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Sample records for mucosal perfusion experimental

  1. Maintenance of superior mesenteric arterial perfusion prevents increased intestinal mucosal permeability in endotoxic pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, M.P.; Kaups, K.L.; Wang, H.L.; Rothschild, H.R. )

    1991-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharide increases intestinal mucosal permeability to hydrophilic compounds such as chromium 51-labeled edetate (51Cr-EDTA). The authors sought to determine whether this phenomenon is partly mediated by lipopolysaccharide-induced mesenteric hypoperfusion. They assessed permeability in an isolated segment of ileum by measuring plasma-to-lumen clearances (C) for two probes, 51Cr-EDTA and urea, and expressing the results as a ratio (CEDTA/CUREA). In control pigs (n = 6) resuscitated with Ringer's lactate (RL), mucosal permeability was unchanged during the 210-minute period of observation. In pigs (n = 7) infused with lipopolysaccharide (50 micrograms/kg) and similarly resuscitated with RL, mesenteric perfusion (Qsma) decreased significantly and permeability increased progressively and significantly. When endotoxic pigs (n = 6) were resuscitated with a regimen (RL plus hetastarch plus dobutamine) that preserved normal Qsma, lipopolysaccharide-induced mucosal hyperpermeability was prevented. Resuscitation of endotoxic pigs (n = 6) with RL plus hetastarch provided intermediate protection against both mesenteric hypoperfusion and increased permeability. These data suggest that diminished Qsma contributes to impaired ileal mucosal barrier function in experimental endotoxicosis.

  2. Hyperenteroglucagonaemia and small intestinal mucosal growth after colonic perfusion of glucose in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Miazza, B M; Al-Mukhtar, M Y; Salmeron, M; Ghatei, M A; Felce-Dachez, M; Filali, A; Villet, R; Wright, N A; Bloom, S R; Crambaud, J C

    1985-01-01

    Beside intraluminal factors, humoral agents play an important role in intestinal adaptation. Enteroglucagon, the mucosal concentration of which is maximal in the terminal ileum and colon, is the strongest candidate for the role of small intestinal mucosal growth factor. The present experiment was designed to study the role of colonic enteroglucagon in stimulating mucosal growth in rats with a normal small intestine. After eight days of glucose large bowel perfusion, enteroglucagon plasma concentrations were 120.7 +/- SEM 9.2 pmol/l, versus 60.1 +/- 6.8 in mannitol perfused control rats (p less than 0.001). Gastrin, cholecystokinin, neurotensin, pancreatic glucagon, and insulin plasma concentrations were unchanged. Crypt cell proliferation, measured by the vincristine metaphase arrest technique, increased significantly in the small intestine of glucose perfused animals (p less than 0.005-0.001) in comparison with the controls. This resulted in a greater mucosal mass in both proximal and distal small bowel: mucosal wet weight, DNA, protein and alpha D-glucosidase per unit length intestine were all significantly higher (p less than 0.05-0.001) than in mannitol perfused rats. Our data, therefore, support the hypothesis that enteroglucagon is an enterotrophic factor and stress the possible role of the colon in the regulation of small bowel trophicity. PMID:3996942

  3. Mucosal blood flow measurements using laser Doppler perfusion monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Dag Arne Lihaug; Gregersen, Hans; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    Perfusion of individual tissues is a basic physiological process that is necessary to sustain oxygenation and nutrition at a cellular level. Ischemia, or the insufficiency of perfusion, is a common mechanism for tissue death or degeneration, and at a lower threshold, a mechanism for the generation of sensory signalling including pain. It is of considerable interest to study perfusion of peripheral abdominal tissues in a variety of circumstances. Microvascular disease of the abdominal organs has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders, including peptic ulcer disease, inflammatory bowel disease and chest pain. The basic principle of laser Doppler perfusion monitoring (LDPM) is to analyze changes in the spectrum of light reflected from tissues as a response to a beam of monochromatic laser light emitted. It reflects the total local microcirculatory blood perfusion, including perfusion in capillaries, arterioles, venules and shunts. During the last 20-25 years, numerous studies have been performed in different parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract using LDPM. In recent years we have developed a multi-modal catheter device which includes a laser Doppler probe, with the intent primarily to investigate patients suffering from functional chest pain of presumed oesophageal origin. Preliminary studies show the feasibility of incorporating LDPM into such catheters for performing physiological studies in the GI tract. LDPM has emerged as a research and clinical tool in preference to other methods; but, it is important to be aware of its limitations and account for them when reporting results. PMID:19132770

  4. Luminal distension as a possible consequence of experimental intestinal perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Wingate, David; Hyams, Ashley; Phillips, Sidney

    1974-01-01

    In an experimental jejunal perfusion study, distress in healthy subjects occurred during eight out of 16 perfusions in which intestinal secretion was provoked. Calculation demonstrates the volumetric consequences of inadequate recovery of secretory perfusates, and analysis of the perfusion studies shows that distress was significantly associated with poor recovery of the perfusate. These observations are pertinent to increasing interest in the phenomenon of intestinal fluid secretion. PMID:4435588

  5. Pretreatment with Saccharomyces boulardii does not prevent the experimental mucositis in Swiss mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The antimetabolite chemotherapy 5-Fluorouracil is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in clinical cancer treatment. Although this drug is not specific for cancer cells and also acts on healthy cells, it can cause mucositis, a common collateral effect. Dysbiosis has also been described in 5-fluorouracil-induced mucositis and is likely to contribute to the overall development of mucositis. In light of this theory, the use of probiotics could be a helpful strategy to alleviate mucositis. So the aim of this study was evaluate the impact of the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii in a model of mucositis. Results After induced of mucositis, mice from the Mucositis groups showed a decrease in food consumption (p < 0.05) and therefore had a greater weight loss (p < 0.05). The treatment with Saccharomyces boulardii did not reverse this effect (p > 0.05). Mucositis induced an increase in intestinal permeability and intestinal inflammation (p < 0.05). There were no differences in mucosal lesions, intestinal permeability and sIgA secretion (p > 0.05) in mice pretreated with S. boulardii. Conclusions S. boulardii was not able to prevent the effects of experimental mucositis induced by 5- Fluorouracil. PMID:24721659

  6. Pretreatment with Saccharomyces boulardii does not prevent the experimental mucositis in Swiss mice.

    PubMed

    Maioli, Tatiani Uceli; de Melo Silva, Brenda; Dias, Michelle Nobre; Paiva, Nivea Carolina; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento; Fernandes, Simone Odilia; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Dos Santos Martins, Flaviano; de Vasconcelos Generoso, Simone

    2014-04-11

    The antimetabolite chemotherapy 5-Fluorouracil is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in clinical cancer treatment. Although this drug is not specific for cancer cells and also acts on healthy cells, it can cause mucositis, a common collateral effect. Dysbiosis has also been described in 5-fluorouracil-induced mucositis and is likely to contribute to the overall development of mucositis. In light of this theory, the use of probiotics could be a helpful strategy to alleviate mucositis. So the aim of this study was evaluate the impact of the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii in a model of mucositis. After induced of mucositis, mice from the Mucositis groups showed a decrease in food consumption (p < 0.05) and therefore had a greater weight loss (p < 0.05). The treatment with Saccharomyces boulardii did not reverse this effect (p > 0.05). Mucositis induced an increase in intestinal permeability and intestinal inflammation (p < 0.05). There were no differences in mucosal lesions, intestinal permeability and sIgA secretion (p > 0.05) in mice pretreated with S. boulardii. S. boulardii was not able to prevent the effects of experimental mucositis induced by 5- Fluorouracil.

  7. Nickel-Related Intestinal Mucositis in IBS-Like Patients: Laser Doppler Perfusion Imaging and Oral Mucosa Patch Test in Use.

    PubMed

    Borghini, Raffaele; Puzzono, Marta; Rosato, Edoardo; Di Tola, Marco; Marino, Mariacatia; Greco, Francesca; Picarelli, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Nickel (Ni) is often the trigger of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-like gastrointestinal disorders: its ingestion may cause allergic contact mucositis, identifiable by means of oral mucosa patch test (omPT). OmPT effectiveness has been proven, but it is still an operator-dependent method. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) was tested to support omPT in Ni allergic contact mucositis diagnosis. Group A: 22 patients with intestinal/systemic symptoms related to the ingestion of Ni-containing foods. Group B: 12 asymptomatic volunteers. Ni-related symptoms and their severity were tested by a questionnaire. All patients underwent Ni omPT with clinical evaluation at baseline (T0), after 30 min (T1), after 2 h (T2), and after 24-48 h (T3). LDPI was performed to evaluate the mean mucosal perfusion at T0, T1, and T2. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA test and Bonferroni multiple-comparison test. All 22 Ni-sensitive patients (group A) presented oral mucosa hyperemia and/or edema at T2. Eight out of the same 22 patients presented a local delayed vesicular reaction at T3 (group A1), unlike the remaining 14 out of 22 patients (group A2). All 12 patients belonging to control group B did not show any alteration. The mean mucosal perfusion calculated with LDPI showed an increase in both subgroups A1 and A2. In group B, no significant perfusion variations were observed. LDPI may support omPT for diagnostic purposes in Ni allergic contact mucositis. This also applies to symptomatic Ni-sensitive patients without aphthous stomatitis after 24-48 h from omPT and that could risk to miss the diagnosis.

  8. Experimental design and the relative sensitivity of BOLD and perfusion fMRI.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, G K; Detre, J A; Zarahn, E; Alsop, D C

    2002-03-01

    This paper compares the statistical power of BOLD and arterial spin labeling perfusion fMRI for a variety of experimental designs within and across subjects. Based on theory and simulations, we predict that perfusion data are composed of independent observations in time under the null hypothesis, in contrast to BOLD data, which possess marked autocorrelation. We also present a method (sinc subtraction) of generating perfusion data from its raw source signal that minimizes the presence of oxygen-sensitive signal changes and can be used with any experimental design. Empirically, we demonstrate the absence of autocorrelation in perfusion noise, examine the shape of the hemodynamic response function for BOLD and perfusion, and obtain a measure of signal to noise for each method. This information is then used to generate a model of relative sensitivity of the BOLD and perfusion methods for within-subject experimental designs of varying temporal frequency. It is determined that perfusion fMRI provides superior sensitivity for within-subject experimental designs that concentrate their power at or below approximately 0.009 Hz (corresponding to a "blocked" experimental design of 60-s epochs). Additionally, evidence is presented that across-subject hypothesis tests may be more sensitive when conducted using perfusion imaging, despite the better within-subject signal to noise obtained in some cases with BOLD. ©2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  9. Experimental study on the segmental perfusion and preservation of spleen.

    PubMed

    Limin, H; Hongchi, J; Wenjie, D; Haiquan, Q; Jun, X

    1999-12-01

    Spleen transplanlation has developed to be an effective strategy for hemophilia A. But it has not been reported up to date that which kind of established solutions is most suitable for perfusion and preservation of spleen. This study aimed to establish some experiences with the comparison among Hartmann's solution, Collins' solution and WMO-I solution, in order to instruct the clinical spleen transplantation. After the splenic artery and vein were dissociated clearly, three kinds of perfusion solutions began to perfuse the corresponding segments of spleen with a randomized sequence. When the efferent fluids from the splenic vein became clear, the perfused spleen segments were preserved for different durations with the same perfusing solution to calculate the survival rate of splencocyte (SRS) and were examined with light and electron microscopy. Among the three solutions, SRS with WMO-I solution was significantly higher than those of the other two (P<0.001). The perfused spleen with WMO-I solution showed the slightest morphological changes and a significant longer preservation duration than those with the other two (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Among the three solutions, WMO-I solution was most suitable for perfusion and preservation of spleen.

  10. Mechanisms for inducing nasal mucosal tolerance in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis.

    PubMed

    Calder, Claudia J; Nicholson, Lindsay B; Dick, Andrew D

    2006-02-01

    Delivering soluble (auto) antigenic peptides via the naso-respiratory route induces tolerance to that peptide and suppression of experimental models of autoimmune disease. In the normal lung, respiratory tract dendritic cells (RTDCs) efficiently endocytose soluble antigens, migrate to regional lymph nodes and present peptide to T cells that subsequently become tolerant. This article describes protocols for inducing tolerance via the naso-respiratory tract in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU); for the isolation of RTDCs to facilitate definition of, and conditions for, maturation and activation of cells; and to test RTDC ability to induce tolerance in murine EAU when adoptively transferred.

  11. Mucosal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis CS; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites. PMID:25424921

  12. Characterising the mucosal and systemic immune responses to experimental human hookworm infection.

    PubMed

    Gaze, Soraya; McSorley, Henry J; Daveson, James; Jones, Di; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Oliveira, Luciana M; Speare, Richard; McCarthy, James S; Engwerda, Christian R; Croese, John; Loukas, Alex

    2012-02-01

    The mucosal cytokine response of healthy humans to parasitic helminths has never been reported. We investigated the systemic and mucosal cytokine responses to hookworm infection in experimentally infected, previously hookworm naive individuals from non-endemic areas. We collected both peripheral blood and duodenal biopsies to assess the systemic immune response, as well as the response at the site of adult worm establishment. Our results show that experimental hookworm infection leads to a strong systemic and mucosal Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, IL-9 and IL-13) and regulatory (IL-10 and TGF-β) response, with some evidence of a Th1 (IFN-γ and IL-2) response. Despite upregulation after patency of both IL-15 and ALDH1A2, a known Th17-inducing combination in inflammatory diseases, we saw no evidence of a Th17 (IL-17) response. Moreover, we observed strong suppression of mucosal IL-23 and upregulation of IL-22 during established hookworm infection, suggesting a potential mechanism by which Th17 responses are suppressed, and highlighting the potential that hookworms and their secreted proteins offer as therapeutics for human inflammatory diseases.

  13. Experimental intraocular malignancy: the effect of intracameral perfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, V G; Green, W R; Liu, Y P; Marsden, E R

    1979-01-01

    Transplantable Brown-Pearce carcinoma was adapted successfully in the rabbit anterior chamber. Regression of tumor growth was attained on tri-weekly perfusion of the AC with 10 micromolar of methotrexate. Tumor cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) and protein activator were found to be markedly depressed during the course of chemotherapy and the PDE cAMP/cGMP ratio was similarly altered. Corroborative light and electron-microscopic studies showed specific alterations of intracellular organelles in relation to MTX and tumor cell death. These findings suggest that metabolic pathways of cyclic nucleotides are important biochemical modulators of neoplastic cells. The method of intraocular perfusion precludes systemic toxic effects and avoids compromising the animals' immunocompetence. Images FIGURE 3 A FIGURE 3 B FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B PMID:232585

  14. Implementing change in perfusion practice: quality improvement vs. experimentation?

    PubMed

    Newland, Richard F; Baker, Robert A

    2009-12-01

    The desire to optimize techniques and interventions that comprise clinical practice will inevitably involve the implementation of change in the process of care. To confirm the intended benefits of instituting clinical change, the process should be undertaken in a scientific manner. Although implementing changes in perfusion practice is limited by the availability of evidence based practice guidelines, we have the opportunity to audit our current practice according to institutional guidelines using quality improvement methods. Current electronic data collection technology is a useful tool available to facilitate the reporting of both clinical and process outcome improvements. The model of clinical effectiveness can be used as a systematic approach to introducing change in clinical practice, which involves reviewing the literature, acquiring appropriate skills and resources, auditing the change, and implementing continuous quality improvement to standardize the process. Finally, reporting the findings allows dissemination of the knowledge that can be generalized. Reporting change strengthens our efforts in clinical effectiveness, highlights the importance of perfusion practice, and increases the influence of the profession.

  15. Mucosal Immune Responses of Mice Experimentally Infected with Pygidiopsis summa (Trematoda: Heterophyidae)

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jong-Yil; Park, Young-Jin; Park, Jae-Hwan; Jung, Bong-Kwang

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal immune responses against Pygidiopsis summa (Trematoda: Heterophyidae) infection were studied in ICR mice. Experimental groups consisted of group 1 (uninfected controls), group 2 (infection with 200 metacercariae), and group 3 (immunosuppression with Depo-Medrol and infection with 200 metacercariae). Worms were recovered in the small intestine at days 1, 3, 5, and 7 post-infection (PI). Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL), mast cells, and goblet cells were counted in intestinal tissue sections stained with Giemsa, astra-blue, and periodic acid-Schiff, respectively. Mucosal IgA levels were measured by ELISA. Expulsion of P. summa from the mouse intestine began to occur from days 3-5 PI which sustained until day 7 PI. The worm expulsion was positively correlated with proliferation of IEL, mast cells, goblet cells, and increase of IgA, although in the case of mast cells significant increase was seen only at day 7 PI. Immunosuppression suppressed all these immune effectors and inhibited worm reduction in the intestine until day 7 PI. The results suggested that various immune effectors which include IEL, goblet cells, mast cells, and IgA play roles in regulating the intestinal mucosal immunity of ICR mice against P. summa infection. PMID:24623878

  16. Characterization of renal parenchymal perfusion during experimental infrarenal aortic clamping and declamping with enhanced thermodiffusion electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kraus, T; Mehrabi, A; Angelescu, M; Golling, M; Allenberg, J R; Klar, E

    2001-07-01

    Despite multiple previous experimental and clinical investigations, it has not been fully clarified until now whether infrarenal aortic cross-clamping (IRAC) induces a significant disturbance of renal parenchymal perfusion. Most renal cortical flow data collected thus far have been heterogenous because of inherent limitations of available measurement technology. The enhanced thermal diffusion (TD) electrode is a newly developed and previously validated prototype device that allows continuous quantification of parenchymal kidney perfusion after local probe implantation. We monitored renal perfusion during experimental IRAC with TD for the first time, thereby also evaluating the potential applicability of the method in clinical aortic surgery. IRAC (20 min) followed by sudden declamping was performed in pigs under general anesthesia (n = 14). Renal cortical blood flow (RCBF) was continuously quantified by TD, total aortic flow (TABF) and renal artery flow (RABF) were measured by ultrasonic flow probes, and parameters of systemic circulation were determined by Swan-Ganz catheter. Our results showed that kidney perfusion can be continuously quantified using TD electrodes during experimental aortic surgery in a porcine model. IRAC does not lead to a significant impairment of RCBF in young pigs as measured by TD. Renal perfusion appears to be predominantly pressure driven. Consequently, abrubt aortic declamping can bring about prolonged renal ischemia. Transfer of the TD method to RCBF monitoring during clinical aortic surgery appears to be feasible and should be investigated in selected cases.

  17. Ventilation-perfusion relationships following experimental pulmonary contusion.

    PubMed

    Batchinsky, Andriy I; Weiss, William B; Jordan, Bryan S; Dick, Edward J; Cancelada, David A; Cancio, Leopoldo C

    2007-09-01

    Ventilation-perfusion changes after right-sided pulmonary contusion (PC) in swine were investigated by means of the multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET). Anesthetized swine (injury, n = 8; control, n = 6) sustained a right-chest PC by a captive-bolt apparatus. This was followed by a 12-ml/kg hemorrhage, resuscitation, and reinfusion of shed blood. MIGET and thoracic computed tomography (CT) were performed before and 6 h after injury. Three-dimensional CT scan reconstruction enabled determination of the combined fractional volume of poorly aerated and non-aerated lung tissue (VOL), and the mean gray-scale density (MGSD). Six hours after PC in injured animals, Pa(O(2)) decreased from 234.9 +/- 5.1 to 113.9 +/- 13.0 mmHg. Shunt (Q(S)) increased (2.7 +/- 0.4 to 12.3 +/- 2.2%) at the expense of blood flow to normal ventilation/perfusion compartments (97.1 +/- 0.4 to 87.4 +/- 2.2%). Dead space ventilation (V(D)/V(T)) increased (58.7 +/- 1.7% to 67.2 +/- 1.2%). MGSD increased (-696.7 +/- 6.1 to -565.0 +/- 24.3 Hounsfield units), as did VOL (4.3 +/- 0.5 to 33.5 +/- 3.2%). Multivariate linear regression of MGSD, VOL, V(D)/V(T), and Q(S) vs. Pa(O(2)) retained VOL and Q(S) (r(2) = .835) as independent covariates of Pa(O(2)). An increase in Q(S) characterizes lung failure 6 h after pulmonary contusion; Q(S) and VOL correlate independently with Pa(O(2)).

  18. Hemostatic effect of oxidized regenerated cellulose in an experimental gastric mucosal resection model.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Aviña, Jacobo; Mönkemüller, Klaus; Sakai, Paulo; Sulbaran, Marianny; Chávez-Vargas, Carlos; Montalvo Javé, Eduardo; Sobrino-Cossío, Sergio

    2014-10-01

    The endoscopic hemostatic therapies currently available do not always result in hemostasis of gastrointestinal bleeding. Oxidized regenerated cellulose (ORC) mesh is a widely available surgical hemostatic material. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hemostatic efficacy of ORC in experimental gastric hemorrhage after endoscopic resection. This was a prospective, two-stage experimental, Phase I, proof-of-concept study. In Stage 1, eight gastric mucosal lesions were created in anticoagulated rabbits and treated with ORC (closed or open pores). In Stage 2, the endoscopic introduction and application of ORC mesh pieces were evaluated in a porcine model of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). In Stage 1, hemostasis was achieved in all lesions. Hemostasis was achieved more rapidly with closed-pore than open-pore ORC (24.5 vs. 66.5 seconds) (P < 0.01). At 24 hours, all lesions showed persistent hemostasis. There were no episodes of rebleeding, complications, or mortality. In Stage 2, the endoscopic introduction of ORC pieces and application with a biopsy forceps were feasible in all ESD lesions. ORC was an effective hemostatic agent for bleeding lesions following mucosal resection in anticoagulated rabbits. Closed-pore ORC achieved hemostasis faster than open-pore ORC. Endoscopic introduction and release of ORC were feasible. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Muscle Tissue Saturation Compared With Muscle Tissue Perfusion During Low Blood Flows: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Sisse Anette; Kjærgaard, Benedict; Olsen Alstrup, Aage Kristian; Munk, Ole Lajord; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Larsson, Anders; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen

    2017-03-22

    To investigate whether changes in muscle tissue perfusion measured with positron emission tomography would be reflected by parallel changes in muscle tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) measured using near-infrared spectroscopy during high and low blood flow levels achieved using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in an animal model. A prospective, randomized study. Research laboratory, single institution. Eight pigs (69-71 kg). In anesthetized pigs, normothermic CPB was established with a blood flow of 60 mL/kg/min for 1 hour. Thereafter, a low blood flow of either 47.5 or 35 mL/kg/min was applied for 1 hour followed by a blood flow of 60 mL/kg/min for an additional hour. Regional StO2 was measured continuously by placing a near-infrared spectroscopy electrode on the skin above the gracilis muscle of the noncannulated back leg. Muscle tissue perfusion was measured using positron emission tomography with (15)O-labeled water during spontaneous circulation and the different CPB blood flows. Systemic oxygen consumption was estimated by measurement of venous saturation and lactate levels. The results showed profound systemic ischemia during low CPB blood flow. StO2 remained high until muscle tissue perfusion decreased to about 50%, after which StO2 paralleled the linear decrease in muscle tissue perfusion. In an experimental CPB animal model, StO2 was stable until muscle tissue perfusion was reduced by about 50%, and at lower blood flow levels, there was almost a linear relationship between StO2 and muscle tissue perfusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of subcutaneous versus mucosal (intranasal) allergen-specific rush immunotherapy in experimental feline asthma.

    PubMed

    Lee-Fowler, Tekla M; Cohn, Leah A; DeClue, Amy E; Spinka, Christine M; Reinero, Carol R

    2009-05-15

    Rush immunotherapy (RIT) is effective for the treatment of experimental feline allergic asthma. In humans, the safety profile of immunotherapy is improved by delivering allergen by a mucosal route. We hypothesized that mucosal (intranasal) RIT would have similar efficacy to subcutaneous RIT with improved safety. Twelve cats sensitized and challenged with Bermuda grass allergen (BGA) were randomized to receive subcutaneous (SC) or intranasal (IN) RIT. Increasing doses of BGA (20-200 microg) were administered over 24h followed by 200 microg BGA weekly as maintenance. Adverse reactions were recorded. Clinical respiratory scores after BGA aerosol challenge, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) % eosinophils, and cytokine concentrations were measured before RIT (day 1) and at months 1, 3 and 6 (M1, M3, M6). More adverse events were recorded with SC RIT (n=12) compared with IN RIT (n=6). Respiratory scores were lower by M6 compared with D1 in both the groups. The % BALF eosinophils declined significantly after RIT for both groups (mean+/-SEM, SC RIT D1 62+/-12, M6 9+/-4; IN RIT D1 54+/-9, M6 14+/-6). The BALF IL-4:IFN-gamma ratio significantly decreased over time in the IN RIT group (mean+/-SEM, D1 2.4+/-0.2, M6 1.0+/-0.2). While both protocols decreased eosinophilic airway inflammation, the SC RIT protocol did not cause life-threatening adverse events and demonstrated more consistent resolution of clinical signs after allergen challenge. Either protocol could be considered for the treatment of feline allergic asthma.

  1. New methods for monitoring dynamic airway tissue oxygenation and perfusion in experimental and clinical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad A; Dhillon, Gundeep; Jiang, Xinguo; Lin, Yu-Chun; Nicolls, Mark R

    2012-11-15

    A dual circulation, supplied by bronchial and pulmonary artery-derived vessels, normally perfuses the airways from the trachea to the terminal bronchioles. This vascular system has been highly conserved through mammalian evolution and is disrupted at the time of lung transplantation. In most transplant centers, this circulation is not restored. The Papworth Hospital Autopsy study has revealed that an additional attrition of periairway vessels is associated with the development of chronic rejection, otherwise known as the bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). Experimental studies subsequently demonstrated that airway vessels are subject to alloimmune injury and that the loss of a functional microvascular system identifies allografts that cannot be rescued with immunosuppressive therapy. Therefore, surgical and medical strategies, which preserve the functionality of the existent vasculature in lung transplant patients, may conceivably limit the incidence of BOS. Given these unique anatomic and physiological considerations, there is an emerging rationale to better understand the perfusion and oxygenation status of airways in transplanted lungs. This article describes novel methodologies, some newly developed by our group, for assessing airway tissue oxygenation and perfusion in experimental and clinical transplantation.

  2. Alternative solution for ex vivo lung perfusion, experimental study on donated human lungs non-accepted for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Mariani, Alessandro Wasum; Medeiros, Israel Lopes de; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Abdalla, Luís Gustavo; Correia, Aristides Tadeu; Nepomuceno, Natália Aparecida; Canzian, Mauro; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate a new perfusate solution to be used for ex vivo lung perfusion. Randomized experimental study using lungs from rejected brain-dead donors harvested and submitted to 1 hour of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) using mainstream solution or the alternative. From 16 lungs blocs tested, we found no difference on weight after EVLP: Steen group (SG) = 1,097±526g; Alternative Perfusion Solution (APS) = 743±248g, p=0.163. Edema formation, assessed by Wet/dry weigh ratio, was statistically higher on the Alternative Perfusion Solution group (APS = 3.63 ± 1.26; SG = 2.06 ± 0.28; p = 0.009). No difference on PaO2 after EVLP (SG = 498±37.53mmHg; APS = 521±55.43mmHg, p=0.348, nor on histological analyses: pulmonary injury score: SG = 4.38±1.51; APS = 4.50±1.77, p=0.881; apoptotic cells count after perfusion: SG = 2.4 ± 2.0 cells/mm2; APS = 4.8 ± 6.9 cells/mm2; p = 0.361). The ex vivo lung perfusion using the alternative perfusion solution showed no functional or histological differences, except for a higher edema formation, from the EVLP using Steen Solution(r) on lungs from rejected brain-dead donors.

  3. Comparison of lung preservation solutions in human lungs using an ex vivo lung perfusion experimental model.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Israel L; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo M; Mariani, Alessandro W; Fernandes, Flávio G; Unterpertinger, Fernando V; Canzian, Mauro; Jatene, Fabio B

    2012-09-01

    Experimental studies on lung preservation have always been performed using animal models. We present ex vivo lung perfusion as a new model for the study of lung preservation. Using human lungs instead of animal models may bring the results of experimental studies closer to what could be expected in clinical practice. Brain-dead donors whose lungs had been declined by transplantation teams were used. The cases were randomized into two groups. In Group 1, Perfadex®was used for pulmonary preservation, and in Group 2, LPDnac, a solution manufactured in Brazil, was used. An ex vivo lung perfusion system was used, and the lungs were ventilated and perfused after 10 hours of cold ischemia. The extent of ischemic-reperfusion injury was measured using functional and histological parameters. After reperfusion, the mean oxygenation capacity was 405.3 mmHg in Group 1 and 406.0 mmHg in Group 2 (p = 0.98). The mean pulmonary vascular resistance values were 697.6 and 378.3 dyn·s·cm-5, respectively (p =0.035). The mean pulmonary compliance was 46.8 cm H20 in Group 1 and 49.3 ml/cm H20 in Group 2 (p =0.816). The mean wet/dry weight ratios were 2.06 and 2.02, respectively (p=0.87). The mean Lung Injury Scores for the biopsy performed after reperfusion were 4.37 and 4.37 in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (p = 1.0), and the apoptotic cell counts were 118.75/mm² and 137.50/mm², respectively (p=0.71). The locally produced preservation solution proved to be as good as Perfadex®. The clinical use of LPDnac may reduce costs in our centers. Therefore, it is important to develop new models to study lung preservation.

  4. Isolated Liver Perfusion Using Percutaneous Methods:[ql An Experimental Study in the Pig

    SciTech Connect

    Harnek, Jan; Cwikiel, Wojciech; Bergqvist, Lennart; Persson, Bo; Stridbeck, Hans

    1996-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for isolated perfusion of the liver using radiological methods. Methods: Twenty-one pigs, weighing about 20 kg, were divided into three groups. By transjugular and transfemoral approaches two occlusion balloons were placed in the inferior vena cava cranial and caudal, respectively, to the origin of the hepatic veins. One occlusion balloon was placed transfemorally in the common hepatic artery. Another occlusion balloon was inserted in the main branch of the portal vein via the transjugular-transhepatic approach in 11 pigs (groups 1 and 2), and in 10 pigs (group 3) by a percutaneous transhepatic route. After inflation of the balloons, patency of the isolated liver circulation was evaluated by recirculation of {sup 99}Tc{sup m}-labelled human albumin during 30 min. Blood tests were obtained after 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, and 30 min to evaluate leakage from the liver to the systemic circulation. Results: Increasing leakage to the systemic circulation from the isolated liver circulation was observed in groups 1 and 2. In the third group the leakage was less than 10%. Conclusion: In an experimental animal model, isolated perfusion of the liver with minor leakage to the systemic circulation may be achieved using radiological methods.

  5. Ghrelin improves intestinal mucosal atrophy during parenteral nutrition: An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Waka; Kaji, Tatsuru; Onishi, Shun; Nakame, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Koji; Kawano, Takafumi; Mukai, Motoi; Souda, Masakazu; Yoshioka, Takako; Tanimoto, Akihide; Ieiri, Satoshi

    2016-12-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) has been reported to be associated with mucosal atrophy of the small intestine. Ghrelin has hormonal, orexigenic, and metabolic activities. We investigated whether ghrelin improved intestinal mucosal atrophy using a TPN-supported rat model. Rats underwent jugular vein catheterization and were divided into four groups: TPN alone (TPN), TPN plus low-dose ghrelin (TPNLG), TPN plus high-dose ghrelin (TPNHG), and oral feeding with normal chow (OF). Ghrelin was administered continuously at dosages of 10 or 50 μg/kg/day. On day 6 rats were euthanized, and the small intestine was harvested and divided into the jejunum and ileum. Then the villus height (VH) and crypt depth (CD) were evaluated. The jejunal and ileal VH and CD in the TPN group were significantly decreased compared with those in the OF group. TPNHG improved only VH of the jejunum. TPNLG improved VH and CD of the jejunum and CD of the ileum. The improvement of TPNLG was significantly stronger than that in CD of the jejunum and ileum. TPN was more strongly associated with mucosal atrophy in the jejunum than in the ileum. Low-dose intravenous administration of ghrelin improved TPN-associated intestinal mucosal atrophy more effectively than high-dose administration. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Experimental reconstruction of teat mucosa by vestibular mucosal graft in cows. A histopathologic and radiographic study.

    PubMed

    Molaei, M M; Oloumi, M M; Maleki, M; Abshenas, J

    2002-09-01

    Injuries to the teat in dairy cows can result in partial or complete obstruction of the teat lumen. Different treatment techniques have been used to restore normal function in injured teats, one of which is autogenous mucosal grafts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the vestibular mucosa as a replacement for teat mucosa in severe teat injuries. Sixteen teats of four healthy, mature, non-gravid Jersey cows were randomly divided into two equal groups. Under high epidural analgesia and after surgical preparation a 1 x 1.5 cm piece of teat mucosa was removed. In group 1, the defect was replaced by a 2 x 2.5 cm vestibular mucosa, whereas in group 2, the defect was left open. In both groups, a sterile disposable teat cannula was inserted into the teat cistern following surgery. To evaluate luminal diameter, double contrast radiography with constant air pressure was performed every 25 days till day 125, after which the animals were slaughtered and teats removed for histopathological study (H&E staining). On the basis of radiographic examination, luminal narrowing in group 2 was significantly more severe than in group 1. Histopathologically, the entire mucosal grafts of group 1 were taken and a good adhesion could be seen between the graft and the host epithelium. In group 2, severe submucosal fibrosis and mucosal papilloid hyperplasia resulted in severe narrowing of the teat cistern. According to the results of this study, it can be concluded that using vestibular mucosal grafts with temporary insertion of teat cannula can be considered as a method of treating teat mucosal injuries.

  7. Phenylalanine transfer across the isolated perfused human placenta: an experimental and modeling investigation.

    PubMed

    Lofthouse, E M; Perazzolo, S; Brooks, S; Crocker, I P; Glazier, J D; Johnstone, E D; Panitchob, N; Sibley, C P; Widdows, K L; Sengers, B G; Lewis, R M

    2016-02-01

    Membrane transporters are considered essential for placental amino acid transfer, but the contribution of other factors, such as blood flow and metabolism, is poorly defined. In this study we combine experimental and modeling approaches to understand the determinants of [(14)C]phenylalanine transfer across the isolated perfused human placenta. Transfer of [(14)C]phenylalanine across the isolated perfused human placenta was determined at different maternal and fetal flow rates. Maternal flow rate was set at 10, 14, and 18 ml/min for 1 h each. At each maternal flow rate, fetal flow rates were set at 3, 6, and 9 ml/min for 20 min each. Appearance of [(14)C]phenylalanine was measured in the maternal and fetal venous exudates. Computational modeling of phenylalanine transfer was undertaken to allow comparison of the experimental data with predicted phenylalanine uptake and transfer under different initial assumptions. Placental uptake (mol/min) of [(14)C]phenylalanine increased with maternal, but not fetal, flow. Delivery (mol/min) of [(14)C]phenylalanine to the fetal circulation was not associated with fetal or maternal flow. The absence of a relationship between placental phenylalanine uptake and net flux of phenylalanine to the fetal circulation suggests that factors other than flow or transporter-mediated uptake are important determinants of phenylalanine transfer. These observations could be explained by tight regulation of free amino acid levels within the placenta or properties of the facilitated transporters mediating phenylalanine transport. We suggest that amino acid metabolism, primarily incorporation into protein, is controlling free amino acid levels and, thus, placental transfer.

  8. Human Urinary Kallidinogenase Promotes Angiogenesis and Cerebral Perfusion in Experimental Stroke.

    PubMed

    Han, Lijuan; Li, Jie; Chen, Yanting; Zhang, Meijuan; Qian, Lai; Chen, Yan; Wu, Zhengzheng; Xu, Yun; Li, Jingwei

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesisis a key restorative mechanism in response to ischemia, and pro-angiogenic therapy could be beneficial in stroke. Accumulating experimental and clinical evidence suggest that human urinary kallidinogenase (HUK) improves stroke outcome, but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. The aim of current study was to verify roles of HUK in post-ischemic angiogenesis and identify relevant mediators. In rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model, we confirmed that HUK treatment could improve stroke outcome, indicated by reduced infarct size and improved neurological function. Notably, the 18F-FDG micro-PET scan indicated that HUK enhanced cerebral perfusion in rats after MCAO treatment. In addition, HUK promotespost-ischemic angiogenesis, with increased vessel density as well as up-regulated VEGF andapelin/APJ expression in HUK-treated MCAO mice. In endothelial cell cultures, induction of VEGF and apelin/APJ expression, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation by HUK was further confirmed. These changes were abrogated by U0126, a selective ERK1/2 inhibitor. Moreover, F13A, a competitive antagonist of APJ receptor, significantly suppressed HUK-induced VEGF expression. Furthermore, angiogenic functions of HUK were inhibited in the presence of selective bradykinin B1 or B2 receptor antagonist both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings indicate that HUK treatment promotes post-ischemic angiogenesis and cerebral perfusion via activation of bradykinin B1 and B2 receptors, which is potentially due to enhancement expression of VEGF and apelin/APJ in ERK1/2 dependent way.

  9. Human Urinary Kallidinogenase Promotes Angiogenesis and Cerebral Perfusion in Experimental Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanting; Zhang, Meijuan; Qian, Lai; Chen, Yan; Wu, Zhengzheng; Xu, Yun; Li, Jingwei

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesisis a key restorative mechanism in response to ischemia, and pro-angiogenic therapy could be beneficial in stroke. Accumulating experimental and clinical evidence suggest that human urinary kallidinogenase (HUK) improves stroke outcome, but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. The aim of current study was to verify roles of HUK in post-ischemic angiogenesis and identify relevant mediators. In rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model, we confirmed that HUK treatment could improve stroke outcome, indicated by reduced infarct size and improved neurological function. Notably, the 18F-FDG micro-PET scan indicated that HUK enhanced cerebral perfusion in rats after MCAO treatment. In addition, HUK promotespost-ischemic angiogenesis, with increased vessel density as well as up-regulated VEGF andapelin/APJ expression in HUK-treated MCAO mice. In endothelial cell cultures, induction of VEGF and apelin/APJ expression, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation by HUK was further confirmed. These changes were abrogated by U0126, a selective ERK1/2 inhibitor. Moreover, F13A, a competitive antagonist of APJ receptor, significantly suppressed HUK-induced VEGF expression. Furthermore, angiogenic functions of HUK were inhibited in the presence of selective bradykinin B1 or B2 receptor antagonist both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings indicate that HUK treatment promotes post-ischemic angiogenesis and cerebral perfusion via activation of bradykinin B1 and B2 receptors, which is potentially due to enhancement expression of VEGF and apelin/APJ in ERK1/2 dependent way. PMID:26222055

  10. Extracorporeal machine perfusion of the pancreas: technical aspects and its clinical implications--a systematic review of experimental models.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Kean Guan; Wee, Mau Nam; Chung, Wen Yuan; Kumar, Rohan; Mees, Soeren Torge; Dennison, Ashley; Maddern, Guy; Trochsler, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas or pancreatic islet transplantation is an important treatment option for insulin-dependent diabetes and its complications. However, as the pancreas is particularly susceptible to ischaemic-reperfusion injury, the criteria for pancreas and islet donation are especially strict. With a chronic shortage of donors, one critical challenge is to maximise organ availability and expand the donor pool. To achieve that, continuous improvement in organ preservation is required, with the aims of reducing ischaemia-reperfusion injury, prolong preservation time and improve graft function. Static cold storage, the only method used in clinical pancreas and islet cell transplant currently, has likely reached its plateau. Machine perfusion, hypothermic or normothermic, could hold the key to improving donor pancreas quality as well as quantity available for transplant. This article reviews the literature on experimental models of pancreas machine perfusion, examines the benefits of machine perfusion, the technical aspects and their clinical implications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cytoprotective drugs in the prevention of ethanol-induced experimental gastric mucosal damage: a morphological study.

    PubMed

    Gaudio, E; Carpino, F; Petrozza, V; Bianchi, G; Alberico, P; Melis, M; Carlei, F; Lygidakis, N J

    1993-04-01

    Various so-called "cytoprotective" agents (sucralfate, carbenoxolone, 16,16-dimethyl-PGE2, sulglycotide and Maalox TC) have been tested on rats, with the aim of quantifying their capability to prevent ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage. Rats fasted for 48 hours received 1 ml of 80% ethanol by oral gavage, after prior oral treatment with placebo or one of the above-mentioned drugs u.i.d. for 5 consecutive days. Six hours after ethanol administration, the animals were sacrificed and the stomach was removed and processed for computerized macroscopic assessment of the damaged surface and for structural (light microscopy) and ultrastructural (scanning and transmission electron microscopy) studies. The results obtained demonstrate that ethanol injury caused extensive mucosal necrosis of the glandular region of the stomach, an event that was effectively reduced in rats treated with 16,16-dm-PGE2, carbenoxolone or sulglycotide. These drugs appeared to preserve the mucosa, with morphology comparable to that of normal noninjured rats - in contrast to the other drugs investigated. These data confirm the cytoprotective properties of sulglycotide in particular, which was the most potent agent for preventing the development of ethanol-induced acute lesions of the gastric mucosa.

  12. Grape seed extract protects IEC-6 cells from chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity and improves parameters of small intestinal mucositis in rats with experimentally-induced mucositis.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Ker Y; Howarth, Gordon S; Yazbeck, Roger; Wright, Tessa H; Whitford, Eleanor J; Payne, Caroline; Butler, Ross N; Bastian, Susan E P

    2009-02-01

    Mucositis is a common side-effect of high-dose chemotherapy regimens. Grape seed extract (GSE) represents a rich source of proanthocyanidins with the potential to decrease oxidative damage and inflammation within the gastrointestinal tract. We evaluated GSE for its capacity to decrease the severity of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in vitro and in vivo. In vitro: GSE was administered to IEC-6 intestinal epithelial cells prior to damage induced by 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). Cell viability was determined by neutral red assay. In vivo: Female Dark Agouti rats (130-180 g) were gavaged with 1 ml GSE (400 mg/kg) daily (day 3-11) and received 5-FU (150 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection on day nine to induce mucositis. Rats were sacrificed at day 12 and intestinal tissues collected for myeloperoxidase and sucrase activity assays and histological analyses. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way ANOVA. GSE prevented the decrease in IEC-6 cell viability induced by 5-FU (p < 0.01). Compared with 5-FU controls, GSE significantly reduced myeloperoxidase activity by 86% and 27% in the proximal jejunum (p < 0.001) and distal ileum (p < 0.05) respectively; decreased qualitative histological scores of damage (p < 0.05) in the proximal jejunum; increased villus height in the proximal jejunum (17%; p < 0.05) and distal ileum (50%; p < 0.01), and attenuated the 5-FU-induced reduction of mucosal thickness by 16% in the jejunum (p < 0.05) and 45% in the ileum (p < 0.01). GSE partially protected IEC-6 cells from 5-FU-induced cytotoxicity and ameliorated intestinal damage induced by 5-FU in rats. GSE may represent a promising prophylactic adjunct to conventional chemotherapy for preventing intestinal mucositis.

  13. Mucosal Tolerance Induced by an Immunodominant Peptide from Rat α3(IV)NC1 in Established Experimental Autoimmune Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, John; Abbott, Danielle S.; Karegli, Julieta; Evans, David J.; Pusey, Charles D.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune glomerulonephritis (EAG), an animal model of Goodpasture’s disease, can be induced in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats by immunization with the noncollagenous domain of the α 3 chain of type IV collagen, α3(IV)NC1. Recent studies have identified an immunodominant peptide, pCol (24-38), from the N-terminus of rat α3(IV)NC1; this peptide contains the major B- and T-cell epitopes in EAG and can induce crescentic nephritis. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of mucosal tolerance in EAG by examining the effects of the nasal administration of this peptide after the onset of disease. A dose-dependent effect was observed: a dose of 300 μg had no effect, a dose of 1000 μg resulted in a moderate reduction in EAG severity, and a dose of 3000 μg produced a marked reduction in EAG severity accompanied by diminished antigen-specific, T-cell proliferative responses. These results demonstrate that mucosal tolerance in EAG can be induced by nasal administration of an immunodominant peptide from the N-terminus of α3(IV)NC1 and should be of value in designing new therapeutic strategies for patients with Goodpasture’s disease and other autoimmune disorders. PMID:19406992

  14. Aluminum enhances inflammation and decreases mucosal healing in experimental colitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pineton de Chambrun, G; Body-Malapel, M; Frey-Wagner, I; Djouina, M; Deknuydt, F; Atrott, K; Esquerre, N; Altare, F; Neut, C; Arrieta, M C; Kanneganti, T-D; Rogler, G; Colombel, J-F; Cortot, A; Desreumaux, P; Vignal, C

    2014-01-01

    The increasing incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) in developing countries has highlighted the critical role of environmental pollutants as causative factors in their pathophysiology. Despite its ubiquity and immune toxicity, the impact of aluminum in the gut is not known. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of environmentally relevant intoxication with aluminum in murine models of colitis and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Oral administration of aluminum worsened intestinal inflammation in mice with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and chronic colitis in interleukin 10-negative (IL10−/−) mice. Aluminum increased the intensity and duration of macroscopic and histologic inflammation, colonic myeloperoxidase activity, inflammatory cytokines expression, and decreased the epithelial cell renewal compared with control animals. Under basal conditions, aluminum impaired intestinal barrier function. In vitro, aluminum induced granuloma formation and synergized with lipopolysaccharide to stimulate inflammatory cytokines expression by epithelial cells. Deleterious effects of aluminum on intestinal inflammation and mucosal repair strongly suggest that aluminum might be an environmental IBD risk factor. PMID:24129165

  15. Comparison of laser and ozone treatments on oral mucositis in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Suzan; Kazancioglu, Hakki Oguz; Acar, Ahmet Hüseyin; Demirtas, Nihat; Kandas, Nur Ozten

    2017-02-11

    Oral mucositis (OM) induces severe pain and limits fundamental life behaviors such as eating, drinking, and talking for patients receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy. In addition, through opportunistic microorganisms, OM frequently leads to systemic infection which then leads to prolonged hospitalization. Severe lesions often adversely affect curative effects in cancer cases. Therefore, the control of OM is important for oral health quality of life and prognosis. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and ozone may be useful to accelerate wound healing. In this study, 24 Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups as control, ozone, and laser groups. All groups received 5-fluorouracil intraperitoneally and trauma to the mouth pouch with a needle. After the formation of OM in the mouth, the control group had no treatment; the ozone group was administered ozone, and the laser group, LLLT. Then, all groups were sacrificed and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor (TGF-β), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) were evaluated in all groups. LLLT was determined to be statistically significantly more effective than ozone on FGF and PDGF. However, in respect of TGF-β, no statistically significant difference was observed between the groups. In conclusion, within the limitations of this study, LLLT is more effective than ozone. However, further studies on this subject are required.

  16. Azadirachta indica Attenuates Colonic Mucosal Damage in Experimental Colitis Induced by Trinitrobenzene Sulfonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, M. K.; Goel, Shalini; Ghatule, R. R.; Singh, A.; Joshi, V. K.; Goel, R. K.

    2013-01-01

    Azadirachta indica leaves indicated the presence of active principles with proven antioxidants, antiinflammatory, immunomodulatory, free radical scavenging and healing properties. In the present study we evaluated the healing effects of 50% ethanol extract of dried leaves of Azadirachta indica on trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis in rats. Azadirachta indica extract (500 mg/kg) was administered orally, once daily for 14 days and studied for its effects on diarrhoea, food and water intake, body weight changes, colonic damage and inflammation, histology, antibacterial activity and free radicals (nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation), antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione) and myeloperoxidase activities in colonic tissue. Intracolonic trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid increased colonic mucosal damage and inflammation, diarrhea, but decreased body weight which were reversed by Azadirachta indica extract and sulfasalazine (positive control) treatments. Azadirachta indica extract showed antibacterial activity. Azadirachta indica extract and sulfasalazine enhanced the antioxidants but decreased free radicals and myeloperoxidase activities affected in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis. Azadirachta indica extract, thus seemed to be effective in healing trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis in rats. PMID:24403663

  17. Effect of Cissus quadrangularis on gastric mucosal defensive factors in experimentally induced gastric ulcer-a comparative study with sucralfate.

    PubMed

    Jainu, Mallika; Devi, C S Shyamala

    2004-01-01

    Cissus quadrangularis is an indigenous plant commonly mentioned in Ayurveda for treatment of gastric ulcers. The ulcer-protective effect of a methanolic extract of C. quadrangularis (CQE) was comparable to that of the reference drug sucralfate. Further, gastric juice and mucosal studies showed that CQE at a dose of 500 mg/kg given for 10 days significantly increased the mucosal defensive factors like mucin secretion, mucosal cell proliferation, glycoproteins, and life span of cells. The present investigation suggests that CQE not only strengthens mucosal resistance against ulcerogens but also promotes healing by inducing cellular proliferation. Thus, CQE has potential usefulness for treatment of peptic ulcer disease.

  18. Uncoupling the systemic circulation and the Ex Vivo circuit during experimental isolated liver perfusion.

    PubMed

    Lhuillier, Franck; Pouyet, Michel; Méchet, Isabelle; Liotard, Dominique; Merle, Eric; Delafosse, Bertrand; Goudable, Joelle; Vianey-Saban, Christine; Viale, Jean-Paul

    2006-01-01

    Performing an ex vivo liver perfusion as a transient liver support requires perfusing the liver with a flow of 1 ml/min per kg of liver, which could reach 25% of the cardiac output when a human liver is used. This high flow could be detrimental in patients with acute liver failure. Therefore, in an ischemic-induced liver failure pig model, we developed a circuit allowing low flows going out of and into the systemic circulation, whereas the flow going through the ex vivo liver is maintained at a high value. This was obtained by uncoupling the ex vivo circuit from the systemic circulation. Ex vivo liver perfusion was performed in a closed circuit with a flow averaging 1 ml/min per kg of ex vivo liver (700 to 800 ml/min, according to the weight of the livers we used). It was linked to the systemic circulation with input and output flows equal to that used during hemodialysis (200 ml/min). Compared with previously reported direct circuits, this perfusion system was well tolerated from a circulatory point of view. After the induction of ischemic liver failure, the ex vivo liver perfusion led to an increase in urea, branched amino acids to aromatic amino acid ratio, and fractional clearance of indocyanine green and galactose and to a decrease in ammonia and lactic acid. This system allowed the ex vivo liver to keep its clearing properties despite a low extracorporeal flow. It represents an extracorporeal circuit that could be used in place of the direct extracorporeal high-flow liver perfusion.

  19. Time-course of cerebral perfusion and tissue oxygenation in the first 6 h after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Westermaier, Thomas; Jauss, Alina; Eriskat, Jörg; Kunze, Ekkehard; Roosen, Klaus

    2009-04-01

    Present knowledge about hemodynamic and metabolic changes after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) originates from neuromonitoring usually starting with aneurysm surgery and animal studies that have been focusing on the first 1 to 3 h after SAH. Most patients, however, are referred to treatment several hours after the insult. We examined the course of hemodynamic parameters, cerebral blood flow, and tissue oxygenation (ptiO2) in the first 6 h after experimental SAH. Sixteen Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to SAH using the endovascular filament model or served as controls (n=8). Bilateral local cortical blood flow, intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, and ptiO2 were followed for 6 h after SAH. After induction of SAH, local cortical blood flow rapidly declined to 22% of baseline and returned to 80% after 6 h. The decline of local cortical blood flow markedly exceeded the decline of cerebral perfusion pressure. ptiO2 declined to 57%, recovered after 2 h, and reached > or =140% of baseline after 6 h. Acute vasoconstriction after SAH is indicated by the marked discrepancy of cerebral perfusion pressure and local cortical blood flow. The excess tissue oxygenation several hours after SAH suggests disturbed oxygen utilization and cerebral metabolic depression. Aside from the sudden increase of intracranial pressure at the time of hemorrhage and delayed cerebral vasospasm, the occurrence of acute vasoconstriction and disturbed oxygen utilization may be additional factors contributing to secondary brain damage after SAH.

  20. Do you mind if I vape? Immediate effects of electronic cigarettes on perfusion in buccal mucosal tissue--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Reuther, William J; Hale, Beverley; Matharu, Jas; Blythe, John N; Brennan, Peter A

    2016-04-01

    The association between smoking and postoperative complications is compounded in patients who have oral and maxillofacial operations by an additional local effect, and patients often continue to smoke after operation despite advice to stop. Recent studies have suggested that nicotine may reduce inflammation and improve angiogenesis, so topical application may be beneficial for smokers. The electronic cigarette is increasing in popularity and more patients ask whether they can vape after operation. We investigated the effect of electronic cigarettes (of which half contained nicotine and half did not) on blood flow in the buccal mucosa in 10 volunteers immediately after vaping. Smokers were excluded as this was considered an additional variable in a small pilot study and our Trust has a no-smoking policy. After vaping for 5 minutes, capillary blood flow was measured in the buccal mucosa at 5-minute intervals using a laser Doppler probe, and the results were expressed as arbitrary perfusion units. There was a wide variation in results and a small but significant rise (p=0.008) as a result of nicotine vaping, but these fell to the same levels as before within 30 minutes. Electronic cigarettes may have an effect on blood flow to the oral mucosa, although further studies are needed to show whether they improve healing time after operation. Additional work is also needed to compare them with cigarettes.

  1. Hypersensitivity to acid is associated with impaired esophageal mucosal integrity in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease with and without esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Weijenborg, Pim W; Smout, André J P M; Verseijden, Caroline; van Veen, Henk A; Verheij, Joanne; de Jonge, Wouter J; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2014-08-01

    Increased esophageal sensitivity and impaired mucosal integrity have both been described in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, but the relationship between hypersensitivity and mucosal integrity is unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate acid sensitivity in patients with erosive and nonerosive reflux disease and control subjects to determine the relation with functional esophageal mucosal integrity changes as well as to investigate cellular mechanisms of impaired mucosal integrity in these patients. In this prospective experimental study, 12 patients with nonerosive reflux disease, 12 patients with esophagitis grade A or B, and 11 healthy control subjects underwent an acid perfusion test and upper endoscopy. Mucosal integrity was measured during endoscopy by electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and biopsy specimens were analyzed in Ussing chambers for transepithelial electrical resistance, transepithelial permeability and gene expression of tight junction proteins and filaggrin. Patients with nonerosive reflux disease and esophagitis were more sensitive to acid perfusion compared with control subjects, having a shorter time to perception of heartburn and higher perceived intensity of heartburn. In reflux patients, enhanced acid sensitivity was associated with impairment of in vivo and vitro esophageal mucosal integrity. Mucosal integrity was significantly impaired in patients with esophagitis, displaying higher transepithelial permeability and lower extracellular impedance. Although no significant differences in the expression of tight junction proteins were found in biopsies among patient groups, mucosal integrity parameters in reflux patients correlated negatively with the expression of filaggrin. In conclusion, sensitivity to acid is enhanced in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, irrespective of the presence of erosions, and is associated with impaired esophageal mucosal integrity. Mucosal integrity of the esophagus

  2. Lung Radiofrequency Ablation: In Vivo Experimental Study with Low-Perfusion-Rate Multitined Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura Lencioni, Riccardo; Bozzi, Elena; Sbrana, Alberto; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of lung radiofrequency (RF) ablation by using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes in an in vivo animal model. Ten New Zealand White rabbits underwent RF ablation using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes (Starburst Talon; RITA Medical Systems, Mountain View, CA) and a 200-W RF generator. The electrode was positioned under fluoroscopy guidance and a single percutaneous RF ablation was performed. Saline perfusate was doped with nonionic iodinated contrast agent to render it visible on computed tomography (CT). The pump infused the saline doped with contrast agent into the lateral tines at a rate of 0.1ml/min. The planned ablation was of 3 min, with the hooks deployed to 2 cm at a target temperature of 105{sup o}C. An immediate posttreatment CT scan documented the distribution of the doped saline and the presence of immediate complications. The animals were monitored for delayed complications and sacrificed within 72 h (n = 4), 2 weeks (n = 3), or 4 weeks (n = 3). Assessment of ablation zone and adjacent structures was done at autopsy. Major complications consisted of pneumothorax requiring drainage (n = 2) and skin burn (n = 1). Immediately after the procedure the area of ablation was depicted at CT as a round, well-demarcated area, homogeneously opacified by iodinated contrast medium (mean size, 2.3 {+-} 0.8 cm). The presence of a sharply demarcated area of coagulation necrosis (mean size, 2.1 {+-} 0.4 cm) without severe damage to adjacent structures was confirmed at autopsy. In one case, euthanized at 4 weeks, in whom pneumothorax and pleural effusion were depicted, pleural fibrinous adhesions were demonstrated at autopsy. In conclusion, lung RF ablation performed in an in vivo animal model using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes is feasible and safe. No severe damage to adjacent structures was demonstrated.

  3. Uptake of perfusion imaging agents by transplanted hearts: an experimental study in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bergsland, J.; Carr, E.A. Jr.; Carroll, M.; Feldman, M.J.; Kung, H.; Wright, J.R.

    1989-02-01

    There is a need for a reliable noninvasive marker of rejection in transplanted hearts. Endomyocardial biopsy is now the universally accepted diagnostic method of choice, but the invasiveness of the procedure and the limited size of the sample obtained makes this method far from ideal. As coronary blood flow may be expected to decrease during acute rejection, there has been interest in thallium-201 chloride (T1), a perfusion marker, as an imaging agent for diagnosing cardiac rejection. Hexakis(t-butylisonitrile)-technetium (Tc-TBI) is a representative of a new class of radiopharmaceuticals proposed as perfusion markers. We have compared the uptake of these imaging agents in a rat model of cardiac transplantation. Uptake of Tc-TBI as well as of T1 was significantly lower in rejecting than in nonrejecting hearts. This change was found in both left (LV) and right (RV) ventricles. Allografts in animals treated with cyclosporine (CyA) showed less severe rejection and higher uptakes of both imaging agents as compared to unmodified rejection. Our results suggest that perfusion imaging with these radionuclides is a potentially useful approach to the problem of detecting allograft rejection.

  4. Perfusion, oxygenation status and growth of experimental tumors upon photodynamic therapy with Pd-bacteriopheophorbide.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Debra K; Thews, Oliver; Scherz, Avigdor; Salomon, Yoram; Vaupel, Peter

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the anti-tumor effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) using a novel bacteriochlorophyll derivative, palladium-bacteriopheophorbide (TOOKAD) on tumor growth, perfusion and oxygenation. Rat DS-sarcomas were treated with either TOOKAD-PDT (2 mg/kg, i.v., immediate illumination) or one of the control treatments (sham-treatment, illumination without photosensitizer, or photosensitizer without illumination). The light source was an infrared-A irradiator fitted with appropriate filters, so that the wavelengths applied (665-800 nm) included the absorption maximum of TOOKAD at 763 nm. Tumor volume was monitored for 90 days after treatment or until a target volume (3.5 ml) was reached. TOOKAD-PDT dramatically inhibited tumor growth with 92% of tumors not reaching the target volume within the observation period. In further experiments, tumor perfusion was assessed using laser Doppler flowmetry. Upon TOOKAD-PDT treatment, a rapid, pronounced decrease in perfusion was seen, down to levels corresponding to only 3% of initial values. Tumor oxygenation monitoring revealed parallel decreases, with levels corresponding to anoxia being reached. The significant anti-tumor effects presented in this report, taken together with the chemical and pharmacokinetic properties of the novel photosensitizer TOOKAD, underline the therapeutic potential of this approach in which flow stasis and induction of anoxia are key elements.

  5. Induction of Interleukin-9-Producing Mucosal Mast Cells Promotes Susceptibility to IgE-Mediated Experimental Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Lee, Jee-Boong; Liu, Bo; Ohta, Shoichiro; Wang, Pin-Yi; Kartashov, Andrey V; Mugge, Luke; Abonia, J Pablo; Barski, Artem; Izuhara, Kenji; Rothenberg, Marc E; Finkelman, Fred D; Hogan, Simon P; Wang, Yui-Hsi

    2015-10-20

    Experimental IgE-mediated food allergy depends on intestinal anaphylaxis driven by interleukin-9 (IL-9). However, the primary cellular source of IL-9 and the mechanisms underlying the susceptibility to food-induced intestinal anaphylaxis remain unclear. Herein, we have reported the identification of multifunctional IL-9-producing mucosal mast cells (MMC9s) that can secrete prodigious amounts of IL-9 and IL-13 in response to IL-33, and mast cell protease-1 (MCPt-1) in response to antigen and IgE complex crosslinking, respectively. Repeated intragastric antigen challenge induced MMC9 development that required T cells, IL-4, and STAT6 transcription factor, but not IL-9 signals. Mice ablated of MMC9 induction failed to develop intestinal mastocytosis, which resulted in decreased food allergy symptoms that could be restored by adoptively transferred MMC9s. Finally, atopic patients that developed food allergy displayed increased intestinal expression of Il9- and MC-specific transcripts. Thus, the induction of MMC9s is a pivotal step to acquire the susceptibility to IgE-mediated food allergy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of class IV laser therapy on chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis: a clinical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Giulia; Gobbo, Margherita; Sturnega, Mauro; Martinelli, Valentina; Mano, Miguel; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Bussani, Rossana; Perinetti, Giuseppe; Long, Carlin S; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Giacca, Mauro; Biasotto, Matteo; Zacchigna, Serena

    2013-12-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a serious and acute side effect in patients with cancer who receive chemotherapy or radiotherapy, often leading to the suspension of therapy and a need for opioid analgesic and enteral/parenteral nutrition, with an effect on patient survival. Among the various interventions proposed in OM management, laser therapy is becoming a recommended treatment option but has limitations due to its heterogeneous laser parameters. Here, we report on our successful clinical experience on the use of class IV laser therapy to treat OM induced by different chemotherapy regimens. To shed light on the mechanisms of action of laser therapy in improving OM resolution, we have developed an animal model of chemotherapy-induced OM, in which we compare the efficacy of the standard low-power laser therapy protocol with an innovative protocol, defined as high-power laser therapy. We show that high-power laser therapy is more effective than low-power laser therapy in improving OM lesion healing, reducing the inflammatory burden, and preserving tissue integrity. In addition, high-power laser therapy has been particularly effective in promoting the formation of new arterioles within the granulation tissue. Our results provide important insights into the mechanism of action of biostimulating laser therapy on OM in vivo and pave a way for clinical experimentation with the use of high-power laser therapy.

  7. The human milk oligosaccharide 2'-fucosyllactose attenuates the severity of experimental necrotising enterocolitis by enhancing mesenteric perfusion in the neonatal intestine.

    PubMed

    Good, Misty; Sodhi, Chhinder P; Yamaguchi, Yukihiro; Jia, Hongpeng; Lu, Peng; Fulton, William B; Martin, Laura Y; Prindle, Thomas; Nino, Diego F; Zhou, Qinjie; Ma, Congrong; Ozolek, John A; Buck, Rachael H; Goehring, Karen C; Hackam, David J

    2016-10-01

    Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) is a common disease in premature infants characterised by intestinal ischaemia and necrosis. The only effective preventative strategy against NEC is the administration of breast milk, although the protective mechanisms remain unknown. We hypothesise that an abundant human milk oligosaccharide (HMO) in breast milk, 2'-fucosyllactose (2'FL), protects against NEC by enhancing intestinal mucosal blood flow, and we sought to determine the mechanisms underlying this protection. Administration of HMO-2'FL protected against NEC in neonatal wild-type mice, resulted in a decrease in pro-inflammatory markers and preserved the small intestinal mucosal architecture. These protective effects occurred via restoration of intestinal perfusion through up-regulation of the vasodilatory molecule endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as administration of HMO-2'FL to eNOS-deficient mice or to mice that received eNOS inhibitors did not protect against NEC, and by 16S analysis HMO-2'FL affected the microbiota of the neonatal mouse gut, although these changes do not seem to be the primary mechanism of protection. Induction of eNOS by HMO-2'FL was also observed in cultured endothelial cells, providing a link between eNOS and HMO in the endothelium. These data demonstrate that HMO-2'FL protects against NEC in part through maintaining mesenteric perfusion via increased eNOS expression, and suggest that the 2'FL found in human milk may be mediating some of the protective benefits of breast milk in the clinical setting against NEC.

  8. Experimental Colitis Is Attenuated by Cardioprotective Diet Supplementation That Reduces Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Mucosal Damage.

    PubMed

    Vargas Robles, Hilda; Citalán Madrid, Alí Francisco; García Ponce, Alexander; Silva Olivares, Angelica; Shibayama, Mineko; Betanzos, Abigail; Del Valle Mondragón, Leonardo; Nava, Porfirio; Schnoor, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) are multifactorial, relapsing disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. However, the etiology is still poorly understood but involves altered immune responses, epithelial dysfunction, environmental factors, and nutrition. Recently, we have shown that the diet supplement corabion has cardioprotective effects due to reduction of oxidative stress and inflammation. Since oxidative stress and inflammation are also prominent risk factors in IBD, we speculated that corabion also has beneficial effects on experimental colitis. Colitis was induced in male mice by administration of 3.5% (w/v) dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water for a period of 3 or 7 days with or without daily gavage feeding of corabion consisting of vitamin C, vitamin E, L-arginine, and eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid. We found that corabion administration attenuated DSS-induced colon shortening, tissue damage, and disease activity index during the onset of colitis. Mechanistically, these effects could be explained by reduced neutrophil recruitment, oxidative stress, production of proinflammatory cytokines, and internalization of the junctional proteins ZO-1 and E-cadherin leading to less edema formation. Thus, corabion may be a useful diet supplement for the management of chronic inflammatory intestinal disorders such as IBD.

  9. Experimental Colitis Is Attenuated by Cardioprotective Diet Supplementation That Reduces Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Mucosal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Vargas Robles, Hilda; Citalán Madrid, Alí Francisco; García Ponce, Alexander; Silva Olivares, Angelica; Shibayama, Mineko; Betanzos, Abigail; Del Valle Mondragón, Leonardo; Nava, Porfirio; Schnoor, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) are multifactorial, relapsing disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. However, the etiology is still poorly understood but involves altered immune responses, epithelial dysfunction, environmental factors, and nutrition. Recently, we have shown that the diet supplement corabion has cardioprotective effects due to reduction of oxidative stress and inflammation. Since oxidative stress and inflammation are also prominent risk factors in IBD, we speculated that corabion also has beneficial effects on experimental colitis. Colitis was induced in male mice by administration of 3.5% (w/v) dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water for a period of 3 or 7 days with or without daily gavage feeding of corabion consisting of vitamin C, vitamin E, L-arginine, and eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid. We found that corabion administration attenuated DSS-induced colon shortening, tissue damage, and disease activity index during the onset of colitis. Mechanistically, these effects could be explained by reduced neutrophil recruitment, oxidative stress, production of proinflammatory cytokines, and internalization of the junctional proteins ZO-1 and E-cadherin leading to less edema formation. Thus, corabion may be a useful diet supplement for the management of chronic inflammatory intestinal disorders such as IBD. PMID:26881044

  10. Healing and mucosal immunity in the skin of experimentally wounded gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L).

    PubMed

    Ceballos-Francisco, Diana; Cordero, Héctor; Guardiola, Francisco A; Cuesta, Alberto; Esteban, María Ángeles

    2017-10-07

    Skin lesions are very common in fisheries, increasing the risk of pathogens entering through the wounded skin of the fish. In the present assay, the progression of wound healing was studied over a 7 day period in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) after making experimental wounds in two different locations: above (group A) or below (group B) the lateral line. Macroscopic observation confirmed faster wound healing of the wounds of fish from group B. Furthermore, several immune-related components were studied in the skin mucus of wounded fish to ascertain whether wounding altered the mucus composition compared with the values obtained from non-wounded fish (group C, control). Significant variations were detected depending on both the site of the wound and the studied parameter. At the same time, the gene expression profile of several immune-relevant genes, including pro-inflammatory (il1b,il6, tnfa), anti-inflamamtory (tgfb, il10), immunoglobulins (ighm, ight), involved in oxidative stress (sod, cat) and in skin regeneration (krt1and grhl1) were studied in the three groups of fish (A, B and C). The results throw further light on the complex process of skin wound healing in fish, since substantial changes in the skin mucus and in the skin gene expression originated by the presence of wounds were observed. This work underline some important differences depending on the place of the fish body where the wound is located. Of particular note was the fact that such changes depended on the site of the wound. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Blockade of high-mobility group box 1 attenuates intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction in experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xia; Zhao, Hong-Xian; Bai, Chao; Zhou, Xiang-Yu

    2017-07-28

    The release of inflammatory cytokines, that plays a dominant role in local pancreatic inflammation and systemic complications in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is implicated in the mechanism of organ dysfunction and bacterial translocation in SAP. This current study aims to investigate possible role of HMGB1 in the intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction of SAP, and the effect of anti-HMGB1 antibody treatment in intestinal mucosal injury in SAP. Our data revealed that the HMGB1 expression was significantly increased in AP mice induced by caerulein and LPS, and the inhibition of HMGB1 played a protective role in intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction, reduced the serum level of other proinflammatory cytokines include IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α. Next we investigated the downstream receptors involving in HMGB1 signaling. We found that the expressions of toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and TLR9 were elevated in ileum of AP mice, the administration of HMGB1 neutralizing antibody significantly reduced the TLR4 and TLR9 expression. It was concluded that HMGB1 contributed the mechanism to the intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction during AP. Blockade of HMGB1 by administration of HMGB1 neutralizing antibody may be a beneficial therapeutic strategy in improving intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction in SAP.

  12. Effects of Different Crystalloid Solutions on Hemodynamics, Peripheral Perfusion, and the Microcirculation in Experimental Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Orbegozo, Diego; Su, Fuhong; Santacruz, Carlos; He, Xinrong; Hosokawa, Koji; Creteur, Jacques; De Backer, Daniel; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2016-10-01

    Crystalloid solutions are used to restore intravascular volume in septic patients, but each solution has limitations. The authors compared the effects of three crystalloid solutions on hemodynamics, organ function, microcirculation, and survival in a sepsis model. Peritonitis was induced by injection of autologous feces in 21 anesthetized, mechanically ventilated adult sheep. After baseline measurements, animals were randomized to lactated Ringer's (LR), normal saline (NS), or PlasmaLyte as resuscitation fluid. The sublingual microcirculation was assessed using sidestream dark field videomicroscopy and muscle tissue oxygen saturation with near-infrared spectroscopy. NS administration was associated with hyperchloremic acidosis. NS-treated animals had lower cardiac index and left ventricular stroke work index than LR-treated animals from 8 h and lower mean arterial pressure than LR-treated animals from 12 h. NS-treated animals had a lower proportion of perfused vessels than LR-treated animals after 12 h (median, 82 [71 to 83] vs. 85 [82 to 89], P = 0.04) and greater heterogeneity of proportion of perfused vessels than PlasmaLyte or LR groups at 18 h. Muscle tissue oxygen saturation was lower at 16 h in the NS group than in the other groups. The survival time of NS-treated animals was shorter than that of the LR group (17 [14 to 20] vs. 26 [23 to 29] h, P < 0.01) but similar to that of the PlasmaLyte group (20 [12 to 28] h, P = 0.74). In this abdominal sepsis model, resuscitation with NS was associated with hyperchloremic acidosis, greater hemodynamic instability, a more altered microcirculation, and more severe organ dysfunction than with balanced fluids. Survival time was shorter than in the LR group.

