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Sample records for multi-antenna rf ion

  1. Extracted ion current density in close-coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source: CC-MATIS

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Y. E-mail: oka@LHD.nifs.ac.jp; Shoji, T.

    2014-02-15

    Positive ions are extracted by using a small extractor from the Close-Coupling Multi-Antenna Type radio frequency driven Ion Source. Two types of RF antenna are used. The maximum extracted ion current density reaches 0.106 A/cm{sup 2}. The RF net power efficiency of the extracted ion current density under standard condition is 11.6 mA/cm{sup 2}/kW. The efficiency corresponds to the level of previous beam experiments on elementary designs of multi-antenna sources, and also to the efficiency level of a plasma driven by a filament in the same chamber. The multi-antenna type RF plasma source is promising for all metal high density ion sources in a large volume chamber.

  2. A close-coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Y.; Shoji, T.

    2012-02-15

    A newly close coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source is tested for the purpose of essentially improving plasma coupling on the basis of our old type ion source, which reuses a NNBI (negative ion source for neutral beam injection) ion source used in 1/5th scale of the Large Helical Device NNBI. The ion source and the antenna structure are described, and the efficient plasma production in terms of the positive ion saturation current (the current density) is studied. The source is made of a metal-walled plasma chamber which is desirable from the point of view of the structural toughness for fusion and industrial application, etc. At around 160 kW of rf input power, the ion saturation current density successfully reaches the 5 A/cm{sup 2} level with a gas pressure of 0.6-2 Pa in hydrogen for 10 ms pulse duration. The rf power efficiency of the plasma production with a close coupling configuration of the antenna is improved substantially compared to that with the previous antenna unit in the old type ion source. The power efficiency is assessed as competing with that of other types of sources.

  3. Ion bombardment in RF photoguns

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdeyev,E.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V. N.

    2009-05-04

    A linac-ring eRHIC design requires a high-intensity CW source of polarized electrons. An SRF gun is viable option that can deliver the required beam. Numerical simulations presented elsewhere have shown that ion bombardment can occur in an RF gun, possibly limiting lifetime of a NEA GaAs cathode. In this paper, we analytically solve the equations of motion of ions in an RF gun using the ponderomotive potential of the Rf field. We apply the method to the BNL 1/2-cell SRF photogun and demonstrate that a significant portion of ions produced in the gun can reach the cathode if no special precautions are taken. Also, the paper discusses possible mitigation techniques that can reduce the rate of ion bombardment.

  4. Ion source with external RF antenna

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ji, Qing; Wilde, Stephen

    2005-12-13

    A radio frequency (RF) driven plasma ion source has an external RF antenna, i.e. the RF antenna is positioned outside the plasma generating chamber rather than inside. The RF antenna is typically formed of a small diameter metal tube coated with an insulator. An external RF antenna assembly is used to mount the external RF antenna to the ion source. The RF antenna tubing is wound around the external RF antenna assembly to form a coil. The external RF antenna assembly is formed of a material, e.g. quartz, which is essentially transparent to the RF waves. The external RF antenna assembly is attached to and forms a part of the plasma source chamber so that the RF waves emitted by the RF antenna enter into the inside of the plasma chamber and ionize a gas contained therein. The plasma ion source is typically a multi-cusp ion source.

  5. Negative ion source with external RF antenna

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Hahto, Sami K.; Hahto, Sari T.

    2007-02-13

    A radio frequency (RF) driven plasma ion source has an external RF antenna, i.e. the RF antenna is positioned outside the plasma generating chamber rather than inside. The RF antenna is typically formed of a small diameter metal tube coated with an insulator. An external RF antenna assembly is used to mount the external RF antenna to the ion source. The RF antenna tubing is wound around the external RF antenna assembly to form a coil. The external RF antenna assembly is formed of a material, e.g. quartz, which is essentially transparent to the RF waves. The external RF antenna assembly is attached to and forms a part of the plasma source chamber so that the RF waves emitted by the RF antenna enter into the inside of the plasma chamber and ionize a gas contained therein. The plasma ion source is typically a multi-cusp ion source. A converter can be included in the ion source to produce negative ions.

  6. Characterization of an RF plasma ion source for ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kopalidis, Peter M.; Wan Zhimin

    2012-11-06

    A novel inductively coupled RF plasma ion source has been developed for use in a beamline ion implanter. Ion density data have been taken with an array of four Langmuir probes spaced equally at the source extraction arc slit. These provide ion density uniformity information as a function of source pressure, RF power and gas mixture composition. In addition, total extracted ion beam current data are presented for the same conditions. The comparative advantages of the RF source in terms of higher beam current, reduced maintenance and overall productivity improvement compared to a hot cathode source are discussed.

  7. Cathode Ion Bombardment in RF Photoguns

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdeyev,E.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, we use the method of rapid oscillating field to solve the equation of ion motion in an RF gun. We apply the method to the BNL 1/2-cell SRF photogun and demonstrate that a significant portion of ions produced in the gun can reach the cathode if no special precautions are taken. Also, the paper proposes a simple mitigation recipe that can reduce the rate of ion bombardment.

  8. Negative ion kinetics in RF glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Gottscho, R.A.; Gacbe, C.E.

    1986-04-01

    Using temporally and spatially resolved laser spectroscopy, the authors have determined the identities, approximate concentrations, effects on the local field, and kinetics of formation and loss of negative ions in RF discharges. CI/sup -/ and BCI/sub 3//sup -/ are the dominant negative ions found in low-frequency discharges through CI/sub 2/ and BCI/sub 3/, respectively. The electron affinity for CI is measured to be 3.6118 +- 0.0005 eV. Negative ion kinetics are strongly affected by application of the RF field. Formation of negative ions by attachment of slow electrons in RF discharges is governed by the extent and duration of electron energy relaxation. Similarly, destruction of negative ions by collisional detachment and field extraction is dependent upon ion energy modulation. Thus, at low frequency, the anion density peaks at the beginning of the anodic and cathodic half-cycles after electrons have attached but before detachment and extraction have had time to occur. At higher frequencies, electrons have insufficient time to attach before they are reheated and the instantaneous anion density in the sheath is greatly reduced. When the negative ion density is comparable to the positive ion density, the plasma potential is observed to lie below the anode potential, double layers form between sheath and plasma, and anions and electrons are accelerated by large sheath fields to electrode surfaces.

  9. Compact RF ion source for industrial electrostatic ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Il; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2016-02-01

    Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex is developing a single-ended electrostatic ion accelerator to irradiate gaseous ions, such as hydrogen and nitrogen, on materials for industrial applications. ELV type high voltage power supply has been selected. Because of the limited space, electrical power, and robust operation, a 200 MHz RF ion source has been developed. In this paper, the accelerator system, test stand of the ion source, and its test results are described.

  10. Compact RF ion source for industrial electrostatic ion accelerator.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Il; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2016-02-01

    Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex is developing a single-ended electrostatic ion accelerator to irradiate gaseous ions, such as hydrogen and nitrogen, on materials for industrial applications. ELV type high voltage power supply has been selected. Because of the limited space, electrical power, and robust operation, a 200 MHz RF ion source has been developed. In this paper, the accelerator system, test stand of the ion source, and its test results are described.

  11. RF H- Ion Source with Saddle Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim G; Johnson, Rolland P; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    In this project we are developing an RF H- surface plasma source (SPS) which will synthesize the most important developments in the field of negative ion sources to provide high pulsed and average current, higher brightness, longer lifetime and higher reliability by improving a power efficiency. Several versions of new plasma generators with different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in a small AlN test chamber in the SNS ion source Test Stand. Then a prototype saddle antenna was installed in the Test Stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved a peak current of 67 mA and an apparent efficiency of 1.6 mA/kW. These values are comparable to those of the present SNS sources and can be expected to be improved when the prototype is developed into an operational version in the next phase of the project.

  12. Modeling and Optimizing RF Multipole Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanghaenel, Sven; Asvany, Oskar; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Radio frequency (rf) ion traps are very well suited for spectroscopy experiments thanks to the long time storage of the species of interest in a well defined volume. The electrical potential of the ion trap is determined by the geometry of its electrodes and the applied voltages. In order to understand the behavior of trapped ions in realistic multipole traps it is necessary to characterize these trapping potentials. Commercial programs like SIMION or COMSOL, employing the finite difference and/or finite element method, are often used to model the electrical fields of the trap in order to design traps for various purposes, e.g. introducing light from a laser into the trap volume. For a controlled trapping of ions, e.g. for low temperature trapping, the time dependent electrical fields need to be known to high accuracy especially at the minimum of the effective (mechanical) potential. The commercial programs are not optimized for these applications and suffer from a number of limitations. Therefore, in our approach the boundary element method (BEM) has been employed in home-built programs to generate numerical solutions of real trap geometries, e.g. from CAD drawings. In addition the resulting fields are described by appropriate multipole expansions. As a consequence, the quality of a trap can be characterized by a small set of multipole parameters which are used to optimize the trap design. In this presentation a few example calculations will be discussed. In particular the accuracy of the method and the benefits of describing the trapping potentials via multipole expansions will be illustrated. As one important application heating effects of cold ions arising from non-ideal multipole fields can now be understood as a consequence of imperfect field configurations.

  13. Low power RF amplifier circuit for ion trap applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, J. R.; García-Delgado, L. A.; Gómez-Fuentes, R.; García-Juárez, A.

    2016-09-01

    A low power RF amplifier circuit for ion trap applications is presented and described. The amplifier is based on a class-D half-bridge amplifier with a voltage mirror driver. The RF amplifier is composed of an RF class-D amplifier, an envelope modulator to ramp up the RF voltage during the ion analysis stage, a detector or amplitude demodulation circuit for sensing the output signal amplitude, and a feedback amplifier that linearizes the steady state output of the amplifier. The RF frequency is set by a crystal oscillator and the series resonant circuit is tuned to the oscillator frequency. The resonant circuit components have been chosen, in this case, to operate at 1 MHz. In testings, the class-D stage operated at a maximum of 78 mW at 1.1356 MHz producing 225 V peak.

  14. A simulation study of linear RF ion guides for AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.-L.; Litherland, A. E.

    2015-02-01

    The use of radiofrequency multipoles and particularly the radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) controlled gas cell to facilitate on-line isobar separations for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is being explored experimentally and theoretically in a preliminary way at present. These new methods have the potential to extend greatly the analytical scope of AMS. However, there are many technical challenges to adapt an RF gas cell isobar separating device and still maintain stable and high transmission for routine AMS using the high current Cs+ sputter ion sources developed for nuclear physics and adapted to the detection of rare radioactive isotopes for AMS. An overview of linear RF ion guide properties is therefore needed to assist in the conceptualization of their efficient additions into AMS. In this work the intrinsic properties of linear RF ion guides, which are relevant to the generation of the RF induced ion energy distributions and for the evaluation of the ion transmissions in vacuum, are systematically studied using SIMION 8.1. These properties are compared among radiofrequency quadrupole, hexapole and octupole ion guides, so that their usefulness for AMS applications can be evaluated and compared. By simulation it is found that to prepare a typical RF captured AMS ion beam to within a safe range of ion energies prior to the onset of gas interactions, a higher multipole is more suitable for the first RF field receptor, while a quadrupole operated with q2 ∼ 0.5 is more suited as the final ion guide for concentrating the energy-cooled ions near axis.

  15. RF Driven Multicusp H- Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.N.; DeVries, G.J.; DiVergilio, W.F.; Hamm, R.W.; Hauck, C.A.; Kunkel, W.B.; McDonald, D.S.; Williams, M.D.

    1990-06-01

    An rf driven multicusp source capable of generating 1-ms H{sup -} beam pulses with a repetition rate as high as 150 Hz has been developed. This source can be operated with a filament or other types of starter. There is almost no lifetime limitation and a clean plasma can be maintained for a long period of operation. It is demonstrated that rf power as high as 25 kW could be coupled inductively to the plasma via a glass-coated copper-coil antenna. The extracted H{sup -} current density achieved is about 200 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  16. rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H- ion sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Y. W.; Fuja, R.; Goulding, R. H.; Hardek, T.; Lee, S.-W.; McCarthy, M. P.; Piller, M. C.; Shin, K.; Stockli, M. P.; Welton, R. F.

    2010-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering ˜38 mA H- beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier.

  17. Ion extraction from a saddle antenna RF surface plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V. Johnson, R. P.; Han, B.; Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Breitschopf, J.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-08

    Existing RF Surface Plasma Sources (SPS) for accelerators have specific efficiencies for H{sup +} and H{sup −} ion generation around 3 to 5 mA/cm{sup 2} per kW, where about 50 kW of RF power is typically needed for 50 mA beam current production. The Saddle Antenna (SA) SPS described here was developed to improve H{sup −} ion production efficiency and SPS reliability and availability. At low RF power, the efficiency of positive ion generation in the plasma has been improved to 200 mA/cm{sup 2} per kW of RF power at 13.56 MHz. Initial cesiation of the SPS was performed by heating cesium chromate cartridges by discharge as was done in the very first versions of the SPS. A small oven to decompose cesium compounds and alloys was developed and tested. After cesiation, the current of negative ions to the collector was increased from 1 mA to 10 mA with RF power ∼1.5 kW in the plasma (6 mm diameter emission aperture) and up to 30 mA with ∼4 kW RF power in the plasma and 250 Gauss longitudinal magnetic field. The ratio of electron current to negative ion current was improved from 30 to 2. Stable generation of H{sup −} beam without intensity degradation was demonstrated in the AlN discharge chamber for a long time at high discharge power in an RF SPS with an external antenna. Continuous wave (CW) operation of the SA SPS has been tested on the small test stand. The general design of the CW SA SPS is based on the pulsed version. Some modifications were made to improve the cooling and cesiation stability. The extracted collector current can be increased significantly by optimizing the longitudinal magnetic field in the discharge chamber. CW operation with negative ion extraction was tested with RF power up to 1.8 kW from the generator (∼1.2 kW in the plasma) with production up to Ic=7 mA. Long term operation was tested with 1.2 kW from the RF generator (∼0.8 kW in the plasma) with production of Ic=5 mA, Iex ∼15 mA (Uex=8 kV, Uc=14 kV)

  18. ION SOURCE (R.F. INDUCTION TYPE)

    DOEpatents

    Mills, C.B.

    1963-04-01

    A method is given for producing energetic ions by ionizing a gas with an oscillating electric field which is parallel to a confining magnetic field, then reorienting the fields perpendicular to each other to accelerate the ions to higher energies. An ion source is described wherein a secondary coil threads the bottom of a rectangular ionization chamber and induces an oscillating field parallel to a fixed intense magnetic field through the chamber. (AEC)

  19. RF-Plasma Source Commissioning in Indian Negative Ion Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M. J.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Yadava, Ratnakar; Chakraborty, A. K.; Bansal, G.; Gahlaut, A.; Soni, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Pandya, K.; Parmar, K. G.; Sonara, J.; Kraus, W.; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Obermayer, S.; Martens, C.; Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.

    2011-09-26

    The Indian program of the RF based negative ion source has started off with the commissioning of ROBIN, the inductively coupled RF based negative ion source facility under establishment at Institute for Plasma research (IPR), India. The facility is being developed under a technology transfer agreement with IPP Garching. It consists of a single RF driver based beam source (BATMAN replica) coupled to a 100 kW, 1 MHz RF generator with a self excited oscillator, through a matching network, for plasma production and ion extraction and acceleration. The delivery of the RF generator and the RF plasma source without the accelerator, has enabled initiation of plasma production experiments. The recent experimental campaign has established the matching circuit parameters that result in plasma production with density in the range of 0.5-1x10{sup 18}/m{sup 3}, at operational gas pressures ranging between 0.4-1 Pa. Various configurations of the matching network have been experimented upon to obtain a stable operation of the set up for RF powers ranging between 25-85 kW and pulse lengths ranging between 4-20 s. It has been observed that the range of the parameters of the matching circuit, over which the frequency of the power supply is stable, is narrow and further experiments with increased number of turns in the coil are in the pipeline to see if the range can be widened. In this paper, the description of the experimental system and the commissioning data related to the optimisation of the various parameters of the matching network, to obtain stable plasma of required density, are presented and discussed.

  20. RF-Plasma Source Commissioning in Indian Negative Ion Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. J.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Bansal, G.; Gahlaut, A.; Soni, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Pandya, K.; Parmar, K. G.; Sonara, J.; Yadava, Ratnakar; Chakraborty, A. K.; Kraus, W.; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Obermayer, S.; Martens, C.; Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.

    2011-09-01

    The Indian program of the RF based negative ion source has started off with the commissioning of ROBIN, the inductively coupled RF based negative ion source facility under establishment at Institute for Plasma research (IPR), India. The facility is being developed under a technology transfer agreement with IPP Garching. It consists of a single RF driver based beam source (BATMAN replica) coupled to a 100 kW, 1 MHz RF generator with a self excited oscillator, through a matching network, for plasma production and ion extraction and acceleration. The delivery of the RF generator and the RF plasma source without the accelerator, has enabled initiation of plasma production experiments. The recent experimental campaign has established the matching circuit parameters that result in plasma production with density in the range of 0.5-1×1018/m3, at operational gas pressures ranging between 0.4-1 Pa. Various configurations of the matching network have been experimented upon to obtain a stable operation of the set up for RF powers ranging between 25-85 kW and pulse lengths ranging between 4-20 s. It has been observed that the range of the parameters of the matching circuit, over which the frequency of the power supply is stable, is narrow and further experiments with increased number of turns in the coil are in the pipeline to see if the range can be widened. In this paper, the description of the experimental system and the commissioning data related to the optimisation of the various parameters of the matching network, to obtain stable plasma of required density, are presented and discussed.

  1. 56. Building 105, close view of ion return RF balance ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. Building 105, close view of ion return RF balance tube adjustment controls. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  2. PARMELA simulations of RF linear accelerators for ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, D. R.; Wan Zhimin; Di Vergilio, W. F.; Saadatmand, K.

    1999-06-10

    RF linear accelerators (LINACs) offer the highest beam energies and currents available to the high-energy segment of the ion-implantation industry. We are using the computer code PARMELA to simulate a variety of beam parameters. The simulations are used to generate beam tunes, optimize LINAC performance, and to design new LINACs.

  3. Swift Heavy Ion Irradiation Effects on NPN rf Power Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushpa, N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana; Gupta, S. K.; Revannasiddaiah, D.

    2011-07-01

    The dc characteristics of NPN rf power transistors were studied systematically before and after irradiation by 50 MeV Li3+ ions, 100 MeV F8+ ions and 140 MeV Si10+ ions in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The transistor parameters such as excess base current (ΔIB = IBpost-IBpre), dc current gain (hFE), and collector-saturation current (ICSat) were determined before and after irradiation. The base current (IB) was found to increase significantly after ion irradiation and this in turn decreases the hFE of the transistors. Further, the output characteristics of the irradiated devices exhibit the decrease in the collector current at the saturation region (ICSat) with increase of ion dose.

  4. 57. Building 105, another view of ion return RF balance ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. Building 105, another view of ion return RF balance tube system, and beginning of waveguide return connections to right of photograph; note bottoms of waveguide systems around circumference of scanner switch in upper part of photograph. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  5. A large-area RF source for negative hydrogen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, P.; Feist, J. H.; Kraus, W.; Speth, E.; Heinemann, B.; Probst, F.; Trainham, R.; Jacquot, C.

    1998-08-01

    In a collaboration with CEA Cadarache, IPP is presently developing an rf source, in which the production of negative ions (H-/D-) is being investigated. It utilizes PINI-size rf sources with an external antenna and for the first step a small size extraction system with 48 cm2 net extraction area. First results from BATMAN (Ba¯varian T_est Ma¯chine for N_egative Ions) show (without Cs) a linear dependence of the negative ion yield with rf power, without any sign of saturation. At elevated pressure (1.6 Pa) a current density of 4.5 mA/cm2 H- (without Cs) has been found so far. At medium pressure (0.6 Pa) the current density is lower by approx. a factor of 5, but preliminary results with Cesium injection show a relative increase by almost the same factor in this pressure range. Langmuir probe measurements indicate an electron temperature Te>2 eV close to the plasma grid with a moderate magnetic filter (700 Gcm). Attempts to improve the performance by using different magnetic configurations and different wall materials are under way.

  6. A large-area RF source for negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, P.; Feist, J. H.; Kraus, W.; Speth, E.; Heinemann, B.; Probst, F.; Trainham, R.; Jacquot, C.

    1998-08-20

    In a collaboration with CEA Cadarache, IPP is presently developing an rf source, in which the production of negative ions (H{sup -}/D{sup -}) is being investigated. It utilizes PINI-size rf sources with an external antenna and for the first step a small size extraction system with 48 cm{sup 2} net extraction area. First results from BATMAN (Bavarian T lowbar est Machine for N lowbar egative Ions) show (without Cs) a linear dependence of the negative ion yield with rf power, without any sign of saturation. At elevated pressure (1.6 Pa) a current density of 4.5 mA/cm{sup 2} H{sup -} (without Cs) has been found so far. At medium pressure (0.6 Pa) the current density is lower by approx. a factor of 5, but preliminary results with Cesium injection show a relative increase by almost the same factor in this pressure range. Langmuir probe measurements indicate an electron temperature T{sub e}>2 eV close to the plasma grid with a moderate magnetic filter (700 Gcm). Attempts to improve the performance by using different magnetic configurations and different wall materials are under way.

  7. Alternative modeling methods for plasma-based Rf ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitzer, Seth A.; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Stoltz, Peter H.; Beckwith, Kristian R. C.

    2016-02-01

    Rf-driven ion sources for accelerators and many industrial applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling and simulation of plasma characteristics. For instance, modeling of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) internal antenna H- source has indicated that a large plasma velocity is induced near bends in the antenna where structural failures are often observed. This could lead to improved designs and ion source performance based on simulation and modeling. However, there are significant separations of time and spatial scales inherent to Rf-driven plasma ion sources, which makes it difficult to model ion sources with explicit, kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation codes. In particular, if both electron and ion motions are to be explicitly modeled, then the simulation time step must be very small, and total simulation times must be large enough to capture the evolution of the plasma ions, as well as extending over many Rf periods. Additional physics processes such as plasma chemistry and surface effects such as secondary electron emission increase the computational requirements in such a way that even fully parallel explicit PIC models cannot be used. One alternative method is to develop fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics in order to model ion sources. Time-domain fluid models can simulate plasma evolution, plasma chemistry, and surface physics models with reasonable computational resources by not explicitly resolving electron motions, which thereby leads to an increase in the time step. This is achieved by solving fluid motions coupled with electromagnetics using reduced-physics models, such as single-temperature magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), extended, gas dynamic, and Hall MHD, and two-fluid MHD models. We show recent results on modeling the internal antenna H- ion source for the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the fluid plasma modeling code USim. We compare demonstrate plasma temperature equilibration in two-temperature MHD models

  8. Alternative modeling methods for plasma-based Rf ion sources.

    PubMed

    Veitzer, Seth A; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Stoltz, Peter H; Beckwith, Kristian R C

    2016-02-01

    Rf-driven ion sources for accelerators and many industrial applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling and simulation of plasma characteristics. For instance, modeling of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) internal antenna H(-) source has indicated that a large plasma velocity is induced near bends in the antenna where structural failures are often observed. This could lead to improved designs and ion source performance based on simulation and modeling. However, there are significant separations of time and spatial scales inherent to Rf-driven plasma ion sources, which makes it difficult to model ion sources with explicit, kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation codes. In particular, if both electron and ion motions are to be explicitly modeled, then the simulation time step must be very small, and total simulation times must be large enough to capture the evolution of the plasma ions, as well as extending over many Rf periods. Additional physics processes such as plasma chemistry and surface effects such as secondary electron emission increase the computational requirements in such a way that even fully parallel explicit PIC models cannot be used. One alternative method is to develop fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics in order to model ion sources. Time-domain fluid models can simulate plasma evolution, plasma chemistry, and surface physics models with reasonable computational resources by not explicitly resolving electron motions, which thereby leads to an increase in the time step. This is achieved by solving fluid motions coupled with electromagnetics using reduced-physics models, such as single-temperature magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), extended, gas dynamic, and Hall MHD, and two-fluid MHD models. We show recent results on modeling the internal antenna H(-) ion source for the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the fluid plasma modeling code USim. We compare demonstrate plasma temperature equilibration in two-temperature MHD

  9. RF Negative Ion Source Development at IPP Garching

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, W.; McNeely, P.; Berger, M.; Christ-Koch, S.; Falter, H. D.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Froeschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; Leyer, S.; Riedl, R.; Speth, E.; Wuenderlich, D.

    2007-08-10

    IPP Garching is heavily involved in the development of an ion source for Neutral Beam Heating of the ITER Tokamak. RF driven ion sources have been successfully developed and are in operation on the ASDEX-Upgrade Tokamak for positive ion based NBH by the NB Heating group at IPP Garching. Building on this experience a RF driven H- ion source has been under development at IPP Garching as an alternative to the ITER reference design ion source. The number of test beds devoted to source development for ITER has increased from one (BATMAN) by the addition of two test beds (MANITU, RADI). This paper contains descriptions of the three test beds. Results on diagnostic development using laser photodetachment and cavity ringdown spectroscopy are given for BATMAN. The latest results for long pulse development on MANITU are presented including the to date longest pulse (600 s). As well, details of source modifications necessitated for pulses in excess of 100 s are given. The newest test bed RADI is still being commissioned and only technical details of the test bed are included in this paper. The final topic of the paper is an investigation into the effects of biasing the plasma grid.

  10. RF Negative Ion Source Development at IPP Garching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, W.; McNeely, P.; Berger, M.; Christ-Koch, S.; Falter, H. D.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; Leyer, S.; Riedl, R.; Speth, E.; Wünderlich, D.

    2007-08-01

    IPP Garching is heavily involved in the development of an ion source for Neutral Beam Heating of the ITER Tokamak. RF driven ion sources have been successfully developed and are in operation on the ASDEX-Upgrade Tokamak for positive ion based NBH by the NB Heating group at IPP Garching. Building on this experience a RF driven H- ion source has been under development at IPP Garching as an alternative to the ITER reference design ion source. The number of test beds devoted to source development for ITER has increased from one (BATMAN) by the addition of two test beds (MANITU, RADI). This paper contains descriptions of the three test beds. Results on diagnostic development using laser photodetachment and cavity ringdown spectroscopy are given for BATMAN. The latest results for long pulse development on MANITU are presented including the to date longest pulse (600 s). As well, details of source modifications necessitated for pulses in excess of 100 s are given. The newest test bed RADI is still being commissioned and only technical details of the test bed are included in this paper. The final topic of the paper is an investigation into the effects of biasing the plasma grid.

  11. Heavy ion plasma confinement in an RF quadrupole trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schermann, J.; Major, F. G.

    1971-01-01

    The confinement of an electron free plasma in a pure quadrupole RF electric trap was considered. The ultimate goal was to produce a large density of mercury ions, in order to realize a trapped ion frequency standard using the hyperfine resonance of 199 Hg(+) at 40.7 GHz. An attempt was made to obtain an iodine plasma consisting of equal numbers of positive and negative ions of atomic iodine, the positive iodine ions, being susceptible to charge-exchange with mercury atoms, will produce the desired mercury ions. The experiment showed that the photoproduction of ions pairs in iodine using the necessary UV radiation occurs with a small cross-section, making it difficult to demonstrate the feasibility of space charge neutralization in a quadrupole trap. For this reason it was considered expedient to choose thallium iodide, which has a more favorable absorption spectrum (in the region of 2000 to 2100 A). The results indicate that, although the ionic recombination is a serious limiting factor, a considerable improvement can be obtained in practice for the density of trapped ions, with a considerable advantage in lifetimes for spectroscopic purposes. The ion pair formation by photoionization is briefly reviewed.

  12. Ion energy distributions in dual frequency RF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Peter; Rees, John; Bort, Sam; Seymour, Dave

    2015-09-01

    For many surface-processing applications involving plasmas operated at RF frequencies it has been found helpful to combine two sources of power operating at different frequencies. By choosing suitable input powers at the two frequencies and varying the phase relationship set between the two inputs, the energy distributions (IEDs) for the ions arriving at the target surface can be optimised. There have been, however, only a limited number of published reports of measured or modelled distributions. In the present work IEDs for both positive and negative ions formed in plasmas in argon and nitrous oxide have been measured for mass-identified ions in two different reactors, one of which is a parallel-plate, capacitatively-coupled, system and the other is an inductively-coupled system. Typical data for 13.56 and 27.1 MHz inputs are presented for a range of phase relationships. The IEDs show clearly significant differences between the data for different species of ions which result in part from the ion-molecule collisions occurring, particularly in the plasma/surface sheath regions.

  13. THERMAL MODELING OF ION EXCHANGE COLUMNS WITH SPHERICAL RF RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; King, W.

    2009-12-30

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal performance of RF columns fully loaded with radioactive cesium. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated during Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process upset conditions with a focus on implementation at Hanford. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results will provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on RF. The current full-scale design for the SCIX system includes a central cooling tube, and one objective of these calculations was to examine its elimination to simplify the design. Results confirmed that a column design without a central cooling tube is feasible for RF, allowing for the possibility of significant design simplifications if it can be assumed that the columns are always filled with liquid. With active cooling through the four outer tubes, the maximum column diameter expected to maintain the temperature below the assumed media and safety limits is 26 inches, which is comparable to the current design diameter. Additional analysis was conducted to predict the maximum column temperatures for the previously unevaluated accident scenario involving inadvertent drainage of liquid from a cesium-saturated column, with retention of the ion exchange media and cesium in the column. As expected, much higher maximum temperatures are observed in this case due to the poor heat transfer properties of air versus liquid. For this hypothetical accident scenario involving inadvertent and complete drainage of liquid from a cesium-saturated column, the modeling results indicate that the maximum temperature within a 28 inch diameter RF column with external cooling is expected to exceed 250 C within 2 days, while the maximum temperature of a 12 inch column is maintained below

  14. Research and development of ion surfing RF carpets for the cyclotron gas stopper at the NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, A. E.; Brodeur, M.; Bollen, G.; Morrissey, D. J.; Schwarz, S.

    2016-06-01

    A model device to transport thermal ions in the cyclotron gas stopper, a next-generation beam thermalization device under construction at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, is presented. Radioactive ions produced by projectile fragmentation will come to rest at distances as large as 45 cm from the extraction orifice of the cyclotron gas stopper. The thermalized ions will be transported to the exit by RF carpets employing the recently developed "ion surfing" method. A quarter-circle prototype RF carpet was tested with potassium ions, and ion transport velocities as high as 60 m/s were observed over distances greater than 10 cm at a helium buffer gas pressure of 80 mbar. The transport of rubidium ions from an RF carpet to an electrode below was also demonstrated. The results of this study formed the basis of the design of the RF carpets for use in the cyclotron gas stopper.

  15. Radio-Frequency (rf) Confinement in Ion Mobility Spectrometry: Apparent Mobilities and Effective Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Samuel J.; Bush, Matthew F.

    2016-08-01

    Ion mobility is a powerful tool for separating and characterizing the structures of ions. Here, a radio-frequency (rf) confining drift cell is used to evaluate the drift times of ions over a broad range of drift field strengths (E/P, V cm-1 Torr-1). The presence of rf potentials radially confines ions and results in excellent ion transmission at low E/P (less than 1 V cm-1 Torr-1), thereby reducing the dependence of ion transmission on the applied drift voltage. Non-linear responses between drift time and reciprocal drift voltages are observed for extremely low E/P and high rf amplitudes. Under these conditions, pseudopotential wells generated by the rf potentials dampen the mobility of ions. The effective potential approximation is used to characterize this mobility dampening behavior, which can be mitigated by adjusting rf amplitudes and electrode dimensions. Using SIMION trajectories and statistical arguments, the effective temperatures of ions in an rf-confining drift cell are evaluated. Results for the doubly charged peptide GRGDS suggest that applied rf potentials can result in a subtle increase (2 K) in effective temperature compared to an electrostatic drift tube. Additionally, simulations of native-like ions of the protein complex avidin suggest that rf potentials have a negligible effect on the effective temperature of these ions. In general, the results of this study suggest that applied rf potentials enable the measurement of drift times at extremely low E/P and that these potentials have negligible effects on ion effective temperature.

  16. RF-driven ion source with a back-streaming electron dump

    DOEpatents

    Kwan, Joe; Ji, Qing

    2014-05-20

    A novel ion source is described having an improved lifetime. The ion source, in one embodiment, is a proton source, including an external RF antenna mounted to an RF window. To prevent backstreaming electrons formed in the beam column from striking the RF window, a back streaming electron dump is provided, which in one embodiment is formed of a cylindrical tube, open at one end to the ion source chamber and capped at its other end by a metal plug. The plug, maintained at the same electrical potential as the source, captures these backstreaming electrons, and thus prevents localized heating of the window, which due to said heating, might otherwise cause window damage.

  17. ALTERATIONS IN CALCIUM ION ACTIVITY BY ELF AND RF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory



    Alterations in calcium ion activity by ELF and RF electromagnetic fields

    Introduction

    Calcium ions play many important roles in biological systems. For example, calcium ion activity can be used as an indicator of second-messenger signal-transduction processe...

  18. Development of a compact high current low emittance RF ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Ranjini; Nabhiraj, P. Y.

    2013-12-01

    A 13.56 MHz inductively coupled plasma based RF ion source is developed for production of high brightness focused ion beams of heavy gaseous elements for high speed milling and light ions for high speed imaging. In order to obtain ion beams with low emittance, no magnetic field of any kind is used in the ion source. However, to achieve the high plasma density, the plasma chamber volume is reduced to couple RF power as high as 8-12 W/cm3 to the plasma. Measurements show that the normalized rms emittance of 0.6 mA Ar1+ beam to be as low as 0.0075 mm-mrad while it is 0.004 mm-mrad for 1.2 mA of ion beam from hydrogen plasma. With a simple parallel plate extraction system with an aperture of 2 mm diameter, 80 mA/cm2 of ion beam from hydrogen plasma could be extracted at 3.5 kV extraction potential and 300 W of RF power. The ion source has been operated with other heavy gases and results show that more than 1 mA of xenon and krypton ion beam could easily be extracted at 5 kV extraction potential and 200 W of RF power. In this article, the capability of the ion source to produce high current, low emittance heavy as well as light ion beams is presented.

  19. Landslide monitoring using multi-antenna GPS deformation monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, T.; Hu, Y.; Ding, X.; Chen, C.

    2007-12-01

    GPS has already widely applied in civil engineering, fault detecting and landslide monitoring in the last decade, because of its convenience and high precision. However, GPS receiver is very expensive. If we want to monitor the landslide twenty-four hours a day, we need to buy a lot of GPS receivers. In order to spend less cost, multi- antenna GPS deformation monitoring system was employed to monitor the landslide of the freeway at Guansi section in Taiwan. Moreover, the data from 3D laser scanner, rain gauge, inclinometer and water table meter were utilized to analysis the movement of this landslide to make sure the safety of the drivers.

  20. Resonance of the Macromotion of Ions Trapped in a RF Trap by the Subharmonic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, Jun; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko

    1992-11-01

    Yb+ ions were trapped in an uncompensated rf trap with light buffer gas and then the storage time, as well as the total number of the trapped ions, was determined by the rf resonance method. When the ratio of the frequency of the trapping field to that of the macromotion of the trapped ions was an integer, the total number and the storage time were smaller and shorter, respectively, than those obtained when the ratio was a half-integer. A theoretical calculation shows that this effect, called the subharmonic oscillation, is caused by excitation of the macromotion of the trapped ions by the leaked trapping rf field, in the case in which the ion trap has an octupole besides a quadrupole potential.

  1. System integration of RF based negative ion experimental facility at IPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, G.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Singh, M. J.; Gahlaut, A.; Soni, J.; Pandya, K.; Parmar, K. G.; Sonara, J.; Chakraborty, A.

    2010-02-01

    The setting up of RF based negative ion experimental facility shall witness the beginning of experiments on the negative ion source fusion applications in India. A 1 MHz RF generator shall launch 100 kW RF power into a single driver on the plasma source to produce a plasma of density ~5 × 1012 cm-3. The source can deliver a negative ion beam of ~10 A with a current density of ~30 mA/cm2 and accelerated to 35 kV through an electrostatic ion accelerator. The experimental system is similar to a RF based negative ion source, BATMAN, presently operating at IPP. The subsystems for source operation are designed and procured principally from indigenous resources, keeping the IPP configuration as a base line. The operation of negative ion source is supported by many subsystems e.g. vacuum pumping system with gate valves, cooling water system, gas feed system, cesium delivery system, RF generator, high voltage power supplies, data acquisition and control system, and different diagnostics. The first experiments of negative ion source are expected to start at IPR from the middle of 2009.

  2. Performance of Ion Surfing Rf-carpets for High-Energy RI Beam Gas Catcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Fumiya; Ito, Yuta; Katayama, Ichiro; Schury, Peter; Sonoda, Tetsu; Wada, Michiharu; Wollnik, Hermann

    A new concept for the transport of ions in gas by means of a traveling potential wave super-imposed on an rf-carpet (RFC), known as ion surfing, has recently been proposed. We demonstrated, for the first time, the transport and extraction of K+ and Cs+ ions using a circular rf-carpet in high pressure He gas. An efficiency of nearly 100% was obtained . In addition, we compared an RFC of a fine pitch (0.16 mm) and the one of a rough pitch (0.32 mm). For higher pressure, the fine RFC was found to be better than the rough RFC.

  3. RF ion source development for neutral beam application

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.; Kippenhan, D.; Vella, M.C.

    1983-11-01

    At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a 24 x 24 cm/sup 2/ RF source has been tested with beam acceleration. Recently, we have been investigating the characteristics of plasmas generated with different kinds of antenna coatings. The antenna coil was installed inside a cylindrical multicusp source (20-cm diam by 24-cm long) and was driven by a 500 W amplifier. A tiny light bulb filament was used to start a background plasma. The RF was then switched on and a steady-state hydrogen plasma of moderate density (n approx. = 10/sup 11//cm/sup 3/) could be sustained even with the filament turned off.

  4. rf driven multicusp H sup minus ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.N.; DeVries, G.J.; DiVergilio, W.F.; Hamm, R.W.; Hauck, C.A.; Kunkel, W.B.; McDonald, D.S.; Williams, M.D. )

    1991-01-01

    An rf driven multicusp source capable of generating 1-ms H{sup {minus}} beam pulses with a repetition rate as high as 150 Hz has been developed. This source can be operated with a filament or other types of starter. There is almost no lifetime limitation and a clean plasma can be maintained for a long period of operation. It is demonstrated that rf power as high as 25 kW could be coupled inductively to the plasma via a glass-coated copper-coil antenna. The extracted H{sup {minus}} current density achieved is about 200 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  5. Polymer modification of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (R-F) ion-exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Hubler, T.L.; Franz, J.A.; Yang, J.J.; Shreeve, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (R-F) resin is a candidate regenerable ion-exchange resin for removal of radioactive cesium from highly alkaline waste tank supernates at both the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Previous investigations into the structure/function relationships of R-F resin have shown that the R-F resin undergoes facile oxidation to produce para-quinones, with loss of ion-exchange sites, hence lowered performance of the resin for cesium ion-exchange. In this report, we give the results of our studies into polymer resins prepared using 4-methylresorcinol and 4-fluororesorcinol. The reaction of 4-methylresorcinol with formaldehyde formed oligomeric structures, while a mixture of 4-fluororesorcinol, phenol, and formaldehyde produced a non-soluble resin in aqueous/alkaline conditions. The 4-fluororesorcinol resin underwent significant nucleophilic displacement of the fluorine substituent to give oxidized resins with lower ion-exchange performance.

  6. Alternative RF coupling configurations for H{sup −} ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Briefi, S.; Fantz, U.; Gutmann, P.

    2015-04-08

    RF heated sources for negative hydrogen ions both for fusion and accelerators require very high RF powers in order to achieve the required H{sup −} current what poses high demands on the RF generators and the RF circuit. Therefore it is highly desirable to improve the RF efficiency of the sources. This could be achieved by applying different RF coupling concepts than the currently used inductive coupling via a helical antenna, namely Helicon coupling or coupling via a planar ICP antenna enhanced with ferrites. In order to investigate the feasibility of these concepts, two small laboratory experiments have been set up. The PlanICE experiment, where the enhanced inductive coupling is going to be investigated, is currently under assembly. At the CHARLIE experiment systematic measurements concerning Helicon coupling in hydrogen and deuterium are carried out. The investigations show that a prominent feature of Helicon discharges occurs: the so-called low-field peak. This is a local improvement of the coupling efficiency at a magnetic field strength of a few mT which results in an increased electron density and dissociation degree. The full Helicon mode has not been achieved yet due to the limited available RF power and magnetic field strength but it might be sufficient for the application of the coupling concept to ion sources to operate the discharge in the low-field-peak region.

  7. Integral electrical characteristics and local plasma parameters of a RF ion thruster.

    PubMed

    Masherov, P E; Riaby, V A; Godyak, V A

    2016-02-01

    Comprehensive diagnostics has been carried out for a RF ion thruster based on inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source with an external flat antenna coil enhanced by ferrite core. The ICP was confined within a cylindrical chamber with low aspect ratio to minimize plasma loss to the chamber wall. Integral diagnostics of the ICP electrical parameters (RF power balance and coil current) allowed for evaluation of the antenna coils, matching networks, and eddy current loss and the true RF power deposited to plasma. Spatially resolved electron energy distribution functions, plasma density, electron temperatures, and plasma potentials were measured with movable Langmuir probes. PMID:26932098

  8. Reliability studies on NPN RF power transistors under swift heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushpa, N.; Praveen, K. C.; Gnana Prakash, A. P.; Naik, P. S.; Cressler, John D.; Gupta, S. K.; Revannasiddaiah, D.

    2012-02-01

    NPN RF power transistors were irradiated with 140 MeV Si 10+ ions, 100 MeV F 8+ ions, 50 MeV Li 3+ ions and Co-60 gamma radiation in the dose range from 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The transistor characteristics are studied before and after irradiation from which the parameters such as Gummel characteristics, excess base current (Δ IB = IBpost - IBpre), dc current gain ( hFE), transconductance ( gm) and collector-saturation current ( ICSat) are determined. The degradation observed in the electrical characteristics is almost the same for different types of ion irradiated NPN RF power transistors with similar total doses although there is a large difference in the linear energy transfer (LET) of the ions. Further, it was observed more degradation in DC I- V characteristics of ion irradiated devices than the Co-60 gamma irradiated devices for higher doses.

  9. Ion Solid Interaction And Surface Modification At RF Breakdown In High-Gradient Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Insepov, Zeke; Norem, Jim; Veitzer, Seth

    2011-06-01

    Ion solid interactions have been shown to be an important new mechanism of unipolar arc formation in high-gradient rf linear accelerators through surface self-sputtering by plasma ions, in addition to an intense surface field evaporation. We believe a non-Debye plasma is formed in close vicinity to the surface and strongly affects surface atomic migration via intense bombardment by ions, strong electric field, and high surface temperature. Scanning electron microscope studies of copper surface of an rf cavity were conducted that show craters, arc pits, and both irregular and regular ripple structures with a characteristic length of 2 microns on the surface. Strong field enhancements are characteristic of the edges, corners, and crack systems at surfaces subjected to rf breakdown.

  10. Computation of ion drag force on a static spherical dust grain immersed in rf discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ikkurthi, V. R.; Melzer, A.; Matyash, K.; Schneider, R.

    2009-04-15

    The ion drag force on static spherical dust grains located in an argon rf discharge under typical laboratory experiment conditions has been computed using a three-dimensional particle-particle-particle-mesh code. Elastic and inelastic collisions have been included in the current model to obtain realistic rf discharge plasma conditions. The ion drag has been computed for various sizes of dust placed at different locations in the rf discharge under different gas pressures. The orbital drag force is typically found larger than the collection drag force. Ion-neutral collisions increase flux to the dust and hence the total drag force for collisional case is found larger than the collisionless case. Within the pressure range investigated, the drag forces do not vary much with pressure. The size dependence of the drag force is nonlinear and agrees well with the forces computed from the analytical models.

  11. Observations of Anisotropic Ion Temperature in the NSTX Edge during RF Heating

    SciTech Connect

    T.M. Biewer; R.E. Bell; J.R. Wilson; P.M. Ryan

    2004-10-21

    A new spectroscopic diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) measures the velocity distribution of ions in the plasma edge with both poloidal and toroidal views. An anisotropic ion temperature is measured during the presence of high-power high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) radio-frequency (RF) heating in helium plasmas, with the poloidal ion temperature roughly twice the toroidal ion temperature. Moreover, the measured spectral distribution suggests that two populations are present and have temperatures of 500 eV and 50 eV with rotation velocities of -50 km/s and -10 km/s, respectively. This bi-modal distribution is observed in both the toroidal and poloidal views (in both He{sup +} and C{sup 2+} ions), and is well correlated with the period of RF power application to the plasma. The temperature of the hot edge ions is observed to increase with the applied RF power, which was scanned between 0 and 4.3 MW. The ion heating mechanism is likely to be ion-Bernstein waves (IBW) from nonlinear decay of the launched HHFW.

  12. Observations of Anisotropic Ion Temperature during RF Heating in the NSTX Edge

    SciTech Connect

    T.M. Biewer; R.E. Bell; D.S. Darrow; C.K. Phillips; J.R. Wilson

    2003-05-19

    A new spectroscopic diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) measures the velocity distribution of ions in the plasma edge with both poloidal and toroidal views. An anisotropic ion temperature is measured during the presence of high power HHFW RF heating in He plasmas, with the poloidal T(sub)i roughly twice the toroidal T(sub)i. Moreover, the measured spectral distribution suggests that two populations have temperatures of 500 eV and 50 eV with rotation velocities of -50 km/s and -10 km/s, respectively. This bi-modal distribution is observed in both the toroidal and poloidal views (in both He II and C III ions), and is well correlated with the period of RF power application to the plasma. The temperature of the edge ions is observed to increase with the applied RF power, which was scanned between 0 and 4.3MW. The ion heating mechanism from HHFW RF power has not yet been identified.

  13. Improving Negative Ion Beam Quality and Purity with a RF Quadrupole Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.

    2011-09-26

    Recent progress in the development of a gas-filled RF quadrupole ion cooler for cooling negative ions is reported. Experiments demonstrate that negative ion beams can be cooled to 2 eV FWHM energy spread with more than 50% transmission through the cooler. The RFQ cooler can potentially improve the purity of radioactive ion beams by magnetic mass separation. New developments on purifying negative ion beams by photodetachment in the RFQ cooler are presented. With a laser of proper photon energy, nearly 100% suppression of the unwanted negative ions in the RFQ cooler has been observed, while the desired ions remain mostly intact. A recent experimental study demonstrates that pure ground state negative ion beams can be obtained by state-selective photodetachment in the RFQ cooler.

  14. Improving Negative Ion Beam Quality And Purity With A RF Quadrupole Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of a gas-filled RF quadrupole ion cooler for cooling negative ions is reported. Experiments demonstrate that negative ion beams can be cooled to 2 eV FWHM energy spread with more than 50% transmission through the cooler. The RFQ cooler can potentially improve the purity of radioactive ion beams by magnetic mass separation. New developments on purifying negative ion beams by photodetachment in the RFQ cooler are presented. With a laser of proper photon energy, nearly 100% suppression of the unwanted negative ions in the RFQ cooler has been observed, while the desired ions remain mostly intact. A recent experimental study demonstrates that pure ground state negation ion beams can be obtained by state-selective photodetachment in the RFQ cooler.

