithelial barrier may have a large impact on susceptibility to injury and overall vocal health. The purpose of this article is to provide a broad-based review of our current knowledge of the vocal fold epithelial barrier. Methods A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted. Details of the structure of the vocal fold epithelial barrier are presented and evaluated in the context of function in injury and pathology. The importance of the epithelial-associated vocal fold mucus barrier is also introduced. Results/Conclusions Information presented in this review is valuable for clinicians and researchers as it highlights the importance of this understudied portion of the vocal folds to overall vocal health and disease. Prevention and treatment of injury to the epithelial barrier is a significant area awaiting further investigation. PMID:24686981

  15. Intestinal epithelial barrier function and tight junction proteins with heat and exercise.

    PubMed

    Dokladny, Karol; Zuhl, Micah N; Moseley, Pope L

    2016-03-15

    A single layer of enterocytes and tight junctions (intercellular multiprotein complexes) form the intestinal epithelial barrier that controls transport of molecules through transcellular and paracellular pathways. A dysfunctional or "leaky" intestinal tight junction barrier allows augmented permeation of luminal antigens, endotoxins, and bacteria into the blood stream. Various substances and conditions have been shown to affect the maintenance of the intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier. The primary focus of the present review is to analyze the effects of exertional or nonexertional (passive hyperthermia) heat stress on tight junction barrier function in in vitro and in vivo (animals and humans) models. Our secondary focus is to review changes in tight junction proteins in response to exercise or hyperthermic conditions. Finally, we discuss some pharmacological or nutritional interventions that may affect the cellular mechanisms involved in maintaining homeostasis of the intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier during heat stress or exercise.

  16. Intestinal epithelial barrier function and tight junction proteins with heat and exercise

    PubMed Central

    Zuhl, Micah N.; Moseley, Pope L.

    2015-01-01

    A single layer of enterocytes and tight junctions (intercellular multiprotein complexes) form the intestinal epithelial barrier that controls transport of molecules through transcellular and paracellular pathways. A dysfunctional or “leaky” intestinal tight junction barrier allows augmented permeation of luminal antigens, endotoxins, and bacteria into the blood stream. Various substances and conditions have been shown to affect the maintenance of the intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier. The primary focus of the present review is to analyze the effects of exertional or nonexertional (passive hyperthermia) heat stress on tight junction barrier function in in vitro and in vivo (animals and humans) models. Our secondary focus is to review changes in tight junction proteins in response to exercise or hyperthermic conditions. Finally, we discuss some pharmacological or nutritional interventions that may affect the cellular mechanisms involved in maintaining homeostasis of the intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier during heat stress or exercise. PMID:26359485

  17. MicroRNAs regulate tight junction proteins and modulate epithelial/endothelial barrier functions.

    PubMed

    Cichon, Christoph; Sabharwal, Harshana; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Tightly controlled epithelial and endothelial barriers are a prerequisite for life as these barriers separate multicellular organisms from their environment and serve as first lines of defense. Barriers between neighboring epithelial cells are formed by multiple intercellular junctions including the 'apical junctional complex-AJC' with tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and desmosomes. TJ consist of tetraspan transmembrane proteins like occludin, various claudins that directly control paracellular permeability, and the 'Junctional Adhesion Molecules' (JAMs). For establishing tight barriers TJ are essential but at the same time have to allow also selective permeability. For this, TJ need to be tightly regulated and controlled. This is organized by a variety of adaptor molecules, i.e., protein kinases, phosphatases and GTPases, which in turn are regulated and fine-tuned involving microRNAs (miRNAs). In this review we summarize available data on the role and targeting of miRNAs in the maintenance of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers.

  18. Alix-mediated assembly of the actomyosin–tight junction polarity complex preserves epithelial polarity and epithelial barrier

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Yvan; Qiu, Xiaohui; Gomero, Elida; Wakefield, Randall; Horner, Linda; Brutkowski, Wojciech; Han, Young-Goo; Solecki, David; Frase, Sharon; Bongiovanni, Antonella; d'Azzo, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of epithelial cell polarity and epithelial barrier relies on the spatial organization of the actin cytoskeleton and proper positioning/assembly of intercellular junctions. However, how these processes are regulated is poorly understood. Here we reveal a key role for the multifunctional protein Alix in both processes. In a knockout mouse model of Alix, we identified overt structural changes in the epithelium of the choroid plexus and in the ependyma, such as asymmetrical cell shape and size, misplacement and abnormal beating of cilia, blebbing of the microvilli. These defects culminate in excessive cell extrusion, enlargement of the lateral ventricles and hydrocephalus. Mechanistically, we find that by interacting with F-actin, the Par complex and ZO-1, Alix ensures the formation and maintenance of the apically restricted actomyosin–tight junction complex. We propose that in this capacity Alix plays a role in the establishment of apical–basal polarity and in the maintenance of the epithelial barrier. PMID:27336173

  19. Physiology and pathophysiology of the epithelial barrier of the female reproductive tract: role of ion channels.

    PubMed

    Chan, Hsiao Chang; Chen, Hui; Ruan, Yechun; Sun, Tingting

    2012-01-01

    The epithelium lining the female reproductive tract forms a selectively permeable barrier that is responsible for creating an optimal luminal fluid microenvironment essential to the success of various reproductive events. The selective permeability of the epithelial barrier to various ions is provided by the gating of epithelial ion channels, which work together with an array of other ion transporters to drive fluid movement across the epithelium. Thus, the luminal fluid is fine-tuned by the selective barrier with tight regulation of the epithelial ion channels. This chapter discusses the role of epithelial ion channels in regulating the epithelial barrier function and thus the fluid volume and ionic composition of the female reproductive tract; physiological factors regulating the ion channels and the importance of the regulation in various reproductive events such as sperm transport and capacitation, embryo development and implantation. Disturbance of the fluid microenvironment due to defects or abnormal regulation of these ion channels and dysregulated epithelial barrier function in a number of pathological conditions, such as ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, hydrosalpinx and infertility, are also discussed.

  20. Drug delivery in overcoming the blood–brain barrier: role of nasal mucosal grafting

    PubMed Central

    Marianecci, Carlotta; Rinaldi, Federica; Hanieh, Patrizia Nadia; Di Marzio, Luisa; Paolino, Donatella; Carafa, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) plays a fundamental role in protecting and maintaining the homeostasis of the brain. For this reason, drug delivery to the brain is much more difficult than that to other compartments of the body. In order to bypass or cross the BBB, many strategies have been developed: invasive techniques, such as temporary disruption of the BBB or direct intraventricular and intracerebral administration of the drug, as well as noninvasive techniques. Preliminary results, reported in the large number of studies on the potential strategies for brain delivery, are encouraging, but it is far too early to draw any conclusion about the actual use of these therapeutic approaches. Among the most recent, but still pioneering, approaches related to the nasal mucosa properties, the permeabilization of the BBB via nasal mucosal engrafting can offer new potential opportunities. It should be emphasized that this surgical procedure is quite invasive, but the implication for patient outcome needs to be compared to the gold standard of direct intracranial injection, and evaluated whilst keeping in mind that central nervous system diseases and lysosomal storage diseases are chronic and severely debilitating and that up to now no therapy seems to be completely successful. PMID:28184152

  1. Glutamate is the major anaplerotic substrate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle of isolated rumen epithelial and duodenal mucosal cells from beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aimed to determine the contribution of substrates to tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle fluxes in rumen epithelial (REC) and duodenal mucosal (DMC) cells isolated from bulls (n = 6) fed either a 75% forage (HF) or 75% concentrate (HC) diet. In separate incubations, [13C6]glucose, [13C5]glutam...

  2. Cyclo-oxygenase isozymes in mucosal ulcerogenic and functional responses following barrier disruption in rat stomachs

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Takuya; Ukawa, Hideki; Yamakuni, Hisashi; Kato, Shinichi; Takeuchi, Koji

    1997-01-01

    We examined the effects of selective and nonselective cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitors on various functional changes in the rat stomach induced by topical application of taurocholate (TC) and investigated the preferential role of COX isozymes in these responses. Rat stomachs mounted in ex vivo chambers were perfused with 50 mM HCl and transmucosal potential difference (p.d.), mucosal blood flow (GMBF), luminal acid loss and luminal levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were measured before, during and after exposure to 20 mM TC. Mucosal application of TC in control rats caused a reduction in p.d., followed by an increase of luminal acid loss and GMBF, and produced only minimal damage in the mucosa 2 h later. Pretreatment with indomethacin (10 mg kg−1, s.c.), a nonselective COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitor, attenuated the gastric hyperaemic response caused by TC without affecting p.d. and acid loss, resulting in haemorrhagic lesions in the mucosa. In contrast, selective COX-2 inhibitors, such as NS-398 and nimesulide (10 mg kg−1, s.c.), had no effect on any of the responses induced by TC and did not cause gross damage in the mucosa. Luminal PGE2 levels were markedly increased during and after exposure to TC and this response was significantly inhibited by indomethacin but not by either NS-398 or nimesulide. The expression of COX-1-mRNA was consistently detected in the gastric mucosa before and after TC treatment, while a faint expression of COX-2-mRNA was detected only 2 h after TC treatment. Both NS-398 and nimesulide significantly suppressed carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema, similar to indomethacin. These results confirmed a mediator role for prostaglandins in the gastric hyperaemic response following TC-induced barrier disruption, and suggest that COX-1 but not COX-2 is a key enzyme in maintaining ‘housekeeping' functions in the gastric mucosa under both normal and adverse conditions. PMID:9351500

  3. Breaking the Gingival Epithelial Barrier: Role of the Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Cytolethal Distending Toxin in Oral Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is part of the HACEK group that causes infective endocarditis, a constituent of the oral flora that promotes some forms of periodontal disease and a member of the family of species that secrete a cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt). The family of bacteria that express the cdt genes participate in diseases that involve the disruption of a mucosal or epithelial layer. In vitro studies have shown that human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC) are native targets of the Cdt that typically induces DNA damage that signals growth arrest at the G2/M interphase of the cell cycle. The gingival epithelium is an early line of defense in the oral cavity against microbial assault. When damaged, bacteria collectively gain entry into the underlying connective tissue where microbial products can affect processes and pathways in infiltrating inflammatory cells culminating in the destruction of the attachment apparatus of the tooth. One approach has been the use of an ex vivo gingival explant model to assess the effects of the Cdt on the morphology and integrity of the tissue. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of these studies and to critically examine the potential contribution of the Cdt to the breakdown of the protective gingival barrier. PMID:24861975

  4. Tight junction disruption: Helicobacter pylori and dysregulation of the gastric mucosal barrier

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Tyler J; Scott, Kathleen E; Fox, James G; Hagen, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    Long-term chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a risk factor for gastric cancer development. In the multi-step process that leads to gastric cancer, tight junction dysfunction is thought to occur and serve as a risk factor by permitting the permeation of luminal contents across an otherwise tight mucosa. Mechanisms that regulate tight junction function and structure in the normal stomach, or dysfunction in the infected stomach, however, are largely unknown. Although conventional tight junction components are expressed in gastric epithelial cells, claudins regulate paracellular permeability and are likely the target of inflammation or H. pylori itself. There are 27 different claudin molecules, each with unique properties that render the mucosa an intact barrier that is permselective in a way that is consistent with cell physiology. Understanding the architecture of tight junctions in the normal stomach and then changes that occur during infection is important but challenging, because most of the reports that catalog claudin expression in gastric cancer pathogenesis are contradictory. Furthermore, the role of H. pylori virulence factors, such as cytotoxin-associated gene A and vacoulating cytotoxin, in regulating tight junction dysfunction during infection is inconsistent in different gastric cell lines and in vivo, likely because non-gastric epithelial cell cultures were initially used to unravel the details of their effects on the stomach. Hampering further study, as well, is the relative lack of cultured cell models that have tight junction claudins that are consistent with native tissues. This summary will review the current state of knowledge about gastric tight junctions, normally and in H. pylori infection, and make predictions about the consequences of claudin reorganization during H. pylori infection. PMID:26523106

  5. Effects of simulated weightlessness on the intestinal mucosal barrier of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Yang, Chun-min; Mao, Gao-ping; Liu, Qing-sen; Guo, Ming-zhou

    2011-07-01

    This study employed a rat tail-suspension model to investigate the effects of simulated weightlessness on the intestinal mucosal barrier. Twenty-four Wistar rats were randomly divided into control (CON), 14-day tail-suspension (SUS-14d), and 21-day tail-suspension (SUS-21d) groups ( n = 8 per group). Expression of occludin and zonula occludins-1 (ZO-1), proteins of the tight junction (TJ), in the intestinal mucosa was measured by immunohistochemical analysis, Western blotting, and mRNA fluorescent quantitation PCR. Plasma concentrations of diamine oxidase (DAO) and D-lactate were determined using an enzymatic spectrophotometric assay. Expression of occludin and ZO-1 was reduced in the SUS-14d and SUS-21d groups as compared to the CON group, with lowest expression observed in the SUS-21d group ( P < 0.01). Examination by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the jejunal epithelium revealed increased intercellular space, decreased TJ and desmosome densities, and destruction of microvilli in the SUS-14d and SUS-21d groups. Plasma DAO and D-lactate concentrations in the SUS-21d group were higher than those in SUS-14d group and significantly higher than those in the CON group ( P < 0.01). In all three groups, the expression of occludin and ZO-1 was found to correlate negatively with DAO ( P < 0.01) and D-lactate ( P < 0.01) concentrations. It is concluded that simulated weightless results in down-regulation of expression of TJ proteins in the rat intestinal mucosa. Simulated weightlessness is proposed to increase intestinal permeability through damage to the TJ.

  6. Mucosal Vaccination Overcomes the Barrier to Recombinant Vaccinia Immunization Caused by Preexisting Poxvirus Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyakov, Igor M.; Moss, Bernard; Strober, Warren; Berzofsky, Jay A.

    1999-04-01

    Overcoming preexisting immunity to vaccinia virus in the adult population is a key requirement for development of otherwise potent recombinant vaccinia vaccines. Based on our observation that s.c. immunization with vaccinia induces cellular and antibody immunity to vaccinia only in systemic lymphoid tissue and not in mucosal sites, we hypothesized that the mucosal immune system remains naive to vaccinia and therefore amenable to immunization with recombinant vaccinia vectors despite earlier vaccinia exposure. We show that mucosal immunization of vaccinia-immune BALB/c mice with recombinant vaccinia expressing HIV gp160 induced specific serum antibody and strong HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. These responses occurred not only in mucosal but also in systemic lymphoid tissue, whereas systemic immunization was ineffective under these circumstances. In this context, intrarectal immunization was more effective than intranasal immunization. Boosting with a second dose of recombinant vaccinia was also more effective via the mucosal route. The systemic HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response was enhanced by coadministration of IL-12 at the mucosal site. These results also demonstrate the independent compartmentalization of the mucosal versus systemic immune systems and the asymmetric trafficking of lymphocytes between them. This approach to circumvent previous vaccinia immunity may be useful for induction of protective immunity against infectious diseases and cancer in the sizable populations with preexisting immunity to vaccinia from smallpox vaccination.

  7. Lipid rafts are disrupted in mildly inflamed intestinal microenvironments without overt disruption of the epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Bowie, Rachel V; Donatello, Simona; Lyes, Clíona; Owens, Mark B; Babina, Irina S; Hudson, Lance; Walsh, Shaun V; O'Donoghue, Diarmuid P; Amu, Sylvie; Barry, Sean P; Fallon, Padraic G; Hopkins, Ann M

    2012-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial barrier disruption is a feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but whether barrier disruption precedes or merely accompanies inflammation remains controversial. Tight junction (TJ) adhesion complexes control epithelial barrier integrity. Since some TJ proteins reside in cholesterol-enriched regions of the cell membrane termed lipid rafts, we sought to elucidate the relationship between rafts and intestinal epithelial barrier function. Lipid rafts were isolated from Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells primed with the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or treated with methyl-β-cyclodextrin as a positive control for raft disruption. Rafts were also isolated from the ilea of mice in which colitis had been induced in conjunction with in vivo intestinal permeability measurements, and lastly from intestinal biopsies of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with predominantly mild or quiescent disease. Raft distribution was analyzed by measuring activity of the raft-associated enzyme alkaline phosphatase and by performing Western blot analysis for flotillin-1. Epithelial barrier integrity was estimated by measuring transepithelial resistance in cytokine-treated cells or in vivo permeability to fluorescent dextran in colitic mice. Raft and nonraft fractions were analyzed by Western blotting for the TJ proteins occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Our results revealed that lipid rafts were disrupted in IFN-γ-treated cells, in the ilea of mice with subclinical colitis, and in UC patients with quiescent inflammation. This was not associated with a clear pattern of occludin or ZO-1 relocalization from raft to nonraft fractions. Significantly, a time-course study in colitic mice revealed that disruption of lipid rafts preceded the onset of increased intestinal permeability. Our data suggest for the first time that lipid raft disruption occurs early in the inflammatory cascade in murine and human colitis and, we speculate, may contribute to

  8. Cooperation of Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 4 is required to breach epithelial barriers.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Roman G; Cláudio, Nuno; Rohde, Manfred; Jäckel, Daniela; Wagner, Carolin; Hensel, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Invasion is an important microbial virulence strategy to overcome the barrier formed by polarized epithelial cells. Salmonella enterica is a food-borne pathogen that deploys a type III secretion system for the manipulation of the actin cytoskeleton and to trigger internalization into epithelial cells. Here we show that this function is not sufficient to enter polarized cells and report that penetration of epithelia from the luminal side requires both the type III secretion system and novel virulence functions conferred by Salmonella pathogenicity island 4. Salmonella pathogenicity island 4 encodes a type I secretion system for the giant non-fimbrial adhesin SiiE that mediates intimate contact of Salmonella to microvilli on the apical membrane. Mutant strains lacking SiiE fail to invade polarized cells, to destroy epithelial barrier functions and to efface the apical brush border. Deletion analyses of repetitive domains in SiiE indicate that the large size of the adhesin is of functional importance. Our observations demonstrate that efficient penetration of epithelial barriers requires the cooperative activity of two Salmonella pathogenicity islands encoding different secretion systems. These findings underline the role of the epithelial brush border and reveal a new mechanism used by bacterial pathogens to overcome this barrier.

  9. NITROTYROSINATION OF A TUBULIN INDUCES EPITHELIAL BARRIER DYSFUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrotyrosination of a-Tubulin Induces Epithelial Transport Dysfunction. Yuh-Chin Huang, Lisa Dailey, Wen-Li Zhang and Ilona Jaspers. ORD, Environmental Protection Agency and CEMLB, University of North Carolina

    a-Tubulin undergoes a cyclic removal and readdition of tyrosin...

  10. Barrier-protective effects of activated protein C in human alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Puig, Ferranda; Fuster, Gemma; Adda, Mélanie; Blanch, Lluís; Farre, Ramon; Navajas, Daniel; Artigas, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a clinical manifestation of respiratory failure, caused by lung inflammation and the disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier. Preservation of the physical integrity of the alveolar epithelial monolayer is of critical importance to prevent alveolar edema. Barrier integrity depends largely on the balance between physical forces on cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts, and this balance might be affected by alterations in the coagulation cascade in patients with ALI. We aimed to study the effects of activated protein C (APC) on mechanical tension and barrier integrity in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) exposed to thrombin. Cells were pretreated for 3 h with APC (50 µg/ml) or vehicle (control). Subsequently, thrombin (50 nM) or medium was added to the cell culture. APC significantly reduced thrombin-induced cell monolayer permeability, cell stiffening, and cell contraction, measured by electrical impedance, optical magnetic twisting cytometry, and traction microscopy, respectively, suggesting a barrier-protective response. The dynamics of the barrier integrity was also assessed by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis of the tight junction ZO-1. Thrombin resulted in more elongated ZO-1 aggregates at cell-cell interface areas and induced an increase in ZO-1 membrane protein content. APC attenuated the length of these ZO-1 aggregates and reduced the ZO-1 membrane protein levels induced by thrombin. In conclusion, pretreatment with APC reduced the disruption of barrier integrity induced by thrombin, thus contributing to alveolar epithelial barrier protection.

  11. Nanoemulsion-based mucosal adjuvant induces apoptosis in human epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Orzechowska, Beata U.; Kukowska-Latallo, Jolanta F.; Coulter, Alexa D.; Szabo, Zsuzsanna; Gamian, Andrzej; Myc, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Nanoemulsions (NEs) are adjuvants that enhance antigen penetration of the nasal mucosa, increase cellular uptake of antigens by both epithelial and dendritic cells, and promote the migration of antigen-loaded dendritic cells to regional lymph nodes within 24-hours of vaccine administration. The objective of this study was to elucidate cell death caused by W805EC NE and identify caspases and genes associated with death pathways. Consistent with this aim, we show that exposure of human epithelial cells (EC), both RPMI 2650 and FaDu, to NE results in the activation of caspases (1, 3/7, 6, 8, and 9) and the expression of genes involved in apoptotic as well as authophagy and necrosis pathways. Interestingly, the NE activates caspase 8 which promotes “immunogenic apoptosis”. The rescue assay was employed to investigate the fate of RPMI 2650 cells treated with W805EC NE. After four hour treatment with as little as 0.03% of NE no cells were rescued at 72 hours. Remarkably, immediately after four-hour treatment, the cells morphologically resembled untreated cells and most of the cells were alive. Altogether, these results suggest that NE induces death of human ECs through multiple pathways. Epithelial cell death caused by W805EC may have further implications on antigen uptake, processing, and presentation by DC's. PMID:25817825

  12. NLRP3 protects alveolar barrier integrity by an inflammasome-independent increase of epithelial cell adherence

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinova, Elena; Chaput, Catherine; Gutbier, Birgitt; Lippmann, Juliane; Sander, Leif E.; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin; Opitz, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, characterized by alveolar barrier disruption. NLRP3 is best known for its ability to form inflammasomes and to regulate IL-1β and IL-18 production in myeloid cells. Here we show that NLRP3 protects the integrity of the alveolar barrier in a mouse model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced pneumonia, and ex vivo upon treatment of isolated perfused and ventilated lungs with the purified bacterial toxin, pneumolysin. We reveal that the preserving effect of NLRP3 on the lung barrier is independent of inflammasomes, IL-1β and IL-18. NLRP3 improves the integrity of alveolar epithelial cell monolayers by enhancing cellular adherence. Collectively, our study uncovers a novel function of NLRP3 by demonstrating that it protects epithelial barrier function independently of inflammasomes. PMID:27476670

  13. Vocal Fold Epithelial Barrier in Health and Injury: A Research Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levendoski, Elizabeth Erickson; Leydon, Ciara; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Vocal fold epithelium is composed of layers of individual epithelial cells joined by junctional complexes constituting a unique interface with the external environment. This barrier provides structural stability to the vocal folds and protects underlying connective tissue from injury while being nearly continuously exposed to potentially…

  14. Constitutive activation of epithelial TLR4 augments inflammatory responses to mucosal injury and drives colitis-associated tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fukata, Masayuki; Shang, Limin; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Sotolongo, John; Pastorini, Cristhine; España, Cecilia; Ungaro, Ryan; Harpaz, Noam; Cooper, Harry S.; Elson, Greg; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Zaias, Julia; Perez, Maria T.; Mayer, Lloyd; Vamadevan, Arunan S.; Lira, Sergio A.; Abreu, Maria T.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic intestinal inflammation culminates in cancer and a link to TLR4 has been suggested by our observation that TLR4 deficiency prevents colitis-associated neoplasia. In the current study, we address the effect of the aberrant activation of epithelial TLR4 on induction of colitis and colitis-associated tumor development. We take a translational approach to address the consequences of increased TLR signaling in the intestinal mucosa. Mice transgenic for a constitutively-active TLR4 under the intestine-specific villin promoter (villin-TLR4 mice) were treated with DSS for acute colitis and azoxymethane-dextran sulfate sodium. TLR4 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in colonic tissue from patients with ulcerative colitis and ulcerative colitis associated cancer. The effect of an antagonist TLR4 Ab was tested in prevention of colitis-associated neoplasia in the AOM-DSS model. Villin-TLR4 mice were highly susceptible to both acute colitis and colitis-associated neoplasia. Villin-TLR4 mice had increased epithelial expression of COX-2 and mucosal PGE2 production at baseline. Increased severity of colitis in villin-TLR4 mice was characterized by enhanced expression of inflammatory mediators and increased neutrophilic infiltration. In human UC samples, TLR4 expression was upregulated in almost all CAC and progressively increases with grade of dysplasia. As a proof of principle, a TLR4/MD-2 antagonist antibody inhibited colitis-associated neoplasia in the mouse model. Our results show that regulation of TLR's can affect the outcome of both acute colitis and its consequences—cancer. Targeting TLR4 and other TLR's may ultimately play a role in prevention or treatment of colitis-associated cancer. PMID:21674704

  15. NOD1 agonist iE-DAP reverses effects of cigarette smoke extract on NOD1 signal pathway in human oral mucosal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yafan; Jiang, Wenhui; Qian, Yajie; Zhou, Qian; Jiang, Hongliu; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Wenmei

    2015-01-01

    Smoking is a well-known risk factor for many systemic diseases and oral disorders. Smoking has been recognized to cause diminished defense, persistent inflammation and result in disease development. Nucleotide binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) signal pathway plays a key role in innate immune and tissue homeostasis. Our recent studies confirmed that cigarette smoke extract (CSE) could inhibit NOD1 expression and affect expression levels of crucial molecules of NOD1 signaling in oral mucosal epithelial cells. In the present study, immortalized human oral mucosal epithelial (Leuk-1) cells were treated with CSE, iE-DAP (NOD1 agonist), CSE + iE-DAP, respectively. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that iE-DAP triggered NOD1 expression of leuk-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. iE-DAP also reversed the suppressive effect of CSE on NOD1 expression and prevented the overactivation of RIP2 and P-NF-κB following CSE exposure. Real-time PCR and ELISA results confirmed that iE-DAP reversed CSE-mediated effects on the mRNA levels and releases of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and IFN-γ by Leuk-1 cells. Taken together, our results indicated that NOD1 activation with iE-DAP could reverse CSE-mediated effects on NOD1 signaling in human oral mucosal epithelial cells. PMID:26550162

  16. Ocular surface reconstruction with a tissue-engineered nasal mucosal epithelial cell sheet for the treatment of severe ocular surface diseases.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masakazu; Nakamura, Takahiro; Yasuda, Makoto; Hata, Yuiko; Okura, Shoki; Iwamoto, Miyu; Nagata, Maho; Fullwood, Nigel J; Koizumi, Noriko; Hisa, Yasuo; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Severe ocular surface diseases (OSDs) with severe dry eye can be devastating and are currently some of the most challenging eye disorders to treat. To investigate the feasibility of using an autologous tissue-engineered cultivated nasal mucosal epithelial cell sheet (CNMES) for ocular surface reconstruction, we developed a novel technique for the culture of nasal mucosal epithelial cells expanded ex vivo from biopsy-derived human nasal mucosal tissues. After the protocol, the CNMESs had 4-5 layers of stratified, well-differentiated cells, and we successfully generated cultured epithelial sheets, including numerous goblet cells. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of keratins 3, 4, and 13; mucins 1, 16, and 5AC; cell junction and basement membrane assembly proteins; and stem/progenitor cell marker p75 in the CNMESs. We then transplanted the CNMESs onto the ocular surfaces of rabbits and confirmed the survival of this tissue, including the goblet cells, up to 2 weeks. The present report describes an attempt to overcome the problems of treating severe OSDs with the most severe dry eye by treating them using tissue-engineered CNMESs to supply functional goblet cells and to stabilize and reconstruct the ocular surface. The present study is a first step toward assessing the use of tissue-engineered goblet-cell transplantation of nonocular surface origin for ocular surface reconstruction.

  17. Tissue Harvesting Site and Culture Medium Affect Attachment, Growth, and Phenotype of Ex Vivo Expanded Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Islam, Rakibul; Eidet, Jon Roger; Badian, Reza A; Lippestad, Marit; Messelt, Edward; Griffith, May; Dartt, Darlene A; Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2017-04-06

    Transplantation of cultured oral mucosal epithelial cells (OMECs) is a promising treatment strategy for limbal stem cell deficiency. In order to improve the culture method, we investigated the effects of four culture media and tissue harvesting sites on explant attachment, growth, and phenotype of OMECs cultured from Sprague-Dawley rats. Neither choice of media or harvesting site impacted the ability of the explants to attach to the culture well. Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/Ham's F12 (DMEM) and Roswell Park Memorial Institute 1640 medium (RPMI) supported the largest cellular outgrowth. Fold outgrowth was superior from LL explants compared to explants from the buccal mucosa (BM), HP, and transition zone of the lower lip (TZ) after six-day culture. Putative stem cell markers were detected in cultures grown in DMEM and RPMI. In DMEM, cells from TZ showed higher colony-forming efficiency than LL, BM, and HP. In contrast to RPMI, DMEM both expressed the putative stem cell marker Bmi-1 and yielded cell colonies. Our data suggest that OMECs from LL and TZ cultured in DMEM give rise to undifferentiated cells with high growth capacity, and hence are the most promising for treatment of limbal stem cell deficiency.

  18. IKKβ in intestinal epithelial cells regulates allergen-specific IgA and allergic inflammation at distant mucosal sites.

    PubMed

    Bonnegarde-Bernard, A; Jee, J; Fial, M J; Aeffner, F; Cormet-Boyaka, E; Davis, I C; Lin, M; Tomé, D; Karin, M; Sun, Y; Boyaka, P N

    2014-03-01

    Regulation of allergic responses by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) remains poorly understood. Using a model of oral allergen sensitization in the presence of cholera toxin as adjuvant and mice with cell-specific deletion of inhibitor-κB kinase (IKKβ) in IECs (IKKβ(ΔIEC)), we addressed the contribution of IECs to allergic sensitization to ingested antigens and allergic manifestations at distant mucosal site of the airways. Cholera toxin induced higher pro-inflammatory responses and altered the profile of the gut microbiota in IKKβ(ΔIEC) mice. Antigen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) responses were unaltered in IKKβ(ΔIEC) mice, but their IgA antibodies (Abs), T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 responses were enhanced. Upon nasal antigen challenge, these mice developed lower levels of allergic lung inflammation, which correlated with higher levels of IgA Abs in the airways. The IKKβ(ΔIEC) mice also recruited a higher number of gut-sensitized T cells in the airways after nasal antigen challenge and developed airway hyper-responsiveness, which were suppressed by treatment with anti-interleukin-17A. Fecal microbiota transplant during allergic sensitization reduced Th17 responses in IKKβ(ΔIEC) mice, but did not affect IgA Ab responses. In summary, we show that IKKβ in IECs shapes the gut microbiota and immune responses to ingested antigens and influences allergic responses in the airways via regulation of IgA Ab responses.

  19. The Bacterial Virulence Factor Lymphostatin Compromises Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function by Modulating Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Babbin, Brian A.; Sasaki, Maiko; Gerner-Schmidt, Kirsten W.; Nusrat, Asma; Klapproth, Jan-Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Lymphocyte inhibitory factor A (lifA) in Citrobacter rodentium encodes the large toxin lymphostatin, which contains two enzymatic motifs associated with bacterial pathogenesis, a glucosyltransferase and a protease. Our aim was to determine the effects of each lymphostatin motif on intestinal epithelial-barrier function. In-frame mutations of C. rodentium lifA glucosyltransferase (CrGlM21) and protease (CrPrM5) were generated by homologous recombination. Infection of both model intestinal epithelial monolayers and mice with C. rodentium wild type resulted in compromised epithelial barrier function and mislocalization of key intercellular junction proteins in the tight junction and adherens junction. In contrast, CrGlM21 was impaired in its ability to reduce barrier function and influenced the tight junction proteins ZO-1 and occludin. CrPrM5 demonstrated decreased effects on the adherens junction proteins β-catenin and E-cadherin. Analysis of the mechanisms revealed that C. rodentium wild type differentially influenced Rho GTPase activation, suppressed Cdc42 activation, and induced Rho GTPase activation. CrGlM21 lost its suppressive effects on Cdc42 activation, whereas CrPrM5 was unable to activate Rho signaling. Rescue experiments using constitutively active Cdc42 or C3 exotoxin to inhibit Rho GTPase supported a role of Rho GTPases in the epithelial barrier compromise induced by C. rodentium. Taken together, our results suggest that lymphostatin is a bacterial virulence factor that contributes to the disruption of intestinal epithelial-barrier function via the modulation of Rho GTPase activities. PMID:19286565

  20. Enteric glia promote intestinal mucosal healing via activation of focal adhesion kinase and release of proEGF

    PubMed Central

    Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Chevalier, Julien; Mahé, Maxime M.; Wedel, Thilo; Urvil, Petri; Derkinderen, Pascal; Savidge, Tor

    2011-01-01

    Wound healing of the gastrointestinal mucosa is essential for the maintenance of gut homeostasis and integrity. Enteric glial cells play a major role in regulating intestinal barrier function, but their role in mucosal barrier repair remains unknown. The impact of conditional ablation of enteric glia on dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced mucosal damage and on healing of diclofenac-induced mucosal ulcerations was evaluated in vivo in GFAP-HSVtk transgenic mice. A mechanically induced model of intestinal wound healing was developed to study glial-induced epithelial restitution. Glial-epithelial signaling mechanisms were analyzed by using pharmacological inhibitors, neutralizing antibodies, and genetically engineered intestinal epithelial cells. Enteric glial cells were shown to be abundant in the gut mucosa, where they associate closely with intestinal epithelial cells as a distinct cell population from myofibroblasts. Conditional ablation of enteric glia worsened mucosal damage after DSS treatment and significantly delayed mucosal wound healing following diclofenac-induced small intestinal enteropathy in transgenic mice. Enteric glial cells enhanced epithelial restitution and cell spreading in vitro. These enhanced repair processes were reproduced by use of glial-conditioned media, and soluble proEGF was identified as a secreted glial mediator leading to consecutive activation of epidermal growth factor receptor and focal adhesion kinase signaling pathways in intestinal epithelial cells. Our study shows that enteric glia represent a functionally important cellular component of the intestinal epithelial barrier microenvironment and that the disruption of this cellular network attenuates the mucosal healing process. PMID:21350188

  1. MicroRNAs regulate tight junction proteins and modulate epithelial/endothelial barrier functions

    PubMed Central

    Cichon, Christoph; Sabharwal, Harshana; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Tightly controlled epithelial and endothelial barriers are a prerequisite for life as these barriers separate multicellular organisms from their environment and serve as first lines of defense. Barriers between neighboring epithelial cells are formed by multiple intercellular junctions including the ‘apical junctional complex—AJC’ with tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and desmosomes. TJ consist of tetraspan transmembrane proteins like occludin, various claudins that directly control paracellular permeability, and the ‘Junctional Adhesion Molecules’ (JAMs). For establishing tight barriers TJ are essential but at the same time have to allow also selective permeability. For this, TJ need to be tightly regulated and controlled. This is organized by a variety of adaptor molecules, i.e., protein kinases, phosphatases and GTPases, which in turn are regulated and fine-tuned involving microRNAs (miRNAs). In this review we summarize available data on the role and targeting of miRNAs in the maintenance of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers. PMID:25610754

  2. Barrier responses of human bronchial epithelial cells to grass pollen exposure.

    PubMed

    Blume, Cornelia; Swindle, Emily J; Dennison, Patrick; Jayasekera, Nivenka P; Dudley, Sarah; Monk, Phillip; Behrendt, Heidrun; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Holgate, Stephen T; Howarth, Peter H; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Davies, Donna E

    2013-07-01

    The airway epithelium forms a physical, chemical and immunological barrier against inhaled environmental substances. In asthma, these barrier properties are thought to be abnormal. In this study, we analysed the effect of grass pollen on the physical and immunological barrier properties of differentiated human primary bronchial epithelial cells. Following exposure to Timothy grass (Phleum pratense) pollen extract, the integrity of the physical barrier was not impaired as monitored by measuring the transepithelial resistance and immunofluorescence staining of tight junction proteins. In contrast, pollen exposure affected the immunological barrier properties by modulating vectorial mediator release. CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL)8/interleukin (IL)-8 showed the greatest increase in response to pollen exposure with preferential release to the apical compartment. Inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways selectively blocked apical CXCL8/IL-8 release via a post-transcriptional mechanism. Apical release of CC chemokine ligand (CCL)20/macrophage inflammatory protein-3α, CCL22/monocyte-derived chemokine and tumour necrosis factor-α was significantly increased only in severe asthma cultures, while CCL11/eotaxin-1 and CXCL10/interferon-γ-induced protein-10 were reduced in nonasthmatic cultures. The bronchial epithelial barrier modulates polarised release of mediators in response to pollen without direct effects on its physical barrier properties. The differential response of cells from normal and asthmatic donors suggests the potential for the bronchial epithelium to promote immune dysfunction in asthma.

  3. The pH-sensing receptor OGR1 improves barrier function of epithelial cells and inhibits migration in an acidic environment.

    PubMed

    de Vallière, Cheryl; Vidal, Solange; Clay, Ieuan; Jurisic, Giorgia; Tcymbarevich, Irina; Lang, Silvia; Ludwig, Marie-Gabrielle; Okoniewski, Michal; Eloranta, Jyrki J; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Wagner, Carsten A; Rogler, Gerhard; Seuwen, Klaus

    2015-09-15

    The pH-sensing receptor ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1; GPR68) is expressed in the gut. Inflammatory bowel disease is typically associated with a decrease in local pH, which may lead to altered epithelial barrier function and subsequent gastrointestinal repair involving epithelial cell adhesion and migration. As the mechanisms underlying the response to pH changes are not well understood, we have investigated OGR1-mediated, pH-dependent signaling pathways in intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells stably overexpressing OGR1 were created and validated as tools to study OGR1 signaling. Barrier function, migration, and proliferation were measured using electric cell-substrate impedance-sensing technology. Localization of the tight junction proteins zonula occludens protein 1 and occludin and the rearrangement of cytoskeletal actin were examined by confocal microscopy. Paracellular permeability and protein and gene expression analysis using DNA microarrays were performed on filter-grown Caco-2 monolayers. We report that an acidic pH shift from pH 7.8 to 6.6 improved barrier function and stimulated reorganization of filamentous actin with prominent basal stress fiber formation. Cell migration and proliferation during in vitro wound healing were inhibited. Gene expression analysis revealed significant upregulation of genes related to cytoskeleton remodeling, cell adhesion, and growth factor signaling. We conclude that acidic extracellular pH can have a signaling function and impact the physiology of intestinal epithelial cells. The deconstruction of OGR1-dependent signaling may aid our understanding of mucosal inflammation mechanisms.

  4. Impaired Intestinal Mucosal Barrier upon Ischemia-Reperfusion: “Patching Holes in the Shield with a Simple Surgical Method”

    PubMed Central

    Rosero, Olivér; Ónody, Péter; Molnár, Dávid; Lotz, Gábor; Turóczi, Zsolt; Fülöp, András; Garbaisz, Dávid; Harsányi, László; Szijártó, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric ischemia-reperfusion (IR) is associated with impairment of the gut barrier function and the initiation of a proinflammatory cascade with life-threatening results. Therefore methods directed to ameliorate IR injury are of great importance. We aimed at describing the effects of postconditioning (PC) on the alterations of the intestinal mucosal function and the inflammatory response upon mesenteric IR. Methods. Male Wistar rats were gavaged with green fluorescent protein-expressing E. coli suspensions. Animals were randomized into three groups (n = 15), sham-operated, IR-, and PC-groups, and underwent 60 minutes of superior mesenteric artery occlusion, followed by 6 hours of reperfusion. Postconditioning was performed at the onset of reperfusion. Blood and tissue samples were taken at the end of reperfusion, for histological, bacteriological, and plasma examinations. Results. The PC-group presented a more favorable claudin-2, claudin-3, claudin-4, and zonula occludens-1 membrane expression profile, and significantly lower rates of bacterial translocation to distant organs and plasma D-lactate levels compared to the IR-group. Histopathological lesions, plasma I-FABP, IL-6, and TNF-α levels were significantly lower in the PC-group compared to the IR-group. Conclusion. The use of postconditioning improved the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier upon mesenteric IR, and thus reduced the incidence of bacterial translocation and development of a systemic inflammatory response. PMID:24955347

  5. Examination of the restoration of epithelial barrier function following superficial keratectomy.

    PubMed

    Hutcheon, Audrey E K; Sippel, Kimberly C; Zieske, James D

    2007-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine the rate of restoration of the corneal epithelial barrier following a superficial keratectomy using a functional assay of tight junction integrity. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and a 3-mm superficial keratectomy was performed. The eyes were allowed to heal from 4 h to 8 weeks and the rate of epithelial wound closure was determined. To examine the restoration of the barrier function, EZ-Link Sulfo-NHS-LC-Biotin (LC-Biotin) was applied to all eyes, experimental and control, for 15 min at the time of sacrifice. This compound does not penetrate through intact tight junctions. Indirect immunofluorescence was performed with anti-laminin, a marker of basement membrane; fluorescein-conjugated streptavidin to detect the biotinylated marker; and anti-occludin and anti-ZO-1, markers of tight junctions. Epithelial wound closure was observed at 36-42 h after wounding. LC-Biotin did not penetrate the intact epithelium. Upon wounding, LC-Biotin penetrated into the stroma subjacent and slightly peripheral to the wound area. This pattern was present from 4-48 h post-wounding. The area of LC-Biotin localization decreased with time and the functional barrier was restored by 72 h. Occludin and ZO-1 were present at all time points. The number of cell layers expressing these proteins appeared to increase at 48 and 72 h. Continuous laminin localization was not observed until at least 7 days after wounding. Barrier function is restored within 1-1.5 days after epithelial wound closure. The loss of barrier function does not extend beyond the edge of the original wound. The restoration of barrier function does not appear to correlate with reassembly of the basement membrane in this model.

  6. Fluticasone Induces Epithelial Injury and Alters Barrier Function in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    MacRedmond, Ruth E.; Singhera, Gurpreet K.; Wadsworth, Samuel J.; Attridge, Susan; Bahzad, Mohammed; Williams, Kristy; Coxson, Harvey O.; White, Steven R.; Dorscheid, Delbert R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The airway epithelium has a number of roles pivotal to the pathogenesis of asthma, including provision of a physical and immune barrier to the inhaled environment. Dysregulated injury and repair responses in asthma result in loss of airway epithelial integrity. Inhaled corticosteroids are a corner stone of asthma treatment. While effective in controlling asthma symptoms, they fail to prevent airway remodeling. Direct cytopathic effects on the airway epithelium may contribute to this. Methods This study examined the effects of a 4-week treatment regimen of inhaled fluticasone 500 μg twice daily in healthy human subjects. Induced sputum was collected for cell counts and markers of inflammation. Barrier function was examined by diethylenetriaminepentacetic acid (DTPA) clearance measured by nuclear scintillation scan, and albumin concentration in induced sputum. Results Steroid exposure resulted in epithelial injury as measured by a significant increase in the number of airway epithelial cells in induced sputum. There was no change in airway inflammation by induced sputum inflammatory cell counts or cytokine levels. Epithelial shedding was associated with an increase in barrier function, as measured by both a decrease in DTPA clearance and decreased albumin in induced sputum. This likely reflects the normal repair response. Conclusion Inhaled corticosteroids cause injury to normal airway epithelium. These effects warrant further evaluation in asthma, where the dysregulated repair response may contribute to airway remodeling. PMID:25324978

  7. Magnetofection Enhances Lentiviral-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Cells through Extracellular and Cellular Barriers.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Stefano; Orlando, Clara; Carbone, Annalucia; Di Gioia, Sante; Conese, Massimo

    2016-11-23

    Gene transfer to airway epithelial cells is hampered by extracellular (mainly mucus) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers. Magnetofection has been used to increase retention time of lentiviral vectors (LV) on the cellular surface. In this study, magnetofection was investigated in airway epithelial cell models mimicking extracellular and cellular barriers. Bronchiolar epithelial cells (H441 line) were evaluated for LV-mediated transduction after polarization onto filters and dexamethasone (dex) treatment, which induced hemicyst formation, with or without magnetofection. Sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was overlaid onto cells, and LV-mediated transduction was evaluated in the absence or presence of magnetofection. Magnetofection of unpolarized H441 cells increased the transduction with 50 MOI (multiplicity of infection, i.e., transducing units/cell) up to the transduction obtained with 500 MOI in the absence of magnetofection. Magnetofection well-enhanced LV-mediated transduction in mucus-layered cells by 20.3-fold. LV-mediated transduction efficiency decreased in dex-induced hemicysts in a time-dependent fashion. In dome-forming cells, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) localization at the cell borders was increased by dex treatment. Under these experimental conditions, magnetofection significantly increased LV transduction by 5.3-fold. In conclusion, these results show that magnetofection can enhance LV-mediated gene transfer into airway epithelial cells in the presence of extracellular (sputum) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers, representing CF-like conditions.

  8. Magnetofection Enhances Lentiviral-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Cells through Extracellular and Cellular Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Stefano; Orlando, Clara; Carbone, Annalucia; Di Gioia, Sante; Conese, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Gene transfer to airway epithelial cells is hampered by extracellular (mainly mucus) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers. Magnetofection has been used to increase retention time of lentiviral vectors (LV) on the cellular surface. In this study, magnetofection was investigated in airway epithelial cell models mimicking extracellular and cellular barriers. Bronchiolar epithelial cells (H441 line) were evaluated for LV-mediated transduction after polarization onto filters and dexamethasone (dex) treatment, which induced hemicyst formation, with or without magnetofection. Sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was overlaid onto cells, and LV-mediated transduction was evaluated in the absence or presence of magnetofection. Magnetofection of unpolarized H441 cells increased the transduction with 50 MOI (multiplicity of infection, i.e., transducing units/cell) up to the transduction obtained with 500 MOI in the absence of magnetofection. Magnetofection well-enhanced LV-mediated transduction in mucus-layered cells by 20.3-fold. LV-mediated transduction efficiency decreased in dex-induced hemicysts in a time-dependent fashion. In dome-forming cells, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) localization at the cell borders was increased by dex treatment. Under these experimental conditions, magnetofection significantly increased LV transduction by 5.3-fold. In conclusion, these results show that magnetofection can enhance LV-mediated gene transfer into airway epithelial cells in the presence of extracellular (sputum) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers, representing CF-like conditions. PMID:27886077

  9. PHD3 Stabilizes the Tight Junction Protein Occludin and Protects Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Zhang, Hai-Sheng; Fong, Guo-Hua; Xi, Qiu-Lei; Wu, Guo-Hao; Bai, Chen-Guang; Ling, Zhi-Qiang; Fan, Li; Xu, Yi-Ming; Qin, Yan-Qing; Yuan, Tang-Long; Sun, Heng; Fang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs) control cellular adaptation to hypoxia. PHDs are found involved in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, the exact role of PHD3, a member of the PHD family, in IBD remains unknown. We show here that PHD3 plays a critical role in maintaining intestinal epithelial barrier function. We found that genetic ablation of Phd3 in intestinal epithelial cells led to spontaneous colitis in mice. Deletion of PHD3 decreases the level of tight junction protein occludin, leading to a failure of intestinal epithelial barrier function. Further studies indicate that PHD3 stabilizes occludin by preventing the interaction between the E3 ligase Itch and occludin, in a hydroxylase-independent manner. Examination of biopsy of human ulcerative colitis patients indicates that PHD3 is decreased with disease severity, indicating that PHD3 down-regulation is associated with progression of this disease. We show that PHD3 protects intestinal epithelial barrier function and reveal a hydroxylase-independent function of PHD3 in stabilizing occludin. These findings may help open avenues for developing a therapeutic strategy for IBD. PMID:26124271

  10. Heparan sulfate and syndecan-1 are essential in maintaining murine and human intestinal epithelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Lars; Salvestrini, Camilla; Park, Pyong Woo; Li, Jin-Ping; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Yamaguchi, Yu; Murch, Simon; Freeze, Hudson H.

    2007-01-01

    Patients with protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) fail to maintain intestinal epithelial barrier function and develop an excessive and potentially fatal efflux of plasma proteins. PLE occurs in ostensibly unrelated diseases, but emerging commonalities in clinical observations recently led us to identify key players in PLE pathogenesis. These include elevated IFN-γ, TNF-α, venous hypertension, and the specific loss of heparan sulfate proteoglycans from the basolateral surface of intestinal epithelial cells during PLE episodes. Here we show that heparan sulfate and syndecan-1, the predominant intestinal epithelial heparan sulfate proteoglycan, are essential in maintaining intestinal epithelial barrier function. Heparan sulfate– or syndecan-1–deficient mice and mice with intestinal-specific loss of heparan sulfate had increased basal protein leakage and were far more susceptible to protein loss induced by combinations of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and increased venous pressure. Similarly, knockdown of syndecan-1 in human epithelial cells resulted in increased basal and cytokine-induced protein leakage. Clinical application of heparin has been known to alleviate PLE in some patients but its unknown mechanism and severe side effects due to its anticoagulant activity limit its usefulness. We demonstrate here that non-anticoagulant 2,3-de-O-sulfated heparin could prevent intestinal protein leakage in syndecan-deficient mice, suggesting that this may be a safe and effective therapy for PLE patients. PMID:18064305

  11. Modified Pulsatilla decoction attenuates oxazolone-induced colitis in mice through suppression of inflammation and epithelial barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuewei; Fan, Fugang; Cao, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders caused by a dysregulated mucosal immune response and epithelial barrier disruption. Conventional treatment of IBD is currently limited to overcoming patient symptoms and is often associated with severe adverse effects from the drugs used. Modified Pulsatilla decoction has been used previously to treat ulcerative colitis (UC) in clinical practice in China, however, the underlying mechanism in the treatment of UC remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the efficiency and mechanisms of modified Pulsatilla decoction in the treatment of oxazolone-induced colitis were investigated. Assessment of clinical colitis and histological examination found that the administration of modified Pulsatilla decoction attenuated the severity of oxazolone-induced colitis in mice. Measurement of cytokine concentration, western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction demonstrated modified Pulsatilla decoction treatment significantly reduced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and restored alterations in tight junction proteins in the colon tissues. In addition, modified Pulsatilla decoction suppressed the activation of the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway. Thus, the findings of the present study demonstrated that modified Pulsatilla decoction offers an effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of IBD and revealed the underlying mechanisms of action offered by modified Pulsatilla decoction. PMID:27278299

  12. Arsenic Compromises Conducting Airway Epithelial Barrier Properties in Primary Mouse and Immortalized Human Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Cara L.; Liguori, Andrew E.; Olsen, Colin E.; Lantz, R. Clark; Burgess, Jefferey L.; Boitano, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is a lung toxicant that can lead to respiratory illness through inhalation and ingestion, although the most common exposure is through contaminated drinking water. Lung effects reported from arsenic exposure include lung cancer and obstructive lung disease, as well as reductions in lung function and immune response. As part of their role in innate immune function, airway epithelial cells provide a barrier that protects underlying tissue from inhaled particulates, pathogens, and toxicants frequently found in inspired air. We evaluated the effects of a five-day exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic {<4μM [~300 μg/L (ppb)] as NaAsO2} on airway epithelial barrier function and structure. In a primary mouse tracheal epithelial (MTE) cell model we found that both micromolar (3.9 μM) and submicromolar (0.8 μM) arsenic concentrations reduced transepithelial resistance, a measure of barrier function. Immunofluorescent staining of arsenic-treated MTE cells showed altered patterns of localization of the transmembrane tight junction proteins claudin (Cl) Cl-1, Cl-4, Cl-7 and occludin at cell-cell contacts when compared with untreated controls. To better quantify arsenic-induced changes in tight junction transmembrane proteins we conducted arsenic exposure experiments with an immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-). We found that arsenic exposure significantly increased the protein expression of Cl-4 and occludin as well as the mRNA levels of Cl-4 and Cl-7 in these cells. Additionally, arsenic exposure resulted in altered phosphorylation of occludin. In summary, exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic can alter both the function and structure of airway epithelial barrier constituents. These changes likely contribute to the observed arsenic-induced loss in basic innate immune defense and increased infection in the airway. PMID:24349408

  13. Dietary Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Supplementation Improves the Mucosal Barrier Function in the Intestine of Weaned Piglets Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiangbing; Gu, Changsong; Hu, Haiyan; Tang, Jun; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Luo, Junqiu; Tian, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been regarded as a safe probiotic strain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dietary LGG supplementation could alleviate diarrhea via improving jejunal mucosal barrier function in the weaned piglets challenged by RV, and further analyze the potential roles for apoptosis of jejunal mucosal cells and intestinal microbiota. A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets: the basal diet and LGG supplementing diet. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused RV or the sterile essential medium. RV infusion increased the diarrhea rate, increased the RV-Ab, NSP4 and IL-2 concentrations and the Bax mRNA levels of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), decreased the villus height, villus height: crypt depth, the sIgA, IL-4 and mucin 1 concentrations and the ZO-1, occludin and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and affected the microbiota of ileum and cecum (P<0.05) in the weaned pigs. Dietary LGG supplementation increased the villus height and villus height: crypt depth, the sIgA, IL-4, mucin 1 and mucin 2 concentrations, and the ZO-1, occludin and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05) reduced the Bax mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05) in weaned pigs. Furthermore, dietary LGG supplementation alleviated the increase of diarrhea rate in the weaned pigs challenged by RV (P<0.05), and relieve the effect of RV infection on the villus height, crypt depth and the villus height: crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), the NSP4, sIgA, IL-2, IL-4, mucin 1 and mucin 2 concentrations of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), the ZO-1, occludin, Bax and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and the microbiota of ileum and cecum (P<0.05) in the weaned pigs challenged by RV. These results suggest that supplementing LGG in diets alleviated the diarrhea of weaned piglets challenged by RV via inhibiting the virus multiplication and improving the jejunal mucosal barrier function

  14. Dietary Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Supplementation Improves the Mucosal Barrier Function in the Intestine of Weaned Piglets Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiangbing; Gu, Changsong; Hu, Haiyan; Tang, Jun; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Luo, Junqiu; Tian, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been regarded as a safe probiotic strain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dietary LGG supplementation could alleviate diarrhea via improving jejunal mucosal barrier function in the weaned piglets challenged by RV, and further analyze the potential roles for apoptosis of jejunal mucosal cells and intestinal microbiota. A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets: the basal diet and LGG supplementing diet. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused RV or the sterile essential medium. RV infusion increased the diarrhea rate, increased the RV-Ab, NSP4 and IL-2 concentrations and the Bax mRNA levels of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), decreased the villus height, villus height: crypt depth, the sIgA, IL-4 and mucin 1 concentrations and the ZO-1, occludin and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and affected the microbiota of ileum and cecum (P<0.05) in the weaned pigs. Dietary LGG supplementation increased the villus height and villus height: crypt depth, the sIgA, IL-4, mucin 1 and mucin 2 concentrations, and the ZO-1, occludin and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05) reduced the Bax mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05) in weaned pigs. Furthermore, dietary LGG supplementation alleviated the increase of diarrhea rate in the weaned pigs challenged by RV (P<0.05), and relieve the effect of RV infection on the villus height, crypt depth and the villus height: crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), the NSP4, sIgA, IL-2, IL-4, mucin 1 and mucin 2 concentrations of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), the ZO-1, occludin, Bax and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and the microbiota of ileum and cecum (P<0.05) in the weaned pigs challenged by RV. These results suggest that supplementing LGG in diets alleviated the diarrhea of weaned piglets challenged by RV via inhibiting the virus multiplication and improving the jejunal mucosal barrier function

  15. Inflammation-induced desmoglein-2 ectodomain shedding compromises the mucosal barrier

    PubMed Central

    Kamekura, Ryuta; Nava, Porfirio; Feng, Mingli; Quiros, Miguel; Nishio, Hikaru; Weber, Dominique A.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2015-01-01

    Desmosomal cadherins mediate intercellular adhesion and control epithelial homeostasis. Recent studies show that proteinases play an important role in the pathobiology of cancer by targeting epithelial intercellular junction proteins such as cadherins. Here we describe the proinflammatory cytokine-induced activation of matrix metalloproteinase 9 and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain–containing protein 10, which promote the shedding of desmosomal cadherin desmoglein-2 (Dsg2) ectodomains in intestinal epithelial cells. Epithelial exposure to Dsg2 ectodomains compromises intercellular adhesion by promoting the relocalization of endogenous Dsg2 and E-cadherin from the plasma membrane while also promoting proliferation by activation of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/3 signaling. Cadherin ectodomains were detected in the inflamed intestinal mucosa of mice with colitis and patients with ulcerative colitis. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel response pathway in which inflammation-induced modification of columnar epithelial cell cadherins decreases intercellular adhesion while enhancing cellular proliferation, which may serve as a compensatory mechanism to promote repair. PMID:26224314

  16. Metformin Improves Ileal Epithelial Barrier Function in Interleukin-10 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yansong; Zhang, Hanying; Sun, Xiaofei; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The impairment of intestinal epithelial barrier is the main etiologic factor of inflammatory bowel disease. The proper intestinal epithelial proliferation and differentiation is crucial for maintaining intestinal integrity. Metformin is a common anti-diabetic drug. The objective is to evaluate the protective effects of metformin on ileal epithelial barrier integrity using interleukin-10 deficient (IL10KO) mice. Methods Wild-type and IL10KO mice were fed with/without metformin for 6 weeks and then ileum was collected for analyses. The mediatory role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was further examined by gain and loss of function study in vitro. Results Compared to wild-type mice, IL10KO mice had increased proliferation, reduced goblet cell and Paneth cell lineage differentiation in the ileum tissue, which was accompanied with increased crypt expansion. Metformin supplementation mitigated intestinal cell proliferation, restored villus/crypt ratio, increased goblet cell and Paneth cell differentiation and improved barrier function. In addition, metformin supplementation in IL10KO mice suppressed macrophage pro-inflammatory activity as indicated by reduced M1 macrophage abundance and decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ expressions. As a target of metformin, AMPK phosphorylation was enhanced in mice treated with metformin, regardless of mouse genotypes. In correlation, the mRNA level of differentiation regulator including bmp4, bmpr2 and math1 were also increased in IL10KO mice supplemented with metformin, which likely explains the enhanced epithelial differentiation in IL10KO mice with metformin. Consistently, in Caco-2 cells, metformin promoted claudin-3 and E-cadherin assembly and mitigated TNF-α-induced fragmentation of tight junction proteins. Gain and loss of function assay also demonstrated AMPK was correlated with epithelial differentiation and proliferation. Conclusions Metformin supplementation promotes

  17. Permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier via mucosal engrafting: implications for drug delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Bleier, Benjamin S; Kohman, Richie E; Feldman, Rachel E; Ramanlal, Shreshtha; Han, Xue

    2013-01-01

    Utilization of neuropharmaceuticals for central nervous system(CNS) disease is highly limited due to the blood-brain barrier(BBB) which restricts molecules larger than 500Da from reaching the CNS. The development of a reliable method to bypass the BBB would represent an enormous advance in neuropharmacology enabling the use of many potential disease modifying therapies. Previous attempts such as transcranial catheter implantation have proven to be temporary and associated with multiple complications. Here we describe a novel method of creating a semipermeable window in the BBB using purely autologous tissues to allow for high molecular weight(HMW) drug delivery to the CNS. This approach is inspired by recent advances in human endoscopic transnasal skull base surgical techniques and involves engrafting semipermeable nasal mucosa within a surgical defect in the BBB. The mucosal graft thereby creates a permanent transmucosal conduit for drugs to access the CNS. The main objective of this study was to develop a murine model of this technique and use it to evaluate transmucosal permeability for the purpose of direct drug delivery to the brain. Using this model we demonstrate that mucosal grafts allow for the transport of molecules up to 500 kDa directly to the brain in both a time and molecular weight dependent fashion. Markers up to 40 kDa were found within the striatum suggesting a potential role for this technique in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. This proof of principle study demonstrates that mucosal engrafting represents the first permanent and stable method of bypassing the BBB thereby providing a pathway for HMW therapeutics directly into the CNS.