  13. Double-Balloon Catheter for Isolated Liver Perfusion: An Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cwikiel, Wojciech; Bergqvist, Lennart; Harnek, Jan

    2001-05-15

    Purpose: Further development of a previously described interventional method for isolated liver perfusion (ILP) with a new double-lumen balloon catheter, and evaluation of the side-effects of such isolation.Methods: In six pigs a double-balloon occlusion catheter was placed via the transjugular approach with its tip in the portal vein. One of the balloons was positioned in the inferior vena cava (IVC), cranial to the origin of the hepatic veins and the other balloon in the portal vein. By the transfemoral approach, a single-balloon occlusion catheter was placed in the IVC caudal to the origin of the hepatic veins. A third catheter was placed by the transfemoral route with the occlusion balloon in the proper hepatic artery. After inflation of all balloons {sup 99}Tc{sup m}-labelled human serum albumin was recirculated through the liver. The isolation was evaluated by repeated measurement of radioactivity levels in peripheral blood. Laboratory tests of liver and pancreas function, and hemoglobin, were taken before, at the end of, and 3 days after the procedure. Blood gases were tested at the beginning and end of the procedure.Results: One pig died during the procedure due to technical failure and was excluded from the study. In the other pigs leakage from the isolated liver to the systemic circulation increased slowly, up to 9.7% (mean) during 30 min of recirculation of the perfusate through the liver. Laboratory tests were normal in all pigs except insignificant acidosis directly after the procedure and the slight elevation of s-ALAT after 3 days.Conclusions: Only minor leakage from the liver to the systemic circulation was noted during ILP performed with a new, double-balloon catheter. There were no serious side effects.

  14. The administration of argon during ex vivo normothermic perfusion in an experimental model of kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephanie F; Adams, Thomas; Hosgood, Sarah A; Nicholson, Michael L

    2017-10-01

    Argon has shown potential as an organoprotective agent in numerous models of ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of argon gas during ex vivo normothermic perfusion (EVNP) in an experimental porcine model of kidney IRI. After a warm ischemia time of 15 min and 17 h of static cold storage, porcine kidneys underwent 1 h of EVNP using leukocyte-depleted blood. During EVNP, kidneys were perfused with a gas composition either of 70% argon (n = 6), 70% nitrogen control (n = 6), or standard 95% oxygen (n = 6) balanced with 5% carbon dioxide. After EVNP, kidneys were reperfused with whole blood under standard conditions for 3 h to assess renal function and injury. During 1-h EVNP, the mean renal blood flow was numerically higher in the argon group (49.2 ± 16.2 mL/min/100 g; P = 0.320) compared with the nitrogen and oxygen groups (42.9 ± 18.64 and 37.71 ± 7.0 mL/min/100 g, respectively). Other measures of renal function and hemodynamics were not significantly different between the argon and control groups during this period. During reperfusion, no significant differences were found in functional parameters or inflammatory markers (P < 0.05). Histologic analysis revealed no significant change in morphology or hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha staining between gaseous groups. Nuclear hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha staining was observed only after 3 h of reperfusion. Our findings suggest that using 70% argon during 1 h of EVNP does not mediate a measurable organoprotective effect in an experimental porcine model of IRI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A novel dual ex vivo lung perfusion technique improves immediate outcomes in an experimental model of lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Noda, K; Isse, K; Tobita, K; Maniwa, Y; Bhama, J K; D'Cunha, J; Bermudez, C A; Luketich, J D; Shigemura, N

    2015-05-01

    The lungs are dually perfused by the pulmonary artery and the bronchial arteries. This study aimed to test the feasibility of dual-perfusion techniques with the bronchial artery circulation and pulmonary artery circulation synchronously perfused using ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) and evaluate the effects of dual-perfusion on posttransplant lung graft function. Using rat heart-lung blocks, we developed a dual-perfusion EVLP circuit (dual-EVLP), and compared cellular metabolism, expression of inflammatory mediators, and posttransplant graft function in lung allografts maintained with dual-EVLP, standard-EVLP, or cold static preservation. The microvasculature in lung grafts after transplant was objectively evaluated using microcomputed tomography angiography. Lung grafts subjected to dual-EVLP exhibited significantly better lung graft function with reduced proinflammatory profiles and more mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to better posttransplant function and compliance, as compared with standard-EVLP or static cold preservation. Interestingly, lung grafts maintained on dual-EVLP exhibited remarkably increased microvasculature and perfusion as compared with lungs maintained on standard-EVLP. Our results suggest that lung grafts can be perfused and preserved using dual-perfusion EVLP techniques that contribute to better graft function by reducing proinflammatory profiles and activating mitochondrial respiration. Dual-EVLP also yields better posttransplant graft function through increased microvasculature and better perfusion of the lung grafts after transplantation. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  16. Beneficial role of the probiotic mixture Ultrabiotique on maintaining the integrity of intestinal mucosal barrier in DSS-induced experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Toumi, Ryma; Abdelouhab, Katia; Rafa, Hayet; Soufli, Imene; Raissi-Kerboua, Djamila; Djeraba, Zineb; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia

    2013-06-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel diseases which include ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn disease has not yet been clarified. Several hypotheses suggest a change in composition of gut microflora along with an impaired mucosal barrier that lead to excessive mucosal immunologic responses. Increased production of nitric oxide (NO) contributes greatly to the tissue injury caused by chronic inflammation. Evidence indicates that the mucus layer covering the epithelium is altered during UC and experimental colitis. Our aim in this study was to investigate the potential therapeutic effect of probiotic during DSS-induced colitis by modulating the immune system and colonic mucus production. For that purpose, the probiotic formulation Ultrabiotique(®) (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum and Bifidobacterium breve) was administered daily for 7 d to mice with colitis. Probiotic supplementation improved clinical symptoms and histological alterations observed during DSS induced colitis. Ultrabiotique(®) treatment down regulated the NO production by peritoneal macrophages of DSS-treated mice and enhanced mucus production in both DSS-treated and healthy mice. In conclusion, the modification of microflora by the Ultrabiotique(®) played a beneficial role in maintaining the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier and promoted tissue repair.

  17. Perfusion vs. oxygen delivery in transfusion with “fresh” and “old” red blood cells: The experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Amy G.; Hofmann, Axel; Cabrales, Pedro; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2010-01-01

    We review the experimental evidence showing systemic and microvascular effects of blood transfusions instituted to support the organism in extreme hemodilution and hemorrhagic shock, focusing on the use of fresh vs. stored blood as a variable. The question: “What does a blood transfusion remedy?” was analyzed in experimental models addressing systemic and microvascular effects showing that oxygen delivery is not the only function that must be addressed. In extreme hemodilution and hemorrhagic shock blood transfusions simultaneously restore blood viscosity and oxygen carrying capacity, the former being critically needed for reestablishing a functional mechanical environment of the microcirculation, necessary for obtaining adequate capillary blood perfusion. Increased oxygen affinity due to 2,3 DPG depletion is shown to have either no effect or a positive oxygenation effect, when the transfused red blood cells (RBCs) do not cause additional flow impairment due to structural malfunctions including increased rigidity and release of hemoglobin. It is concluded that fresh RBCs are shown to be superior to stored RBCs in transfusion, however increased oxygen affinity may be a positive factor in hemorrhagic shock resuscitation. Although experimental studies seldom reproduce emergency and clinical conditions, nonetheless they serve to explore fundamental physiological mechanisms in the microcirculation that cannot be directly studied in humans. PMID:20646963

  18. Dynamic changes in shunt and ventilation-perfusion mismatch following experimental pulmonary contusion.

    PubMed

    Batchinsky, Andriy I; Jordan, Bryan S; Necsoiu, Corina; Dubick, Michael A; Cancio, Leopoldo C

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate early changes in oxygenation by means of the multiple inert gas elimination technique and in coagulation by means of thromboelastography (TEG) after right-sided pulmonary contusion (PC) in swine. Anesthetized swine (group 1; n = 8) sustained a right-chest PC by a captive-bolt stunner. Multiple inert gas elimination technique, TEG, and thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans were performed before and 10, 30, 60, and 120 min after injury. Three-dimensional CT scan reconstruction enabled measurement of volumes of poorly (Vol(Poor)) and nonaerated (Vol(Non)) lung. Eight animals (group 0) were used as uninjured controls. Pulmonary contusion led to sustained tachycardia and transient hypotension. Partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) decreased from 83.9 +/- 4.2 mmHg at baseline to 51.3 +/- 2.8 mmHg 10 min after PC (P < 0.001). Vol(Poor) and Vol(Non) on the right increased significantly after PC, followed by gradual progression in injury marked by decreased Vol(Poor) and increased Vol(Non). By the multiple inert gas elimination technique, blood flow to the true shunt compartment increased from 4.4% +/- 1.0% at baseline to 21.2% +/- 4.9% 10 min after PC, P < 0.001, peaked at 33.2% +/- 7.5% 30 min after PC, P < 0.001, and remained significantly higher compared with controls. Transient increase in blood flow to low and very low ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) compartments was also seen. Clot reaction time and formation rate by TEG increased at 2 h after PC. True shunt is the major cause of hypoxemia after PC, but V/Q mismatch also contributes significantly early after injury. By CT, PC leads to significant loss of functional lung volume on the side of injury. A mild hypocoagulable state was identified 2 h after injury.

  19. The human milk oligosaccharide 2′-fucosyllactose attenuates the severity of experimental necrotising enterocolitis by enhancing mesenteric perfusion in the neonatal intestine

    PubMed Central

    Good, Misty; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Yamaguchi, Yukihiro; Jia, Hongpeng; Lu, Peng; Fulton, William B.; Martin, Laura Y.; Prindle, Thomas; Nino, Diego F.; Zhou, Qinjie; Ma, Congrong; Ozolek, John A.; Buck, Rachael H.; Goehring, Karen C.; Hackam, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) is a common disease in premature infants characterised by intestinal ischaemia and necrosis. The only effective preventative strategy against NEC is the administration of breast milk, although the protective mechanisms remain unknown. We hypothesise that an abundant human milk oligosaccharide (HMO) in breast milk, 2′-fucosyllactose (2′FL), protects against NEC by enhancing intestinal mucosal blood flow, and we sought to determine the mechanisms underlying this protection. Administration of HMO-2′FL protected against NEC in neonatal wild-type mice, resulted in a decrease in pro-inflammatory markers and preserved the small intestinal mucosal architecture. These protective effects occurred via restoration of intestinal perfusion through up-regulation of the vasodilatory molecule endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as administration of HMO-2′FL to eNOS-deficient mice or to mice that received eNOS inhibitors did not protect against NEC, and by 16S analysis HMO-2′FL affected the microbiota of the neonatal mouse gut, although these changes do not seem to be the primary mechanism of protection. Induction of eNOS by HMO-2′FL was also observed in cultured endothelial cells, providing a link between eNOS and HMO in the endothelium. These data demonstrate that HMO-2′FL protects against NEC in part through maintaining mesenteric perfusion via increased eNOS expression, and suggest that the 2′FL found in human milk may be mediating some of the protective benefits of breast milk in the clinical setting against NEC. PMID:27609061

  20. Enhancement of gastric mucosal blood flow with sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Guslandi, M; Sorghi, M; Tittobello, A

    1994-01-01

    Twelve patients with dyspepsia whose gastric abnormalities ranged from diffuse reddening of the mucosa to multiple erosions were treated for 4 weeks with oral sulglycotide, a sulphated glycopeptide with known gastroprotective and ulcer-healing properties. Before and after treatment, gastric mucosal blood flow was assessed by means of laser Doppler flowmetry. A significant (P < 0.01) increase in mucosal perfusion was observed after sulglycotide treatment, suggesting that enhancement of mucosal blood flow may contribute to the therapeutic properties of the drug.

  1. Effect of cardiopulmonary bypass on gastrointestinal perfusion and function.

    PubMed

    Gaer, J A; Shaw, A D; Wild, R; Swift, R I; Munsch, C M; Smith, P L; Taylor, K M

    1994-02-01

    Gastric mucosal tonometry was used to determine the adequacy of gastrointestinal perfusion in 10 patients undergoing elective myocardial revascularization. Patients were prospectively randomized to receive either pulsatile or nonpulsatile flow during cardiopulmonary bypass. All patients showed a reduction in gastric mucosal perfusion during bypass, manifested by a reduction in the gastric mucosal pH, which occurred independently of variations in the arterial pH. In the group of patients receiving nonpulsatile flow, this reduction was significantly greater (p < 0.05). Cardiopulmonary bypass using nonpulsatile flow is associated with the development of a gastric mucosal acidosis, which may have implications for the development of postoperative complications.

  2. Mucosal acid causes gastric mucosal microcirculatory disturbance in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Funatsu, Toshiyuki; Chono, Koji; Hirata, Takuya; Keto, Yoshihiro; Kimoto, Aishi; Sasamata, Masao

    2007-01-05

    The mechanism by which nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) suppress gastric mucosal blood flow is not fully understood, although the depletion of mucosal prostaglandin E2 has been proposed as one possible explanation. We investigated the role of gastric acid on gastric mucosal blood flow in NSAID-treated rats. A rat stomach was mounted in an ex vivo chamber, and gastric mucosal blood flow was measured sequentially in a 5-mm2 area of the gastric corpus using a scanning laser Doppler perfusion image system. Results showed that diclofenac (5 mg/kg s.c.) and indomethacin (10 mg/kg s.c.) did not affect gastric mucosal blood flow, although both strongly decreased mucosal prostaglandin E2 when saline was instilled into the gastric chamber. On replacement of the saline in the chamber with 100 mM hydrochloric acid, these drugs caused a decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow levels within 30 min. The specific cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors celecoxib (50 mg/kg s.c.) and rofecoxib (25 mg/kg s.c.) did not affect mucosal prostaglandin E2 level, nor did they decrease gastric mucosal blood flow, even when hydrochloric acid was added to the chamber. Furthermore, measurement of vasoconstrictive factors present in the mucosa showed that endothelin-1 levels increased after administration of diclofenac s.c. in the presence of intragastric hydrochloric acid. This indicates that the presence of mucosal hydrochloric acid plays an important role in the NSAID-induced decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow, while the COX-1-derived basal prostaglandin E2, which is unlikely to control gastric mucosal blood flow itself, protects microcirculatory systems from mucosal hydrochloric acid.

  3. Reduction of radiochemotherapy-induced early oral mucositis by recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (palifermin): Experimental studies in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, Wolfgang . E-mail: doerr@rcs.urz.tu-dresden.de; Baessler, Stefan; Reichel, Sandra; Spekl, Kathrin

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (rHuKGF or palifermin) on oral mucositis induced by radiochemotherapy in a mouse model. Methods and Materials: Cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (cisplatin) and/or 5-fluorouracil were given before single dose irradiation, combined with palifermin before or after the treatment, or both. Daily fractionated irradiation for 2 weeks was followed by graded test doses. With additional chemotherapy in Week 1, palifermin was given before radiotherapy and at the end of the first week, or additionally at the end of Week 2. Radiochemotherapy in Week 2 was combined with palifermin at the end of Weeks 1 and 2, Weeks 1, 2, and 3, or additionally before radiotherapy. Ulceration of mouse tongue mucosa was analyzed as the endpoint. Results: The dose associated with ulcer induction in 50% of the mice (ED{sub 50}) for single-dose irradiation was 11.5 {+-} 0.7 Gy. Palifermin increased the ED{sub 50} to about 19 Gy in all protocols tested. Similar values were observed when chemotherapy was added before irradiation. With fractionated irradiation, palifermin increased the ED{sub 50} for test irradiation from 5.7 {+-} 1.5 Gy to 12-15 Gy, depending on the administration protocol. With chemotherapy in Week 1, two palifermin injections had no significant effect, but a third injection increased the ED{sub 50} to 13 Gy. With chemotherapy in Week 2, all palifermin protocols resulted in ED{sub 50} values of 13-14 Gy. Conclusion: A marked increase in oral mucosal radiation tolerance by palifermin was found, which was preserved in combinations with chemotherapy using cisplatin and/or 5-fluorouracil.

  4. Esophageal acid sensitivity and mucosal integrity in patients with functional heartburn.

    PubMed

    Weijenborg, P W; Smout, A J P M; Bredenoord, A J

    2016-11-01

    Patients with functional heartburn (FH) experience troublesome heartburn that is not related to gastroesophageal reflux. The etiology of the heartburn sensation in FH patients is unknown. In patients with reflux disease, esophageal hypersensitivity seems associated with impaired mucosal integrity. We aimed to determine esophageal sensitivity and mucosal integrity in FH and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients. In this prospective experimental study, we performed an acid perfusion test and upper endoscopy with biopsies in 12 patients with NERD and nine patients with FH. Mucosal integrity was measured during endoscopy using electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and biopsy specimens were analyzed in Ussing chambers for transepithelial electrical resistance and transepithelial permeability. Lag time to heartburn perception was significantly longer in FH patients (median 12 min) than in NERD patients (median 3 min). Once perceived, intensity of heartburn was scored equal with median visual analog scale 6.5 and 7.1 respectively. Esophageal mucosal integrity was also comparable between FH and NERD patients, both in vivo extracellular impedance and ex vivo transepithelial resistance and permeability were similar. Patients with FH did not show acid hypersensitivity as seen in patients with NERD. However, once perceived, intensity of heartburn is similar. Esophageal mucosal integrity is similar between NERD and FH patients, and is therefore unlikely to be the underlying cause of the observed difference in esophageal acid perception. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Increasing the effective concentration of melphalan in experimental rat liver tumours: comparison of isolated liver perfusion and hepatic artery infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Marinelli, A.; van Dierendonck, J. H.; van Brakel, G. M.; Irth, H.; Kuppen, P. J.; Tjaden, U. R.; van de Velde, C. J.

    1991-01-01

    Regional chemotherapy allows further exploitation of the steep dose response curve of most chemotherapeutic agents, while systemic toxicity remains tolerable. We investigated the difference in maximally tolerated dose, pharmacokinetics and antitumour effect comparing administration of melphalan as a bolus in isolated liver perfusion (ILP) or via hepatic artery infusion (HAI). For these in vivo studies an experimental model for liver metastases in male WAG/Ola rats is obtained by subcapsular inoculation of CC531 rat colon carcinoma cells. In this system, ILP allowed administration of a two times higher dose than HAI (12 mg kg-1 vs 6 mg kg-1). In both treatment modalities systemic toxicity (leukopenia) was dose limiting. No hepatic toxicity was observed. Bolus administration of the maximally tolerated doses of melphalan in HAI (6 mg kg-1) and ILP (12 mg kg-1) resulted in four times higher concentrations in both liver and tumour tissue of the ILP treated rats. However, the ratio of mean drug concentration in liver vs tumour tissue appeared to be 1.5 times that found for HAI. In the range of the in tumour tissue measured melphalan concentrations the CC531 cells showed a steep dose response relationship in vitro. Whereas HAI resulted in significant tumour growth delay, complete remissions were observed in 90% of the rats treated with ILP. This study shows that with 12 mg kg-1 melphalan in ILP highly effective drug concentrations are achieved in CC531 tumour tissue; although the melphalan concentration in liver tissue shows an even higher increase than in tumour tissue, hepatic toxicity is negligible in this dose range.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1764369

  6. The effect of pumpless extracorporeal CO2 removal on regional perfusion of the brain in experimental acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kreyer, Stefan; Muders, Thomas; Luepschen, Henning; Kricklies, Corinna; Linden, Katharina; Soehle, Martin; Zinserling, Joerg; Putensen, Christian; Wrigge, Hermann

    2013-07-01

    Lung-protective mechanical ventilation with low tidal volumes (V(T)) is often associated with hypercapnia (HC), which may be unacceptable in patients with brain injury. CO2 removal using a percutaneous extracorporeal lung assist (pECLA) enables normocapnia despite low V(T), but its effects on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) remain ambiguous. We hypothesized that reversal of HC by pECLA impairs rCBF in a porcine lung injury model. Lung injury was induced in 9 anesthetized pigs by hydrochloric acid aspiration. rCBF and systemic hemodynamics were measured by colored microsphere technique and transpulmonary-thermodilution during a randomized sequence of 4 experimental situations: pECLA shunt-on (1) with HC and (2) without HC, pECLA shunt-off (3) with HC and (4) without HC. HC increased rCBF (P<0.05). CO2 removal with pECLA resulting in normocapnia, decreased rCBF to levels comparable to those without pECLA and normocapnia. HC resulted in increased cardiac output (+25.5%). Cardiac output was highest during HC with pECLA shunt (+44.9%). During pECLA with CO2 removal, cardiac output (+38.1%) decreased compared with pECLA without CO2 removal, but stayed higher than during normocapnia/no pECLA shunt (P<0.05). In this animal model, mechanical ventilation with low V(T) was associated with HC and increased rCBF. CO2 removal by pECLA restored normocapnia, reduced rCBF to levels of normocapnia, but required a higher systemic blood flow for the perfusion of the pECLA device. If these results could be transferred to patients, extracorporeal CO2 removal might be an option for treatment of combined lung and brain injury in condition of a sufficient cardiac flow reserve.

  7. Experimental evaluation and computational modeling of tissue damage from low-flow push-pull perfusion sampling in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, David E; Hains, Leah; Li, David; Bull, Joseph; Lentz, Stephen I; Kennedy, Robert T

    2015-03-15

    Neurochemical monitoring via sampling probes is valuable for deciphering neurotransmission in vivo. Microdialysis is commonly used; however, the spatial resolution is poor. Recently push-pull perfusion at low flow rates (50nL/min) has been proposed as a method for in vivo sampling from the central nervous system. Tissue damage from such probes has not been investigated in detail. In this work, we evaluated acute tissue response to low-flow push-pull perfusion by infusing the nuclear stains Sytox Orange and Hoechst 33342 through probes implanted in the striatum for 200min, to label damaged and total cells, respectively, in situ. Using the damaged/total labeled cell ratio as a measure of tissue damage, we found that 33±8% were damaged within the dye region around a microdialysis probe. We found that low-flow push-pull perfusion probes damaged 24±4% of cells in the sampling area. Flow had no effect on the number of damaged cells for low-flow push-pull perfusion. Modeling revealed that shear stress and pressure gradients generated by the flow were lower than thresholds expected to cause damage. Comparison with existing methods.Push-pull perfusion caused less tissue damage but yielded 1500-fold better spatial resolution. Push-pull perfusion at low flow rates is a viable method for sampling from the brain with potential for high temporal and spatial resolution. Tissue damage is mostly caused by probe insertion. Smaller probes may yield even lower damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Experimental Evaluation and Computational Modeling of Tissue Damage from Low-Flow Push-Pull Perfusion Sampling In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cepeda, David E.; Hains, Leah; Li, David; Bull, Joseph; Lentz, Stephen I.; Kennedy, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Neurochemical monitoring via sampling probes is valuable for deciphering neurotransmission in vivo. Microdialysis is commonly used; however, the spatial resolution is poor. New Method Recently push-pull perfusion at low flow rates (50 nL/min) has been proposed as a method for in vivo sampling from the central nervous system. Tissue damage from such probes has not been investigated in detail. In this work, we evaluated acute tissue response to low-flow push-pull perfusion by infusing the nuclear stains Sytox Orange and Hoechst 33342 through probes implanted in the striatum for 200 min, to label damaged and total cells, respectively, in situ. Results Using the damaged/total labeled cell ratio as a measure of tissue damage, we found that 33 ± 8% were damaged within the dye region around a microdialysis probe. We found that low-flow push-pull perfusion probes damaged 24 ± 4% of cells in the sampling area. Flow had no effect on the number of damaged cells for low-flow push-pull perfusion. Modeling revealed that shear stress and pressure gradients generated by the flow were lower than thresholds expected to cause damage. Comparison with existing methods Push-pull perfusion caused less tissue damage but yielded 1500-fold better spatial resolution. Conclusions Push-pull perfusion at low flow rates is a viable method for sampling from the brain with potential for high temporal and spatial resolution. Tissue damage is mostly caused by probe insertion. Smaller probes may yield even lower damage. PMID:25614385

  9. Experimental verification of bioheat transfer theories: measurement of temperature profiles around large artificial vessels in perfused tissue.

    PubMed

    Crezee, J; Lagendijk, J J

    1990-07-01

    The verification of thermal models for use in hyperthermia treatment planning is essential. We investigated the heat transfer between a single vessel and the surrounding vascularised tissue, comparing the conventional bioheat transfer theory and the recently developed keff model using analytical and numerical methods. A plastic tube inserted into the tissue of an isolated perfused organ served as an artificial vessel. This enabled us to vary the blood flow in the vessel and in the tissue independently. The organ used was a bovine kidney, turned into a perfused tissue phantom using an alcohol fixation technique. The temperature profile within the tissue was mapped with constantan-manganin thermocouple wire sensors with a total diameter of 50 microns. The temperature profile relative to the temperature difference between the vessel and organ was measured; increased perfusion caused a reduction of the vessel wall temperature but did not affect the width of the profile. Studying the transient tissue temperature after a step-wise change of the blood temperature in the vessel revealed a faster diffusion of heat at higher perfusion rates. These facts are in accordance with the keff model, but not with the conventional heat-sink theory.

  10. Lung [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and ventilation-perfusion mismatch in the early stage of experimental acute smoke inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Musch, Guido; Winkler, Tilo; Harris, R. Scott; Vidal Melo, Marcos F.; Wellman, Tyler J.; de Prost, Nicolas; Kradin, Richard L.; Venegas, Jose G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALI) occurs in a third of patients with smoke inhalation injury. Its clinical manifestations usually do not appear until 48 to 72 h after inhalation. Identifying inflammatory changes that occur in pulmonary parenchyma earlier than that could provide insight into the pathogenesis of smoke-induced ALI. Furthermore, noninvasive measurement of such changes might lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment. Because glucose is the main source of energy for pulmonary inflammatory cells, we hypothesized that its pulmonary metabolism is increased shortly after smoke inhalation, when classic manifestations of ALI are not yet expected. Methods In five sheep we induced unilateral injury with 48 breaths of cotton smoke while the contralateral lung served as control. We used positron emission tomography with: 1) [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose to measure pulmonary inflammatory cell metabolic activity; and 2) [13N]nitrogen in saline to measure shunt and ventilation-perfusion distributions separately in the smoke-exposed and control lungs. Results The pulmonary [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake rate was increased at 4 h after smoke inhalation (mean ± SD: 0.0031 ± 0.0013 vs. 0.0026 ± 0.0010 min−1, P < 0.05) mainly as a result of increased glucose phosphorylation. At this stage there was no worsening in lung aeration or shunt. However, there was a shift of perfusion toward units with lower ventilation-to-perfusion ratio (mean ratio ± SD: 0.82 ± 0.10 vs. 1.12 ± 0.02, P < 0.05) and increased heterogeneity of the ventilation-perfusion distribution (mean ± SD: 0.21 ± 0.07 vs. 0.13 ± 0.01, P < 0.05). Conclusion Using noninvasive imaging we demonstrated that increased pulmonary [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and ventilation-perfusion mismatch occur early after smoke inhalation. PMID:24051392

  11. Lung [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and ventilation-perfusion mismatch in the early stage of experimental acute smoke inhalation.

    PubMed

    Musch, Guido; Winkler, Tilo; Harris, R Scott; Vidal Melo, Marcos F; Wellman, Tyler J; de Prost, Nicolas; Kradin, Richard L; Venegas, Jose G

    2014-03-01

    Acute lung injury occurs in a third of patients with smoke inhalation injury. Its clinical manifestations usually do not appear until 48-72 h after inhalation. Identifying inflammatory changes that occur in pulmonary parenchyma earlier than that could provide insight into the pathogenesis of smoke-induced acute lung injury. Furthermore, noninvasive measurement of such changes might lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment. Because glucose is the main source of energy for pulmonary inflammatory cells, the authors hypothesized that its pulmonary metabolism is increased shortly after smoke inhalation, when classic manifestations of acute lung injury are not yet expected. In five sheep, the authors induced unilateral injury with 48 breaths of cotton smoke while the contralateral lung served as control. The authors used positron emission tomography with: (1) [F]fluorodeoxyglucose to measure metabolic activity of pulmonary inflammatory cells; and (2) [N]nitrogen in saline to measure shunt and ventilation-perfusion distributions separately in the smoke-exposed and control lungs. The pulmonary [F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake rate was increased at 4 h after smoke inhalation (mean ± SD: 0.0031 ± 0.0013 vs. 0.0026 ± 0.0010 min; P < 0.05) mainly as a result of increased glucose phosphorylation. At this stage, there was no worsening in lung aeration or shunt. However, there was a shift of perfusion toward units with lower ventilation-to-perfusion ratio (mean ratio ± SD: 0.82 ± 0.10 vs. 1.12 ± 0.02; P < 0.05) and increased heterogeneity of the ventilation-perfusion distribution (mean ± SD: 0.21 ± 0.07 vs. 0.13 ± 0.01; P < 0 .05). Using noninvasive imaging, the authors demonstrated that increased pulmonary [F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and ventilation-perfusion mismatch occur early after smoke inhalation.

  12. Expression of Chemoresistance-Related Genes and Heat Shock Protein 72 in Hyperthermic Isolated Limb Perfusion of Malignant Melanoma: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Knorr, C.; Pelz, J. O.; Göhl, J.; Hohenberger, W.; Meyer, T.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion (HILP) is considered an established treatment for multiple locoregional intransit metastases in malignant melanoma of the extremities. Various mechanisms such as the expression of chemoresistance genes and heat shock proteins by the tumor may be responsible for varying response rates and locoregional recurrences of the treatment. The aim of the experimental animal study was to investigate the direct impact of HILP on such mechanisms of resistance. Tissue temperature, administration of the cytostatic drug, and duration of perfusion were varied. Expression of the chemoresistance genes mdr1, mrp1, mrp2, and lrp and of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in the tumor tissue was analysed using RT-PCR and western blot analysis. The untreated SK-MEL-3 tumor expressed mdr1, mrp1, and lrp, but not mrp2. Neither variation of temperature, administration of the cytostatic drug, nor duration of perfusion changed the expression of this “resistance pattern”. In contrast to the cytostatic drug, hyperthermia causes a persistent induction of HSP72. Both observations could offer a potential explanation for failure of HILP in malignant melanoma. PMID:20634932

  13. Mucosal vaccines: novel strategies and applications for the control of pathogens and tumors at mucosal sites.

    PubMed

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis Cs; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites.

  14. Denoising and artefact reduction in dynamic flat detector CT perfusion imaging using high speed acquisition: first experimental and clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manhart, Michael T.; Aichert, André; Struffert, Tobias; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Kowarschik, Markus; Maier, Andreas K.; Hornegger, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2014-08-01

    Flat detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) is a novel technique using C-arm angiography systems for interventional dynamic tissue perfusion measurement with high potential benefits for catheter-guided treatment of stroke. However, FD-CTP is challenging since C-arms rotate slower than conventional CT systems. Furthermore, noise and artefacts affect the measurement of contrast agent flow in tissue. Recent robotic C-arms are able to use high speed protocols (HSP), which allow sampling of the contrast agent flow with improved temporal resolution. However, low angular sampling of projection images leads to streak artefacts, which are translated to the perfusion maps. We recently introduced the FDK-JBF denoising technique based on Feldkamp (FDK) reconstruction followed by joint bilateral filtering (JBF). As this edge-preserving noise reduction preserves streak artefacts, an empirical streak reduction (SR) technique is presented in this work. The SR method exploits spatial and temporal information in the form of total variation and time-curve analysis to detect and remove streaks. The novel approach is evaluated in a numerical brain phantom and a patient study. An improved noise and artefact reduction compared to existing post-processing methods and faster computation speed compared to an algebraic reconstruction method are achieved.

  15. Denoising and artefact reduction in dynamic flat detector CT perfusion imaging using high speed acquisition: first experimental and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Manhart, Michael T; Aichert, André; Struffert, Tobias; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Kowarschik, Markus; Maier, Andreas K; Hornegger, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2014-08-21

    Flat detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) is a novel technique using C-arm angiography systems for interventional dynamic tissue perfusion measurement with high potential benefits for catheter-guided treatment of stroke. However, FD-CTP is challenging since C-arms rotate slower than conventional CT systems. Furthermore, noise and artefacts affect the measurement of contrast agent flow in tissue. Recent robotic C-arms are able to use high speed protocols (HSP), which allow sampling of the contrast agent flow with improved temporal resolution. However, low angular sampling of projection images leads to streak artefacts, which are translated to the perfusion maps. We recently introduced the FDK-JBF denoising technique based on Feldkamp (FDK) reconstruction followed by joint bilateral filtering (JBF). As this edge-preserving noise reduction preserves streak artefacts, an empirical streak reduction (SR) technique is presented in this work. The SR method exploits spatial and temporal information in the form of total variation and time-curve analysis to detect and remove streaks. The novel approach is evaluated in a numerical brain phantom and a patient study. An improved noise and artefact reduction compared to existing post-processing methods and faster computation speed compared to an algebraic reconstruction method are achieved.

  16. [Mucosal immune system and mucosal vaccine].

    PubMed

    Yanagita, M; Hiroi, T; Kiyono, H

    1997-02-01

    In the recent years, mucosal immune system is recognized as the new world in the area of immunology. The host is continuously exposed to the numerous numbers of environmental antigens via the mucosa and the skin. A total surface area of the mucosa is approximately 200 times larger than that of the skin, and the former surface area contains a large numbers of lymphoid cells (> 10(11)). In order to provide an effective defence for the host by vaccine, it is logical to consider the mucosal immune system. According to the new informations obtained by the modern cellular and molecular immunobiological knowledges and approaches, the concept of the mucosal immune system has been rapidly proceeded to apply for the development of mucosal vaccine. In this report, we have reviewed and discussed the recent progress in the characterization of mucosal immune system and the development of mucosal vaccine.

  17. Neutralisation of the interleukin-33/ST2 pathway ameliorates experimental colitis through enhancement of mucosal healing in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sedhom, Mamdouh A K; Pichery, Mélanie; Murdoch, Jenna R; Foligné, Benoit; Ortega, Nathalie; Normand, Sylvain; Mertz, Kirsten; Sanmugalingam, Devika; Brault, Lea; Grandjean, Teddy; Lefrancais, Emma; Fallon, Padraic G; Quesniaux, Valérie; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Cathomas, Gieri; Junt, Tobias; Chamaillard, Mathias; Girard, Jean-Philippe; Ryffel, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Objective Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) have been intrinsically linked to a deregulated cytokine network, but novel therapeutic principles are urgently needed. Here we identify the interleukin (IL)-33 and its receptor ST2 as key negative regulators of wound healing and permeability in the colon of mice. Design Expression of IL-33 and ST2 was determined by qRT-PCR, ELISA, immunohistochemistry and western-blot analysis. Wild-type and St2−/− mice were used in wound healing experiments and in two experimental models of IBD triggered by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid or dextran sodium sulphate (DSS). Neutralisation of ST2 was performed by using a specific blocking antibody. Results Nuclear localisation and enhanced expression of IL-33 in myofibroblasts and enterocytes was linked to disease involvement independently of inflammation, while the expression of ST2 was primarily restricted to the colonic epithelia. In two experimental models of IBD, genetic ablation of ST2 significantly improved signs of colitis, while a sustained epithelial expression of the cyto-protective factor connexin-43 was observed in DSS-treated St2-deficient mice. Unexpectedly, absence of ST2 in non-hematopoietic cells was sufficient to protect against colitis. Consistently, specific inhibition of endogenous ST2-mediated signalling by treatment with neutralising antibody improved DSS-induced colitis. In addition, IL-33 treatment impaired epithelial barrier permeability in vitro and in vivo, whereas absence of ST2 enhanced wound healing response upon acute mechanical injury in the colon. Conclusions Our study unveiled a novel non-hematopoietic function of IL-33 in epithelial barrier function and wound healing. Therefore, blocking the IL-33/ST2 axis may represent an efficient therapy in IBD. PMID:23172891

  18. Helminths and mucosal immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Joel V

    2006-08-01

    Geographic and ethnic variations in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease frequency suggest that environmental factors affect disease risk. Prevention of parasitic worms (helminths) through improved hygiene may be one factor leading to the increased disease prevalence. Helminths alter host mucosal and systemic immunity. Animals exposed to helminths are protected from experimental colitis and other immunological diseases, and helminthic colonization can be used to treat ongoing murine and human disease. Helminths induce mucosal T cells to make Th2 and regulatory cytokines. Helminth-induced mucosal IL4, TGFbeta, and IL10 likely are part of the protective process. Helminths affect pathways of innate immunity like TLR4 expression and function. Worms also induce various regulatory-type T-cell subsets in the gut that limit effector T-cell growth and function. These effects of once ever-present helminths may have protected people from immune-mediated illnesses like inflammatory bowel disease.

  19. Omics in fish mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Irene; Magadán, Susana

    2017-10-01

    The mucosal immune system of fish is a complex network of immune cells and molecules that are constantly surveilling the environment and protecting the host from infection. A number of "omics" tools are now available and utilized to understand the complexity of mucosal immune systems in non-traditional animal models. This review summarizes recent advances in the implementation of "omics" tools pertaining to the four mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues in teleosts. Genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and "omics" in microbiome research require interdisciplinary collaboration and careful experimental design. The data-rich datasets generated are proving really useful at discovering new innate immune players in fish mucosal secretions, identifying novel markers of specific mucosal immune responses, unraveling the diversity of the B and T cell repertoires and characterizing the diversity of the microbial communities present in teleost mucosal surfaces. Bioinformatics, data analysis and storage platforms should be developed to facilitate rapid processing of large datasets, especially when mammalian tools such as bioinformatics analysis software are not available in fishes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Counteracting negative venous line pressures to avoid arterial air bubbles: an experimental study comparing two different types of miniaturized extracorporeal perfusion systems.

    PubMed

    Aboud, Anas; Mederos-Dahms, Hendrikje; Liebing, Kai; Zittermann, Armin; Schubert, Harald; Murray, Edward; Renner, Andre; Gummert, Jan; Börgermann, Jochen

    2015-05-29

    Because of its low rate of clinical complications, miniaturized extracorporeal perfusion systems (MEPS) are frequently used in heart centers worldwide. However, many recent studies refer to the higher probability of gaseous microemboli formation by MEPS, caused by subzero pressure values. This is the main reason why various de-airing devices were developed for today's perfusion systems. In the present study, we investigated the potential benefits of a simple one-way-valve connected to a volume replacement reservoir (OVR) for volume and pressure compensation. In an experimental study on 26 pigs, we compared MEPS (n = 13) with MEPS plus OVR (n = 13). Except OVR, perfusion equipment was identical in both groups. Primary endpoints were pressure values in the venous line and the right atrium as well as the number and volume of air bubbles. Secondary endpoints were biochemical parameters of systemic inflammatory response, ischemia, hemodilution and hemolysis. One animal was lost in the MEPS + OVR group. In the MEPS + OVR group no pressure values below -150 mmHg in the venous line and no values under -100 mmHg in right atrium were noticed. On the contrary, nearly 20% of venous pressure values in the MEPS group were below -150 and approximately 10% of right atrial pressure values were below -100 mmHg. Compared with the MEPS group, the bubble counter device showed lower numbers of arterial air bubbles in the MEPS + OVR group (mean ± SD: 13444 ± 5709 vs. 1 ± 2, respectively; p < 0.001). In addition, bubble volume was significantly lower in the MEPS + OVR group than in the MEPS group (mean ± SD: 1522 ± 654 μl vs. 4 ± 6 μl, respectively; p < 0.001). The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 and biochemical indices of cardiac ischemia (creatine kinase, and troponin I) were comparable between both groups. The use of a miniaturized perfusion system with a volume replacement reservoir is able to counteract excessive

  1. Oleic acid-induced mucosal injury in developing piglet intestine.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, O R; Henninger, K; Fowler, M; Tso, P; Crissinger, K D

    1993-03-01

    A role for luminal nutrients, in particular products of lipid digestion, in the pathogenesis of mucosal injury to developing intestine has been postulated. We evaluated changes in mucosal permeability and light and electron microscopic histology induced by luminal perfusion with the long-chain fatty acid oleate in developing piglet intestine as a function of age and concentration of the fatty acid. 51Cr-labeled EDTA plasma-to-lumen clearance was measured in jejunum and ileum of 1-day-, 3-day-, 2-wk-, and 1-mo-old piglets during sequential perfusion with saline control (20 min); 0, 1, 5, and 10 mM oleic acid/10 mM taurocholate in saline (20 min); and normal saline (60 min). The jejunum of piglets < or = 2 wk showed significantly greater increases in mucosal permeability compared with 1-mo-old animals after perfusion with oleic acid. This effect was dependent on the luminal concentration of the fatty acid and was associated with mucosal injury evident under light and electron microscopy. In contrast, the overall response in ileum was more attenuated compared with jejunum. Thus oleic acid, a common dietary fatty acid, induces dose- and age-dependent injury in developing piglet intestine. Investigation of the mechanisms of this injury may provide the basis for dietary modifications directed at decreasing the risk of mucosal injury during enteral feeding in neonatal intestine.

  2. Experimental studies of the physiologic properties of technetium-99m agents: Myocardial transport of perfusion imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Meerdink, D.J.; Leppo, J.A. )

    1990-10-16

    The physiologic properties of new technetium-99m-labeled myocardial imaging agents (Tc-99m sestamibi, an isonitrile; and Tc-99m teboroxime, a boronic acid adduct of technetium dioxime) are discussed and compared to thallium-201 (Tl-201). Studies with isolated hearts, subcellular fractions and cell cultures indicate that Tc-99m sestamibi, Tc-99m teboroxime and Tl-201 do not share common transport or sequestration mechanisms. Although peak Tc-99m sestamibi myocardial extraction over time is about half that of Tl-201 at equivalent coronary blood flows, the amount of Tc-99m sestamibi that remains in the heart is similar to that of Tl-201 because of its higher retention efficiency. The high retention efficiency for Tc-99m sestamibi also results in minimal redistribution. In contrast, Tc-99m teboroxime myocardial extraction is higher than that of Tl-201, but its retention is less efficient, resulting in relatively rapid washout characteristics which may quickly result in tracer redistribution. During reperfusion after a no-flow period, Tc-99m sestamibi extraction and retention increase, but for Tc-99m teboroxime and Tl-201 these values tend to decrease. All tracers show adequate transport characteristics for perfusion imaging, and differences in transport and retention should lead to the development of new clinical protocols.27 references.

  3. Palliation of radiation-related mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, B.R.; Spektor, W.S.

    1990-01-01

    Oral mucositis associated with head and neck radiotherapy can substantially hinder completion of cancer therapy. Alleviation of this often severe stomatitis can provide enhanced patient comfort and facilitate appropriate care. A double-blind format was used in a pilot project to measure, against a control rinse, the effectiveness of an oral rinse consisting of hydrocortisone, nystatin, tetracycline, and diphenhydramine in controlling radiation-related mucositis. A combination of clinical evaluation and patient responses to a questionnaire was used to judge the results of the topical medications. Patients using the experimental medication developed less mucositis than did patients in the control group.

  4. Countercurrent transfer of dopamine from venous blood in the cavernous sinus to the arterial blood supplying the brain - the perfused rabbit head as an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Muszak, J; Krzymowski, T; Gilun, P; Stefanczyk-Krzymowska, S

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the current study was to check whether countercurrent transfer of dopamine occurs in the cavernous sinus of the rabbit and whether the rabbit can be used as an animal model to study cavernous sinus function. After exsanguination of the animal, oxygenated and warmed (37°C) Hanseneleit-Krebs buffer with autologous or homologous blood (in a 3:1 or 1:1 ratio) was pumped through both common carotid arteries into the head (60 ml/min; 80-100 mm Hg) and radiolabeled dopamine (3(H)-DA, 10 μCi) was infused into the cavernous sinus through the angular oculi vein. Cerebral blood from the basilar artery was collected from the cannulated vertebral artery during 3(H)-DA infusion and for 10 minutes after completion of infusion. Selected brain tissue samples were collected after completion of the head perfusion. It was demonstrated that dopamine can penetrate from the rabbit's cavernous sinus to the internal carotid artery supplying the brain. Dopamine permeation was greater when the rabbit head was perfused with buffer and blood in a 3:1 ratio than with 1:1 (P<0.01). When the head was perfused with buffer and blood in a 3:1 ratio, significant radioactivity was found in samples collected from the brain basilar artery during and after 3(H)-DA infusion (P<0.001). The radioactivity was identified as 34.13 ± 2.7% unmetabolized 3(H)-DA and 65.9 ± 2.7% its metabolites. Significant radioactivity was also found in some brain tissue samples in both groups (P<0.05). The concentration of free radiolabeled dopamine particles in the dialysate of blood plasma and plasma diluted with buffer did not differ significantly. Because the structures of the cavernous sinus and cavernous fragment of the internal carotid artery of the rabbit are similar to those in humans, it suggests that rabbits can serve as a model for experimental physiological studies of cavernous sinus function and retrograde dopamine transfer in the cavernous sinus should be considered as an important link in

  5. New generation of oral mucosal vaccines targeting dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jennifer L; Sahay, Bikash; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2013-12-01

    As most infectious organisms gain entry at mucosal surfaces, there is a great deal of interest in developing vaccines that elicit effective mucosal immune responses against pathogen challenge. Targeted vaccination is one of the most effective methods available to prevent and control infectious diseases. Mucosal vaccines can offer lower costs, better accessibility, needle free delivery, and a higher capacity for mass immunizations during pandemics. Both local mucosal immunity and robust systemic responses can be achieved through mucosal vaccination. Recent progress in understanding the molecular and cellular components of the mucosal immune system have allowed for the development of a novel mucosal vaccine platform utilizing specific dendritic cell-targeting peptides and orally administered lactobacilli to elicit efficient antigen specific immune responses against infections, including Bacillus anthracis in experimental models of disease.

  6. New generation of oral mucosal vaccines targeting dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Jennifer L.; Sahay, Bikash; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2013-01-01

    As most infectious organisms gain entry at mucosal surfaces, there is a great deal of interest in developing vaccines that elicit effective mucosal immune responses against pathogen challenge. Targeted vaccination is one of the most effective methods available to prevent and control infectious diseases. Mucosal vaccines can offer lower costs, better accessibility, needle free delivery, and a higher capacity for mass immunizations during pandemics. Both local mucosal immunity and robust systemic responses can be achieved through mucosal vaccination. Recent progress in understanding the molecular and cellular components of the mucosal immune system have allowed for the development of a novel mucosal vaccine platform utilizing specific dendritic cell-targeting peptides and orally administered lactobacilli to elicit efficient antigen specific immune responses against infections, including B. anthracis in experimental models of disease. PMID:23835515

  7. Mannitol-facilitated perfusion staining with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) for detection of experimental cerebral infarction and biochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-Yo; Yang, Dianer; Kuan, Chia-Yi

    2012-01-15

    A simple method to quantify cerebral infarction has great value for mechanistic and therapeutic studies in experimental stroke research. Immersion staining of unfixed brain slices with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) is a popular method to determine cerebral infarction in preclinical studies. However, it is often difficult to apply immersion TTC-labeling to severely injured or soft newborn brains in rodents. Here we report an in vivo TTC perfusion-labeling method based on osmotic opening of blood-brain-barrier with mannitol-pretreatment. This new method delineates cortical infarction correlated with the boundary of morphological cell injury, differentiates the induction or subcellular redistribution of apoptosis-related factors between viable and damaged areas, and easily determines the size of cerebral infarction in both adult and newborn mice. Using this method, we confirmed that administration of lipopolysaccharide 72 h before hypoxia-ischemia increases the damage in neonatal mouse brains, in contrast to its effect of protective preconditioning in adults. These results demonstrate a fast and inexpensive method that simplifies the task of quantifying cerebral infarction in small or severely injured brains and assists biochemical analysis of experimental cerebral ischemia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mannitol-facilitated perfusion staining with 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) for detection of experimental cerebral infarction and biochemical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu-Yo; Yang, Dianer; Kuan, Chia-Yi

    2011-01-01

    A simple method to quantify cerebral infarction has great value for mechanistic and therapeutic studies in experimental stroke research. Immersion staining of unfixed brain slices with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) is a popular method to determine cerebral infarction in preclinical studies. However, it is often difficult to apply immersion TTC-labeling to severely injured or soft newborn brains in rodents. Here we report an in-vivo TTC perfusion-labeling method based on osmotic opening of blood-brain-barrier with mannitol-pretreatment. This new method delineates cortical infarction correlated with the boundary of morphological cell injury, differentiates the induction or subcellular redistribution of apoptosis-related factors between viable and damaged areas, and easily determines the size of cerebral infarction in both adult and newborn mice. Using this method, we confirmed that administration of lipopolysaccharide 72 h before hypoxia-ischemia increases the damage in neonatal mouse brains, in contrast to its effect of protective preconditioning in adults. These results demonstrate a fast and inexpensive method that simplifies the task of quantifying cerebral infarction in small or severely injured brains and assists biochemical analysis of experimental cerebral ischemia. PMID:21982741

  9. Mucosal gene therapy using a pseudotyped lentivirus vector encoding murine interleukin-10 (mIL-10) suppresses the development and relapse of experimental murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Therapeutic gene transfer is currently being evaluated as a potential therapy for inflammatory bowel disease. This study investigates the safety and therapeutic benefit of a locally administered lentiviral vector encoding murine interleukin-10 in altering the onset and relapse of dextran sodium sulfate induced murine colitis. Methods Lentiviral vectors encoding the reporter genes firefly-luciferase and murine interleukin-10 were administered by intrarectal instillation, either once or twice following an ethanol enema to facilitate mucosal uptake, on Days 3 and 20 in Balb/c mice with acute and relapsing colitis induced with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). DSS colitis was characterized using clinical disease activity, macroscopic, and microscopic scores. Bioluminescence optical imaging analysis was employed to examine mucosal lentiviral vector uptake and transgene expression. Levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in homogenates of rectal tissue were measured by ELISA. Biodistribution of the lentiviral vector to other organs was evaluated by real time quantitative PCR. Results Mucosal delivery of lentiviral vector resulted in significant transduction of colorectal mucosa, as shown by bioluminescence imaging analysis. Lentiviral vector-mediated local expression of interleukin-10 resulted in significantly increased levels of this cytokine, as well as reduced levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, and significantly reduced the clinical disease activity, macroscopic, and microscopic scores of DSS colitis. Systemic biodistribution of locally instilled lentiviral vector to other organs was not detected. Conclusions Topically-delivered lentiviral vectors encoding interleukin-10 safely penetrated local mucosal tissue and had therapeutic benefit in this DSS model of murine colitis. PMID:24712338

  10. Why mucosal health?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aquaculture species depend more heavily on mucosal barriers than their terrestrial agricultural counterparts as they are continuously interacting with the aquatic microbiota. Unlike classical immune centers, such as the spleen and kidney, the accessibility of mucosal surfaces through immersion/dip t...

  11. Herbs in Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Baharvand, Maryam; Jafari, Soudeh

    2017-01-01

    Oral mucositis is an inflammatory mucosal destruction as a result of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, which in severe cases can impair patients’ quality of life. Moreover, mucosal infection and/or systemic involvement due to compromised immunity leads to delay or discontinuation of the treatment. Many strategies and agents have been suggested for the management of this condition. Because of their lower side effects compared to chemical drugs, general interest in evaluating therapeutic effects of herbs has been increased intensively. Herbal plants apply their effect through different mechanisms of action: antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antiseptic, and anticarcinogenic activity. Recently, various natural agents in plants have been noticed in mucositis, which may improve the symptoms through different interventions. The purpose of this review is to focus on the preventive or therapeutic use of herbal medicine to alleviate oral mucositis. PMID:28511530

  12. Radiation Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    PS, Satheesh Kumar; Balan, Anita; Sankar, Arun; Bose, Tinky

    2009-01-01

    Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene PMID:20668585

  13. Effects of balanced hydroxyethyl starch solutions on gut mucosal microcirculation and exhaled nitric oxide in septic rats: A randomised, animal study.

    PubMed

    Langanke, Kristina; Hinkelmann, Jürgen; Fischer, Lars G; Van Aken, Hugo K; Sielenkamper, Andreas W; Ertmer, Christian; Freise, Hendrik

    2013-08-01

    Balanced hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solutions with a molecular weight of 130 kDa (tetrastarches) are frequently used in clinical practice. These solutions are derived either from waxy maize or potato starch and they are not bioequivalent. Investigation of the effects of waxy maize-derived and potato-derived starches on intestinal microcirculation and pulmonary inflammation in experimental sepsis. A randomised (three groups), blinded animal study. Animal experimental facility in a university hospital. Twenty-one male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 275 to 300 g. Sepsis was induced by caecal ligation and puncture. Animals received balanced crystalloid infusion (6 ml kg h) for 23 h followed by randomised 1 h bolus infusion (30 ml kg h) of crystalloid: balanced crystalloid solution or waxy maize starch: 6% wt/vol HES 130/0.4 or potato starch: 6% wt/vol HES 130/0.42. Results are presented as median (interquartiles). Using intravital microscopy, mucosal perfusion was assessed by intercapillary area (ICA) between all perfused capillaries (ICAtotal) and continuously perfused capillaries only (ICAcont). Mucosal blood flow was calculated from arteriolar diameter and red blood cell velocity. Intestinal wall 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NTint) content and exhaled nitric oxide (exNO), to indicate pulmonary inflammation, were measured. Both tetrastarches improved capillary perfusion compared to the crystalloid group, as indicated by reduced ICAtotal [crystalloid 1054 (905 to 1211) μm; waxy maize starch 789 (744 to 940) μm, P <0.05; potato starch 674 (536 to 693) μm, P < 0.05] and reduced ICAcont [crystalloid 1060 (996 to 1340) μm; waxy maize starch 860 (793 to 975) μm, P <0.05; potato starch 701 (558 to 728) μm, P <0.05]. Mucosal blood flow and systemic blood pressure did not differ significantly between groups. 3-NTint was comparable among all groups. exNO was significantly reduced from 11.1 (5.0 to 16.5) ppb to 4.2 (4.0 to 4.8) ppb in the waxy

  14. Ultrasound perfusion signal processing for tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, MinWoo; Abbey, Craig K.; Insana, Michael F.

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced blood perfusion in a tissue mass is an indication of neo-vascularity and a sign of a potential malignancy. Ultrasonic pulsed-Doppler imaging is a preferred modality for noninvasive monitoring of blood flow. However, the weak blood echoes and disorganized slow flow make it difficult to detect perfusion using standard methods without the expense and risk of contrast enhancement. Our research measures the efficiency of conventional power-Doppler (PD) methods at discriminating flow states by comparing measurement performance to that of an ideal discriminator. ROC analysis applied to the experimental results shows that power Doppler methods are just 30-50 % efficient at perfusion flows less than 1ml/min, suggesting an opportunity to improve perfusion assessment through signal processing. A new perfusion estimator is proposed by extending the statistical discriminator approach. We show that 2-D perfusion color imaging may be enhanced using this approach.

  15. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zhiquan; Levy, Claire N.; Ferre, April L.; Hartig, Heather; Fang, Cifeng; Lentz, Gretchen; Fialkow, Michael; Kirby, Anna C.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Germann, Anja; von Briesen, Hagen; McElrath, M. Juliana; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Baker, Chris A. R.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Gao, Dayong; Hladik, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible. Methods and Findings To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10–15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension. Conclusions Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes. PMID:27232996

  16. Mucosal immunology of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Berin, M Cecilia; Sampson, Hugh A

    2013-05-06

    Food allergies are increasing in prevalence at a higher rate than can be explained by genetic factors, suggesting a role for as yet unidentified environmental factors. In this review, we summarize the state of knowledge about the healthy immune response to antigens in the diet and the basis of immune deviation that results in immunoglobulin E (IgE) sensitization and allergic reactivity to foods. The intestinal epithelium forms the interface between the external environment and the mucosal immune system, and emerging data suggest that the interaction between intestinal epithelial cells and mucosal dendritic cells is of particular importance in determining the outcome of immune responses to dietary antigens. Exposure to food allergens through non-oral routes, in particular through the skin, is increasingly recognized as a potentially important factor in the increasing rate of food allergy. There are many open questions on the role of environmental factors, such as dietary factors and microbiota, in the development of food allergy, but data suggest that both have an important modulatory effect on the mucosal immune system. Finally, we discuss recent developments in our understanding of immune mechanisms of clinical manifestations of food allergy. New experimental tools, particularly in the field of genomics and the microbiome, are likely to shed light on factors responsible for the growing clinical problem of food allergy.

  17. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Sean M; Shu, Zhiquan; Levy, Claire N; Ferre, April L; Hartig, Heather; Fang, Cifeng; Lentz, Gretchen; Fialkow, Michael; Kirby, Anna C; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M; Veazey, Ronald S; Germann, Anja; von Briesen, Hagen; McElrath, M Juliana; Dezzutti, Charlene S; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Baker, Chris A R; Shacklett, Barbara L; Gao, Dayong; Hladik, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible. To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10-15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension. Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes.

  18. Mucosal Immunology of Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Berin, M. Cecilia; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2013-01-01

    Food allergies are increasing in prevalence at a higher rate than can be explained by genetic factors, suggesting a role for as yet unidentified environmental factors. In this review, we summarize the state of knowledge about the healthy immune response to antigens in the diet and the basis of immune deviation that results in IgE sensitization and allergic reactivity to foods. The intestinal epithelium forms the interface between the external environment and the mucosal immune system, and emerging data suggest that the interaction between intestinal epithelial cells and mucosal dendritic cells is of particular importance in determining the outcome of immune responses to dietary antigens. Exposure to food allergens through non-oral routes, in particular through the skin, is increasingly recognized as a potentially important factor in the increasing rate of food allergy. There are many open questions on the role of environmental factors such as dietary factors and microbiota in the development of food allergy, but data suggest that both have an important modulatory effect on the mucosal immune system. Finally, we discuss recent developments in our understanding of immune mechanisms of clinical manifestations of food allergy. New experimental tools, particularly in the field of genomics and microbiome, are likely to shed light on factors responsible for the growing clinical problem of food allergy. PMID:23660362

  19. Mucosal Health in Aquaculture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abstract The mucosal surfaces (skin, gill, and intestine) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient absorption, osmoregulation, and waste excretion. Aquaculture specie...

  20. Excessive negative venous line pressures and increased arterial air bubble counts during miniaturized cardiopulmonary bypass: an experimental study comparing miniaturized with conventional perfusion systems.

    PubMed

    Aboud, Anas; Liebing, Kai; Börgermann, Jochen; Ensminger, Stephan; Zittermann, Armin; Renner, Andre; Hakim-Meibodi, Kavous; Gummert, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Miniaturized cardiopulmonary bypass (MCPB) is increasingly used in cardiac surgery, because it can lower clinically significant complications such as systemic inflammatory response, haemolysis and high transfusion requirements. A limitation of MCPB is the risk of excessive negative pressure in the venous line during volume depletion, probably leading to gaseous microembolism. In an experimental study with 24 pigs, we compared conventional open cardiopulmonary bypass (CCPB group, n = 11) with MCPB (n = 13). The same pump and identical tubing materials were used in both groups. Primary endpoints were pressure values in the venous line and the right atrium as well as the amount of air bubbles >500 µm. Secondary endpoints were biochemical parameters of systemic inflammatory response, ischaemia, haemodilution and haemolysis. Nearly 20% of venous pressure values were below -150 mmHg and approximately 10% of the right atrial pressure values were below -100 mmHg in the MCPB group, during the experiment. No such low values were observed in the CCPB group. In addition, the number of large arterial air bubbles was higher in the MCPB group compared with the CCPB group (mean ± standard deviation [SD]: 13 444 ± 5709 vs 0.9 ± 0.6, respectively; P < 0.001). Bubble volume was also significantly larger during MCPB compared with CCPB (mean ± SD: 1522 ± 654 vs 4.1 ± 2.5 µl, respectively; P < 0.001). Blood levels of interleukin-6, free haemoglobin and creatine kinase were significantly higher in the CCPB group compared with the MCPB group. Despite the benefits of MCPB regarding systemic inflammatory response and haemolysis, this technique is associated with excessive negative venous line pressures and a significant increase in the number and volume of arterial air bubbles compared with CCPB. Mini-perfusion systems and the management of MCPB require further refinements to avoid such adverse effects.

  1. Mucosal and systemic adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Collier, Martha L.; Richmond, Erin M. B.; Davis, Nancy L.; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2006-03-01

    Vaccination represents the most effective control measure in the fight against infectious diseases. Local mucosal immune responses are critical for protection from, and resolution of, infection by numerous mucosal pathogens. Antigen processing across mucosal surfaces is the natural route by which mucosal immunity is generated, as peripheral antigen delivery typically fails to induce mucosal immune responses. However, we demonstrate in this article that mucosal immune responses are evident at multiple mucosal surfaces after parenteral delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP). Moreover, coinoculation of null VRP (not expressing any transgene) with inactivated influenza virions, or ovalbumin, resulted in a significant increase in antigen-specific systemic IgG and fecal IgA antibodies, compared with antigen alone. Pretreatment of VRP with UV light largely abrogated this adjuvant effect. These results demonstrate that alphavirus replicon particles possess intrinsic systemic and mucosal adjuvant activity and suggest that VRP RNA replication is the trigger for this activity. We feel that these observations and the continued experimentation they stimulate will ultimately define the specific components of an alternative pathway for the induction of mucosal immunity, and if the activity is evident in humans, will enable new possibilities for safe and inexpensive subunit and inactivated vaccines. vaccine vector | Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus | viral immunology | RNA virus

  2. C. albicans Colonization of Human Mucosal Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Southern, Peter; Horbul, Julie; Maher, Diane; Davis, Dana A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Candida albicans is a low level commensal organism in normal human populations with the continuous potential to expand and cause a spectrum of clinical conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings Using ex vivo human organ cultures and populations of primary human cells, we have developed several related experimental systems to examine early-stage interactions between C. albicans and mucosal surfaces. Experiments have been conducted both with exogenously added C. albicans and with overtly normal human mucosal surfaces supporting pre-existing infections with natural isolates of Candida. Under different culture conditions, we have demonstrated the formation of C. albicans colonies on human target cells and filament formation, equivalent to tissue invasion. Conclusions/Significance These organ culture systems provide a valuable new resource to examine the molecular and cellular basis for Candida colonization of human mucosal surfaces. PMID:18446191

  3. Perfusion decellularization of whole organs.

    PubMed

    Guyette, Jacques P; Gilpin, Sarah E; Charest, Jonathan M; Tapias, Luis F; Ren, Xi; Ott, Harald C

    2014-01-01

    The native extracellular matrix (ECM) outlines the architecture of organs and tissues. It provides a unique niche of composition and form, which serves as a foundational scaffold that supports organ-specific cell types and enables normal organ function. Here we describe a standard process for pressure-controlled perfusion decellularization of whole organs for generating acellular 3D scaffolds with preserved ECM protein content, architecture and perfusable vascular conduits. By applying antegrade perfusion of detergents and subsequent washes to arterial vasculature at low physiological pressures, successful decellularization of complex organs (i.e., hearts, lungs and kidneys) can be performed. By using appropriate modifications, pressure-controlled perfusion decellularization can be achieved in small-animal experimental models (rat organs, 4-5 d) and scaled to clinically relevant models (porcine and human organs, 12-14 d). Combining the unique structural and biochemical properties of native acellular scaffolds with subsequent recellularization techniques offers a novel platform for organ engineering and regeneration, for experimentation ex vivo and potential clinical application in vivo.

  4. Hypothermia improves oral and gastric mucosal microvascular oxygenation during hemorrhagic shock in dogs.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Christian; Schwartges, Ingo; Swertz, Meike; Beck, Christopher; Bauer, Inge; Picker, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Hypothermia is known to improve tissue function in different organs during physiological and pathological conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hypothermia on oral and gastric mucosal microvascular oxygenation (μHbO2) and perfusion (μflow) under physiological and hemorrhagic conditions. Five dogs were repeatedly anesthetized. All animals underwent each experimental protocol (randomized cross-over design): hypothermia (34°C), hypothermia during hemorrhage, normothermia, and normothermia during hemorrhage. Microcirculatory and hemodynamic variables were recorded. Systemic (DO2) and oral mucosal (μDO2) oxygen delivery were calculated. Hypothermia increased oral μ HbO2 with no effect on gastric μHbO2. Hemorrhage reduced oral and gastric μHbO2 during normothermia (-36 ± 4% and -27 ± 7%); however, this effect was attenuated during additional hypothermia (-15 ± 5% and -11 ± 5%). The improved μ HbO2 might be based on an attenuated reduction in μ flow during hemorrhage and additional hypothermia (-51 ± 21 aU) compared to hemorrhage and normothermia (-106 ± 19 aU). μDO2 was accordingly attenuated under hypothermia during hemorrhage whereas DO2 did not change. Thus, in this study hypothermia alone improves oral μHbO2 and attenuates the effects of hemorrhage on oral and gastric μ HbO2. This effect seems to be mediated by an increased μDO2 on the basis of increased μ flow.

  5. Cytokines and mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Bamias, Giorgos; Arseneau, Kristen O; Cominelli, Fabio

    2014-11-01

    Cytokines are integral mediators for maintaining intestinal mucosal homeostasis, as well as prominent effector molecules during chronic gut inflammatory diseases. This review focuses on recent studies of the role of specific cytokines in mucosal immunity. Dichotomous, or even opposing, functions have been described for several cytokines involved in intestinal innate immunity (most notably for members of the interleukin-1 family), which depend on the specific inflammatory conditions within the intestinal mucosa. For example, both interleukin-1α and interleukin-33 exhibit 'alarmin'-type properties that can signal tissue or cell damage, which further add to their well described proinflammatory roles. Costimulatory molecules of the tumor necrosis factor/tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, such as TNF-like cytokine 1A and LIGHT, are actively involved in mucosal proinflammatory pathways, but also may exert protection against infectious agents to facilitate recovery from acute inflammation. Finally, innate lymphoid cells are increasingly recognized as important cellular sources of pivotal mucosal cytokines, including the interleukin-23/T helper 17 cytokine, interleukin-22. Elucidating the complexity of cytokine signaling within the normal mucosa and during acute and chronic inflammation will be a pivotal step toward understanding the pathogenesis of immune-mediated gut diseases and developing effective therapies to treat them.

  6. Adjunctive efficacy of probiotics in the treatment of experimental peri-implant mucositis with mechanical and photodynamic therapy: a randomized, cross-over clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mongardini, Claudio; Pilloni, Andrea; Farina, Roberto; Di Tanna, Gianluca; Zeza, Blerina

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the adjunctive clinical efficacy of probiotics in the treatment of peri-implant mucositis (p-iM) with professionally administered plaque removal (PAPR) and photodynamic therapy (PDT). Following p-iM induction, patients underwent PAPR + PDT and were randomly assigned to receive the professional and home-based administration of probiotics (Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus brevis) (test treatment) or placebo preparation (control treatment) according to a cross-over design. Clinical parameters were assessed at six sites for each implant before as well as at 2 and 6 weeks after professional treatment administration. Twenty patients contributing one dental implant each were included. Immediately before treatment and at 6 weeks, the median number of sites with bleeding on probing (BoP+) sites per implant unit was 4 (3-6) and 2 (0-2) (p < 0.001), respectively, for test treatment, and 3.5 (2-4) and 2 (0-3) (p = 0.03), respectively, for control treatment. No significant difference in clinical outcomes was observed between treatment groups. The combination of PAPR and PDT either alone or associated with probiotics determined a significant reduction in the number of BoP+ sites at 2 and 6 weeks around implants with p-iM. The adjunctive use of probiotics did not significantly enhance the clinical outcomes of PAPR + PDT. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Radiofrequency ablation with a new perfused-cooled electrode using a single pump: an experimental study in ex vivo bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Kwon; Seo, Jung Wook

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a new perfused-cooled electrode that uses a single pump for creating a large ablation zone in explanted bovine liver. This was done by comparing with the radiofrequency (RF) ablation zones that were created with a monopolar cooled electrode to the RF ablation zones that were created by the new perfused-cooled electrode. We developed a new perfused-cooled electrode that uses a single pump by modifying a 17-gauge cooled electrode (Radionics) with a 2.5-cm outer metallic sheath (15-gauge) in order to allow use of the internal cooling water (5.85 % hypertonic saline) for the infused saline. Thirty ablation zones were created in explanted bovine livers (12-min ablation cycle; pulsed technique; 2000 mA, maximum) with three different regimens: group A, RF ablation with the 17-gauge cooled electrode; group B, RF ablation with the 15-gauge cooled electrode; group C, RF ablation with the perfused-cooled electrode. T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was obtained immediately after RF ablation for calculating volumes of the ablation zone. Following MR imaging, the ablation zones were excised and measured for transverse diameters and vertical diameters. The transverse diameter, vertical diameter, and the calculated volumes of the ablation zones on MR imaging were compared among the groups. Ablation zones created with the perfused-cooled electrode (group C) were significantly larger than those created with the 17-gauge cooled electrode (group A) and the 15-gauge cooled electrode (group B) according to the transverse diameter and vertical diameter on the gross specimens (p < 0.05): 3.6 +/- 0.38 cm and 4.4 +/- 0.20 cm in group A, 3.7 +/- 0.08 cm and 4.6 +/- 0.16 cm in group B, and 5.4 +/- 0.65 cm and 6.0 +/- 0.56 cm in group C, respectively. On the MR imaging, the calculated volumes of the ablation zones in group C were significantly larger than those in groups A and B (p < 0.05): 23.1 +/- 8.7 cm3 in group A, 28

  8. Radiofrequency Ablation with a New Perfused-Cooled Electrode Using a Single Pump: An Experimental Study in Ex Vivo Bovine Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seung Kwon Seo, Jung Wook

    2005-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a new perfused-cooled electrode that uses a single pump for creating a large ablation zone in explanted bovine liver. This was done by comparing with the radiofrequency (RF) ablation zones that were created with a monopolar cooled electrode to the RF ablation zones that were created by the new perfused-cooled electrode. We developed a new perfused-cooled electrode that uses a single pump by modifying a 17-gauge cooled electrode (Radionics) with a 2.5-cm outer metallic sheath (15-gauge) in order to allow use of the internal cooling water (5.85 % hypertonic saline) for the infused saline. Thirty ablation zones were created in explanted bovine livers (12-min ablation cycle; pulsed technique; 2000 mA, maximum) with three different regimens: group A, RF ablation with the 17-gauge cooled electrode; group B, RF ablation with the 15-gauge cooled electrode; group C, RF ablation with the perfused-cooled electrode. T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was obtained immediately after RF ablation for calculating volumes of the ablation zone. Following MR imaging, the ablation zones were excised and measured for transverse diameters and vertical diameters. The transverse diameter, vertical diameter, and the calculated volumes of the ablation zones on MR imaging were compared among the groups. Ablation zones created with the perfused-cooled electrode (group C) were significantly larger than those created with the 17-gauge cooled electrode (group A) and the 15-gauge cooled electrode (group B) according to the transverse diameter and vertical diameter on the gross specimens (p < 0.05): 3.6 {+-} 0.38 cm and 4.4 {+-} 0.20 cm in group A, 3.7 {+-} 0.08 cm and 4.6 {+-} 0.16 cm in group B, and 5.4 {+-} 0.65 cm and 6.0 {+-} 0.56 cm in group C, respectively. On the MR imaging, the calculated volumes of the ablation zones in group C were significantly larger than those in groups A and B (p < 0.05): 23.1 {+-} 8.7 cm{sup 3} in

  9. The role of cognitive group therapy and happiness training on cerebral blood flow using 99mTc-ECD brain perfusion SPECT: a quasi-experimental study of depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Azizi, M; Bahrieniain, S A; Baghdasarians, A; Emamipur, S; Azizmohammadi, Z; Qutbi, S M; Javadi, H; Assadi, M; Asli, I N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of cognitive group therapy and happiness training objectively in the local cerebral blood flow of patients with major depression (MD). The present research is semi-experimental to pre- and post-test with a control group. Three groups were formed, and this number was incorporated in each group: 12 patients were chosen randomly; the first group of depressed patients benefited from the combination of pharmacotherapy and sessions of cognitive group therapy; the second group used a combination of pharmacotherapy and sessions of happiness training; and a third group used only pharmacotherapy. We compared cognitive-behavioural therapy and happiness training efficacy with only pharmacotherapy in MD patients. We performed brain perfusion SPECT in each group, before and after each trial. The study was conducted on 36 patients with MD (32 women and 4 men; mean age: 41.22 ± 9.08; range: 27-65 years). There were significant differences regarding the two trial effects into two experimental groups (p < 0/001) before and after trials, while such differences were not significant in the control group (p > 0.05). In addition, there was significant difference among the regional cerebral blood flow in the frontal and prefrontal regions into two experimental groups before and after trials (p < 0/001), while such differences were not significant in the control group (p > 0.05). This study demonstrated decreased cerebral perfusion in the frontal regions in MD patients, which increased following cognitive group therapy and happiness training. Because of its availability, low costs, easy performance, and the objective semi-quantitative information supplied, brain perfusion SPECT scanning might be useful to assess the diagnosis and therapy efficacy. Further exploration is needed to validate its clinical role.