  15. Effect of a RF Wave on Ion Cyclotron Instability in Size Distributed Impurities Containing Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A. K.; Tripathi, V. K.; Annou, R.

    2008-09-07

    The effect of a large amplitude lower hybrid wave on current driven ion cyclotron waves in a dusty plasma where dust grains are size distributed is examined. The influence of the lower hybrid wave on the stabilization of the instability is studied. The efficacy of rf is dust density dependent.

  16. Computation of Ion Drag Force and Charge on a Static Spherical Dust Grain in RF Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikkurthi, V. R.; Melzer, A.; Matyash, K.; Schneider, R.

    2008-09-07

    The ion drag force and charge on a spherical dust grain located in RF discharge plasma is computed using a 3-dimensional Particle-Particle Particle-Mesh (P3M) code. Our plasma model includes finite-size effects for dust grains and allows to self-consistently resolve the dust grain charging due to absorption of plasma electrons and ions. Ion drag and dust charge have been computed for various sizes of dust particles placed at various locations in the discharge. The results for ion drag have been compared with previous collisionless models and affect of collisions on drag has been discussed in detail.

  17. RF Manipulation of Ions in the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Martin, James J.; Sims, William H.; Chakrabarti, Suman; Lewis, Raymond A.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of antimatter provides the highest mass specific energy of any other known reaction. Proper harnessing of this energy holds great promise for future space propulsion systems. Many different propulsion concepts have been proposed that take advantage of antimatter, either using matter-antimatter as the primary fuel, or as a 'spark plug' for fusion and fission systems. In order to begin to address these concepts experimentally, a method of storing and transporting antimatter must be developed. The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) is a first-generation storage and transportation device designed to store and transport 10(exp 12) antiprotons with a storage half-life of 18 days. It uses a Penning-Malmberg ion trap with a 4T magnetic field and 20 kV potential. This will enable researchers much more flexibility in the design of antimatter experiments related to propulsion. Ions cannot be stored indefinitely in a real trap, as ion cloud instabilities develop from imperfections in manufacturing and misalignments in assembly. Previous work has been done at both the National Institute of Standards and University of California in San Diego in using RF (radio frequency) signals to both diagnose and confine the ion cloud. Two electrodes in the trap have been segmented to allow both reception and transmission of RF waves in the ion cloud. Experiments are underway to determine the number of ions and density in the cloud by "listening" to protons contained in the HiPAT. Currently we believe the density of ions stored in the trap is roughly 10(exp 15) m(exp -3). Development of non-destructive techniques is vital to the project goals, enabling continuous monitoring of the quantities stored in the system. Experimental work is also being done in identifying RF transmission frequencies that can manipulate the density of the cloud, by exchanging energy and momentum between the RF wave and the ions. Preliminary experiments have demonstrated this interaction.

  18. Ion optical effects in a low pressure rf plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Oechsner, Hans; Paulus, Hubert

    2013-11-15

    Ion optical effects in low pressure gas discharges are introduced as a novel input into low pressure plasma technology. They are based on appropriate geometrical plasma confinements which enable a control of the shape of internal density and potential distributions and, hence, the ion motion in the plasma bulk. Such effects are exemplified for an electron cyclotron wave resonance plasma in Ar at 1–5 × 10{sup −3} millibars. The geometry of the plasma chamber is modified by a conical and a cylindrical insert. Computer simulations display spherical plasma density contours to be formed around the conical confinement. This effects an increase of the ratio of the ion currents into the conical and the cylindrical inserts which depends on the fourth power of the plasma electron temperature. A quantitative understanding of this behavior is presented. As another essential result, the shape of the internal plasma contours is found to be independent of the pressure controlled plasma parameters.

  19. Efficient cesiation in RF driven surface plasma negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Belchenko, Yu; Ivanov, A; Konstantinov, S; Sanin, A; Sotnikov, O

    2016-02-01

    Experiments on hydrogen negative ions production in the large radio-frequency negative ion source with cesium seed are described. The system of directed cesium deposition to the plasma grid periphery was used. The small cesium seed (∼0.5 G) provides an enhanced H(-) production during a 2 month long experimental cycle. The gradual increase of negative ion yield during the long-term source runs was observed after cesium addition to the source. The degraded H(-) production was recorded after air filling to the source or after the cesium washing away from the driver and plasma chamber walls. The following source conditioning by beam shots produces the gradual recovery of H(-) yield to the high value. The effect of H(-) yield recovery after cesium coverage passivation by air fill was studied. The concept of cesium coverage replenishment and of H(-) yield recovery due to sputtering of cesium from the deteriorated layers is discussed. PMID:26932015

  20. Investigation of fringe plasma parameters on a high power rf driven ion source

    SciTech Connect

    McNeely, P.; Schiesko, L.

    2010-02-15

    It has been observed that there are differences between the uncompensated Langmuir probes installed in the upper and lower areas of the rf driven H{sup -} sources at IPP Garching. The two probes often had substantially different floating potentials or ion saturation currents. In an effort to understand the reasons for these differences a Langmuir probe analysis system was used on the probes to collect the full current voltage characteristic. The results show what is likely the formation of an ion-ion plasma. The paper shows the effect of beam extraction and the presence of caesium on the probe characteristics.

  1. RF BEAM CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE BROOKHAVEN RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER, RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    BRENNAN,J.M.; CAMPBELL,A.; DELONG,J.; HAYES,T.; ONILLON,E.; ROSE,J.; VETTER,K.

    1998-06-22

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is two counter-rotating rings with six interaction points. The RF Beam Control system for each ring will control two 28 MHz cavities for acceleration, and five 197 MHz cavities for preserving the 5 ns bunch length during 10 hour beam stores. Digital technology is used extensively in: Direct Digital Synthesis of rf signals and Digital Signal Processing for, the realization of state-variable feedback loops, real-time calculation of rf frequency, and bunch-by-bunch phase measurement of the 120 bunches. DSP technology enables programming the parameters of the feedback loops in order to obtain closed-loop dynamics that are independent of synchrotron frequency.

  2. Synthesis, structural characterization, and performance evaluation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) ion-exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Hubler, T.L.; Franz, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.; Bryan, S.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Brown, G.N.; Bray, L.A.; Linehan, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    The 177 underground storage tanks at the DOE`s Hanford Site contain an estimated 180 million tons of high-level radioactive wastes. It is desirable to remove and concentrate the highly radioactive fraction of the tank wastes for vitrification. Resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin, an organic ion-exchange resin with high selectivity and capacity for the cesium ion, which is a candidate ion-exchange material for use in remediation of tank wastes. The report includes information on the structure/function analysis of R-F resin and the synthetic factors that affect performance of the resin. CS-100, a commercially available phenol-formaldehyde (P-F) resin, and currently the baseline ion-exchanger for removal of cesium ion at Hanford, is compared with the R-F resin. The primary structural unit of the R-F resin was determined to consist of a 1,2,3,4-tetrasubstituted resorcinol ring unit while CS-100, was composed mainly of a 1,2,4-trisubstituted ring. CS-100 shows the presence of phenoxy-ether groups, and this may account for the much lower decontamination factor of CS-100 for cesium ion. Curing temperatures for the R-F resin were found to be optimal at 105--130C. At lower temperatures, insufficient curing, hence crosslinking, of the polymer resin occurs and selectivity for cesium drops. Curing at elevated temperatures leads to chemical degradation. Optimal particle size for R-F resin is in the range of 20--50 mesh-sized particles. R-F resin undergoes chemical degradation or oxidation which destroys ion-exchange sites. The ion-exchange sites (hydroxyl groups) are converted to quinones and ketones. CS-100, though it has much lower performance for cesium ion-exchange, is significantly more chemically stable than R-F resin. To gamma radiation, CS-100 is more radiolytically stable than R-F resin.

  3. On RF heating of inhomogeneous collisional plasma under ion-cyclotron resonance conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-15

    During ion-cyclotron resonance (ICR) heating of plasma by the magnetic beach method, as well as in some other versions of ICR heating, it is necessary to excite Alfvén oscillations. In this case, it is difficult to avoid the phenomenon of the Alfvén resonance, in which Alfvén oscillations transform into lower hybrid oscillations. The latter efficiently interact with electrons, due to which most of the deposited RF energy is spent on electron (rather than ion) heating. The Alfvén resonance takes place due to plasma inhomogeneity across the external magnetic field. Therefore, it could be expected that variations in the plasma density profile would substantially affect the efficiency of the interaction of RF fields with charged particles. However, the results obtained for different plasma density profiles proved to be nearly the same. In the present work, a plasma is considered the parameters of which correspond to those planned in future ICR plasma heating experiments on the PS-1 facility at the Kurchatov Institute. When analyzing the interaction of RF fields with charged particles, both the collisionless resonance interaction and the interaction caused by Coulomb collisions are taken into account, because, in those experiments, the Coulomb collision frequency will be comparable with the frequency of the heating field. Antennas used for ICR heating excite RF oscillations with a wide spectrum of wavenumbers along the magnetic field. After averaging over the spectrum, the absorbed RF energy calculated with allowance for collisions turns out to be close to that absorbed in collisionless plasma, the energy fraction absorbed by electrons being substantially larger than that absorbed by ions.

  4. BROADBAND ANTENNA MATCHING NETWORK DESIGN AND APPLICATION FOR RF PLASMA ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Ki; Kang, Yoon W; Piller, Chip; Fathy, Aly

    2011-01-01

    The RF ion source at Spallation Neutron Source has been upgraded to meet higher beam power requirement. One important subsystem for efficient operation of the ion source is the 2MHz RF impedance matching network. The real part of the antenna impedance is very small and is affected by plasma density for 2MHz operating frequency. Previous impedance matching network for the antenna has limited tuning capability to cover this potential variation of the antenna impedance since it employed a single tuning element and an impedance transformer. A new matching network with two tunable capacitors has been built and tested. This network can allow precision matching and increase the tunable range without using a transformer. A 5-element broadband matching network also has been designed, built and tested. The 5-element network allows wide band matching up to 50 kHz bandwidth from the resonance center of 2 MHz. The design procedure, simulation and test results are presented.

  5. Tests of an RF Dipole Crabbing Cavity for an Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Castilla Loeza, Alejandro; Delayen, Jean R.

    2013-12-01

    On the scheme of developing a medium energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab, we have designed a compact superconducting rf dipole cavity at 750 MHz to crab both electron and ion bunches and increase luminosities at the interaction points (IP) of the machine. Following the design optimization and characterization of the electromagnetic properties such as peak surface fields and shunt impedance, along with field nonuniformities, multipole components content, higher order modes (HOM) and multipacting, a prototype cavity was built by Niowave Inc. The 750 MHz prototype crab cavity has been tested at 4 K and is ready for re-testing at 4 K and 2 K at Jefferson Lab. In this paper we present the detailed results of the rf tests performed on the 750 MHz crab cavity prototype.

  6. Simulations of Ion Migration in the LCLS RF Gun and Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Brachmann, Axel; Dowell, David; /SLAC

    2012-06-25

    The motivation for this work was the observed surface contamination of the first LCLS RF gun copper cathode. We will present the results of simulations in regards to ion migration in the LCLS gun. Ions of residual gases will be created by interaction of molecular gas species with the UV drive laser beam and by the electron beam itself. The larger part of those ionized molecules remain in the vicinity of creation, are transported towards beam line walls or away from the cathode. However a small fraction gains enough kinetic energy, focused by RF and magnetic fields and propagates to the cathode, producing an undesirable increase of the cathode's surface work function. Although this fraction is small, during long term operation, this effect may become a significant factor limiting the source performance.

  7. An RF-only ion-funnel for extraction from high-pressure gases

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, T.; Fudenberg, D.; Varentsov, V.; Sabourov, A.; Gratta, G.; Dilling, J.; DeVoe, R.; Sinclair, D.; Fairbank, W.; Albert, J. B.; Auty, D. J.; Barbeau, P. S.; Beck, D.; Benitez-Medina, C.; Breidenbach, M.; Cao, G. F.; Chambers, C.; Cleveland, B.; Coon, M.; Craycraft, A.; Daniels, T.; Daugherty, S. J.; Didberidze, T.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dunford, M.; Fabris, L.; Farine, J.; Feldmeier, W.; Fierlinger, P.; Gornea, R.; Graham, K.; Heffner, M.; Hughes, M.; Jewell, M.; Jiang, X. S.; Johnson, T. N.; Johnston, S.; Karelin, A.; Kaufman, L. J.; Killick, R.; Koffas, T.; Kravitz, S.; Krücken, R.; Kuchenkov, A.; Kumar, K. S.; Leonard, D. S.; Leonard, F.; Licciardi, C.; Lin, Y. H.; Ling, J.; MacLellan, R.; Marino, M. G.; Mong, B.; Moore, D.; Odian, A.; Ostrovskiy, I.; Ouellet, C.; Piepke, A.; Pocar, A.; Retiere, F.; Rowson, P. C.; Rozo, M. P.; Schubert, A.; Smith, E.; Stekhanov, V.; Tarka, M.; Tolba, T.; Tosi, D.; Twelker, K.; Vuilleumier, J. -L.; Walton, J.; Walton, T.; Weber, M.; Wen, L. J.; Wichoski, U.; Yang, L.; Yen, Y. -R.

    2015-01-27

    An RF ion-funnel technique has been developed to extract ions from a high-pressure (10 bar) noble-gas environment into a vacuum (10-6 mbar). Detailed simulations have been performed and a prototype has been developed for the purpose of extracting 136Ba ions from Xe gas with high efficiency. With this prototype, ions have been extracted for the first time from high-pressure xenon gas and argon gas. Systematic studies have been carried out and compared to simulations. This demonstration of extraction of ions, with mass comparable to that of the gas generating the high-pressure, has applications to Ba tagging from a Xe-gas time-projection chamber for double-beta decay, as well as to the general problem of recovering trace amounts of an ionized element in a heavy (m > 40 u) carrier gas.

  8. An RF-only ion-funnel for extraction from high-pressure gases

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brunner, T.; Fudenberg, D.; Varentsov, V.; Sabourov, A.; Gratta, G.; Dilling, J.; DeVoe, R.; Sinclair, D.; Fairbank, W.; Albert, J. B.; et al

    2015-01-27

    An RF ion-funnel technique has been developed to extract ions from a high-pressure (10 bar) noble-gas environment into a vacuum (10-6 mbar). Detailed simulations have been performed and a prototype has been developed for the purpose of extracting 136Ba ions from Xe gas with high efficiency. With this prototype, ions have been extracted for the first time from high-pressure xenon gas and argon gas. Systematic studies have been carried out and compared to simulations. This demonstration of extraction of ions, with mass comparable to that of the gas generating the high-pressure, has applications to Ba tagging from a Xe-gas time-projectionmore » chamber for double-beta decay, as well as to the general problem of recovering trace amounts of an ionized element in a heavy (m > 40 u) carrier gas.« less

  9. RF System Requirements for a Medium-Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, Robert A; Hannon, Fay E; Guo, Jiquan; Huang, Shichun; Huang, Yulu; Wang, Haipeng; Wang, S

    2015-09-01

    JLab is studying options for a medium energy electron-ion collider that could fit on the JLab site and use CEBAF as a full-energy electron injector. A new ion source, linac and booster would be required, together with collider storage rings for the ions and electrons. In order to achieve the maximum luminosity these will be high-current storage rings with many bunches. We present the high-level RF system requirements for the storage rings, ion booster ring and high-energy ion beam cooling system, and describe the technology options under consideration to meet them. We also present options for staging that might reduce the initial capital cost while providing a smooth upgrade path to a higher final energy. The technologies under consideration may also be useful for other proposed storage ring colliders or ultimate light sources.

  10. An investigation of electron and oxygen ion damage in Si npn RF power transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushpa, N.; Gnana Prakash, A. P.; Praveen, K. C.; Cressler, John D.; Revannasiddaiah, D.

    The effects of 8 MeV electrons and 60 and 95 MeV oxygen ions on the electrical properties of Si npn RF power transistors have been investigated as a function of fluence. The dc current gain (hFE), displacement damage factor, excess base current (Δ IB=IBpost-IBpre), excess collector current (Δ IC=ICpost-ICpre), collector saturation current (ICS) and deep level transient spectroscopy trap signatures of the irradiated transistors were systematically evaluated.

  11. Installation of spectrally selective imaging system in RF negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, K; Wünderlich, D; Fantz, U; Heinemann, B; Kisaki, M; Nagaoka, K; Nakano, H; Osakabe, M; Tsumori, K; Geng, S; Kaneko, O; Takeiri, Y

    2016-02-01

    A spectrally selective imaging system has been installed in the RF negative ion source in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-relevant negative ion beam test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment) to investigate distribution of hydrogen Balmer-α emission (Hα) close to the production surface of hydrogen negative ion. We selected a GigE vision camera coupled with an optical band-path filter, which can be controlled remotely using high speed network connection. A distribution of Hα emission near the bias plate has been clearly observed. The same time trend on Hα intensities measured by the imaging diagnostic and the optical emission spectroscopy is confirmed. PMID:26931995

  12. Studies on the Extraction Region of the Type VI RF Driven H- Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeely, P.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Franzen, P.; Heinemann, B.; Hu, C.; Kraus, W.; Riedl, R.; Speth, E.; Wilhelm, R.

    2002-11-01

    IPP Garching has spent several years developing a RF driven H- ion source intended to be an alternative to the current ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) reference design ion source. A RF driven source offers a number of advantages to ITER in terms of reduced costs and maintenance requirements. Although the RF driven ion source has shown itself to be competitive with a standard arc filament ion source for positive ions many questions still remain on the physics behind the production of the H- ion beam extracted from the source. With the improvements that have been implemented to the BATMAN (Bavarian Test Machine for Negative Ions) facility over the last two years it is now possible to study both the extracted ion beam and the plasma in the vicinity of the extraction grid in greater detail. This paper will show the effect of changing the extraction and acceleration voltage on both the current and shape of the beam as measured on the calorimeter some 1.5 m downstream from the source. The extraction voltage required to operate in the plasma limit is 3 kV. The perveance optimum for the extraction system was determined to be 2.2 x 10-6 A/V3/2 and occurs at 2.7 kV extraction voltage. The horizontal and vertical beam half widths vary as a function of the extracted ion current and the horizontal half width is generally smaller than the vertical. The effect of reducing the co-extracted electron current via plasma grid biasing on the H- current extractable and the beam profile from the source is shown. It is possible in the case of a silver contaminated plasma to reduce the co-extracted electron current to 20% of the initial value by applying a bias of 12 V. In the case where argon is present in the plasma, biasing is observed to have minimal effect on the beam half width but in a pure hydrogen plasma the beam half width increases as the bias voltage increases. New Langmuir probe studies that have been carried out parallel to the plasma grid (in the

  13. Steady-state operation of a large-area high-power RF ion source for the neutral beam injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Doo-Hee; Park, Min; Jeong, Seung Ho; Kim, Tae-Seong; Lee, Kwang Won; In, Sang Ryul

    2014-10-01

    A large-area high-power RF-driven ion source is being developed in Germany for the heating and current drive (H&CD) of an ITER device. Negative hydrogen ion sources are the major components of neutral beam injection systems in future large-scale fusion devices such as an the ITER and the DEMO. The first and the second long-pulse ion sources (LPIS-1 and LPIS-2) have been successfully developed with a magnetic-bucket plasma generator, including a filament heating structure for the first NBI (NBI-1) system of the KSTAR tokamak. A development plan exists for a large-area high-power RF ion source for steady-state operation (more than 300 seconds) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to extract positive ions, which can be used for the NBI heating and current drive systems, and to extract negative ions for future fusion devices such as a Fusion Neutron Source and Korea — DEMO. The RF ion source consists of a driver region, including a helical antenna and a discharge chamber, and an expansion region (magnetic bucket of the prototype LPIS-1). RF power can be transferred at up to 10 kW with a fixed frequency of 2 MHz through an optimized RF matching system. An actively water-cooled Faraday shield is located inside the driver region of the ion source for stable and steady-state operation of the RF discharge. The uniformities of the plasma parameters are measured at the lowest area of the expansion bucket by using two RF-compensated electrostatic probes along the directions of the short and the long dimensions of the expansion region.

  14. Status of the RF-driven H⁻ ion source for J-PARC linac.

    PubMed

    Oguri, H; Ohkoshi, K; Ikegami, K; Takagi, A; Asano, H; Ueno, A; Shibata, T

    2016-02-01

    For the upgrade of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex linac beam current, a cesiated RF-driven negative hydrogen ion source was installed during the 2014 summer shutdown period, with subsequent operations commencing on September 29, 2014. The ion source has been successfully operating with a beam current and duty factor of 33 mA and 1.25% (500 μs and 25 Hz), respectively. The result of recent beam operation has demonstrated that the ion source is capable of continuous operation for approximately 1100 h. The spark rate at the beam extractor was observed to be at a frequency of less than once a day, which is an acceptable level for user operation. Although an antenna failure occurred during operation on October 26, 2014, no subsequent serious issues have occurred since then. PMID:26932020

  15. Operation of RF driven negative ion source in a pure-hydrogen mode

    SciTech Connect

    Abdrashitov, G.; Belchenko, Yu. Gusev, I.; Senkov, D.; Sanin, A.; Shikhovtsev, I.; Kondakov, A.; Ivanov, A. A.; Sotnikov, O.

    2015-04-08

    The production of negative hydrogen ions in the radio-frequency driven long-pulsed source with external antenna is studied. RF drivers with various geometry of external antenna, Faraday shield and magnets at the rear flange were examined. H- beam extraction through the single emission aperture was performed in the source pure-hydrogen mode with no external seed of alkali additives. H- beam with ion emission current density up to 5 mA/cm{sup 2} and energy up to 75 keV was regularly obtained in the 1 s pulses of the pure-hydrogen mode. The regular temporal increase of H- ion production due to deposition of impurities on the plasma grid surface was recorded. The H- emission current density increased up to 9 mA/cm{sup 2} in this case.

  16. Application of rf superconductivity to high-brightness ion-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Roche, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    A development program is underway to apply rf superconductivity to the design of cw linear accelerators for high-brightness ion beams. The key issues associated with this endeavor have been delineated in an earlier paper. Considerable progress has been made both experimentally and theoretically to resolve a number of these issues. In this paper we summarize this progress. We also identify current and future work in the areas of accelerator technology and superconducting materials which will confront the remaining issues and/or provide added capability to the technology. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Particle-In-Cell/Monte Carlo Simulation of Ion Back BomBardment in a High Average Current RF Photo-Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.

    2009-10-17

    In this paper, we report on study of ion back bombardment in a high average current radio-frequency (RF) photo-gun using a particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulation method. Using this method, we systematically studied effects of gas pressure, RF frequency, RF initial phase, electric field profile, magnetic field, laser repetition rate, different ion species on ion particle line density distribution, kinetic energy spectrum, and ion power line density distribution back bombardment onto the photocathode. Those simulation results suggested that effects of ion back bombardment could increase linearly with the background gas pressure and laser repetition rate. The RF frequency has significantly affected the ion motion inside the gun so that the ion power deposition on the photocathode in an RF gun can be several orders of magnitude lower than that in a DC gun. The ion back bombardment can be minimized by appropriately choosing the electric field profile and the initial phase.

  18. Investigation of a rf inductively coupled plasma ion source capable of highly uniform and collimated ion-beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanarov, V.; Hayes, A.; Yevtukhov, R.; Kameyama, I.; Siegfried, D.; Waahlin, E.

    2006-03-15

    In accordance with advanced data storage device fabrication requirements, we have evaluated a new broad-beam rf ion source for ion beam etching and deposition application. This source utilizes a novel reentrant shaped plasma inductively coupled plasma generator for improved radial plasma density uniformity and a dynamic magnetic field for improved static etch uniformity. It has the capability of reproducibly generating extremely uniform ion beams from 500 to 1500 eV with divergence angle <3 deg. and high directionality [Kanarov et al. (patent pending)]. For a 150 mm diameter wafer, an etch uniformity of <1% {sigma}/mean in static condition or <0.5% with wafer rotation is obtained over an ion incident angle range of 0 deg. - 65 deg. Recently, we have investigated extending the operation of this source to the critical low energy range, 100-500 eV, required for fabricating thin film magnetic head sensors. It was found that, under optimum operating conditions, excellent static etch uniformity (1%-1.5% {sigma}/mean) could be obtained at high ion beam current densities, up to 0.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, over the entire low-energy range while still achieving low divergence angles (<5 deg.) and high beam directionality. The ion beam performance was consistent with results obtained by simulation and by experiment using a 19-hole array ion optic test stand with scanning ion probe [E. Waahlin (unpublished)]. In this article we will describe the design of the ion source and then present the experimental performance data including plasma density distribution measured by an array of flat Langmuir probes, beam divergence distribution obtained by a 'pepper-pot' etch measurement technique, and etching rate distributions.

  19. Design of a cavity ring-down spectroscopy diagnostic for negative ion rf source SPIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Pasqualotto, R.; Alfier, A.; Lotto, L.

    2010-10-15

    The rf source test facility SPIDER will test and optimize the source of the 1 MV neutral beam injection systems for ITER. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) will measure the absolute line-of-sight integrated density of negative (H{sup -} and D{sup -}) ions, produced in the extraction region of the source. CRDS takes advantage of the photodetachment process: negative ions are converted to neutral hydrogen atoms by electron stripping through absorption of a photon from a laser. The design of this diagnostic is presented with the corresponding simulation of the expected performance. A prototype operated without plasma has provided CRDS reference signals, design validation, and results concerning the signal-to-noise ratio.

  20. Observations of Anisotropic Ion Temperature in the NSTX Edge during RF Heating

    SciTech Connect

    T.M. Biewer; R.E. Bell; P.M. Ryan; J.R. Wilson

    2004-06-28

    A new spectroscopic diagnostic with both toroidal and poloidal views has been implemented in the edge of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). This edge rotation diagnostic (ERD) was designed to measure the velocity and temperature of ions. The intersection of the diagnostic sightlines with the intrinsic emission shell provides the localization of the measurement. There are 7 toroidally directed views and 6 poloidally directed views of the outboard plasma edge. The poloidal view is {approx}20 cm (toroidally) from the RF antenna, and the toroidal view is {approx}2 m away. The sightlines are nearly tangent to the flux surfaces. The C{sup 2+} triplet near 4651 {angstrom} and the He{sup +} line at 4685 {angstrom} are measured. In the results presented here, helium is the bulk, ''working'' ion of the discharge. The NSTX is a large spherical tokamak with a major radius of 0.85 m and a minor radius of 0.65 m. The outer walls and center-stack are lined with protective carbon tiles. Pulse lengths for these NSTX discharges are {approx} 600 ms, with an on-axis toroidal magnetic field of {approx} 0.3 T. The plasma current is 500 kA. The on-axis electron temperature and density are {le} 2 keV and {approx} 2 x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, respectively with {le} 4.3 MW of High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) Radio Frequency (RF) auxiliary heating.

  1. Developing reliable internal antennas and standardizing performance of H- RF ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Dudnikov, V. G.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Roseberry, R. T.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.

    2013-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates near 1 MW of beam power on target with 30-40 mA peak current in the linac and an overall availability of ˜90%. H- beam pulses (˜1 ms, 60Hz) are produced by a RF-driven, Cs-enhanced, multi-cusp ion source closely coupled to an electrostatic Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) which focuses the beam into an RFQ accelerator. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of ˜99%. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2MHz, ˜60kW) of a copper antenna which has been encased with a thickness of ˜0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and is immersed into the plasma chamber. Failure of this coating material during operations has been a long-standing problem and a cause of downtime. This report describes new antenna installation criteria which have led to trouble free antenna performance over this last year, a significant improvement over previous years. These results suggest that inclusions and defects in the antenna coating play an important role in the failure process. This report also addresses the problem of inconsistent performance among our inventory of five ostensibly identical baseline SNS ion sources. Over the last several years only source ♯3 has regularly provided the required beam current to the SNS by outperforming the others by 5-10 mA. To address this, all baseline sources have been characterized on the ion source test stand and small physical differences between source ♯3 and the others have been identified and the impact of those differences on beam production assessed.

  2. Purification of Radioactive Ion Beams by Photodetachment in a RF Quadrupole Ion Beam Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Beene, James R; Havener, Charles C; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Lewis, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    A highly efficient method for suppressing isobar contaminants in negative radioactive ion beams by photodetachment is demonstrated. A laser beam having the appropriate photon energy is used to selectively neutralize the contaminants. The efficiency of photodetachment can be substantially improved when the laser-ion interaction takes place inside a radio frequency quadrupole ion cooler. In off-line experiments with ion beams of stable isotopes, more than 99.9% suppression of Co{sup -}, S{sup -}, and O{sup -} ions has been demonstrated while under the identical conditions only 22% reduction in Ni{sup -} and no reduction in Cl{sup -} and F{sup -} ions were observed. This technique is being developed for on-line purification of a number of interesting radioactive beams, such as {sup 56}Ni, {sup 17,18}F, and {sup 33,36}Cl.

  3. ITO/InP solar cells: A comparison of devices fabricated by ion beam and RF sputtering of the ITO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coutts, T. J.

    1987-01-01

    This work was performed with the view of elucidating the behavior of indium tin oxide/indium phosphide (ITO/InP) solar cells prepared by RF and ion beam sputtering. It was found that using RF sputter deposition of the ITO always leads to more efficient devices than ion beam sputter deposition. An important aspect of the former technique is the exposure of the single crystal p-InP substrates to a very low plasma power prior to deposition. Substrates treated in this manner have also been used for ion beam deposition of ITO. In this case the cells behave very similarly to the RF deposited cells, thus suggesting that the lower power plasma exposure (LPPE) is the crucial process step.

  4. Multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receiver and its advantages in high-precision positioning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Danan; Chen, Wen; Cai, Miaomiao; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Minghua; Yu, Chao; Zheng, Zhengqi; Wang, Yuanfei

    2016-02-01

    The multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receiver is a high precision, low cost, and widely used emerging receiver. Using this type of receiver, the satellite and receiver clock errors can be eliminated simultaneously by forming between antenna single-differences, which is equivalent to the conventional double-difference model. However, current multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receiver products have not fully realized their potential to achieve better accuracy, efficiency, and broader applications. This paper introduces the conceptual design and derivable products of multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receivers involving the aspects of attitude determination, multipath effect mitigation, phase center variation correction, and ground-based carrier phase windup calibration. Through case studies, the advantages of multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receivers in high-precision positioning applications are demonstrated.

  5. Fine-tuning to minimize emittances of J-PARC RF-driven H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, A.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Asano, H.; Oguri, H.

    2016-02-01

    The Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) cesiated RF-driven H- ion source has been successfully operated for about one year. By the world's brightest level beam, the J-PARC design beam power of 1 MW was successfully demonstrated. In order to minimize the transverse emittances, the rod-filter-field (RFF) was optimized by changing the triple-gap-lengths of each of pairing five piece rod-filter-magnets. The larger emittance degradation seems to be caused by impurity-gases than the RFF. The smaller beam-hole-diameter of the extraction electrode caused the more than expected improvements on not only the emittances but also the peak beam intensity.

  6. Operation of a cw rf driven ion source with hydrogen and deuterium gas{sup a}

    SciTech Connect

    Melnychuk, S.T.; Debiak, T.W.; Sredniawski, J.J.

    1996-04-01

    We will describe the operation of a cw rf driven multicusp ion source designed for extraction of high current hydrogen and deuterium beams. The source is driven at 2 MHz by a 2.5 turn induction antenna immersed in the plasma. Bare stainless-steel and porcelain-coated Cu antennas have been used. The plasma load is matched to the rf generator by a variable tap {ital N}:1 transformer isolated to 46 kV, and an LC network on the secondary. With H{sub 2} gas the source can be operated at pressures between 5 and 60 mT with power reflection coefficients {lt}0.01. The extracted ion current density with a porcelain-coated antenna is approximately given by 35 mA/cm{sup 2}/kW with an 80 G dipole filter field for input powers from 3.5 to 6.6 kW. The current density remained constant for operation with a 6 and an 8 mm aperture. The source has been operated for 260 h at 3.6 kW with a single-porcelain-coated antenna. Mass spectrometer measurements of the extracted beam at this power show a species mix for H{sup +}:H{sup +}{sub 2}:H{sup +}{sub 3}:OH{sup +} of 0.49: 0.04: 0.42: 0.04. The calculated beam divergence using the IGUN code is compared with the measured divergence from an electrostatic sweep emittance scanner designed for high-power cw beam diagnostics. Phase space measurements at 40 kV and 23 mA beam current result in a normalized rms emittance of 0.09 {pi}mmmrad. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Toroidal Rotation and Core Ion Confinement with RF Heating in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    deGrassie, J.S.; Greenfield, C.M.; Baker, D.R.; Burrell, K.H.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T.C.; Petty, C.C.; Prater, R.; Staebler, G.M.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Rice, B.W. Rice, Mau, T.K.; Porkolab, M.

    1999-07-01

    Shear in the E x B flow velocity can stabilize turbulent transport [1], and so it is of interest to understand the physics behind electric field generation and modification in the tokamak. In DIII-D the core radial electric field in many regimes is generated by flow velocities driven by momentum input from neutral beam injection (NBI). In a variety of conditions it is observed that direct electron heating is accompanied by a reduction in the NBI driven toroidal rotation velocity, U{sub {phi}}, and the ion temperature, T{sub i}, primarily in the core, {rho} <0.5 (where {rho} is a radial coordinate of the normalized toroidal flux). This electron heating can be done with either electron cyclotron heating (ECH) or fast wave electron heating (FWEH). Both can be accompanied by the reduction in U{sub {phi}} and T{sub i} [2-4]. Details of the parallel wavenumber (k//) spectrum of the launched rf do not seem to be important in either case for the effect to exist. Reductions are observed for EC waves launched with nonzero k// for current drive or launched radially with k//=0; and for FWEH with waves directed either co or counter, using the DIII-D four strap antennas [5], This universality indicates that increased electron temperature, T{sub e}, is increasing ion momentum and thermal transport, at least in the parameter regimes of these experiments. It is also possible that nonambipolar transport of resonantly heated particles is playing a role. To date, the great majority of the DIII-D experiments have been conducted with the rf target discharges driven by co-injected NBI.

  8. Characterization of the CW starter plasma RF matching network for operating the SNS H⁻ ion source with lower H₂ flows.

    PubMed

    Han, B X; Stockli, M P; Kang, Y; Piller, C; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Santana, M; Welton, R F

    2016-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source H(-) ion source is operated with a pulsed 2-MHz RF (50-60 kW) to produce the 1-ms long, ∼50 mA H(-) beams at 60 Hz. A continuous low power (∼300 W) 13.56-MHz RF plasma, which is initially ignited with a H2 pressure bump, serves as starter plasma for the pulsed high power 2-MHz RF discharges. To reduce the risk of plasma outages at lower H2 flow rates which is desired for improved performance of the following radio frequency quadrupole, the 13.56-MHz RF matching network was characterized over a broad range of its two tuning capacitors. The H-α line intensity of the 13.56-MHz RF plasma and the reflected power of the 13.56-MHz RF were mapped against the capacitor settings. Optimal tunes for the maximum H-α intensity are consistent with the optimal tunes for minimum reflected power. Low limits of the H2 flow rate not causing plasma outages were explored within the range of the map. A tune region that allows lower H2 flow rate has been identified, which differs from the optimal tune for global minimum reflected power that was mostly used in the past. PMID:26932025

  9. A High-Intensity, RF Plasma-Sputter Negative Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.; Bao, Y.; Cui, B.; Lohwasser, R.; Reed, C.A.; Zhang, T.

    1999-03-02

    A high-intensity, plasma-sputter negative-ion source based on the use of RF power for plasma generation has been developed that can be operated in either pulsed or dc modes. The source utilizes a high-Q, self-igniting, inductively coupled antenna system, operating at 80 MHz that has been optimized to generate Cs-seeded plasmas at low pressures (typically, <1 mTorr for Xe). The source is equipped with a 19-mm diameter spherical-sector cathode machined from the desired material. To date, the source has been utilized to generate dc negative-ion beams from a variety of species, including: C{sup {minus}}(610 {micro}A); F{sup {minus}}(100 {micro}A); Si{sup {minus}}(500 {micro}A); S{sup {minus}}(500 {micro}A); P{sup {minus}}(125 {micro}A); Cl{sup {minus}}(200 {micro}A); Ni{sup {minus}}(150 {micro}A); Cu{sup {minus}}(230 {micro}A); Ge{sup {minus}}(125 {micro}A); As{sup {minus}}(100 {micro}A); Se{sup {minus}}(200 {micro}A); Ag{sup {minus}}(70 {micro}A); Pt{sup {minus}}(125 {micro}A); Au{sup {minus}}(250 {micro}A). The normalized emittance {var_epsilon}{sub n} of the source at the 80% contour is: {var_epsilon}{sub n} = 7.5 mm.mrad.(MeV){sup 1/2}. The design principles of the source, operational parameters, ion optics, emittance and intensities for a number of negative-ion species will be presented in this report.

  10. Low pressure and high power rf sources for negative hydrogen ions for fusion applications (ITER neutral beam injection).

    PubMed

    Fantz, U; Franzen, P; Kraus, W; Falter, H D; Berger, M; Christ-Koch, S; Fröschle, M; Gutser, R; Heinemann, B; Martens, C; McNeely, P; Riedl, R; Speth, E; Wünderlich, D

    2008-02-01

    The international fusion experiment ITER requires for the plasma heating and current drive a neutral beam injection system based on negative hydrogen ion sources at 0.3 Pa. The ion source must deliver a current of 40 A D(-) for up to 1 h with an accelerated current density of 200 Am/(2) and a ratio of coextracted electrons to ions below 1. The extraction area is 0.2 m(2) from an aperture array with an envelope of 1.5 x 0.6 m(2). A high power rf-driven negative ion source has been successfully developed at the Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) at three test facilities in parallel. Current densities of 330 and 230 Am/(2) have been achieved for hydrogen and deuterium, respectively, at a pressure of 0.3 Pa and an electron/ion ratio below 1 for a small extraction area (0.007 m(2)) and short pulses (<4 s). In the long pulse experiment, equipped with an extraction area of 0.02 m(2), the pulse length has been extended to 3600 s. A large rf source, with the width and half the height of the ITER source but without extraction system, is intended to demonstrate the size scaling and plasma homogeneity of rf ion sources. The source operates routinely now. First results on plasma homogeneity obtained from optical emission spectroscopy and Langmuir probes are very promising. Based on the success of the IPP development program, the high power rf-driven negative ion source has been chosen recently for the ITER beam systems in the ITER design review process.

  11. Spatial distribution of the plasma parameters in the RF negative ion source prototype for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lishev, S.; Schiesko, L.; Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.

    2015-04-08

    A numerical model, based on the fluid plasma theory, has been used for description of the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters (electron density and temperature, plasma potential as well as densities of the three types of positive hydrogen ions) in the IPP prototype RF negative hydrogen ion source. The model covers the driver and the expansion plasma region of the source with their actual size and accounts for the presence of the magnetic filter field with its actual value and location as well as for the bias potential applied to the plasma grid. The obtained results show that without a magnetic filter the two 2D geometries considered, respectively, with an axial symmetry and a planar one, represent accurately the complex 3D structure of the source. The 2D model with a planar symmetry (where the E×B and diamagnetic drifts could be involved in the description) has been used for analysis of the influence, via the charged-particle and electron-energy fluxes, of the magnetic filter and of the bias potential on the spatial structure of the plasma parameters in the source. Benchmarking of results from the code to experimental data shows that the model reproduces the general trend in the axial behavior of the plasma parameters in the source.

  12. Spatial distribution of the plasma parameters in the RF negative ion source prototype for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lishev, S.; Schiesko, L.; Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.

    2015-04-01

    A numerical model, based on the fluid plasma theory, has been used for description of the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters (electron density and temperature, plasma potential as well as densities of the three types of positive hydrogen ions) in the IPP prototype RF negative hydrogen ion source. The model covers the driver and the expansion plasma region of the source with their actual size and accounts for the presence of the magnetic filter field with its actual value and location as well as for the bias potential applied to the plasma grid. The obtained results show that without a magnetic filter the two 2D geometries considered, respectively, with an axial symmetry and a planar one, represent accurately the complex 3D structure of the source. The 2D model with a planar symmetry (where the E×B and diamagnetic drifts could be involved in the description) has been used for analysis of the influence, via the charged-particle and electron-energy fluxes, of the magnetic filter and of the bias potential on the spatial structure of the plasma parameters in the source. Benchmarking of results from the code to experimental data shows that the model reproduces the general trend in the axial behavior of the plasma parameters in the source.

  13. High-precision hyperfine structure measurement in slow atomic ion beams by collinear laser-rf double resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Amarjit Sen, Childs, W.J.; Goodman, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    A new collinear laser-ion beam apparatus for slow ions (1 to 1.5 keV) has been built for measuring the hyperfine structure of metastable levels of ions with laser-rf double resonance technique. Narrow linewidths of approx.60 kHz (FWHM) have been observed for the first time in such systems. As a first application the hyperfine structure of the 4f/sup 7/(/sup 8/S/sup 0/)5d /sup 9/D/sub J//sup 0/ metastable levels of /sup 151,153/Eu/sup +/ has been measured with high precision. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  14. RF Sources for the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J.; Brunkhorst, C.; Fredd, E.; Goulding, R. H.; Goulding, R. H.; Greenough, N.; Kung, C.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Swain, D. W.; Wilson, J. R.

    2005-10-04

    The RF source requirements for the ITER ion cyclotron (IC) heating and current drive system are very challenging ? 20 MW CW power into an antenna load with a VSWR of up to 2 over the frequency range of 35-65 MHz. For the two present antenna designs under consideration, 8 sources providing 2.5 MW each are to be employed. For these sources, the outputs of two final power amplifiers (FPAs), using the high power CPI 4CM2500KG tube, are combined with a 180? hybrid combiner to easily meet the ITER IC source requirements ? 2.5 MW is supplied at a VSWR of 2 at ? 70% of the maximum tube power available in class B operation. The cylindrical cavity configuration for the FPAs is quite compact so that the 8 combined sources fit into the space allocated at the ITER site with room to spare. The source configuration is described in detail and its projected operating power curves are presented. Although the CPI tube has been shown to be stable under high power operating conditions on many facilities, a test of the combined FPA source arrangement is in preparation using existing high power 30 MHz amplifiers to assure that this configuration can be made robustly stable for all phases at a VSWR up to 2. The possibility of using 12 sources to feed a suitably modified antenna design is also discussed in the context of providing flexibility for specifying the final IC antenna design.

  15. Single and multi-point ion energy distributions in a VHF+RF commercial plasma reactor measured by novel in-wafer ion energy analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Barton; Funk, Merritt; Chen, Lee; Sundararajan, Radha; Zhao, Jianping

    2012-10-01

    A novel, all silicon, minimally perturbing, non-contaminating, in-wafer, 2 and 3 layer ion energy analyzer described elsewhere in this conference is used to measure ion energy distributions for a variety of realistic processing conditions in a commercial VHF + 13.56 MHZ RF reactor with no modifications to its basic geometry or RF delivery system. Spectra with energies as high 1 keV are measured with resolution on the order of 1%. We show data and discuss the splitting of the high energy peaks due to finite ion sheath crossing time effects and how this splitting scales with frequency, power and pressure. We discuss the origin of the charge exchange peaks. We use the identification of atomic and molecular oxygen ion peaks to estimate the resolution of the diagnostic. The effect of VHF in narrowing ion energy distributions and yielding moderate ion energies will be highlighted. Spectra using a multi-point, 2 layer variant of the ion energy analyzer design were obtained at 4 radial locations for a variety of conditions in argon and oxygen plasmas. These spectra quantify center to edge variations and reveal unique spectral features due to pre-existing modifications to the test reactor's upper counter electrode surface.

  16. Recent Investigations, Development and Industrial Applications of RF-ion Thrusters in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassner, H.; Killinger, R.; Kukies, R.; Mueller, J.

    2002-01-01

    R &D work on ion thrusters using radio frequency propellant ionisation has been done at Giessen University since 1962. Engines with ionizer diameters from 4 cm to 35 cm have been designed, built, and tested. Plasma and beam diagnostics have been done and several application studies were carried out. The present work at the 1. Institute of Physics is mainly focussed on two topics: First: The RF-plasma is being modelled in detail in order to establish scaling laws which will allow to scale the existing hardware and save D &Q work. Determination of basic plasma effects shall allow to find the optimum geometry and working parameters (e.g. the discharge vessel length, the best rf-frequency and the necessary discharge pressure). Then, reliable thrust, power, flow rate and efficiency data of different sized RIT-systems can be predicted. Second: The large Giessen test facility "P100,000" (with 30 m3 of chamber volume) has been completely refurbished, to allow the operation of Astriums new 22 cm diam thruster RIT-XT: The oil diffusion pumps were replaced by several cryopumps and two additional turbomolecular pumps. The conical beam target (stainless steel) has been replaced by inclined carbon collector strips. A new beam scanning system has been installed, which can be moved during operation in y- and z- direction. The scanner consists of 160 specially designed Faraday cups. Other diagnostic elements like calorimetric systems, small mass spectrometers etc. can be installed on the scanner, too. The development in the industry did start at Astrium (former MBB) in 1970 with the investigation of the 10 cm discharge chamber diameter laboratory thruster (RIT 10) manufactured in Giessen, using Mercury as the propellant. A first vibration test and a 1000-h lifetime test was performed and did show that the thruster can be used in space. The first 10 years of industrial development were filled with development of electronics, propellant feed system, thruster design and additional

  17. A comparison of lower and higher LET heavy ion irradiation effects on silicon NPN rf power transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathi, M. N.; Pushpa, N.; Vinayakprasanna, N. H.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2016-06-01

    The Silicon NPN rf power transistors were irradiated with 180 MeV Au14+ and 150 MeV Ag12+ ions in the dose range of 1 Mrad to 100 Mrad. The SRIM simulation was used to understand the energy loss and range of these ions in the transistor structure. The different electrical parameters such as Gummel characteristics, excess base current (∆IB), dc current gain (hFE), transconductance (gm), displacement damage factor (K) and output characteristics were studied systematically before and after irradiation. These results were compared with lower linear energy transfer (LET) ions such as 50 MeV Li3+, 95 MeV O7+, 100 MeV F8+, 140 MeV Si10+ and 175 MeV Ni13+ ions in the same dose range. The degradation for 180 MeV Au14+ and 150 MeV Ag12+ ion irradiated transistors was significantly more when compared to lower LET ions, indicating that the transistors are vulnerable to higher LET ion irradiations. Isochronal annealing study was conducted on the irradiated transistors to analyze the recovery in different electrical parameters. After isochronal annealing, the recovery in hFE and other electrical parameters was around 67% for Ag12+ ion irradiated transistors and 60% for Au14+ ion irradiated transistors.