  18. Effect of carbon nanoparticles on renal epithelial cell structure, barrier function, and protein expression

    PubMed Central

    BLAZER-YOST, BONNIE L.; BANGA, AMIRAJ; AMOS, ADAM; CHERNOFF, ELLEN; LAI, XIANYIN; LI, CHENG; MITRA, SOMENATH; WITZMANN, FRANK A.

    2011-01-01

    To assess effects of carbon nanoparticle (CNP) exposure on renal epithelial cells, fullerenes (C60), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were incubated with a confluent renal epithelial line for 48 h. At low concentrations, CNP-treated cells exhibited significant decreases in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) but no changes in hormone-stimulated ion transport or CNP-induced toxicity or stress responses as measured by lactate dehydrogenase or cytokine release. The changes in TEER, manifested as an inverse relationship with CNP concentration, were mirrored by an inverse correlation between dose and changes in protein expression. Lower, more physiologically relevant, concentrations of CNP have the most profound effects on barrier cell function and protein expression. These results indicate an impact of CNPs on renal epithelial cells at concentrations lower than have been previously studied and suggest caution with regard to increasing CNP levels entering the food chain due to increasing environmental pollution. PMID:21067278

  19. Promoting effect of lactoferrin on barrier function and epithelial differentiation of human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Ryo; Aoki, Reiji; Aoki-Yoshida, Ayako; Tajima, Atsushi; Takayama, Yoshiharu

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effects of bovine lactoferrin on keratinocyte differentiation and barrier function. Addition of bovine lactoferrin to differentiating HaCaT human keratinocytes led to increased transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), a marker of epithelial barrier function. This elevation was followed by upregulation of two differentiation markers, involucrin and filaggrin. The expression level of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 was also enhanced by bovine lactoferrin. The lactoferrin-induced upregulation of involucrin and filaggrin expression were confirmed in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK). Treatment with SB203580, a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) α inhibitor, impaired the upregulation of involucrin and filaggrin expression in response to lactoferrin. The elevation of p38 MAPK phosphorylation was further enhanced by lactoferrin in the initial stage of differentiation of HaCaT keratinocytes. The findings suggest that bovine lactoferrin promotes epithelial differentiation by a p38-MAPK-dependent mechanism.

  20. Replication of CMV in the gut of HIV-infected individuals and epithelial barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Somsouk, Ma; Hunt, Peter W.

    2017-01-01

    Although invasive cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease is uncommon in the era of antiretroviral therapy (ART), asymptomatic CMV coinfection is nearly ubiquitous in HIV infected individuals. While microbial translocation and gut epithelial barrier dysfunction may promote persistent immune activation in treated HIV infection, potentially contributing to morbidity and mortality, it has been unclear whether CMV replication in individuals with no symptoms of CMV disease might play a role in this process. We hypothesized that persistent CMV replication in the intestinal epithelium of HIV/CMV-coinfected individuals impairs gut epithelial barrier function. Using a combination of state-of-the-art in situ hybridization technology (RNAscope) and immunohistochemistry, we detected CMV DNA and proteins and evidence of intestinal damage in rectosigmoid samples from CMV-positive individuals with both untreated and ART-suppressed HIV infection. Two different model systems, primary human intestinal cells differentiated in vitro to form polarized monolayers and a humanized mouse model of human gut, together demonstrated that intestinal epithelial cells are fully permissive to CMV replication. Independent of HIV, CMV disrupted tight junctions of polarized intestinal cells, significantly reducing transepithelial electrical resistance, a measure of monolayer integrity, and enhancing transepithelial permeability. The effect of CMV infection on the intestinal epithelium is mediated, at least in part, by the CMV-induced proinflammatory cytokine IL-6. Furthermore, letermovir, a novel anti-CMV drug, dampened the effects of CMV on the epithelium. Together, our data strongly suggest that CMV can disrupt epithelial junctions, leading to bacterial translocation and chronic inflammation in the gut and that CMV could serve as a target for therapeutic intervention to prevent or treat gut epithelial barrier dysfunction during HIV infection. PMID:28241080

  1. A novel dual-flow bioreactor simulates increased fluorescein permeability in epithelial tissue barriers.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Serena; Sbrana, Tommaso; La Marca, Margherita; Di Patria, Valentina; Martinucci, Valentina; Tirella, Annalisa; Domenici, Claudio; Ahluwalia, Arti

    2014-09-01

    Permeability studies across epithelial barriers are of primary importance in drug delivery as well as in toxicology. However, traditional in vitro models do not adequately mimic the dynamic environment of physiological barriers. Here, we describe a novel two-chamber modular bioreactor for dynamic in vitro studies of epithelial cells. The fluid dynamic environment of the bioreactor was characterized using computational fluid dynamic models and measurements of pressure gradients for different combinations of flow rates in the apical and basal chambers. Cell culture experiments were then performed with fully differentiated Caco-2 cells as a model of the intestinal epithelium, comparing the effect of media flow applied in the bioreactor with traditional static transwells. The flow increases barrier integrity and tight junction expression of Caco-2 cells with respect to the static controls. Fluorescein permeability increased threefold in the dynamic system, indicating that the stimulus induced by flow increases transport across the barrier, closely mimicking the in vivo situation. The results are of interest for studying the influence of mechanical stimuli on cells, and underline the importance of developing more physiologically relevant in vitro tissue models. The bioreactor can be used to study drug delivery, chemical, or nanomaterial toxicity and to engineer barrier tissues.

  2. Acute Acrolein Exposure Induces Impairment of Vocal Fold Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei; Sivasankar, M. Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous pollutant abundant in cigarette smoke, mobile exhaust, and industrial waste. There is limited literature on the effects of acrolein on vocal fold tissue, although there are clinical reports of voice changes after pollutant exposures. Vocal folds are responsible for voice production. The overall objective of this study was to investigate the effects of acrolein exposure on viable, excised vocal fold epithelial tissue and to characterize the mechanism underlying acrolein toxicity. Vocal fold epithelia were studied because they form the outermost layer of the vocal folds and are a primary recipient of inhaled pollutants. Porcine vocal fold epithelia were exposed to 0, 50, 100, 500, 900 or 1300 μM of acrolein for 3 hours; the metabolic activity, epithelial resistance, epithelial permeability, tight junction protein (occludin and claudin 3) expression, cell membrane integrity and lipid peroxidation were investigated. The data demonstrated that acrolein exposure at 500 μM significantly reduced vocal fold epithelial metabolic activity by 27.2% (p≤0.001). Incubation with 100 μM acrolein caused a marked increase in epithelial permeability by 130.5% (p<0.05) and a reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) by 180.0% (p<0.001). While the expression of tight junctional protein did not change in acrolein-treated samples, the cell membrane integrity was significantly damaged with a 45.6% increase of lipid peroxidation as compared to controls (p<0.05). Taken together, these data provide evidence that acute acrolein exposure impairs vocal fold epithelial barrier integrity. Lipid peroxidation-induced cell membrane damage may play an important role in reducing the barrier function of the epithelium. PMID:27643990

  3. Caspase-12 Silencing Attenuates Inhibitory Effects of Cigarette Smoke Extract on NOD1 Signaling and hBDs Expression in Human Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiang; Qian, Ya-jie; Zhou, Qian; Ye, Pei; Duan, Ning; Huang, Xiao-feng; Zhu, Ya-nan; Li, Jing-jing; Hu, Li-ping; Zhang, Wei-yun; Han, Xiao-dong; Wang, Wen-mei

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure is associated with increased risk of various diseases. Epithelial cells-mediated innate immune responses to infectious pathogens are compromised by cigarette smoke. Although many studies have established that cigarette smoke exposure affects the expression of Toll-liked receptor (TLR), it remains unknown whether the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1) expression is affected by cigarette smoke exposure. In the study, we investigated effects of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on NOD1 signaling in an immortalized human oral mucosal epithelial (Leuk-1) cell line. We first found that CSE inhibited NOD1 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, CSE modulated the expression of other crucial molecules in NOD1 signaling and human β defensin (hBD) 1, 2 and 3. We found that RNA interference-induced Caspase-12 silencing increased NOD1 and phospho-NF-κB (p-NF-κB) expression and down-regulated RIP2 expression. The inhibitory effects of CSE on NOD1 signaling can be attenuated partially through Caspase-12 silencing. Intriguingly, Caspase-12 silencing abrogated inhibitory effects of CSE on hBD1, 3 expression and augmented induced effect of CSE on hBD2 expression. Caspase-12 could play a vital role in the inhibitory effects of cigarette smoke on NOD1 signaling and hBDs expression in oral mucosal epithelial cells. PMID:25503380

  4. The Corneal Epithelial Barrier and Its Developmental Role in Isolating Corneal Epithelial and Conjunctival Cells From One Another

    PubMed Central

    Kubilus, James K.; Zapater i Morales, Carolina; Linsenmayer, Thomas F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose During development, the corneal epithelium (CE) and the conjunctiva are derived from the surface ectoderm. Here we have examined how, during development, the cells of these two issues become isolated from each other. Methods Epithelia from the anterior eyes of chicken embryos were labeled with the fluorescent, lipophilic dye, 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI). DiI was placed on the epithelial surface of the developing anterior eye and its diffusion was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Concomitant morphologic changes in the surface cells of these epithelial were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Immunofluorescence was used to analyze the expression of cytokeratin K3, ZO-1, N-cadherin and Connexin-43 and the function of gap junctions was analyzed using a cut-loading with the fluorescent dye rhodamine-dextran. Results Prior to embryonic day 8 (E8), DiI placed on the surface of the CE spreads throughout all the epithelial cells of the anterior eye. When older eyes were similarly labeled, dye diffusion was restricted to the CE. Similarly, diffusion of DiI placed on the conjunctival surface after E8 was restricted to the conjunctiva. Scanning electron microscopy showed that developmentally (1) physical separations progressively form between the cells of the CE and those of the conjunctiva, and (2) by E8 these separations form a ring that completely encompasses the cornea. The functional restriction of gap junctions between these tissues did not occur until E14. Conclusions During ocular development, a barrier to the diffusion of DiI forms between the contiguous CE and conjunctiva prior to the differential expression of gap junctions within these tissues. PMID:28319640

  5. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type III Translocon Is Required for Biofilm Formation at the Epithelial Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cindy S.; Rangel, Stephanie M.; Almblad, Henrik; Kierbel, Arlinet; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Hauser, Alan R.; Engel, Joanne N.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a deadly Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen of immunocompromised hosts, often involve the formation of antibiotic-resistant biofilms. Although biofilm formation has been extensively studied in vitro on glass or plastic surfaces, much less is known about biofilm formation at the epithelial barrier. We have previously shown that when added to the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells, P. aeruginosa rapidly forms cell-associated aggregates within 60 minutes of infection. By confocal microscopy we now show that cell-associated aggregates exhibit key characteristics of biofilms, including the presence of extracellular matrix and increased resistance to antibiotics compared to planktonic bacteria. Using isogenic mutants in the type III secretion system, we found that the translocon, but not the effectors themselves, were required for cell-associated aggregation on the surface of polarized epithelial cells and at early time points in a murine model of acute pneumonia. In contrast, the translocon was not required for aggregation on abiotic surfaces, suggesting a novel function for the type III secretion system during cell-associated aggregation. Supernatants from epithelial cells infected with wild-type bacteria or from cells treated with the pore-forming toxin streptolysin O could rescue aggregate formation in a type III secretion mutant, indicating that cell-associated aggregation requires one or more host cell factors. Our results suggest a previously unappreciated function for the type III translocon in the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms at the epithelial barrier and demonstrate that biofilms may form at early time points of infection. PMID:25375398

  6. Acidic bile salts modulate the squamous epithelial barrier function by modulating tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Miwa, Hiroto

    2011-08-01

    Experimental models for esophageal epithelium in vitro either suffer from poor differentiation or complicated culture systems. An air-liquid interface system with normal human bronchial epithelial cells can serve as a model of esophageal-like squamous epithelial cell layers. Here, we explore the influence of bile acids on barrier function and tight junction (TJ) proteins. The cells were treated with taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), or deoxycholic acid (DCA) at different pH values, or with pepsin. Barrier function was measured by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the diffusion of paracellular tracers (permeability). The expression of TJ proteins, including claudin-1 and claudin-4, was examined by Western blotting of 1% Nonidet P-40-soluble and -insoluble fractions. TCA and GCA dose-dependently decreased TEER and increased paracellular permeability at pH 3 after 1 h. TCA (4 mM) or GCA (4 mM) did not change TEER and permeability at pH 7.4 or pH 4. The combination of TCA and GCA at pH 3 significantly decreased TEER and increased permeability at lower concentrations (2 mM). Pepsin (4 mg/ml, pH 3) did not have any effect on barrier function. DCA significantly decreased the TEER and increased permeability at pH 6, a weakly acidic condition. TCA (4 mM) and GCA (4 mM) significantly decreased the insoluble fractions of claudin-1 and claudin-4 at pH 3. In conclusion, acidic bile salts disrupted the squamous epithelial barrier function partly by modulating the amounts of claudin-1 and claudin-4. These results provide new insights for understanding the role of TJ proteins in esophagitis.

  7. Commensal Bacteria-Dependent Indole Production Enhances Epithelial Barrier Function in the Colon

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yosuke; Kinoshita, Makoto; Harada, Kazuo; Mizutani, Masafumi; Masahata, Kazunori; Kayama, Hisako; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Microbiota have been shown to have a great influence on functions of intestinal epithelial cells (ECs). The role of indole as a quorum-sensing (QS) molecule mediating intercellular signals in bacteria has been well appreciated. However, it remains unknown whether indole has beneficial effects on maintaining intestinal barriers in vivo. In this study, we analyzed the effect of indole on ECs using a germ free (GF) mouse model. GF mice showed decreased expression of junctional complex molecules in colonic ECs. The feces of specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice contained a high amount of indole; however the amount was significantly decreased in the feces of GF mice by 27-fold. Oral administration of indole-containing capsules resulted in increased expression of both tight junction (TJ)- and adherens junction (AJ)-associated molecules in colonic ECs in GF mice. In accordance with the increased expression of these junctional complex molecules, GF mice given indole-containing capsules showed higher resistance to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. A similar protective effect of indole on DSS-induced epithelial damage was also observed in mice bred in SPF conditions. These findings highlight the beneficial role of indole in establishing an epithelial barrier in vivo. PMID:24278294

  8. Bifidobacteria Prevent Tunicamycin-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Subsequent Barrier Disruption in Human Intestinal Epithelial Caco-2 Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Takuya; Oishi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is caused by accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the ER, thereby compromising its vital cellular functions in protein production and secretion. Genome wide association studies in humans as well as experimental animal models linked ER stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) with intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the mechanisms linking the outcomes of ER stress in IECs to intestinal disease have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the impact of ER stress on intestinal epithelial barrier function using human colon carcinoma-derived Caco-2 monolayers. Tunicamycin-induced ER stress decreased the trans-epithelial electrical resistance of Caco-2 monolayers, concomitant with loss of cellular plasma membrane integrity. Epithelial barrier disruption in Caco-2 cells after ER stress was not caused by caspase- or RIPK1-dependent cell death but was accompanied by lysosomal rupture and up-regulation of the ER stress markers Grp78, sXBP1 and Chop. Interestingly, several bifidobacteria species inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress and thereby diminished barrier disruption in Caco-2 monolayers. Together, these results showed that ER stress compromises the epithelial barrier function of Caco-2 monolayers and demonstrate beneficial impacts of bifidobacteria on ER stress in IECs. Our results identify epithelial barrier loss as a potential link between ER stress and intestinal disease development, and suggest that bifidobacteria could exert beneficial effects on this phenomenon. PMID:27611782

  9. Establishment of a novel in vitro model of stratified epithelial wound healing with barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Andrades, Miguel; Alonso-Pastor, Luis; Mauris, Jérôme; Cruzat, Andrea; Dohlman, Claes H.; Argüeso, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The repair of wounds through collective movement of epithelial cells is a fundamental process in multicellular organisms. In stratified epithelia such as the cornea and skin, healing occurs in three steps that include a latent, migratory, and reconstruction phases. Several simple and inexpensive assays have been developed to study the biology of cell migration in vitro. However, these assays are mostly based on monolayer systems that fail to reproduce the differentiation processes associated to multilayered systems. Here, we describe a straightforward in vitro wound assay to evaluate the healing and restoration of barrier function in stratified human corneal epithelial cells. In this assay, circular punch injuries lead to the collective migration of the epithelium as coherent sheets. The closure of the wound was associated with the restoration of the transcellular barrier and the re-establishment of apical intercellular junctions. Altogether, this new model of wound healing provides an important research tool to study the mechanisms leading to barrier function in stratified epithelia and may facilitate the development of future therapeutic applications. PMID:26759072

  10. Establishment of a novel in vitro model of stratified epithelial wound healing with barrier function.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Andrades, Miguel; Alonso-Pastor, Luis; Mauris, Jérôme; Cruzat, Andrea; Dohlman, Claes H; Argüeso, Pablo

    2016-01-13

    The repair of wounds through collective movement of epithelial cells is a fundamental process in multicellular organisms. In stratified epithelia such as the cornea and skin, healing occurs in three steps that include a latent, migratory, and reconstruction phases. Several simple and inexpensive assays have been developed to study the biology of cell migration in vitro. However, these assays are mostly based on monolayer systems that fail to reproduce the differentiation processes associated to multilayered systems. Here, we describe a straightforward in vitro wound assay to evaluate the healing and restoration of barrier function in stratified human corneal epithelial cells. In this assay, circular punch injuries lead to the collective migration of the epithelium as coherent sheets. The closure of the wound was associated with the restoration of the transcellular barrier and the re-establishment of apical intercellular junctions. Altogether, this new model of wound healing provides an important research tool to study the mechanisms leading to barrier function in stratified epithelia and may facilitate the development of future therapeutic applications.

  11. Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid-derived prostaglandin E3 on intestinal epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lagunas, Maria J; Ferrer, Ruth; Moreno, Juan J

    2013-05-01

    Prostaglandins (PG) are inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic or eicosapentaenoic acid giving rise to the 2-series or the 3-series prostanoids, respectively. Previously, we have observed that PGE2 disrupts epithelial barrier function. Considering the beneficial effect of fish oil consumption in intestinal inflammatory processes, the aim of this study was to assess the role of PGE3 on epithelial barrier function assessed from transepithelial electrical resistance and dextran fluxes in Caco-2 cells. The results indicate that PGE3 increased paracellular permeability (PP) to the same extent as PGE2, through the interaction with EP1 and EP4 receptors and with intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP as the downstream targets. Moreover, we observed a redistribution of tight junction proteins, occludin and claudin-4. In conclusion, PGE3 is able to increase PP thus leading to reconsider the role of PGE2/PGE3 ratio in the beneficial effects of dietary fish oil supplementation in the disruption of barrier function.

  12. Involvement of PI3K/AKT and MAPK Pathways for TNF-α Production in SiHa Cervical Mucosal Epithelial Cells Infected with Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jung-Bo; Quan, Juan-Hua; Kim, Ye-Eun; Rhee, Yun-Ee; Kang, Byung-Hyun; Choi, In-Wook; Cha, Guang-Ho; Yuk, Jae-Min; Lee, Young-Ha

    2015-08-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis; induces proinflammation in cervicovaginal mucosal epithelium. To investigate the signaling pathways in TNF-α production in cervical mucosal epithelium after T. vaginalis infection, the phosphorylation of PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathways were evaluated in T. vaginalis-infected SiHa cells in the presence and absence of specific inhibitors. T. vaginalis increased TNF-α production in SiHa cells, in a parasite burden-dependent and incubation time-dependent manner. In T. vaginalis-infected SiHa cells, AKT, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and JNK were phosphorylated from 1 hr after infection; however, the phosphorylation patterns were different from each other. After pretreatment with inhibitors of the PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathways, TNF-α production was significantly decreased compared to the control; however, TNF-α reduction patterns were different depending on the type of PI3K/MAPK inhibitors. TNF-α production was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by treatment with wortmannin and PD98059, whereas it was increased by SP600125. These data suggested that PI3K/AKT and MAPK signaling pathways are important in regulation of TNF-α production in cervical mucosal epithelial SiHa cells. However, activation patterns of each pathway were different from the types of PI3K/MAPK pathways.

  13. Collagen accumulation and dysfunctional mucosal barrier of the small intestine in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Arutyunov, Gregory P; Kostyukevich, Olga I; Serov, Roman A; Rylova, Natalya V; Bylova, Nadezda A

    2008-04-10

    Chronic heart failure is a systemic disease with a devastating prognosis, which affects many organ systems other than the cardiovascular system. A total of 45 Chronic heart failure patients of ischemic etiology and 18 control subjects aged 45-65 years were recruited. All subjects underwent a physical examination by a qualified physician, echocardiography, an evaluation of the trophological status (including height and weight assessment) and net-of-fat body mass (NFBM) determination, an evaluation of intestinal functional activity based on fat and protein excretion with feces, and biopsy examination from the small intestine (see below). For all of them were performed functional tests of the small intestine and morphological examination of the small intestine and biopsy collection. Staining for collagen content of the mucosal wall showed that collagen content differed significantly between the four cohorts studied. In fact, relative collagen content was highest in advanced stages of the disease. However, patients with cardiac cachexia displayed even higher relative amounts of collagen than those of the same functional class without cardiac cachexia. Both fat loss and protein loss with the feces correlated with relative collagen area.

  14. Protective effects of nonionic tri-block copolymers on bile acid-mediated epithelial barrier disruption.

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, A.; Fink, D.; Musch, M.; Valuckaite, V.; Zabornia, O.; Grubjesic, S.; Firestone, M. A.; Matthews, J. B.; Alverdy, J. C.

    2011-11-01

    Translocation of bacteria and other luminal factors from the intestine following surgical injury can be a major driver of critical illness. Bile acids have been shown to play a key role in the loss of intestinal epithelial barrier function during states of host stress. Experiments to study the ability of nonionic block copolymers to abrogate barrier failure in response to bile acid exposure are described. In vitro experiments were performed with the bile salt sodium deoxycholate on Caco-2 enterocyte monolayers using transepithelial electrical resistance to assay barrier function. A bisphenol A coupled triblock polyethylene glycol (PEG), PEG 15-20, was shown to prevent sodium deoxycholate-induced barrier failure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, lactate dehydrogenase, and caspase 3-based cell death detection assays demonstrated that bile acid-induced apoptosis and necrosis were prevented with PEG 15-20. Immunofluorescence microscopic visualization of the tight junctional protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) demonstrated that PEG 15-20 prevented significant changes in tight junction organization induced by bile acid exposure. Preliminary transepithelial electrical resistance-based studies examining structure-function correlates of polymer protection against bile acid damage were performed with a small library of PEG-based copolymers. Polymer properties associated with optimal protection against bile acid-induced barrier disruption were PEG-based compounds with a molecular weight greater than 10 kd and amphiphilicity. The data demonstrate that PEG-based copolymer architecture is an important determinant that confers protection against bile acid injury of intestinal epithelia.

  15. Moxibustion regulates inflammatory mediators and colonic mucosal barrier in ulcerative colitis rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tie-Ming; Xu, Na; Ma, Xian-De; Bai, Zeng-Hua; Tao, Xing; Yan, Hong-Chi

    2016-01-01

    occludin and ZO-1 in colonic tissue represent a potential mechanism for improved intestinal mucosal tissue repair with grain-sized moxibustion. PMID:26937144

  16. Increased Expression of DUOX2 is an Epithelial Response to Mucosal Dysbiosis Required for Immune Homeostasis in Mouse Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Grasberger, Helmut; Gao, Jun; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Kitamoto, Sho; Zhang, Min; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Eaton, Kathryn A.; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Shreiner, Andrew B.; Merchant, Juanita L.; Owyang, Chung; Kao, John Y.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Dual oxidase 2 (DUOX2), a hydrogen-peroxide generator at the apical membrane of gastrointestinal epithelia, is upregulated in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) before the onset of inflammation, but little is known about its effects. We investigated the role of DUOX2 in maintaining mucosal immune homeostasis in mice. METHODS We analyzed the regulation of DUOX2 in intestinal tissues of germ-free vs conventional mice, mice given antibiotics or colonized with only segmented filamentous bacteria, mice associated with human microbiota, and mice with deficiencies in interleukin (IL)23 and 22 signaling. We performed 16S rRNA gene quantitative PCR of intestinal mucosa and mesenteric lymph nodes of Duoxa−/− mice that lack functional DUOX enzymes. Genes differentially expressed in Duoxa−/− mice compared to co-housed wild type littermates were correlated with gene expression changes in early-stage IBD using gene set enrichment analysis. RESULTS Colonization of mice with segmented filamentous bacteria upregulated intestinal expression of DUOX2. DUOX2 regulated redox-signaling within mucosa-associated microbes and restricted bacterial access to lymphatic tissues of the mice, thereby reducing microbiota-induced immune responses. Induction of Duox2 transcription by microbial colonization did not require the mucosal cytokines IL17 or IL22, although IL22 increased expression of Duox2. Dysbiotic, but not healthy human microbiota, activated a DUOX2 response in recipient germ-free mice that corresponded to abnormal colonization of the mucosa with distinct populations of microbes. In Duoxa−/− mice, abnormalities in ileal mucosal gene expression at homeostasis recapitulated those in patients with mucosal dysbiosis. CONCLUSIONS DUOX2 regulates interactions between the intestinal microbiota and the mucosa to maintain immune homeostasis in mice. Mucosal dysbiosis leads to increased expression of DUOX2, which might be a marker of perturbed mucosal

  17. The relative balance of GM-CSF and TGF-β1 regulates lung epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Christian E; Schlingmann, Barbara; Dorsainvil White, StevenClaude; Ward, Christina; Fan, Xian; Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Brown, Lou Ann S; Guidot, David M; Koval, Michael

    2015-06-15

    Lung barrier dysfunction is a cardinal feature of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Alcohol abuse, which increases the risk of ARDS two- to fourfold, induces transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, which increases epithelial permeability and impairs granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent barrier integrity in experimental models. We hypothesized that the relative balance of GM-CSF and TGF-β1 signaling regulates lung epithelial barrier function. GM-CSF and TGF-β1 were tested separately and simultaneously for their effects on lung epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. TGF-β1 alone caused an ∼ 25% decrease in transepithelial resistance (TER), increased paracellular flux, and was associated with projections perpendicular to tight junctions ("spikes") containing claudin-18 that colocalized with F-actin. In contrast, GM-CSF treatment induced an ∼ 20% increase in TER, decreased paracellular flux, and showed decreased colocalization of spike-associated claudin-18 with F-actin. When simultaneously administered to lung epithelial cells, GM-CSF antagonized the effects of TGF-β1 on epithelial barrier function in cultured cells. Given this, GM-CSF and TGF-β1 levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia and correlated with markers for pulmonary edema and patient outcome. In patient BAL fluid, protein markers of lung barrier dysfunction, serum α2-macroglobulin, and IgM levels were increased at lower ratios of GM-CSF/TGF-β1. Critically, patients who survived had significantly higher GM-CSF/TGF-β1 ratios than nonsurviving patients. This study provides experimental and clinical evidence that the relative balance between GM-CSF and TGF-β1 signaling is a key regulator of lung epithelial barrier function. The GM-CSF/TGF-β1 ratio in BAL fluid may provide a concentration-independent biomarker that can predict patient outcomes in ARDS.

  18. Physicochemical Factors that Affect Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Passage Across Epithelial Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Alison; Vidyasagar, Sadasivan; DeLouise, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of nanomaterials in terms of size, shape, and surface chemistry poses a challenge to those who are trying to characterize the human health and environmental risks associated with incidental and unintentional exposures. There are numerous products that are already commercially available that contain solid metal and metal oxide nanoparticles, either embedded in a matrix or in solution. Exposure assessments for these products are often incomplete or difficult due to technological challenges associated with detection and quantitation of nanoparticles in gaseous or liquid carriers. The main focus of recent research has been on hazard identification. However, risk is a product of hazard and exposure, and one significant knowledge gap is that of the target organ dose following in vivo exposures. In order to reach target organs, nanoparticles must first breech the protective barriers of the respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, or skin. The fate of those nanoparticles that reach physiological barriers is in large part determined by the properties of the particles and the barriers themselves. This article reviews the physiological properties of the lung, gut, and skin epithelia, the physicochemical properties of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles that are likely to affect their ability to breech epithelial barriers, and what is known about their fate following in vivo exposures. PMID:20049809

  19. Protective Effect of Huoxiang Zhengqi Oral Liquid on Intestinal Mucosal Mechanical Barrier of Rats with Postinfectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome Induced by Acetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yao; Liu, Wei; Peng, Qiu-Xian; Peng, Jiang-Li; Yu, Lin-Zhong; Hu, Jian-Lan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a rat model with acetic acid-induced PI-IBS was used to study the role of HXZQ oral liquid in repairing the colonic epithelial barrier and reducing intestinal permeability. Pathomorphism of colonic tissue, epithelial ultrastructure, DAO activity in serum, and the protein expression of ZO-1 and occludin were examined to investigate protective effect mechanisms of HXZQ on intestinal mucosa barrier and then present experimental support for its use for prevention and cure of PI-IBS. PMID:25254052

  20. Unique Transcompartmental Bridge: Antigen-Presenting Cells Sampling across Endothelial and Mucosal Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Frederick; Tong, Alexander A.; Huang, Alex Y.

    2016-01-01

    Potentially harmful pathogens can gain access to tissues and organ systems through body sites that are in direct contact with the outside environment, such as the skin, the gut, and the airway mucosa. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) represent a bridge between the innate and adaptive immunity, and their capacity for constant immune surveillance and rapid sampling of incoming pathogens and other potentially harmful antigens is central for mounting an effective and robust protective host response. The classical view is that APCs perform this task efficiently within the tissue to sense invading agents intra-compartmentally. However, recent data based on high resolution imaging support an additional transcompartmental surveillance behavior by APC by reaching across intact physical barriers. In this review, we summarize intravital microscopic evidences of APC to sample antigens transcompartmentally at the gut mucosa and other body sites. PMID:27375624

  1. Protective effect of salvianolic acid B on NASH rat liver through restoring intestinal mucosal barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Chun; Jin, Qing-Mei; Kong, Wei-Zong; Chen, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) on the disease progress of NASH and change of intestinal barrier function. Methods: Sixty Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into control group, model group and treated group, with the former given normal diet and the latter 2 groups rats fed high-fat diet. In treated group, rats were infused through the stomach with 1 mg/ml Sal B every day at a dose of 20 mL/kg body weight. All animals were killed at the 24th week and plasma levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), endotoxin (ET) and diamine oxdase (DAO) were analyzed using the blood samples. The histopathology of liver was observed by H&E staining. The expression changes of tight junction protein occludin and ZO-1 were analyzed by immunocytochemistry. Ultrastructural morphology of small intestinal tissues was investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Results: Plasma levels of ALT, AST, TG, TC, ET and DAO were significantly higher in model group than those in both control group and group treated with Sal B. In model group, vacuolated swelling of the cytoplasm with aggregates of chronic inflammatory cells was observed in the liver tissue but not in Sal B-treated group. NAFLD Activity Score in the treated group was significantly lower than that in model group. Immunohistochemical staining showed that Sal B administration recovered the expression of occludin and ZO-1, which was downregulated in the model group. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that cell surface microvilli and major intercellular junctional complex including tight junction, gap junction and adherens junction were restored in Sal B-treated group. Conclusion: Sal B exerted protective function against high-fat diet-induced liver damage by restoring healthy barrier function of intestine in NASH rat model. PMID:26191218

  2. Functional and cytometric examination of different human lung epithelial cell types as drug transport barriers

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyoung Ah; Rosania, Gus R.; Kim, Chong-Kook; Shin, Meong Cheol

    2016-01-01

    To develop inhaled medications, various cell culture models have been used to examine the transcellular transport or cellular uptake properties of small molecules. For the reproducible high throughput screening of the inhaled drug candidates, a further verification of cell architectures as drug transport barriers can contribute to establishing appropriate in vitro cell models. In the present study, side-by-side experiments were performed to compare the structure and transport function of three lung epithelial cells (Calu-3, normal human bronchial primary cells (NHBE), and NL-20). The cells were cultured on the nucleopore membranes in the air-liquid interface (ALI) culture conditions, with cell culture medium in the basolateral side only, starting from day 1. In transport assays, paracellular transport across all three types of cells appeared to be markedly different with the NHBE or Calu-3 cells, showing low paracellular permeability and high TEER values, while the NL-20 cells showed high paracellular permeability and low TEER. Quantitative image analysis of the confocal microscope sections further confirmed that the Calu-3 cells formed intact cell monolayers in contrast to the NHBE and NL-20 cells with multilayers. Among three lung epithelial cell types, the Calu-3 cell cultures under the ALI condition showed optimal cytometric features for mimicking the biophysical characteristics of in vivo airway epithelium. Therefore, the Calu-3 cell monolayers could be used as functional cell barriers for the lung-targeted drug transport studies. PMID:26746641

  3. Protective effect and mechanism of hydrogen treatment on lung epithelial barrier dysfunction in rats with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, L-D; Wu, X-Y; Tao, B-D; Wang, N; Zhang, J

    2016-01-26

    This study aimed to explore the protective effect of hydrogen and to investigate the underlying mechanism of its preliminary effect on the alveolar epithelial barrier function in septic rats. Forty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into three groups (N = 15): control [saline injection (intraperitoneal, ip), air drawing; SA], acute lung injury group [lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection (ip, 15 mg/kg), air drawing; LA], and acute lung injury combined with hydrogen drawing group [LPS injection (ip, 15 mg/kg), 2% hydrogen drawing; LH]. The rats were euthanized after 6 h of treatment, and the extravascular lung water (EVLW), pulmonary alveolar-arterial oxygen pressure (A-aDO2), and respiratory index (RI) of each group were measured. The aquaporin-1 (AQP-1) protein expression in the lung tissues was detected using immunohistochemistry and western blotting, and the correlation between the EVLW and AQP-1 was analyzed. The lung morphology was observed with light and electron microscopy. In the LA group, EVLW (0.87 ± 0.17), A-aDO2 (113.21 ± 13.92), RI (0.65 ± 0.26), and AQP-1 expression increased. Additionally, thickened alveolar walls, significant invasion of inflammatory cells around the vessels, capillary ectasia, hyperemia/hemorrhage in the alveolar space, significantly swollen mitochondria, and increased vacuolar degeneration were observed. A significant negative correlation between AQP-1 expression and EVLW was observed (R2 = 0.8806). Compared with the LA group, EVLW (0.71 ± 0.19), A-aDO2 (132.42 ± 17.39), RI (0.75 ± 0.24), and inflammatory reaction decreased and AQP-1 expression increased in the LH group. The damage to pulmonary epithelial cells improved after hydrogen treatment in rats with sepsis; hydrogen could protect the pulmonary epithelial barrier function by acting on AQP-1.

  4. Interferon-gamma increased epithelial barrier function via upregulating claudin-7 expression in human submandibular gland duct epithelium.

    PubMed

    Abe, Ayumi; Takano, Kenichi; Kojima, Takashi; Nomura, Kazuaki; Kakuki, Takuya; Kaneko, Yakuto; Yamamoto, Motohisa; Takahashi, Hiroki; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-06-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are necessary for salivary gland function and may serve as indicators of salivary gland epithelial dysfunction. IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a newly recognized fibro-inflammatory condition which disrupts the TJ associated epithelial barrier. The salivary glands are one of the most frequently involved organs in IgG4-RD, however, changes of the TJ associated epithelial barrier in salivary gland duct epithelium is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the regulation and function of TJs in human submandibular gland ductal epithelial cells (HSDECs) in normal and IgG4-RD. We examined submandibular gland (SMG) tissue from eight control individuals and 22 patients with IgG4-RD and established an HSDEC culture system. Immunohistochemistry, immunocytochemistry, western blotting, and measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) were performed. Claudin-4, claudin-7, occludin, and JAM-A were expressed at the apical side of the duct epithelium in submandibular gland (SMG) tissue and at the cell borders in HSDECs of normal and IgG4-RD. The expression and distribution of TJs in SMG tissue were not different in control individuals and patients with IgG4-RD in vivo and in vitro. Although interferon-gamma (IFNγ) generally disrupts the integrity and function of TJs, as manifested by decreased epithelial barrier function, IFNγ markedly increased the epithelial barrier function of HSDECs via upregulation of claudin-7 expression in HSDECs from patients with IgG4-RD. This is the first report showing an IFNγ-dependent increase in epithelial barrier function in the salivary gland duct epithelium. Our results provide insights into the functional significance of TJs in salivary gland duct epithelium in physiological and pathological conditions, including IgG4-RD.

  5. Severity of pancreatitis-associated intestinal mucosal barrier injury is reduced following treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wenhong; Abliz, Ablikim; Xu, Sheng; Sun, Rongze; Guo, Wenyi; Shi, Qiao; Yu, Jia; Wang, Weixing

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that apocynin, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (NOX) inhibitor, significantly decreased acute pancreatitis-associated inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters. In addition, apocynin was able to reduce ischemic reperfusion injury-associated damage; however, the exact effects of apocynin on acute pancreatitis-associated intestinal mucosal injury have yet to be fully clarified. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of apocynin on intestinal mucosal injury in a rat model of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). A total of 60 male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=15/group): Sham operation group (SO), SAP group, apocynin treatment (APO) group and drug control (APO-CON) group. SAP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. Apocynin was administered 30 min prior to SAP induction in the APO group. All rats were sacrificed 12 h after SAP induction. Intestinal integrity was assessed by measuring diamine oxidase (DAO) levels. Morphological alterations to intestinal tissue were determined under light and transmission electron microscopy. NOX2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB expression levels were detected in the intestine by immunohistochemical staining. Oxidative stress was detected by measuring intestinal malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase content. In addition, blood inflammatory cytokines, and amylase (AMY) and lipase (LIP) levels were evaluated. The results demonstrated that apocynin attenuated the following: i) Serum AMY, LIP and DAO levels; ii) pancreatic and intestinal pathological injury; iii) intestinal MDA content; iv) intestinal ultrastructural alterations; v) serum interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels; and vi) NOX2, p38 MAPK and NF-κB expression in intestinal tissues. These results suggested that apocynin may attenuate

  6. Gut Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction and Innate Immune Activation Predict Mortality in Treated HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Peter W.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Rodriguez, Benigno; Shive, Carey; Clagett, Brian; Funderburg, Nicholas; Robinson, Janet; Huang, Yong; Epling, Lorrie; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Meinert, Curtis L.; Van Natta, Mark L.; Jabs, Douglas A.; Lederman, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. While inflammation predicts mortality in treated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the prognostic significance of gut barrier dysfunction and phenotypic T-cell markers remains unclear. Methods. We assessed immunologic predictors of mortality in a case-control study within the Longitudinal Study of the Ocular Complications of AIDS (LSOCA), using conditional logistic regression. Sixty-four case patients who died within 12 months of treatment-mediated viral suppression were each matched to 2 control individuals (total number of controls, 128) by duration of antiretroviral therapy–mediated viral suppression, nadir CD4+ T-cell count, age, sex, and prior cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis. A similar secondary analysis was conducted in the SCOPE cohort, which had participants with less advanced immunodeficiency. Results. Plasma gut epithelial barrier integrity markers (intestinal fatty acid binding protein and zonulin-1 levels), soluble CD14 level, kynurenine/tryptophan ratio, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 level, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level, and D-dimer level all strongly predicted mortality, even after adjustment for proximal CD4+ T-cell count (all P ≤ .001). A higher percentage of CD38+HLA-DR+ cells in the CD8+ T-cell population was a predictor of mortality before (P = .031) but not after (P = .10) adjustment for proximal CD4+ T-cell count. Frequencies of senescent (defined as CD28−CD57+ cells), exhausted (defined as PD1+ cells), naive, and CMV-specific T cells did not predict mortality. Conclusions. Gut epithelial barrier dysfunction, innate immune activation, inflammation, and coagulation—but not T-cell activation, senescence, and exhaustion—independently predict mortality in individuals with treated HIV infection with a history of AIDS and are viable targets for interventions. PMID:24755434

  7. Gut microbiota facilitates dietary heme-induced epithelial hyperproliferation by opening the mucus barrier in colon

    PubMed Central

    Ijssennagger, Noortje; Belzer, Clara; Hooiveld, Guido J.; Dekker, Jan; van Mil, Saskia W. C.; Müller, Michael; Kleerebezem, Michiel; van der Meer, Roelof

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer risk is associated with diets high in red meat. Heme, the pigment of red meat, induces cytotoxicity of colonic contents and elicits epithelial damage and compensatory hyperproliferation, leading to hyperplasia. Here we explore the possible causal role of the gut microbiota in heme-induced hyperproliferation. To this end, mice were fed a purified control or heme diet (0.5 μmol/g heme) with or without broad-spectrum antibiotics for 14 d. Heme-induced hyperproliferation was shown to depend on the presence of the gut microbiota, because hyperproliferation was completely eliminated by antibiotics, although heme-induced luminal cytotoxicity was sustained in these mice. Colon mucosa transcriptomics revealed that antibiotics block heme-induced differential expression of oncogenes, tumor suppressors, and cell turnover genes, implying that antibiotic treatment prevented the heme-dependent cytotoxic micelles to reach the epithelium. Our results indicate that this occurs because antibiotics reinforce the mucus barrier by eliminating sulfide-producing bacteria and mucin-degrading bacteria (e.g., Akkermansia). Sulfide potently reduces disulfide bonds and can drive mucin denaturation and microbial access to the mucus layer. This reduction results in formation of trisulfides that can be detected in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, trisulfides can serve as a novel marker of colonic mucolysis and thus as a proxy for mucus barrier reduction. In feces, antibiotics drastically decreased trisulfides but increased mucin polymers that can be lysed by sulfide. We conclude that the gut microbiota is required for heme-induced epithelial hyperproliferation and hyperplasia because of the capacity to reduce mucus barrier function. PMID:26216954

  8. Gut microbiota facilitates dietary heme-induced epithelial hyperproliferation by opening the mucus barrier in colon.

    PubMed

    Ijssennagger, Noortje; Belzer, Clara; Hooiveld, Guido J; Dekker, Jan; van Mil, Saskia W C; Müller, Michael; Kleerebezem, Michiel; van der Meer, Roelof

    2015-08-11

    Colorectal cancer risk is associated with diets high in red meat. Heme, the pigment of red meat, induces cytotoxicity of colonic contents and elicits epithelial damage and compensatory hyperproliferation, leading to hyperplasia. Here we explore the possible causal role of the gut microbiota in heme-induced hyperproliferation. To this end, mice were fed a purified control or heme diet (0.5 μmol/g heme) with or without broad-spectrum antibiotics for 14 d. Heme-induced hyperproliferation was shown to depend on the presence of the gut microbiota, because hyperproliferation was completely eliminated by antibiotics, although heme-induced luminal cytotoxicity was sustained in these mice. Colon mucosa transcriptomics revealed that antibiotics block heme-induced differential expression of oncogenes, tumor suppressors, and cell turnover genes, implying that antibiotic treatment prevented the heme-dependent cytotoxic micelles to reach the epithelium. Our results indicate that this occurs because antibiotics reinforce the mucus barrier by eliminating sulfide-producing bacteria and mucin-degrading bacteria (e.g., Akkermansia). Sulfide potently reduces disulfide bonds and can drive mucin denaturation and microbial access to the mucus layer. This reduction results in formation of trisulfides that can be detected in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, trisulfides can serve as a novel marker of colonic mucolysis and thus as a proxy for mucus barrier reduction. In feces, antibiotics drastically decreased trisulfides but increased mucin polymers that can be lysed by sulfide. We conclude that the gut microbiota is required for heme-induced epithelial hyperproliferation and hyperplasia because of the capacity to reduce mucus barrier function.

  9. Boswellia serrata Preserves Intestinal Epithelial Barrier from Oxidative and Inflammatory Damage.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Daniela; Rancan, Serena; Orso, Genny; Dall'Acqua, Stefano; Brun, Paola; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Carrara, Maria; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Caparrotta, Laura; Montopoli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants are currently the therapeutic choices in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), however, with limited remission and often serious side effects. Meanwhile complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is increasing, particularly herbal medicine. Boswellia serrata is a traditional Ayurvedic remedy with anti-inflammatory properties, of interest for its usefulness in IBDs. The mechanism of this pharmacological potential of Boswellia serrata was investigated in colonic epithelial cell monolayers exposed to H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α, chosen as in vitro experimental model of intestinal inflammation. The barrier function was evaluated by the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and paracellular permeability assay, and by the tight junction proteins (zonula occludens-1, ZO-1 and occludin) immunofluorescence. The expression of phosphorylated NF-κB and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were determined by immunoblot and cytofluorimetric assay, respectively. Boswellia serrata oleo-gum extract (BSE) and its pure derivative acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA), were tested at 0.1-10 μg/ml and 0.027 μg/ml, respectively. BSE and AKBA safety was demonstrated by no alteration of intestinal cell viability and barrier function and integrity biomarkers. H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α treatment of Caco-2 cell monolayers significantly reduced TEER, increased paracellular permeability and caused the disassembly of tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1. BSE and AKBA pretreatment significantly prevented functional and morphological alterations and also the NF-κB phosphorylation induced by the inflammatory stimuli. At the same concentrations BSE and AKBA counteracted the increase of ROS caused by H2O2 exposure. Data showed the positive correlation of the antioxidant activity with the mechanism involved in the physiologic maintenance of the integrity and function of the intestinal epithelium. This study elucidates the

  10. Boswellia serrata Preserves Intestinal Epithelial Barrier from Oxidative and Inflammatory Damage

    PubMed Central

    Catanzaro, Daniela; Rancan, Serena; Orso, Genny; Dall’Acqua, Stefano; Brun, Paola; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Carrara, Maria; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Caparrotta, Laura; Montopoli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants are currently the therapeutic choices in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), however, with limited remission and often serious side effects. Meanwhile complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is increasing, particularly herbal medicine. Boswellia serrata is a traditional Ayurvedic remedy with anti-inflammatory properties, of interest for its usefulness in IBDs. The mechanism of this pharmacological potential of Boswellia serrata was investigated in colonic epithelial cell monolayers exposed to H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α, chosen as in vitro experimental model of intestinal inflammation. The barrier function was evaluated by the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and paracellular permeability assay, and by the tight junction proteins (zonula occludens-1, ZO-1 and occludin) immunofluorescence. The expression of phosphorylated NF-κB and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were determined by immunoblot and cytofluorimetric assay, respectively. Boswellia serrata oleo-gum extract (BSE) and its pure derivative acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA), were tested at 0.1-10 μg/ml and 0.027μg/ml, respectively. BSE and AKBA safety was demonstrated by no alteration of intestinal cell viability and barrier function and integrity biomarkers. H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α treatment of Caco-2 cell monolayers significantly reduced TEER, increased paracellular permeability and caused the disassembly of tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1. BSE and AKBA pretreatment significantly prevented functional and morphological alterations and also the NF-κB phosphorylation induced by the inflammatory stimuli. At the same concentrations BSE and AKBA counteracted the increase of ROS caused by H2O2 exposure. Data showed the positive correlation of the antioxidant activity with the mechanism involved in the physiologic maintenance of the integrity and function of the intestinal epithelium. This study elucidates the

  11. Intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and loss of barrier function in the setting of altered microbiota with enteral nutrient deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Demehri, Farokh R.; Barrett, Meredith; Ralls, Matthew W.; Miyasaka, Eiichi A.; Feng, Yongjia; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2013-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN), a commonly used treatment for patients who cannot receive enteral nutrition, is associated with significant septic complications due in part to a loss of epithelial barrier function (EBF). While the underlying mechanisms of TPN-related epithelial changes are poorly understood, a mouse model of TPN-dependence has helped identify several contributing factors. Enteral deprivation leads to a shift in intestinal microbiota to predominantly Gram-negative Proteobacteria. This is associated with an increase in expression of proinflammatory cytokines within the mucosa, including interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. A concomitant loss of epithelial growth factors leads to a decrease in epithelial cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. The resulting loss of epithelial tight junction proteins contributes to EBF dysfunction. These mechanisms identify potential strategies of protecting against TPN-related complications, such as modification of luminal bacteria, blockade of proinflammatory cytokines, or growth factor replacement. PMID:24392360

  12. Induction of mucosal immunity through systemic immunization: Phantom or reality?

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fei; Patel, Girishchandra B.; Hu, Songhua; Chen, Wangxue

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Generation of protective immunity at mucosal surfaces can greatly assist the host defense against pathogens which either cause disease at the mucosal epithelial barriers or enter the host through these surfaces. Although mucosal routes of immunization, such as intranasal and oral, are being intensely explored and appear promising for eliciting protective mucosal immunity in mammals, their application in clinical practice has been limited due to technical and safety related challenges. Most of the currently approved human vaccines are administered via systemic (such as intramuscular and subcutaneous) routes. Whereas these routes are acknowledged as being capable to elicit antigen-specific systemic humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, they are generally perceived as incapable of generating IgA responses or protective mucosal immunity. Nevertheless, currently licensed systemic vaccines do provide effective protection against mucosal pathogens such as influenza viruses and Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, whether systemic immunization induces protective mucosal immunity remains a controversial topic. Here we reviewed the current literature and discussed the potential of systemic routes of immunization for the induction of mucosal immunity. PMID:26752023

  13. Protein-Coated Nanoparticles Are Internalized by the Epithelial Cells of the Female Reproductive Tract and Induce Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Savannah E.; Konjufca, Vjollca H.

    2014-01-01

    The female reproductive tract (FRT) includes the oviducts (fallopian tubes), uterus, cervix and vagina. A layer of columnar epithelium separates the endocervix and uterus from the outside environment, while the vagina is lined with stratified squamous epithelium. The mucosa of the FRT is exposed to antigens originating from microflora, and occasionally from infectious microorganisms. Whether epithelial cells (ECs) of the FRT take up (sample) the lumen antigens is not known. To address this question, we examined the uptake of 20–40 nm nanoparticles (NPs) applied vaginally to mice which were not treated with hormones, epithelial disruptors, or adjuvants. We found that 20 and 40 nm NPs are quickly internalized by ECs of the upper FRT and within one hour could be observed in the lymphatic ducts that drain the FRT, as well as in the ileac lymph nodes (ILNs) and the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs). Chicken ovalbumin (Ova) conjugated to 20 nm NPs (NP-Ova) when administered vaginally reaches the internal milieu in an immunologically relevant form; thus vaginal immunization of mice with NP-Ova induces systemic IgG to Ova antigen. Most importantly, vaginal immunization primes the intestinal mucosa for secretion of sIgA. Sub-cutaneous (s.c) boosting immunization with Ova in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) further elevates the systemic (IgG1 and IgG2c) as well as mucosal (IgG1 and sIgA) antibody titers. These findings suggest that the modes of antigen uptake at mucosal surfaces and pathways of antigen transport are more complex than previously appreciated. PMID:25490456

  14. Why mucosal health?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaculture species depend more heavily on mucosal barriers than their terrestrial agricultural counterparts as they are continuously interacting with the aquatic microbiota. Unlike classical immune centers, such as the spleen and kidney, the accessibility of mucosal surfaces through immersion/dip t...

  15. Nitric oxide attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced barrier disruption and protein tyrosine phosphorylation in monolayers of intestinal epithelial cell.

    PubMed

    Katsube, Takanori; Tsuji, Hideo; Onoda, Makoto

    2007-06-01

    The intestinal epithelium provides a barrier to the transport of harmful luminal molecules into the systemic circulation. A dysfunctional epithelial barrier is closely associated with the pathogenesis of a variety of intestinal and systemic disorders. We investigated here the effects of nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on the barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2. When treated with H(2)O(2), Caco-2 cell monolayers grown on permeable supports exhibited several remarkable features of barrier dysfunction as follows: a decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance, an increase in paracellular permeability to dextran, and a disruption of the intercellular junctional localization of the scaffolding protein ZO-1. In addition, an induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous cellular proteins including ZO-1, E-cadherin, and beta-catenin, components of tight and adherens junctions, was observed. On the other hand, combined treatment of Caco-2 monolayers with H(2)O(2) and an NO donor (NOC5 or NOC12) relieved the damage to the barrier function and suppressed the protein tyrosine phosphorylation induced by H(2)O(2) alone. These results suggest that NO protects the barrier function of intestinal epithelia from oxidative stress by modulating some intracellular signaling pathways of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in epithelial cells.