  10. Modulation of gut mucosal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kleessen, Brigitta; Blaut, Michael

    2005-04-01

    Non-digestible inulin-type fructans, such as oligofructose and high-molecular-weight inulin, have been shown to have the ability to alter the intestinal microbiota composition in such a way that members of the microbial community, generally considered as health-promoting, are stimulated. Bifidobacteria and lactobacilli are the most frequently targeted organisms. Less information exists on effects of inulin-type fructans on the composition, metabolism and health-related significance of bacteria at or near the mucosa surface or in the mucus layer forming mucosa-associated biofilms. Using rats inoculated with a human faecal flora as an experimental model we have found that inulin-type fructans in the diet modulated the gut microbiota by stimulation of mucosa-associated bifidobacteria as well as by partial reduction of pathogenic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium and thereby benefit health. In addition to changes in mucosal biofilms, inulin-type fructans also induced changes in the colonic mucosa stimulating proliferation in the crypts, increasing the release of mucins, and altering the profile of mucin components in the goblet cells and epithelial mucus layer. These results indicate that inulin-type fructans may stabilise the gut mucosal barrier. Dietary supplementation with these prebiotics could offer a new approach to supporting the barrier function of the mucosa.

  11. Influence of NaCl Concentrations on Coagulation, Temperature, and Electrical Conductivity Using a Perfusion Radiofrequency Ablation System: An Ex Vivo Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Aube, Christophe Schmidt, Diethard; Brieger, Jens; Schenk, Martin; Kroeber, Stefan; Vielle, Bruno; Claussen, Claus D.; Goldberg, S. Nahum; Pereira, Philippe L.

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. To determine, by means of an ex vivo study, the effect of different NaCl concentrations on the extent of coagulation obtained during radiofrequency (RF) ablation performed using a digitally controlled perfusion device. Method. Twenty-eight RF ablations were performed with 40 W for 10 min using continuous NaCl infusion in fresh excised bovine liver. For perfusion, NaCl concentrations ranging from 0 (demineralized water) to 25% were used. Temperature, the amount of energy, and the dimensions of thermal-induced white coagulation were assessed for each ablation. These parameters were compared using the nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. Correlations were calculated according to the Spearman test. Results. RF ablation performed with 0.9% to 25% concentrations of NaCl produced a mean volume of coagulation of 30.7 {+-} 3.8 cm{sup 3}, with a mean short-axis diameter of 3.6 {+-} 0.2 cm. The mean amount of energy was 21,895 {+-} 1,674 W and the mean temperature was 85.4 {+-} 12.8 deg. C. Volume of coagulation, short-axis diameter, and amount of energy did not differ significantly among NaCl concentrations (p > 0.5). A correlation was found between the NaCl concentration and the short-axis diameter of coagulation (r = 0.64) and between the NaCl concentration and the mean temperature (r = 0.67), but not between the NaCl concentration and volume of coagulation. Conclusion. In an ex vivo model, continuous perfusion with high NaCl concentrations does not significantly improve the volume of thermal-induced coagulation. This may be because the use of a low-power generator cannot sufficiently exploit the potential advantage of better tissue conductivity provided by NaCl perfusion.

  12. Influence of NaCl concentrations on coagulation, temperature, and electrical conductivity using a perfusion radiofrequency ablation system: an ex vivo experimental study.

    PubMed

    Aubé, Christophe; Schmidt, Diethard; Brieger, Jens; Schenk, Martin; Kroeber, Stefan; Vielle, Bruno; Claussen, Claus D; Goldberg, S Nahum; Pereira, Philippe L

    2007-01-01

    To determine, by means of an ex vivo study, the effect of different NaCl concentrations on the extent of coagulation obtained during radiofrequency (RF) ablation performed using a digitally controlled perfusion device. Twenty-eight RF ablations were performed with 40 W for 10 min using continuous NaCl infusion in fresh excised bovine liver. For perfusion, NaCl concentrations ranging from 0 (demineralized water) to 25% were used. Temperature, the amount of energy, and the dimensions of thermal-induced white coagulation were assessed for each ablation. These parameters were compared using the nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. Correlations were calculated according to the Spearman test. RF ablation performed with 0.9% to 25% concentrations of NaCl produced a mean volume of coagulation of 30.7 +/- 3.8 cm(3), with a mean short-axis diameter of 3.6 +/- 0.2 cm. The mean amount of energy was 21,895 +/- 1,674 W and the mean temperature was 85.4 +/- 12.8 degrees C. Volume of coagulation, short-axis diameter, and amount of energy did not differ significantly among NaCl concentrations (p > 0.5). A correlation was found between the NaCl concentration and the short-axis diameter of coagulation (r = 0.64) and between the NaCl concentration and the mean temperature (r = 0.67), but not between the NaCl concentration and volume of coagulation. In an ex vivo model, continuous perfusion with high NaCl concentrations does not significantly improve the volume of thermal-induced coagulation. This may be because the use of a low-power generator cannot sufficiently exploit the potential advantage of better tissue conductivity provided by NaCl perfusion.

  13. Cine-ASL: a steady-pulsed arterial spin labeling method for myocardial perfusion mapping in mice. Part I. Experimental study.

    PubMed

    Troalen, Thomas; Capron, Thibaut; Cozzone, Patrick J; Bernard, Monique; Kober, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Arterial spin labeling has been developed and used for the quantitative and completely noninvasive assessment of myocardial perfusion in vivo. Here we propose a novel arterial spin labeling method called cine-ASL, which is based on an electrocardiogram-gated steady-pulsed labeling approach combined with simultaneous readout over the cardiac cycle using cine-fast low-angle shot. This method led to shorter acquisition times than the previously used Look-Locker flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery gradient-echo technique while preserving spatial resolution and robustness with respect to cardiac motion. High resolution perfusion mapping (in-plane resolution = 195 μm × 391 μm) was carried out with both techniques at 4.7 T in a group of 14 healthy mice. Mean perfusion values were 5.0 ± 0.8 mL g(-1) min(-1) with cine-ASL and 5.9 ± 1.4 mL g(-1) min(-1) with Look-Locker flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery. In one animal, physiological stress was induced with higher anesthetic concentration to evaluate the response of both methods under vasodilation. Global myocardial perfusion increased from 5.6 to 16.0 mL g(-1) min(-1) with cine-ASL and from 6.3 to 18.7 mL g(-1) min(-1) with Look-Locker flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery. Although this original scheme requires a separate T1 measurement to be fully quantitative, it improves arterial spin labeling sensitivity while maintaining compatibility with motion constraints in cardiac MRI in small rodents.

  14. Milk supplemented with immune colostrum: protection against rotavirus diarrhea and modulatory effect on the systemic and mucosal antibody responses in calves experimentally challenged with bovine rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Parreño, V; Marcoppido, G; Vega, C; Garaicoechea, L; Rodriguez, D; Saif, L; Fernández, F

    2010-07-01

    Group A bovine rotavirus (BRV) is the major cause of neonatal calf diarrhea worldwide. As a preventive strategy, we evaluated the protection and immunomodulation in two groups of BRV-inoculated calves. All calves received control colostrum (CC; VN=65,536; IgG(1)=16,384) prior to gut closure followed by the milk supplemented with immune colostrum (VN=1,048,576; IgG(1)=262,144), twice a day, for 14 days. Calves received milk supplemented with 0.8% immune colostrum [(Gp 1) VN=16,384; IgG(1)=4096] or milk supplemented with 0.4% immune colostrum [(Gp 2) VN=1024; IgG(1)=1024]. Calves receiving CC or colostrum deprived calves (CD) fed antibody (Ab) free milk served as controls (Gp 3 and 4). Calves were inoculated with virulent BRV IND at 2 days of age. Group 1 calves (milk IgG(1) 4096) showed 80% protection against BRV diarrhea and significantly reduced virus shedding. At 21 post-inoculation days (PID), the antibody secreting cell (ASC) responses of Gp 1 calves were limited mainly to duodenal and jejunal lamina propria (LP) with limited or no responses in systemic sites (spleen and PBL) and mesenteric lymph nodes. The profile of serum and fecal Ab responses as well as the ASC responses was also modulated by the presence of passive IgG(1) Abs and probably other colostrum components, toward higher titers of IgA Ab in serum and feces and a greater number of IgA ASC in the proximal intestine, reflecting positive modulation by colostrum toward this isotype associated with optimal protection of the intestinal mucosa. After challenge, at PID 21, all calves in Gp 1 and 2 were fully protected against diarrhea and only 1 of 5 calves in Gp 1 shed virus asymptomatically, indicating that the passive Ab treatment for 14 days was effective in protecting most of the animals after a first and a second virus exposure. The final outcome was a positive modulation of the mucosal immune responses and a high protection rate against diarrhea and virus shedding during the period of peak

  15. Mucosal melanoma: an update.

    PubMed

    Ballester Sánchez, R; de Unamuno Bustos, B; Navarro Mira, M; Botella Estrada, R

    2015-03-01

    Mucosal melanoma is a rare melanoma subtype that differs from the cutaneous form of the tumor in its biology, clinical manifestations, and management. Diagnosis is usually late due to a lack of early or specific signs and the location of lesions in areas that are difficult to access on physical examination. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for localized disease. The value of sentinel lymph node biopsy and lymphadenectomy is still unclear. Radiotherapy can be used as adjuvant therapy for the control of local disease. c-KIT mutations are more common than in other types of melanoma and this has led to significant advances in the use of imatinib for the treatment of metastatic mucosal melanoma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  16. Gastric bicarbonate secretion, acid secretion, and mucosal blood flow during influence of pentagastrin and omeprazole in the cat.

    PubMed

    Guttu, K; Røsok, B; Gislason, H; Fändriks, L; Svanes, K; Grønbech, J E

    1991-04-01

    In this study secretion of bicarbonate and acid and mucosal blood flow were determined simultaneously in cats. The gastric lumen of anesthetized cats was continuously perfused with isotonic saline. Secretion of HCO-3 and H+ was calculated from continuous measurements of pH and PCO2 in the perfusate. Mucosal blood was measured by means of radiolabeled microspheres. Under resting acid secretory conditions, bicarbonate secretion into the gastric lumen averaged 1.0 mumol/min. Somewhat surprising, both omeprazole (4 mg/kg as bolus) and pentagastrin (16 micrograms/kg.h intravenously) significantly reduced the HCO-3 secretion. Omeprazole did not influence mucosal blood flow, whereas corpus mucosal blood flow increased during pentagastrin stimulation. Under resting acid secretory conditions and during omeprazole treatment there was a close linear relationship between acid and bicarbonate secretion. No such relationship was found during pentagastrin stimulation of the mucosa. No consistent relationship was obtained between blood flow and bicarbonate secretion in normal gastric mucosa.

  17. Evaluation of the preventive effect of dexpanthenol in radiation injury by lung perfusion scintigraphy: a preclinical experimental model of radiation injury.

    PubMed

    Koç, Zehra P; İn, Erdal; Karslioğlu, İhsan; Üçer, Özlem; Canpolat, Sinan

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to show the preventative effects of dexpanthenol in radiation injuries caused by radiotherapy (RT) through the use of lung perfusion scintigraphy in the pre-RT and post-RT periods. Six male New Zealand rabbits (5-6 months of age and ∼2.5-3 kg in weight) were the used in this study. The animals were subjected to Tc-macroaggregated albumin lung perfusion scintigraphy in the pre-RT and post-RT (i.e. 2 weeks after treatment) periods. The scintigraphies were performed with the same dose by the same staff and the methodology used the same acquisition parameters. The rabbits were divided into two groups: group I (administered RT only) and group II (also administered intramuscular 500 mg dexpanthenol injections for 14 consecutive days after RT). Quantification was performed to compare the groups and the quantification variables were compared using a paired samples t-test, with P value less than 0.05 considered to be statistically significant. Histopathological analysis was also carried out. The post-RT scintigraphies indicated a decrease in the counts in both lungs, suggesting early post-RT injury. The difference between the counts obtained from both lungs in groups I and II was significantly different and favoured group II. Histopathological results confirmed the scintigraphy results. It is possible to estimate post-RT changes in the early period (in contrast to previous data) by lung perfusion scintigraphy. Dexpanthenol may also reduce the effects of RT to a degree. Although this is the first study to report the preventive effects of dexpanthenol on RT injuries, further studies are warranted in this area.

  18. [CT evaluation of extravascular perfusion of contrast medium and its potential to a new method of diagnosis: an experimental study using macro, micro-molecular contrast media].

    PubMed

    Sako, M; Sugimoto, K; Matsumoto, S; Hirota, S; Fujita, Y; Hasegawa, Y; Kuwata, Y; Tomita, M; Murakami, T; Kono, M

    1994-03-25

    To evaluate the dynamics of extravascular perfusion, dynamic CT with two different molecular sized contrast media was performed on VX2 tumor of rabbit. The first dynamic CT was performed with a bolus injection of iopamidol (IP:120 mgI/ml, 5 ml). After ascertaining that the tumor attenuation had returned to the pre-contrast level, the second dynamic CT was performed on the same slice with bolus injection of iodoethylated starch (IES:120 mgI/ml). The time-density (T-D) curves of the same tumor area on the images obtained by two contrast media were compared. The T-D curve with IP showed definitely higher level than that with IES. This occurrence can be explained that IP, 13 A in size, has higher permeability distributing not only in the intravascular space, but also into the extravascular space. On the other hand, IES, 200 A in size, will stay mostly in the intravascular space. From this, we consider that the attenuation difference between the two curves will be an indicator for the dynamics of extravascular perfusion, suggesting to become a new method for CT diagnosis.

  19. Beneficial Effect of Short Pretransplant Period of Hypothermic Pulsatile Perfusion of the Warm-Ischemic Kidney after Cold Storage: Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Lázaro, Alberto; Humanes, Blanca; Jado, Juan Carlos; Mojena, Marina; González-Nicolás, María Ángeles; Del Cañizo, Juan Francisco; Tejedor, Alberto; Lledó-García, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Warm ischemia (WI) produces a significant deleterious effect in potential kidney grafts. Hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) seems to improve immediate graft function after transplant. Our aim was to analyze the effect of short pretransplant periods of pulsatile HMP on histology and renal injury in warm-ischemic kidneys. Twelve minipigs were used. WI was achieved in the right kidney by applying a vascular clamp for 45 min. After nephrectomy, autotransplant was performed following one of two strategies: cold storage of the kidneys or cold storage combined with perfusion in pulsatile HMP. The graft was removed early to study renal morphology, inflammation (fibrosis), and apoptosis. Proinflammatory activity and fibrosis were less pronounced after cold storage of the kidneys with HMP than after cold storage only. The use of HMP also decreased apoptosis compared with cold storage only. The detrimental effects on cells of an initial and prolonged period of WI seem to improve with a preservation protocol that includes a short period of pulsatile HMP after cold storage and immediately before the transplant, in comparison with cold storage only.

  20. Beneficial Effect of Short Pretransplant Period of Hypothermic Pulsatile Perfusion of the Warm-Ischemic Kidney after Cold Storage: Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Humanes, Blanca; Jado, Juan Carlos; Mojena, Marina; González-Nicolás, María Ángeles; del Cañizo, Juan Francisco; Lledó-García, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Warm ischemia (WI) produces a significant deleterious effect in potential kidney grafts. Hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) seems to improve immediate graft function after transplant. Our aim was to analyze the effect of short pretransplant periods of pulsatile HMP on histology and renal injury in warm-ischemic kidneys. Twelve minipigs were used. WI was achieved in the right kidney by applying a vascular clamp for 45 min. After nephrectomy, autotransplant was performed following one of two strategies: cold storage of the kidneys or cold storage combined with perfusion in pulsatile HMP. The graft was removed early to study renal morphology, inflammation (fibrosis), and apoptosis. Proinflammatory activity and fibrosis were less pronounced after cold storage of the kidneys with HMP than after cold storage only. The use of HMP also decreased apoptosis compared with cold storage only. The detrimental effects on cells of an initial and prolonged period of WI seem to improve with a preservation protocol that includes a short period of pulsatile HMP after cold storage and immediately before the transplant, in comparison with cold storage only. PMID:27556029

  1. Fluorescence endoscopic imaging for evaluation of gastric mucosal blood flow: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquillon, Nicolas; Mordon, Serge R.; Mathieu, D.; Maunoury, Vincent; Marechal, Xavier-Marie; Neviere, Remi; Wattel, Francis; Chopin, Claude

    1999-02-01

    Microcirculatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract appear to be a major compound of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome secondary to sepsis or septic shock. A better analysis of mucosal hypoperfusion in critically ill patients with sepsis may be helpful for the comprehension of this high mortality-associated syndrome. Fluorescence endoscopy has been recognized as a non-invasive method for both spatial and temporal evaluation of gastrointestinal mucosal perfusion. We performed this imaging technique during routine gastric endoscopy in patients with sepsis criteria. The study included gastric observation and appearance time of gastric fluorescence after an intravenous 10% sodium - fluorescein bolus. Qualitative analysis of high fluorescence areas was compared with mucosal blood flow measurements by laser - Doppler flowmetry. We concluded that the fluorescence endoscopic imaging in critically ill patients with sepsis may reveal spacial and temporal differences in the mucosal microcirculation distribution.

  2. Organizing a mucosal defense.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Rodney D; Lorenz, Robin G

    2005-08-01

    Gastrointestinal associated lymphoid tissue can be divided into loosely organized effector sites, which include the lamina propria and intraepithelial lymphocytes, and more organized structures, such as mesenteric lymph nodes (LNs), Peyer's patches (PPs), isolated lymphoid follicles, and cryptopatches (CPs). These organized structures in the gastrointestinal tract have been hypothesized to play the role of primary lymphoid organ, supporting the extrathymic development of T lymphocytes (CPs), secondary lymphoid organs involved in the induction of the mucosal immune response (PPs), and tertiary lymphoid structures whose function is still under debate (isolated lymphoid follicles). The most widely studied lymphoid structure found in the small intestine is the PP. PPs are secondary lymphoid structures, and their development and function have been extensively investigated. However, single lymphoid aggregates resembling PPs have been also described in humans and in the murine small intestines. These isolated lymphoid follicles have both germinal centers and an overlying follicle-associated epithelium, suggesting that they also can function as inductive sites for the mucosal immune response. This review compares and contrasts the development and function of the four main organized gastrointestinal lymphoid tissues: CPs, isolated lymphoid follicles, PPs, and mesenteric LNs.

  3. Effect of Transplantation of Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Platelets Rich Plasma on Experimental Model of Radiation Induced Oral Mucosal Injury in Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    El Kholy, Samar; El Rouby, Dalia; Rashed, Laila; Shouman, Tarek

    2017-01-01

    Normal tissue damage following radiotherapy is still a major problem in cancer treatment. Therefore, the current work aimed at exploring the possible role of systemically injected bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and/or locally injected platelet rich plasma (PRP) in ameliorating the side effects of ionizing radiation on the rat's tongue. Twelve rats served as control group (N) and 48 rats received a single radiation dose of 13 Gy to the head and neck region; then, they were equally divided into 4 experimental groups: irradiated only (C), irradiated + MSCs (S), irradiated + (PRP) (P), and combined group (PS). Animal scarification occurred in 3 and 7 days after radiation. Then, tongues were dissected and examined histologically and for expression of bcl-2 by RT-PCR. Histological examination of the treated groups (S), (P), and (PS) revealed an obvious improvement in the histological structure of the tongue, compared to group (C), in addition to upregulated expression of bcl-2, indicating decreased apoptotic activity. Conclusion. BM-MSCs and PRP have shown positive effect in minimizing the epithelial atrophy of normal oral mucosa after regional radiotherapy, which was emphasized by decreasing apoptotic activity in these tissues. Nevertheless, combined use of BM-MSCs and PRP did not reveal the assumed synergetic effect in oral tissue protection. PMID:28337218

  4. The schistosome glutathione S-transferase P28GST, a unique helminth protein, prevents intestinal inflammation in experimental colitis through a Th2-type response with mucosal eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Driss, V; El Nady, M; Delbeke, M; Rousseaux, C; Dubuquoy, C; Sarazin, A; Gatault, S; Dendooven, A; Riveau, G; Colombel, J F; Desreumaux, P; Dubuquoy, L; Capron, M

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal helminth parasites are potent inducers of T helper type 2 (Th2) response and have a regulatory role, notably on intestinal inflammation. As infection with schistosomes is unlikely to provide a reliable treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, we have investigated the beneficial effect of a schistosome enzymatic protein, the 28-kDa glutathione S-transferase (P28GST), on the modulation of disease activity and immune responses in experimental colitis. Our results showed that immunization with recombinant P28GST is at least as efficient as established schistosome infection to reduce colitis lesions and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Considering underlying mechanisms, the decrease of inflammatory parameters was associated with the polarization of the immune system toward a Th2 profile, with local and systemic increases of interleukin (IL)-13 and IL-5. Dense eosinophil infiltration was observed in the colons of P28GST-immunized rats and mice. Depletion of eosinophils by treatment with an anti-Siglec-F monoclonal antibody and use of IL-5-deficient mice led to the loss of therapeutic effect, suggesting the crucial role for eosinophils in colitis prevention by P28GST. These findings reveal that immunization with P28GST, a unique recombinant schistosome enzyme, ameliorates intestinal inflammation through eosinophil-dependent modulation of harmful type 1 responses, representing a new immuno-regulatory strategy against inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26174763

  5. The schistosome glutathione S-transferase P28GST, a unique helminth protein, prevents intestinal inflammation in experimental colitis through a Th2-type response with mucosal eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Driss, V; El Nady, M; Delbeke, M; Rousseaux, C; Dubuquoy, C; Sarazin, A; Gatault, S; Dendooven, A; Riveau, G; Colombel, J F; Desreumaux, P; Dubuquoy, L; Capron, M

    2016-03-01

    Intestinal helminth parasites are potent inducers of T helper type 2 (Th2) response and have a regulatory role, notably on intestinal inflammation. As infection with schistosomes is unlikely to provide a reliable treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, we have investigated the beneficial effect of a schistosome enzymatic protein, the 28-kDa glutathione S-transferase (P28GST), on the modulation of disease activity and immune responses in experimental colitis. Our results showed that immunization with recombinant P28GST is at least as efficient as established schistosome infection to reduce colitis lesions and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Considering underlying mechanisms, the decrease of inflammatory parameters was associated with the polarization of the immune system toward a Th2 profile, with local and systemic increases of interleukin (IL)-13 and IL-5. Dense eosinophil infiltration was observed in the colons of P28GST-immunized rats and mice. Depletion of eosinophils by treatment with an anti-Siglec-F monoclonal antibody and use of IL-5-deficient mice led to the loss of therapeutic effect, suggesting the crucial role for eosinophils in colitis prevention by P28GST. These findings reveal that immunization with P28GST, a unique recombinant schistosome enzyme, ameliorates intestinal inflammation through eosinophil-dependent modulation of harmful type 1 responses, representing a new immuno-regulatory strategy against inflammatory bowel diseases.

  6. Effect of Transplantation of Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Platelets Rich Plasma on Experimental Model of Radiation Induced Oral Mucosal Injury in Albino Rats.

    PubMed

    Elsaadany, Basma; El Kholy, Samar; El Rouby, Dalia; Rashed, Laila; Shouman, Tarek

    2017-01-01

    Normal tissue damage following radiotherapy is still a major problem in cancer treatment. Therefore, the current work aimed at exploring the possible role of systemically injected bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and/or locally injected platelet rich plasma (PRP) in ameliorating the side effects of ionizing radiation on the rat's tongue. Twelve rats served as control group (N) and 48 rats received a single radiation dose of 13 Gy to the head and neck region; then, they were equally divided into 4 experimental groups: irradiated only (C), irradiated + MSCs (S), irradiated + (PRP) (P), and combined group (PS). Animal scarification occurred in 3 and 7 days after radiation. Then, tongues were dissected and examined histologically and for expression of bcl-2 by RT-PCR. Histological examination of the treated groups (S), (P), and (PS) revealed an obvious improvement in the histological structure of the tongue, compared to group (C), in addition to upregulated expression of bcl-2, indicating decreased apoptotic activity. Conclusion. BM-MSCs and PRP have shown positive effect in minimizing the epithelial atrophy of normal oral mucosa after regional radiotherapy, which was emphasized by decreasing apoptotic activity in these tissues. Nevertheless, combined use of BM-MSCs and PRP did not reveal the assumed synergetic effect in oral tissue protection.

  7. Mucosal biofilms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P

    2011-08-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that form on surfaces and are embedded in an extracellular matrix. C. albicans forms pathogenic mucosal biofilms that are evoked by changes in host immunity or mucosal ecology. Mucosal surfaces are inhabited by many microbial species; hence these biofilms are polymicrobial. Several recent studies have applied paradigms of biofilm analysis to study mucosal C. albicans infections. These studies reveal that the Bcr1 transcription factor is a master regulator of C. albicans biofilm formation under diverse conditions, though the most relevant Bcr1 target genes can vary with the biofilm niche. An important determinant of mucosal biofilm formation is the interaction with host defenses. Finally, studies of interactions between bacterial species and C. albicans provide insight into the communication mechanisms that endow polymicrobial biofilms with unique properties.

  8. Abdominal perfusion computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis.

  9. Abdominal Perfusion Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M. Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis. PMID:25610249

  10. An experimental study of the recovery of injured porcine lungs with prolonged normothermic cellular ex vivo lung perfusion following donation after circulatory death.

    PubMed

    Spratt, John R; Mattison, Lars M; Iaizzo, Paul A; Brown, Roland Z; Helms, Haylie; Iles, Tinen L; Howard, Brian; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Loor, Gabriel

    2017-09-01

    Donation after circulatory death (DCD) is an underused source of donor lungs. Normothermic cellular ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is effective in preserving standard donor lungs but may also be useful in the preservation and assessment of DCD lungs. Using a model of DCD and prolonged EVLP, the effects of donor warm ischemia and postmortem ventilation on graft recovery were evaluated. Adult male swine underwent general anesthesia and heparinization. In the control group (n = 4), cardioplegic arrest was induced and the lungs were procured immediately. In the four treatment groups, a period of agonal hypoxia was followed by either 1 h of warm ischemia with (n = 4) or without (n = 4) ventilation or 2 h of warm ischemia with (n = 4) or without (n = 4) ventilation. All lungs were studied on an EVLP platform for 24 h. Hemodynamic measures, compliance, and oxygenation on EVLP were worse in all DCD lungs compared with controls. Hemodynamics and compliance normalized in all lungs after 24 h of EVLP, but DCD lungs demonstrated impaired oxygenation. Normothermic cellular EVLP is effective in preserving and monitoring of DCD lungs. Early donor postmortem ventilation and timely procurement lead to improved graft function. © 2017 Steunstichting ESOT.

  11. Dutch perfusion incident survey.

    PubMed

    Groenenberg, Ingrid; Weerwind, Patrick W; Everts, Peter A M; Maessen, Jos G

    2010-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass procedures remain complex, involving many potential risks. Therefore, a nationwide retrospective study was conducted to gain insight into the number of incidents and accidents in Dutch adult perfusion practice. An anonymous postal survey (85 questions about hardware, disposables, fluids and medication, air emboli, anticoagulation, practice, and safety measures) was sent to all Dutch perfusionists involved in adult cardiovascular perfusion during 2006 and 2007. To guarantee complete anonymity, respondents were asked to return the survey to a notary who discarded personal information. The net response rate was 72% and covered 23,500 perfusions. Individual respondents performed 240 ± 103 perfusions during the 2-year study period and had 13.8 ± 8.7 years of practical experience. The incident rate was 1 per 15.6 perfusions and the adverse event rate was 1 per 1,236 perfusions. The three most reported incidents were: (1) persistent inability to raise the activated coagulation time above 400s during perfusion (184 incidents); (2) an allergic or anaphylactic reaction to drugs, fluids, or blood products (114 incidents); and (3) clotting formation in the extracorporeal circuit (74 incidents). Furthermore, pre-bypass safety measures showed no statistically significant association with the reported incidents. In comparison with data from the recent literature, the reported number of incidents is high. Nevertheless, the adverse outcome rate is well matched to other published surveys. The relatively high response rate conveys the impression that the Dutch perfusionist is vigilant and willing to report incidents. Hence, a web-based Dutch perfusion incident registration system is recommended.

  12. Esophageal blood flow in the cat. Normal distribution and effects of acid perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hollwarth, M.E.; Smith, M.; Kvietys, P.R.; Granger, D.N.

    1986-03-01

    The radioactive microsphere technique was used to estimate blood flow to different regions of the esophagus and to adjacent regions of the stomach before and after perfusion of the esophagus with hydrochloric acid (pH 1.5) for 5 min. Under resting conditions total blood flow, as well as blood flow to the mucosal-submucosal layer and the muscular layer, to both sphincters was significantly higher than to the esophageal body. Blood flow to the adjacent regions of the stomach was significantly higher than esophageal blood flow. Acid perfusion resulted in a large increase in total blood flow in both sphincters and the lower esophageal body. Gastric blood flow was not altered by acid perfusion. The esophageal hyperemia resulted primarily from an increase in blood flow to the muscular layer; mucosal-submucosal blood flow was increased only in the lower esophageal sphincter. The present study indicates that short periods (5 min) of gastroesophageal reflux may increase esophageal blood flow.

  13. Experimental peri-implant mucositis in man.

    PubMed

    Zitzmann, N U; Berglundh, T; Marinello, C P; Lindhe, J

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine reactions of gingiva and peri-implant mucosa (PiM) to de novo plaque accumulation in humans. Prior to the start of the study, which included 12 partially edentulous subjects, a 3-week plaque control program was performed. Ethical approval was granted by the local ethics committee. On day 0, 2 soft tissue biopsies were harvested, 1 from a tooth and 1 from an implant site in every subject. After 3 weeks of undisturbed plaque accumulation (day 21), 2 additional biopsies were obtained from the gingiva and PiM in each subject. The tissue samples, each 4x4 mm in size, were snap frozen and prepared for immunohistochemical analysis. The size of the infiltrate (ICT) in the day 0 biopsies, was about 0.03 mm2 in both the gingiva and PiM. At the end of the plaque accumulation period, the size of the lesion had significantly increased in both groups and occupied an area of 0.26 mm2 in the gingiva and 0.14 mm2 in PiM. In the biopsies presenting day 0, the proportions of the various cell populations examined were similar in the gingiva and in PiM. The tissue fractions of almost all types of cells increased during the 3 weeks, but the mean change for each cell type was greater in the gingiva than in PiM. The CD3/CD19 ratio decreased in the gingiva between day 0 and 21, but increased in PiM. The results of the present study indicated that plaque accumulation induced an inflammatory response characterized by increased proportions of T- and B-cells in the ICT of both the gingiva and the PiM. Although not statistically significant, the host response in the gingiva tended to be more pronounced than in the peri-implant mucosa.

  14. Hypothermia Improves Oral and Gastric Mucosal Microvascular Oxygenation during Hemorrhagic Shock in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Inge; Picker, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Hypothermia is known to improve tissue function in different organs during physiological and pathological conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hypothermia on oral and gastric mucosal microvascular oxygenation (μHbO2) and perfusion (μflow) under physiological and hemorrhagic conditions. Five dogs were repeatedly anesthetized. All animals underwent each experimental protocol (randomized cross-over design): hypothermia (34°C), hypothermia during hemorrhage, normothermia, and normothermia during hemorrhage. Microcirculatory and hemodynamic variables were recorded. Systemic (DO2) and oral mucosal (μDO2) oxygen delivery were calculated. Hypothermia increased oral μHbO2 with no effect on gastric μHbO2. Hemorrhage reduced oral and gastric μHbO2 during normothermia (−36 ± 4% and −27 ± 7%); however, this effect was attenuated during additional hypothermia (−15 ± 5% and −11 ± 5%). The improved μHbO2 might be based on an attenuated reduction in μflow during hemorrhage and additional hypothermia (−51 ± 21 aU) compared to hemorrhage and normothermia (−106 ± 19 aU). μDO2 was accordingly attenuated under hypothermia during hemorrhage whereas DO2 did not change. Thus, in this study hypothermia alone improves oral μHbO2 and attenuates the effects of hemorrhage on oral and gastric μHbO2. This effect seems to be mediated by an increased μDO2 on the basis of increased μflow. PMID:24327826

  15. Mucosal vaccines: the promise and the challenge.

    PubMed

    Neutra, Marian R; Kozlowski, Pamela A

    2006-02-01

    Most infectious agents enter the body at mucosal surfaces and therefore mucosal immune responses function as a first line of defence. Protective mucosal immune responses are most effectively induced by mucosal immunization through oral, nasal, rectal or vaginal routes, but the vast majority of vaccines in use today are administered by injection. As discussed in this Review, current research is providing new insights into the function of mucosal tissues and the interplay of innate and adaptive immune responses that results in immune protection at mucosal surfaces. These advances promise to accelerate the development and testing of new mucosal vaccines against many human diseases including HIV/AIDS.

  16. GPU-accelerated voxelwise hepatic perfusion quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Cao, Y.

    2012-09-01

    Voxelwise quantification of hepatic perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging greatly contributes to assessment of liver function in response to radiation therapy. However, the efficiency of the estimation of hepatic perfusion parameters voxel-by-voxel in the whole liver using a dual-input single-compartment model requires substantial improvement for routine clinical applications. In this paper, we utilize the parallel computation power of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate the computation, while maintaining the same accuracy as the conventional method. Using compute unified device architecture-GPU, the hepatic perfusion computations over multiple voxels are run across the GPU blocks concurrently but independently. At each voxel, nonlinear least-squares fitting the time series of the liver DCE data to the compartmental model is distributed to multiple threads in a block, and the computations of different time points are performed simultaneously and synchronically. An efficient fast Fourier transform in a block is also developed for the convolution computation in the model. The GPU computations of the voxel-by-voxel hepatic perfusion images are compared with ones by the CPU using the simulated DCE data and the experimental DCE MR images from patients. The computation speed is improved by 30 times using a NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU compared to a 2.67 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. To obtain liver perfusion maps with 626 400 voxels in a patient's liver, it takes 0.9 min with the GPU-accelerated voxelwise computation, compared to 110 min with the CPU, while both methods result in perfusion parameters differences less than 10-6. The method will be useful for generating liver perfusion images in clinical settings.

  17. GPU-accelerated voxelwise hepatic perfusion quantification.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Cao, Y

    2012-09-07

    Voxelwise quantification of hepatic perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging greatly contributes to assessment of liver function in response to radiation therapy. However, the efficiency of the estimation of hepatic perfusion parameters voxel-by-voxel in the whole liver using a dual-input single-compartment model requires substantial improvement for routine clinical applications. In this paper, we utilize the parallel computation power of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate the computation, while maintaining the same accuracy as the conventional method. Using compute unified device architecture-GPU, the hepatic perfusion computations over multiple voxels are run across the GPU blocks concurrently but independently. At each voxel, nonlinear least-squares fitting the time series of the liver DCE data to the compartmental model is distributed to multiple threads in a block, and the computations of different time points are performed simultaneously and synchronically. An efficient fast Fourier transform in a block is also developed for the convolution computation in the model. The GPU computations of the voxel-by-voxel hepatic perfusion images are compared with ones by the CPU using the simulated DCE data and the experimental DCE MR images from patients. The computation speed is improved by 30 times using a NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU compared to a 2.67 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. To obtain liver perfusion maps with 626 400 voxels in a patient's liver, it takes 0.9 min with the GPU-accelerated voxelwise computation, compared to 110 min with the CPU, while both methods result in perfusion parameters differences less than 10(-6). The method will be useful for generating liver perfusion images in clinical settings.

  18. GPU-Accelerated Voxelwise Hepatic Perfusion Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H; Cao, Y

    2012-01-01

    Voxelwise quantification of hepatic perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging greatly contributes to assessment of liver function in response to radiation therapy. However, the efficiency of the estimation of hepatic perfusion parameters voxel-by-voxel in the whole liver using a dual-input single-compartment model requires substantial improvement for routine clinical applications. In this paper, we utilize the parallel computation power of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate the computation, while maintaining the same accuracy as the conventional method. Using CUDA-GPU, the hepatic perfusion computations over multiple voxels are run across the GPU blocks concurrently but independently. At each voxel, non-linear least squares fitting the time series of the liver DCE data to the compartmental model is distributed to multiple threads in a block, and the computations of different time points are performed simultaneously and synchronically. An efficient fast Fourier transform in a block is also developed for the convolution computation in the model. The GPU computations of the voxel-by-voxel hepatic perfusion images are compared with ones by the CPU using the simulated DCE data and the experimental DCE MR images from patients. The computation speed is improved by 30 times using a NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU compared to a 2.67 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. To obtain liver perfusion maps with 626400 voxels in a patient’s liver, it takes 0.9 min with the GPU-accelerated voxelwise computation, compared to 110 min with the CPU, while both methods result in perfusion parameters differences less than 10−6. The method will be useful for generating liver perfusion images in clinical settings. PMID:22892645

  19. Gastroduodenal Mucosal Defense Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hyder; Kaji, Izumi; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review To highlight recent developments in the field of gastroduodenal mucosal defense with emphasis on lumen-gut interactions. Recent Findings There has been a growing interest in the physiological functions of luminal chemosensors present from tongue to colon that detect organic molecules in the luminal content associated with nutrient ingestion, usually associated with specialized cells, in particular the enteroendocrine cells. These receptors transduce the release of peptide hormones, in particular proglucagon-derived products such as the glucagon-like-peptides (GLPs), which have profound effects on gut function and on metabolism. Luminal chemosensors transduce GLP release in response to changes in the cellular environment, as part of the mechanism of nutrient chemosensing. GLP-2 has important trophic effects on the intestinal mucosa, including increasing the proliferation rate of stem cells and reducing transmucosal permeability to ions and small molecules, in addition to increasing the rate of duodenal bicarbonate secretion. GLP-1, although traditionally considered an incretin that enhances the effect of insulin on peripheral tissues, also has trophic effects on the intestinal epithelium. Summary A better understanding of the mechanisms that mediate GLP release can further illuminate the importance of nutrient chemosensing as an important component of the mechanism that mediates the trophic effects of luminal nutrients. GLP-1 and -2 are already in clinical use for the treatment of diabetes and intestinal failure. Improved understanding of the control of their release and their end-organ effects will identify new clinical indications and interventions that enhance their release. PMID:26376476

  20. Parenteral Vaccination Can Be an Effective Means of Inducing Protective Mucosal Responses

    PubMed Central

    Freytag, Lucy C.

    2016-01-01

    The current paradigm in vaccine development is that nonreplicating vaccines delivered parenterally fail to induce immune responses in mucosal tissues. However, both clinical and experimental data have challenged this concept, and numerous studies have shown that induction of mucosal immune responses after parenteral vaccination is not a rare occurrence and might, in fact, significantly contribute to the protection against mucosal infections afforded by parenteral vaccines. While the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well understood, the realization that parenteral vaccination can be an effective means of inducing protective mucosal responses is paradigm-shifting and has potential to transform the way vaccines are designed and delivered. PMID:27122485

  1. Quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Tsui, B M; Frey, E C; LaCroix, K J; Lalush, D S; McCartney, W H; King, M A; Gullberg, G T

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the clinical application of attenuation compensation to myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with the promise that accurate quantitative images can be obtained to improve clinical diagnoses. The different attenuation compensation methods that are available create confusion and some misconceptions. Also, attenuation-compensated images reveal other image-degrading effects including collimator-detector blurring and scatter that are not apparent in uncompensated images. This article presents basic concepts of the major factors that degrade the quality and quantitative accuracy of myocardial perfusion SPECT images, and includes a discussion of the various image reconstruction and compensation methods and misconceptions and pitfalls in implementation. The differences between the various compensation methods and their performance are demonstrated. Particular emphasis is directed to an approach that promises to provide quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT images by accurately compensating for the 3-dimensional (3-D) attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter effects. With advances in the computer hardware and optimized implementation techniques, quantitatively accurate and high-quality myocardial perfusion SPECT images can be obtained in clinically acceptable processing time. Examples from simulation, phantom, and patient studies are used to demonstrate the various aspects of the investigation. We conclude that quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT, which holds great promise to improve clinical diagnosis, is an achievable goal in the near future.

  2. Mucosal iron in the control of iron absorption in a rat intestinal transplant model

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, P.C.; Zhong, R.; Haist, J.; Flanagan, P.R.; Grant, D.R. )

    1991-02-01

    Isogeneic intestinal transplantation of iron-loaded and iron-deficient intestine into iron-deficient rats was performed in 20 Lewis rats to isolate the effect of intestinal mucosal iron on iron absorption. Rats were iron loaded with three weekly IM injections of 50 mg of iron dextran and were rendered iron deficient with an iron-deficient diet for 3 weeks. Iron status was assessed by hepatic and gut mucosal iron determination. Uptake and transfer of 59Fe-ascorbate was measured in an isolated perfused segment of transplanted intestine 48 hours after transplantation. The mean rate of uptake of 59Fe from an iron-loaded intestine (mean mucosal iron concentration, 7.97 +/- 2.02 mumol/g) was 431 +/- 27 nmol/30 min, and from an iron-deficient intestine (mean mucosal iron concentration, 1.35 +/- .84 mumol/g), 743 +/- 222 nmol/30 min (P less than 0.001). The mean transfer of 59Fe from the mucosal cell to the body through an iron-loaded intestine was 63 +/- 22 nmol/30 min, and through an iron-deficient intestine was 86 +/- 32 nmol/30 min (P less than 0.05). These results suggest that the gut mucosal iron concentration regulates the uptake and transfer of iron in the intestine.

  3. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Reeb, Jeremie; Cypel, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    Lung transplantation is an established life-saving therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Unfortunately, greater success in lung transplantation is hindered by a shortage of lung donors and the relatively poor early-, mid-, and long-term outcomes associated with severe primary graft dysfunction. Ex vivo lung perfusion has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for a more accurate lung assessment and improvement in lung quality. This review outlines the: (i) rationale behind the method; (ii) techniques and protocols; (iii) Toronto ex vivo lung perfusion method; (iv) devices available; and (v) clinical experience worldwide. We also highlight the potential of ex vivo lung perfusion in leading a new era of lung preservation.

  4. Mucosal integrity and sensitivity to acid in the proximal esophagus in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Weijenborg, Pim W; van den Bergh Weerman, Marius A; van den Wijngaard, René M J G J; Verheij, J; Smout, André J P M; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-07-01

    Acid reflux episodes that extend to the proximal esophagus are more likely to be perceived. This suggests that the proximal esophagus is more sensitive to acid than the distal esophagus, which could be caused by impaired mucosal integrity in the proximal esophagus. Our aim was to explore sensitivity to acid and mucosal integrity in different segments of the esophagus. We used a prospective observational study, including 12 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). After stopping acid secretion-inhibiting medication, two procedures were performed: an acid perfusion test and an upper endoscopy with electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and esophageal biopsies. Proximal and distal sensitivity to acid and tissue impedance were measured in vivo, and mucosal permeability and epithelial intercellular spaces at different esophageal levels were measured in vitro. Mean lag time to heartburn perception was much shorter after proximal acid perfusion (0.8 min) than after distal acid perfusion (3.9 min) (P = 0.02). Median in vivo tissue impedance was significantly lower in the distal esophagus (4,563 Ω·m) compared with the proximal esophagus (8,170 Ω·m) (P = 0.002). Transepithelial permeability, as measured by the median fluorescein flux was significantly higher in the distal (2,051 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) than in the proximal segment (368 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) (P = 0.033). Intercellular space ratio and maximum heartburn intensity were not significantly different between the proximal and distal esophagus. In GERD patients off acid secretion-inhibiting medication, acid exposure in the proximal segment of the esophagus provokes symptoms earlier than acid exposure in the distal esophagus, whereas mucosal integrity is impaired more in the distal esophagus. These findings indicate that the enhanced sensitivity to proximal reflux episodes is not explained by increased mucosal permeability. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. [Portable peristaltic perfusion pumps].

    PubMed

    Magallón Pedrera, I; Soto Torres, I

    1999-11-01

    Portable peristaltic perfusion pumps allow one to administer pharmaceuticals in hospitals as well as in primary health care centers and furthermore these pumps present multiple advantages for patients and their families since they make it possible to carry out treatment in a patient's home while at the same time lowering the costs involved. The authors analyze the most out standing aspects of portable peristaltic perfusion pumps along with their characteristics, installation, programming, and how to turn them on; in addition, the authors list the maintenance care which these pumps require.

  6. Role of endogenous gastric mucosal prostaglandins in the formation of acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by aspirin, ethanol, HCl and CH3COOH.

    PubMed

    Amioka, I; Arima, T; Nagashima, H

    1987-06-01

    The role of endogenous mucosal prostaglandins (PGs) in the production of acute gastric mucosal lesions (AGML) was examined in rats. Aspirin, ethanol or 0.6 N-HCl was given intragastrically and 20% acetic acid was injected into the gastric wall. Endogenous gastric mucosal PG (A + B), PGE and PGF were determined by radioimmunoassay. Their gastric contents were markedly reduced by aspirin administration (p less than 0.001). The level of gastric mucosal PGs still remained low (p less than 0.001) after the aspirin-induced AGML began to heal. Furthermore, rats with AGML induced by ethanol, HCl or acetic acid, showed no decrease in endogenous gastric mucosal PGs compared with the controls. These findings indicated that endogenous PGs are not necessary for either the induction or healing of experimental AGML.

  7. Biology of HIV Mucosal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review HIV-1 mucosal transmission plays a critical role in HIV-1 infection and AIDS pathogenesis. This review summarizes the latest advances in biological studies of HIV-1 mucosal transmission, highlighting the implications of these studies in the development of microbicides to prevent HIV-1 transmission. Recent findings New studies of initial HIV-1 infection using improved culture models updated the current view of mucosal transmission. Mechanistic studies enhanced our understanding of cell-cell transmission of HIV-1 mediated by the major target cells, including dendritic cells, CD4+ T cells, and macrophages. Increasing evidence indicated the significance of host factors and immune responses in HIV-1 mucosal infection and transmission. Summary Recent progress in HIV-1 mucosal infection and transmission enriches our knowledge of virus-host interactions and viral pathogenesis. Functional studies of HIV-1 interactions with host cells can provide new insights into the design of more effective approaches to combat HIV-1 infection and AIDS. PMID:18802490

  8. Melatonin inhibits alcohol-induced increases in duodenal mucosal permeability in rats in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sommansson, Anna; Saudi, Wan Salman Wan; Nylander, Olof; Sjöblom, Markus

    2013-07-01

    Increased intestinal permeability is often associated with epithelial inflammation, leaky gut, or other pathological conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. We recently found that melatonin decreases basal duodenal mucosal permeability, suggesting a mucosal protective mode of action of this agent. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the effects of melatonin on ethanol-, wine-, and HCl-induced changes of duodenal mucosal paracellular permeability and motility. Rats were anesthetized with thiobarbiturate and a ~30-mm segment of the proximal duodenum was perfused in situ. Effects on duodenal mucosal paracellular permeability, assessed by measuring the blood-to-lumen clearance of ⁵¹Cr-EDTA, motility, and morphology, were investigated. Perfusing the duodenal segment with ethanol (10 or 15% alcohol by volume), red wine, or HCl (25-100 mM) induced concentration-dependent increases in paracellular permeability. Luminal ethanol and wine increased, whereas HCl transiently decreased duodenal motility. Administration of melatonin significantly reduced ethanol- and wine-induced increases in permeability by a mechanism abolished by the nicotinic receptor antagonists hexamethonium (iv) or mecamylamine (luminally). Signs of mucosal injury (edema and beginning of desquamation of the epithelium) in response to ethanol exposure were seen only in a few villi, an effect that was histologically not changed by melatonin. Melatonin did not affect HCl-induced increases in mucosal permeability or decreases in motility. Our results show that melatonin reduces ethanol- and wine-induced increases in duodenal paracellular permeability partly via an enteric inhibitory nicotinic-receptor dependent neural pathway. In addition, melatonin inhibits ethanol-induced increases in duodenal motor activity. These results suggest that melatonin may serve important gastrointestinal barrier functions.

  9. Distribution of perfusion.

    PubMed

    Glenny, Robb; Robertson, H Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Local driving pressures and resistances within the pulmonary vascular tree determine the distribution of perfusion in the lung. Unlike other organs, these local determinants are significantly influenced by regional hydrostatic and alveolar pressures. Those effects on blood flow distribution are further magnified by the large vertical height of the human lung and the relatively low intravascular pressures in the pulmonary circulation. While the distribution of perfusion is largely due to passive determinants such as vascular geometry and hydrostatic pressures, active mechanisms such as vasoconstriction induced by local hypoxia can also redistribute blood flow. This chapter reviews the determinants of regional lung perfusion with a focus on vascular tree geometry, vertical gradients induced by gravity, the interactions between vascular and surrounding alveolar pressures, and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. While each of these determinants of perfusion distribution can be examined in isolation, the distribution of blood flow is dynamically determined and each component interacts with the others so that a change in one region of the lung influences the distribution of blood flow in other lung regions. © 2011 American Physiological Society.

  10. Nonmucosal Alphavirus Vaccination Stimulates a Mucosal Inductive Environment in the Peripheral Draining Lymph Node1

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Nicholson, Michael G.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Zamora, Melodie; West, Ande; Iwasaki, Akiko; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    The strongest mucosal immune responses are induced following mucosal Ag delivery and processing in the mucosal lymphoid tissues, and much is known regarding the immunological parameters which regulate immune induction via this pathway. Recently, experimental systems have been identified in which mucosal immune responses are induced following nonmucosal Ag delivery. One such system, footpad delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP), led to the local production of IgA Abs directed against both expressed and codelivered Ags at multiple mucosal surfaces in mice. In contrast to the mucosal delivery pathway, little is known regarding the lymphoid structures and immunological components that are responsible for mucosal immune induction following nonmucosal delivery. In this study, we have used footpad delivery of VRP to probe the constituents of this alternative pathway for mucosal immune induction. Following nonmucosal VRP delivery, J chain-containing, polymeric IgA Abs were detected in the peripheral draining lymph node (DLN), at a time before IgA detection at mucosal surfaces. Further analysis of the VRP DLN revealed up-regulated α4β7 integrin expression on DLN B cells, expression of mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 on the DLN high endothelia venules, and production of IL-6 and CC chemokines, all characteristics of mucosal lymphoid tissues. Taken together, these results implicate the peripheral DLN as an integral component of an alternative pathway for mucosal immune induction. A further understanding of the critical immunological and viral components of this pathway may significantly improve both our knowledge of viral-induced immunity and the efficacy of viral-based vaccines. PMID:18566424

  11. The mucosal immune system: from fundamental concepts to vaccine development.

    PubMed

    McGhee, J R; Mestecky, J; Dertzbaugh, M T; Eldridge, J H; Hirasawa, M; Kiyono, H

    1992-01-01

    Recent studies in experimental animals and humans have shown that the mucosal immune system, which is characterized by secretory IgA (S-IgA) antibodies as the major humoral defence factor, contains specialized lymphoid tissues where antigens are encountered from the environment, are taken up and induce B- and T-cell responses. This event is followed by an exodus of specific lymphocytes, which home to various effector sites such as the lamina propria regions and glands. These responses are regulated by T cells and cytokines and lead to plasma cell differentiation and subsequent production of S-IgA antibodies in external secretions. This knowledge has led to practical approaches for vaccine construction and delivery into mucosal inductive sites in an effort to elicit host protection at mucosal surfaces where the infection actually occurs.

  12. Sex differences and effects of oestrogen in rat gastric mucosal defence.

    PubMed

    Shore, Richard; Björne, Håkan; Omoto, Yoko; Siemiatkowska, Anna; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Lindblad, Mats; Holm, Lena

    2017-01-21

    To evaluate sex differences and the effects of oestrogen administration in rat gastric mucosal defence. Sex differences in gastric mucus thickness and accumulation rate, absolute gastric mucosal blood flow using microspheres, the integrity of the gastric mucosal epithelium in response to a chemical irritant and the effects of oestrogen administration on relative gastric mucosal blood flow in an acute setting was assessed in an in vivo rat experimental model. Subsequently, sex differences in the distribution of oestrogen receptors and calcitonin gene related peptide in the gastric mucosa of animals exposed to oestrogen in the above experiments was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. The absolute blood flow in the GI-tract was generally higher in males, but only significantly different in the corpus part of the stomach (1.12 ± 0.12 mL/min•g in males and 0.51 ± 0.03 mL/min•g in females) (P = 0.002). After removal of the loosely adherent mucus layer the thickness of the firmly adherent mucus layer in males and females was 79 ± 1 µm and 80 ± 3 µm respectively. After 60 min the mucus thickness increased to 113 ± 3 µm in males and 121 ± 3 µm in females with no statistically significant difference seen between the sexes. Following oestrogen administration (0.1 followed by 1 µg/kg•min), mean blood flow in the gastric mucosa decreased by 31% [68 ± 13 perfusion units (PFU)] in males which was significantly different compared to baseline (P = 0.02). In females however, mean blood flow remained largely unchanged with a 4% (5 ± 33 PFU) reduction. The permeability of the gastric mucosa increased to a higher level in females than in males (P = 0.01) after taurocholate challenge. However, the calculated mean clearance increase did not significantly differ between the sexes [0.1 ± 0.04 to 1.1 ± 0.1 mL/min•100 g in males and 0.4 ± 0.3 to 2.1 ± 0.3 mL/min•100 g in females (P = 0.065)]. There were no significant differences between 17β-Estradiol treated

  13. Sex differences and effects of oestrogen in rat gastric mucosal defence

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Richard; Björne, Håkan; Omoto, Yoko; Siemiatkowska, Anna; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Lindblad, Mats; Holm, Lena

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate sex differences and the effects of oestrogen administration in rat gastric mucosal defence. METHODS Sex differences in gastric mucus thickness and accumulation rate, absolute gastric mucosal blood flow using microspheres, the integrity of the gastric mucosal epithelium in response to a chemical irritant and the effects of oestrogen administration on relative gastric mucosal blood flow in an acute setting was assessed in an in vivo rat experimental model. Subsequently, sex differences in the distribution of oestrogen receptors and calcitonin gene related peptide in the gastric mucosa of animals exposed to oestrogen in the above experiments was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS The absolute blood flow in the GI-tract was generally higher in males, but only significantly different in the corpus part of the stomach (1.12 ± 0.12 mL/min•g in males and 0.51 ± 0.03 mL/min•g in females) (P = 0.002). After removal of the loosely adherent mucus layer the thickness of the firmly adherent mucus layer in males and females was 79 ± 1 µm and 80 ± 3 µm respectively. After 60 min the mucus thickness increased to 113 ± 3 µm in males and 121 ± 3 µm in females with no statistically significant difference seen between the sexes. Following oestrogen administration (0.1 followed by 1 µg/kg•min), mean blood flow in the gastric mucosa decreased by 31% [68 ± 13 perfusion units (PFU)] in males which was significantly different compared to baseline (P = 0.02). In females however, mean blood flow remained largely unchanged with a 4% (5 ± 33 PFU) reduction. The permeability of the gastric mucosa increased to a higher level in females than in males (P = 0.01) after taurocholate challenge. However, the calculated mean clearance increase did not significantly differ between the sexes [0.1 ± 0.04 to 1.1 ± 0.1 mL/min•100 g in males and 0.4 ± 0.3 to 2.1 ± 0.3 mL/min•100 g in females (P = 0.065)]. There were no significant differences between 17

  14. Immunoglobulin Responses at the Mucosal Interface

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kang; Chorny, Alejo

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are colonized by large communities of commensal bacteria and represent the primary site of entry for pathogenic agents. To prevent microbial intrusion, mucosal B cells release large amounts of immunoglobulin (Ig) molecules through multiple follicular and extrafollicular pathways. IgA is the most abundant antibody isotype in mucosal secretions and owes its success in frontline immunity to its ability to undergo transcytosis across epithelial cells. In addition to translocating IgA onto the mucosal surface, epithelial cells educate the mucosal immune system as to the composition of the local microbiota and instruct B cells to initiate IgA responses that generate immune protection while preserving immune homeostasis. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the cellular interactions and signaling pathways governing IgA production at mucosal surfaces and discuss new findings on the regulation and function of mucosal IgD, the most enigmatic isotype of our mucosal antibody repertoire. PMID:21219173

  15. Multiscale modeling of mucosal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling techniques are playing increasingly important roles in advancing a systems-level mechanistic understanding of biological processes. Computer simulations guide and underpin experimental and clinical efforts. This study presents ENteric Immune Simulator (ENISI), a multiscale modeling tool for modeling the mucosal immune responses. ENISI's modeling environment can simulate in silico experiments from molecular signaling pathways to tissue level events such as tissue lesion formation. ENISI's architecture integrates multiple modeling technologies including ABM (agent-based modeling), ODE (ordinary differential equations), SDE (stochastic modeling equations), and PDE (partial differential equations). This paper focuses on the implementation and developmental challenges of ENISI. A multiscale model of mucosal immune responses during colonic inflammation, including CD4+ T cell differentiation and tissue level cell-cell interactions was developed to illustrate the capabilities, power and scope of ENISI MSM. Background Computational techniques are becoming increasingly powerful and modeling tools for biological systems are of greater needs. Biological systems are inherently multiscale, from molecules to tissues and from nano-seconds to a lifespan of several years or decades. ENISI MSM integrates multiple modeling technologies to understand immunological processes from signaling pathways within cells to lesion formation at the tissue level. This paper examines and summarizes the technical details of ENISI, from its initial version to its latest cutting-edge implementation. Implementation Object-oriented programming approach is adopted to develop a suite of tools based on ENISI. Multiple modeling technologies are integrated to visualize tissues, cells as well as proteins; furthermore, performance matching between the scales is addressed. Conclusion We used ENISI MSM for developing predictive multiscale models of the mucosal immune system during gut

  16. Multiscale modeling of mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yongguo; Abedi, Vida; Carbo, Adria; Zhang, Xiaoying; Lu, Pinyi; Philipson, Casandra; Hontecillas, Raquel; Hoops, Stefan; Liles, Nathan; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Computational techniques are becoming increasingly powerful and modeling tools for biological systems are of greater needs. Biological systems are inherently multiscale, from molecules to tissues and from nano-seconds to a lifespan of several years or decades. ENISI MSM integrates multiple modeling technologies to understand immunological processes from signaling pathways within cells to lesion formation at the tissue level. This paper examines and summarizes the technical details of ENISI, from its initial version to its latest cutting-edge implementation. Object-oriented programming approach is adopted to develop a suite of tools based on ENISI. Multiple modeling technologies are integrated to visualize tissues, cells as well as proteins; furthermore, performance matching between the scales is addressed. We used ENISI MSM for developing predictive multiscale models of the mucosal immune system during gut inflammation. Our modeling predictions dissect the mechanisms by which effector CD4+ T cell responses contribute to tissue damage in the gut mucosa following immune dysregulation.Computational modeling techniques are playing increasingly important roles in advancing a systems-level mechanistic understanding of biological processes. Computer simulations guide and underpin experimental and clinical efforts. This study presents ENteric Immune Simulator (ENISI), a multiscale modeling tool for modeling the mucosal immune responses. ENISI's modeling environment can simulate in silico experiments from molecular signaling pathways to tissue level events such as tissue lesion formation. ENISI's architecture integrates multiple modeling technologies including ABM (agent-based modeling), ODE (ordinary differential equations), SDE (stochastic modeling equations), and PDE (partial differential equations). This paper focuses on the implementation and developmental challenges of ENISI. A multiscale model of mucosal immune responses during colonic inflammation, including CD4+ T

  17. Contactless mapping of rhythmical phenomena in tissue perfusion using PPGI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huelsbusch, Markus; Blazek, Vladimir

    2002-04-01

    This paper presents the experimental setup and preliminary results of a near infrared CCD camera based Photoplethysmography Imaging (PPGI) system, which has been shown to be suitable for contactless and spatially resolved assessment of rhythmical blood volume changes in the skin. To visualize the complex rhythmical patterns in the dermal perfusion the Wavelet Transform is utilized. It is able to jointly assess time and frequency behavior of signals and thus allows to analyze instationary oscillations and variabilities in the different human rhythmics. The presented system is expected to provide new insights into the functional sequences of physiological tissue perfusion as well as of the perfusion status in ulcer formation and wound healing.

  18. Immunology of Gut Mucosal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pasetti, Marcela F.; Simon, Jakub K.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Understanding the mechanisms underlying the induction of immunity in the gastrointestinal mucosa following oral immunization and the cross-talk between mucosal and systemic immunity should expedite the development of vaccines to diminish the global burden caused by enteric pathogens. Identifying an immunological correlate of protection in the course of field trials of efficacy, animal models (when available), or human challenge studies is also invaluable. In industrialized country populations, live attenuated vaccines (e.g. polio, typhoid, and rotavirus) mimic natural infection and generate robust protective immune responses. In contrast, a major challenge is to understand and overcome the barriers responsible for the diminished immunogenicity and efficacy of the same enteric vaccines in underprivileged populations in developing countries. Success in developing vaccines against some enteric pathogens has heretofore been elusive (e.g. Shigella). Different types of oral vaccines can selectively or inclusively elicit mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and a variety of cell-mediated immune responses. Areas of research that require acceleration include interaction between the gut innate immune system and the stimulation of adaptive immunity, development of safe yet effective mucosal adjuvants, better understanding of homing to the mucosa of immunologically relevant cells, and elicitation of mucosal immunologic memory. This review dissects the immune responses elicited in humans by enteric vaccines. PMID:21198669

  19. Perfusion abnormalities in hemimegalencephaly.

    PubMed

    Wintermark, P; Roulet-Perez, E; Maeder-Ingvar, M; Moessinger, A C; Gudinchet, F; Meuli, R

    2009-04-01

    Cerebrovascular changes are rarely discussed in patients with hemimegalencephaly. These alterations have previously been associated with epileptical activity. We report the case of a 36-week gestation neonate presenting with total right hemimegalencephaly, as demonstrated by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed in the first days of life. Perfusion-weighted imaging displayed a clear hypervascularization of the right hemisphere. Diffusion-tensor imaging showed an arrangement of white matter fibers concentrically around the ventricle on the right hemisphere. AngioMRI showed an obvious asymmetry in the size of the middle cerebral arteries, with the right middle cerebral artery being prominent. The baby was free of clinical seizures during his first week of life. An electroencephalogram at that time displayed an asymmetric background activity, but no electrical seizures. Perfusion anomalies in hemimegalencephaly may not necessarily be related to epileptical activity, but may be related to vessel alterations. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  20. Primary mucosal melanomas: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Marija; Vlajkovic, Slobodan; Jovanovic, Predrag; Stefanovic, Vladisav

    2012-01-01

    Primary mucosal melanomas arise from melanocytes located in mucosal membranes lining respiratory, gastrointestinal and urogenital tract. Although a majority of mucosal melanomas originate from the mucosa of the nasal cavity and accessory sinuses, oral cavity, anorectum, vulva and vagina, they can arise in almost any part of mucosal membranes. Most of mucosal melanomas occur in occult sites, which together with the lack of early and specific signs contribute to late diagnosis, and poor prognosis. Because of their rareness the knowledge about their pathogenesis and risk factors is insufficient, and also there are not well established protocols for staging and treatment of mucosal melanomas. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, with trends toward more conservative treatment since radical surgery did not show an advantage for survival. Radiotherapy can provide better local control in some locations, but did not show improvement in survival. There is no effective systemic therapy for these aggressive tumors. Compared with cutaneous and ocular melanoma, mucosal melanomas have lowest percent of five-year survival. Recently revealed molecular changes underlying mucosal melanomas offer new hope for development of more effective systemic therapy for mucosal melanomas. Herein we presented a comprehensive review of various locations of primary melanoma along mucosal membranes, their epidemiological and clinical features, and treatment options. We also gave a short comparison of some characteristics of cutaneous and mucosal melanomas. PMID:23071856

  1. The Mucosal Immune System of Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish possess an adaptive immune system associated with each of their mucosal body surfaces. Evidence obtained from mucosal vaccination and mucosal infection studies reveal that adaptive immune responses take place at the different mucosal surfaces of teleost. The main mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) of teleosts are the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), the gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT) and the recently discovered nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Teleost MALT includes diffuse B cells and T cells with specific phenotypes different from their systemic counterparts that have co-evolved to defend the microbe-rich mucosal environment. Both B and T cells respond to mucosal infection or vaccination. Specific antibody responses can be measured in the gills, gut and skin mucosal secretions of teleost fish following mucosal infection or vaccination. Rainbow trout studies have shown that IgT antibodies and IgT+ B cells are the predominant B cell subset in all MALT and respond in a compartmentalized manner to mucosal infection. Our current knowledge on adaptive immunity in teleosts is limited compared to the mammalian literature. New research tools and in vivo models are currently being developed in order to help reveal the great intricacy of teleost mucosal adaptive immunity and help improve mucosal vaccination protocols for use in aquaculture. PMID:26274978

  2. Perfusion Based Cell Culture Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiskanen, A.; Emnéus, J.; Dufva, M.

    Performing cell culture in miniaturized perfusion chambers gives possibilities to experiment with cells under near in vivo like conditions. In contrast to traditional batch cultures, miniaturized perfusion systems provide precise control of medium composition, long term unattended cultures and tissue like structuring of the cultures. However, as this chapter illustrates, many issues remain to be identified regarding perfusion cell culture such as design, material choice and how to use these systems before they will be widespread amongst biomedical researchers.

  3. Nifedipine improves blood flow and oxygen supply, but not steady-state oxygenation of tumours in perfusion pressure-controlled isolated limb perfusion.

    PubMed

    Thews, O; Hummel, M; Kelleher, D K; Lecher, B; Vaupel, P

    2002-12-02

    Isolated limb perfusion allows the direct application of therapeutic agents to a tumour-bearing extremity. The present study investigated whether the dihydropyridine-type Ca(2+)-channel blocker nifedipine could improve blood flow and oxygenation status of experimental tumours during isolated limb perfusion. Perfusion was performed by cannulation of the femoral artery and vein in rats bearing DS-sarcoma on the hind foot dorsum. Perfusion rate was adjusted to maintain a perfusion pressure of 100-140 mmHg throughout the experiment. Following equilibration, nifedipine was continuously infused for 30 min (8.3 microg min(-1) kg(-1) BW). During constant-pressure isolated limb perfusion, nifedipine can significantly increase perfusion rate (+100%) and RBC flux (+60%) through experimental leg tumours. "Steal phenomena" in favour of the surrounding normal tissue and oedema formation were not observed. Despite the increased oxygen availability (+63%) seen upon application of this calcium channel blocker, nifedipine does not result in a substantial reduction of tumour hypoxia, most probably due to an increase in O(2) uptake with rising O(2) supply to the tumour-bearing hind limb. Nifedipine application during isolated limb perfusion can enhance tumour microcirculation and may therefore promote the delivery (pharmacokinetics) of anti-cancer drugs to the tumour and by this improve the efficacy of pressure-controlled isolated limb perfusion.

  4. Warm vs. cold perfusion techniques to rescue rodent liver grafts.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Andrea; Kron, Philipp; Graf, Rolf; Dutkowski, Philipp; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2014-12-01

    A variety of liver perfusion techniques have been proposed to protect liver grafts prior to implantation. We compared hypothermic and normothermic oxygenated perfusion techniques in a rat liver transplant model, using higher risk grafts obtained after cardiac arrest (DCD). Rat livers were subjected to 30 or 60 min in situ warm ischemia, without application of heparin. Livers were excised and stored for 4 h at 4°C, mimicking DCD organ procurement, followed by conventional organ transport. In experimental groups, DCD liver grafts received a 4 h normothermic oxygenated perfusion through the portal vein and the hepatic artery instead of cold storage. The perfusate consisted of either full blood or leukocyte-depleted blood (normothermic groups). Other livers underwent hypothermic oxygenated perfusion (HOPE) for 1 h after warm ischemia and 4 h cold storage (HOPE group). Liver injury was assessed during machine perfusion and after isolated liver reperfusion, and by orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). DCD livers, subjected to normothermic perfusion, disclosed reduced injury and improved survival compared to cold storage after limited warm ischemia of 30 min (70%; 7/10), but failed to protect from lethal injury in grafts exposed to 60 min warm ischemia (0%; 0/10). This finding was consistent with Kupffer and endothelial cell activation in cold stored and normothermic perfused livers. In contrast, HOPE protected from hepatocyte and non-parenchymal cell injury and led to 90% (9/10) and 63% (5/8) animal survival after 30 and 60 min of donor warm ischemia, respectively. This is the first evidence that HOPE is superior to normothermic oxygenated perfusion in a clinically relevant model through modulation of the innate immunity and endothelial cell activation. Copyright © 2014 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mucosal vaccination: lung versus nose.