  18. Recent developments in the application of rf superconductivity to high-brightness and high-gradient ion beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Nichols, G.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1991-12-31

    A development program is underway to apply rf superconductivity to the design of continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high- brightness ion beams. Since the last workshop, considerable progress has been made both experimentally and theoretically toward this application. Recent tests of niobium resonators for ion acceleration have yielded average accelerating gradients as high as 18 MV/m. In an experiment with a radio-frequency quadrupole geometry, niobium was found to sustain cw peak surface electric fields as high as 128 MV/m over large (10 cm{sup 2}) surface areas. Theoretical studies of beam impingement and cumulative beam breakup have also yielded encouraging results. Consequently, a section of superconducting resonators and focusing elements has been designed for tests with high-current deuteron beams. In addition, considerable data pertaining to the rf properties of high-{Tc} superconductors has been collected at rf-field amplitudes and frequencies of interest in connection with accelerator operation. This paper summarizes the recent progress and identifies current and future work in the areas of accelerator technology and superconducting materials which will build upon it.

  19. Recent developments in the application of rf superconductivity to high-brightness and high-gradient ion beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Nichols, G.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1991-01-01

    A development program is underway to apply rf superconductivity to the design of continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high- brightness ion beams. Since the last workshop, considerable progress has been made both experimentally and theoretically toward this application. Recent tests of niobium resonators for ion acceleration have yielded average accelerating gradients as high as 18 MV/m. In an experiment with a radio-frequency quadrupole geometry, niobium was found to sustain cw peak surface electric fields as high as 128 MV/m over large (10 cm{sup 2}) surface areas. Theoretical studies of beam impingement and cumulative beam breakup have also yielded encouraging results. Consequently, a section of superconducting resonators and focusing elements has been designed for tests with high-current deuteron beams. In addition, considerable data pertaining to the rf properties of high-{Tc} superconductors has been collected at rf-field amplitudes and frequencies of interest in connection with accelerator operation. This paper summarizes the recent progress and identifies current and future work in the areas of accelerator technology and superconducting materials which will build upon it.

  20. Evaluation of plasma density in RF CCP discharges from ion current to Langmuir probe: experiment and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloshin, Dmitry; Kovalev, Alexander; Mankelevich, Yuri; Proshina, Olga; Rakhimova, Tatyana; Vasilieva, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Experimental measurements of current-voltage relationship in RF CCP discharge in argon at 81 MHz have been performed by cylindrical Langmuir probes technique. Two different probe radii have been used: 50 and 250 μm. The high plasma density 1010-1011 cm-3 has been estimated at specific input power under study. The experimental data on nonmonotonic behavior of probe current with pressure were observed firstly for conditions of RF discharge plasmas. To analyze the probe measurements the fast numerical model for ion current collected by a cylindrical probe has been developed. This model is based on the particle-in-cell with Monte-Carlo collision method for ions motion and Boltzmann relation for electrons. The features of probe data at studied conditions were discussed. The comparative analysis of different collisionless approaches for plasma density calculation from ion probe current is done. It is shown that in general collisionless theories underestimate the plasma density value. For correct evaluation of plasma density experimental I- V probe measurement should be supplied by the numerical simulation. It was demonstrated that the collisionless analytical theory of orbital motion can formally give correct results on plasma density at some plasma conditions even when ion collisions take place. The physical reasons of this accidental validity are explained.

  1. Rod-filter-field optimization of the J-PARC RF-driven H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A. Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2015-04-08

    In order to satisfy the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) second-stage requirements of an H{sup −} ion beam of 60mA within normalized emittances of 1.5πmm•mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500μs×25Hz) and a life-time of longer than 1month, the J-PARC cesiated RF-driven H{sup −} ion source was developed by using an internal-antenna developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Although rod-filter-field (RFF) is indispensable and one of the most beam performance dominative parameters for the RF-driven H{sup −} ion source with the internal-antenna, the procedure to optimize it is not established. In order to optimize the RFF and establish the procedure, the beam performances of the J-PARC source with various types of rod-filter-magnets (RFMs) were measured. By changing RFM’s gap length and gap number inside of the region projecting the antenna inner-diameter along the beam axis, the dependence of the H{sup −} ion beam intensity on the net 2MHz-RF power was optimized. Furthermore, the fine-tuning of RFM’s cross-section (magnetmotive force) was indispensable for easy operation with the temperature (T{sub PE}) of the plasma electrode (PE) lower than 70°C, which minimizes the transverse emittances. The 5% reduction of RFM’s cross-section decreased the time-constant to recover the cesium effects after an slightly excessive cesiation on the PE from several 10 minutes to several minutes for T{sub PE} around 60°C.

  2. Coincident ion acceleration and electron extraction for space propulsion using the self-bias formed on a set of RF biased grids bounding a plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, D.; Aanesland, A.

    2014-11-01

    We propose an alternative method to accelerate ions in classical gridded ion thrusters and ion sources such that co-extracted electrons from the source may provide beam space charge neutralization. In this way there is no need for an additional electron neutralizer. The method consists of applying RF voltage to a two-grid acceleration system via a blocking capacitor. Due to the unequal effective area of the two grids in contact with the plasma, a dc self-bias is formed, rectifying the applied RF voltage. As a result, ions are continuously accelerated within the grid system while electrons are emitted in brief instants within the RF period when the RF space charge sheath collapses. This paper presents the first experimental results and a proof-of-principle. Experiments are carried out using the Neptune thruster prototype which is a gridded Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) source operated at 4 MHz, attached to a larger beam propagation chamber. The RF power supply is used both for the ICP discharge (plasma generation) and powering the acceleration grids via a capacitor for ion acceleration and electron extraction without any dc power supplies. The ion and electron energies, particle flux and densities are measured using retarding field energy analyzers (RFEA), Langmuir probes and a large beam target. The system operates in Argon and N2. The dc self-bias is found to be generated within the gridded extraction system in all the range of operating conditions. Broad quasi-neutral ion-electron beams are measured in the downstream chamber with energies up to 400 eV. The beams from the RF acceleration method are compared with classical dc acceleration with an additional external electron neutralizer. It is found that the two acceleration techniques provide similar performance, but the ion energy distribution function from RF acceleration is broader, while the floating potential of the beam is lower than for the dc accelerated beam.

  3. Mass spectrometry of positive ions in capacitively coupled low pressure RF discharges in oxygen with water impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanović, Ilija; Stojanović, Vladimir; Boulmer-Leborgne, Chantal; Lecas, Thomas; Kovacevic, Eva; Berndt, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    A capacitively coupled RF oxygen discharge is studied by means of mass spectroscopy. Mass spectra of neutral and positive species are measured in the mid plane between the electrodes at different distances between plasma and mass-spectrometer orifice. In the case of positive ions, as expected, the largest flux originates from \\text{O}2+ . However, a significant number of impurities are detected, especially for low input powers and larger distances. The most abundant positive ions (besides \\text{O}2+ ) are \\text{N}{{\\text{O}}+}, \\text{NO}2+ , {{\\text{H}}+}≤ft({{\\text{H}}2}\\text{O}\\right) , and {{\\text{H}}+}{{≤ft({{\\text{H}}2}\\text{O}\\right)}2} . In particular, for the case of hydrated hydronium ions {{\\text{H}}+}{{≤ft({{\\text{H}}2}\\text{O}\\right)}n} (n  =  1, 2) a surprisingly large flux (for low pressure plasma conditions) is detected. Another interesting fact concerns the {{\\text{H}}2}{{\\text{O}}+} ions. Despite the relatively high ammount of water impurities {{\\text{H}}2}{{\\text{O}}+} ions are present only in traces. The reaction mechanisms leading to the production of the observed ions, especially the hydrated hydronium ions are discussed.

  4. Effect of phase difference in multi-antenna microwave thermal ablation for breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Phasukkit, Pattarapong; Sanpanich, Arthorn; Tungjitkusolmun, Supan; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    It was realized that cancer in breast is one of the most health hazards threatening women around the world for many years. Thermal ablation by using microwave energy is another alternative surgical maneuver due to its minimally invasive therapeutic technique. In this research, we investigate an effect of phase difference between three adjacent opened-slot coaxial probes in a multiple antenna alignment of microwave thermal ablation system for breast cancer treatment. FEM by using COMSOL is an implementation tools to simulate for 0, 45, 90, 135 and 180 degree of phase difference. 3D Simulation results show that temperature distribution pattern, destructive volume and SAR in breast tissue are affected from those phase-shift utilization in multi-antenna system significantly. PMID:24110538

  5. Performance of multi-aperture grid extraction systems for an ITER-relevant RF-driven negative hydrogen ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzen, P.; Gutser, R.; Fantz, U.; Kraus, W.; Falter, H.; Fröschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; McNeely, P.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Stäbler, A.; Wünderlich, D.

    2011-07-01

    The ITER neutral beam system requires a negative hydrogen ion beam of 48 A with an energy of 0.87 MeV, and a negative deuterium beam of 40 A with an energy of 1 MeV. The beam is extracted from a large ion source of dimension 1.9 × 0.9 m2 by an acceleration system consisting of seven grids with 1280 apertures each. Currently, apertures with a diameter of 14 mm in the first grid are foreseen. In 2007, the IPP RF source was chosen as the ITER reference source due to its reduced maintenance compared with arc-driven sources and the successful development at the BATMAN test facility of being equipped with the small IPP prototype RF source ( {\\sim}\\frac{1}{8} of the area of the ITER NBI source). These results, however, were obtained with an extraction system with 8 mm diameter apertures. This paper reports on the comparison of the source performance at BATMAN of an ITER-relevant extraction system equipped with chamfered apertures with a 14 mm diameter and 8 mm diameter aperture extraction system. The most important result is that there is almost no difference in the achieved current density—being consistent with ion trajectory calculations—and the amount of co-extracted electrons. Furthermore, some aspects of the beam optics of both extraction systems are discussed.

  6. Fronthaul Compression and Transmit Beamforming Optimization for Multi-Antenna Uplink C-RAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuhan; Yu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    This paper considers the joint fronthaul compression and transmit beamforming design for the uplink cloud radio access network (C-RAN), in which multi-antenna user terminals communicate with a cloud-computing based centralized processor (CP) through multi-antenna base-stations (BSs) serving as relay nodes. A compress-and-forward relaying strategy, named the VMAC scheme, is employed, in which the BSs can either perform single-user compression or Wyner-Ziv coding to quantize the received signals and send the quantization bits to the CP via capacity-limited fronthaul links; the CP performs successive decoding with either successive interference cancellation (SIC) receiver or linear minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE) receiver. Under this setup, this paper investigates the joint optimization of the transmit beamformers at the users and the quantization noise covariance matrices at the BSs for maximizing the network utility. A novel weighted minimum-mean-square-error successive convex approximation (WMMSE-SCA) algorithm is first proposed for maximizing the weighted sum rate under the user transmit power and fronthaul capacity constraints with single-user compression. Assuming a heuristic decompression order, the proposed algorithm is then adapted for optimizing the transmit beamforming and fronthaul compression under Wyner-Ziv coding. This paper also proposes a low-complexity separate design consisting of optimizing transmit beamformers for the Gaussian vector multiple-access channel along with per-antenna quantizers with uniform quantization noise levels across the antennas at each BS. Numerical results show that with optimized beamforming and fronthaul compression, C-RAN can significantly outperform conventional cellular networks. Furthermore, the low complexity separate design already performs very close to the optimized joint design in regime of practical interest.

  7. Self-induced steady-state magnetic field in the negative ion sources with localized rf power deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivarova, A.; Todorov, D.; Lishev, St.

    2016-02-01

    The study is in the scope of a recent activity on modeling of SPIDER (Source for Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) which is under development regarding the neutral beam injection heating system of ITER. The regime of non-ambipolarity in the source, established before, is completed here by introducing in the model the steady state magnetic field, self-induced in the discharge due to the dc current flowing in it. Strong changes in the discharge structure are reported.

  8. Self-induced steady-state magnetic field in the negative ion sources with localized rf power deposition.

    PubMed

    Shivarova, A; Todorov, D; Lishev, St

    2016-02-01

    The study is in the scope of a recent activity on modeling of SPIDER (Source for Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) which is under development regarding the neutral beam injection heating system of ITER. The regime of non-ambipolarity in the source, established before, is completed here by introducing in the model the steady state magnetic field, self-induced in the discharge due to the dc current flowing in it. Strong changes in the discharge structure are reported. PMID:26932036

  9. Investigation of ion energy and angular distributions at the wafer edge in rf capacitively coupled reactors using CFD-ACE+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhoj, Ananth; Roy, Abhra; Jain, Kunal; Xiong, Zhongmin

    2015-09-01

    Dual frequency capacitively coupled reactors are now commonly used in microelectronics fabrication. The extent of possible independent control of ion fluxes and ion energy and angular distribution (IEADs) by varying HF and LF signals is currently a topic of great interest. In this study, we report on investigations of IEADs in single and dual frequency CCPs, including the wafer edge refinement using CFD-ACE+. The current algorithms in CFD-ACE+ allow the determination of total power at the electrode or in the discharge. To account for the presence of two or more rf sources connected to a powered electrode, the existing numerical algorithms for power targeting were enhanced to track current at the electrode as a function of time, vary voltage and determine power as a function of frequency. The Monte Carlo transport module for heavy species in CFD-ACE+ was recently enhanced to compute IEADs in rf discharges. Results for the effect of varying power and pressure on IEADs were compared to semi-analytical models and data reported in Gahan et al.. The validated model was applied to investigate the effect of details of HF and LF signals on IEADs in Argon discharges.

  10. Maintenance and operation procedure, and feedback controls of the J-PARC RF-driven H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A. Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2015-04-08

    In order to satisfy the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) second stage requirements of an H{sup −} ion beam of 60mA within normalized emittances of 1.5πmm•mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500μs×25Hz) and a life-time of longer than 1month, the J-PARC cesiated RF-driven H{sup −} ion source was developed by using an internal-antenna developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The maintenance and operation procedure to minimize the plasma chamber (PCH) replacement time on the beam line, which is very important to maximize the J-PARC beam time especially for an antenna failure, is presented in this paper. The PCH preserved by filling argon (Ar) gas inside after pre-conditioning including pre-cesiation to produce the required beam at a test-stand successfully produced the required beam on the beam line with slight addition of cesium (Cs). The methods of the feedback controls of a 2MHz-RF-matching, an H{sup −} ion beam intensity and the addition of Cs are also presented. The RF-matching feedback by using two vacuum variable capacitors (VVCs) and RF-frequency shift produced the almost perfect matching with negligibly small reflected RF-power. The H{sup −} ion beam intensity was controlled within errors of ±0.1mA by the RF-power feedback. The amount of Cs was also controlled by remotely opening a Cs-valve to keep the RF-power lower than a settled value.

  11. Computation of charge and ion drag force on multiple static spherical dust grains immersed in rf discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ikkurthi, V. R.; Matyash, K.; Schneider, R.; Melzer, A.

    2010-10-15

    Charging of multiple spherical dust grains located in presheath and sheath regions of an rf discharge has been studied using a three-dimensional particle-particle-particle-mesh (P{sup 3}M) code. First, dust charge, potential, and ion drag force on two dust particles for various interparticle separations are computed. It is found that for dust separations larger than the shielding length the dust parameters for the two dust particles match with the single particle values. As the dust separation is equal to or less than the shielding length, the transverse component of ion force increases which is due to dynamic shielding effect caused by neighboring dust particle. However, dust charge, potential, and ion drag are found not to be affected considerably. Further, dust charge and potential on an arrangement of nine dust particles are computed. The dust charge and potential do not differ much from the single particle values for the presheath. However the dust charges of multiple dust particles in the sheath are much less negative compared to the single dust case which is shown to be due to ion focusing.

  12. Efficient Isobar Suppression by Photodetachment in a RF Quadrupole Ion Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Havener, Charles C; Lewis, Thomas L.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Beene, James R

    2009-01-01

    A highly efficient method for suppressing isobar contaminants in negative radioactive ion beams by photodetachment is demonstrated. A laser beam having the appropriate photon energy is used to selectively neutralize the contaminant if the electron affinity of the contaminant is lower than the electron affinity of the desired radioactive ions. The photodetachment efficiency can be dramatically increased when the laser-ion interaction is made inside a radio frequency quadrupole ion beam cooler where the ion residence time can be a few milliseconds. In off-line experiments with ion beams of stable isotopes, more than 99.9% suppression of S- and O- ions by photodetachment has been obtained. These ions would be the contaminants of desired beams of Cl- and F-, respectively. Under similar conditions no reduction in Cl- and F- ions was observed. The off-line results demonstrate the potential of this technique for on-line purification of a number of interesting radioactive beams and possible applications in accelerator mass spectrometry.

  13. Channel direction information probing for multi-antenna cognitive radio system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang; Villardi, Gabriel Porto; Kojima, Fumihide; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    This work studies the problem of channel direction information (CDI) probing for multi-antenna cognitive radio system. The CDI of the channel from the secondary transmitter (ST) to primary receiver (PR) is elementary information in designing the beamforming at the ST for mitigating the interference to the PR. However, lacking the explicit cooperation between primary and secondary systems, the CDI has to be acquired by probing at the ST, which is challenging. To solve this, we consider the line of sight (LoS) channel between the ST and the PR, and propose one CDI probing scheme for the ST. Specifically, the ST sends two types of probing signals by beamforming towards an interested region where both the secondary receiver (SR) and the PR are located and then actively learns the hidden feedback information from the primary system to acquire the CDI. The proposed scheme has a closed-form solution, and avoids the iteration between the probing and acquisition, which is desirable for practical system. Moreover, we show that the proposed probing scheme can be extended for primary systems working under multi-access channel and broadcasting channel. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed scheme can improve the accuracy of the acquired CDI at the ST in cognitive ratio system remarkably.

  14. Impedance matched, high-power, rf antenna for ion cyclotron resonance heating of a plasma

    DOEpatents

    Baity, Jr., Frederick W.; Hoffman, Daniel J.; Owens, Thomas L.

    1988-01-01

    A resonant double loop radio frequency (rf) antenna for radiating high-power rf energy into a magnetically confined plasma. An inductive element in the form of a large current strap, forming the radiating element, is connected between two variable capacitors to form a resonant circuit. A real input impedance results from tapping into the resonant circuit along the inductive element, generally near the midpoint thereof. The impedance can be matched to the source impedance by adjusting the separate capacitors for a given tap arrangement or by keeping the two capacitances fixed and adjustng the tap position. This results in a substantial reduction in the voltage and current in the transmission system to the antenna compared to unmatched antennas. Because the complete circuit loop consisting of the two capacitors and the inductive element is resonant, current flows in the same direction along the entire length of the radiating element and is approximately equal in each branch of the circuit. Unidirectional current flow permits excitation of low order poloidal modes which penetrate more deeply into the plasma.

  15. Comparison of AlN films grown by RF magnetron sputtering and ion-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, J.; Fu, T.; Cheung, N.W.; Ross, J.; Newman, N.; Rubin, M.

    1993-04-01

    Crystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films were formed on various substrates by using RF magnetron sputtering of an A1 target in a nitrogen plasma and also by ion-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (IAMBE). Basal-oriented AlN/(111) Si showed a degradation of crystallinity with increased substrate temperature from 550 to 770 C, while the crystallinity of AlN/(0001) A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples improved from 700 to 850 C. The optical absorption characteristics of the AlN/(0001) A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} films as grown by both deposition methods revealed a decrease in subbandgap absorption with increased substrate temperature.

  16. Operation of a planar-electrode ion-trap array with adjustable RF electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumph, M.; Holz, P.; Langer, K.; Meraner, M.; Niedermayr, M.; Brownnutt, M.; Blatt, R.

    2016-02-01

    One path to realizing systems of trapped atomic ions suitable for large-scale quantum computing and simulation is to create a two-dimensional (2D) array of ion traps. Interactions between nearest-neighbouring ions could then be turned on and off by tuning the ions’ relative positions and frequencies. We demonstrate and characterize the operation of a planar-electrode ion-trap array. By driving the trap with a network of phase-locked radio-frequency resonators which provide independently variable voltage amplitudes we vary the position and motional frequency of a Ca+ ion in two-dimensions within the trap array. Work on fabricating a miniaturised form of this 2D trap array is also described, which could ultimately provide a viable architecture for large-scale quantum simulations.

  17. Optical emission spectroscopy at the large RF driven negative ion test facility ELISE: Instrumental setup and first results

    SciTech Connect

    Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Riedl, R.; Bonomo, F.

    2013-09-15

    One of the main topics to be investigated at the recently launched large (A{sub source}= 1.0 × 0.9 m{sup 2}) ITER relevant RF driven negative ion test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment) is the connection between the homogeneity of the plasma parameters close to the extraction system and the homogeneity of the extracted negative hydrogen ion beam. While several diagnostics techniques are available for measuring the beam homogeneity, the plasma parameters are determined by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) solely. First OES measurements close to the extraction system show that without magnetic filter field the vertical profile of the plasma emission is more or less symmetric, with maxima of the emission representing the projection of the plasma generation volumes, and a distinct minimum in between. The profile changes with the strength of the magnetic filter field but under all circumstances the plasma emission in ELISE is much more homogeneous compared to the smaller IPP prototype sources. Planned after this successful demonstration of the ELISE OES system is to combine OES with tomography in order to determine locally resolved values for the plasma parameters.

  18. Operation of a cw rf driven ion source with hydrogen and deuterium gas (abstract){sup a}

    SciTech Connect

    Melnychuk, S.T.; Debiak, T.W.; Sredniawski, J.J.

    1996-03-01

    We will describe the operation of a cw rf driven multicusp ion source designed for extraction of high current hydrogen and deuterium beams. The source is driven at 2 MHz by a 2.5 turn induction antenna immersed in the plasma. Bare stainless-steel and porcelain-coated Cu antennas have been used. The plasma load is matched to the rf generator by a variable tap {ital N}:1 transformer isolated to 46 kV, and an LC network on the secondary. With H{sub 2} gas the source can be operated at pressures between 5 and 60 mT with power reflection coefficients {lt}0.01. The extracted ion current density with a porcelain-coated antenna is approximately given by 35 mA/cm{sup 2}/kW with an 80 G dipole filter field for input powers from 3.5 to 6.6 kW. The current density remained constant for operation with a 6 and an 8 mm aperture. The source has been operated for 260 h at 3.6 kW with a single-porcelain-coated antenna. Mass spectrometer measurements of the extracted beam at this power show a species mix for H{sup +}:H{sup +}{sub 2}:H{sup +}{sub 3}:OH{sup +} of 0.49: 0.04: 0.42: 0.04. The calculated beam divergence using the IGUN code is compared with the measured divergence from an electrostatic sweep emittance scanner designed for high-power cw beam diagnostics. Phase space measurements at 40 kV and 23 mA beam current result in a normalized rms emittance of 0.09 {pi}mmmrad. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Negative ion production in the RF multiaperture surface-plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Abdrashitov, G.; Belchenko, Yu. Dranichnikov, A.; Gorbovsky, A.; Kapitonov, V.; Kolmogorov, V.; Kondakov, A.; Konstantinov, S.; Sanin, A.; Selivanov, A.; Selivanov, P.; Shikhovtsev, I.; Stupishin, N.; Tiunov, M.; Ivanov, A.; Sotnikov, O.; Binderbauer, M.; Putvinski, S.; Smirnov, A.; Sevier, L.

    2015-04-08

    The experiments on negative hydrogen ion beam production in a multi-aperture long-pulse surface-plasma source are described. H- ions are produced on the surface of a plasma grid covered by cesium and illuminated by fast plasma particles. The source uses a radio-frequency driver to generate plasma. A composite magnet system made of external permanent magnets confines and filters electrons in the plasma region, and deflects them in the extraction area. A multiaperture, multi-electrode ion optical system is used for beam formation. The electrode heating and cooling during long pulses is accomplished by circulating a heat transfer fluid through channels drilled in the electrodes bodies. H- ions extraction through a single aperture and 21 apertures was performed and studied. A stable H- beam with the current up to 0.7 A, energy up to 74 kV, and pulse duration up to 7 s was routinely obtained.

  20. Two regimes in the decay behavior of ions from a linear r.f. Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwolek, Jonathan; Wells, James; Goodman, Douglas; Blümel, Reinhold; Smith, Winthrop

    2016-05-01

    A linear Paul trap (LPT) enables ions to be trapped for use in a variety of experiments. In many of these experiments, such as those measuring charge exchange or sympathetic cooling, the decay of ions from the trap is used to measure some quantity of interest. This decay is typically modeled as a single exponential. We have found that in cases where the trap is loaded to high numbers of ions, the ion decay is better described by a double exponential decay function. We have experimentally examined the decay of ions from an LPT loaded by photoionization from a magneto-optical trap as a function of the q stability parameter of the Paul trap. The LPT is loaded to steady-state, then the loading is stopped and the number of trapped ions as a function of time is monitored to determine the decay. We present numerical simulations and experimental results that demonstrate two distinct regions in the decay. For high steady-state values, the trap exhibits a double-exponential behavior. However, if the trap is filled to a steady-state value below a threshold, the decay recovers the typical single-exponential behavior. This behavior should be universal to any Paul trap regardless of the geometry or species trapped. NSF Grant No. PHY-1307874.

  1. Effects of RF inductively coupled plasma ion source on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-Al-N nanocrystalline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongke; Xie, Wei; Zou, Changwei

    2016-04-01

    The effects of radio frequency inductively coupled plasma ion source (RF-ICPIS) powers on the properties of Ti-Al-N nanocrystalline films were explored. The results indicated the powers of ion source had great influences on elements contents of Ti1- x Al x N nanocrystalline films. However, for Ti-Al-N films deposited at 60 W with highest Al content, h-AlN phase appeared. With the increasing of RF-ICPIS powers, Al contents in the Ti1- x Al x N increased gradually which led to the decreased grain size and denser nanostructure. The TEM images indicated that all the Ti-Al-N films were nanocrystalline TiN embedded into an amorphous matrix. The hardness of films increased, while the friction coefficient decreased with the variation of RF-ICPIS powers. Maximum hardness of 34.7 GPa and minimum friction coefficient of 0.13 were obtained for Ti-Al-N films deposited at RF-ICPIS powers of 50 W. The introduction of RF-ICPIS significantly improved and enhanced the mechanical properties of Ti-Al-N films.

  2. Novel Reactor Relevant RF Actuator Schemes for the Lower Hybrid and the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonoli, Paul

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a fresh physics perspective on the onerous problem of coupling and successfully utilizing ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and lower hybrid range of frequencies (LHRF) actuators in the harsh environment of a nuclear fusion reactor. The ICRF and LH launchers are essentially first wall components in a fusion reactor and as such will be subjected to high heat fluxes. The high field side (HFS) of the plasma offers a region of reduced heat flux together with a quiescent scrape off layer (SOL). Placement of the ICRF and LHRF launchers on the tokamak HFS also offers distinct physics advantages: The higher toroidal magnetic field makes it possible to couple faster phase velocity LH waves that can penetrate farther into the plasma core and be absorbed by higher energy electrons, thereby increasing the current drive efficiency. In addition, re-location of the LH launcher off the mid-plane (i.e., poloidal ``steering'') allows further control of the deposition location. Also ICRF waves coupled from the HFS couple strongly to mode converted ion Bernstein waves and ion cyclotron waves waves as the minority density is increased, thus opening the possibility of using this scheme for flow drive and pressure control. Finally the quiescent nature of the HFS scrape off layer should minimize the effects of RF wave scattering from density fluctuations. Ray tracing / Fokker Planck simulations will be presented for LHRF applications in devices such as the proposed Advanced Divertor Experiment (ADX) and extending to ITER and beyond. Full-wave simulations will also be presented which demonstrate the possible combinations of electron and ion heating via ICRF mode conversion. Work supported by the US DoE under Contract Numbers DE-FC02-01ER54648 and DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  3. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A. Koizumi, I.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2014-02-15

    The prototype rf-driven H{sup −} ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H{sup −} ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (T{sub PE}) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used T{sub PE} of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H{sup −} ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  4. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H(-) ion source.

    PubMed

    Ueno, A; Koizumi, I; Ohkoshi, K; Ikegami, K; Takagi, A; Yamazaki, S; Oguri, H

    2014-02-01

    The prototype rf-driven H(-) ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H(-) ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (TPE) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used TPE of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H(-) ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  5. Emittance measurements for optimum operation of the J-PARC RF-driven H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A. Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2015-04-08

    In order to satisfy the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) second stage requirements of an H{sup −} ion beam of 60mA within normalized emittances of 1.5πmm•mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500μs×25Hz) and a life-time of longer than 1month, the J-PARC cesiated RF-driven H{sup −} ion source was developed by using an internal-antenna developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The transverse emittances of the source were measured with various conditions to find out the optimum operation conditions minimizing the horizontal and vertical rms normalized emittances. The transverse emittances were most effectively reduced by operating the source with the plasma electrode temperature lower than 70°C. The optimum value of the cesium (Cs) density around the beam hole of the plasma electrode seems to be proportional to the plasma electrode temperature. The fine control of the Cs density is indispensable, since the emittances seem to increase proportionally to the excessiveness of the Cs density. Furthermore, the source should be operated with the Cs density beyond a threshold value, since the plasma meniscus shape and the ellipse parameters of the transverse emittances seem to be changed step-function-likely on the threshold Cs value.

  6. Enhancement of NUBEAM for the simulation of fast ion and RF-wave interaction based on the quasi-linear theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jae-Min; McCune, Douglas; Chang, C. S.

    2007-11-01

    The Monte-Carlo package NUBEAM for time-dependent modeling of fast ions in a tokamak geometry has been upgraded to simulate the effects of ICRF heating on the fast ions. The RF-wave field data is provided by executing TORIC5 inside TRANSP and passed to NUBEAM. An iterative algorithm has been implemented to match the RF-power absorption value calculated by NUBEAM with the level predicted by TORIC5. The effects of RF-wave fields on the fast ions are modeled by evaluating Monte-Carlo kicks based on the quasi-linear theory. Because of the unique feature of NUBEAM, the so called ``goosing'' which enables an order of magnitude faster calculation, special care needs to be taken in the Monte-Carlo simulation. The modification of the goose algorithm in the presence of RF-wave fields will be presented. Also, the necessary features of NUBEAM for future application to self-consistent coupling with an ICRF full wave code will be discussed.

  7. Ion sheath effects on RF plasma probes - Experimental results in laboratory plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kist, R.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory work dealing with the frequency characteristic of the plasma impedance of spherical and cylindrical electrode systems is reported. The influence of the ion sheath on various features of the impedance characteristic is emphasized. Those features are the series and parallel resonance as well as additional resonances due to the excitation of electroacoustic and cyclotron harmonic waves. The dependence of the series and parallel resonances on dc biasing leads to a method of determining the ion sheath capacity for a cylindrical electrode system. The obtained values agree fairly well with those obtained from a theoretical model for the density and potential distribution in the sheath of a cylindrical sensor aligned with a supersonic plasma flow. The amplitude of resonances due to excitation of longitudinal plasma waves (electroacoustic and cyclotron harmonic) is reduced or even vanishes for sufficiently negative dc bias. Positive bias first leads to an increased amplitude up to a certain dc bias value above which, however, the amplitude decreases again due to electron absorption at the sensor surface.

  8. Properties of Th4+ and Th3+ from rf spectroscopy of high-L thorium Rydberg ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keele, Julie Adel

    Several properties of radon-like Th4+ and francium-like Th3+ were determined from measurements of high-L Rydberg fine structure in Th3+ and Th2+ ions. The measurements were carried out using the resonant excitation Stark ionization spectroscopy (RESIS) technique to detect rf transitions between levels in the same n. The measured Rydberg fine structures were then fit to an effective potential model, and the properties of the ions were extracted. Properties of the 1S0 ground state of Th4+ extracted from the measurements of the n=37 Th3+ Rydberg fine structure were the scalar dipole polarizability, alpha D,0=7.702(6)a.u. and the scalar quadrupole polarizability, alphaQ,0=29.1(1.6) a.u. The Th2+ Rydberg fine structure is much more complex since the ground state of Th3+ is a 2 F5/2, and the presence of low-lying excited states cause non-adiabatic effects in the fine structure which are not well described by the effective potential. To extract the properties, non-adiabatic corrections had to be calculated. The properties of Th3+ extracted were the permanent quadrupole moment, Q=0.5931(14)a.u. , the scalar and tensor dipole polarizabilities, alpha D,0=15.224(33)a.u. and alpha D,2=--5.30(11)a.u., the permanent hexadecapole moment, pi=--0.69(28)a.u., and the reduced dipole and octupole matrix elements coupling the ground state to the 6 d 2D3/2 state, ||=1.436(2) a.u. and ||=3.3(1.1) a.u.

  9. Rf sheaths and impurity generation by ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, F.W.

    1988-11-01

    In general, Faraday screen elements in an ICRF antenna are not aligned precisely along the combined toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields. When plasma of density n > 2epsilon/sub 0/V/eg/sup 2/ /approximately/ 10/sup 9/cm/sup -3/ is present in the gap between elements, electron response to the parallel electric field shorts out the electric field over most of the gap, leaving a narrow sheath of positive space charge and intense electric field. Here V denotes the voltage across the gap and g the gap spacing. This intense electric field accelerates ions up to an appreciable fraction of the gap voltage (/approximately/ 1 kV), sufficient to cause physical sputtering of the screen material. Impurities so generated constitute the principal limitation on power density (kW/cm/sup 2/) for ICRF antennas. ICRF antenna and Faraday screen design principles which minimize sputtering are discussed. 24 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  10. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Mass spectrometry study of positive and negative ions in a capacitively coupled atmospheric pressure RF excited glow discharge in He-water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Iza, Felipe; Lauwers, Daniël; Aranda Gonzalvo, Yolanda

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution RF excited atmospheric pressure glow discharges are investigated in He-water mixtures in a parallel metal plate reactor by mass spectrometry. Positive and negative ion fluxes to the electrode are investigated as a function of varying water concentration and discharge power. The dominant positive ions are H3O+ (and its clusters), OH+, O+, O_2^+ , He_2^+ , HeH+, O_2^+ and H_3^+ . Negative ions are detectable from a concentration of 900 ppm water in He onwards. Coinciding with the emergence of the negative ions, there is a drop in positive ion flux to the mass spectrometer and a significant increase in applied voltage indicating increasing electron loss by attachment and ion loss by mutual (three and two body) positive-negative ion recombination. The dominant negative ions are OH- and its clusters. The negative ion flux increases with increasing water concentration. Positive and negative ion cluster formation increases with decreasing discharge power and increasing concentration of water vapour at constant power. It is shown that the size of the sampling orifice of the inlet of the mass spectrometer is important for sampling atmospheric pressure active plasmas due to the presence of the narrow sheath.

  11. TELAER: a multi-mode/multi-antenna interferometric airborne SAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perna, Stefano; Amaral, Tiago; Berardino, Paolo; Esposito, Carmen; Jackson, Giuseppe; Pauciullo, Antonio; Vaz Junior, Eurico; Wimmer, Christian; Lanari, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    a degradation of the geometric resolution, which in this case becomes equal to 5m. Such an operational flexibility, added to the above discussed single-pass interferometric capability and to the intrinsic flexibility of airborne platforms, renders the TELAER airborne SAR system a powerful instrument for fast generation of high resolution Digital Elevation Models, even in natural disaster scenarios. Accordingly, this system can play today a key role not only for strictly scientific purposes, but also for the monitoring of natural hazards, especially if properly integrated with other remote sensing sensors. [1] S. Perna et al., "Capabilities of the TELAER airborne SAR system upgraded to the multi-antenna mode", In Proceedings IGARSS 2012 Symposium, Munich, 2012. [2] G. Franceschetti, and R.Lanari, Synthetic Aperture Radar Processing, CRC PRESS, New York, 1999.

  12. Excellent vacuum tribological properties of Pb/PbS film deposited by RF magnetron sputtering and ion sulfurizing.

    PubMed

    Guozheng, Ma; Binshi, Xu; Haidou, Wang; Shuying, Chen; Zhiguo, Xing

    2014-01-01

    Soft metal Pb film of 3 μm in thickness was deposited on AISI 440C steel by RF magnetron sputtering, and then some of the Pb film samples were treated by low-temperature ion sulfurizing (LTIS) and formed Pb/PbS composite film. Tribological properties of the Pb and Pb/PbS films were tested contrastively in vacuum and air condition using a self-developed tribometer (model of MSTS-1). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were adopted to analyze the microstructure and chemical construction of the films and their worn surfaces. The results show that a mass of Pb was changed to PbS during the process of LTIS. In air condition, owing to the severe oxidation effect, pure Pb film showed relatively high friction coefficients (0.6), and Pb/PbS composite film also lost its friction-reduction property after sliding for a short time. In a vacuum, the average friction coefficients of Pb film were about 0.1, but the friction coefficient curve fluctuated obviously. And the Pb/PbS composite film exhibited excellent tribological properties in vacuum condition. Its friction coefficients keep stable at a low value of about 0.07 for a long time. If takes the value of friction coefficients exceeding 0.2 continuously as a criterion of lubrication failure, the sliding friction life of Pb/PbS film was as long as 3.2 × 10(5) r, which is 8 times of that of the Pb film. It can be concluded that the Pb/PbS film has excellent vacuum tribological properties and important foreground for applying in space solid lubrication related fields.

  13. Thermal and electrostatic simulations of the diagnostic calorimeter for the Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma beam

    SciTech Connect

    Serianni, G.; Dalla Palma, M.; Fasolo, D.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pomaro, N.; Rizzolo, A.; Tollin, M.; De Muri, M.

    2012-02-15

    To study and optimise negative ion production for the ITER neutral beam injectors, a test facility is under construction in Padova with the aim of testing beam characteristics and to verify the source proper operation. The instrumented calorimeter STRIKE (short-time retractable instrumented kalorimeter experiment) is being developed to characterise the SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) beam during short operations. The paper presents an investigation of the response of STRIKE measurement systems. It results that biasing is necessary to cope with the influence of secondary electrons on current measurements; moreover, despite the discretisation of the recorded thermal patterns introduced by the pixels of thermal cameras, a sufficient spatial resolution is expected.

  14. RF system for ''TARN II''

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, K.; Fujita, M.; Itano, A.; Kanazawa, M.; Kodaira, M.; Kurihara, T.; Tojyo, E.; Watanabe, S.; Yamazaki, N.; Yoshizawa, M.

    1985-10-01

    An rf acceleration system for the INS heavy-ion synchrotron proposal is being developed. The rf characteristics of full-size ferrite toroids have been measured in a test cavity to study tunable frequencies of an rf cavity. It is estimated from the measurement on the ferrite material TDK SY-6 that a single-gap rf cavity based upon two ferrite-loaded quarter-wave coaxial resonators with four turns each of main and supplementary bias windings will give frequencies of 0.71-7.02 MHz for adiabatic capture and of 0.86-8.00 MHz for synchronous capture. RF acceleration parameters and design features of the rf cavity are presented.

  15. Measurements of sputtered neutrals and ions and investigation of their roles on the plasma properties during rf magnetron sputtering of Zn and ZnO targets

    SciTech Connect

    Maaloul, L.; Stafford, L.

    2013-11-15

    Langmuir probe and optical absorption spectroscopy measurements were used to determine the line-integrated electron density, electron temperature, and number density of Ar atoms in metastable {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} levels in a 5 mTorr, rf magnetron sputtering plasmas used for the deposition of ZnO-based thin films. While the average electron energy and density of Ar atoms in {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} excited states were fairly independent of self-bias voltage, the Ar {sup 3}P{sub 2}-to-electron number density ratio decreased by approximately a factor of 5 when going from −115 V to −300 V. This decrease was correlated to an increase by about one order of magnitude of the number density of sputtered Zn atoms determined by absolute actinometry measurements on Zn I using either Ar or Xe as the actinometer gas. These results were also found to be in excellent agreement with the predictions of a global model accounting for Penning ionization of sputtered Zn particles. The importance of the latter reactions was further confirmed by plasma sampling mass spectrometry showing a double peak structure for Zn ions: a low-energy component ascribed to thermalized ions created in the gas phase (by direct electron impact and by Penning ionization) and a high-energy tail due to ions ejected from the target and reaching quasi-collisionlessly the substrate surface.

  16. A collisional radiative model for caesium and its application to an RF source for negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Wünderlich, D. Wimmer, C.; Friedl, R.

    2015-04-08

    A collisional radiative (CR) model for caesium atoms in low-temperature, low-pressure hydrogen-caesium plasmas is introduced. This model includes the caesium ground state, 14 excited states, the singly charged caesium ion and the negative hydrogen ion. The reaction probabilities needed as input are based on data from the literature, using some scaling and extrapolations. Additionally, new cross sections for electron collision ionization and three-body recombination have been calculated. The relevance of mutual neutralization of positive caesium ions and negative hydrogen ions is highlighted: depending on the densities of the involved particle species, this excitation channel can have a significant influence on the population densities of excited states in the caesium atom. This strong influence is successfully verified by optical emission spectroscopy measurements performed at the IPP prototype negative hydrogen ion source for ITER NBI. As a consequence, population models for caesium in electronegative low-temperature, low-pressure hydrogen-caesium plasmas need to take into account the mutual neutralization process. The present CR model is an example for such models and represents an important prerequisite for deducing the total caesium density in surface production based negative hydrogen ion sources.

  17. Low Temperature Nitriding of 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel Using RF-ICP Method: the Role of Ion Beam Flux Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; Ba, Dechun; Ming, Yue; Xu, Lin; Guo, Deyu

    2014-10-01

    The significant role of ion beam flux during nitriding 304 austenitic stainless steel has been investigated by using a radio frequency inductively-coupled plasma reactor into which a sample with negative bias voltage was inserted. A milliammeter is used to detect the current of ions which collide with the sample and optical emission spectroscopy is used to discern the reactive species included in the nitrogen plasma. The nitriding efficiency is indicated by X-ray diffraction and the microhardness test. The reported data reveal that the ion beam flux density as well as the deposition pressure, bias voltage and time can strongly affect the nitriding of stainless steel via the expanded multiphase microstructure inside the nitrided layer. The increase in the density of ion flux results in an ascent in the intensity of the expanded peak and a simultaneous decline in the intensity of the γ austenite peak. The evolution trend of ion beam flux density is described as a function of the operating pressure and the bias voltage. The maximum ion flux density has been achieved at 10 Pa pressure and -500 V bias voltage. A reasonable nitriding region has been, consequently, suggested after comparing this work with previously reported results.

  18. RF deflector system for beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkinen, J.; Gustafsson, J.; Kivikoski, M.; Liukkonen, E.; Nieminen, V.

    1999-06-01

    In some in-beam experiments, an adjustment of the time structure of the cyclotron ion beam guided to the desired research target by a beamline is sometimes needed. This situation occurs if, for example, the decay times of the reaction products are too short compared to the period corresponding to the beam frequency. In the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä the frequency of the ion pulses hitting the research target is 10-21 MHz depending on the frequency of the acceleration voltage. A RF deflector system was constructed to adjust the ion beam pulse frequency according to the respective requirements. A desired portion of the ion pulses are deflected by feeding a high-amplitude RF-signal between deflecting plates located into the beam line. The specified deflecting voltage amplitude of 10-15 kV is achieved with 1 kW of RF power.

  19. An analysis of 100 MeV F 8+ ion and 50 MeV Li 3+ ion irradiation effects on silicon NPN rf power transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushpa, N.; Praveen, K. C.; Gnana Prakash, A. P.; Prabhakara Rao, Y. P.; Tripati, Ambuj; Revannasiddaiah, D.

    2010-08-01

    The dc characteristics exhibited by NPN power transistors are studied systematically before and after irradiation by 100 MeV F 8+ ions and 50 MeV Li 3+ ions in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The transistor parameters such as excess base current (Δ IB= IBpost- IBpre), dc current gain ( hFE), transconductance ( gm), and collector-saturation current ( ICsat) were studied before and after irradiation. The damage factors ( k) for hFE were calculated for ion irradiated transistors using Messenger-Spratt relation. The base current ( IB) was found to increase significantly after ion irradiation and this in turn decreases the hFE of the transistors. The gm decreases significantly after ion irradiation. Moreover, the output characteristics of irradiated devices also show that the collector current ( IC) in the saturation region ( ICsat) decrease with increase in ion dose. The observed change in these characteristics may be due to the ion induced generation-recombination (G-R) centers in emitter-base (E-B) spacer oxide and the ion induced point defects and their complexes in the transistor structure.

  20. Design and performance of an instrument for electron impact tandem mass spectrometry and action spectroscopy of mass/charge selected macromolecular ions stored in RF ion trap*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranković, Milos Lj.; Giuliani, Alexandre; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.

    2016-06-01

    A new apparatus was designed, coupling an electron gun with a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer, to perform m/ z (mass over charge) selected ion activation by electron impact for tandem mass spectrometry and action spectroscopy. We present in detail electron tracing simulations of a 300 eV electron beam inside the ion trap, design of the mechanical parts, electron optics and electronic circuits used in the experiment. We also report examples of electron impact activation tandem mass spectra for Ubiquitin protein, Substance P and Melittin peptides, at incident electron energies in the range from 280 eV to 300 eV.

  1. Investigation of the physical properties of ion assisted ZrN thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signore, M. A.; Valerini, D.; Rizzo, A.; Tapfer, L.; Capodieci, L.; Cappello, A.

    2010-06-01

    Ion bombardment during thin film growth is known to cause structural and morphological changes in the deposited films, thus affecting their physical properties. In this work zirconium nitride films have been deposited by the ion assisted magnetron sputtering technique. The ion energy is controlled by varying the voltage applied to the substrate in the range 0-25 V. The deposited ZrN films are characterized for their structure, surface roughness, oxygen contamination, optical reflectance and electrical resistivity. With increasing substrate voltage crystallinity of the films is enhanced with a preferential orientation of the ZrN grains having the (1 1 1) axis perpendicular to the substrate surface. At the same time, a decrease in electrical resistivity and oxygen contamination content is observed up to 20 V. A higher substrate voltage (25 V) causes an inversion in the observed experimental trends. The role of oxygen contamination decrease and generation of nitrogen vacancies due to ionic assistance have been considered as a possible explanation for the experimental results.

  2. Numerical study of plasma generation process and internal antenna heat loadings in J-PARC RF negative ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, T.; Nishida, K.; Mochizuki, S.; Mattei, S.; Lettry, J.; Hatayama, A.; Ueno, A.; Oguri, H.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Asano, H.; Naito, F.

    2016-02-01

    A numerical model of plasma transport and electromagnetic field in the J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) radio frequency ion source has been developed to understand the relation between antenna coil heat loadings and plasma production/transport processes. From the calculation, the local plasma density increase is observed in the region close to the antenna coil. Electrons are magnetized by the magnetic field line with absolute magnetic flux density 30-120 Gauss which leads to high local ionization rate. The results suggest that modification of magnetic configuration can be made to reduce plasma heat flux onto the antenna.

  3. Numerical study of plasma generation process and internal antenna heat loadings in J-PARC RF negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Shibata, T; Nishida, K; Mochizuki, S; Mattei, S; Lettry, J; Hatayama, A; Ueno, A; Oguri, H; Ohkoshi, K; Ikegami, K; Takagi, A; Asano, H; Naito, F

    2016-02-01

    A numerical model of plasma transport and electromagnetic field in the J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) radio frequency ion source has been developed to understand the relation between antenna coil heat loadings and plasma production/transport processes. From the calculation, the local plasma density increase is observed in the region close to the antenna coil. Electrons are magnetized by the magnetic field line with absolute magnetic flux density 30-120 Gauss which leads to high local ionization rate. The results suggest that modification of magnetic configuration can be made to reduce plasma heat flux onto the antenna. PMID:26932010

  4. RF transformer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  5. Structure/function studies of resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) and phenol-formaldehyde (P-F) copolymer ion-exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Hubler, T.L.; Franz, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.; Hogan, M.O.; Hallen, R.T.; Brown, G.N.; Linehan, J.C.