  16. Protein kinase C δ signaling is required for dietary prebiotic-induced strengthening of intestinal epithelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Richard Y.; Abdullah, Majd; Määttänen, Pekka; Pilar, Ana Victoria C.; Scruten, Erin; Johnson-Henry, Kathene C.; Napper, Scott; O’Brien, Catherine; Jones, Nicola L.; Sherman, Philip M.

    2017-01-01

    Prebiotics are non-digestible oligosaccharides that promote the growth of beneficial gut microbes, but it is unclear whether they also have direct effects on the intestinal mucosal barrier. Here we demonstrate two commercial prebiotics, inulin and short-chain fructo-oligosaccharide (scFOS), when applied onto intestinal epithelia in the absence of microbes, directly promote barrier integrity to prevent pathogen-induced barrier disruptions. We further show that these effects involve the induction of select tight junction (TJ) proteins through a protein kinase C (PKC) δ-dependent mechanism. These results suggest that in the absence of microbiota, prebiotics can directly exert barrier protective effects by activating host cell signaling in the intestinal epithelium, which represents a novel alternative mechanism of action of prebiotics. PMID:28098206

  17. Beneficial role of the probiotic mixture Ultrabiotique on maintaining the integrity of intestinal mucosal barrier in DSS-induced experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Toumi, Ryma; Abdelouhab, Katia; Rafa, Hayet; Soufli, Imene; Raissi-Kerboua, Djamila; Djeraba, Zineb; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia

    2013-06-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel diseases which include ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn disease has not yet been clarified. Several hypotheses suggest a change in composition of gut microflora along with an impaired mucosal barrier that lead to excessive mucosal immunologic responses. Increased production of nitric oxide (NO) contributes greatly to the tissue injury caused by chronic inflammation. Evidence indicates that the mucus layer covering the epithelium is altered during UC and experimental colitis. Our aim in this study was to investigate the potential therapeutic effect of probiotic during DSS-induced colitis by modulating the immune system and colonic mucus production. For that purpose, the probiotic formulation Ultrabiotique(®) (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum and Bifidobacterium breve) was administered daily for 7 d to mice with colitis. Probiotic supplementation improved clinical symptoms and histological alterations observed during DSS induced colitis. Ultrabiotique(®) treatment down regulated the NO production by peritoneal macrophages of DSS-treated mice and enhanced mucus production in both DSS-treated and healthy mice. In conclusion, the modification of microflora by the Ultrabiotique(®) played a beneficial role in maintaining the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier and promoted tissue repair.

  18. Mucosal innate immune cells regulate both gut homeostasis and intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kurashima, Yosuke; Goto, Yoshiyuki; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Continuous exposure of intestinal mucosal surfaces to diverse microorganisms and their metabolites reflects the biological necessity for a multifaceted, integrated epithelial and immune cell-mediated regulatory system. The development and function of the host cells responsible for the barrier function of the intestinal surface (e.g., M cells, Paneth cells, goblet cells, and columnar epithelial cells) are strictly regulated through both positive and negative stimulation by the luminal microbiota. Stimulation by damage-associated molecular patterns and commensal bacteria-derived microbe-associated molecular patterns provokes the assembly of inflammasomes, which are involved in maintaining the integrity of the intestinal epithelium. Mucosal immune cells located beneath the epithelium play critical roles in regulating both the mucosal barrier and the relative composition of the luminal microbiota. Innate lymphoid cells and mast cells, in particular, orchestrate the mucosal regulatory system to create a mutually beneficial environment for both the host and the microbiota. Disruption of mucosal homeostasis causes intestinal inflammation such as that seen in inflammatory bowel disease. Here, we review the recent research on the biological interplay among the luminal microbiota, epithelial cells, and mucosal innate immune cells in both healthy and pathological conditions.

  19. Critical role for IL-1β in DNA damage-induced mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Kanarek, Naama; Grivennikov, Sergei I.; Leshets, Michael; Lasry, Audrey; Alkalay, Irit; Horwitz, Elad; Shaul, Yoav D.; Stachler, Matthew; Voronov, Elena; Apte, Ron N.; Pagano, Michele; Pikarsky, Eli; Karin, Michael; Ghosh, Sankar; Ben-Neriah, Yinon

    2014-01-01

    β-TrCP, the substrate recognition subunit of SCF-type ubiquitin ligases, is ubiquitously expressed from two distinct paralogs, targeting for degradation many regulatory proteins, among which is the NF-κB inhibitor IκB. To appreciate tissue-specific roles of β-TrCP, we studied the consequences of inducible ablation of three or all four alleles of the E3 in the mouse gut. The ablation resulted in mucositis, a destructive gut mucosal inflammation, which is a common complication of different cancer therapies and represents a major obstacle to successful chemoradiation therapy. We identified epithelial-derived IL-1β as the culprit of mucositis onset, inducing mucosal barrier breach. Surprisingly, epithelial IL-1β is induced by DNA damage via an NF-κB–independent mechanism. Tissue damage caused by gut barrier disruption is exacerbated in the absence of NF-κB, with failure to express the endogenous IL-1β receptor antagonist IL-1Ra upon four-allele loss. Antibody neutralization of IL-1β prevents epithelial tight junction dysfunction and alleviates mucositis in β-TrCP–deficient mice. IL-1β antagonists should thus be considered for prevention and treatment of severe morbidity associated with mucositis. PMID:24469832

  20. Mucosal cytokine network in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Andoh, Akira; Yagi, Yuhki; Shioya, Makoto; Nishida, Atsushi; Tsujikawa, Tomoyuki; Fujiyama, Yoshihide

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) are characterized by ongoing mucosal inflammation in which dysfunction of the host immunologic response against dietary factors and commensal bacteria is involved. The chronic inflammatory process leads to disruption of the epithelial barrier, and the formation of epithelial ulceration. This permits easy access for the luminal microbiota and dietary antigens to cells resident in the lamina propria, and stimulates further pathological immune cell responses. Cytokines are essential mediators of the interactions between activated immune cells and non-immune cells, including epithelial and mesenchymal cells. The clinical efficacy of targeting TNF-α clearly indicates that cytokines are the therapeutic targets in IBD patients. In this manuscript, we focus on the biological activities of recently-reported cytokines [Interleukin (IL)-17 cytokine family, IL-31 and IL-32], which might play a role through interaction with TNF-α in the pathophysiology of IBD. PMID:18777592

  1. Cellular crosstalk between airway epithelial and endothelial cells regulates barrier functions during exposure to double‐stranded RNA

    PubMed Central

    Reale, Riccardo; Held, Marie; Loxham, Matthew; Millar, Timothy M.; Collins, Jane E.; Swindle, Emily J.; Morgan, Hywel; Davies, Donna E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The epithelial and endothelial barriers of the airway mucosa are critical for regulation of tissue homeostasis and protection against pathogens or other tissue damaging agents. In response to a viral infection, epithelial cells must signal to the endothelium to initiate immune cell recruitment. This is a highly temporal regulated process; however, the mechanisms of this cross‐talk are not fully understood. Methods In a close‐contact co‐culture model of human airway epithelial and endothelial cells, cellular crosstalk was analyzed using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) measurements, immunofluorescence, electron microscopy, and ELISA. Viral infections were simulated by exposing airway epithelial cells apically to double‐stranded RNA (Poly(I:C)). Using a microfluidic culture system, the temporal release of mediators was analyzed in the co‐culture model. Results Within 4 h of challenge, double‐stranded RNA induced the release of TNF‐α by epithelial cells. This activated endothelial cells by triggering the release of the chemoattractant CX3CL1 (fractalkine) by 8 h post‐challenge and expression of adhesion molecules E‐selectin and ICAM‐1. These responses were significantly reduced by neutralising TNF‐α. Conclusion By facilitating kinetic profiling, the microfluidic co‐culture system has enabled identification of a key signaling mechanism between the epithelial and endothelial barriers. Better understanding of cell–cell cross‐talk and its regulatory mechanisms has the potential to identify new therapeutic strategies to control airway inflammation. PMID:28250924

  2. Povidone-iodine-induced cell death in cultured human epithelial HeLa cells and rat oral mucosal tissue.

    PubMed

    Sato, So; Miyake, Masao; Hazama, Akihiro; Omori, Koichi

    2014-07-01

    Although povidone-iodine (PVP-I) has been used as a gargle since 1956, its effectiveness and material safety have been remained controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the toxicity of PVP-I to epithelial cells in a concentration range significantly lower than that used clinically. Study design was in vitro laboratory investigations and in vivo histological and immunologic analysis. We examined the effects of PVP-I at concentrations of 1 × 10(-2) to 1 × 10(3) μM and 1 × 10(-4) to 1 × 10 μM on HeLa cells as a model of epithelial cells and rat oral mucosa, respectively, after 1 or 2 days of exposure. Annexin V/FLUOS was used to distinguish live, apoptotic and necrotic cells. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method was also used to observe whether apoptotic epithelial cells exist in rat oral mucosa after 1 day of exposure of PVP-I. HeLa cells developed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity, and epithelium of rat oral mucosa was thinned in a concentration-dependent manner. HeLa cell apoptosis increased after 1 × 10(0) μM of PVP-I exposure for 2 days. In the TUNEL method, many apoptotic epithelial cells were observed in the rat oral mucosa after 1 day of exposure to diluted 1 × 10(-2) μM of PVP-I, but minimal apoptotic epithelial cells were observed using 1 × 10(-3) μM of PVP-I. Our findings suggest that exposure to PVP-I, of which concentrations are even lower than those used clinically, causes toxicity in epithelial cells. This knowledge would help us better understand the risk of the use of PVP-I against mucosa.

  3. Candidalysin is a fungal peptide toxin critical for mucosal infection

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, David L.; Wilson, Duncan; Richardson, Jonathan P.; Mogavero, Selene; Tang, Shirley X.; Wernecke, Julia; Höfs, Sarah; Gratacap, Remi L.; Robbins, Jon; Runglall, Manohursingh; Murciano, Celia; Blagojevic, Mariana; Thavaraj, Selvam; Förster, Toni M.; Hebecker, Betty; Kasper, Lydia; Vizcay, Gema; Iancu, Simona I.; Kichik, Nessim; Häder, Antje; Kurzai, Oliver; Luo, Ting; Krüger, Thomas; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Cota, Ernesto; Bader, Oliver; Wheeler, Robert T.; Gutsmann, Thomas; Hube, Bernhard; Naglik, Julian R.

    2016-01-01

    Cytolytic proteins and peptide toxins are classical virulence factors of several bacterial pathogens which disrupt epithelial barrier function, damage cells and activate or modulate host immune responses. Until now human pathogenic fungi were not known to possess such toxins. Here we identify the first fungal cytolytic peptide toxin in the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans. This secreted toxin directly damages epithelial membranes, triggers a danger response signaling pathway and activates epithelial immunity. Toxin-mediated membrane permeabilization is enhanced by a positively charged C-terminus and triggers an inward current concomitant with calcium influx. C. albicans strains lacking this toxin do not activate or damage epithelial cells and are avirulent in animal models of mucosal infection. We propose the name ‘Candidalysin’ for this cytolytic peptide toxin; a newly identified, critical molecular determinant of epithelial damage and host recognition of the clinically important fungus, C. albicans. PMID:27027296

  4. Recovery of mucosal barrier function in ischemic porcine ileum and colon is stimulated by a novel agonist of the ClC-2 chloride channel, lubiprostone.

    PubMed

    Moeser, Adam J; Nighot, Prashant K; Engelke, Kory J; Ueno, Ryuji; Blikslager, Anthony T

    2007-02-01

    Previous studies utilizing an ex vivo porcine model of intestinal ischemic injury demonstrated that prostaglandin (PG)E(2) stimulates repair of mucosal barrier function via a mechanism involving Cl(-) secretion and reductions in paracellular permeability. Further experiments revealed that the signaling mechanism for PGE(2)-induced mucosal recovery was mediated via type-2 Cl(-) channels (ClC-2). Therefore, the objective of the present study was to directly investigate the role of ClC-2 in mucosal repair by evaluating mucosal recovery in ischemia-injured intestinal mucosa treated with the selective ClC-2 agonist lubiprostone. Ischemia-injured porcine ileal mucosa was mounted in Ussing chambers, and short-circuit current (I(sc)) and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) were measured in response to lubiprostone. Application of 0.01-1 microM lubiprostone to ischemia-injured mucosa induced concentration-dependent increases in TER, with 1 microM lubiprostone stimulating a twofold increase in TER (DeltaTER = 26 Omega.cm(2); P < 0.01). However, lubiprostone (1 microM) stimulated higher elevations in TER despite lower I(sc) responses compared with the nonselective secretory agonist PGE(2) (1 microM). Furthermore, lubiprostone significantly (P < 0.05) reduced mucosal-to-serosal fluxes of (3)H-labeled mannitol to levels comparable to those of normal control tissues and restored occludin localization to tight junctions. Activation of ClC-2 with the selective agonist lubiprostone stimulated elevations in TER and reductions in mannitol flux in ischemia-injured intestine associated with structural changes in tight junctions. Prostones such as lubiprostone may provide a selective and novel pharmacological mechanism of accelerating recovery of acutely injured intestine compared with the nonselective action of prostaglandins such as PGE(2).

  5. PRIMARY CULTURE OF CHOROIDAL EPITHELIAL CELLS: CHARACTERIZATION OF AN IN VITRO MODEL OF BLOOD-CSF BARRIER

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, WEI; ZHAO, QIUQU; GRAZIANO, JOSEPH H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary A primary rat choroidal epithelial cell culture system was developed to investigate mechanisms of heavy metal toxicity on the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier. Epithelial cells were dissociated from choroidal tissue by pronase digestion and cultured in standard DMEM culture media supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 10 ng epithelial growth factor per ml. The procedure yielded 2–5 × 104 cells from pooled plexuses of three to four rats, and a viability of 77–85%. The cultures displayed a dominant polygonal type of epithelial cells, with a population doubling time of 2–3 d. The cultures were of distinct choroidal epithelial origins. For example, immunocytochemical studies using monospecific rabbit anti-rat TTR polyclonal antibody revealed a strong positive stain of transthyretin (TTR), a thyroxine transport protein exclusively produced by the choroidal epithelia. Also, reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed the presence of specific TTR mRNA in the cultures. The cultures were further adapted to grow on a freely permeable membrane sandwiched between two culture chambers. The formation of an impermeable confluent monolayer occurred within 5 d after seeding and was verified by the presence of a steady electrical resistance across the membrane (80 ± 10 ohm per cm2). The epithelial barriers appeared to actively transport [125I]-thyroxine from the basal to apical chamber. These results suggest that this primary cell culture system possesses typical choroidal epithelial characteristics and appears to be a suitable model for in vitro mechanistic investigations of blood–CSF barrier. PMID:9542634

  6. Deoxynivalenol affects in vitro intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity through inhibition of protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Van De Walle, Jacqueline; Sergent, Therese; Piront, Neil; Toussaint, Olivier; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Larondelle, Yvan

    2010-06-15

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common mycotoxin contaminants of raw and processed cereal food, adversely affects the gastrointestinal tract. Since DON acts as a protein synthesis inhibitor, the constantly renewing intestinal epithelium could be particularly sensitive to DON. We analyzed the toxicological effects of DON on intestinal epithelial protein synthesis and barrier integrity. Differentiated Caco-2 cells, as a widely used model of the human intestinal barrier, were exposed to realistic intestinal concentrations of DON (50, 500 and 5000 ng/ml) during 24 h. DON caused a concentration-dependent decrease in total protein content associated with a reduction in the incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-leucine, demonstrating its inhibitory effect on protein synthesis. DON simultaneously increased the paracellular permeability of the monolayer as reflected through a decreased transepithelial electrical resistance associated with an increased paracellular flux of the tracer [{sup 3}H]-mannitol. A concentration-dependent reduction in the expression level of the tight junction constituent claudin-4 was demonstrated by Western blot, which was not due to diminished transcription, increased degradation, or NF-{kappa}B, ERK or JNK activation, and was also observed for a tight junction independent protein, i.e. intestinal alkaline phosphatase. These results demonstrate a dual toxicological effect of DON on differentiated Caco-2 cells consisting in an inhibition of protein synthesis as well as an increase in monolayer permeability, and moreover suggest a possible link between them through diminished synthesis of the tight junction constituent claudin-4.

  7. JAM-related proteins in mucosal homeostasis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Luissint, Anny-Claude; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A

    2014-03-01

    Mucosal surfaces are lined by epithelial cells that form a physical barrier protecting the body against external noxious substances and pathogens. At a molecular level, the mucosal barrier is regulated by tight junctions (TJs) that seal the paracellular space between adjacent epithelial cells. Transmembrane proteins within TJs include junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs) that belong to the cortical thymocyte marker for Xenopus family of proteins. JAM family encompasses three classical members (JAM-A, JAM-B, and JAM-C) and related molecules including JAM4, JAM-like protein, Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR), CAR-like membrane protein and endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule. JAMs have multiple functions that include regulation of endothelial and epithelial paracellular permeability, leukocyte recruitment during inflammation, angiogenesis, cell migration, and proliferation. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of the JAM family members in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis and leukocyte trafficking with a particular emphasis on barrier function and its perturbation during pathological inflammation.

  8. JAM related proteins in mucosal homeostasis and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Luissint, Anny-Claude; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are lined by epithelial cells that form a physical barrier protecting the body against external noxious substances and pathogens. At a molecular level, the mucosal barrier is regulated by tight junctions (TJs) that seal the paracellular space between adjacent epithelial cells. Transmembrane proteins within TJs include Junctional Adhesion Molecules (JAMs) that belong to the CTX (Cortical Thymocyte marker for Xenopus) family of proteins. JAM family encompasses three classical members (JAM-A, -B and –C) and related molecules including JAM4, JAM-Like protein (JAM-L), Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR), CAR-Like Membrane Protein (CLMP) and Endothelial cell-Selective Adhesion Molecule (ESAM). JAMs have multiple functions that include regulation of endothelial and epithelial paracellular permeability, leukocyte recruitment during inflammation, angiogenesis, cell migration and proliferation. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of the JAM family members in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis and leukocyte trafficking with a particular emphasis on barrier function and its perturbation during pathological inflammation. PMID:24667924

  9. Healthcare Burden, Risk Factors, and Outcomes of Mucosal Barrier Injury Laboratory-Confirmed Bloodstream Infections after Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dandoy, Christopher E; Haslam, David; Lane, Adam; Jodele, Sonata; Demmel, Kathy; El-Bietar, Javier; Flesch, Laura; Myers, Kasiani C; Pate, Abigail; Rotz, Seth; Daniels, Paulina; Wallace, Gregory; Nelson, Adam; Waters, Heather; Connelly, Beverly; Davies, Stella M

    2016-09-01

    Mucosal barrier injury laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infections (MBI-LCBIs) lead to significant morbidity, mortality, and healthcare resource utilization in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients. Determination of the healthcare burden of MBI-LCBIs and identification of patients at risk of MBI-LCBIs will allow researchers to identify strategies to reduce MBI-LCBI rates. The objective of our study was to describe the incidence, risk factors, timing, and outcomes of MBI-LCBIs in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of 374 patients who underwent HSCT at a large free-standing academic children's hospital to determine the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of patients that developed a bloodstream infection (BSI) including MBI-LCBI, central line-associated BSI (CLABSI), or secondary BSI in the first year after HSCT. Outcome measures included nonrelapse mortality (NRM), central venous catheter removal within 7 days of positive culture, shock, admission to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) within 48 hours of positive culture, and death within 10 days of positive culture. One hundred seventy BSIs were diagnosed in 100 patients (27%): 80 (47%) MBI-LCBIs, 68 (40%) CLABSIs, and 22 (13%) secondary infections. MBI-LCBIs were diagnosed at a significantly higher rate in allogeneic HSCT patients (18% versus 7%, P = .007). Reduced-intensity conditioning (OR, 1.96; P = .015) and transplant-associated thrombotic microangiopathy (OR, 2.94; P = .0004) were associated with MBI-LCBI. Nearly 50% of all patients with a BSI developed septic shock, 10% died within 10 days of positive culture, and nearly 25% were transferred to the PICU. One-year NRM was significantly increased in patients with 1 (34%) and more than 1 (56%) BSIs in the first year post-HSCT compared with those who did not develop BSIs (14%) (P ≤ .0001). There was increased 1-year NRM in patients with at least 1 MBI-LCBI (OR, 1.94; P

  10. Age-related differences in mucosal barrier function and morphology of the small intestine in low and normal birth weight piglets.

    PubMed

    Huygelen, V; De Vos, M; Willemen, S; Fransen, E; Casteleyn, C; Van Cruchten, S; Van Ginneken, C

    2014-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that the mucosal maturation of the small intestine is altered in low birth weight piglets, pairs of naturally suckled low birth weight (LBW, n = 20) and normal birth weight (NBW, n = 20) littermate piglets were selected and sampled after 0, 3, 10, and 28 d of suckling. In vivo intestinal permeability was evaluated via a lactulose-mannitol absorption test. Other indirect measurements for mucosal barrier functioning included sampling for histology and immunohistochemistry (intestinal trefoil factor [ITF]), measuring intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) activity, and immunoblotting for occludin, caspase-3, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The lactulose-mannitol ratio did not differ between NBW and LBW piglets, but a significant increase in this ratio was observed in 28-d-old piglets (P = 0.001). Small intestinal villus height did not differ with age (P = 0.02) or birth weight (P = 0.20). In contrast, villus width (P = 0.02) and crypt depth (P < 0.05) increased gradually with age, but no birth-weight-related differences were observed. LBW piglets had significantly (P = 0.03) more ITF immunoreactive positive cells per villus area compared to NBW piglets, whereas no age (P = 0.82) or region-related (P = 0.13) differences could be observed. The activity of IAP in the small intestine was higher in newborn piglets compared to the older piglets. No significant differences in cell proliferation in the small intestine was observed (P = 0.47) between NBW and LBW piglets; the highest proliferation was seen in piglets of 28 d of age (P = 0.01). Newborn piglets had significantly fewer apoptotic cells, whereas more apoptotic cells were seen in piglets of 10 d of age (P < 0.01). In conclusion, birth weight did not affect the parameters related to intestinal barrier function investigated in this study, suggesting that the mucosal barrier function is not altered in LBW piglets. Nevertheless, these results confirm that the mucosal barrier function

  11. Development of a novel self micro-emulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) for reducing HIV protease inhibitor-induced intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Bokai; Zha, Weibin; Wang, Yun; Wen, Cong; Stude, Elaine J; Wang, Xuan; Jin, Fang; Wang, Guangji; Zhang, Luyong; Zhou, Huiping

    2010-01-01

    The development of HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) has been one of the most significant advances of the past decade in controlling HIV infection. Unfortunately, the benefits of HIV PIs are compromised by serious side effects. One of the most frequent and deleterious side effects of HIV PIs is severe gastrointestinal (GI) disorders including mucosal erosions, epithelial barrier dysfunction, and leak-flux diarrhea, which occurs in 16–62% of patients on HIV PIs. Although the underlying mechanisms behind HIV PI-associated serious adverse side effects remain to be identified, our recent studies have shown that activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response plays a critical role in HIV PI-induced GI complications. The objective of this study was to develop a novel self micro-emulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) using various antioxidants as surfactants and co-surfactants to reduce the GI side effects of the most commonly used HIV PI, ritonavir. The biological activities of this SMSDDS of ritonavir were compared with that of Norvir®, which is currently used in the clinic. Rat normal intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) and mouse Raw 264.7 macrophages were used to examine the effect of new SMEDDS of ritonavir on activation of ER stress and oxidative stress. The Sprague-Dawley rats and C57/BL6 mice were used for pharmacokinetic studies and in vivo studies. The intracellular and plasma drug concentrations were determined by HPLC analysis. Activation of ER stress was detected by western blot analysis and secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter assay. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured using dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate as a probe. Cell viability was determined by Roche’s cell proliferation reagent WST-1. Protein levels of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) were determined by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The intestinal permeability was assessed by luminal enteral administration of fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated

  12. Development of a novel self-microemulsifying drug delivery system for reducing HIV protease inhibitor-induced intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lei, Bokai; Zha, Weibin; Wang, Yun; Wen, Cong; Studer, Elaine J; Wang, Xuan; Jin, Fang; Wang, Guangji; Zhang, Luyong; Zhou, Huiping

    2010-06-07

    The development of HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) has been one of the most significant advances of the past decade in controlling HIV infection. Unfortunately, the benefits of HIV PIs are compromised by serious side effects. One of the most frequent and deleterious side effects of HIV PIs is severe gastrointestinal (GI) disorders including mucosal erosions, epithelial barrier dysfunction, and leak-flux diarrhea, which occurs in 16-62% of patients on HIV PIs. Although the underlying mechanisms behind HIV PI-associated serious adverse side effects remain to be identified, our recent studies have shown that activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response plays a critical role in HIV PI-induced GI complications. The objective of this study was to develop a novel self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) using various antioxidants as surfactants and cosurfactants to reduce the GI side effects of the most commonly used HIV PI, ritonavir. The biological activities of this SMSDDS of ritonavir were compared with that of Norvir, which is currently used in the clinic. Rat normal intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) and mouse Raw 264.7 macrophages were used to examine the effect of new SMEDDS of ritonavir on activation of ER stress and oxidative stress. Sprague-Dawley rats and C57/BL6 mice were used for pharmacokinetic studies and in vivo studies. The intracellular and plasma drug concentrations were determined by HPLC analysis. Activation of ER stress was detected by Western blot analysis and secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter assay. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured using dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate as a probe. Cell viability was determined by Roche's cell proliferation reagent WST-1. Protein levels of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha and IL-6) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The intestinal permeability was assessed by luminal enteral administration of fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated dextran

  13. Modulation of gut mucosal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kleessen, Brigitta; Blaut, Michael

    2005-04-01

    Non-digestible inulin-type fructans, such as oligofructose and high-molecular-weight inulin, have been shown to have the ability to alter the intestinal microbiota composition in such a way that members of the microbial community, generally considered as health-promoting, are stimulated. Bifidobacteria and lactobacilli are the most frequently targeted organisms. Less information exists on effects of inulin-type fructans on the composition, metabolism and health-related significance of bacteria at or near the mucosa surface or in the mucus layer forming mucosa-associated biofilms. Using rats inoculated with a human faecal flora as an experimental model we have found that inulin-type fructans in the diet modulated the gut microbiota by stimulation of mucosa-associated bifidobacteria as well as by partial reduction of pathogenic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium and thereby benefit health. In addition to changes in mucosal biofilms, inulin-type fructans also induced changes in the colonic mucosa stimulating proliferation in the crypts, increasing the release of mucins, and altering the profile of mucin components in the goblet cells and epithelial mucus layer. These results indicate that inulin-type fructans may stabilise the gut mucosal barrier. Dietary supplementation with these prebiotics could offer a new approach to supporting the barrier function of the mucosa.

  14. Decreased epithelial barrier function evoked by exposure to metabolic stress and nonpathogenic E. coli is enhanced by TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kimberley; Caldwell, Jackie; Phan, Van; Prescott, David; Nazli, Aisha; Wang, Arthur; Soderhölm, Johan D; Perdue, Mary H; Sherman, Philip M; McKay, Derek M

    2008-03-01

    A defect in mitochondrial activity contributes to many diseases. We have shown that monolayers of the human colonic T84 epithelial cell line exposed to dinitrophenol (DNP, uncouples oxidative phosphorylation) and nonpathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) (strain HB101) display decreased barrier function. Here the impact of DNP on macrophage activity and the effect of TNF-alpha, DNP, and E. coli on epithelial permeability were assessed. DNP treatment of the human THP-1 macrophage cell line resulted in reduced ATP synthesis, and, although hyporesponsive to LPS, the metabolically stressed macrophages produced IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha. Given the role of TNF-alpha in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the association between increased permeability and IBD, recombinant TNF-alpha (10 ng/ml) was added to the DNP (0.1 mM) + E. coli (10(6) colony-forming units), and this resulted in a significantly greater loss of T84 epithelial barrier function than that elicited by DNP + E. coli. This increased epithelial permeability was not due to epithelial death, and the enhanced E. coli translocation was reduced by pharmacological inhibitors of NF-kappabeta signaling (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, NF-kappabeta essential modifier-binding peptide, BAY 11-7082, and the proteosome inhibitor, MG132). In contrast, the drop in transepithelial electrical resistance was unaffected by the inhibitors of NF-kappabeta. Thus, as an integrative model system, our findings support the induction of a positive feedback loop that can severely impair epithelial barrier function and, as such, could contribute to existing inflammation or trigger relapses in IBD. Thus metabolically stressed epithelia display increased permeability in the presence of viable nonpathogenic E. coli that is exaggerated by TNF-alpha released by activated immune cells, such as macrophages, that retain this ability even if they themselves are experiencing a degree of metabolic stress.

  15. Pro-inflammatory NF-κB and early growth response gene 1 regulate epithelial barrier disruption by food additive carrageenan in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye Jin; Kim, Juil; Park, Seong-Hwan; Do, Kee Hun; Yang, Hyun; Moon, Yuseok

    2012-06-20

    The widely used food additive carrageenan (CGN) has been shown to induce intestinal inflammation, ulcerative colitis-like symptoms, or neoplasm in the gut epithelia in animal models, which are also clinical features of human inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, the effects of CGN on pro-inflammatory transcription factors NF-κB and early growth response gene 1 product (EGR-1) were evaluated in terms of human intestinal epithelial barrier integrity. Both pro-inflammatory transcription factors were elevated by CGN and only NF-κB activation was shown to be involved in the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-8. Moreover, the integrity of the in vitro epithelial monolayer under the CGN insult was maintained by both activated pro-inflammatory transcription factors NF-κB and EGR-1. Suppression of NF-κB or EGR-1 aggravated barrier disruption by CGN, which was associated with the reduced gene expression of tight junction component zonula occludens 1 and its irregular localization in the epithelial monolayer.

  16. Remodeling of Tight Junctions and Enhancement of Barrier Integrity of the CACO-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cell Layer by Micronutrients.

    PubMed

    Valenzano, Mary Carmen; DiGuilio, Katherine; Mercado, Joanna; Teter, Mimi; To, Julie; Ferraro, Brendan; Mixson, Brittany; Manley, Isabel; Baker, Valerissa; Moore, Beverley A; Wertheimer, Joshua; Mullin, James M

    2015-01-01

    The micronutrients zinc, quercetin, butyrate, indole and berberine were evaluated for their ability to induce remodeling of epithelial tight junctions (TJs) and enhance barrier integrity in the CACO-2 gastrointestinal epithelial cell culture model. All five of these chemically very diverse micronutrients increased transepithelial electrical resistance (Rt) significantly, but only berberine also improved barrier integrity to the non-electrolyte D-mannitol. Increases of Rt as much as 200% of untreated controls were observed. Each of the five micronutrients also induced unique, signature-like changes in TJ protein composition, suggesting multiple pathways (and TJ arrangements) by which TJ barrier function can be enhanced. Decreases in abundance by as much as 90% were observed for claudin-2, and increases of over 300% could be seen for claudins -5 and -7. The exact effects of the micronutrients on barrier integrity and TJ protein composition were found to be highly dependent on the degree of differentiation of the cell layer at the time it was exposed to the micronutrient. The substratum to which the epithelial layer adheres was also found to regulate the response of the cell layer to the micronutrient. The implications of these findings for therapeutically decreasing morbidity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease are discussed.

  17. Characterization and mucosal responses of interleukin 17 family ligand and receptor genes in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interleukin (IL) 17 family cytokines are important mediators of mucosal immune responses, tightly regulated by signals from the complex milieu of pathogenic and commensal microbes, epithelial cells and innate and adaptive leukocytes found at tissue barriers. In mammals, IL17 ligand expression has be...

  18. Effects of Carbon Nanotubes in Barrier Epithelial Cells via Effects on Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Shanta

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one of the most common nanoparticles (NP) found in workplace air. Therefore, there is a strong chance that these NP will enter the human body. They have similar physical properties to asbestos, a known toxic material, yet there is limited evidence showing that CNTs may be hazardous to human barrier epithelia. In previous studies done in our laboratory, the effects of CNTs on the barrier function in the human airway epithelial cell line (Calu-3) were measured. Measurements were done using electrophysiology, a technique which measures both transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), a measure of monolayer integrity, and short circuit current (SCC) which is a measure of vectorial ion transport across the cell monolayer. The research findings showed that select physiologically relevant concentrations of long single-wall (SW) and multi-wall (MW) CNTs significantly decreased the stimulated SCC of the Calu-3 cells compared to untreated cultures. Calu-3 cells showed decreases in TEER when incubated for 48 hours (h) with concentrations of MWCNT ranging from 4microg/cm2 to 0.4ng/cm2 and SWCNT ranging from 4microg/cm2 to 0.04ng/cm2. The impaired cellular function, despite sustained cell viability, led us to investigate the mechanism by which the CNTs were affecting the cell membrane. We investigated the interaction of short MWCNTs with model lipid membranes using an ion channel amplifier, Planar Bilayer Workstation. Membranes were synthesized using neutral diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) and negatively charged diphytanoylphosphatidylserine (DPhPS) lipids. Gramicidin A (GA), an ion channel reporter protein, was used to measure changes in ion channel conductance due to CNT exposures. Synthetic membranes exposed to CNTs allowed bursts of currents to cross the membrane when they were added to the membrane buffer system. When added to the membrane in the presence of GA, they distorted channel formation and reduced membrane stability.

  19. Wound repair: role of immune–epithelial interactions

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, G; Neumann, P-A; Sumagin, R; Denning, TL; Nusrat, A

    2016-01-01

    The epithelium serves as a highly selective barrier at mucosal surfaces. Upon injury, epithelial wound closure is orchestrated by a series of events that emanate from the epithelium itself as well as by the temporal recruitment of immune cells into the wound bed. Epithelial cells adjoining the wound flatten out, migrate, and proliferate to rapidly cover denuded surfaces and re-establish mucosal homeostasis. This process is highly regulated by proteins and lipids, proresolving mediators such as Annexin A1 protein and resolvins released into the epithelial milieu by the epithelium itself and infiltrating innate immune cells including neutrophils and macrophages. Failure to achieve these finely tuned processes is observed in chronic inflammatory diseases that are associated with non-healing wounds. An improved understanding of mechanisms that mediate repair is important in the development of therapeutics aimed to promote mucosal wound repair. PMID:26174765

  20. The effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on small intestinal barrier function and mucosal gene transcription; a randomized double-blind placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mujagic, Zlatan; de Vos, Paul; Boekschoten, Mark V.; Govers, Coen; Pieters, Harm-Jan H. M.; de Wit, Nicole J. W.; Bron, Peter A.; Masclee, Ad A. M.; Troost, Freddy J.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of three Lactobacillus plantarum strains on in-vivo small intestinal barrier function and gut mucosal gene transcription in human subjects. The strains were selected for their differential effects on TLR signalling and tight junction protein rearrangement, which may lead to beneficial effects in a stressed human gut mucosa. Ten healthy volunteers participated in four different intervention periods: 7-day oral intake of either L. plantarum WCFS1, CIP104448, TIFN101 or placebo, proceeded by a 4 weeks wash-out period. Lactulose-rhamnose ratio (an indicator of small intestinal permeability) increased after intake of indomethacin, which was given as an artificial stressor of the gut mucosal barrier (mean ratio 0.06 ± 0.04 to 0.10 ± 0.06, p = 0.001), but was not significantly affected by the bacterial interventions. However, analysis in small intestinal biopsies, obtained by gastroduodenoscopy, demonstrated that particularly L. plantarum TIFN101 modulated gene transcription pathways related to cell-cell adhesion with high turnover of genes involved in tight- and adhesion junction protein synthesis and degradation (e.g. actinin alpha-4, metalloproteinase-2). These effects were less pronounced for L. plantarum WCFS1 and CIP104448. In conclusion, L. plantarum TIFN101 induced the most pronounced probiotic properties with specific gene transcriptional effects on repair processes in the compromised intestine of healthy subjects. PMID:28045137

  1. Transforming Growth Factor-β Regulation of Epithelial Tight Junction Proteins Enhances Barrier Function and Blocks Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7-Induced Increased Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Kathryn L.; Reardon, Colin; Wang, Arthur; Nazli, Aisha; McKay, Derek M.

    2005-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC) is an enteric pathogen that causes potentially fatal symptoms after intimate adhesion, modulation of intestinal epithelial signal transduction, and alteration of epithelial function (eg, barrier disruption). Although the epithelial barrier is critical to gut homeostasis, only a few agents, such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, can enhance or protect epithelial barrier function. Our aims were to delineate the mechanism(s) behind TGF-β-induced barrier enhancement and to determine whether TGF-β could prevent EHEC-induced barrier disruption. Using monolayers of the human T84 colonic epithelial cell line, we found that TGF-β induced a significant increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (a measure of paracellular permeability) through activation of ERK MAPK and SMAD signaling pathways and up-regulation of the tight junction protein claudin-1. Additionally, TGF-β pretreatment of epithelia blocked the decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and the increase in transepithelial passage of [3H]-mannitol caused by EHEC infection. EHEC infection was associated with reduced expression of zonula occludens-1, occludin, and claudin-2 (but not claudin-1 or claudin-4); TGF-β pretreatment prevented these changes. These studies provide insight into EHEC pathogenesis by illustrating the mechanisms underlying TGF-β-induced epithelial barrier enhancement and identifying TGF-β as an agent capable of blocking EHEC-induced increases in epithelial permeability via maintenance of claudin-2, occludin, and zonula occludens-1 levels. PMID:16314472

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase 13 modulates intestinal epithelial barrier integrity in inflammatory diseases by activating TNF

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E; Dejonckheere, Eline; Van Hauwermeiren, Filip; Lodens, Sofie; De Rycke, Riet; Van Wonterghem, Elien; Staes, An; Gevaert, Kris; López-Otin, Carlos; Libert, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Several pathological processes, such as sepsis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are associated with impairment of intestinal epithelial barrier. Here, we investigated the role of matrix metalloproteinase MMP13 in these diseases. We observed that MMP13−/− mice display a strong protection in LPS- and caecal ligation and puncture-induced sepsis. We could attribute this protection to reduced LPS-induced goblet cell depletion, endoplasmic reticulum stress, permeability and tight junction destabilization in the gut of MMP13−/− mice compared to MMP13+/+ mice. Both in vitro and in vivo, we found that MMP13 is able to cleave pro-TNF into bioactive TNF. By LC-MS/MS, we identified three MMP13 cleavage sites, which proves that MMP13 is an alternative TNF sheddase next to the TNF converting enzyme TACE. Similarly, we found that the same mechanism was responsible for the observed protection of the MMP13−/− mice in a mouse model of DSS-induced colitis. We identified MMP13 as an important mediator in sepsis and IBD via the shedding of TNF. Hence, we propose MMP13 as a novel drug target for diseases in which damage to the gut is essential. PMID:23723167

  3. Hyaluronan and layilin mediate loss of airway epithelial barrier function induced by cigarette smoke by decreasing E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Forteza, Rosanna Malbran; Casalino-Matsuda, S Marina; Falcon, Nieves S; Valencia Gattas, Monica; Monzon, Maria E

    2012-12-07

    Cigarette smoke (CigS) exposure is associated with increased bronchial epithelial permeability and impaired barrier function. Primary cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to CigS exhibit decreased E-cadherin expression and reduced transepithelial electrical resistance. These effects were mediated by hyaluronan (HA) because inhibition of its synthesis with 4-methylumbelliferone prevented these effects, and exposure to HA fragments of <70 kDa mimicked these effects. We show that the HA receptor layilin is expressed apically in human airway epithelium and that cells infected with lentivirus expressing layilin siRNAs were protected against increased permeability triggered by both CigS and HA. We identified RhoA/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) as the signaling effectors downstream layilin. We conclude that HA fragments generated by CigS bind to layilin and signal through Rho/ROCK to inhibit the E-cadherin gene and protein expression, leading to a loss of epithelial cell-cell contact. These studies suggest that HA functions as a master switch protecting or disrupting the epithelial barrier in its high versus low molecular weight form and that its depolymerization is a first and necessary step triggering the inflammatory response to CigS.

  4. Hyaluronan and Layilin Mediate Loss of Airway Epithelial Barrier Function Induced by Cigarette Smoke by Decreasing E-cadherin*

    PubMed Central

    Forteza, Rosanna Malbran; Casalino-Matsuda, S. Marina; Falcon, Nieves S.; Valencia Gattas, Monica; Monzon, Maria E.

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CigS) exposure is associated with increased bronchial epithelial permeability and impaired barrier function. Primary cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to CigS exhibit decreased E-cadherin expression and reduced transepithelial electrical resistance. These effects were mediated by hyaluronan (HA) because inhibition of its synthesis with 4-methylumbelliferone prevented these effects, and exposure to HA fragments of <70 kDa mimicked these effects. We show that the HA receptor layilin is expressed apically in human airway epithelium and that cells infected with lentivirus expressing layilin siRNAs were protected against increased permeability triggered by both CigS and HA. We identified RhoA/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) as the signaling effectors downstream layilin. We conclude that HA fragments generated by CigS bind to layilin and signal through Rho/ROCK to inhibit the E-cadherin gene and protein expression, leading to a loss of epithelial cell-cell contact. These studies suggest that HA functions as a master switch protecting or disrupting the epithelial barrier in its high versus low molecular weight form and that its depolymerization is a first and necessary step triggering the inflammatory response to CigS. PMID:23048036

  5. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK-3) influences epithelial barrier function by regulating Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Severson, Eric A.; Kwon, Mike; Hilgarth, Roland S; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2010-01-01

    The apical junctional complex (AJC) encompassing the tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) plays a pivotal role in regulating epithelial barrier function and epithelial cell proliferative processes through signaling events that remain poorly characterized. A potential regulator of AJC protein expression is Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3). GSK-3 is a constitutively active kinase that is repressed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In the present study, we report that GSK-3 activity regulates the structure and function of the AJC in polarized model intestinal (SK-CO15) and kidney (Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK)) epithelial cells. Reduction of GSK-3 activity, either by small molecule inhibitors or siRNA targeting GSK-3 alpha and beta mRNA, resulted in increased permeability to both ions and bulk solutes. Immunofluorescence labeling and immunoblot analyses revealed that the barrier defects correlated with decreased protein expression of AJC transmembrane proteins Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin without influencing other TJ proteins, Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1) and Junctional Adhesion Molecule A (JAM-A). The decrease in Occludin and E-cadherin protein expression correlated with downregulation of the corresponding mRNA levels for these respective proteins following GSK-3 inhibition. These observations implicate an important role of GSK-3 in the regulation of the structure and function of the AJC that is mediated by differential modulation of mRNA transcription of key AJC proteins, Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin. PMID:20617560

  6. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK-3) influences epithelial barrier function by regulating Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Severson, Eric A.; Kwon, Mike; Hilgarth, Roland S.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2010-07-02

    The Apical Junctional Complex (AJC) encompassing the tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) plays a pivotal role in regulating epithelial barrier function and epithelial cell proliferative processes through signaling events that remain poorly characterized. A potential regulator of AJC protein expression is Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3). GSK-3 is a constitutively active kinase that is repressed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In the present study, we report that GSK-3 activity regulates the structure and function of the AJC in polarized model intestinal (SK-CO15) and kidney (Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK)) epithelial cells. Reduction of GSK-3 activity, either by small molecule inhibitors or siRNA targeting GSK-3 alpha and beta mRNA, resulted in increased permeability to both ions and bulk solutes. Immunofluorescence labeling and immunoblot analyses revealed that the barrier defects correlated with decreased protein expression of AJC transmembrane proteins Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin without influencing other TJ proteins, Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1) and Junctional Adhesion Molecule A (JAM-A). The decrease in Occludin and E-cadherin protein expression correlated with downregulation of the corresponding mRNA levels for these respective proteins following GSK-3 inhibition. These observations implicate an important role of GSK-3 in the regulation of the structure and function of the AJC that is mediated by differential modulation of mRNA transcription of key AJC proteins, Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin.

  7. Gut epithelial barrier dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus-hepatitis C virus coinfected patients: Influence on innate and acquired immunity

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Mercedes; Fernández Gutiérrez del Álamo, Clotilde; Girón-González, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Even in cases where viral replication has been controlled by antiretroviral therapy for long periods of time, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients have several non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) related co-morbidities, including liver disease, cardiovascular disease and neurocognitive decline, which have a clear impact on survival. It has been considered that persistent innate and acquired immune activation contributes to the pathogenesis of these non-AIDS related diseases. Immune activation has been related with several conditions, remarkably with the bacterial translocation related with the intestinal barrier damage by the HIV or by hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver cirrhosis. Consequently, increased morbidity and mortality must be expected in HIV-HCV coinfected patients. Disrupted gut barrier lead to an increased passage of microbial products and to an activation of the mucosal immune system and secretion of inflammatory mediators, which in turn might increase barrier dysfunction. In the present review, the intestinal barrier structure, measures of intestinal barrier dysfunction and the modifications of them in HIV monoinfection and in HIV-HCV coinfection will be considered. Both pathogenesis and the consequences for the progression of liver disease secondary to gut microbial fragment leakage and immune activation will be assessed. PMID:26819512

  8. Gut epithelial barrier dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus-hepatitis C virus coinfected patients: Influence on innate and acquired immunity.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Mercedes; Fernández Gutiérrez del Álamo, Clotilde; Girón-González, José Antonio

    2016-01-28

    Even in cases where viral replication has been controlled by antiretroviral therapy for long periods of time, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients have several non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) related co-morbidities, including liver disease, cardiovascular disease and neurocognitive decline, which have a clear impact on survival. It has been considered that persistent innate and acquired immune activation contributes to the pathogenesis of these non-AIDS related diseases. Immune activation has been related with several conditions, remarkably with the bacterial translocation related with the intestinal barrier damage by the HIV or by hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver cirrhosis. Consequently, increased morbidity and mortality must be expected in HIV-HCV coinfected patients. Disrupted gut barrier lead to an increased passage of microbial products and to an activation of the mucosal immune system and secretion of inflammatory mediators, which in turn might increase barrier dysfunction. In the present review, the intestinal barrier structure, measures of intestinal barrier dysfunction and the modifications of them in HIV monoinfection and in HIV-HCV coinfection will be considered. Both pathogenesis and the consequences for the progression of liver disease secondary to gut microbial fragment leakage and immune activation will be assessed.

  9. Epithelial restitution and wound healing in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Andreas; Dignass, Axel U

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is characterized by a chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa. The mucosal epithelium of the alimentary tract constitutes a key element of the mucosal barrier to a broad spectrum of deleterious substances present within the intestinal lumen including bacterial microorganisms, various dietary factors, gastrointestinal secretory products and drugs. In addition, this mucosal barrier can be disturbed in the course of various intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases. Fortunately, the integrity of the gastrointestinal surface epithelium is rapidly reestablished even after extensive destruction. Rapid resealing of the epithelial barrier following injuries is accomplished by a process termed epithelial restitution, followed by more delayed mechanisms of epithelial wound healing including increased epithelial cell proliferation and epithelial cell differentiation. Restitution of the intestinal surface epithelium is modulated by a range of highly divergent factors among them a broad spectrum of structurally distinct regulatory peptides, variously described as growth factors or cytokines. Several regulatory peptide factors act from the basolateral site of the epithelial surface and enhance epithelial cell restitution through TGF-β-dependent pathways. In contrast, members of the trefoil factor family (TFF peptides) appear to stimulate epithelial restitution in conjunction with mucin glycoproteins through a TGF-β-independent mechanism from the apical site of the intestinal epithelium. In addition, a number of other peptide molecules like extracellular matrix factors and blood clotting factors and also non-peptide molecules including phospholipids, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), adenine nucleotides, trace elements and pharmacological agents modulate intestinal epithelial repair mechanisms. Repeated damage and injury of the intestinal surface are key features of various intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel

  10. Effect of toll-like receptor 3 agonist poly I:C on intestinal mucosa and epithelial barrier function in mouse models of acute colitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong-Wei; Yue, Yue-Hong; Han, Hua; Chen, Xiu-Li; Lu, Yong-Gang; Zheng, Ji-Min; Hou, Hong-Tao; Lang, Xiao-Meng; He, Li-Li; Hu, Qi-Lu; Dun, Zi-Qian

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate potential effects of poly I:C on mucosal injury and epithelial barrier disruption in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced acute colitis. METHODS Thirty C57BL/6 mice were given either regular drinking water (control group) or 2% (w/v) DSS drinking water (model and poly I:C groups) ad libitum for 7 d. Poly I:C was administrated subcutaneously (20 μg/mouse) 2 h prior to DSS induction in mice of the poly I:C group. Severity of colitis was evaluated by disease activity index, body weight, colon length, histology and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, as well as the production of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 17 (IL-17) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Intestinal permeability was analyzed by the fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled-dextran (FITC-D) method. Ultrastructural features of the colon tissue were observed under electron microscopy. Expressions of tight junction (TJ) proteins, including zo-1, occludin and claudin-1, were measured by immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence, Western blot and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). RESULTS DSS caused significant damage to the colon tissue in the model group. Administration of poly I:C dramatically protected against DSS-induced colitis, as demonstrated by less body weight loss, lower disease activity index score, longer colon length, colonic MPO activity, and improved macroscopic and histological scores. It also ameliorated DSS-induced ultrastructural changes of the colon epithelium, as observed under scanning electron microscopy, as well as FITC-D permeability. The mRNA and protein expressions of TJ protein, zo-1, occludin and claudin-1 were also found to be significantly enhanced in the poly I:C group, as determined by immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence, Western blot and RT-qPCR. By contrast, poly I:C pretreatment markedly reversed the DSS-induced up-regulated expressions of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-17 and IFN

  11. Interaction between endometrial epithelial cells and blood leucocytes promotes cytokine release and epithelial barrier function in response to Chlamydia trachomatis lipopolysaccharide stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sze Ho, Lok; He, Qiong; Chen, Jie; Xu, Penghui; Ling Tsang, Lai; Yu, Sidney; Wa Chung, Yiu; Chang Chan, Hsiao

    2010-09-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infection is currently the most common cause of infection-related sterility in women. However, it remains largely unknown how uterine epithelial cells interact with recruited leucocytes in response to C. trachomatis infection in the female genital tract. To study the defence mechanism of the endometrium against C. trachomatis infection, we established an in vitro co-culture of EEC (endometrial epithelial cells) and PBL (peripheral blood leucocytes) isolated from mice and investigated the immune response of these cells upon C. trachomatis LPS (lipopolysaccharide) challenge using a cytokine antibody array and RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR). Our results showed that upon C. trachomatis LPS stimulation, proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines, such as TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, MIPs (macrophage inflammatory proteins), IL-12p40p70, KC, GCSFs (granulocyte colony stimulating factors), IL-6 and TIMPs (tissue inhibition metalloproteinases) are up-regulated and/or released from EEC-PBL co-culture. Further, the TER (transepithelial resistance), measured by the Isc (short-circuit current) technique was significantly increased in EEC/PBL co-cultured cells and also when stimulated with C. trachomatis LPS compared with EEC alone. These changes appear to be mediated by the change in cytokine-induced expression of tight junction-related protein ZO-1. The present results demonstrated that the epithelial-immune cross-talk could promote the release of proinflammatory cytokines and enhance the barrier function of the endometrium against C. trachomatis infection in the female reproductive tract.

  12. H19 Long Noncoding RNA Regulates Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function via MicroRNA 675 by Interacting with RNA-Binding Protein HuR

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Tongtong; Jaladanki, Suraj K.; Liu, Lan; Xiao, Lan; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Wang, Jun-Yao; Xu, Yan; Gorospe, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    The disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier function occurs commonly in various pathologies, but the exact mechanisms responsible are unclear. The H19 long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) regulates the expression of different genes and has been implicated in human genetic disorders and cancer. Here, we report that H19 plays an important role in controlling the intestinal epithelial barrier function by serving as a precursor for microRNA 675 (miR-675). H19 overexpression increased the cellular abundance of miR-675, which in turn destabilized and repressed the translation of mRNAs encoding tight junction protein ZO-1 and adherens junction E-cadherin, resulting in the dysfunction of the epithelial barrier. Increasing the level of the RNA-binding protein HuR in cells overexpressing H19 prevented the stimulation of miR-675 processing from H19, promoted ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression, and restored the epithelial barrier function to a nearly normal level. In contrast, the targeted deletion of HuR in intestinal epithelial cells enhanced miR-675 production in the mucosa and delayed the recovery of the gut barrier function after exposure to mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion. These results indicate that H19 interacts with HuR and regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier function via the H19-encoded miR-675 by altering ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression posttranscriptionally. PMID:26884465

  13. High therapeutic efficacy of Cathelicidin-WA against postweaning diarrhea via inhibiting inflammation and enhancing epithelial barrier in the intestine

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Hongbo; Zhang, Lin; Gan, Zhenshun; Xiong, Haitao; Yu, Caihua; Du, Huahua; Wang, Yizhen

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhea is a leading cause of death among young mammals, especially during weaning. Here, we investigated the effects of Cathelicidin-WA (CWA) on diarrhea, intestinal morphology, inflammatory responses, epithelial barrier and microbiota in the intestine of young mammals during weaning. Piglets with clinical diarrhea were selected and treated with saline (control), CWA or enrofloxacin (Enro) for 4 days. Both CWA and Enro effectively attenuated diarrhea. Compared with the control, CWA decreased IL-6, IL-8 and IL-22 levels and reduced neutrophil infiltration into the jejunum. CWA inhibited inflammation by down-regulating the TLR4-, MyD88- and NF-κB-dependent pathways. Additionally, CWA improved intestinal morphology by increasing villus and microvillus heights and enhancing intestinal barrier function by increasing tight junction (TJ) protein expression and augmenting wound-healing ability in intestinal epithelial cells. CWA also improved microbiota composition and increased short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) levels in feces. By contrast, Enro not only disrupted the intestinal barrier but also negatively affected microbiota composition and SCFA levels in the intestine. In conclusion, CWA effectively attenuated inflammation, enhanced intestinal barrier function, and improved microbiota composition in the intestines of weaned piglets. These results suggest that CWA could be an effective and safe therapy for diarrhea or other intestinal diseases in young mammals. PMID:27181680

  14. Protective Effects of Ferulic Acid against Heat Stress-Induced Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    He, Shasha; Liu, Fenghua; Xu, Lei; Yin, Peng; Li, Deyin; Mei, Chen; Jiang, Linshu; Ma, Yunfei; Xu, Jianqin

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress is important in the pathogenesis of intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction. Ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic acid widely found in fruits and vegetables, can scavenge free radicals and activate cell stress responses. This study is aimed at investigating protective effects of FA on heat stress-induced dysfunction of the intestinal epithelial barrier in vitro and in vivo. Intestinal epithelial (IEC-6) cells were pretreated with FA for 4 h and then exposed to heat stress. Heat stress caused decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and increased permeability to 4-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran (FD4). Both effects were inhibited by FA in a dose-dependent manner. FA significantly attenuated the decrease in occludin, ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression observed with heat stress. The distortion and redistribution of occludin, ZO-1 and E-cadherin proteins were also effectively prevented by FA pretreatment. Moreover, heat stress diminished electron-dense material detected in tight junctions (TJs), an effect also alleviated by FA in a dose-dependent manner. In an in vivo heat stress model, FA (50 mg/kg) was administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats for 7 consecutive days prior to exposure to heat stress. FA pretreatment significantly attenuated the effects of heat stress on the small intestine, including the increased FD4 permeability, disrupted tight junctions and microvilli structure, and reduced occludin, ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that FA pretreatment is potentially protective against heat stress-induced intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction.