    PubMed

    Vujanic, Ana; Sutton, Philip; Snibson, Kenneth J; Yen, Hung-Hsun; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre Y

    2012-07-15

    The induction of potent mucosal immune responses able to prevent the establishment of infection at the onset of mucosal pathogen colonisation represents a desirable but challenging goal for vaccine development. Here we compare nasal vaccine delivery with intra-pulmonary vaccination using a sheep lymphatic cannulation model. Our results demonstrate that nasal delivery of a non-infective ISCOMATRIX(®) influenza vaccine does not induce primary immune responses in the lymph draining the nasal lymph nodes, suggesting that local immune responses in the lymph nodes draining the nasal cavity are relatively weak. However, this mode of delivery can boost existing immunity in the nasal lymph. Using the same adjuvant we were able to induce very potent immune responses in both blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), following intra-pulmonary delivery of ISCOMATRIX(®) influenza vaccine, even when very small doses of antigen were employed. Lung delivery could also induce comparable immune responses against other recombinant antigens mixed with ISCOMATRIX(®) adjuvant and could therefore become a method of choice for the induction of immunity to mucosal pathogens infecting the lower respiratory tract. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Vestibuloplasty: allograft versus mucosal graft.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, H M; Parhiz, A; Ghafari, S

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the application of alloderm and mucosal graft for vestibuloplasty. This randomized controlled trial with split mouth design was carried out on 20 edentulous patients. Patients underwent vestibuloplasty surgery with the Clark technique. Half of the prepared bed in each patient was covered with alloderm and the other half with mucosal graft. Vestibule depth (width of fixed tissue) and relapse in the two sides immediately after surgery, and 1, 3 and 6 months after surgery were measured and compared. Statistical analysis was carried out using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Student's paired t and Friedman tests. The width of the fixed tissue in the alloderm graft at 1, 3 and 6 month intervals was significantly lower than that in the autograft (P<0.05). The difference in relapse between the two grafts was not statistically significant at any time. The results of the study suggest that alloderm is as effective as mucosal grafts in vestibuloplasty. Copyright © 2011 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  7. Perfusion Bioreactor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1990-01-01

    Perfusion bioreactor module, self-contained, closed-loop cell-culture system that operates in microgravity or on Earth. Equipment supports growth or long-term maintenance of cultures of human or other fragile cells for experiments in basic cell biology or process technology. Designed to support proliferation (initially at exponential rates of growth) of cells in complex growth medium and to maintain confluent cells in defined medium under conditions optimized to permit or encourage selected functions of cells, including secretion of products of cells into medium.

  8. Experimental study on the fine structure of chicken liver parenchyme with special references to extrasinusoidal macrophages and sinusoidal blood cells. Part 2. Sinusoidal blood cells in normal and India ink perfused livers.

    PubMed

    Ohata, M; Ito, T

    1986-06-01

    Leucocytes and thrombocytes in the chicken liver sinusoids were observed under normal conditions and after intravenous India ink perfusion. The monocytes exhibited conspicuous phagocytic activity. At 30 min or earlier and 4 hr after the perfusion, they ingested considerable amounts of the carbon particles, which were deposited in small vacuoles and/or lysosomes. In this study we revealed two transitional forms of the monocyte changing into the Kupffer cell. In one transitional form, which already at 15 min after the perfusion stored considerable amounts of the particles, the ectoplasmic layer was partly differentiated and projected many pseudopodia into the sinusoid. At 48 hr after the perfusion, the other transitional form was attached by its wide basal surface to the endothelial linig and projected well-developed pseudopodia into the sinusoid like the Kupffer cell without, however, storing the carbon particles. These findings are thought to suggest the transformation of the monocytes into the Kupffer cells. Thus we came to the assumption that the Kupffer cells might be replenished: by self-proliferation; by the macrophages from the hepatic parenchyme into the sinusoid; or by transformation from the monocytes circulating into the sinusoid (the "triple origin" as opposed to the "dual origin" of the Kupffer cell). In the earliest stage after India ink perfusion, the thrombocytes exhibited the most striking reaction comparable to the Kupffer cells toward which they were assembled. The India ink particles were taken up into the "surface connected canalicular system" (SCS), which thickened and made vacuolar expansions as the amount of the particles was increased. At 4 hr after perfusion, the particles disappeared from the majority of the thrombocytes, leaving an empty SCS. The India ink particle uptake and storage by the thrombocyte were thought to be temporary phenomena, different from the true phagocytosis of the macrophages.

  9. Effect of cardiac dysrhythmia on cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    Sand, B J; Rose, H B; Barker, W F

    1976-07-01

    Extracranial carotid arterial obstructive disease has been the entity most commonly associated with transient cerebrovascular insufficiency. A nonobstructive, frequently overlooked cause of cerebral ischemia is cardiac dysrhythmia. We have explored this by observations of experimental animals and of man. Blood flow and pressure in the carotid arteries of dogs were shown to be decreased by mechnically induced premature ventricular contractions. The significance of the cardiogenic contribution to altered cerebrovascular perfusion was studied by ocular and brachial plethysmography in 210 patients suspected by history of having carotid arterial insufficiency. Of the 210 patients, 62 demonstrated abnormal ocular plethysmographic recordings, and of those, nine had dysrhythmias associated with significant deficits of ocular perfusion. Five patients whose recordings were technically suitable for publication are presented to demonstrate the bizarre ocular plethysmographic recordings seen during the dysrhythmic cycle.

  10. Mucosal injury induced by ischemia and reperfusion in the piglet intestine: Influences of age and feeding

    SciTech Connect

    Crissinger, K.D.; Granger, D.N. )

    1989-10-01

    The pathogenesis of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis is unknown, but enteral alimentation, infectious agents, and mesenteric ischemia have been frequently invoked as primary initiators of the disease. To define the vulnerability of the intestinal mucosa to ischemia and reperfusion in the developing piglet, we evaluated changes in mucosal permeability using plasma-to-lumen clearance of chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in the ileum of anesthetized 1-day-, 3-day-, 2-wk-, and 1-mo-old piglets as a function of (a) duration of intestinal ischemia (20, 40, or 60 min of total superior mesenteric artery occlusion), (b) feeding status (fasted or nursed), and (c) composition of luminal perfusate (balanced salt solution vs. predigested cow milk-based formula). Baseline chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid clearance was not significantly altered by ischemia, irrespective of duration, or feeding in all age groups. However, clearances were significantly elevated during reperfusion after 1 h of total intestinal ischemia in all age groups, whether fasted or fed. Reperfusion-induced increases in clearance did not differ among age groups when the bowel lumen was perfused with a balanced salt solution. However, luminal perfusion with formula resulted in higher clearances in 1-day-old piglets compared with all older animals. Thus, the neonatal intestine appears to be more vulnerable to mucosal injury induced by ischemia and reperfusion in the presence of formula than the intestine of older animals.

  11. A rat model against chemotherapy plus radiation-induced oral mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Alkesh; Rajesh, S.; Chandrashekhar, V.M.; Rathnam, Shivprakash; Shah, Karishma; Mallikarjuna Rao, C.; Nandakumar, K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Present study was aimed at developing an experimental model of oral mucositis in rats using a combination of chemotherapeutic agent and radiation. Study design Female Wistar rats (150–200 g) were divided into 3 groups (n = 6). Rats in group 1 (normal control) and group 2 (mucositis control) were treated with vehicle. Rats in group 3 were treated with l-glutamine (1 g/kg, p.o.; 15 days) before and after mucositis induction. Oral mucositis was induced by busulfan (6 mg/kg, p.o.; 4 days) and the tongue exposed to infrared (IR) radiation of intensity 40 mV/cm2 for 5 s on the 1st, 4th and 10th days of challenge using a tail flick apparatus. Parameters monitored were body weight, food intake, blood count and survival. Oral mucositis score (OMS) was recorded daily. Histological changes of the irradiated tongue were assessed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results Busulfan and IR radiation significantly reduced body weight and food intake of the mucositis control group as compared to normal control. Clear ulceration of the tongue reflected in the OMS. Histopathology of the tongue revealed intense lymphocytic infiltration, decreased thickness of squamous epithelial cell layer, decrease in number of blood vessels, and necrosis of cells along with pseudo-membrane formation in the mucositis control group. These findings suggested that oral mucositis was successfully induced and treatment with l-glutamine partially reversed these conditions. Conclusion Oral mucositis was established successfully in rats by the combination of chemotherapeutic agent and IR radiation. This may be a useful model for screening drugs in the treatment of oral mucositis. PMID:24227960

  12. Sensory neurons signal for an increase in rat gastric mucosal blood flow in the face of pending acid injury.

    PubMed

    Holzer, P; Livingston, E H; Guth, P H

    1991-08-01

    Disruption of the gastric mucosal barrier is quickly followed by an increase in gastric mucosal blood flow, which is thought to be a defensive reaction to prevent further injury. This study examined how this increase in blood flow is brought about. When the stomach of urethane-anesthetized rats was perfused with 0.15N HCl, disruption of the gastric mucosal barrier with 15% ethanol increased the disappearance of acid from the gastric lumen and enhanced gastric mucosal blood flow. This increase in blood flow was blocked by local arterial infusion of tetrodotoxin (60 ng/min) to the stomach and by chemical ablation of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons. Inhibition of the blood flow increase was associated with exaggeration of gross and histological injury to the mucosa. IV injection of atropine (0.2 mg/kg) or pyrilamine (2 mg/kg) did not affect blood flow increase in response to barrier disruption, whereas morphine injection (2 mg/kg) inhibited it. The current findings show that the increase in gastric mucosal blood flow that follows disruption of the gastric mucosal barrier in the presence of acid is mediated by sensory neurons that seem to monitor acid back-diffusion and in turn signal for a protective increase in blood flow.

  13. Harmonic analysis of perfusion pumps.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, F Carroll; Donovan, F M; Townsley, Mary I

    2003-12-01

    The controversy over the use of nonpulsatile versus pulsatile pumps for maintenance of normal organ function during ex vivo perfusion has continued for many years, but resolution has been limited by lack of a congruent mathematical definition of pulsatility. We hypothesized that the waveform frequency and amplitude, as well as the underlying mean distending pressure are all key parameters controlling vascular function. Using discrete Fourier Analysis, our data demonstrate the complexity of the pulmonary arterial pressure waveform in vivo and the failure of commonly available perfusion pumps to mimic in vivo dynamics. In addition, our data show that the key harmonic signatures are intrinsic to the perfusion pumps, are similar for flow and pressure waveforms, and are unchanged by characteristics of the downstream perfusion circuit or perfusate viscosity.

  14. Effect of Hymenolepis nana on the mouse ileal mucosal cells: histochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Sanad, M M; Salem, S A; el-Gamal, R L; Darwish, R A; el-Ridi, A M

    1990-12-01

    Histochemical studies of the ileal mucosal cells of mice experimentally infected with H. nana revealed definite increase in mucous secretions indicating increased activity of the goblet cells in response to mucosal irritation. The activity of acid phosphatase was also increased representing a sort of defence mechanism against the attached worms. The activities of ATP-ase and NADH diaphorase enzymes were decreased indicating disturbance in the metabolic and transport processes and in the absorptive function of the intestinal epithelial cells.

  15. The Development of an AIDS Mucosal Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xian; Chen, Zhiwei

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that mucosal tissues contain the largest surface area of the human body and are the front line of natural host defense against various pathogens. In fact, more than 80% of infectious disease pathogens probably gain entry into the susceptible human hosts through open mucosal surfaces. Human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1), a mainly sexually transmitted virus, also primarily targets the vaginal and gastrointestinal mucosa as entry sites for viral transmission, seeding, replication and amplification. Since HIV-1 establishes its early replication in vaginal or rectal mucosal tissues, the induction of sufficient mucosal immunity at the initial site of HIV-1 transmission becomes essential for a protective vaccine. However, despite the fact that current conventional vaccine strategies have remained unsuccessful in preventing HIV-1 infection, sufficient financial support and resources have yet to be given to develop a vaccine able to elicit protective mucosal immunity against sexual transmissions. Interestingly, Chinese ancestors invented variolation through intranasal administration about one thousand years ago, which led to the discovery of a successful smallpox vaccine and the final eradication of the disease. It is the hope for all mankind that the development of a mucosal AIDS vaccine will ultimately help control the AIDS pandemic. In order to discover an effective mucosal AIDS vaccine, it is necessary to have a deep understanding of mucosal immunology and to test various mucosal vaccination strategies. PMID:21994611

  16. Voice Disorders in Mucosal Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Ruas, Ana Cristina Nunes; Lucena, Márcia Mendonça; da Costa, Ananda Dutra; Vieira, Jéssica Rafael; de Araújo-Melo, Maria Helena; Terceiro, Benivaldo Ramos Ferreira; de Sousa Torraca, Tania Salgado; de Oliveira Schubach, Armando; Valete-Rosalino, Claudia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Leishmaniasis is considered as one of the six most important infectious diseases because of its high detection coefficient and ability to produce deformities. In most cases, mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) occurs as a consequence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. If left untreated, mucosal lesions can leave sequelae, interfering in the swallowing, breathing, voice and speech processes and requiring rehabilitation. Objective To describe the anatomical characteristics and voice quality of ML patients. Materials and Methods A descriptive transversal study was conducted in a cohort of ML patients treated at the Laboratory for Leishmaniasis Surveillance of the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases - Fiocruz, between 2010 and 2013. The patients were submitted to otorhinolaryngologic clinical examination by endoscopy of the upper airways and digestive tract and to speech-language assessment through directed anamnesis, auditory perception, phonation times and vocal acoustic analysis. The variables of interest were epidemiologic (sex and age) and clinic (lesion location, associated symptoms and voice quality. Results 26 patients under ML treatment and monitored by speech therapists were studied. 21 (81%) were male and five (19%) female, with ages ranging from 15 to 78 years (54.5+15.0 years). The lesions were distributed in the following structures 88.5% nasal, 38.5% oral, 34.6% pharyngeal and 19.2% laryngeal, with some patients presenting lesions in more than one anatomic site. The main complaint was nasal obstruction (73.1%), followed by dysphonia (38.5%), odynophagia (30.8%) and dysphagia (26.9%). 23 patients (84.6%) presented voice quality perturbations. Dysphonia was significantly associated to lesions in the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity. Conclusion We observed that vocal quality perturbations are frequent in patients with mucosal leishmaniasis, even without laryngeal lesions; they are probably associated to disorders of some resonance

  17. Ex vivo lung perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Machuca, Tiago N.

    2014-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  18. Noncontact blood perfusion mapping in clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakovlev, Dmitry; Dwyer, Vincent; Hu, Sijung; Silberschmidt, Vadim

    2016-04-01

    Non-contact imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) to detect pulsatile blood microcirculation in tissue has been selected as a successor to low spatial resolution and slow scanning blood perfusion techniques currently employed by clinicians. The proposed iPPG system employs a novel illumination source constructed of multiple high power LEDs with narrow spectral emission, which are temporally modulated and synchronised with a high performance sCMOS sensor. To ensure spectrum stability and prevent thermal wavelength drift due to junction temperature variations, each LED features a custom-designed thermal management system to effectively dissipate generated heat and auto-adjust current flow. The use of a multi-wavelength approach has resulted in simultaneous microvascular perfusion monitoring at various tissue depths, which is an added benefit for specific clinical applications. A synchronous detection algorithm to extract weak photoplethysmographic pulse-waveforms demonstrated robustness and high efficiency when applied to even small regions of 5 mm2. The experimental results showed evidences that the proposed system could achieve noticeable accuracy in blood perfusion monitoring by creating complex amplitude and phase maps for the tissue under examination.

  19. The effects of progressive anemia on jejunal mucosal and serosal tissue oxygenation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Haisjackl, M; Luz, G; Sparr, H; Germann, R; Salak, N; Friesenecker, B; Deusch, E; Meusburger, S; Hasibeder, W

    1997-03-01

    Anemia may promote intestinal hypoxia. We studied the effects of progressive isovolemic hemodilution on jejunal mucosal (Po2muc), and serosal tissue oxygen tension (Po2ser, Clark-type surface electrodes), mucosal microvascular hemoglobin oxygen saturation (Hbo2muc), and hematocrit (Hctmuc; tissue reflectance spectophotometry) in a jejunal segment. Twelve domestic pigs were anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. Laparatomy was performed, arterial supply of a jejunal segment isolated, and constant pressure pump perfused. Seven animals were progressively hemodiluted to systemic hematocrits (Hctsys) of 20%, 15%, 10%, and 6%. Baseline for Po2muc, Po2ser and Hbo2muc was 23.5 +/- 2.1 mm Hg, 57.5 +/- 4 mm Hg, and 47.0% +/- 6.4% which were not different from the five controls. Despite a significant increase in jejunal blood flow, jejunal oxygen delivery decreased and oxygen extraction ratio increased significantly at Hctsys 10% and 6%. Po2ser decreased significantly below or at Hctsys of 15%, whereas Po2muc and Hbo2muc were maintained to Hctsys of 10%, but less than 10% Hbo2muc and mesenteric venous pH decreased significantly, implying that physiological limits of jejunal microvascular adaptation to severe anemia were reached. Decrease of Hctmuc was less pronounced than Hctsys. In conclusion, redistribution of jejunal blood flow and an increase in the ratio of mucosal to systemic hematocrit are the main mechanisms maintaining mucosal oxygen supply during progressive anemia.

  20. Blood perfusion construction for infrared face recognition based on bio-heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhihua; Liu, Guodong

    2014-01-01

    To improve the performance of infrared face recognition for time-lapse data, a new construction of blood perfusion is proposed based on bio-heat transfer. Firstly, by quantifying the blood perfusion based on Pennes equation, the thermal information is converted into blood perfusion rate, which is stable facial biological feature of face image. Then, the separability discriminant criterion in Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) domain is applied to extract the discriminative features of blood perfusion information. Experimental results demonstrate that the features of blood perfusion are more concentrative and discriminative for recognition than those of thermal information. The infrared face recognition based on the proposed blood perfusion is robust and can achieve better recognition performance compared with other state-of-the-art approaches.

  1. Mucosal immunity and probiotics in fish.

    PubMed

    Lazado, Carlo C; Caipang, Christopher Marlowe A

    2014-07-01

    Teleost mucosal immunity has become the subject of unprecedented research studies in recent years because of its diversity and defining characteristics. Its immune repertoire is governed by the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) which are divided into gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissues (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissues (GIALT). The direct contact with its immediate environment makes the mucosal surfaces of fish susceptible to a wide variety of pathogens. The inherent immunocompetent cells and factors in the mucosal surfaces together with the commensal microbiota have pivotal role against pathogens. Immunomodulation is a popular prophylactic strategy in teleost and probiotics possess this beneficial feature. Most of the studies on the immunomodulatory properties of probiotics in fish mainly discussed their impacts on systemic immunity. In contrast, few of these studies discussed the immunomodulatory features of probiotics in mucosal surfaces and are concentrated on the influences in the gut. Significant attention should be devoted in understanding the relationship of mucosal immunity and probiotics as the present knowledge is limited and are mostly based on extrapolations of studies in humans and terrestrial vertebrates. In the course of the advancement of mucosal immunity and probiotics, new perspectives in probiotics research, e.g., probiogenomics have emerged. This review affirms the relevance of probiotics in the mucosal immunity of fish by revisiting and bridging the current knowledge on teleost mucosal immunity, mucosal microbiota and immunomodulation of mucosal surfaces by probiotics. Expanding the knowledge of immunomodulatory properties of probiotics especially on mucosal immunity is essential in advancing the use of probiotics as a sustainable and viable strategy for successful fish husbandry.

  2. Role of capsaicin sensitive nerves in epidermal growth factor effects on gastric mucosal injury and blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Kang, J; Teng, C; Chen, F; Wee, A

    1998-01-01

    Background—Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and capsaicin protect against experimental gastric mucosal injury. Capsaicin exerts its gastroprotective effect by stimulating afferent neurones leading to release of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) which causes gastric hyperaemia. EGF also causes gastric hyperaemia but whether it acts via capsaicin sensitive neurones is unknown. 
Aims—To assess the influence of: (1) capsaicin desensitisation on EGF effects on gastric mucosal injury and gastric mucosal blood flow; and (2) close arterial infusion of hCGRP8-37, a CGRP antagonist, on EGF effects on gastric mucosal blood flow. 
Methods—The absolute ethanol induced gastric mucosal injury model in the rat was used. Gastric mucosal damage was assessed by planimetry and light microscopy. Gastric mucosal blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry in a gastric chamber preparation. 
Results—Capsaicin desensitisation abolished the gastroprotective and gastric hyperaemic effects of EGF. Close arterial infusion of hCGRP8-37 antagonised the hyperaemic effect of both capsaicin and EGF. 
Conclusion—Results show that EGF may exert its gastroprotective and gastric hyperaemic effects via capsaicin sensitive afferent neurones. 

 Keywords: capsaicin; epidermal growth factor; gastric mucosal injury; gastric mucosal blood flow; calcitonin gene related peptide antagonist; rat PMID:9577339

  3. Perfusion measurement in acute pancreatitis using dynamic perfusion MDCT.

    PubMed

    Bize, Pierre E; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Christoph D; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2006-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether MDCT with perfusion imaging could help in assessing the severity of acute pancreatitis in the initial phase of the disease. One hundred six patients with abdominal pain were prospectively enrolled in this study. Patients were separated into two groups: P1 (severe) and P2 (mild) acute pancreatitis. Mean perfusion value was 24.8 mL/100 mL/min in the P1 group and 50.5 mL/100 mL/min in the P2 group (p = 0.0016, significant). Our preliminary data suggest that pancreatic perfusion measurement using MDCT with perfusion imaging could help in assessing the severity of acute pancreatitis.

  4. Eosinophils in mucosal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Travers, J; Rothenberg, M E

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils, multifunctional cells that contribute to both innate and adaptive immunity, are involved in the initiation, propagation and resolution of immune responses, including tissue repair. They achieve this multifunctionality by expression of a diverse set of activation receptors, including those that directly recognize pathogens and opsonized targets, and by their ability to store and release preformed cytotoxic mediators that participate in host defense, to produce a variety of de novo pleotropic mediators and cytokines and to interact directly and indirectly with diverse cell types, including adaptive and innate immunocytes and structural cells. Herein, we review the basic biology of eosinophils and then focus on new emerging concepts about their role in mucosal immune homeostasis, particularly maintenance of intestinal IgA. We review emerging data about their development and regulation and describe new concepts concerning mucosal eosinophilic diseases. We describe recently developed therapeutic strategies to modify eosinophil levels and function and provide collective insight about the beneficial and detrimental functions of these enigmatic cells. PMID:25807184

  5. Cerebral-Body Perfusion Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    compared to the 0.5g curve) fall in flow. Fig. 9b, showing the 5g case, strongly suggests a possible, so-called, " luxury perfusion ", in which natural...as the luxury perfusion situation which bypasses the flow with the nutrients it carries (through newly opened collaterals) and result in a "blackout...89-0054 CEREBRAL-BODY PERFUSION MODEL S. Sorek’, J. Bear2, and M., Feinsod3 in Collaboration with K. Allen4, L. Bunt5 and S. Ben-IHaiM6 July 1990

  6. Antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, analgesics, and nutritional supplements for alimentary tract mucositis.

    PubMed

    Barasch, Andrei; Elad, Sharon; Altman, Arnold; Damato, Kathryn; Epstein, Joel

    2006-06-01

    This review focuses on the value of several groups of agents for the prevention and treatment of mucositis. The review refers to alimentary mucositis as a generalized term that includes oral mucositis and gastrointestinal mucositis. This paper is part of the systematic review made by the mucositis study group which operates in the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC)/International Society of Oral Oncology (ISOO). Several new guidelines are suggested in this review as an update to the primary systematic review that was published by the same group in 2004.

  7. Distributed Perfusion Educational Model: A Shift in Perfusion Economic Realities

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Jon W.; Evans, Edward L.; Hoerr, Harry R.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: In recent years, a steady decline in the number of perfusion education programs in the United States has been noted. At the same time, there has been a parallel decline in the number of students graduated from perfusion educational programs in the United States. Also, as noted by several authors, there has been an increase in demand for perfusion graduates. The decline in programs and graduates has also been noted in anesthesia and surgical residency programs. The shift is caused by a combination of economic and clinical factors. First, decreased reimbursement has led to reallocation of hospital resources. Second, the original enthusiasm for beating heart coronary artery bypass surgery was grossly overestimated and has led to further reallocation of hospital resources and denigration of cardiopulmonary bypass. This paper describes two models of perfusion education programs: serial perfusion education model (SPEM) and the distributed perfusion education model (DPEM). Arguments are presented that the SPEM has some serious limitations and challenges for long-term economic survival. The authors feel the DPEM along with dependence on tuition funding can survive the current clinical and economic conditions and allow the profession to adapt to changes in scope of practice. PMID:16524152

  8. Mucosal Wave Measurement and Visualization Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Krausert, Christopher R.; Olszewski, Aleksandra E.; Taylor, Lindsay N.; McMurray, James S.; Dailey, Seth H.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2010-01-01

    Organized vibration of the vocal folds is critical to high quality voice production. When the vocal folds oscillate, the superficial tissue of the vocal fold is displaced in a wave-like fashion, creating the so called “mucosal wave”. Because the mucosal wave is dependent on vocal fold structure, physical alterations of that structure cause mucosal wave abnormalities. Visualization and quantification of mucosal wave properties have become useful parameters in diagnosing and managing vocal fold pathology. Mucosal wave measurement provides information about vocal fold characteristics that cannot be determined with other assessment techniques. Here, we discuss the benefits, disadvantages, and clinical applicability of the different mucosal wave measurement techniques, such as electroglottography (EGG), photoglottography (PGG), and ultrasound and visualization techniques that include videokymography (VKG), stroboscopy, and high-speed digital imaging (HSDI). The various techniques and their specific uses are reviewed with the intention of helping researchers and clinicians choose a method for a given situation and understand its limitations as well as its potential applications. Recent applications of these techniques for quantitative assessment demonstrate that additional research must be conducted to realize the full potential of these tools. Evaluations of existing research and recommendations for future research are given to promote both the quantitative study of the mucosal wave through accurate and standardized measurement of mucosal wave parameters and the development of reliable methods with which physicians can diagnose vocal disorders. PMID:20471798

  9. Mucosal Immunosenescence In The Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shintaro; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that pathogen-specific secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody (Ab) is the major player at mucosal surfaces for host defense. However, alterations in the mucosal immune system occur in advanced aging which results in a failure of induction of SIgA Abs for protection from infectious diseases. Signs of mucosal senescence first appear in the gut immune system. Further, changes in the intestinal microbiota most likely influence mucosal immunity. To overcome the immunological aging decline in mucosal immunity, several adjuvant systems including mucosal dendritic cell (DC) targeting have been shown to be attractive and effective immunological strategies. Similarly, antigen (Ag) uptake-M cells are ideal targets for facilitating Ag-specific mucosal immune responses. However, the numbers of M cells are reduced in aged mice. In this regard, Spi-B, an essential transcription factor for the functional and structural differentiation of M cells could be a potent strategy for the induction of effective mucosal immunity in aging. PMID:25531743

  10. Localized Pemphigus Vegetans without Mucosal Involvement.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vk; Jindal, N; Imchen, S

    2014-03-01

    Pemphigus vegetans is a rare variant of pemphigus vulgaris. A 62-year-old woman presented with erythematous moist vegetative plaque on the left breast and left groin. There was no mucosal involvement. Histopathological and direct immunofluorescence findings were suggestive of pemphigus vegetans. She showed excellent response to oral steroids. Literature is scarcely available on the limited involvement with pemphigus vegetans without mucosal involvement.

  11. Biology and Mucosal Immunity to Myxozoans

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Daniela; Bartholomew, Jerri; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2014-01-01

    Myxozoans are among the most abundant parasites in nature. Their life cycles involve two hosts: an invertebrate, usually an annelid, and a vertebrate, usually a fish. They affect fish species in their natural habitats but also constitute a menace for fish aquaculture. Using different strategies they are able to parasitize and cause damage in multiple organs, including mucosal tissues, which they use also as portals of entry. In fish, the main mucosal sites include the intestine, skin and gills. Recently the finding of a specific mucosal immunoglobulin in teleost (IgT), analogous to mammalian IgA, and the capacity of fish to develop a specific mucosal immune response against different pathogens, has highlighted the importance of studying immune responses at mucosal sites. In this review, we describe the major biological characteristics of myxozoan parasites and present the data available regarding immune responses for species that infect mucosal sites. As models for mucosal immunity we review the responses to Enteromyxum spp. and Ceratomyxa shasta, both of which parasitize the intestine. The immune response at the skin and gills is also described, as these mucosal tissues are used by myxozoans as attaching surfaces and portal of entry, and some species also parasitize these sites. Finally, the development of immunoprophylactic strategies is discussed. PMID:23994774

  12. Vaccination strategies for mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ogra, P L; Faden, H; Welliver, R C

    2001-04-01

    Mucosal administration of vaccines is an important approach to the induction of appropriate immune responses to microbial and other environmental antigens in systemic sites and peripheral blood as well as in most external mucosal surfaces. The development of specific antibody- or T-cell-mediated immunologic responses and the induction of mucosally induced systemic immunologic hyporesponsiveness (oral or mucosal tolerance) depend on complex sets of immunologic events, including the nature of the antigenic stimulation of specialized lymphoid structures in the host, antigen-induced activation of different populations of regulatory T cells (Th1 versus Th2), and the expression of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines. Availability of mucosal vaccines will provide a painless approach to deliver large numbers of vaccine antigens for human immunization. Currently, an average infant will receive 20 to 25 percutaneous injections for vaccination against different childhood infections by 18 months of age. It should be possible to develop for human use effective, nonliving, recombinant, replicating, transgenic, and microbial vector- or plant-based mucosal vaccines to prevent infections. Based on the experience with many dietary antigens, it is also possible to manipulate the mucosal immune system to induce systemic tolerance against environmental, dietary, and possibly other autoantigens associated with allergic and autoimmune disorders. Mucosal immunity offers new strategies to induce protective immune responses against a variety of infectious agents. Such immunization may also provide new prophylactic or therapeutic avenues in the control of autoimmune diseases in humans.

  13. Vaccination Strategies for Mucosal Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ogra, Pearay L.; Faden, Howard; Welliver, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Mucosal administration of vaccines is an important approach to the induction of appropriate immune responses to microbial and other environmental antigens in systemic sites and peripheral blood as well as in most external mucosal surfaces. The development of specific antibody- or T-cell-mediated immunologic responses and the induction of mucosally induced systemic immunologic hyporesponsiveness (oral or mucosal tolerance) depend on complex sets of immunologic events, including the nature of the antigenic stimulation of specialized lymphoid structures in the host, antigen-induced activation of different populations of regulatory T cells (Th1 versus Th2), and the expression of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines. Availability of mucosal vaccines will provide a painless approach to deliver large numbers of vaccine antigens for human immunization. Currently, an average infant will receive 20 to 25 percutaneous injections for vaccination against different childhood infections by 18 months of age. It should be possible to develop for human use effective, nonliving, recombinant, replicating, transgenic, and microbial vector- or plant-based mucosal vaccines to prevent infections. Based on the experience with many dietary antigens, it is also possible to manipulate the mucosal immune system to induce systemic tolerance against environmental, dietary, and possibly other autoantigens associated with allergic and autoimmune disorders. Mucosal immunity offers new strategies to induce protective immune responses against a variety of infectious agents. Such immunization may also provide new prophylactic or therapeutic avenues in the control of autoimmune diseases in humans. PMID:11292646

  14. Prophylactic and therapeutic modulation of innate and adaptive immunity against mucosal infection of herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Uyangaa, Erdenebileg; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Eo, Seong Kug

    2014-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are the most common cause of genital ulceration in humans worldwide. Typically, HSV-1 and 2 infections via mucosal route result in a lifelong latent infection after peripheral replication in mucosal tissues, thereby providing potential transmission to neighbor hosts in response to reactivation. To break the transmission cycle, immunoprophylactics and therapeutic strategies must be focused on prevention of infection or reduction of infectivity at mucosal sites. Currently, our understanding of the immune responses against mucosal infection of HSV remains intricate and involves a balance between innate signaling pathways and the adaptive immune responses. Numerous studies have demonstrated that HSV mucosal infection induces type I interferons (IFN) via recognition of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and activates multiple immune cell populations, including NK cells, conventional dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs. This innate immune response is required not only for the early control of viral replication at mucosal sites, but also for establishing adaptive immune responses against HSV antigens. Although the contribution of humoral immune response is controversial, CD4(+) Th1 T cells producing IFN-γ are believed to play an important role in eradicating virus from the hosts. In addition, the recent experimental successes of immunoprophylactic and therapeutic compounds that enhance resistance and/or reduce viral burden at mucosal sites have accumulated. This review focuses on attempts to modulate innate and adaptive immunity against HSV mucosal infection for the development of prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. Notably, cells involved in innate immune regulations appear to shape adaptive immune responses. Thus, we summarized the current evidence of various immune mediators in response to mucosal HSV infection, focusing on the importance of innate immune responses.

  15. Quantification of myocardium at risk in myocardial perfusion SPECT by co-registration and fusion with delayed contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging--an experimental ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Ugander, Martin; Soneson, Helen; Engblom, Henrik; van der Pals, Jesper; Erlinge, David; Heiberg, Einar; Arheden, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (MPS) can be used to assess myocardium at risk in occlusive coronary ischaemia. The aim was to develop a method to quantify myocardium at risk as perfusion defect size on ex vivo MPS using co-registration and fusion with ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Pigs (n = 19) were injected 99mTc-tetrofosmin prior to concluding 40 min of coronary artery occlusion, followed by reperfusion and MRI contrast injection. The excised heart was imaged with T1-weighted MRI and MPS, and images were co-registered using freely available software (Segment v1.8, http://segment.heiberg.se). The left ventricle was semi-automatically delineated in MRI and copied to MPS. The threshold for a MPS perfusion defect was defined as the mean counts in the MPS image at the MRI-determined border between remote myocardium and air. The threshold was measured using count maxima set to the 100th-95th percentile of counts within the myocardium. The count maximum that gave the lowest threshold variability (SD) was considered the most robust. A count maximum using the 100th percentile yielded a threshold of (mean ± SD) 55 ± 6·2%. This method showed the lowest SD compared to 99th-95th percentile count maxima (6·6-7·2%). We describe a method for objective quantification of myocardium at risk as perfusion defect size on MPS using knowledge of the anatomy of the myocardium from co-registered MRI. This enables simultaneous quantification of myocardium at risk by MPS and infarct size by MRI for the evaluation of treatments for myocardial infarction. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2011 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  16. Mucosal vaccines: a paradigm shift in the development of mucosal adjuvants and delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Atul; Gowda, Devegowda Vishakante; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V; Shinde, Chetan G; Iyer, Meenakshi

    2015-04-01

    Mucosal immune responses are the first-line defensive mechanisms against a variety of infections. Therefore, immunizations of mucosal surfaces from which majority of infectious agents make their entry, helps to protect the body against infections. Hence, vaccinization of mucosal surfaces by using mucosal vaccines provides the basis for generating protective immunity both in the mucosal and systemic immune compartments. Mucosal vaccines offer several advantages over parenteral immunization. For example, (i) ease of administration; (ii) non-invasiveness; (iii) high-patient compliance; and (iv) suitability for mass vaccination. Despite these benefits, to date, only very few mucosal vaccines have been developed using whole microorganisms and approved for use in humans. This is due to various challenges associated with the development of an effective mucosal vaccine that can work against a variety of infections, and various problems concerned with the safe delivery of developed vaccine. For instance, protein antigen alone is not just sufficient enough for the optimal delivery of antigen(s) mucosally. Hence, efforts have been made to develop better prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines for improved mucosal Th1 and Th2 immune responses using an efficient and safe immunostimulatory molecule and novel delivery carriers. Therefore, in this review, we have made an attempt to cover the recent advancements in the development of adjuvants and delivery carriers for safe and effective mucosal vaccine production.

  17. Osteitis and mucosal inflammation in a rabbit model of sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Campos, Carlos Augusto Correia de; Dolci, Eduardo Landini Lutaif; Silva, Leonardo da; Dolci, José Eduardo Lutaif; Campos, Carlos Alberto Herrerias de; Dolci, Ricardo Landini Lutaif

    2015-01-01

    Several experimental studies have shown osteitis after the onset of sinusitis, supporting the idea that bone involvement could participate in the dissemination and perpetuation of this inflammatory disease. However, procedures commonly performed for the induction of sinusitis, such as antrostomies, can trigger sinusitis by themselves. To evaluate osteitis in an animal model of sinusitis that does not violate the sinus directly and verify whether this is limited to the induction side, or if it affects the contralateral side. Experimental study in which sinusitis was produced by inserting an obstructing sponge into the nasal cavity of 20 rabbits. After defined intervals, the animals were euthanized and maxillary sinus samples were removed for semi-quantitative histological analysis of mucosa and bone. Signs of bone and mucosal inflammation were observed, affecting both the induction and contralateral sides. Statistical analysis showed correlation between the intensity of osteitis on both sides, but not between mucosal and bone inflammation on the same side, supporting the theory that inflammation can spread through bone structures, regardless of mucosal inflammation. This study demonstrated that in an animal model of sinusitis that does not disturb the sinus directly osteitis occurs in the affected sinus and that it also affects the contralateral side. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan involves two nuclear scan tests to measure breathing (ventilation) and circulation ( ... In: Mettler FA, Guiberteau MJ, eds. Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  19. Mucosal immunology of tolerance and allergy in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Lauren; Mayer, Lloyd; Berin, M. Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The mucosal immune system typically exists in a state of active tolerance to food antigens and commensal bacteria. Tolerance to food proteins is induced in part by dendritic cells residing in the intestinal mucosa and implemented by regulatory T cells. Food allergy occurs when immune tolerance is disrupted and a sensitizing immune response characterized by food-specific IgE production occurs instead. Experimental food allergy in mice requires use of adjuvant or exploitation of alternate routes of sensitization to induce allergic sensitization, and can aid in understanding the mechanisms of sensitization to food allergens and the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal manifestations of food allergy. Recent work in the understanding of mucosal immunology of tolerance and allergy in the gastrointestinal tract will be discussed. PMID:22447352

  20. Intragastric capsaicin enhances rat gastric acid elimination and mucosal blood flow by afferent nerve stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Lippe, I. T.; Pabst, M. A.; Holzer, P.

    1989-01-01

    1. This study investigated the effects of intragastric capsaicin on acid output, clearance of aniline, potential difference, and morphology of the mucosa in the rat stomach. The experiments were carried out on rats anaesthetized with urethane in which the stomachs were continuously perfused with saline. 2. When the stomach was perfused with normal saline (pH approximately 6), intragastric capsaicin (32-640 microM) had no effect on the output of titratable acid. In contrast, when acid output was stimulated by pentagastrin or when the stomach was perfused with acid saline (pH 3), capsaicin reduced acid output. Acid loss which occurred during perfusion with saline of pH 2 was not significantly increased by capsaicin. This suggests that capsaicin does not enhance acid back-diffusion but facilitates acid elimination by other means. 3. The gastric clearance of [14C]-aniline, which is an indirect index of gastric mucosal blood flow, was estimated while the stomach was perfused with saline of pH 3. The clearance of aniline rose by 50-60% following intragastric administration of capsaicin (160 microM) whereas the mean arterial blood pressure was increased by about 2.5 mmHg only. Combined pretreatment of the rats with atropine, phentolamine, and propranolol did not alter the effect of capsaicin on the gastric clearance of aniline. 4. The gastric potential difference was not altered by capsaicin (160 microM) administered together with saline of pH 3. This and the finding that there were no signs of mucosal damage by light and scanning electron microscopy indicate that intragastric capsaicin does not irritate the gastric mucosa. 5. The effects of intragastric capsaicin on gastric acid output and aniline clearance and on blood pressure were absent in rats in which capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurones had been ablated by neonatal treatment with a neurotoxic dose of capsaicin, which indicates that they result from stimulation of afferent nerve endings in the stomach. It is

  1. The effect of royal jelly on oral mucositis in patients undergoing radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Ozden; Güngörmüş, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of royal jelly on oral mucositis in patients undergoing radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The study population consisted of 103 patients undergoing radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Oral mucositis was graded according to the World Health Organization criteria, and patients were divided into 2 groups. All patients received mouthwash therapy with benzydamine hydrochloride and nystatin rinses. In addition, patients in the experimental group received royal jelly. The mean resolution time of oral mucositis in the royal jelly group was significantly shorter than that of the control group. As a result, the study results demonstrate that royal jelly administrated by a certain procedure improved the signs and symptoms of oral mucositis and markedly shortened its healing time.

  2. The effect of auranofin on glucose uptake by the isolated vascularly perfused, small intestine of the rat.

    PubMed

    McMaster, D; Love, A H

    1987-11-01

    Auranofin at a concentration of 2.5 micrograms/ml had no effect on glucose uptake by the viable, isolated, vascularly perfused, small intestine of the rat and no net movement of water was detected. No effect on glucose uptake or water movement was found when intestines from rats fed 0.1 mg/Kg body weight per day for 4 weeks were perfused with drug free medium. Mucosal damage was seen in 1 of 2 rats fed Auranofin and examined histologically.

  3. Mucositis management in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Keefe, Dorothy M K

    2006-04-01

    Mucositis is an important toxicity to be aware of in anticancer therapy. It contributes to a reduction in cure rates from cancer. Until recently, it has been poorly understood and therefore has not been well managed. It causes patient distress, delays in treatment administration, and reductions in dose intensity, and it costs the health-care system a large amount of money. Mucositis has traditionally been associated more with hematologic malignancies than with solid tumors, because the incidence of severe mucositis has been much higher with the high-dose chemotherapy regimens used in hematologic malignancies. However, the chemotherapy used in solid tumors also causes mucositis and deserves further study. The separation between oral and gastrointestinal mucositis is potentially false and is being removed, with much research now investigating the entire alimentary canal. There are similarities and differences between radiation therapy- and chemotherapy-induced mucositis, and these have implications for treatment and prevention scheduling and type. Risk prediction is another area that requires more work, but there is real hope that, in the future, we might be able to predict who will suffer from mucositis and in which parts of the alimentary canal, thus enabling us to appropriately target the newer antimucotoxic therapies. The Mucositis Study Goup of the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer has recently published management guidelines for oral and gastrointestinal mucositis and is in the process of updating them. The guidelines serve as an excellent starting place for future mucositis research because they not only review the available treatments but also discuss mechanisms and epidemiology.

  4. Intra-abdominal hypertension--an experimental study of early effects on intra-abdominal metabolism.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Per; Hörer, Tal; Nilsson, Kristofer F; Agren, Göran; Norgren, Lars; Jansson, Kjell

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this experimental study was to investigate the early effects of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) on intra-abdominal metabolism and intestinal mucosal blood flow to evaluate whether metabolites can serve as markers for organ dysfunction during IAH. A swine model was used, and the animals were anesthetized and ventilated. Fifteen animals were subjected to IAH of 30 mm Hg for 4 hr by carbon dioxide insufflation. Seven animals served as controls. Hemodynamic data, arterial blood samples, and urine output were analyzed. Intraluminal laser Doppler flowmetry measured intestinal mucosal blood flow. Glucose, glycerol, lactate, and pyruvate concentrations and lactate-to-pyruvate (l/p) ratio were measured intraperitoneally and intramurally in the small intestine and rectum using microdialysis. IAH lowered the abdominal perfusion pressure by 12-18 mm Hg, reduced the intestinal mucosal blood flow by 45-63%, and decreased urine output by 50-80%. In the intervention group, glycerol concentrations increased at all locations, pyruvate concentrations decreased, and the l/p ratio increased intraperitoneally and intramurally in the small intestine. Control animals remained metabolically stable. Glucose and lactate concentrations were only slightly affected or unchanged in both the groups. IAH reduces intestinal blood flow and urinary output and causes early metabolic changes, indicating a discrete shift toward anaerobic metabolism. Intraperitoneal microdialysis may be useful in the early detection of impaired organ dysfunction with metabolic consequences in IAH and abdominal compartment syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Intestinal mucosal atrophy and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Darcy; Gohil, Kartik; Basson, Marc D

    2012-11-28

    Mucosal adaptation is an essential process in gut homeostasis. The intestinal mucosa adapts to a range of pathological conditions including starvation, short-gut syndrome, obesity, and bariatric surgery. Broadly, these adaptive functions can be grouped into proliferation and differentiation. These are influenced by diverse interactions with hormonal, immune, dietary, nervous, and mechanical stimuli. It seems likely that clinical outcomes can be improved by manipulating the physiology of adaptation. This review will summarize current understanding of the basic science surrounding adaptation, delineate the wide range of potential targets for therapeutic intervention, and discuss how these might be incorporated into an overall treatment plan. Deeper insight into the physiologic basis of adaptation will identify further targets for intervention to improve clinical outcomes.

  6. Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Osama Muhammad; Eliopoulos, Nicoletta; Muanza, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced oral mucositis (RIOM) is a major dose-limiting toxicity in head and neck cancer patients. It is a normal tissue injury caused by radiation/radiotherapy (RT), which has marked adverse effects on patient quality of life and cancer therapy continuity. It is a challenge for radiation oncologists since it leads to cancer therapy interruption, poor local tumor control, and changes in dose fractionation. RIOM occurs in 100% of altered fractionation radiotherapy head and neck cancer patients. In the United Sates, its economic cost was estimated to reach 17,000.00 USD per patient with head and neck cancers. This review will discuss RIOM definition, epidemiology, impact and side effects, pathogenesis, scoring scales, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. PMID:28589080

  7. Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Maria, Osama Muhammad; Eliopoulos, Nicoletta; Muanza, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced oral mucositis (RIOM) is a major dose-limiting toxicity in head and neck cancer patients. It is a normal tissue injury caused by radiation/radiotherapy (RT), which has marked adverse effects on patient quality of life and cancer therapy continuity. It is a challenge for radiation oncologists since it leads to cancer therapy interruption, poor local tumor control, and changes in dose fractionation. RIOM occurs in 100% of altered fractionation radiotherapy head and neck cancer patients. In the United Sates, its economic cost was estimated to reach 17,000.00 USD per patient with head and neck cancers. This review will discuss RIOM definition, epidemiology, impact and side effects, pathogenesis, scoring scales, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  8. Intestinal mucosal atrophy and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Darcy; Gohil, Kartik; Basson, Marc D

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal adaptation is an essential process in gut homeostasis. The intestinal mucosa adapts to a range of pathological conditions including starvation, short-gut syndrome, obesity, and bariatric surgery. Broadly, these adaptive functions can be grouped into proliferation and differentiation. These are influenced by diverse interactions with hormonal, immune, dietary, nervous, and mechanical stimuli. It seems likely that clinical outcomes can be improved by manipulating the physiology of adaptation. This review will summarize current understanding of the basic science surrounding adaptation, delineate the wide range of potential targets for therapeutic intervention, and discuss how these might be incorporated into an overall treatment plan. Deeper insight into the physiologic basis of adaptation will identify further targets for intervention to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:23197881

  9. Nifedipine increases fetoplacental perfusion.

    PubMed

    Karahanoglu, Ertugrul; Altinboga, Orhan; Akpinar, Funda; Demirdag, Erhan; Ozdemirci, Safak; Akyol, Aysegul; Yalvac, Serdar

    2017-01-01

    Our aim is to evaluate the effect of nifedipine on fetoplacental hemodynamic parameters. A retrospective study was conducted at a tertiary center with 30 patients for whom nifedipine treatment was used as a tocolytic therapy for preterm labor. Initiation of this treatment was at 31.6±2.5 weeks of gestation. We combined the pulse Doppler imaging parameters with grayscale imaging via the Bernoulli theorem, which is called the "continuity equation", to get the fetoplacental perfusion (FPP). Evaluated parameters were the resistance index (RI), the pulsatility index (PI), systole/diastole ratios (S/D), the velocity-time integral of the umbilical artery (VTI), the radius of the umbilical artery, the peak systolic velocity and the mean pressure gradient in the umbilical artery. From these parameters, the FPP was acquired. We found that the RI, the PI and the S/D ratio did not change after treatment with nifedipine. The mean pressure gradient, the VTI and the peak systolic velocity increased after treatment with nifedipine. Nifedipine increases FPP from 166±73.81 beat.cm3/min to 220±83.3 beat.cm3/min. Although nifedipine had no effect on the PI, the RI or the S/D, it increased the mean pressure gradient, the VTI and FPP.

  10. CAD of myocardial perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Corstiaan J.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2007-03-01

    Our purpose is in the automated evaluation of the physiological relevance of lesions in coronary angiograms. We aim to extract as much as possible quantitative information about the physiological condition of the heart from standard angiographic image sequences. Coronary angiography is still the gold standard for evaluating and diagnosing coronary abnormalities as it is able to locate precisely the coronary artery lesions. The dimensions of the stenosis can be assessed nowadays successfully with image processing based Quantitative Coronary Angiography (QCA) techniques. Our purpose is to assess the clinical relevance of the pertinent stenosis. We therefore analyze the myocardial perfusion as revealed in standard angiographic image sequences. In a Region-of-Interest (ROI) on the angiogram (without an overlaying major blood vessel) the contrast is measured as a function of time (the so-called time-density curve). The required hyperemic state of exercise is induced artificially by the injection of a vasodilator drug e.g. papaverine. In order to minimize motion artifacts we select based on the recorded ECG signal end-diastolic images in both a basal and a hyperemic run in the same projection to position the ROI. We present the development of the algorithms together with results of a small study of 20 patients which have been catheterized following the standard protocol.

  11. Mucosal Vaccine Development Based on Liposome Technology

    PubMed Central

    Norling, Karin; Bally, Marta; Höök, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Immune protection against infectious diseases is most effective if located at the portal of entry of the pathogen. Hence, there is an increasing demand for vaccine formulations that can induce strong protective immunity following oral, respiratory, or genital tract administration. At present, only few mucosal vaccines are found on the market, but recent technological advancements and a better understanding of the principles that govern priming of mucosal immune responses have contributed to a more optimistic view on the future of mucosal vaccines. Compared to live attenuated vaccines, subcomponent vaccines, most often protein-based, are considered safer, more stable, and less complicated to manufacture, but they require the addition of nontoxic and clinically safe adjuvants to be effective. In addition, another limiting factor is the large antigen dose that usually is required for mucosal vaccines. Therefore, the combination of mucosal adjuvants with the recent progress in nanoparticle technology provides an attractive solution to these problems. In particular, the liposome technology is ideal for combining protein antigen and adjuvant into an effective mucosal vaccine. Here, we describe and discuss recent progress in nanoparticle formulations using various types of liposomes that convey strong promise for the successful development of the next generation of mucosal vaccines. PMID:28127567

  12. Treatment of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bagán-Sebastián, José V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of oral mucositis is a challenge, due to its complex biological nature. Over the last 10 years, different strategies have been developed for the management of oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Material and Methods An exhaustive search was made of the PubMed-Medline, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, crossing the key words “oral mucositis”, “prevention” and “treatment” with the terms “chemotherapy” and “radiotherapy” by means of the boolean operators “AND” and “NOT”. A total of 268 articles were obtained, of which 96 met the inclusion criteria. Results Several interventions for the prevention of oral mucositis, such as oral hygiene protocols, amifostine, benzidamine, calcium phosphate, cryotherapy and iseganan, among others, were found to yield only limited benefits. Other studies have reported a decrease in the appearance and severity of mucositis with the use of cytoprotectors (sucralfate, oral glutamine, hyaluronic acid), growth factors, topical polyvinylpyrrolidone, and low power laser irradiation. Conclusions Very few interventions of confirmed efficacy are available for the management of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy. However, according to the reviewed literature, the use of palifermin, cryotherapy and low power laser offers benefits, reducing the incidence and severity of oral mucositis – though further studies are needed to confirm the results obtained. Key words:Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis Treatment. PMID:27034762

  13. Omeprazole promotes proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion in humans.

    PubMed

    Mertz-Nielsen, A; Hillingsø, J; Bukhave, K; Rask-Madsen, J

    1996-01-01

    The proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, surprisingly resulted in higher rates of proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion than previously reported using an H2 receptor antagonist for gastric acid inhibition. Gastroduodenal perfusions were performed in healthy volunteers to evaluate whether this incidental finding is explained by more potent gastric acid inhibition by omeprazole or might be caused by the different mode of drug action. Basal and stimulated gastric and duodenal bicarbonate secretion rates were measured in the same subjects in control experiments (n = 17) and after pretreatment with high dose omeprazole (n = 17) and ranitidine (n = 9), respectively, by use of a technique permitting simultaneous measurements. Concentrations of bicarbonate were measured in the respective effluents by the method of back titration. Both omeprazole and ranitidine completely inhibited gastric acid secretion (pH 6.9 v 6.8; p > 0.05). Omeprazole caused higher rates of basal (mean (SEM)) (597 (48) v 351 (39) mumol/h; p < 0.02) and vagally stimulated (834 (72) v 474 (66) mumol/h; p < 0.02), but not acid stimulated (3351 (678) v 2550 (456) mumol/h; p > 0.05) duodenal bicarbonate secretion compared with control experiments. Also the combination of omeprazole and ranitidine increased (p = 0.05) duodenal bicarbonate secretion, while ranitidine alone caused no change in either basal or stimulated secretion. In the stomach basal as well as vagally stimulated bicarbonate secretion was independent of the means of acid inhibition. These results show that the proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, promotes proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion apparently independent of its gastric acid inhibitory effect. The mechanism of action remains speculative.

  14. Omeprazole promotes proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Mertz-Nielsen, A; Hillingsø, J; Bukhave, K; Rask-Madsen, J

    1996-01-01

    The proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, surprisingly resulted in higher rates of proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion than previously reported using an H2 receptor antagonist for gastric acid inhibition. Gastroduodenal perfusions were performed in healthy volunteers to evaluate whether this incidental finding is explained by more potent gastric acid inhibition by omeprazole or might be caused by the different mode of drug action. Basal and stimulated gastric and duodenal bicarbonate secretion rates were measured in the same subjects in control experiments (n = 17) and after pretreatment with high dose omeprazole (n = 17) and ranitidine (n = 9), respectively, by use of a technique permitting simultaneous measurements. Concentrations of bicarbonate were measured in the respective effluents by the method of back titration. Both omeprazole and ranitidine completely inhibited gastric acid secretion (pH 6.9 v 6.8; p > 0.05). Omeprazole caused higher rates of basal (mean (SEM)) (597 (48) v 351 (39) mumol/h; p < 0.02) and vagally stimulated (834 (72) v 474 (66) mumol/h; p < 0.02), but not acid stimulated (3351 (678) v 2550 (456) mumol/h; p > 0.05) duodenal bicarbonate secretion compared with control experiments. Also the combination of omeprazole and ranitidine increased (p = 0.05) duodenal bicarbonate secretion, while ranitidine alone caused no change in either basal or stimulated secretion. In the stomach basal as well as vagally stimulated bicarbonate secretion was independent of the means of acid inhibition. These results show that the proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, promotes proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion apparently independent of its gastric acid inhibitory effect. The mechanism of action remains speculative. PMID:8566861

  15. The mucosal immune system for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Aayam; Azegamia, Tatsuhiko; Kiyonoa, Hiroshi

    2014-11-20

    Mucosal surfaces are continuously exposed to the external environment and therefore represent the largest lymphoid organ of the body. In the mucosal immune system, gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs), including Peyer's patches and isolated lymphoid follicles, play an important role in the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in the gut. GALTs have unique organogenesis characteristics and interact with the network of dendritic cells and T cells for the simultaneous induction and regulation of IgA responses and oral tolerance. In these lymphoid tissues, antigens are up taken by M cells in the epithelial layer, and antigen-specific immune responses are subsequently initiated by GALT cells. Nasopharynx- and tear-duct-associated lymphoid tissues (NALTs and TALTs) are key organized lymphoid structures in the respiratory tract and ocular cavities, respectively, and have been shown to interact with each other. Mucosal surfaces are also characterized by host-microbe interactions that affect the genesis and maturation of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues and the induction and regulation of innate and acquired mucosal immune responses. Because most harmful pathogens enter the body through mucosal surfaces by ingestion, inhalation, or sexual contact, the mucosa is a candidate site for vaccination. Mucosal vaccination has some physiological and practical advantages, such as decreased costs and reduced risk of needle-stick injuries and transmission of bloodborne diseases, and it is painless. Recently, the application of modern bioengineering and biochemical engineering technologies, including gene transformation and manipulation systems, resulted in the development of systems to express vaccine antigens in transgenic plants and nanogels, which will usher in a new era of delivery systems for mucosal vaccine antigens. In this review, based on some of our research group's thirty seven years of progress and effort, we highlight the unique features of mucosal immune

  16. Animal models of mucositis: implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Joanne M; Gibson, Rachel J; Keefe, Dorothy M K

    2011-01-01

    Alimentary mucositis is a major acute complication in the clinical setting, occurring in a large percentage of patients undergoing cytotoxic therapy. One of the major problems with alimentary mucositis is that the underlying mechanisms behind its development are not entirely understood, which makes it extremely difficult to develop effective interventions. Animal models provide a critical source of knowledge when sampling from patients is unavailable or interventions are yet to be fully tested. This review focuses on the animal models used to increase our understanding of the mechanisms of mucositis and translate new antimucotoxic agents into clinical trials.

  17. Oral mucositis. A complication of radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, C.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Oral mucositis is a complication of head and neck radiotherapy. It is understood what causes the inflammation and what biological tissue changes occur, however, a definite cure for oral mucositis has not yet been found. Supportive treatments, analgesics, antimicrobials and anti-inflammatory agents have been prescribed, none of which has been a thorough measure of treatment. An effective cure for oral mucositis is still in the midst of scientific research. In the interim local palliative treatments will help to alleviate the patients', debilitating symptoms.

  18. Role of helminths in regulating mucosal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Joel V; Summers, Robert W; Elliott, David E

    2005-09-01

    The rapid rise in prevalence of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) in highly developed countries suggests that environmental change engenders risk for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Eradication of parasitic worms (helminths) through increased hygiene may be one such change that has led to increased prevalence of these diseases. Helminths alter host mucosal and systemic immunity, inhibiting dysregulated inflammatory responses. Animals exposed to helminths are protected from experimental colitis, encephalitis, and diabetes. Patients with CD or UC improve when exposed to whipworm. Lamina propria (LP) mononuclear cells from helminth-colonized mice make less interleukin (IL)-12 p40 and IFN-gamma, but more IL-4, IL-13, IL-10, TGF-beta, and PGE(2) compared to LP mononuclear cells from naive mice. Systemic immune responses show similar skewing toward Th2 and regulatory cytokine production in worm-colonized animal models and humans. Recent reports suggest that helminths induce regulatory T cell activity. These effects by once ubiquitous organisms may have protected individuals from many of the emerging immune-mediated illnesses like IBD, multiple sclerosis, type I diabetes, and asthma.

  19. Establishment of a hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension model by hepatic arterial perfusion with 80% alcohol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; He, Fu-Liang; Liu, Fu-Quan; Yue, Zhen-Dong; Zhao, Hong-Wei

    2015-08-28

    To determine the feasibility and safety of establishing a porcine hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension model by hepatic arterial perfusion with 80% alcohol. Twenty-one healthy Guizhou miniature pigs were randomly divided into three experimental groups and three control groups. The pigs in the three experimental groups were subjected to hepatic arterial perfusion with 7, 12 and 17 mL of 80% alcohol, respectively, while those in the three control groups underwent hepatic arterial perfusion with 7, 12 and 17 mL of saline, respectively. Hepatic arteriography and direct portal phlebography were performed on all animals before and after perfusion, and the portal venous pressure and diameter were measured before perfusion, immediately after perfusion, and at 2, 4 and 6 wk after perfusion. The following procedures were performed at different time points: routine blood sampling, blood biochemistry, blood coagulation and blood ammonia tests before surgery, and at 2, 4 and 6 wk after surgery; hepatic biopsy before surgery, within 6 h after surgery, and at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 wk after surgery; abdominal enhanced computed tomography examination before surgery and at 6 wk after surgery; autopsy and multi-point sampling of various liver lobes for histological examination at 6 wk after surgery. In experimental group 1, different degrees of hepatic fibrosis were observed, and one pig developed hepatic cirrhosis. In experimental group 2, there were cases of hepatic cirrhosis, different degrees of increased portal venous pressure, and intrahepatic portal venous bypass, but neither extrahepatic portal-systemic bypass circulation nor death occurred. In experimental group 3, two animals died and three animals developed hepatic cirrhosis, and different degrees of increased portal venous pressure and intrahepatic portal venous bypass were also observed, but there was no extrahepatic portal-systemic bypass circulation. It is feasible to establish an animal model of hepatic cirrhosis and

  20. A regenerative approach towards mucosal fenestration closure.

    PubMed

    Gandi, Padma; Anumala, Naveen; Reddy, Amarender; Chandra, Rampalli Viswa

    2013-06-06

    Mucosal fenestration is an opening or an interstice through the oral mucosa. A lesion which occurs with greater frequency than generally realised, its occurrence is attributed to a myriad of causes. Mucogingival procedures including connective tissue grafts, free gingival grafts and lateral pedicle grafts are generally considered to be the treatment of choice in the closure of a mucosal fenestration. More often, these procedures are performed in conjunction with other procedures such as periradicular surgery and with bone grafts. However, the concomitant use of gingival grafts and bone grafts in mucosal fenestrations secondary to infections in sites exhibiting severe bone loss is highly debatable. In this article, we report two cases of mucosal fenestrations secondary to trauma and their management by regenerative periodontal surgery with the placement of guided tissue regeneration membrane and bone graft. The final outcome was a complete closure of the fenestration in both the cases.

  1. A regenerative approach towards mucosal fenestration closure

    PubMed Central

    Gandi, Padma; Anumala, Naveen; Reddy, Amarender; Viswa Chandra, Rampalli

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal fenestration is an opening or an interstice through the oral mucosa. A lesion which occurs with greater frequency than generally realised, its occurrence is attributed to a myriad of causes. Mucogingival procedures including connective tissue grafts, free gingival grafts and lateral pedicle grafts are generally considered to be the treatment of choice in the closure of a mucosal fenestration. More often, these procedures are performed in conjunction with other procedures such as periradicular surgery and with bone grafts. However, the concomitant use of gingival grafts and bone grafts in mucosal fenestrations secondary to infections in sites exhibiting severe bone loss is highly debatable. In this article, we report two cases of mucosal fenestrations secondary to trauma and their management by regenerative periodontal surgery with the placement of guided tissue regeneration membrane and bone graft. The final outcome was a complete closure of the fenestration in both the cases. PMID:23749826

  2. Microbiota and mucosal immunity in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Bruno M; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20 years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota.

  3. Topical therapy for mucosal yeast infections.

    PubMed

    Summers, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal yeast infection is best understood as a consequence of compromised mucosal cell-mediated and innate immunity. Defense against oral candidiasis is dominantly cell mediated. The innate immune system may play the main role in regulating vulvovaginal yeast infection. Conditions that compromise cell-mediated immunity such as leukemia, severe illness and HIV infection must be considered as predisposing factors for recurrent oral candidiasis. Compromise of vaginal innate immunity due to mucosal allergy or due to a genetic defect such as mannose-binding lectin deficiency contributes to chronic vulvovaginal yeast infection. Treatment of cofactors must be considered in order to achieve control in recurrent mucosal yeast infection. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Targeting Mucosal Healing in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Aarti; Wasan, Sharmeel K.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of medical treatment for Crohn's disease includes improving patients' quality of life while reducing the need for hospitalization and surgery. The current medical armamentarium includes 5-aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, immunomodulators, and biologic agents. In the past, response to treatment was measured by clinical improvement in symptoms; however, with the advent of disease-modifying medications, mucosal healing has emerged as an increasingly important goal of therapy. Mucosal healing, or endoscopic remission, is associated with increased rates of clinical remission, fewer hospitalizations, and fewer abdominal surgeries. Both the immunomodulator and biologic classes of medications are effective at inducing mucosal healing. Despite several limitations, mucosal healing has become a desirable and valid measure of disease activity. PMID:21869869

  5. Transgenic killer commensal bacteria as mucosal protectants.

    PubMed

    Polonelli, L

    2001-05-01

    As first line of defense against the majority of infections and primary site for their transmission, mucosal surfaces of the oral cavity and genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and respiratory tracts represent the most suitable sites to deliver protective agents for the prevention of infectious diseases. Mucosal protection is important not only for life threatening diseases but also for opportunistic infections which currently represent a serious burden in terms of morbidity, mortality, and cost of cures. Candida albicans is among the most prevalent causes of mucosal infections not only in immuno-compromised patients, such as HIV-infected subjects who are frequently affected by oral and esophageal candidiasis, but also in otherwise healthy individuals, as in the case of acute vaginitis. Unfortunately, current strategies for mucosal protection against candidiasis are severely limited by the lack of effective vaccines and the relative paucity and toxicity of commercially available antifungal drugs.

  6. Microbiota and Mucosal Immunity in Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Bruno M.; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20 years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota. PMID:25821449

  7. Mucosal Vaccination against Tuberculosis Using Inert Bioparticles

    PubMed Central

    Reljic, Rajko; Sibley, Laura; Huang, Jen-Min; Pepponi, Ilaria; Hoppe, Andreas; Hong, Huynh A.

    2013-01-01

    Needle-free, mucosal immunization is a highly desirable strategy for vaccination against many pathogens, especially those entering through the respiratory mucosa, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Unfortunately, mucosal vaccination against tuberculosis (TB) is impeded by a lack of suitable adjuvants and/or delivery platforms that could induce a protective immune response in humans. Here, we report on a novel biotechnological approach for mucosal vaccination against TB that overcomes some of the current limitations. This is achieved by coating protective TB antigens onto the surface of inert bacterial spores, which are then delivered to the respiratory tract. Our data showed that mice immunized nasally with coated spores developed humoral and cellular immune responses and multifunctional T cells and, most importantly, presented significantly reduced bacterial loads in their lungs and spleens following pathogenic challenge. We conclude that this new vaccine delivery platform merits further development as a mucosal vaccine for TB and possibly also other respiratory pathogens. PMID:23959722

  8. Evaluating acellular versus cellular perfusate composition during prolonged ex vivo lung perfusion after initial cold ischaemia for 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Becker, Simon; Steinmeyer, Jasmin; Avsar, Murat; Höffler, Klaus; Salman, Jawad; Haverich, Axel; Warnecke, Gregor; Ochs, Matthias; Schnapper, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has developed as a powerful technique to evaluate particularly marginal donor lungs prior to transplantation. In this study, acellular and cellular perfusate compositions were compared in an identical experimental setting as no consensus has been reached on a preferred technique yet. Porcine lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h on the basis of an acellular or a cellular perfusate composition after 24 h of cold ischaemia as defined organ stress. During perfusion, haemodynamic and respiratory parameters were monitored. After EVLP, the lung condition was assessed by light and transmission electron microscopy. Aerodynamic parameters did not show significant differences between groups and remained within the in vivo range during EVLP. Mean oxygenation indices were 491 ± 39 in the acellular group and 513 ± 53 in the cellular group. Groups only differed significantly in terms of higher pulmonary artery pressure and vascular resistance in the cellular group. Lung histology and ultrastructure were largely well preserved after prolonged EVLP and showed only minor structural alterations which were similarly present in both groups. Prolonged acellular and cellular EVLP for 12 h are both feasible with lungs prechallenged by ischaemic organ stress. Physiological and ultrastructural analysis showed no superiority of either acellular or cellular perfusate composition.

  9. Polyamines and Gut Mucosal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, Jennifer; Chang, Elizabeth T.; Wang, Jian-Ying; Rao, Jaladanki N.

    2012-01-01

    The epithelium of gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa has the most rapid turnover rate of any tissue in the body and its integrity is preserved through the dynamic balance between cell migration, proliferation, growth arrest and apoptosis. To maintain tissue homeostasis of the GI mucosa, the rates of epithelial cell division and apoptosis must be highly regulated by various extracellular and intracellular factors including cellular polyamines. Natural polyamines spermidine, spermine and their precursor putrescine, are organic cations in eukaryotic cells and are implicated in the control of multiple signaling pathways and distinct cellular functions. Normal intestinal epithelial growth depends on the available supply of polyamines to the dividing cells in the crypts, and polyamines also regulate intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) apoptosis. Although the specific molecular processes controlled by polyamines remains to be fully defined, increasing evidence indicates that polyamines regulate intestinal epithelial integrity by modulating the expression of various growth-related genes. In this review, we will extrapolate the current state of scientific knowledge regarding the roles of polyamines in gut mucosal homeostasis and highlight progress in cellular and molecular mechanisms of polyamines and their potential clinical applications. PMID:25237589

  10. Cancer therapy-related oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Redding, Spencer W

    2005-08-01

    Oral mucositis is a common side effect of cancer therapies, particularly radiation therapy for head and neck cancer and various forms of chemotherapy. It commonly results in severe oral pain that can compromise the duration and success of cancer management. Hospitalizations are common because patients lose the ability to take anything by mouth due to severe pain and must have alimentation supported during this period. Pain management usually requires potent narcotic analgesia. Cancer therapy-related oral mucositis is commonly described as the most significant and debilitating acute complication associated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Until recently, cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis was thought to be a process involving the epithelium only. Evidence is building that the process of oral mucositis involves far more than just the epithelium, but includes multiple cellular processes of the submucosa as well. Many strategies have been evaluated to prevent oral mucositis, but the data is confusing since it is often conflicting. Therapy with the growth factor, KGF1, appears promising, as it is the only medication currently approved by the FDA. A multifaceted approach that targets the entire mucositis process will probably be needed to optimize overall prevention.