    1996-09-01

    he U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site was established to produce plutonium for the U.S. defense mission. Over the course of decades, hazardous, toxic, and radioactive chemical wastes were generated and disposed of in a variety of ways including storage in underground tanks. An estimated 180 million tons of high-level radioactive wastes are stored in 177 underground storage tanks. During production of fissile plutonium, large quantities of 90Sr and 137CS were produced. The high abundance and intermediate length half- lives of these fission products are the reason that effort is directed toward selective removal of these radionuclides from the bulk waste stream before final tank waste disposal is effected. Economically, it is desirable to remove the highly radioactive fraction of the tank waste for vitrification. Ion-exchange technology is being evaluated for removing cesium from Hanford Site waste tanks. This report summarizes data and analysis performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)for both resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) and phenol-formaldehyde (P-F) resins and relates their observed differences in performance and chemical stability to their structure. The experimental approach used to characterize the resins was conducted using primarily two types of data: batch distribution coefficients (Kds) and solid-state 13C NMR. Comparison of these data for a particular resin allowed correlation of resin performance to resin structure. Additional characterization techniques included solid-state 19F NMR, and elemental analyses.

  6. Trapping mode dipolar DC collisional activation in the RF-only ion guide of a linear ion trap/time-of-flight instrument for gaseous bio-ion declustering.

    PubMed

    Webb, Ian K; Gao, Yang; Londry, Frank A; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-09-01

    The application of dipolar direct current (DDC) to the radio frequency-only ion guide (Q0) of a hybrid quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometer for collision-induced declustering of large bio-ions is described. As a broadband technique, ion trap DDC collisional activation (CA) is employed to decluster ions simultaneously over a relatively broad mass-to-charge (m/z) range. Declustering DDC CA can yield significantly narrower peaks relative to those observed in the absence of declustering methods, depending upon the extent of noncovalent adduction associated with the ions, and can also be used in conjunction with other methods, such as nozzle-skimmer CA. The key experimental variables in the DDC experiment are the DDC voltage (VDDC), VRF , and the time over which VDDC is applied. The VDDC/VRF ratio is key to the extent to which ion temperatures are elevated and also influences the upper m/z limit for ion storage. The VDDC/VRF ratio affects ion temperatures and the upper m/z limit in opposing directions. That is, as the ratio increases, the ion temperature also increases, whereas the upper m/z storage limit decreases. However, for a given VDDC /VRF ratio, the upper m/z storage limit can be increased by increasing VRF, at the expense of the lower m/z limit for ion storage. The key value of the approach is that it affords a relatively precise degree of control over ion temperatures as well as the time over which they are elevated to a higher temperature. The utility of the method is illustrated by the application of ion trap DDC CA in Q0 to oligonucleotide, protein, and multimeric protein complex analyte ions. PMID:24078247

  7. Flute stabilization due to ponderomotive force created by an rf field with a variable gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Yasaka, Y.; Itatani, R.

    1986-06-30

    An rf-stabilization experiment was performed in the axisymmetric single-mirror device HIEI by controlling the radial-gradient scale length of the rf field with the aid of an azimuthally phased antenna array. The flute stability depends sensitively on the scale length of the perpendicular rf electric field, which shows that rf stabilization is caused by the ponderomotive force for ions.

  8. RF compensation of double Langmuir probes: modelling and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caneses, Juan F.; Blackwell, Boyd

    2015-06-01

    An analytical model describing the physics of driven floating probes has been developed to model the RF compensation of the double langmuir probe (DLP) technique. The model is based on the theory of the RF self-bias effect as described in Braithwaite’s work [1], which we extend to include time-resolved behaviour. The main contribution of this work is to allow quantitative determination of the intrinsic RF compensation of a DLP in a given RF discharge. Using these ideas, we discuss the design of RF compensated DLPs. Experimental validation for these ideas is presented and the effects of RF rectification on DLP measurements are discussed. Experimental results using RF rectified DLPs indicate that (1) whenever sheath thickness effects are important overestimation of the ion density is proportional to the level of RF rectification and suggest that (2) the electron temperature measurement is only weakly affected.

  9. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  10. Spontaneous fission of 256Rf, new data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirikhin, A. I.; Yeremin, A. V.; Izosimov, I. N.; Isaev, A. V.; Kuznetsov, A. N.; Malyshev, O. N.; Popeko, A. G.; Popov, Yu. A.; Sokol, E. A.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Andel, B.; Asfari, M. Z.; Gall, B.; Yoshihiro, N.; Kalaninova, Z.; Mullins, S.; Piot, J.; Stefanova, E.; Tonev, D.

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous fission properties of the short-lived neutron-deficient 256Rf nucleus produced in the complete fusion reaction with a beam of multiply charged heavy 50Ti ions from the U-400 cyclotron (FLNR, JINR) are experimentally investigated. Its half-life and decay branching ratio are measured. The average number of neutrons per spontaneous fission of 256Rf (bar v = 4.47 ± 0.09) is determined for the first time.

  11. Matching network for RF plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Pickard, Daniel S.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2007-11-20

    A compact matching network couples an RF power supply to an RF antenna in a plasma generator. The simple and compact impedance matching network matches the plasma load to the impedance of a coaxial transmission line and the output impedance of an RF amplifier at radio frequencies. The matching network is formed of a resonantly tuned circuit formed of a variable capacitor and an inductor in a series resonance configuration, and a ferrite core transformer coupled to the resonantly tuned circuit. This matching network is compact enough to fit in existing compact focused ion beam systems.

  12. Structure and mechanical properties of 3dTM ion doped RF sputtered ZnO thin films on Si (100)

    SciTech Connect

    Venkaiah, M. Singh, R.

    2014-04-24

    Mn, Fe and Mn-Fe doped ZnO thin films were deposited on Si (100) substrates by rf- magnetron sputtering using ceramic target in pure oxygen gas environment. The X-ray diffraction shows the polycrystalline wurtzite structure films. The average grain size varies from 32-50 nm, with lower grain size for Fe doped ZnO films. The room temperature loading and unloading curve are continuous without any pop-in. The Young's modulus and hardness are in the range 156-178 GPa and 14-15.5 GPa respectively.

  13. Design of RF Power System for CPHS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng; Du, Taibin; Guan, Xialing

    The Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) system has been proposed and designed by the Department of Engineering Physics of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. It consists of an accelerator front-end-a highintensity ion source, a 3 MeV radiofrequency quadrupole linac (RFQ), and a 13 MeV drift-tube linac (DTL), a neutron target station, and some experimental stations. In design of our RF power supply, both RFQ and DTL share a single klystron which is capable of 2.5 MW peak RF power and a 3.33% duty factor. The 325 MHz klystron contains a modulating anode and has a 100 kW average output power. Portions of the RF power system, such as pulsed high voltage power supply, modulator, crowbar protection and RF power transmission are all presented in details in this paper.

  14. Prototype rf cavity for the HISTRAP accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mosko, S.W.; Dowling, D.T.; Olsen, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    HISTRAP, a proposed synchrotron-cooling-storage ring designed to both accelerate and decelerate very highly charged very heavy ions for atomic physics research, requires an rf accelerating system to provide /+-/2.5 kV of peak accelerating voltage per turn while tuning through a 13.5:1 frequency range in a fraction of a second. A prototype half-wave, single gap rf cavity with biased ferrite tuning was built and tested over a continuous tuning range of 200 kHz through 2.7 MHz. Initial test results establish the feasibility of using ferrite tuning at the required rf power levels. The resonant system is located entirely outside of the accelerator's 15cm ID beam line vacuum enclosure except for a single rf window which serves as an accelerating gap. Physical separation of the cavity and the beam line permits in situ vacuum baking of the beam line at 300/degree/C.

  15. Rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-11-02

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser are provided which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  16. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  17. Ion manipulation device to prevent loss of ions

    DOEpatents

    Tolmachev, Aleksey; Smith, Richard D; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Anderson, Gordon A; Baker, Erin M

    2015-03-03

    An ion manipulation method and device to prevent loss of ions is disclosed. The device includes a pair of surfaces. An inner array of electrodes is coupled to the surfaces. A RF voltage and a DC voltage are alternately applied to the inner array of electrodes. The applied RF voltage is alternately positive and negative so that immediately adjacent or nearest neighbor RF applied electrodes are supplied with RF signals that are approximately 180 degrees out of phase.

  18. Progress on a cryogenically cooled RF gun polarized electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller, R.P., III; Edwards, H.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    RF guns have proven useful in multiple accelerator applications. An RF gun capable of producing polarized electrons is an attractive electron source for the ILC or an electron-ion collider. Producing such a gun has proven elusive. The NEA GaAs photocathode needed for polarized electron production is damaged by the vacuum environment in an RF gun. Electron and ion back bombardment can also damage the cathode. These problems must be mitigated before producing an RF gun polarized electron source. In this paper we report continuing efforts to improve the vacuum environment in a normal conducting RF gun by cooling it with liquid nitrogen after a high temperature vacuum bake out. We also report on a design of a cathode preparation chamber to produce bulk GaAs photocathodes for testing in such a gun. Future directions are also discussed.

  19. Plasma rotation and rf heating in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrassie, J. S.; Baker, D. R.; Burrell, K. H.; Greenfield, C. M.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Luce, T. C.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Rice, B. W.

    1999-09-20

    In a variety of discharge conditions on DIII-D it is observed that rf electron heating reduces the toroidal rotation speed and core ion temperature. The rf heating can be with either fast wave or electron cyclotron heating and this effect is insensitive to the details of the launched toroidal wavenumber spectrum. To date all target discharges have rotation first established with co-directed neutral beam injection. A possible cause is enhanced ion momentum and thermal diffusivity due to electron heating effectively creating greater anomalous viscosity. Another is that a counter directed toroidal force is applied to the bulk plasma via rf driven radial current.

  20. Plasma rotation and rf heating in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Grassie, J. S. de; Baker, D. R.; Burrell, K. H.; Greenfield, C. M.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Luce, T. C.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Rice, B. W.

    1999-09-20

    In a variety of discharge conditions on DIII-D it is observed that rf electron heating reduces the toroidal rotation speed and core ion temperature. The rf heating can be with either fast wave or electron cyclotron heating and this effect is insensitive to the details of the launched toroidal wavenumber spectrum. To date all target discharges have rotation first established with co-directed neutral beam injection. A possible cause is enhanced ion momentum and thermal diffusivity due to electron heating effectively creating greater anomalous viscosity. Another is that a counter directed toroidal force is applied to the bulk plasma via rf driven radial current. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Microfluidic stretchable RF electronics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2010-12-01

    Stretchable electronics is a revolutionary technology that will potentially create a world of radically different electronic devices and systems that open up an entirely new spectrum of possibilities. This article proposes a microfluidic based solution for stretchable radio frequency (RF) electronics, using hybrid integration of active circuits assembled on flex foils and liquid alloy passive structures embedded in elastic substrates, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This concept was employed to implement a 900 MHz stretchable RF radiation sensor, consisting of a large area elastic antenna and a cluster of conventional rigid components for RF power detection. The integrated radiation sensor except the power supply was fully embedded in a thin elastomeric substrate. Good electrical performance of the standalone stretchable antenna as well as the RF power detection sub-module was verified by experiments. The sensor successfully detected the RF radiation over 5 m distance in the system demonstration. Experiments on two-dimensional (2D) stretching up to 15%, folding and twisting of the demonstrated sensor were also carried out. Despite the integrated device was severely deformed, no failure in RF radiation sensing was observed in the tests. This technique illuminates a promising route of realizing stretchable and foldable large area integrated RF electronics that are of great interest to a variety of applications like wearable computing, health monitoring, medical diagnostics, and curvilinear electronics.

  2. Phase stable RF transport system

    DOEpatents

    Curtin, Michael T.; Natter, Eckard F.; Denney, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF transport system delivers a phase-stable RF signal to a load, such as an RF cavity of a charged particle accelerator. A circuit generates a calibration signal at an odd multiple frequency of the RF signal where the calibration signal is superimposed with the RF signal on a common cable that connects the RF signal with the load. Signal isolating diplexers are located at both the RF signal source end and load end of the common cable to enable the calibration to be inserted and extracted from the cable signals without any affect on the RF signal. Any phase shift in the calibration signal during traverse of the common cable is then functionally related to the phase shift in the RF signal. The calibration phase shift is used to control a phase shifter for the RF signal to maintain a stable RF signal at the load.

  3. Rheumatoid factor (RF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections Leukemia , multiple myeloma , and other cancers Chronic lung disease Chronic liver disease In some cases, people who are healthy and have no other medical problem will have a higher-than-normal RF level.

  4. RF-Based Accelerators for HEDP Research

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, John W.; Sessler, Andrew; Keller, Roderich; Ostroumov,Petr; Chou, Weiren

    2005-05-09

    Accelerator-driven High-Energy Density Physics (HEDP) experiments require typically 1 nanosecond, 1 microcoulomb pulses of mass 20 ions accelerated to several MeV to produce eV-level excitations in thin targets, the warm dense matter regime. Traditionally the province of induction linacs, RF-based acceleration may be a viable alternative with recent breakthroughs in accelerating structures and high-field compact superconducting solenoids. A reference design for an RF-based accelerator for HEDP research is presented using 15 T solenoids and multiple-gap RF structures configured with multiple parallel beams combined at the target. The beam is ballistically compressed with an induction linac core providing the necessary energy sweep and injected into a plasma-neutralized drift compression channel resulting in a 1 mm radius beam spot 1 nanosecond long at a thin foil or low-density target.

  5. Prospects for Advanced RF Theory and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, D.B.

    1999-04-12

    This paper represents an attempt to express in print the contents of a rather philosophical review talk. The charge for the talk was not to summarize the present status of the field and what we can do, but to assess what we will need to do in the future and where the gaps are in fulfilling these needs. The objective was to be complete, covering all aspects of theory and modeling in all frequency regimes, although in the end the talk mainly focussed on the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). In choosing which areas to develop, it is important to keep in mind who the customers for RF modeling are likely to be and what sorts of tasks they will need for RF to do. This occupies the first part of the paper. Then we examine each of the elements of a complete RF theory and try to identify the kinds of advances needed.

  6. Rf power sources

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.

    1988-05-01

    This paper covers RF power sources for accelerator applications. The approach has been with particular customers in mind. These customers are high energy physicists who use accelerators as experimental tools in the study of the nucleus of the atom, and synchrotron light sources derived from electron or positron storage rings. This paper is confined to electron-positron linear accelerators since the RF sources have always defined what is possible to achieve with these accelerators. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  7. Microbunching and RF Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-05-23

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  8. RF Stabilization for Storage of Antiprotons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Lewis, Raymond A.

    2005-01-01

    Portable storage of antimatter is an important step in the experimental exploration of antimatter in propulsion applications. The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is a Penning-Malmberg ion trap being developed to trap and store low energy antiprotons for a period of weeks. The antiprotons can then be transported for use in experiments. HiPAT is being developed and evaluated using normal matter, before an attempt is made to store and transport antiprotons. Stortd ions have inherent instabilities that limit the storage lifetime. RF stabilization at cyclotron resonance frequencies is demonstrated over a period of 6 days for normal matter ion clouds. A variety of particles have been stored, including protons, C+ ions, and H2+ ions. Cyclotron resonance frequencies are defined and experimental evidence presented to demonstrate excitation of cyclotron waves in the plasma for all three species of ions.

  9. Apparatus and method of dissociating ions in a multipole ion guide

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Ian K.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    2014-07-08

    A method of dissociating ions in a multipole ion guide is disclosed. A stream of charged ions is supplied to the ion guide. A main RF field is applied to the ion guide to confine the ions through the ion guide. An excitation RF field is applied to one pair of rods of the ion guide. The ions undergo dissociation when the applied excitation RF field is resonant with a secular frequency of the ions. The multipole ion guide is, but not limited to, a quadrupole, a hexapole, and an octopole.

  10. Porous NASICON-Type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 Thin Film Deposited by RF Sputtering as Cathode Material for Li-Ion Microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiawati, Vinsensia Ade; Vacandio, Florence; Eyraud, Marielle; Knauth, Philippe; Djenizian, Thierry

    2016-08-01

    We report the electrochemical performance of porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 thin films to be used as a cathode for Li-ion microbatteries. Crystalline porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 layers were obtained by radio frequency sputtering with an annealing treatment. The thin films were characterized by XRD, SEM, and electrochemical techniques. The chronoamperometry experiments showed that a discharge capacity of 88 mAhg-1 (23 μAhcm-2) is attained for the first cycle at C/10 to reach 65 mAhg-1 (17 μAhcm-2) after 10 cycles with a good stability over 40 cycles.

  11. Porous NASICON-Type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 Thin Film Deposited by RF Sputtering as Cathode Material for Li-Ion Microbatteries.

    PubMed

    Sugiawati, Vinsensia Ade; Vacandio, Florence; Eyraud, Marielle; Knauth, Philippe; Djenizian, Thierry

    2016-12-01

    We report the electrochemical performance of porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 thin films to be used as a cathode for Li-ion microbatteries. Crystalline porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 layers were obtained by radio frequency sputtering with an annealing treatment. The thin films were characterized by XRD, SEM, and electrochemical techniques. The chronoamperometry experiments showed that a discharge capacity of 88 mAhg(-1) (23 μAhcm(-2)) is attained for the first cycle at C/10 to reach 65 mAhg(-1) (17 μAhcm(-2)) after 10 cycles with a good stability over 40 cycles. PMID:27535695

  12. Porous NASICON-Type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 Thin Film Deposited by RF Sputtering as Cathode Material for Li-Ion Microbatteries.

    PubMed

    Sugiawati, Vinsensia Ade; Vacandio, Florence; Eyraud, Marielle; Knauth, Philippe; Djenizian, Thierry

    2016-12-01

    We report the electrochemical performance of porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 thin films to be used as a cathode for Li-ion microbatteries. Crystalline porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 layers were obtained by radio frequency sputtering with an annealing treatment. The thin films were characterized by XRD, SEM, and electrochemical techniques. The chronoamperometry experiments showed that a discharge capacity of 88 mAhg(-1) (23 μAhcm(-2)) is attained for the first cycle at C/10 to reach 65 mAhg(-1) (17 μAhcm(-2)) after 10 cycles with a good stability over 40 cycles.

  13. Ion trap device

    DOEpatents

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-26

    An ion trap device is disclosed. The device includes a series of electrodes that define an ion flow path. A radio frequency (RF) field is applied to the series of electrodes such that each electrode is phase shifted approximately 180 degrees from an adjacent electrode. A DC voltage is superimposed with the RF field to create a DC gradient to drive ions in the direction of the gradient. A second RF field or DC voltage is applied to selectively trap and release the ions from the device. Further, the device may be gridless and utilized at high pressure.

  14. Recent developments in superconducting cavity RF control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simrock, Stefan

    2005-02-01

    Presently a large number of superconducting accelerators under construction or proposed impose stringent requirements on the rf control of the accelerating fields, operability, and reliability. The accelerator application range from linear colliders, UV-FELs and X-FELs, ERL based light sources, high power proton accelerators to heavy ion accelerators. Examples are TESLA and NLC, the European XFEL and Lux, the Cornell ERL based light source, the high power ERL based IR-FEL at JLAB, the neutron spallation source SNS, the heavy ion accelerator RIA, and the energy upgrade of the CEBAF accelerator at JLAB. The requirements on the rf systems range from low to high current, medium to high gradient, and relativistic to non-relativistics beam. With the technology in analog and digital electronics developing rapidly, the technology for rf feedback system is changing more and more from analog or hybrid systems towards fully digital systems. Todays DSPs and FPGAs can process sophisticated feedback algorithms on a time scale of some 100 ns to a few us with ADCs and DACs with about 100 MHz bandwidth at 14 bit and latencies less than 100 ns available to inter-face to the field detectors and field control actuators. Also fast analog multiplier technology allows for field detection and actuators for rf control with high linearity, measurement and control bandwidth while maintaining low noise levels.

  15. Manipulating Short-Lived Isotopes with Inhomogeneous RF-Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T.; Schuessler, H.A.

    2003-08-26

    Online isotopes separators (ISOL-systems) and projectile fragment separators provide a wide variety of radioactive ions with energies in the keV to the several MeV ranges. For high resolution radio frequency and optical spectroscopy the ions must be decelerated to low energies and possibly injected into an ion trap. With this goal in mind we have made simulations of ion orbits under the influence of strong focusing by inhomogeneous RF fields and decelerating DC fields. The operation of the segmented linear ion guide, the ion carpet, and the ion funnel are discussed. The optimum operating parameters of these devices are obtained using computer simulations with SIMION software.

  16. RF wave propagation and scattering in turbulent tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W. Michoski, C.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2015-12-10

    Drift wave turbulence driven by the steep electron and ion temperature gradients in H-mode divertor tokamaks produce scattering of the RF waves used for heating and current drive. The X-ray emission spectra produced by the fast electrons require the turbulence broaden RF wave spectrum. Both the 5 GHz Lower Hybrid waves and the 170 GHz electron cyclotron [EC] RF waves experience scattering and diffraction by the electron density fluctuations. With strong LHCD there are bifurcations in the coupled turbulent transport dynamics giving improved steady-state confinement states. The stochastic scattering of the RF rays makes the prediction of the distribution of the rays and the associated particle heating a statistical problem. Thus, we introduce a Fokker-Planck equation for the probably density of the RF rays. The general frame work of the coupled system of coupled high frequency current driving rays with the low-frequency turbulent transport determines the profiles of the plasma density and temperatures.

  17. RF wave propagation and scattering in turbulent tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W.; Michoski, C.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2015-12-01

    Drift wave turbulence driven by the steep electron and ion temperature gradients in H-mode divertor tokamaks produce scattering of the RF waves used for heating and current drive. The X-ray emission spectra produced by the fast electrons require the turbulence broaden RF wave spectrum. Both the 5 GHz Lower Hybrid waves and the 170 GHz electron cyclotron [EC] RF waves experience scattering and diffraction by the electron density fluctuations. With strong LHCD there are bifurcations in the coupled turbulent transport dynamics giving improved steady-state confinement states. The stochastic scattering of the RF rays makes the prediction of the distribution of the rays and the associated particle heating a statistical problem. Thus, we introduce a Fokker-Planck equation for the probably density of the RF rays. The general frame work of the coupled system of coupled high frequency current driving rays with the low-frequency turbulent transport determines the profiles of the plasma density and temperatures.

  18. Toroidal Rotation in RF Heated JET Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, L.-G.; Nave, F.; Zastrow, K.-D.

    2007-09-28

    Experiments have been carried out on JET aimed at studying rotation in RF heated plasmas with low external momentum input. Both plasmas with Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating and Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) have been investigated. The rotation profiles are measured by Charge Exchange recombination spectroscopy, using short diagnostic Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) pulses. Moreover, the temporal evolution of the central rotation could in some cases be deduced from MHD activity. While most of the measurements were focussed on ICRF heating, the profiles measured in plasmas with LHCD are interesting since they are the first reported from JET in such plasmas. In particular, they allowed for studies of rotation in RF heated plasmas with q>1. The experimental results are presented together with an analysis of the torque from ICRF heated fast ions.

  19. Barrier RF stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2004-12-01

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver {+-}7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  20. Barrier RF Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.

    2005-06-08

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver {+-}7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  1. Barrier RF Stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.

    2005-06-01

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver ±7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  2. RF Gun Optimization Study

    SciTech Connect

    A. S. Hofler; P. Evtushenko; M. Krasilnikov

    2007-08-01

    Injector gun design is an iterative process where the designer optimizes a few nonlinearly interdependent beam parameters to achieve the required beam quality for a particle accelerator. Few tools exist to automate the optimization process and thoroughly explore the parameter space. The challenging beam requirements of new accelerator applications such as light sources and electron cooling devices drive the development of RF and SRF photo injectors. RF and SRF gun design is further complicated because the bunches are space charge dominated and require additional emittance compensation. A genetic algorithm has been successfully used to optimize DC photo injector designs for Cornell* and Jefferson Lab**, and we propose studying how the genetic algorithm techniques can be applied to the design of RF and SRF gun injectors. In this paper, we report on the initial phase of the study where we model and optimize gun designs that have been benchmarked with beam measurements and simulation.

  3. Sputtering and ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on sputtering and ion plating are presented. Subjects discussed are: (1) concepts and applications of ion plating, (2) sputtering for deposition of solid film lubricants, (3) commercial ion plating equipment, (4) industrial potential for ion plating and sputtering, and (5) fundamentals of RF and DC sputtering.

  4. Barrier RF stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou and Akira Takagi

    2003-02-24

    This paper introduces a new method for stacking beams in the longitudinal phase space. It uses RF barriers to confine and compress beams in an accelerator, provided that the machine momentum acceptance is a few times larger than the momentum spread of the injected beam. This is the case for the Fermilab Main Injector. A barrier RF system employing Finemet cores and high-voltage solid-state switches is under construction. The goal is to double the number of protons per cycle on the production target for Run2 and NuMI experiments.

  5. Rf2a and rf2b transcription factors

    DOEpatents

    Beachy, Roger N.; Petruccelli, Silvana; Dai, Shunhong

    2007-10-02

    A method of activating the rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) promoter in vivo is disclosed. The RTBV promoter is activated by exposure to at least one protein selected from the group consisting of Rf2a and Rf2b.

  6. Studies of RF sheaths and diagnostics on IShTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crombé, K.; Devaux, S.; D'Inca, R.; Faudot, E.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Heuraux, S.; Jacquot, J.; Louche, F.; Moritz, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Tripsky, M.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-12-01

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetised plasma test facility for RF sheaths studies at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Garching. In contrast to a tokamak, a test stand provides more liberty to impose the parameters and gives better access for the instrumentation and antennas. The project will support the development of diagnostic methods for characterising RF sheaths and validate and improve theoretical predictions. The cylindrical vacuum vessel has a diameter of 1 m and is 1.1 m long. The plasma is created by an external cylindrical plasma source equipped with a helical antenna that has been designed to excite the m=1 helicon mode. In inductive mode, plasma densities and electron temperatures have been characterised with a planar Langmuir probe as a function of gas pressure and input RF power. A 2D array of RF compensated Langmuir probes and a spectrometer are planned. A single strap RF antenna has been designed; the plasma-facing surface is aligned to the cylindrical plasma to ease the modelling. The probes will allow direct measurements of plasma density profiles in front of the RF antenna, and thus a detailed study of the density modifications induced by RF sheaths, which influences the coupling. The RF antenna frequency has been chosen to study different plasma wave interactions: the accessible plasma density range includes an evanescent and propagative behaviour of slow or fast waves, and allows the study of the effect of the lower hybrid resonance layer.

  7. The TESLA RF System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choroba, S.

    2003-12-01

    The TESLA project proposed by the TESLA collaboration in 2001 is a 500 to 800GeV e+/e- linear collider with integrated free electron laser facility. The accelerator is based on superconducting cavity technology. Approximately 20000 superconducting cavities operated at 1.3GHz with a gradient of 23.4MV/m or 35MV/m will be required to achieve the energy of 500GeV or 800GeV respectively. For 500GeV ˜600 RF stations each generating 10MW of RF power at 1.3GHz at a pulse duration of 1.37ms and a repetition rate of 5 or 10Hz are required. The original TESLA design was modified in 2002 and now includes a dedicated 20GeV electron accelerator in a separate tunnel for free electron laser application. The TESLA XFEL will provide XFEL radiation of unprecedented peak brilliance and full transverse coherence in the wavelength range of 0.1 to 6.4nm at a pulse duration of 100fs. The technology of both accelerators, the TESLA linear collider and the XFEL, will be identical, however the number of superconducting cavities and RF stations for the XFEL will be reduced to 936 and 26 respectively. This paper describes the layout of the entire RF system of the TESLA linear collider and the TESLA XFEL and gives an overview of its various subsystems and components.

  8. Quad RF power meter

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, D.W.

    1987-09-01

    This report shows how to construct a four-channel RF power meter from circuit boards and components found in a Hewlett Packard Model 432A Power Meter. Included are descriptions of necessary modifications, electrical circuit diagrams, and a parts list. Each of the four power meters is compatible with a Hewlett Packard 432A Power Meter.

  9. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  10. Reduction of RF sheaths potentials by compensation or suppression of parallel RF currents on ICRF antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, A.; Colas, L.; Vulliez, K.; Argouarch, A.; Milanesio, D.

    2009-11-01

    Radio Frequency (RF) sheaths are suspected to limit the performance of present-day Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antennae over long pulses and should be minimized in future Fusion devices. Within the simplest models, RF sheath effects are quantified by the integral VRF = ∫E//ṡdl where the parallel RF field E// is linked with the slow wave. On "long open field lines" with large toroidal extension on both sides of the antenna it was shown that VRF is excited by parallel RF currents j// flowing on the antenna structure. We thus propose two ways to reduce |VRF| by acting on j// on the antenna front face. The first method, more adapted for protruding antennae, consists in avoiding the j// circulation on the antenna structure, by slotting the antenna frame on its horizontal edges and by cutting partially the Faraday screen rods. The second method, well suited for recessed antennae, consists in compensating j// of opposite signs along long flux tubes, with parallelepiped antennae aligned with tilted flux tubes. The different concepts are assessed numerically on a 2-strap Tore Supra antenna phased [0, π] using near RF fields from the antenna code TOPICA. Simulations stress the need to suppress all current paths for j// to reduce substantially |VRF| over the whole antenna height.

  11. Barrier rf systems in synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra M. Bhat

    2004-06-28

    Recently, many interesting applications of the barrier RF system in hadron synchrotrons have been realized. A remarkable example of this is the development of longitudinal momentum mining and implementation at the Fermilab Recycler for extraction of low emittance pbars for the Tevatron shots. At Fermilab, we have barrier RF systems in four different rings. In the case of Recycler Ring, all of the rf manipulations are carried out using a barrier RF system. Here, the author reviews various uses of barrier rf systems in particle accelerators including some new schemes for producing intense proton beam and possible new applications.

  12. RF Gun Optimization Study

    SciTech Connect

    Alicia Hofler; Pavel Evtushenko

    2007-07-03

    Injector gun design is an iterative process where the designer optimizes a few nonlinearly interdependent beam parameters to achieve the required beam quality for a particle accelerator. Few tools exist to automate the optimization process and thoroughly explore the parameter space. The challenging beam requirements of new accelerator applications such as light sources and electron cooling devices drive the development of RF and SRF photo injectors. A genetic algorithm (GA) has been successfully used to optimize DC photo injector designs at Cornell University [1] and Jefferson Lab [2]. We propose to apply GA techniques to the design of RF and SRF gun injectors. In this paper, we report on the initial phase of the study where we model and optimize a system that has been benchmarked with beam measurements and simulation.

  13. Racetrack microtron rf system

    SciTech Connect

    Tallerico, P.J.; Keffeler, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The rf system for the National Bureau of Standards (NBS)/Los Alamos cw racetrack microtron is described. The low-power portion consists of five 75-W amplifers that drive two input ports in each of two chopper deflection cavities and one port in the prebuncher cavity. A single 500-kW klystron drives four separate 2380-MHz cavity sections: the two main accelerator sections, a capture section, and a preaccelerator section. The phases and amplitudes in all cavities are controlled by electronic or electromechanical controls. The 1-MW klystron power supply and crowbar system were purchased as a unit; several modifications are described that improve power-supply performance. The entire rf system has been tested and shipped to the NBS, and the chopper-buncher system has been operated with beam at the NBS. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  14. RF pulse compression development

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.; Weaver, J.N.

    1987-10-01

    The body of this paper discusses the theory and some rules for designing a multistage Binary Energy Compressor (BEC) including its response to nonstandard phase coding, describes some proof-of-principle experiments with a couple of low power BECs, presents the design parameters for some sample linear collider rf systems that could possibly use a BEC to advantage and outlines in the conclusion some planned R and D efforts. 8 refs., 26 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. RF pulsed heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritzkau, David Peace

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE011 mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 μs pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE012 mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 × 106 pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 × 106 pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  16. RF Pulsed Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritzkau, D. P.

    2002-01-01

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic elds on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic eld on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE011 mode at a resonant frequency of 11:424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1:5 s perent surface preparations.he cavity are designed to A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE012 mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in re ected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 106 pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86106 pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  17. Pressurized rf cavities in ionizing beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freemire, B.; Tollestrup, A. V.; Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Torun, Y.; Johnson, R. P.; Flanagan, G.; Hanlet, P. M.; Collura, M. G.; Jana, M. R.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Schwarz, T.

    2016-06-01

    A muon collider or Higgs factory requires significant reduction of the six dimensional emittance of the beam prior to acceleration. One method to accomplish this involves building a cooling channel using high pressure gas filled radio frequency cavities. The performance of such a cavity when subjected to an intense particle beam must be investigated before this technology can be validated. To this end, a high pressure gas filled radio frequency (rf) test cell was built and placed in a 400 MeV beam line from the Fermilab linac to study the plasma evolution and its effect on the cavity. Hydrogen, deuterium, helium and nitrogen gases were studied. Additionally, sulfur hexafluoride and dry air were used as dopants to aid in the removal of plasma electrons. Measurements were made using a variety of beam intensities, gas pressures, dopant concentrations, and cavity rf electric fields, both with and without a 3 T external solenoidal magnetic field. Energy dissipation per electron-ion pair, electron-ion recombination rates, ion-ion recombination rates, and electron attachment times to SF6 and O2 were measured.

  18. Progress on using NEA cathodes in an RF gun

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller, R.P., III; Anderson, T.; Edwards, H.; Bluem, H.; Schultheiss, T.; Sinclair, C.; Huening, M.; /DESY

    2005-05-01

    RF guns have proven useful in multiple accelerator applications, and are an attractive electron source for the ILC. Using a NEA GaAs photocathode in such a gun allows for the production of polarized electron beams. However the lifetime of a NEA cathode in this environment is reduced by ion and electron bombardment and residual gas oxidation. We report progress made with studies to produce a RF gun using a NEA GaAs photocathode to produce polarized electron beams. We discuss simulations of ion back bombardment and attempts to reduce the residual gas pressure in the gun are discussed. Future directions are also discussed.

  19. Modulator considerations for the SNS RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Tallerico, P.J.; Reass, W.A.

    1998-12-31

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an intense neutron source for neutron scattering experiments. The project is in the research stage, with construction funding beginning next year. The SNS is comprised of an ion source, a 1,000 MeV, H{sup {minus}} linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, a neutron producing target, and experimental area to utilize the scattering of the neutrons. The linear accelerator is RF driven, and the peak beam current is 27 mA and the beam duty factor is 5.84%. The peak RF power required is 104 MW, and the H{sup {minus}} beam pulse length is 0.97 ms at a 60 Hz repetition rate. The RF pulses must be about 0.1 ms longer than the beam pulses, due to the Q of the accelerating cavities, and the time required to establish control of the cavity fields. The modulators for the klystrons in this accelerator are discussed in this paper. The SNS is designed to be expandable, so the beam power can be doubled or even quadrupled in the future. One of the double-power options is to double the beam pulse length and duty factor. The authors are specifying the klystrons to operate in this twice-duty-factor mode, and the modulator also should be expandable to 2 ms pulses at 60 Hz. Due to the long pulse length and low RF frequency of 805 MHz, the klystron power is specified at 2.5 MW peak, and the RF system will have 56 klystrons at 805 MHz, and three 1.25 MW peak power klystrons at 402.5 MHz for the low energy portion of the accelerator. The low frequency modulators are conventional floating-deck modulation anode control systems.

  20. RF system at HIRFL-CSR main ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. Z.; Zhang, D. S.; Zhan, W. L.

    2001-12-01

    A heavy ion cooler-storage ring HIRFL-CSR[1] has been constructed at IMP. It consists of a main ring (CSRm) and an experimental ring (CSRe). Two RF cavities will be employed for CSRm. One is for beam acceleration, and another is for beam RF stacking. The accelerating cavity is designed to accelerate the beam from 10-50 MeV/u to 400-900 MeV/u with harmonic number h=1. The peak RF voltage is 8.0 kV and frequency range is from 0.25 MHz to 1.7 MHz. The RF stacking cavity with maximum voltage amplitude of 20 kV and tunable frequency range 6.0-14.0 MHz is used to capture the injected bunches from injector SSC (or SFC) and to accumulate the beam to high intensity by RF stacking method. In the present paper, the designed RF parameters and the details of hardware for the RF system are described.

  1. Characterization of the NiFe sputter etch process in a rf plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kropewnicki, Thomas J.; Paterson, Alex M.; Panagopoulos, Theodoros; Holland, John P.

    2006-05-15

    The sputter etching of NiFe thin films by Ar ions in a rf plasma has been studied and characterized with the use of a Langmuir probe. The NiFe sputter etch rate was found to depend strongly on incident ion energy, with the highest NiFe etch rates occurring at high rf bias power, low pressure, and moderate rf source power. NiFe etch rates initially increased with increasing rf source power, then saturated at higher rf source powers. Pressure had the weakest effect on NiFe etch rates. Empirically determined sputter yields based on the NiFe etch rates and ion current densities were calculated, and these compared favorably to sputter yields determined using the sputtering model proposed by Sigmund [Phys. Rev. 184, 383 (1969)].

  2. ACCELERATORS Study of a magnetic alloy-loaded RF cavity for bunch compression at the CSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Da-Yu; Liu, Yong; Xia, Jia-Wen; Li, Peng; Zhao, Yong-Tao; Yang, Lei; Qi, Xin

    2010-12-01

    The Heavy Ion Research Facility and Cooling Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR) accelerator in Lanzhou offers a unique possibility for the generation of high density and short pulse heavy ion beams by non-adiabatic bunch compression longitudinally, which is implemented by a fast jump of the RF-voltage amplitude. For this purpose, an RF cavity with high electric field gradient loaded with Magnetic Alloy cores has been developed. The results show that the resonant frequency range of the single-gap RF cavity is from 1.13 MHz to 1.42 MHz, and a maximum RF voltage of 40 kV with a total length of 100 cm can be obtained, which can be used to compress heavy ion beams of 238U72+ with 250 MeV/u from the initial bunch length of 200 ns to 50 ns with the coaction of the two single-gap RF cavity mentioned above.

  3. Tomcat-Projects_RF

    2004-09-15

    Tomcat-Projects_RF is a software package for analyzing sensor data obtained from a database and displaying the results with Java Servlet Pages (JSP). SQL Views into the dataset are tailored for personnel having different roles in monitoring the items in a storage facility. For example, an inspector, a host treaty compliance officer, a system engineer and software developers were the users identified that would need to access data at different levels of detail, The analysis providesmore » a high level status of the storage facility and allows the user to go deeper into the data details if the user desires.« less

  4. Tomcat-Projects_RF

    SciTech Connect

    Warrant, Marilyn M.; Garcia, Rudy J.; Zhang, Pengchu; Arms, Robert M.; Herzer, John A.; Conrad, Gregory N.; Brabson, John M.

    2004-09-15

    Tomcat-Projects_RF is a software package for analyzing sensor data obtained from a database and displaying the results with Java Servlet Pages (JSP). SQL Views into the dataset are tailored for personnel having different roles in monitoring the items in a storage facility. For example, an inspector, a host treaty compliance officer, a system engineer and software developers were the users identified that would need to access data at different levels of detail, The analysis provides a high level status of the storage facility and allows the user to go deeper into the data details if the user desires.

  5. RF Modal Quantity Gaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanleuven, K.

    1989-01-01

    The primary objective is to provide a concept of a radio frequency (RF) modal resonance technique which is being investigated as a method for gaging the quantities of subcritical cryogenic propellants in metallic tanks. Of special interest are the potential applications of the technique to microgravity propellant gaging situations. The results of concept testing using cryogenic oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen, as well as paraffin simulations of microgravity fluid orientations, are reported. These test results were positive and showed that the gaging concept was viable.

  6. RF current sensor

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James A.; Sparks, Dennis O.

    1998-11-10

    An RF sensor having a novel current sensing probe and a voltage sensing probe to measure voltage and current. The current sensor is disposed in a transmission line to link all of the flux generated by the flowing current in order to obtain an accurate measurement. The voltage sensor is a flat plate which operates as a capacitive plate to sense voltage on a center conductor of the transmission line, in which the measured voltage is obtained across a resistance leg of a R-C differentiator circuit formed by the characteristic impedance of a connecting transmission line and a capacitance of the plate, which is positioned proximal to the center conductor.

  7. Glancing angle RF sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    RF sheaths occur in tokamaks when ICRF waves encounter conducting boundaries. The sheath plays an important role in determining the efficiency of ICRF heating, the impurity influxes from the edge plasma, and the plasma-facing component damage. An important parameter in sheath theory is the angle θ between the equilibrium B field and the wall. Recent work with 1D and 2D sheath models has shown that the rapid variation of θ around a typical limiter can lead to enhanced sheath potentials and localized power deposition (hot spots) when the B field is near glancing incidence. The physics model used to obtain these results does not include some glancing-angle effects, e.g. possible modification of the angular dependence of the Child-Langmuir law and the role of the magnetic pre-sheath. Here, we report on calculations which explore these effects, with the goal of improving the fidelity of the rf sheath BC used in analytical and numerical calculations. Work supported by US DOE grants DE-FC02-05ER54823 and DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  8. The MUCOOL RF Program

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Bross, A.; Moretti, A.; Norris, B.; Qian, Z.; Torun, Y.; Rimmer, R.; Li, D.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Sandstrom, R.; /Geneva U.

    2006-06-26

    Efficient muon cooling requires high RF gradients in the presence of high (3T) solenoidal fields. The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) also requires that the x-ray production from these cavities is low, in order to minimize backgrounds in the particle detectors that must be located near the cavities. These cavities require thin Be windows to ensure the highest fields on the beam axis. In order to develop these cavities, the MUCOOL RF Program was started about 6 years ago. Initial measurements were made on a six-cell cavity and a single-cell pillbox, both operating at 805 MHz. We have now begun measurements of a 201 MHz pillbox cavity. This program has led to new techniques to look at dark currents, a new model for breakdown and a general model of cavity performance based on surface damage. The experimental program includes studies of thin Be windows, conditioning, dark current production from different materials, magnetic-field effects and breakdown.

  9. Particle-In-Cell/Monte Carlo Simulation of Ion Back Bombardment in Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Corlett, John; Staples, John

    2009-03-02

    In this paper, we report on studies of ion back bombardment in high average current dc and rf photoinjectors using a particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo method. Using H{sub 2} ion as an example, we observed that the ion density and energy deposition on the photocathode in rf guns are order of magnitude lower than that in a dc gun. A higher rf frequency helps mitigate the ion back bombardment of the cathode in rf guns.

  10. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  11. Control of the RF waveform at the chuck of an industrial oxide-etch reactor

    SciTech Connect

    BERRY,LEE; MAYNARD,HELEN; MILLER,PAUL A.; MOORE,TONY; PENDLEY,MICHAEL; RESTA,VICTORIA; SPARKS,DENNIS; YANG,QUINGYUN

    2000-05-04

    Radio frequency (rf) power is applied to the chuck of a high-density plasma reactor in order to extract ions and to control the energy of the ions used for the fabrication of microelectronic devices. In many cases, the temporal shape of the rf waveform largely determines the shape of the spectrum of those extracted ions, thereby strongly affecting feature evolution. Using auxiliary rf circuits the authors successfully made major changes to the rf potential waveform at the chuck of an Applied Materials 5300 HDP Omega reactor without affecting the normal functioning of the reactor's control systems. This work established the practical feasibility of techniques for modifying the ion energy distribution functions of industrial reactors.

  12. Capture, acceleration and bunching rf systems for the MEIC booster and storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaoheng; Guo, Jiquan; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng; Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC), proposed by Jefferson Lab, consists of a series of accelerators. The electron collider ring accepts electrons from CEBAF at energies from 3 to 12 GeV. Protons and ions are delivered to a booster and captured in a long bunch before being ramped and transferred to the ion collider ring. The ion collider ring accelerates a small number of long ion bunches to colliding energy before they are re-bunched into a high frequency train of very short bunches for colliding. Two sets of low frequency RF systems are needed for the long ion bunch energy ramping in the booster and ion collider ring. Another two sets of high frequency RF cavities are needed for re-bunching in the ion collider ring and compensating synchrotron radiation energy loss in the electron collider ring. The requirements from energy ramping, ion beam bunching, electron beam energy compensation, collective effects, beam loading and feedback capability, RF power capability, etc. are presented. The preliminary designs of these RF systems are presented. Concepts for the baseline cavity and RF station configurations are described, as well as some options that may allow more flexible injection and acceleration schemes.

  13. RF MEMS Based Reconfigurable Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2004-01-01

    The presentation will first of all address the advantages of RF MEMS circuit in antenna applications and also the need for electronically reconfigurable antennas. Next, discuss some of the recent examples of RF MEMS based reconfigurable microstrip antennas. Finally, conclude the talk with a summary of MEMS antenna performance.

  14. NSLS-II RF SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.; Gash, W.; Holub, B.; Kawashima, Y.; Ma, H.; Towne, N.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II is a new third generation light source being constructed at Brookhaven Lab. The storage ring is optimized for low emittance by use of damping wigglers to reduce the emittance to below 1 nm-rad. The RF systems are designed to provide stable beam through tight RF phase and amplitude stability requirements.

  15. Compact superconducting rf-dipole cavity designs for deflecting and crabbing applications

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Subashini; Delayen, Jean R.; Castilla, Alejandro

    2013-06-01

    Over the years the superconducting parallel-bar design has evolved into an rf-dipole cavity with improved properties. The new rf-dipole design is considered for a number of deflecting and crabbing applications. Some of those applications are the 499 MHz rf separator system for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade, the 400 MHz crabbing cavity system for the proposed LHC high luminosity upgrade, and the 750 MHz crabbing cavity for the medium energy electron-ion collider in Jefferson Lab. In this paper we present the optimized rf design in terms of rf performance including rf properties, higher order modes (HOM) properties, multipacting and multipole expansion for the above mentioned applications.

  16. Studies of RF sheaths and diagnostics on IShTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Crombé, K.; D’Inca, R.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Jacquot, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Louche, F.; Tripsky, M.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.

    2015-12-10

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetised plasma test facility for RF sheaths studies at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Garching. In contrast to a tokamak, a test stand provides more liberty to impose the parameters and gives better access for the instrumentation and antennas. The project will support the development of diagnostic methods for characterising RF sheaths and validate and improve theoretical predictions. The cylindrical vacuum vessel has a diameter of 1 m and is 1.1 m long. The plasma is created by an external cylindrical plasma source equipped with a helical antenna that has been designed to excite the m=1 helicon mode. In inductive mode, plasma densities and electron temperatures have been characterised with a planar Langmuir probe as a function of gas pressure and input RF power. A 2D array of RF compensated Langmuir probes and a spectrometer are planned. A single strap RF antenna has been designed; the plasma-facing surface is aligned to the cylindrical plasma to ease the modelling. The probes will allow direct measurements of plasma density profiles in front of the RF antenna, and thus a detailed study of the density modifications induced by RF sheaths, which influences the coupling. The RF antenna frequency has been chosen to study different plasma wave interactions: the accessible plasma density range includes an evanescent and propagative behaviour of slow or fast waves, and allows the study of the effect of the lower hybrid resonance layer.