  15. Altered intestinal microbial flora and impaired epithelial barrier structure and function in CKD: the nature, mechanisms, consequences and potential treatment.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Zhao, Ying-Yong; Pahl, Madeleine V

    2016-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) results in systemic inflammation and oxidative stress which play a central role in CKD progression and its adverse consequences. Although many of the causes and consequences of oxidative stress and inflammation in CKD have been extensively explored, little attention had been paid to the intestine and its microbial flora as a potential source of these problems. Our recent studies have revealed significant disruption of the colonic, ileal, jejunal and gastric epithelial tight junction in different models of CKD in rats. Moreover, the disruption of the epithelial barrier structure and function found in uremic animals was replicated in cultured human colonocytes exposed to uremic human plasma in vitro We have further found significant changes in the composition and function of colonic bacterial flora in humans and animals with advanced CKD. Together, uremia-induced impairment of the intestinal epithelial barrier structure and function and changes in composition of the gut microbiome contribute to the systemic inflammation and uremic toxicity by accommodating the translocation of endotoxin, microbial fragments and other noxious luminal products in the circulation. In addition, colonic bacteria are the main source of several well-known pro-inflammatory uremic toxins such as indoxyl sulfate, p-cresol sulfate, trimethylamine-N-oxide and many as-yet unidentified retained compounds in end-stage renal disease patients. This review is intended to provide an overview of the effects of CKD on the gut microbiome and intestinal epithelial barrier structure and their role in the pathogenesis of systemic inflammation and uremic toxicity. In addition, potential interventions aimed at mitigating these abnormalities are briefly discussed.

  16. Rhubarb extract partially improves mucosal integrity in chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Bajic, Juliana E; Eden, Georgina L; Lampton, Lorrinne S; Cheah, Ker Y; Lymn, Kerry A; Pei, Jinxin V; Yool, Andrea J; Howarth, Gordon S

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of orally gavaged aqueous rhubarb extract (RE) on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis in rats. METHODS Female Dark Agouti rats (n = 8/group) were gavaged daily (1 mL) with water, high-dose RE (HDR; 200 mg/kg) or low-dose RE (LDR; 20mg/kg) for eight days. Intestinal mucositis was induced (day 5) with 5-FU (150 mg/kg) via intraperitoneal injection. Intestinal tissue samples were collected for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and histological examination. Xenopus oocytes expressing aquaporin 4 water channels were prepared to examine the effect of aqueous RE on cell volume, indicating a potential mechanism responsible for modulating net fluid absorption and secretion in the gastrointestinal tract. Statistical significance was assumed at P < 0.05 by one-way ANOVA. RESULTS Bodyweight was significantly reduced in rats administered 5-FU compared to healthy controls (P < 0.01). Rats administered 5-FU significantly increased intestinal MPO levels (≥ 307%; P < 0.001), compared to healthy controls. However, LDR attenuated this effect in 5-FU treated rats, significantly decreasing ileal MPO activity (by 45%; P < 0.05), as compared to 5-FU controls. 5-FU significantly reduced intestinal mucosal thickness (by ≥ 29% P < 0.001) as compared to healthy controls. LDR significantly increased ileal mucosal thickness in 5-FU treated rats (19%; P < 0.05) relative to 5-FU controls. In xenopus oocytes expressing AQP4 water channels, RE selectively blocked water influx into the cell, induced by a decrease in external osmotic pressure. As water efflux was unaltered by the presence of extracellular RE, the directional flow of water across the epithelial barrier, in the presence of extracellular RE, indicated that RE may alleviate water loss across the epithelial barrier and promote intestinal health in chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis. CONCLUSION In summary, low dose RE improves selected parameters of mucosal integrity and reduces ileal

  17. Nanomaterial interactions with and trafficking across the lung alveolar epithelial barrier: implications for health effects of air-pollution particles

    PubMed Central

    Yacobi, Nazanin R.; Fazllolahi, Farnoosh; Kim, Yong Ho; Sipos, Arnold; Borok, Zea; Kim, Kwang-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the health effects of air-pollution particles suggest that injury may result from inhalation of airborne ultrafine particles (<100 nm in diameter). Engineered nanomaterials (<100 nm in at least one dimension) may also be harmful if inhaled. Nanomaterials deposited on the respiratory epithelial tract are thought to cross the air-blood barrier, especially via the expansive alveolar region, into the systemic circulation to reach end organs (e.g., myocardium, liver, pancreas, kidney, and spleen). Since ambient ultrafine particles are difficult to track, studies of defined engineered nanomaterials have been used to obtain valuable information on how nanomaterials interact with and traffic across the air-blood barrier of mammalian lungs. Since specific mechanistic information on how nanomaterials interact with the lung is difficult to obtain using in vivo or ex vivo lungs due to their complex anatomy, in vitro alveolar epithelial models have been of considerable value in determining nanomaterial-lung interactions. In this review, we provide information on mechanisms underlying lung alveolar epithelial injury caused by various nanomaterials and on nanomaterial trafficking across alveolar epithelium that may lead to end-organ injury. PMID:25568662

  18. Food proteins and gut mucosal barrier. IV. Effects of acute and chronic ethanol administration on handling and uptake of bovine serum albumin by rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, M.; Carter, E.A.; Walker, W.A.

    1986-11-01

    The effects of ethanol exposure on small intestinal handling and uptake of radiolabeled bovine serum albumin were investigated using everted gut sacs. There was less breakdown of BSA after acute ethanol administration in vitro and after acute and chronic in vivo exposure. Thus, the vascular compartment of the small intestine was confronted with more complete and potentially more antigenic material after ethanol. Changes in BSA binding and uptake after acute exposure were shown to be reversible after 4-6 hr. In all groups, there was more BSA binding when the small intestine was exposed to ethanol. This difference was most pronounced after chronic exposure. In the same group, uptake of BSA was correlated with binding and significantly increased. Combined effects of ethanol on the gut mucosal barrier may account for changes in food antigen handling and uptake.

  19. Effects of early enteral nutrition on the gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal barrier of patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Gu, Fang; Wang, Fengxian; Zhang, Yuanda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of early enteral nutrition on the gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal barrier of patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection. Methods: A total of 120 patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection were randomly divided into an early enteral nutrition (EN) group and a parenteral nutrition (PN) group (n=60). The patients were given nutritional support intervention for 14 days, and the expression levels of serum transferrin, albumin, total protein, endotoxin, D-lactic acid and inflammatory cytokines were detected on the 1st, 7th and 14th days respectively. Results: As the treatment progressed, the levels of serum transferrin, albumin and total protein of the EN group were significantly higher than those of the PN group (P<0.05), while the levels of serum endotoxin and D-lactic acid of the form group were significantly lower (P<0.05). After treatment, the expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were decreased in the EN group, which were significantly different from those of the PN group (P<0.05). During treatment, the incidence rates of complications such as abdominal distension, diarrhea, sepsis, nausea, vomiting and gastric retention were similar. The mean healing time of wound surface was 9.34±0.78 days in the EN group and 12.46±2.19 days in the PN group, i.e. such time of the former was significantly shorter than that of the latter (P<0.05). Conclusion: Treating patients having burn-induced invasive fungal infection by early enteral nutrition support with arginine can safely alleviate malnutrition and stress reaction, strengthen cellular immune function and promote wound healing, thereby facilitating the recovery of gastrointestinal motility and the function of intestinal mucosal barrier. PMID:27375697

  20. The function of breast cancer resistance protein in epithelial barriers, stem cells and milk secretion of drugs and xenotoxins.

    PubMed

    van Herwaarden, Antonius E; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2006-01-01

    The breast cancer resistance protein [BCRP (also known as ABCG2)] belongs to the ATP binding cassette (ABC) family of transmembrane drug transporters. BCRP has a broad substrate specificity and actively extrudes a wide variety of drugs, carcinogens and dietary toxins from cells. Situated in the apical plasma membrane of epithelial cells of the small and large intestine and renal proximal tubules and in the bile canalicular membrane of hepatocytes, BCRP decreases the oral availability and systemic exposure of its substrates. In several blood-tissue barriers BCRP reduces tissue penetration of its substrates and it protects haematopoietic stem cells from cytotoxic substrates. Moreover, BCRP is expressed in mammary gland alveolar epithelial cells during pregnancy and lactation, where it actively secretes a variety of drugs, toxins and carcinogens into milk. In apparent contradiction with the detoxifying role of BCRP in mothers, this contamination of milk exposes suckling infants and dairy consumers to xenotoxins. BCRP thus affects many important aspects of pharmacology and toxicology.

  1. CD24 regulated gene expression and distribution of tight junction proteins is associated with altered barrier function in oral epithelial monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ping; Nadkarni, Mangala A; Simonian, Mary; Hunter, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Background Control of intercellular penetration of microbial products is critical for the barrier function of oral epithelia. We demonstrated that CD24 is selectively and strongly expressed in the cells of the epithelial attachment to the tooth and the epithelial lining of the diseased periodontal pocket and studies in vitro showed that CD24 regulated expression of the epithelial intercellular adhesion protein E-cadherin. Results In the present study, the barrier function of oral epithelial cell monolayers to low molecular weight dextran was assayed as a model for the normal physiological function of the epithelial attachment to limit ingress of microbial products from oral microbial biofilms. Paracellular transfer of low molecular weight dextran across monolayers of oral epithelial cells was specifically decreased following incubation with anti-CD24 peptide antibody whereas passage of dextran across the monolayer was increased following silencing of mRNA for CD24. Changes in barrier function were related to the selective regulation of the genes encoding zonula occludens-1, zonula occludens-2 and occludin, proteins implicated in tight junctions. More particularly, enhanced barrier function was related to relocation of these proteins to the cell periphery, compatible with tight junctions. Conclusion CD24 has the constitutive function of maintaining expression of selected genes encoding tight junction components associated with a marginal barrier function of epithelial monolayers. Activation by binding of an external ligand to CD24 enhances this expression but is also effective in re-deployment of tight junction proteins that is aligned with enhanced intercellular barrier function. These results establish the potential of CD24 to act as a potent regulator of the intercellular barrier function of epithelia in response to local microbial ecology. PMID:19138432

  2. Stepwise DNA Methylation Changes Are Linked to Escape from Defined Proliferation Barriers and Mammary Epithelial Cell Immortalization

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, Petr; Jensen, Taylor J.; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2009-04-20

    The timing and progression of DNA methylation changes during carcinogenesis are not completely understood. To develop a timeline of aberrant DNA methylation events during malignant transformation, we analyzed genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in an isogenic human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) culture model of transformation. To acquire immortality and malignancy, the cultured finite lifespan HMEC must overcome two distinct proliferation barriers. The first barrier, stasis, is mediated by the retinoblastoma protein and can be overcome by loss of p16(INK4A) expression. HMEC that escape stasis and continue to proliferate become genomically unstable before encountering a second more stringent proliferation barrier, telomere dysfunction due to telomere attrition. Rare cells that acquire telomerase expression may escape this barrier, become immortal, and develop further malignant properties. Our analysis of HMEC transitioning from finite lifespan to malignantly transformed showed that aberrant DNA methylation changes occur in a stepwise fashion early in the transformation process. The first aberrant DNA methylation step coincides with overcoming stasis, and results in few to hundreds of changes, depending on how stasis was overcome. A second step coincides with immortalization and results in hundreds of additional DNA methylation changes regardless of the immortalization pathway. A majority of these DNA methylation changes are also found in malignant breast cancer cells. These results show that large-scale epigenetic remodeling occurs in the earliest steps of mammary carcinogenesis, temporally links DNA methylation changes and overcoming cellular proliferation barriers, and provides a bank of potential epigenetic biomarkers that mayprove useful in breast cancer risk assessment.

  3. Alpha-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Protects against Cytokine-Induced Barrier Damage in Caco-2 Intestinal Epithelial Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Váradi, Judit; Harazin, András; Fenyvesi, Ferenc; Réti-Nagy, Katalin; Gogolák, Péter; Vámosi, György; Bácskay, Ildikó; Fehér, Pálma; Ujhelyi, Zoltán; Vasvári, Gábor; Róka, Eszter; Haines, David; Deli, Mária A.; Vecsernyés, Miklós

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a potent anti-inflammatory peptide with cytoprotective effect in various tissues. The present investigation demonstrates the ability of α-MSH to interact with intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and mitigate inflammatory processes of the epithelial barrier. The protective effect of α-MSH was studied on Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial monolayers, which were disrupted by exposure to tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. The barrier integrity was assessed by measuring transepithelial electric resistance (TEER) and permeability for marker molecules. Caco-2 monolayers were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for expression of melanocortin-1 receptor and tight junction proteins ZO-1 and claudin-4. The activation of nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-κB) was detected by fluorescence microscopy and inflammatory cytokine expression was assessed by flow cytometric bead array cytokine assay. Exposure of Caco-2 monolayers to proinflammatory cytokines lowered TEER and increased permeability for fluorescein and albumin, which was accompanied by changes in ZO-1 and claudin-4 immunostaining. α-MSH was able to prevent inflammation-associated decrease of TEER in a dose-dependent manner and reduce the increased permeability for paracellular marker fluorescein. Further immunohistochemistry analysis revealed proinflammatory cytokine induced translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit into Caco-2 cell nuclei, which was inhibited by α-MSH. As a result the IL-6 and IL-8 production of Caco-2 monolayers were also decreased with different patterns by the addition of α-MSH to the culture medium. In conclusion, Caco-2 cells showed a positive immunostaining for melanocortin-1 receptor and α-MSH protected Caco-2 cells against inflammatory barrier dysfunction and inflammatory activation induced by tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β cytokines. PMID:28103316

  4. Murine filaggrin-2 is involved in epithelial barrier function and down-regulated in metabolically induced skin barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hansmann, Britta; Ahrens, Kerstin; Wu, Zhihong; Proksch, Ehrhardt; Meyer-Hoffert, Ulf; Schröder, Jens-Michael

    2012-04-01

    The S100 fused-type proteins (SFTPs) are thought to be involved in the barrier formation and function of the skin. Mutations in the profilaggrin gene, one of the best investigated members of this family, are known to be the major risk factors for ichthyosis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis. Recently, we identified human filaggrin-2 as a new member of the SFTP family. To achieve further insight into its function, here the murine filaggrin-2 was analysed as a possible orthologue. The 5' and 3' ends of the mouse filaggrin-2 cDNA of the BALB/c strain were sequenced and confirmed an organization typical for SFTPs. Murine filaggrin-2 showed an expression pattern mainly in keratinizing epithelia in the upper cell layers on both mRNA and protein levels. The expression in cultured mouse keratinocytes was increased upon elevated Ca(2+) levels. Immunoblotting experiments indicated an intraepidermal processing of the 250-kDa full-length protein. In metabolically (essential fatty acid-deficient diet) induced skin barrier dysfunction, filaggrin-2 expression was significantly reduced, whereas filaggrin expression was up-regulated. In contrast, mechanical barrier disruption with acetone treatment did not affect filaggrin-2 mRNA expression. These results suggest that filaggrin-2 may contribute to epidermal barrier function and its regulation differs, at least in parts, from that of filaggrin.

  5. Ferulate protects the epithelial barrier by maintaining tight junction protein expression and preventing apoptosis in tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Eun Kyeong; Park, Min Hi; Ha, Young Mi; Jung, Kyung Jin; Kim, Min-Sun; Kim, Mi Kyung; Yu, Byung Pal; Chung, Hae Young

    2013-03-01

    Epithelial barrier function is determined by both transcellular and paracellular permeability, the latter of which is mainly influenced by tight junctions (TJs) and apoptotic leaks within the epithelium. We investigated the protective effects of ferulate on epithelial barrier integrity by examining permeability, TJ protein expression, and apoptosis in Caco-2 cells treated with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP), a strong reactive species inducer. Caco-2 cells pretreated with ferulate (5 or 15 μM) were exposed to t-BHP (100 μM), and ferulate suppressed the t-BHP-mediated increases in reactive species and epithelial permeability in Caco-2 cells. Moreover, ferulate inhibited epithelial cell leakage induced by t-BHP, which was accompanied by decreased expression of the TJ proteins zonula occludens-1 and occludin. In addition, pretreatment with ferulate markedly protected cells against t-BHP-induced apoptosis, as evidenced by decreased nuclear condensation, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 cleavage and an increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. These results suggest that ferulate protects the epithelial barrier of Caco-2 cells against oxidative stress, which results in increased epithelial permeability, decreased TJ protein expression, and increased apoptosis. The most significant finding of our study is the demonstration of protective, ferulate-mediated antioxidant effects on barrier integrity, with a particular focus on intracellular molecular mechanisms.

  6. Rhinovirus-Induced Barrier Dysfunction in Polarized Airway Epithelial Cells Is Mediated by NADPH Oxidase 1▿

    PubMed Central

    Comstock, Adam T.; Ganesan, Shyamala; Chattoraj, Asamanja; Faris, Andrea N.; Margolis, Benjamin L.; Hershenson, Marc B.; Sajjan, Umadevi S.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we showed that rhinovirus (RV), which is responsible for the majority of common colds, disrupts airway epithelial barrier function, as evidenced by reduced transepithelial resistance (RT), dissociation of zona occludins 1 (ZO-1) from the tight junction complex, and bacterial transmigration across polarized cells. We also showed that RV replication is required for barrier function disruption. However, the underlying biochemical mechanisms are not known. In the present study, we found that a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mimetic, poly(I:C), induced tight junction breakdown and facilitated bacterial transmigration across polarized airway epithelial cells, similar to the case with RV. We also found that RV and poly(I:C) each stimulated Rac1 activation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and Rac1-dependent NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1) activity. Inhibitors of Rac1 (NSC23766), NOX (diphenylene iodonium), and NOX1 (small interfering RNA [siRNA]) each blocked the disruptive effects of RV and poly(I:C) on RT, as well as the dissociation of ZO-1 and occludin from the tight junction complex. Finally, we found that Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) is not required for either poly(I:C)- or RV-induced reductions in RT. Based on these results, we concluded that Rac1-dependent NOX1 activity is required for RV- or poly(I:C)-induced ROS generation, which in turn disrupts the barrier function of polarized airway epithelia. Furthermore, these data suggest that dsRNA generated during RV replication is sufficient to disrupt barrier function. PMID:21507984

  7. Mucosal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis CS; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites. PMID:25424921

  8. Atelectrauma disrupts pulmonary epithelial barrier integrity and alters the distribution of tight junction proteins ZO-1 and claudin 4

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation inevitably exposes the delicate tissues of the airways and alveoli to abnormal mechanical stresses that can induce pulmonary edema and exacerbate conditions such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. The goal of our research is to characterize the cellular trauma caused by the transient abnormal fluid mechanical stresses that arise when air is forced into a liquid-occluded airway (i.e., atelectrauma). Using a fluid-filled, parallel-plate flow chamber to model the “airway reopening” process, our in vitro study examined consequent increases in pulmonary epithelial plasma membrane rupture, paracellular permeability, and disruption of the tight junction (TJ) proteins zonula occludens-1 and claudin-4. Computational analysis predicts the normal and tangential surface stresses that develop between the basolateral epithelial membrane and underlying substrate due to the interfacial stresses acting on the apical cell membrane. These simulations demonstrate that decreasing the velocity of reopening causes a significant increase in basolateral surface stresses, particularly in the region between neighboring cells where TJs concentrate. Likewise, pulmonary epithelial wounding, paracellular permeability, and TJ protein disruption were significantly greater following slower reopening. This study thus demonstrates that maintaining a higher velocity of reopening, which reduces the damaging fluid stresses acting on the airway wall, decreases the mechanical stresses on the basolateral cell surface while protecting cells from plasma membrane rupture and promoting barrier integrity. PMID:22898551

  9. Probiotics ameliorate the hydrogen peroxide-induced epithelial barrier disruption by a PKC- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Seth, A.; Yan, Fang; Polk, D.Brent; Rao, R. K.

    2009-01-01

    Probiotics promote intestinal epithelial integrity and reduce infection and diarrhea. We evaluated the effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-produced soluble proteins (p40 and p75) on the hydrogen peroxide-induced disruption of tight junctions and barrier function in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Pretreatment of cell monolayers with p40 or p75 attenuated the hydrogen peroxide-induced decrease in transepithelial resistance and increase in inulin permeability in a time- and dose-dependent manner. p40 and p75 also prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced redistribution of occludin, ZO-1, E-cadherin, and β-catenin from the intercellular junctions and their dissociation from the detergent-insoluble fractions. Both p40 and p75 induced a rapid increase in the membrane translocation of PKCβI and PKCε. The attenuation of hydrogen peroxide-induced inulin permeability and redistribution of tight junction proteins by p40 and p75 was abrogated by Ro-32-0432, a PKC inhibitor. p40 and p75 also rapidly increased the levels of phospho-ERK1/2 in the detergent-insoluble fractions. U0126 (a MAP kinase inhibitor) attenuated the p40- and p75-mediated reduction of hydrogen peroxide-induced tight junction disruption and inulin permeability. These studies demonstrate that probiotic-secretory proteins protect the intestinal epithelial tight junctions and the barrier function from hydrogen peroxide-induced insult by a PKC- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanism. PMID:18292183

  10. Effects of Soybean Agglutinin on Mechanical Barrier Function and Tight Junction Protein Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells from Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Qin, Guixin; Zhao, Yuan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Feifei; Che, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we sought to investigate the role of soybean agglutinin (SBA) in mediating membrane permeability and the mechanical barrier function of intestinal epithelial cells. The IPEC-J2 cells were cultured and treated with 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, or 3.0 mg/mL SBA. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity were measured to evaluate membrane permeability. The results showed a significant decrease in TEER values (p < 0.05) in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and a pronounced increase in AP activity (p < 0.05). Cell growth and cell morphology were used to evaluate the cell viability. A significant cell growth inhibition (p < 0.05) and alteration of morphology were observed when the concentration of SBA was increased. The results of western blotting showed that the expression levels of occludin and claudin-3 were decreased by 31% and 64% compared to those of the control, respectively (p < 0.05). In addition, immunofluorescence labeling indicated an obvious decrease in staining of these targets and changes in their localizations. In conclusion, SBA increased the membrane permeability, inhibited the cell viability and reduced the levels of tight junction proteins (occludin and claudin-3), leading to a decrease in mechanical barrier function in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:24189218

  11. Probiotics ameliorate the hydrogen peroxide-induced epithelial barrier disruption by a PKC- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Seth, A; Yan, Fang; Polk, D Brent; Rao, R K

    2008-04-01

    Probiotics promote intestinal epithelial integrity and reduce infection and diarrhea. We evaluated the effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-produced soluble proteins (p40 and p75) on the hydrogen peroxide-induced disruption of tight junctions and barrier function in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Pretreatment of cell monolayers with p40 or p75 attenuated the hydrogen peroxide-induced decrease in transepithelial resistance and increase in inulin permeability in a time- and dose-dependent manner. p40 and p75 also prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced redistribution of occludin, ZO-1, E-cadherin, and beta-catenin from the intercellular junctions and their dissociation from the detergent-insoluble fractions. Both p40 and p75 induced a rapid increase in the membrane translocation of PKCbetaI and PKCepsilon. The attenuation of hydrogen peroxide-induced inulin permeability and redistribution of tight junction proteins by p40 and p75 was abrogated by Ro-32-0432, a PKC inhibitor. p40 and p75 also rapidly increased the levels of phospho-ERK1/2 in the detergent-insoluble fractions. U0126 (a MAP kinase inhibitor) attenuated the p40- and p75-mediated reduction of hydrogen peroxide-induced tight junction disruption and inulin permeability. These studies demonstrate that probiotic-secretory proteins protect the intestinal epithelial tight junctions and the barrier function from hydrogen peroxide-induced insult by a PKC- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanism.

  12. Long noncoding RNA SPRY4-IT1 regulates intestinal epithelial barrier function by modulating the expression levels of tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lan; Rao, Jaladanki N; Cao, Shan; Liu, Lan; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Jennifer; Liu, Yulan; Gorospe, Myriam; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2016-02-15

    Epithelial cells line the intestinal mucosa and form an important barrier to a wide array of noxious substances in the lumen. Disruption of the barrier integrity occurs commonly in various pathologies. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) control diverse biological processes, but little is known about the role of lncRNAs in regulation of the gut permeability. Here we show that the lncRNA SPRY4-IT1 regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier function by altering expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins. SPRY4-IT1 silencing led to dysfunction of the epithelial barrier in cultured cells by decreasing the stability of mRNAs encoding TJ proteins claudin-1, claudin-3, occludin, and JAM-1 and repressing their translation. In contrast, increasing the levels of SPRY4-IT1 in the intestinal mucosa protected the gut barrier in mice exposed to septic stress by increasing the abundance of TJ proteins. SPRY4-IT1 directly interacted with TJ mRNAs, and this process was enhanced through the association with the RNA-binding protein HuR. Of interest, the intestinal mucosa from patients with increased gut permeability exhibited a decrease in the levels of SPRY4-IT1. These findings highlight a novel role for SPRY4-IT1 in controlling the intestinal epithelial barrier and define a mechanism by which SPRY4-IT1 modulates TJ expression by altering the stability and translation of TJ mRNAs.

  13. Long noncoding RNA SPRY4-IT1 regulates intestinal epithelial barrier function by modulating the expression levels of tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lan; Rao, Jaladanki N.; Cao, Shan; Liu, Lan; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Jennifer; Liu, Yulan; Gorospe, Myriam; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells line the intestinal mucosa and form an important barrier to a wide array of noxious substances in the lumen. Disruption of the barrier integrity occurs commonly in various pathologies. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) control diverse biological processes, but little is known about the role of lncRNAs in regulation of the gut permeability. Here we show that the lncRNA SPRY4-IT1 regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier function by altering expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins. SPRY4-IT1 silencing led to dysfunction of the epithelial barrier in cultured cells by decreasing the stability of mRNAs encoding TJ proteins claudin-1, claudin-3, occludin, and JAM-1 and repressing their translation. In contrast, increasing the levels of SPRY4-IT1 in the intestinal mucosa protected the gut barrier in mice exposed to septic stress by increasing the abundance of TJ proteins. SPRY4-IT1 directly interacted with TJ mRNAs, and this process was enhanced through the association with the RNA-binding protein HuR. Of interest, the intestinal mucosa from patients with increased gut permeability exhibited a decrease in the levels of SPRY4-IT1. These findings highlight a novel role for SPRY4-IT1 in controlling the intestinal epithelial barrier and define a mechanism by which SPRY4-IT1 modulates TJ expression by altering the stability and translation of TJ mRNAs. PMID:26680741

  14. Phenotypic changes in colonocytes following acute stress or activation of mast cells in mice: implications for delayed epithelial barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Demaude, J; Salvador‐Cartier, C; Fioramonti, J; Ferrier, L; Bueno, L

    2006-01-01

    Background and aim Stressful life events are known to modulate the development or relapse of disease in both inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel disease patients but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Stress is known to effect mast cells, interferon γ (IFN‐γ), and myosin light chain phosphorylation to trigger colonic epithelial barrier dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether acute stress induced or chemical mast cell activation impaired expression and function of epithelial tight junctions, and altered colonocyte differentiation in mice. Methods Colonic paracellular permeability was assessed as the in vivo lumen to blood ratio of 51Cr‐EDTA in different groups of mice (controls, stressed, mast cell degranulator BrX‐537A treated), pretreated or not with the mast cell stabiliser doxantrazole. Involvement of mast cells and IFN‐γ was evaluated in wild‐type and IFN‐γ deficient mice. Tight junction alteration was assessed by histology, transmission electron microscopy, and real time reverse transcription‐polymerase chain reaction. Colonocyte differentiation was determined by protein kinase C ζ (PKCζ) immunofluorescence and western blotting, and alkaline phosphatase activity assay. Results Acute stress induced a three day delayed increase in colonic paracellular permeability which involved mast cell degranulation and overproduction of IFN‐γ. The colonic epithelial barrier was morphologically altered and expression of mRNA encoding tight junction proteins ZO‐2 and occludin was decreased. Moreover, three days after acute stress, colonocyte differentiation was reduced, as shown by decreased expression of both PKCζ isotype and alkaline phosphatase. Conclusion These data highlight new mechanisms whereby an acute stress acts on the gastrointestinal tract by inducing alterations in colonocyte differentiation and decreased expression of mRNA encoding tight junction proteins. Thus phenotypic changes in colonocytes could

  15. Effects of Lactobacillus johnsonii and Lactobacillus reuteri on gut barrier function and heat shock proteins in intestinal porcine epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hao-Yu; Roos, Stefan; Jonsson, Hans; Ahl, David; Dicksved, Johan; Lindberg, Jan Erik; Lundh, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a set of highly conserved proteins that can serve as intestinal gate keepers in gut homeostasis. Here, effects of a probiotic, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), and two novel porcine isolates, Lactobacillus johnsonii strain P47-HY and Lactobacillus reuteri strain P43-HUV, on cytoprotective HSP expression and gut barrier function, were investigated in a porcine IPEC-J2 intestinal epithelial cell line model. The IPEC-J2 cells polarized on a permeable filter exhibited villus-like cell phenotype with development of apical microvilli. Western blot analysis detected HSP expression in IPEC-J2 and revealed that L. johnsonii and L. reuteri strains were able to significantly induce HSP27, despite high basal expression in IPEC-J2, whereas LGG did not. For HSP72, only the supernatant of L. reuteri induced the expression, which was comparable to the heat shock treatment, which indicated that HSP72 expression was more stimulus specific. The protective effect of lactobacilli was further studied in IPEC-J2 under an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) challenge. ETEC caused intestinal barrier destruction, as reflected by loss of cell–cell contact, reduced IPEC-J2 cell viability and transepithelial electrical resistance, and disruption of tight junction protein zonula occludens-1. In contrast, the L. reuteri treatment substantially counteracted these detrimental effects and preserved the barrier function. L. johnsonii and LGG also achieved barrier protection, partly by directly inhibiting ETEC attachment. Together, the results indicate that specific strains of Lactobacillus can enhance gut barrier function through cytoprotective HSP induction and fortify the cell protection against ETEC challenge through tight junction protein modulation and direct interaction with pathogens. PMID:25847917

  16. Effect of Fusarium-Derived Metabolites on the Barrier Integrity of Differentiated Intestinal Porcine Epithelial Cells (IPEC-J2)

    PubMed Central

    Springler, Alexandra; Vrubel, Galina-Jacqueline; Mayer, Elisabeth; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Novak, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The human, animal and plant pathogen Fusarium, which contaminates agricultural commodities worldwide, produces numerous secondary metabolites. An example is the thoroughly-investigated deoxynivalenol (DON), which severely impairs gastrointestinal barrier integrity. However, to date, the toxicological profile of other Fusarium-derived metabolites, such as enniatins, beauvericin, moniliformin, apicidin, aurofusarin, rubrofusarin, equisetin and bikaverin, are poorly characterized. Thus we examined their effects—as metabolites alone and as metabolites in combination with DON—on the intestinal barrier function of differentiated intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) over 72 h. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) was measured at 24-h intervals, followed by evaluation of cell viability using neutral red (NR) assay. Enniatins A, A1, B and B1, apicidin, aurofusarin and beauvericin significantly reduced TEER. Moniliformin, equisetin, bikaverin and rubrofusarin had no effect on TEER. In the case of apicidin, aurofusarin and beauvericin, TEER reductions were further substantiated by the addition of otherwise no-effect DON concentrations. In all cases, viability was unaffected, confirming that TEER reductions were not due to compromised viability. Considering the prevalence of mycotoxin contamination and the diseases associated with intestinal barrier disruption, consumption of contaminated food or feed may have substantial health implications. PMID:27869761

  17. Delivery of Berberine Using Chitosan/Fucoidan-Taurine Conjugate Nanoparticles for Treatment of Defective Intestinal Epithelial Tight Junction Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shao-Jung; Don, Trong-Ming; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Mi, Fwu-Long

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial-derived lipopolysaccharides (LPS) can cause defective intestinal barrier function and play an important role in the development of inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, a nanocarrier based on chitosan and fucoidan was developed for oral delivery of berberine (Ber). A sulfonated fucoidan, fucoidan-taurine (FD-Tau) conjugate, was synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The FD-Tau conjugate was self-assembled with berberine and chitosan (CS) to form Ber-loaded CS/FD-Tau complex nanoparticles with high drug loading efficiency. Berberine release from the nanoparticles had fast release in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF, pH 7.4), while the release was slow in simulated gastric fluid (SGF, pH 2.0). The effect of the berberine-loaded nanoparticles in protecting intestinal tight-junction barrier function against nitric oxide and inflammatory cytokines released from LPS-stimulated macrophage was evaluated by determining the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and paracellular permeability of a model macromolecule fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FITC-dextran) in a Caco-2 cells/RAW264.7 cells co-culture system. Inhibition of redistribution of tight junction ZO-1 protein by the nanoparticles was visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The results suggest that the nanoparticles may be useful for local delivery of berberine to ameliorate LPS-induced intestinal epithelia tight junction disruption, and that the released berberine can restore barrier function in inflammatory and injured intestinal epithelial. PMID:25421323

  18. Dynamic analysis of the mesenchymal-epithelial transition of blood-brain barrier forming glia in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Schwabe, Tina; Li, Xiaoling

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT During development, many epithelia are formed by a mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET). Here, we examine the major stages and underlying mechanisms of MET during blood-brain barrier formation in Drosophila. We show that contact with the basal lamina is essential for the growth of the barrier-forming subperineurial glia (SPG). Septate junctions (SJs), which provide insulation of the paracellular space, are not required for MET, but are necessary for the establishment of polarized SPG membrane compartments. In vivo time-lapse imaging reveals that the Moody GPCR signaling pathway regulates SPG cell growth and shape, with different levels of signaling causing distinct phenotypes. Timely, well-coordinated SPG growth is essential for the uniform insertion of SJs and thus the insulating function of the barrier. To our knowledge, this is the first dynamic in vivo analysis of all stages in the formation of a secondary epithelium, and of the key role trimeric G protein signaling plays in this important morphogenetic process. PMID:28108476

  19. Activation of epithelial STAT3 regulates intestinal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Neufert, Clemens; Pickert, Geethanjali; Zheng, Yan; Wittkopf, Nadine; Warntjen, Moritz; Nikolaev, Alexei; Ouyang, Wenjun; Neurath, Markus F; Becker, Christoph

    2010-02-15

    The intestinal epithelium that lines the mucosal surface along the GI-tract is a key player for the intestinal homeostasis of the healthy individual. In case of a mucosal damage or a barrier defect as seen in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, the balance is disturbed, and translocation of intestinal microbes to the submucosa is facilitated. We recently demonstrated a pivotal role of STAT3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) for the restoration of the balance at the mucosal surface of the gut in an experimental colitis model. STAT3 was rapidly induced in intestinal epithelial cells upon challenge of mice in both experimental colitis and intestinal wound healing models. STAT3 activation was found to be dispensable in the steady-state conditions but was important for efficient regeneration of the epithelium in response to injury. Here, we extend our previous findings by showing epithelial STAT3 activation in human patients suffering from IBD and provide additional insights how the activation of epithelial STAT3 by IL-22 regulates intestinal homeostasis and mucosal wound healing. We also demonstrate that antibody-mediated neutralization of IL-22 has little impact on the development of experimental colitis in mice, but significantly delays recovery from colitis. Thus, our data suggest that targeting the STAT3 signaling pathway in IEC is a promising therapeutic approach in situations when the intestinal homeostasis is disturbed, e.g., as seen in Crohn's disease or Ulcerative colitis.

  20. Ammonia inhibits cAMP-regulated intestinal Cl- transport. Asymmetric effects of apical and basolateral exposure and implications for epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, M; Smith, J A; Resnick, A; Awtrey, C S; Hrnjez, B J; Matthews, J B

    1995-01-01

    The colon, unlike most organs, is normally exposed to high concentrations of ammonia, a weak base which exerts profound and diverse biological effects on mammalian cells. The impact of ammonia on intestinal cell function is largely unknown despite its concentration of 4-70 mM in the colonic lumen. The human intestinal epithelial cell line T84 was used to model electrogenic Cl- secretion, the transport event which hydrates mucosal surfaces and accounts for secretory diarrhea. Transepithelial transport and isotopic flux analysis indicated that physiologically-relevant concentrations of ammonia (as NH4Cl) markedly inhibit cyclic nucleotide-regulated Cl- secretion but not the response to the Ca2+ agonist carbachol. Inhibition by ammonia was 25-fold more potent with basolateral compared to apical exposure. Ion substitution indicated that the effect of NH4Cl was not due to altered cation composition or membrane potential. The site of action of ammonia is distal to cAMP generation and is not due simply to cytoplasmic alkalization. The results support a novel role for ammonia as an inhibitory modulator of intestinal epithelial Cl- secretion. Secretory responsiveness may be dampened in pathological conditions associated with increased mucosal permeability due to enhanced access of lumenal ammonia to the basolateral epithelial compartment. Images PMID:7593599

  1. AMP-18 Targets p21 to Maintain Epithelial Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peili; Li, Yan Chun; Toback, F. Gary

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated homeostasis of epithelial cells resulting in disruption of mucosal barrier function is an important pathogenic mechanism in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). We have characterized a novel gastric protein, Antrum Mucosal Protein (AMP)-18, that has pleiotropic properties; it is mitogenic, anti-apoptotic and can stimulate formation of tight junctions. A 21-mer synthetic peptide derived from AMP-18 exhibits the same biological functions as the full-length protein and is an effective therapeutic agent in mouse models of IBD. In this study we set out to characterize therapeutic mechanisms and identify molecular targets by which AMP-18 maintains and restores disrupted epithelial homeostasis in cultured intestinal epithelial cells and a mouse model of IBD. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, a pro-inflammatory cytokine known to mediate gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal injury in IBD, was used to induce intestinal epithelial cell injury, and study the effects of AMP-18 on apoptosis and the cell cycle. An apoptosis array used to search for targets of AMP-18 in cells exposed to TNF-α identified the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1. Treatment with AMP-18 blunted increases in p21 expression and apoptosis, while reversing disturbed cell cycle kinetics induced by TNF-α. AMP-18 appears to act through PI3K/AKT pathways to increase p21 phosphorylation, thereby reducing its nuclear accumulation to overcome the antiproliferative effects of TNF-α. In vitamin D receptor-deficient mice with TNBS-induced IBD, the observed increase in p21 expression in colonic epithelial cells was suppressed by treatment with AMP peptide. The results indicate that AMP-18 can maintain and/or restore the homeostatic balance between proliferation and apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells to protect and repair mucosal barrier homeostasis and function, suggesting a therapeutic role in IBD. PMID:25919700

  2. Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin b impairs intestinal epithelial barrier function by altering tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Ngendahayo Mukiza, Clément; Dubreuil, J Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin b (STb) causes diarrhea in animals. STb binds to sulfatide, its receptor, and is then internalized. In the cytoplasm, through a cascade of events, STb triggers the opening of ion channels, allowing ion secretion and water loss and leading to diarrhea. Tight junctions (TJs) are well known for controlling paracellular traffic of ions and water by forming a physical intercellular barrier in epithelial cells, and some bacterial toxins are known to affect adversely TJs. The present study aimed at determining the effect of STb on TJs. T84 cells were treated for 24 h with purified STb and a nontoxic STb mutant (D30V). Transepithelial resistance (TER), paracellular flux marker, and confocal microscopy were used to analyze the effect of STb on TJs. Purified STb caused a significant reduction of TER parallel to an increase in paracellular permeability compared to the results seen in untreated cells or mutant D30V. The increased paracellular permeability was associated with a marked alteration of F-actin stress fibers. F-actin filament dissolution and condensation were accompanied by redistribution and/or fragmentation of ZO-1, claudin-1, and occludin. These changes were also observed following treatment of T84 cells with an 8-amino-acid peptide found in the STb sequence corresponding to a consensus sequence of Vibrio cholerae Zot toxin. These effects were not observed with a scrambled peptide or mutant D30V. Our findings indicate that STb induces epithelial barrier dysfunction through changes in TJ proteins that could contribute to diarrhea.

  3. Escherichia coli Heat-Stable Toxin b Impairs Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function by Altering Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ngendahayo Mukiza, Clément

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin b (STb) causes diarrhea in animals. STb binds to sulfatide, its receptor, and is then internalized. In the cytoplasm, through a cascade of events, STb triggers the opening of ion channels, allowing ion secretion and water loss and leading to diarrhea. Tight junctions (TJs) are well known for controlling paracellular traffic of ions and water by forming a physical intercellular barrier in epithelial cells, and some bacterial toxins are known to affect adversely TJs. The present study aimed at determining the effect of STb on TJs. T84 cells were treated for 24 h with purified STb and a nontoxic STb mutant (D30V). Transepithelial resistance (TER), paracellular flux marker, and confocal microscopy were used to analyze the effect of STb on TJs. Purified STb caused a significant reduction of TER parallel to an increase in paracellular permeability compared to the results seen in untreated cells or mutant D30V. The increased paracellular permeability was associated with a marked alteration of F-actin stress fibers. F-actin filament dissolution and condensation were accompanied by redistribution and/or fragmentation of ZO-1, claudin-1, and occludin. These changes were also observed following treatment of T84 cells with an 8-amino-acid peptide found in the STb sequence corresponding to a consensus sequence of Vibrio cholerae Zot toxin. These effects were not observed with a scrambled peptide or mutant D30V. Our findings indicate that STb induces epithelial barrier dysfunction through changes in TJ proteins that could contribute to diarrhea. PMID:23716609

  4. Group A Streptococcus exploits human plasminogen for bacterial translocation across epithelial barrier via tricellular tight junctions

    PubMed Central

    Sumitomo, Tomoko; Nakata, Masanobu; Higashino, Miharu; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2016-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a human-specific pathogen responsible for local suppurative and life-threatening invasive systemic diseases. Interaction of GAS with human plasminogen (PLG) is a salient characteristic for promoting their systemic dissemination. In the present study, a serotype M28 strain was found predominantly localized in tricellular tight junctions of epithelial cells cultured in the presence of PLG. Several lines of evidence indicated that interaction of PLG with tricellulin, a major component of tricellular tight junctions, is crucial for bacterial localization. A site-directed mutagenesis approach revealed that lysine residues at positions 217 and 252 within the extracellular loop of tricellulin play important roles in PLG-binding activity. Additionally, we demonstrated that PLG functions as a molecular bridge between tricellulin and streptococcal surface enolase (SEN). The wild type strain efficiently translocated across the epithelial monolayer, accompanied by cleavage of transmembrane junctional proteins. In contrast, amino acid substitutions in the PLG-binding motif of SEN markedly compromised those activities. Notably, the interaction of PLG with SEN was dependent on PLG species specificity, which influenced the efficiency of bacterial penetration. Our findings provide insight into the mechanism by which GAS exploits host PLG for acceleration of bacterial invasion into deeper tissues via tricellular tight junctions. PMID:26822058

  5. Clinical Characteristics Associated with Post-Operative Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Typpo, Katri V; Larmonier, Claire B.; Deschenes, Jendar; Redford, Daniel; Kiela, Pawel R.; Ghishan, Fayez K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Children with congenital heart disease (CHD) have loss of intestinal epithelial barrier function (EBF), which increases their risk for post-operative sepsis and organ dysfunction. We do not understand how post-operative cardiopulmonary support or the inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) might alter intestinal EBF. We examined variation in a panel of plasma biomarkers to reflect intestinal EBF (cellular and paracellular structure and function) after CPB and in response to routine ICU care. Design Prospective cohort Setting University medical center cardiac intensive care unit Patients Twenty children aged newborn to 18 years undergoing repair or palliation of CHD with CPB. Interventions We measured baseline and repeated plasma FABP2, citrulline, claudin 3, and dual sugar permeability test (DSPT) to reflect intestinal epithelial integrity, epithelial function, paracellular integrity, and paracellular function, respectively. We measured baseline and repeated plasma pro-inflammatory (IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL4, IL10) cytokines, known to modulate intestinal EBF in murine models of CPB. Measurements and Main Results All patients had abnormal baseline FABP2 concentrations (mean 3815.5 pg/mL), (normal 41–336 pg/mL). Cytokine response to CPB was associated with early, but not late changes in plasma concentrations of FABP2 and citrulline. Variation in biomarker concentrations over time were associated with aspects of ICU care indicating greater severity of illness: claudin 3, FABP2, and DSPT ratio were associated with symptoms of feeding intolerance (p<0.05) while FABP2 was positively associated with vasoactive-inotrope score (VIS) (p=0.04). Citrulline was associated with larger arteriovenous O2 saturation difference (p=0.04) and had a complex relationship with VIS. Conclusions Children undergoing CPB for repair or palliation of CHD are at risk for intestinal injury and often present with evidence for loss of intestinal

  6. Persistence and Toxin Production by Clostridium difficile within Human Intestinal Organoids Result in Disruption of Epithelial Paracellular Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Jhansi L.; Huang, Sha; Opp, Judith S.; Nagy, Melinda S.; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Young, Vincent B.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of infectious nosocomial diarrhea. The pathogenesis of C. difficile infection (CDI) results from the interactions between the pathogen, intestinal epithelium, host immune system, and gastrointestinal microbiota. Previous studies of the host-pathogen interaction in CDI have utilized either simple cell monolayers or in vivo models. While much has been learned by utilizing these approaches, little is known about the direct interaction of the bacterium with a complex host epithelium. Here, we asked if human intestinal organoids (HIOs), which are derived from pluripotent stem cells and demonstrate small intestinal morphology and physiology, could be used to study the pathogenesis of the obligate anaerobe C. difficile. Vegetative C. difficile, microinjected into the lumen of HIOs, persisted in a viable state for up to 12 h. Upon colonization with C. difficile VPI 10463, the HIO epithelium is markedly disrupted, resulting in the loss of paracellular barrier function. Since similar effects were not observed when HIOs were colonized with the nontoxigenic C. difficile strain F200, we directly tested the role of toxin using TcdA and TcdB purified from VPI 10463. We show that the injection of TcdA replicates the disruption of the epithelial barrier function and structure observed in HIOs colonized with viable C. difficile. PMID:25312952

  7. Persistence and toxin production by Clostridium difficile within human intestinal organoids result in disruption of epithelial paracellular barrier function.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Jhansi L; Huang, Sha; Opp, Judith S; Nagy, Melinda S; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Young, Vincent B; Spence, Jason R

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of infectious nosocomial diarrhea. The pathogenesis of C. difficile infection (CDI) results from the interactions between the pathogen, intestinal epithelium, host immune system, and gastrointestinal microbiota. Previous studies of the host-pathogen interaction in CDI have utilized either simple cell monolayers or in vivo models. While much has been learned by utilizing these approaches, little is known about the direct interaction of the bacterium with a complex host epithelium. Here, we asked if human intestinal organoids (HIOs), which are derived from pluripotent stem cells and demonstrate small intestinal morphology and physiology, could be used to study the pathogenesis of the obligate anaerobe C. difficile. Vegetative C. difficile, microinjected into the lumen of HIOs, persisted in a viable state for up to 12 h. Upon colonization with C. difficile VPI 10463, the HIO epithelium is markedly disrupted, resulting in the loss of paracellular barrier function. Since similar effects were not observed when HIOs were colonized with the nontoxigenic C. difficile strain F200, we directly tested the role of toxin using TcdA and TcdB purified from VPI 10463. We show that the injection of TcdA replicates the disruption of the epithelial barrier function and structure observed in HIOs colonized with viable C. difficile.

  8. Neutrophil-derived JAML Inhibits Repair of Intestinal Epithelial Injury During Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Dominique A.; Sumagin, Ronen; McCall, Ingrid C.; Leoni, Giovanna; Neumann, Philipp A.; Andargachew, Rakieb; Brazil, Jennifer C.; Medina-Contreras, Oscar; Denning, Timothy L.; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil transepithelial migration (TEM) during acute inflammation is associated with mucosal injury. Using models of acute mucosal injury in-vitro and in-vivo, we describe a new mechanism by which neutrophils infiltrating the intestinal mucosa disrupt epithelial homeostasis. We report that junctional adhesion molecule-like protein (JAML) is cleaved from neutrophil surface by zinc-metalloproteases during TEM. Neutrophil-derived soluble JAML bound to the epithelial tight junction protein coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) resulting in compromised barrier and inhibition of wound repair, through decreased epithelial proliferation. The deleterious effects of JAML on barrier and wound repair were reversed with an anti-JAML mAb that inhibits JAML-CAR binding. Thus, JAML released from transmigrating neutrophils across inflamed epithelia can promote recruitment of leukocytes and aid in clearance of invading microorganisms. However, sustained release of JAML under pathologic conditions associated with persistence of large numbers of infiltrated neutrophil would compromise intestinal barrier and inhibit mucosal healing. Targeting JAML-CAR interactions may thus improve mucosal healing responses under conditions of dysregulated neutrophil recruitment. PMID:24621992

  9. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-neuropeptide Y (NPY) crosstalk regulates inflammation, epithelial barrier functions and colonic motility

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Bindu; Jeppsson, Sabrina; Pienkowski, Stefan; Belsham, Denise D; Sitaraman, Shanthi V.; Merlin, Didier; Kokkotou, Efi; Nusrat, Asma; Tansey, Malu G.; Srinivasan, Shanthi

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuro-immune interactions play a significant role in regulating the severity of inflammation. Our previous work demonstrated that neuropeptide Y (NPY) is up regulated in the enteric nervous system (ENS) during murine colitis, and that NPY knockout mice exhibit reduced inflammation. Here we investigated if NPY expression during inflammation is induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF), the main pro-inflammatory cytokine. Methods Utilizing primary enteric neurons and colon explant cultures from WT and NPY knockout (NPY−/−) mice, we determined if NPY knockdown modulates TNF release and epithelial permeability. Further we assessed if NPY expression is inducible by TNF in enteric neuronal cells and mouse model of experimental colitis, utilizing the TNF inhibitors-etanercept (blocks transmembrane and soluble TNF) and XPro1595 (blocks soluble TNF only). Results We found that enteric neurons express TNF receptors (TNFR1 and R2). Primary enteric neurons from NPY−/− mice produced less TNF compared to WT. Further, TNF activated NPY promoter in enteric neurons via phospho-c-jun. NPY−/− mice had decreased intestinal permeability. In vitro, NPY increased epithelial permeability via phosphatidyl inositol-3-kinase (PI3-K)-induced pore-forming claudin-2. TNF inhibitors attenuated NPY expression in vitro and in vivo. TNF-inhibitor-treated colitic mice exhibited reduced NPY expression and inflammation, reduced oxidative stress, enhanced neuronal survival and improved colonic motility. XPro1595 had more protective effects on neuronal survival and motility compared to etanercept. Conclusions We demonstrate a novel TNF-NPY cross talk that modulates inflammation, barrier functions and colonic motility during inflammation. It is also suggested that selective blocking of soluble TNF maybe a better therapeutic option than using anti-TNF antibodies. PMID:24108115

  10. Protective effects of ψ taraxasterol 3-O-myristate and arnidiol 3-O-myristate isolated from Calendula officinalis on epithelial intestinal barrier.

    PubMed

    Dall'Acqua, Stefano; Catanzaro, Daniela; Cocetta, Veronica; Igl, Nadine; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Cecconello, Laura; Montopoli, Monica

    2016-03-01

    The triterpene esters ᴪ taraxasterol-3-O-myristate (1) and arnidiol-3-O-myristate (2) were tested for their ability to protect epithelial intestinal barrier in an in vitro model. Their effects on ROS production and on trans-epithelial resistance were investigated on CaCo-2 cell monolayers both in basal and stress-induced conditions. Both compounds were able to modulate the stress damage induced by H2O2 and INFγ+TNFα, showing a potential use as model compounds for the study of new therapeutic agents for intestinal inflammations.

  11. Breaking the epithelial polarity barrier in cancer: the strange case of LKB1/PAR-4

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, Johanna I.; Tervonen, Topi A.; Klefström, Juha

    2013-01-01

    The PAR clan of polarity regulating genes was initially discovered in a genetic screen searching for genes involved in asymmetric cell divisions in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. Today, investigations in worms, flies and mammals have established PAR proteins as conserved and fundamental regulators of animal cell polarization in a broad range of biological phenomena requiring cellular asymmetries. The human homologue of invertebrate PAR-4, a serine–threonine kinase LKB1/STK11, has caught attention as a gene behind Peutz–Jeghers polyposis syndrome and as a bona fide tumour suppressor gene commonly mutated in sporadic cancer. LKB1 functions as a master regulator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and 12 other kinases referred to as the AMPK-related kinases, including four human homologues of PAR-1. The role of LKB1 as part of the energy sensing LKB1-AMPK module has been intensively studied, whereas the polarity function of LKB1, in the context of homoeostasis or cancer, has gained less attention. Here, we focus on the PAR-4 identity of LKB1, discussing the weight of evidence indicating a role for LKB1 in regulation of cell polarity and epithelial integrity across species and highlight recent investigations providing new insight into the old question: does the PAR-4 identity of LKB1 matter in cancer? PMID:24062587

  12. Clostridium difficile Toxins Disrupt Epithelial Barrier Function by Altering Membrane Microdomain Localization of Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nusrat, A.; von Eichel-Streiber, C.; Turner, J. R.; Verkade, P.; Madara, J. L.; Parkos, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium difficile is the etiologic agent of pseudomembranous colitis. C. difficile toxins TcdA and TcdB are UDP-glucosyltransferases that monoglucosylate and thereby inactivate the Rho family of GTPases (W. P. Ciesla, Jr., and D. A. Bobak, J. Biol. Chem. 273:16021–16026, 1998). We utilized purified reference toxins of C. difficile, TcdA-10463 (TcdA) and TcdB-10463 (TcdB), and a model intestinal epithelial cell line to characterize their influence on tight-junction (TJ) organization and hence to analyze the mechanisms by which they contribute to the enhanced paracellular permeability and disease pathophysiology of pseudomembranous colitis. The increase in paracellular permeability induced by TcdA and TcdB was associated with disorganization of apical and basal F-actin. F-actin restructuring was paralleled by dissociation of occludin, ZO-1, and ZO-2 from the lateral TJ membrane without influencing the subjacent adherens junction protein, E-cadherin. In addition, we observed decreased association of actin with the TJ cytoplasmic plaque protein ZO-1. Differential detergent extraction and fractionation in sucrose density gradients revealed TcdB-induced redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from detergent-insoluble fractions constituting “raft-like” membrane microdomains, suggesting an important role of Rho proteins in maintaining the association of TJ proteins with such microdomains. These toxin-mediated effects on actin and TJ structure provide a mechanism for early events in the pathophysiology of pseudomembranous colitis. PMID:11179295

  13. Effects of Phonation Time and Magnitude Dose on Vocal Fold Epithelial Genes, Barrier Integrity, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Tsuyoshi; Valenzuela, Carla V.; Novaleski, Carolyn K.; Van Deusen, Mark; Mitchell, Joshua R.; Garrett, C. Gaelyn; Sivasankar, M. Preeti; Rousseau, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of increasing time and magnitude doses of vibration exposure on transcription of the vocal fold's junctional proteins, structural alterations, and functional tissue outcomes. Study Design Animal study. Methods 100 New Zealand White breeder rabbits were studied. Dependent variables were measured in response to increasing time doses (30, 60, or 120 minutes) and magnitude doses (control, modal intensity, and raised intensity) of vibration exposure. Messenger RNA expression of occludin, zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1), E-cadherin, β-catenin, interleukin 1β (IL-1β), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ1), and fibronectin were measured. Tissue structural alterations were assessed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Transepithelial resistance was used to measure functional tissue outcomes. Results Occludin gene expression was downregulated in vocal folds exposed to 120 minute time doses of raised intensity phonation, relative to control, and modal intensity phonation. ZO-1 gene expression was upregulated following a 120 minute time dose of modal intensity phonation, compared to control, and downregulated after a 120 minute time dose of raised intensity phonation, compared to modal intensity phonation. E-cadherin gene expression was downregulated after a120 minute time dose of raised intensity phonation, compared to control and modal intensity phonation. TEM revealed extensive desquamation of the stratified squamous epithelial cells with increasing time and magnitude doses of vibration exposure. A general observation of lower transepithelial resistance measures was made in tissues exposed to raised intensity phonation, compared to all other groups. Conclusions This study provides evidence of vocal fold tissue responses to varying time and magnitude doses of vibration exposure. Level of Evidence N/A PMID:25073715

  14. Nutritional Keys for Intestinal Barrier Modulation

    PubMed Central

    De Santis, Stefania; Cavalcanti, Elisabetta; Mastronardi, Mauro; Jirillo, Emilio; Chieppa, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal tract represents the largest interface between the external environment and the human body. Nutrient uptake mostly happens in the intestinal tract, where the epithelial surface is constantly exposed to dietary antigens. Since inflammatory response toward these antigens may be deleterious for the host, a plethora of protective mechanisms take place to avoid or attenuate local damage. For instance, the intestinal barrier is able to elicit a dynamic response that either promotes or impairs luminal antigens adhesion and crossing. Regulation of intestinal barrier is crucial to control intestinal permeability whose increase is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions. The cross talk among bacteria, immune, and dietary factors is able to modulate the mucosal barrier function, as well as the intestinal permeability. Several nutritional products have recently been proposed as regulators of the epithelial barrier, even if their effects are in part contradictory. At the same time, the metabolic function of the microbiota generates new products with different effects based on the dietary content. Besides conventional treatments, novel therapies based on complementary nutrients are now growing. Fecal therapy has been recently used for the clinical treatment of refractory Clostridium difficile infection instead of the classical antibiotic therapy. In the present review, we will outline the epithelial response to nutritional components derived from dietary intake and microbial fermentation focusing on the consequent effects on the integrity of the epithelial barrier. PMID:26697008

  15. Anti-mouse CD52 monoclonal antibody ameliorates intestinal epithelial barrier function in interleukin-10 knockout mice with spontaneous chronic colitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Honggang; Dong, Jianning; Shi, Peiliang; Liu, Jianhui; Zuo, Lugen; Li, Yi; Gong, Jianfeng; Gu, Lili; Zhao, Jie; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-02-01

    Intestinal inflammation causes tight junction changes and death of epithelial cells, and plays an important role in the development of Crohn's disease (CD). CD52 monoclonal antibody (CD52 mAb) directly targets the cell surface CD52 and is effective in depleting mature lymphocytes by cytolytic effects in vivo, leading to long-lasting changes in adaptive immunity. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of CD52 mAb on epithelial barrier function in animal models of IBD. Interleukin-10 knockout mice (IL-10(-/-) ) of 16 weeks with established colitis were treated with CD52 mAb once a week for 2 weeks. Severity of colitis, CD4(+) lymphocytes and cytokines in the lamina propria, epithelial expression of tight junction proteins, morphology of tight junctions, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)/TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2) mRNA expression, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) expression and activity, as well as epithelial apoptosis in proximal colon were measured at the end of the experiment. CD52 mAb treatment effectively attenuated colitis associated with decreased lamina propria CD4(+) lymphocytes and interferon-γ/IL-17 responses in colonic mucosa in IL-10(-/-) mice. After CD52 mAb treatment, attenuation of colonic permeability, increased epithelial expression and correct localization of tight junction proteins (occludin and zona occludens protein-1), as well as ameliorated tight junction morphology were observed in IL-10(-/-) mice. CD52 mAb treatment also effectively suppressed the epithelial apoptosis, mucosa TNF-α mRNA expression, epithelial expression of long MLCK, TNFR2 and phosphorylation of MLC. Our results indicated that anti-CD52 therapy may inhibit TNF-α/TNFR2-mediated epithelial apoptosis and MLCK-dependent tight junction permeability by depleting activated T cells in the gut mucosa.