  11. The Ethanol-Induced Stimulation of Rat Duodenal Mucosal Bicarbonate Secretion In Vivo Is Critically Dependent on Luminal Cl–

    PubMed Central

    Sommansson, Anna; Wan Saudi, Wan Salman; Nylander, Olof; Sjöblom, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol may induce metabolic and functional changes in gastrointestinal epithelial cells, contributing to impaired mucosal barrier function. Duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion (DBS) is a primary epithelial defense against gastric acid and also has an important function in maintaining the homeostasis of the juxtamucosal microenvironment. The aim in this study was to investigate the effects of the luminal perfusion of moderate concentrations of ethanol in vivo on epithelial DBS, fluid secretion and paracellular permeability. Under thiobarbiturate anesthesia, a ∼30-mm segment of the proximal duodenum with an intact blood supply was perfused in situ in rats. The effects on DBS, duodenal transepithelial net fluid flux and the blood-to-lumen clearance of 51Cr-EDTA were investigated. Perfusing the duodenum with isotonic solutions of 10% or 15% ethanol-by-volume for 30 min increased DBS in a concentration-dependent manner, while the net fluid flux did not change. Pre-treatment with the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh172 (i.p. or i.v.) did not change the secretory response to ethanol, while removing Cl− from the luminal perfusate abolished the ethanol-induced increase in DBS. The administration of hexamethonium (i.v.) but not capsazepine significantly reduced the basal net fluid flux and the ethanol-induced increase in DBS. Perfusing the duodenum with a combination of 1.0 mM HCl and 15% ethanol induced significantly greater increases in DBS than 15% ethanol or 1.0 mM HCl alone but did not influence fluid flux. Our data demonstrate that ethanol induces increases in DBS through a mechanism that is critically dependent on luminal Cl− and partly dependent on enteric neural pathways involving nicotinic receptors. Ethanol and HCl appears to stimulate DBS via the activation of different bicarbonate transporting mechanisms. PMID:25033198

  12. The ethanol-induced stimulation of rat duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion in vivo is critically dependent on luminal Cl-.

    PubMed

    Sommansson, Anna; Wan Saudi, Wan Salman; Nylander, Olof; Sjöblom, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol may induce metabolic and functional changes in gastrointestinal epithelial cells, contributing to impaired mucosal barrier function. Duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion (DBS) is a primary epithelial defense against gastric acid and also has an important function in maintaining the homeostasis of the juxtamucosal microenvironment. The aim in this study was to investigate the effects of the luminal perfusion of moderate concentrations of ethanol in vivo on epithelial DBS, fluid secretion and paracellular permeability. Under thiobarbiturate anesthesia, a ∼30-mm segment of the proximal duodenum with an intact blood supply was perfused in situ in rats. The effects on DBS, duodenal transepithelial net fluid flux and the blood-to-lumen clearance of 51Cr-EDTA were investigated. Perfusing the duodenum with isotonic solutions of 10% or 15% ethanol-by-volume for 30 min increased DBS in a concentration-dependent manner, while the net fluid flux did not change. Pre-treatment with the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh172 (i.p. or i.v.) did not change the secretory response to ethanol, while removing Cl- from the luminal perfusate abolished the ethanol-induced increase in DBS. The administration of hexamethonium (i.v.) but not capsazepine significantly reduced the basal net fluid flux and the ethanol-induced increase in DBS. Perfusing the duodenum with a combination of 1.0 mM HCl and 15% ethanol induced significantly greater increases in DBS than 15% ethanol or 1.0 mM HCl alone but did not influence fluid flux. Our data demonstrate that ethanol induces increases in DBS through a mechanism that is critically dependent on luminal Cl- and partly dependent on enteric neural pathways involving nicotinic receptors. Ethanol and HCl appears to stimulate DBS via the activation of different bicarbonate transporting mechanisms.

  13. Viable neurons with luxury perfusion in hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Wong, C Y; Luciano, M G; MacIntyre, W J; Brunken, R C; Hahn, J F; Go, R T

    1997-09-01

    A woman with hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis had functional imaging of cerebral perfusion and metabolism to demonstrate the effects of endoscopic third ventriculostomy--a new form of internal surgical shunting. Technetium-99m-ECD SPECT and 18F-FDG PET showed regional luxury perfusion at the left frontal region. Three months after a successful third ventriculostomy, a repeated imaging of cerebral perfusion and metabolism showed resolution of luxury perfusion and global improvement of both perfusion and metabolism. This concurred with postoperative clinical improvement. The paired imaging of cerebral perfusion and metabolism provides more information than just imaging perfusion or metabolism. Thus, the detection of perfusion and metabolism mismatch may open a new window of opportunity for surgical intervention.

  14. Construction and validation of a microprocessor controlled extracorporal circuit in rats for the optimization of isolated limb perfusion.

    PubMed

    Gürtler, Ulrich; Fuchs, Peter; Stangelmayer, Achim; Bernhardt, Günther; Buschauer, Armin; Spruss, Thilo

    2004-12-01

    Although a few experimental approaches to isolated limb perfusion (ILP) are described in the literature, none of these animal models mimics the clinical perfusion techniques adequately to improve the technique of ILP on the basis of valid preclinical data. Therefore, we developed an ILP setup in rats allowing online monitoring of essential perfusion parameters such as temperature (in perfusate, various tissues, and rectum), pH (perfusate), perfusion pressure, and O(2) concentration (in perfusate, tissue), by a tailor-made data acquisition system. This setup permits close supervision of vital parameters during ILP. Various interdependencies, concerning the flow rate and the pressure of perfusate as well as tissue oxygenation were registered. For the measurement of pO(2) values in the perfusate and in different regions of the perfused hind limb, a novel type of microoptode based on quenching of a fluorescent dye was devised. Stable normothermic (37 degrees C) perfusion conditions were maintained at a constant perfusion pressure in the range of 40-60 mm Hg by administration of the spasmo lytic moxaverine (0.5 mg/mL of perfusate as initial dose) at a perfusate flow rate of 0.5 mL/min for 60 min. At the end of an ILP, there were no signs of tissue damage, neither concerning laboratory data (K(+), myoglobin, creatine kinase, lactic dehydrogenase) nor histopathological criteria. The reported ILP model is not only well suited to investigate the effects of hyperthermia but also to assess the efficacy of new antineoplastic approaches, when nude rats, bearing human tumours in the hind limbs, are used.

  15. Modeling laser irradiation conditions for mucosal tissues in antimicrobial photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Astaf'eva, L. G.; Plavskii, V. Yu.

    2012-05-01

    We use computer modeling to analzye empirically selected conditions for antimicrobial photodynamic therapy of mucosal tissues. We calculate the optical and thermal fields for experimental conditions for low-intensity (cold) laser irradiation used in treatment of lesions in mucosal tissues stained by methylene blue: λ = 670 nm, power density 150-300 mW/cm2, doses 9-18 J/cm2; λ = 632.8 nm, 15 mW/cm2, dose 4.5 J/cm2. For numerical estimates, we used the optical characteristics of methylene blue and three layers of mucosal tissues at the laser radiation wavelengths, and also the thermal characteristics of the tissues. The experimental conditions were optimized using the ratio of the tissue penetration depth for the absorbed optical energy and the penetration depth of methylene blue into the lesion, while maintaining safe tissue heating temperatures.

  16. Importance of organ preservation solution composition in reducing myocardial edema during machine perfusion for heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cobert, M L; Peltz, M; West, L M; Jessen, M E

    2010-06-01

    Machine perfusion preservation has been used experimentally to extend the storage interval of donor hearts. We previously demonstrated that machine perfusion with glucose-supplemented Celsior preservation solution led to superior reperfusion function but resulted in increased myocardial edema compared with conventional static preservation. We hypothesized that other solutions that contain an oncotic agent, such as University of Wisconsin Machine Perfusion Solution (UWMPS), might reduce graft edema development while maintaining myocardial oxidative metabolism during long-term storage. Canine hearts were stored and perfused in a perfusion preservation device (LifeCradle; Organ Transport Systems) after cardioplegic arrest and donor cardiectomy. Hearts were perfused either with glucose-supplemented Celsior (which lacks an oncotic agent) or UWMPS (which contains hydroxyethyl starch) at 5 degrees C in the perfusion device over 10 hours. Oxygen consumption (MVO(2)), lactate accumulation, regional flow distribution, and myocardial water content were measured. Hearts in both groups continued to extract oxygen over the entire perfusion interval. Lactate accumulation was minimal in both groups. Both solutions delivered perfusate evenly to all regions of myocardium. Heart weight increase (Celsior 31.3 +/- 4.3%, UWMPS -3.3 +/- 1.9%) and final myocardial water content (Celsior 80.2 +/- 1.3%, UWMPS 75.9 +/- 0.3%) were higher in the Celsior group (P < .005). Donor hearts can be supported by a perfusion device over relatively extended storage intervals. These organs continue to undergo oxidative metabolism with little lactate accumulation. An oncotic agent appears to be important in limiting increases in myocardial water content. UWMPS appears to be superior for perfusion preservation of myocardium by reducing edema development during storage.

  17. Mucosal and cutaneous capnometry for the assessment of tissue hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Mallat, Jihad; Vallet, Benoit

    2017-10-04

    In critically ill patients, tissue hypoperfusion is an important cause leading to multi- organ dysfunction and death, and it cannot always be detected by measuring standard global hemodynamic and oxygen-derived parameters. Gastric intramucosal PCO2 as measured by gastric tonometry has been recognized to be of clinical value as a prognostic factor, in assessing the effects of particular therapeutic interventions, and as an end-point of resuscitation. However, this technique has several limitations that have hampered its implementation in clinical practice. The sublingual tissue bed has been shown to be damaged in models of shock, and microcirculatory changes in this area may indicate imminent changes in other important organs. The measurement of sublingual mucosal PCO2 (PslCO2) by sublingual capnography is technically simple, noninvasive and gives near instantaneous results. Clinical studies have established that high PslCO2 values and, more especially, high PslCO2 gap (PslCO2 - arterial PCO2) values are correlated with impaired microcirculatory blood flow and a poor outcome in critically ill patients. Sublingual capnography seems to be the ideal noninvasive monitoring tool to evaluate the severity of shock states and the adequacy of tissue perfusion. However, clinical studies are needed to determine the clinical utility of PslCO2 gap monitoring as end-point target to guide resuscitation in critically ill patients.

  18. Melatonin pretreatment improves gastric mucosal blood flow and maintains intestinal barrier function during hemorrhagic shock in dogs.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Christian; Weber, Andreas P M; Wallenfang, Martin; Hoffmann, Till; Mettler-Altmann, Tabea; Truse, Richard; Bauer, Inge; Picker, Olaf; Mathes, Alexander M

    2017-05-01

    Melatonin improves hepatic perfusion after hemorrhagic shock and may reduce stress-induced gastric lesions. This study was designed to investigate whether pretreatment with melatonin may influence gastric mucosal microcirculatory perfusion (μflow), oxygenation (μHbO2 ), or intestinal barrier function during physiological and hemorrhagic conditions in dogs. In a randomized crossover study, five anesthetized foxhounds received melatonin 100 μg kg(-1) or vehicle (ethanol 5%) intravenously in the absence or presence of hemorrhagic shock (60 minutes, -20% blood volume). Systemic hemodynamic variables, gastric mucosal perfusion, and oxygenation were recorded continuously; intestinal barrier function was assessed intermittently via xylose absorption. During hemorrhagic shock, melatonin significantly attenuated the decrease in μflow, compared with vehicle (-19±9 vs -43±10 aU, P<.05), without influence on μHbO2 . A significant increase in xylose absorption was detected during hemorrhage in vehicle-treated dogs, compared with sham-operated animals (13±2 vs 8±1 relative amounts, P<.05); this was absent in melatonin-treated animals (6±1 relative amounts). Melatonin did not influence macrocirculation. Melatonin improves regional blood flow suggesting improved oxygen delivery in gastric mucosa during hemorrhagic shock. This could provide a mechanism for the observed protection of intestinal barrier function in dogs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Effects of long chain fatty acids on solute absorption: perfusion studies in the human jejunum.

    PubMed Central

    Ammon, H V; Thomas, P J; Phillips, S F

    1977-01-01

    Perfusion studies were performed in healthy volunteers to test the hypothesis that net fluid secretion induced by fatty acids is accompanied by parallel reduction in solute transport. Ricinoleic acid provoked a marked net secretion of fluid and concomitantly inhibited the absorption of all solutes tested; these included glucose, xylose, L-leucine, L-lysine, Folic acid, and 2-mono-olein. Oleic acid also reduced net fluid and solute transport, but was less potent in reducing solute absorption than was ricinoleic acid. When fluid secretion was induced osmotically with mannitol, glucose and xylose absorption was not affected. The mechanism for this generalised effect of fatty acids on solute absorption is uncertain, possibly nonspecific, and might be related to mucosal damage and altered mucosal permeability induced by these agents. PMID:590838

  20. Three-dimensional optical micro-angiography maps directional blood perfusion deep within microcirculation tissue beds in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruikang K.

    2007-12-01

    Optical micro-angiography (OMAG) is a recently developed method of imaging localized blood perfusion at capillary level resolution within microcirculatory beds. This paper reports that the OMAG is capable of directional blood perfusion mapping in vivo. This is achieved simply by translating the mirror located in the reference arm back and forth while 3D imaging is performed. The mirror which moves toward the incident beam gives the blood perfusion that flows away from the beam direction and vice versa. The approach is experimentally demonstrated by imaging of a flow phantom and then cerebro-vascular perfusion of a live mouse with cranium intact.

  1. Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging in myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Kadota, K.; Kambara, H.; Torizuka, K.

    1985-08-01

    TI-201 myocardial perfusion imaging was performed in six patients with clinically documented myocarditis. Each case manifested electrocardiographic abnormalities with elevation of serum cardiac enzymes and no significant stenosis of the coronary arteries observed on angiogram. Resting TI-201 images were visually assessed by three observers. Focal perfusion defects were observed in three cases (50%), among which two showed multiple perfusion defects. Emission computed tomography using TI-201 clearly delineated multifocal lesions in the first case. On the other hand, no significant perfusion defects were noted in the remaining three cases. Thus, myocarditis should be considered as one of the disease entities that may produce perfusion defects on TI-201 myocardial imaging.

  2. Perfusion studies in cholera: methods and procedures.

    PubMed

    van Loon, F P; Gyr, K; Banik, A K

    1992-09-01

    This paper reviews the characteristics of perfusion techniques in the study of intestinal functions by specifically examining the methods and procedures of perfusion in patients with diarrhoea due to infection with V. cholerae 01. Because of abundant jejunal secretion of water and electrolytes in cholera, perfusion studies require special approaches with regard to patient preparation, use of tubing material, selection of markers, and rate of perfusion. A discussion on specific problems involved in marker perfusion techniques in cholera and on the interpretation of the results is followed by practical recommendations.

  3. Visceral and mucosal involvement in neonatal haemangiomatosis.

    PubMed

    Maruani, A; Piram, M; Sirinelli, D; Herbreteau, D; Saliba, E; Machet, M C; Lorette, G

    2012-10-01

    Two types of neonatal haemangiomatosis (NH) are distinguished: diffuse which is associated with a high rate of mortality linked to mucosal/visceral involvement, and benign. First, this study aimed to examine the frequency of mucosal and visceral (especially hepatic) involvement in NH, according to skin extension, and second, it aimed to examine clinical, pathological (with glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1) immunostaining), and imaging features of NH, including follow-up data. This was a descriptive retrospective study carried out in the University Hospital Center of Tours, France. The study included 19 patients with cutaneous NH (number of skin haemangiomas ranging from 5 to >100). Mucosal involvement was observed in 32% of all cases (100% and 19% in diffuse and other cutaneous cases respectively) and hepatic involvement in 42% (67% and 38% respectively). The number of hepatic haemangiomas ranged from 1 to >10. Half of the hepatic haemangiomas cases exhibited increased hepatic arterial blood flow. Mucosal and hepatic involvement was frequent in cases with a high number of cutaneous haemangiomas (>100), but only frequency of mucosal involvement was statistically significant (P = 0.021). © 2011 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2011 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  4. Does machine perfusion decrease ischemia reperfusion injury?

    PubMed

    Bon, D; Delpech, P-O; Chatauret, N; Hauet, T; Badet, L; Barrou, B

    2014-06-01

    In 1990's, use of machine perfusion for organ preservation has been abandoned because of improvement of preservation solutions, efficient without perfusion, easy to use and cheaper. Since the last 15 years, a renewed interest for machine perfusion emerged based on studies performed on preclinical model and seems to make consensus in case of expanded criteria donors or deceased after cardiac death donations. We present relevant studies highlighted the efficiency of preservation with hypothermic machine perfusion compared to static cold storage. Machines for organ preservation being in constant evolution, we also summarized recent developments included direct oxygenation of the perfusat. Machine perfusion technology also enables organ reconditioning during the last hours of preservation through a short period of perfusion on hypothermia, subnormothermia or normothermia. We present significant or low advantages for machine perfusion against ischemia reperfusion injuries regarding at least one primary parameter: risk of DFG, organ function or graft survival.

  5. Double tracer autoradiographic method for sequential evaluation of regional cerebral perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, H.; Tsuji, S.; Oba, H.; Kinuya, K.; Terada, H.; Sumiya, H.; Shiba, K.; Mori, H.; Hisada, K.; Maeda, T. )

    1989-01-01

    A new double tracer autoradiographic method for the sequential evaluation of altered regional cerebral perfusion in the same animal is presented. This method is based on the sequential injection of two tracers, {sup 99m}Tc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime and N-isopropyl-({sup 125}I)p-iodoamphetamine. This method is validated in the assessment of brovincamine effects on regional cerebral perfusion in an experimental model of chronic brain ischemia in the rat. The drug enhanced perfusion recovery in low-flow areas, selectively in surrounding areas of infarction. The results suggest that this technique is of potential use in the study of neuropharmacological effects applied during the experiment.

  6. Design verification of a compact system for detecting tissue perfusion using bimodal diffuse optical technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakela, Julia M.; Hedrick, Taylor L.; Lee, Seung Yup; Vishwanath, Karthik; Zanfardino, Sara; Chung, Yooree G.; Helton, Michael C.; Kolodziejski, Noah J.; Stapels, Christopher J.; McAdams, Daniel R.; Fernandez, Daniel E.; Christian, James F.; Feinberg, Stephen E.; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2017-02-01

    It is essential to monitor tissue perfusion during and after reconstructive surgery, as restricted blood flow can result in graft failures. Current clinical procedures are insufficient to monitor tissue perfusion, as they are intermittent and often subjective. To address this unmet clinical need, a compact, low-cost, multimodal diffuse correlation spectroscopy and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system was developed. We verified system performance via tissue phantoms and experimental protocols for rigorous bench testing. Quantitative data analysis methods were employed and tested to enable the extraction of tissue perfusion parameters. This design verification study assures data integrity in future in vivo studies.

  7. Connexins in respiratory and gastrointestinal mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Bou Saab, Joanna; Losa, Davide; Chanson, Marc; Ruez, Richard

    2014-04-17

    The mucosal lining forms the physical and chemical barrier that protects against pathogens and hostile particles and harbors its own population of bacteria, fungi and archea, known as the microbiota. The immune system controls tolerance of this population of microorganisms that have proven to be beneficial for its host. Keeping its physical integrity and a correct balance with the microbiota, the mucosa preserves its homeostasis and its protective function and maintains host's health. However, in some conditions, pathogens may succeed in breaching mucosal homeostasis and successfully infecting the host. In this review we will discuss the role the mucosa plays in the defense against bacterial pathogens by considering the gap junction protein connexins. We will detail their implication in mucosal homeostasis and upon infection with bacteria in the respiratory and the gastrointestinal tracts. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mucosal Immunity and Candida albicans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, David L.; Naglik, Julian R.

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between mucosal surfaces and microbial microbiota are key to host defense, health, and disease. These surfaces are exposed to high numbers of microbes and must be capable of distinguishing between those that are beneficial or avirulent and those that will invade and cause disease. Our understanding of the mechanisms involved in these discriminatory processes has recently begun to expand as new studies bring to light the importance of epithelial cells and novel immune cell subsets such as Th17 T cells in these processes. Elucidating how these mechanisms function will improve our understanding of many diverse diseases and improve our ability to treat patients suffering from these conditions. In our voyage to discover these mechanisms, mucosal interactions with opportunistic commensal organisms such as the fungus Candida albicans provide insights that are invaluable. Here, we review current knowledge of the interactions between C. albicans and epithelial surfaces and how this may shape our understanding of microbial-mucosal interactions. PMID:21776285

  9. Oral mucosal diseases: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Stoopler, Eric T; Sollecito, Thomas P

    2014-11-01

    Oral mucosal diseases encompass several common conditions that affect the general population. Some of these disorders present with signs and symptoms that are pathognomonic for the condition, whereas others present with similar features that can make clinical diagnosis difficult to achieve. It is important for physicians to have a clear understanding of these disorders to provide appropriate care to patients. This article reviews clinical aspects of common oral mucosal disorders, including candidiasis, herpes simplex viral infections, aphthous stomatitis, lichen planus, pemphigus vulgaris, and mucous membrane pemphigoid.

  10. Modeling of nanotherapeutics delivery based on tumor perfusion

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Anne L.; Abdollahi, Behnaz; Martinez, Carlos J.; Burey, Lacey A.; Landis, Melissa D.; Chang, Jenny C.; Ferrari, Mauro; Frieboes, Hermann B.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneities in the perfusion of solid tumors prevent optimal delivery of nanotherapeutics. Clinical imaging protocols to obtain patient-specific data have proven difficult to implement. It is challenging to determine which perfusion features hold greater prognostic value and to relate measurements to vessel structure and function. With the advent of systemically administered nanotherapeutics, whose delivery is dependent on overcoming diffusive and convective barriers to transport, such knowledge is increasingly important. We describe a framework for the automated evaluation of vascular perfusion curves measured at the single vessel level. Primary tumor fragments, collected from triple-negative breast cancer patients and grown as xenografts in mice, were injected with fluorescence contrast and monitored using intravital microscopy. The time to arterial peak and venous delay, two features whose probability distributions were measured directly from time-series curves, were analyzed using a Fuzzy C-mean (FCM) supervised classifier in order to rank individual tumors according to their perfusion characteristics. The resulting rankings correlated inversely with experimental nanoparticle accumulation measurements, enabling modeling of nanotherapeutics delivery without requiring any underlying assumptions about tissue structure or function, or heterogeneities contained within. With additional calibration, these methodologies may enable the study of nanotherapeutics delivery strategies in a variety of tumor models. PMID:24039540

  11. Dynamic CT head phantom for perfusion and angiography studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, K.; Blazeski, A.; Dannecker, K.; Lee, Q. Y.; Holscher, C.; Donahue, C.; van Kampen, W.

    2010-03-01

    Contrast imaging is a compelling enhancement for the portable, flat panel-based brain CT scanner currently under development at Xoran. Due to the relative low temporal resolution of flat panel detectors, enabling tomographic imaging on such platform requires optimizing the imaging and injection protocols. A dynamic CT head phantom was designed to facilitate this task. The Dynamic Perfusion and Angiography Model (PAM), mimics tissue attenuation in CT images, provides physiological timing for angiography and perfusion studies, and moves fluid with properties similar to those of blood. The design consists of an arterial system, which contains bifurcating vessels that feed into perfusion chambers, mimicking blood flow through capillaries and smaller vessels, and a venous system, which is symmetrical to the arterial side and drains the perfusion chambers. The variation of geometry and flow rate in the phantom provides the physiological total time that fluid spends in the head, and the difference in material densities correlates to CT numbers for biological tissues. This paper discusses the design of Dynamic PAM and shows experimental results demonstrating its ability to realistically simulate blood flow. Results of dynamic imaging studies of the phantom are also presented.

  12. Limited myocardial perfusion reserve in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.A.; Haynie, M. )

    1990-03-01

    Experimental studies in animals have suggested that coronary flow reserve may be limited in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Accordingly, to noninvasively determine the effect of LVH on myocardial perfusion reserve, 25 patients, 9 with LVH and 16 controls, underwent positron imaging with rubidium-82 (82Rb) (30-55 mCi) or nitrogen-13 (13N) ammonia (12-19 mCi) at rest and following intravenous dipyridamole and handgrip stress. LVH was documented by echocardiographic and/or electrocardiographic measurements. LVH patients had either no chest pain (n = 8) and/or a normal coronary angiogram (n = 6). Nine simultaneous transaxial images were acquired, and the mean ratio of stress to rest activity (S:R), based on all regions for each heart, was calculated as an estimate of myocardial perfusion reserve. There were no regional differences in activity (i.e., perfusion defects) in any of the studies. S:R averaged 1.41 +/- 0.10 (s.d.) for controls and 1.06 +/- 0.09 for patients with LVH (p less than 0.0001). These data provide support for an abnormality in perfusion reserve in patients with LVH.

  13. Modeling of nanotherapeutics delivery based on tumor perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Ven, Anne L.; Abdollahi, Behnaz; Martinez, Carlos J.; Burey, Lacey A.; Landis, Melissa D.; Chang, Jenny C.; Ferrari, Mauro; Frieboes, Hermann B.

    2013-05-01

    Heterogeneities in the perfusion of solid tumors prevent optimal delivery of nanotherapeutics. Clinical imaging protocols for obtaining patient-specific data have proven difficult to implement. It is challenging to determine which perfusion features hold greater prognostic value and to relate measurements to vessel structure and function. With the advent of systemically administered nanotherapeutics whose delivery is dependent on overcoming diffusive and convective barriers to transport, such knowledge is increasingly important. We describe a framework for the automated evaluation of vascular perfusion curves measured at the single vessel level. Primary tumor fragments, collected from triple-negative breast cancer patients and grown as xenografts in mice, were injected with fluorescence contrast and monitored using intravital microscopy. The time to arterial peak and venous delay, two features whose probability distributions were measured directly from time-series curves, were analyzed using a fuzzy c-mean supervised classifier in order to rank individual tumors according to their perfusion characteristics. The resulting rankings correlated inversely with experimental nanoparticle accumulation measurements, enabling the modeling of nanotherapeutics delivery without requiring any underlying assumptions about tissue structure or function, or heterogeneities contained therein. With additional calibration, these methodologies may enable the investigation of nanotherapeutics delivery strategies in a variety of tumor models.

  14. Protection of pigs against genital Chlamydia trachomatis challenge by parenteral or mucosal DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Schautteet, Katelijn; De Clercq, Evelien; Jönsson, Yannick; Lagae, Stefanie; Chiers, Koen; Cox, Eric; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2012-04-16

    The current study evaluates combined aerosol-vaginal delivery of a MOMP-based Chlamydia trachomatis (serovar E) DNA vaccine in a pig genital challenge model. Most non-replicating antigens are rather poor mucosal immunogens in comparison to replicating antigens. Therefore, a mucosal administered DNA vaccine, which actually mimics a live vaccine, could be promising. Protection was promoted by plasmids encoding the porcine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (pcDNA3.1zeo::GM-CSF), the Escherichia coli thermo-labile enterotoxin (LT) subunit A (plasmid PJV2004::LTa) and subunit B (plasmid PJV2005::LTb). Mucosal C. trachomatis DNA vaccination induced significant protection against genital C. trachomatis challenge although the infection could not be eradicated. Intradermal immunization was significantly less efficient in protecting experimentally infected pigs. Protection was correlated with efficient T cell priming and significantly higher serum IgA titers following primo vaccination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-08-01

    In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed.

  16. Role of Cannabinoids in Gastrointestinal Mucosal Defense and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gyires, Klára; Zádori, Zoltán S.

    2016-01-01

    Modulating the activity of the endocannabinoid system influences various gastrointestinal physiological and pathophysiological processes, and cannabinoid receptors as well as regulatory enzymes responsible for the synthesis or degradation of endocannabinoids representing potential targets to reduce the development of gastrointestinal mucosal lesions, hemorrhage and inflammation. Direct activation of CB1 receptors by plant-derived, endogenous or synthetic cannabinoids effectively reduces both gastric acid secretion and gastric motor activity, and decreases the formation of gastric mucosal lesions induced by stress, pylorus ligation, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or alcohol, partly by peripheral, partly by central mechanisms. Similarly, indirect activation of cannabinoid receptors through elevation of endocannabinoid levels by globally acting or peripherally restricted inhibitors of their metabolizing enzymes (FAAH, MAGL) or by inhibitors of their cellular uptake reduces the gastric mucosal lesions induced by NSAIDs in a CB1 receptor-dependent fashion. Dual inhibition of FAAH and cyclooxygenase enzymes induces protection against both NSAID-induced gastrointestinal damage and intestinal inflammation. Moreover, in intestinal inflammation direct or indirect activation of CB1 and CB2 receptors exerts also multiple beneficial effects. Namely, activation of both CB receptors was shown to ameliorate intestinal inflammation in various murine colitis models, to decrease visceral hypersensitivity and abdominal pain, as well as to reduce colitis-associated hypermotility and diarrhea. In addition, CB1 receptors suppress secretory processes and also modulate intestinal epithelial barrier functions. Thus, experimental data suggest that the endocannabinoid system represents a promising target in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, and this assumption is also confirmed by preliminary clinical studies. PMID:26935536

  17. Mucosal tolerance induction in autoimmune myocarditis and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Göser, Stefan; Leuschner, Florian; Volz, H Christian; Buss, Sebastian; Andrassy, Martin; Öttl, Renate; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Katus, Hugo A; Kaya, Ziya

    2013-01-20

    Antigen-specific therapy is a compelling approach for the treatment of autoimmune conditions. Primary goal is to induce the specific tolerization of self-reactive immune cells without altering host immunity against pathogens. We studied the effects of mucosal tolerance induction on cTnI-induced experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) and post-infarct remodeling. Mucosal tolerance was induced by intranasal application of cTnI, alternatively anti-CD3 p.o. Protocols varied in frequency, dosage and time point of application before EAM. We then applied the most effective regimen to mice undergoing myocardial infarction in order to verify its effectiveness in post-infarct cardiac remodeling. The myocardium was evaluated on histological slides and for the cytokine secretion pattern, while echocardiography determined cardiac function. A single dose of 100 μg of cTnI 7 days prior to myocarditis appeared to be most effective in suppressing inflammation and fibrosis (p = 0.03), while improving fractional shortening (p = 0.02). Treatment with intranasal cTnI upregulated IL-10 expression. On the other hand, frequent intranasal application of high doses of cTnI increased myocardial inflammation. Anti-CD3 p.o. showed the propensity to reduce myocardial inflammation and improve cardiac function. The single dose regimen of i.n. cTnI applied 7 days before a myocardial infarction reduced inflammation by trend (p=0.07) and improved heart function (p=0.002). Moreover, expression of matrix metalloproteinases 9 and 14 significantly decreased when treated with intranasal cTnI (p<0.01). Depending on the optimal amount, the time period and the choice of antigen, effective mucosal tolerance can be achieved and represents an appealing therapeutic approach in the inflammatory process of cardiac remodeling. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantitative pixelwise myocardial perfusion maps from first-pass perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Weng, A M; Ritter, C O; Beer, M; Hahn, D; Köstler, H

    2014-07-01

    To calculate and evaluate absolute quantitative myocardial perfusion maps from rest first-pass perfusion MRI. 10 patients after revascularization of myocardial infarction underwent cardiac rest first-pass perfusion MRI. Additionally, perfusion examinations were performed in 12 healthy volunteers. Quantitative myocardial perfusion maps were calculated by using a deconvolution technique, and results were compared were the findings of a sector-based quantification. Maps were typically calculated within 3 min per slice. For the volunteers, myocardial blood flow values of the maps were 0.51 ± 0.16 ml g(-1) per minute, whereas sector-based evaluation delivered 0.52 ± 0.15 ml g(-1) per minute. A t-test revealed no statistical difference between the two sets of values. For the patients, all perfusion defects visually detected in the dynamic perfusion series could be correctly reproduced in the maps. Calculation of quantitative perfusion maps from myocardial perfusion MRI examinations is feasible. The absolute quantitative maps provide additional information on the transmurality of perfusion defects compared with the visual evaluation of the perfusion series and offer a convenient way to present perfusion MRI findings. Voxelwise analysis of myocardial perfusion helps clinicians to assess the degree of tissue damage, and the resulting maps are a good tool to present findings to patients.

  19. Mucosal melanoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Ascierto, Paolo Antonio; Accorona, Remo; Botti, Gerardo; Farina, Davide; Fossati, Piero; Gatta, Gemma; Gogas, Helen; Lombardi, Davide; Maroldi, Roberto; Nicolai, Piero; Ravanelli, Marco; Vanella, Vito

    2017-04-01

    Mucosal melanoma of the head and neck is a very rare and aggressive malignancy with a very poor prognosis. The nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, and oral cavity are the most common locations. One-, 3- and 5-year survival rates between 2000 and 2007 were 63%, 30% and 20%, respectively. Cigarette smoking seems to be a risk factor even though the evidence for this is very low. Clinical signs and symptoms are usually nonspecific. While surgery is considered the mainstay of treatment for most mucosal melanomas of the head and neck region, radiotherapy has a role in local control of the disease after surgery. Many new treatment options in the last years, in particular targeted therapies (i.e. inhibitors of c-KIT, NRAS/MEK or BRAF) and immunotherapies (anti CTLA-4 and anti PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies), have changed the history of cutaneous melanoma. Despite the different biology, mucosal melanoma is currently treated in the same way as cutaneous melanoma; however, patients with mucosal melanoma were excluded from the majority of recent clinical trials. Recent molecular findings offer new hope for the development of more effective systemic therapy.

  20. Characterization of Mucosal Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna; Kashleva, Helena; Dwivedi, Prabhat; Diaz, Patricia; Vasilakos, John

    2009-01-01

    C. albicans triggers recurrent infections of the alimentary tract mucosa that result from biofilm growth. Although the ability of C. albicans to form a biofilm on abiotic surfaces has been well documented in recent years, no information exists on biofilms that form directly on mucosal surfaces. The objectives of this study were to characterize the structure and composition of Candida biofilms forming on the oral mucosa. We found that oral Candida biofilms consist of yeast, hyphae, and commensal bacteria, with keratin dispersed in the intercellular spaces. Neutrophils migrate through the oral mucosa and form nests within the biofilm mass. The cell wall polysaccharide β-glucan is exposed during mucosal biofilm growth and is more uniformly present on the surface of biofilm organisms invading the oral mucosa. We conclude that C. albicans forms complex mucosal biofilms consisting of both commensal bacterial flora and host components. These discoveries are important since they can prompt a shift of focus for current research in investigating the role of Candida-bacterial interactions in the pathogenesis of mucosal infections as well as the role of β-glucan mediated signaling in the host response. PMID:19956771

  1. Concomitant early mucosal and cutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Boaventura, Viviane S; Cafe, Virginia; Costa, Jackson; Oliveira, Fabiano; Bafica, Andre; Rosato, Andrea; de Freitas, Luiz A R; Brodskyn, Claudia; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina

    2006-08-01

    Mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) is often clinically silent until reaching a highly advanced state. In this prospective study, 6 of 220 patients with early cutaneous leishmaniasis were diagnosed with mucosal involvement by otorhinolaryngological examination (a rate similar to the reported rate of late ML). Detection of early ML may represent an important strategy in preventing severe mucosal destruction in human leishmaniasis.

  2. [Method for Extracting Vascular Perfusion Region Based on Ultrasound Contrast Agent].

    PubMed

    Shan, Xin; Wen, Yingang; Lin, Tao; Zhu, Xinjian

    2015-10-01

    Vascular perfusion distribution in fibroids contrast-enhanced ultrasound images provides useful pathological and physiological information, because the extraction of the vascular perfusion area can be helpful to quantitative evaluation of uterine fibroids blood supply. The pixel gray scale in vascular perfusion area of fibroids contrast-enhanced ultrasound image sequences is different from that in other regions, and, based on this, we proposed a method of extracting vascular perfusion area of fibroids. Firstly, we denoised the image sequence, and then we used Brox optical flow method to estimate motion of two adjacent frames, based on the results of the displacement field for motion correction. Finally, we extracted vascular perfusion region from the surrounding background based on the differences in gray scale for the magnitude of the rich blood supply area and lack of blood supply area in ultrasound images sequence. The experimental results showed that the algorithm could accurately extract the vascular perfusion area, reach the precision of identification of clinical perfusion area, and only small amount of calculation was needed and the process was fairly simple.

  3. Human papillomavirus vaccination induces neutralising antibodies in oral mucosal fluids.

    PubMed

    Handisurya, A; Schellenbacher, C; Haitel, A; Senger, T; Kirnbauer, R

    2016-02-16

    Mucosal human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a major cause of cancers and papillomas of the anogenital and oropharyngeal tract. HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies in sera and cervicovaginal secretions and protects uninfected individuals from persistent anogenital infection and associated diseases caused by the vaccine-targeted HPV types. Whether immunisation can prevent oropharyngeal infection and diseases and whether neutralising antibodies represent the correlate of protection, is still unclear. We determined IgG and neutralising antibodies against low-risk HPV6 and high-risk HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids from healthy females (n=20) before and after quadrivalent HPV-vaccination and compared the results with non-vaccinated controls. HPV-vaccination induced type-specific antibodies in sera and oral fluids of the vaccinees. Importantly, the antibodies in oral fluids were capable of neutralising HPV pseudovirions in vitro, indicating protection from infection. The increased neutralising antibody levels against HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids post-vaccination correlated significantly within an individual. We provide experimental proof that HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies to the vaccine-targeted types in oral fluids. Hence, immunisation may confer direct protection against type-specific HPV infection and associated diseases of the oropharyngeal tract. Measurement of antibodies in oral fluids represents a suitable tool to assess vaccine-induced protection within the mucosal milieu of the orophayrynx.

  4. Human papillomavirus vaccination induces neutralising antibodies in oral mucosal fluids

    PubMed Central

    Handisurya, A; Schellenbacher, C; Haitel, A; Senger, T; Kirnbauer, R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mucosal human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a major cause of cancers and papillomas of the anogenital and oropharyngeal tract. HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies in sera and cervicovaginal secretions and protects uninfected individuals from persistent anogenital infection and associated diseases caused by the vaccine-targeted HPV types. Whether immunisation can prevent oropharyngeal infection and diseases and whether neutralising antibodies represent the correlate of protection, is still unclear. Methods: We determined IgG and neutralising antibodies against low-risk HPV6 and high-risk HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids from healthy females (n=20) before and after quadrivalent HPV-vaccination and compared the results with non-vaccinated controls. Results: HPV-vaccination induced type-specific antibodies in sera and oral fluids of the vaccinees. Importantly, the antibodies in oral fluids were capable of neutralising HPV pseudovirions in vitro, indicating protection from infection. The increased neutralising antibody levels against HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids post-vaccination correlated significantly within an individual. Conclusions: We provide experimental proof that HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies to the vaccine-targeted types in oral fluids. Hence, immunisation may confer direct protection against type-specific HPV infection and associated diseases of the oropharyngeal tract. Measurement of antibodies in oral fluids represents a suitable tool to assess vaccine-induced protection within the mucosal milieu of the orophayrynx. PMID:26867163

  5. The effect of initial and dynamic liver conditions on RF ablation size: a study in perfused and non-perfused animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belous, Anna; Podhajsky, Ronald J.

    2009-02-01

    Investigators reporting RF ablation (RFA) studies often use different initial and dynamic conditions, often in porcine or bovine liver models. This study examines the effects of initial temperature, prior freezing, and perfusion in these models. Understanding how these variables affect RFA size provides some basis for comparing data from different studies. We obtained porcine and bovine livers from a slaughterhouse and divided them into experimental groups each with discrete initial temperatures set in the range of 12 to 37°C. The livers were used either the day of harvest or frozen within 1-3 days prior to RFA treatment. A perfused liver model was developed to simulate human blood flow rates and allowed accurate control of the temperature and flow rate. Saline (0.9%) was substituted for blood. The non-perfused liver model group included bovine and porcine tissue; whereas the perfused liver model group included only porcine tissue. One experiment included porcine livers that were perfused at different flow rates and with different saline concentrations. Harvested tissue from this group was examined under a light microscope and the level of edema was assessed using image processing software. The results demonstrate no significant difference in RF lesion sizes between porcine and bovine livers. Freezing the tissue prior to treatment has no significant effect but the initial temperature does significantly affect the size of ablation. The ablation size in perfused liver is similar to in vivo results (earlier study) but is significantly smaller then non-perfused liver. Morphological analysis indicates that perfusion, freezing, and saline concentration cause significant tissue edema.

  6. Management of Mucositis During Chemotherapy: From Pathophysiology to Pragmatic Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Van Sebille, Ysabella Z A; Stansborough, Romany; Wardill, Hannah R; Bateman, Emma; Gibson, Rachel J; Keefe, Dorothy M

    2015-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is a common condition caused by the breakdown of the mucosal barrier. Symptoms can include pain, vomiting and diarrhoea, which can often necessitate chemotherapy treatment breaks or dose reductions, thus compromising survival outcomes. Despite the significant impact of mucositis, there are currently limited clinically effective pharmacological therapies for the pathology. New emerging areas of research have been proposed to play key roles in the development of mucositis, providing rationale for potential new therapeutics for the prevention, treatment or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. This review aims to address these new areas of research and to comment on the therapeutics arising from them.

  7. Esophageal sensitivity to acid in patients with Barrett's esophagus is not related to preserved esophageal mucosal integrity.

    PubMed

    Weijenborg, P W; Smout, A J P M; Krishnadath, K K; Bergman, J G H M; Verheij, J; Bredenoord, A J

    2017-07-01

    Patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) usually have severe gastroesophageal reflux. However, they often have surprisingly few reflux symptoms. We hypothesized that BE patients are less sensitive to acid than gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients without Barrett and that this is due to an unusual preservation of mucosal integrity of the squamous epithelium prohibiting transepithelial acid diffusion. We prospectively analyzed esophageal sensitivity and esophageal mucosal integrity in GERD patients with and without BE and healthy subjects. An acid perfusion test was performed and mucosal integrity was assessed in vivo by electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and ex vivo by Ussing chamber experiments with biopsy specimens. Gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with BE were less sensitive to acid than GERD patients without BE, but more sensitive to acid than healthy controls (time to perception Barrett's 14.0 minutes, GERD 4.6 minutes, controls 17.5 minutes). However, extracellular impedance (6.2 and 5.7 vs 8.4×10(3)  Ω/m) and transepithelial resistance (94.0 and 89 vs 118 Ω/cm(2) ) was similar in BE and GERD patients and significantly lower than in healthy subjects. Transepithelial fluorescein flux was equally increased in GERD patients with and without BE (1.6 and 1.7×10(3) vs 0.6×10(3)  nmol/cm(2) /h). Esophageal hypersensitivity to acid is less pronounced in BE patients than in GERD patients without Barrett. However, mucosal integrity of the squamous epithelium is equally impaired in GERD patients with and without Barrett, indicating that factors other than esophageal mucosal barrier integrity explain the difference in acid sensitivity between those with BE and those without. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Tissue perfusion measurements: multiple-exposure laser speckle analysis generates laser Doppler-like spectra.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Oliver B; Andrews, Michael K

    2010-01-01

    Variations in skin perfusion are easily detected by laser speckle contrast maps, but a robust interpretation of the information has been lacking. We show that multiple-exposure laser speckle methods produce the same spectral information as laser Doppler methods when applied to targets with embedded moving scatterers. This enables laser speckle measurements to be interpreted more quantitatively. We do this by using computer simulation of speckle data, and by experimental measurements on Brownian motion and skin perfusion using a laser Doppler system and a multiple-exposure laser speckle system. The power spectral density measurements of the light fluctuations derived using both techniques are exactly equivalent. Dermal perfusion can therefore be measured by laser Doppler or laser speckle contrast methods. In particular, multiexposure laser speckle can be rapidly processed to generate a full-field map of the perfusion index proportional to the concentration and mean velocity of red blood cells.

  9. Sublingual vaccination with sonicated Salmonella proteins and mucosal adjuvant induces mucosal and systemic immunity and protects mice from lethal enteritis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Feng; Wu, Tzee-Chung; Wu, Chia-Chao; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Lo, Wen-Tsung; Hwang, Kwei-Shuai; Hsu, Mu-Ling; Peng, Ho-Jen

    2011-07-01

    Salmonella enteritidis is one of the most common pathogens of enteritis. Most experimental vaccines against Salmonella infection have been applied through injections. This is a new trial to explore the effect of sublingual administration of Salmonella vaccines on systemic and mucosal immunity. Adult BALB/c mice were sublingually vaccinated with sonicated Salmonella proteins (SSP) alone, or plus adjuvant CpG DNA (CpG) or cholera toxin (CT). They were boosted 2 weeks later. Saliva specific secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody responses were significantly stimulated in the mice vaccinated with SSP only or together with CpG or CT. Whereas the mice sublingually vaccinated with SSP and CpG had higher spleen cell IFN-γ production and serum specific IgG2a antibody responses, those receiving SSP and CT showed enhanced spleen cell IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6 production, and serum specific IgG1 antibody responses. After oral challenge with live S. enteritidis, the same strain of the source of SSP, immune protection in those sublingually vaccinated with SSP and CpG or CT was found to prevent intestinal necrosis and to render a higher survival rate. In conclusion, sublingual vaccination together with mucosal adjuvant CpG or CT is a simple but effective way against enteric bacterial pathogens.

  10. Increased Mucosal CD4+ T Cell Activation in Rhesus Macaques following Vaccination with an Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Bukh, Irene; Calcedo, Roberto; Roy, Soumitra; Carnathan, Diane G.; Grant, Rebecca; Qin, Qiuyue; Boyd, Surina; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Veeder, Christin L.; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Betts, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The possibility that vaccination with adenovirus (AdV) vectors increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of HIV acquisition within the Step trial. Modeling this within rhesus macaques is complicated because human adenoviruses, including human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5), are not endogenous to macaques. Here, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector (simian adenovirus 7 [SAdV-7]) enhances mucosal T cell activation within rhesus macaques. Following intramuscular SAdV-7 vaccination, we observed a pronounced increase in SAdV-7-specific CD4+ T cell responses in peripheral blood and, more dramatically, in rectal mucosa tissue. Vaccination also induced a significant increase in the frequency of activated memory CD4+ T cells in SAdV-7- and HAdV-5-vaccinated animals in the rectal mucosa but not in peripheral blood. These fluctuations within the rectal mucosa were also associated with a pronounced decrease in the relative frequency of naive resting CD4+ T cells. Together, these results indicate that peripheral vaccination with an AdV vector can increase the activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells, potentially providing an experimental model to further evaluate the role of host-vector interactions in increased HIV acquisition after AdV vector vaccination. IMPORTANCE The possibility that vaccination with a human adenovirus 5 vector increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition within the Step trial. In this study, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector in rhesus macaques enhances mucosal CD4+ T cell activation, the main cell target of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/HIV. The results showed that vaccination with an adenoviral vector indeed increases activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells and potentially increases susceptibility to SIV

  11. Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG A-905 treatment reduces intestinal damage in a murine model of irinotecan-induced mucositis.

    PubMed

    Bastos, R W; Pedroso, S H S P; Vieira, A T; Moreira, L M C; França, C S; Cartelle, C T; Arantes, R M E; Generoso, S V; Cardoso, V N; Neves, M J; Nicoli, J R; Martins, F S

    2016-09-01

    Indigenous microbiota plays a crucial role in the development of several intestinal diseases, including mucositis. Gastrointestinal mucositis is a major and serious side effect of cancer therapy, and there is no effective therapy for this clinical condition. However, some probiotics have been shown to attenuate such conditions. To evaluate the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG A-905 (Sc-905), a potential probiotic yeast, we investigated whether pre- or post-treatment with viable or inactivated Sc-905 could prevent weight loss and intestinal lesions, and maintain integrity of the mucosal barrier in a mucositis model induced by irinotecan in mice. Only post-treatment with viable Sc-905 was able to protect mice against the damage caused by chemotherapy, reducing the weight loss, increase of intestinal permeability and jejunal lesions (villous shortening). Besides, this treatment reduced oxidative stress, prevented the decrease of goblet cells and stimulated the replication of cells in the intestinal crypts of mice with experimental mucositis. In conclusion, Sc-905 protects animals against irinotecan-induced mucositis when administered as a post-treatment with viable cells, and this effect seems to be related with the reduction of oxidative stress and preservation of intestinal mucosa.

  12. Mapping the literature of perfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, E F

    1999-01-01

    Perfusionists select and operate the equipment necessary for monitoring, supporting, or temporarily replacing the patient's circulatory or respiratory function. There are over 3,000 perfusionists working in U.S. hospitals, medical and perfusionist groups, and as independent contractors. The purpose of this study was to identify the core literature of perfusion and to determine which major databases provide the most thorough access to this literature. This paper is part of the Medical Library Association Nursing and Allied Health Resource Section's project to map the literature of the allied health professions. It uses a bibliometric methodology to identify core journals. A group of forty-three journals was determined to make up the core journal literature of perfusion. MEDLINE provided the best overall indexing coverage for these journals, but librarians and perfusionists will wish to supplement its use with the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature in order to access the journals written primarily for perfusionists. The study results can guide purchasing and database searching decisions of collection development and reference librarians, encourage the database producer to increase coverage of titles that are unindexed or underindexed, and advise perfusionists of the best access to their core literature. PMID:10427432

  13. Oral alprazolam acutely increases nucleus accumbens perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Daniel H.; Pinkham, Amy E.; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Ruparel, Kosha; Elliott, Mark A.; Valdez, Jeffrey; Smith, Mark A.; Detre, John A.; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2014-01-01

    Benzodiazepines treat anxiety, but can also produce euphoric effects, contributing to abuse. Using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, we provide the first direct evidence in humans that alprazolam (Xanax) acutely increases perfusion in the nucleus accumbens, a key reward-processing region linked to addiction. PMID:23070072

  14. Personality factors correlate with regional cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, R L; Kumari, V; Williams, S C R; Zelaya, F O; Connor, S E J; Alsop, D C; Gray, J A

    2006-06-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence pointing to a neurobiological basis of personality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biological bases of the major dimensions of Eysenck's and Cloninger's models of personality using a noninvasive magnetic resonance perfusion imaging technique in 30 young, healthy subjects. An unbiased voxel-based analysis was used to identify regions where the regional perfusion demonstrated significant correlation with any of the personality dimensions. Highly significant positive correlations emerged between extraversion and perfusion in the basal ganglia, thalamus, inferior frontal gyrus and cerebellum and between novelty seeking and perfusion in the cerebellum, cuneus and thalamus. Strong negative correlations emerged between psychoticism and perfusion in the basal ganglia and thalamus and between harm avoidance and perfusion in the cerebellar vermis, cuneus and inferior frontal gyrus. These observations suggest that personality traits are strongly associated with resting cerebral perfusion in a variety of cortical and subcortical regions and provide further evidence for the hypothesized neurobiological basis of personality. These results may also have important implications for functional neuroimaging studies, which typically rely on the modulation of cerebral hemodynamics for detection of task-induced activation since personality effects may influence the intersubject variability for both task-related activity and resting cerebral perfusion. This technique also offers a novel approach for the exploration of the neurobiological correlates of human personality.

  15. Technetium myocardial perfusion agents: an introduction

    SciTech Connect

    English, R.J.; Kozlowski, J.; Tumeh, S.S.; Holman, B.L.

    1987-09-01

    This is the third in a series of four Continuing Education articles on developing radiopharmaceuticals. After reading this article, the reader should be able to: 1) understand the basic concepts of myocardial perfusion imaging; and 2) discuss the advantages of the technetium myocardial perfusion complexes over thallium-201.

  16. Luxury perfusion following anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Friedland, S; Winterkorn, J M; Burde, R M

    1996-09-01

    We present five patients who developed luxury perfusion following anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in whom fluorescein angiography was misinterpreted as "capillary hemangioma" or neovascularization of the disc. In each case, the segment of disc hyperemia corresponded to a spared region of visual field. Luxury perfusion represents a reparative autoregulatory reaction to ischemia.

  17. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Rosalyn D.; Raja, Waseem K.; Wang, Rebecca Y.; Stinson, Jordan A.; Glettig, Dean L.; Burke, Kelly A.; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogensis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight. PMID:25843606

  18. Probiotics as Antifungals in Mucosal Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Victor H; Bandara, H M H N; Mayer, Marcia P A; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Candidais an opportunistic pathogen that causes mucosal and deep systemic candidiasis. The emergence of drug resistance and the side effects of currently available antifungals have restricted their use as long-term prophylactic agents for candidal infections. Given this scenario, probiotics have been suggested as a useful alternative for the management of candidiasis. We analyzed the available data on the efficacy of probiotics in candidal colonization of host surfaces. A number of well-controlled studies indicate that probiotics, particularly lactobacilli, suppressCandidagrowth and biofilm development in vitro.A few clinical trials have also shown the beneficial effects of probiotics in reducing oral, vaginal, and enteric colonization byCandida; alleviation of clinical signs and symptoms; and, in some cases, reducing the incidence of invasive fungal infection in critically ill patients. Probiotics may serve in the future as a worthy ally in the battle against chronic mucosal candidal infections.

  19. Myocardial perfusion with rubidium-82. III. Theory relating severity of coronary stenosis to perfusion deficit

    SciTech Connect

    Mullani, N.A.

    1984-11-01

    The relation between the quantitative perfusion deficit, as measured by emission computerized tomography, and the severity of coronary artery stenosis is important for the noninvasive clinical evaluation of coronary artery disease in man. Positron emission tomography allows direct noninvasive measurement of myocardial perfusion and quantification of the size of the perfusion defect. Given this important imformation, a mathematical model has been derived to gauge the severity of a coronary stenosis from quantitative perfusion measurements in the normal and poststenotic regions of the heart. The theoretical basis is presented for relating regional myocardial perfusion and regional perfusion resistance to total, coronary blood flow and resistance at normal resting flow and during maximal coronary vasodilation. The concept of perfusion reserve is presented as a clinical measure of the severity of a stenosis.

  20. The microbiome and regulation of mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Andrew J; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is a mucosal surface constantly exposed to foreign antigens and microbes, and is protected by a vast array of immunologically active structures and cells. Epithelial cells directly participate in immunological surveillance and direction of host responses in the gut and can express numerous pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR9, and nucleotide oligomerization domain 2, as well as produce chemotactic factors for both myeloid and lymphoid cells following inflammatory stimulation. Within the epithelium and in the underlying lamina propria resides a population of innate lymphoid cells that, following stimulation, can become activated and produce effector cytokines and exert both protective and pathogenic roles during inflammation. Lamina propria dendritic cells play a large role in determining whether the response to a particular antigen will be inflammatory or anti-inflammatory. It is becoming clear that the composition and metabolic activity of the intestinal microbiome, as a whole community, exerts a profound influence on mucosal immune regulation. The microbiome produces short-chain fatty acids, polysaccharide A, α-galactosylceramide and tryptophan metabolites, which can induce interleukin-22, Reg3γ, IgA and interleukin-17 responses. However, much of what is known about microbiome–host immune interactions has come from the study of single bacterial members of the gastrointestinal microbiome and their impact on intestinal mucosal immunity. Additionally, evidence continues to accumulate that alterations of the intestinal microbiome can impact not only gastrointestinal immunity but also immune regulation at distal mucosal sites. PMID:24329495

  1. [Compromized myocardial perfusion in arrhythmias (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Simon, H; Neumann, G; Felix, R; Hedde, H; Schaede, A; Thurn, P; Winkler, C

    1977-09-15

    In 7 patients with arrhythmias of various origin the myocardial scintigram displayed either a diffuse or circumscript defect of the perfusion. The coronary arteriogram was normal in all patients. The localized defect of the perfusion in 2 patients was in the region of the upper part of the interventricular septum. Both had a left bundle brunch block. A correlation between the perfusion defect and the electrophysiological abnormality seems probable. The perfusion defect in one of the patients is most probably caused by a previous myocarditis followed by fibrous changes. In the other 6 patients the cause for the perfusion defect is not obvious. A history of myocarditis is missing. The presence of "small vessel disease" in those patients has however to be considered. Our results point to the relation between an abnormality of the microcirculation and arrhythmias in younger patients.

  2. Machine perfusion in organ transplantation: a tool for ex-vivo graft conditioning with mesenchymal stem cells?

    PubMed

    Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Neyrinck, Arne; Rega, Filip; Devos, Timothy; Pirenne, Jacques

    2013-02-01

    Machine perfusion has emerged as a tool to evaluate pretransplant graft function more objectively during preservation. Machine perfusion also offers the possibility to recondition questionable organs and to 'immunomodulate' allografts ex vivo. This article aims to review the current knowledge on machine perfusion of the various solid thoracic and abdominal organs, and to discuss the new possibility of conditioning and treating grafts with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) during machine perfusion. Different methods of machine perfusion have been described varying among organs in temperature and composition of perfusate. Commercial devices have recently become available for machine perfusion of all organs, with the largest clinical experience acquired in kidney and lung transplantation. Clinical studies are ongoing for liver, heart, and pancreas. MSC therapy in organ transplantation is now emerging with clinical studies set up to investigate its potential to attenuate ischemia/reperfusion injury (innate immunity) and to downregulate the alloimmune response (adaptive immunity) and promote engraftment after transplantation. We hypothesize that delivery of MSCs directly into the machine perfusion circuit may provide a unique opportunity to treat and immunomodulate organs prior to transplantation. To our knowledge, no study on ex-vivo delivery of MSCs during machine perfusion has been reported. Machine perfusion of solid organs has regained much attention during the last decade. It provides a new promising tool that may allow pretransplant ex-vivo assessment, preservation, repair, and conditioning of grafts. Experimental research and clinical trials testing the administration of MSCs during machine perfusion are warranted to explore the potential benefit and mechanisms of this approach.

  3. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as mucosal adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Iho, Sumiko; Maeyama, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Fumiko

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial DNA comprising palindromic sequences and containing unmethylated CpG is recognized by toll-like receptor 9 of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and induces the production of interferon-α and chemokines, leading to the activation of a Th1 immune response. Therefore, synthetic equivalents of bacterial DNA (CpG oligodeoxynucleotides) have been developed for clinical applications. They are usually phosphorothioated for in vivo use; this approach also leads to adverse effects as reported in mouse models.Mucosal vaccines that induce both mucosal and systemic immunity received substantial attention in recent years. For their development, phosphodiester-linked oligodeoxynucleotides, including the sequence of a palindromic CpG DNA may be advantageous as adjuvants because their target pDCs are present right there, in the mucosa of the vaccination site. In addition, the probability of adverse effects is believed to be low. Here, we review the discovery of such CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and their possible use as mucosal adjuvants. PMID:25751765

  4. Age, gender, dentures and oral mucosal disorders.

    PubMed

    MacEntee, M I; Glick, N; Stolar, E

    1998-03-01

    The numbers of participants over 75 years of age in previous studies of oral health have not been sufficient to permit a full investigation of the influence of age on the mouth. In this study a disproportionate stratified random sample of 255 independent elders was selected from a list of urban voters to provide similar numbers of men and women in three age groups. The subjects were interviewed and examined, and nearly half of them had mucosal disorders. There was a significant (P < 0.05) association between mucosal lesions and the use of dentures and tobacco, whereas stomatitis, denture-related hyperplasia and angular cheilitis in particular were associated significantly with men and with the use of defective dentures. Logistic regression revealed that neither age alone nor the quality of dentures predispose to mucosal lesions, but that the odds of finding stomatitis, denture-related hyperplasia and angular cheilitis in particular increased about three-fold in denture-users, and almost doubled in men.

  5. Mucosal perforators from the facial artery.

    PubMed

    Coronel-Banda, Mauricio E; Serra-Renom, Jose M; Lorente, Marian; Larrea-Terán, Wendy P

    2014-07-01

    The cutaneous perforators of the facial artery have been well described, but to our knowledge the oral mucosal perforators have not. We studied 10 facial arteries from 10 hemifaces in 5 cadavers. The arteries were injected with latex, and we studied all perforators that extended from the facial artery and headed directly to the oral mucosa. The diameter and length of the facial artery and its mucosal perforators were measured and compared. We found 52 oral mucosal perforators in the 10 facial arteries injected with latex. Their mean (SD) diameter was 0.5 (0.2) mm and the mean (SD) number/facial artery was 5.2 (1.1). Their mean (SD) length was 16.4 (5.3) mm. Most of those to the cheek were localised between the branching-off points of the inferior and superior labial arteries. The facial artery has perforators to the oral mucosa of the cheek, most of them between the points at which the labial arteries emerge.

  6. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches.

  7. Methylsulfonylmethane is effective against gastric mucosal injury.

    PubMed

    Amirshahrokhi, Keyvan; Khalili, Ali-Reza

    2017-09-15

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a natural organosulfur compound has been widely used as a dietary supplement. MSM has protective effects against various disorders through its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties however the effect of MSM on gastric mucosal injury remains unclear. The aim of the present study is to determine whether MSM has beneficial effects on ethanol/HCl-induced gastric ulcer in mice. Macroscopic and histopathological evaluation of gastric mucosa revealed that ethanol/HCl administration produced apparent mucosal injuries, while pretreatment with MSM (200 and 400mg/kg, orally) could effectively protect gastric mucosa against the injuries caused by acidified ethanol. MSM significantly increased the levels of glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and decreased the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), carbonyl protein, and nitric oxide (NO) in gastric tissues compared with those in the ethanol group. MSM suppressed gastric inflammation by reducing the levels of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Moreover, pretreatment of mice with MSM decreased the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) as a key regulator of inflammation in gastric mucosa. Taken together, these data suggest that MSM is able to decrease the severity of ethanol/HCl-induced gastric mucosal injury through inhibition of oxidative stress and inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dermoscopic appearance of an amelanotic mucosal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Andreas; Beck-Zoul, Ulrike; Held, Laura; Haase, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypomelanotic or amelanotic melanomas are challenging to identify, especially at mucosal sites. The dermoscopic clues to the diagnosis of mucosal melanomas have been reported to be structureless zones with the presence of blue, gray, or white colors. Case A female in her seventies noted a new lesion on the inside of her right labia that first appeared two months prior. Her past medical history was significant for rheumatoid arthritis requiring ongoing treatment with methotrexate for 20 years and adalimumab for 10 years. After no response to two weeks of local treatment for suspected herpes simplex infection, her gynecologist performed a skin biopsy. Based on the histopathological diagnosis of an amelanotic melanoma (Breslow thickness of 1.3 mm) the patient was referred to dermatology for further assessment. Polarized dermoscopy revealed a distinct asymmetric, sharply demarcated homogenous white papule (4 × 5 mm) as well as polymorphous vessels. Conclusion Dermoscopy may aid in the diagnosis of amelanotic mucosal melanomas. Our case revealed a structureless white area and polymorphous vessels. Additional clues to the diagnosis were the advanced age of the patient and the clinical presentation of a new lesion. PMID:27867742

  9. Hitting the mucosal road in tolerance induction.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    Within the last decades a dramatic increase in allergic diseases has been recognized in the Westernized societies, leading to the fact that meanwhile 25-30% of the population is afflicted by allergic disorders. Besides a hereditary disposition, other factors, including a reduced microbial contact early in life or changes in nutrition, might also have influenced this epidemiological development. So far the only causative treatment against type-I allergies is specific immunotherapy. In young and monosensitized patients this treatment is highly efficacious, while there are clear limitations in older or multisensitized patients. Allergy research therefore aims at establishing new and more efficacious treatment strategies in prophylactic as well as therapeutic settings. Our research programs focus on the development of novel allergy vaccines based on the induction of mucosal tolerance. In different mouse models of respiratory allergy mucosal treatment with genetically engineered allergen constructs proved to prevent the development of allergic mono- and multisensitivities. The additional use of mucosal adjuvants seems particularly important to improve therapeutic treatment approaches. Recent studies on the inverse relation of certain parasite infections and the development of allergy prompted us to search for selected parasitic molecules with immunosuppressive properties as potential adjuvant systems for novel allergy vaccines. An overview of our recent studies will be given.

  10. Chitosan-based mucosal adjuvants: Sunrise on the ocean.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yufei; Fan, Qingze; Hao, Dongxia; Wu, Jie; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2015-11-04

    Mucosal vaccination, which is shown to elicit systemic and mucosal immune responses, serves as a non-invasive and convenient alternative to parenteral administration, with stronger capability in combatting diseases at the site of entry. The exploration of potent mucosal adjuvants is emerging as a significant area, based on the continued necessity to amplify the immune responses to a wide array of antigens that are poorly immunogenic at the mucosal sites. As one of the inspirations from the ocean, chitosan-based mucosal adjuvants have been developed with unique advantages, such as, ability of mucosal adhesion, distinct trait of opening the junctions to allow the paracellular transport of antigen, good tolerability and biocompatibility, which guaranteed the great potential in capitalizing on their application in human clinical trials. In this review, the state of art of chitosan and its derivatives as mucosal adjuvants, including thermo-sensitive chitosan system as mucosal adjuvant that were newly developed by author's group, was described, as well as the clinical application perspective. After a brief introduction of mucosal adjuvants, chitosan and its derivatives as robust immune potentiator were discussed in detail and depth, in regard to the metabolism, safety profile, mode of actions and preclinical and clinical applications, which may shed light on the massive clinical application of chitosan as mucosal adjuvant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Gut permeability and mucosal inflammation: bad, good or context dependent.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, R; Sorrell, M F; Batra, S K; Dhawan, P; Singh, A B

    2017-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disease. A breach in the mucosal barrier, otherwise known as "leaky gut," is alleged to promote mucosal inflammation by intensifying immune activation. However, interaction between the luminal antigen and mucosal immune system is necessary to maintain mucosal homeostasis. Furthermore, manipulations leading to deregulated gut permeability have resulted in susceptibility in mice to colitis as well as to creating adaptive immunity. These findings implicate a complex but dynamic association between mucosal permeability and immune homeostasis; however, they also emphasize that compromised gut permeability alone may not be sufficient to induce colitis. Emerging evidence further supports the role(s) of proteins associated with the mucosal barrier in epithelial injury and repair: manipulations of associated proteins also modified epithelial differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Taken together, the role of gut permeability and proteins associated in regulating mucosal inflammatory diseases appears to be more complex than previously thought. Herein, we review outcomes from recent mouse models where gut permeability was altered by direct and indirect effects of manipulating mucosal barrier-associated proteins, to highlight the significance of mucosal permeability and the non-barrier-related roles of these proteins in regulating chronic mucosal inflammatory conditions.

  12. Challenges in mucosal vaccines for the control of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Azegami, Tatsuhiko; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    The mucosal surface is the largest route through which pathogens enter the human body. To control the outbreak of mucosal infectious diseases, we must use our knowledge of the mucosal immune system to create vaccines that elicit protective mucosal and systemic immunity. Mucosal vaccines have advantages over traditional injectable vaccines in that they not only induce effective mucosal immune responses, but they also do not cause physical or psychological discomfort. Mucosal vaccines currently licensed for human use include oral vaccines against Vibrio cholerae, Salmonella typhi, poliovirus and rotavirus, and nasal vaccines against influenza virus. To further improve the existing vaccines, it will be necessary to develop novel vaccine production, storage and delivery systems through innovative strategies derived from interdisciplinary scientific research. Our accumulated knowledge of the innate and acquired arms of the mucosal immune system and the recent scientific and technical advancements in the fields of molecular biology, plant biology, bio-engineering and chemical engineering, genome biology and systems biology have created a unique research and development platform for the development of the next generation of mucosal vaccines. This review summarizes the current perspectives and future directions of mucosal vaccine development with emphasis on oral and nasal vaccines for the control of infectious diseases. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Mucosal melanomas in the racially diverse population of California.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Lisa; Wong, Michael K; Peng, David H; Cockburn, Myles

    2017-02-01

    Mucosal melanomas are rare, poorly understood neoplasms without a consensus standard of care. We sought to define mucosal melanoma tumor characteristics and the racial/ethnic attributes of patients with mucosal melanomas. We analyzed 130,920 cutaneous melanomas and 1919 mucosal melanomas recorded in the population-based California Cancer Registry from 1988 to 2013. Although only 1% of melanomas occurring in nonHispanic whites were mucosal, other racial/ethnic groups had a higher proportion of mucosal melanomas (15% for Asian/Pacific Islanders, 9% for nonHispanic blacks, and 4% for Hispanics). Anorectal mucosal melanomas were most common in female Asian/Pacific Islanders, whereas genitourinary mucosal melanomas were highest in nonHispanic whites, and head and neck tumors were most common among Hispanics. Stage at presentation was not uniform among racial/ethnic groups, with Asian/Pacific Islanders having the highest rates of metastasis. The lack of a standardized staging system for mucosal melanomas confounds classification and knowledge regarding metastasis. Small sample size limits comparative analysis across race, stage, site, and depth. Mucosal melanomas differ by race/ethnicity with regard to anatomic site, stage, and depth. Because early detection offers the best chance of increased survival, greater awareness will aid clinicians who care for patients at risk for these aggressive tumors. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Establishment of a hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension model by hepatic arterial perfusion with 80% alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; He, Fu-Liang; Liu, Fu-Quan; Yue, Zhen-Dong; Zhao, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the feasibility and safety of establishing a porcine hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension model by hepatic arterial perfusion with 80% alcohol. METHODS: Twenty-one healthy Guizhou miniature pigs were randomly divided into three experimental groups and three control groups. The pigs in the three experimental groups were subjected to hepatic arterial perfusion with 7, 12 and 17 mL of 80% alcohol, respectively, while those in the three control groups underwent hepatic arterial perfusion with 7, 12 and 17 mL of saline, respectively. Hepatic arteriography and direct portal phlebography were performed on all animals before and after perfusion, and the portal venous pressure and diameter were measured before perfusion, immediately after perfusion, and at 2, 4 and 6 wk after perfusion. The following procedures were performed at different time points: routine blood sampling, blood biochemistry, blood coagulation and blood ammonia tests before surgery, and at 2, 4 and 6 wk after surgery; hepatic biopsy before surgery, within 6 h after surgery, and at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 wk after surgery; abdominal enhanced computed tomography examination before surgery and at 6 wk after surgery; autopsy and multi-point sampling of various liver lobes for histological examination at 6 wk after surgery. RESULTS: In experimental group 1, different degrees of hepatic fibrosis were observed, and one pig developed hepatic cirrhosis. In experimental group 2, there were cases of hepatic cirrhosis, different degrees of increased portal venous pressure, and intrahepatic portal venous bypass, but neither extrahepatic portal-systemic bypass circulation nor death occurred. In experimental group 3, two animals died and three animals developed hepatic cirrhosis, and different degrees of increased portal venous pressure and intrahepatic portal venous bypass were also observed, but there was no extrahepatic portal-systemic bypass circulation. CONCLUSION: It is feasible to establish an

  15. Zinc supplementation to improve mucositis and dermatitis in patients after radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancers: A double-blind, randomized study

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.-C. . E-mail: 8508A6@mail.chimei.org.tw; Que, Jenny; Lin, L.-K.; Lin, F.-C.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether zinc supplementation can accelerate the healing of mucositis and dermatitis after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: In this double-blind study, patients were placed into two randomized groups (experimental and control) of 50 patients each. The groups were homogeneous with respect to medical history, tumor characteristics, and therapeutic details. The experimental group received a standard dose of a zinc supplement, and the control group was given a placebo. Results: Patients in the control group developed Grade 2 mucositis and dermatitis earlier and sooner than patients in the experimental group. There was also a significant difference in the development of Grade 3 mucositis and dermatitis between the two groups. Patients in the experimental group were found to have milder mucositis and dermatitis. Zinc supplementation did not show much benefit in those patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy or make a substantial impact on weight changes. Conclusions: Zinc supplementation used in conjunction with radiotherapy could postpone the development of severe mucositis and dermatitis for patients with cancers of the head and neck. Zinc supplementation can also alleviate the degree of mucositis and dermatitis. The impact of zinc on tumor growth and patient survival is under further investigation.