  17. Shielding for thermoacoustic tomography with RF excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, M.; Becker, G.; Dey, P.; Generotzky, J.; Patch, S. K.

    2008-02-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) pulses used to generate thermoacoustic computerized tomography (TCT) signal couple directly into the pulser-receiver and oscilloscope, swamping true TCT signal. We use a standard RF enclosure housing both RF amplifier and object being imaged. This is similar to RF shielding of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suites and protects electronics outside from stray RF. Unlike MRI, TCT receivers are ultrasound transducers, which must also be shielded from RF. A transducer housing that simultaneously shields RF and permits acoustic transmission was developed specifically for TCT. We compare TCT signals measured with and without RF shielding.

  18. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  19. New ion trap for frequency standard applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1989-01-01

    A novel linear ion trap was designed, which permits storage of a large number of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the RF confining fields. This new trap should store about 20 times the number of ions as a conventional RF trap with no corresponding increase in second-order Doppler shift from the confining field. In addition, the sensitivity of this shift to trapping parameters, i.e., RF voltage, RF frequency, and trap size, is greatly reduced.

  20. Plasma Acceleration from RF Discharge in Dielectric Capillary

    SciTech Connect

    A. Dunaevsky; Y. Raitses; N. J. Fisch

    2005-08-09

    Plasma acceleration from rf discharge in dielectric capillary was demonstrated. Observed plasma flow had ion energies of approximately 100 eV and electron energies of approximately 20 eV. The discharge was powered by a MHz-range rf generator and fed by Ar. Experimental results indicate possible validity of assumptions about formation of a potential difference at the open end of the capillary and presence of hot electron fraction in the capillary discharge. Simplicity and small dimensions of the source are attractive for micro-propulsion applications.

  1. Spectroscopy of {sup 257}Rf

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, J.; Heinz, A.; Winkler, R.; Khoo, T. L.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Peterson, D.; Seweryniak, D.; Ahmad, I.; Back, B. B.; Carpenter, M. P.; Greene, J. P.; Jiang, C. L.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Robinson, A.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.; Vondrasek, R.; Wang, X.

    2009-06-15

    The isotope {sup 257}Rf was produced in the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 208}Pb({sup 50}Ti,n){sup 257}Rf. Reaction products were separated and identified by mass. Delayed spectroscopy of {sup 257}Rf and its decay products was performed. A partial decay scheme with configuration assignments is proposed based on {alpha} hindrance factors. The excitation energy of the 1/2{sup +}[620] configuration in {sup 253}No is proposed. The energy of this 1/2{sup +} state in a series of N=151 isotones increases with nuclear charge, reflecting an increase in the N=152 gap. This gap is deduced to grow substantially from 850 to 1400 keV between Z=94 and 102. An isomeric state in {sup 257}Rf, with a half-life of 160{sub -31}{sup +42} {mu}s, was discovered by detecting internal conversion electrons followed by {alpha} decay. It is interpreted as a three-quasiparticle high-K isomer. A second group of internal conversion electrons, with a half-life of 4.1{sub -1.3}{sup +2.4} s, followed by {alpha} decay, was also observed. These events might originate from the decay of excited states in {sup 257}Lr, populated by electron-capture decay of {sup 257}Rf. Fission of {sup 257}Rf was unambiguously detected, with a branching ratio of b{sub Rf}{sup SF}=0.02{+-}0.01.

  2. RF breakdown experiments at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, L.; Scheitrum, G.; Vlieks, A.; Pearson, C.; Caryotakis, G.; Luhmann, N. C.

    1999-05-01

    RF breakdown is a critical issue in the conditioning of klystrons, accelerator sections, and rf components for the next linear collider (NLC), as well as other high gradient accelerators and high power microwave sources. SLAC is conducting a series of experiments using an X-band traveling wave ring to characterize the processes and trigger mechanisms associated with rf breakdown. The goal of the research is to identify materials, processes, and manufacturing methods that will increase the breakdown threshold and minimize the time required for conditioning.

  3. Characterization of Ion Dynamics in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Webb, Ian K.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Venkata BS; Zhang, Xinyu; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-08-23

    Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulation (SLIM) represent a novel class of ion optical devices based upon electrodes patterned on planar surfaces, and relying on a combined action of radio frequency and DC electric fields and specific buffer gas density conditions. Initial experimental studies have demonstrated the feasibility of the SLIM concept. This report offers an in-depth consideration of key ion dynamics properties in such devices based upon ion optics theory and computational modeling. The SLIM devices investigated are formed by two surfaces, each having an array of radio frequency (RF) "rung" electrodes, bordered by DC "guard" electrodes. Ion motion is confined by the RF effective potential in the direction orthogonal to the boards, and limited or controlled in the transversal direction by the guard DC potentials. Ions can be efficiently trapped and stored in SLIM devices where the confinement of ions can be ‘soft’ in regard to the extent of collisional activation, similarly to RF-only multipole ion guides and traps. The segmentation of the RF rung electrodes and guards along the axis makes it possible to apply electric field profiles to stimulate ion transfer within a SLIM. In the case of a linear DC gradient applied to RF rungs and guards, a virtually uniform electric field can be created along the axis of the device, enabling ion mobility separations.

  4. Characterization of ion dynamics in structures for lossless ion manipulations.

    PubMed

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V; Webb, Ian K; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Zhang, Xinyu; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D

    2014-09-16

    Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulation (SLIM) represent a novel class of ion optical devices based upon electrodes patterned on planar surfaces, and relying on a combined action of radiofrequency and DC electric fields and specific buffer gas density conditions. Initial experimental studies have demonstrated the feasibility of the SLIM concept. This report offers an in-depth consideration of key ion dynamics properties in such devices based upon ion optics theory and computational modeling. The SLIM devices investigated are formed by two surfaces, each having an array of radiofrequency (RF) "rung" electrodes, bordered by DC "guard" electrodes. Ion motion is confined by the RF effective potential in the direction orthogonal to the boards and limited or controlled in the transversal direction by the guard DC potentials. Ions can be efficiently trapped and stored in SLIM devices where the confinement of ions can be "soft" in regard to the extent of collisional activation, similarly to RF-only multipole ion guides and traps. The segmentation of the RF rung electrodes and guards along the axis makes it possible to apply static or transient electric field profiles to stimulate ion transfer within a SLIM. In the case of a linear DC gradient applied to RF rungs and guards, a virtually uniform electric field can be created along the axis of the device, enabling high quality ion mobility separations. PMID:25152178

  5. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  6. Rf-driver linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1987-05-01

    The next generation of linear collider after the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider) will probably have an energy in the range 300 GeV-1 TeV per linac. A number of exotic accelerating schemes, such as laser and plasma acceleration, have been proposed for linear colliders of the far future. However, the technology which is most mature and which could lead to a collider in the above energy range in the relatively near future is the rf-driven linac, in which externally produced rf is fed into a more or less conventional metallic accelerating structure. Two basic technologies have been proposed for producing the required high peak rf power: discrete microwave power sources, and various two-beam acceleration schemes in which the rf is produced by a high current driving beam running parallel to the main accelerator. The current status of experimental and analytic work on both the discrete source and the two-beam methods for producing rf is discussed. The implications of beam-beam related effects (luminosity, disruption and beamstrahlung) for the design of rf-driven colliders are also considered.

  7. Production and decay properties of the 1.9-s isomeric state in {sup 261}Rf

    SciTech Connect

    Haba, H.; Kaji, D.; Kikunaga, H.; Kudou, Y.; Morimoto, K.; Morita, K.; Ozeki, K.; Sumita, T.; Yoneda, A.; Kasamatsu, Y.; Komori, Y.; Ooe, K.; Shinohara, A.

    2011-03-15

    The 1.9-s isomeric state ({sup 261}Rf{sup b}) in {sup 261}Rf was directly populated in the {sup 248}Cm({sup 18}O,5n){sup 261}Rf{sup b} reaction. Alpha and spontaneous fission (SF) decays of {sup 261}Rf{sup b}, as well as the 68-s state {sup 261}Rf{sup a}, was investigated with a rotating wheel apparatus under low background conditions attained by a gas-jet transport system coupled to the RIKEN gas-filled recoil ion separator. An identification of {sup 261}Rf{sup b} was based on {alpha}-{alpha} correlations linking {alpha} decays of {sup 261}Rf{sup b} and its daughter {sup 257}No. The {alpha}-particle energy of {sup 261}Rf{sup b} was measured to be 8.52 {+-} 0.05 MeV. The half-life was determined to be 1.9 {+-} 0.4 s based on both 8.52-MeV {alpha} and SF decays. The {alpha} and SF branches are 0.27 {+-} 0.06 and 0.73 {+-} 0.06, respectively. The cross section for the {sup 248}Cm({sup 18}O,5n){sup 261}Rf{sup b} reaction is {sigma}({sup 261}Rf{sup b}) = 11 {+-} 2 nb at 95.1 MeV, which gives a cross-section ratio of {sigma}({sup 261}Rf{sup a})/{sigma}({sup 261}Rf{sup b}) = 1.1 {+-} 0.2.

  8. A new equilibrium theory for rf discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Francis F.; Curreli, Davide

    2011-10-01

    Two problems often encountered in RF discharges are 1) anomalous skin depth and 2) anomalous electron diffusion across magnetic fields B. Both effects can be explained if the discharges are not unusually long or short. The Simon short-circuit effect then allows the electrons to follow the Boltzmann relation even across B. Once Maxwellian electrons are assumed, a remarkable result can be obtained for radial profiles of density, potential, and ion drift velocity toward the cylindrical wall. In suitably normalized units, these profiles take on a universal shape for all discharges, regardless of B. The velocity profile naturally reaches the Bohm velocity at the wall (= sheath edge). Our code EQM solves for the radial profiles of plasma and neutral density including neutral depletion. All radial dependences are taken into account exactly, and no assumption of a presheath is necessary. To get the profile of Te requires energy balance in the specific discharge. We have done this for helicon discharges described by the HELIC code. Iteration between EQM and HELIC yields all profiles and also the absolute density for given RF power. Now at Univ. of Padua, Padua, Italy.

  9. Experimental investigation of hydrogen peroxide RF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barni, R.; Decina, A.; Zanini, S.; D'Orazio, A.; Riccardi, C.

    2016-04-01

    This work reports a detailed experimental study of the plasma properties in low pressure RF discharges in hydrogen peroxide and a comparison with argon under the same operating conditions. H2O2 plasmas have been proposed for sterilization purposes. Electrical properties of the discharge were shown to be similar, as for the RF and DC voltages of the driving electrode. Bulk plasma volume remains stable, concentrated in an almost cylindrical region between the two facing electrodes. It was found that the electron temperature is almost uniform across the plasma and independent of the power level. This is higher than in argon discharges: T e  =  4.6  ±  0.9 eV versus T e  =  3.3  ±  1.1 eV. The plasma density increases almost linearly with the power level and a substantial negative ion component has been ruled out in hydrogen peroxide. Dissociation in the plasma gas phase was revealed by atomic hydrogen and hydroxyl radical emission in the discharge spectra. Emission from hydroxyl and atomic oxygen demonstrates that oxidizing radicals are produced by hydrogen peroxide discharges, revealing its usefulness for plasma processing other than sterilization, for instance to increase polymer film surface energy. On the other hand, argon could be considered as a candidate for the sterilization purposes due to the intense production of UV radiation.

  10. Technology of RF superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This work has several parts, two of which are collaborative development projects with the majority of the work being performed at Argonne. The first is the development of a superconducting RFQ structure in collaboration with AccSys Technology Inc. of Pleasanton, California, funded as a Phase II SBIR grant. Another is a collaborative project with the Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi, India (who are funding the work) to develop new superconducting ion accelerating structures. Other initiatives are developing various aspects of the technology required to utilize ATLAS as a secondary beam linac for radioactive beams.

  11. ICR Heating in Ion Separation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, A.V.

    2005-12-15

    A systematic procedure for analyzing the physical processes that govern ICR heating in systems for ion separation is developed. The procedure is based on an analytic model of an rf antenna generating rf fields within a plasma column in a magnetic field and includes such issues as the calculation of rf fields, examination of the ICR interaction of ions with these fields, and determination of the distribution function of the ion flow at the exit from the ICR heating system. It is shown that, even in ICR heating systems with easily achievable parameter values, ions with appreciably different masses can be efficiently separated by energy.

  12. Recent experimental results and modeling of RF heating of ({sup 3}He)-D JET plasmas: RF as a tool to study transport

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Marinoni, A.; Casati, A.; Joffrin, E.; Imbeaux, F.; Kiptily, V.; Sharapov, S.; Santala, M.; Giroud, C.; Crombe, K.; Andrew, Y.; Lomas, P.; Felton, R.

    2007-09-28

    D plasmas with {sup 3}He minorities have sharp, thin ion-ion hybrid layers that enable to efficiently excite short wavelength branches that are subsequently damped by fairly well localized electron Landau and TTMP absorption. Depending on the minority concentration chosen, ion minority heating or electron mode conversion damping is dominant. Recent experiments have been devoted to the study of ({sup 3}He)-D JET plasmas. One aspect of those experiments--using RF heating as a tool--is the study of the response of the plasma to RF power modulation, allowing to examine the fate of the RF power and to diagnose particle and energy transport. The present paper gives a very brief summary of a subset of these experiments. The focus will largely but not exclusively be on understanding ITB physics. The adopted probing methods are more generally applicable, though.

  13. Phase modulation in RF tag

    DOEpatents

    Carrender, Curtis Lee; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2007-02-20

    A radio frequency (RF) communication system employs phase-modulated backscatter signals for RF communication from an RF tag to an interrogator. The interrogator transmits a continuous wave interrogation signal to the RF tag, which based on an information code stored in a memory, phase-modulates the interrogation signal to produce a backscatter response signal that is transmitted back to the interrogator. A phase modulator structure in the RF tag may include a switch coupled between an antenna and a quarter-wavelength stub; and a driver coupled between the memory and a control terminal of the switch. The driver is structured to produce a modulating signal corresponding to the information code, the modulating signal alternately opening and closing the switch to respectively decrease and increase the transmission path taken by the interrogation signal and thereby modulate the phase of the response signal. Alternatively, the phase modulator may include a diode coupled between the antenna and driver. The modulating signal from the driver modulates the capacitance of the diode, which modulates the phase of the response signal reflected by the diode and antenna.

  14. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  15. Design of RF Systems for the RTD Mission VASIMR

    SciTech Connect

    Baity, F.W.; Barber, G.C.; Carter, M.D.; Chang-Diaz, F.R.; Goulding, R.H.; McCaskill, G.E.; Sparks, D.O.; Squire, J.P.

    1999-04-12

    The first flight test of the variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket (VASIMR) is tentatively scheduled for the Radiation and Technology Demonstration (RTD) in 2003. This mission to map the radiation environment out to several earth radii will employ both a Hall thruster and a VASIMR during its six months duration, beginning from low earth orbit. The mission will be powered by a solar array providing 12 kW of direct current electricity at 50 V. The VASIMR utilizes radiofrequency (RF) power both to generate a high-density plasma in a helicon source and to accelerate the plasma ions to high velocity by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). The VASIMR concept is being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in collaboration with national laboratories and universities. Prototype plasma sources, RF amplifiers, and antennas are being developed in the experimental facilities of the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL).

  16. Unified model of the rf plasma sheath: Part 2, Asymptotic connection formulae

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.E.

    1996-08-01

    A previously-developed approximation to the first integral of the Poisson equation enables one to obtain solutions for the voltage- current characteristics of a radio-frequency (rf) plasma sheath that are valid over the whole range of inertial response of the ions to an imposed rf voltage or current-specified conditions. The theory reproduced the time-dependent voltage-current characteristics of the two extreme cases corresponding to the Lieberman rf sheath theory and the Metze-Ernie-Oskam theory. In this paper the sheath model is connected to the plasma bulk description, and a prescription is given for the ion relaxation time constant, which determines the time-dependent ion impact energy on the electrode surface. It appears that this connected model should be applicable to those high density, low pressure plasmas in which the Debye length is a small fraction of the ion mean free path, which itself is a small fraction of the plasma dimension.

  17. Cryogenic vacuumm RF feedthrough device

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Genfa; Phillips, Harry Lawrence

    2008-12-30

    A cryogenic vacuum rf feedthrough device comprising: 1) a probe for insertion into a particle beam; 2) a coaxial cable comprising an inner conductor and an outer conductor, a dielectric/insulating layer surrounding the inner conductor, the latter being connected to the probe for the transmission of higher mode rf energy from the probe; and 3) a high thermal conductivity stub attached to the coaxial dielectric about and in thermal contact with the inner conductor which high thermal conductivity stub transmits heat generated in the vicinity of the probe efficiently and radially from the area of the probe and inner conductor all while maintaining useful rf transmission line characteristics between the inner and outer coaxial conductors.

  18. The integrated optic RF spectrum analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedinoff, M. E.; Ranganath, T. R.; Joseph, T. R.; Lee, J. Y.

    1981-01-01

    The results of measurements made on a fully integrated optic RF spectrum analyzer (IOSA) are reported. The performance of the device acousto-optic bandwidth, single-tone RF resolution, two-tone RF resolution, single-tone dynamic range, two-tone dynamic range, and single-tone RF response are presented. The device parameters that control device performance are analyzed. These results demonstrate the viability of the IOSA for real time spectrum analysis of pulsed and CW RF signals. Improvements of RF bandwidth resolution can be obtained by the use of larger collimated optical beams which requires larger optical lens elements, and hence, larger crystals.

  19. Atomic ion clock with two ion traps, and method to transfer ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D. (Inventor); Chung, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An atomic ion clock with a first ion trap and a second ion trap, where the second ion trap is of higher order than the first ion trap. In one embodiment, ions may be shuttled back and forth from one ion trap to the other by application of voltage ramps to the electrodes in the ion traps, where microwave interrogation takes place when the ions are in the second ion trap, and fluorescence is induced and measured when the ions are in the first ion trap. In one embodiment, the RF voltages applied to the second ion trap to contain the ions are at a higher frequency than that applied to the first ion trap. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  20. Plasma rotation induced by RF

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, V. S.; Chiu, S. C.; Lin-Liu, Y. R. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698; Omelchenko, Y. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698

    1999-09-20

    Plasma rotation has many beneficial effects on tokamak operation including stabilization of MHD and microturbulence to improve the beta limit and confinement. Contrary to present-day tokamaks, neutral beams may not be effective in driving rotation in fusion reactors; hence the investigation of radiofrequency (RF) induced plasma rotation is of great interest and potential importance. This paper reviews the experimental results of RF induced rotation and possible physical mechanisms, suggested by theories, to explain the observations. This subject is only in the infancy of its research and many challenging issues remained to be understood and resolved. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  1. RF-source resistance meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakley, E. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Several embodiments of RF source resistance measuring devices are disclosed. Common to all embodiments in the feature of the inclusion of at least one variable resistor, and a peak readout meter. In one embodiment, two ganged unloaded potentiometers are employed while another embodiment comprises an automaticnulling RF power bridge circuit with a variable rather than a fixed bridge reference resistance. A third embodiment comprises a calorimeter with a varible rather than a fixed resistor, while in another embodiment attenuator pads with variable resistors are employed.

  2. Beam dynamics and expected RHIC performance with 56MHz RF upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov,A.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2009-05-04

    An upgrade of the RHIC storage RF system with a superconducting 56 MHz cavity was recently proposed. This upgrade will provide a significant increase in the acceptance of the RHIC 197 MHz storage RF bucket. This paper summarizes simulations of beam evolution due to intra-beam scattering (IBS) for beam parameters expected with the 56 MHz SRF cavity upgrade. Expected luminosity improvements are shown for Au ions at 100 GeV/nucleon and protons at 250 GeV.

  3. RF low-level control for the Linac4 H{sup −} source

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, A. Grudiev, A.; Lettry, J.; Paoluzzi, M.; Schmitzer, C.; Nishida, K.

    2015-04-08

    The H{sup −} source for the Linac4 accelerator at CERN uses an RF driven plasma for the production of H{sup −}. The RF is supplied by a 2 MHz RF tube amplifier with a maximum power output of 100 kW and a pulse duration of up to 2 ms. The low-level RF signal generation and measurement system has been developed using standard CERN controls electronics in the VME form factor. The RF frequency and amplitude reference signals are generated using separate arbitrary waveform generator channels. The frequency and amplitude are both freely programmable over the duration of the RF pulse, which allows fine-tuning of the excitation. Measurements of the forward and reverse RF power signals are performed via directional couplers using high-speed digitizers, and permit the estimation of the plasma impedance and deposited power via an equivalent circuit model. The low-level RF hardware and software implementations are described, and experimental results obtained with the Linac4 ion sources in the test stand are presented.

  4. Saddle antenna radio frequency ion sources.

    PubMed

    Dudnikov, V; Johnson, R; Murray, S; Pennisi, T; Santana, M; Piller, C; Stockli, M; Welton, R; Breitschopf, J; Dudnikova, G

    2016-02-01

    Existing RF ion sources for accelerators have specific efficiencies for H(+) and H(-) ion generation ∼3-5 mA/cm(2) kW, where about 50 kW of RF power is typically needed for 50 mA beam current production. The Saddle Antenna (SA) surface plasma source (SPS) described here was developed to improve H(-) ion production efficiency, reliability, and availability. In SA RF ion source, the efficiency of positive ion generation in the plasma has been improved to 200 mA/cm(2) kW. After cesiation, the current of negative ions to the collector was increased from 1 mA to 10 mA with RF power ∼1.5 kW in the plasma (6 mm diameter emission aperture) and up to 30 mA with ∼4 kW RF. Continuous wave (CW) operation of the SA SPS has been tested on the test stand. The general design of the CW SA SPS is based on the pulsed version. Some modifications were made to improve the cooling and cesiation stability. CW operation with negative ion extraction was tested with RF power up to ∼1.2 kW in the plasma with production up to Ic = 7 mA. A stable long time generation of H(-) beam without degradation was demonstrated in RF discharge with AlN discharge chamber. PMID:26931988

  5. Electrical characterization of rf plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.A.

    1991-08-01

    Radio-frequency (rf) electrical sources are commonly used to generate plasmas for processing of industrial materials and for related experimental work. Published descriptions of such plasmas usually include generator-power measurements, and occasionally include plasma dc-bias measurements. One or both of these quantitites are also used in industrial feedback ccontrol systems for setpoint regulation. Recent work at Sandia an elsewhere with an experimental rf discharge device (the GEC RF Reference Cell'') has shown that power and dc-bias levels are often insufficient information for specifying the state of the plasma. The plasma can have nonlinear electrical characteristics that cause harmonic generation, and the harmonic levels can depend sensitively on the impedance of the external circuitry at harmonic frequencies. Even though the harmonics may be low in amplitude, they can be directly related to large changes in plasma power and to changes in optical emission from the plasma. Consequently, in order for a worker to truly master the plasma-generation process, it is necessary to understand, measure, and control electrical characteristics of the plamsa. In this paper we describe technique that have been developed from work with the Reference Cell for making electrical measurements on rf plasmas, and we describe surprising observations of harmonic behavior. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Automatic calorimetry system monitors RF power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harness, B. W.; Heiberger, E. C.

    1969-01-01

    Calorimetry system monitors the average power dissipated in a high power RF transmitter. Sensors measure the change in temperature and the flow rate of the coolant, while a multiplier computes the power dissipated in the RF load.

  7. Simulation of synchrotron motion with rf noise

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, B.T.; Forest, E.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    1986-08-01

    The theoretical formulation is described that is behind an algorithm for synchrotron phase-space tracking with rf noise and some preliminary simulation results of bunch diffusion under rf noise obtained by actual tracking.

  8. "Virtual IED sensor" at an rf-biased electrode in low-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanova, M. A.; Lopaev, D. V.; Zyryanov, S. M.; Rakhimov, A. T.

    2016-07-01

    Energy distribution and the flux of the ions coming on a surface are considered as the key-parameters in anisotropic plasma etching. Since direct ion energy distribution (IED) measurements at the treated surface during plasma processing are often hardly possible, there is an opportunity for virtual ones. This work is devoted to the possibility of such indirect IED and ion flux measurements at an rf-biased electrode in low-pressure rf plasma by using a "virtual IED sensor" which represents "in-situ" IED calculations on the absolute scale in accordance with a plasma sheath model containing a set of measurable external parameters. The "virtual IED sensor" should also involve some external calibration procedure. Applicability and accuracy of the "virtual IED sensor" are validated for a dual-frequency reactive ion etching (RIE) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor with a capacitively coupled rf-biased electrode. The validation is carried out for heavy (Ar) and light (H2) gases under different discharge conditions (different ICP powers, rf-bias frequencies, and voltages). An EQP mass-spectrometer and an rf-compensated Langmuir probe (LP) are used to characterize plasma, while an rf-compensated retarded field energy analyzer (RFEA) is applied to measure IED and ion flux at the rf-biased electrode. Besides, the pulsed selfbias method is used as an external calibration procedure for ion flux estimating at the rf-biased electrode. It is shown that pulsed selfbias method allows calibrating the IED absolute scale quite accurately. It is also shown that the "virtual IED sensor" based on the simplest collisionless sheath model allows reproducing well enough the experimental IEDs at the pressures when the sheath thickness s is less than the ion mean free path λi (s < λi). At higher pressure (when s > λi), the difference between calculated and experimental IEDs due to ion collisions in the sheath is observed in the low energy range. The effect of electron impact ionization

  9. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Mangan, Michael A.; Blain, Matthew G.; Tigges, Chris P.; Linker, Kevin L.

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  10. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOEpatents

    Conway, P.H.; Yu, D.U.L.

    1995-02-28

    A digital-to-analog converter is disclosed for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration. 18 figs.

  11. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Patrick H.; Yu, David U. L.

    1995-01-01

    A digital-to analogue converter for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration.

  12. Reliability and availability considerations in the RF systems of ATW-class accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallerico, Paul J.; Lynch, Michael T.; Lawrence, George

    1995-09-01

    In an RF-driven, ion accelerator for waste transmutation or nuclear material production, the overall availability is perhaps the most important specification. The synchronism requirements in an ion accelerator, as contrasted to an electron accelerator, cause a failure of an RF source to have a greater consequence. These large machines also are major capital investments, so the availability determines the return on this capital. RF system design methods to insure a high availability without paying a serious cost penalty are the subject of this paper. The overall availability goal in our present designs is 75% for the entire ATW complex, and from 25 to 35% of the unavailability is allocated to the RF system, since it is one of the most complicated subsystems in the complex. The allowed down time for the RF system (including the linac and all other subsystems) is then only 7 to 9% of the operating time per year, or as little as 613 hours per year, for continuous operation. Since large accelerators consume large amounts of electrical power, excellent efficiency is also required with the excellent availability. The availability also influences the sizes of the RF components: smaller components may fail and yet the accelerator may still meet all specifications. Larger components are also attractive, since the cost of an RF system usually increases as the square root of the number of RF systems utilized. In some cases, there is a reliability penalty that accompanies the cost savings from using larger components. We discuss these factors, and present an availability model that allows one to examine these trade offs, and make rational choices in the RF and accelerator system designs.

  13. New ion trap for atomic frequency standard applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1989-01-01

    A novel linear ion trap that permits storage of a large number of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the radio frequency (RF) confining fields has been designed and built. This new trap should store about 20 times the number of ions a conventional RF trap stores with no corresponding increase in second-order Doppler shift from the confining field. In addition, the sensitivity of this shift to trapping parameters, i.e., RF voltage, RF frequency, and trap size, is greatly reduced.

  14. High gradient RF breakdown studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Lisa Leanne

    Higher accelerating gradients are required by future demands for TeV electron linear colliders. With higher energy comes the challenge of handling stronger electromagnetic fields in the accelerator structures and in the microwave sources that supply the power. A limit on the maximum field gradient is imposed by rf electrical breakdown. Investigating methods to achieve higher gradients and to better understand the mechanisms involved in the rf breakdown process has been the focal point of this study. A systematic series of rf breakdown experiments have been conducted at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center utilizing a transmission cavity operating in the TM020 mode. A procedure was developed to examine the high gradient section of the cavity in an electron microscope. The results have revealed that breakdown asymmetry exists between opposing high gradient surfaces. During breakdown, a plasma formation is detected localized near the surface with no visible evidence of an arc traversing the gap. These findings support the theory that high frequency rf breakdown is a single surface phenomenon. Other results from this study have shown that breakdown can occur at relatively low voltages when surface irregularities exist and along grain boundaries. A series of steps have been developed through this study that have significantly reduced the number of breakdowns that occur along grain boundaries. Testing under various vacuum conditions (10-11--10 -5 Torr) have revealed that while the breakdown threshold remained the same, the field emitted current density increased by almost two orders of magnitude. This suggests that the total field emitted current density is not the critical parameter in the initiation of high frequency vacuum breakdown. In the course of this study, microparticles were carefully tracked before and after rf processing. The outcome of this research suggests that expensive cleanroom facilities may not offer any advantage over practicing good cleaning and

  15. RF power coupling for the CSNS DTL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hua-Chang; Peng, Jun; Yin, Xue-Jun; Ouyang, Hua-Fu; Fu, Shi-Nian

    2011-01-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) drift tube linac (DTL) consists of four tanks and each tank is fed by a 2.5 MW klystron. Accurate predication of RF coupling between the RF cavity and ports is very important for DTL RF coupler design. An iris-type coupler is chosen to couple the RF power to the DTL accelerating cavity. The physical design of the DTL coupler and the calculations of RF coupling between the cavity and coupler are carried out. The results from the numerical simulations are in excellent agreement with the analytical results.

  16. The Murmansk Initiative-RF: Completion

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.; Wester, D. W.; Dyer, R. S.; Sorlie, A. A.; Moller, B.

    2003-02-24

    The Murmansk Initiative-RF (MI) was conceived to provide the Russian Federation (RF) with the capacity to manage low-level liquid radioactive waste (LLRW) and comply with the requirements of the London Convention that prohibit ocean dumping of these wastes. The Initiative, under a trilateral agreement begun in 1994/95, has upgraded an existing low-level liquid radioactive waste treatment facility, increased its capacity from 1,200 m3 /year to 5,000 m3 /year, and expanded the capability of the facility to treat liquids containing salt (up to 20 g/L). The three parties to the agreement, the Russian Federation, Norway, and the United States, have split the costs for the project. It was the first project of its kind to utilize exclusively Russian subcontractors in the upgrade and expansion of the LLRW treatment plant on the premises of FGUP Atomflot (now FGUP Atomflot) in Murmansk, Russia. The project advanced into the test-operation phase. These start-up activities have include d processing of actual radioactive liquid waste from the Arctic icebreaker fleet, and incorporation of these wastes into a cementation process of Russian design. Initial runs have revealed that procedures for unloading spent ion-exchange sorbents need to be improved and that sludges formed during removal of alkaline-earth metals should be compacted in order for the facility to operate at its full potential. These issues needed a substantial amount of work but have now been resolved, and progress on the final critical phases of the project, including Russian licensing activities will be reported. Discussions will also report on any modifications to the proposed operational schedule or protocols for the now operating facility. ''Lessons Learned'' over the six years of construction through operation are evaluated and discussed.

  17. Ion funnel with extended mass range and reduced conductance limit aperture

    DOEpatents

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-04-01

    An improved ion funnel design is disclosed that decreases the axial RF (parasite) fields at the ion funnel exit. This is achieved by addition of one or more compensation electrodes after the conductance limit electrode. Various RF voltage profiles may be applied to the various electrodes minimizing the parasite axial potential wells. The smallest RF aperture that serves as the conductance limiting electrode is further reduced over standard designs. Overall, the ion funnel improves transmission ranges of both low m/z and high m/z ions, reducing RF activation of ions and decreasing the gas load to subsequent differential pumping stages.

  18. Local nonlinear rf forces in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiale; Gao, Zhe

    2014-06-15

    The local nonlinear forces induced by radio frequency (rf) waves are derived in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas, where the inhomogeneity exists in the rf fields, in the static magnetic field as well as in the equilibrium density and temperature. The local parallel force is completely resonant, but a novel component dependent on those inhomogeneities is obtained as the result of the inhomogeneous transport of parallel resonant-absorbed momentum by the nonlinear perpendicular drift flux. In the local poloidal force, the component induced by the inhomogeneity of rf power absorption is also confirmed and it can be recognized as the residual effect from the incomplete cancellation between the rate of the diamagnetic poloidal momentum gain and the Lorentz force due to the radial diffusion-like flux. The compact expression for radial force is also obtained for the first time, whose nonresonant component is expressed as the sum of the ponderomotive force on particles and the gradients of the nonresonant perpendicular pressure and of the nonresonant momentum flux due to the finite temperature effect. Numerical calculations in a 1-D slab model show that the resonant component dependent on the inhomogeneities may be significant when the ion absorption dominates the resonant wave-particle interaction. A quantitative estimation shows that the novel component in the parallel force is important to understand the experiments of the ion-cyclotron-frequency mode-conversion flow drive.

  19. Double rf system for bunch shortening

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Yong Ho.

    1990-11-01

    It was suggested by Zisman that the combination of the two systems (double rf system) may be more effective to shorten a bunch, compromising between the desirable and the undesirable effects mentioned above. In this paper, we demonstrate that a double rf system is, in fact, quite effective in optimizing the rf performance. The parameters used are explained, and some handy formulae for bunch parameters are derived. We consider an example of bunch shortening by adding a higher-harmonic rf system to the main rf system. The parameters of the main rf system are unchanged. The double rf system, however, can be used for another purpose. Namely, the original bunch length can be obtained with a main rf voltage substantially lower than for a single rf system without necessitating a high-power source for the higher-harmonic cavities. Using a double rf system, the momentum acceptance remains large enough for ample beam lifetime. Moreover, the increase in nonlinearity of the rf waveform increases the synchrotron tune spread, which potentially helps a beam to be stabilized against longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities. We will show some examples of this application. We discuss the choice of the higher-harmonic frequency.

  20. Recent Advancements of RF Guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faillace, Luigi

    High-brightness, high-current electron beams are the main requirement for fourth generation light sources such as free-electron lasers (FELs), energy recovery Linacs (ERLs) and high-energy linear colliders. The most successful device for producing such beams is the Radio-Frequency (RF) photoinjector that has been undergoing a constant evolution over the past nearly 30 years towards the production of ever-lower beam emittances and higher currents. The on-going progress in the technology of higher quality materials as well as the enhanced quality of laser pulse shaping have allowed huge improvements in the generation of higher-quality electron beams. Here, it is presented an overview of recent advancements and future perspectives of RF photoinjectors for a fifth generation light source.

  1. Low jitter RF distribution system

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell; Doolittle, Lawrence; Huang, Gang

    2012-09-18

    A timing signal distribution system includes an optical frequency stabilized laser signal amplitude modulated at an rf frequency. A transmitter box transmits a first portion of the laser signal and receive a modified optical signal, and outputs a second portion of the laser signal and a portion of the modified optical signal. A first optical fiber carries the first laser signal portion and the modified optical signal, and a second optical fiber carries the second portion of the laser signal and the returned modified optical signal. A receiver box receives the first laser signal portion, shifts the frequency of the first laser signal portion outputs the modified optical signal, and outputs an electrical signal on the basis of the laser signal. A detector at the end of the second optical fiber outputs a signal based on the modified optical signal. An optical delay sensing circuit outputs a data signal based on the detected modified optical signal. An rf phase detect and correct signal circuit outputs a signal corresponding to a phase stabilized rf signal based on the data signal and the frequency received from the receiver box.

  2. Rf System for the NLCTA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Adolphsen, C.; Eichner, J.; Fuller, R.W.; Gold, S.L.; Hanna, S.M.; Hoag, H.A.; Holmes, S.G.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, Theodore L.; Loewen, R.J.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.D.; Pope, R.; Rifkin, J.; Ruth, R.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, Z.; Yeremian, A.; /SLAC

    2011-08-26

    This paper describes an X-Band RF system for the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator. The RF system consists of a 90 MeV injector and a 540 MeV linac. The main components of the injector are two low-Q single-cavity prebunchers and two 0.9-m-long detuned accelerator sections. The linac system consists of six 1.8-m-long detuned and damped detuned accelerator sections powered in pairs. The rf power generation, compression, delivery, distribution and measurement systems consist of klystrons, SLEDII energy compression systems, rectangular waveguides, magic-T's, and directional couplers. The phase and amplitude for each prebuncher is adjusted via a magic-T type phase shifter/attenuator. Correct phasing between the two 0.9 m accelerator sections is obtained by properly aligning the sections and adjusting two squeeze type phase shifters. Bunch phase and bunch length can be monitored with special microwave cavities and measurement systems. The design, fabrication, microwave measurement, calibration, and operation of the sub-systems and their components are briefly presented.

  3. Rf System for the NLCTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. W.; Adolphsen, C.; Eichner, J.; Fuller, R. W.; Gold, S. L.; Hanna, S. M.; Hoag, H. A.; Holmes, S. G.; Koontz, R. F.; Lavine, T. L.; Loewen, R. J.; Miller, R. H.; Nantista, C. D.; Pope, R.; Rifkin, J.; Ruth, R. D.; Tantawi, S. G.; Vlieks, A. E.; Wilson, Z.; Yeremian, A.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes an X-Band rf system for the Next Linear Accelerator Test Accelerator. The rf system consists of a 90 MeV injector and a 540 MeV linac. The main components of the injector are two low-Q single-cavity prebunchers and two 0.9-m-long detuned accelerator sections. The linac system consists of six 1.8-m-long detuned, or damped and detuned, accelerator sections powered in pairs. The rf power generation, compression, delivery, distribution and measurement systems consist of klystrons, SLED-II energy compression systems, rectangular waveguides, magic-T's, and directional couplers. The phase and amplitude for each prebuncher is adjusted via a magic-T type phase shifter/attenuator. The correct phasing between two 0.9 m accelerator sections is obtained by properly setting the sections and adjusting two squeeze type phase shifters. Also, bunch phase and bunch length can be monitored by special microwave cavities and measurement systems. The design, fabrication, microwave measurement, calibration, and operation for above sub-systems and their components will be presented.

  4. Contamination removal by ion sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Christopher G.

    1990-11-01

    Experimental investigations are described for ion-beam sputtering and RF-plasma sputtering to determine the effectiveness of the methods for removing contaminants from an optical surface. The effects of ion-beam sputtering are tested with an ion gun and measured by mounting a 5-MHz quartz-crystal microbalance on a sample holder and simulating spacecraft contamination. RF-plasma sputtering involves the application of an alternating electric field to opposing electrodes immersed in a low density gas, and is tested with the same setup. The energy dependence of the sputtering yields is measured to determine whether the different contaminants are removed and whether the mirror surface is affected. Ion-beam sputtering removes all contaminants tested, but also affects the mirror surface at high energies. When the correct DC bias is applied, RF sputtering can remove the contaminants without removing the metal-mirror surface.

  5. Inhomogeneous electric field effects in a linear RF quadruple trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melborne, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The exact potential corresponding to confining fields inside a linear rf quadrupole particle trap of finite length is presented. The analytic expressions for the trapping potential is derived by introducing a linear trap employing a relatively simple cylindrical geometry and solving Laplace's equation for the trap electrodes. The finite length of linear traps results in field distortion near the trap ends. An exact analytic determination of the fields is useful because the profile of the trapped ion cloud is highly dependent on the fields confining it. It is shown that near the ends of the trap, the effective potential arising from the rf fields acts to propel particles out of the trap, and further, that the addition of a dc bias generates an inhomogeneous in the trap that influences the particles both perpendicularly to and along the trap's long axis.

  6. Focused electron and ion beam systems

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Persaud, Arun; Ji, Qing; Jiang, Ximan

    2004-07-27

    An electron beam system is based on a plasma generator in a plasma ion source with an accelerator column. The electrons are extracted from a plasma cathode in a plasma ion source, e.g. a multicusp plasma ion source. The beam can be scanned in both the x and y directions, and the system can be operated with multiple beamlets. A compact focused ion or electron beam system has a plasma ion source and an all-electrostatic beam acceleration and focusing column. The ion source is a small chamber with the plasma produced by radio-frequency (RF) induction discharge. The RF antenna is wound outside the chamber and connected to an RF supply. Ions or electrons can be extracted from the source. A multi-beam system has several sources of different species and an electron beam source.

  7. A brief history of high power RF proton linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    The first mention of linear acceleration was in a paper by G. Ising in 1924 in which he postulated the acceleration of positive ions induced by spark discharges which produced electric fields in gaps between a series of {open_quotes}drift tubes{close_quotes}. Ising apparently was not able to demonstrate his concept, most likely due to the limited state of electronic devices. Ising`s work was followed by a seminal paper by R. Wideroe in 1928 in which he demonstrated the first linear accelerator. Wideroe was able to accelerate sodium or potassium ions to 50 keV of energy using drift tubes connected alternately to high frequency waves and to ground. Nuclear physics during this period was interested in accelerating protons, deuterons, electrons and alpha particles and not heavy ions like sodium or potassium. To accelerate the light ions required much higher frequencies than available at that time. So linear accelerators were not pursued heavily at that time. Research continued during the 1930s but the development of high frequency RF tubes for radar applications in World War 2 opened the potential for RF linear accelerators after the war. The Berkeley laboratory of E. 0. Lawrence under the leadership of Luis Alvarez developed a new linear proton accelerator concept that utilized drift tubes that required a full RF period to pass through as compared to the earlier concepts. This development resulted in the historic Berkeley 32 MeV proton linear accelerator which incorporated the {open_quotes}Alvarez drift tube{close_quotes} as the basic acceleration scheme using surplus 200 MHz radar components.

  8. The upgrade project for the RF system for the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Ciardullo, D.J.; Hayes, T.; Meth, M.; McNerney, A.J.; Otis, A.; Pirkl, W.; Sanders, R.; Spitz, R.; Toldo, F.; Zaltsman, A.

    1993-01-01

    The AGS operates a varied program of proton, heavy ion, and polarized proton acceleration for fixed-target experiments and will soon serve as the injector of these beams into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC. The new Booster synchrotron extends the range of intensities and masses that can be accelerated. The 1.5 GeV injection energy increases the space charge limit by a factor of four to more than 6 [times] 10[sup 13] protons per pulse. To accommodate the increased beam current the rf system will be upgraded to provide more power and lower impedance to the beam. The flexibility of the rf system will also be enhanced by virtue of a new rf beam control system and installation of individual tuning servos for the ten rf cavities. The fundamental necessity for upgrading the rf system is to deliver more power to the accelerating beam. Three key ingredients of the upgrade project addressing this problem is (1) new power amplifiers provide the necessary power, and are closely coupled to the cavities, (2) wideband rf feedback reduces the effective impedance by a factor of 10, and (3) the capacitors loading the acceleration gaps (four per cavity) are increased from 275 pF to 600 pF.

  9. The upgrade project for the RF system for the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Ciardullo, D.J.; Hayes, T.; Meth, M.; McNerney, A.J.; Otis, A.; Pirkl, W.; Sanders, R.; Spitz, R.; Toldo, F.; Zaltsman, A.

    1993-06-01

    The AGS operates a varied program of proton, heavy ion, and polarized proton acceleration for fixed-target experiments and will soon serve as the injector of these beams into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC. The new Booster synchrotron extends the range of intensities and masses that can be accelerated. The 1.5 GeV injection energy increases the space charge limit by a factor of four to more than 6 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per pulse. To accommodate the increased beam current the rf system will be upgraded to provide more power and lower impedance to the beam. The flexibility of the rf system will also be enhanced by virtue of a new rf beam control system and installation of individual tuning servos for the ten rf cavities. The fundamental necessity for upgrading the rf system is to deliver more power to the accelerating beam. Three key ingredients of the upgrade project addressing this problem is (1) new power amplifiers provide the necessary power, and are closely coupled to the cavities, (2) wideband rf feedback reduces the effective impedance by a factor of 10, and (3) the capacitors loading the acceleration gaps (four per cavity) are increased from 275 pF to 600 pF.

  10. Characterization of indium tin oxide films by RF-assisted DC magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houng, Boen; Wang, Adam

    2012-05-01

    A unique design of RF (radio frequency) assisted DC (direct current) sputter was employed to deposit ITO (indium tin oxide) films on PET (polyethylene terephtalate) substrate. Effects of different RF portions of total power and oxygen gas flow on the properties of the films were investigated. It was found that the films became denser as the applied RF portion of the total power increased. This is due to higher momentum energy transfer by impinging ions increasing adatom diffusion on the films. Thus, a larger grained and less porous microstructure was presented in the films deposited at higher RF portions of the total power. However, a rougher surface morphology and minor crystallization was also found in the films prepared at 100% RF power. By wisely adjusting to a 50% RF portion of the total power, the electrical resistivity can reach a minimum value of 5.4 × 10-4 Ω cm associated with the carrier concentration of 7.0 × 1020 cm-3 and mobility of 17.4 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively. In addition, the oxygen gas concentration in the sputtering chamber was found to play a key role in determining the quality of the films. As oxygen gas flowed at 2 sccm, the electrical resistivity was decreased to 3.9 × 10-4 Ω cm at a 50% RF portion of the total power. The electrical conduction mechanism, based on the grain boundary scattering, was correlated to the microstructure of the films in terms of grain size.

  11. Taming Magnetically Confined Plasmas with RF Waves: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porkolab, Miklos

    2009-11-01

    Heating and profile control by RF waves in magnetic fusion experiments has led to the development of a new area of physics, namely wave propagation and absorption in high temperature plasmas in complex magnetic field geometries. In addition, the development of high power microwave sources as well as novel antenna structures capable of handling high RF powers has also been necessary. In this talk I shall summarize the historical progression of relevant results in three frequency regimes, namely the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), the electron cyclotron frequency and its harmonics (ECRH), and the lower hybrid frequency range (LHRF). In the ICRF regime breakthrough heating results were obtained in the 1980s in tokamaks with good confinement of energetic ions, such as PLT, TFTR and JET. In the period of late 1970s to mid 1980s the theory of RF current drive (LHCD, ECCD and that of fast wave, or FWCD) was developed. Soon thereafter efficient lower hybrid current drive was demonstrated in tokamak experiments such as Versator II, Alcator--C and PLT, and later JT60-U, Tore-Supra and JET. High harmonic FWCD has been also demonstrated on DIII-D and NSTX. Long pulse multi-MW LHCD experiments are now in preparation on the new superconducting tokamaks EAST (China) and K-STAR (Korea). ECRH results in the 1980s and beyond progressed rapidly with the development of gyrotron sources at the MW level and subsequently efficient heating and current drive was demonstrated on DIII-D, Asdex-U, JT-60U and TCV, including the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes. Recent gyrotron tube development at the MW level at 170 GHz ensures the availability of ECH and ECCD on ITER. Finally, new results on RF induced transport phenomena have been discovered, such as enhanced plasma rotation and flow drive that hold promise for optimizing ITER performance.