  16. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β is required for epithelial-mesenchymal transition and barrier dysfunction in mouse podocytes under high glucose conditions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Yang, Lili; Qiao, Yingjin; Liu, Zhangsuo

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is important for diabetic nephropathy (DN). Podocytes are specialized epithelial cells, which form a major component of the glomerular filtration barrier. Podocyte damage has been suggested to be the primary mechanism behind the albuminuria associated with DN. The present study aimed to determine the function of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β in EMT and barrier dysfunction of mouse podocytes exposed to high glucose (HG) conditions. Matured and differentiated podocytes were treated with normal glucose (NG), HG or NG + mannitol. Podocytes were also transfected with a small interfering RNA (siRNA) against GSK-3β or a scrambled siRNA, or were treated with lithium chloride (LiCl), a GSK-3β inhibitor, under NG or HG conditions. The expression levels of the epithelial cell markers, nephrin and podocin, and the myofibroblast cell markers, α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) and fibronectin, in podocytes by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining, respectively. The monolayer barrier function was assessed by albumin inflow. The phosphorylation and activity levels of GSK-3β were also quantified. It was observed that HG promotes EMT in podocytes, due to the increased levels of podocin and nephrin expression and the reduced α-SMA and fibronectin expression levels. HG also induced barrier dysfunction and increased the expression level of total GSK-3β, Try216-phosphorylated-GSK-3β and the GSK-3β activity in podocytes. Transfection of GSK-3β siRNA or treatment with LiCl reversed the HG-induced EMT and barrier dysfunction in podocytes. In conclusion, the present study determined that GSK-3β is required for EMT and barrier dysfunction in podocytes under HG conditions; therefore, GSK-3β may be a novel target for the treatment of DN. PMID:27748847

  17. Analysis of the 'angulin' proteins LSR, ILDR1 and ILDR2--tricellulin recruitment, epithelial barrier function and implication in deafness pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Tomohito; Tokuda, Shinsaku; Kitajiri, Shin-ichiro; Masuda, Sayuri; Nakamura, Hiroki; Oda, Yukako; Furuse, Mikio

    2013-02-15

    Tricellular tight junctions (tTJs) seal the extracellular space at tricellular contacts (TCs), where the corners of three epithelial cells meet. To date, the transmembrane proteins tricellulin and lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) are known to be molecular components of tTJs. LSR recruits tricellulin to tTJs, and both proteins are required for the full barrier function of epithelial cellular sheets. In the present study, we show that two LSR-related proteins, immunoglobulin-like domain-containing receptor (ILDR) 1 and ILDR2, are also localized at TCs and recruit tricellulin. At least one of LSR, ILDR1 and ILDR2 was expressed in most of the epithelial tissues in mice. The expressions of LSR, ILDR1 and ILDR2 were generally complementary to each other, although LSR and ILDR1 were co-expressed in some epithelia. ILDR1 was required for the establishment of a strong barrier of the epithelium, similar to LSR, when introduced into cultured epithelial cells, whereas ILDR2 provided a much weaker barrier. We further analyzed human ILDR1, mutations in which cause a familial deafness, DFNB42, and found that most DFNB42-associated ILDR1 mutant proteins were defective in recruitment of tricellulin. We also found that tricellulin mutant proteins associated with another familial deafness, DFNB49, were not recruited to TCs by ILDR1. These findings show the heterogeneity of the molecular organization of tTJs in terms of the content of LSR, ILDR1 or ILDR2, and suggest that ILDR1-mediated recruitment of tricellulin to TCs is required for hearing. Given their common localization at epithelial cell corners and recruitment of tricellulin, we propose to designate LSR, ILDR1 and ILDR2 as angulin family proteins.

  18. Expression of late viral proteins is restricted in nasal mucosal leucocytes but not in epithelial cells during early-stage equine herpes virus-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Gryspeerdt, Annick C; Vandekerckhove, Annelies P; Baghi, Hossein Bannazadeh; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2012-08-01

    Equine herpes virus (EHV)-1 replicates in the epithelial cells of the upper respiratory tract and reaches the lamina propria and bloodstream in infected mononuclear cells. This study evaluated expression of the late viral proteins gB, gC, gD and gM in respiratory epithelial and mononuclear cells using: (1) epithelial-like rabbit kidney cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected with EHV-1 in vitro; (2) an equine ex vivo nasal explant system; and (3) nasal mucosa tissue of ponies infected in vivo. The viral proteins were expressed in all late-infected epithelial cells, whereas expression was not observed in infected leucocytes where proteins gB and gM were expressed in 60-90%, and proteins gC and gD in only 20% of infected cells, respectively. The results indicate that expression of these viral proteins during early-stage EHV-1 infection is highly dependent on the cell type infected.

  19. Distinct roles of short and long thymic stromal lymphopoietin isoforms in house dust mite-induced asthmatic airway epithelial barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hangming; Hu, Yahui; Liu, Laiyu; Zou, Mengchen; Huang, Chaowen; Luo, Lishan; Yu, Changhui; Wan, Xuan; Zhao, Haijin; Chen, JiaLong; Xie, Zhefan; Le, Yanqing; Zou, Fei; Cai, Shaoxi

    2016-01-01

    Loss of airway epithelial integrity contributes significantly to asthma pathogenesis. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) may have dual immunoregulatory roles. In inflammatory disorders of the bowel, the long isoform of TSLP (lfTSLP) promotes inflammation while the short isoform (sfTSLP) inhibits inflammation. We hypothesize that lfTSLP contributes to house dust mite (HDM)-induced airway epithelial barrier dysfunction and that synthetic sfTSLP can prevent these effects. In vitro, airway epithelial barrier function was assessed by monitoring transepithelial electrical resistance, fluorescent-dextran permeability, and distribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin. In vivo, BALB/c mice were exposed to HDM by nasal inhalation for 5 consecutive days per week to establish an asthma model. sfTSLP and 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) were administered 1 h before HDM exposure. After 8 weeks, animal lung function tests and pathological staining were performed to evaluate asthma progression. We found that HDM and lfTSLP impaired barrier function. Treatment with sfTSLP and 1,25D3 prevented HDM-induced airway epithelial barrier disruption. Moreover, sfTSLP and 1,25D3 treatment ameliorated HDM-induced asthma in mice. Our data emphasize the importance of the different expression patterns and biological properties of sfTSLP and lfTSLP. Moreover, our results indicate that sfTSLP and 1,25D3 may serve as novel therapeutic agents for individualized treatment of asthma. PMID:27996052

  20. JAM-A associates with ZO-2, afadin, and PDZ-GEF1 to activate Rap2c and regulate epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Ana C; Sumagin, Ronen; Rankin, Carl R; Leoni, Giovanna; Mina, Michael J; Reiter, Dirk M; Stehle, Thilo; Dermody, Terence S; Schaefer, Stacy A; Hall, Randy A; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A

    2013-09-01

    Intestinal barrier function is regulated by epithelial tight junctions (TJs), structures that control paracellular permeability. Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is a TJ-associated protein that regulates barrier; however, mechanisms linking JAM-A to epithelial permeability are poorly understood. Here we report that JAM-A associates directly with ZO-2 and indirectly with afadin, and this complex, along with PDZ-GEF1, activates the small GTPase Rap2c. Supporting a functional link, small interfering RNA-mediated down-regulation of the foregoing regulatory proteins results in enhanced permeability similar to that observed after JAM-A loss. JAM-A-deficient mice and cultured epithelial cells demonstrate enhanced paracellular permeability to large molecules, revealing a potential role of JAM-A in controlling perijunctional actin cytoskeleton in addition to its previously reported role in regulating claudin proteins and small-molecule permeability. Further experiments suggest that JAM-A does not regulate actin turnover but modulates activity of RhoA and phosphorylation of nonmuscle myosin, both implicated in actomyosin contraction. These results suggest that JAM-A regulates epithelial permeability via association with ZO-2, afadin, and PDZ-GEF1 to activate Rap2c and control contraction of the apical cytoskeleton.

  1. Human Alpha-Defensin HNP1 Increases HIV Traversal of the Epithelial Barrier: A Potential Role in STI-Mediated Enhancement of HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Valere, Kimyata; Rapista, Aprille; Eugenin, Eliseo; Lu, Wuyuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Alpha-defensins, including human neutrophil peptides 1-3 (HNP1-3) and human defensin 5 (HD5), are elevated at the genital mucosa in individuals with sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The presence of STIs is associated with an increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission, suggesting there may be a role for defensins in early events of HIV transmission. HD5 has been demonstrated to contribute to STI-mediated increased HIV infectivity in vitro. HNPs exhibit anti-HIV activity in vitro. However, increased levels of HNPs have been associated with enhanced HIV acquisition and higher viral load in breast milk. This study found that HNP1, but not HD5, significantly disrupted epithelial integrity and promoted HIV traversal of epithelial barriers. Linear HNP1 with the same charges did not affect epithelial permeability, indicating that the observed effect of HNP1 on the epithelial barrier was structure dependent. These results suggest a role for HNP1 in STI-mediated enhancement of HIV transmission. PMID:26379091

  2. Medroxyprogesterone acetate and levonorgestrel increase genital mucosal permeability and enhance susceptibility to genital herpes simplex virus type 2 infection.

    PubMed

    Quispe Calla, N E; Vicetti Miguel, R D; Boyaka, P N; Hall-Stoodley, L; Kaur, B; Trout, W; Pavelko, S D; Cherpes, T L

    2016-11-01

    Depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is a hormonal contraceptive especially popular in areas with high prevalence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). Although observational studies identify DMPA as an important STI risk factor, mechanisms underlying this connection are undefined. Levonorgestrel (LNG) is another progestin used for hormonal contraception, but its effect on STI susceptibility is much less explored. Using a mouse model of genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection, we herein found that DMPA and LNG similarly reduced genital expression of the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein-1α (DSG1α), enhanced access of inflammatory cells to genital tissue by increasing mucosal epithelial permeability, and increased susceptibility to viral infection. Additional studies with uninfected mice revealed that DMPA-mediated increases in mucosal permeability promoted tissue inflammation by facilitating endogenous vaginal microbiota invasion. Conversely, concomitant treatment of mice with DMPA and intravaginal estrogen restored mucosal barrier function and prevented HSV-2 infection. Evaluating ectocervical biopsy tissue from women before and 1 month after initiating DMPA remarkably revealed that inflammation and barrier protection were altered by treatment identically to changes seen in progestin-treated mice. Together, our work reveals DMPA and LNG diminish the genital mucosal barrier; a first-line defense against all STI, but may offer foundation for new contraceptive strategies less compromising of barrier protection.

  3. Medroxyprogesterone acetate and levonorgestrel increase genital mucosal permeability and enhance susceptibility to genital herpes simplex virus type 2 infection

    PubMed Central

    Calla, Nirk E Quispe; Miguel, Rodolfo D Vicetti; Boyaka, Prosper N; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne; Kaur, Balveen; Trout, Wayne; Pavelko, Stephen D; Cherpes, Thomas L

    2016-01-01

    Depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is a hormonal contraceptive especially popular in areas with high prevalence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). While observational studies identify DMPA as an important STI risk factor, mechanisms underlying this connection are undefined. Levonorgestrel (LNG) is another progestin used for hormonal contraception, but its effect on STI susceptibility is much less explored. Using a mouse model of genital HSV-2 infection, we herein found DMPA and LNG similarly reduced genital expression of the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein-1α (DSG1α), enhanced access of inflammatory cells to genital tissue by increasing mucosal epithelial permeability, and increased susceptibility to viral infection. Additional studies with uninfected mice revealed DMPA-mediated increases in mucosal permeability promoted tissue inflammation by facilitating endogenous vaginal microbiota invasion. Conversely, concomitant treatment of mice with DMPA and intravaginal estrogen restored mucosal barrier function and prevented HSV-2 infection. Evaluating ectocervical biopsy tissue from women before and 1 month after initiating DMPA remarkably revealed inflammation and barrier protection were altered by treatment identically to changes seen in progestin-treated mice. Together, our work reveals DMPA and LNG diminish the genital mucosal barrier; a first-line defense against all STI, but may offer foundation for new contraceptive strategies less compromising of barrier protection. PMID:27007679

  4. Cystic fibrosis: a mucosal immunodeficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Taylor Sitarik; Prince, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as a channel that regulates the transport of ions and the movement of water across the epithelial barrier. Mutations in CFTR, which form the basis for the clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis, affect the epithelial innate immune function in the lung, resulting in exaggerated and ineffective airway inflammation that fails to eradicate pulmonary pathogens. Compounding the effects of excessive neutrophil recruitment, the mutant CFTR channel does not transport antioxidants to counteract neutrophil-associated oxidative stress. Whereas mutant CFTR expression in leukocytes outside of the lung does not markedly impair their function, the expected regulation of inflammation in the airways is clearly deficient in cystic fibrosis. The resulting bacterial infections, which are caused by organisms that have substantial genetic and metabolic flexibility, can resist multiple classes of antibiotics and evade phagocytic clearance. The development of animal models that approximate the human pulmonary phenotypes—airway inflammation and spontaneous infection—may provide the much-needed tools to establish how CFTR regulates mucosal immunity and to test directly the effect of pharmacologic potentiation and correction of mutant CFTR function on bacterial clearance. PMID:22481418

  5. The serine protease-mediated increase in intestinal epithelial barrier function is dependent on occludin and requires an intact tight junction.

    PubMed

    Ronaghan, Natalie J; Shang, Judie; Iablokov, Vadim; Zaheer, Raza; Colarusso, Pina; Dion, Sébastien; Désilets, Antoine; Leduc, Richard; Turner, Jerrold R; MacNaughton, Wallace K

    2016-09-01

    Barrier dysfunction is a characteristic of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Understanding how the tight junction is modified to maintain barrier function may provide avenues for treatment of IBD. We have previously shown that the apical addition of serine proteases to intestinal epithelial cell lines causes a rapid and sustained increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), but the mechanisms are unknown. We hypothesized that serine proteases increase barrier function through trafficking and insertion of tight junction proteins into the membrane, and this could enhance recovery of a disrupted monolayer after calcium switch or cytokine treatment. In the canine epithelial cell line, SCBN, we showed that matriptase, an endogenous serine protease, could potently increase TER. Using detergent solubility-based cell fractionation, we found that neither trypsin nor matriptase treatment changed levels of tight junction proteins at the membrane. In a fast calcium switch assay, serine proteases did not enhance the rate of recovery of the junction. In addition, serine proteases could not reverse barrier disruption induced by IFNγ and TNFα. We knocked down occludin in our cells using siRNA and found this prevented the serine protease-induced increase in TER. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), we found serine proteases induce a greater mobile fraction of occludin in the membrane. These data suggest that a functional tight junction is needed for serine proteases to have an effect on TER, and that occludin is a crucial tight junction protein in this mechanism.

  6. Density-enhanced Phosphatase 1 Regulates Phosphorylation of Tight Junction Proteins and Enhances Barrier Function of Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Sallee, Jennifer L.; Burridge, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is a dynamic process that can activate multiple signaling pathways. These signaling pathways can be regulated through reversible tyrosine phosphorylation events. The level of tyrosine phosphorylation of junctional proteins reflects the balance between protein-tyrosine kinase and protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity. The receptor-tyrosine phosphatase DEP-1 (CD148/PTP-η) has been implicated in cell growth and differentiation as well as in regulating phosphorylation of junctional proteins. However, the role of DEP-1 in regulating tight junction phosphorylation and the integrity of cell-cell junctions is still under investigation. In this study, we used a catalytically dead substrate-trapping mutant of DEP-1 to identify potential substrates at cell-cell junctions. We have shown that in epithelial cells the trapping mutant of DEP-1 interacts with the tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1 in a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent manner. In contrast, PTP-PEST, Shp2, and PTPμ did not interact with these proteins, suggesting that the interaction of DEP-1 with occludin and ZO-1 is specific. In addition, occludin and ZO-1 were dephosphorylated by DEP-1 but not these other phosphatases in vitro. Overexpression of DEP-1 increased barrier function as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance and also reduced paracellular flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran following a calcium switch. Reduced DEP-1 expression by small interfering RNA had a small but significant increase in junction permeability. These data suggest that DEP-1 can modify the phosphorylation state of tight junction proteins and play a role in regulating permeability. PMID:19332538

  7. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells maintain intestinal epithelial stem cells after tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Aparicio-Domingo, Patricia; Romera-Hernandez, Monica; Karrich, Julien J; Cornelissen, Ferry; Papazian, Natalie; Lindenbergh-Kortleve, Dicky J; Butler, James A; Boon, Louis; Coles, Mark C; Samsom, Janneke N; Cupedo, Tom

    2015-10-19

    Disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier allows bacterial translocation and predisposes to destructive inflammation. To ensure proper barrier composition, crypt-residing stem cells continuously proliferate and replenish all intestinal epithelial cells within days. As a consequence of this high mitotic activity, mucosal surfaces are frequently targeted by anticancer therapies, leading to dose-limiting side effects. The cellular mechanisms that control tissue protection and mucosal healing in response to intestinal damage remain poorly understood. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) are regulators of homeostasis and tissue responses to infection at mucosal surfaces. We now demonstrate that ILC3s are required for epithelial activation and proliferation in response to small intestinal tissue damage induced by the chemotherapeutic agent methotrexate. Multiple subsets of ILC3s are activated after intestinal tissue damage, and in the absence of ILC3s, epithelial activation is lost, correlating with increased pathology and severe damage to the intestinal crypts. Using ILC3-deficient Lgr5 reporter mice, we show that maintenance of intestinal stem cells after damage is severely impaired in the absence of ILC3s or the ILC3 signature cytokine IL-22. These data unveil a novel function of ILC3s in limiting tissue damage by preserving tissue-specific stem cells.

  8. Annexin A1–containing extracellular vesicles and polymeric nanoparticles promote epithelial wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Giovanna; Neumann, Philipp-Alexander; Kamaly, Nazila; Quiros, Miguel; Nishio, Hikaru; Jones, Hefin R.; Sumagin, Ronen; Hilgarth, Roland S.; Alam, Ashfaqul; Fredman, Gabrielle; Argyris, Ioannis; Rijcken, Emile; Kusters, Dennis; Reutelingsperger, Chris; Perretti, Mauro; Parkos, Charles A.; Farokhzad, Omid C.; Neish, Andrew S.; Nusrat, Asma

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial restitution is an essential process that is required to repair barrier function at mucosal surfaces following injury. Prolonged breaches in epithelial barrier function result in inflammation and further damage; therefore, a better understanding of the epithelial restitution process has potential for improving the development of therapeutics. In this work, we demonstrate that endogenous annexin A1 (ANXA1) is released as a component of extracellular vesicles (EVs) derived from intestinal epithelial cells, and these ANXA1-containing EVs activate wound repair circuits. Compared with healthy controls, patients with active inflammatory bowel disease had elevated levels of secreted ANXA1-containing EVs in sera, indicating that ANXA1-containing EVs are systemically distributed in response to the inflammatory process and could potentially serve as a biomarker of intestinal mucosal inflammation. Local intestinal delivery of an exogenous ANXA1 mimetic peptide (Ac2-26) encapsulated within targeted polymeric nanoparticles (Ac2-26 Col IV NPs) accelerated healing of murine colonic wounds after biopsy-induced injury. Moreover, one-time systemic administration of Ac2-26 Col IV NPs accelerated recovery following experimentally induced colitis. Together, our results suggest that local delivery of proresolving peptides encapsulated within nanoparticles may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for clinical situations characterized by chronic mucosal injury, such as is seen in patients with IBD. PMID:25664854

  9. Vitamin D/VDR signaling attenuates lipopolysaccharide‑induced acute lung injury by maintaining the integrity of the pulmonary epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yong-Yan; Liu, Tian-Jing; Fu, Jian-Hua; Xu, Wei; Wu, Lin-Lin; Hou, A-Na; Xue, Xin-Dong

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D and its receptor have a protective effect on epithelial barriers in various tissues. Low levels of vitamin D are associated with numerous pulmonary diseases, including acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome. The present study investigated whether the vitamin D/vitamin D receptor (VDR) pathway may ameliorate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)‑induced ALI through maintaining the integrity of the alveolar epithelial barrier. This was investigated by exposing wild‑type (WT) and VDR knockout C57BL/6J mice to LPS, then comparing the healthy and LPS‑treated mice lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). More specifically, lung histology, mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and protein expression levels of tight junction proteins were determined. In addition, a vitamin D analog (paricalcitol) was administered to WT mice in order to investigate the effect of vitamin D on the alveolar epithelial barrier following exposure to LPS. VDR knockout mice exhibited severe lung injuries (P<0.001), increased alveolar permeability [demonstrated by a higher wet‑dry ratio of lung weight (P<0.05), greater expression levels of BALF protein (P<0.001) and fluorescein isothiocyanate‑conjugated 4 kDa dextran (P<0.001) leakage into the alveolar space], elevated proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine mRNA levels, as demonstrated by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction (P<0.05), and decreased protein and mRNA expression levels of occludin (P<0.01) and zonula occludens‑1 (ZO‑1; P<0.01) compared with WT mice. Paricalcitol treatment partially inhibited these pathological changes in WT mice by maintaining the mRNA and protein expression levels of occludin (P<0.01) and ZO‑1 (P<0.05). A lack of VDRs in the pulmonary epithelial barrier appeared to compromise its defense, leading to more severe LPS‑induced lung injury. Furthermore, vitamin D treatment alleviated LPS‑induced lung injury and preserved alveolar

  10. Specific and Efficient Uptake of Surfactant-Free Poly(Lactic Acid) Nanovaccine Vehicles by Mucosal Dendritic Cells in Adult Zebrafish after Bath Immersion

    PubMed Central

    Rességuier, Julien; Delaune, Emilie; Coolen, Anne-Line; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Boudinot, Pierre; Le Guellec, Dominique; Verrier, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Activation of mucosal immunity is a key milestone for next-generation vaccine development. Biocompatible polymer-based nanoparticles (NPs) are promising vectors and adjuvants for mucosal vaccination. However, their in vivo uptake by mucosae and their biodistribution in antigen-presenting cells (APCs) need to be better understood to optimize mucosal nanovaccine designs. Here, we assessed if APCs are efficiently targeted in a spontaneous manner by surfactant-free poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles (PLA-NPs) after mucosal administration. Combining histology and flow imaging approaches, we describe and quantify the mucosal uptake of 200 nm PLA-NPs in adult zebrafish. Following bath administration, PLA-NPs penetrated and crossed epithelial barriers from all exposed mucosae. In mucosae, PLA-NPs accumulated in APCs, which were identified as dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages, and IgZ+ B cells in gills and skin. PLA-NP uptake by phagocytes was specific to these cell types, as PLA-NPs were not detected in neutrophils. Importantly, quantitative analyses in gills revealed that DCs take up PLA-NPs with specifically high efficiency. This study shows that surfactant-free PLA-NPs, which display optimal biocompatibility, can spontaneously target DCs with high efficiency in vivo following mucosal administration, and highlights PLA-NPs as powerful platforms for mucosal vaccine delivery in the medical and veterinary fields, and particularly in aquaculture. PMID:28289416

  11. A role for IL-22 in the relationship between intestinal helminths, gut microbiota and mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Leung, Jacqueline M; Loke, P'ng

    2013-03-01

    The intestinal tract is home to nematodes as well as commensal bacteria (microbiota), which have coevolved with the mammalian host. The mucosal immune system must balance between an appropriate response to dangerous pathogens and an inappropriate response to commensal microbiota that may breach the epithelial barrier, in order to maintain intestinal homeostasis. IL-22 has been shown to play a critical role in maintaining barrier homeostasis against intestinal pathogens and commensal bacteria. Here we review the advances in our understanding of the role of IL-22 in helminth infections, as well as in response to commensal and pathogenic bacteria of the intestinal tract. We then consider the relationship between intestinal helminths and gut microbiota and hypothesize that this relationship may explain how helminths may improve symptoms of inflammatory bowel diseases. We propose that by inducing an immune response that includes IL-22, intestinal helminths may enhance the mucosal barrier function of the intestinal epithelium. This may restore the mucosal microbiota populations from dysbiosis associated with colitis and improve intestinal homeostasis.

  12. Study of Stress Induced Failure of the Blood-gas Barrier and the Epithelial-epithelial Cells Connections of the Lung of the Domestic Fowl, Gallus gallus Variant Domesticus after Vascular Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Maina, John N; Jimoh, Sikiru A

    2013-01-01

    Complete blood-gas barrier breaks (BGBBs) and epithelial-epithelial cells connections breaks (E-ECCBs) were enumerated in the lungs of free range chickens, Gallus gallus variant domesticus after vascular perfusion at different pressures. The E-ECCBs surpassed the BGBBs by a factor of ~2. This showed that the former parts of the gas exchange tissue were structurally weaker or more vulnerable to failure than the latter. The differences in the numbers of BGBBs and E-ECCBs in the different regions of the lung supplied with blood by the 4 main branches of the pulmonary artery (PA) corresponded with the diameters of the blood vessels, the angles at which they bifurcated from the PA, and the positions along the PA where they branched off. Most of the BGBBs and the E-ECCBs occurred in the regions supplied by the accessory- and the caudomedial branches: the former is the narrowest branch and the first blood vessel to separate from the PA while the latter is the most direct extension of the PA and is the widest. The E-ECCBs appeared to separate and fail from tensing of the blood capillary walls, as the perfusion- and intramural pressures increased. Compared to the mammalian lungs on which data are available, i.e., those of the rabbit, the dog, and the horse, the blood-gas barrier of the lung of free range chickens appears to be substantially stronger for its thinness. PMID:25288905

  13. Gastrointestinal mucositis: the role of MMP-tight junction interactions in tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Al-Dasooqi, Noor; Wardill, Hannah R; Gibson, Rachel J

    2014-07-01

    Chemotherapy for cancer causes significant gut toxicity known as mucositis. The pathogenesis of mucositis is ill defined. Recent clinical research guidelines have highlighted epithelial junctional complexes as emerging targets within mucositis research. Given the robust biological evidence linking tight junctions and matrix metalloproteinases, key mediators of mucositis, tight junction proteins have received significant attention. Despite this, the link between tight junctions, matrix metalloproteinases and mucositis development is yet to be established. This critical review therefore aims to describe the role of matrix metalloproteinases in mucositis, and how matrix metalloproteinase-dependent tight junction disruption may contribute to the pathobiology of mucositis.

  14. Gut microbiota, epithelial function and derangements in obesity.

    PubMed

    Raybould, Helen E

    2012-02-01

    The gut epithelium is a barrier between the 'outside' and 'inside' world. The major function of the epithelium is to absorb nutrients, ions and water, yet it must balance these functions with that of protecting the 'inside' world from potentially harmful toxins, irritants, bacteria and other pathogens that also exist in the gut lumen. The health of an individual depends upon the efficient digestion and absorption of all required nutrients from the diet. This requires sensing of meal components by gut enteroendocrine cells, activation of neural and humoral pathways to regulate gastrointestinal motor, secretory and absorptive functions, and also to regulate food intake and plasma levels of glucose. In this way, there is a balance between the delivery of food and the digestive and absorptive capacity of the intestine. Maintenance of the mucosal barrier likewise requires sensory detection of pathogens, toxins and irritants; breakdown of the epithelial barrier is associated with gut inflammation and may ultimately lead to inflammatory bowel disease. However, disruption of the barrier alone is not sufficient to cause frank inflammatory bowel disease. Several recent studies have provided compelling new evidence to suggest that changes in epithelial barrier function and inflammation are associated with and may even lead to altered regulation of body weight and glucose homeostasis. This article provides a brief review of some recent evidence to support the hypothesis that changes in the gut microbiota and alteration of gut epithelial function will perturb the homeostatic humoral and neural pathways controlling food intake and body weight.

  15. A Molecular Link Between Interleukin 22 and Intestinal Mucosal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoyan; Chalmers, Laura; Fu, Xiaobing; Zhao, Min

    2012-01-01

    Background Interleukin 22 (IL-22) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) are two important regulators of inflammation. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are considered inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), due to the belief that these diseases result from dysregulated responses of the intestinal immune system to bacteria present in the commensal flora. The Problem It is debated whether a breakdown of immune tolerance is the primary cause of these diseases or occurs downstream of an initial defect of the intestinal barrier and intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). Basic/Clinical Science Advances Recent reports suggest a crucial role for IL-22 in the regulation of gut inflammation as well as epithelial barrier integrity. Local IL-22 gene delivery enhances expression of its downstream effector, STAT3, within colonic epithelial cells and induces both STAT3-dependent expression of mucus-associated molecules and restitution of mucus-producing goblet cells. IEC-specific deletion of STAT3 results in significant susceptibility to experimental colitis with a striking defect in epithelial restitution. STAT3 activation, thus, may regulate immune homeostasis in the gut by promoting IL-22-dependent mucosal wound healing. Clinical Care Relevance The importance of IL-22/STAT3 signaling in IEC wound healing suggests a critical role for epithelial homeostasis in IBDs. Conclusion Effective healing of the IECs could be considered a primary target in the development of treatments for IBDs. IL-22/STAT3 signaling exerts a protective role in the process of intestinal mucosal wound healing and may thereby provide a promising therapeutic approach to the treatment of IBDs. PMID:24527311

  16. Immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells in two steps by direct targeting of senescence barriers does not require gross genomic alterations

    SciTech Connect

    Garbe, James C.; Vrba, Lukas; Sputova, Klara; Fuchs, Laura; Novak, Petr; Brothman, Arthur R.; Jackson, Mark; Chin, Koei; LaBarge, Mark A.; Watts, George; Futscher, Bernard W.; Stampfer, Martha R.

    2014-10-29

    Telomerase reactivation and immortalization are critical for human carcinoma progression. However, little is known about the mechanisms controlling this crucial step, due in part to the paucity of experimentally tractable model systems that can examine human epithelial cell immortalization as it might occur in vivo. We achieved efficient non-clonal immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) by directly targeting the 2 main senescence barriers encountered by cultured HMEC. The stress-associated stasis barrier was bypassed using shRNA to p16INK4; replicative senescence due to critically shortened telomeres was bypassed in post-stasis HMEC by c-MYC transduction. Thus, 2 pathologically relevant oncogenic agents are sufficient to immortally transform normal HMEC. The resultant non-clonal immortalized lines exhibited normal karyotypes. Most human carcinomas contain genomically unstable cells, with widespread instability first observed in vivo in pre-malignant stages; in vitro, instability is seen as finite cells with critically shortened telomeres approach replicative senescence. Our results support our hypotheses that: (1) telomere-dysfunction induced genomic instability in pre-malignant finite cells may generate the errors required for telomerase reactivation and immortalization, as well as many additional “passenger” errors carried forward into resulting carcinomas; (2) genomic instability during cancer progression is needed to generate errors that overcome tumor suppressive barriers, but not required per se; bypassing the senescence barriers by direct targeting eliminated a need for genomic errors to generate immortalization. Achieving efficient HMEC immortalization, in the absence of “passenger” genomic errors, should facilitate examination of telomerase regulation during human carcinoma progression, and exploration of agents that could prevent immortalization.

  17. Chloride channel ClC- 2 enhances intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier function via regulation of caveolin-1 and caveolar trafficking of occludin.

    PubMed

    Nighot, Prashant K; Leung, Lana; Ma, Thomas Y

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the chloride channel ClC-2 plays a critical role in intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ) barrier function via intracellular trafficking of TJ protein occludin. To study the mechanism of ClC-2-mediated TJ barrier function and intracellular trafficking of occludin, we established ClC-2 over-expressing Caco-2 cell line (Caco-2(CLCN2)) by full length ClC-2 ORF transfection. ClC-2 over-expression (Caco-2(CLCN2)) significantly enhanced TJ barrier (increased TER by ≥2 times and reduced inulin flux by 50%) compared to control Caco-2(pEZ) cells. ClC-2 over-expression (Caco-2(CLCN2)) increased occludin protein level compared to control Caco-2(pEZ) cells. Surface biotinylation assay revealed reduced steady state endocytosis of occludin in Caco-2(CLCN2) cells. Furthermore, ClC-2 over-expression led to reduction in caveolin-1 protein level and diminishment of caveolae assembly. Caveolae disruption increased TJ permeability in control but not ClC-2 over-expressing Caco-2(CLCN2) cells. Selective ClC-2 channel blocker GaTx2 caused an increase in caveolin-1 protein level and reduced occludin level. Delivery of cell permeable caveolin-1 scaffolding domain reduced the occludin protein level. Over all, these results suggest that ClC- 2 enhances TJ barrier function in intestinal epithelial cells via regulation of caveolin-1 and caveolae-mediated trafficking of occludin.

  18. Immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells in two steps by direct targeting of senescence barriers does not require gross genomic alterations

    DOE PAGES

    Garbe, James C.; Vrba, Lukas; Sputova, Klara; ...

    2014-10-29

    Telomerase reactivation and immortalization are critical for human carcinoma progression. However, little is known about the mechanisms controlling this crucial step, due in part to the paucity of experimentally tractable model systems that can examine human epithelial cell immortalization as it might occur in vivo. We achieved efficient non-clonal immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) by directly targeting the 2 main senescence barriers encountered by cultured HMEC. The stress-associated stasis barrier was bypassed using shRNA to p16INK4; replicative senescence due to critically shortened telomeres was bypassed in post-stasis HMEC by c-MYC transduction. Thus, 2 pathologically relevant oncogenic agentsmore » are sufficient to immortally transform normal HMEC. The resultant non-clonal immortalized lines exhibited normal karyotypes. Most human carcinomas contain genomically unstable cells, with widespread instability first observed in vivo in pre-malignant stages; in vitro, instability is seen as finite cells with critically shortened telomeres approach replicative senescence. Our results support our hypotheses that: (1) telomere-dysfunction induced genomic instability in pre-malignant finite cells may generate the errors required for telomerase reactivation and immortalization, as well as many additional “passenger” errors carried forward into resulting carcinomas; (2) genomic instability during cancer progression is needed to generate errors that overcome tumor suppressive barriers, but not required per se; bypassing the senescence barriers by direct targeting eliminated a need for genomic errors to generate immortalization. Achieving efficient HMEC immortalization, in the absence of “passenger” genomic errors, should facilitate examination of telomerase regulation during human carcinoma progression, and exploration of agents that could prevent immortalization.« less

  19. Immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells in two steps by direct targeting of senescence barriers does not require gross genomic alterations

    PubMed Central

    Garbe, James C; Vrba, Lukas; Sputova, Klara; Fuchs, Laura; Novak, Petr; Brothman, Arthur R; Jackson, Mark; Chin, Koei; LaBarge, Mark A; Watts, George; Futscher, Bernard W; Stampfer, Martha R

    2014-01-01

    Telomerase reactivation and immortalization are critical for human carcinoma progression. However, little is known about the mechanisms controlling this crucial step, due in part to the paucity of experimentally tractable model systems that can examine human epithelial cell immortalization as it might occur in vivo. We achieved efficient non-clonal immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) by directly targeting the 2 main senescence barriers encountered by cultured HMEC. The stress-associated stasis barrier was bypassed using shRNA to p16INK4; replicative senescence due to critically shortened telomeres was bypassed in post-stasis HMEC by c-MYC transduction. Thus, 2 pathologically relevant oncogenic agents are sufficient to immortally transform normal HMEC. The resultant non-clonal immortalized lines exhibited normal karyotypes. Most human carcinomas contain genomically unstable cells, with widespread instability first observed in vivo in pre-malignant stages; in vitro, instability is seen as finite cells with critically shortened telomeres approach replicative senescence. Our results support our hypotheses that: (1) telomere-dysfunction induced genomic instability in pre-malignant finite cells may generate the errors required for telomerase reactivation and immortalization, as well as many additional “passenger” errors carried forward into resulting carcinomas; (2) genomic instability during cancer progression is needed to generate errors that overcome tumor suppressive barriers, but not required per se; bypassing the senescence barriers by direct targeting eliminated a need for genomic errors to generate immortalization. Achieving efficient HMEC immortalization, in the absence of “passenger” genomic errors, should facilitate examination of telomerase regulation during human carcinoma progression, and exploration of agents that could prevent immortalization. PMID:25485586

  20. Norepinephrine potentiates proinflammatory responses of human vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brosnahan, Amanda J; Vulchanova, Lucy; Witta, Samantha R; Dai, Yuying; Jones, Bryan J; Brown, David R

    2013-06-15

    The vaginal epithelium provides a barrier to pathogens and recruits immune defenses through the secretion of cytokines and chemokines. Several studies have shown that mucosal sites are innervated by norepinephrine-containing nerve fibers. Here we report that norepinephrine potentiates the proinflammatory response of human vaginal epithelial cells to products produced by Staphylococcus aureus, a pathogen that causes menstrual toxic shock syndrome. The cells exhibit immunoreactivity for catecholamine synthesis enzymes and the norepinephrine transporter. Moreover, the cells secrete norepinephrine and dopamine at low concentrations. These results indicate that norepinephrine may serve as an autocrine modulator of proinflammatory responses in the vaginal epithelium.

  1. Intra-Subtype Variation in Enteroadhesion Accounts for Differences in Epithelial Barrier Disruption and Is Associated with Metronidazole Resistance in Blastocystis Subtype-7

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kevin Shyong Wei

    2014-01-01

    Blastocystis is an extracellular, enteric pathogen that induces intestinal disorders in a range of hosts including humans. Recent studies have identified potential parasite virulence factors in and host responses to this parasite; however, little is known about Blastocystis-host attachment, which is crucial for colonization and virulence of luminal stages. By utilizing 7 different strains of the parasite belonging to two clinically relevant subtypes ST-4 and ST-7, we investigated Blastocystis-enterocyte adhesion and its association with parasite-induced epithelial barrier disruption. We also suggest that drug resistance in ST-7 strains might result in fitness cost that manifested as impairment of parasite adhesion and, consequently, virulence. ST-7 parasites were generally highly adhesive to Caco-2 cells and preferred binding to intercellular junctions. These strains also induced disruption of ZO-1 and occludin tight junction proteins as well as increased dextran-FITC flux across epithelial monolayers. Interestingly, their adhesion was correlated with metronidazole (Mz) susceptibility. Mz resistant (Mzr) strains were found to be less pathogenic, owing to compromised adhesion. Moreover, tolerance of nitrosative stress was also reduced in the Mzr strains. In conclusion, the findings indicate that Blastocystis attaches to intestinal epithelium and leads to epithelial barrier dysfunction and that drug resistance might entail a fitness cost in parasite virulence by limiting entero-adhesiveness. This is the first study of the cellular basis for strain-to-strain variation in parasite pathogenicity. Intra- and inter-subtype variability in cytopathogenicity provides a possible explanation for the diverse clinical outcomes of Blastocystis infections. PMID:24851944

  2. Structure and barrier properties of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells are affected by extracellular matrix protein coating.

    PubMed

    Sorkio, Anni; Hongisto, Heidi; Kaarniranta, Kai; Uusitalo, Hannu; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Skottman, Heli

    2014-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions play a vital role in cell morphology, migration, proliferation, and differentiation of cells. We investigated the role of ECM proteins on the structure and function of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (hESC-RPE) cells during their differentiation and maturation from hESCs into RPE cells in adherent differentiation cultures on several human ECM proteins found in native human Bruch's membrane, namely, collagen I, collagen IV, laminin, fibronectin, and vitronectin, as well as on commercial substrates of xeno-free CELLstart™ and Matrigel™. Cell pigmentation, expression of RPE-specific proteins, fine structure, as well as the production of basal lamina by hESC-RPE on different protein coatings were evaluated after 140 days of differentiation. The integrity of hESC-RPE epithelium and barrier properties on different coatings were investigated by measuring transepithelial resistance. All coatings supported the differentiation of hESC-RPE cells as demonstrated by early onset of cell pigmentation and further maturation to RPE monolayers after enrichment. Mature RPE phenotype was verified by RPE-specific gene and protein expression, correct epithelial polarization, and phagocytic activity. Significant differences were found in the degree of RPE cell pigmentation and tightness of epithelial barrier between different coatings. Further, the thickness of self-assembled basal lamina and secretion of the key ECM proteins found in the basement membrane of the native RPE varied between hESC-RPE cultured on compared protein coatings. In conclusion, this study shows that the cell culture substrate has a major effect on the structure and basal lamina production during the differentiation and maturation of hESC-RPE potentially influencing the success of cell integrations and survival after cell transplantation.

  3. Characterization of the Probiotic Yeast Saccharomyces boulardii in the Healthy Mucosal Immune System.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Lauren E; McDermott, Courtney D; Stewart, Taryn P; Hudson, William H; Rios, Daniel; Fasken, Milo B; Corbett, Anita H; Lamb, Tracey J

    2016-01-01

    The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii has been shown to ameliorate disease severity in the context of many infectious and inflammatory conditions. However, use of S. boulardii as a prophylactic agent or therapeutic delivery vector would require delivery of S. boulardii to a healthy, uninflamed intestine. In contrast to inflamed mucosal tissue, the diverse microbiota, intact epithelial barrier, and fewer inflammatory immune cells within the healthy intestine may all limit the degree to which S. boulardii contacts and influences the host mucosal immune system. Understanding the nature of these interactions is crucial for application of S. boulardii as a prophylactic agent or therapeutic delivery vehicle. In this study, we explore both intrinsic and immunomodulatory properties of S. boulardii in the healthy mucosal immune system. Genomic sequencing and morphological analysis of S. boulardii reveals changes in cell wall components compared to non-probiotic S. cerevisiae that may partially account for probiotic functions of S. boulardii. Flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry demonstrate limited S. boulardii association with murine Peyer's patches. We also show that although S. boulardii induces a systemic humoral immune response, this response is small in magnitude and not directed against S. boulardii itself. RNA-seq of the draining mesenteric lymph nodes indicates that even repeated administration of S. boulardii induces few transcriptional changes in the healthy intestine. Together these data strongly suggest that interaction between S. boulardii and the mucosal immune system in the healthy intestine is limited, with important implications for future work examining S. boulardii as a prophylactic agent and therapeutic delivery vehicle.

  4. Mucosal Immunity and Candida albicans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, David L.; Naglik, Julian R.

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between mucosal surfaces and microbial microbiota are key to host defense, health, and disease. These surfaces are exposed to high numbers of microbes and must be capable of distinguishing between those that are beneficial or avirulent and those that will invade and cause disease. Our understanding of the mechanisms involved in these discriminatory processes has recently begun to expand as new studies bring to light the importance of epithelial cells and novel immune cell subsets such as Th17 T cells in these processes. Elucidating how these mechanisms function will improve our understanding of many diverse diseases and improve our ability to treat patients suffering from these conditions. In our voyage to discover these mechanisms, mucosal interactions with opportunistic commensal organisms such as the fungus Candida albicans provide insights that are invaluable. Here, we review current knowledge of the interactions between C. albicans and epithelial surfaces and how this may shape our understanding of microbial-mucosal interactions. PMID:21776285

  5. Melatonin inhibits alcohol-induced increases in duodenal mucosal permeability in rats in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sommansson, Anna; Saudi, Wan Salman Wan; Nylander, Olof; Sjöblom, Markus

    2013-07-01

    Increased intestinal permeability is often associated with epithelial inflammation, leaky gut, or other pathological conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. We recently found that melatonin decreases basal duodenal mucosal permeability, suggesting a mucosal protective mode of action of this agent. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the effects of melatonin on ethanol-, wine-, and HCl-induced changes of duodenal mucosal paracellular permeability and motility. Rats were anesthetized with thiobarbiturate and a ~30-mm segment of the proximal duodenum was perfused in situ. Effects on duodenal mucosal paracellular permeability, assessed by measuring the blood-to-lumen clearance of ⁵¹Cr-EDTA, motility, and morphology, were investigated. Perfusing the duodenal segment with ethanol (10 or 15% alcohol by volume), red wine, or HCl (25-100 mM) induced concentration-dependent increases in paracellular permeability. Luminal ethanol and wine increased, whereas HCl transiently decreased duodenal motility. Administration of melatonin significantly reduced ethanol- and wine-induced increases in permeability by a mechanism abolished by the nicotinic receptor antagonists hexamethonium (iv) or mecamylamine (luminally). Signs of mucosal injury (edema and beginning of desquamation of the epithelium) in response to ethanol exposure were seen only in a few villi, an effect that was histologically not changed by melatonin. Melatonin did not affect HCl-induced increases in mucosal permeability or decreases in motility. Our results show that melatonin reduces ethanol- and wine-induced increases in duodenal paracellular permeability partly via an enteric inhibitory nicotinic-receptor dependent neural pathway. In addition, melatonin inhibits ethanol-induced increases in duodenal motor activity. These results suggest that melatonin may serve important gastrointestinal barrier functions.

  6. Management of Mucositis During Chemotherapy: From Pathophysiology to Pragmatic Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Van Sebille, Ysabella Z A; Stansborough, Romany; Wardill, Hannah R; Bateman, Emma; Gibson, Rachel J; Keefe, Dorothy M

    2015-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is a common condition caused by the breakdown of the mucosal barrier. Symptoms can include pain, vomiting and diarrhoea, which can often necessitate chemotherapy treatment breaks or dose reductions, thus compromising survival outcomes. Despite the significant impact of mucositis, there are currently limited clinically effective pharmacological therapies for the pathology. New emerging areas of research have been proposed to play key roles in the development of mucositis, providing rationale for potential new therapeutics for the prevention, treatment or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. This review aims to address these new areas of research and to comment on the therapeutics arising from them.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outer Membrane Vesicles Triggered by Human Mucosal Fluid and Lysozyme Can Prime Host Tissue Surfaces for Bacterial Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Metruccio, Matteo M. E.; Evans, David J.; Gabriel, Manal M.; Kadurugamuwa, Jagath L.; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of human morbidity and mortality that often targets epithelial surfaces. Host immunocompromise, or the presence of indwelling medical devices, including contact lenses, can predispose to infection. While medical devices are known to accumulate bacterial biofilms, it is not well understood why resistant epithelial surfaces become susceptible to P. aeruginosa. Many bacteria, including P. aeruginosa, release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) in response to stress that can fuse with host cells to alter their function. Here, we tested the hypothesis that mucosal fluid can trigger OMV release to compromise an epithelial barrier. This was tested using tear fluid and corneal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. After 1 h both human tear fluid, and the tear component lysozyme, greatly enhanced OMV release from P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS) controls (∼100-fold). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and SDS-PAGE showed tear fluid and lysozyme-induced OMVs were similar in size and protein composition, but differed from biofilm-harvested OMVs, the latter smaller with fewer proteins. Lysozyme-induced OMVs were cytotoxic to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro and murine corneal epithelium in vivo. OMV exposure in vivo enhanced Ly6G/C expression at the corneal surface, suggesting myeloid cell recruitment, and primed the cornea for bacterial adhesion (∼4-fold, P < 0.01). Sonication disrupted OMVs retained cytotoxic activity, but did not promote adhesion, suggesting the latter required OMV-mediated events beyond cell killing. These data suggest that mucosal fluid induced P. aeruginosa OMVs could contribute to loss of epithelial barrier function during medical device-related infections. PMID:27375592

  8. Molecular Pathways: Breaking the Epithelial Cancer Barrier for Chimeric Antigen Receptor and T-cell Receptor Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, Christian S

    2016-04-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically engineered to express a tumor-targeting chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) or T-cell receptor (TCR) can mediate cancer regression in some patients. CARs are synthetic single-chain proteins that use antibody domains to target cell surface antigens. TCRs are natural heterodimeric proteins that can target intracellular antigens through recognition of peptides bound to human leukocyte antigens. CARs have shown promise in B-cell malignancies and TCRs in melanoma, but neither approach has achieved clear success in an epithelial cancer. Treatment of epithelial cancers may be particularly challenging because of a paucity of target antigens expressed by carcinomas and not by important healthy tissues. In addition, epithelial cancers may be protected by inhibitory ligands and soluble factors in the tumor microenvironment. One strategy to overcome these negative regulators is to modulate expression of T-cell genes to enhance intrinsic T-cell function. Programmable nucleases, which can suppress inhibitory genes, and inducible gene expression systems, which can enhance stimulatory genes, are entering clinical testing. Other work is delineating whether control of genes for immune checkpoint receptors (e.g.,PDCD1, CTLA4) and cytokine and TCR signaling regulators (e.g.,CBLB, CISH, IL12, IL15) can increase the antitumor activity of therapeutic T cells.

  9. Immuno-localization of type-IV collagen in the blood-gas barrier and the epithelial–epithelial cell connections of the avian lung

    PubMed Central

    Jimoh, S. A.; Maina, J. N.

    2013-01-01

    The terminal respiratory units of the gas exchange tissue of the avian lung, the air capillaries (ACs) and the blood capillaries (BCs), are small and rigid: the basis of this mechanical feature has been highly contentious. Because the strength of the blood-gas barrier (BGB) of the mammalian lung has been attributed to the presence of type-IV collagen (T-IVc), localization of T-IVc in the basement membranes (BM) of the BGB and the epithelial–epithelial cell connections (E-ECCs) of the exchange tissue of the lung of the avian (chicken) lung was performed in order to determine whether it may likewise contribute to the strength of the BGB. T-IVc was localized in both the BM and the E-ECCs. As part of an integrated fibroskeletal scaffold on the lung, T-IVc may directly contribute to the strengths of the ACs and the BCs. PMID:23193049

  10. The inner foreskin of healthy males at risk of HIV infection harbors epithelial CD4+ CCR5+ cells and has features of an inflamed epidermal barrier.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Maria P; Lama, Javier R; Karuna, Shelly T; Fong, Youyi; Montano, Silvia M; Ganoza, Carmela; Gottardo, Raphael; Sanchez, Jorge; McElrath, M Juliana

    2014-01-01

    Male circumcision provides partial protection against multiple sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. To examine potential vulnerabilities in foreskin epithelial structure, we used Wilcoxon paired tests adjusted using the false discovery rate method to compare inner and outer foreskin samples from 20 healthy, sexually active Peruvian males who have sex with males or transgender females, ages 21-29, at elevated risk of HIV infection. No evidence of epithelial microtrauma was identified, as assessed by keratinocyte activation, fibronectin deposition, or parakeratosis. However, multiple suprabasal tight junction differences were identified: 1) inner foreskin stratum corneum was thinner than outer (p = 0.035); 2) claudin 1 had extended membrane-bound localization throughout inner epidermis stratum spinosum (p = 0.035); 3) membrane-bound claudin 4 was absent from inner foreskin stratum granulosum (p = 0.035); and 4) occludin had increased membrane deposition in inner foreskin stratum granulosum (p = 0.042) versus outer. Together, this suggests subclinical inflammation and paracellular transport modifications to the inner foreskin. A setting of inflammation was further supported by inner foreskin epithelial explant cultures secreting higher levels of GM-CSF (p = 0.029), IP-10 (p = 0.035) and RANTES (p = 0.022) than outer foreskin, and also containing an increased density of CCR5+ and CD4+ CCR5+ cells (p = 0.022). Inner foreskin dermis also secreted more RANTES than outer (p = 0.036), and had increased density of CCR5+ cells (p = 0.022). In conclusion, subclinical changes to the inner foreskin of sexually active males may support an inflammatory state, with availability of target cells for HIV infection and modifications to epidermal barriers, potentially explaining the benefits of circumcision for STI prevention.

  11. Collective epithelial cell invasion overcomes mechanical barriers of collagenous extracellular matrix by a narrow tube-like geometry and MMP14-dependent local softening†

    PubMed Central

    Alcaraz, Jordi; Mori, Hidetoshi; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Brownfield, Doug; Galgoczy, Roland; Bissell, Mina J.