  16. Starter Feeding Supplementation Alters Colonic Mucosal Bacterial Communities and Modulates Mucosal Immune Homeostasis in Newborn Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junhua; Bian, Gaorui; Sun, Daming; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of starter feeding supplementation on colonic mucosal bacterial communities and on mucosal immune homeostasis in pre-weaned lambs. We selected eight pairs of 10-day-old lamb twins. One twin was fed breast milk (M, n = 8), while the other was fed breast milk plus starter (M+S, n = 8). The lambs were sacrificed at 56 days age. Colonic content was collected to determine the pH and the concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA) and lactate. The colonic mucosa was harvested to characterize the bacterial communities using Illumina MiSeq sequencing and to determine mRNA expression levels of cytokines and toll-like receptors (TLR) using quantitative real-time PCR. The results show that starter feeding decreased luminal pH and increased the concentrations of acetate, propionate, butyrate, total VFA, and lactate in the colon. The principal coordinate analysis (PCA) and analysis of molecular variance show that starter feeding supplementation significantly affected the colonic mucosal bacterial communities with a higher relative abundance of the dominant taxa unclassified S24-7, Oscillibacter, Prevotella, Parabacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Ruminobacter, and Succinivibrio, and a lower proportion of unclassified Ruminococcaceae, RC9_gut_group, Blautia, Phocaeicola, Phascolarctobacterium, unclassified BS11_gut_group, unclassified family_XIII, and Campylobacter in lambs. Meanwhile, starter feeding decreased mRNA expression of TLR4 and cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ in colonic tissue. Furthermore, the changes in the colonic mucosal mRNA expression of TLR and cytokines were associated with changes in mucosal bacterial composition. These findings may provide new insights into colonic mucosal bacteria and immune homeostasis in developing lambs. PMID:28382025

  17. Gastric Mucosal Energy Metabolism and “Stress Ulceration,”

    PubMed Central

    Menguy, Rene; Masters, Y. F.

    1974-01-01

    Acute gastric erosions following hemorrhagic shock (stress ulceration) have been attributed to gastric hyperacidity, altered gastric secretion of mucus and an abnormal permeability of the gastric mucosa to H+. This report aims at presenting evidence supporting an alternate hypothesis: the event linking shock-induced gastric mucosal ischemia to mucosal necrosis is a deficit in gastric mucosal energy metabolism. Our experimental procedure consisted of harvesting the stomachs of rats and rabbits by “stop-freeze” (liquid N2) at different intervals after the induction of hemorrhagic shock. Levels of adenosine-phosphates and of glycolytic intermediates in gastric mucosa were measured. We studied the changes in the levels of these substrates produced by shock as well as by factors capable, when combined with shock, of rendering the gastric mucosa more vulnerable to stress ulceration. The influence of shock and of these modifying factors were evaluated by comparison with data from appropriately designed control experiments. In parallel experiments we examined the frequency of stress ulceration (gross and microscopic) under these same standard conditions. There have emerged from these studies a number of observations all based upon data with the highest statistical significance. The data are consonant with the hypothesis stated above: an energy deficit severe enough to cause cellular necrosis is the event linking shock-induced gastric mucosal ischemia and stress ulceration. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2. PMID:4278107

  18. Comparison of Mucosal, Subcutaneous and Intraperitoneal Routes of Rat Leptospira Infection.

    PubMed

    Zilber, Anne-Laure; Belli, Patrick; Grezel, Delphine; Artois, Marc; Kodjo, Angeli; Djelouadji, Zoheira

    2016-03-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis found worldwide that is caused by a spirochete. The main reservoirs of Leptospira, which presents an asymptomatic infection, are wild rodents, including the brown rat (Rattus norvegicus). Experimental studies of the mechanisms of its renal colonization in rats have previously used an intraperitoneal inoculation route. However, knowledge of rat-rat transmission requires the use of a natural route of inoculation, such as a mucosal or subcutaneous route. We investigated for the first time the effects of subcutaneous and mucosal inoculation routes compared to the reference intraperitoneal route during Leptospira infection in adult rats. Infection characteristics were studied using Leptospira renal isolation, serology, and molecular and histological analyses. Leptospira infection was asymptomatic using each inoculation route, and caused similar antibody production regardless of renal colonization. The observed renal colonization rates were 8 out of 8 rats, 5 out of 8 rats and 1 out of 8 rats for the intraperitoneal, mucosal and subcutaneous inoculation routes, respectively. Thus, among the natural infection routes studied, mucosal inoculation was more efficient for renal colonization associated with urinary excretion than the subcutaneous route and induced a slower-progressing infection than the intraperitoneal route. These results can facilitate understanding of the infection modalities in rats, unlike the epidemiological studies conducted in wild rats. Future studies of other natural inoculation routes in rat models will increase our knowledge of rat-rat disease transmission and allow the investigation of infection kinetics.

  19. Comparison of Mucosal, Subcutaneous and Intraperitoneal Routes of Rat Leptospira Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zilber, Anne-Laure; Belli, Patrick; Grezel, Delphine; Artois, Marc; Kodjo, Angeli; Djelouadji, Zoheira

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis found worldwide that is caused by a spirochete. The main reservoirs of Leptospira, which presents an asymptomatic infection, are wild rodents, including the brown rat (Rattus norvegicus). Experimental studies of the mechanisms of its renal colonization in rats have previously used an intraperitoneal inoculation route. However, knowledge of rat-rat transmission requires the use of a natural route of inoculation, such as a mucosal or subcutaneous route. We investigated for the first time the effects of subcutaneous and mucosal inoculation routes compared to the reference intraperitoneal route during Leptospira infection in adult rats. Infection characteristics were studied using Leptospira renal isolation, serology, and molecular and histological analyses. Leptospira infection was asymptomatic using each inoculation route, and caused similar antibody production regardless of renal colonization. The observed renal colonization rates were 8 out of 8 rats, 5 out of 8 rats and 1 out of 8 rats for the intraperitoneal, mucosal and subcutaneous inoculation routes, respectively. Thus, among the natural infection routes studied, mucosal inoculation was more efficient for renal colonization associated with urinary excretion than the subcutaneous route and induced a slower-progressing infection than the intraperitoneal route. These results can facilitate understanding of the infection modalities in rats, unlike the epidemiological studies conducted in wild rats. Future studies of other natural inoculation routes in rat models will increase our knowledge of rat-rat disease transmission and allow the investigation of infection kinetics. PMID:27031867

  20. Enhancement in gastric mucosal EGF and PDGF receptor expression with ulcer healing by sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, J; Majka, J; Sano, S; Nowak, P; Murty, V L; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1995-07-01

    1. The effect of an antiulcer agent, sulglycotide, on mucosal expression of EGF and PDGF receptors with chronic ulcer healing was investigated. 2. Rats with experimentally-induced gastric ulcers were treated twice daily for 14 consecutive days, either with sulglycotide at 200 mg/kg or vehicle, and at different stages of treatment used for quantitation of gastric mucosal EGF and PDGF receptors. 3. The ulcer healing was accompanied by an increase in mucosal expression of both types of receptors. A 1.8-fold increase in EGF and 3.1-fold increase in PDGF receptors occurred by the 4th day following the development of ulcer and reached a maximum of 2.4-3.9-fold increase by the 10-14th day. 4. Treatment with sulglycotide caused accelerated ulcer healing accompanied by a significant enhancement in the receptors expression. A 2.3- and 3.6-fold increase in EGF and PDGF receptor expression occurred by the 4th day of sulglycotide treatment, reaching a 5.5- and 5.6-fold respective increase by the 10th day when the ulcer essentially healed. 5. The results attest to the ability of sulglycotide to stimulate the gastric mucosal proliferative activities associated with ulcer healing.

  1. Perceiving nasal patency through mucosal cooling rather than air temperature or nasal resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Blacker, Kara; Luo, Yuehao; Bryant, Bruce; Jiang, Jianbo

    2011-01-01

    Adequate perception of nasal airflow (i.e., nasal patency) is an important consideration for patients with nasal sinus diseases. The perception of a lack of nasal patency becomes the primary symptom that drives these patients to seek medical treatment. However, clinical assessment of nasal patency remains a challenge because we lack objective measurements that correlate well with what patients perceive. The current study examined factors that may influence perceived patency, including air temperature, humidity, mucosal cooling, nasal resistance, and trigeminal sensitivity. Forty-four healthy subjects rated nasal patency while sampling air from three facial exposure boxes that were ventilated with untreated room air, cold air, and dry air, respectively. In all conditions, air temperature and relative humidity inside each box were recorded with sensors connected to a computer. Nasal resistance and minimum airway cross-sectional area (MCA) were measured using rhinomanometry and acoustic rhinometry, respectively. General trigeminal sensitivity was assessed through lateralization thresholds to butanol. No significant correlation was found between perceived patency and nasal resistance or MCA. In contrast, air temperature, humidity, and butanol threshold combined significantly contributed to the ratings of patency, with mucosal cooling (heat loss) being the most heavily weighted predictor. Air humidity significantly influences perceived patency, suggesting that mucosal cooling rather than air temperature alone provides the trigeminal sensation that results in perception of patency. The dynamic cooling between the airstream and the mucosal wall may be quantified experimentally or computationally and could potentially lead to a new clinical evaluation tool.

  2. Perceiving Nasal Patency through Mucosal Cooling Rather than Air Temperature or Nasal Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai; Blacker, Kara; Luo, Yuehao; Bryant, Bruce; Jiang, Jianbo

    2011-01-01

    Adequate perception of nasal airflow (i.e., nasal patency) is an important consideration for patients with nasal sinus diseases. The perception of a lack of nasal patency becomes the primary symptom that drives these patients to seek medical treatment. However, clinical assessment of nasal patency remains a challenge because we lack objective measurements that correlate well with what patients perceive.The current study examined factors that may influence perceived patency, including air temperature, humidity, mucosal cooling, nasal resistance, and trigeminal sensitivity. Forty-four healthy subjects rated nasal patency while sampling air from three facial exposure boxes that were ventilated with untreated room air, cold air, and dry air, respectively. In all conditions, air temperature and relative humidity inside each box were recorded with sensors connected to a computer. Nasal resistance and minimum airway cross-sectional area (MCA) were measured using rhinomanometry and acoustic rhinometry, respectively. General trigeminal sensitivity was assessed through lateralization thresholds to butanol. No significant correlation was found between perceived patency and nasal resistance or MCA. In contrast, air temperature, humidity, and butanol threshold combined significantly contributed to the ratings of patency, with mucosal cooling (heat loss) being the most heavily weighted predictor. Air humidity significantly influences perceived patency, suggesting that mucosal cooling rather than air temperature alone provides the trigeminal sensation that results in perception of patency. The dynamic cooling between the airstream and the mucosal wall may be quantified experimentally or computationally and could potentially lead to a new clinical evaluation tool. PMID:22022361

  3. [Function and morphology of isolated rat kidney following cellfree perfusion with various plasmaexpanders (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Franke, H; Sobotta, E E; Witzki, G; Unsicker, K

    1975-05-01

    Isolated arteficially perfused rat kidneys prepared as described by Franke et al. (1971) were perfused for 60 min with solutions of Haemaccel, Dextran 40, Pluronic-F-108, or hydroxy-aethyl starch in a single pass system. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of the Haemaccel or Dextran 40 perfused organs amounted during the first 30 min to 0.58 ml X g-1 X min-1 and 0.47 ml X g-1 X min-1 respectively. Using Pluronic-F-108 or hydroxy-aethyl starch GFR rose to 0.94 ml X g-1 X min-1 and to 0.85 ml X G-1 X min-1. With Haemaccel or Dextran 40 solutions a mean tubular Na-reabsorption of 75.4 mumol X g-1 X min-1 and of 59 mumol X g-1 X min-1 respectively was determined. Employing Pluronic-F-108 or hydroxy-aethyl starch a mean sodium net transport of 92.6 mumol X g-1 X min-1 in both experimental groups was obtained. The differences described in the functional capabilities of Haemaccel or Dextran 40 and of Pluronic-F-108 or Hydroxyethyl starch perfused kidneys are in good accordance with morphological changes in the ultrastructure. The most striking morphological deviations were found in proximal tubules of those kidneys perfused with Haemaccel solutions. On the other hand after perfusion with hydroxyethyl starch only very few morphological alterations could be detected.

  4. Sacral nerve stimulation enhances early intestinal mucosal repair following mucosal injury in a pig model

    PubMed Central

    Brégeon, Jérémy; Coron, Emmanuel; Da Silva, Anna Christina Cordeiro; Jaulin, Julie; Aubert, Philippe; Chevalier, Julien; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Meurette, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Key points Reducing intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) dysfunctions is recognized as being of major therapeutic interest for various intestinal disorders.Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is known to reduce IEB permeability.Here, we report in a pig model that SNS enhances morphological and functional recovery of IEB following mucosal injury induced via 2,4,6‐trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid. These effects are associated with an increased expression of tight junction proteins such as ZO‐1 and FAK.These results establish that SNS enhances intestinal barrier repair in acute mucosal injury. They further set the scientific basis for future use of SNS as a complementary or alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of gut disorders with IEB dysfunctions such as inflammatory bowel diseases or irritable bowel syndrome. Abstract Intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) dysfunctions, such as increased permeability or altered healing, are central to intestinal disorders. Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is known to reduce IEB permeability, but its ability to modulate IEB repair remains unknown. This study aimed to characterize the impact of SNS on mucosal repair following 2,4,6‐trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)‐induced lesions. Six pigs were stimulated by SNS 3 h prior to and 3 h after TNBS enema, while sham animals (n = 8) were not stimulated. The impact of SNS on mucosal changes was evaluated by combining in vivo imaging, histological and functional methods. Biochemical and transcriptomic approaches were used to analyse the IEB and mucosal inflammatory response. We observed that SNS enhanced the recovery from TNBS‐induced increase in transcellular permeability. At 24 h, TNBS‐induced alterations of mucosal morphology were significantly less in SNS compared with sham animals. SNS reduced TNBS‐induced changes in ZO‐1 expression and its epithelial pericellular distribution, and also increased pFAK/FAK expression compared with sham. Interestingly, SNS increased

  5. Sacral nerve stimulation enhances early intestinal mucosal repair following mucosal injury in a pig model.

    PubMed

    Brégeon, Jérémy; Coron, Emmanuel; Da Silva, Anna Christina Cordeiro; Jaulin, Julie; Aubert, Philippe; Chevalier, Julien; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Meurette, Guillaume; Neunlist, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Reducing intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) dysfunctions is recognized as being of major therapeutic interest for various intestinal disorders. Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is known to reduce IEB permeability. Here, we report in a pig model that SNS enhances morphological and functional recovery of IEB following mucosal injury induced via 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid. These effects are associated with an increased expression of tight junction proteins such as ZO-1 and FAK. These results establish that SNS enhances intestinal barrier repair in acute mucosal injury. They further set the scientific basis for future use of SNS as a complementary or alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of gut disorders with IEB dysfunctions such as inflammatory bowel diseases or irritable bowel syndrome. Intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) dysfunctions, such as increased permeability or altered healing, are central to intestinal disorders. Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is known to reduce IEB permeability, but its ability to modulate IEB repair remains unknown. This study aimed to characterize the impact of SNS on mucosal repair following 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced lesions. Six pigs were stimulated by SNS 3 h prior to and 3 h after TNBS enema, while sham animals (n = 8) were not stimulated. The impact of SNS on mucosal changes was evaluated by combining in vivo imaging, histological and functional methods. Biochemical and transcriptomic approaches were used to analyse the IEB and mucosal inflammatory response. We observed that SNS enhanced the recovery from TNBS-induced increase in transcellular permeability. At 24 h, TNBS-induced alterations of mucosal morphology were significantly less in SNS compared with sham animals. SNS reduced TNBS-induced changes in ZO-1 expression and its epithelial pericellular distribution, and also increased pFAK/FAK expression compared with sham. Interestingly, SNS increased the mucosal density of neutrophils

  6. Parametric imaging of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology using ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    A new image processing strategy is detailed for the simultaneous measurement of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology parameters from a sequence of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) images. A technique for locally mapping tumor perfusion parameters using skeletonized neovascular data is also introduced. Simulated images were used to test the neovascular skeletonization technique and variance (error) of relevant parametric estimates. Preliminary DCE-US image datasets were collected in 6 female patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and using a Philips iU22 ultrasound system equipped with a L9-3 MHz transducer and Definity contrast agent. Simulation data demonstrates that neovascular morphology parametric estimation is reproducible albeit measurement error can occur at a lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Experimental results indicate the feasibility of our approach to performing both tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology measurements from DCE-US images. Future work will expand on our initial clinical findings and also extent our image processing strategy to 3-dimensional space to allow whole tumor characterization.

  7. The Mouse Isolated Perfused Kidney Technique.

    PubMed

    Czogalla, Jan; Schweda, Frank; Loffing, Johannes

    2016-11-17

    The mouse isolated perfused kidney (MIPK) is a technique for keeping a mouse kidney under ex vivo conditions perfused and functional for 1 hr. This is a prerequisite for studying the physiology of the isolated organ and for many innovative applications that may be possible in the future, including perfusion decellularization for kidney bioengineering or the administration of anti-rejection or genome-editing drugs in high doses to prime the kidney for transplantation. During the time of the perfusion, the kidney can be manipulated, renal function can be assessed, and various pharmaceuticals administered. After the procedure, the kidney can be transplanted or processed for molecular biology, biochemical analysis, or microscopy. This paper describes the perfusate and the surgical technique needed for the ex vivo perfusion of mouse kidneys. Details of the perfusion apparatus are given and data are presented showing the viability of the kidney's preparation: renal blood flow, vascular resistance, and urine data as functional, transmission electron micrographs of different nephron segments as morphological readouts, and western blots of transport proteins of different nephron segments as molecular readout.

  8. Cutaneous toxicity of 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide in isolated perfused porcine skin.

    PubMed

    King, J R; Monteiro-Riviere, N A

    1990-06-01

    Previous research has shown the isolated perfused porcine skin flap (IPPSF) to be a novel in vitro experimental model for investigating xenobiotic percutaneous absorption. In this study, the IPPSF was used to biochemically and morphologically assess the dermatotoxicity of 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide (CEMS), a monofunctional analog of the vesicant, sulfur mustard. IPPSFs were perfused in a recirculating perfusion system and were treated with 97% CEMS (n = 4) or served as controls (n = 4). Additional IPPSFs were perfused in a nonrecirculating perfusion system and were treated with CEMS (n = 4) or were controls (n = 4). After dosing, each IPPSF was perfused for 8 hr. Cumulative glucose utilization (GU) and lactate production/glucose utilization ratio (L/GU ratio) were used as viability parameters. The average rate of GU for CEMS was significantly lower than control (p less than 0.05) in the recirculating and nonrecirculating IPPSFs. The L/GU ratio for CEMS was not significantly different (p greater than 0.05) from control for either perfusion system. CEMS resulted in a marked increase in vascular resistance versus control in both perfusion systems. Gross vesicles and bullae formation occurred in six of the CEMS-treated IPPSFs. Light microscopy revealed subepidermal vesicle formation above the basement membrane and extensive basal cell pyknosis in all IPPSFs treated with CEMS. No macroscopic or microscopic lesions were noted in the control flaps. Transmission electron microscopy revealed separation between the lamina lucida and the lamina densa of the basal lamina, with intracellular vacuolization and mitochondrial swelling occurring in the stratum basale and stratum spinosum cells of IPPSFs treated with CEMS. These lesions are similar to those described after human exposure to sulfur mustard. Full characterization of the morphological and biochemical changes seen after topical exposure of the IPPSF to vesicants may shed light on the pathogenesis of cutaneous toxicity

  9. Buccal mucosal graft in reconstructive urology: uses beyond urethral stricture.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Abhishek; Dican, Razvan; Beier, Jörn; Keller, Hansjörg

    2014-07-01

    The use of buccal mucosal grafts for the reconstruction of urethral strictures is an established procedure. Because of its robustness, the buccal mucosal graft could also potentially provide an alternative for other indications in reconstructive urology. We report here six consecutive patients who received a buccal mucosal graft for ureteral strictures, glans reconstruction and stoma stenosis. The follow up for all patients ranged from 26 to 50 months. The buccal mucosal graft showed excellent functional results for the ureteral strictures and stenosis from ureterocutaneostomy. For glans reconstructions, the buccal mucosal grafts delivered excellent cosmetic and functional results without causing meatal stenosis. We conclude the buccal mucosal graft can be used in reconstructive surgery beyond the reconstruction of urethral strictures.

  10. IL-36R signalling activates intestinal epithelial cells and fibroblasts and promotes mucosal healing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Scheibe, Kristina; Backert, Ingo; Wirtz, Stefan; Hueber, Axel; Schett, Georg; Vieth, Michael; Probst, Hans Christian; Bopp, Tobias; Neurath, Markus F; Neufert, Clemens

    2017-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-36R signalling plays a proinflammatory role in different organs including the skin, but the expression of IL-36R ligands and their molecular function in intestinal inflammation are largely unknown. We studied the characteristics of IL-36R ligand expression in IBDs and experimental colitis. The functional role of IL-36R signalling in the intestine was addressed in experimental colitis and wound healing models in vivo by using mice with defective IL-36R signalling (IL-36R-/-) or Myd88, neutralising anti-IL-36R antibodies, recombinant IL-36R ligands and RNA-seq genome expression analysis. Expression of IL-36α and IL-36γ was significantly elevated in active human IBD and experimental colitis. While IL-36γ was predominantly detected in nuclei of the intestinal epithelium, IL-36α was mainly found in the cytoplasm of CD14(+) inflammatory macrophages. Functional studies showed that defective IL-36R signalling causes high susceptibility to acute dextran sodium sulfate colitis and impairs wound healing. Mechanistically, IL-36R ligands released upon mucosal damage activated IL-36R(+) colonic fibroblasts via Myd88 thereby inducing expression of chemokines, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and IL-6. Moreover, they induced proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and expression of the antimicrobial protein lipocalin 2. Finally, treatment of experimental intestinal wounds with IL-36R ligands significantly accelerated mucosal healing in vivo. IL-36R signalling is activated upon intestinal damage, stimulates IECs and fibroblasts and drives mucosal healing. Modulation of the IL-36R pathway emerges as a potential therapeutic strategy for induction of mucosal healing in IBD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Evidence for a common mucosal immune system in the pig.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Heather L; Obradovic, Milan R

    2015-07-01

    The majority of lymphocytes activated at mucosal sites receive instructions to home back to the local mucosa, but a portion also seed distal mucosa sites. By seeding distal sites with antigen-specific effector or memory lymphocytes, the foundation is laid for the animal's mucosal immune system to respond with a secondary response should to this antigen be encountered at this site in the future. The common mucosal immune system has been studied quite extensively in rodent models but less so in large animal models such as the pig. Reasons for this paucity of reported induction of the common mucosal immune system in this species may be that distal mucosal sites were examined but no induction was observed and therefore it was not reported. However, we suspect that the majority of investigators simply did not sample distal mucosal sites and therefore there is little evidence of immune response induction in the literature. It is our hope that more pig immunologists and infectious disease experts who perform mucosal immunizations or inoculations on pigs will sample distal mucosal sites and report their findings, whether results are positive or negative. In this review, we highlight papers that show that immunization/inoculation using one route triggers mucosal immune system induction locally, systemically, and within at least one distal mucosal site. Only by understanding whether immunizations at one site triggers immunity throughout the common mucosal immune system can we rationally develop vaccines for the pig, and through these works we can gather evidence about the mucosal immune system that may be extrapolated to other livestock species or humans.

  12. Ventilation-perfusion imaging in pulmonary papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Espinola, D; Rupani, H; Camargo, E E; Wagner, H N

    1981-11-01

    Three children with laryngeal papillomas involving the lungs had serial ventilation-perfusion scintigrams to assess results of therapy designed to reduce the bronchial involvement. Different imaging patterns were observed depending on size, number, and location of lesions. In early parenchymal involvement a ventilation-perfusion mismatch was seen. The initial and follow-up studies correlated well with clinical and radiographic findings. This noninvasive procedure is helpful in evaluating ventilatory and perfusion impairment in these patients as well as their response to treatment.

  13. Ventilation-perfusion imaging in pulmonary papillomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Espinola, D.; Rupani, H.; Camargo, E.E.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    Three children with laryngeal papillomas involving the lungs had serial ventilation-perfusion scintigrams to assess results of therapy designed to reduce the bronchial involvement. Different imaging patterns were observed depending on size, number, and location of lesions. In early parenchymal involvement a ventilation-perfusion mismatch was seen. The initial and follow-up studies correlated well with clinical and radiographic findings. This noninvasive procedure is helpful in evaluating ventilatory and perfusion impairment in these patients as well as their response to treatment.

  14. Cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2016-07-01

    The flow of viscous fluid in the cochlea induces shear forces, which could provide benefit in clinical practice, for example to guide cochlear implant insertion or produce static pressure to the cochlear partition or wall. From a research standpoint, studying the effects of a viscous fluid in the cochlea provides data for better understanding cochlear fluid mechanics. However, cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid may damage the cochlea. In this work we studied the physiological and anatomical effects of perfusing the cochlea with a viscous fluid. Gerbil cochleae were perfused at a rate of 2.4 μL/min with artificial perilymph (AP) and sodium hyaluronate (Healon, HA) in four different concentrations (0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%). The different HA concentrations were applied either sequentially in the same cochlea or individually in different cochleae. The perfusion fluid entered from the round window and was withdrawn from basal scala vestibuli, in order to perfuse the entire perilymphatic space. Compound action potentials (CAP) were measured after each perfusion. After perfusion with increasing concentrations of HA in the order of increasing viscosity, the CAP thresholds generally increased. The threshold elevation after AP and 0.0625% HA perfusion was small or almost zero, and the 0.125% HA was a borderline case, while the higher concentrations significantly elevated CAP thresholds. Histology of the cochleae perfused with the 0.0625% HA showed an intact Reissner's membrane (RM), while in cochleae perfused with 0.125% and 0.25% HA RM was torn. Thus, the CAP threshold elevation was likely due to the broken RM, likely caused by the shear stress produced by the flow of the viscous fluid. Our results and analysis indicate that the cochlea can sustain, without a significant CAP threshold shift, up to a 1.5 Pa shear stress. Beside these finding, in the 0.125% and 0.25% HA perfusion cases, a temporary CAP threshold shift was observed, perhaps due to the presence and

  15. Cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Olson, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    The flow of viscous fluid in the cochlea induces shear forces, which could provide benefit in clinical practice, for example to guide cochlear implant insertion or produce static pressure to the cochlear partition or wall. From a research standpoint, studying the effects of a viscous fluid in the cochlea provides data for better understanding cochlear fluid mechanics. However, cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid may damage the cochlea. In this work we studied the physiological and anatomical effects of perfusing the cochlea with a viscous fluid. Gerbil cochleae were perfused at a rate of 2.4 μL/min with artificial perilymph (AP) and sodium hyaluronate (Healon, HA) in four different concentrations (0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%). The different HA concentrations were applied either sequentially in the same cochlea or individually in different cochleae. The perfusion fluid entered from the round window and was withdrawnfrom basal scala vestibuli, in order to perfuse the entire perilymphatic space. Compound action potentials (CAP) were measured after each perfusion. After perfusion with increasing concentrations of HA in the order of increasing viscosity, the CAP thresholds generally increased. The threshold elevation after AP and 0.0625% HA perfusion was small or almost zero, and the 0.125% HA was a borderline case, while the higher concentrations significantly elevated CAP thresholds. Histology of the cochleae perfused with the 0.0625% HA showed an intact Reissner’s membrane, while in cochleae perfused with 0.125% and 0.25% HA Reissner’s membrane (RM) was torn. Thus, the CAP threshold elevation was likely due to the broken of RM, which likely caused by the shear stress produced by the flow of the viscous fluid. Our results and analysis indicate that the cochlea can sustain, without a significant CAP threshold shift, up to a 1.5 Pa shear stress. Beside these finding, in the 0.125% and 0.25% HA perfusion cases, a temporary CAP threshold shift was observed

  16. [Perfusion computed tomography for diffuse liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S A; Juchems, M S

    2012-08-01

    Perfusion computed tomography (CT) has its main application in the clinical routine diagnosis of neuroradiological problems. Polyphase multi-detector spiral computed tomography is primarily used in liver diagnostics. The use of perfusion CT is also possible for the diagnostics and differentiation of diffuse hepatic diseases. The differentiation between cirrhosis and cirrhosis-like parenchymal changes is possible. It also helps to detect early stages of malignant tumors. However, there are some negative aspects, particularly that of radiation exposure. This paper summarizes the technical basics and possible applications of perfusion CT in cases of diffuse liver disease and weighs up the advantages and disadvantages of the examinations.

  17. Systemic immunization with papillomavirus L1 protein completely prevents the development of viral mucosal papillomas.

    PubMed Central

    Suzich, J A; Ghim, S J; Palmer-Hill, F J; White, W I; Tamura, J K; Bell, J A; Newsome, J A; Jenson, A B; Schlegel, R

    1995-01-01

    Infection of mucosal epithelium by papillomaviruses is responsible for the induction of genital and oral warts and plays a critical role in the development of human cervical and oropharyngeal cancer. We have employed a canine model to develop a systemic vaccine that completely protects against experimentally induced oral mucosal papillomas. The major capsid protein, L1, of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) was expressed in Sf9 insect cells in native conformation. L1 protein, which self-assembled into virus-like particles, was purified on CsCl gradients and injected intradermally into the foot pad of beagles. Vaccinated animals developed circulating antibodies against COPV and became completely resistant to experimental challenge with COPV. Successful immunization was strictly dependent upon native L1 protein conformation and L1 type. Partial protection was achieved with as little as 0.125 ng of L1 protein, and adjuvants appeared useful for prolonging the host immune response. Serum immunoglobulins passively transferred from COPV L1-immunized beagles to naive beagles conferred protection from experimental infection with COPV. Our results indicate the feasibility of developing a human vaccine to prevent mucosal papillomas, which can progress to malignancy. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8524802

  18. Systemic immunization with papillomavirus L1 protein completely prevents the development of viral mucosal papillomas.

    PubMed

    Suzich, J A; Ghim, S J; Palmer-Hill, F J; White, W I; Tamura, J K; Bell, J A; Newsome, J A; Jenson, A B; Schlegel, R

    1995-12-05

    Infection of mucosal epithelium by papillomaviruses is responsible for the induction of genital and oral warts and plays a critical role in the development of human cervical and oropharyngeal cancer. We have employed a canine model to develop a systemic vaccine that completely protects against experimentally induced oral mucosal papillomas. The major capsid protein, L1, of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) was expressed in Sf9 insect cells in native conformation. L1 protein, which self-assembled into virus-like particles, was purified on CsCl gradients and injected intradermally into the foot pad of beagles. Vaccinated animals developed circulating antibodies against COPV and became completely resistant to experimental challenge with COPV. Successful immunization was strictly dependent upon native L1 protein conformation and L1 type. Partial protection was achieved with as little as 0.125 ng of L1 protein, and adjuvants appeared useful for prolonging the host immune response. Serum immunoglobulins passively transferred from COPV L1-immunized beagles to naive beagles conferred protection from experimental infection with COPV. Our results indicate the feasibility of developing a human vaccine to prevent mucosal papillomas, which can progress to malignancy.

  19. Systemic Immunization with Papillomavirus L1 Protein Completely Prevents the Development of Viral Mucosal Papillomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzich, Joann A.; Ghim, Shin-Je; Palmer-Hill, Frances J.; White, Wendy I.; Tamura, James K.; Bell, Judith A.; Newsome, Joseph A.; Bennett Jenson, A.; Schlegel, Richard

    1995-12-01

    Infection of mucosal epithelium by papillomaviruses is responsible for the induction of genital and oral warts and plays a critical role in the development of human cervical and oropharyngeal cancer. We have employed a canine model to develop a systemic vaccine that completely protects against experimentally induced oral mucosal papillomas. The major capsid protein, L1, of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) was expressed in Sf9 insect cells in native conformation. L1 protein, which self-assembled into virus-like particles, was purified on CsCl gradients and injected intradermally into the foot pad of beagles. Vaccinated animals developed circulating antibodies against COPV and became completely resistant to experimental challenge with COPV. Successful immunization was strictly dependent upon native L1 protein conformation and L1 type. Partial protection was achieved with as little as 0.125 ng of L1 protein, and adjuvants appeared useful for prolonging the host immune response. Serum immunoglobulins passively transferred from COPV L1-immunized beagles to naive beagles conferred protection from experimental infection with COPV. Our results indicate the feasibility of developing a human vaccine to prevent mucosal papillomas, which can progress to malignancy.

  20. Oral mucosal immunization using glucomannosylated bilosomes.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sanyog; Indulkar, Anura; Harde, Harshad; Agrawal, Ashish K

    2014-06-01

    The present study embarks on the feasibility of GM-bilosomes as a rationally designed vehicle for oral mucosal immunization. Bilosomes containing BSA as a model antigen were found to have vesicle size of 157 +/- 3 nm, PDI of 0.287 +/- 0.045, zeta potential of -21.8 +/- 2.01 mV and entrapment efficiency of 71.3 +/- 4.3%. Bilosomal formulations were freeze dried and entrapped BSA in freeze dried formulations was found to retain its structural and conformational stability as evident by SDS-PAGE and CD analysis. The GM-bilosomes were also found stable in different simulated biological fluids and bile salt solutions of different concentrations. In-vitro drug release revealed that GM-bilosomes were able to sustain drug release up to 24 h. In-vitro cell uptake in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells demonstrated significantly higher uptake of GM-bilosomes in comparison with bilosomes and free antigen. Intestinal uptake studies on excised rat intestinal sections further demonstrated higher uptake of vesicular systems throughout the intestinal region in comparison with free antigen. Significantly higher (p < 0.05) systemic immune response (serum IgG level) was observed in case of GM-bilosomes in comparison with bilosomes and alum adsorbed BSA (BSA-AL) following oral administration. The immune response observed in case of GM-bilosomes was comparable to BSA-AL administered through im route without any significant difference (p > 0.05). More importantly, GM-bilosomes were found capable of inducing mucosal immune response as well as cell mediated immune response which was not induced by im BSA-AL. In conclusion, GM-bilosomes could be considered as promising carrier and adjuvant system for oral mucosal immunization and productively exploited for oral delivery of other candidate antigens.

  1. Glycerol monolaurate prevents mucosal SIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingsheng; Estes, Jacob D; Schlievert, Patrick M; Duan, Lijie; Brosnahan, Amanda J; Southern, Peter J; Reilly, Cavan S; Peterson, Marnie L; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Brunner, Kevin G; Nephew, Karla R; Pambuccian, Stefan; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Carlis, John V; Haase, Ashley T

    2009-04-23

    Although there has been great progress in treating human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection, preventing transmission has thus far proven an elusive goal. Indeed, recent trials of a candidate vaccine and microbicide have been disappointing, both for want of efficacy and concerns about increased rates of transmission. Nonetheless, studies of vaginal transmission in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-rhesus macaque (Macacca mulatta) model point to opportunities at the earliest stages of infection in which a vaccine or microbicide might be protective, by limiting the expansion of infected founder populations at the portal of entry. Here we show in this SIV-macaque model, that an outside-in endocervical mucosal signalling system, involving MIP-3alpha (also known as CCL20), plasmacytoid dendritic cells and CCR5(+ )cell-attracting chemokines produced by these cells, in combination with the innate immune and inflammatory responses to infection in both cervix and vagina, recruits CD4(+) T cells to fuel this obligate expansion. We then show that glycerol monolaurate-a widely used antimicrobial compound with inhibitory activity against the production of MIP-3alpha and other proinflammatory cytokines-can inhibit mucosal signalling and the innate and inflammatory response to HIV-1 and SIV in vitro, and in vivo it can protect rhesus macaques from acute infection despite repeated intra-vaginal exposure to high doses of SIV. This new approach, plausibly linked to interfering with innate host responses that recruit the target cells necessary to establish systemic infection, opens a promising new avenue for the development of effective interventions to block HIV-1 mucosal transmission.

  2. Mucosal microbiome dysbiosis in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Coker, Olabisi Oluwabukola; Dai, Zhenwei; Nie, Yongzhan; Zhao, Guijun; Cao, Lei; Nakatsu, Geicho; Wu, William Kk; Wong, Sunny Hei; Chen, Zigui; Sung, Joseph J Y; Yu, Jun

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to characterise the microbial changes associated with histological stages of gastric tumourigenesis. We performed 16S rRNA gene analysis of gastric mucosal samples from 81 cases including superficial gastritis (SG), atrophic gastritis (AG), intestinal metaplasia (IM) and gastric cancer (GC) from Xi'an, China, to determine mucosal microbiome dysbiosis across stages of GC. We validated the results in mucosal samples of 126 cases from Inner Mongolia, China. We observed significant mucosa microbial dysbiosis in IM and GC subjects, with significant enrichment of 21 and depletion of 10 bacterial taxa in GC compared with SG (q<0.05). Microbial network analysis showed increasing correlation strengths among them with disease progression (p<0.001). Five GC-enriched bacterial taxa whose species identifications correspond to Peptostreptococcus stomatis, Streptococcus anginosus, Parvimonas micra, Slackia exigua and Dialister pneumosintes had significant centralities in the GC ecological network (p<0.05) and classified GC from SG with an area under the receiver-operating curve (AUC) of 0.82. Moreover, stronger interactions among gastric microbes were observed in Helicobacter pylori-negative samples compared with H. pylori-positive samples in SG and IM. The fold changes of selected bacteria, and strengths of their interactions were successfully validated in the Inner Mongolian cohort, in which the five bacterial markers distinguished GC from SG with an AUC of 0.81. In addition to microbial compositional changes, we identified differences in bacterial interactions across stages of gastric carcinogenesis. The significant enrichments and network centralities suggest potentially important roles of P. stomatis, D. pneumosintes, S. exigua, P. micra and S. anginosus in GC progression. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Gut mucosal immunostimulation by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vitiñi, E; Alvarez, S; Medina, M; Medici, M; de Budeguer, M V; Perdigón, G

    2000-12-01

    The beneficial properties of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on human health have been frequently demonstrated. The interaction of LAB with the lymphoid cells associated to the gut to activate the mucosal immune system and the mechanisms by which they can exert an adjuvant effect is still unclear, as well as if this property is common for all the LAB. We studied the influence of the oral administration of different geneous of LAB such as Lactobacillus casei, L. acidophilus, L. rhamnosus, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. plantarum, Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus. We determined if the LAB assayed were able to stimulate the specific, the non-specific immune response (inflammatory response), or both. We demonstrated that all the bacteria assayed were able to increase the number of IgA producing cells associated to the lamina propria of small intestine. This effect was dose dependent. The increase in IgA+ producing cells was not always correlated with an increase in the CD4+ T cell number, indicating that some LAB assayed only induced clonal expansion of B cells triggered to produce IgA. Most of them, induced an increase in the number of cells involved in the inflammatory immune response. CD8+ T cell were diminished or not affected, with exception of L. plantarum that induced an increase at low dose. This fact would mean that LAB are unable to induce cytotoxicity mechanisms. We demonstrated the importance in the selection of LAB to be used as gut mucosal adjuvant. The different behaviours observed among them on the gut mucosal immune response, specially those that induce inflammatory immune response, show that not all the LAB can be used as oral adjuvant and that the beneficial effect of them can not generalized to genous or specie. The immunoadjuvant capacity would be a property of the strain assayed.

  4. Vitamin D and mucosal immune function

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Significant advances have been made in the characterization of Vitamin D and the Vitamin D receptor (VDR) in immune function. The studies of signaling pathways involved in the response to infection and inflammation have led to a more detailed understanding of the cellular response to Vitamin D through VDR. This review summarizes recent progress in understanding how Vitamin D contributes to mucosal immune function, particularly in relation to the molecular mechanisms by which Vitamin D and VDR influence mucosal immunity, bacterial infection, and inflammation. Recent findings Recently, it was shown that Vitamin D modulates the T cell antigen receptor, further demonstrating that Vitamin D has a nonclassical role in immunoregulation. The anti-inflammation and anti-infection functions for Vitamin D are newly identified and highly significant activities. Vitamin D/VDR have multiple critical functions in regulating the response to intestinal homeostasis, tight junctions, pathogen invasion, commensal bacterial colonization, antimicrobe peptide secretion, and mucosal defense. Interestingly, microorganisms modulate the VDR signaling pathway. Summary Vitamin D is known as a key player in calcium homeostasis and electrolyte and blood pressure regulation. Recently, important progress has been made in understanding how the noncanonical activities of Vitamin D influence the pathogenesis and prevention of human disease. Vitamin D and VDR are directly involved in T cell antigen receptor signaling. The involvement of Vitamin D/VDR in anti-inflammation and anti-infection represents a newly identified and highly significant activity for VDR. Studies have indicated that the dysregulation of VDR may lead to exaggerated inflammatory responses, raising the possibility that defects in Vitamin D and VDR signaling transduction may be linked to bacterial infection and chronic inflammation. Further characterization of Vitamin D/VDR will help elucidate the pathogenesis of

  5. Glycerol monolaurate prevents mucosal SIV transmission

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingsheng; Estes, Jacob D.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Duan, Lijie; Brosnahan, Amanda J.; Southern, Peter J.; Reilly, Cavan S.; Peterson, Marnie L.; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Brunner, Kevin G.; Nephew, Karla R.; Pambuccian, Stefan; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Carlis, John V.; Haase, Ashley T.

    2009-01-01

    While there has been great progress in treating HIV-1 infection1, preventing transmission has thus far proven an elusive goal. Indeed, recent trials of a candidate vaccine and microbicide have been disappointing, both for want of efficacy and concerns about increased rates of transmission2–4. Nonetheless, studies of vaginal transmission in the SIV-rhesus macaque model point to opportunities in the earliest stages of infection where a vaccine or microbicide might be protective, by limiting the expansion of infected founder populations at the portal of entry5, 6. Here we show in this SIV-macaque model, that an outside-in endocervical mucosal signalling system, involving MIP-3α, plasmacytoid dendritic cells and CCR5+cell-attracting chemokines produced by these cells, in combination with the innate immune and inflammatory responses to infection in both cervix and vagina, recruit CD4+T cells to fuel this obligate expansion. We then show that glycerol monolaurate, a widely used antimicrobial compound 7 with inhibitory activity against production of MIP-3α and other proinflammatory cytokines8, can inhibit mucosal signalling and the innate and inflammatory response to HIV-1 and SIV in vitro, and in vivo can protect rhesus macaques from acute infection despite repeated intra-vaginal exposure to high doses of SIV. This novel approach, plausibly linked to interfering with innate host responses that recruit the target cells necessary to establish systemic infection, opens a promising new avenue for development of effective interventions to block HIV-1 mucosal transmission. PMID:19262509

  6. Oral lichen planus and lichenoid mucositis.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, Scott S; Ciarrocca, Katharine

    2014-04-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is commonly found in middle-aged women. Although the cause is unknown, research points to several complex immunologic events and cells that are responsible for the inflammatory destruction and chronicity of these lesions. Biopsy for histologic diagnosis is recommended. The mainstay of treatment remains topical corticosteroids; however, newer therapies such as immunomodulating agents are available for recalcitrant lesions. In cases of lichenoid mucositis or reactions, treatment should be directed at identifying and removing the presumed cause. Given the apparent risk of squamous cell carcinoma in these patients, frequent follow-up and repeat biopsy are vital.

  7. Peptic activity and gastroduodenal mucosal damage.

    PubMed Central

    Raufman, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    This contribution reviews briefly the history of the discovery and characterization of peptic activity; secretory models and current concepts regarding the regulation of pepsinogen secretion; and evidence that pepsin is a necessary co-factor for gastroduodenal mucosal injury. Several animal studies indicate that peptic activity is required for acid- and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastroduodenal ulceration. A more vigorous approach to the development of anti-peptic drugs for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease is encouraged. Images Figure 1 PMID:9041694

  8. Gastric Mucosal Protection by Aegle Marmelos Against Gastric Mucosal Damage: Role of Enterochromaffin Cell and Serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Purnima; Dutta, Shubha R.; Guha, Debjani

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) released from enterochromaffin (EC) cells in gastric mucosa inhibits gastric acidity by increasing the gastric mucus secretion. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of aqueous extract of Aegle marmelos (AM) ripe fruit pulp (250 mg/kg body weight) on mean ulcer index (MUI), EC cells, 5-HT content, and adherent mucosal thickness of ulcerated gastric tissue in adult albino rats. Material and Methods: Ulceration was induced by using aspirin (500 mg/kg, p.o.), cerebellar nodular lesion and applying cold-restraint stress. Results: In all cases increased MUI in gastric tissue along with decreased EC cell count was observed with concomitant decrease of 5-HT content and adherent mucosal thickness (P < 0.05). Pretreatment with AM for 14 days decreased MUI, increased EC cell count, and 5-HT content as well as adherent mucosal thickness in all ulcerated group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: AM produces gastric mucosal protection mediated by increased EC cell count and 5-HT levels. PMID:25672237

  9. Hepatic Blood Perfusion Estimated by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography in Pigs Limitations of the Slope Method

    PubMed Central

    Winterdahl, Michael; Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Susanne; Mortensen, Frank V.; Alstrup, Aage K. O.; Hansen, Søren B.; Munk, Ole L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and the slope method can provide absolute measures of hepatic blood perfusion from hepatic artery (HA) and portal vein (PV) at experimentally varied blood flow rates. Materials and Methods Ten anesthetized 40-kg pigs underwent DCE-CT during periods of normocapnia (normal flow), hypocapnia (decreased flow), and hypercapnia (increased flow), which was induced by adjusting the ventilation. Reference blood flows in HA and PV were measured continuously by surgically-placed ultrasound transit-time flowmeters. For each capnic condition, the DCE-CT estimated absolute hepatic blood perfusion from HA and PV were calculated using the slope method and compared with flowmeter based absolute measurements of hepatic perfusions and relative errors were analyzed. Results The relative errors (mean±SEM) of the DCE-CT based perfusion estimates were −21±23% for HA and 81±31% for PV (normocapnia), 9±23% for HA and 92±42% for PV (hypocapnia), and 64±28% for HA and −2±20% for PV (hypercapnia). The mean relative errors for HA were not significantly different from zero during hypo- and normocapnia, and the DCE-CT slope method could detect relative changes in HA perfusion between scans. Infusion of contrast agent led to significantly increased hepatic blood perfusion, which biased the PV perfusion estimates. Conclusions Using the DCE-CT slope method, HA perfusion estimates were accurate at low and normal flow rates whereas PV perfusion estimates were inaccurate and imprecise. At high flow rate, both HA perfusion estimates were significantly biased. PMID:22836307

  10. Rhubarb extract partially improves mucosal integrity in chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Bajic, Juliana E; Eden, Georgina L; Lampton, Lorrinne S; Cheah, Ker Y; Lymn, Kerry A; Pei, Jinxin V; Yool, Andrea J; Howarth, Gordon S

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of orally gavaged aqueous rhubarb extract (RE) on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis in rats. METHODS Female Dark Agouti rats (n = 8/group) were gavaged daily (1 mL) with water, high-dose RE (HDR; 200 mg/kg) or low-dose RE (LDR; 20mg/kg) for eight days. Intestinal mucositis was induced (day 5) with 5-FU (150 mg/kg) via intraperitoneal injection. Intestinal tissue samples were collected for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and histological examination. Xenopus oocytes expressing aquaporin 4 water channels were prepared to examine the effect of aqueous RE on cell volume, indicating a potential mechanism responsible for modulating net fluid absorption and secretion in the gastrointestinal tract. Statistical significance was assumed at P < 0.05 by one-way ANOVA. RESULTS Bodyweight was significantly reduced in rats administered 5-FU compared to healthy controls (P < 0.01). Rats administered 5-FU significantly increased intestinal MPO levels (≥ 307%; P < 0.001), compared to healthy controls. However, LDR attenuated this effect in 5-FU treated rats, significantly decreasing ileal MPO activity (by 45%; P < 0.05), as compared to 5-FU controls. 5-FU significantly reduced intestinal mucosal thickness (by ≥ 29% P < 0.001) as compared to healthy controls. LDR significantly increased ileal mucosal thickness in 5-FU treated rats (19%; P < 0.05) relative to 5-FU controls. In xenopus oocytes expressing AQP4 water channels, RE selectively blocked water influx into the cell, induced by a decrease in external osmotic pressure. As water efflux was unaltered by the presence of extracellular RE, the directional flow of water across the epithelial barrier, in the presence of extracellular RE, indicated that RE may alleviate water loss across the epithelial barrier and promote intestinal health in chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis. CONCLUSION In summary, low dose RE improves selected parameters of mucosal integrity and reduces ileal

  11. A Murine Model of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Peri-Implant Mucositis and Peri-Implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Pirih, Flavia Q.; Hiyari, Sarah; Leung, Ho-Yin; Barroso, Ana D. V.; Jorge, Adrian C. A.; Perussolo, Jeniffer; Atti, Elisa; Lin, Yi-Ling; Tetradis, Sotirios; Camargo, Paulo M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dental implants are a vastly used treatment option for tooth replacement. Dental implants are however susceptible to inflammatory diseases such as peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, which are highly prevalent and may lead to implant loss. Unfortunately, the understanding of the pathogenesis of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis is fragmented and incomplete. Therefore, the availability of a reproducible animal model to study these inflammatory diseases would facilitate the dissection of their pathogenic mechanisms. The objective of this study is to propose a murine model of experimental peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. Materials and Methods Screw-shaped titanium implants were placed in the upper healed edentulous alveolar ridges of C57BL/6J mice eight weeks after tooth extraction. Following four weeks of osseointegration, Porphyromonas gingivalis-lipolysaccharide (LPS) injections were delivered to the peri-implant soft tissues for six weeks. No-injections and vehicle injections were utilized as controls. Peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis were assessed clinically, radiographically (micro-CT) and histologically following LPS-treatment. Results LPS-injections resulted in a significant increase in soft tissue edema around the head of the implants as compared to the control groups. Micro-CT analysis revealed significantly greater bone loss in the LPS-treated implants. Histological analysis of the specimens demonstrated that the LPS-group had increased soft tissue vascularity, which harbored a dense mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate, and the bone exhibited noticeable osteoclast activity. Conclusion The induction of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis in mice via localized delivery of bacterial LPS has been demonstrated. We anticipate that this model will contribute to the development of more effective preventive and therapeutic approaches for these two conditions. PMID:24967609

  12. A Murine Model of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Peri-Implant Mucositis and Peri-Implantitis.

    PubMed

    Pirih, Flavia Q; Hiyari, Sarah; Leung, Ho-Yin; Barroso, Ana D V; Jorge, Adrian C A; Perussolo, Jeniffer; Atti, Elisa; Lin, Yi-Ling; Tetradis, Sotirios; Camargo, Paulo M

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants are a widely used treatment option for tooth replacement. However, they are susceptible to inflammatory diseases such as peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, which are highly prevalent and may lead to implant loss. Unfortunately, the understanding of the pathogenesis of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis is fragmented and incomplete. Therefore, the availability of a reproducible animal model to study these inflammatory diseases would facilitate the dissection of their pathogenic mechanisms. The objective of this study is to propose a murine model of experimental peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. Screw-shaped titanium implants were placed in the upper healed edentulous alveolar ridges of C57BL/6J mice 8 weeks after tooth extraction. Following 4 weeks of osseointegration, Porphyromonas gingivalis -lipolysaccharide (LPS) injections were delivered to the peri-implant soft tissues for 6 weeks. No-injections and vehicle injections were utilized as controls. Peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis were assessed clinically, radiographically (microcomputerized tomograph [CT]), and histologically following LPS-treatment. LPS-injections resulted in a significant increase in soft tissue edema around the head of the implants as compared to the control groups. Micro-CT analysis revealed significantly greater bone loss in the LPS-treated implants. Histological analysis of the specimens demonstrated that the LPS-group had increased soft tissue vascularity, which harbored a dense mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate, and the bone exhibited noticeable osteoclast activity. The induction of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis in mice via localized delivery of bacterial LPS has been demonstrated. We anticipate that this model will contribute to the development of more effective preventive and therapeutic approaches for these 2 conditions.

  13. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Is Associated with More Serious Small Intestinal Mucosal Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen-Rui; Chen, Mei-Hui; He, Xing-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical and experimental research has revealed that diabetes mellitus (DM) is characterized by intestinal hypomotility, gut microbial dysbiosis, increased gut permeability, microcirculation disorders, circulatory changes, and dysfunction of intestinal stem cells, which may be linked to inflammation of intestinal mucosa. However, the relationship between type 2 DM (T2DM) and macroscopic small intestinal mucosal injuries is still unclear. Therefore, we retrospectively studied capsule endoscopy data to determine the relationship between T2DM and small intestinal mucosal injuries. Materials and Methods We compared the records of 38 T2DM patients with those of 152 non-DM patients for small intestinal mucosal injuries. Different types of mucosal injuries and Lewis scores were compared between T2DM and non-DM patients. The relationships between patients with or without different types of diabetic complications and the Lewis score was assessed. Moreover, the relationships between insulin resistance and Lewis score, between HbA1c and Lewis score, were also both assessed. Results The prevalence of a villous edema in subjects with T2DM was significantly higher than in those without DM (P < 0.001), but incidence of ulcers was not different (P = 1.000). With T2DM, the Lewis score was also significantly higher (P = 0.002). In addition, subjects with diabetic nephropathy showed significantly higher Lewis scores than patients without diabetic nephropathy (P = 0.033). In Pearson’s correlation tests, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) value was correlated positively with the Lewis score (γ = 0.175, P = 0.015), but no statistical correlation was found between HbA1c level and Lewis score (γ = 0.039, P = 0.697). Conclusions Subjects with T2DM, especially those with diabetic nephropathy, have higher Lewis scores and more serious small intestinal mucosal lesions. PMID:27598308

  14. Evolution of pulmonary perfusion defects demonstrated with contrast-enhanced dynamic MR perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Howarth, N R; Beziat, C; Berthezène, Y

    1999-01-01

    Pulmonary perfusion defects can be demonstrated with contrast-enhanced dynamic MR perfusion imaging. We present the case of a patient with a pulmonary artery sarcoma who presented with a post-operative pulmonary embolus and was followed in the post-operative period with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR perfusion imaging. This technique allows rapid imaging of the first passage of contrast material through the lung after bolus injection in a peripheral vein. To our knowledge, this case report is the first to describe the use of this MR technique in showing the evolution of peripheral pulmonary perfusion defects associated with pulmonary emboli.

  15. Quasi-simultaneous multimodal imaging of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wenqi; Gan, Qi; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous and quantitative assessment of multiple tissue parameters may facilitate more effective diagnosis and therapy in many clinical applications, such as wound healing. However, existing wound assessment methods are typically subjective and qualitative, with the need for sequential data acquisition and coregistration between modalities, and lack of reliable standards for performance evaluation or calibration. To overcome these limitations, we developed a multimodal imaging system for quasi-simultaneous assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion in a quantitative and noninvasive fashion. The system integrated multispectral and laser speckle imaging technologies into one experimental setup. Tissue oxygenation and perfusion were reconstructed by advanced algorithms. The accuracy and reliability of the imaging system were quantitatively validated in calibration experiments and a tissue-simulating phantom test. The experimental results were compared with a commercial oxygenation and perfusion monitor. Dynamic detection of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion was also demonstrated in vivo by a postocclusion reactive hyperemia procedure in a human subject and a wound healing process in a wounded mouse model. Our in vivo experiments not only validated the performance of the multimodal imaging system for cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion imaging but also demonstrated its technical potential for wound healing assessment in clinical practice.

  16. Quasi-simultaneous multimodal imaging of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenqi; Gan, Qi; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous and quantitative assessment of multiple tissue parameters may facilitate more effective diagnosis and therapy in many clinical applications, such as wound healing. However, existing wound assessment methods are typically subjective and qualitative, with the need for sequential data acquisition and coregistration between modalities, and lack of reliable standards for performance evaluation or calibration. To overcome these limitations, we developed a multimodal imaging system for quasi-simultaneous assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion in a quantitative and noninvasive fashion. The system integrated multispectral and laser speckle imaging technologies into one experimental setup. Tissue oxygenation and perfusion were reconstructed by advanced algorithms. The accuracy and reliability of the imaging system were quantitatively validated in calibration experiments and a tissue-simulating phantom test. The experimental results were compared with a commercial oxygenation and perfusion monitor. Dynamic detection of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion was also demonstrated in vivo by a postocclusion reactive hyperemia procedure in a human subject and a wound healing process in a wounded mouse model. Our in vivo experiments not only validated the performance of the multimodal imaging system for cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion imaging but also demonstrated its technical potential for wound healing assessment in clinical practice.

  17. The development of mucosal vaccines for both mucosal and systemic immune induction and the roles played by adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination is the most successful immunological practice that improves the quality of human life and health. Vaccine materials include antigens of pathogens and adjuvants potentiating the effectiveness of vaccination. Vaccines are categorized using various criteria, including the vaccination material used and the method of administration. Traditionally, vaccines have been injected via needles. However, given that most pathogens first infect mucosal surfaces, there is increasing interest in the establishment of protective mucosal immunity, achieved by vaccination via mucosal routes. This review summarizes recent developments in mucosal vaccines and their associated adjuvants. PMID:28168169

  18. Symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux, abnormal oesophageal acid exposure, and mucosal acid sensitivity are three separate, though related, aspects of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, P J; Maher, L; Pryde, A; Heading, R C

    1991-01-01

    The Bernstein test has been used as a test of oesophageal acid sensitivity for over 30 years but its clinical value has been challenged by the advent of ambulatory pH monitoring. Furthermore, the relation between mucosal acid sensitivity, symptomatic reflux, and abnormal oesophageal acid exposure time is unclear. This study examined the relation between these three parameters in patients referred for pH monitoring with unexplained chest pain or heartburn. Fifty consecutive patients were studied - nine with non-cardiac chest pain and 41 with a history of heartburn. Symptomatic reflux was defined as a greater than or equal to 50% temporal association between pain episodes and reflux events (pH less than 4) during pH monitoring. A positive acid perfusion test (in which the patient's usual symptoms were evoked by acid, though not saline) had a 100% sensitivity, 73% specificity, and 81% accuracy for the detection of symptomatic reflux. All 10 patients with symptomatic reflux during pH monitoring had evidence of mucosal acid sensitivity. A negative acid perfusion test made symptomatic reflux unlikely. However, symptomatic reflux or a positive acid perfusion test, or both, were found in some patients with a normal oesophageal acid exposure time during pH monitoring. Mucosal acid sensitivity, abnormal oesophageal acid exposure time, and symptomatic reflux should be regarded as separate, though related aspects of reflux disease. The Bernstein test is simple, safe, and easily performed. A positive test helps to identify an oesophageal cause of symptoms, particularly in patients in whom other aspects of 'gastro-oesophageal reflux disease' are absent, or who do not have symptoms during pH monitoring. PMID:1864528

  19. Improved exercise myocardial perfusion during lidoflazine therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, W.; Narahara, K.A.; Park, J.

    1983-11-01

    Lidoflazine is a synthetic drug with calcium-channel blocking effects. In a study of 6 patients with severe classic angina pectoris, single-blind administration of lidoflazine was associated with improved myocardial perfusion during exercise as determined by thallium-201 stress scintigraphy. These studies demonstrate that lidoflazine therapy is associated with relief of angina, an increased physical work capacity, and improved regional myocardial perfusion during exercise.

  20. Pancreas transplants: Evaluation using perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuni, C.C.; du Cret, R.P.; Boudreau, R.J.

    1989-07-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphic perfusion studies in evaluating pancreas transplant patients, we reviewed 56 of these studies in 22 patients who had 27 transplants. Seventeen patients underwent two or more studies. The perfusion studies were performed with 20 mCi (740 MBq) of 99mTc-DTPA injected as a bolus followed by eight to 16 serial 2-sec images and a 500,000-count immediate static image. Images were evaluated for (1) the time and intensity of pancreatic peak radioactivity relative to the time and intensity of the iliac arterial peak; (2) relative pancreatic to iliac arterial intensity on the static image; and (3) size, homogeneity, and definition of the pancreas. Clinical diagnoses at the time of scintigraphy of normal function (n = 36), rejection (n = 13), pancreatitis (n = 6), or arterial thrombosis (n = 1) were based on insulin requirement, urine amylase, serum glucose, serum amylase, response to therapy, cultures, CT, MR, sonography, scintigraphy with 67Ga or 111In-WBCs, percutaneous drainage results, angiography, surgery, and pathologic examination of resected transplants. Three 99mTc-DTPA perfusion studies showed no pancreatic perfusion, four showed decreasing perfusion on serial studies, and five showed progressive loss of definition of the pancreas on serial studies. Of the three patients with no detectable perfusion, one had a normally functioning transplant, one had arterial thrombosis with transplant infarction, and one had severe rejection with minimal function. Decreasing perfusion was associated with rejection in three patients and pancreatitis in one. Decreasing definition was seen in four patients with rejection and one with pancreatitis. We conclude that perfusion scintigraphy is useful, primarily when performed serially, although nonspecific for evaluating pancreas transplants.

  1. Vicarious Audiovisual Learning in Perfusion Education

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Thomas E.; Holt, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Perfusion technology is a mechanical and visual science traditionally taught with didactic instruction combined with clinical experience. It is difficult to provide perfusion students the opportunity to experience difficult clinical situations, set up complex perfusion equipment, or observe corrective measures taken during catastrophic events because of patient safety concerns. Although high fidelity simulators offer exciting opportunities for future perfusion training, we explore the use of a less costly low fidelity form of simulation instruction, vicarious audiovisual learning. Two low fidelity modes of instruction; description with text and a vicarious, first person audiovisual production depicting the same content were compared. Students (n = 37) sampled from five North American perfusion schools were prospectively randomized to one of two online learning modules, text or video. These modules described the setup and operation of the MAQUET ROTAFLOW standalone centrifugal console and pump. Using a 10 question multiple-choice test, students were assessed immediately after viewing the module (test #1) and then again 2 weeks later (test #2) to determine cognition and recall of the module content. In addition, students completed a questionnaire assessing the learning preferences of today’s perfusion student. Mean test scores from test #1 for video learners (n = 18) were significantly higher (88.89%) than for text learners (n = 19) (74.74%), (p < .05). The same was true for test #2 where video learners (n = 10) had an average score of 77% while text learners (n = 9) scored 60% (p < .05). Survey results indicated video learners were more satisfied with their learning module than text learners. Vicarious audiovisual learning modules may be an efficacious, low cost means of delivering perfusion training on subjects such as equipment setup and operation. Video learning appears to improve cognition and retention of learned content and may play an important

  2. Role of perfusion imaging in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Sillanpää, N

    2013-03-01

    Imaging has a central role in the diagnosis and classification of acute stroke, the triage of patients to different treatment approaches and the prediction of the clinical outcome and the risk of hemorrhagic complications. A multimodal imaging protocol that includes a perfusion study allows diagnostics beyond anatomical findings by enabling the characterization of the ischemic brain tissue and the cerebral hemodynamic state. This information potentially leads to more accurate clinical decision making with the intention to select the right patients for different revascularization therapies regardless of fixed time windows. Perfusion imaging enables the detection and quantification of the irreversibly damaged infarct core and the at-risk penumbra. Parameters derived from perfusion studies can serve as surrogate markers for stroke severity and are independent predictors of the clinical outcome and the occurrence of hemorrhagic complications. The validation and standardization of the perfusion methodology is still ongoing. Currently there is emerging but no high level evidence that perfusion imaging improves the clinical outcome or has a direct impact on the decision to treat the patient with intravenous thrombolytic therapy or intra-arterial interventions. Thus, definite guidelines on the role of the perfusion imaging in the context of acute stroke cannot yet be given.

  3. Hydroxyethyl starch solution for extracorporeal tissue perfusion.

    PubMed

    Taeger, Christian D; Friedrich, Oliver; Drechsler, Caroline; Weigand, Annika; Hobe, Frieder; Geppert, Carol I; Münch, Frank; Birkholz, Torsten; Buchholz, Rainer; Horch, Raymund E; Präbst, Konstantin

    2016-11-04

    In the field of free flap transfer in reconstructive surgery, the trans- or replanted tissue always undergoes cell damage during ischemia to a more or less strong extent. In previous studies we already showed that conserving muscle transplants by means of extracorporeal perfusion over a period of 6 hours by using a crystalloid solution for perfusion. However, we observed significant edema formation. In this study we aimed at reducing the edema formation by using an iso-oncotic colloid as perfusion solution. This way we wanted to evaluate a possible new application of hydroxyl-ethyl starch in an extracorporeal setup to exploit potential benefits of the colloid.Examined parameters include the muscles' functionality with external field stimulation, histological examination and edema formation. Perfused muscles showed a statistically significant higher ability to exert force compared to nonperfused ones. These findings can be confirmed using Annexin V as marker for cell damage, as perfusion of muscle tissue limits damage significantly compared to nonperfused tissue. Substituting the electrolyte perfusion solution with a colloidal one shows the tendency to reduce the edema formation however without statistical significance.

  4. Perfusion visualization and analysis for pulmonary embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Michael S.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Naidich, David P.; Novak, Carol L.

    2005-04-01

    Given the nature of pulmonary embolism (PE), timely and accurate diagnosis is critical. Contrast enhanced high-resolution CT images allow physicians to accurately identify segmental and sub-segmental emboli. However, it is also important to assess the effect of such emboli on the blood flow in the lungs. Expanding upon previous research, we propose a method for 3D visualization of lung perfusion. The proposed method allows users to examine perfusion throughout the entire lung volume at a single glance, with areas of diminished perfusion highlighted so that they are visible independent of the viewing location. This may be particularly valuable for better accuracy in assessing the extent of hemodynamic alterations resulting from pulmonary emboli. The method also facilitates user interaction and may help identify small peripheral sub-segmental emboli otherwise overlooked. 19 patients referred for possible PE were evaluated by CT following the administration of IV contrast media. An experienced thoracic radiologist assessed the 19 datasets with 17 diagnosed as being positive for PE with multiple emboli. Since anomalies in lung perfusion due to PE can alter the distribution of parenchymal densities, we analyzed features collected from histograms of the computed perfusion maps and demonstrate their potential usefulness as a preliminary test to suggest the presence of PE. These histogram features also offer the possibility of distinguishing distinct patterns associated with chronic PE and may even be useful for further characterization of changes in perfusion or overall density resulting from associated conditions such as pneumonia or diffuse lung disease.

  5. Dexmedetomidine decreases the oral mucosal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Yoshida, Kenji; Tanaka, Eri; Togami, Kohei; Tada, Hitoshi; Ganzberg, Steven; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    There is an abundance of blood vessels in the oral cavity, and intraoperative bleeding can disrupt operations. There have been some interesting reports about constriction of vessels in the oral cavity, one of which reported that gingival blood flow in cats is controlled by sympathetic α-adrenergic fibres that are involved with vasoconstriction. Dexmedetomidine is a sedative and analgesic agent that acts through the α-2 adrenoceptor, and is expected to have a vasoconstrictive action in the oral cavity. We have focused on the relation between the effects of α-adrenoceptors by dexmedetomidine and vasoconstriction in oral tissues, and assessed the oral mucosal blood flow during sedation with dexmedetomidine. The subjects comprised 13 healthy male volunteers, sedated with dexmedetomidine in a loading dose of 6 μg/kg/h for 10 min and a continuous infusion of 0.7 μg/kg/h for 32 min. The mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and palatal mucosal blood flow (PMBF) were measured at 0, 5, 10, 12, 22, and 32 min after the start of the infusion. The HR, CO, and PBMF decreased significantly during the infusion even though there were no differences in the SV. The SVR increased significantly but the PMBF decreased significantly. In conclusion, PMBF was reduced by the mediating effect of dexmedetomidine on α-2 adrenoceptors.

  6. Iron medication-induced gastric mucosal injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuchen; Ouyang, Jie; Wieczorek, Rosemary; DeSoto, Fidelina

    2009-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal erosion, ulcer, necrosis and strictures after an acute iron overdose are well described. However, gastric mucosal injury in patients receiving therapeutic iron has received only scant recognition despite its wide use. We report a case of iron medication-induced gastric mucosal injury in a 76-year-old male who presented with iron deficiency anemia and had been taking ferrous sulfate tablet for 4 years. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed a pale, villous appearing flat lesion along the lesser curvature of gastric body. Histopathologic examination of EGD biopsies of the flat lesion showed brown crystalline materials deposited in the lamina propria of gastric mucosa, which was accompanied with fibrosis, chronic inflammation, and foreign body reaction. The crystalline materials were covered and admixed with gastric epithelium. Prussian blue iron stain confirmed that the brown crystalline materials were iron. The iron and hemosiderin accumulation was also seen in cytoplasm of epithelial cells and lumen of fundic gastric glands. The recognition and reporting by pathologists of iron-induced changes in EGD biopsies will alert clinicians to this underrecognized but easily correctable complication by alternative forms of iron therapy, such as liquid preparation.

  7. Th17 cells and Mucosal Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Aujla, Shean J.; Dubin, Patricia J.; Kolls, Jay K.