  12. Low Cost RF Amplifier for Community TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ch, Syafaruddin; Sasongko, Sudi Mariyanto Al; Made Budi Suksmadana, I.; Mustiko Okta Muvianto, Cahyo; Ariessaputra, Suthami

    2016-01-01

    he capability of television to deliver audio video makes this media become the most effective method to spread information. This paper presents an experiment of RF amplifier design having low-cost design and providing sufficient RF power particularly for community television. The RF amplifier consists of two stages of amplifier. The first stage amplifier was used to leverage output of TV modulator from 11dBm to enable to drive next stage amplifier. CAD simulation and fabrication were run to reach optimum RF amplifier design circuit. The associated circuit was made by determining stability circle, stability gain, and matching impedance. Hence, the average power of first stage RF amplifier was 24.68dBm achieved. The second stage used RF modules which was ready match to 50 ohm for both input and output port. The experiment results show that the RF amplifier may operate at frequency ranging from 174 to 230MHz. The average output power of the 2nd stage amplifier was 33.38 Watt with the overall gain of 20.54dB. The proposed RF amplifier is a cheap way to have a stable RF amplifier for community TV. The total budget for the designed RF amplifier is only a 1/5 compared to local design of final TV amplifier.

  13. RF Processing Experience with the GTF Prototype RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerge, J.F.

    2010-11-24

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. A total of five different metal cathodes (4 Cu and 1 Mg) have been installed on the GTF gun. The rf processing history with the different cathodes will be presented including peak field achieved at the cathode. The LCLS gun is intended to operate at 120 MV/m and fields up to 140 MV/m have been achieved in the GTF gun. After installing a new cathode the number of rf pulses required to reach 120 MV/m is approximately 5-10 million. Total emitted dark current and Fowler Nordheim plots are also shown over the life of the cathode. The GTF photo-injector gun is an S-band standing-wave structure, with two resonant cavities and an intervening thick washer (Figure 1). The flat, back wall of the first cavity is a copper plate that serves as photocathode when illuminated with ultraviolet light from a pulsed, high-power laser. RF power enters the gun through an iris on the outer wall of the second cavity, and is coupled to the first through the axial opening of the washer. The first cavity is often referred to as a half cell, because its full-cell length has been truncated by the cathode plate and the second cavity is called the full cell. The gun is designed to operate in a {pi} mode, with the peak field on axis in each cell approximately equal. The maximum in the half cell occurs at the cathode, and in the full cell near the center of the cavity. The field profile and tuning procedures are discussed in a separate tech note [1].

  14. NHE-RF, a Merlin-Interacting Protein, Is Primarily Expressed in Luminal Epithelia, Proliferative Endometrium, and Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Wiederhold, Thorsten; Nielsen, G. Petur; James, Marianne; Pinney-Michalowski, Denise; Roy, Jennifer E.; Cohen, Wendy A.; Ramesh, Vijaya; Louis, David N.

    2001-01-01

    NHE-RF, a regulatory cofactor for NHE (Na+-H+ exchanger) type 3, interacts with ion transporters and receptors through its PDZ domains and with the MERM proteins (merlin, ezrin, radixin and moesin) via its carboxyl terminus. Thus, NHE-RF may act as a multifunctional adaptor protein and play a role in the assembly of signal transduction complexes, linking ion channels and receptors to the actin cytoskeleton. NHE-RF expression is up-regulated in response to estrogen in estrogen receptor-positive breast carcinoma cell lines, suggesting that it may be involved in estrogen signaling. To further understand NHE-RF function and its possible role in estrogen signaling, we analyzed NHE-RF expression in normal human tissues, including cycling endometrium, and in breast carcinomas, tissues in which estrogen plays an important role in regulating cell growth and proliferation. NHE-RF is expressed in many epithelia, especially in cells specialized in ion transport or absorption, and is often localized to apical (luminal) membranes. NHE-RF expression varies markedly in proliferative versus secretory endometrium, with high expression in proliferative (estrogen-stimulated) endometrium. Furthermore, estrogen receptor status and NHE-RF expression correlate closely in breast carcinoma specimens. These findings support a role for NHE-RF in estrogen signaling. PMID:11141479

  15. Single electron beam rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Stein, W.E.; Rockwood, S.D.

    1981-02-11

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which uses rf feedback to enhance efficiency are described. Rf energy is extracted from a single electron beam by decelerating cavities and energy is returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns, such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, resonant feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to reduce the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  16. Radial ion transport in a nonaxisymmetric magnetic mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.L.

    1989-02-01

    An experimental study of radial ion transport in a nonaxisymmetric magnetic mirror is presented. It is found that the ion confinement time perpendicular to the magnetic field is an order of magnitude shorter than predicted by classical and neoclassical theories, and that radial transport can be the dominant ion loss mechanism. Transport experiments are performed in hydrogen, helium and argon plasmas by measuring equilibrium radial profiles of plasma density, ionization source, end loss current, electric field, electron temperature and ion temperature. The radial profiles of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient (D/perpendicular/) are presented, and range from a radial average of approx. =5 /times/ 10/sup 3/ cm/sup 2//sec for hydrogen to approx. =2 /times/ 10/sup 4/ cm/sup 2//sec for argon. These coefficients are a factor of ten larger than the maximum possible classical and neoclassical diffusion coefficients in all three gases. The effect of low frequency RF power in the ion cyclotron range on the radial ion transport rate is also investigated. RF power increases the ion perpendicular transport, which then becomes the dominant loss mechanism. With sufficient RF power, the ion perpendicular loss rate exceeds the ionization source, with a resultant loss of plasma equilibrium. Application of RF power increases the radial transport rate of plasmas with resonant ions, which are also heated by the RF waves, as well as plasmas whose ion cyclotron resonance is not inside the confinement region. The increased transport rate during application of RF power shows up as an increased D/perpendicular/. This indicates that the radial ion transport is due to a direct interaction between the ions and the RF field, rather than to radial profile changes or enhanced ambipolar potential which are other RF effects. The effect of RF power on plasma potential is also studied. 64 refs., 57 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Overview of the RF Systems for LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, P.; Akre, R.; Boyce, R.; Emma, P.; Hill, A.; Rago, C.; /SLAC

    2005-06-15

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC, when it becomes operational in 2009, will provide its user community with an X-ray source many orders of magnitude brighter than anything available in the world at that time [1]. The electron beam acceleration will be provided by existing and new RF systems capable of maintaining the amplitude and phase stability of each bunch to extremely tight tolerances. RF feedback control of the various RF systems will be fundamental in ensuring the beam arrives at the LCLS undulator at precisely the required energy and peak current phase. This paper details the requirements for RF stability for the various LCLS RF systems and also highlights proposals for how these injector and Linac RF systems can meet these tight constraints.

  18. High voltage RF feedthrough bushing

    DOEpatents

    Grotz, Glenn F.

    1984-01-01

    Described is a multi-element, high voltage radio frequency bushing for trmitting RF energy to an antenna located in a vacuum container. The bushing includes a center conductor of complex geometrical shape, an outer coaxial shield conductor, and a thin-walled hollow truncated cone insulator disposed between central and outer conductors. The shape of the center conductor, which includes a reverse curvature portion formed of a radially inwardly directed shoulder and a convex portion, controls the uniformity of the axial surface gradient on the insulator cone. The outer shield has a first substantially cylindrical portion and a second radially inwardly extending truncated cone portion.

  19. Dust Growth by RF Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Churton, B.; Samarian, A. A.; Coueedel, L.

    2008-09-07

    The effect of the dust particle growth by RF sputtering on glow discharge has been investigated. It has been found that the growth of dust particles modifies the electrical characteristics of the discharge. In particularly, the absolute value of the self-bias voltage decreases during the particle growth due to the electron losses on the dust particles. To find the correlation between the dust growth and the self bias evolution, dust particles have been collected at different times. The dust particle growth rate is found to be linear.

  20. Robust multiplatform RF emitter localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Issa, Huthaifa; Ordóñez, Raúl

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, position based services has increase. Thus, recent developments in communications and RF technology have enabled system concept formulations and designs for low-cost radar systems using state-of-the-art software radio modules. This research is done to investigate a novel multi-platform RF emitter localization technique denoted as Position-Adaptive RF Direction Finding (PADF). The formulation is based on the investigation of iterative path-loss (i.e., Path Loss Exponent, or PLE) metrics estimates that are measured across multiple platforms in order to autonomously adapt (i.e. self-adjust) of the location of each distributed/cooperative platform. Experiments conducted at the Air-Force Research laboratory (AFRL) indicate that this position-adaptive approach exhibits potential for accurate emitter localization in challenging embedded multipath environments such as in urban environments. The focus of this paper is on the robustness of the distributed approach to RF-based location tracking. In order to localize the transmitter, we use the Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) data to approximate distance from the transmitter to the revolving receivers. We provide an algorithm for on-line estimation of the Path Loss Exponent (PLE) that is used in modeling the distance based on Received Signal Strength (RSS) measurements. The emitter position estimation is calculated based on surrounding sensors RSS values using Least-Square Estimation (LSE). The PADF has been tested on a number of different configurations in the laboratory via the design and implementation of four IRIS wireless sensor nodes as receivers and one hidden sensor as a transmitter during the localization phase. The robustness of detecting the transmitters position is initiated by getting the RSSI data through experiments and then data manipulation in MATLAB will determine the robustness of each node and ultimately that of each configuration. The parameters that are used in the functions are

  1. MEMS technologies for rf communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qun; Kim, B. K.

    2001-04-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) represents an exciting new technology derived from the same fabricating processes used to make integrated circuits. The trends of growing importance of the wireless communications market is toward the system with minimal size, cost and power consumption. For the purpose of MEMS R&D used for wireless communications, a history and present situation of MEMS device development are reviewed in this paper, and an overview of MEMS research topics on RF communication applications and the state of the art technologies are also presented here.

  2. OPERATION OF THE RHIC RF SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    BRENNAN,J.M.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; DELONG,J.; FISCHER,W.; HAYES,T.; SMITH,K.S.; ZALTSMAN,A.

    2003-05-12

    Operational aspects of the RHIC rf system are described. To date three different beam combinations have been collided for physics production: gold-gold, deuteron-gold, and proton-proton(polarized). To facilitate this flexibility the rf systems of the two rings are independent and self-sufficient. Techniques to cope with problems such as, injection/capture, beam loading, bunch shortening, and rf noise have evolved and are explained.

  3. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  4. Conceptual design of the 26. 7 MHz RF system for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.; Deng, D.P.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.; Pirkl, W.; Ratti, A.

    1993-01-01

    The 26.7 MHz (harmonic No. h=342) RF system will be used to capture the injected bunched beam from the AGS and accelerate it to a kinetic energy of up to 250 GeV for protons; 100 GeV/u for gold ions. All ions except protons cross transition, and are finally transferred to a storage RF system working at 196 MHz. Each RHIC ring will be provided with two single-ended capacitively loaded quarter-wave cavities; each of these can be dynamically tuned by 100 kHz to compensate for the change in speed of the beam, and can deliver at least 200 kV voltage. A 100 kW tetrode amplifier with local RF feedback is directly coupled to the cavity to minimize phase delay. Prototypes of cavity and amplifier have been built and first test results are presented.

  5. Conceptual design of the 26.7 MHz RF system for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.; Deng, D.P.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.; Pirkl, W.; Ratti, A.

    1993-06-01

    The 26.7 MHz (harmonic No. h=342) RF system will be used to capture the injected bunched beam from the AGS and accelerate it to a kinetic energy of up to 250 GeV for protons; 100 GeV/u for gold ions. All ions except protons cross transition, and are finally transferred to a storage RF system working at 196 MHz. Each RHIC ring will be provided with two single-ended capacitively loaded quarter-wave cavities; each of these can be dynamically tuned by 100 kHz to compensate for the change in speed of the beam, and can deliver at least 200 kV voltage. A 100 kW tetrode amplifier with local RF feedback is directly coupled to the cavity to minimize phase delay. Prototypes of cavity and amplifier have been built and first test results are presented.

  6. Power dissipation analysis in N2O/He RF discharges using particle modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despax, B.; Yousfi, M.; Younis, G.; Caquineau, H.

    2005-12-01

    The power dissipation in radiofrequency (RF) discharges in N2O-He mixtures was measured as a function of He dilution in N2O at two different gas pressures and several RF voltages. The maximum of power dissipation as a function of the helium dilution was found to be dependent on both the gas pressure and the RF voltages. A particle model is used to analyse such a power variation in terms of the processes occurring between charged particles (i.e. electrons, negative ions: O-, NO- and positive ions: N2O+, He+) and the neutral gas mixture (N2O and He). The electric model results bring out the importance of the elastic electron-He collisions on the position of maximum dissipated power.

  7. Reconfigurable RF CMOS Circuit for Cognitive Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masu, Kazuya; Okada, Kenichi

    Cognitive radio and/or SDR (Software Defined Radio) inherently requires multi-band and multi standard wireless circuit. The circuit is implemented based on Si CMOS technology. In this article, the recent progress of Si RF CMOS is described and the reconfigurable RF CMOS circuit which was proposed by the authors is introduced. At the present and in the future, several kind of Si CMOS technology can be used for RF CMOS circuit implementation. The realistic RF CMOS circuit implementation toward cognitive and/or SDR is discussed.

  8. Plasma-Surface Interactions and RF Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas; Smithe, D. N.; Beckwith, K.; Davidson, B. D.; Kruger, S. E.; Pankin, A. Y.; Roark, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    Implementation of recently developed finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) modeling techniques on high-performance computing platforms allows RF power flow, and antenna near- and far-field behavior, to be studied in realistic experimental ion-cyclotron resonance heating scenarios at previously inaccessible levels of resolution. We present results and 3D animations of high-performance (10k-100k core) FDTD simulations of Alcator C-Mod's field-aligned ICRF antenna on the Titan supercomputer, considering (a) the physics of slow wave excitation in the immediate vicinity of the antenna hardware and in the scrape-off layer for various edge densities, and (b) sputtering and impurity production, as driven by self-consistent sheath potentials at antenna surfaces. Related research efforts in low-temperature plasma modeling, including the use of proper orthogonal decomposition methods for PIC/fluid modeling and the development of plasma chemistry tools (e.g. a robust and flexible reaction database, principal path reduction analysis capabilities, and improved visualization options), will also be summarized. Supported by U.S. DoE SBIR Phase I/II Award DE-SC0009501 and ALCC/OLCF.

  9. Effects of applied radio frequency power on low-temperature catalytic-free nanostructured carbon nitride films by rf PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritikos, Richard; Othman, Maisara; Abdul Rahman, Saadah

    2016-06-01

    Low-temperature catalytic-free carbon nitride, CN x nanostructured thin films were produced by using radio frequency (rf) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition employing a parallel-plate electrode configuration. The effects of varying applied rf power, P rf (30-100 W), on the formation of these structures were studied. Aligned nanostructured CN x films were produced at P rf as low as 40 W, but uniform highly vertical-aligned CN x nanorods were produced at P rf of 60 and 80 W. This was induced by the presence of high ion bombardment on the growing films and the preferential bonding of isonitrile to aromatic bonds in the nanostructures. It was also observed that nitrogen incorporation is highest in this range and the structure and bonding in the nanostructure reflects those of typical polymeric/amorphous carbon nitride films.

  10. Ultra-stable Hg(+) trapped ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. John; Maleki, Lute

    1990-01-01

    A fieldable trapped ion frequency standard based on Hg-199(+) ions confined in a hybrid rf/dc linear ion trap is developed. This trap permits storage of large numbers of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the rf confining fields. In preliminary measurements a stability of 2 to 3 x 10(exp -15) was obtained for 10000 second averaging times. These measurements were carried out with a 120 mHz wide atomic resonance line for the 40.5 GHz clock transition with a second order Doppler shift from the rf trapping field of 6 x 10(exp -13).

  11. Airborne RF Measurement System and Analysis of Representative Flight RF Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Smith, Laura J.; Jones, Richard A.; Fleck, Vincent J.; Salud, Maria Theresa; Mielnik, John

    2007-01-01

    Environmental radio frequency (RF) data over a broad band of frequencies were needed to evaluate the airspace around several airports. An RF signal measurement system was designed using a spectrum analyzer connected to an aircraft VHF/UHF navigation antenna installed on a small aircraft. This paper presents an overview of the RF measurement system and provides analysis of a sample of RF signal measurement data over a frequency range of 30 MHz to 1000 MHz.

  12. RF/optical shared aperture for high availability wideband communication RF/FSO links

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Anthony J; Pao, Hsueh-yuan; Sargis, Paul

    2014-04-29

    An RF/Optical shared aperture is capable of transmitting and receiving optical signals and RF signals simultaneously. This technology enables compact wide bandwidth communications systems with 100% availability in clear air turbulence, rain and fog. The functions of an optical telescope and an RF reflector antenna are combined into a single compact package by installing an RF feed at either of the focal points of a modified Gregorian telescope.

  13. RF/optical shared aperture for high availability wideband communication RF/FSO links

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Anthony J; Pao, Hsueh-yuan; Sargis, Paul

    2015-03-24

    An RF/Optical shared aperture is capable of transmitting and receiving optical signals and RF signals simultaneously. This technology enables compact wide bandwidth communications systems with 100% availability in clear air turbulence, rain and fog. The functions of an optical telescope and an RF reflector antenna are combined into a single compact package by installing an RF feed at either of the focal points of a modified Gregorian telescope.

  14. Gas and plasma dynamics of RF discharge jet of low pressure in a vacuum chamber with flat electrodes and inside tube, influence of RF discharge on the steel surface parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khristoliubova, V. I.; Kashapov, N. F.; Shaekhov, M. F.

    2016-06-01

    Researches results of the characteristics of the RF discharge jet of low pressure and the discharge influence on the surface modification of high speed and structural steels are introduced in the article. Gas dynamics, power and energy parameters of the RF low pressure discharge flow in the discharge chamber and the electrode gap are studied in the presence of the materials. Plasma flow rate, discharge power, the concentration of electrons, the density of RF power, the ion current density, and the energy of the ions bombarding the surface materials are considered for the definition of basic properties crucial for the process of surface modification of materials as they were put in the plasma jet. The influence of the workpiece and effect of products complex configuration on the RF discharge jet of low pressure is defined. The correlation of the input parameters of the plasma unit on the characteristics of the discharge is established.

  15. Characterization of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Separations in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hamid, Ahmed M.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Venkata BS; Webb, Ian K.; Deng, Liulin; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Prost, Spencer A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; et al

    2015-10-28

    We report on the development and characterization of a new traveling wave-based Structure for Lossless Ion Manipulations (TW-SLIM) for ion mobility separations (IMS). The TW-SLIM module uses parallel arrays of rf electrodes on two closely spaced surfaces for ion confinement, where the rf electrodes are separated by arrays of short electrodes, and using these TWs can be created to drive ion motion. In this initial work, TWs are created by the dynamic application of dc potentials. The capabilities of the TW-SLIM module for efficient ion confinement, lossless ion transport, and ion mobility separations at different rf and TW parameters aremore » reported. The TW-SLIM module is shown to transmit a wide mass range of ions (m/z 200–2500) utilizing a confining rf waveform (~1 MHz and ~300 Vp-p) and low TW amplitudes (<20 V). Additionally, the short TW-SLIM module achieved resolutions comparable to existing commercially available low pressure IMS platforms and an ion mobility peak capacity of ~32 for TW speeds of <210 m/s. TW-SLIM performance was characterized over a wide range of rf and TW parameters and demonstrated robust performance. In conclusion, the combined attributes of the flexible design and low voltage requirements for the TW-SLIM module provide a basis for devices capable of much higher resolution and more complex ion manipulations.« less

  16. Characterization of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Separations in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, Ahmed M.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Venkata BS; Webb, Ian K.; Deng, Liulin; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Prost, Spencer A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-10-28

    We report on the development and characterization of a new traveling wave-based Structure for Lossless Ion Manipulations (TW-SLIM) for ion mobility separations (IMS). The TW-SLIM module uses parallel arrays of rf electrodes on two closely spaced surfaces for ion confinement, where the rf electrodes are separated by arrays of short electrodes, and using these TWs can be created to drive ion motion. In this initial work, TWs are created by the dynamic application of dc potentials. The capabilities of the TW-SLIM module for efficient ion confinement, lossless ion transport, and ion mobility separations at different rf and TW parameters are reported. The TW-SLIM module is shown to transmit a wide mass range of ions (m/z 200–2500) utilizing a confining rf waveform (~1 MHz and ~300 Vp-p) and low TW amplitudes (<20 V). Additionally, the short TW-SLIM module achieved resolutions comparable to existing commercially available low pressure IMS platforms and an ion mobility peak capacity of ~32 for TW speeds of <210 m/s. TW-SLIM performance was characterized over a wide range of rf and TW parameters and demonstrated robust performance. In conclusion, the combined attributes of the flexible design and low voltage requirements for the TW-SLIM module provide a basis for devices capable of much higher resolution and more complex ion manipulations.

  17. Characterization of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Separations in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Ahmed M; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Webb, Ian K; Deng, Liulin; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A; Prost, Spencer A; Norheim, Randolph V; Tolmachev, Aleksey V; Smith, Richard D

    2015-11-17

    We report on the development and characterization of a traveling wave (TW)-based Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (TW-SLIM) module for ion mobility separations (IMS). The TW-SLIM module uses parallel arrays of rf electrodes on two closely spaced surfaces for ion confinement, where the rf electrodes are separated by arrays of short electrodes, and using these TWs can be created to drive ion motion. In this initial work, TWs are created by the dynamic application of dc potentials. The capabilities of the TW-SLIM module for efficient ion confinement, lossless ion transport, and ion mobility separations at different rf and TW parameters are reported. The TW-SLIM module is shown to transmit a wide mass range of ions (m/z 200-2500) utilizing a confining rf waveform (∼1 MHz and ∼300 Vp-p) and low TW amplitudes (<20 V). Additionally, the short TW-SLIM module achieved resolutions comparable to existing commercially available low pressure IMS platforms and an ion mobility peak capacity of ∼32 for TW speeds of <210 m/s. TW-SLIM performance was characterized over a wide range of rf and TW parameters and demonstrated robust performance. The combined attributes of the flexible design and low voltage requirements for the TW-SLIM module provide a basis for devices capable of much higher resolution and more complex ion manipulations. PMID:26510005

  18. RF power recovery feedback circulator

    DOEpatents

    Sharamentov, Sergey I.

    2011-03-29

    A device and method for improving the efficiency of RF systems having a Reflective Load. In the preferred embodiment, Reflected Energy from a superconducting resonator of a particle accelerator is reintroduced to the resonator after the phase of the Reflected Energy is aligned with the phase of the Supply Energy from a RF Energy Source. In one embodiment, a Circulator is used to transfer Reflected Energy from the Reflective Load into a Phase Adjuster which aligns the phase of the Reflected Energy with that of the Supply Energy. The phase-aligned energy is then combined with the Supply Energy, and reintroduced into the Reflective Load. In systems having a constant phase shift, the Phase Adjuster may be designed to shift the phase of the Reflected Energy by a constant amount using a Phase Shifter. In systems having a variety (variable) phase shifts, a Phase Shifter controlled by a phase feedback loop comprising a Phase Detector and a Feedback Controller to account for the various phase shifts is preferable.

  19. Barrier RF stacking at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou et al.

    2003-06-04

    A key issue to upgrade the luminosity of the Tevatron Run2 program and to meet the neutrino requirement of the NuMI experiment at Fermilab is to increase the proton intensity on the target. This paper introduces a new scheme to double the number of protons from the Main Injector (MI) to the pbar production target (Run2) and to the pion production target (NuMI). It is based on the fact that the MI momentum acceptance is about a factor of four larger than the momentum spread of the Booster beam. Two RF barriers--one fixed, another moving--are employed to confine the proton beam. The Booster beams are injected off-momentum into the MI and are continuously reflected and compressed by the two barriers. Calculations and simulations show that this scheme could work provided that the Booster beam momentum spread can be kept under control. Compared with slip stacking, a main advantage of this new method is small beam loading effect thanks to the low peak beam current. The RF barriers can be generated by an inductive device, which uses nanocrystal magnet alloy (Finemet) cores and fast high voltage MOSFET switches. This device has been designed and fabricated by a Fermilab-KEK-Caltech team. The first bench test was successful. Beam experiments are being planned.

  20. RF sources for future colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Robert M.

    1997-02-01

    As we push particle colliders to 1-TeV center-of-mass collision energy and beyond, we require much more from our RF energy sources, both in terms of the RF performance and the number required for a given machine. In order to conserve real estate, the operating frequency of future colliders is apt to be higher than the S-band used for the SLAC SLC. It is this inevitable trend toward higher frequencies which presents the source designer with the greatest challenge. This paper is about that challenge. For reasons which will become clear, as we go to frequencies substantially above X-band, we will require sources other than klystrons, probably of the type referred to as "fast-wave devices," such as FEL or gyro-based amplifiers, or two-beam accelerators. Because these are discussed elsewhere in this conference, I will stick to the klystron as my model in describing the challenges to be overcome, as well as the criteria which must be met by alternative sources for new accelerators.

  1. TECHNICAL COMPARISON OF CANDIDATE ION EXCHANGE MEDIA FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE (SCIX) APPLICATIONS IN SUPPORT OF SUPPLEMENTAL LAW PRETREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    RAMSEY AA; THORSON MR

    2010-12-28

    At-tank supplemental pretreatment including both filtration and small column ion exchange is currently under evaluation to facilitate salt waste retrieval and processing in the Hanford tank farms. Spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) resin is the baseline ion exchange resin for use in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). This document provides background and technical rationale to assist in determining whether spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) is also the appropriate ion exchange resin for supplemental LAW pretreatment processes and compares sRF with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) as potential supplemental pretreatment ion exchange media.

  2. RF generation in the DARHT Axis-II beam dump

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl A. Jr.

    2012-05-03

    We have occasionally observed radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic signals in the downstream transport (DST) of the second axis linear induction accelerator (LIA) at the dual-axis radiographic hydrodynamic testing (DARHT) facility. We have identified and eliminated some of the sources by eliminating the offending cavities. However, we still observe strong RF in the range 1 GHz t0 2 GHz occurring late in the {approx}2-{micro}s pulse that can be excited or prevented by varying the downstream tune. The narrow frequency width (<0.5%) and near exponential growth at the dominant frequency is indicative of a beam-cavity interaction, and electro-magnetic simulations of cavity structure show a spectrum rich in resonances in the observed frequency range. However, the source of beam produced RF in the cavity resonance frequency range has not been identified, and it has been the subject of much speculation, ranging from beam-plasma or beam-ion instabilities to unstable cavity coupling.

  3. RF control hardware design for CYCIAE-100 cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhiguo; Fu, Xiaoliang; Ji, Bin; Zhao, Zhenlu; Zhang, Tianjue; Li, Pengzhan; Wei, Junyi; Xing, Jiansheng; Wang, Chuan

    2015-11-01

    The Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility project is being constructed by BRIF division of China Institute of Atomic Energy. In this project, a 100 MeV high intensity compact proton cyclotron is built for multiple applications. The first successful beam extraction of CYCIAE-100 cyclotron was done in the middle of 2014. The extracted proton beam energy is 100 MeV and the beam current is more than 20 μA. The RF system of the CYCIAE-100 cyclotron includes two half-wavelength cavities, two 100 kW tetrode amplifiers and power transmission line systems (all above are independent from each other) and two sets of Low Level RF control crates. Each set of LLRF control includes an amplitude control unit, a tuning control unit, a phase control unit, a local Digital Signal Process control unit and an Advanced RISC Machines based EPICS IOC unit. These two identical LLRF control crates share one common reference clock and take advantages of modern digital technologies (e.g. DSP and Direct Digital Synthesizer) to achieve closed loop voltage and phase regulations of the dee-voltage. In the beam commission, the measured dee-voltage stability of RF system is better than 0.1% and phase stability is better than 0.03°. The hardware design of the LLRF system will be reviewed in this paper.

  4. RF physics of ICWC discharge at high cyclotron harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Lyssoivan, A.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; Vervier, M.; Van Schoor, M.; Bobkov, V.; Rohde, V.; Schneider, P.; Douai, D.; Kogut, D.; Kreter, A.; Möller, S.; Philipps, V.; Sergienko, G.; Moiseenko, V.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Collaboration: TEXTOR Team; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-12

    Recent experiments on Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) performed in tokamaks TEXTOR and ASDEX Upgrade with standard ICRF antennas operated at fixed frequencies but variable toroidal magnetic field demonstrated rather contrasting parameters of ICWC discharge in scenarios with on-axis fundamental ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) for protons,ω=ω{sub H+}, and with its high cyclotron harmonics (HCH), ω=10ω{sub cH+}⋅ HCH scenario: very high antenna coupling to low density RF plasmas (P{sub pl}≈0.9P{sub RF-G}) and low energy Maxwellian distribution of CX hydrogen atoms with temperature T{sub H}≈350 eV. Fundamental ICR: lower antenna-plasma coupling efficiency (by factor of about 1.5 times) and generation of high energy non-Maxwellian CX hydrogen atoms (with local energy E{sub ⊥H} ≥1.0 keV). In the present paper, we analyze the obtained experimental results numerically using (i) newly developed 0-D transport code describing the process of plasma production with electron and ion collisional ionization in helium-hydrogen gas mixture and (ii) earlier developed 1-D Dispersion Relation Solver accounting for finite temperature effects and collision absorption mechanisms for all plasma species in addition to conventionally examined Landau/TTPM damping for electrons and cyclotron absorption for ions. The numerical study of plasma production in helium with minor hydrogen content in low and high toroidal magnetic fields is presented. The investigation of the excitation, conversion and absorption of plasma waves as function of B{sub T}-field suggests that only fast waves (FW) may give a crucial impact on antenna coupling and characteristics of the ICWC discharge using standard poloidally polarized ICRF antennas designed to couple RF power mainly to FW. The collisional (non-resonant) absorption by electrons and ions and IC absorption by resonant ions of minor concentration in low T{sub e} plasmas is studied at fundamental ICR and its high harmonics.

  5. Experimental Evaluation of a Negative Ion Source for a Heavy Ion Fusion Negative Ion Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L. R.; Hahto, S. K.; Hahto, S. T.; Kwan, J. W.; Leung, K. N.

    2004-06-16

    Negative halogen ions have recently been proposed as a possible alternative to positive ions for heavy ion fusion drivers because electron accumulation would not be a problem in the accelerator, and if desired, the beams could be photo-detached to neutrals. To test the ability to make suitable quality beams, an experiment was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using chlorine in an RF-driven ion source. Without introducing any cesium (which is required to enhance negative ion production in hydrogen ion sources) a negative chlorine current density of 45 mA/cm{sup 2} was obtained under the same conditions that gave 57 45 mA/cm{sup 2} of positive chlorine, suggesting the presence of nearly as many negative ions as positive ions in the plasma near the extraction plane. The negative ion spectrum was 99.5% atomic chlorine ions, with only 0.5% molecular chlorine, and essentially no impurities. Although this experiment did not incorporate the type of electron suppression technology that i s used in negative hydrogen beam extraction, the ratio of co-extracted electrons to Cl{sup -} was as low as 7 to 1, many times lower than the ratio of their mobilities, suggesting that few electrons are present in the near-extractor plasma. This, along with the near-equivalence of the positive and negative ion currents, suggests that the plasma in this region was mostly an ion-ion plasma. The negative chlorine current density was relatively insensitive to pressure, and scaled linearly with RF power. If this linear scaling continues to hold at higher RF powers, it should permit current densities of 100 45 mA/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for present heavy ion fusion injector concepts. The effective ion temperatures of the positive and negative ions appeared to be similar and relatively low for a plasma source.

  6. Ion Induction Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, John J.; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    The description of beams in RF and induction accelerators share many common features. Likewise, there is considerable commonality between electron induction accelerators (see Chap. 7) and ion induction accelerators. However, in contrast to electron induction accelerators, there are fewer ion induction accelerators that have been operated as application-driven user facilities. Ion induction accelerators are envisioned for applications (see Chap. 10) such as Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF), High Energy Density Physics (HEDP), and spallation neutron sources. Most ion induction accelerators constructed to date have been limited scale facilities built for feasibility studies for HIF and HEDP where a large numbers of ions are required on target in short pulses. Because ions are typically non-relativistic or weakly relativistic in much of the machine, space-charge effects can be of crucial importance. This contrasts the situation with electron machines, which are usually strongly relativistic leading to weaker transverse space-charge effects and simplified longitudinal dynamics. Similarly, the bunch structure of ion induction accelerators relative to RF machines results in significant differences in the longitudinal physics.

  7. 47 CFR 101.1525 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1525 Section 101.1525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Service and Technical Rules for the 70/80/90 GHz Bands § 101.1525 RF safety. Licensees in the...

  8. 47 CFR 95.1125 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 95.1125 Section 95.1125 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1125 RF safety. Portable...

  9. 47 CFR 95.1125 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RF safety. 95.1125 Section 95.1125 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1125 RF safety. Portable...

  10. 47 CFR 90.1335 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RF safety. 90.1335 Section 90.1335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1335 RF...

  11. 47 CFR 90.1335 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RF safety. 90.1335 Section 90.1335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1335 RF...

  12. 47 CFR 90.1335 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RF safety. 90.1335 Section 90.1335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1335 RF...

  13. 47 CFR 101.1525 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1525 Section 101.1525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Service and Technical Rules for the 70/80/90 GHz Bands § 101.1525 RF safety. Licensees in the...

  14. 47 CFR 101.1525 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1525 Section 101.1525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Service and Technical Rules for the 70/80/90 GHz Bands § 101.1525 RF safety. Licensees in the...

  15. 47 CFR 95.1125 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RF safety. 95.1125 Section 95.1125 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1125 RF safety. Portable...

  16. 47 CFR 101.1525 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1525 Section 101.1525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Service and Technical Rules for the 70/80/90 GHz Bands § 101.1525 RF safety. Licensees in the...

  17. 47 CFR 95.1125 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RF safety. 95.1125 Section 95.1125 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1125 RF safety. Portable...

  18. 47 CFR 101.1525 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1525 Section 101.1525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Service and Technical Rules for the 70/80/90 GHz Bands § 101.1525 RF safety. Licensees in the...

  19. 47 CFR 90.1335 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 90.1335 Section 90.1335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1335 RF...

  20. RF-controlled implantable solid state switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, T. B.

    1971-01-01

    Miniature, totally implantable, solid state RF-controlled switching circuit for biotelemetry systems consumes zero power in off condition and turns on or off by pulse of RF energy. Switch, the size of small coin, is reducible by integrated circuit techniques.

  1. 47 CFR 27.52 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 27.52 Section 27.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.52 RF safety. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to...

  2. 47 CFR 95.1125 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RF safety. 95.1125 Section 95.1125 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1125 RF safety. Portable...

  3. 47 CFR 27.52 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RF safety. 27.52 Section 27.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.52 RF safety. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to...

  4. 47 CFR 27.52 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RF safety. 27.52 Section 27.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.52 RF safety. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to...

  5. 47 CFR 27.52 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RF safety. 27.52 Section 27.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.52 RF safety. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to...

  6. 47 CFR 90.1335 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RF safety. 90.1335 Section 90.1335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1335 RF...

  7. 47 CFR 27.52 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RF safety. 27.52 Section 27.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.52 RF safety. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to...

  8. RF switch positioner for communications satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, A. G.; Griesser, H. P.; Grant, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The RF switch positioner is a simple, lightweight, redundant positioning mechanism used to reconfigure the antenna beam on the INTELSAT VI satellite. It simultaneously rotates approximately 100 squareax waveguide switches through a full 360 deg. The RF switch positioner has been space qualified and has performed to expectations in conjunction with the feed networks in range testing.

  9. RF SYSTEM FOR THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRODOWSKI, J.; DELONG, J.; METH, M.; SMITH, K.; ZALTSMAN, A.

    2001-06-18

    During accumulation the RF beam current in the spallation neutron source ring rises from 0 to 50 amperes. A clean, 250 nanosecond gap is needed for the extraction kicker risetime. Large momentum spread and small peak current are needed to prevent instabilities and stopband related losses. A robust RF system meeting these requirements has been designed.

  10. Airborne RF Measurement System (ARMS) and Analysis of Representative Flight RF Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Smith, Laura J.; Jones, Richard A.; Fleck, Vincent J.; Salud, Maria Theresa; Mielnik, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Environmental radio frequency (RF) data over a broad band of frequencies (30 MHz to 1000 MHz) were obtained to evaluate the electromagnetic environment in airspace around several airports. An RF signal measurement system was designed utilizing a spectrum analyzer connected to the NASA Lancair Columbia 300 aircraft's VHF/UHF navigation antenna. This paper presents an overview of the RF measurement system and provides analysis of sample RF signal measurement data. This aircraft installation package and measurement system can be quickly returned to service if needed by future projects requiring measurement of an RF signal environment or exploration of suspected interference situations.

  11. The impact of frequency mixing on sheath properties: Ion energy distribution and Vdc/Vrf interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Steven; Hoffman, Daniel; Yang, Jang-Gyoo; Paterson, Alex; Holland, John

    2005-05-01

    A dual frequency rf sheath is analyzed using a simple rf sheath model to study the interaction between the two driving rf currents and their effect on sheath parameters. A symmetric rf discharge with defined electron density and dc sheath potential is modeled using a sharp boundary sheath approximation. Three results of this study are reported: (1) reproduction of trends in ion energy distribution functions predicted and measured in previous studies, (2) a frequency-mixing-dependent relationship between the dc sheath potential and applied rf potential, and (3) an additional asymmetry in the ion energy distribution function generated by the intermodulation components resulting from the nonlinear sheath.

  12. Reduction of RF-sheaths potentials by compensation or suppression of parallel RF currents on ICRF antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, A.; Colas, L.; Vulliez, K.; Ekedahl, A.; Argouarch, A.; Milanesio, D.

    2010-02-01

    Radio frequency (RF) sheaths are suspected of limiting the performance of present-day ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRFs) antennas over long pulses and should be minimized in future fusion devices. Within the simplest models, RF-sheath effects are quantified by the integral VRF = ∫ Epar · dl where the parallel RF field Epar is linked with the slow wave. On 'long open field lines' with large toroidal extension on both sides of the antenna it was shown that VRF is excited by parallel RF currents jpar flowing on the antenna structure. In this paper, the validity of this simple sheath theory is tested experimentally on the Tore Supra (TS) ITER-like antenna prototype (ILP), together with antenna simulation and post-processing codes developed to compute VRF. The predicted poloidal localization of high-|VRF| zones is confronted to that inferred from experimental data analysis. Surface temperature distribution on ILP front face, as well as ILP-induced modifications of RF coupling and hot spots on a magnetically connected lower hybrid current drive antenna, indicates local maxima of dc plasma potential in both the upper and lower parts of the ILP. This result, qualitatively conforming to VRF simulations, is interpreted in terms of jpar flowing on ILP frame. Once the validation is done, such reliable theoretical models and numerical codes are then employed to provide predictive results. Indeed, we propose two ways to reduce |VRF| by acting on jpar on the antenna front face. The first method, more adapted for protruding antennas, consists of avoiding the jpar circulation on the antenna structure, by slotting the antenna frame on its horizontal edges and by partially cutting the Faraday screen rods. The second method, well suited for recessed antennas, consists of compensating jpar of opposite signs along long flux tubes, with parallelepiped antennas aligned with (tilted) flux tubes. The different concepts are assessed numerically on a two-strap TS antenna phased [0

  13. Magnetoplasmonic RF mixing and nonlinear frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firby, C. J.; Elezzabi, A. Y.

    2016-07-01

    We present the design of a magnetoplasmonic Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) modulator facilitating radio-frequency (RF) mixing and nonlinear frequency generation. This is achieved by forming the MZI arms from long-range dielectric-loaded plasmonic waveguides containing bismuth-substituted yttrium iron garnet (Bi:YIG). The magnetization of the Bi:YIG can be driven in the nonlinear regime by RF magnetic fields produced around adjacent transmission lines. Correspondingly, the nonlinear temporal dynamics of the transverse magnetization component are mapped onto the nonreciprocal phase shift in the MZI arms, and onto the output optical intensity signal. We show that this tunable mechanism can generate harmonics, frequency splitting, and frequency down-conversion with a single RF excitation, as well as RF mixing when driven by two RF signals. This magnetoplasmonic component can reduce the number of electrical sources required to generate distinct optical modulation frequencies and is anticipated to satisfy important applications in integrated optics.

  14. R&D ERL: Low level RF

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.

    2010-01-15

    A superconducting RF (SRF) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is currently under development at the Collider-Accelerator Department (C-AD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The major components from an RF perspective are (a) a 5-cell SRF ERL cavity, (b) an SRF photocathode electron gun, and (c) a drive laser for the photocathode gun. Each of these RF subsystems has its own set of RF performance requirements, as well as common requirements for ensuring correct synchronism between them. A low level RF (LLRF) control system is currently under development, which seeks to leverage both technology and experience gained from the recently commissioned RHIC LLRF system upgrade. This note will review the LLRF system requirements and describe the system to be installed at the ERL.

  15. RF FEL for power beaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Robert

    The laser device components associated with operating a radio frequency-free electron laser (RF-FEL) for beaming power from Earth were designed and tested. Analysis of the power beaming system requirements reveals that the FEL, identified by NASA as the laser of choice, is the major subsystem requiring demonstration before proceeding further in proving the efficacy of laser power beaming. Rocketdyne has identified a series of low cost, low risk demonstrations which proceed sequentially, as follows: (1) a 1 kW proof-of-principle demonstration; (2) a 150 kW demonstration of beaming power to a satellite; and (3) a MW class demonstration of Earth to lunar surface power transmission. This sequence of events can be completed in 5.5 years at a cost of $188M, with key milestones each year.

  16. RF Cavity Characterization with VORPAL

    SciTech Connect

    C. Nieter, C. Roark, P. Stoltz, C.D. Zhou, F. Marhauser

    2011-03-01

    When designing a radio frequency (RF) accelerating cavity structure various figures of merit are considered before coming to a final cavity design. These figures of merit include specific field and geometry based quantities such as the ratio of the shunt impedance to the quality factor (R/Q) or the normalized peak fields in the cavity. Other important measures of cavity performance include the peak surface fields as well as possible multipacting resonances in the cavity. High fidelity simulations of these structures can provide a good estimate of these important quantities before any cavity prototypes are built. We will present VORPAL simulations of a simple pillbox structure where these quantities can be calculated analytically and compare them to the results from the VORPAL simulations. We will then use VORPAL to calculate these figures of merit and potential multipacting resonances for two cavity designs under development at Jefferson National Lab for Project X.

  17. Design of rf conditioner cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Govil, R.; Rimmer, R.A.; Sessler, A.; Kirk, H.G.

    1992-06-01

    Theoretical studies are made of radio frequency structures which can be used to condition electron beams so as to greatly reduce the stringent emittance requirements for successful lasing in a free-electron laser. The basic strategy of conditioning calls for modulating an electron beam in the transverse dimension, by a periodic focusing channel, while it traverses a series of rf cavities, each operating in a TM{sub 210} mode. In this paper, we analyze the cavities both analytically and numerically (using MAFIA simulations). We find that when cylindrical symmetry is broken the coupling impedance can be greatly enhanced. We present results showing various performance characteristics as a function of cavity parameters, as well as possible designs for conditioning cavities.

  18. Superconducting cavities and modulated RF

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1981-02-01

    If a cavity has an infinite Q/sub o/, 81.5% of the energy contained in a pulse incident upon the cavity is transferred into the cavity by the end of the pulse if the cavity Q/sub e/ is chosen so that the cavity time constant is 0.796 pulse width (T/sub a/). As Q/sug o/ decreases, the energy in the cavity at the end of the pulse decreases very slowly as long as T/sub a/ is much less than the unloaded cavity time constant, T/sub co/. SC cavities with very high Q/sub o/ enable one to obtain very high gradients with a low power cw source. At high gradients, however, one often does not attain the high Q/sub o/ predicted by theory. Therefore, if one is inteerested in attaining maximum energy in the cavity, as is the case for RF processing and diagnostics, for a given available source energy there is no point in keeping the power on for longer than 0.1 T/sub co/ because the energy expended after 0.1 T/sub co/ is wasted. Therefore, to attain high fields at moderate Q/sub o/, pulsed operation is indicated. This note derives the fields and energy stored and dissipated in the cavity when Q/sub e/ is optimized for a given T/sub a/. It shows how to use this data to measure Q/sub o/ of an SC cavity as a function of field level, how to process the cavity with high RF fields, how to operate SC cavities in the pulsed mode to obtain higher efficiencies and gradients. Experimental results are also reported.

  19. Radio frequency multicusp ion source development (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-03-01

    The radio-frequency (rf) driven multicusp source was originally developed for use in the Superconducting Super Collider injector. It has been demonstrated that the source can meet the H{sup {minus}} beam current and emittance requirements for this application. By employing a porcelain-coated antenna, a clean plasma discharge with very long-life operation can be achieved. Today, the rf source is used to generate both positive and negative hydrogen ion beams and has been tested in various particle accelerator laboratories throughout the world. Applications of this ion source have been extended to other fields such as ion beam lithography, oil-well logging, ion implantation, accelerator mass spectrometry and medical therapy machines. This paper summarizes the latest rf ion source technology and development at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. RF System High Power Amplifier Software Conversion at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    G. Lahti; H. Dong; T. Seegerger

    2006-10-31

    Jefferson Lab is in the process of converting the RF system from analog RF modules and non-smart high power amplifiers (HPAs) to digital RF modules and smart HPAs. The present analog RF module controls both the RF signal and the non-smart HPA hardware. The new digital RF module will only control the RF signal, so the new HPA must include embedded software. This paper will describe the conversion from a software perspective, including the initial testing, the intermediate mixed system of old and new units, and finally the totally new RF system.

  1. Electron beam control rf discharges for plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, M.J.; Ruzic, D.N.; Yang, J.

    1995-12-31

    Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) discharges for microelectronics fabrication suffer from the inability to separately control plasma density and ion power flux to the wafer. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) reactors have been developed to provide some degree of independent control. This is accomplished by arranging for ionization to be provided dominantly by the applied electromagnetic instead of the rf bias to the substrate. Both ICP and ECR reactors, though, optimally operate at low gas pressures, and are not typically used for intermediate to high pressure etching and deposition systems. To address the higher pressure range, a hybrid electron beam/RIE discharge system (EB-RIE) has been developed. In the EB-RIE system, a planar electron beam (1--3 kV) is injected into the plasma chamber above and parallel to the wafer. An rf bias is separately applied to the substrate. A 2-dimensional model of the EB-RIE reactor has been developed to investigate the scaling of the device and analyze previous experimental measurements. Results from the model are discussed for Ar and Ar/SiH{sub 4} gas mixtures in which the beam energy, gas pressure and positioning of the beam are varied.