    2013-01-01

    Collective cell invasion (CCI) through interstitial collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial to the initial stages of branching morphogenesis, and a hallmark of tissue repair and dissemination of certain tumors. The collagenous ECM acts as a mechanical barrier against CCI. However, the physical nature of this barrier and how it is overcome by cells remains incompletely understood. To address these questions, we performed theoretical and experimental analysis of mammary epithelial branching morphogenesis in 3D type I collagen (collagen-I) gels. We found that the mechanical resistance of collagen-I is largely due to its elastic rather than its viscous properties. We also identified two strategies utilized by mammary epithelial cells that can independently minimize ECM mechanical resistance during CCI. First, cells adopt a narrow tube-like geometry during invasion, which minimizes the elastic opposition from the ECM as revealed by theoretical modeling of the most frequent invasive shapes and sizes. Second, the stiffness of the collagenous ECM is reduced at invasive fronts due to its degradation by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), as indicated by direct measurements of collagen-I microelasticity by atomic force microscopy. Molecular techniques further specified that the membrane-bound MMP14 mediates degradation of collagen-I at invasive fronts. Thus, our findings reveal that MMP14 is necessary to efficiently reduce the physical restraints imposed by collagen-I during branching morphogenesis, and help our overall understanding of how forces are balanced between cells and their surrounding ECM to maintain collective geometry and mechanical stability during CCI. PMID:21993836

  12. Salmosan, a β-galactomannan-rich product, in combination with Lactobacillus plantarum contributes to restore intestinal epithelial barrier function by modulation of cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Brufau, M Teresa; Campo-Sabariz, Joan; Carné, Sergi; Ferrer, Ruth; Martín-Venegas, Raquel

    2017-03-01

    Mannan-oligosaccharides (MOSs) are mannose-rich substrates with several intestinal health-promoting properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential capacity of Salmosan (S-βGM), a β-galactomannan-rich MOS product, to restore epithelial barrier function independently from its capacity to reduce bacterial invasion. In addition, the combination of S-βGM with the proven probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum (LP) was also tested. Paracellular permeability was assessed by transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) in co-cultures of Caco-2 cells and macrophages (differentiated from THP-1 cells) stimulated with LPS of Salmonella Enteritidis and in Caco-2 cell cultures stimulated with TNF-α in the absence or presence of 500 μg/ml S-βGM, LP (MOI 10) or a combination of both. In both culture models, TER was significantly reduced up to 25% by LPS or TNF-α stimulation, and the addition of S-βGM or LP alone did not modify TER, whereas the combination of both restored TER to values of nonstimulated cells. Under LPS stimulation, TNF-α production was significantly increased by 10-fold, whereas IL-10 and IL-6 levels were not modified. The combination of S-βGM and LP reduced TNF-α production to nonstimulated cell values and significantly increased IL-10 and IL-6 levels (5- and 7.5-fold, respectively). Moreover, S-βGM has the capacity to induce an increase of fivefold in LP growth. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that S-βGM in combination with LP protects epithelial barrier function by modulation of cytokine secretion, thus giving an additional value to this MOS as a potential symbiotic.

  13. TNF-α modulation of intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier is regulated by ERK1/2 activation of Elk-1.

    PubMed

    Al-Sadi, Rana; Guo, Shuhong; Ye, Dongmei; Ma, Thomas Y

    2013-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) is a proinflammatory cytokine that plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. TNF-α causes an increase in intestinal permeability; however, the signaling pathways and the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. The major purpose of this study was to investigate the role of MAP kinase pathways (ERK1/2 and p38 kinase) and the molecular processes involved. An in vitro intestinal epithelial model system consisting of Caco-2 monolayers and an in vivo mouse model system were used to delineate the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in TNF-α effects on tight junction barrier. The TNF-α-induced increase in Caco-2 tight junction permeability was mediated by activation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway, but not the p38 kinase pathway. Activation of the ERK1/2 pathway led to phosphorylation and activation of the ETS domain-containing transcription factor Elk-1. The activated Elk-1 translocated to the nucleus, where it bound to its binding motif on the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) promoter region, leading to the activation of MLCK promoter activity and gene transcription. In addition, in vivo intestinal perfusion studies also indicated that the TNF-α-induced increase in mouse intestinal permeability requires ERK1/2-dependent activation of Elk-1. These studies provide novel insight into the cellular and molecular processes that regulate the TNF-α-induced increase in intestinal epithelial tight junction permeability.

  14. Cultivation of Human Oral Mucosal Explants on Contact Lenses.

    PubMed

    Zsebik, Barbara; Ujlaky-Nagy, László; Losonczy, Gergely; Vereb, György; Takács, Lili

    2017-03-24

    Purpose/Aim: Autologous cultivated oral mucosal (OM) epithelial transplantation has been successfully used as corneal epithelial replacement in bilateral limbal stem cell deficiency. Recently, lotrafilcon A contact lens (CL) surface was described as a suitable carrier for cultured stem cells in corneal epithelial transplantation. Our aim was to establish explant cultures from human OM on CL carriers that are free of animal-derived materials and feeder cells.

  15. Collagen peptides ameliorate intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction in immunostimulatory Caco-2 cell monolayers via enhancing tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qianru; Chen, Oliver; Martins, Isabela M; Hou, Hu; Zhao, Xue; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Li, Bafang

    2017-03-22

    Dysfunction of the intestinal barrier plays a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and multiple organ failure. The effect of Alaska pollock skin-derived collagen and its 3 tryptic hydrolytic fractions, HCP (6 kDa retentate), MCP (3 kDa retentate) and LCP (3 kDa permeate) on TNF-α induced barrier dysfunction was investigated in Caco-2 cell monolayers. TNF-α induced barrier dysfunction was significantly attenuated by the collagen and its peptide fractions, especially LCP, compared to TNF-α treated controls (P < 0.05). Compared to a negative control, 24 h pre-incubation with 2 mg mL(-1) LCP significantly alleviated the TNF-α induced breakdown of the tight junction protein ZO-1 and occludin and inhibited MLC phosphorylation and MLCK expression. The activation of NFκB and Elk-1 was suppressed by LCP. Thus, collagen peptides may attenuate TNF-α induced barrier dysfunction of Caco-2 cells by inhibiting the NFκB and ERK1/2-mediated MLCK pathway with associated decreases in ZO-1 and occludin protein expression.

  16. A Choroid Plexus Epithelial Cell-based Model of the Human Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier to Study Bacterial Infection from the Basolateral Side.

    PubMed

    Dinner, Stefanie; Borkowski, Julia; Stump-Guthier, Carolin; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Schroten, Horst; Schwerk, Christian

    2016-05-06

    The epithelial cells of the choroid plexus (CP), located in the ventricular system of the brain, form the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). The BCSFB functions in separating the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the blood and restricting the molecular exchange to a minimum extent. An in vitro model of the BCSFB is based on cells derived from a human choroid plexus papilloma (HIBCPP). HIBCPP cells display typical barrier functions including formation of tight junctions (TJs), development of a transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), as well as minor permeabilities for macromolecules. There are several pathogens that can enter the central nervous system (CNS) via the BCSFB and subsequently cause severe disease like meningitis. One of these pathogens is Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis), a human-specific bacterium. Employing the HIBCPP cells in an inverted cell culture filter insert system enables to study interactions of pathogens with cells of the BCSFB from the basolateral cell side, which is relevant in vivo. In this article, we describe seeding and culturing of HIBCPP cells on cell culture inserts. Further, infection of the cells with N. meningitidis along with analysis of invaded and adhered bacteria via double immunofluorescence is demonstrated. As the cells of the CP are also involved in other diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer`s disease and Multiple Sclerosis, as well as during the brain metastasis of tumor cells, the model system can also be applied in other fields of research. It provides the potential to decipher molecular mechanisms and to identify novel therapeutic targets.

  17. Glycoprotein A33 deficiency: a new mouse model of impaired intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Benjamin B.; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Buchert, Michael; Putoczki, Tracy L.; Doggett, Karen; Bao, Shisan; Johnstone, Cameron N.; Masson, Frederick; Hollande, Frederic; Burgess, Antony W.; Scott, Andrew M.; Ernst, Matthias; Heath, Joan K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cells of the intestinal epithelium provide a selectively permeable barrier between the external environment and internal tissues. The integrity of this barrier is maintained by tight junctions, specialised cell-cell contacts that permit the absorption of water and nutrients while excluding microbes, toxins and dietary antigens. Impairment of intestinal barrier function contributes to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, including food hypersensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colitis-associated cancer (CAC). Glycoprotein A33 (GPA33) is an intestinal epithelium-specific cell surface marker and member of the CTX group of transmembrane proteins. Roles in cell-cell adhesion have been demonstrated for multiple CTX family members, suggesting a similar function for GPA33 within the gastrointestinal tract. To test a potential requirement for GPA33 in intestinal barrier function, we generated Gpa33−/− mice and subjected them to experimental regimens designed to produce food hypersensitivity, colitis and CAC. Gpa33−/− mice exhibited impaired intestinal barrier function. This was shown by elevated steady-state immunosurveillance in the colonic mucosa and leakiness to oral TRITC-labelled dextran after short-term exposure to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) to injure the intestinal epithelium. Gpa33−/− mice also exhibited rapid onset and reduced resolution of DSS-induced colitis, and a striking increase in the number of colitis-associated tumours produced by treatment with the colon-specific mutagen azoxymethane (AOM) followed by two cycles of DSS. In contrast, Gpa33−/− mice treated with AOM alone showed no increase in sporadic tumour formation, indicating that their increased tumour susceptibility is dependent on inflammatory stimuli. Finally, Gpa33−/− mice displayed hypersensitivity to food allergens, a common co-morbidity in humans with IBD. We propose that Gpa33−/− mice provide a valuable model to study the mechanisms linking

  18. Polyamines and Gut Mucosal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, Jennifer; Chang, Elizabeth T.; Wang, Jian-Ying; Rao, Jaladanki N.

    2012-01-01

    The epithelium of gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa has the most rapid turnover rate of any tissue in the body and its integrity is preserved through the dynamic balance between cell migration, proliferation, growth arrest and apoptosis. To maintain tissue homeostasis of the GI mucosa, the rates of epithelial cell division and apoptosis must be highly regulated by various extracellular and intracellular factors including cellular polyamines. Natural polyamines spermidine, spermine and their precursor putrescine, are organic cations in eukaryotic cells and are implicated in the control of multiple signaling pathways and distinct cellular functions. Normal intestinal epithelial growth depends on the available supply of polyamines to the dividing cells in the crypts, and polyamines also regulate intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) apoptosis. Although the specific molecular processes controlled by polyamines remains to be fully defined, increasing evidence indicates that polyamines regulate intestinal epithelial integrity by modulating the expression of various growth-related genes. In this review, we will extrapolate the current state of scientific knowledge regarding the roles of polyamines in gut mucosal homeostasis and highlight progress in cellular and molecular mechanisms of polyamines and their potential clinical applications. PMID:25237589

  19. Mucosal immunology of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Berin, M Cecilia; Sampson, Hugh A

    2013-05-06

    Food allergies are increasing in prevalence at a higher rate than can be explained by genetic factors, suggesting a role for as yet unidentified environmental factors. In this review, we summarize the state of knowledge about the healthy immune response to antigens in the diet and the basis of immune deviation that results in immunoglobulin E (IgE) sensitization and allergic reactivity to foods. The intestinal epithelium forms the interface between the external environment and the mucosal immune system, and emerging data suggest that the interaction between intestinal epithelial cells and mucosal dendritic cells is of particular importance in determining the outcome of immune responses to dietary antigens. Exposure to food allergens through non-oral routes, in particular through the skin, is increasingly recognized as a potentially important factor in the increasing rate of food allergy. There are many open questions on the role of environmental factors, such as dietary factors and microbiota, in the development of food allergy, but data suggest that both have an important modulatory effect on the mucosal immune system. Finally, we discuss recent developments in our understanding of immune mechanisms of clinical manifestations of food allergy. New experimental tools, particularly in the field of genomics and the microbiome, are likely to shed light on factors responsible for the growing clinical problem of food allergy.

  20. Transgenic Expression of miR-222 Disrupts Intestinal Epithelial Regeneration by Targeting Multiple Genes Including Frizzled-7.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hee Kyoung; Chen, Yu; Rao, Jaladanki N; Liu, Lan; Xiao, Lan; Turner, Douglas J; Yang, Peixin; Gorospe, Myriam; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2015-08-03

    Defects in intestinal epithelial integrity occur commonly in various pathologies. miR-222 is implicated in many aspects of cellular function and plays an important role in several diseases, but its exact biological function in the intestinal epithelium is underexplored. We generated mice with intestinal epithelial tissue-specific overexpression of miR-222 to investigate the function of miR-222 in intestinal physiology and diseases in vivo. Transgenic expression of miR-222 inhibited mucosal growth and increased susceptibility to apoptosis in the small intestine, thus leading to mucosal atrophy. The miR-222-elevated intestinal epithelium was vulnerable to pathological stress, since local overexpression of miR-222 not only delayed mucosal repair after ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury but also exacerbated gut barrier dysfunction induced by exposure to cecal ligation and puncture. miR-222 overexpression also decreased expression of the Wnt receptor Frizzled-7 (FZD7), cyclin-dependent kinase 4, and tight junctions in the mucosal tissue. Mechanistically, we identified the Fzd7 mRNA as a novel target of miR-222 and found that [miR-222/Fzd7 mRNA] association repressed Fzd7 mRNA translation. These results implicate miR-222 as a negative regulator of normal intestinal epithelial regeneration and protection by down-regulating expression of multiple genes including the Fzd7. Our findings also suggest a novel role of increased miR-222 in the pathogenesis of mucosal growth inhibition, delayed healing, and barrier dysfunction.

  1. Curcumin Protects Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Function of Rat Enteritis via Activation of MKP-1 and Attenuation of p38 and NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fan-Su; Zhang, Qing-Hua; Zeng, Jian-Ying; Xiao, Li-Ping; Yu, Xin-Pei; Peng, Dan-dan; Su, Lei; Xiao, Bing; Zhang, Zhen-Shu

    2010-01-01

    Background Intestinal mucosa barrier (IMB) dysfunction results in many notorious diseases for which there are currently few effective treatments. We studied curcumin's protective effect on IMB and examined its mechanism by using methotrexate (MTX) induced rat enteritis model and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treated cell death model. Methodology/Principal Findings Curcumin was intragastrically administrated from the first day, models were made for 7 days. Cells were treated with curcumin for 30 min before exposure to LPS. Rat intestinal mucosa was collected for evaluation of pathological changes. We detected the activities of D-lactate and diamine oxidase (DAO) according to previous research and measured the levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) by colorimetric method. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) were determined by RT-PCR and IL-10 production was determined by ELISA. We found Curcumin decreased the levels of D-lactate, DAO, MPO, ICAM-1, IL-1β and TNF-α, but increased the levels of IL-10 and SOD in rat models. We further confirmed mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) was activated but phospho-p38 was inhibited by curcumin by western blot assay. Finally, NF-κB translocation was monitored by immunofluorescent staining. We showed that curcumin repressed I-κB and interfered with the translocation of NF-κB into nucleus. Conclusions/Significance The effect of curcumin is mediated by the MKP-1-dependent inactivation of p38 and inhibition of NF-κB-mediated transcription. Curcumin, with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities may be used as an effective reagent for protecting intestinal mucosa barrier and other related intestinal diseases. PMID:20885979

  2. Contribution of epithelial innate immunity to systemic protection afforded by prolyl hydroxylase inhibition in murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Keely, Simon; Campbell, Eric L.; Baird, Alan W.; Hansbro, Philip M.; Shalwitz, Robert A.; Kotsakis, Anna; McNamee, Eoin N.; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Kominsky, Douglas J.; Colgan, Sean P.

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) through prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) inhibition limits mucosal damage associated with models of murine colitis. However, little is known about how PHD inhibitors (PHDi) influence systemic immune function during mucosal inflammation or the relative importance of immunological changes to mucosal protection. We hypothesized that PHDi enhances systemic innate immune responses to colitis-associated bacteremia. Mice with colitis induced by TNBS were treated with AKB-4924, a new HIF-1 isoform-predominant PHDi and clinical, immunological and biochemical endpoints were assessed. Administration of AKB-4924 led to significantly reduced weight loss and disease activity compared to vehicle controls. Treated groups were pyrexic, but did not become subsequently hypothermic. PHDi treatment augmented epithelial barrier function and led to an approximately 50-fold reduction in serum endotoxin during colitis. AKB-4924 also decreased cytokines involved in pyrogenesis and hypothermia, significantly reducing serum levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, while increasing IL-10. Treatment offered no protection against colitis in epithelial-specific HIF-1α deficient mice, strongly implicating epithelial HIF-1α as the tissue target for AKB-4924-mediated protection. Taken together, these results indicate that inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase with AKB-4924 enhances innate immunity and identifies the epithelium is a central site of inflammatory protection afforded by PHDi in murine colitis. PMID:23695513

  3. Tight junctions and IBS--the link between epithelial permeability, low-grade inflammation, and symptom generation?

    PubMed

    Piche, T

    2014-03-01

    In this issue of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Dr Ewa Wilcz-Villega and colleagues report low expression of E-cadherin, a tight junction protein involved in the regulation of paracellular permeability, in the colonic mucosa of patients with the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with predominance of diarrhea (IBS-D) or alternating symptoms (IBS-A). These findings constitute an improvement in our knowledge of epithelial barrier disruption associated with IBS. There is mounting evidence to indicate that a compromised epithelial barrier is associated with low-grade immune activation and intestinal dysfunction in at least a proportion of IBS patients. During the last 10 years of research, much interest has focused on the increase in the number of different types of immune cells in the gut mucosa of IBS patients including: mast cells, T lymphocytes, and other local cells such as enteroendocrine cells. The inflammatory mediators released by these cells or other luminal factors could be at the origin of altered epithelial barrier functions and enteric nervous system signaling, which lead to gut hypersensitivity. A current conceptual framework states that clinical symptoms of IBS could be associated with structural and functional abnormalities of the mucosal barrier, highlighting the crucial importance of elucidating the contributory role of epithelial barrier defects in the pathogenesis of IBS. More importantly, disruption of the epithelial barrier could also participate in the generation of persistent abdominal pain and discomfort mimicking IBS in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases considered in remission. This mini review gives a brief summary of clinical and experimental evidence concerning the mechanisms underlying epithelial barrier defects in IBS.

  4. The cell line NCl-H441 is a useful in vitro model for transport studies of human distal lung epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Johanna J; Muchitsch, Viktoria E; Gausterer, Julia C; Schwagerus, Elena; Huwer, Hanno; Daum, Nicole; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Ehrhardt, Carsten

    2014-03-03

    The lack of a well characterized, continuously growing in vitro model of human distal lung epithelial phenotype constitutes a serious limitation in the area of inhalation biopharmaceutics, particularly in the context of transepithelial transport studies. Here, we investigated if a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line, NCl-H441, has potential to serve as an in vitro model of human distal lung epithelium. The development of barrier properties was studied by immunocytochemistry (ICC) against the junction proteins zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1) and E-cadherin and measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). Moreover, transport studies with the paracellular marker compounds fluorescein sodium and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextrans of molecular weights ranging from 4 to 70 kDa were carried out. The expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1) and organic cation transporters (OCT/Ns; SLC22A1-A5) was investigated by ICC and immunoblot. P-gp function was assessed by monolayer release and bidirectional transport studies using rhodamine 123 (Rh123) and the inhibitors verapamil and LY335979. Uptake of 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+)) was measured, in order to assess organic cation transporter function in vitro. Furthermore, the inhibitory potential of several organic cations on ASP(+) uptake was studied. NCl-H441 cells, when grown under liquid-covered conditions, formed confluent, electrically tight monolayers with peak TEER values of approximately 1000 Ω·cm(2), after 8-12 days in culture. These monolayers were able to differentiate paracellularly transported substrates according to their molecular weight. Presence of P-gp, OCT1, OCT2, OCT3, OCTN1, and OCTN2 was confirmed by Western blot and ICC and was similar to data from freshly isolated human alveolar epithelial cells in primary culture. Rh123 release from NCI-H441 monolayers was time-dependent and showed low, albeit significant attenuation by both inhibitors

  5. A primary human macrophage-enteroid co-culture model to investigate mucosal gut physiology and host-pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Gaelle; Baetz, Nicholas W.; Staab, Janet F.; Donowitz, Mark; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Zachos, Nicholas C.

    2017-01-01

    Integration of the intestinal epithelium and the mucosal immune system is critical for gut homeostasis. The intestinal epithelium is a functional barrier that secludes luminal content, senses changes in the gut microenvironment, and releases immune regulators that signal underlying immune cells. However, interactions between epithelial and innate immune cells to maintain barrier integrity and prevent infection are complex and poorly understood. We developed and characterized a primary human macrophage-enteroid co-culture model for in-depth studies of epithelial and macrophage interactions. Human intestinal stem cell-derived enteroid monolayers co-cultured with human monocyte-derived macrophages were used to evaluate barrier function, cytokine secretion, and protein expression under basal conditions and following bacterial infection. Macrophages enhanced barrier function and maturity of enteroid monolayers as indicated by increased transepithelial electrical resistance and cell height. Communication between the epithelium and macrophages was demonstrated through morphological changes and cytokine production. Intraepithelial macrophage projections, efficient phagocytosis, and stabilized enteroid barrier function revealed a coordinated response to enterotoxigenic and enteropathogenic E. coli infections. In summary, we have established the first primary human macrophage-enteroid co-culture system, defined conditions that allow for a practical and reproducible culture model, and demonstrated its suitability to study gut physiology and host responses to enteric pathogens. PMID:28345602

  6. The Effector Domain Region of the Vibrio vulnificus MARTX Toxin Confers Biphasic Epithelial Barrier Disruption and Is Essential for Systemic Spread from the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Gavin, Hannah E.; Beubier, Nike T.

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus causes highly lethal bacterial infections in which the Multifunctional Autoprocessing Repeats-in-Toxins (MARTX) toxin product of the rtxA1 gene is a key virulence factor. MARTX toxins are secreted proteins up to 5208 amino acids in size. Conserved MARTX N- and C-terminal repeat regions work in concert to form pores in eukaryotic cell membranes, through which the toxin’s central region of modular effector domains is translocated. Upon inositol hexakisphosphate-induced activation of the of the MARTX cysteine protease domain (CPD) in the eukaryotic cytosol, effector domains are released from the holotoxin by autoproteolytic activity. We previously reported that the native MARTX toxin effector domain repertoire is dispensable for epithelial cellular necrosis in vitro, but essential for cell rounding and apoptosis prior to necrotic cell death. Here we use an intragastric mouse model to demonstrate that the effector domain region is required for bacterial virulence during intragastric infection. The MARTX effector domain region is essential for bacterial dissemination from the intestine, but dissemination occurs in the absence of overt intestinal tissue pathology. We employ an in vitro model of V. vulnificus interaction with polarized colonic epithelial cells to show that the MARTX effector domain region induces rapid intestinal barrier dysfunction and increased paracellular permeability prior to onset of cell lysis. Together, these results negate the inherent assumption that observations of necrosis in vitro directly predict bacterial virulence, and indicate a paradigm shift in our conceptual understanding of MARTX toxin function during intestinal infection. Results implicate the MARTX effector domain region in mediating early bacterial dissemination from the intestine to distal organs–a key step in V. vulnificus foodborne pathogenesis–even before onset of overt intestinal pathology. PMID:28060924

  7. Inflammatory Response and Barrier Dysfunction by Different e-Cigarette Flavoring Chemicals Identified by Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry in e-Liquids and e-Vapors on Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gerloff, Janice; Sundar, Isaac K.; Freter, Robert; Sekera, Emily R.; Friedman, Alan E.; Robinson, Risa; Pagano, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies suggest that electronic cigarette (e-cig) flavors can be harmful to lung tissue by imposing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. The potential inflammatory response by lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts exposed to e-cig flavoring chemicals in addition to other risk-anticipated flavor enhancers inhaled by e-cig users is not known. The goal of this study was to evaluate the release of the proinflammatory cytokine (interleukin-8 [IL-8]) and epithelial barrier function in response to different e-cig flavoring chemicals identified in various e-cig e-liquid flavorings and vapors by chemical characterization using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis. Flavorings, such as acetoin (butter), diacetyl, pentanedione, maltol (malt), ortho-vanillin (vanilla), coumarin, and cinnamaldehyde in comparison with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), were used in this study. Human bronchial epithelial cells (Beas2B), human mucoepidermoid carcinoma epithelial cells (H292), and human lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) were treated with each flavoring chemical for 24 hours. The cells and conditioned media were then collected and analyzed for toxicity (viability %), lung epithelial barrier function, and proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 release. Cell viability was not significantly affected by any of the flavoring chemicals tested at a concentration of 10 μM to 1 mM. Acetoin and diacetyl treatment induced IL-8 release in Beas2B cells. Acetoin- and pentanedione-treated HFL-1 cells produced a differential, but significant response for IL-8 release compared to controls and TNFα. Flavorings, such as ortho-vanillin and maltol, induced IL-8 release in Beas2B cells, but not in H292 cells. Of all the flavoring chemicals tested, acetoin and maltol were more potent inducers of IL-8 release than TNFα in Beas2B and HFL-1 cells. Flavoring chemicals rapidly impaired epithelial barrier function in human bronchial epithelial cells (16-HBE) as measured by electric cell

  8. A Gut Microbial Metabolite of Linoleic Acid, 10-Hydroxy-cis-12-octadecenoic Acid, Ameliorates Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Impairment Partially via GPR40-MEK-ERK Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Junki; Mizukure, Taichi; Park, Si-Bum; Kishino, Shigenobu; Kimura, Ikuo; Hirano, Kanako; Bergamo, Paolo; Rossi, Mauro; Suzuki, Takuya; Arita, Makoto; Ogawa, Jun; Tanabe, Soichi

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbial metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids have attracted much attention because of their various physiological properties. Dysfunction of tight junction (TJ) in the intestine contributes to the pathogenesis of many disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. We evaluated the effects of five novel gut microbial metabolites on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced barrier impairment in Caco-2 cells and dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice. 10-Hydroxy-cis-12-octadecenoic acid (HYA), a gut microbial metabolite of linoleic acid, suppressed TNF-α and dextran sulfate sodium-induced changes in the expression of TJ-related molecules, occludin, zonula occludens-1, and myosin light chain kinase. HYA also suppressed the expression of TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2) mRNA and protein expression in Caco-2 cells and colonic tissue. In addition, HYA suppressed the protein expression of TNFR2 in murine intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, HYA significantly up-regulated G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 expression in Caco-2 cells. It also induced [Ca2+]i responses in HEK293 cells expressing human GPR40 with higher sensitivity than linoleic acid, its metabolic precursor. The barrier-recovering effects of HYA were abrogated by a GPR40 antagonist and MEK inhibitor in Caco-2 cells. Conversely, 10-hydroxyoctadacanoic acid, which is a gut microbial metabolite of oleic acid and lacks a carbon-carbon double bond at Δ12 position, did not show these TJ-restoring activities and down-regulated GPR40 expression. Therefore, HYA modulates TNFR2 expression, at least partially, via the GPR40-MEK-ERK pathway and may be useful in the treatment of TJ-related disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25505251

  9. Maturation of the Intestinal Epithelial Barrier in Neonatal Rats Coincides with Decreased FcRn Expression, Replacement of Vacuolated Enterocytes and Changed Blimp-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo Sureda, Ester; Weström, Björn; Pierzynowski, Stefan G.; Prykhodko, Olena

    2016-01-01

    Background The intestinal barrier is immature in newborn mammals allowing for transfer of bioactive macromolecules, e.g. protecting antibodies, from mother’s milk to the blood circulation and in neonatal rodents lasts until weaning. This passage involves the neonatal-Fc-receptor (FcRn) binding IgG in the proximal and highly endocytic vacuolated enterocytes in the distal immature small intestine (SI). Recent studies have suggested an involvement of the transcription factor B-lymphocyte-induced maturation-protein-1 (Blimp-1) in the regulation of SI maturation in mice. Hence, the objective of the present study was to monitor the development of the intestinal barrier function, in relation to Blimp-1 expression during both natural and precociously induced intestinal maturation in rats. Results During the suckling period IgG plasma levels increased, while after gut closure it temporarily decreased. This corresponded to a high expression of FcRn in the proximal SI epithelium and the presence of vacuolated enterocytes in the distal SI. The immature foetal-type epithelium was replaced after weaning or induced precocious maturation, by an adult-type epithelium with FcRnneg cells in the proximal and by non-vacuolated enterocytes in the distal SI. In parallel to this epithelial shift, Blimp-1 expression decreased in the distal SI. Conclusion The switch from foetal- to adult-type epithelium, with decreased proximal expression of FcRn and distal replacement of vacuolated enterocytes, was concurrent in the two SI regions and could be used for monitoring SI maturation in the rat. The changes in expression of Blimp-1 in the distal SI epithelium followed the maturation pattern. PMID:27736989

  10. Outer Membrane Vesicles and Soluble Factors Released by Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and Commensal ECOR63 Enhance Barrier Function by Regulating Expression of Tight Junction Proteins in Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Carina-Shianya; Badia, Josefa; Bosch, Manel; Giménez, Rosa; Baldomà, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelial layer forms a physical and biochemical barrier that maintains the segregation between host and intestinal microbiota. The integrity of this barrier is critical in maintaining homeostasis in the body and its dysfunction is linked to a variety of illnesses, especially inflammatory bowel disease. Gut microbes, and particularly probiotic bacteria, modulate the barrier integrity by reducing gut permeability and reinforcing tight junctions. Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is a good colonizer of the human gut with proven therapeutic efficacy in the remission of ulcerative colitis in humans. EcN positively modulates the intestinal epithelial barrier through upregulation and redistribution of the tight junction proteins ZO-1, ZO-2 and claudin-14. Upregulation of claudin-14 has been attributed to the secreted protein TcpC. Whether regulation of ZO-1 and ZO-2 is mediated by EcN secreted factors remains unknown. The aim of this study was to explore whether outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by EcN strengthen the epithelial barrier. This study includes other E. coli strains of human intestinal origin that contain the tcpC gene, such as ECOR63. Cell-free supernatants collected from the wild-type strains and from the derived tcpC mutants were fractionated into isolated OMVs and soluble secreted factors. The impact of these extracellular fractions on the epithelial barrier was evaluated by measuring transepithelial resistance and expression of several tight junction proteins in T-84 and Caco-2 polarized monolayers. Our results show that the strengthening activity of EcN and ECOR63 does not exclusively depend on TcpC. Both OMVs and soluble factors secreted by these strains promote upregulation of ZO-1 and claudin-14, and down-regulation of claudin-2. The OMVs-mediated effects are TcpC-independent. Soluble secreted TcpC contributes to the upregulation of ZO-1 and claudin-14, but this protein has no effect on the transcriptional

  11. Outer Membrane Vesicles and Soluble Factors Released by Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and Commensal ECOR63 Enhance Barrier Function by Regulating Expression of Tight Junction Proteins in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Carina-Shianya; Badia, Josefa; Bosch, Manel; Giménez, Rosa; Baldomà, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelial layer forms a physical and biochemical barrier that maintains the segregation between host and intestinal microbiota. The integrity of this barrier is critical in maintaining homeostasis in the body and its dysfunction is linked to a variety of illnesses, especially inflammatory bowel disease. Gut microbes, and particularly probiotic bacteria, modulate the barrier integrity by reducing gut permeability and reinforcing tight junctions. Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is a good colonizer of the human gut with proven therapeutic efficacy in the remission of ulcerative colitis in humans. EcN positively modulates the intestinal epithelial barrier through upregulation and redistribution of the tight junction proteins ZO-1, ZO-2 and claudin-14. Upregulation of claudin-14 has been attributed to the secreted protein TcpC. Whether regulation of ZO-1 and ZO-2 is mediated by EcN secreted factors remains unknown. The aim of this study was to explore whether outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by EcN strengthen the epithelial barrier. This study includes other E. coli strains of human intestinal origin that contain the tcpC gene, such as ECOR63. Cell-free supernatants collected from the wild-type strains and from the derived tcpC mutants were fractionated into isolated OMVs and soluble secreted factors. The impact of these extracellular fractions on the epithelial barrier was evaluated by measuring transepithelial resistance and expression of several tight junction proteins in T-84 and Caco-2 polarized monolayers. Our results show that the strengthening activity of EcN and ECOR63 does not exclusively depend on TcpC. Both OMVs and soluble factors secreted by these strains promote upregulation of ZO-1 and claudin-14, and down-regulation of claudin-2. The OMVs-mediated effects are TcpC-independent. Soluble secreted TcpC contributes to the upregulation of ZO-1 and claudin-14, but this protein has no effect on the transcriptional

  12. Microbiota-host interactions in irritable bowel syndrome: epithelial barrier, immune regulation and brain-gut interactions.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Niall P; Quigley, Eamonn M M; Brint, Elizabeth

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, sometimes debilitating, gastrointestinal disorder worldwide. While altered gut motility and sensation, as well as aberrant brain perception of visceral events, are thought to contribute to the genesis of symptoms in IBS, a search for an underlying aetiology has, to date, proven unsuccessful. Recently, attention has been focused on the microbiota as a possible factor in the pathogenesis of IBS. Prompted by a number of clinical observations, such as the recognition of the de novo development of IBS following enteric infections, as well as descriptions of changes in colonic bacterial populations in IBS and supported by clinical responses to interventions, such as antibiotics and probiotics, that modify the microbiota, various approaches have been taken to investigating the microbiota-host response in IBS, as well as in animal models thereof. From such studies a considerable body of evidence has accumulated to indicate the activation or upregulation of both factors involved in bacterial engagement with the host as well host defence mechanisms against bacteria. Alterations in gut barrier function, occurring in response, or in parallel, to changes in the microbiota, have also been widely described and can be seen to play a pivotal role in generating and sustaining host immune responses both within and beyond the gut. In this manner a plausible hypothesis, based on an altered microbiota and/or an aberrant host response, for the pathogenesis, of at least some instances of IBS, can be generated.

  13. Microbiota-host interactions in irritable bowel syndrome: Epithelial barrier, immune regulation and brain-gut interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Niall P; Quigley, Eamonn MM; Brint, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, sometimes debilitating, gastrointestinal disorder worldwide. While altered gut motility and sensation, as well as aberrant brain perception of visceral events, are thought to contribute to the genesis of symptoms in IBS, a search for an underlying aetiology has, to date, proven unsuccessful. Recently, attention has been focused on the microbiota as a possible factor in the pathogenesis of IBS. Prompted by a number of clinical observations, such as the recognition of the de novo development of IBS following enteric infections, as well as descriptions of changes in colonic bacterial populations in IBS and supported by clinical responses to interventions, such as antibiotics and probiotics, that modify the microbiota, various approaches have been taken to investigating the microbiota-host response in IBS, as well as in animal models thereof. From such studies a considerable body of evidence has accumulated to indicate the activation or upregulation of both factors involved in bacterial engagement with the host as well host defence mechanisms against bacteria. Alterations in gut barrier function, occurring in response, or in parallel, to changes in the microbiota, have also been widely described and can be seen to play a pivotal role in generating and sustaining host immune responses both within and beyond the gut. In this manner a plausible hypothesis, based on an altered microbiota and/or an aberrant host response, for the pathogenesis, of at least some instances of IBS, can be generated. PMID:25083059

  14. Illuminating dynamic neutrophil trans-epithelial migration with micro-optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Kengyeh K.; Kusek, Mark E.; Liu, Linbo; Som, Avira; Yonker, Lael M.; Leung, Huimin; Cui, Dongyao; Ryu, Jinhyeob; Eaton, Alexander D.; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Hurley, Bryan P.

    2017-01-01

    A model of neutrophil migration across epithelia is desirable to interrogate the underlying mechanisms of neutrophilic breach of mucosal barriers. A co-culture system consisting of a polarized mucosal epithelium and human neutrophils can provide a versatile model of trans-epithelial migration in vitro, but observations are typically limited to quantification of migrated neutrophils by myeloperoxidase correlation, a destructive assay that precludes direct longitudinal study. Our laboratory has recently developed a new isotropic 1-μm resolution optical imaging technique termed micro-optical coherence tomography (μOCT) that enables 4D (x,y,z,t) visualization of neutrophils in the co-culture environment. By applying μOCT to the trans-epithelial migration model, we can robustly monitor the spatial distribution as well as the quantity of neutrophils chemotactically crossing the epithelial boundary over time. Here, we demonstrate the imaging and quantitative migration results of our system as applied to neutrophils migrating across intestinal epithelia in response to a chemoattractant. We also demonstrate that perturbation of a key molecular event known to be critical for effective neutrophil trans-epithelial migration (CD18 engagement) substantially impacts this process both qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:28368012

  15. Chlamydia trachomatis Infection of Endocervical Epithelial Cells Enhances Early HIV Transmission Events

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Lyndsey R.; Amedee, Angela M.; Albritton, Hannah L.; Kozlowski, Pamela A.; Lacour, Nedra; McGowin, Chris L.; Schust, Danny J.; Quayle, Alison J.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis causes a predominantly asymptomatic, but generally inflammatory, genital infection that is associated with an increased risk for HIV acquisition. Endocervical epithelial cells provide the major niche for this obligate intracellular bacterium in women, and the endocervix is also a tissue in which HIV transmission can occur. The mechanism by which CT infection enhances HIV susceptibility at this site, however, is not well understood. Utilizing the A2EN immortalized endocervical epithelial cell line grown on cell culture inserts, we evaluated the direct role that CT-infected epithelial cells play in facilitating HIV transmission events. We determined that CT infection significantly enhanced the apical-to-basolateral migration of cell-associated, but not cell-free, HIVBaL, a CCR5-tropic strain of virus, across the endocervical epithelial barrier. We also established that basolateral supernatants from CT-infected A2EN cells significantly enhanced HIV replication in peripheral mononuclear cells and a CCR5+ T cell line. These results suggest that CT infection of endocervical epithelial cells could facilitate both HIV crossing the mucosal barrier and subsequent infection or replication in underlying target cells. Our studies provide a mechanism by which this common STI could potentially promote the establishment of founder virus populations and the maintenance of local HIV reservoirs in the endocervix. Development of an HIV/STI co-infection model also provides a tool to further explore the role of other sexually transmitted infections in enhancing HIV acquisition. PMID:26730599

  16. Chlamydia trachomatis Infection of Endocervical Epithelial Cells Enhances Early HIV Transmission Events.

    PubMed

    Buckner, Lyndsey R; Amedee, Angela M; Albritton, Hannah L; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Lacour, Nedra; McGowin, Chris L; Schust, Danny J; Quayle, Alison J

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis causes a predominantly asymptomatic, but generally inflammatory, genital infection that is associated with an increased risk for HIV acquisition. Endocervical epithelial cells provide the major niche for this obligate intracellular bacterium in women, and the endocervix is also a tissue in which HIV transmission can occur. The mechanism by which CT infection enhances HIV susceptibility at this site, however, is not well understood. Utilizing the A2EN immortalized endocervical epithelial cell line grown on cell culture inserts, we evaluated the direct role that CT-infected epithelial cells play in facilitating HIV transmission events. We determined that CT infection significantly enhanced the apical-to-basolateral migration of cell-associated, but not cell-free, HIVBaL, a CCR5-tropic strain of virus, across the endocervical epithelial barrier. We also established that basolateral supernatants from CT-infected A2EN cells significantly enhanced HIV replication in peripheral mononuclear cells and a CCR5+ T cell line. These results suggest that CT infection of endocervical epithelial cells could facilitate both HIV crossing the mucosal barrier and subsequent infection or replication in underlying target cells. Our studies provide a mechanism by which this common STI could potentially promote the establishment of founder virus populations and the maintenance of local HIV reservoirs in the endocervix. Development of an HIV/STI co-infection model also provides a tool to further explore the role of other sexually transmitted infections in enhancing HIV acquisition.

  17. Toll-like receptor 2 activation by β2→1-fructans protects barrier function of T84 human intestinal epithelial cells in a chain length-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Leonie M; Meyer, Diederick; Pullens, Gerdie; Faas, Marijke M; Venema, Koen; Ramasamy, Uttara; Schols, Henk A; de Vos, Paul

    2014-07-01

    Dietary fiber intake is associated with lower incidence and mortality from disease, but the underlying mechanisms of these protective effects are unclear. We hypothesized that β2→1-fructan dietary fibers confer protection on intestinal epithelial cell barrier function via Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), and we studied whether β2→1-fructan chain-length differences affect this process. T84 human intestinal epithelial cell monolayers were incubated with 4 β2→1-fructan formulations of different chain-length compositions and were stimulated with the proinflammatory phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) was analyzed by electric cell substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) as a measure for tight junction-mediated barrier function. To confirm TLR2 involvement in barrier modulation by β2→1-fructans, ECIS experiments were repeated using TLR2 blocking antibody. After preincubation of T84 cells with short-chain β2→1-fructans, the decrease in TEER as induced by PMA (62.3 ± 5.2%, P < 0.001) was strongly attenuated (15.2 ± 8.8%, P < 0.01). However, when PMA was applied first, no effect on recovery was observed during addition of the fructans. By blocking TLR2 on the T84 cells, the protective effect of short-chain β2→1-fructans was substantially inhibited. Stimulation of human embryonic kidney human TLR2 reporter cells with β2→1-fructans induced activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, confirming that β2→1-fructans are specific ligands for TLR2. To conclude, β2→1-fructans exert time-dependent and chain length-dependent protective effects on the T84 intestinal epithelial cell barrier mediated via TLR2. These results suggest that TLR2 located on intestinal epithelial cells could be a target of β2→1-fructan-mediated health effects.

  18. Probiotic-derived polyphosphate enhances the epithelial barrier function and maintains intestinal homeostasis through integrin-p38 MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Shuichi; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Konishi, Hiroaki; Ueno, Nobuhiro; Kobayashi, Naoyuki; Shigyo, Tatsuro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics exhibit beneficial effects on human health, particularly in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis in a complex manner notwithstanding the diversity of an intestinal flora between individuals. Thus, it is highly probable that some common molecules secreted by probiotic and/or commensal bacteria contribute to the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and protect the intestinal epithelium from injurious stimuli. To address this question, we aimed to isolate the cytoprotective compound from a lactobacillus strain, Lactobacillus brevis SBC8803 which possess the ability to induce cytoprotective heat shock proteins in mouse small intestine. L. brevis was incubated in MRS broth and the supernatant was passed through with a 0.2-µm filter. Caco2/bbe cells were treated with the culture supernatant, and HSP27 expression was evaluated by Western blotting. HSP27-inducible components were separated by ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE anion exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and HPLC. Finally, we identified that the HSP27-inducible fraction was polyphosphate (poly P), a simple repeated structure of phosphates, which is a common product of lactobacilli and other bacteria associated with intestinal microflora without any definitive physiological functions. Then, poly P was synthesized by poly P-synthesizing enzyme polyphosphate kinase. The synthesized poly P significantly induced HSP27 from Caco2/BBE cells. In addition, Poly P suppressed the oxidant-induced intestinal permeability in the mouse small intestine and pharmacological inhibitors of p38 MAPK and integrins counteract its protective effect. Daily intrarectal administration of poly P (10 µg) improved the inflammation grade and survival rate in 4% sodium dextran sulfate-administered mice. This study, for the first time, demonstrated that poly P is the molecule responsible for maintaining intestinal barrier actions which are mediated through the intestinal integrin β1-p38 MAPK.

  19. Probiotic-Derived Polyphosphate Enhances the Epithelial Barrier Function and Maintains Intestinal Homeostasis through Integrin–p38 MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Segawa, Shuichi; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Konishi, Hiroaki; Ueno, Nobuhiro; Kobayashi, Naoyuki; Shigyo, Tatsuro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics exhibit beneficial effects on human health, particularly in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis in a complex manner notwithstanding the diversity of an intestinal flora between individuals. Thus, it is highly probable that some common molecules secreted by probiotic and/or commensal bacteria contribute to the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and protect the intestinal epithelium from injurious stimuli. To address this question, we aimed to isolate the cytoprotective compound from a lactobacillus strain, Lactobacillus brevis SBC8803 which possess the ability to induce cytoprotective heat shock proteins in mouse small intestine. L. brevis was incubated in MRS broth and the supernatant was passed through with a 0.2-µm filter. Caco2/bbe cells were treated with the culture supernatant, and HSP27 expression was evaluated by Western blotting. HSP27-inducible components were separated by ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE anion exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and HPLC. Finally, we identified that the HSP27-inducible fraction was polyphosphate (poly P), a simple repeated structure of phosphates, which is a common product of lactobacilli and other bacteria associated with intestinal microflora without any definitive physiological functions. Then, poly P was synthesized by poly P-synthesizing enzyme polyphosphate kinase. The synthesized poly P significantly induced HSP27 from Caco2/BBE cells. In addition, Poly P suppressed the oxidant-induced intestinal permeability in the mouse small intestine and pharmacological inhibitors of p38 MAPK and integrins counteract its protective effect. Daily intrarectal administration of poly P (10 µg) improved the inflammation grade and survival rate in 4% sodium dextran sulfate-administered mice. This study, for the first time, demonstrated that poly P is the molecule responsible for maintaining intestinal barrier actions which are mediated through the intestinal integrin β1-p38 MAPK. PMID:21858054

  20. Oral mucositis - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer treatment - mucositis; Cancer treatment - mouth pain; Cancer treatment - mouth sores; Chemotherapy - mucositis; Chemotherapy - mouth pain; Chemotherapy - mouth sores; Radiation therapy - mucositis; Radiation therapy - mouth pain; Radiation therapy - mouth ...

  1. Characterization of the Probiotic Yeast Saccharomyces boulardii in the Healthy Mucosal Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Lauren E.; McDermott, Courtney D.; Stewart, Taryn P.; Hudson, William H.; Rios, Daniel; Fasken, Milo B.; Corbett, Anita H.; Lamb, Tracey J.

    2016-01-01

    The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii has been shown to ameliorate disease severity in the context of many infectious and inflammatory conditions. However, use of S. boulardii as a prophylactic agent or therapeutic delivery vector would require delivery of S. boulardii to a healthy, uninflamed intestine. In contrast to inflamed mucosal tissue, the diverse microbiota, intact epithelial barrier, and fewer inflammatory immune cells within the healthy intestine may all limit the degree to which S. boulardii contacts and influences the host mucosal immune system. Understanding the nature of these interactions is crucial for application of S. boulardii as a prophylactic agent or therapeutic delivery vehicle. In this study, we explore both intrinsic and immunomodulatory properties of S. boulardii in the healthy mucosal immune system. Genomic sequencing and morphological analysis of S. boulardii reveals changes in cell wall components compared to non-probiotic S. cerevisiae that may partially account for probiotic functions of S. boulardii. Flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry demonstrate limited S. boulardii association with murine Peyer’s patches. We also show that although S. boulardii induces a systemic humoral immune response, this response is small in magnitude and not directed against S. boulardii itself. RNA-seq of the draining mesenteric lymph nodes indicates that even repeated administration of S. boulardii induces few transcriptional changes in the healthy intestine. Together these data strongly suggest that interaction between S. boulardii and the mucosal immune system in the healthy intestine is limited, with important implications for future work examining S. boulardii as a prophylactic agent and therapeutic delivery vehicle. PMID:27064405

  2. Radiation Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    PS, Satheesh Kumar; Balan, Anita; Sankar, Arun; Bose, Tinky

    2009-01-01

    Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene PMID:20668585

  3. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 preserves intestinal epithelial barrier function from TNF-α induced injury via suppression of NF-kB p65 mediated MLCK-P-MLC signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanwen; Zhu, Jing; Chen, Guowei; Zuo, Shuai; Zhang, Junling; Chen, Ziyi; Wang, Xin; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yucun; Wang, Pengyuan

    2015-05-08

    Substantial studies have demonstrated the protective effect of 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) on intestinal barrier function, but the mechanisms are not fully illustrated. In this study, the effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on TNF-α induced barrier dysfunction was further investigated in Caco-2 cell monolayers. The barrier function of Caco-2 monolayers was evaluated by measuring trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and FITC-Dextran 40,000 Da (FD-40) trans-membrane flux. ZO-1 and Occludin were chosen as markers of the localization of tight junction (TJ) proteins for immunofluorescence. The expression of MLCK and phosphorylation level of myosin light chain (MLC) were measured by immunoblotting. The activation of NF-kB p65 was analyzed by EMSA and immunofluorescence. The results suggest that 1,25(OH)2D3 preserves intestinal epithelial barrier function from TNF-α induced injury via suppression of NF-kB p65 mediated activation of MLCK-P-MLC signaling pathway.

  4. Hypoxia Increases Epithelial Permeability in Human Nasal Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Min, Hyun Jin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Yoon, Joo-Heon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The nasal mucosa is the first site to encounter pathogens, and it forms continuous barriers to various stimuli. This barrier function is very important in the innate defense mechanism. Additionally, inflammation of the nasal sinus is known to be a hypoxic condition. Here, we studied the effect of hypoxia on barrier function in normal human nasal epithelial (NHNE) cells. Materials and Methods The expression levels of various junction complex proteins were assessed in hypoxia-stimulated NHNE cells and human nasal mucosal tissues. We performed real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis, western blotting, and immunofluorescence assays to examine differences in the mRNA and protein expression of ZO-1, a tight junction protein, and E-cadherin in NHNE cells. Moreover, we evaluated the trans-epithelial resistance (TER) of NHNE cells under hypoxic conditions to check for changes in permeability. The expression of ZO-1 and E-cadherin was measured in human nasal mucosa samples by western blotting. Results Hypoxia time-dependently decreased the expression of ZO-1 and E-cadherin at the gene and protein levels. In addition, hypoxia decreased the TER of NHNE cells, which indicates increased permeability. Human nasal mucosa samples, which are supposed to be hypoxic, showed significantly decreased levels of ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression compared with control. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that hypoxia altered the expression of junction complex molecules and increased epithelial permeability in human nasal epithelia. This suggests that hypoxia causes barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, it may be associated with innate immune dysfunction after encountering pathogens. PMID:25837192

  5. Epithelial Transport in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ghishan, Fayez K.; Kiela, Pawel R.

    2014-01-01

    The epithelium of the gastrointestinal tract is one of the most versatile tissues in the organism, responsible for providing a tight barrier between dietary and bacterial antigens and the mucosal and systemic immune system, while maintaining efficient digestive and absorptive processes to ensure adequate nutrient and energy supply. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD; Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis) are associated with a breakdown of both functions, which in some cases are clearly interrelated. In this updated literature review, we focus on the effects of intestinal inflammation and the associated immune mediators on selected aspects of the transepithelial transport of macro- and micronutrients. The mechanisms responsible for nutritional deficiencies are not always clear and could be related to decreased intake, malabsorption and excess losses. We summarize the known causes of nutrient deficiencies and the mechanism of IBD-associated diarrhea. We also overview the consequences of impaired epithelial transport, which infrequently transcend its primary purpose to affect the gut microbial ecology and epithelial integrity. While some of those regulatory mechanisms are relatively well established, more work needs to be done to determine how inflammatory cytokines can alter the transport process of nutrients across the gastrointestinal and renal epithelia. PMID:24691115

  6. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches.

  7. Mucosal Health in Aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract The mucosal surfaces (skin, gill, and intestine) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient absorption, osmoregulation, and waste excretion. Aquaculture specie...

  8. The mucosal immune system: From dentistry to vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Kiyono, Hiroshi; Azegami, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is the beginning of the aero-digestive tract, which is covered by mucosal epithelium continuously under the threat of invasion of pathogens, it is thus protected by the mucosal immune system. In the early phase of our scientific efforts for the demonstration of mucosal immune system, dental science was one of major driving forces due to their foreseeability to use oral immunity for the control of oral diseases. The mucosal immune system is divided functionally into, but interconnected inductive and effector sites. Intestinal Peyer's patches (PPs) are an inductive site containing antigen-sampling M cells and immunocompetent cells required to initiate antigen-specific immune responses. At effector sites, PP-originated antigen-specific IgA B cells become plasma cells to produce polymeric IgA and form secretory IgA by binding to poly-Ig receptor expressed on epithelial cells for protective immunity. The development of new-generation mucosal vaccines, including the rice-based oral vaccine MucoRice, on the basis of the coordinated mucosal immune system is a promising strategy for the control of mucosal infectious diseases.

  9. The mucosal immune system: From dentistry to vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    KIYONO, Hiroshi; AZEGAMI, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is the beginning of the aero-digestive tract, which is covered by mucosal epithelium continuously under the threat of invasion of pathogens, it is thus protected by the mucosal immune system. In the early phase of our scientific efforts for the demonstration of mucosal immune system, dental science was one of major driving forces due to their foreseeability to use oral immunity for the control of oral diseases. The mucosal immune system is divided functionally into, but interconnected inductive and effector sites. Intestinal Peyer’s patches (PPs) are an inductive site containing antigen-sampling M cells and immunocompetent cells required to initiate antigen-specific immune responses. At effector sites, PP-originated antigen-specific IgA B cells become plasma cells to produce polymeric IgA and form secretory IgA by binding to poly-Ig receptor expressed on epithelial cells for protective immunity. The development of new-generation mucosal vaccines, including the rice-based oral vaccine MucoRice, on the basis of the coordinated mucosal immune system is a promising strategy for the control of mucosal infectious diseases. PMID:26460320

  10. Endogenous IL-33 is highly expressed in mouse epithelial barrier tissues, lymphoid organs, brain, embryos, and inflamed tissues: in situ analysis using a novel Il-33-LacZ gene trap reporter strain.

    PubMed

    Pichery, Mélanie; Mirey, Emilie; Mercier, Pascale; Lefrancais, Emma; Dujardin, Arnaud; Ortega, Nathalie; Girard, Jean-Philippe

    2012-04-01

    IL-33 (previously known as NF from high endothelial venules) is an IL-1 family cytokine that signals through the ST2 receptor and drives cytokine production in mast cells, basophils, eosinophils, invariant NKT and NK cells, Th2 lymphocytes, and type 2 innate immune cells (natural helper cells, nuocytes, and innate helper 2 cells). Little is known about endogenous IL-33; for instance, the cellular sources of IL-33 in mouse tissues have not yet been defined. In this study, we generated an Il-33-LacZ gene trap reporter strain (Il-33(Gt/Gt)) and used this novel tool to analyze expression of endogenous IL-33 in vivo. We found that the Il-33 promoter exhibits constitutive activity in mouse lymphoid organs, epithelial barrier tissues, brain, and embryos. Immunostaining with anti-IL-33 Abs, using Il-33(Gt/Gt) (Il-33-deficient) mice as control, revealed that endogenous IL-33 protein is highly expressed in mouse epithelial barrier tissues, including stratified squamous epithelia from vagina and skin, as well as cuboidal epithelium from lung, stomach, and salivary gland. Constitutive expression of IL-33 was not detected in blood vessels, revealing the existence of species-specific differences between humans and mice. Importantly, IL-33 protein was always localized in the nucleus of producing cells with no evidence for cytoplasmic localization. Finally, strong expression of the Il-33-LacZ reporter was also observed in inflamed tissues, in the liver during LPS-induced endotoxin shock, and in the lung alveoli during papain-induced allergic airway inflammation. Together, our findings support the possibility that IL-33 may function as a nuclear alarmin to alert the innate immune system after injury or infection in epithelial barrier tissues.

  11. Epithelial NEMO links innate immunity to chronic intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nenci, Arianna; Becker, Christoph; Wullaert, Andy; Gareus, Ralph; van Loo, Geert; Danese, Silvio; Huth, Marion; Nikolaev, Alexei; Neufert, Clemens; Madison, Blair; Gumucio, Deborah; Neurath, Markus F; Pasparakis, Manolis

    2007-03-29

    Deregulation of intestinal immune responses seems to have a principal function in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. The gut epithelium is critically involved in the maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis-acting as a physical barrier separating luminal bacteria and immune cells, and also expressing antimicrobial peptides. However, the molecular mechanisms that control this function of gut epithelial cells are poorly understood. Here we show that the transcription factor NF-kappaB, a master regulator of pro-inflammatory responses, functions in gut epithelial cells to control epithelial integrity and the interaction between the mucosal immune system and gut microflora. Intestinal epithelial-cell-specific inhibition of NF-kappaB through conditional ablation of NEMO (also called IkappaB kinase-gamma (IKKgamma)) or both IKK1 (IKKalpha) and IKK2 (IKKbeta)-IKK subunits essential for NF-kappaB activation-spontaneously caused severe chronic intestinal inflammation in mice. NF-kappaB deficiency led to apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells, impaired expression of antimicrobial peptides and translocation of bacteria into the mucosa. Concurrently, this epithelial defect triggered a chronic inflammatory response in the colon, initially dominated by innate immune cells but later also involving T lymphocytes. Deficiency of the gene encoding the adaptor protein MyD88 prevented the development of intestinal inflammation, demonstrating that Toll-like receptor activation by intestinal bacteria is essential for disease pathogenesis in this mouse model. Furthermore, NEMO deficiency sensitized epithelial cells to tumour-necrosis factor (TNF)-induced apoptosis, whereas TNF receptor-1 inactivation inhibited intestinal inflammation, demonstrating that TNF receptor-1 signalling is crucial for disease induction. These findings demonstrate that a primary NF-kappaB signalling defect in intestinal epithelial cells disrupts immune homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract

  12. A Dietary Fiber-Deprived Gut Microbiota Degrades the Colonic Mucus Barrier and Enhances Pathogen Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mahesh S; Seekatz, Anna M; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Hickey, Christina A; Wolter, Mathis; Pudlo, Nicholas A; Kitamoto, Sho; Terrapon, Nicolas; Muller, Arnaud; Young, Vincent B; Henrissat, Bernard; Wilmes, Paul; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Núñez, Gabriel; Martens, Eric C

    2016-11-17

    Despite the accepted health benefits of consuming dietary fiber, little is known about the mechanisms by which fiber deprivation impacts the gut microbiota and alters disease risk. Using a gnotobiotic mouse model, in which animals were colonized with a synthetic human gut microbiota composed of fully sequenced commensal bacteria, we elucidated the functional interactions between dietary fiber, the gut microbiota, and the colonic mucus barrier, which serves as a primary defense against enteric pathogens. We show that during chronic or intermittent dietary fiber deficiency, the gut microbiota resorts to host-secreted mucus glycoproteins as a nutrient source, leading to erosion of the colonic mucus barrier. Dietary fiber deprivation, together with a fiber-deprived, mucus-eroding microbiota, promotes greater epithelial access and lethal colitis by the mucosal pathogen, Citrobacter rodentium. Our work reveals intricate pathways linking diet, the gut microbiome, and intestinal barrier dysfunction, which could be exploited to improve health using dietary therapeutics.