    2008-01-01

    Th17 cells are a new lineage of T-cells that are controlled by the transcription factor RORγt and develop independent of GATA-3, T-bet, Stat 4 and Stat 6. Novel effector molecules produced by these cells include IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, and IL-26. IL-17RA binds IL-17A and IL-17F and is critical for host defense against extracellular planktonic bacteria by regulating chemokine gradients for neutrophil emigration into infected tissue sites as well as host granulopoiesis. Moreover IL-17 and IL-22 regulate the production of antimicrobial proteins in mucosal epithelium. Although TGF-β1 and IL-6 have been shown to be critical for development of Th17 cells from naïve precursors, IL-23 is also important in regulating IL-17 release in mucosal tissues in response to infectious stimuli. Compared to Th1 cells, IL-23 and IL-17 show limited roles in controlling host defense against primary infections with intracellular bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis suggesting a predominate role of the Th17 lineage in host defense against extracellular pathogens. However in the setting of chronic biofilm infections, as that occurs with Cystic Fibrosis or bronchetctasis, Th17 cells may be key contributors of tissue injury. PMID:18054248

  8. Nitric oxide as a mediator of gastrointestinal mucosal injury?—Say it ain't so

    PubMed Central

    Kubes, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide has been suggested as a contributor to tissue injury in various experimental models of gastrointestinal inflammation. However, there is overwhelming evidence that nitric oxide is one of the most important mediators of mucosal defence, influencing such factors as mucus secretion, mucosal blood flow, ulcer repair and the activity of a variety of mucosal immunocytes. Nitric oxide has the capacity to down-regulate inflammatory responses in the gastrointestinal tract, to scavenge various free radical species and to protect the mucosa from injury induced by topical irritants. Moreover, questions can be raised regarding the evidence purported to support a role for nitric oxide in producing tissue injury. In this review, we provide an overview of the evidence supporting a role for nitric oxide in protecting the gastrointestinal tract from injury. PMID:18475671

  9. Mucosal Inducible NO Synthase–Producing IgA+ Plasma Cells in Helicobacter pylori–Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Mattea; Moos, Verena; Heller, Frank; Meyer, Thomas F.; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Bojarski, Christian; Fehlings, Michael; Doerner, Thomas; Allers, Kristina; Aebischer, Toni; Ignatius, Ralf; Schneider, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The mucosal immune system is relevant for homeostasis, immunity, and also pathological conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. Inducible NO synthase (iNOS)–dependent production of NO is one of the factors linked to both antimicrobial immunity and pathological conditions. Upregulation of iNOS has been observed in human Helicobacter pylori infection, but the cellular sources of iNOS are ill defined. Key differences in regulation of iNOS expression impair the translation from mouse models to human medicine. To characterize mucosal iNOS-producing leukocytes, biopsy specimens from H. pylori–infected patients, controls, and participants of a vaccination trial were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, along with flow cytometric analyses of lymphocytes for iNOS expression and activity. We newly identified mucosal IgA-producing plasma cells (PCs) as one major iNOS+ cell population in H. pylori–infected patients and confirmed intracellular NO production. Because we did not detect iNOS+ PCs in three distinct infectious diseases, this is not a general feature of mucosal PCs under conditions of infection. Furthermore, numbers of mucosal iNOS+ PCs were elevated in individuals who had cleared experimental H. pylori infection compared with those who had not. Thus, IgA+ PCs expressing iNOS are described for the first time, to our knowledge, in humans. iNOS+ PCs are induced in the course of human H. pylori infection, and their abundance seems to correlate with the clinical course of the infection. PMID:27456483

  10. Minimally invasive treatment of oral ranula with a mucosal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Jia, T; Xing, L; Zhu, F; Jin, X; Liu, L; Tao, J; Chen, Y; Gao, Z; Zhang, H

    2015-02-01

    We have developed a new method for minimally-invasive treatment of uncomplicated oral ranulas using a mucosal tunnel, and we report the clinical outcome. We constructed a mucosal tunnel for each of 35 patients who presented with an oral ranula, by making 2 parallel incisions across the top of the protruding ranula 2-3mm apart, and dissected the soft tissue along the incisions to its wall. The fluid was removed and the cavity irrigated with normal saline. The wall of the ranula was not treated. The first mucosal tunnel was made by suturing the base of the mucosal strip to the deepest part of the wall of the ranula. The mucosal base of the tunnel and the deepest part of the base of the ranula were fixed with absorbable sutures. The two external edges of the incisions were sutured together to form the second mucosal tunnel, and apposing sutures were inserted between the two parallel incisions to form two natural mucosal tunnels. The duration of follow-up ranged from 1 to 5 years. One patient was lost to follow-up and 34 patients were cured. Outcomes were satisfactory without relapse during the follow-up period and the patients were satisfied with the outcome. The mucosal tunnel is a safe, effective, simple, and minimally-invasive treatment for oral ranula.

  11. OCT visualization of acute radiation mucositis: pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkova, Natalia; Maslennikova, Anna; Terentieva, Anna; Fomina, Yulia; Khomutinnikova, Nina; Balalaeva, Irina; Vyseltseva, Yulia; Larin, Roman; Kornoukhova, Natalia; Shakhov, Andrey; Shakhova, Natalia; Gelikonov, Grigory; Kamensky, Vladislav; Feldchtein, Felix

    2005-08-01

    We present pilot results in optical coherence tomography (OCT) visualization of normal mucosa radiation damage. 15 patients undergoing radiation treatment of head and neck cancer were enrolled. OCT was used to monitor the mucositis development during and after treatment. OCT can see stages of radiation mucositis development, including hidden ones, before any clinical manifestations.

  12. Induction of mucosal immunity through systemic immunization: Phantom or reality?

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fei; Patel, Girishchandra B.; Hu, Songhua; Chen, Wangxue

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Generation of protective immunity at mucosal surfaces can greatly assist the host defense against pathogens which either cause disease at the mucosal epithelial barriers or enter the host through these surfaces. Although mucosal routes of immunization, such as intranasal and oral, are being intensely explored and appear promising for eliciting protective mucosal immunity in mammals, their application in clinical practice has been limited due to technical and safety related challenges. Most of the currently approved human vaccines are administered via systemic (such as intramuscular and subcutaneous) routes. Whereas these routes are acknowledged as being capable to elicit antigen-specific systemic humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, they are generally perceived as incapable of generating IgA responses or protective mucosal immunity. Nevertheless, currently licensed systemic vaccines do provide effective protection against mucosal pathogens such as influenza viruses and Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, whether systemic immunization induces protective mucosal immunity remains a controversial topic. Here we reviewed the current literature and discussed the potential of systemic routes of immunization for the induction of mucosal immunity. PMID:26752023

  13. Cannabinoid HU210 Protects Isolated Rat Stomach against Impairment Caused by Serum of Rats with Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ming-hua; Li, Yong-yu; Xu, Jing; Feng, Ya-jing; Lin, Xu-hong; Li, Kun; Han, Tong; Chen, Chang-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP), especially severe acute pancreatitis often causes extra-pancreatic complications, such as acute gastrointestinal mucosal lesion (AGML) which is accompanied by a considerably high mortality, yet the pathogenesis of AP-induced AGML is still not fully understood. In this report, we investigated the alterations of serum components and gastric endocrine and exocrine functions in rats with experimental acute pancreatitis, and studied the possible contributions of these alterations in the pathogenesis of AGML. In addition, we explored the intervention effects of cannabinoid receptor agonist HU210 and antagonist AM251 on isolated and serum-perfused rat stomach. Our results showed that the AGML occurred after 5 h of AP replication, and the body homeostasis was disturbed in AP rat, with increased levels of pancreatic enzymes, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), proinflammtory cytokines and chemokines in the blood, and an imbalance of the gastric secretion function. Perfusing the isolated rat stomach with the AP rat serum caused morphological changes in the stomach, accompanied with a significant increment of pepsin and [H+] release, and increased gastrin and decreased somatostatin secretion. HU210 reversed the AP-serum-induced rat pathological alterations, including the reversal of transformation of the gastric morphology to certain degree. The results from this study prove that the inflammatory responses and the imbalance of the gastric secretion during the development of AP are responsible for the pathogenesis of AGML, and suggest the therapeutic potential of HU210 for AGML associated with acute pancreatitis. PMID:23285225

  14. Cannabinoid HU210 protects isolated rat stomach against impairment caused by serum of rats with experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ming-hua; Li, Yong-yu; Xu, Jing; Feng, Ya-jing; Lin, Xu-hong; Li, Kun; Han, Tong; Chen, Chang-jie

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP), especially severe acute pancreatitis often causes extra-pancreatic complications, such as acute gastrointestinal mucosal lesion (AGML) which is accompanied by a considerably high mortality, yet the pathogenesis of AP-induced AGML is still not fully understood. In this report, we investigated the alterations of serum components and gastric endocrine and exocrine functions in rats with experimental acute pancreatitis, and studied the possible contributions of these alterations in the pathogenesis of AGML. In addition, we explored the intervention effects of cannabinoid receptor agonist HU210 and antagonist AM251 on isolated and serum-perfused rat stomach. Our results showed that the AGML occurred after 5 h of AP replication, and the body homeostasis was disturbed in AP rat, with increased levels of pancreatic enzymes, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), proinflammtory cytokines and chemokines in the blood, and an imbalance of the gastric secretion function. Perfusing the isolated rat stomach with the AP rat serum caused morphological changes in the stomach, accompanied with a significant increment of pepsin and [H+] release, and increased gastrin and decreased somatostatin secretion. HU210 reversed the AP-serum-induced rat pathological alterations, including the reversal of transformation of the gastric morphology to certain degree. The results from this study prove that the inflammatory responses and the imbalance of the gastric secretion during the development of AP are responsible for the pathogenesis of AGML, and suggest the therapeutic potential of HU210 for AGML associated with acute pancreatitis.

  15. Significantly different proliferative potential of oral mucosal epithelial cells between six animal species.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Makoto; Yamato, Masayuki; Takagi, Ryo; Murakami, Daisuke; Namiki, Hideo; Okano, Teruo

    2014-06-01

    There has been an upsurge in regenerative medicine in recent years. In particular, because oral mucosal epithelial cells can be obtained noninvasively, cultured epithelial cell sheets have been used in a number of ectopic transplantations. Additionally, the verification of the properties of experimental animals' cultured cells has accelerated the application of regenerative medicine. In the present study, the properties of oral mucosal epithelial cells were compared between six animal species. The human and pig epithelia were relatively thicker than the epithelia of the other species. The colony-forming efficiency of the rat was the highest, followed by those of the dog, human, rabbit, and pig, whereas the colonies of the mouse cells were all paraclone and uncountable in the colony-forming assay. We also found that the rabbit and pig cells proliferated poorly and were unable to form cell sheets without feeder layers. In contrast, even in the absence of feeder layers and cholera toxin, cultured dog and mouse cells formed contiguous sheets, when the cell seeding density was high. These results indicate that interspecies variation is considerable in oral mucosal epithelial cells and that specific experimental animal or human cells must be chosen according to the intended use. Copyright © 2013 Society of Plastics Engineers.

  16. Protoporphyrin-induced Cholestasis in the Isolated In Situ Perfused Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Avner, Dennis L.; Lee, Randall G.; Berenson, Malcolm M.

    1981-01-01

    The pathogenesis of liver disease in protoporphyria has been presumed to result from the hepatic deposition of protoporphyrin. To examine the effects of protoporphyrin on hepatic bile flow and histopathology, studies were performed employing an isolated, in situ, rat liver perfusion system. Rat livers in the control group were perfused with 0-80 μmol sodium taurocholate/h. Rat livers in the experimental group were perfused with sodium taurocholate and (a) sufficient quantities of protoporphyrin to produce maximal canalicular secretion and (b) perfusate protoporphyrin concentrations of 0.01, 0.1, and 1 μM. The administration of protoporphyrin sufficient to achieve maximal canalicular secretion was found to significantly reduce bile flow in rats infused with 0, 40, and 80 μmol sodium taurocholate/h. Linear regression analysis defined the relationship between bile flow and biliary bile acid secretion and showed that the bile acid-independent fraction of bile flow was reduced (P < 0.01). Bile acid-dependent flow was unaffected and there was no significant difference in biliary bile acid secretion rates between control and protoporphyrin-perfused livers. Perfusion of rat livers with varying concentrations of protoporphyrin demonstrated the reduction of bile flow was dose-related. Analysis of perfusate enzyme activity did not reveal abnormalities that could account for the cholestasis. Studies to evaluate the effect of protoporphyrin on regional hepatic hemodynamics were inconclusive. Histopathological studies of control and protoporphyrin-perfused rat livers did not show abnormalities on light microscopy. However, canalicular dilatation, distortion, and loss of microvilli were present in the protoporphyrin-perfused livers examined by transmission electron microscopy. Although ultraviolet microscopy showed diffuse fluorescence of the hepatocytes and canaliculi of protoporphyrin-perfused livers, the deposition of protoporphyrin in amorphous or crystalline forms was

  17. Metformin and sulodexide restore cardiac microvascular perfusion capacity in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    van Haare, Judith; Kooi, M Eline; van Teeffelen, Jurgen W G E; Vink, Hans; Slenter, Jos; Cobelens, Hanneke; Strijkers, Gustav J; Koehn, Dennis; Post, Mark J; van Bilsen, Marc

    2017-04-11

    Disturbances in coronary microcirculatory function, such as the endothelial glycocalyx, are early hallmarks in the development of obesity and insulin resistance. Accordingly, in the present study myocardial microcirculatory perfusion during rest and stress was assessed following metformin or sulodexide therapy in a rat model of diet-induced obesity. Additionally, the effect of degradation of the glycocalyx on myocardial perfusion was assessed in chow-fed rats. Rats were fed a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks and were divided into a group without therapy, and groups that received the anti-diabetic drug metformin or the glycocalyx-stabilizing drug sulodexide in their drinking water during the last 4 weeks of the feeding period. Myocardial microvascular perfusion was determined using first-pass perfusion MRI before and after adenosine infusion. The effect of HFD on microcirculatory properties was also assessed by sidestream darkfield (SDF) imaging of the gastrocnemius muscle. In an acute experimental setting, hyaluronidase was administered to chow-fed control rats to determine the effect of enzymatical degradation of the glycocalyx on myocardial perfusion. HFD-rats developed central obesity and insulin sensitivity was reduced as evidenced by the marked reduction in insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt in both cardiac and gastrocnemius muscle. We confirmed our earlier findings that the robust increase in myocardial perfusion in chow-fed rats after an adenosine challenge (+56%, p = 0.002) is blunted in HFD rats (+8%, p = 0.68). In contrast, 4-weeks treatment with metformin or sulodexide partly restored the increase in myocardial perfusion during adenosine infusion in HFD rats (+81%, p = 0.002 and +37%, p = 0.02, respectively). Treating chow-fed rats acutely with hyaluronidase, to enzymatically degrade the glyocalyx, completely blunted the increase in myocardial perfusion during stress. In early stages of HFD-induced insulin resistance myocardial perfusion

  18. Prevention and treatment of oral mucositis in patients receiving chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sarrión-Pérez, Maria G.

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucositis is one of the most common side effects of cancer treatment (chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy). It is an inflammatory process that affects the mucosa of the oral cavity, giving rise to erythematous areas in combination with ulcers that can reach a large size. The true importance of oral mucositis is the complications it causes – fundamentally intense pain associated to the oral ulcers, and the risk of overinfection. This in turn may require reduction or even suspension of the antineoplastic treatment, with the risk of seriously worsening the patient prognosis. This points to the importance of establishing therapeutic tools of use in the prevention and/or treatment of mucositis. The present study offers a literature review of all the articles published over the last 10 years referred to the prevention and/or treatment of oral mucositis associated to chemotherapy. Key words:Oral mucositis, management, prevention, treatment, chemotherapy. PMID:24596640

  19. HIV and mucosal barrier interactions: consequences for transmission and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Burgener, Adam; McGowan, Ian; Klatt, Nichole R

    2015-10-01

    The mucosal barrier plays an integral function in human health as it is the primary defense against pathogens, and provides a critical transition between the external environment and the human internal body. In the context of HIV infection, the most relevant mucosal surfaces include those of the gastrointestinal (GI) and genital tract compartments. Several components help maintain the effectiveness of this mucosal surface, including the physical anatomy of the barrier, cellular immunity, soluble factors, and interactions between the epithelial barrier and the local microenvironment, including mucus and host microbiota. Any defects in barrier integrity or function can rapidly lead to an increase in acquisition risk, or with established infection may result in increased pathogenesis, morbidities, or mortality. Indeed, a key feature to all aspects of HIV infection from transmission to pathogenesis is disruption and/or dysfunction of mucosal barriers. Herein, we will detail the host-pathogen relationship of HIV and mucosal barriers in both of these scenarios.

  20. Recent progress in HIV vaccines inducing mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Pavot, Vincent; Rochereau, Nicolas; Lawrence, Philip; Girard, Marc P; Genin, Christian; Verrier, Bernard; Paul, Stéphane

    2014-07-31

    In spite of several attempts over many years at developing a HIV vaccine based on classical strategies, none has convincingly succeeded to date. As HIV is transmitted primarily by the mucosal route, particularly through sexual intercourse, understanding antiviral immunity at mucosal sites is of major importance. An ideal vaccine should elicit HIV-specific antibodies and mucosal CD8⁺ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) as a first line of defense at a very early stage of HIV infection, before the virus can disseminate into the secondary lymphoid organs in mucosal and systemic tissues. A primary focus of HIV preventive vaccine research is therefore the induction of protective immune responses in these crucial early stages of HIV infection. Numerous approaches are being studied in the field, including building upon the recent RV144 clinical trial. In this article, we will review current strategies and briefly discuss the use of adjuvants in designing HIV vaccines that induce mucosal immune responses.

  1. Oral Mucositis: Melatonin Gel an Effective New Treatment.

    PubMed

    Abdel Moneim, Ahmed Esmat; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Florido, Javier; Shen, Ying-Qiang; Fernández-Gil, Beatriz; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Escames, Germaine

    2017-05-07

    The current treatment for cervico-facial cancer involves radio and/or chemotherapy. Unfortunately, cancer therapies can lead to local and systemic complications such as mucositis, which is the most common dose-dependent complication in the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. Mucositis can cause a considerably reduced quality of life in cancer patients already suffering from physical and psychological exhaustion. However, the role of melatonin in the treatment of mucositis has recently been investigated, and offers an effective alternative therapy in the prevention and/or management of radio and/or chemotherapy-induced mucositis. This review focuses on the pathobiology and management of mucositis in order to improve the quality of cancer patients' lives.

  2. Oral Mucositis: Melatonin Gel an Effective New Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Moneim, Ahmed Esmat; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Florido, Javier; Shen, Ying-Qiang; Fernández-Gil, Beatriz; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Escames, Germaine

    2017-01-01

    The current treatment for cervico-facial cancer involves radio and/or chemotherapy. Unfortunately, cancer therapies can lead to local and systemic complications such as mucositis, which is the most common dose-dependent complication in the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. Mucositis can cause a considerably reduced quality of life in cancer patients already suffering from physical and psychological exhaustion. However, the role of melatonin in the treatment of mucositis has recently been investigated, and offers an effective alternative therapy in the prevention and/or management of radio and/or chemotherapy-induced mucositis. This review focuses on the pathobiology and management of mucositis in order to improve the quality of cancer patients’ lives. PMID:28481279

  3. Biomimetic perfusion and electrical stimulation applied in concert improved the assembly of engineered cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Jung; Luo, Jianwen; Duan, Yi; Yeager, Keith; Konofagou, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance of normal myocardial function depends intimately on synchronous tissue contraction driven by electrical activation and on adequate nutrient perfusion in support thereof. Bioreactors have been used to mimic aspects of these factors in vitro to engineer cardiac tissue, but due to design limitations, previous bioreactor systems have yet to simultaneously support nutrient perfusion, electrical stimulation, and unconstrained (i.e., not isometric) tissue contraction. To the best of our knowledge, the bioreactor system described herein is the first to integrate in concert these three key factors. We present the design of our bioreactor and characterize its capability in integrated experimental and mathematical modeling studies. We then culture cardiac cells obtained from neonatal rats in porous, channeled elastomer scaffolds with the simultaneous application of perfusion and electrical stimulation, with controls excluding either one or both of these two conditions. After eight days of culture, constructs grown with the simultaneous perfusion and electrical stimulation exhibited substantially improved functional properties, as evidenced by a significant increase in contraction amplitude (0.23±0.10% vs. 0.14±0.05, 0.13±0.08, or 0.09±0.02% in control constructs grown without stimulation, without perfusion, or either stimulation or perfusion, respectively). Consistently, these constructs had significantly improved DNA contents, cell distribution throughout the scaffold thickness, cardiac protein expression, cell morphology and overall tissue organization than either control group. Thus, the simultaneous application of medium perfusion and electrical conditioning enabled by the use of the novel bioreactor system may accelerate the generation of fully functional, clinically sized cardiac tissue constructs. PMID:22170772

  4. Biomimetic perfusion and electrical stimulation applied in concert improved the assembly of engineered cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Maidhof, Robert; Tandon, Nina; Lee, Eun Jung; Luo, Jianwen; Duan, Yi; Yeager, Keith; Konofagou, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2012-11-01

    Maintenance of normal myocardial function depends intimately on synchronous tissue contraction, driven by electrical activation and on adequate nutrient perfusion in support thereof. Bioreactors have been used to mimic aspects of these factors in vitro to engineer cardiac tissue but, due to design limitations, previous bioreactor systems have yet to simultaneously support nutrient perfusion, electrical stimulation and unconstrained (i.e. not isometric) tissue contraction. To the best of our knowledge, the bioreactor system described herein is the first to integrate these three key factors in concert. We present the design of our bioreactor and characterize its capability in integrated experimental and mathematical modelling studies. We then cultured cardiac cells obtained from neonatal rats in porous, channelled elastomer scaffolds with the simultaneous application of perfusion and electrical stimulation, with controls excluding either one or both of these two conditions. After 8 days of culture, constructs grown with simultaneous perfusion and electrical stimulation exhibited substantially improved functional properties, as evidenced by a significant increase in contraction amplitude (0.23 ± 0.10% vs 0.14 ± 0.05%, 0.13 ± 0.08% or 0.09 ± 0.02% in control constructs grown without stimulation, without perfusion, or either stimulation or perfusion, respectively). Consistently, these constructs had significantly improved DNA contents, cell distribution throughout the scaffold thickness, cardiac protein expression, cell morphology and overall tissue organization compared to control groups. Thus, the simultaneous application of medium perfusion and electrical conditioning enabled by the use of the novel bioreactor system may accelerate the generation of fully functional, clinically sized cardiac tissue constructs. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Renal accumulation of /sup 99m/Tc-DMSA in the artificially perfused isolated rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Goldraich, N.P.; Alvarenga, A.R.; Goldraich, I.H.; Ramos, O.L.; Sigulem, D.

    1985-12-01

    In order to investigate aspects of the renal handling of /sup 99m/Tc-DMSA, 68 isolated rat kidneys were artificially perfused. The experimental groups were: Group 1 (no. = 32)-oxygenated filtering kidneys; Group 2 (no. = 29)-oxygenated non-filtering kidneys; Group 3 (no. = 7)-anaerobic non-filtering kidneys. The authors conclude that the /sup 99m/Tc-DMSA complex is strongly bound to albumin, is not filtered and is removed from perfusion fluid through the renal peritubular capillary route and that this occurs by an active process which depends upon aerobic metabolism. This process has a high capacity and is not inhibited by probenecid.

  6. Effects of Steroid Hormones on Sex Differences in Cerebral Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ghisleni, Carmen; Bollmann, Steffen; Biason-Lauber, Anna; Poil, Simon-Shlomo; Brandeis, Daniel; Martin, Ernst; Michels, Lars; Hersberger, Martin; Suckling, John

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in the brain appear to play an important role in the prevalence and progression of various neuropsychiatric disorders, but to date little is known about the cerebral mechanisms underlying these differences. One widely reported finding is that women demonstrate higher cerebral perfusion than men, but the underlying cause of this difference in perfusion is not known. This study investigated the putative role of steroid hormones such as oestradiol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) as underlying factors influencing cerebral perfusion. We acquired arterial spin labelling perfusion images of 36 healthy adult subjects (16 men, 20 women). Analyses on average whole brain perfusion levels included a multiple regression analysis to test for the relative impact of each hormone on the global perfusion. Additionally, voxel-based analyses were performed to investigate the sex difference in regional perfusion as well as the correlations between local perfusion and serum oestradiol, testosterone, and DHEAS concentrations. Our results replicated the known sex difference in perfusion, with women showing significantly higher global and regional perfusion. For the global perfusion, DHEAS was the only significant predictor amongst the steroid hormones, showing a strong negative correlation with cerebral perfusion. The voxel-based analyses revealed modest sex-dependent correlations between local perfusion and testosterone, in addition to a strong modulatory effect of DHEAS in cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. We conclude that DHEAS in particular may play an important role as an underlying factor driving the difference in cerebral perfusion between men and women. PMID:26356576

  7. Effects of Steroid Hormones on Sex Differences in Cerebral Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Ghisleni, Carmen; Bollmann, Steffen; Biason-Lauber, Anna; Poil, Simon-Shlomo; Brandeis, Daniel; Martin, Ernst; Michels, Lars; Hersberger, Martin; Suckling, John; Klaver, Peter; O'Gorman, Ruth L

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in the brain appear to play an important role in the prevalence and progression of various neuropsychiatric disorders, but to date little is known about the cerebral mechanisms underlying these differences. One widely reported finding is that women demonstrate higher cerebral perfusion than men, but the underlying cause of this difference in perfusion is not known. This study investigated the putative role of steroid hormones such as oestradiol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) as underlying factors influencing cerebral perfusion. We acquired arterial spin labelling perfusion images of 36 healthy adult subjects (16 men, 20 women). Analyses on average whole brain perfusion levels included a multiple regression analysis to test for the relative impact of each hormone on the global perfusion. Additionally, voxel-based analyses were performed to investigate the sex difference in regional perfusion as well as the correlations between local perfusion and serum oestradiol, testosterone, and DHEAS concentrations. Our results replicated the known sex difference in perfusion, with women showing significantly higher global and regional perfusion. For the global perfusion, DHEAS was the only significant predictor amongst the steroid hormones, showing a strong negative correlation with cerebral perfusion. The voxel-based analyses revealed modest sex-dependent correlations between local perfusion and testosterone, in addition to a strong modulatory effect of DHEAS in cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. We conclude that DHEAS in particular may play an important role as an underlying factor driving the difference in cerebral perfusion between men and women.

  8. Autologous Transplantation of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cell Sheets Cultured on an Amniotic Membrane Substrate for Intraoral Mucosal Defects

    PubMed Central

    Amemiya, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Kanamura, Narisato

    2015-01-01

    The human amniotic membrane (AM) is a thin intrauterine placental membrane that is highly biocompatible and possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-scarring properties. Using AM, we developed a novel method for cultivating oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets. We investigated the autologous transplantation of oral mucosal epithelial cells cultured on AM in patients undergoing oral surgeries. We obtained specimens of AM from women undergoing cesarean sections. This study included five patients without any history of a medical disorder who underwent autologous cultured oral epithelial transplantation following oral surgical procedures. Using oral mucosal biopsy specimens obtained from these patients, we cultured oral epithelial cells on an AM carrier. We transplanted the resultant cell sheets onto the oral mucosal defects. Patients were followed-up for at least 12 months after transplantation. After 2–3 weeks of being cultured on AM, epithelial cells were well differentiated and had stratified into five to seven layers. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the cultured cells expressed highly specific mucosal epithelial cell markers and basement membrane proteins. After the surgical procedures, no infection, bleeding, rejection, or sheet detachment occurred at the reconstructed sites, at which new oral mucous membranes were evident. No recurrence was observed in the long-term follow-up, and the postoperative course was excellent. Our results suggest that AM-cultured oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets represent a useful biomaterial and feasible method for oral mucosal reconstruction. However, our primary clinical study only evaluated their effects on a limited number of small oral mucosal defects. PMID:25915046

  9. Mucosal drug delivery: membranes, methodologies, and applications.

    PubMed

    Song, Yifan; Wang, Yiping; Thakur, Rashmi; Meidan, Victor M; Michniak, Bozena

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, extensive research into novel forms of drug delivery has suggested that mucosal approaches offer a promising therapeutic alternative, especially for systemically acting drugs. Transmucosal drug delivery offers many benefits, including noninvasive administration, convenience, rapid onset, as well as elimination of hepatic first-pass metabolism. The investigated absorptive surfaces consist of the nasal, buccal, ocular, vaginal, and rectal mucosae. Among these, the nasal and buccal routes have proved the most promising to date. The bioavailability achieved mainly depends upon the pathophysiological state of the mucosa and the properties of both the drug and delivery systems. Various agents can increase the efficacy of transmucosal drug delivery. These include cyclodextrins, bile salts, surfactants, fusidic acid derivatives, microspheres, liposomes, and bioadhesive agents. The mechanisms of action, effectiveness, and toxicity profiles of these enhancers have been investigated extensively in both animal and human models.

  10. Mucosal cavernous hemangioma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Mainak; Kundu, Sohag; Barik, Sabyasachi; Banerjee, Shoham; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata

    2015-02-01

    Mucosal cavernous hemangiomas of maxillary sinus and the lateral nasal wall are seldom encountered and difficult to diagnose with misleading radiologic features like bone erosion and heterogeneity due to patchy contrast uptake. The overall picture mimicking sinonasal malignancy, it is unclear whether there is true breach in the bone or remodeling due to the lesion's chronicity. Interestingly, it often does not bleed as expected during surgery, questioning the use of therapeutic embolization and pre-intervention vascular shrinkage. The clinical presentation and management protocol of sinonasal cavernous hemangiomas seem greatly individualized. We here present a patient with cavernous hemangioma of maxillary sinus and discuss the distinguishing clinical, histologic and imaging characteristics and subsequent management options, and attempt to establish the findings as the basis of considering it as an important differential diagnosis of radiologically heterogeneous sinonasal mass with suspected bone erosions presenting with nasal obstruction and epistaxis, mostly in young women.

  11. Cyclosporin metabolism by human gastrointestinal mucosal microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Webber, I R; Peters, W H; Back, D J

    1992-01-01

    The in vitro metabolism of the immunosuppressant cyclosporin (CsA) by human gastrointestinal mucosal microsomes has been studied. Macroscopically normal intestinal (n = 4) and liver (n = 2) tissue was obtained from kidney transplant donors, and microsomes prepared. Intestinal metabolism was most extensive with duodenal protein (15% conversion to metabolites M1/M17 after 2 h incubation at 37 degrees C; metabolite measurement by h.p.l.c). Western blotting confirmed the presence of P-4503A (enzyme subfamily responsible for CsA metabolism) in duodenum and ileum tissue, but not in colon tissue. The results of this study indicate that the gut wall may play a role in the first-pass metabolism of CsA, and could therefore be a contributory factor to the highly variable oral bioavailability of CsA. PMID:1389941

  12. Mucosal cytokine network in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Andoh, Akira; Yagi, Yuhki; Shioya, Makoto; Nishida, Atsushi; Tsujikawa, Tomoyuki; Fujiyama, Yoshihide

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) are characterized by ongoing mucosal inflammation in which dysfunction of the host immunologic response against dietary factors and commensal bacteria is involved. The chronic inflammatory process leads to disruption of the epithelial barrier, and the formation of epithelial ulceration. This permits easy access for the luminal microbiota and dietary antigens to cells resident in the lamina propria, and stimulates further pathological immune cell responses. Cytokines are essential mediators of the interactions between activated immune cells and non-immune cells, including epithelial and mesenchymal cells. The clinical efficacy of targeting TNF-α clearly indicates that cytokines are the therapeutic targets in IBD patients. In this manuscript, we focus on the biological activities of recently-reported cytokines [Interleukin (IL)-17 cytokine family, IL-31 and IL-32], which might play a role through interaction with TNF-α in the pathophysiology of IBD. PMID:18777592

  13. [Effect of acupuncture on contents of beta-endorphin in the plasma and hypothalamus in rats with stress-induced gastric mucosal injury].

    PubMed

    Han, Yan-jing; Dai, Wei-wei; Peng, Lei; Zhou, Lei; Ma, Hui-fang

    2011-10-01

    To explore the mechanism of acupuncture in preventing and treating stress-induced gastric mucosal injury from the view of brain-gut axis. Forty male Wister rats were randomly divided into normal control, model 1, treatment, model 2 and prevention groups (n=8). Gastric mucosa injury model was established by intragastric perfusion of dehydrated alcohol (1.0 mL/rat). Rats of the treatment group were treated with acupuncture after modeling, while those of the prevention group treated first, followed by modeling. The time of modeling in model 1 group and model 2 group was simultaneous with that of the treatment group and prevention group respectively. Acupuncture was applied to "Zusanli"(ST 36), "Zhongwan" (CV 12) and "Neiguan" (PC 6) for 20 min, once daily for 5 days. Before sampling the tissues, 10% charcoal suspension was intragastric perfused 1 h for analyzing the rate of gastrointestinal propulsion(distance from the upper end of the charcoal powder to the cardia/total length of the cardia to the anus x 100%). Gastric mucosal ulcer index was measured by using Guth's method. The contents of beta-endorphin(beta-EP)in plasma and hypothalamus were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Compared with the normal control group, the gastrointestinal propulsion rates were decreased considerably in the two model groups (P < 0.05), while the gastric mucosal ulcer indexes and the contents of beta-EP in both plasma and hypothalamus were increased significantly in the model groups (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). Compared with the corresponding model groups, the gastrointestinal propulsion rate was increased remarkably in the prevention group (P < 0.05), and the gastric mucosal ulcer indexes and the contents of plasma beta-EP level were decreased obviously in both treatment and prevention groups (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). The contents of hypothalamic beta-EP were increased further in the later two groups (P < 0.01). Acupuncture of ST 36, CV 12 and PC 6 can promote the repair of gastric

  14. Effect of Specific Antibodies on the Excitability of Internally Perfused Squid Axons

    PubMed Central

    Huneeus, F. C.; Fernandez, H. L.

    1967-01-01

    Giant axons from the squid Dosidicus gigas were internally perfused with rabbit antiaxoplasm antibodies and their effect upon the action potential and the membrane potential was studied. Necessary requirements for the antibodies to affect these parameters in a consistent manner were: (a) removal of the bulk of axoplasm from the perfused zone, accomplished by initially perfusing with a cysteine-rich (400 mM) solution, and (b) addition of small amounts of cysteine (30 mM) to the antibody-containing solution. When these experimental conditions were met, conduction block ensued generally within 3 hr of the first contact of the axon inner surface with the antibody Antineurofilament antibodies and nonspecific antibodies had no effect. External application of antiaxoplasm antibodies had no effect. PMID:4168852

  15. The isolated and perfused working heart of the frog, Rana esculenta: an improved preparation.

    PubMed

    Acierno, R; Gattuso, A; Cerra, M C; Pellegrino, D; Agnisola, C; Tota, B

    1994-05-01

    1. An in vitro preparation of the intact heart of the frog Rana esculenta was set up. 2. The isolated heart, perfused at constant pressure, was spontaneously beating and able to generate physiological values of output pressure, cardiac output, ventricle work and power. It showed the typical phenomenon of the "hypodynamic state" after a relatively constant time from the onset of the perfusion. 3. Perfusion with air-saturated saline and 99.5% oxygen-saturated saline did not show significant differences in the recorded parameters. 4. This experimental model represents a useful tool for physiological and pharmacological studies, especially when the direct analysis of the effects of hormones, mediators or drugs requires an intact heart preparation.

  16. Effect of specific antibodies on the excitability of internally perfused squid axons.

    PubMed

    Huneeus, F C; Fernandez, H L

    1967-11-01

    Giant axons from the squid Dosidicus gigas were internally perfused with rabbit antiaxoplasm antibodies and their effect upon the action potential and the membrane potential was studied. Necessary requirements for the antibodies to affect these parameters in a consistent manner were: (a) removal of the bulk of axoplasm from the perfused zone, accomplished by initially perfusing with a cysteine-rich (400 mM) solution, and (b) addition of small amounts of cysteine (30 mM) to the antibody-containing solution. When these experimental conditions were met, conduction block ensued generally within 3 hr of the first contact of the axon inner surface with the antibody Antineurofilament antibodies and nonspecific antibodies had no effect. External application of antiaxoplasm antibodies had no effect.

  17. [The isolated perfused porcine kidney model for investigations concerning surgical therapy procedures].

    PubMed

    Peters, Kristina; Michel, Maurice Stephan; Matis, Ulrike; Häcker, Axel

    2006-01-01

    Experiments to develop innovative surgical therapy procedures are conventionally conducted on animals, as crucial aspects like tissue removal and bleeding disposition cannot be investigated in vitro. Extracorporeal organ models however reflect these aspects and could thus reduce the use of animals for this purpose fundamentally in the future. The aim of this work was to validate the isolated perfused porcine kidney model with regard to its use for surgical purposes on the basis of histological and radiological procedures. The results show that neither storage nor artificial perfusion led to any structural or functional damage which would affect the quality of the organ. The kidney model is highly suitable for simulating the main aspects of renal physiology and allows a constant calibration of perfusion pressure and tissue temperature. Thus, with only a moderate amount of work involved, the kidney model provides a cheap and readily available alternative to conventional animal experiments; it allows standardised experimental settings and provides valid results.

  18. The oral mucosal surface and blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Detailed information about the size of the oral mucosa is scarce in the literature, and those studies that do exist do not take into account the size of the tongue or the enlargement of the surface by the papillae. Because of the various functions of the oral mucosa in the maintenance of oral health, knowledge of its true size may provide a better understanding of the physiology of the oral cavity and some oral diseases and direct future therapeutic strategies. The aim of this study was to determine the total size of the oral mucosa. Methods Five human adult cadaver heads were cut in the median sagittal plane, and the total area of the oral surface was determined using silicon casts. The surface of the tongue was measured with quantitative profilometry. Photographs of oral blood vessels were taken in different areas of the oral mucosa of adult test subjects using intravital microscopy, and the pictures were compared with vessel casts of the oral mucosal capillaries of a maccaca fasciculrais monkey, which was studied using a scanning electron microscope. Results The results showed that the dorsal side of the tongue comprises a large proportion of the total oral mucosal surface. The surface area of the epithelium increases moving from anterior to posterior on the tongue, and the number of underlying blood vessels increases proportionally. Conclusions It can be concluded that the back of the tongue plays an important role in the oral resorption of drugs. Clinical relevance: The results may be of relevance for the delivery and development of oral drug application. PMID:23497446

  19. Microbes and mucosal immune responses in asthma.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Trevor T; Johnston, Sebastian L; Openshaw, Peter J

    2013-03-09

    The substantial increase in the worldwide prevalence of asthma and atopy has been attributed to lifestyle changes that reduce exposure to bacteria. A recent insight is that the largely bacterial microbiome maintains a state of basal immune homoeostasis, which modulates immune responses to microbial pathogens. However, some respiratory viral infections cause bronchiolitis of infancy and childhood wheeze, and can exacerbate established asthma; whereas allergens can partly mimic infectious agents. New insights into the host’s innate sensing systems, combined with recently developed methods that characterise commensal and pathogenic microbial exposure, now allow a unified theory for how microbes cause mucosal inflammation in asthma. The respiratory mucosa provides a key microbial interface where epithelial and dendritic cells interact with a range of functionally distinct lymphocytes. Lymphoid cells then control a range of pathways, both innate and specific, which organise the host mucosal immune response. Fundamental to innate immune responses to microbes are the interactions between pathogen-associated molecular patterns and pattern recognition receptors, which are associated with production of type I interferons, proinflammatory cytokines, and the T-helper-2 cell pathway in predisposed people. These coordinated, dynamic immune responses underlie the differing asthma phenotypes, which we delineate in terms of Seven Ages of Asthma. An understanding of the role of microbes in the atopic march towards asthma, and in causing exacerbations of established asthma, provides the rationale for new specific treatments that can be assessed in clinical trials. On the basis of these new ideas, specific host biomarkers might then allow personalised treatment to become a reality for patients with asthma.

  20. [An automatic system controlled by microcontroller for carotid sinus perfusion].

    PubMed

    Yi, X L; Wang, M Y; Fan, Z Z; He, R R

    2001-08-01

    To establish a new method for controlling automatically the carotid perfusion pressure. A cheap practical automatic perfusion unit based on AT89C2051 micro controller was designed. The unit, LDB-M perfusion pump and the carotid sinus of an animal constituted an automatic perfusion system. This system was able to provide ramp and stepwise updown perfusion pattern and has been used in the research of baroreflex. It can insure the precision and reproducibility of perfusion pressure curve, and improve the technical level in corresponding medical field.

  1. Mucosal barrier injury, fever and infection in neutropenic patients with cancer: introducing the paradigm febrile mucositis.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, Walter J F M; Herbers, Alexandra H E; Netea, Mihai G; Blijlevens, Nicole M A

    2014-11-01

    Infection remains one of the most prominent complications after cytotoxic treatment for cancer. The connection between neutropenia and both infections and fever has long been designated as 'febrile neutropenia', but treatment with antimicrobial agents and haematopoietic growth factors has failed to significantly reduce its incidence. Moreover, emerging antimicrobial resistance is becoming a concern that necessitates the judicious use of available antimicrobial agents. In addition to neutropenia, patients who receive cytotoxic therapy experience mucosal barrier injury (MBI) or 'mucositis'. MBI creates a port-de-entrée for resident micro-organisms to cause blood stream infections and contributes directly to the occurrence of fever by disrupting the highly regulated host-microbe interactions, which, even in the absence of an infection, can result in strong inflammatory reactions. Indeed, MBI has been shown to be a pivotal factor in the occurrence of inflammatory complications after cytotoxic therapy. Hence, the concept 'febrile neutropenia' alone may no longer suffice and a new concept 'febrile mucositis' should be recognized as the two are at least complementary. This review we summarizes the existing evidence for both paradigms and proposes new therapeutic approaches to tackle the perturbed host-microbe interactions arising from cytotoxic therapy-induced tissue damage in order to reduce fever in neutropenic patients with cancer. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Lumped-parameter tissue temperature-blood perfusion model of a cold-stressed fingertip.

    PubMed

    Shitzer, A; Stroschein, L A; Gonzalez, R R; Pandolf, K B

    1996-05-01

    A lumped-parameter model of a fingertip is presented. The semispherical model includes the effects of heat storage, heat exchange with the environment, and heat transport by blood perfusion. The thermal insulation on the surface of the fingertip is represented by the overall heat transfer coefficient that is calculated by common engineering formulas. The model is solved analytically for the simple case of constant blood perfusion rate. The general case of variable blood perfusion rates is solved by an Euler finite difference technique. At this stage, the model does not include active control mechanisms of blood perfusion. Thus the effects of cold-induced vasodilatation have to be superimposed and are modeled by symmetrical triangular waveforms because these were found to best depict the behavior of fingers exposed to cold environments. Results of this model were compared with experimental data obtained in two separate studies. One included 60-min infrared thermograms of the dorsal surface of bare hands of sedentary subjects horizontally suspended on a fish net in a 0 degree C environment. Another study, on gloved finger temperatures, involved 0 and -6.7 degrees C environments. Fingertip (nail bed) temperatures of both these studies were compared with model predictions. Blood perfusion rates were assumed and adjusted within physiologically reasonable limits. Comparison of measured and computed temperature records showed very good conformity in both cases studied.

  3. Human cortical perfusion and the arterial pulse: a near-infrared spectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Hon C; Cheng, Anita; Liu, Ruth; Borrett, Donald S

    2004-01-01

    Background The pulsatile nature of the arterial pulse induces a pulsatile perfusion pattern which can be observed in human cerebral cortex with non-invasive near-infrared spectroscopy. The present study attempts to establish a quantitative relation between these two events, even in situations of very weak signal-to-noise ratio in the cortical perfusion signal. The arterial pulse pattern was extracted from the left middle finger by means of plethesmographic techniques. Changes in cortical perfusion were detected with a continuous-wave reflectance spectrophotometer on the scalp overlying the left prefrontal cortex. Cross-correlation analysis was performed to provide evidence for a causal relation between the arterial pulse and relative changes in cortical total hemoglobin. In addition, the determination of the statistical significance of this relation was established by the use of phase-randomized surrogates. Results The results showed statistically significant cross correlation between the arterial and perfusion signals. Conclusions The approach designed in the present study can be utilized for a quantitative and continuous assessment of the perfusion states of the cerebral cortex in experimental and clinical settings even in situations of extremely low signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:15113424

  4. Improved Pseudo-Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling for Mapping Brain Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Nezamzadeh, Marzieh; Matson, Gerald B.; Young, Karl; Weiner, Michael W.; Schuff, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate arterial spin labeling (ASL) methods for improved brain perfusion mapping. Previously, Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) was developed to overcome limitations inherent with conventional continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL), but the control scan (null pulse) in the original method for pCASL perturbs the equilibrium magnetization, diminishing the ASL signal. Here, a new modification of pCASL, termed mpCASL is reported, in which the perturbation caused by the null pulse is reduced and perfusion mapping improved. Materials and Methods Improvements with mpCASL are demonstrated using numerical simulations and experiments. ASL signal intensity as well as contrast and reproducibility of in-vivo brain perfusion images were measured in four volunteers who had MRI scans at 4 Tesla and the data compared across the labeling methods. Results Perfusion maps with mpCASL showed, on average, higher ASL signal intensity and higher image contrast than those from CASL or pCASL. Furthermore, mpCASL yielded better reproducibility in repeat scans than the other methods. Conclusion The experimental results are consistent with the hypothesis that the new null pulse of mpCASL leads to improved brain perfusion images. PMID:20512895

  5. A practical guide to microfluidic perfusion culture of adherent mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Lily; Toh, Yi-Chin; Voldman, Joel; Yu, Hanry

    2007-06-01

    Culturing cells at microscales allows control over microenvironmental cues, such as cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions; the potential to scale experiments; the use of small culture volumes; and the ability to integrate with microsystem technologies for on-chip experimentation. Microfluidic perfusion culture in particular allows controlled delivery and removal of soluble biochemical molecules in the extracellular microenvironment, and controlled application of mechanical forces exerted via fluid flow. There are many challenges to designing and operating a robust microfluidic perfusion culture system for routine culture of adherent mammalian cells. The current literature on microfluidic perfusion culture treats microfluidic design, device fabrication, cell culture, and micro-assays independently. Here we systematically present and discuss important design considerations in the context of the entire microfluidic perfusion culture system. These design considerations include the choice of materials, culture configurations, microfluidic network fabrication and micro-assays. We also present technical issues such as sterilization; seeding cells in both 2D and 3D configurations; and operating the system under optimized mass transport and shear stress conditions, free of air-bubbles. The integrative and systematic treatment of the microfluidic system design and fabrication, cell culture, and micro-assays provides novices with an effective starting point to build and operate a robust microfludic perfusion culture system for various applications.

  6. Non-negative constraint for image-based breathing gating in ultrasound hepatic perfusion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kaizhi; Ding, Mingyue; Chen, Xi; Deng, Wenjie; Zhang, Zhijun

    2015-12-01

    Images acquired during free breathing using contrast enhanced ultrasound hepatic perfusion imaging exhibits a periodic motion pattern. It needs to be compensated for if a further accurate quantification of the hepatic perfusion analysis is to be executed. To reduce the impact of respiratory motion, image-based breathing gating algorithm was used to compensate the respiratory motion in contrast enhanced ultrasound. The algorithm contains three steps of which respiratory kinetics extracted, image subsequences determined and image subsequences registered. The basic performance of the algorithm was to extract the respiratory kinetics of the ultrasound hepatic perfusion image sequences accurately. In this paper, we treated the kinetics extracted model as a non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) problem. We extracted the respiratory kinetics of the ultrasound hepatic perfusion image sequences by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). The technique involves using the NMF objective function to accurately extract respiratory kinetics. It was tested on simulative phantom and used to analyze 6 liver CEUS hepatic perfusion image sequences. The experimental results show the effectiveness of our proposed method in quantitative and qualitative.

  7. Spatial optimization in perfusion bioreactors improves bone tissue-engineered construct quality attributes.

    PubMed

    Papantoniou, Ioannis; Guyot, Yann; Sonnaert, Maarten; Kerckhofs, Greet; Luyten, Frank P; Geris, Liesbet; Schrooten, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Perfusion bioreactors have shown great promise for tissue engineering applications providing a homogeneous and consistent distribution of nutrients and flow-induced shear stresses throughout tissue-engineered constructs. However, non-uniform fluid-flow profiles found in the perfusion chamber entrance region have been shown to affect tissue-engineered construct quality characteristics during culture. In this study a whole perfusion and construct, three dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics approach was used in order to optimize a critical design parameter such as the location of the regular pore scaffolds within the perfusion bioreactor chamber. Computational studies were coupled to bioreactor experiments for a case-study flow rate. Two cases were compared in the first instance seeded scaffolds were positioned immediately after the perfusion chamber inlet while a second group was positioned at the computationally determined optimum distance were a steady state flow profile had been reached. Experimental data showed that scaffold location affected significantly cell content and neo-tissue distribution, as determined and quantified by contrast enhanced nanoCT, within the constructs both at 14 and 21 days of culture. However, gene expression level of osteopontin and osteocalcin was not affected by the scaffold location. This study demonstrates that the bioreactor chamber environment, incorporating a scaffold and its location within it, affects the flow patterns within the pores throughout the scaffold requiring therefore dedicated optimization that can lead to bone tissue engineered constructs with improved quality attributes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Mucosal adaptation to aspirin induced gastric damage in humans. Studies on blood flow, gastric mucosal growth, and neutrophil activation.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, J W; Dembinski, A; Stoll, R; Domschke, W; Konturek, S J

    1994-01-01

    The gastropathy associated with the ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin is a common side effect of this class of drugs, but the precise mechanisms by which they cause mucosal damage have not been fully explained. During continued use of an injurious substance, such as aspirin, the extent of gastric mucosal damage decreases and this phenomenon is named gastric adaptation. To assess the extent of mucosal damage by aspirin and subsequent adaptation the effects of 14 days of continuous, oral administration of aspirin (2 g per day) to eight healthy male volunteers was studied. To estimate the rate of mucosal damage, gastroscopy was performed before (day 0) and at days 3, 7, 14 of aspirin treatment. Gastric microbleeding and gastric mucosal blood flow were measured using laser Doppler flowmeter and mucosal biopsy specimens were taken for the estimation of tissue DNA synthesis and RNA and DNA concentration. In addition, the activation of neutrophils in peripheral blood was assessed by measuring their ability to associate with platelets. Aspirin induced acute damage mainly in gastric corpus, reaching at day 3 about 3.5 on the endoscopic Lanza score but lessened to about 1.5 at day 14 pointing to the occurrence of gastric adaptation. Mucosal blood flow increased at day 3 by about 50% in the gastric corpus and by 88% in the antrum. The in vitro DNA synthesis and RNA concentration, an index of mucosal growth, were reduced at day 3 but then increased to reach about 150% of initial value at the end of aspirin treatment. It is concluded that the treatment with aspirin in humans induces gastric adaptation to this agent, which entails the increase in mucosal blood flow, the rise in neutrophil activation, and the enhancement in mucosal growth. PMID:7959223

  9. Ventilation-Perfusion Relationships Following Experimental Pulmonary Contusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-14

    new method for assessment of pulmo- nary density distributions involving semiautomatic 3-dimensional reconstruction of chest computed tomography (CT...hemorrhage, alveolar edema, inflammation, and necrosis, each graded on a scale of 0 through 4 (0 normal, 1 minimal, 2 mild, 3 moderate, 4...in the left lungs of the injured animals were mild and consisted of patchy ground- glass opacification (Fig. 6). Semiautomatic CT scan analysis

  10. Mucositis and non-invasive markers of small intestinal function.

    PubMed

    Tooley, Katie L; Howarth, Gordon S; Butler, Ross N

    2009-05-01

    Mucositis is a common and debilitating side effect of chemotherapy that manifests due to the inability of chemotherapy agents to discriminate between normal and neoplastic cells. This results in ulcerating lesions lining the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, the development of efficacious treatments for small intestinal mucositis has been hindered as the pathobiology of mucositis is still not fully understood. The small intestine is an extensive organ which is largely inaccessible by conventional means. Non-invasive biomarkers such as small intestinal permeability, H(2) breath tests, serum citrulline tests and the (13)C-sucrose breath test (SBT) have emerged as potential markers of small intestinal function. The SBT is emerging as the more appropriate biomarker to assess chemotherapy-induced mucositis in cancer patients and animal models, where it measures the decrease in sucrase activity associated with villus blunting and crypt disruption. The SBT has been successfully applied to detect mucositis induced by different classes of chemotherapy agents and has been used successfully to monitor small intestinal function with a range of candidate anti-mucositis treatments. We propose the SBT a superior biomarker of small intestinal function that could be successfully applied in clinical practice for monitoring the development of mucositis in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  11. The mucosal immune system: From dentistry to vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    KIYONO, Hiroshi; AZEGAMI, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is the beginning of the aero-digestive tract, which is covered by mucosal epithelium continuously under the threat of invasion of pathogens, it is thus protected by the mucosal immune system. In the early phase of our scientific efforts for the demonstration of mucosal immune system, dental science was one of major driving forces due to their foreseeability to use oral immunity for the control of oral diseases. The mucosal immune system is divided functionally into, but interconnected inductive and effector sites. Intestinal Peyer’s patches (PPs) are an inductive site containing antigen-sampling M cells and immunocompetent cells required to initiate antigen-specific immune responses. At effector sites, PP-originated antigen-specific IgA B cells become plasma cells to produce polymeric IgA and form secretory IgA by binding to poly-Ig receptor expressed on epithelial cells for protective immunity. The development of new-generation mucosal vaccines, including the rice-based oral vaccine MucoRice, on the basis of the coordinated mucosal immune system is a promising strategy for the control of mucosal infectious diseases. PMID:26460320

  12. The mucosal immune system: From dentistry to vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Kiyono, Hiroshi; Azegami, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is the beginning of the aero-digestive tract, which is covered by mucosal epithelium continuously under the threat of invasion of pathogens, it is thus protected by the mucosal immune system. In the early phase of our scientific efforts for the demonstration of mucosal immune system, dental science was one of major driving forces due to their foreseeability to use oral immunity for the control of oral diseases. The mucosal immune system is divided functionally into, but interconnected inductive and effector sites. Intestinal Peyer's patches (PPs) are an inductive site containing antigen-sampling M cells and immunocompetent cells required to initiate antigen-specific immune responses. At effector sites, PP-originated antigen-specific IgA B cells become plasma cells to produce polymeric IgA and form secretory IgA by binding to poly-Ig receptor expressed on epithelial cells for protective immunity. The development of new-generation mucosal vaccines, including the rice-based oral vaccine MucoRice, on the basis of the coordinated mucosal immune system is a promising strategy for the control of mucosal infectious diseases.

  13. Mucosal adenosine stimulates chloride secretion in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, A.D.; Clancy, G.; Welsh, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    Adenosine is a local regulator of a variety of physiological functions in many tissues and has been observed to stimulate secretion in several Cl-secreting epithelia. In canine tracheal epithelium the authors found that adenosine stimulates Cl secretion from both the mucosal and submucosal surfaces. Addition of adenosine, or its analogue 2-chloroadenosine, to the mucosal surface potently stimulated Cl secretion with no effect on the rate of Na absorption. Stimulation resulted from an interaction of adenosine with adenosine receptors, because it was blocked by the adenosine receptor blocker, 8-phenyltheophylline. The adenosine receptor was a stimulatory receptor as judged by the rank-order potency of adenosine and its analogues and by the increase in cellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels produced by 2-chloroadenosine. Adenosine also stimulated Cl secretion when it was added to the submucosal surface, although the maximal increase in secretion was less and it was much less potent. The observation that mucosal 8-phenyletheophylline blocked the effect of submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, whereas submucosal 8-phenyltheophylline did not prevent a response to mucosal or submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, suggests that adenosine receptors are located on the mucosal surface. Thus submucosal adenosine may stimulate secretion by crossing the epithelium and interacting with receptors located on the mucosal surface. Because adenosine can be released from mast cells located in the airway lumen in response to inhaled material, and because adenosine stimulated secretion from the mucosal surface, it may be in a unique position to control the epithelium on a regional level.

  14. Oral mucosal status and major salivary gland function

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, A.; Fox, P.C.; Ship, J.A.; Atkinson, J.C.; Macynski, A.A.; Baum, B.J. )

    1990-07-01

    Normal salivary function is considered to be critical for the maintenance of healthy oral mucosa. However, few studies have examined mucosal changes in patients with objectively documented salivary gland performance. In the present report, the mucosal status of 298 subjects being evaluated in a dry mouth clinic was assessed. A complete oral examination was performed and unstimulated and stimulated salivary samples were collected separately from the parotid and submandibular/sublingual glands. Data were analyzed according to diagnosis and salivary output after the assignment of an oral mucosal rating to each subject. In general, the mucosal surfaces were well preserved and infections were not seen. Patients evaluated for Sjoegren's syndrome and radiation-induced xerostomia had the lowest salivary gland performance but displayed a mucosal status similar to denture-wearing healthy subjects or patients with normal salivary flow who had idiopathic xerostomia. However, those patients with a total lack of salivary flow rarely had normal-appearing oral mucosa. These results confirm a role for saliva in oral mucosal preservation and also suggest that other factors may act to maintain oral mucosal integrity.

  15. Simultaneous in vivo measurements of intranasal air and mucosal temperature.

    PubMed

    Wiesmiller, Kerstin; Keck, Tilman; Leiacker, Richard; Lindemann, Jörg

    2007-06-01

    Nasal cavity volume and blood temperature along the nasal airways, reflecting the mucosal temperature, are considered to be the most important predictors of nasal air conditioning. The purpose of this study was to simultaneously in vivo measure intranasal air as well as mucosal temperature for the first time. Fifteen healthy subjects were enrolled into the study. Two combined miniaturized thermocouples were used for simultaneous recording of intranasal air and mucosal temperature within the anterior turbinate area close to the head of the middle turbinate without interruption of nasal breathing. The highest air and mucosal temperature values were detected at the end of expiration, the lowest values at the end of inspiration. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The mean mucosal temperature ranged from 30.2 +/- 0.9 to 32.2 +/- 0.8 degrees C. The mean air temperature ranged from 28.5 +/- 1.2 to 34.1 +/- 0.7 degrees C. The mean differences between air and mucosal temperature were 1.7 +/- 0.5 degrees C after inspiration and 1.9 +/- 0.7 degrees C after expiration. Simultaneous measurements of intranasal air and mucosal temperature are practicable. The detected temperature gradient between air and mucosa confirm a relevant heat exchange during inspiration and expiration. This gradient between air and mucosa is obligatory for heat and water exchange to ensure adequate nasal air conditioning.

  16. Oral Mucosal Lesions in Indians From Northeast Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Patricia Ramos; Porto, Lia Pontes Arruda; dos Santos, Jean Nunes; e Ribeiro, Livia Silva Figueiredo; de Aquino Xavier, Flavia Caló; Figueiredo, Andreia Leal; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions, and their risk indicators in adult Kiriri Indians from Northeast Brazil. Clinical oral examination was performed on a representative sample of 223 Indians (age ≥19 years). A systematic evaluation of lips, labial mucosa and sulcus, commissures, buccal mucosa and sulcus, gingiva and alveolar ridge, tongue, floor of the mouth, and soft and hard palate was performed. Bivariate analysis was conducted to assess associations between mucosal conditions and age, gender, income, educational level, diabetic status, and smoking status. Mucosal lesions were found in 50 participants (22.4%). The most prevalent lesions were fistulae (6.2%) and traumatic ulcers (4.48%). Oral mucosal was associated with higher age (≥35 years; odds ratio [OR] = 1.99, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05–3.76, P = 0.03) and lower education level (<9 years; OR = 2.13, 95% CI: 0.96–4.71, P = 0.06). Mucosal conditions are prevalent in Kiriri Indians and the presence of mucosal lesions is associated with advanced age and lower education. A public health program aimed at preventing and treating mucosal lesions and targeted toward the high-risk group is vital to improve the oral health status of this population. PMID:25501053

  17. Ketoprofen-loaded Eudragit electrospun nanofibers for the treatment of oral mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Reda, Rana Ihab; Wen, Ming Ming; El-Kamel, Amal Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to formulate ketoprofen (KET)-loaded Eudragit L and Eudragit S nanofibers (NFs) by the electrospinning technique for buccal administration to treat oral mucositis as a safe alternative to orally administered KET, which causes gastrointestinal tract (GIT) side effects. Materials and methods NFs were prepared by electrospinning using Eudragit L and Eudragit S. Several variables were evaluated to optimize NF formulation, such as polymer types and concentrations, applied voltage, flow rate and drug concentrations. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and analyses of drug contents, hydration capacity, surface pH, drug release and ex vivo permeation were performed to evaluate the NFs. The selected formulation (F1) was evaluated in vivo on induced oral mucositis in rabbits. Results SEM revealed that 20% polymer formed smooth and bead-free NFs. DSC results confirmed the amorphous nature of KET in the NFs. FTIR confirmed hydrogen bond formation between the drug and polymer, which stabilized the NFs. Both formulations (F1 and F2) had an acceptable surface pH. The drug loading was >90%. The amount of KET released from NF formulations was statistically significantly higher (P≤0.001) than that released from the corresponding solvent-casted films. The complete release of KET from F1 occurred within 2 hours. Ex vivo permeation study revealed that only a small fraction of drug permeated from F1, which was a better candidate than F2 for local buccal delivery. In vivo evaluation of F1 on oral mucositis induced in rabbits demonstrated that F1 reduced the clinical severity of mucositis in rabbits under the current experimental conditions. The attenuated clinical severity was accompanied by a marked reduction in inflammatory infiltrate and re-epithelization of the epithelial layer. Conclusion Eudragit L100 nanofibers (EL-NF) loaded with KET (F1) suppressed

  18. Gastric HCO3- secretion induced by mucosal acidification: different mechanisms depending on acid concentration.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Eitaro; Hayashi, Masamune; Sasaki, Yoko; Takeuchi, Koji

    2005-01-01

    We compared the HCO3- secretory responses induced by mucosal acidification at different HCl concentrations (100 and 200 mM HCl) in the rat stomach. Under urethane anesthesia, the stomach was mounted on an ex vivo chamber and perfused with saline under inhibition of acid secretion by omeprazole (60 mg/kg, i.p.). TheHCO3- secretion was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method and by adding 2 mM HCl. The acidification was performed by exposure of the mucosa to 100 mMor 200 mM HCl for 10 min. The secretion of HCO3- was increased by acidification of the mucosa at both 100 and 200 mM of HCl, and the maximal HCO3- response was 1.5-times greater at the latter concentration. The HCO3- responses induced by 100 and 200 mM HCl were both totally inhibited by prior administration of indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin (PG) production. The HCO3- stimulatory effect of 200 mM HCl was also significantly attenuated by pre-treatment with N(G)-nitro L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), the inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, as well as chemical ablation of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons, whereas that of 100 mM HCl was affected by neither of these treatments. We conclude that the mucosal acidification stimulates gastric HCO3- secretion in different mechanisms, depending on the concentration of acid; the response caused by 100 mM HCl is mediated only by PGs, while that caused by 200 mM HCl is mediated by both capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons and NO, in addition to PGs.

  19. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy: the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Anagnostopoulos, C.; Cerqueira, M.; Ell, P. J.; Flint, E. J.; Harbinson, M.; Kelion, A. D.; Al-Mohammad, A.; Prvulovich, E. M.; Shaw, L. J.; Tweddel, A. C.

    2003-01-01

    This review summarises the evidence for the role of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. It is the product of a consensus conference organised by the British Cardiac Society, the British Nuclear Cardiology Society and the British Nuclear Medicine Society and is endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Radiologists. It was used to inform the UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence in their appraisal of MPS in patients with chest pain and myocardial infarction. MPS is a well-established, non-invasive imaging technique with a large body of evidence to support its effectiveness in the diagnosis and management of angina and myocardial infarction. It is more accurate than the exercise ECG in detecting myocardial ischaemia and it is the single most powerful technique for predicting future coronary events. The high diagnostic accuracy of MPS allows reliable risk stratification and guides the selection of patients for further interventions, such as revascularisation. This in turn allows more appropriate utilisation of resources, with the potential for both improved clinical outcomes and greater cost-effectiveness. Evidence from modelling and observational studies supports the enhanced cost-effectiveness associated with MPS use. In patients presenting with stable or acute chest pain, strategies of investigation involving MPS are more cost-effective than those not using the technique. MPS also has particular advantages over alternative techniques in the management of a number of patient subgroups, including women, the elderly and those with diabetes, and its use will have a favourable impact on cost-effectiveness in these groups. MPS is already an integral part of many clinical guidelines for the investigation and management of angina and myocardial infarction. However, the technique is underutilised in the UK, as judged by the inappropriately long waiting times and by

  20. Retrograde arterialized venous flap: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Moshammer, Harald E T; Schwarzl, Franz X; Haas, Franz M; Maechler, Heinrich; Pierer, Gerhard; Wiltgen, Marco; Koch, Horst

    2003-01-01

    An experimental model was established to study circulation in retrograde arterialized venous flaps (RAVF). Venous flaps measuring 7 x 4 cm with a matching venous system were harvested from both forearms of 10 fresh human cadavers. In each trial, both flaps were simultaneously perfused with heparinized human blood driven by a pulsatile circulation model. In each trial there was one flap with retrograde perfusion, and one flap with antegrade perfusion. Clinical assessment, measurement of outflow, and angiographic examination with digitally assisted assessment after 3 h of perfusion showed better results for retrograde perfusion in 8 of the 10 trials. This study indicates that blood circulation in the periphery of arterialized venous flaps can be enhanced by retrograde arterialization. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Cardiac tissue engineering using perfusion bioreactor systems

    PubMed Central

    Radisic, Milica; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wang, Yadong; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    This protocol describes tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cell populations on porous scaffolds (in some cases with an array of channels) and bioreactors with perfusion of culture medium (in some cases supplemented with an oxygen carrier). The overall approach is ‘biomimetic’ in nature as it tends to provide in vivo-like oxygen supply to cultured cells and thereby overcome inherent limitations of diffusional transport in conventional culture systems. In order to mimic the capillary network, cells are cultured on channeled elastomer scaffolds that are perfused with culture medium that can contain oxygen carriers. The overall protocol takes 2–4 weeks, including assembly of the perfusion systems, preparation of scaffolds, cell seeding and cultivation, and on-line and end-point assessment methods. This model is well suited for a wide range of cardiac tissue engineering applications, including the use of human stem cells, and high-fidelity models for biological research. PMID:18388955

  2. Use of spin echo T(2) BOLD in assessment of cerebral misery perfusion at 1.5 T.

    PubMed

    Kavec, M; Gröhn, O H; Kettunen, M I; Silvennoinen, M J; Penttonen, M; Kauppinen, R A

    2001-03-01

    Inadequate blood supply relative to metabolic demand, a haemodynamic condition termed as misery perfusion, often occurs in conjunction with acute ischaemic stroke. Misery perfusion results in adaptive changes in cerebral physiology including increased cerebral blood volume (CBV) and oxygen extraction ratio (OER) to secure substrate supply for the brain. It has been suggested that the presence of misery perfusion may be an indication of reversible ischaemia, thus detection of this condition may have clinical impact in acute stroke imaging. The ability of single spin echo T(2) to detect misery perfusion in the rat brain at 1.5 T owing to its sensitivity to blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast was studied both theoretically and experimentally. Based on the known physiology of misery perfusion, tissue morphometry and blood relaxation data, T(2) behaviour in misery perfusion was simulated. The interpretation of these computations was experimentally assessed by quantifying T(2) in a rat model for cerebral misery perfusion. CBF was quantified with the H(2) clearance method. A drop of CBF from 58+/-8 to 17+/-3 ml/100 g/min in the parieto-frontal cortex caused shortening of T(2) from 66.9+/-0.4 to 64.6+/-0.5 ms. Under these conditions, no change in diffusion MRI was detected. In contrast, the cortex with CBF of 42+/-7 ml/100 g/min showed no change in T(2). Computer simulations accurately predicted these T(2) responses. The present study shows that the acute drop of CBF by 70% causes a negative BOLD that is readily detectable by T(2) MRI at 1.5 T. Thus BOLD may serve as an index of misery perfusion thus revealing viable tissue with increased OER.

  3. Acute Toxicity and Gastroprotective Role of M. pruriens in Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injuries in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hassandarvish, Pouya; Abdul Majid, Nazia; Hadi, A. Hamid A.; Nordin, Noraziah; Abdulla, Mahmood A.

    2013-01-01

    The investigation was to evaluate gastroprotective effects of ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats. Forty-eight rats were divided into 8 groups: negative control, extract control, ulcer control, reference control, and four experimental groups. As a pretreatment, the negative control and the ulcer control groups were orally administered carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). The reference control was administered omeprazole orally (20 mg/kg). The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was given orally to the extract control group (500 mg/kg) and the experimental groups (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg). After 1 h, CMC was given orally to the negative and the extract control groups. The other groups received absolute ethanol. The rats were sacrificed after 1 h. The ulcer control group exhibited significant mucosal injuries with decreased gastric wall mucus and severe damage to the gastric mucosa. The extract caused upregulation of Hsp70 protein, downregulation of Bax protein, and intense periodic acid schiff uptake of glandular portion of stomach. Gastric mucosal homogenate showed significant antioxidant properties with increase in synthesis of PGE2, while MDA was significantly decreased. The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was nontoxic (<5 g/kg) and could enhance defensive mechanisms against hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. PMID:23781513

  4. Collaboration of epithelial cells with organized mucosal lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Neutra, M R; Mantis, N J; Kraehenbuhl, J P

    2001-11-01

    Immune surveillance of mucosal surfaces requires the delivery of intact macromolecules and microorganisms across epithelial barriers to organized mucosal lymphoid tissues. Transport, processing and presentation of foreign antigens, as well as local induction and clonal expansion of antigen-specific effector lymphocytes, involves a close collaboration between organized lymphoid tissues and the specialized follicle-associated epithelium. M cells in the follicle-associated epithelium transport foreign macromolecules and microorganisms to antigen-presenting cells within and under the epithelial barrier. Determination of the earliest cellular interactions that occur in and under the follicle-associated epithelium could greatly facilitate the design of effective mucosal vaccines in the future.

  5. Prevention and management of antineoplastic therapy induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Bey, Afshan; Ahmed, Syed S; Hussain, Bilal; Devi, Seema; Hashmi, Sarwat H

    2010-07-01

    With the scientific advancements in the management of malignant diseases, the treatment is expensive and bears high morbidity in term of oral mucositis. It is a debilitating condition and has been researched extensively for its pathogenesis and treatment. Various treatment options include barrier forming, mucosal protectants, mouth rinses, growth factors, lasers and midline-sparing procedures. Some agents are used locally while others are administered systemically. Despite the availability of a wide range of treatment options for mucositis, a cost-effective treatment is yet to be evolved.