  2. Performance predictions of RF heated plasma in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, S.; Wan, B.; Zhang, X.; Budny, R. V.; Guo, Y.; McCune, D.; Xu, P.; Yang, J.; Qian, J.; Shi, Y.; Wang, F.; Kaye, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Scenario development of high power L- and H-mode plasmas in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) tokamak is reported. The simulations use PTRANSP in combination with TSC to explore EAST plasmas with various radio frequency (RF) auxiliary heating methods, including ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) and lower hybrid current drive. The GLF23 transport model is found to give a better fit to temperature measurements compared with the MMM95 and MMM08 models. A series of ICRH simulations are performed to optimize parameters of a new ICRH system in EAST. The highest plasma stored energy and other related plasma parameters using the current auxiliary power limits are predicted. The discharge length of high power plasma can be 8-200 s, depending on the volt-second consumption in different scenarios. Various phenomena are reported including the influence of different fractions of RF power on their deposition behavior, and on thermal diffusivity, the linear relation between q0 and LHW power fraction, different behavior of fast ions between L- and H-mode plasmas. The scenario development is predicted to improve the performance of EAST.

  3. Unified Model of the rf Plasma Sheath, Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Merle

    1996-10-01

    By developing an approximation to the first integral of the Poisson equation, one can obtain solutions for the current-voltage characteristics of an rf plasma sheath that are valid over the whole range of inertial response of the ions to an imposed rf voltage or current. (M.E.Riley, 1995 GEC, abstract QA5, published in Bull. Am. Phys. Soc., 40, 1587 (1995).) The theory has been shown to adequately reproduce current-voltage characteristics of two extreme cases (M.A. Lieberman, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 16, 638 (1988). A. Metze, D.W. Ernie, and H.J.Oskam, J.Appl.Phys., 60, 3081 (1986).) of ion response. In this work I show the effect of different conventions for connecting the sheath model to the bulk plasma. Modifications of the Mach number and a finite electric field at the Bohm point are natural choices. The differences are examined for a sheath in a high density Ar plasma and are found to be insignificant. A theoretical argument favors the electric field modification. *Work performed at Sandia National Labs and supported by US DoE under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Pressurized H2 rf Cavities in Ionizing Beams and Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.; Collura, M. G.; Flanagan, G.; Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P. M.; Jana, M. R.; Johnson, R. P.; Kaplan, D. M.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Schwarz, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Torun, Y.; Yonehara, K.

    2013-10-01

    A major technological challenge in building a muon cooling channel is operating RF cavities in multi-tesla external magnetic fields. We report the first experimental characterization of a high pressure gas-filled 805 MHz RF cavity for use with intense ionizing beams and strong external magnetic fields. RF power consumption by beam-induced plasma was investigated with hydrogen and deuterium gases with pressures between 20 and 100 atm and peak RF gradients between 5 and 50 MV/m. The energy absorption per ion pair-RF cycle ranges from 10-18 to 10-16 J. The low pressure case agrees well with an analytical model based on electron and ion mobilities. Varying concentrations of oxygen gas were investigated to remove free electrons from the cavity and reduce the RF power consumption. Measurements of the electron attachment time to oxygen and rate of ion-ion recombination were also made. Additionally, we demonstrate the operation of the gas-filled RF cavity in a solenoidal field of up to 3 T, finding no major magnetic field dependence. These results indicate that a high pressure gas-filled cavity is potentially a viable technology for muon ionization cooling.

  5. Neutron emission from JET DT plasmas with RF heating on minority hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, H.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Gorini, G.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Källne, J.; Tardocchi, M.; EFDA-JET Workprogramme, contributors to the

    2002-07-01

    The neutron emission spectrum from d+t→α+n reactions has been measured as a means to study the plasma response to radio frequency (RF) power coupled to hydrogen and deuteron minority components (through fundamental and second harmonic, respectively) in a tritium discharge at JET. The spectrum was measured with the magnetic proton recoil spectrometer and was analysed in terms of two spectral components due to thermal (TH) and high-energy (HE) deuterons interacting with the bulk ion population of thermal tritons. The results were used to derive information on the deuteron population in terms of temperatures (TTH and THE) as well as corresponding particle and kinetic energy densities of the plasma; the bulk ion temperature (Ti = TTH) was determined both before (with Ohmic heating only) and during the RF pulse. Similar information on protons was derived from other measurements in order to estimate the different RF effects on protons and deuterons. This paper illustrates qualitatively the type of empirical ion kinetic information that can be obtained from neutron emission spectroscopy; the data serves as a basis for comparison with results of predictive and interpretative models on RF effects in plasmas.

  6. Electron Source based on Superconducting RF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Tianmu

    High-bunch-charge photoemission electron-sources operating in a Continuous Wave (CW) mode can provide high peak current as well as the high average current which are required for many advanced applications of accelerators facilities, for example, electron coolers for hadron beams, electron-ion colliders, and Free-Electron Lasers (FELs). Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) has many advantages over other electron-injector technologies, especially when it is working in CW mode as it offers higher repetition rate. An 112 MHz SRF electron photo-injector (gun) was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to produce high-brightness and high-bunch-charge bunches for electron cooling experiments. The gun utilizes a Quarter-Wave Resonator (QWR) geometry for a compact structure and improved electron beam dynamics. The detailed RF design of the cavity, fundamental coupler and cathode stalk are presented in this work. A GPU accelerated code was written to improve the speed of simulation of multipacting, an important hurdle the SRF structure has to overcome in various locations. The injector utilizes high Quantum Efficiency (QE) multi-alkali photocathodes (K2CsSb) for generating electrons. The cathode fabrication system and procedure are also included in the thesis. Beam dynamic simulation of the injector was done with the code ASTRA. To find the optimized parameters of the cavities and beam optics, the author wrote a genetic algorithm Python script to search for the best solution in this high-dimensional parameter space. The gun was successfully commissioned and produced world record bunch charge and average current in an SRF photo-injector.

  7. Spectrometers for RF breakdown studies for CLIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacewicz, M.; Ziemann, V.; Ekelöf, T.; Dubrovskiy, A.; Ruber, R.

    2016-08-01

    An e+e- collider of several TeV energy will be needed for the precision studies of any new physics discovered at the LHC collider at CERN. One promising candidate is CLIC, a linear collider which is based on a two-beam acceleration scheme that efficiently solves the problem of power distribution to the acceleration structures. The phenomenon that currently prevents achieving high accelerating gradients in high energy accelerators such as the CLIC is the electrical breakdown at very high electrical field. The ongoing experimental work within the CLIC collaboration is trying to benchmark the theoretical models focusing on the physics of vacuum breakdown which is responsible for the discharges. In order to validate the feasibility of accelerating structures and observe the characteristics of the vacuum discharges and their eroding effects on the structure two dedicated spectrometers are now commissioned at the high-power test-stands at CERN. First, the so called Flashbox has opened up a possibility for non-invasive studies of the emitted breakdown currents during two-beam acceleration experiments. It gives a unique possibility to measure the energy of electrons and ions in combination with the arrival time spectra and to put that in context with accelerated beam, which is not possible at any of the other existing test-stands. The second instrument, a spectrometer for detection of the dark and breakdown currents, is operated at one of the 12 GHz stand-alone test-stands at CERN. Built for high repetition rate operation it can measure the spatial and energy distributions of the electrons emitted from the acceleration structure during a single RF pulse. Two new analysis tools: discharge impedance tracking and tomographic image reconstruction, applied to the data from the spectrometer make possible for the first time to obtain the location of the breakdown inside the structure both in the transversal and longitudinal direction thus giving a more complete picture of the

  8. Can we estimate plasma density in ICP driver through electrical parameters in RF circuit?

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, M. Sudhir, Dass Chakraborty, A.

    2015-04-08

    To avoid regular maintenance, invasive plasma diagnostics with probes are not included in the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) based ITER Neutral Beam (NB) source design. Even non-invasive probes like optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics are also not included in the present ITER NB design due to overall system design and interface issues. As a result, negative ion beam current through the extraction system in the ITER NB negative ion source is the only measurement which indicates plasma condition inside the ion source. However, beam current not only depends on the plasma condition near the extraction region but also on the perveance condition of the ion extractor system and negative ion stripping. Nevertheless, inductively coupled plasma production region (RF driver region) is placed at distance (∼ 30cm) from the extraction region. Due to that, some uncertainties are expected to be involved if one tries to link beam current with plasma properties inside the RF driver. Plasma characterization in source RF driver region is utmost necessary to maintain the optimum condition for source operation. In this paper, a method of plasma density estimation is described, based on density dependent plasma load calculation.

  9. RF Power and HOM Coupler Tutorial

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B

    2003-10-28

    Radio frequency (RF) couplers are used on superconducting cavities to deliver RF power for creating accelerating fields and to remove unwanted higher-order mode power for reducing emittance growth and cryogenic load. RF couplers in superconducting applications present a number of interdisciplinary design challenges that need to be addressed, since poor performance in these devices can profoundly impact accelerator operations and the overall success of a major facility. This paper will focus on critical design issues for fundamental and higher order mode (HOM) power couplers, highlight a sampling of reliability-related problems observed in couplers, and discuss some design strategies for improving performance.

  10. Multi-level RF identification system

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Kerry D.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2004-07-20

    A radio frequency identification system having a radio frequency transceiver for generating a continuous wave RF interrogation signal that impinges upon an RF identification tag. An oscillation circuit in the RF identification tag modulates the interrogation signal with a subcarrier of a predetermined frequency and modulates the frequency-modulated signal back to the transmitting interrogator. The interrogator recovers and analyzes the subcarrier signal and determines its frequency. The interrogator generates an output indicative of the frequency of the subcarrier frequency, thereby identifying the responding RFID tag as one of a "class" of RFID tags configured to respond with a subcarrier signal of a predetermined frequency.

  11. Nb-Pb Superconducting RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Sekutowicz, J.; Iversen, J.; Kreps, G.; Moller, W.D.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Smedley, J.; Rao, T.; Ferrario, M.; Kneisel, P.; Langner, J.; Strzyzewski, P.; Lefferts, R.; Lipski, A.; Szalowski, K.; Ko, K.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2006-03-29

    We report on the status of an electron RF-gun made of two superconductors: niobium and lead. The presented design combines the advantages of the RF performance of bulk niobium superconducting cavities and the reasonably high quantum efficiency of lead, as compared to other superconducting metals. The concept, mentioned in a previous paper, follows the attractive approach of all niobium superconducting RF-gun as it has been proposed by the BNL group. Measured values of quantum efficiency for lead at various photon energies, analysis of recombination time of photon-broken Cooper pairs for lead and niobium, and preliminary cold test results are discussed in this paper.

  12. Nb-Pb superconducting RF gun

    SciTech Connect

    J. Sekutowicz; J. Iversen; G. Kreps; W.D. Moller; W. Singer; X. Singer; I. Ben-Zvi; A. Burrill; J. Smedley; T. Rao; M. Ferrario; P. Kneisel; J. Langner; P. Strzyzewski; R. Lefferts; A. Lipski; K. Szalowski; K. Ko; L. Xiao

    2006-04-14

    We report on the status of an electron RF-gun made of two superconductors: niobium and lead. The presented design combines the advantages of the RF performance of bulk niobium superconducting cavities and the reasonably high quantum efficiency of lead, as compared to other superconducting metals. The concept, mentioned in a previous paper, follows the attractive approach of all niobium superconducting RF-gun as it has been proposed by the BNL group. Measured values of quantum efficiency for lead at various photon energies, analysis of recombination time of photon-broken Cooper pairs for lead and niobium, and preliminary cold test results are discussed in this paper.

  13. Ion beam sputter etching and deposition of fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Sovey, J. S.; Miller, T. B.; Crandall, K. S.

    1978-01-01

    Fluoropolymer etching and deposition techniques including thermal evaporation, RF sputtering, plasma polymerization, and ion beam sputtering are reviewed. Etching and deposition mechanisms and material characteristics are discussed. Ion beam sputter etch rates for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were determined as a function of ion energy, current density and ion beam power density. Peel strengths were measured for epoxy bonds to various ion beam sputtered fluoropolymers. Coefficients of static and dynamic friction were measured for fluoropolymers deposited from ion bombarded PTFE.

  14. Ion beam sputter etching and deposition of fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Sovey, J. S.; Miller, T. B.; Crandall, K. S.

    1978-01-01

    Fluoropolymer etching and deposition techniques including thermal evaporation, RF sputtering, plasma polymerization, and ion beam sputtering are reviewed. Etching and deposition mechanism and material characteristics are discussed. Ion beam sputter etch rates for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were determined as a function of ion energy, current density and ion beam power density. Peel strengths were measured for epoxy bonds to various ion beam sputtered fluoropolymers. Coefficients of static and dynamic friction were measured for fluoropolymers deposited from ion bombarded PTFE.

  15. Capacitor analysis for rf antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Power, W.H.; Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Commercially available vacuum capacitors have been used in radio frequency (rf) antenna designs. The dimensional envelope of the capacitors has adapted favorably to antenna concepts. However, capacitors that are commercially available have not demonstrated acceptable performance characteristics for maximum design currents of 800 A rms at 80 MHz and 1300 A rms at 30 MHz or for voltages of 50 kV peak. The reason for capacitor failure was investigated. The investigation consisted of establishing existing mechanical design features, defining desired operating criteria of key capacitor components, determining component design limitations, and developing a modified concept for testing. The design criteria included a variable capacitance range of 50 to 450 pF at the maximum current conditions. Effects of capacitor cooling by means of radiative transfer and forced convective transfer were considered. The resulting modified capacitor design concept uses as many components of the commercially available capacitors as possible. An apparatus for testing and evaluation was designed for the proposed capacitor concepts. Tests have demonstrated reliable operations at 750 A and 80 MHz cw on a similar design. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Micropower RF material proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    A level detector or proximity detector for materials capable of sensing through plastic container walls or encapsulating materials is of the sensor. Thus, it can be used in corrosive environments, as well as in a wide variety of applications. An antenna has a characteristic impedance which depends on the materials in proximity to the antenna. An RF oscillator, which includes the antenna and is based on a single transistor in a Colpitt's configuration, produces an oscillating signal. A detector is coupled to the oscillator which signals changes in the oscillating signal caused by changes in the materials in proximity to the antenna. The oscillator is turned on and off at a pulse repetition frequency with a low duty cycle to conserve power. The antenna consists of a straight monopole about one-quarter wavelength long at the nominal frequency of the oscillator. The antenna may be horizontally disposed on a container and very accurately detects the fill level within the container as the material inside the container reaches the level of the antenna.

  17. Micropower RF material proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-11-10

    A level detector or proximity detector for materials capable of sensing through plastic container walls or encapsulating materials is disclosed. Thus, it can be used in corrosive environments, as well as in a wide variety of applications. An antenna has a characteristic impedance which depends on the materials in proximity to the antenna. An RF oscillator, which includes the antenna and is based on a single transistor in a Colpitt`s configuration, produces an oscillating signal. A detector is coupled to the oscillator which signals changes in the oscillating signal caused by changes in the materials in proximity to the antenna. The oscillator is turned on and off at a pulse repetition frequency with a low duty cycle to conserve power. The antenna consists of a straight monopole about one-quarter wavelength long at the nominal frequency of the oscillator. The antenna may be horizontally disposed on a container and very accurately detects the fill level within the container as the material inside the container reaches the level of the antenna. 5 figs.

  18. Modular open RF architecture: extending VICTORY to RF systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melber, Adam; Dirner, Jason; Johnson, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Radio frequency products spanning multiple functions have become increasingly critical to the warfighter. Military use of the electromagnetic spectrum now includes communications, electronic warfare (EW), intelligence, and mission command systems. Due to the urgent needs of counterinsurgency operations, various quick reaction capabilities (QRCs) have been fielded to enhance warfighter capability. Although these QRCs were highly successfully in their respective missions, they were designed independently resulting in significant challenges when integrated on a common platform. This paper discusses how the Modular Open RF Architecture (MORA) addresses these challenges by defining an open architecture for multifunction missions that decomposes monolithic radio systems into high-level components with welldefined functions and interfaces. The functional decomposition maximizes hardware sharing while minimizing added complexity and cost due to modularization. MORA achieves significant size, weight and power (SWaP) savings by allowing hardware such as power amplifiers and antennas to be shared across systems. By separating signal conditioning from the processing that implements the actual radio application, MORA exposes previously inaccessible architecture points, providing system integrators with the flexibility to insert third-party capabilities to address technical challenges and emerging requirements. MORA leverages the Vehicular Integration for Command, Control, Communication, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (C4ISR)/EW Interoperability (VICTORY) framework. This paper concludes by discussing how MORA, VICTORY and other standards such as OpenVPX are being leveraged by the U.S. Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command (RDECOM) Communications Electronics Research, Development, and Engineering Center (CERDEC) to define a converged architecture enabling rapid technology insertion, interoperability and reduced SWaP.

  19. CEBAF'S New RF Separator Structure Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Reza Kazimi; Jock Fugitt; A. Krycuk; Charles Sinclair; Larry Turlington

    1993-05-01

    Prototypes of the rf separator for CEBAF have been made and successfully beam tested. The structure is a new design which has a high transverse shunt impedance together with a small transverse dimension compared to more conventional rf deflecting structures. Five rf separators will be used at CEBAF to allow beam from any one of the five recirculation passes to be delivered to any of the three experimental halls. The authors have already described the basic design of the structure and theoretical calculations. They have also reported some results from rf measurements and beam tests. In this paper they present more beam test results, their final design parameters, and test results of coupling two 1/2 wavelength cavities together.

  20. Degreasing and cleaning superconducting RF Niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Rauchmiller, Michael; Kellett, Ron; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    The purpose and scope of this report is to detail the steps necessary for degreasing and cleaning of superconducting RF Niobium cavities in the A0 clean room. It lists the required equipment and the cleaning procedure.

  1. Single frequency RF powered ECG telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. H.; Hynecek, J.; Homa, J.

    1979-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that a radio frequency magnetic field can be used to power implanted electronic circuitry for short range telemetry to replace batteries. A substantial reduction in implanted volume can be achieved by using only one RF tank circuit for receiving the RF power and transmitting the telemetered information. A single channel telemetry system of this type, using time sharing techniques, was developed and employed to transmit the ECG signal from Rhesus monkeys in primate chairs. The signal from the implant is received during the period when the RF powering radiation is interrupted. The ECG signal is carried by 20-microsec pulse position modulated pulses, referred to the trailing edge of the RF powering pulse. Satisfactory results have been obtained with this single frequency system. The concept and the design presented may be useful for short-range long-term implant telemetry systems.

  2. Si-based RF MEMS components.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, James E.; Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Baker, Michael Sean; Fleming, James Grant; Stewart, Harold D.; Dyck, Christopher William

    2005-01-01

    Radio frequency microelectromechanical systems (RF MEMS) are an enabling technology for next-generation communications and radar systems in both military and commercial sectors. RF MEMS-based reconfigurable circuits outperform solid-state circuits in terms of insertion loss, linearity, and static power consumption and are advantageous in applications where high signal power and nanosecond switching speeds are not required. We have demonstrated a number of RF MEMS switches on high-resistivity silicon (high-R Si) that were fabricated by leveraging the volume manufacturing processes available in the Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL), a Class-1, radiation-hardened CMOS manufacturing facility. We describe novel tungsten and aluminum-based processes, and present results of switches developed in each of these processes. Series and shunt ohmic switches and shunt capacitive switches were successfully demonstrated. The implications of fabricating on high-R Si and suggested future directions for developing low-loss RF MEMS-based circuits are also discussed.

  3. New developments in RF power sources

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.H.

    1994-06-01

    The most challenging rf source requirements for high-energy accelerators presently being studied or designed come from the various electron-positron linear collider studies. All of these studies except TESLA (the superconducting entry in the field) have specified rf sources with much higher peak powers than any existing tubes at comparable high frequencies. While circular machines do not, in general, require high peak power, the very high luminosity electron-positron rings presently being designed as B factories require prodigious total average rf power. In this age of energy conservation, this puts a high priority on high efficiency for the rf sources. Both modulating anodes and depressed collectors are being investigated in the quest for high efficiency at varying output powers.

  4. High-brightness ion and electron rf linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A. )

    1989-01-01

    In the past, development work to increase the energy and intensity of particle accelerators tended to be pursued in separate directions, but now almost all modern applications have to achieve an intensity as high as possible at the desired energy, along with a very good beam quality in terms of the beam confinement, aiming, or focusing. The figure of merit used is the beam brightness, defined as the beam power (or current when the energy is fixed) divided by the phase space appropriate to the problem at hand. Phase space for the beam as a whole is six-dimensional, describing the physical size of the beam and change in size with time or distance; the area projected on one plane is called emittance. Achieving high intensity and good quality simultaneously is difficult, primarily because of nonlinear space- charge and focusing forces at nonrelativistic velocities and because of beam-breakup effects for relativistic beams. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in understanding the physics of these effects; some aspects are reviewed here and related to their impact on practical design aspects. 7 refs.

  5. Normal Conducting RF Cavity for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; DeMello, A.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Summers, D.

    2010-05-23

    Normal conducting RF cavities must be used for the cooling section of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), currently under construction at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. Eight 201-MHz cavities are needed for the MICE cooling section; fabrication of the first five cavities is complete. We report the cavity fabrication status including cavity design, fabrication techniques and preliminary low power RF measurements.

  6. Fast beam stacking using rf barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Capista, D.; Griffin, J.; Ng, K.-Y.; Wildman, D.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Two barrier RF systems were fabricated, tested and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. Each can provide 8 kV rectangular pulses (the RF barriers) at 90 kHz. When a stationary barrier is combined with a moving barrier, injected beams from the Booster can be continuously deflected, folded and stacked in the Main Injector, which leads to doubling of the beam intensity. This paper gives a report on the beam experiment using this novel technology.

  7. RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Christodoulou, Christos George; Feldner, Lucas Matthew

    2005-01-01

    A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

  8. RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Christodoulou, Christos George; Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Feldner, Lucas Matthew

    2005-07-01

    A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

  9. A no-load RF calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    The described device can be used to measure the output of any dc powered RF source. No dummy load is required for the measurements. The device is, therefore, called the 'no-load calorimeter' (NLC). The NLC measures the power actually fed to the antenna or another useful load. It is believed that the NLC can compete successfully with directional coupler type systems in measuring the output of high-power RF sources.

  10. RF study and 3-D simulations of a side-coupling thermionic RF-gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimjaem, S.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C.

    2014-02-01

    A thermionic RF-gun for generating ultra-short electron bunches was optimized, developed and used as a source at a linac-based THz radiation research laboratory of the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The RF-gun is a π/2-mode standing wave structure, which consists of two S-band accelerating cells and a side-coupling cavity. The 2856 MHz RF wave is supplied from an S-band klystron to the gun through the waveguide input-port at the cylindrical wall of the second cell. A fraction of the RF power is coupled from the second cell to the first one via a side-coupling cavity. Both the waveguide input-port and the side-coupling cavity lead to an asymmetric geometry of the gun. RF properties and electromagnetic field distributions inside the RF-gun were studied and numerically simulated by using computer codes SUPERFISH 7.19 and CST Microwave Studio 2012©. RF characterizations and tunings of the RF-gun were performed to ensure the reliability of the gun operation. The results from 3D simulations and measurements are compared and discussed in this paper. The influence of asymmetric field distributions inside the RF-gun on the electron beam properties was investigated via 3D beam dynamics simulations. A change in the coupling-plane of the side-coupling cavity is suggested to improve the gun performance.

  11. Movable RF probe eliminates need for calibration in plasma accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. B.

    1967-01-01

    Movable RF antenna probe in plasma accelerators continuously maps the RF field both within and beyond the accelerator. It eliminates the need for installing probes in the accelerator walls. The moving RF probe can be used to map the RF electrical field under various accelerator conditions.

  12. Overview of High Power Vacuum Dry RF Load Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2015-08-27

    A specific feature of RF linacs based on the pulsed traveling wave (TW) mode of operation is that only a portion of the RF energy is used for the beam acceleration. The residual RF energy has to be terminated into an RF load. Higher accelerating gradients require higher RF sources and RF loads, which can stably terminate the residual RF power. RF feeders (from the RF source though the accelerating section to the load) are vacuumed to transmit multi-megawatt high power RF. This overview will outline vacuumed RF loads only. A common method to terminate multi-MW RF power is to use circulated water (or other liquid) as an absorbing medium. A solid dielectric interface (a high quality ceramic) is required to separate vacuum and liquid RF absorber mediums. Using such RF load approaches in TW linacs is troubling because there is a fragile ceramic window barrier and a failure could become catastrophic for linac vacuum and RF systems. Traditional loads comprising of a ceramic disk have limited peak and average power handling capability and are therefore not suitable for high gradient TW linacs. This overview will focus on ''vacuum dry'' or ''all-metal'' loads that do not employ any dielectric interface between vacuum and absorber. The first prototype is an original design of RF loads for the Stanford Two-Mile Accelerator.

  13. Experimental Investigation of RF Sheath Rectification in ICRF and LH Heated Plasmas on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoukov, R.; Whyte, D. G.; Faust, I.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Meneghini, O.; Wallace, G.; Wukitch, S.; Myra, J.

    2011-12-23

    Radio frequency (RF) rectification of the plasma sheath is being actively studied on C-Mod as a likely mechanism that leads to prohibitively high molybdenum levels in the plasma core of ion cyclotron RF (ICRF) heated discharges. We installed emissive, ion sensitive, Langmuir, and 3-D B-dot probes to quantify the plasma potentials ({Phi}{sub P}) in ICRF and lower hybrid (LH) heated discharges. Two probe sets were mounted on fixed limiter surfaces and one set of probes was mounted on a reciprocating (along the major radius) probe. Initial results showed that RF rectification is strongly dependent on the local plasma density and not on the local RF fields. The RF sheaths had a threshold-like appearance at the local density of {approx}10{sup 16} m-{sup 3}. Radial probe scans revealed that the RF sheaths peaked in the vicinity of the ICRF limiter surface, agreeing with a recent theory. The highest {Phi}{sub P}'s were observed on magnetic field lines directly mapped to the active ICRF antenna. Measurements in LH heated plasmas showed a strong {Phi}{sub P} dependence on the parallel index of refraction n{sub ||} of the launched LH waves: {Phi}{sub P} is greater at lower n{sub ||}. Little dependence was observed on the local plasma density.

  14. The CEBAF RF Separator System Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hovater; Mark Augustine; Al Guerra; Richard Nelson; Robert Terrell; Mark Wissmann

    2004-08-01

    The CEBAF accelerator uses RF deflecting cavities operating at the third sub-harmonic (499 MHz) of the accelerating frequency (1497 MHz) to ''kick'' the electron beam to the experimental halls. The cavities operate in a TEM dipole mode incorporating mode enhancing rods to increase the cavity's transverse shunt impedance [1]. As the accelerators energy has increased from 4 GeV to 6 GeV the RF system, specifically the 1 kW solid-state amplifiers, have become problematic, operating in saturation because of the increased beam energy demands. Two years ago we began a study to look into replacement for the RF amplifiers and decided to use a commercial broadcast Inductive Output Tube (IOT) capable of 30 kW. The new RF system uses one IOT amplifier on multiple cavities as opposed to one amplifier per cavity as was originally used. In addition, the new RF system supports a proposed 12 GeV energy upgrade to CEBAF. We are currently halfway through the upgrade with three IOTs in operation and the remaining one nearly installed. This paper reports on the new RF system and the IOT performance.

  15. RF heating of nanoclusters for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letfullin, Renat R.; Letfullin, Alla R.; George, Thomas F.

    2015-03-01

    Nanodrugs selectively delivered to a tumor site can be activated by radiation for drug release, or nanoparticles (NPs) can be used as a drug themselves by producing biological damage in cancer cells through thermal, mechanical ablations or charged particle emission. Radio-frequency (RF) waves have an excellent ability to penetrate into the human body without causing healthy tissue damage, which provides a great opportunity to activate/heat NPs delivered inside the body as a contrast agent for diagnosis and treatment purposes. However the heating of NPs in the RF range of the spectrum is controversial in the research community because of the low power load of RF waves and low absorption of NPs in the RF range. To resolve these weaknesses in the RF activation of NPs and dramatically increase absorption of contrast agents in tumor, we suggest aggregating the nanoclusters inside or on the surface of the cancer cells. We simulate space distribution of temperature changes inside and outside metal and dielectric nanopraticles/nanoclusters, determine the number of nanoparticles needed to form a cluster, and estimate the thermal damage area produced in surrounding medium by nanopraticles/nanoclusters heated in the RF field.

  16. Thermoregulatory responses to RF energy absorption.

    PubMed

    Adair, Eleanor R; Black, David R

    2003-01-01

    This white paper combines a tutorial on the fundamentals of thermoregulation with a review of the current literature concerned with physiological thermoregulatory responses of humans and laboratory animals in the presence of radio frequency (RF) and microwave fields. The ultimate goal of research involving whole body RF exposure of intact organisms is the prediction of effects of such exposure on human beings. Most of the published research on physiological thermoregulation has been conducted on laboratory animals, with a heavy emphasis on laboratory rodents. Because their physiological heat loss mechanisms are limited, these small animals are very poor models for human beings. Basic information about the thermoregulatory capabilities of animal models relative to human capability is essential for the appropriate evaluation and extrapolation of animal data to humans. In general, reliance on data collected on humans and nonhuman primates, however fragmentary, yields a more accurate understanding of how RF fields interact with humans. Such data are featured in this review, including data from both clinic and laboratory. Featured topics include thermal sensation, human RF overexposures, exposures attending magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), predictions based on simulation models, and laboratory studies of human volunteers. Supporting data from animal studies include the thermoregulatory profile, response thresholds, physiological responses of heat production and heat loss, intense or prolonged exposure, RF effects on early development, circadian variation, and additive drug-microwave interactions. The conclusion is inescapable that humans demonstrate far superior thermoregulatory ability over other tested organisms during RF exposure at, or even above current human exposure guidelines. PMID:14628305

  17. A trapped mercury 199 ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, L. S.; Giffard, R. P.; Mcguire, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    Mercury 199 ions confined in an RF quadrupole trap and optically pumped by mercury 202 ion resonance light are investigated as the basis for a high performance frequency standard with commercial possibilities. Results achieved and estimates of the potential performance of such a standard are given.

  18. Orthogonal ion injection apparatus and process

    SciTech Connect

    Kurulugama, Ruwan T; Belov, Mikhail E

    2014-04-15

    An orthogonal ion injection apparatus and process are described in which ions are directly injected into an ion guide orthogonal to the ion guide axis through an inlet opening located on a side of the ion guide. The end of the heated capillary is placed inside the ion guide such that the ions are directly injected into DC and RF fields inside the ion guide, which efficiently confines ions inside the ion guide. Liquid droplets created by the ionization source that are carried through the capillary into the ion guide are removed from the ion guide by a strong directional gas flow through an inlet opening on the opposite side of the ion guide. Strong DC and RF fields divert ions into the ion guide. In-guide orthogonal injection yields a noise level that is a factor of 1.5 to 2 lower than conventional inline injection known in the art. Signal intensities for low m/z ions are greater compared to convention inline injection under the same processing conditions.

  19. Fundamental studies of ion injection and trapping of electrosprayed ions on a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarmby, Scott Thomas

    The quadrupole ion trap is a highly versatile and sensitive analytical mass spectrometer. Because of the advantages offered by the ion trap, there has been intense interest in coupling it to ionization techniques such as electrospray which form ions externally to the ion trap. In this work, experiments and computer simulations were employed to study the injection of electrosprayed ions into the ion trap of a Finnigan MAT LCQ LC/MS n mass spectrometer. The kinetic energy distribution of the ion beam was characterized and found to be relatively wide, a result of the high pressures from the atmospheric pressure source. One of the most important experimental parameters which affects ion injection efficiency is the RF voltage applied to the ring electrode. A theoretical model was fit to experimental data allowing the optimum RF voltage for trapping a given m/z ion to be predicted. Computer simulations of ion motion were performed to study the effect of various instrumental parameters on trapping efficiency. A commercially available ion optics program, SIMION v6.0, was chosen because it allowed the actual ion trap electrode geometry including endcap holes to be simulated. In contrast to previous computer simulations, SIMION provided the ability to start ions outside the ion trap and to simulate more accurately the injection of externally formed ions. The endcap holes were found to allow the RF field to penetrate out of the ion trap and affect ions as they approached the ion trap. From these simulations, a model for the process by which injected ions are trapped was developed. Using these computer simulations, techniques of improving trapping efficiency were investigated. Most previous techniques perturb ions which are already in the ion trap and therefore cannot be used to accumulate ions; the ability to accumulate ions is a necessity with ionization sources such as electrospray which form ions continuously. One such novel technique for improving trapping efficiency

  20. Update on RF System Studies and VCX Fast Tuner Work for the RIA Drive Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B; Shen, S

    2003-05-06

    The limited cavity beam loading conditions anticipated for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) create a situation where microphonic-induced cavity detuning dominates radio frequency (RF) coupling and RF system architecture choices in the linac design process. Where most superconducting electron and proton linacs have beam-loaded bandwidths that are comparable to or greater than typical microphonic detuning bandwidths on the cavities, the beam-loaded bandwidths for many heavy-ion species in the RIA driver linac can be as much as a factor of 10 less than the projected 80-150 Hz microphonic control window for the RF structures along the driver, making RF control problematic. While simply overcoupling the coupler to the cavity can mitigate this problem to some degree, system studies indicate that for the low-{beta} driver linac alone, this approach may cost 50% or more than an RF system employing a voltage controlled reactance (VCX) fast tuner. An update of these system cost studies, along with the status of the VCX work being done at Lawrence Livermore National Lab is presented here.

  1. Cryo-EM visualization of the ribosome in termination complex with apo-RF3 and RF1

    PubMed Central

    Pallesen, Jesper; Hashem, Yaser; Korkmaz, Gürkan; Koripella, Ravi Kiran; Huang, Chenhui; Ehrenberg, Måns; Sanyal, Suparna; Frank, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Termination of messenger RNA translation in Bacteria and Archaea is initiated by release factors (RFs) 1 or 2 recognizing a stop codon in the ribosomal A site and releasing the peptide from the P-site transfer RNA. After release, RF-dissociation is facilitated by the G-protein RF3. Structures of ribosomal complexes with RF1 or RF2 alone or with RF3 alone—RF3 bound to a non-hydrolyzable GTP-analog—have been reported. Here, we present the cryo-EM structure of a post-termination ribosome containing both apo-RF3 and RF1. The conformation of RF3 is distinct from those of free RF3•GDP and ribosome-bound RF3•GDP(C/N)P. Furthermore, the conformation of RF1 differs from those observed in RF3-lacking ribosomal complexes. Our study provides structural keys to the mechanism of guanine nucleotide exchange on RF3 and to an L12-mediated ribosomal recruitment of RF3. In conjunction with previous observations, our data provide the foundation to structurally characterize the complete action cycle of the G-protein RF3. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00411.001 PMID:23755360

  2. Investigation of the temporal sheath dynamics in the intermediate RF regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shihab, M.; Elgendy, A. T.; Eremin, D.; Mussenbrock, T.; Brinkmann, R. P.; Korolov, I.; Derzsi, A.; Donko, Z.; Schulze, J.

    2012-10-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of modulated RF plasma boundary sheaths is investigated employing a recently published model termed Ensemble In Spacetime (EST) and Particle In Cell (PIC) model. The EST enables a fast, and kinetically self-consistent simulation of all RF modulated plasma boundary sheaths in all technically relevant discharge regimes, (Shihab et al 2012 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45 185202). A numerical experiment has been done using PIC approach with an electrically and geometrically symmetric capacitively coupled plasma. Using the resulting ion flux to the sheath and the sheath potential as input parameters, the sheath dynamics is simulated with EST as well. The results of EST are in excellent agreement with the PIC results. A huge reduction in the simulation time is achieved using EST. The ion dynamics in the intermediate regime (i.e., the ion transit time is of the order of the RF period) causes a temporal asymmetry for the sheath dynamics. The memory effects due to the ion inertia is supposed to give rise to a phase difference between the expansion and the contraction phases of the plasma sheath and consequently to a hysteresis of the sheath charge voltage relation.

  3. Measurement of RF electric field in high- β plasma using a Pockels detector in magnetosphere plasma confinement device RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushiake, Toshiki; Nishiura, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, Atsushi

    2015-11-01

    The magnetosphere plasma confinement device RT-1 generates a dipole magnetic field that can confine high- β plasma by using a levitated superconducting coil. So far it is reported that high temperature electrons (up to 50keV) exist and that the local electron βe value exceeds more than 100%. However, the ion β value βi remains low in the present high- β state. To realize a high-βi state, we have started Ion Cyclotron Heating (ICH) experiments. For efficient ICH in a dipole topology, it is important to measure RF electric fields and characterize the propagation of RF waves in plasmas. On this viewpoint, we started direct measurement of local RF electric fields in RT-1 with a Pockels sensor system. A non-linear optical crystal in the Pockels sensor produces birefringence in an ambient electric field. The refractive index change of the birefringence is proportional to the applied electric field strength, which can be used to measure local electric fields. RF electric field distribution radiated from an ICH antenna was measured inside RT-1 in air, and was compared with numerical results calculated by TASK code. Results on the measurement of electric field distribution in high- β plasma and evaluation of the absorbed RF power into ions will be reported. Supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 23224014.

  4. RF Performance of Membrane Aperture Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flint, Eirc M.; Lindler, Jason E.; Thomas, David L.; Romanofsky, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of recent results establishing the suitability of Membrane Aperture Shell Technology (MAST) for Radio Frequency (RF) applications. These single surface shells are capable of maintaining their figure with no preload or pressurization and minimal boundary support, yet can be compactly roll stowed and passively self deploy. As such, they are a promising technology for enabling a future generation of RF apertures. In this paper, we review recent experimental and numerical results quantifying suitable RF performance. It is shown that candidate materials possess metallic coatings with sufficiently low surface roughness and that these materials can be efficiently fabricated into RF relevant doubly curved shapes. A numerical justification for using a reflectivity metric, as opposed to the more standard RF designer metric of skin depth, is presented and the resulting ability to use relatively thin coating thickness is experimentally validated with material sample tests. The validity of these independent film sample measurements are then confirmed through experimental results measuring RF performance for reasonable sized doubly curved apertures. Currently available best results are 22 dBi gain at 3 GHz (S-Band) for a 0.5m aperture tested in prime focus mode, 28dBi gain for the same antenna in the C-Band (4 to 6 GHz), and 36.8dBi for a smaller 0.25m antenna tested at 32 GHz in the Ka-Band. RF range test results for a segmented aperture (one possible scaling approach) are shown as well. Measured antenna system actual efficiencies (relative to the unachievable) ideal for these on axis tests are generally quite good, typically ranging from 50 to 90%.

  5. RF pulse compression for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1995-05-01

    Future (nonsuperconducting) linear colliders will require very high values of peak rf power per meter of accelerating structure. The role of rf pulse compression in producing this power is examined within the context of overall rf system design for three future colliders at energies of 1.0--1.5 TeV, 5 TeV and 25 TeV. In order keep the average AC input power and the length of the accelerator within reasonable limits, a collider in the 1.0--1.5 TeV energy range will probably be built at an x-band rf frequency, and will require a peak power on the order of 150--200 MW per meter of accelerating structure. A 5 TeV collider at 34 GHz with a reasonable length (35 km) and AC input power (225 MW) would require about 550 MW per meter of structure. Two-beam accelerators can achieve peak powers of this order by applying dc pulse compression techniques (induction linac modules) to produce the drive beam. Klystron-driven colliders achieve high peak power by a combination of dc pulse compression (modulators) and rf pulse compression, with about the same overall rf system efficiency (30--40%) as a two-beam collider. A high gain (6.8) three-stage binary pulse compression system with high efficiency (80%) is described, which (compared to a SLED-11 system) can be used to reduce the klystron peak power by about a factor of two, or alternately, to cut the number of klystrons in half for a 1.0--1.5 TeV x-band collider. For a 5 TeV klystron-driven collider, a high gain, high efficiency rf pulse compression system is essential.

  6. RF pulse compression for future linear colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Perry B.

    1995-07-01

    Future (nonsuperconducting) linear colliders will require very high values of peak rf power per meter of accelerating structure. The role of rf pulse compression in producing this power is examined within the context of overall rf system design for three future colliders at energies of 1.0-1.5 TeV, 5 TeV, and 25 TeV. In order to keep the average AC input power and the length of the accelerator within reasonable limits, a collider in the 1.0-1.5 TeV energy range will probably be built at an x-band rf frequency, and will require a peak power on the order of 150-200 MW per meter of accelerating structure. A 5 TeV collider at 34 GHz with a reasonable length (35 km) and AC input power (225 MW) would require about 550 MW per meter of structure. Two-beam accelerators can achieve peak powers of this order by applying dc pulse compression techniques (induction linac modules) to produce the drive beam. Klystron-driven colliders achieve high peak power by a combination of dc pulse compression (modulators) and rf pulse compression, with about the same overall rf system efficiency (30-40%) as a two-beam collider. A high gain (6.8) three-stage binary pulse compression system with high efficiency (80%) is described, which (compared to a SLED-II system) can be used to reduce the klystron peak power by about a factor of two, or alternatively, to cut the number of klystrons in half for a 1.0-1.5 TeV x-band collider. For a 5 TeV klystron-driven collider, a high gain, high efficiency rf pulse compression system is essential.

  7. Solid state power systems for DC and RF accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, R. J.; Richter-Sand, R. J.

    1999-06-01

    Modern accelerator applications require high average and peak powers—particularly RF accelerators and DC accelerators. In many of these applications, it is possible to replace tubes in the power systems with solid state power supplies. In this paper we outline work which we have performed in developing solid state pulsed and CW pulsed power systems for RF linacs and for DC accelerators. We have built and successfully tested a 125 kV, 2.5 MW peak, 60 kW average pulsed power system which is well suited to driving ion beam linacs. This system is modular, with 3 modules capable of driving a large Klystron. The system has been extensively tested with both resistive and fault loads. This type of power supply promises to be less than half as expensive as a conventional thyratron modulator, with considerably more flexibility in pulse duration. We have also powered our Nested High Voltage (NHV) accelerators with a solid state power supply using IGBTs. This type of supply is suitable for both NHV machines, and other Dynamitron style accelerators. Pulsed burst mode excitation of this type of power supply allows us to maintain 1 MV in the NHV accelerator with less than three hundred watts of idling power.

  8. RF H and CD systems for DEMO - Challenges and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, T.; Wenninger, R.; Barbato, E.; Cardinali, A.; Cesario, R.; Mirizzi, F.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Eester, D. V.; Lerche, E.

    2014-02-12

    The aim of driving a sufficient amount of plasma current with an appropriate radial current density profile is considered as one of the key challenges for a tokamak fusion power plant in steady state operation. Furthermore, efficient heating to enable transition to regime of enhanced confinement and to achieve breakeven plasma temperatures as well as MHD control and plasma breakdown assistance are required. In the framework of the EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology (PPPT) activities, the ability of the Electron cyclotron (EC), Ion Cyclotron (IC) and Lower Hybrid (LH) systems to fulfil these requirements, was studied for a demonstration fusion power plant (DEMO). As boundary condition, a 1D description of the plasma for a pulsed DEMO based on system code studies combined with transport analysis was developed. The predicted 1D plasma parameters were used to calculate the current drive (CD) efficiency of each system and eventually optimised it. As an example, the EC current drive efficiency could be increased strongly by top launch compared to equatorial launch at least by a factor of two. For the IC system, two possible windows of operation for standard and higher frequencies were highlighted, whereby again top launch leads to higher CD-efficiencies. The efficiencies predicted for DEMO for the RF current drive systems will be presented. Finally, gaps in the feasibility of RF systems under DEMO relevant conditions will be identified.

  9. Neutral particle dynamics in a high-power RF source

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, D. Paunska, Ts.; Shivarova, A.; Tarnev, Kh.

    2015-04-08

    Previous studies on the spatial discharge structure in the SPIDER source of negative hydrogen/deuterium ions carried out at low applied power are extended towards description of the discharge maintenance under the conditions of the actual rf power deposition of 100 kW planned for a single driver of the source. In addition to the expected higher electron density, the results show strong increase of the electron temperature and of the temperatures of the neutral species (hydrogen atoms and molecules). In the discussions, not only the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters but also that of the fluxes in the discharge (particle and energy fluxes) is involved. The obtained results come in confirmation of basic concepts for low-pressure discharge maintenance: (i) mutually related electron density and temperature as a display of the generalized Schottky condition, (ii) discharge behavior governed by the fluxes, i.e. strong nonlocality in the discharge, and (iii) a non-ambipolarity in the discharge regime, which originates from shifted maxima of the electron density and temperature and shows evidence in a vortex electron flux and in a dc current in a rf discharge, the latter resulting from a shift in the positions of the maxima of the electron density and plasma potential.

  10. Non-fusion applications of RF and microwave technology

    SciTech Connect

    Caughman, J.B.O.; Baity, F.W.; Bigelow, T.S.; Gardner, W.L.; Hoffman, D.J.; Forrester, S.C.; White, T.L.

    1995-12-01

    The processing of materials using rf and/or microwave power is a broad area that has grown significantly in the past few years. The authors have applied rf and microwave technology in the areas of ceramic sintering, plasma processing, and waste processing. The sintering of ceramics in the frequency range of 50 MHz-28 GHz has lead to unique material characteristics compared to materials that have been sintered conventionally. It has been demonstrated that sintering can be achieved in a variety of materials, including alumina, zirconia, silicon carbide, and boron carbide. In the area of plasma processing, progress has been made in the development and understanding of high density plasma sources, including inductively coupled plasma (ICP) sources. The effects of processing conditions on the ion energy distribution at the substrate surface (a critical processing issue) have been determined for a variety of process gases. The relationship between modeling and experiment is being established. Microwave technology has also been applied to the treatment of radioactive and chemical waste. The application of microwaves to the removal of contaminated concrete has been demonstrated. Details of these programs and other potential application areas are discussed.

  11. Solid state power systems for DC and RF accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, R. J.; Richter-Sand, R. J.

    1999-06-10

    Modern accelerator applications require high average and peak powers - particularly RF accelerators and DC accelerators. In many of these applications, it is possible to replace tubes in the power systems with solid state power supplies. In this paper we outline work which we have performed in developing solid state pulsed and CW pulsed power systems for RF linacs and for DC accelerators. We have built and successfully tested a 125 kV, 2.5 MW peak, 60 kW average pulsed power system which is well suited to driving ion beam linacs. This system is modular, with 3 modules capable of driving a large Klystron. The system has been extensively tested with both resistive and fault loads. This type of power supply promises to be less than half as expensive as a conventional thyratron modulator, with considerably more flexibility in pulse duration. We have also powered our Nested High Voltage (NHV) accelerators with a solid state power supply using IGBTs. This type of supply is suitable for both NHV machines, and other Dynamitron style accelerators. Pulsed burst mode excitation of this type of power supply allows us to maintain 1 MV in the NHV accelerator with less than three hundred watts of idling power.

  12. Novel Crab Cavity RF Design

    SciTech Connect

    Dudas, A.; Neubauer, M. L.; Sah, R.; Rimmer, B.; Wang, H.

    2011-03-01

    A 20-50 MV integrated transverse voltage is required for the Electron-Ion Collider. The most promising of the crab cavity designs that have been proposed in the last five years are the TEM type crab cavities because of the higher transverse impedance. The TEM design approach is extended here to a hybrid crab cavity that includes the input power coupler as an integral part of the design. A prototype was built with Phase I monies and tested at JLAB. The results reported on, and a system for achieving 20-50 MV is proposed.

  13. RF Reactive Magnetron Sputter Deposition of Silicon Sub-Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hattum, E. D.