  13. Human genital epithelial cells capture cell-free human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and transmit the virus to CD4+ Cells: implications for mechanisms of sexual transmission.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiwei; Chen, Zhiwei; Phillips, David M

    2003-11-15

    Sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) accounts for the majority of new infections worldwide. However, the mechanism of viral transmission across the mucosal barrier is poorly understood. By use of an ectocervical epithelium-derived cell line, we found that the cells are capable of sequestering large amounts of HIV particles but are refractory to cell-free viral infection. The sequestered virus particles remained infectious for >/=6 days and resisted treatment with trypsin. Upon coculture with CD4(+)-susceptible cells, epithelial cells can effectively transmit the virus to these cells, which can result in robust infection of the target cells. Inhibitory studies have shown that heparan sulfate moiety of cell-surface proteoglycans is involved in the viral attachment to these CD4-negative epithelial cells. Genital epithelial cells may play active roles in sequestering, protecting, and transferring virus during sexual transmission of HIV.

  14. A mucosally targeted subunit vaccine candidate eliciting HIV-1 transcytosis-blocking Abs

    PubMed Central

    Matoba, Nobuyuki; Magérus, Aude; Geyer, Brian C.; Zhang, Yunfang; Muralidharan, Mrinalini; Alfsen, Annette; Arntzen, Charles J.; Bomsel, Morgane; Mor, Tsafrir S.

    2004-01-01

    A vaccine that would engage the mucosal immune system against a broad range of HIV-1 subtypes and prevent epithelial transmission is highly desirable. Here we report fusing the mucosal targeting B subunit of cholera toxin to the conserved galactosylceramide-binding domain (including the ELDKWA-neutralizing epitope) of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope protein, which mediates the transcytosis of HIV-1 across the mucosal epithelia. Chimeric protein expressed in bacteria or plants assembled into oligomers that were capable of binding galactosyl-ceramide and GM1 gangliosides. Mucosal (intranasal) administration in mice of the purified chimeric protein followed by an i.p. boost resulted in transcytosis-neutralizing serum IgG and mucosal IgA responses and induced immunological memory. Plant production of mucosally targeted immunogens could be particularly useful for immunization programs in developing countries, where desirable product traits include low cost of manufacture, heat stability, and needle-free delivery. PMID:15347807

  15. Role of mucus in ischemia/reperfusion-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Mojzis, J; Hegedüsová, R; Mirossay, L

    2000-01-01

    Gastric mucus plays an important role in gastric mucosal protection. Apart from its "barrier" function, it has been demonstrated that mucus protects gastric epithelial cells against toxic oxygen metabolites derived from the xanthine/ xanthine oxidase system. In this study, we investigated the effect of malotilate and sucralfate (mucus production stimulators) and N-acetylcysteine (mucolytic agent) on ischemia/reperfusion-induced gastric mucosal injury. Gastric ischemia was induced by 30 min clamping of the coeliac artery followed by 30 min of reperfusion. The mucus content was determined by the Alcian blue method. Sucralfate (100 mg/kg), malotilate (100 mg/kg), and N-acetylcysteine (100 mg/kg) were given orally 30 min before surgery. Both sucralfate and malotilate increased the mucus production in control rats. On the other hand, N-acetyloysteine significantly decreased mucus content in control (sham) group. A significant decrease of mucus content was found in the control and the N-acetylcysteine pretreated group during the period of ischemia. On the other hand, sucralfate and malotilate prevented the decrease the content of mucus during ischemia. A similar result can be seen after ischemia/reperfusion. In the control group and N-acetylcysteine pretreated group a significant decrease of adherent mucus content was found. However, sucralfate and malotilate increased mucus production (sucralfate significantly). Sucralfate and malotilate also significantly protected the gastric mucosa against ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury. However, N-acetylcysteine significantly increased gastric mucosal injury after ischemia/reperfusion. These results suggest that gastric mucus may be involved in the protection of gastric mucosa after ischemia/reperfusion.

  16. The Role of E-Cadherin in Maintaining the Barrier Function of Corneal Epithelium after Treatment with Cultured Autologous Oral Mucosa Epithelial Cell Sheet Grafts for Limbal Stem Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hoft, Richard H.; Wood, Andrew; Oliva, Joan; Niihara, Hope; Makalinao, Andrew; Thropay, Jacquelyn; Pan, Derek; Tiger, Kumar; Garcia, Julio; Laporte, Amanda; French, Samuel W.; Niihara, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The role of E-cadherin in epithelial barrier function of cultured autologous oral mucosa epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) grafts was examined. CAOMECS were cultured on a temperature-responsive surface and grafted onto rabbit corneas with Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency (LSCD). E-cadherin levels were significantly higher in CAOMECS compared to normal and LSCD epithelium. Beta-catenin colocalized with E-cadherin in CAOMECS cell membranes while phosphorylated beta-catenin was significantly increased. ZO-1, occludin, and Cnx43 were also strongly expressed in CAOMECS. E-cadherin and beta-catenin localization at the cell membrane was reduced in LSCD corneas, while CAOMECS-grafted corneas showed a restoration of E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression. LSCD corneas did not show continuous staining for ZO-1 or for Cnx43, while CAOMECS-grafted corneas showed a positive expression of ZO-1 and Cnx43. Cascade Blue® hydrazide did not pass through CAOMECS. Because E-cadherin interactions are calcium-dependent, EGTA was used to chelate calcium and disrupt cell adhesion. EGTA-treated CAOMECS completely detached from cell culture surface, and E-cadherin levels were significantly decreased. In conclusion, E cadherin high expression contributed to CAOMECS tight and gap junction protein recruitment at the cell membrane, thus promoting cellular adhesion and a functional barrier to protect the ocular surface. PMID:27777792

  17. Defensins, lectins, mucins, and secretory immunoglobulin A: microbe-binding biomolecules that contribute to mucosal immunity in the human gut.

    PubMed

    Chairatana, Phoom; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2017-02-01

    In the intestine, the mucosal immune system plays essential roles in maintaining homeostasis between the host and microorganisms, and protecting the host from pathogenic invaders. Epithelial cells produce and release a variety of biomolecules into the mucosa and lumen that contribute to immunity. In this review, we focus on a subset of these remarkable host-defense factors - enteric α-defensins, select lectins, mucins, and secretory immunoglobulin A - that have the capacity to bind microbes and thereby contribute to barrier function in the human gut. We provide an overview of the intestinal epithelium, describe specialized secretory cells named Paneth cells, and summarize our current understanding of the biophysical and functional properties of these select microbe-binding biomolecules. We intend for this compilation to complement prior reviews on intestinal host-defense factors, highlight recent advances in the field, and motivate investigations that further illuminate molecular mechanisms as well as the interplay between these molecules and microbes.

  18. Defensins, Lectins, Mucins and Secretory Immunoglobulin A: Microbe-Binding Biomolecules that Contribute to Mucosal Immunity in the Human Gut

    PubMed Central

    Chairatana, Phoom; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    In the intestine, the mucosal immune system plays essential roles in maintaining homeostasis between the host and microorganisms, and protecting the host from pathogenic invaders. Epithelial cells produce and release a variety of biomolecules into the mucosa and lumen that contribute to immunity. In this review, we focus on a subset of these remarkable host-defense factors – enteric α-defensins, select lectins, mucins, and secretory immunoglobulin A – that have the capacity to bind microbes and thereby contribute to barrier function in the human gut. We provide an overview of the intestinal epithelium, describe specialized secretory cells named Paneth cells, and summarize our current understanding of the biophysical and functional properties of these select microbe-binding biomolecules. We intend for this compilation to complement prior reviews on intestinal host-defense factors, highlight recent advances in the field, and motivate investigations that further illuminate molecular mechanisms as well as the interplay between these molecules and microbes. PMID:27841019

  19. Protection and Restitution of Gut Barrier by Probiotics: Nutritional and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Rao, R. K.; Samak, G.

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are beneficial bacteria present in various dietary components and many of these colonize in the human and animal intestine. In the gut probiotics help the host by assisting in maintenance of normal mucosal homeostasis. Probiotics not only help maintain normal function of the gut mucosa, but also protect mucosa from injurious factors such as toxins, allergens and pathogens. The beneficial effect of probiotics is mediated by multiple mechanisms, including cytoprotection, cell proliferation, cell migration, resistance to apoptosis, synthesis of proteins and gene expression. One of the important cytoprotective effects of probiotics in the intestinal mucosa is to strengthen the epithelial tight junctions and preservation of mucosal barrier function. Probiotics not only enhance barrier function by inducing synthesis and assembly of tight junction proteins, but also preventing disruption of tight junctions by injurious factors. Bioactive factors released by probiotics trigger activation of various cell signaling pathways that lead to strengthening of tight junctions and the barrier function. This article reviews and summarizes the current understanding of various probiotics that are involved in the protection of gut barrier function, highlights the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the protective effect and addresses the clinical implications of probiotic supplementation. PMID:24353483

  20. Protection and Restitution of Gut Barrier by Probiotics: Nutritional and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Rao, R K; Samak, G

    2013-05-01

    Probiotics are beneficial bacteria present in various dietary components and many of these colonize in the human and animal intestine. In the gut probiotics help the host by assisting in maintenance of normal mucosal homeostasis. Probiotics not only help maintain normal function of the gut mucosa, but also protect mucosa from injurious factors such as toxins, allergens and pathogens. The beneficial effect of probiotics is mediated by multiple mechanisms, including cytoprotection, cell proliferation, cell migration, resistance to apoptosis, synthesis of proteins and gene expression. One of the important cytoprotective effects of probiotics in the intestinal mucosa is to strengthen the epithelial tight junctions and preservation of mucosal barrier function. Probiotics not only enhance barrier function by inducing synthesis and assembly of tight junction proteins, but also preventing disruption of tight junctions by injurious factors. Bioactive factors released by probiotics trigger activation of various cell signaling pathways that lead to strengthening of tight junctions and the barrier function. This article reviews and summarizes the current understanding of various probiotics that are involved in the protection of gut barrier function, highlights the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the protective effect and addresses the clinical implications of probiotic supplementation.

  1. Antagonistic effect of Candida albicans and IFNγ on E-cadherin expression and production by human primary gingival epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Audoy, Julie; Chmielewski, Witold

    2012-11-01

    Caused mainly by Candida albicans, oropharyngeal candidiasis is the most common oral complication associated with HIV disease worldwide. Host defenses against C. albicans essentially fall into two categories: specific immune mechanisms and local oral mucosal epithelial cell defenses. Since oral mucosa is the first line of defense in the form of a physical barrier against C. albicans invasion, and since epithelial cells are involved in anti-Candida innate immunity through different cytokines, we wanted to determine whether C. albicans alters E-cadherin expression and production, and whether interferon-γ (INFγ), a TH1 cytokine, is involved in the anti-Candida defense. Using primary human gingival epithelial cells, we demonstrated that C. albicans significantly decreased E-cadherin mRNA expression and protein production. This effect was basically obtained at later infective periods (24 and 48h). Interestingly, when IFNγ was added to C. albicans infected epithelial cell cultures, it prevented the side effect of C. albicans on E-cadherin mRNA expression and protein production and deposition. All together, these results suggested concomitant interactions between oral epithelial cells and IFNγ against C. albicans infection.

  2. Induction of duodenal mucosal tumors of intestinal epithelial cell origin showing frequent nuclear β-catenin accumulation similar to the concurrently induced colorectal tumors in rats after treatment with azoxymethane.

    PubMed

    Kikuchihara, Yoh; Onda, Nobuhiko; Kimura, Masayuki; Kangawa, Yumi; Mizukami, Sayaka; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Azoxymethane (AOM) is a potent carcinogen used for induction of colon tumors in rats and mice. It is also known that AOM treatment induces small bowel tumors in addition to colorectal tumors in rats. The present study examined the histogenesis of AOM-induced rat duodenal tumors in comparison with concurrently induced colorectal tumors by histochemical and immunohistochemical approaches. Duodenal and colorectal tumors were positive for both periodic acid-Schiff reaction and Alcian blue staining. Immunohistochemically, duodenal tumors were positive for intestinal epithelial markers such as cytokeratin (CK) 20 (100%) and mucin (MUC) 2 (91.7%) but negative for pancreaticobiliary markers such as CK7 (100%) and MUC1 (100%). All colorectal tumors were also negative for CK7 and MUC1 but positive for CK20. Eighty percent of colorectal tumors were positive for MUC2. In addition, nuclear accumulation of β-catenin was found in duodenal tumors (70.8%), which was similar to colorectal tumors (90.0%). These results indicate that duodenal tumors induced by AOM treatment of rats were derived from intestinal epithelium. Similar to colorectal tumors, nuclear accumulation of β-catenin indicates activation of Wnt signaling as a driving force for tumor progression in AOM-induced duodenal tumors.

  3. Mucosal melanoma: an update.

    PubMed

    Ballester Sánchez, R; de Unamuno Bustos, B; Navarro Mira, M; Botella Estrada, R

    2015-03-01

    Mucosal melanoma is a rare melanoma subtype that differs from the cutaneous form of the tumor in its biology, clinical manifestations, and management. Diagnosis is usually late due to a lack of early or specific signs and the location of lesions in areas that are difficult to access on physical examination. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for localized disease. The value of sentinel lymph node biopsy and lymphadenectomy is still unclear. Radiotherapy can be used as adjuvant therapy for the control of local disease. c-KIT mutations are more common than in other types of melanoma and this has led to significant advances in the use of imatinib for the treatment of metastatic mucosal melanoma.

  4. Effect of Hymenolepis nana on the mouse ileal mucosal cells: histochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Sanad, M M; Salem, S A; el-Gamal, R L; Darwish, R A; el-Ridi, A M

    1990-12-01

    Histochemical studies of the ileal mucosal cells of mice experimentally infected with H. nana revealed definite increase in mucous secretions indicating increased activity of the goblet cells in response to mucosal irritation. The activity of acid phosphatase was also increased representing a sort of defence mechanism against the attached worms. The activities of ATP-ase and NADH diaphorase enzymes were decreased indicating disturbance in the metabolic and transport processes and in the absorptive function of the intestinal epithelial cells.

  5. Mucus barrier-triggered disassembly of siRNA nanocarriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Troels B.; Li, Leon; Howard, Kenneth A.

    2014-10-01

    The mucus overlying mucosal epithelial surfaces presents not only a biological barrier to the penetration of potential pathogens, but also therapeutic modalities including RNAi-based nanocarriers. Movement of nanomedicines across the mucus barriers of the gastrointestinal mucosa is modulated by interactions of the nanomedicine carriers with mucin glycoproteins inside the mucus, potentiated by the large surface area of the nanocarrier. We have developed a fluorescence activation-based reporter system showing that the interaction between polyanionic mucins and the cationic chitosan/small interfering RNA (siRNA) nanocarriers (polyplexes) results in the disassembly and consequent triggered release of fluorescent siRNA. The quantity of release was found to be dependent on the molar ratio between chitosan amino groups and siRNA phosphate groups (NP ratio) of the polyplexes with a maximal estimated 48.6% release of siRNA over 30 min at NP 60. Furthermore, a microfluidic in vitro model of the gastrointestinal mucus barrier was used to visualize the dynamic interaction between chitosan/siRNA nanocarriers and native purified porcine stomach mucins. We observed strong interactions and aggregations at the mucin-liquid interface, followed by an NP ratio dependent release and consequent diffusion of siRNA across the mucin barrier. This work describes a new model of interaction at the nanocarrier-mucin interface and has important implications for the design and development of nucleic acid-based nanocarrier therapeutics for mucosal disease treatments and also provides insights into nanoscale pathogenic processes.The mucus overlying mucosal epithelial surfaces presents not only a biological barrier to the penetration of potential pathogens, but also therapeutic modalities including RNAi-based nanocarriers. Movement of nanomedicines across the mucus barriers of the gastrointestinal mucosa is modulated by interactions of the nanomedicine carriers with mucin glycoproteins inside the

  6. Effects of arginine on intestinal epithelial cell integrity and nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Xia, Mi; Ye, Lulu; Hou, Qihang; Yu, Qinghua

    2016-11-14

    Arginine is a multifaceted amino acid that is critical to the normal physiology of the gastrointestinal tract. Oral arginine administration has been shown to improve mucosal recovery following intestinal injury. The present study investigated the influence of extracellular arginine concentrations on epithelial cell barrier regulation and nutrition uptake by porcine small intestinal epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2). The results show that reducing arginine concentration from 0·7 to 0·2 mm did not affect the transepithelial electrical resistance value, tight-junction proteins (claudin-1, occludin, E-cadherin), phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (p-ERK) and mucin-1 expression. Furthermore, reducing arginine concentration stimulated greater expression of cationic amino acid transporter (CAT1), excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT3) and alanine/serine/cysteine transporter (ASCT1) mRNA by IPEC-J2 cells, which was verified by elevated efficiency of amino acid uptake. Glucose consumption by IPEC-J2 cells treated with 0·2 mm-arginine remained at the same physiological level to guarantee energy supply and to maintain the cell barrier. This experiment implied that reducing arginine concentration is feasible in IPEC-J2 cells guaranteed by nutrient uptake and cell barrier function.

  7. Shuttling of information between the mucosal and luminal environment drives intestinal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Asselin, Claude; Gendron, Fernand-Pierre

    2014-11-17

    The gastrointestinal tract is a passageway for dietary nutrients, microorganisms and xenobiotics. The gut is home to diverse bacterial communities forming the microbiota. While bacteria and their metabolites maintain gut homeostasis, the host uses innate and adaptive immune mechanisms to cope with the microbiota and luminal environment. In recent years, multiple bi-directional instructive mechanisms between microbiota, luminal content and mucosal immune systems have been uncovered. Indeed, epithelial and immune cell-derived mucosal signals shape microbiota composition, while microbiota and their by-products shape the mucosal immune system. Genetic and environmental perturbations alter gut mucosal responses which impact on microbial ecology structures. On the other hand, changes in microbiota alter intestinal mucosal responses. In this review, we discuss how intestinal epithelial Paneth and goblet cells interact with the microbiota, how environmental and genetic disorders are sensed by endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy responses, how specific bacteria, bacterial- and diet-derived products determine the function and activation of the mucosal immune system. We will also discuss the critical role of HDAC activity as a regulator of immune and epithelial cell homeostatic responses.

  8. Suppression of gastric mucosal inflammatory responses to Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide by sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Slomiany, B L; Piotrowski, J; Slomiany, A

    1999-02-01

    The effect of the antiulcer agent sulglycotide on gastric epithelial cell apoptosis and the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) during Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide-induced acute gastritis was investigated. Rats, pretreated twice daily for 3 consecutive days with sulglycotide at 200 mg/kg or vehicle, were subjected to surface epithelial application of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide (50 microg/animal), and, after 4 additional days on the drug or vehicle regimen, their mucosal tissue was used for histologic assessment, quantitation of TNF-alpha and IL-4, and the assay of epithelial cell apoptosis. In the absence of sulglycotide, H. pylori lipopolysaccharide caused acute mucosal responses manifested by the inflammatory infiltration of the lamina propria with lymphocytes and plasma cells, edema, hyperemia, and epithelial hemorrhage. These responses were accompanied by an 11-fold increase in epithelial cell apoptosis and a 9-fold enhancement of the mucosal expression of proinflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha. However, the mucosal expression of regulatory cytokine IL-4 decreased by 15%. Treatment with sulglycotide produced significant (56.6%) reduction in the extent of acute mucosal inflammatory changes caused by H. pylori lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, the effect of sulglycotide was manifested in an 88.3% reduction in the epithelial cell apoptosis and a 69.1% decrease in the mucosal expression of TNF-alpha, whereas the expression of IL-4 showed only marginal (6%) enhancement. The results suggest that the cytoprotective agent sulglycotide suppresses the inflammatory and apoptotic events elicited in gastric mucosa by H. pylori lipopolysaccharide through stimulation of TNF-alpha expression.

  9. Gut barrier in health and disease: focus on childhood.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, D; Ianiro, G; Vanella, G; Bibbò, S; Bruno, G; Simeone, G; Mele, G

    2015-01-01

    The gut barrier is a functional unit, organized as a multi-layer system, made up of two main components: a physical barrier surface, which prevents bacterial adhesion and regulates paracellular diffusion to the host tissues, and a deep functional barrier, that is able to discriminate between pathogens and commensal microorganisms, organizing the immune tolerance and the immune response to pathogens. Other mechanisms, such as gastric juice and pancreatic enzymes (which both have antibacterial properties) participate in the luminal integrity of the gut barrier. From the outer layer to the inner layer, the physical barrier is composed of gut microbiota (that competes with pathogens to gain space and energy resources, processes the molecules necessary to mucosal integrity and modulates the immunological activity of deep barrier), mucus (which separates the intraluminal content from more internal layers and contains antimicrobial products and secretory IgA), epithelial cells (which form a physical and immunological barrier) and the innate and adaptive immune cells forming the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (which is responsible for antigen sampling and immune responses). Disruption of the gut barrier has been associated with many gastrointestinal diseases, but also with extra-intestinal pathological condition, such as type 1 diabetes mellitus, allergic diseases or autism spectrum disorders. The maintenance of a healthy intestinal barrier is therefore of paramount importance in children, for both health and economic reasons. Many drugs or compounds used in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders act through the restoration of a normal intestinal permeability. Several studies have highlighted the role of probiotics in the modulation and reduction of intestinal permeability, considering the strong influence of gut microbiota in the modulation of the function and structure of gut barrier, but also on the immune response of the host. To date, available weapons for the

  10. Alteration in Intrapulmonary Pharmacokinetics of Aerosolized Model Compounds Due to Disruption of the Alveolar Epithelial Barriers Following Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Tada, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a lethal lung disease that is characterized by the accumulation of extracellular matrix and a change in lung structure. In this study, intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics of aerosolized model compounds were evaluated using rats with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Aerosol formulations of indocyanine green, 6-carboxyfluorescein (6-CF), and fluorescein isothiocyanate dextrans (FD; 4.4, 10, 70, and 250 kDa) were administered to rat lungs using a MicroSprayer. Indocyanine green fluorescence signals were significantly weaker in fibrotic lungs than in control lungs and 6-CF and FD concentrations in the plasma of pulmonary fibrotic animals were markedly higher than in the plasma of control animals. Moreover, disrupted epithelial tight junctions, including claudins-1, -3, and -5, were observed in pulmonary fibrotic lesions using immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, destruction of tight junctions on model alveolar epithelial cells (NCI-H441) by transforming growth factor-β1 treatment enhanced the permeability of 6-CF and FDs through NCI-H441 cell monolayers. These results indicate that aerosolized drugs are easily distributed into the plasma after leakage through damaged tight junctions of alveolar epithelium. Therefore, the development of delivery systems for anti-fibrotic agents to improve intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics may be necessary for effective idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis therapy.

  11. Characterization of the Molecular Interplay between Moraxella catarrhalis and Human Respiratory Tract Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Stefan P. W.; Eleveld, Marc J.; Hermans, Peter W. M.; Bootsma, Hester J.

    2013-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a mucosal pathogen that causes childhood otitis media and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults. During the course of infection, M. catarrhalis needs to adhere to epithelial cells of different host niches such as the nasopharynx and lungs, and consequently, efficient adhesion to epithelial cells is considered an important virulence trait of M. catarrhalis. By using Tn-seq, a genome-wide negative selection screenings technology, we identified 15 genes potentially required for adherence of M. catarrhalis BBH18 to pharyngeal epithelial Detroit 562 and lung epithelial A549 cells. Validation with directed deletion mutants confirmed the importance of aroA (3-phosphoshikimate 1-carboxyvinyl-transferase), ecnAB (entericidin EcnAB), lgt1 (glucosyltransferase), and MCR_1483 (outer membrane lipoprotein) for cellular adherence, with ΔMCR_1483 being most severely attenuated in adherence to both cell lines. Expression profiling of M. catarrhalis BBH18 during adherence to Detroit 562 cells showed increased expression of 34 genes in cell-attached versus planktonic bacteria, among which ABC transporters for molybdate and sulfate, while reduced expression of 16 genes was observed. Notably, neither the newly identified genes affecting adhesion nor known adhesion genes were differentially expressed during adhesion, but appeared to be constitutively expressed at a high level. Profiling of the transcriptional response of Detroit 562 cells upon adherence of M. catarrhalis BBH18 showed induction of a panel of pro-inflammatory genes as well as genes involved in the prevention of damage of the epithelial barrier. In conclusion, this study provides new insight into the molecular interplay between M. catarrhalis and host epithelial cells during the process of adherence. PMID:23936538

  12. Milk fermentation products of L. helveticus R389 activate calcineurin as a signal to promote gut mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Vinderola, Gabriel; Matar, Chantal; Perdigón, Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    Background Fermented milks containing probiotic bacteria are a way of delivering bioactive constituents to targets in the gastrointestinal tract. We reported previously that the fermentation of milk at constant pH 6 by L. helveticus R389 increased its content of peptide fractions, and the oral administration of the non-bacterial fraction (FMSpH6) to mice increased total secretory IgA in the intestinal lumen and enhanced the number of IgA and various cytokines producing cells as well as the secretion of IL-6 by small intestine epithelial cells. We also demonstrated that this FMSpH6 was effective for the prevention of Salmonella typhimurium infection in mice. In this work, we studied in mice the impact of the oral administration of the supernatant of milk fermented by L. helveticus R389 on the gut physiology by measuring parameters such as calcium channels and E-cadherin expression, the activation of the biological signal calcineurin and mast and goblet cells, as a way to determine some mechanisms involved in the immunomodulating effects of the milk fermentation products, observed in previous studies. We analyzed the impact of the supernatant of milk fermented by L. helveticus R389 at pH6-controlled on the expression of calcineurin and on the reinforcement of the ephitelial barrier, measuring parameters such as calcium channels and E-cadherin expression and in the reinforcement of the non-specific immunity determining mast cells and goblet cells associated to the gut. Results We observed an enhanced expression of TRPV6 channels in the duodenum, indicating an improved capacity for dietary Ca2+ uptake. We demonstrated an enhanced expression of calcineurin in the small intestine, able to upregulate immune parameters such as IL-2 and TNF production, with an increase in the number of these cytokines secreting cells. We determined an increase in the number of mucosal mast cells and goblet cells, which would mean an improved state of mucosal surveillance at sites of

  13. Combined exposure of diesel exhaust particles and respirable Soufrière Hills volcanic ash causes a (pro-)inflammatory response in an in vitro multicellular epithelial tissue barrier model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomašek, Ines; Horwell, Claire J.; Damby, David; Barošová, Hana; Geers, Christoph; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Clift, Martin J. D.

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundThere are justifiable health concerns regarding the potential adverse effects associated with human exposure to volcanic ash (VA) particles, especially when considering communities living in urban areas already exposed to heightened air pollution. The aim of this study was, therefore, to gain an imperative, first understanding of the biological impacts of respirable VA when exposed concomitantly with diesel particles.MethodsA sophisticated in vitro 3D triple cell co-culture model of the human alveolar epithelial tissue barrier was exposed to either a single or repeated dose of dry respirable VA (deposited dose of 0.26 ± 0.09 or 0.89 ± 0.29 μg/cm2, respectively) from Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat for a period of 24 h at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Subsequently, co-cultures were exposed to co-exposures of single or repeated VA and diesel exhaust particles (DEP; NIST SRM 2975; 0.02 mg/mL), a model urban pollutant, at the pseudo-ALI. The biological impact of each individual particle type was also analysed under these precise scenarios. The cytotoxic (LDH release), oxidative stress (depletion of intracellular GSH) and (pro-)inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-8 and IL-1β) responses were assessed after the particulate exposures. The impact of VA exposure upon cell morphology, as well as its interaction with the multicellular model, was visualised via confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively.ResultsThe combination of respirable VA and DEP, in all scenarios, incited an heightened release of TNF-α and IL-8 as well as significant increases in IL-1β, when applied at sub-lethal doses to the co-culture compared to VA exposure alone. Notably, the augmented (pro-)inflammatory responses observed were not mediated by oxidative stress. LSM supported the quantitative assessment of cytotoxicity, with no changes in cell morphology within the barrier model evident. A direct interaction of the VA with all

  14. Organizing a mucosal defense.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Rodney D; Lorenz, Robin G

    2005-08-01

    Gastrointestinal associated lymphoid tissue can be divided into loosely organized effector sites, which include the lamina propria and intraepithelial lymphocytes, and more organized structures, such as mesenteric lymph nodes (LNs), Peyer's patches (PPs), isolated lymphoid follicles, and cryptopatches (CPs). These organized structures in the gastrointestinal tract have been hypothesized to play the role of primary lymphoid organ, supporting the extrathymic development of T lymphocytes (CPs), secondary lymphoid organs involved in the induction of the mucosal immune response (PPs), and tertiary lymphoid structures whose function is still under debate (isolated lymphoid follicles). The most widely studied lymphoid structure found in the small intestine is the PP. PPs are secondary lymphoid structures, and their development and function have been extensively investigated. However, single lymphoid aggregates resembling PPs have been also described in humans and in the murine small intestines. These isolated lymphoid follicles have both germinal centers and an overlying follicle-associated epithelium, suggesting that they also can function as inductive sites for the mucosal immune response. This review compares and contrasts the development and function of the four main organized gastrointestinal lymphoid tissues: CPs, isolated lymphoid follicles, PPs, and mesenteric LNs.

  15. Iron medication-induced gastric mucosal injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuchen; Ouyang, Jie; Wieczorek, Rosemary; DeSoto, Fidelina

    2009-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal erosion, ulcer, necrosis and strictures after an acute iron overdose are well described. However, gastric mucosal injury in patients receiving therapeutic iron has received only scant recognition despite its wide use. We report a case of iron medication-induced gastric mucosal injury in a 76-year-old male who presented with iron deficiency anemia and had been taking ferrous sulfate tablet for 4 years. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed a pale, villous appearing flat lesion along the lesser curvature of gastric body. Histopathologic examination of EGD biopsies of the flat lesion showed brown crystalline materials deposited in the lamina propria of gastric mucosa, which was accompanied with fibrosis, chronic inflammation, and foreign body reaction. The crystalline materials were covered and admixed with gastric epithelium. Prussian blue iron stain confirmed that the brown crystalline materials were iron. The iron and hemosiderin accumulation was also seen in cytoplasm of epithelial cells and lumen of fundic gastric glands. The recognition and reporting by pathologists of iron-induced changes in EGD biopsies will alert clinicians to this underrecognized but easily correctable complication by alternative forms of iron therapy, such as liquid preparation.

  16. CCN1 induces a reversible epithelial-mesenchymal transition in gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chai, Jianyuan; Norng, Manith; Modak, Cristina; Reavis, Kevin M; Mouazzen, Wasim; Pham, Jennifer

    2010-08-01

    CCN1 is a matricellular protein that activates many genes related to wound healing and tissue remodeling in fibroblasts, but its effect on epithelial cells remains unclear. This study examined the role of CCN1 in epithelial wound healing using rat gastric epithelial cells and rat stomach ulcer as in vitro and in vivo models, respectively. We found that CCN1 expression is highly upregulated in the epithelial cells adjacent to a wound and remains high until the wound is healed. Upregulation of CCN1 activates a transient epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the epithelial cells at the migrating front and drives wound closure. Once the wound is healed, these epithelial cells and their progeny can resume their original epithelial phenotype. We also found that CCN1-induced E-cadherin loss is not due to transcriptional regulation but rather protein degradation due to the collapse of adherens junctions, which is contributed by beta-catenin translocation. CCN1-activated integrin-linked kinase mediates this process. Finally, our in vivo study showed that locally neutralizing CCN1 drastically impairs wound closure, whereas local injection of recombinant CCN1 protein induces expression of vimentin and smooth muscle alpha-actin in normal gastric mucosal epithelial cells and accelerates re-epithelialization during ulcer healing. In conclusion, our study indicates that CCN1 can induce reversible epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and this feature may have great value for clinical wound healing.

  17. Modulation of Intestinal Epithelial Defense Responses by Probiotic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wan, L Y M; Chen, Z J; Shah, N P; El-Nezami, H

    2016-12-09

    Probiotics are live microorganisms, which when administered in food confer numerous health benefits. In previous studies about beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria to health, particularly in the fields of intestinal mucosa defense responses, specific probiotics, in a strain-dependent manner, show certain degree of potential to reinforce the integrity of intestinal epithelium and/or regulate some immune components. The mechanism of probiotic action is an area of interest. Among all possible routes of modulation by probiotics of intestinal epithelial cell-mediated defense responses, modulations of intestinal barrier function, innate, and adaptive mucosal immune responses, as well as signaling pathways are considered to play important role in the intestinal defense responses against pathogenic bacteria. This review summarizes the beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria to intestinal health together with the mechanisms affected by probiotic bacteria: barrier function, innate, and adaptive defense responses such as secretion of mucins, defensins, trefoil factors, immunoglobulin A (IgA), Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokines, gut associated lymphoid tissues, and signaling pathways.

  18. Intestinal barrier integrity and function in infants with cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Tahra M. K.; Mohammed, Omnia A.; Nasif, Khalid A.; El Gezawy, Ebtesam M.

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims The safety of the human body is maintained by effective monitoring of the mucosal surface integrity and protection against potentially harmful compounds. This function of the gut called intestinal barrier function can be affected by cholestasis and the absence of bile in the intestinal lumen. We aimed to determine whether the gut barrier integrity is impaired in infants with cholestasis by evaluation of the intestinal fatty acid binding proteins (I-FABP) and ileal bile acid binding protein (I-BABP) as markers of intestinal epithelial cell damage and plasma D-lactate level as a marker of gut wall permeability. Methods This case-control study included 53 infants with cholestasis and 29 controls. Serum levels of I-FABP, I-BABP, and D-lactate were measured in all subjects. Results Both groups of patients with neonatal hepatitis and biliary atresia showed significantly higher levels of I-FABP and I-BABP than the controls. There were no differences in the serum D-lactate level between the cases and controls. There was no difference between the two groups of patients (I and II) regarding any of the parameters studied. No significant correlations between serum levels of I-FABP, I-BABP, or D-lactate and total or direct bilirubin levels were found in the cholestatic infants. Conclusions The intestinal epithelial barrier integrity is breached nearly in all parts of the intestine in infants with cholestasis. Further research is recommended to determine the impact of this finding on the management of these infants. The relationship between physical intestinal barrier damage and its functional failure remains subject for further research. PMID:28239322

  19. Mucosal biofilms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P

    2011-08-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that form on surfaces and are embedded in an extracellular matrix. C. albicans forms pathogenic mucosal biofilms that are evoked by changes in host immunity or mucosal ecology. Mucosal surfaces are inhabited by many microbial species; hence these biofilms are polymicrobial. Several recent studies have applied paradigms of biofilm analysis to study mucosal C. albicans infections. These studies reveal that the Bcr1 transcription factor is a master regulator of C. albicans biofilm formation under diverse conditions, though the most relevant Bcr1 target genes can vary with the biofilm niche. An important determinant of mucosal biofilm formation is the interaction with host defenses. Finally, studies of interactions between bacterial species and C. albicans provide insight into the communication mechanisms that endow polymicrobial biofilms with unique properties.

  20. Mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Irene; Zhang, Yong-An; Sunyer, J Oriol

    2011-12-01

    As physical barriers that separate teleost fish from the external environment, mucosae are also active immunological sites that protect them against exposure to microbes and stressors. In mammals, the sites where antigens are sampled from mucosal surfaces and where stimulation of naïve T and B lymphocytes occurs are known as inductive sites and are constituted by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). According to anatomical location, the MALT in teleost fish is subdivided into gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT). All MALT contain a variety of leukocytes, including, but not limited to, T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages and granulocytes. Secretory immunoglobulins are produced mainly by plasmablasts and plasma cells, and play key roles in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD, in which IgM was thought to be the only one responding to pathogens both in systemic and mucosal compartments. However, a third teleost immunoglobulin class, IgT/IgZ, was discovered in 2005, and it has recently been shown to behave as the prevalent immunoglobulin in gut mucosal immune responses. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of fish MALT. Moreover, we attempt to integrate the existing knowledge on both basic and applied research findings on fish mucosal immune responses, with the goal to provide new directions that may facilitate the development of novel vaccination strategies that stimulate not only systemic, but also mucosal immunity.

  1. Mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of Teleost fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene; Zhang, Yong-An; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2012-01-01

    As physical barriers that separate teleost fish from the external environment, mucosae are also active immunological sites that protect them against exposure to microbes and stressors. In mammals, the sites where antigens are sampled from mucosal surfaces and where stimulation of naive T and B lymphocytes occurs are known as inductive sites and are constituted by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). According to anatomical location, the MALT in teleost fish is subdivided into gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT). All MALT contain a variety of leukocytes, including, but not limited to, T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages and granulocytes. Secretory immunoglobulins are produced mainly by plasmablasts and plasma cells, and play key roles in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD, in which IgM was thought to be the only one responding to pathogens both in systemic and mucosal compartments. However, a third teleost immunoglobulin class, IgT/IgZ, was discovered in 2005, and it has recently been shown to behave as the prevalent immunoglobulin in gut mucosal immune responses. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of fish MALT. Moreover, we attempt to integrate the existing knowledge on both basic and applied research findings on fish mucosal immune responses, with the goal to provide new directions that may facilitate the development of novel vaccination strategies that stimulate not only systemic, but also mucosal immunity. PMID:22133710

  2. A novel method for imaging sites of paracellular passage of macromolecules in epithelial sheets.

    PubMed

    Richter, Jan F; Schmauder, Ralf; Krug, Susanne M; Gebert, Andreas; Schumann, Michael

    2016-05-10

    Understanding the dynamics of intestinal barrier function is key to elucidating oral delivery routes of therapeutics as well as to understanding various diseases that involve the mucosal immune system. Passage of macromolecules across barrier-forming epithelia is classically analyzed by means of various tracer flux measurements. This approach averages over contributions from many cells and lacks labeling of passage-sites. Thus, abundance and nature of involved cells have remained unidentified. We present a novel method that allowed for optical analysis of passage of various macromolecules on large-scale and single-cell level. To achieve tracking of passage loci in epithelia at submicrometer resolution we used biotinylated and fluorescent macromolecules that bind to basolateral membranes pre-labeled with cell-adherent avidin. We applied this method to epithelial cell lines and isolated mucosae in order to 3-dimensionally determine barrier leak properties over time. Tracer passage was found in all epithelia examined. However, it was infrequent, strikingly inhomogeneous, depended on culture duration and tightness of the monolayer. Stimulating passage with barrier-perturbing agents increased the number of leaks exposition time-dependently in cell lines and explanted mucosae. After stepwise opening of the paracellular passage pathway, integrated tracer-signal measured by our assay strictly correlated to simultaneously performed standard fluxes. Thus, our assay allows for the study of transepithelial macromolecule passage in various physiological and pathological conditions.

  3. Barrier function of the nasal mucosa in health and type-2 biased airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, N; Van Crombruggen, K; Gevaert, E; Bachert, C

    2016-03-01

    The mucosal lining of the upper airways represents the outer surface of the body to the ambient air and its contents and is prepared for it as the first line of defense. Apart from the well-described physical barrier and the mucociliary clearance, a variety of systems, including the airway microbiome, antimicrobial proteins, damage-associated molecular patterns, innate lymphoid cells, epithelial-derived cytokines and chemokines, and finally the adaptive immune system, as well as eosinophils as newly appreciated defense cells form different levels of protection against and response to any possible intruder. Of interest especially for allergic airway disease, mucosal germs might not just elicit a classical Th1/Th17-biased inflammatory response, but may directly induce a type-2 mucosal inflammation. Innovative therapeutic interventions may be possible at different levels also; however, whether modulations of the innate or adaptive immune responses will finally be more successful, and how the correction of the adaptive immune response might impact on the innate side, will be determined in the near future.

  4. The gut-brain barrier in major depression: intestinal mucosal dysfunction with an increased translocation of LPS from gram negative enterobacteria (leaky gut) plays a role in the inflammatory pathophysiology of depression.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michael; Kubera, Marta; Leunis, Jean-Claude

    2008-02-01

    There is now evidence that major depression (MDD) is accompanied by an activation of the inflammatory response system (IRS) and that pro-inflammatory cytokines and lipopolysacharide (LPS) may induce depressive symptoms. The aim of the present study was to examine whether an increased gastrointestinal permeability with an increased translocation of LPS from gram negative bacteria may play a role in the pathophysiology of MDD. Toward this end, the present study examines the serum concentrations of IgM and IgA against LPS of the gram-negative enterobacteria, Hafnia Alvei, Pseudomonas Aeruginosa, Morganella Morganii, Pseudomonas Putida, Citrobacter Koseri, and Klebsielle Pneumoniae in MDD patients and normal controls. We found that the prevalences and median values for serum IgM and IgA against LPS of enterobacteria are significantly greater in patients with MDD than in normal volunteers. These differences are significant to the extent that a significant diagnostic performance is obtained, i.e. the area under the ROC curve is 90.1%. The symptom profiles of increased IgM and IgA levels are fatigue, autonomic and gastro-intestinal symptoms and a subjective feeling of infection. The results show that intestinal mucosal dysfunction characterized by an increased translocation of gram-negative bacteria (leaky gut) plays a role in the inflammatory pathophysiology of depression. It is suggested that the increased LPS translocation may mount an immune response and thus IRS activation in some patients with MDD and may induce specific "sickness behaviour" symptoms. It is suggested that patients with MDD should be checked for leaky gut by means of the IgM and IgA panel used in the present study and accordingly should be treated for leaky gut.

  5. Tsr Chemoreceptor Interacts With IL-8 Provoking E. coli Transmigration Across Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bing; Li, Manshu; Xu, Yonghao; Islam, Diana; Khang, Julie; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Lee, Warren; Szaszi, Katalin; Zhong, Nanshan; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Li, Yimin; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial colonization of epithelial surfaces and subsequent transmigration across the mucosal barrier are essential for the development of infection. We hypothesized that the methyl-accepting proteins (MCPs), known as chemoreceptors expressed on Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterial surface, play an important role in mediating bacterial transmigration. We demonstrated a direct interaction between human interleukin-8 (IL-8) and Tsr receptor, a major MCP chemoreceptor. Stimulation of human lung epithelial cell monolayer with IL-8 resulted in increased E. coli adhesion and transmigration of the native strain (RP437) and a strain expressing only Tsr (UU2373), as compared to a strain (UU2599) with Tsr truncation. The augmented E. coli adhesion and migration was associated with a higher expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 and production of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, and a lower expression of the tight junction protein claudin-1 and the plasma membrane protein caveolin-1 in lung epithelial cells. An increased E. coli colonization and pulmonary cytokine production induced by the RP437 and UU2373 strains was attenuated in mice challenged with the UU2599 strain. Our results suggest a critical role of the E. coli Tsr chemoreceptor in mediating bacterial colonization and transmigration across human lung epithelium during development of pulmonary infections. PMID:27506372

  6. Expression of IL-22 in the Skin Causes Th2-Biased Immunity, Epidermal Barrier Dysfunction, and Pruritus via Stimulating Epithelial Th2 Cytokines and the GRP Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lou, Hongfei; Lu, Jingning; Choi, Eun Byul; Oh, Min Hee; Jeong, Mingeum; Barmettler, Sara; Zhu, Zhou; Zheng, Tao

    2017-04-01

    Increased expression of Th22 cytokine IL-22 is a characteristic finding in atopic dermatitis (AD). However, the specific role of IL-22 in the pathogenesis of AD in vivo has yet to be elucidated. Consistent with observations in human AD, IL-22 was significantly increased in the AD skin of mice after epicutaneous sensitization to house dust mite allergen. Utilizing a skin-specific inducible transgenic system, we show in the present study that expression of IL-22 in the skin of mice caused an AD-like phenotype characterized by chronic pruritic dermatitis associated with Th2-biased local and systemic immune responses, downregulation of epidermal differentiation complex genes, and enhanced dermatitis upon epicutaneous allergen exposure. IL-22 potently induced the expression of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), a neuropeptide pruritogen, in dermal immune cells and sensory afferents and in their skin-innervating sensory neurons. IL-22 also differentially upregulated the expression of GRP receptor (GRPR) on keratinocytes of AD skin. The number of GRP(+) cells in the skin correlated with the AD severity and the intensity of pruritus. IL-22 directly upregulated the expression of epithelial-derived type 2 cytokines (thymic stromal lymphopoietin and IL-33) and GRP in primary keratinocytes. Furthermore, GRP not only strongly induced thymic stromal lymphopoietin but it also increased the expression of IL-33 and GRPR synergistically with IL-22. Importantly, we found that the expression of GRP was strikingly increased in the skin of patients with AD. These results indicate that IL-22 plays important pathogenic roles in the initiation and development of AD, in part through inducing keratinocyte production of type 2 cytokines and activation of the GRP/GRPR pathway.

  7. Denatured globular protein and bile salt-coated nanoparticles for poorly water-soluble drugs: Penetration across the intestinal epithelial barrier into the circulation system and enhanced oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Yang, Ke; Fan, Lifang; Lv, Yaqi; Jin, Zhu; Zhu, Shumin; Qin, Chao; Wang, Yiao; Yin, Lifang

    2015-11-10

    Oral drug delivery is the most preferred route for patients; however, the low solubility of drugs and the resultant poor absorption compromise the benefits of oral administration. On the other hand, for years, the overwhelmingly accepted mechanism for enhanced oral absorption using lipid nanocarriers was based on the process of lipid digestion and drug solubilization in the small intestine. Few reports indicated that other bypass pathways are involved in drug absorption in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) for oral delivery of nanocarriers. Herein, we report a new nanoemulsion system with a denatured globular protein with a diameter of 30 nm, soybean protein isolates (SPI), and bile salt as emulsifiers, aiming to enhance the absorption of insoluble drugs and explore other pathways for absorption. A BCS class II drug, fenofibrate (FB), was used as the model drug. The SPI and bile salt-coated Ns with a diameter of approximately 150 nm were prepared via a high-pressure homogenizing procedure. Interestingly, the present Ns could be converted to solid dosage form using fluid-bed coating technology, maintaining a nanoscale size. Most importantly, in a model of in situ rat intestinal perfusion, Ns could penetrate across the intestinal epithelial barrier into the systemic circulation and then obtain biodistribution into other tissues. In addition, Ns significantly improved FB oral absorption, exhibited as a greater than 2- and 2.5-fold increase in Cmax and AUC0-t, respectively, compared to the suspension formulation. Overall, the present Ns are promising nanocarriers for the oral delivery of insoluble drugs, and the penetration of intact Ns across the GIT barrier into systemic circulation may be a new strategy for improved drug absorption with the use of nanocarriers.

  8. Intestinal barriers to bacteria and their toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.I.; Owen, R.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Immunologic and nonimmunologic processes work together to protect the host from the multitude of microorganisms residing within the intestinal lumen. Mechanical integrity of the intestinal epithelium, mucus in combination with secretory antibody, antimicrobial metabolites of indigenous microorganisms, and peristalsis each limit proliferation and systemic dissemination of enteric pathogens. Uptake of microorganisms by Peyer's patches and other intestinal lymphoid structures and translocation circumvent the mucosal barrier, especially in immunosuppressed individuals. Improved understanding of the composition and limitation of the intestinal barrier, coupled with advances in genetic engineering of immunogenic bacteria, development of oral delivery systems, and immunomodulators, now make enhancement of mucosal barriers feasible. 32 references.

  9. Pharmacological Protection From Radiation {+-} Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Cotrim, Ana P.; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Sunshine, Abraham N.; Zheng Changyu; Sowers, Anastasia L.; Thetford, Angela D.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B.; Baum, Bruce J.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation {+-} cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, {approx}8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses {+-} cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 Multiplication-Sign 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

  10. The Origin of Mucosal Immunity: Lessons from the Holobiont Hydra

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Katja

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Historically, mucosal immunity—i.e., the portion of the immune system that protects an organism’s various mucous membranes from invasion by potentially pathogenic microbes—has been studied in single-cell epithelia in the gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tracts of vertebrates. Phylogenetically, mucosal surfaces appeared for the first time about 560 million years ago in members of the phylum Cnidaria. There are remarkable similarities and shared functions of mucosal immunity in vertebrates and innate immunity in cnidarians, such as Hydra species. Here, we propose a common origin for both systems and review observations that indicate that the ultimately simple holobiont Hydra provides both a new perspective on the relationship between bacteria and animal cells and a new prism for viewing the emergence and evolution of epithelial tissue-based innate immunity. In addition, recent breakthroughs in our understanding of immune responses in Hydra polyps reared under defined short-term gnotobiotic conditions open up the potential of Hydra as an animal research model for the study of common mucosal disorders. PMID:27803185

  11. The Origin of Mucosal Immunity: Lessons from the Holobiont Hydra.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Katja; Bosch, Thomas C G

    2016-11-01

    Historically, mucosal immunity-i.e., the portion of the immune system that protects an organism's various mucous membranes from invasion by potentially pathogenic microbes-has been studied in single-cell epithelia in the gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tracts of vertebrates. Phylogenetically, mucosal surfaces appeared for the first time about 560 million years ago in members of the phylum Cnidaria. There are remarkable similarities and shared functions of mucosal immunity in vertebrates and innate immunity in cnidarians, such as Hydra species. Here, we propose a common origin for both systems and review observations that indicate that the ultimately simple holobiont Hydra provides both a new perspective on the relationship between bacteria and animal cells and a new prism for viewing the emergence and evolution of epithelial tissue-based innate immunity. In addition, recent breakthroughs in our understanding of immune responses in Hydra polyps reared under defined short-term gnotobiotic conditions open up the potential of Hydra as an animal research model for the study of common mucosal disorders.

  12. Caspase-8 regulates TNF-alpha induced epithelial necroptosis and terminal ileitis

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Claudia; Martini, Eva; Wittkopf, Nadine; Amann, Kerstin; Weigmann, Benno; Neumann, Helmut; Waldner, Maximilian; Hedrick, Stephen M.; Tenzer, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F.; Becker, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunction of the intestinal epithelium is believed to result in excessive translocation of commensal bacteria into the bowel wall that drives chronic mucosal inflammation in Crohn's disease; an incurable inflammatory bowel disease in humans characterized by inflammation of the terminal ileum1. Beside the physical barrier established by the tight contact of cells, specialized epithelial cells such as Paneth cells and goblet cells provide innate immune defence functions by secreting mucus and antimicrobial peptides which hamper access and survival of bacteria adjacent to the epithelium2. Epithelial cell death is a hallmark of intestinal inflammation and has been discussed as a pathogenic mechanism driving Crohn's disease (CD) in humans3. However, the regulation of epithelial cell death and its role in intestinal homeostasis remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate a critical role for caspase-8 in regulating necroptosis of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and terminal ileitis. Mice with a conditional deletion of caspase-8 in the intestinal epithelium (Casp8ΔIEC) spontaneously developed inflammatory lesions in the terminal ileum and were highly susceptible to colitis. Casp8ΔIEC mice lacked Paneth cells and showed reduced numbers of goblet cells suggesting dysregulated anti-microbial immune cell functions of the intestinal epithelium. Casp8ΔIEC mice showed increased cell death in the Paneth cell area of small intestinal crypts. Epithelial cell death was induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α, was associated with increased expression of receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3) and could be inhibited upon blockade of necroptosis. Finally, we identified high levels of RIP3 in human Paneth cells and increased necroptosis in the terminal ileum of patients with Crohn's disease, suggesting a potential role of necroptosis in the pathogenesis of this disease. Taken together, our data demonstrate a critical function of caspase-8 in regulating intestinal homeostasis

  13. Regulation of the gut microbiota by the mucosal immune system in mice.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Mizuho; Inohara, Naohiro

    2014-09-01

    The benefits of commensal bacteria to the health of the host have been well documented, such as providing stimulation to potentiate host immune responses, generation of useful metabolites, and direct competition with pathogens. However, the ability of the host immune system to control the microbiota remains less well understood. Recent microbiota analyses in mouse models have revealed detailed structures and diversities of microbiota at different sites of the digestive tract in mouse populations. The contradictory findings of previous studies on the role of host immune responses in overall microbiota composition are likely attributable to the high β-diversity in mouse populations as well as technical limitations of the methods to analyze microbiota. The host employs multiple systems to strictly regulate their interactions with the microbiota. A spatial segregation between the host and microbiota is achieved with the mucosal epithelium, which is further fortified with a mucus layer on the luminal side and Paneth cells that produce antimicrobial peptides. When commensal bacteria or pathogens breach the epithelial barrier and translocate to peripheral tissues, the host immune system is activated to eliminate them. Defective segregation and tissue elimination of commensals result in exaggerated inflammatory responses and possibly death of the host. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of mouse microbiota, its common features with human microbiota, the technologies utilized to analyze microbiota, and finally the challenges faced to delineate the role of host immune responses in the composition of the luminal microbiota.