  6. 86Rb+ ion fluxes in resting and immunologically stimulated mucosal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Pilatus, U; Pecht, I

    1993-05-01

    We studied fluxes of Rb+ ions, using its 86Rb isotope as a radioactive tracer in living rat mucosal mast cell cultures (RBL-2H3 line) grown to high density on beads. Continuously perfused samples of these cells could be immunologically stimulated by antigen clustering of IgE bound to the cells type I Fc epsilon receptors (Fc epsilon RI) and both the cellular response, as measured by the secreted mediators, as well as the uptake of 86Rb+ of the perfused sample could be monitored. The following results were obtained. (i) In resting cells, 86Rb+ influx is observed upon exposure to extracellular 86Rb+. It proceeds with a monoexponential time course (tau = 30.6 +/- 8 min) reaching a steady-state distribution of [86Rb+]int/[86Rb+]ext = 31.6 +/- 6.4 and can be inhibited by ouabain. (ii) Fc epsilon RI clustering-mediated stimulation of these cells causes an immediate and marked increase in both amplitude and rate of 86Rb+ uptake, which also fits a monoexponential function (tau = 26.8 +/- 8.6 min). (iii) This stimulated 86Rb+ uptake can also be inhibited by ouabain. It is not caused by Ca2+ influx or by the exocytotic process as evidenced by the fact that it is also observed in buffer to which no Ca2+ ions were added. Analysis of these results by a simple model taking into account unidirectional 86Rb+ influx by the Na+/K(+)-dependent ATPase and its efflux by K+ channels yields a resting cells unidirectional K+ uptake of 3.0 +/- 1.1 10(7) ions/cell/s, which is increased by ca. 10% upon clustering of the Fc epsilon RI by IgE and antigen. The stimulated influx is suggested to be due to enhanced activity of the Na+/K(+)-dependent ATPase, reflecting increased permeability for Na+ ions.

  7. Imaging of myocardial perfusion with magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Barkhausen, Jörg; Hunold, Peter; Jochims, Markus; Debatin, Jörg F

    2004-06-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is currently the leading cause of death in developed nations. Reflecting the complexity of cardiac function and morphology, noninvasive diagnosis of CAD represents a major challenge for medical imaging. Although coronary artery stenoses can be depicted with magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) techniques, its functional or hemodynamic impact frequently remains elusive. Therefore, there is growing interest in other, target organ-specific parameters such as myocardial function at stress and first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging to assess myocardial blood flow. This review explores the pathophysiologic background, recent technical developments, and current clinical status of first-pass MR imaging (MRI) of myocardial perfusion.

  8. Distributions of perfusion and lung water.

    PubMed

    Ekeh, S U; Chu, R Y; Ficken, V J; Allen, E W; Ryals, C J

    1990-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using 123I-iodoantipyrine (123I-IAP) and 99mTc-labeled macroaggregated albumin (99mTc-MAA) to describe and compare the distributions of perfusion and water content in lung injuries. These radiopharmaceuticals were administered to 9 rabbits, 5 control and 4 with lung injuries. Isolated lungs were imaged by a scintillation gamma camera. The distribution of 123I-IAP outlined the entire lung mass whereas perfusion defect in the distribution of 99mTc-MAA was seen clearly in the case of severe lung injury.

  9. Stress-first Myocardial Perfusion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Nasir; Parker, Matthew W; Henzlova, Milena J; Duvall, William Lane

    2016-02-01

    Stress-first approaches to myocardial perfusion imaging provide diagnostically and prognostically accurate perfusion data equivalent to a full rest-stress study, save time in the imaging laboratory, and reduce the radiation exposure to patients and laboratory staff. Converting a nuclear cardiology laboratory from a conventional rest-stress strategy to a stress-first approach involves challenges such as the need for attenuation correction, triage of patients to an appropriate protocol, real-time review of stress images, and consideration of differential reimbursement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reference values and physiological characterization of a specific isolated pig kidney perfusion model

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Volker; Grosse-Siestrup, Christian; Fehrenberg, Claudia; Fischer, Axel; Meissler, Michael; Groneberg, David A

    2007-01-01

    Background Models of isolated and perfused kidneys are used to study the effects of drugs, hazardous or toxic substances on renal functions. Since physiological and morphological parameters of small laboratory animal kidneys are difficult to compare to human renal parameters, porcine kidney perfusion models have been developed to simulate closer conditions to the human situation, but exact values of renal parameters for different collection and perfusion conditions have not been reported so far. If the organs could be used out of regular slaughtering processes animal experiments may be avoided. Methods To assess renal perfusion quality, we analyzed different perfusion settings in a standardized model of porcine kidney hemoperfusion with organs collected in the operating theatre (OP: groups A-D) or in a public abattoir (SLA: group E) and compared the data to in vivo measurements in living animals (CON). Experimental groups had defined preservation periods (0, 2 and 24 hrs), one with additional albumin in the perfusate (C) for edema reduction. Results Varying perfusion settings resulted in different functional values (mean ± SD): blood flow (RBF [ml/min*100 g]: (A) 339.9 ± 61.1; (C) 244.5 ± 53.5; (D) 92.8 ± 25.8; (E) 153.8 ± 41.5); glomerular fitration (GFR [ml/min*100 g]: (CON) 76.1 ± 6.2; (A) 59.2 ± 13.9; (C) 25.0 ± 10.6; (D) 1.6 ± 1.3; (E) 16.3 ± 8.2); fractional sodium reabsorption (RFNa [%] (CON) 99.8 ± 0.1; (A) 82.3 ± 8.1; (C) 86.8 ± 10.3; (D) 38.4 ± 24.5; (E) 88.7 ± 5.8). Additionally the tubular coupling-ratio of Na-reabsorption/O2-consumption was determined (TNa/O2-cons [mmol-Na/mmol- O2] (CON) 30.1; (A) 42.0, (C) 80.6; (D) 17.4; (E) 23.8), exhibiting OP and SLA organs with comparable results. Conclusion In the present study functional values for isolated kidneys with different perfusion settings were determined to assess organ perfusion quality. It can be summarized that the hemoperfused porcine kidney can serve as a biological model with

  11. Long-term oral melatonin administration reduces ethanol-induced increases in duodenal mucosal permeability and motility in rats.

    PubMed

    Sommansson, A; Yamskova, O; Schiöth, H B; Nylander, O; Sjöblom, M

    2014-10-01

    Increased intestinal epithelial permeability is associated with intestinal inflammation and dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of long-term oral melatonin administration on ethanol-induced increases in duodenal mucosal permeability and hypermotility. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered melatonin in their tap water (0.1 mg mL(-1) or 0.5 mg mL(-1) ) for 2 or 4 weeks. After the treatment period, the rats were anaesthetized with Inactin(®) , and a 30-mm duodenal segment was perfused in situ. The effects on duodenal mucosal paracellular permeability, bicarbonate secretion, fluid flux and motor activity were studied. The expression levels of the tight junction components, zona occludens (ZO)-1, ZO-2, and ZO-3, claudin-2, claudin-3, claudin-4, occludin, and myosin light chain kinase and of the melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2 were assessed using qRT-PCR. Melatonin administration for 2 weeks significantly reduced the basal paracellular permeability, an effect that was absent after 4 weeks. Perfusing the duodenal segment with 15% ethanol induced marked increases in duodenal paracellular permeability, bicarbonate secretion and motor activity. Melatonin for 2 weeks dose-dependently reduced ethanol-induced increases in permeability and motor activity. Four weeks of melatonin administration reduced the ethanol-induced increases in duodenal motility and bicarbonate secretion but had no effect on the increases in permeability. Two weeks of melatonin administration upregulated the expression of MT1 and MT2 , although both were downregulated after 4 weeks. Melatonin downregulated the expression of ZO-3 and upregulated the expression of claudin-2, even as all other mRNA-levels investigated were unaffected. Although further studies are needed, our data demonstrate that melatonin administration markedly improves duodenal barrier functions, suggesting its utility in clinical applications when intestinal barrier functions are compromised.

  12. Mucosal adherent bacterial dysbiosis in patients with colorectal adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yingying; Chen, Jing; Zheng, Junyuan; Hu, Guoyong; Wang, Jingjing; Huang, Chunlan; Lou, Lihong; Wang, Xingpeng; Zeng, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that the gut microbiota is involved in the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). The composition of gut microbiota in CRC precursors has not been adequately described. To characterize the structure of adherent microbiota in this disease, we conducted pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA genes to determine the bacterial profile of normal colons (healthy controls) and colorectal adenomas (CRC precursors). Adenoma mucosal biopsy samples and adjacent normal colonic mucosa from 31 patients with adenomas and 20 healthy volunteers were profiled using the Illumina MiSeq platform. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) showed structural segregation between colorectal adenomatous tissue and control tissue. Alpha diversity estimations revealed higher microbiota diversity in samples from patients with adenomas. Taxonomic analysis illustrated that abundance of eight phyla (Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Candidate-division TM7, and Tenericutes) was significantly different. In addition, Lactococcus and Pseudomonas were enriched in preneoplastic tissue, whereas Enterococcus, Bacillus, and Solibacillus were reduced. However, both PCoA and cluster tree analyses showed similar microbiota structure between adenomatous and adjacent non-adenoma tissues. These present findings provide preliminary experimental evidence supporting that colorectal preneoplastic lesion may be the most important factor leading to alterations in bacterial community composition. PMID:27194068

  13. Role of neutrophils in acrylonitrile-induced gastric mucosal damage.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, Nadia M; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A; Alghamdi, Hassan A; Tolba, Mai F; Esmat, Ahmed; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2012-01-25

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) is a widely used intermediate in the manufacture of plastics, acrylic fibers, synthetic rubbers and resins that are used in a variety of products including food containers and medical devices. ACN is a possible human carcinogen and a documented animal carcinogen, with the stomach being an important target of its toxicity. ACN has been previously reported to require metabolic activation to reactive intermediates and finally to cyanide (CN⁻). The current study aimed at exploring the potential role of neutrophils in ACN-induced gastric damage in rats. Experimental neutropenia was attained by injecting rats with methotrexate. This significantly ameliorated gastric mucosal injury induced by ACN. This is evidenced by protection against the increase in gastric ulcer index, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and CN⁻ level. Also, neutropenia guarded against the decrease in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), induction of oxidative stress and reduction of total nitrites and alleviated histopathological alterations in rat stomachs. These data indicate that neutrophil infiltration is, at least partly, involved in ACN-induced gastric damage in rats.

  14. Metabolic Characteristics of Human Hearts Preserved for 12 Hours by Static Storage, Antegrade Perfusion or Retrograde Coronary Sinus Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Cobert, Michael L.; Merritt, Matthew E.; West, LaShondra M.; Ayers, Colby; Jessen, Michael E.; Peltz, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s) Machine perfusion of donor hearts is a promising strategy to increase the donor pool. Antegrade perfusion is effective but can lead to aortic valve incompetence and non-nutrient flow. Experience with retrograde coronary sinus perfusion of donor hearts has been limited. We tested the hypothesis that retrograde perfusion could support myocardial metabolism over an extended donor ischemic interval. Methods Human hearts from donors rejected or not offered for transplantation were preserved for 12 hours in University of Wisconsin Machine Perfusion Solution by: 1. Static hypothermic storage 2. Hypothermic antegrade machine perfusion or 3. Hypothermic retrograde machine perfusion. Myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2), and lactate accumulation were measured. Ventricular tissue was collected for proton (1H) and phosphorus-31 (31P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to evaluate the metabolic state of the myocardium. Myocardial water content was determined at end-experiment. Results Stable perfusion parameters were maintained throughout the perfusion period with both perfusion techniques. Lactate/alanine ratios were lower in perfused hearts compared to static hearts (p<.001). Lactate accumulation (Antegrade 2.0±.7, Retrograde 1.7±.1 mM) and MVO2 (Antegrade 0.25±.2, Retrograde 0.26±.3 mL O2/min/100g) were similar in machine perfused groups. High energy phosphates were better preserved in both perfused groups (p<.05). Left ventricular myocardial water content was increased in retrograde perfused (80.2±.8%) compared to both antegrade perfused (76.6±.8%, p=.02) and static storage hearts (76.7±1%, p=.02). Conclusions In conclusion, machine perfusion by either the antegrade or the retrograde technique can support myocardial metabolism over long intervals. Machine perfusion appears promising for long term preservation of human donor hearts. PMID:24642559

  15. Meta-Analysis of Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-06

    Coronary Disease; Echocardiography; Fractional Flow Reserve, Myocardial; Hemodynamics; Humans; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Myocardial Perfusion Imaging; Perfusion; Predictive Value of Tests; Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography; Positron Emission Tomography; Multidetector Computed Tomography; Echocardiography, Stress; Coronary Angiography

  16. Blood leakage and melphalan leakage from the perfusion circuit during regional hyperthermic perfusion for malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hafstroem, L.; Hugander, A.; Joensson, P.E.; Westling, H.; Ehrsson, H.

    1984-06-01

    In regional hyperthermic perfusion with melphalan for patients with malignant melanoma of the leg, plasma leakage between the perfusion circuit and the systemic circulation was 4-7 ml X min-1. The melphalan concentration in the perfusate was biphasic, with half-lives of 8-12 mins for the initial phase and 19-28 mins for the second phase, after the first dose. After a second dose, the corresponding values were 11-13 and 26-34 mins. The highest concentration in general circulation was 0.38 micrograms X ml-1.

  17. Oral Nucleotides Only Minimally Improve 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Mucositis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Mashtoub, Suzanne; Feo, Benjamin; Whittaker, Alexandra L; Lymn, Kerry A; Martinez-Puig, Daniel; Howarth, Gordon S

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is characterized by inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa, compromising intestinal function. Exogenous nucleotides have been reported to repair the mucosa. The nucleotide preparation, Nucleoforce F0328 (Nucleoforce), was investigated for its potential to ameliorate intestinal mucositis in rats. Female Dark Agouti rats (n = 8/group) were gavaged once daily with Nucleoforce (175 mg/kg) or water from Days 0 to 8 and injected (i.p.) with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; 150 mg/kg) or saline on Day 5. Histological parameters (disease severity, crypt depth, and villus height measurements) and myeloperoxidase activity were quantified. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Jejunal and ileal histological disease severity scores were significantly increased by 5-FU, compared to normal controls (P < 0.05). Nucleoforce treatment in 5-FU-injected rats significantly reduced jejunal and ileal disease severity compared to 5-FU controls (P < 0.05). In 5-FU-injected rats, jejunal and ileal villus heights and crypt depths were significantly decreased compared to 5-FU controls, with no additional Nucleoforce effect (P > 0.05). Intestinal myeloperoxidase activity was significantly elevated by 5-FU (8.8-fold), compared to normal controls (P < 0.05), which was not normalized by Nucleoforce treatment (P > 0.05). Nucleoforce only partially improved parameters associated with experimentally-induced mucositis. Future studies could investigate increased concentrations, more frequent administration, or protective microencapsulation delivery methods, to increase bioavailability.

  18. Chlorhexidine induces DNA damage in rat peripheral leukocytes and oral mucosal cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Bazo, Ana Paula; da Silva Franchi, Carla Adriene; Marques, Mariângela Esther Alencar; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Favero

    2004-10-01

    Chlorhexidine digluconate is widely used in dental practice for decreasing plaque control, controlling gingivitis and disinfecting root canals. However, the undesirable effects of chlorhexidine digluconate regarding its genotoxicity are conflicting in the literature. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the genotoxicity of chlorhexidine digluconate in rat peripheral blood and oral mucosal cells by the single cell gel (comet) assay and micronucleus assay. Thirty male Wistar rats were distributed into three groups: negative control; experimental group orally treated with 0.5 ml of 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate, twice daily, during 8 days; and positive control, which received 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide at 0.5 g/l by drinking water. A statistically significant increase of DNA damage was observed in leukocytes and oral mucosal cells of the chlorhexidine digluconate treated group, as assessed by the comet assay. However, no increase of micronucleated cells was detected in reticulocytes from peripheral blood cells. Taken together, the data indicate that chlorhexidine digluconate is able to induce primary DNA damage in leukocytes and in oral mucosal cells, but no chromosome breakage or loss in erythrocytes.

  19. Mucosal tears at the oesophagogastric junction (the Mallory-Weiss syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Michael; Bottrill, M. B.; Edwards, A. T.; Mitchell, Winifred M.; Peet, B. Gadsby; Williams, R. E.

    1961-01-01

    This is a re-appraisal of the supposedly rare Mallory-Weiss syndrome in which 11 patients with mucosal tears at the oesophagogastric junction are described. The fact that these cases were collected from general hospitals within a short period suggests that the condition is more common than supposed and may account for a considerable proportion of the 20 to 25% of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in whom no radiological abnormality can subsequently be found. Of the 11 patients, eight presented with gastrointestinal bleeding, two with mediastinitis, and one without relevant symptoms. The classical history of antecedent vomiting before the bleeding was obtained in only four patients, its absence not excluding the diagnosis. The presence of a small hiatal hernia in four patients appeared to predispose to mucosal tears as did mucosal atrophy occurring with advancing age. Some experimental findings pertaining to the mechanism of the tears are presented. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIGS. 4 and 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8FIG. 9FIG. 10 PMID:13684977

  20. Contrast-enhanced, real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging of tissue perfusion: preliminary results in a rabbit model of testicular torsion.

    PubMed

    Paltiel, H J; Padua, H M; Gargollo, P C; Cannon, G M; Alomari, A I; Yu, R; Clement, G T

    2011-04-07

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) imaging is potentially applicable to the clinical investigation of a wide variety of perfusion disorders. Quantitative analysis of perfusion is not widely performed, and is limited by the fact that data are acquired from a single tissue plane, a situation that is unlikely to accurately reflect global perfusion. Real-time perfusion information from a tissue volume in an experimental rabbit model of testicular torsion was obtained with a two-dimensional matrix phased array US transducer. Contrast-enhanced imaging was performed in 20 rabbits during intravenous infusion of the microbubble contrast agent Definity® before and after unilateral testicular torsion and contralateral orchiopexy. The degree of torsion was 0° in 4 (sham surgery), 180° in 4, 360° in 4, 540° in 4, and 720° in 4. An automated technique was developed to analyze the time history of US image intensity in experimental and control testes. Comparison of mean US intensity rate of change and of ratios between mean US intensity rate of change in experimental and control testes demonstrated good correlation with testicular perfusion and mean perfusion ratios obtained with radiolabeled microspheres, an accepted 'gold standard'. This method is of potential utility in the clinical evaluation of testicular and other organ perfusion.

  1. Contrast-enhanced, real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging of tissue perfusion: preliminary results in a rabbit model of testicular torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paltiel, H. J.; Padua, H. M.; Gargollo, P. C.; Cannon, G. M., Jr.; Alomari, A. I.; Yu, R.; Clement, G. T.

    2011-04-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) imaging is potentially applicable to the clinical investigation of a wide variety of perfusion disorders. Quantitative analysis of perfusion is not widely performed, and is limited by the fact that data are acquired from a single tissue plane, a situation that is unlikely to accurately reflect global perfusion. Real-time perfusion information from a tissue volume in an experimental rabbit model of testicular torsion was obtained with a two-dimensional matrix phased array US transducer. Contrast-enhanced imaging was performed in 20 rabbits during intravenous infusion of the microbubble contrast agent Definity® before and after unilateral testicular torsion and contralateral orchiopexy. The degree of torsion was 0° in 4 (sham surgery), 180° in 4, 360° in 4, 540° in 4, and 720° in 4. An automated technique was developed to analyze the time history of US image intensity in experimental and control testes. Comparison of mean US intensity rate of change and of ratios between mean US intensity rate of change in experimental and control testes demonstrated good correlation with testicular perfusion and mean perfusion ratios obtained with radiolabeled microspheres, an accepted 'gold standard'. This method is of potential utility in the clinical evaluation of testicular and other organ perfusion.

  2. Cellular Energetical Actions of "Chemical" and "Surgical" Vagotomy in Gastrointestinal Mucosal Damage and Protection: Similarities, Differences and Significance for Brain-Gut Function.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Imre L; Czimmer, Jozsef; Mozsik, Gyula

    2016-01-01

    The authors, as internists, registered significant difference in the long lasting actions of surgical and chemical (atropine treatment) vagotomy in patients with peptic ulcer during second half of the last century (efficency, gastric acid secretion, gastrointestinal side effects, briefly benefical and harmful actions were examined). 1. Since the authors participated in the establishing of human clinical pharmacology in this field, they wanted to know more and more facts of the acute and chronic effects of surgical and chemical (atropine treatment) on the gastrointestinal mucosal biochemisms and their actions altered by bioactive compounds and scavengers regarding the development of gastric mucosal damage and protection. The observations were carried out in animals under various experimental conditions (in intact, pylorus-ligated rats, in different experimental ulcer models, together with application of various mucosal protecting compounds) without and with surgical vagotomy and chemical vagotomy produced by atropine treatment. 1. No changes were obtained in the cellular energy systems (ATP, ADP, AMP, cAMP, "adenylate pool", "energy charge" [(ATP+0.5 ADP)/ (ATP+ADP+AMP)] of stomach (glandular part, forestomach) in pylorus ligated rats after surgical vagotomy in contrast to those produced by only chemical vagotomy; 2. The effects of the gastric mucosal protective compounds [atropine, cimetidine, prostaglandins, scavengers (like vitamin A, β-carotene), capsaicin] disappeared after surgical vagotomy; 3. The extents of different chemical agents induced mucosal damaging effects were enhanced by surgical vagotomy and was not altered by chemical vagotomy; 4. The existence of feedback mechanisms of pharmacological (cellular and intracellular) regulatory mechanisms between the membrane-bound ATPdependent energy systems exists in the gastric mucosa of intact animals, and after chemical vagotomy, but not after surgical vagotomy. 1. Increased vagal nerve activity takes place

  3. Cellular Energetical Actions of “Chemical” and “Surgical” Vagotomy in Gastrointestinal Mucosal Damage and Protection: Similarities, Differences and Significance for Brain-Gut Function

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Imre L.; Czimmer, Jozsef; Mozsik, Gyula

    2016-01-01

    Background The authors, as internists, registered significant difference in the long lasting actions of surgical and chemical (atropine treatment) vagotomy in patients with peptic ulcer during second half of the last century (efficency, gastric acid secretion, gastrointestinal side effects, briefly benefical and harmful actions were examined). Aims 1. Since the authors participated in the establishing of human clinical pharmacology in this field, they wanted to know more and more facts of the acute and chronic effects of surgical and chemical (atropine treatment) on the gastrointestinal mucosal biochemisms and their actions altered by bioactive compounds and scavengers regarding the development of gastric mucosal damage and protection. Methods The observations were carried out in animals under various experimental conditions (in intact, pylorus-ligated rats, in different experimental ulcer models, together with application of various mucosal protecting compounds) without and with surgical vagotomy and chemical vagotomy produced by atropine treatment. Results 1. No changes were obtained in the cellular energy systems (ATP, ADP, AMP, cAMP, “adenylate pool”, “energy charge“ [(ATP+ 0.5 ADP)/ (ATP+ADP+AMP)] of stomach (glandular part, forestomach) in pylorus ligated rats after surgical vagotomy in contrast to those produced by only chemical vagotomy; 2. The effects of the gastric mucosal protective compounds [atropine, cimetidine, prostaglandins, scavengers (like vitamin A, β-carotene), capsaicin] disappeared after surgical vagotomy; 3. The extents of different chemical agents induced mucosal damaging effects were enhanced by surgical vagotomy and was not altered by chemical vagotomy; 4. The existence of feedback mechanisms of pharmacological (cellular and intracellular) regulatory mechanisms between the membrane-bound ATP-dependent energy systems exists in the gastric mucosa of intact animals, and after chemical vagotomy, but not after surgical vagotomy

  4. Effects of laser acupuncture on blood perfusion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-ju; Zeng, Chang-chun; Liu, Han-ping; Liu, Song-hao; Liu, Liang-gang

    2006-09-01

    Based on Pennes equation, the influences of the intensity and the impulse frequency of laser acupuncture on the point tissues' blood flow perfusion rate are discussed. We find that the blood perfusion rate of point tissue increases with the intensity of laser acupuncture increasing. After impulse laser acupuncture the point tissue blood perfusion rate increase little, but after continuum laser acupuncture the point tissues blood perfusion rate increase much.

  5. The "push-to-low" approach for optimization of high-density perfusion cultures of animal cells.

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, Konstantin; Goudar, Chetan; Ng, Maria; Meneses, Renato; Thrift, John; Chuppa, Sandy; Matanguihan, Cary; Michaels, Jim; Naveh, David

    2006-01-01

    High product titer is considered a strategic advantage of fed-batch over perfusion cultivation mode. The titer difference has been experimentally demonstrated and reported in the literature. However, the related theoretical aspects and strategies for optimization of perfusion processes with respect to their fed-batch counterparts have not been thoroughly explored. The present paper introduces a unified framework for comparison of fed-batch and perfusion cultures, and proposes directions for improvement of the latter. The comparison is based on the concept of "equivalent specific perfusion rate", a variable that conveniently bridges various cultivation modes. The analysis shows that development of economically competitive perfusion processes for production of stable proteins depends on our ability to dramatically reduce the dilution rate while keeping high cell density, i.e., operating at low specific perfusion rates. Under these conditions, titer increases significantly, approaching the range of fed-batch titers. However, as dilution rate is decreased, a limit is reached below which performance declines due to poor growth and viability, specific productivity, or product instability. To overcome these limitations, a strategy referred to as "push-to-low" optimization has been developed. This approach involves an iterative stepwise decrease of the specific perfusion rate, and is most suitable for production of stable proteins where increased residence time does not compromise apparent specific productivity or product quality. The push-to-low approach was successfully applied to the production of monoclonal antibody against tumor necrosis factor (TNF). The experimental results followed closely the theoretical prediction, providing a multifold increase in titer. Despite the medium improvement, reduction of the specific growth rate along with increased apoptosis was observed at low specific perfusion rates. This phenomenon could not be explained with limitation or

  6. Targeted inhibition of IL-18 attenuates irinotecaninduced intestinal mucositis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Júnior, R C P; Freitas, H C; Wong, D V T; Wanderley, C W S; Nunes, L G; Leite, L L; Miranda, S P; Souza, M H L P; Brito, G A C; Magalhães, P J C; Teixeira, M M; Cunha, F Q; Ribeiro, R A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Intestinal mucositis is a common side-effect of irinotecan-based cancer chemotherapy regimens. This mucositis is associated with cytokine activation and NO synthesis. Production of IL-18 is up-regulated in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease. Therefore, we have investigated the role of IL-18 in the pathogenesis of irinotecan-induced intestinal mucositis. Experimental Approach Wild type (WT), IL-18 or caspase-1 knockout mice were treated with either saline or irinotecan (60 mg·kg−1 per 4 days, i.p.) or the IL-18 binding protein (IL-18bp, 10 mg·kg−1) before irinotecan. On day 5, diarrhoea was monitored and proximal intestinal strips were obtained for histopathology, in vitro gut contractility, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and inducible NOS (iNOS) activity, and detection of IL-18 expression. Key Results Irinotecan induced severe diarrhoea accompanied by intestinal injury (villi shortening and increased crypt depth). Additionally, irinotecan treatment increased MPO and iNOS activity, iNOS immunostaining and IL-18 expression in WT mice compared with saline treatment. The IL-18 production was associated with macrophages. In vitro, intestinal smooth muscle strips were hyperresponsive to ACh after irinotecan treatment. Increases in MPO and iNOS activity, intestinal contractility and diarrhoea were prevented in caspase-1 knockout and IL-18 knockout mice, and in IL-18bp-treated WT mice. Furthermore, the Survival of irinotecan-treated mice was increased and iNOS immunoexpression and IL-18 production prevented in IL-18 knockout mice. Conclusions and Implications Targeting IL-18 function may be a promising therapeutic approach to decreasing the severity of intestinal mucositis during irinotecan treatment regimens. PMID:24428790

  7. Clinical, Immune, and Microbiome Traits of Gingivitis and Peri-implant Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Schincaglia, G P; Hong, B Y; Rosania, A; Barasz, J; Thompson, A; Sobue, T; Panagakos, F; Burleson, J A; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, A; Diaz, P I

    2017-01-01

    Tissues surrounding dental implants and teeth develop clinical inflammation in response to microbial stimuli. However, the literature suggests that differences exist in the microbial insult and inflammatory responses leading to gingivitis and peri-implant mucositis. In this pilot study, the authors use for the first time a systems biology approach to comprehensively evaluate clinical parameters, selected inflammatory markers, and the microbiome of subject-matched tooth and implant sites during native inflammation and in response to experimental plaque accumulation. Fifteen subjects with 2 posterior implants and corresponding contralateral teeth were examined at enrollment; at day 0, after reinstitution of gingival/mucosal health; at days 7, 14, and 21, during stent-mediated oral hygiene (OH) abstention; and at day 42, after resumption of OH. The subgingival microbiome was evaluated via 16S rRNA gene sequencing and 8 selected inflammatory markers measured in crevicular fluid. Comparison of teeth and implants via general linear models based on orthogonal polynomials showed similar responses in clinical parameters, inflammatory mediators, and proportions of individual microbial taxa during OH abstention. Implants, however, accumulated less plaque and underwent more heterogeneous shifts in microbiome structure. A multilevel, within-group, sparse partial least squares analysis of covariation of microbial, inflammatory, and clinical parameters throughout all study visits found inflammation around teeth and implants positively correlated with IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta and with the proportions of Selenomonas, Prevotella, and 5 species-level phylotypes. Gingivitis, however, showed a stronger positive correlation with lactoferrin and IL-1ra and a stronger negative correlation with Rothia. Peri-implant mucositis, on the contrary, correlated positively with certain microbial taxa not associated with gingivitis by a previous study or the current one. In summary, differences

  8. Modeling pegylated liposomal doxorubicin-induced hand-foot syndrome and intestinal mucositis in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yau-Hung; Lee, Ya-Ting; Wen, Chi-Chung; Chen, Yun-Chen; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) has been widely used to treat cancer. The adverse effects of PLD noted in clinical practice, especially hand-foot syndrome (HFS), are regarded as unique, and the management methods for them remain limited. This study was aimed at developing a feasible experimental model for translational medicine to solve this clinical issue by using skin fluorescent transgenic zebrafish. We established an optimal protocol for the administration of Lipo-Dox™, a PLD in current clinical use, to the Tg(k18:dsred) zebrafish line expressing red fluorescence in keratinocytes. We made use of bodyweight, survival rate, gross observation, flssuorescent microscopic assessment, and pathological examination of the zebrafish to assess this model. The consecutive administration protocol of PLD resulted in growth retardation of the zebrafish embryo and survival impairment, indicating establishment of a significant toxicity. We observed fin necrosis and keratinocyte dissociation phenotypes in the PLD-treated fish after consecutive administration. The skin toxicity induced by the Lipo-Dox injection was subsequently reversible, which might be compatible with a clinical course of skin recovery after discontinuation of Lipo-Dox administration. Furthermore, we found that the number of intestinal goblet cells, an important marker of intestinal inflammation, in the Lipo-Dox-injected zebrafish was markedly increased, accompanied by impaired mucosal integrity. The intestinal inflammation induced by Lipo-Dox resembled the intestinal mucositis the clinical patients suffered from after the administration of PLD. In conclusion, we established a zebrafish model for PLD-induced HFS. The intestinal mucositis simultaneously noted in the PLD-treated zebrafish validated the similarity of clinical courses after administration of PLD. This model is easily assessable, efficient, and worthy for use in developing a new therapeutic protocol for prevention or treatment of HFS as well

  9. Temporal and concentration effects of isoflurane anaesthesia on intestinal tissue oxygenation and perfusion in horses.

    PubMed

    Hopster, K; Hopster-Iversen, C; Geburek, F; Rohn, K; Kästner, S B R

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of duration of anaesthesia and concentration of isoflurane on global perfusion as well as intestinal microperfusion and oxygenation. Nine Warmblood horses were premedicated with xylazine; anaesthesia was induced with midazolam and ketamine, and maintained with isoflurane. Horses were ventilated to normocapnia. During 7 h of anaesthesia, mean arterial blood pressures (MAP), heart rate, central venous pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, expiratory isoflurane concentration (ETIso) and cardiac output using lithium dilution were measured; cardiac index (CI) was calculated. Intestinal microperfusion and oxygenation were measured using laser Doppler flowmetry and white-light spectrophotometry. Surface probes were placed via median laparotomy on the serosal and mucosal site of the jejunum and the pelvic flexion of the colon. After 3 h of constant ETIso (1.4%), ETIso was increased in 0.2% increments up to 2.4%, followed by a decrease to 1.2% and an increase to 1.4%. The CI and MAP decreased continuously with increasing ETIso to 40 ± 5 mL/kg/min and 52 ± 8 mmHg, respectively. Microperfusion and oxygenation remained unchanged until an ETIso of 2.0% resulted in CI and MAP of 48 ± 5 mL/kg/min and 62 ± 6 mmHg, respectively, and then decreased rapidly. When ETIso decreased back to baseline, CI, MAP, microperfusion and oxygenation recovered to baseline. Isoflurane concentration but not duration of isoflurane anaesthesia influenced central and intestinal oxygenation and perfusion in healthy horses. Under isoflurane, intestinal perfusion appeared to be preserved until a threshold MAP or blood flow was reached.

  10. Role of hypothermic machine perfusion in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Andrea; Dutkowski, Philipp

    2015-06-01

    Machine liver perfusion has significantly evolved during the last ten years to optimize extended criteria liver grafts and to address the worldwide organ shortage. This review gives an overview on available ex vivo and in vivo data on hypothermic machine liver perfusion. We discuss also possible protective pathways and show most recent clinical applications of hypothermic machine liver perfusion in human.

  11. Perfusion MRI: The Five Most Frequently Asked Clinical Questions

    PubMed Central

    Essig, Marco; Nguyen, Thanh Binh; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Saake, Marc; Provenzale, James M.; Enterline, David S.; Anzalone, Nicoletta; Dörfler, Arnd; Rovira, Àlex; Wintermark, Max; Law, Meng

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This article addresses questions that radiologists frequently ask when planning, performing, processing, and interpreting MRI perfusion studies in CNS imaging. CONCLUSION Perfusion MRI is a promising tool in assessing stroke, brain tumors, and neurodegenerative diseases. Most of the impediments that have limited the use of perfusion MRI can be overcome to allow integration of these methods into modern neuroimaging protocols. PMID:23971482

  12. Increased sinusoidal volume and solute extraction during retrograde liver perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, N.M.; Manning, J.A.; Weisiger, R.A.

    1989-06-01

    Retrograde isolated liver perfusion has been used to probe acinar functional heterogeneity, but the hemodynamic effects of backward flow have not been characterized. In this study, extraction of a long-chain fatty acid derivative, 12-N-methyl-7-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-amino stearate (12-NBDS), was greater during retrograde than during anterograde perfusion of isolated rat liver. To determine whether hemodynamic differences between anterograde and retrograde perfused livers could account for this finding, the hepatic extracellular space was measured for both directions of flow by means of (/sup 14/C)sucrose washout during perfusion as well as by direct measurement of (/sup 14/C)sucrose entrapped during perfusion. A three- to fourfold enlargement of the total hepatic extracellular space was found during retrograde perfusion by both approaches. Examination of perfusion-fixed livers by light microscopy and morphometry revealed that marked distension of the sinusoids occurred during retrograde perfusion and that this accounts for the observed increase in the (/sup 14/C)sucrose space. These findings support the hypothesis that maximum resistance to perfusate flow in the isolated perfused rat liver is located at the presinusoidal level. In addition, increased transit time of perfusate through the liver and greater sinusoidal surface area resulting from sinusoidal distension may account for the higher extraction of 12-NBDS and possibly other compounds by retrograde perfused liver.

  13. An alternative method for neonatal cerebro-myocardial perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Luciani, Giovanni Battista; De Rita, Fabrizio; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Several techniques have already been described for selective cerebral perfusion during repair of aortic arch pathology in children. One method combining cerebral with myocardial perfusion has also been proposed. A novel technique is reported here for selective and independent cerebro-myocardial perfusion for neonatal and infant arch surgery. Technical aspects and potential advantages are discussed. PMID:22307393

  14. Alleviating mucositis: are we on track for a novel therapeutic?

    PubMed

    Lalla, Rajesh V

    2015-02-01

    Oral and gastrointestinal mucositis has emerged as an important toxicity of cancer therapy. In addition to supportive care measures, agents for the prevention or treatment of mucositis in specific patient populations are described in the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines published by the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer/International Society of Oral Oncology. However, there still remains an unmet clinical need for preventive and therapeutic agents in several patient populations. The successful development of such agents will rely on our improved understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying mucositis. Studies are also underway on novel delivery mechanisms and risk prediction models that can facilitate the selective use of interventions for mucositis in a targeted and cost-effective manner. A large number of agents are at various stages in the clinical development pipeline. Enhanced management of this dose-limiting toxicity will allow the delivery of optimal cancer therapy and improve patient prognosis.

  15. [Mucositis in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiochemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Santos, Renata Cristina Schmidt; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo José; Segreto, Roberto Araújo; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo

    2011-12-01

    The objective of present study was to classify oral mucositis according to the Common Toxicity Criterion (CTC) international parameters in head and neck tumor patients simultaneously treated with radio and chemotherapy, and characterize a patient profile in our area, observing the individuals' habits, tumor characteristics, treatment protocol and acute reaction intensity. Fifty patients undergoing simultaneous 66 to 70 Gy megavoltage radiotherapy and cisplatin/carboplatin chemotherapy were evaluated in this study. Weekly evaluations of the degree of mucositis were perfoemed according to CTC, a four-degree ordinal scale; 36% of all patients and 100% of those with diabetes discontinued treatment due to mucositis, showing that this pathology contributes to the severity of mucositis.

  16. Gene, environment, microbiome and mucosal immune tolerance in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Kevin D.; Scher, Jose U.

    2016-01-01

    RA is a complex multifactorial chronic disease that transitions through several stages. Multiple studies now support that there is a prolonged phase in early RA development during which there is serum elevation of RA-related autoantibodies including RF and ACPAs in the absence of clinically evident synovitis. This suggests that RA pathogenesis might originate in an extra-articular location, which we hypothesize is a mucosal site. In discussing this hypothesis, we will present herein the current understanding of mucosal immunology, including a discussion about the generation of autoimmune responses at these surfaces. We will also examine how other factors such as genes, microbes and other environmental toxins (including tobacco smoke) could influence the triggering of autoimmunity at mucosal sites and eventually systemic organ disease. We will also propose a research agenda to improve our understanding of the role of mucosal inflammation in the development of RA. PMID:25539828

  17. Mucosal environmental sensors in the pathogenesis of dry eye.

    PubMed

    Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Stern, Michael E

    2014-09-01

    The 4th Cullen Symposium, held April 17 and 18, 2014, included expert researchers in mucosal immunity of the eye and other mucosal surfaces, particularly the gut. The theme of the meeting was environmental sensing mechanisms in mucosal tissues and their relevance for initiating ocular surface inflammation in dry eye. There are a number of shared features between the ocular surface and other mucosal surfaces, but distinct differences may exist in the type and distribution of mucins and microbiota. Mechanisms to regulate DC maturation and prevent tissue-damaging inflammation are shared among these sites. Epithelial and dendritic cells are key environmental sensors participating in initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses in response to a variety of environmental stresses.

  18. Physiology and immunology of mucosal barriers in catfish (Ictalurus spp.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mucosal barriers of catfish (Ictalurus spp.) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient adsorption, osmoregulation, waste excretion, and environmental sensing. Catf...

  19. Prevention of acute gastric mucosal lesions by Solcoseryl.

    PubMed

    Brzozowski, T; Radecki, T; Sendur, R; Gustaw, P; Konturek, S J

    1987-04-01

    Solcoseryl, a deproteinized extract from calf blood containing various biologically active substances, has been reported to promote the healing of skin wounds and gastric ulceration In this study, the gastroprotective effects of Solcoseryl vis-a-vis acute gastric mucosal damage were examined in rats. Solcoseryl significantly reduced the formation of acute lesions induced by intragastric application of absolute ethanol or acidified taurocholate and by water immersion and restraint stress, but failed to affect those caused by acidified aspirin. Since Solcoseryl did not offer protection in the absence of mucosal prostaglandins (PG) e.g. in aspirin-induced gastric damage, it is likely that PG may be involved in the observed gastroprotective activity of the drug. Solcoseryl failed to affect gastric acid or pepsin secretion, but increased mucosal blood flow. Thus PG generated by Solcoseryl might contribute to the maintenance of the observed mucosal microcirculation and the prevention of lesion formation by corrosive substances and stress conditions.

  20. Gastrointestinal mucositis: the role of MMP-tight junction interactions in tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Al-Dasooqi, Noor; Wardill, Hannah R; Gibson, Rachel J

    2014-07-01

    Chemotherapy for cancer causes significant gut toxicity known as mucositis. The pathogenesis of mucositis is ill defined. Recent clinical research guidelines have highlighted epithelial junctional complexes as emerging targets within mucositis research. Given the robust biological evidence linking tight junctions and matrix metalloproteinases, key mediators of mucositis, tight junction proteins have received significant attention. Despite this, the link between tight junctions, matrix metalloproteinases and mucositis development is yet to be established. This critical review therefore aims to describe the role of matrix metalloproteinases in mucositis, and how matrix metalloproteinase-dependent tight junction disruption may contribute to the pathobiology of mucositis.

  1. Tumor Vessel Compression Hinders Perfusion of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agents1

    PubMed Central

    Galiè, Mirco; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Montani, Maura; Amici, Augusto; Calderan, Laura; Marzola, Pasquina; Benati, Donatella; Merigo, Flavia; Marchini, Cristina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is an advanced approach to in vivo assessment of tumor vascularity and is being increasingly adopted in clinical oncology. It is based on 1- to 10 µm-sized gas microbubbles, which can cross the capillary beds of the lungs and are effective echo enhancers. It is known that high cell density, high transendothelial fluid exchange, and poorly functioning lymphatic circulation all provoke solid stress, which compresses vessels and drastically reduces tumor blood flow. Given their size, we supposed that the perfusion of microbubbles is affected by anatomic features of tumor vessels more than are contrast agents traditionally used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Here, we compared dynamic information obtained from CEUS and DCE-MRI on two experimental tumor models exhibiting notable differences in vessel anatomy. We found that tumors with small, flattened vessels show a much higher resistance to microbubble perfusion than to MRI contrast agents, and appear scarcely vascularized at CEUS examination, despite vessel volume adequate for normal function. Thus, whereas CEUS alone could induce incorrect diagnosis when tumors have small or collapsed vessels, integrated analysis using CEUS and DCE-MRI allows in vivo identification of tumors with a vascular profile frequently associated with malignant phenotypes. PMID:15967105

  2. N-13-glutamate uptake and perfusion during antineoplastic therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, W.H.; Helus, F.; Panzer, M.; Debatin, J.; Oberdorfer, F.; Ostertag, H.; Sinn, H.J.

    1985-05-01

    Flow-limited N-13-glutamate (glu) uptake has been shown for non-treated experimental and human tumors. How does N-13-glu uptake change during therapy, and do the changes parallel perfusion or do they rather exhibit reduced transport capacity. - 92 investigations were based on subsequent i.v. injections of 1-5 mCi N-13-glu and C-11 -butanol (but) in 38 rats bearing Walker carcinomas in the hind leg. Activity was detected with a single-crystal gamma camera with high-energy pin-hole collimator and recorded 5 min for each radioagent. The initial uptake of C-11-but was regarded as a measure of local perfusion. Before irradiation, the N-13-glu tumor-to-muscle uptake averaged 4.30 +- 0.66 (SEM, N=14), 30 min after a single dose of 800 rd 3.06 +- 0.36 and 2 days later 4.04 +- 0.67 (N=10). The data show that radio- and chemotherapy changes N-13-glu uptake independently of flow. Flow limitation is turned into transport (or metabolic) limitation. The procedure allows to differentiate between indirect tumor response mediated by a reduction of blood flow (as examplified with 5-HT) and a direct action on the tumor cells.

  3. Polymeric penetration enhancers promote humoral immune responses to mucosal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Klein, Katja; Mann, Jamie F S; Rogers, Paul; Shattock, Robin J

    2014-06-10

    Protective mucosal immune responses are thought best induced by trans-mucosal vaccination, providing greater potential to generate potent local immune responses than conventional parenteral vaccination. However, poor trans-mucosal permeability of large macromolecular antigens limits bioavailability to local inductive immune cells. This study explores the utility of polymeric penetration enhancers to promote trans-mucosal bioavailability of insulin, as a biomarker of mucosal absorption, and two vaccine candidates: recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (CN54gp140) and tetanus toxoid (TT). Responses to vaccinating antigens were assessed by measurement of serum and the vaginal humoral responses. Polyethyleneimine (PEI), Dimethyl-β-cyclodextrin (DM-β-CD) and Chitosan enhanced the bioavailability of insulin following intranasal (IN), sublingual (SL), intravaginal (I.Vag) and intrarectal (IR) administration. The same penetration enhancers also increased antigen-specific IgG and IgA antibody responses to the model vaccine antigens in serum and vaginal secretions following IN and SL application. Co-delivery of both antigens with PEI or Chitosan showed the highest increase in systemic IgG and IgA responses following IN or SL administration. However the highest IgA titres in vaginal secretions were achieved after IN immunisations with PEI and Chitosan. None of the penetration enhancers were able to increase antibody responses to gp140 after I.Vag immunisations, while in contrast PEI and Chitosan were able to induce TT-specific systemic IgG levels following I.Vag administration. In summary, we present supporting data that suggest appropriate co-formulation of vaccine antigens with excipients known to influence mucosal barrier functions can increase the bioavailability of mucosally applied antigens promoting the induction of mucosal and systemic antibody responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sino-nasal mucosal malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Karim, Muneeb Uddin; Khan, Khursheed; Ali, Nasir; Ikram, Mubasher

    2015-04-29

    A 49-year-old man with a history of left nasal discharge and nasal cavity blockage for 5 months was diagnosed with sino-nasal mucosal malignant melanoma on nasal biopsy. On CT scan, the tumour involved the nasal cavity, left maxillary sinus, ethmoid sinus and medial left orbit. The tumour was grossly excised and adjuvant radiation therapy was offered. The patient was planned for an Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy technique to keep tolerance doses of organs at risk within normal limits and at same time deliver the intended dose of radiation to the tumour site, using 66 Gy in 33 fractions. Owing to the anatomical complexity of the sino-nasal region, precision radiotherapy (RT) is mandatory to optimally irradiate the tumour area while sparing critical surrounding normal structures from late toxicity of RT. Established dose constraints for at-risk organs can only be accomplished through this novel technique of RT. However, despite advances in techniques, current treatment modalities have not significantly made an impact on survival of these patients. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  5. Cystic fibrosis: a mucosal immunodeficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Taylor Sitarik; Prince, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as a channel that regulates the transport of ions and the movement of water across the epithelial barrier. Mutations in CFTR, which form the basis for the clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis, affect the epithelial innate immune function in the lung, resulting in exaggerated and ineffective airway inflammation that fails to eradicate pulmonary pathogens. Compounding the effects of excessive neutrophil recruitment, the mutant CFTR channel does not transport antioxidants to counteract neutrophil-associated oxidative stress. Whereas mutant CFTR expression in leukocytes outside of the lung does not markedly impair their function, the expected regulation of inflammation in the airways is clearly deficient in cystic fibrosis. The resulting bacterial infections, which are caused by organisms that have substantial genetic and metabolic flexibility, can resist multiple classes of antibiotics and evade phagocytic clearance. The development of animal models that approximate the human pulmonary phenotypes—airway inflammation and spontaneous infection—may provide the much-needed tools to establish how CFTR regulates mucosal immunity and to test directly the effect of pharmacologic potentiation and correction of mutant CFTR function on bacterial clearance. PMID:22481418

  6. Vaccination against Salmonella Infection: the Mucosal Way.

    PubMed

    Gayet, Rémi; Bioley, Gilles; Rochereau, Nicolas; Paul, Stéphane; Corthésy, Blaise

    2017-09-01

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica includes several serovars infecting both humans and other animals and leading to typhoid fever or gastroenteritis. The high prevalence of associated morbidity and mortality, together with an increased emergence of multidrug-resistant strains, is a current global health issue that has prompted the development of vaccination strategies that confer protection against most serovars. Currently available systemic vaccine approaches have major limitations, including a reduced effectiveness in young children and a lack of cross-protection among different strains. Having studied host-pathogen interactions, microbiologists and immunologists argue in favor of topical gastrointestinal administration for improvement in vaccine efficacy. Here, recent advances in this field are summarized, including mechanisms of bacterial uptake at the intestinal epithelium, the assessment of protective host immunity, and improved animal models that closely mimic infection in humans. The pros and cons of existing vaccines are presented, along with recent progress made with novel formulations. Finally, new candidate antigens and their relevance in the refined design of anti-Salmonella vaccines are discussed, along with antigen vectorization strategies such as nanoparticles or secretory immunoglobulins, with a focus on potentiating mucosal vaccine efficacy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Idiopathic mucosal penile squamous papillomas in dogs.

    PubMed

    Cornegliani, Luisa; Vercelli, Antonella; Abramo, Francesca

    2007-12-01

    A new papillomatous clinical entity is described affecting the penile mucosa of dogs. The animals, 11 male dogs of different breeds, ageing from 6 to 13 years, were presented for genital mass and occasional haematuria. Surgical incision of the prepuce skin of the anaesthetized dogs showed the presence of single pedunculated, soft, pink-red, cauliflower-like masses arising from the penile mucosa, with diameter ranging from 2 to 8 cm. In all cases, histopathological examination of the excised masses showed normal epithelial differentiation with digitiform expansion of all the layers and elongated rete ridges slanted towards the periphery of the lesion. Evidence of ballooning degeneration or basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies was not found. Both immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction techniques failed to reveal papillomavirus. According to the histological World Health Organization classification of papillomatous lesions and due to the lack of evidence of a viral origin the masses were identified as idiopathic mucosal penile squamous papillomas. Urinary problems resolved after surgical excision, haematuria was therefore considered secondary to ulceration of the papillated masses.

  8. Immunotherapy for drug-refractory mucosal leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Badaro, Roberto; Lobo, Iza; Munos, Alvaro; Netto, Eduardo M; Modabber, Farrokh; Campos-Neto, Antonio; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G

    2006-10-15

    Pentavalent antimony (Sb(v)) is the mainstay therapy for mucosal leishmaniasis (ML), but it is toxic, and relapses are common. Immunotherapy using a mixture of killed parasites, with or without bacille Calmette-Guerin, is an alternative but is used sporadically because of inconsistent results. We developed a defined immunotherapeutic antigen preparation for use in an observational, open-label trial to treat 6 patients with ML with a history of Sb(v) therapy failure. All patients were treated with the antigens thiol-specific antioxidant, Leishmania major stress inducible protein 1, Leishmania elongation initiation factor, and Leishmania heat shock protein 83, plus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Patients underwent clinical and pathological evaluations before the initiation of immunotherapy and at 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, 24, and 60 months after. One month after the third injection, 1 patient showed complete clinical remission (CC) and remained disease free for the duration of the study. At the 9-month follow-up examination, 5 patients showed CC, and all patients were asymptomatic at a subsequent 5-year follow-up examination. These data support the concept that vaccine therapy with a defined antigen combination, used with standard chemotherapy, is a safe and effective approach to treat drug-refractory ML.

  9. Human papillomavirus DNA in oral mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, Lucia; Campisi, Giuseppina; Lama, Anna; Giambalvo, Ornella; Osborn, John; Margiotta, Valerio; Ammatuna, Pietro

    2002-03-15

    This study determined the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in oral mucosa cells from 121 patients with different types of oral mucosal lesions (13 squamous cell carcinomas, 59 potentially malignant lesions, 49 benign erosive ulcerative lesions) and from 90 control subjects. HPV DNA was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction, and genotype was determined by DNA sequencing. HPV prevalence was 61.5% in carcinomas, 27.1% in potentially malignant lesions, 26.5% in erosive ulcerative lesions, and 5.5% in control subjects. The risk of malignant or potentially malignant lesions was associated with HPV and was statistically significant. HPV-18 was found in 86.5% of HPV-positive lesions but was not associated with a particular type of lesion and was found in 80% of the HPV-positive control subjects. HPV infection was related to older age but not to sex, smoking, or alcohol use; the presence of lesions in the oral cavity increased the risk of HPV infection.

  10. Mucosal immune responses following intestinal nematode infection

    PubMed Central

    Zaph, C; Cooper, P J; Harris, N L

    2014-01-01

    In most natural environments, the large majority of mammals harbour parasitic helminths that often live as adults within the intestine for prolonged periods (1–2 years) 1. Although these organisms have been eradicated to a large extent within westernized human populations, those living within rural areas of developing countries continue to suffer from high infection rates. Indeed, recent estimates indicate that approximately 2·5 billion people worldwide, mainly children, currently suffer from infection with intestinal helminths (also known as geohelminths and soil-transmitted helminths) 2. Paradoxically, the eradication of helminths is thought to contribute to the increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and allergy observed in developed countries. In this review, we will summarize our current understanding of host–helminth interactions at the mucosal surface that result in parasite expulsion or permit the establishment of chronic infections with luminal dwelling adult worms. We will also provide insight into the adaptive immune mechanisms that provide immune protection against re-infection with helminth larvae, a process that is likely to be key to the future development of successful vaccination strategies. Lastly, the contribution of helminths to immune modulation and particularly to the treatment of allergy and inflammatory bowel disease will be discussed. PMID:25201407

  11. Mucosal disease series. Number IV. Erythema multiforme.

    PubMed

    Farthing, P; Bagan, J-V; Scully, C

    2005-09-01

    Erythema multiforme (EM) is an acute mucocutaneous hypersensitivity reaction characterised by a skin eruption, with or without oral or other mucous membrane lesions. Occasionally EM may involve the mouth alone. EM has been classified into a number of different variants based on the degree of mucosal involvement and the nature and distribution of the skin lesions. EM minor typically affects no more than one mucosa, is the most common form and may be associated with symmetrical target lesions on the extremities. EM major is more severe, typically involving two or more mucous membranes with more variable skin involvement - which is used to distinguish it from Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), where there is extensive skin involvement and significant morbidity and a mortality rate of 5-15%. Both EM major and SJS can involve internal organs and typically are associated with systemic symptoms. Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) may be a severe manifestation of EM, but some experts regard it as a discrete disease. EM can be triggered by a number of factors, but the best documented is preceding infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV), the lesions resulting from a cell mediated immune reaction triggered by HSV-DNA. SJS and TEN are usually initiated by drugs, and the tissue damage is mediated by soluble factors including Fas and FasL.

  12. Lung Perfusion Scanning in Hepatic Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, N. N.; Ackrill, P.; Wood, J.

    1972-01-01

    Abnormal lung perfusion scans using radioactive particles were found in five out of six cases of hepatic cirrhosis with arterial hypoxaemia. None had clinical evidence of cardiopulmonary disease or signs of pulmonary embolism on arteriography. The scan defects are probably caused by a disorder of the pulmonary microvasculature, which may show regional variation in severity. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4645896

  13. A reappraisal of retrograde cerebral perfusion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Brain protection during aortic arch surgery by perfusing cold oxygenated blood into the superior vena cava was first reported by Lemole et al. In 1990 Ueda and associates first described the routine use of continuous retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) in thoracic aortic surgery for the purpose of cerebral protection during the interval of obligatory interruption of anterograde cerebral flow. The beneficial effects of RCP may be its ability to sustain brain hypothermia during hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) and removal of embolic material from the arterial circulation of the brain. RCP can offer effective brain protection during HCA for about 40 to 60 minutes. Animal experiments revealed that RCP provided inadequate cerebral perfusion and that neurological recovery was improved with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP), however, both RCP and ACP provide comparable clinical outcomes regarding both the mortality and stroke rates by risk-adjusted and case-matched comparative study. RCP still remains a valuable adjunct for brain protection during aortic arch repair in particular pathologies and patients. PMID:23977600

  14. Asynchronicity of facial blood perfusion in migraine.

    PubMed

    Zaproudina, Nina; Teplov, Victor; Nippolainen, Ervin; Lipponen, Jukka A; Kamshilin, Alexei A; Närhi, Matti; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI) technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology.

  15. Nuclear cardiology: Myocardial perfusion and function

    SciTech Connect

    Seldin, D.W. )

    1991-08-01

    Myocardial perfusion studies continue to be a major focus of research, with new investigations of the relationship of exercise-redistribution thallium imaging to diagnosis, prognosis, and case management. The redistribution phenomenon, which seemed to be fairly well understood a few years ago, is now recognized to be much more complex than originally thought, and various strategies have been proposed to clarify the meaning of persistent defects. Pharmacologic intervention with dipyridamole and adenosine has become available as an alternative to exercise, and comparisons with exercise imaging and catheterization results have been described. Thallium itself is no longer the sole single-photon perfusion radiopharmaceutical; two new technetium agents are now widely available. In addition to perfusion studies, advances in the study of ventricular function have been made, including reports of studies performed in conjunction with technetium perfusion studies, new insights into cardiac physiology, and the prognostic and case-management information that function studies provide. Finally, work has continued with monoclonal antibodies for the identification of areas of myocyte necrosis. 41 references.

  16. Coupling between resting cerebral perfusion and EEG.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, R L; Poil, S-S; Brandeis, D; Klaver, P; Bollmann, S; Ghisleni, C; Lüchinger, R; Martin, E; Shankaranarayanan, A; Alsop, D C; Michels, L

    2013-07-01

    While several studies have investigated interactions between the electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging BOLD signal fluctuations, less is known about the associations between EEG oscillations and baseline brain haemodynamics, and few studies have examined the link between EEG power outside the alpha band and baseline perfusion. Here we compare whole-brain arterial spin labelling perfusion MRI and EEG in a group of healthy adults (n = 16, ten females, median age: 27 years, range 21-48) during an eyes closed rest condition. Correlations emerged between perfusion and global average EEG power in low (delta: 2-4 Hz and theta: 4-7 Hz), middle (alpha: 8-13 Hz), and high (beta: 13-30 Hz and gamma: 30-45 Hz) frequency bands in both cortical and sub-cortical regions. The correlations were predominately positive in middle and high-frequency bands, and negative in delta. In addition, central alpha frequency positively correlated with perfusion in a network of brain regions associated with the modulation of attention and preparedness for external input, and central theta frequency correlated negatively with a widespread network of cortical regions. These results indicate that the coupling between average EEG power/frequency and local cerebral blood flow varies in a frequency specific manner. Our results are consistent with longstanding concepts that decreasing EEG frequencies which in general map onto decreasing levels of activation.

  17. Asynchronicity of Facial Blood Perfusion in Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Zaproudina, Nina; Teplov, Victor; Nippolainen, Ervin; Lipponen, Jukka A.; Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Närhi, Matti; Karjalainen, Pasi A.; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI) technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology. PMID:24324592

  18. Volume perfusion CT imaging of cerebral vasospasm: diagnostic performance of different perfusion maps.

    PubMed

    Othman, Ahmed E; Afat, Saif; Nikoubashman, Omid; Müller, Marguerite; Schubert, Gerrit Alexander; Bier, Georg; Brockmann, Marc A; Wiesmann, Martin; Brockmann, Carolin

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of different volume perfusion CT (VPCT) maps regarding the detection of cerebral vasospasm compared to angiographic findings. Forty-one datasets of 26 patients (57.5 ± 10.8 years, 18 F) with subarachnoid hemorrhage and suspected cerebral vasospasm, who underwent VPCT and angiography within 6 h, were included. Two neuroradiologists independently evaluated the presence and severity of vasospasm on perfusion maps on a 3-point Likert scale (0-no vasospasm, 1-vasospasm affecting <50 %, 2-vasospasm affecting >50 % of vascular territory). A third neuroradiologist independently assessed angiography for the presence and severity of vasospasm on a 3-point Likert scale (0-no vasospasm, 1-vasospasm affecting < 50 %, 2-vasospasm affecting > 50 % of vessel diameter). Perfusion maps of cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTT), and time to drain (TTD) were evaluated regarding diagnostic accuracy for cerebral vasospasm with angiography as reference standard. Correlation analysis of vasospasm severity on perfusion maps and angiographic images was performed. Furthermore, inter-reader agreement was assessed regarding findings on perfusion maps. Diagnostic accuracy for TTD and MTT was significantly higher than for all other perfusion maps (TTD, AUC = 0.832; MTT, AUC = 0.791; p < 0.001). TTD revealed higher sensitivity than MTT (p = 0.007). The severity of vasospasm on TTD maps showed significantly higher correlation levels with angiography than all other perfusion maps (p ≤ 0.048). Inter-reader agreement was (almost) perfect for all perfusion maps (kappa ≥ 0.927). The results of this study indicate that TTD maps have the highest sensitivity for the detection of cerebral vasospasm and highest correlation with angiography regarding the severity of vasospasm.

  19. Digestive physiology of the pig symposium: involvement of gut chemosensing in the regulation of mucosal barrier function and defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kaji, I; Akiba, Y; Kaunitz, J D

    2013-05-01

    Meal ingestion is followed by release of numerous hormones from enteroendocrine cells interspersed among the epithelial cells lining the intestine. Recently, the de-orphanization of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-type nutrient receptors, expressed on the apical membranes of enteroendocrine cells, has suggested a plausible mechanism whereby luminal nutrients trigger the release of gut hormones. Activation of nutrient receptors triggers intracellular signaling mechanisms that promote exocytosis of hormone-containing granules into the submucosal space. Hormones released by foregut enteroendocrine cells include the glucagon-like peptides (GLP) affecting glycemic control (GLP-1) and releasing pro-proliferative, hypertrophy-inducing growth factors (GLP-2). The foregut mucosa, being exposed to pulses of concentrated HCl, is protected by a system of defense mechanisms, which includes epithelial bicarbonate and mucus secretion and augmentation of mucosal blood flow. We have reported that luminal co-perfusion of AA with nucleotides in anesthetized rats releases GLP-2 into the portal vein, associated with increased bicarbonate and mucus secretion and mucosal blood flow. The GLP-2 increases bicarbonate secretion via release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) from myenteric nerves. Luminal bile acids also release gut hormones due to activation of the bile-acid receptor known as G Protein-Coupled Receptor (GPR) 131, G Protein Bile Acid Receptor (GPBAR) 1, or Takeda G Protein-Coupled Receptor (TGR) 5, also expressed on enteroendocrine cells. The GLP are metabolized by dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV), an enzyme of particular interest to pharmaceutical, because its inhibition increases plasma concentrations of GLP-1 to treat diabetes. We have also reported that DPPIV inhibition enhances the secretory effects of nutrient-evoked GLP-2. Understanding the release mechanism and the metabolic pathways of gut hormones is of potential utility to the formulation of feedstuff

  20. LPS from bovine serum albumin drives TNF-α release during ex-vivo placenta perfusion experiments, contaminates the perfusion system but can be effectively removed by oxidative cleaning.

    PubMed

    Vasanthan, T; Rochow, N; Mian, F; Codini, T; DeFrance, B; Fusch, G; Samiee-Zafarghandy, S; Fusch, C

    2014-12-01

    The dual ex-vivo perfusion of human placental tissue is useful to study inflammatory pathways. We found significant TNF-α release in negative controls similar in concentration to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated placentas. The aim of the current study was to (i) identify sources driving TNF-α release and (ii) develop an approach to control for it. (i) To determine sources leading to TNF-α release, solutions frequently circulated through the perfusion system and perfusion media with different bovine serum albumin (BSA) quality were exposed to mouse macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7) and subsequently measured for TNF-α expression. (ii) To assess memory effects and validate cleaning procedures, sham perfusion experiments were conducted either in the presence or absence of exogenous LPS, in new tubing that was contaminated, cleaned and analyzed for the effectiveness of LPS removal. Oxidative and acid-base cleaning were tested for their effectiveness to reduce LPS contamination. TNF-α release, observed in negative control experiments, was attributed to the use of LPS-contaminated BSA as well as inadequate cleaning of the perfusion system. Once introduced in the perfusion system, LPS accumulated and created a memory effect. Oxidative but not acid-base depyrogenation effectively reduced LPS levels to concentrations that were in accordance with FDA guidelines (<0.5 EU/mL) for medical equipment redeemed appropriate for re-use. LPS contamination of the placenta perfusion model could have confounding effects on experimental outcomes leading to misinterpretation of data. To circumvent LPS contamination LPS-free BSA and oxidative depyrogenation cleaning techniques should be implemented in future placental perfusion studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Pulsed radiofrequency ablation using perfused needle applicators in an in vitro trial on bovine liver].

    PubMed

    Frieser, Markus; Strobel, Deike; Schaber, Stefan; Wissniowski, Thaddaeus Till; Bernatik, Thomas; Adis, Steffen; Hahn, Eckhart Georg; Hänsler, Johannes Marcus

    2010-04-01

    Intermittent energy application seems to have positive effects in achieving necrotic zones. We analyzed different pulse periods (PPs) to optimize this method. A radiofrequency alternating current was delivered via a triple-needle applicator (3 cm distance of each needle) introduced into freshly procured bovine liver. The open applicator system was constantly perfused with physiological NaCl solution (3×80 ml/h, power output was constant 90 W). Radiofrequency current was fed to the individual needle in turn of varying PPs (1, 2, 5, and 7 s) over 15 min. Each experimental run comprised a total of 30 applications and temperature was recorded over time. The largest necrotic diameters were found at PP 1 s (relevant: shortest axial diameter/D in the center of the lesion: 9.27 cm, SD±0.97 cm) (PP 2 s D=8.65 cm, SD±0.95 cm, p=0.021; PP 5 s D=8.35 cm, SD±0.95 cm, p=0.001; PP 7 s D=8.18 cm, SD±0.79 cm, p=0.0001). Neither doubling the perfusion rate nor raising the concentration of the perfusion liquid led at PP 1 s to increased necrotic diameters (p=0.82). Our study shows that reducing the PP to 1 s of an open perfused intermittent radiofrequency ablation system produces significantly larger coagulation volumes in explanted liver tissue reaching necrotic diameters over 9 cm. Neither doubling perfusion rates nor higher concentrated perfusion liquid increase necrotic diameters.

  2. Neurotensin releases norepinephrine differentially from perfused hypothalamus of sated and fasted rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.F.; Rezvani, A.H.; Hepler, J.R.; Myers, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The central injection of neurotensin (NT) has been reported to attenuate the intake of food in the fasted animal. To determine whether endogenous norepinephrine (NE) is involved in the satiating effect of NT, the in vivo activity of NE in circumscribed sites in the hypothalamus of the unanesthetized rat was examined. Bilateral guide tubes for push-pull perfusion were implanted stereotaxically to rest permanently above one of several intended sites of perfusion, which included the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), ventromedial nucleus (VMN), and the lateral hypothalamic (LH) area. After endogenous stores of NE at a specific hypothalamic locus were radiolabeled by microinjection of 0.02-0.5 ..mu..Ci of (/sup 3/H)NE, an artificial cerebrospinal fluid was perfused at the site at a rate of 20 ..mu..l/min over successive intervals of 5.0 min. When 0.05 or 0.1 ..mu..g/..mu..l NT was added to the perfusate, the peptide served either to enhance or educe the local release of NE at 50% of the sites of perfusion. In these experiments, the circumscribed effect of NT on the characteristics of catecholamine efflux depended entirely on the state of hunger or satiety of the rat. That is, when NT was perfused in the fully satiated rat, NE release was augmented within the PVn or VMN; conversely, NE release was inhibited in the LH. in the animal fasted for 18-22 h, NT exerted an opposite effect on the activity of NE within the same anatomical loci in that the efflux of NE was enhanced in the LH but attenuated or unaffected in the PVN or VMN. Taken together, these observations provide experimental support for the view-point that NT could act as a neuromodulator of the activity of hypothalamic noradrenergic neurons that are thought to play a functional role in the regulation of food intake.

  3. Using Light to Treat Mucositis and Help Wounds Heal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignatius, Robert W.; Martin, Todd S.; Kirk, Charles

    2008-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development is focusing on the use of controlled illumination by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to treat mucositis and to accelerate healing of wounds. The basic idea is to illuminate the affected area of a patient with light of an intensity, duration, and wavelength (or combination of wavelengths) chosen to produce a therapeutic effect while generating only a minimal amount of heat. This method of treatment was originally intended for treating the mucositis that is a common complication of chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer. It is now also under consideration as a means to accelerate the healing of wounds and possibly also to treat exposure to chemical and radioactive warfare agents. Radiation therapy and many chemotherapeutic drugs often damage the mucosal linings of the mouth and gastrointestinal tract, leading to mouth ulcers (oral mucositis), nausea, and diarrhea. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy is currently the standard of care for ischemic, hypoxic, infected, and otherwise slowlyhealing problem wounds, including those of oral mucositis. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy increases such cellular activities as collagen production and angiogenesis, leading to an increased rate of healing. Biostimulation by use of laser light has also been found to be effective in treating mucositis. For hyperbaricoxygen treatment, a patient must remain inside a hyperbaric chamber for an extended time. Laser treatment is limited by laser-wavelength capabilities and by narrowness of laser beams, and usually entails the generation of significant amounts of heat.

  4. Nocifensive Behaviors in Mice with Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Michael W; Long, C Tyler; Marcus, Karen L; Sarmadi, Shayan; Roback, Donald M; Fukuyama, Tomoki; Baeumer, Wolfgang; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2017-02-10

    Oral mucositis can result in significant dysphagia, and is the most common dose-limiting acute toxicity in head and neck cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy. There is a critical need to determine the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie radiotherapy-associated discomfort in patients with mucositis. The objective was to induce oral mucositis in mice, using a clinical linear accelerator, and to quantify resultant discomfort, and characterize peripheral sensitization. A clinical linear accelerator was used to deliver ionizing radiation to the oral cavity of mice. Mucositis severity scoring, and various behavioral assays were performed to quantify bouts of orofacial wiping and scratching, bite force, gnawing behavior and burrowing activity. Calcium imaging was performed on neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. Glossitis was induced with a single fraction of at least 27 Gy. Body weight decreased and subsequently returned to baseline, in concert with development and resolution of mucositis, which was worst at day 10 and 11 postirradiation, however was resolved within another 10 days. Neither bite force, nor gnawing behavior were measurably affected. However, burrowing activity was decreased, and both facial wiping and scratching were increased while mice had visible mucositis lesions. Sensory nerves of irradiated mice were more responsive to histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha and capsaicin. Radiation-induced glossitis is associated with hyper-reactivity of sensory neurons in the trigeminal ganglia of mice, and is accompanied by several behaviors indicative of both itch and pain. These data validate an appropriate model for cancer treatment related discomfort in humans.

  5. Sodium alginate inhibits methotrexate-induced gastrointestinal mucositis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Atsuki; Itoh, Tomokazu; Nasu, Reishi; Kajiwara, Eiji; Nishida, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal mucositis is one of the most prevalent side effects of chemotherapy. Methotrexate is a pro-oxidant compound that depletes dihydrofolate pools and is widely used in the treatment of leukemia and other malignancies. Through its effects on normal tissues with high rates of proliferation,