  14. Regulation of the gut microbiota by the mucosal immune system in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Mizuho

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of commensal bacteria to the health of the host have been well documented, such as providing stimulation to potentiate host immune responses, generation of useful metabolites, and direct competition with pathogens. However, the ability of the host immune system to control the microbiota remains less well understood. Recent microbiota analyses in mouse models have revealed detailed structures and diversities of microbiota at different sites of the digestive tract in mouse populations. The contradictory findings of previous studies on the role of host immune responses in overall microbiota composition are likely attributable to the high β-diversity in mouse populations as well as technical limitations of the methods to analyze microbiota. The host employs multiple systems to strictly regulate their interactions with the microbiota. A spatial segregation between the host and microbiota is achieved with the mucosal epithelium, which is further fortified with a mucus layer on the luminal side and Paneth cells that produce antimicrobial peptides. When commensal bacteria or pathogens breach the epithelial barrier and translocate to peripheral tissues, the host immune system is activated to eliminate them. Defective segregation and tissue elimination of commensals result in exaggerated inflammatory responses and possibly death of the host. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of mouse microbiota, its common features with human microbiota, the technologies utilized to analyze microbiota, and finally the challenges faced to delineate the role of host immune responses in the composition of the luminal microbiota. PMID:24792038

  15. Systemic Staphylococcus aureus infection mediated by Candida albicans hyphal invasion of mucosal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Schlecht, Lisa Marie; Peters, Brian M.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Freiberg, Jeffrey A.; Hänsch, Gertrud M.; Filler, Scott G.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus are often co-isolated in cases of biofilm-associated infections. C. albicans can cause systemic disease through morphological switch from the rounded yeast to the invasive hyphal form. Alternatively, systemic S. aureus infections arise from seeding through breaks in host epithelial layers although many patients have no documented portal of entry. We describe a novel strategy by which S. aureus is able to invade host tissue and disseminate via adherence to the invasive hyphal elements of Candida albicans. In vitro and ex vivo findings demonstrate a specific binding of the staphylococci to the candida hyphal elements. The C. albicans cell wall adhesin Als3p binds to multiple staphylococcal adhesins. Furthermore, Als3p is required for C. albicans to transport S. aureus into the tissue and cause a disseminated infection in an oral co-colonization model. These findings suggest that C. albicans can facilitate the invasion of S. aureus across mucosal barriers, leading to systemic infection in co-colonized patients. PMID:25332378

  16. Interleukin-10 Enhances the Intestinal Epithelial Barrier in the Presence of Corticosteroids through p38 MAPK Activity in Caco-2 Monolayers: A Possible Mechanism for Steroid Responsiveness in Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Lorén, Violeta; Cabré, Eduard; Ojanguren, Isabel; Domènech, Eugeni; Pedrosa, Elisabet; García-Jaraquemada, Arce; Mañosa, Miriam; Manyé, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids are the first line therapy for moderate-severe flare-ups of ulcerative colitis. Despite that, up to 60% of patients do not respond adequately to steroid treatment. Previously, we reported that low IL-10 mRNA levels in intestine are associated with a poor response to glucocorticoids in active Crohn’s disease. Here, we test whether IL-10 can favour the response to glucocorticoids by improving the TNFα-induced intestinal barrier damage (assessed by transepithelial electrical resistance) in Caco-2 monolayers, and their possible implications on glucocorticoid responsiveness in active ulcerative colitis. We show that the association of IL-10 and glucocorticoids improves the integrity of TNFα-treated Caco-2 cells and that p38 MAPK plays a key role. In vitro, IL-10 facilitates the nuclear translocation of p38 MAPK-phosphorylated thereby modulating glucocorticoids-receptor-α, IL-10-receptor-α and desmoglein-2 expression. In glucocorticoids-refractory patients, p38 MAPK phosphorylation and membrane desmoglein-2 expression are reduced in colonic epithelial cells. These results suggest that p38 MAPK-mediated synergism between IL-10 and glucocorticoids improves desmosome straightness contributing to the recovery of intestinal epithelium and reducing luminal antigens contact with lamina propria in ulcerative colitis. This study highlights the link between the intestinal epithelium in glucocorticoids-response in ulcerative colitis. PMID:26090671

  17. Interleukin-10 Enhances the Intestinal Epithelial Barrier in the Presence of Corticosteroids through p38 MAPK Activity in Caco-2 Monolayers: A Possible Mechanism for Steroid Responsiveness in Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Lorén, Violeta; Cabré, Eduard; Ojanguren, Isabel; Domènech, Eugeni; Pedrosa, Elisabet; García-Jaraquemada, Arce; Mañosa, Miriam; Manyé, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids are the first line therapy for moderate-severe flare-ups of ulcerative colitis. Despite that, up to 60% of patients do not respond adequately to steroid treatment. Previously, we reported that low IL-10 mRNA levels in intestine are associated with a poor response to glucocorticoids in active Crohn's disease. Here, we test whether IL-10 can favour the response to glucocorticoids by improving the TNFα-induced intestinal barrier damage (assessed by transepithelial electrical resistance) in Caco-2 monolayers, and their possible implications on glucocorticoid responsiveness in active ulcerative colitis. We show that the association of IL-10 and glucocorticoids improves the integrity of TNFα-treated Caco-2 cells and that p38 MAPK plays a key role. In vitro, IL-10 facilitates the nuclear translocation of p38 MAPK-phosphorylated thereby modulating glucocorticoids-receptor-α, IL-10-receptor-α and desmoglein-2 expression. In glucocorticoids-refractory patients, p38 MAPK phosphorylation and membrane desmoglein-2 expression are reduced in colonic epithelial cells. These results suggest that p38 MAPK-mediated synergism between IL-10 and glucocorticoids improves desmosome straightness contributing to the recovery of intestinal epithelium and reducing luminal antigens contact with lamina propria in ulcerative colitis. This study highlights the link between the intestinal epithelium in glucocorticoids-response in ulcerative colitis.

  18. Claudin-4 Overexpression in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Is Associated with Hypomethylation and Is a Potential Target for Modulation of Tight Junction Barrier Function Using a C-Terminal Fragment of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin1

    PubMed Central

    Litkouhi, Babak; Kwong, Joseph; Lo, Chun-Min; Smedley, James G; McClane, Bruce A; Aponte, Margarita; Gao, Zhijian; Sarno, Jennifer L; Hinners, Jennifer; Welch, William R; Berkowitz, Ross S; Mok, Samuel C; Garner, Elizabeth I O

    2007-01-01

    Background Claudin-4, a tight junction (TJ) protein and receptor for the C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE), is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Previous research suggests DNA methylation is a mechanism for claudin-4 overexpression in cancer and that C-CPE acts as an absorption-enhancing agent in claudin-4-expressing cells. We sought to correlate claudin-4 overexpression in EOC with clinical outcomes and TJ barrier function, investigate DNA methylation as a mechanism for overexpression, and evaluate the effect of C-CPE on the TJ. Methods Claudin-4 expression in EOC was quantified and correlated with clinical outcomes. Claudin-4 methylation status was determined, and claudin-4-negative cell lines were treated with a demethylating agent. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing was used to calculate junctional (paracellular) resistance (Rb) in EOC cells after claudin-4 silencing and after C-CPE treatment. Results Claudin-4 overexpression in EOC does not correlate with survival or other clinical endpoints and is associated with hypomethylation. Claudin-4 overexpression correlates with Rb and C-CPE treatment of EOC cells significantly decreased Rb in a dose- and claudin-4-dependent noncytotoxic manner. Conclusions C-CPE treatment of EOC cells leads to altered TJ function. Further research is needed to determine the potential clinical applications of C-CPE in EOC drug delivery strategies. PMID:17460774

  19. Claudin-4 forms a paracellular barrier, revealing the interdependence of claudin expression in the loose epithelial cell culture model opossum kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Borovac, Jelena; Barker, Reid S; Rievaj, Juraj; Rasmussen, Andrew; Pan, Wanling; Wevrick, Rachel; Alexander, R Todd

    2012-12-15

    The effect of claudins on paracellular fluxes has been predominantly studied in either Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) or LLCPK cells. Neither model system has a very low transepithelial resistance (TER) as observed in leaky epithelia. Moreover, results from one model system are not always consistent with another. Opossum kidney (OK) cells form tight junctions yet have a very low TER. We therefore set out to characterize the paracellular transport properties of this cell culture model. Ussing chamber dilution potential measurements revealed that OK cells exhibit a very low TER (11.7 ± 1.4 Ω·cm(2)), slight cation selectivity (P(Na)/P(Cl) = 1.10 ± 0.01), and the Eisenman permeability sequence IV; the permeability of monovalent cations ranking K(+) > Cs(+) > Rb(+) > Na(+) > Li(+). Quantitative real-time PCR studies found that OK cells endogenously express claudin-4 > -1 > -6 > -20 > -9 > -12 > -11 > -15. Overexpression of claudin-4 significantly increased TER, decreased Na(+) and Cl(-) permeability, and increased levels of claudin-1, -6, and -9 mRNA. Knockdown of claudin-4 in the overexpressing cells significantly decreased TER without altering claudin expression; thus claudin-4 forms a barrier in OK cells. Knockdown of endogenous claudin-4 decreased claudin-1, -9, and -12 expression without altering TER. Claudin-2 overexpression decreased TER, significantly increased Na(+) and Cl(-) permeability, and decreased claudin-12 and -6 expression. Together these results demonstrate that claudin expression is tightly coupled in OK cells.

  20. Gastroduodenal Mucosal Defense Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hyder; Kaji, Izumi; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review To highlight recent developments in the field of gastroduodenal mucosal defense with emphasis on lumen-gut interactions. Recent Findings There has been a growing interest in the physiological functions of luminal chemosensors present from tongue to colon that detect organic molecules in the luminal content associated with nutrient ingestion, usually associated with specialized cells, in particular the enteroendocrine cells. These receptors transduce the release of peptide hormones, in particular proglucagon-derived products such as the glucagon-like-peptides (GLPs), which have profound effects on gut function and on metabolism. Luminal chemosensors transduce GLP release in response to changes in the cellular environment, as part of the mechanism of nutrient chemosensing. GLP-2 has important trophic effects on the intestinal mucosa, including increasing the proliferation rate of stem cells and reducing transmucosal permeability to ions and small molecules, in addition to increasing the rate of duodenal bicarbonate secretion. GLP-1, although traditionally considered an incretin that enhances the effect of insulin on peripheral tissues, also has trophic effects on the intestinal epithelium. Summary A better understanding of the mechanisms that mediate GLP release can further illuminate the importance of nutrient chemosensing as an important component of the mechanism that mediates the trophic effects of luminal nutrients. GLP-1 and -2 are already in clinical use for the treatment of diabetes and intestinal failure. Improved understanding of the control of their release and their end-organ effects will identify new clinical indications and interventions that enhance their release. PMID:26376476

  1. What interactions drive the salivary mucosal pellicle formation?

    PubMed Central

    Gibbins, Hannah L.; Yakubov, Gleb E.; Proctor, Gordon B.; Wilson, Stephen; Carpenter, Guy H.

    2014-01-01

    The bound salivary pellicle is essential for protection of both the enamel and mucosa in the oral cavity. The enamel pellicle formation is well characterised, however the mucosal pellicle proteins have only recently been clarified and what drives their formation is still unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the salivary pellicle on particles with different surface properties (hydrophobic or hydrophilic with a positive or negative charge), to determine a suitable model to mimic the mucosal pellicle. A secondary aim was to use the model to test how transglutaminase may alter pellicle formation. Particles were incubated with resting whole mouth saliva, parotid saliva and submandibular/sublingual saliva. Following incubation and two PBS and water washes bound salivary proteins were eluted with two concentrations of SDS, which were later analysed using SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Experiments were repeated with purified transglutaminase to determine how this epithelial-derived enzyme may alter the bound pellicle. Protein pellicles varied according to the starting salivary composition and the particle chemistry. Amylase, the single most abundant protein in saliva, did not bind to any particle indicating specific protein binding. Most proteins bound through hydrophobic interactions and a few according to their charges. The hydrophobic surface most closely matched the known salivary mucosal pellicle by containing mucins, cystatin and statherin but an absence of amylase and proline-rich proteins. This surface was further used to examine the effect of added transglutaminase. At the concentrations used only statherin showed any evidence of crosslinking with itself or another saliva protein. In conclusion, the formation of the salivary mucosal pellicle is probably mediated, at least in part, by hydrophobic interactions to the epithelial cell surface. PMID:24921197

  2. The use of polyion complex micelles to enhance the oral delivery of salmon calcitonin and transport mechanism across the intestinal epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Li, Xin-Ru; Zhou, Yan-Xia; Li, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Yong; Ma, Shu-Jin; Li, Jin-Wen; Gao, Ya-Jie; Liu, Yan; Wang, Xing-Lin; Yin, Dong-Dong

    2012-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the effect of polyanionic copolymer mPEG-grafted-alginic acid (mPEG-g-AA)-based polyion complex (PIC) micelles on enhancing the oral absorption of salmon calcitonin (sCT) in vivo and in vitro and identify the transepithelial transport mechanism of PIC micelles across the intestinal barrier. mPEG-g-AA was first successfully synthesized and characterized in cytotoxicity. The PIC micelles were approximately of 72 nm in diameter with a narrow distribution. The extremely significant enhancement of hypocalcemia efficacy of sCT-loaded PIC micelles in rats was evidenced by intraduodenal administration in comparison with sCT solution. The presence of mPEG-grafted-chitosan in PIC micelles had no favorable effect on this action in the referred content. In the Caco-2 transport studies, PIC micelles could significantly increase the permeability of sCT across Caco-2 monolayers without significantly affecting transepithelial electrical resistance values during the transport study. No evident alterations in the F-actin cytoskeleton were detected by confocal microscope observation following treatment of the cell monolayers with PIC micelles, which further certified the incapacity of PIC micelles to open the intercellular tight junctions. In addition, TEM observations showed that the intact PIC micelles were transported across the everted gut sac. These suggested that the transport of PIC micelles across Caco-2 cell monolayers involve a predominant transcytosis mechanism via endocytosis rather than paracellular pathway. Furthermore, PIC micelles were localized in both the cytoplasm and the nuclei observed by CLSM. Therefore, PIC micelles might be a potentially applicable tool for enhancing the oral absorption of cationic peptide and protein drugs.

  3. Microbiota Influences Vaccine and Mucosal Adjuvant Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A symbiotic relationship between humans and the microbiota is critical for the maintenance of our health, including development of the immune system, enhancement of the epithelial barrier, and acquisition of nutrients. Recent research has shown that the microbiota impacts immune cell development and differentiation. These findings suggest that the microbiota may also influence adjuvant and vaccine efficacy. Indeed, several factors such as malnutrition and poor sanitation, which affect gut microbiota composition, impair the efficacy of vaccines. Although there is little evidence that microbiota alters vaccine efficacy, further understanding of human immune system-microbiota interactions may lead to the effective development of adjuvants and vaccines for the treatment of diseases. PMID:28261017

  4. Microbiota Influences Vaccine and Mucosal Adjuvant Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Gi

    2017-02-01

    A symbiotic relationship between humans and the microbiota is critical for the maintenance of our health, including development of the immune system, enhancement of the epithelial barrier, and acquisition of nutrients. Recent research has shown that the microbiota impacts immune cell development and differentiation. These findings suggest that the microbiota may also influence adjuvant and vaccine efficacy. Indeed, several factors such as malnutrition and poor sanitation, which affect gut microbiota composition, impair the efficacy of vaccines. Although there is little evidence that microbiota alters vaccine efficacy, further understanding of human immune system-microbiota interactions may lead to the effective development of adjuvants and vaccines for the treatment of diseases.

  5. Survey of pre-inflammation cytokines levels in radiotherapy-induced-mucositis.

    PubMed

    Seyyednejad, Farshad; Rezaee, Amirreza; Haghi, Sarvar; Goldust, Mohamad

    2012-11-15

    Mucositis is a toxic side effect of anti-cancer treatments and is a major focus in cancer research. Pro-inflammatory cytokines have previously been implicated in the pathophysiology of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. The aim of this study was to detect a correlation between serum cytokine levels in head and neck (H and N) cancer patients receiving combined chemo-radiation therapy. Thirty patients with H and N epithelial cancer were recruited to this study. All patients received radiotherapy to the H and N region with doses ranging from 50-70 Gray (Gy). Chemotherapy with cisplatin, carboplatin, 5-fluorouracil and taxanes was given to high-risk patients, using standard chemotherapy protocols. Patients were evaluated for mucositis according to WHO common toxicity criteria and blood samples were drawn for inflammatory (IL-1 and TNF-a) and before and during treatment. The mucositis evaluation demonstrated mucositis grade IV in 33.3% of the patients after the 3rd treatment week. At the end of treatment, the number of patients with grade IV mucositis was less. IL-1 and TNF-alpha did not show any correlation with PEG tube installation. The level of cytokines measured before and during therapy showed decreased TNF-alpha especially after the third week of therapy. No relationship between IL-1 and TNF-alpha, level and mucositis grade was shown.

  6. Evidence-based interventions for cancer treatment-related mucositis: putting evidence into practice.

    PubMed

    Eilers, June; Harris, Debra; Henry, Karen; Johnson, Lee Ann

    2014-01-01

    Mucositis is an inflammatory process that can involve the mucosal epithelial cells from the mouth to the rectum. Historically, mucositis and stomatitis were used interchangeably, but momentum has increased toward more specific terminology since the 2000s. Stomatitis refers to inflammatory diseases of the mouth, including the mucosa, dentition, periapices, and periodontium, whereas mucositis refers more globally to an inflammatory process involving the mucous membranes of the oral cavity and the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, differentiation is needed regarding mucositis involving the oral cavity and the remainder of the gastrointestinal tract that require use of a scope-type device for close examination. As a result, oral cavity mucositis has been the focus of the majority of the studies reported to date. The mucous membranes beyond the oral cavity are more challenging to view, so the mouth has been presented as revealing potential changes in the gastrointestinal tract. However, because of the variation in morphology, function of different locations, and risks associated with procedures to validate that speculation, evidence is limited. The purpose of this article is to review evidence-based interventions for mucositis, particularly in the oral cavity, and provide clinicians with guidelines for nursing interventions.

  7. HIV-associated disruption of mucosal epithelium facilitates paracellular penetration by human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Tugizov, Sharof M; Herrera, Rossana; Chin-Hong, Peter; Veluppillai, Piri; Greenspan, Deborah; Michael Berry, J; Pilcher, Christopher D; Shiboski, Caroline H; Jay, Naomi; Rubin, Mary; Chein, Aung; Palefsky, Joel M

    2013-11-01

    The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated epithelial lesions is substantially higher in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals than in HIV-uninfected individuals. The molecular mechanisms underlying the increased risk of HPV infection in HIV-infected individuals are poorly understood. We found that HIV proteins tat and gp120 were expressed within the oral and anal mucosal epithelial microenvironment of HIV-infected individuals. Expression of HIV proteins in the mucosal epithelium was correlated with the disruption of epithelial tight junctions (TJ). Treatment of polarized oral, cervical and anal epithelial cells, and oral tissue explants with tat and gp120 led to disruption of epithelial TJ and increased HPV pseudovirion (PsV) paracellular penetration in to the epithelium. PsV entry was observed in the basal/parabasal cells, the cells in which the HPV life cycle is initiated. Our data suggest that HIV-associated TJ disruption of mucosal epithelia may potentiate HPV infection and subsequent development of HPV-associated neoplasia.

  8. Microbes and mucosal immune responses in asthma.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Trevor T; Johnston, Sebastian L; Openshaw, Peter J

    2013-03-09

    The substantial increase in the worldwide prevalence of asthma and atopy has been attributed to lifestyle changes that reduce exposure to bacteria. A recent insight is that the largely bacterial microbiome maintains a state of basal immune homoeostasis, which modulates immune responses to microbial pathogens. However, some respiratory viral infections cause bronchiolitis of infancy and childhood wheeze, and can exacerbate established asthma; whereas allergens can partly mimic infectious agents. New insights into the host’s innate sensing systems, combined with recently developed methods that characterise commensal and pathogenic microbial exposure, now allow a unified theory for how microbes cause mucosal inflammation in asthma. The respiratory mucosa provides a key microbial interface where epithelial and dendritic cells interact with a range of functionally distinct lymphocytes. Lymphoid cells then control a range of pathways, both innate and specific, which organise the host mucosal immune response. Fundamental to innate immune responses to microbes are the interactions between pathogen-associated molecular patterns and pattern recognition receptors, which are associated with production of type I interferons, proinflammatory cytokines, and the T-helper-2 cell pathway in predisposed people. These coordinated, dynamic immune responses underlie the differing asthma phenotypes, which we delineate in terms of Seven Ages of Asthma. An understanding of the role of microbes in the atopic march towards asthma, and in causing exacerbations of established asthma, provides the rationale for new specific treatments that can be assessed in clinical trials. On the basis of these new ideas, specific host biomarkers might then allow personalised treatment to become a reality for patients with asthma.

  9. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Spray-Dried Plasma Is Mediated by a Reduction in Mucosal Lymphocyte Activation and Infiltration in a Mouse Model of Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Bosque, Anna; Miró, Lluïsa; Amat, Concepció; Polo, Javier; Moretó, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    Spray-dried preparations from porcine and bovine plasma can alleviate mucosal inflammation in experimental models and improve symptoms in patients with enteropathy. In rodents, dietary supplementation with porcine spray-dried plasma (SDP) attenuates intestinal inflammation and improves the epithelial barrier function during intestinal inflammation induced by Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (SEB). The aim of this study was to discern the molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of SDP. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with 8% SDP or control diet (based on milk proteins) for two weeks, from weaning until day 33. On day 32, the mice were given a SEB dose (i.p., 25 µg/mouse) or vehicle. SEB administration increased cell recruitment to mesenteric lymph nodes and the percentage of activated Th lymphocytes and SDP prevented these effects). SDP supplementation increased the expression of interleukin 10 (IL-10) or transforming growth factor- β (TGF-β) compared to the SEB group. The SEB challenge increased six-fold the expression of mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 (MAdCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1); and these effects were attenuated by SDP supplementation. SEB also augmented NF-κB phosphorylation, an effect that was prevented by dietary SDP. Our results indicate that the anti-inflammatory effects of SDP involve the regulation of transcription factors and adhesion molecules that reduce intestinal cell infiltration and the degree of the inflammatory response. PMID:27782068

  10. Biology of HIV Mucosal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review HIV-1 mucosal transmission plays a critical role in HIV-1 infection and AIDS pathogenesis. This review summarizes the latest advances in biological studies of HIV-1 mucosal transmission, highlighting the implications of these studies in the development of microbicides to prevent HIV-1 transmission. Recent findings New studies of initial HIV-1 infection using improved culture models updated the current view of mucosal transmission. Mechanistic studies enhanced our understanding of cell-cell transmission of HIV-1 mediated by the major target cells, including dendritic cells, CD4+ T cells, and macrophages. Increasing evidence indicated the significance of host factors and immune responses in HIV-1 mucosal infection and transmission. Summary Recent progress in HIV-1 mucosal infection and transmission enriches our knowledge of virus-host interactions and viral pathogenesis. Functional studies of HIV-1 interactions with host cells can provide new insights into the design of more effective approaches to combat HIV-1 infection and AIDS. PMID:18802490

  11. [Focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck's disease) in a Turkish family].

    PubMed

    Weidner, F

    1996-12-01

    A 31-year-old Turkish patient and some family members suffered from multiple hyperplastic oral mucosal papules. Intralesional papilloma virus was not found but the patient had elevated levels of CD8 lymphocytes in his peripheral blood. We diagnosed focal epithelial hyperplasia of Heck.

  12. Enteric Pathogens and Their Toxin-Induced Disruption of the Intestinal Barrier through Alteration of Tight Junctions in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Wageha A.; Hess, Claudia; Hess, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining a healthy gut environment is a prerequisite for sustainable animal production. The gut plays a key role in the digestion and absorption of nutrients and constitutes an initial organ exposed to external factors influencing bird’s health. The intestinal epithelial barrier serves as the first line of defense between the host and the luminal environment. It consists of a continuous monolayer of intestinal epithelial cells connected by intercellular junctional complexes which shrink the space between adjacent cells. Consequently, free passing of solutes and water via the paracellular pathway is prevented. Tight junctions (TJs) are multi-protein complexes which are crucial for the integrity and function of the epithelial barrier as they not only link cells but also form channels allowing permeation between cells, resulting in epithelial surfaces of different tightness. Tight junction’s molecular composition, ultrastructure, and function are regulated differently with regard to physiological and pathological stimuli. Both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that reduced tight junction integrity greatly results in a condition commonly known as “leaky gut”. A loss of barrier integrity allows the translocation of luminal antigens (microbes, toxins) via the mucosa to access the whole body which are normally excluded and subsequently destroys the gut mucosal homeostasis, coinciding with an increased susceptibility to systemic infection, chronic inflammation and malabsorption. There is considerable evidence that the intestinal barrier dysfunction is an important factor contributing to the pathogenicity of some enteric bacteria. It has been shown that some enteric pathogens can induce permeability defects in gut epithelia by altering tight junction proteins, mediated by their toxins. Resolving the strategies that microorganisms use to hijack the functions of tight junctions is important for our understanding of microbial pathogenesis, because some pathogens

  13. Enteric Pathogens and Their Toxin-Induced Disruption of the Intestinal Barrier through Alteration of Tight Junctions in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Awad, Wageha A; Hess, Claudia; Hess, Michael

    2017-02-10

    Maintaining a healthy gut environment is a prerequisite for sustainable animal production. The gut plays a key role in the digestion and absorption of nutrients and constitutes an initial organ exposed to external factors influencing bird's health. The intestinal epithelial barrier serves as the first line of defense between the host and the luminal environment. It consists of a continuous monolayer of intestinal epithelial cells connected by intercellular junctional complexes which shrink the space between adjacent cells. Consequently, free passing of solutes and water via the paracellular pathway is prevented. Tight junctions (TJs) are multi-protein complexes which are crucial for the integrity and function of the epithelial barrier as they not only link cells but also form channels allowing permeation between cells, resulting in epithelial surfaces of different tightness. Tight junction's molecular composition, ultrastructure, and function are regulated differently with regard to physiological and pathological stimuli. Both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that reduced tight junction integrity greatly results in a condition commonly known as "leaky gut". A loss of barrier integrity allows the translocation of luminal antigens (microbes, toxins) via the mucosa to access the whole body which are normally excluded and subsequently destroys the gut mucosal homeostasis, coinciding with an increased susceptibility to systemic infection, chronic inflammation and malabsorption. There is considerable evidence that the intestinal barrier dysfunction is an important factor contributing to the pathogenicity of some enteric bacteria. It has been shown that some enteric pathogens can induce permeability defects in gut epithelia by altering tight junction proteins, mediated by their toxins. Resolving the strategies that microorganisms use to hijack the functions of tight junctions is important for our understanding of microbial pathogenesis, because some pathogens can

  14. Current progress and challenges in ocular surface reconstruction using cultivated epithelial sheet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Inatomi, T; Nakamura, T; Koizumi, N; Sotozono, C; Kinoshita, S

    2008-07-01

    The cultivated epithelial transplantation is a new surgical modality for treating a variety of severe ocular surface disorders. This type of tissue-engineered epithelial sheet provides a rapid epithelial coverage on the corneal surface that reduces inflammation and postoperative complications. Although cultivated corneal epithelial transplantation is an effective surgical strategy, autologous transplantation is limited to unilateral cases. Autologous cultivated oral mucosal epithelial transplantation (COMET) enables surgeons to reconstruct the ocular surface using autologous, non-ocular surface cells, and has opened a new pathway for treating severe, bilateral ocular surface disorders.

  15. Stress-induced breakdown of intestinal barrier function in the rat: reversal by wood creosote.

    PubMed

    Kuge, Tomoo; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2006-07-24

    Our previous studies demonstrated that wood creosote (Seirogan) inhibits intestinal secretion and normalizes the transport of electrolytes and water in rats subjected to restraint stress. The goal of the present study was to examine whether wood creosote has a protective effect against stress-induced breakdown of intestinal barrier function. F-344 rats were subjected to 90-min water avoidance stress (WAS) with wood creosote (30 mg/kg) or vehicle administered intragastrically 30 min prior to WAS. Sham stressed rats received wood creosote or vehicle treatment but did not experience the WAS. All rats were euthanized at the end of the WAS or sham-stress and the jejunum and colon were isolated. Epithelial transport was studied in modified Ussing chambers. Spontaneous secretion was assessed by electrophysiological measurement of the short circuit current (I(sc)) while electrical conductance (G) was calculated from the potential difference (PD) and I(sc) using Ohm's law. Intestinal permeability was defined by the mucosal-to-serosal flux of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). WAS significantly elevated basal I(sc) and G and increased epithelial permeability to HRP in the jejunum but not in the colon. Wood creosote resulted in a significant reduction of the stress-induced increase in I(sc), G and the mucosal-to-serosal flux of HRP compared to the vehicle-treated group. Wood creosote caused no significant effects in sham-stressed rats. The results suggest that oral administration of wood creosote may prevent stress-induced diarrhea by preventing aversive effects on small intestinal secretion and barrier function.

  16. Validation of a chicken ileal explant culture for measurement of mucosal inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gut mucosa holds a single layer of epithelial cells and the largest mass of lymphoid tissue in the body. While epithelial cell cultures are widely used to assess intestinal barrier functions, they have limitations to study cellular interactions with other cells, in particular those of the immune sys...

  17. Mucus-penetrating nanoparticles for drug and gene delivery to mucosal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Samuel K.; Wang, Ying-Ying; Hanes, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Mucus is a viscoelastic and adhesive gel that protects the lung airways, gastrointestinal (GI) tract, vagina, eye and other mucosal surfaces. Most foreign particulates, including conventional particle-based drug delivery systems, are efficiently trapped in human mucus layers by steric obstruction and/or adhesion. Trapped particles are typically removed from the mucosal tissue within seconds to a few hours depending on anatomical location, thereby strongly limiting the duration of sustained drug delivery locally. A number of debilitating diseases could be treated more effectively and with fewer side effects if drugs and genes could be more efficiently delivered to the underlying mucosal tissues in a controlled manner. This review first describes the tenacious mucus barrier properties that have precluded the efficient penetration of therapeutic particles. It then reviews the design and development of new mucus-penetrating particles that may avoid rapid mucus clearance mechanisms, and thereby provide targeted or sustained drug delivery for localized therapies in mucosal tissues. PMID:19133304

  18. Idiopathic mucosal penile squamous papillomas in dogs.

    PubMed

    Cornegliani, Luisa; Vercelli, Antonella; Abramo, Francesca

    2007-12-01

    A new papillomatous clinical entity is described affecting the penile mucosa of dogs. The animals, 11 male dogs of different breeds, ageing from 6 to 13 years, were presented for genital mass and occasional haematuria. Surgical incision of the prepuce skin of the anaesthetized dogs showed the presence of single pedunculated, soft, pink-red, cauliflower-like masses arising from the penile mucosa, with diameter ranging from 2 to 8 cm. In all cases, histopathological examination of the excised masses showed normal epithelial differentiation with digitiform expansion of all the layers and elongated rete ridges slanted towards the periphery of the lesion. Evidence of ballooning degeneration or basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies was not found. Both immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction techniques failed to reveal papillomavirus. According to the histological World Health Organization classification of papillomatous lesions and due to the lack of evidence of a viral origin the masses were identified as idiopathic mucosal penile squamous papillomas. Urinary problems resolved after surgical excision, haematuria was therefore considered secondary to ulceration of the papillated masses.

  19. Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is associated with changes in proteolytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Leblond, Jonathan; Le Pessot, Florence; Hubert-Buron, Aurélie; Duclos, Célia; Vuichoud, Jacques; Faure, Magali; Breuillé, Denis; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2008-02-01

    Mucositis, a common toxic side effect of chemotherapy, is characterized by an arrest of cell proliferation and a loss of gut barrier function, which may cause treatment reduction or withdrawal. Gut integrity depends on nutritional and metabolic factors, including the balance between protein synthesis and proteolysis. The effects of methotrexate (MTX; a frequently used chemotherapeutic agent) on intestinal proteolysis and gut barrier function were investigated in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received 2.5 mg/kg of MTX subcutaneously during 3 days and were euthanized at Day 4 (D4) or Day 7 (D7). We observed at D4 that MTX induced mucosal damage and increased intestinal permeability (7-fold) and the mucosal concentration of interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6 (4- to 6-fold). In addition, villus height and glutathione content significantly decreased. Intestinal proteolysis was also affected by MTX as cathepsin D activity increased at D4, whereas chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity decreased and calpain activities remained unaffected. At D7, cathepsin D activity was restored to control levels, but proteasome activity remained reduced. This disruption of proteolysis pathways strongly contributed to mucositis and requires further study. Lysosomal proteolytic activity may be considered the main proteolytic pathway responsible for alteration of mucosal integrity and intestinal permeability during mucositis, as cathepsin D activity was found to be correlated with mucosal atrophy and intestinal permeability. Proteasome regulation could possibly be an adaptive process for survival. Future investigation is warranted to target proteolytic pathways with protective nutritional or pharmacological therapies during mucositis.

  20. Changes in the Luminal Environment of the Colonic Epithelial Cells and Physiopathological Consequences.

    PubMed

    Blachier, François; Beaumont, Martin; Andriamihaja, Mireille; Davila, Anne-Marie; Lan, Annaïg; Grauso, Marta; Armand, Lucie; Benamouzig, Robert; Tomé, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Evidence, mostly from experimental models, has accumulated, indicating that modifications of bacterial metabolite concentrations in the large intestine luminal content, notably after changes in the dietary composition, may have important beneficial or deleterious consequences for the colonic epithelial cell metabolism and physiology in terms of mitochondrial energy metabolism, reactive oxygen species production, gene expression, DNA integrity, proliferation, and viability. Recent data suggest that for some bacterial metabolites, like hydrogen sulfide and butyrate, the extent of their oxidation in colonocytes affects their capacity to modulate gene expression in these cells. Modifications of the luminal bacterial metabolite concentrations may, in addition, affect the colonic pH and osmolarity, which are known to affect colonocyte biology per se. Although the colonic epithelium appears able to face, up to some extent, changes in its luminal environment, notably by developing a metabolic adaptive response, some of these modifications may likely affect the homeostatic process of colonic epithelium renewal and the epithelial barrier function. The contribution of major changes in the colonocyte luminal environment in pathological processes, like mucosal inflammation, preneoplasia, and neoplasia, although suggested by several studies, remains to be precisely evaluated, particularly in a long-term perspective.

  1. Gluten affects epithelial differentiation-associated genes in small intestinal mucosa of coeliac patients.

    PubMed

    Juuti-Uusitalo, K; Mäki, M; Kainulainen, H; Isola, J; Kaukinen, K

    2007-11-01

    In coeliac disease gluten induces an immunological reaction in genetically susceptible patients, and influences on epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation in the small-bowel mucosa. Our aim was to find novel genes which operate similarly in epithelial proliferation and differentiation in an epithelial cell differentiation model and in coeliac disease patient small-bowel mucosal biopsy samples. The combination of cDNA microarray data originating from a three-dimensional T84 epithelial cell differentiation model and small-bowel mucosal biopsy samples from untreated and treated coeliac disease patients and healthy controls resulted in 30 genes whose mRNA expression was similarly affected. Nine of 30 were located directly or indirectly in the receptor tyrosine kinase pathway starting from the epithelial growth factor receptor. Removal of gluten from the diet resulted in a reversion in the expression of 29 of the 30 genes in the small-bowel mucosal biopsy samples. Further characterization by blotting and labelling revealed increased epidermal growth factor receptor and beta-catenin protein expression in the small-bowel mucosal epithelium in untreated coeliac disease patients compared to healthy controls and treated coeliac patients. We found 30 genes whose mRNA expression was affected similarly in the epithelial cell differentiation model and in the coeliac disease patient small-bowel mucosal biopsy samples. In particular, those genes involved in the epithelial growth factor-mediated signalling pathways may be involved in epithelial cell differentiation and coeliac disease pathogenesis. The epithelial cell differentiation model is a useful tool for studying gene expression changes in the crypt-villus axis.

  2. Mucosal Immunity and B Cells in Teleosts: Effect of Vaccination and Stress

    PubMed Central

    Parra, David; Reyes-Lopez, Felipe E.; Tort, Lluis

    2015-01-01

    Fish are subjected to several insults from the environment, which may endanger animal survival. Mucosal surfaces are the first line of defense against these threats, acting as a physical barrier to protect the animal but also functioning as an active immune tissue. Thus, four mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues (MALTs), which lead the immune responses in gut, skin, gills, and nose, have been described in fish. Humoral and cellular immunity, as well as their regulation and the factors that influence the response in these mucosal lymphoid tissues, are still not well known in most fish species. Mucosal B-lymphocytes and immunoglobulins (Igs) are key players in the immune response that takes place in those MALTs. The existence of IgT as a mucosal specialized Ig gives us the opportunity of measuring specific responses after infection or vaccination, a fact that was not possible until recently in most fish species. The vaccination process is influenced by several factors, being stress one of the main stimuli determining the success of the vaccine. Thus, one of the major goals in a vaccination process is to avoid possible situations of stress, which might interfere with fish immune performance. However, interaction between immune and neuroendocrine systems at mucosal tissues is still unknown. In this review, we will summarize the latest findings about B-lymphocytes and Igs in mucosal immunity and the effect of stress and vaccination on B-cell response at mucosal sites. It is important to point out that a limited number of studies have been published regarding stress in mucosa and very few about the influence of stress over mucosal B-lymphocytes. PMID:26236311

  3. Primary mucosal melanomas: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Marija; Vlajkovic, Slobodan; Jovanovic, Predrag; Stefanovic, Vladisav

    2012-01-01

    Primary mucosal melanomas arise from melanocytes located in mucosal membranes lining respiratory, gastrointestinal and urogenital tract. Although a majority of mucosal melanomas originate from the mucosa of the nasal cavity and accessory sinuses, oral cavity, anorectum, vulva and vagina, they can arise in almost any part of mucosal membranes. Most of mucosal melanomas occur in occult sites, which together with the lack of early and specific signs contribute to late diagnosis, and poor prognosis. Because of their rareness the knowledge about their pathogenesis and risk factors is insufficient, and also there are not well established protocols for staging and treatment of mucosal melanomas. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, with trends toward more conservative treatment since radical surgery did not show an advantage for survival. Radiotherapy can provide better local control in some locations, but did not show improvement in survival. There is no effective systemic therapy for these aggressive tumors. Compared with cutaneous and ocular melanoma, mucosal melanomas have lowest percent of five-year survival. Recently revealed molecular changes underlying mucosal melanomas offer new hope for development of more effective systemic therapy for mucosal melanomas. Herein we presented a comprehensive review of various locations of primary melanoma along mucosal membranes, their epidemiological and clinical features, and treatment options. We also gave a short comparison of some characteristics of cutaneous and mucosal melanomas. PMID:23071856

  4. The Mucosal Immune System of Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish possess an adaptive immune system associated with each of their mucosal body surfaces. Evidence obtained from mucosal vaccination and mucosal infection studies reveal that adaptive immune responses take place at the different mucosal surfaces of teleost. The main mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) of teleosts are the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), the gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT) and the recently discovered nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Teleost MALT includes diffuse B cells and T cells with specific phenotypes different from their systemic counterparts that have co-evolved to defend the microbe-rich mucosal environment. Both B and T cells respond to mucosal infection or vaccination. Specific antibody responses can be measured in the gills, gut and skin mucosal secretions of teleost fish following mucosal infection or vaccination. Rainbow trout studies have shown that IgT antibodies and IgT+ B cells are the predominant B cell subset in all MALT and respond in a compartmentalized manner to mucosal infection. Our current knowledge on adaptive immunity in teleosts is limited compared to the mammalian literature. New research tools and in vivo models are currently being developed in order to help reveal the great intricacy of teleost mucosal adaptive immunity and help improve mucosal vaccination protocols for use in aquaculture. PMID:26274978

  5. Polymeric enhancers of mucosal epithelia permeability: synthesis, transepithelial penetration-enhancing properties, mechanism of action, safety issues.

    PubMed

    Di Colo, Giacomo; Zambito, Ylenia; Zaino, Chiara

    2008-05-01

    Transmucosal drug administration across nasal, buccal, and ocular mucosae is noninvasive, eliminates hepatic first-pass metabolism and harsh environmental conditions, allows rapid onset, and further, mucosal surfaces are readily accessible. Generally, however, hydrophilic drugs, such as peptides and proteins, are poorly permeable across the epithelium, which results in insufficient bioavailability. Therefore, reversible modifications of epithelial barrier structure by permeation enhancers are required. Low molecular weight enhancers generally have physicochemical characteristics favoring their own absorption, whereas polymeric enhancers are not absorbed, and this minimizes the risk of systemic toxicity. The above considerations have warranted the present survey of the studies on polymeric transmucosal penetration-enhancers that have appeared in the literature during the last decade. Studies on intestinal permeation enhancers are also reviewed as they give information on the mechanism of action and safety of polymers. The synthesis and characterization of polymers, their effectiveness in enhancing the absorption of different drugs across different epithelium types, their mechanism of action and structure-efficacy relationship, and the relevant safety issues are reviewed. The active polymers are classified into: polycations (chitosan and its quaternary ammonium derivatives, poly-L-arginine (poly-L-Arg), aminated gelatin), polyanions (N-carboxymethyl chitosan, poly(acrylic acid)), and thiolated polymers (carboxymethyl cellulose-cysteine, polycarbophil (PCP)-cysteine, chitosan-thiobutylamidine, chitosan-thioglycolic acid, chitosan-glutathione conjugates).

  6. Intestinal antigen-presenting cells in mucosal immune homeostasis: crosstalk between dendritic cells, macrophages and B-cells.

    PubMed

    Mann, Elizabeth R; Li, Xuhang

    2014-08-07

    The intestinal immune system maintains a delicate balance between immunogenicity against invading pathogens and tolerance of the commensal microbiota. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) involves a breakdown in tolerance towards the microbiota. Dendritic cells (DC), macrophages (MΦ) and B-cells are known as professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) due to their specialization in presenting processed antigen to T-cells, and in turn shaping types of T-cell responses generated. Intestinal DC are migratory cells, unique in their ability to generate primary T-cell responses in mesenteric lymph nodes or Peyer's patches, whilst MΦ and B-cells contribute to polarization and differentiation of secondary T-cell responses in the gut lamina propria. The antigen-sampling function of gut DC and MΦ enables them to sample bacterial antigens from the gut lumen to determine types of T-cell responses generated. The primary function of intestinal B-cells involves their secretion of large amounts of immunoglobulin A, which in turn contributes to epithelial barrier function and limits immune responses towards to microbiota. Here, we review the role of all three types of APC in intestinal immunity, both in the steady state and in inflammation, and how these cells interact with one another, as well as with the intestinal microenvironment, to shape mucosal immune responses. We describe mechanisms of maintaining intestinal immune tolerance in the steady state but also inappropriate responses of APC to components of the gut microbiota that contribute to pathology in IBD.

  7. Focal epithelial hyperplasia - an update.

    PubMed

    Said, Ahmed K; Leao, Jair C; Fedele, Stefano; Porter, Stephen R

    2013-07-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is an asymptomatic benign mucosal disease, which is mostly observed in specific groups in certain geographical regions. FEH is usually a disease of childhood and adolescence and is generally associated with people who live in poverty and of low socioeconomic status. Clinically, FEH is typically characterized by multiple, painless, soft, sessile papules, plaques or nodules, which may coalesce to give rise to larger lesions. Human papillomavirus (HPV), especially genotypes 13 and 32, have been associated and detected in the majority of FEH lesions. The clinical examination and social history often allow diagnosis, but histopathological examination of lesional tissue is usually required to confirm the exact diagnosis. FEH sometimes resolves spontaneously however, treatment is often indicated as a consequence of aesthetic effects or any interference with occlusion. There remains no specific therapy for FEH, although surgical removal, laser excision or possibly topical antiviral agents may be of benefit. There remains no evidence that FEH is potentially malignant.

  8. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zhiquan; Levy, Claire N.; Ferre, April L.; Hartig, Heather; Fang, Cifeng; Lentz, Gretchen; Fialkow, Michael; Kirby, Anna C.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Germann, Anja; von Briesen, Hagen; McElrath, M. Juliana; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Baker, Chris A. R.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Gao, Dayong; Hladik, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible. Methods and Findings To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10–15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension. Conclusions Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes. PMID:27232996

  9. Epithelial cell-extracellular matrix interactions and stem cells in airway epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Coraux, Christelle; Roux, Jacqueline; Jolly, Thomas; Birembaut, Philippe

    2008-08-15

    In healthy subjects, the respiratory epithelium forms a continuous lining to the airways and to the environment, and plays a unique role as a barrier against external deleterious agents to protect the airways from the insults. In respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic bronchitis, or asthma, the airway epithelium is frequently remodeled and injured, leading to the impairment of its defense functions. The rapid restoration of the epithelial barrier is crucial for these patients. The complete regeneration of the airway epithelium is a complex phenomenon, including not only the epithelial wound repair but also the epithelial differentiation to reconstitute a fully well differentiated and functional epithelium. The regeneration implies two partners: the epithelial stem/progenitor cells and factors able to regulate this process. Among these factors, epithelial cells-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions play a crucial role. The secretion of a provisional ECM, the cell-ECM relationships through epithelial receptors, and the remodeling of the ECM by proteases (mainly matrix metalloproteinases) contribute not only to airway epithelial repair by modulating epithelial cell migration and proliferation, but also to the differentiation of repairing cells leading to the complete restoration of the wounded epithelium. A better characterization of resident stem cells and of effectors of the regeneration process is an essential prerequisite to propose new regenerative therapeutics to patients suffering from infectious/inflammatory respiratory diseases.

  10. Hypothesis about mechanisms through which nicotine might exert its effect on the interdependence of inflammation and gut barrier function in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    McGilligan, Victoria E; Wallace, Julie M W; Heavey, Patricia M; Ridley, Diana L; Rowland, Ian R

    2007-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is characterized by impairment of the epithelial barrier and the formation of ulcer-type lesions, which result in local leaks and generalized alterations of mucosal tight junctions. Ultimately, this results in increased basal permeability. Although disruption of the epithelial barrier in the gut is a hallmark of inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal infections, it remains unclear whether barrier breakdown is an initiating event of UC or rather a consequence of an underlying inflammation, evidenced by increased production of proinflammatory cytokines. UC is less common in smokers, suggesting that the nicotine in cigarettes may ameliorate disease severity. The mechanism behind this therapeutic effect is still not fully understood, and indeed it remains unclear if nicotine is the true protective agent in cigarettes. Nicotine is metabolized in the body into a variety of metabolites and can also be degraded to form various breakdown products. It is possible these metabolites or degradation products may be the true protective or curative agents. A greater understanding of the pharmacodynamics and kinetics of nicotine in relation to the immune system and enhanced knowledge of gut permeability defects in UC are required to establish the exact protective nature of nicotine and its metabolites in UC. This review suggests possible hypotheses for the protective mechanism of nicotine in UC, highlighting the relationship between gut permeability and inflammation, and indicates where in the pathogenesis of the disease nicotine may mediate its effect.

  11. Gastric mucosal inflammatory responses to Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide: down-regulation of nitric oxide synthase-2 and caspase-3 by sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Slomiany, B L; Piotrowski, J; Slomiany, A

    1999-07-22

    We applied the animal model of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide-induced gastritis to assess the effect of antiulcer agent, sulglycotide, on the mucosal inflammatory responses by analyzing the interplay between the activity of a key apoptotic caspase, caspase-3, epithelial cell apoptosis, and the expression of constitutive (cNOS) and inducible (NOS-2) nitric oxide synthase. H. pylori lipopolysaccharide applied intragastrically elicited within 4 days a pattern of mucosal responses resembling that of acute gastritis. This was accompanied by an 11.2-fold increase in epithelial cell apoptosis, a 6.5-fold induction in mucosal expression of NOS-2 and a 2.2-fold decline in cNOS, and a 5.4-fold increase in caspase-3 activity. Treatment with sulglycotide led to a 56.7% reduction in the extent of mucosal inflammatory changes elicited by H. pylori lipopolysaccharide and an 88.3% decrease in the epithelial cells apoptosis. Furthermore, this effect of sulglycotide was associated with a 51% decrease in mucosal expression of caspase-3 activity, a 73.7% decline in NOS-2, and a 64.1% increase in cNOS. The findings suggest that sulglycotide suppresses the H. pylori-induced mucosal inflammatory responses by up-regulating cNOS and interfering with the events propagated by NOS-2 and caspase-3.

  12. Dietary intervention with serum-derived bovine immunoglobulins protects barrier function in a mouse model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bosque, Anna; Miró, Lluïsa; Maijó, Mònica; Polo, Javier; Campbell, Joy; Russell, Louis; Crenshaw, Joe; Weaver, Eric; Moretó, Miquel

    2015-06-15

    Dietary supplementation with immunoglobulins from animal plasma has anti-inflammatory effects on intestinal and lung models of acute inflammation. Here, we aimed to establish whether dietary intervention with serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin (SBI) can prevent alterations in intestinal barrier function in a mouse model with a genetic predisposition to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Wild-type (WT) mice and mice lacking the mdr1a gene (KO) were fed diets supplemented with either SBI (2% wt/wt) or milk proteins (control diet), from day 21 (weaning) until day 56. The epithelial permeability of distal colon crypts was measured by confocal microscopy using a fluorescent marker. The expression of junctional epithelial E-cadherin and β-catenin proteins were determined by Western blot and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) by immunofluorescence. Mucins (MUC1, MUC2, MUC4), TFF3, cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ), and inducible nitric oxide synthase RNA expression were quantified by real-time PCR. SBI blocked the increase in colon crypt permeability and partially prevented the reduction in E-cadherin and ZO-1 expression that characterize the KO mouse model (both P < 0.05). SBI inclusion also reduced the mucosal expression of the inflammatory markers TNF-α, IFN-γ, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (all P < 0.005). The number of goblet cells in the colon of KO mice was low and correlated well with MUC2 and TFF3 expression (P < 0.001), whereas dietary supplementation with SBI attenuated these effects (all P < 0.05). In short, dietary SBI ameliorated colonic barrier alterations and reduced the expression of mucosal inflammatory markers in a genetic model of IBD.

  13. Impact of Helicobacter pylori on the healing process of the gastric barrier

    PubMed Central

    Mnich, Eliza; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Sicińska, Paulina; Hinc, Krzysztof; Obuchowski, Michał; Gajewski, Adrian; Moran, Anthony P; Chmiela, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the impact of selected well defined Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) antigens on gastric barrier cell turnover. METHODS In this study, using two cellular models of gastric epithelial cells and fibroblasts, we have focused on exploring the effects of well defined H. pylori soluble components such as glycine acid extract antigenic complex (GE), subunit A of urease (UreA), cytotoxin associated gene A protein (CagA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on cell turnover by comparing the wound healing capacity of the cells in terms of their proliferative and metabolic activity as well as cell cycle distribution. Toxic effects of H. pylori components have been assessed in an association with damage to cell nuclei and inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation. RESULTS We showed that H. pylori GE, CagA and UreA promoted regeneration of epithelial cells and fibroblasts, which is necessary for effective tissue healing. However, in vivo increased proliferative activity of these cells may constitute an increased risk of gastric neoplasia. In contrast, H. pylori LPS showed a dose-dependent influence on the process of wound healing. At a low concentration (1 ng/mL) H. pylori LPS accelerated of healing epithelial cells, which was linked to significantly enhanced cell proliferation and MTT reduction as well as lack of alterations in cell cycle and downregulation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) production as well as cell nuclei destruction. By comparison, H. pylori LPS at a high concentration (25 ng/mL) inhibited the process of wound repair, which was related to diminished proliferative activity of the cells, cell cycle arrest, destruction of cell nuclei and downregulation of the EGF/STAT3 signalling pathway. CONCLUSION In vivo H. pylori LPS driven effects might lead to the maintenance of chronic inflammatory response and pathological disorders on the level of the gastric mucosal barrier. PMID:27672275

  14. Free fucose is a danger signal to human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chow, Wai Ling; Lee, Yuan Kun

    2008-03-01

    Fucose is present in foods, and it is a major component of human mucin glycoproteins and glycolipids. l-Fucose can also be found at the terminal position of many cell-surface oligosaccharide ligands that mediate cell-recognition and adhesion-signalling pathways. Mucin fucose can be released through the hydrolytic activity of pathogens and indigenous bacteria, leading to the release of free fucose into the intestinal lumen. The immunomodulating effects of free fucose on intestinal epithelial cells (enterocyte-like Caco-2) were investigated. It was found that the presence of l-fucose up regulated genes and secretion of their encoded proteins that are involved in both the innate and adaptive immune responses, possibly via the toll-like receptor-2 signalling pathway. These include TNFSF5, TNFSF7, TNF-alpha, IL12, IL17 and IL18. Besides modulating immune reactions in differentiated Caco-2 cells, fucose induced a set of cytokine genes that are involved in the development and proliferation of immune cells. These include the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) BMP2, BMP4, IL5, thrombopoietin and erythropoietin. In addition, the up regulated gene expression of fibroblast growth factor-2 may help to promote epithelial cell restitution in conjunction with the enhanced expression of transforming growth factor-beta mRNA. Since the exogenous fucose was not metabolised by the differentiated Caco-2 cells as a carbon source, the reactions elicited were suggested to be a result of the direct interaction of fucose and differentiated Caco-2 cells. The presence of free fucose may signal the invasion of mucin-hydrolysing microbial cells and breakage of the mucosal barrier. The intestinal epithelial cells respond by up regulation and secretion of cytokines, pre-empting the actual invasion of pathogens.

  15. Application of direct oral microscopy in evaluating mucosal margins around invasive oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Michcik, Adam; Michajłowski, Igor; Starzyńska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Direct oral microscopy constitutes a novel, non-invasive diagnostic technique, which aids clinical examination of the oral cavity. The oral mucosa is examined at multiple magnifications and features such as sub-epithelial mucosal vessels, surface patterns, colour tone, transparency and the exact demarcation of mucosal lesions are estimated. The incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) oscillates between 1.9% and 3.5%, which makes it the eighth most common carcinoma occurring around the world and in Poland. The 5-year survival rates oscillate between 20% and 30%. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate clinically unchanged mucosal margins around OSCC by direct oral microscopy. The authors approached the question whether the borders of mucosal margins around OSCC established via direct oral microscopy differ from those established based on clinical examination. Material and methods Fifteen patients diagnosed with OSCC were enrolled. Patients were first clinically examined to evaluate the extent of the tumour and to plan resection margins. Eventually, direct oral microscopy was performed to establish the width of the subclinically unchanged mucosal margins based on a standard picture of healthy oral mucosae, followed by comparison with those established by clinical evaluation. Results Histopathologic results of biopsies from areas indicated by direct oral microscopy revealed dysplasia in 86.7% of patients, whereas biopsies from areas indicated by clinical examination revealed dysplasia only in 40% of individuals, resulting in the need for widening of mucosal margins. Conclusions Direct oral microscopy enables detection of dysplasia within clinically unaltered mucosal margins around OSCC, which results in more precise establishing of resection boundaries, contributing to improvement of resection totality. PMID:26759543

  16. Probiotics promote endocytic allergen degradation in gut epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chun-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Huang, Shelly; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antigens transported across A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers conserved antigenicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Probiotic proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Epithelial barrier dysfunction plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases; the mechanism is to be further understood. The ubiquitin E3 ligase A20 (A20) plays a role in the endocytic protein degradation in the cells. This study aims to elucidate the role of A20 in the maintenance of gut epithelial barrier function. Methods: Gut epithelial cell line, HT-29 cell, was cultured into monolayers to evaluate the barrier function in transwells. RNA interference was employed to knock down the A20 gene in HT-29 cells to test the role of A20 in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function. Probiotic derived proteins were extracted from the culture supernatants using to enhance the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. Results: The results showed that the knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function in HT-29 monolayers, mainly increased the intracellular permeability. The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Allergens collected from the transwell basal chambers of A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers still conserved functional antigenicity. Treating with probiotic derived proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells and promote the barrier function. Conclusion: A20 plays an important role in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function as shown by HT-29 monolayer. Probiotic derived protein increases the expression of A20 and promote the HT-29 monolayer barrier function.

  17. The Development of an AIDS Mucosal Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xian; Chen, Zhiwei

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that mucosal tissues contain the largest surface area of the human body and are the front line of natural host defense against various pathogens. In fact, more than 80% of infectious disease pathogens probably gain entry into the susceptible human hosts through open mucosal surfaces. Human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1), a mainly sexually transmitted virus, also primarily targets the vaginal and gastrointestinal mucosa as entry sites for viral transmission, seeding, replication and amplification. Since HIV-1 establishes its early replication in vaginal or rectal mucosal tissues, the induction of sufficient mucosal immunity at the initial site of HIV-1 transmission becomes essential for a protective vaccine. However, despite the fact that current conventional vaccine strategies have remained unsuccessful in preventing HIV-1 infection, sufficient financial support and resources have yet to be given to develop a vaccine able to elicit protective mucosal immunity against sexual transmissions. Interestingly, Chinese ancestors invented variolation through intranasal administration about one thousand years ago, which led to the discovery of a successful smallpox vaccine and the final eradication of the disease. It is the hope for all mankind that the development of a mucosal AIDS vaccine will ultimately help control the AIDS pandemic. In order to discover an effective mucosal AIDS vaccine, it is necessary to have a deep understanding of mucosal immunology and to test various mucosal vaccination strategies. PMID:21994611

  18. Topical therapy for mucosal yeast infections.

    PubMed

    Summers, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal yeast infection is best understood as a consequence of compromised mucosal cell-mediated and innate immunity. Defense against oral candidiasis is dominantly cell mediated. The innate immune system may play the main role in regulating vulvovaginal yeast infection. Conditions that compromise cell-mediated immunity such as leukemia, severe illness and HIV infection must be considered as predisposing factors for recurrent oral candidiasis. Compromise of vaginal innate immunity due to mucosal allergy or due to a genetic defect such as mannose-binding lectin deficiency contributes to chronic vulvovaginal yeast infection. Treatment of cofactors must be considered in order to achieve control in recurrent mucosal yeast infection.