    2007-01-01

    RF reactive magnetron plasma sputter deposition of silicon sub oxide E.D. van Hattum Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Utrecht University The work described in the thesis has been inspired and stimulated by the use of SiOx layers in the direct inductive printing technology, where the SiOx layer is used as the charge retention layer on the drums for copying and printing devices. The thesis describes investigations of the plasma and of processes taking place on the sputter target and on the SiOx growth surface in the room temperature, RF reactive magnetron plasma sputter deposition technology. The sputtering target consists of silicon and the reactive atmosphere consists of an Ar/O2 mixture. The composition of the grown SiOx layers has been varied between x=0 and x=2 by variation of the O2 partial pressure. The characteristics of the growth process have been related to the nanostructural properties of the grown films. The deposition system enables the characterisation of the plasma (Langmuir probe, energy resolved mass spectrometer) and of the growing film (Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD), Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy) and is connected to a beamline of a 6MV tandem van de Graaff accelerator. Also Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy have been applied. It is shown how ERD can be used as a real-time in-situ technique. The thesis presents spatially resolved values of the ion density, electron temperature and the quasi-electrostatic potential, determined using a Langmuir probe. The plasma potential has a maximum about 2 cm from the cathode erosion area, and decreases (more than 200 V typically) towards the floating sputter cathode. The potential decreases slightly in the direction towards the grounded growth surface and the positive, mainly Ar+, ions created in the large volume of the plasma closest to the substrate are accelerated towards the growth surface. These ions obtain a few eV of

  14. RF characterization and testing of ridge waveguide transitions for RF power couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Jose, Mentes; Singh, G. N.; Kumar, Girish; Bhagwat, P. V.

    2016-12-01

    RF characterization of rectangular to ridge waveguide transitions for RF power couplers has been carried out by connecting them back to back. Rectangular waveguide to N type adapters are first calibrated by TRL method and then used for RF measurements. Detailed information is obtained about their RF behavior by measurements and full wave simulations. It is shown that the two transitions can be characterized and tuned for required return loss at design frequency of 352.2 MHz. This opens the possibility of testing and conditioning two transitions together on a test bench. Finally, a RF coupler based on these transitions is coupled to an accelerator cavity. The power coupler is successfully tested up to 200 kW, 352.2 MHz with 0.2% duty cycle.

  15. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  16. Ion manipulation device

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Baker, Erin M

    2014-09-16

    An ion manipulation method and device is disclosed. The device includes a pair of substantially parallel surfaces. An array of inner electrodes is contained within, and extends substantially along the length of, each parallel surface. The device includes a first outer array of electrodes and a second outer array of electrodes. Each outer array of electrodes is positioned on either side of the inner electrodes, and is contained within and extends substantially along the length of each parallel surface. A DC voltage is applied to the first and second outer array of electrodes. A RF voltage, with a superimposed electric field, is applied to the inner electrodes by applying the DC voltages to each electrode. Ions either move between the parallel surfaces within an ion confinement area or along paths in the direction of the electric field, or can be trapped in the ion confinement area.

  17. Generation of X-rays and neutrons with a RF-discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental study concerning disk shaped plasma structures was performed. Such disk-shaped structures can be obtained using an rf discharge in hydrogen. The applied frequency was 1-2 Mhz. In case of operation in deuterium it was found that the discharge emits neutrons and X-rays, although the applied voltage is only 2 kV. This phenomenon was explained by assuming formation of plasma cavitons which are surrounded by high electric fields. The condition for formation of these cavitons is that the applied rf frequency is equal to the plasma frequency. The ions trapped in these resonance structures acquire sufficient energy that they can undergo fusion reactions with the ions in the surrounding gas.

  18. RF Manipulation and Detection of Protons in the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James; Lewis, Raymond A.; Pearson, J. Boise; Sims, W. Herb; Chakrabarti, Suman; Fant, Wallace E.; Stan McDonald

    2003-01-01

    HiPAT is a Penning-Malmberg trap designed to contain 10(exp 12) particles diagnostics of the plasma. Destructive particle detection is performed by extracting trapped ions from HiPAT and colliding them with a microchannel plate detector (providing number and energy information). The improved RF system has been used to detect various plasma modes for both electron and ion plasmas in the two traps at MSFC, including axd, cyclotron, and diocotron modes. New diagnostics are also being added to HiPAT to measure the axial density distribution of the trapped cloud to match measured RF plasma modes to plasma conditions. In addition, plasma modeling efforts have been started using the XOOPIC code.

  19. Introduction to Latest RF ATE with Low Test Cost Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimishima, Masayuki

    This paper describes latest RF Automated Test Equipment (RF ATE) technologies that include device under test (DUT) connections, a calibration method, and an RF test module mainly focusing on low cost of test (COT). Most important respect for low COT is how achieve a number of simultaneous measurements and short test time as well as a plain calibration. We realized these respects by a newly proposed calibration method and a drastically downsized RF test module with multiple resources and high throughput. The calibration method is very convenient for RF ATE. Major contribution for downsizing of the RF test module is RF circuit technology in form of RF functional system in package (RF-SIPs), resulting in very attractive test solutions.

  20. National RF Test Facility as a multipurpose development tool

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, T.J.; Becraft, W.R.; Berry, L.A.; Blue, C.W.; Gardner, W.L.; Haselton, H.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Loring, C.M. Jr.; Moeller, F.A.; Ponte, N.S.

    1983-01-01

    Additions and modifications to the National RF Test Facility design have been made that (1) focus its use for technology development for future large systems in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), (2) expand its applicability to technology development in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies (ECRF) at 60 GHz, (3) provide a facility for ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) 60-GHz ring physics studies, and (4) permit engineering studies of steady-state plasma systems, including superconducting magnet performance, vacuum vessel heat flux removal, and microwave protection. The facility will continue to function as a test bed for generic technology developments for ICRF and the lower hybrid range of frequencies (LHRF). The upgraded facility is also suitable for mirror halo physics experiments.

  1. Computer simulations of ions in radio-frequency traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, A.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.; Djomehri, J.; Harabetian, E.

    1990-01-01

    The motion of ions in a trapped-ion frequency standard affects the stability of the standard. In order to study the motion and structures of large ion clouds in a radio-frequency (RF) trap, a computer simulation of the system that incorporates the effect of thermal excitation of the ions was developed. Results are presented from the simulation for cloud sizes up to 512 ions, emphasizing cloud structures in the low-temperature regime.

  2. Rf capacitively-coupled electrodeless light source

    DOEpatents

    Manos, Dennis M.; Diggs, Jessie; Ametepe, Joseph D.; Fugitt, Jock A.

    2000-01-01

    An rf capacitively-coupled electrodeless light source is provided. The light source comprises a hollow, elongated chamber and at least one center conductor disposed within the hollow, elongated chamber. A portion of each center conductor extends beyond the hollow, elongated chamber. At least one gas capable of forming an electronically excited molecular state is contained within each center conductor. An electrical coupler is positioned concentric to the hollow, elongated chamber and the electrical coupler surrounds the portion of each center conductor that extends beyond the hollow, elongated chamber. A rf-power supply is positioned in an operable relationship to the electrical coupler and an impedance matching network is positioned in an operable relationship to the rf power supply and the electrical coupler.

  3. RF Spectroscopy on a Homogeneous Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenjie; Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Patel, Parth; Struck, Julian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Over the last two decades RF spectroscopy has been established as an indispensable tool to probe a large variety of fundamental properties of strongly interacting Fermi gases. This ranges from measurement of the pairing gap over tan's contact to the quasi-particle weight of Fermi polarons. So far, most RF spectroscopy experiments have been performed in harmonic traps, resulting in an averaged response over different densities. We have realized an optical uniform potential for ultracold Fermi gases of 6 Li atoms, which allows us to avoid the usual problems connected to inhomogeneous systems. Here we present recent results on RF spectroscopy of these homogeneous samples with a high signal to noise ratio. In addition, we report progress on measuring the contact of a unitary Fermi gas across the normal to superfluid transition.

  4. X-Band RF Gun Development

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, Arnold; Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami; Anderson, Scott; Hartemann, Fred; Marsh, Roark; /LLNL, Livermore

    2012-06-22

    In support of the MEGa-ray program at LLNL and the High Gradient research program at SLAC, a new X-band multi-cell RF gun is being developed. This gun, similar to earlier guns developed at SLAC for Compton X-ray source program, will be a standing wave structure made of 5.5 cells operating in the pi mode with copper cathode. This gun was designed following criteria used to build SLAC X-band high gradient accelerating structures. It is anticipated that this gun will operate with surface electric fields on the cathode of 200 MeV/m with low breakdown rate. RF will be coupled into the structure through a final cell with symmetric duel feeds and with a shape optimized to minimize quadrupole field components. In addition, geometry changes to the original gun, operated with Compton X-ray source, will include a wider RF mode separation, reduced surface electric and magnetic fields.

  5. Laser/rf personnel identification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zari, Michael C.; Ward, Reeder N.; Hess, David A.; Anderson, Christopher S.

    1995-05-01

    This paper documents the design of a Laser/RF Personnel Identification System developed for the US Army Communications and Electronics Command (CECOM) for soldier identification. The system has dual use applications, including law enforcement officer protection, and includes a laser interrogation unit with a programmable activation code. The interrogation unit is very directive for low probability of intercept (LPI), which is of interest during covert operations. A responder unit, worn by the law enforcement personnel or soldier, transmits an LPI radio frequency (RF) response only after receiving the proper interrogation code. The basic subsystems for the identification system are a laser interrogation unit, an RF responder unit, and a programming/synchronization unit. In this paper, the operating principles for the subsystems are reviewed and design issues are discussed. In addition to the design performed for CECOM, a breadboard system was developed to validate the concept. Hardware implementation is reviewed and field testing of the breadboard is presented.

  6. Pulsed rf superconductivity program at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1984-08-01

    Recent tests performed at SLAC on superconducting TM/sub 010/ caavities using short rf pulses (less than or equal to 2.5 ..mu..s) have established that at the cavity surface magnetic fields can be reached in the vicinity of the theoretical critical fields without an appreciable increase in average losses. Tests on niobium and lead cavities are reported. The pulse method seems to be best suited to study peak field properties of superconductors in the microwave band, without the limitations imposed by defects. The short pulses also seem to be more effective in decreasing the causes of field emission by rf processing. Applications of the pulsed rf superconductivity to high-gradient linear accelerators are also possible.

  7. Field-free junctions for surface electrode ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, Robert; Schmied, R.; Blain, M. G.; Leibfried, D.; Wineland, D.

    2015-05-01

    Intersections between transport guides in a network of RF ion traps are a key ingredient to many implementations of scalable quantum information processing with trapped ions. Several junction architectures demonstrated so far are limited by varying radial secular frequencies, a reduced trap depth, or a non-vanishing RF field along the transport channel. We report on the design and progress in implementing a configurable microfabricated surface electrode Y-junction that employs switchable RF electrodes. An essentially RF-field-free pseudopotential guide between any two legs of the junction can be established by applying RF potential to a suitable pair of electrodes. The transport channel's height above the electrodes, its depth and radial curvature are constant to within 15%. Supported by IARPA, Sandia, NSA, ONR, and the NIST Quantum Information Program.

  8. SSRL photocathode RF gun test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, M.; Baltay, M.; Boyce, A.

    1995-12-31

    A photocathode RF gun test stand designed for the production and study of high brightness electron beams will be constructed at SSRL. The beam will be generated from a laser driven third generation photocathode RF gun being developed in collaboration with BNL, LBL, and UCLA. The 3-5 [MeV] beam from the gun will be accelerated using a SLAC three meter S-band accelerator section, in order to achieve the desired low emittance beam, emittance compensation with solenoidal focusing will be employed.

  9. Inductance of rf-wave-heated plasmas.

    PubMed

    Farshi, E; Todo, Y

    2003-03-14

    The inductance of rf-wave-heated plasmas is derived. This inductance represents the inductance of fast electrons located in a plateau during their acceleration due to electric field or deceleration due to collisions and electric field. This inductance has been calculated for small electric fields from the two-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation as the flux crossing the surface of critical energy mv(2)(ph)/2 in the velocity space. The new expression may be important for radio-frequency current drive ramp-up, current drive efficiency, current profile control, and so on in tokamaks. This inductance may be incorporated into transport codes that study plasma heating by rf waves.

  10. Potential-well distortion in barrier Rf

    SciTech Connect

    King Ng

    2004-04-29

    Head-tail asymmetry has been observed in the longitudinal beam profiles in the Fermilab Recycler Ring where protons or antiprotons are stored in rf barrier buckets. The asymmetry is caused by the distortion of the rf potential well in the presence of resistive impedance. Gaussian energy distribution can fit the observed asymmetric beam profile but not without discrepancy. It can also fit the measured energy distribution. On the other hand, generalized elliptic distribution gives a better fit to the beam profile. However, it fails to reproduce the observed energy distribution.

  11. Ion source development for various applications in Korea (invited) (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y. S.

    2008-02-15

    Ion source development in Korea has been related with various applications from accelerator to nanotechnology. Conventional ion sources such as Duoplasmatron and PIG ion sources were developed for high power proton accelerator and small cyclotron accelerators. To improve lifetime of the high current proton ion source, helicon plasma ion sources were developed with external rf antenna and applied for neutron generation in drive-in-target configuration. Negative hydrogen ion sources were also developed for tandem and cyclotron accelerators by using both rf and filament discharges. Large-area high-current ion sources for the KSTAR NBI system were developed and successfully tested for long-pulse operation of up to 300 s. Several broad beam ion sources for industrial applications such as ion implantation and surface treatment were also developed by using arc, rf, and microwave discharges. Recently, ion source applications become diversified to the area of nano- and biotechnologies. For example, C60 ion source was developed for the use of bioapplications in nanometer scale. For focused ion beam as a nanofabrication tool, liquid metal ion sources were improved and a novel plasma ion source was developed by utilizing localized sheath discharges. Research and development activities of these ion sources will be discussed with short description of appropriate applications.

  12. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR FIXED CST AND RF COLUMNS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S

    2007-10-17

    In support of a small column ion exchange (SCIX) process for the Savannah River Site waste processing program, transient and steady state two-dimensional heat transfer models have been constructed for columns loaded with cesium-saturated crystalline silicotitanate (CST) or spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) beads and 6 molar sodium tank waste supernate. Radiolytic decay of sorbed cesium results in heat generation within the columns. The models consider conductive heat transfer only with no convective cooling and no process flow within the columns (assumed column geometry: 27.375 in ID with a 6.625 in OD center-line cooling pipe). Heat transfer at the column walls was assumed to occur by natural convection cooling with 35 C air. A number of modeling calculations were performed using this computational heat transfer approach. Minimal additional calculations were also conducted to predict temperature increases expected for salt solution processed through columns of various heights at the slowest expected operational flow rate of 5 gpm. Results for the bounding model with no process flow and no active cooling indicate that the time required to reach the boiling point of {approx}130 C for a CST-salt solution mixture containing 257 Ci/liter of Cs-137 heat source (maximum expected loading for SCIX applications) at 35 C initial temperature is about 6 days. Modeling results for a column actively cooled with external wall jackets and the internal coolant pipe (inlet coolant water temperature: 25 C) indicate that the CST column can be maintained non-boiling under these conditions indefinitely. The results also show that the maximum temperature of an RF-salt solution column containing 133 Ci/liter of Cs-137 (maximum expected loading) will never reach boiling under any conditions (maximum predicted temperature without cooling: 88 C). The results indicate that a 6-in cooling pipe at the center of the column provides the most effective cooling mechanism for reducing the

  13. Observations of aspect sensitive RF-enhanced incoherent backscatter in the polar cap ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhillon, Ranvir; Robinson, T. R.; Yeoman, Timothy K.

    RF-induced plasma instabilities give rise to characteristic spectral enhancements in incoherent scatter spectra. The aspect sensitivity of these enhancements provides valuable information regarding the physical processes that occur within the RF-affected ionospheric patch. These direction-dependent signatures exhibit significant variability and help shed light on possible coupling between artificial field-aligned irregularities generated at the upper-hybrid height and RF-induced instabilities excited near the reflection height for O-mode-polarized radio waves. This directional dependence of RF-enhanced incoherent radar backscatter has been shown using data from the high-latitude ionosphere, and the significant features included consistent field-aligned signatures that may be related to the presence of artificial field-aligned irregularities. These earlier high-latitude results provided motivation for repeating the investigation in the different geophysical conditions that obtain in the polar cap ionosphere. The Space Plasma Exploration by Active Radar (SPEAR) facility is located within the polar cap and has provided observations of RF-enhanced ion and plasma line spectra recorded by the EISCAT Svalbard UHF incoherent scatter radar system (ESR), which is collocated with SPEAR. We present observations of aspect sensitive E-and F-region SPEAR-induced ion and plasma line enhance-ments from several directions in the magnetic meridian plane, centred on field-aligned. These enhancements indicate excitation of both the purely growing mode and the parametric decay instability, together with sporadic E-layer results that may indicate the presence of cavitons. We note consistent enhancements from field-aligned, vertical and also from 5 degrees south of field-aligned. We attribute the prevalence of vertical scatter to the importance of the Spitze region, and of that from field-aligned to possible wave/irregularity coupling.

  14. Nanofabrication using home-made RF plasma coupled chemical vapour deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Si Ci; Ilyas, Usman; Rawat, Rajdeep Singh

    2014-08-01

    Zinc oxide, ZnO, a popular semiconductor material with a wide band gap (3.37 eV) and high binding energy of the exciton (60 meV), has numerous applications such as in optoelectronics, chemical/biological sensors, and drug delivery. This project aims to (i) optimize the operating conditions for growth of ZnO nanostructures using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, and (ii) investigate the effects of coupling radiofrequency (RF) plasma to the CVD method on the quality of ZnO nanostructures. First, ZnO nanowires were synthesized using a home-made reaction setup on gold-coated and non-coated Si (100) substrates at 950 °C. XRD, SEM, EDX, and PL measurements were used for characterizations and it was found that a deposition duration of 10 minutes produced the most well-defined ZnO nanowires. SEM analysis revealed that the nanowires had diameters ranging from 30-100 mm and lengths ranging from 1-4 µm. In addition, PL analysis showed strong UV emission at 380 nm, making it suitable for UV lasing. Next, RF plasma was introduced for 30 minutes. Both remote and in situ RF plasma produced less satisfactory ZnO nanostructures with poorer crystalline structure, surface morphology, and optical properties due to etching effect of energetic ions produced from plasma. However, a reduction in plasma discharge duration to 10 minutes produced thicker and shorter ZnO nanostructures. Based on experimentation conducted, it is insufficient to conclude that RF plasma cannot aid in producing well-defined ZnO nanostructures. It can be deduced that the etching effect of energetic ions outweighed the increased oxygen radical production in RF plasma nanofabrication.

  15. Extraction characteristics of a low-energy ion beam system with a remote plasma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, M. R.; Wada, M.

    2016-02-01

    Low-energy argon beams were extracted from a dual-chamber ion source system. The first chamber is a quartz cylinder where dense inductively coupled plasmas were produced using 13.56 MHz radio frequency (rf) power. The discharge was driven into an adjacent chamber which acts as a reservoir for ion beam extraction using a dual-electrode extractor configuration. Extraction of ions from the second chamber with energies in the 100 eV range was achieved while minimizing fluctuations induced by the rf signal. A custom-built retarding potential analyzer was used to analyze the effectiveness of ion beam transport using the remote plasma chamber. Well-defined beams were extracted between 60 and 100 V extraction potentials at 50-100 W rf powers. An increase in rf power resulted in an increase in average ion energy, increase in ion current density while the energy spread remains constant.

  16. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  17. RF Conditioning and testing of fundamental power couplers for the RIA project

    SciTech Connect

    M. Stirbet; J. Popielarski; T. L. Grimm; M. Johnson

    2003-09-01

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) is the highest priority of the nuclear physics community in the United States for a major new accelerator facility. A principal element of RIA will be a superconducting 1.4 GeV superconducting ion linac accelerating ions of isotopes from hydrogen to uranium onto production targets or for further acceleration by a second superconducting linac. The superconducting linac technology is closely related to that used at existing accelerators and the Spallation Neutron Source. Taking advantage of JLAB's SRF Institute facilities and expertise for the SNS project, preparation of couplers, RF conditioning and high power tests have been performed on fundamental power couplers for RIA project.

  18. Battery-Powered RF Pre-Ionization System for the Caltech Magnetohydrodynamically-Driven Jet Experiment: RF Discharge Properties and MHD-Driven Jet Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, Vernon H.

    This thesis describes investigations of two classes of laboratory plasmas with rather different properties: partially ionized low pressure radiofrequency (RF) discharges, and fully ionized high density magnetohydrodynamically (MHD)-driven jets. An RF pre-ionization system was developed to enable neutral gas breakdown at lower pressures and create hotter, faster jets in the Caltech MHD-Driven Jet Experiment. The RF plasma source used a custom pulsed 3 kW 13.56 MHz RF power amplifier that was powered by AA batteries, allowing it to safely float at 4-6 kV with the cathode of the jet experiment. The argon RF discharge equilibrium and transport properties were analyzed, and novel jet dynamics were observed. Although the RF plasma source was conceived as a wave-heated helicon source, scaling measurements and numerical modeling showed that inductive coupling was the dominant energy input mechanism. A one-dimensional time-dependent fluid model was developed to quantitatively explain the expansion of the pre-ionized plasma into the jet experiment chamber. The plasma transitioned from an ionizing phase with depressed neutral emission to a recombining phase with enhanced emission during the course of the experiment, causing fast camera images to be a poor indicator of the density distribution. Under certain conditions, the total visible and infrared brightness and the downstream ion density both increased after the RF power was turned off. The time-dependent emission patterns were used for an indirect measurement of the neutral gas pressure. The low-mass jets formed with the aid of the pre-ionization system were extremely narrow and collimated near the electrodes, with peak density exceeding that of jets created without pre-ionization. The initial neutral gas distribution prior to plasma breakdown was found to be critical in determining the ultimate jet structure. The visible radius of the dense central jet column was several times narrower than the axial current channel

  19. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE... rules for radiation hazards, as set forth in § 1.1307 of this chapter....

  20. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE... rules for radiation hazards, as set forth in § 1.1307 of this chapter....

  1. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE... rules for radiation hazards, as set forth in § 1.1307 of this chapter....

  2. RF Breakdown of Metallic Surfaces in Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    BastaniNejad, M.; Elmustafa, A.A.; Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Hu, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Alsharo'a, M.; Neubauer, M.; Sah, R.; /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2009-05-01

    In earlier reports, microscopic images of the surfaces of metallic electrodes used in high-pressure gas-filled 805 MHz RF cavity experiments were used to investigate the mechanism of RF breakdown of tungsten, molybdenum, and beryllium electrode surfaces. Plots of remnants were consistent with the breakdown events being due to field emission, due to the quantum mechanical tunnelling of electrons through a barrier as described by Fowler and Nordheim. In the work described here, these studies have been extended to include tin, aluminium, and copper. Contamination of the surfaces, discovered after the experiments concluded, have cast some doubt on the proper qualities to assign to the metallic surfaces. However, two significant results are noted. First, the maximum stable RF gradient of contaminated copper electrodes is higher than for a clean surface. Second, the addition of as little as 0.01% of SF6 to the hydrogen gas increased the maximum stable gradient, which implies that models of RF breakdown in hydrogen gas will be important to the study of metallic breakdown.

  3. Experimental Study of RF Pulsed Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent, Lisa; Tantawi, Sami; Dolgashev, Valery; Nantista, Christopher; Higashi, Yasuo; Aicheler, Markus; Heikkinen, Samuli; Wuensch, Walter; /CERN

    2011-11-04

    Cyclic thermal stresses produced by rf pulsed heating can be the limiting factor on the attainable reliable gradients for room temperature linear accelerators. This is especially true for structures that have complicated features for wakefield damping. These limits could be pushed higher by using special types of copper, copper alloys, or other conducting metals in constructing partial or complete accelerator structures. Here we present an experimental study aimed at determining the potential of these materials for tolerating cyclic thermal fatigue due to rf magnetic fields. A special cavity that has no electric field on the surface was employed in these studies. The cavity shape concentrates the magnetic field on one flat surface where the test material is placed. The materials tested in this study have included oxygen free electronic grade copper, copper zirconium, copper chromium, hot isostatically pressed copper, single crystal copper, electroplated copper, Glidcop(reg. sign), copper silver, and silver plated copper. The samples were exposed to different machining and heat treatment processes prior to rf processing. Each sample was tested to a peak pulsed heating temperature of approximately 110 C and remained at this temperature for approximately 10 x 10{sup 6} rf pulses. In general, the results showed the possibility of pushing the gradient limits due to pulsed heating fatigue by the use of copper zirconium and copper chromium alloys.

  4. NSLS-II RF BEAM POSITION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, K.; Della Penna, A. J.; DeLong, J.; Kosciuk, B.; Mead, J.; Pinayev, I.; Singh, O.; Tian, Y.; Ha, K.; Portmann, G.; Sebek J.

    2011-03-28

    An internal R&D program has been undertaken at BNL to develop a sub-micron RF Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the NSLS-II 3rd generation light source that is currently under construction. The BPM R&D program started in August 2009. Successful beam tests were conducted 15 months from the start of the program. The NSLS-II RF BPM has been designed to meet all requirements for the NSLS-II Injection system and Storage Ring. Housing of the RF BPM's in +-0.1 C thermally controlled racks provide sub-micron stabilization without active correction. An active pilot-tone has been incorporated to aid long-term (8hr min) stabilization to 200nm RMS. The development of a sub-micron BPM for the NSLS-II has successfully demonstrated performance and stability. Pilot Tone calibration combiner and RF synthesizer has been implemented and algorithm development is underway. The program is currently on schedule to start production development of 60 Injection BPM's starting in the Fall of 2011. The production of {approx}250 Storage Ring BPM's will overlap the Injection schedule.

  5. RF Design of the LCLS Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C

    2010-12-13

    Final dimensions for the LCLS RF gun are described. This gun, referred to as the LCLS gun, is a modified version of the UCLA/BNL/SLAC 1.6 cell S-Band RF gun [1], referred to as the prototype gun. The changes include a larger mode separation (15 MHz for the LCLS gun vs. 3.5 MHz for the prototype gun), a larger radius at the iris between the 2 cells, a reduced surface field on the curvature of the iris between the two cells, Z power coupling, increased cooling channels for operation at 120 Hz, dual rf feed, deformation tuning of the full cell, and field probes in both cells. Temporal shaping of the klystron pulse, to reduce the average power dissipated in the gun, has also been adopted. By increasing the mode separation, the amplitude of the 0-mode electric field on the cathode decreases from 10% of the peak on axis field for the prototype gun to less than 3% for the LCLS gun for the steady state fields. Beam performance is improved as shown by the PARMELA simulations. The gun should be designed to accept a future load lock system. Modifications follow the recommendations of our RF review committee [2]. Files and reference documents are compiled in Section IV.

  6. Image reconstructions with the rotating RF coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakic, A.; Wang, H.; Weber, E.; Li, B. K.; Poole, M.; Liu, F.; Crozier, S.

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that rotating a single RF transceive coil (RRFC) provides a uniform coverage of the object and brings a number of hardware advantages (i.e. requires only one RF channel, averts coil-coil coupling interactions and facilitates large-scale multi-nuclear imaging). Motion of the RF coil sensitivity profile however violates the standard Fourier Transform definition of a time-invariant signal, and the images reconstructed in this conventional manner can be degraded by ghosting artifacts. To overcome this problem, this paper presents Time Division Multiplexed — Sensitivity Encoding (TDM-SENSE), as a new image reconstruction scheme that exploits the rotation of the RF coil sensitivity profile to facilitate ghost-free image reconstructions and reductions in image acquisition time. A transceive RRFC system for head imaging at 2 Tesla was constructed and applied in a number of in vivo experiments. In this initial study, alias-free head images were obtained in half the usual scan time. It is hoped that new sequences and methods will be developed by taking advantage of coil motion.

  7. Advanced RF power sources for linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1996-10-01

    In order to maintain a reasonable over-all length at high center-of-mass energy, the main linac of an electron-positron linear collider must operate at a high accelerating gradient. For copper (non-superconducting) accelerator structures, this implies a high peak power per unit length and a high peak power per RF source, assuming a limited number of discrete sources are used. To provide this power, a number of devices are currently under active development or conceptual consideration: conventional klystrons with multi-cavity output structures, gyroklystrons, magnicons, sheet-beam klystrons, multiple-beam klystrons and amplifiers based on the FEL principle. To enhance the peak power produced by an rf source, the SLED rf pulse compression scheme is currently in use on existing linacs, and new compression methods that produce a flatter output pulse are being considered for future linear colliders. This paper covers the present status and future outlook for the more important rf power sources and pulse compression systems. It should be noted that high gradient electron linacs have applications in addition to high-energy linear colliders; they can, for example, serve as compact injectors for FEL`s and storage rings.

  8. The IPNS second harmonic RF upgrade.

    SciTech Connect

    Middendorf, M. E.; Brumwell, F. R.; Dooling, J. C.; Horan, D.; Kustom, R. L.; Lien, M. K.; McMichael, G. E.; Moser, M. R.; Nassiri, A.; Wang, S.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2008-01-01

    The intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) is used to accelerate protons from 50 MeV to 450 MeV, at a repetition rate of 30 Hz. The original ring design included two identical rf systems, each consisting of an accelerating cavity, cavity bias supply, power amplifiers and low-level analog electronics. The original cavities are located 180 degrees apart in the ring and provide a total peak accelerating voltage of {approx}21 kV over the 2.21-MHz to 5.14-MHz revolution frequency sweep. A third rf system has been constructed and installed in the RCS. The third rf system is capable of operating at the fundamental revolution frequency for the entire acceleration cycle, providing an additional peak accelerating voltage of up to {approx}11 kV, or at the second harmonic of the revolution frequency for the first {approx}4 ms of the acceleration cycle, providing an additional peak voltage of up to {approx}11 kV for bunch shape control. We describe here the hardware implementation and operation to date of the third rf cavity in the second harmonic mode.

  9. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE... rules for radiation hazards, as set forth in § 1.1307 of this chapter....

  10. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE... rules for radiation hazards, as set forth in § 1.1307 of this chapter....

  11. Three-dimensional RF structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. K.; Browman, M. J.; Weiland, T.

    1989-04-01

    The calculation of three-dimensional rf structures is rapidly approaching adolescence, after having been in its infancy for the last four years. This paper will show the kinds of calculations that are currently being performed in the frequency domain and is a companion paper to one in which time-domain calculations are described.

  12. Three-dimensional rf structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.K.; Browman, M.J.; Weiland, T.

    1988-01-01

    The calculation of three-dimensional rf structures is rapidly approaching adolescence, after having been in its infancy for the last four years. This paper will show the kinds of calculations that are currently being performed in the frequency domain and is a companion paper to one in which time-domain calculations are described. 13 refs., 14 figs.

  13. Eccentric superconducting RF cavity separator structure

    DOEpatents

    Aggus, John R.; Giordano, Salvatore T.; Halama, Henry J.

    1976-01-01

    Accelerator apparatus having an eccentric-shaped, iris-loaded deflecting cavity for an rf separator for a high energy high momentum, charged particle accelerator beam. In one embodiment, the deflector is superconducting, and the apparatus of this invention provides simplified machining and electron beam welding techniques. Model tests have shown that the electrical characteristics provide the desired mode splitting without adverse effects.

  14. 47 CFR 95.1221 - RF exposure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF exposure. 95.1221 Section 95.1221 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO... operating under this section must contain a finite difference time domain (FDTD) computational...

  15. Experimental study of rf pulsed heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Lisa; Tantawi, Sami; Dolgashev, Valery; Nantista, Christopher; Higashi, Yasuo; Aicheler, Markus; Heikkinen, Samuli; Wuensch, Walter

    2011-04-01

    Cyclic thermal stresses produced by rf pulsed heating can be the limiting factor on the attainable reliable gradients for room temperature linear accelerators. This is especially true for structures that have complicated features for wakefield damping. These limits could be pushed higher by using special types of copper, copper alloys, or other conducting metals in constructing partial or complete accelerator structures. Here we present an experimental study aimed at determining the potential of these materials for tolerating cyclic thermal fatigue due to rf magnetic fields. A special cavity that has no electric field on the surface was employed in these studies. The cavity shape concentrates the magnetic field on one flat surface where the test material is placed. The materials tested in this study have included oxygen free electronic grade copper, copper zirconium, copper chromium, hot isostatically pressed copper, single crystal copper, electroplated copper, Glidcop®, copper silver, and silver plated copper. The samples were exposed to different machining and heat treatment processes prior to rf processing. Each sample was tested to a peak pulsed heating temperature of approximately 110°C and remained at this temperature for approximately 10×106 rf pulses. In general, the results showed the possibility of pushing the gradient limits due to pulsed heating fatigue by the use of copper zirconium and copper chromium alloys.

  16. RF cavities with transversely biased ferrite tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Smythe, W.R.; Brophy, T.G.; Carlini, R.D.; Friedrichs, C.C.; Grisham, D.L.; Spalek, G.; Wilkerson, L.C.

    1985-10-01

    Earley et al. suggested that ferrite tuned rf cavities have lower ferrite power dissipation if the ferrite bias field is perpendicular rather than parallel to the rf magnetic field. A 50-84 MHz cavity has been constructed in which ferrite can be biased either way. Low power measurements of six microwave ferrites show that the magnetic Q's of these ferrites under perpendicular bias are much higher than under parallel bias, and that the high Q region extends over a much wider range of rf permeability. TDK Y-5 ferrite was found to have a magnetic Q of 10,800, 4,800, 1,200 and 129 at rf permeabilities of 1.2, 2.4, 3.7 and 4.5, respectively. Measurements of perpendicularly biased ferrite at various power levels were made in a coaxial line cavity. The Q of Y-5 ferrite was found to decrease by less than a factor of 2 as the power density in the ferrite was increased to 1.3 W/cmT. A cavity design for a 6 GeV, high current, rapid cycling synchrotron using transversely biased ferrite tuning is described.

  17. Binary rf pulse compression experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Lavine, T.L.; Spalek, G.; Farkas, Z.D.; Menegat, A.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    Using rf pulse compression it will be possible to boost the 50- to 100-MW output expected from high-power microwave tubes operating in the 10- to 20-GHz frequency range, to the 300- to 1000-MW level required by the next generation of high-gradient linacs for linear for linear colliders. A high-power X-band three-stage binary rf pulse compressor has been implemented and operated at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). In each of three successive stages, the rf pulse-length is compressed by half, and the peak power is approximately doubled. The experimental results presented here have been obtained at low-power (1-kW) and high-power (15-MW) input levels in initial testing with a TWT and a klystron. Rf pulses initially 770 nsec long have been compressed to 60 nsec. Peak power gains of 1.8 per stage, and 5.5 for three stages, have been measured. This corresponds to a peak power compression efficiency of about 90% per stage, or about 70% for three stages, consistent with the individual component losses. The principle of operation of a binary pulse compressor (BPC) is described in detail elsewhere. We recently have implemented and operated at SLAC a high-power (high-vacuum) three-stage X-band BPC. First results from the high-power three-stage BPC experiment are reported here.

  18. RF Sputtering of Gold Contacts On Niobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    Reliable gold contacts are deposited on niobium by combination of RF sputtering and photolithography. Process results in structures having gold only where desired for electrical contact. Contacts are stable under repeated cycling from room temperature to 4.2 K and show room-temperature contact resistance as much as 40 percent below indium contacts made by thermalcompression bonding.

  19. Common Sense Copper and RF Guns

    SciTech Connect

    Mulhollan, G.

    2005-01-18

    The purpose of this document is to gather together both fundamental information on copper and on the cleaning and operation of copper in RF gun structures. While incomplete, this is a living document and will be added to and updated as necessary.

  20. Simulations of percutaneous RF ablation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Kwok, Jonathan; Beetel, Robert J.

    2003-06-01

    Breast and liver cancers provide an ongoing challenge in regard to treatment efficacy and successful clinical outcomes. A variety of percutaneous technology has been applied for thermal treatment of the liver and breast, including laser, microwave, cryogenic and radiofrequency (RF) devices. When simplicity and cost are factored in, RF hardware and applicators offer the most cost-effective treatment pathway by interventional radiologists and surgeons. To model percutaneous RF treatments in liver and breast, simulations were done in 3D with a finite element model. Three RF systems were modeled, including 1) single needle; 2) clustered needle, cooled and uncooled; and 3) deployable, hook electrodes. The results show the limitations of the systems in percutaneous procedures, depending on temperature limits, duration of treatment, and whether the devices are cooled or uncooled. For thermal treatment, the isotherm of 55°C was considered the margin of coagulation necrosis. The 3-D volumes of 55°C and 65°C isotherm shells aid in the selection of the best method to improve clinical outcomes, while paying attention to the size and shape of the applicator and duration of treatment.

  1. Transparency and Coherence in rf SQUID Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anlage, Steven; Trepanier, Melissa; Zhang, Daimeng

    We have developed active metamaterials capable of quickly tuning their electrical and magnetic responses over a wide frequency range. These metamaterials are based on superconducting elements to form low loss, physically and electrically small, highly tunable structures for fundamental studies of extraordinarily nonlinear media. The meta-atoms are rf superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) that incorporate the Josephson effect. RF SQUIDs have an inductance which is strongly tunable with dc and rf magnetic fields and currents. The rf SQUID metamaterial is a richly nonlinear effective medium introducing qualitatively new macroscopic quantum phenomena into the metamaterials community, namely magnetic flux quantization and the Josephson effect. The coherent oscillation of the meta-atoms is strongly sensitive to the environment and measurement conditions, and we have developed several strategies to improve the coherence experimentally by exploiting ideas from nonlinear dynamics. The metamaterials also display a unique form of transparency whose development can be manipulated through multiple parametric dependences. We discuss these qualitatively new metamaterial phenomena. This work is supported by the NSF-GOALI and OISE Programs through Grant No. ECCS-1158644 and the Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials (CNAM).

  2. Interactions of release factor RF3 with the translation machinery.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The bacterial release factor RF3 is a GTPase that has been implicated in multiple, incompletely understood steps of protein synthesis. This study explores the genetic interaction of RF3 with other components of the translation machinery. RF3 contributes to translation termination by recycling the class I release factors RF1 and RF2 off post-termination ribosomes. RF3 has also been implicated in dissociation of peptidyl-tRNAs from elongating ribosomes and in a post-peptidyltransferase quality control (post-PT QC) mechanism that selectively terminates ribosomes carrying erroneous peptides. A majority of the in vivo studies on RF3 have been carried out in K-12 strains of Escherichia coli which carry a partially defective RF2 protein with an Ala to Thr substitution at position 246. Here, the contribution of the K-12 specific RF2 variant to RF3 activities has been investigated. Strain reconstruction experiments in both E. coli and Salmonella enterica demonstrate that defects in termination and post-PT QC that are associated with RF3 loss, as well as phenotypes uncovered by phenotypic profiling, are all substantially ameliorated when the incompletely active K-12-specific RF2 protein is replaced by a fully active Ala246 RF2. These results indicate that RF3 loss is well tolerated in bacteria with fully active class I release factors, but that many of the previously reported phenotypes for RF3 deletion strains have been compromised by the presence of a partially defective RF2. PMID:25636454

  3. Rf beam control for the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.

    1994-09-26

    RF beam control systems for hadron synchrotrons have evolved over the past three decades into an essentially standard design. The key difference between hadron and lepton machines is the absence of radiation damping and existence of significant frequency variation in the case of hadrons. Although the motion of the hadron in the potential well of the rf wave is inherently stable it is not strongly damped. Damping must be provided by electronic feedback through the accelerating system. This feedback is typically called the phase loop. The technology of the rf beam control system for the AGS Booster synchrotron is described. First, the overall philosophy of the design is explained in terms of a conventional servo system that regulates the beam horizontal position in the vacuum chamber. The concept of beam transfer functions is fundamental to the mathematics of the design process and is reviewed. The beam transfer functions required for this design are derived from first principles. An overview of the beam signal pick-ups and high level rf equipment is given. The major subsystems, the frequency program, the heterodyne system, and beam feedback loops, are described in detail. Beyond accelerating the beam, the rf system must also synchronize the bunches in the Booster to the buckets in the AGS before transfer. The technical challenge in this process is heightened by the need to accomplish synchronization while the frequency is still changing. Details of the synchronization system are given. This report is intended to serve two purposes. One is to document the hardware and performance of the systems that have been built. The other is to serve as a tutorial vehicle from which the non-expert can not only learn the details of this system but also learn the principles of beam control that have led to the particular design choices made.

  4. The design for the LCLS RF photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alley, R.; Bharadwaj, V.; Clendenin, J.; Emma, P.; Fisher, A.; Frisch, J.; Kotseroglou, T.; Miller, R. H.; Palmer, D. T.; Schmerge, J.; Sheppard, J. C.; Woodley, M.; Yeremian, A. D.; Rosenzweig, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Serafini, L.

    1999-06-01

    We report on the design of the RF photoinjector of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The RF photoinjector is required to produce a single 150 MeV bunch of ˜1 nC and ˜100 A peak current at a repetition rate of 120 Hz with a normalized rms transverse emittance of ˜1 π mm-mrad. The design employs a 1.6-cell S-band RF gun with an optical spot size at the cathode of a radius of ˜1 mm and a pulse duration with an rms sigma of ˜3 ps. The peak RF field at the cathode is 150 MV/m with extraction 57° ahead of the RF peak. A solenoidal field near the cathode allows the compensation of the initial emittance growth by the end of the injection linac. Spatial and temporal shaping of the laser pulse striking the cathode will reduce the compensated emittance even further. Also, to minimize the contribution of the thermal emittance from the cathode surface, while at the same time optimizing the quantum efficiency, the laser wavelength for a Cu cathode should be tunable around 260 nm. Following the injection linac the geometric emittance simply damps linearly with energy growth. PARMELA simulations show that this design will produce the desired normalized emittance, which is about a factor of two lower than has been achieved to date in other systems. In addition to low emittance, we also aim for laser amplitude stability of 1% in the UV and a timing jitter in the electron beam of 0.5 ps rms, which will lead to less than 10% beam intensity fluctuation after the electron bunch is compressed in the main linac.

  5. Rheumatoid factor (RF) distribution in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Thé, J; Ebersole, J L

    1991-05-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of an autoantibody, IgM rheumatoid factor, that may result from the chronic inflammation noted in periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to detect IgM-RF, a biotin-avidin ELISA was developed. This assay was found to be sensitive and accurate by testing a rheumatoid arthritis population. The characteristics of this rheumatoid arthritis group were further determined, such that the total serum immunoglobulin concentrations were slightly elevated although within the normal range for IgM, IgG, and IgA; IgG antibody levels were elevated against oral microorganisms of the genus Capnocytophaga, while elevated IgM antibody levels were noted to Bacteroides species. In a population of 260 subjects of which 171 were periodontal disease patients, 16 of 171 (9.4%) were seropositive for IgM-RF, of which the predominant disease types were advanced destructive periodontitis and adult periodontitis. For comparison, a random population of seronegative periodontal disease patients was constructed that was matched for sex and approximate age to the seropositive group. The total immunoglobulin levels of the two groups were not significantly different and the means of both were slightly lower than the rheumatoid arthritis group. When the antibody profiles of the two periodontal disease populations were compared it became evident that the RF-positive group showed IgM and IgG antibody that was significantly elevated to Capnocytophaga species and F. nucleatum. Therefore, the chronic inflammation associated with periodontitis appears to increase significantly the formation of IgM-RF; however, there does appear to be a relationship between IgM-RF and elevated antibody to selected oral microorganisms. PMID:1890163

  6. Automatic impedance matching network for ICRH-RF experiments on SST-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, R.; Singh, M.; Jadav, H. M.; Purohit, D.; George, Siju; Rajnish, K.; Singh, Raj; Kulkarni, S. V.; ICRH-RF Group

    2010-02-01

    Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) is a promising heating method for a fusion device due to its localized power deposition profile, a direct ion heating at high density, and established technology for high power RF generation and transmission low cost. For the same reason 1.5-Megawatt ICRH system is developed indigenously for steady state super-conducting tokamak (SST-1). Since plasma-loading impedance is generally small as compared to the characteristic impedance of the transmission system, a significant amount of power will be reflected from the antenna back towards the generator giving very high reflections to SWR which can damage the high power RF tube. Hence matching network is used to match the total transmission line system to the antenna impedance so that the RF generator sees a matched load and can operate at high efficiency. In the ICRH system, coarse matching network and the on-line automatic matching network designed for the impedance matching of the system to transfer maximum power to the tokamak plasma during 1000 seconds operation. The plasma impedance varies in time on milliseconds scale and hence on-line impedance matching has to match the impedance on a faster scale to avoid the reflections as well as to transfer maximum power to the plasma for heating. There are two transmission lines connected with Hybrid coupler sourced by RF Generator (RF Power) 45.6 MHz frequency. Automatic matching network is connected with each transmission line, which offers on-line fine matching along with coarse matching system connected with transmission line. The matching system includes stubs, phase shifters and the automatic matching system consists of motorized vacuum variable capacitors connected to 9" transmission line. The method includes the detection of reflected power in transmission line with the help of probes, give a right signal to VME based data acquisition and control system to do calculations and generate the signal to vary the capacitance of

  7. Experimental Study of RF Sheath Formation on a Fast Wave Antenna and Limiter in the LAPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Michael; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; van Compernolle, Bart; Carter, Troy

    2015-11-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) will be an essential component of heating power in ITER. During ICRH, radio frequency (RF) sheaths may form both at the exciting antenna and further away, e.g. in the divertor region, and may cause wall material sputtering and decreased RF power coupling to the plasma. It is important to do detailed laboratory experiments that fully diagnose the sheaths and wave fields. This is not possible in fusion devices. A new RF system has recently been constructed for performing such studies in the LAPD plasma column (ne ~1012 -1013cm-3 , Te ~ 1 - 10 eV ,B0 ~ 400 - 2000 G , diameter ~ 60cm , length ~ 18 m) . The RF system is capable of pulsing at the 1 Hz rep. rate of the LAPD plasma and operating between 2-6 MHz (1st - 9th harmonic of fci in H) with a power output of 200 kW. First results of this system driving a single-strap fast wave antenna will be presented. Emissive and Langmuir probe measurements in the vicinity of both the antenna and a remote limiter and wave coupling measured by magnetic pickup loops will be presented.

  8. Metal negative ion beam extraction from a radio frequency ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, S.; Yamada, N.; Kasuya, T.; Romero, C. F. P.; Wada, M.

    2015-04-08

    A metal ion source of magnetron magnetic field geometry has been designed and operated with a Cu hollow target. Radio frequency power at 13.56 MHz is directly supplied to the hollow target to maintain plasma discharge and induce self-bias to the target for sputtering. The extraction of positive and negative Cu ion beams have been tested. The ion beam current ratio of Cu{sup +} to Ar{sup +} has reached up to 140% when Ar was used as the discharge support gas. Cu{sup −} ion beam was observed at 50 W RF discharge power and at a higher Ar gas pressure in the ion source. Improvement of poor RF power matching and suppression of electron current is indispensable for a stable Cu{sup −} ion beam production from the source.

  9. Ion transit through capacitively coupled Ar sheaths: Ion current and energy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, W. M.; Hartney, M. A.; Oldham, W. G.; Hess, D. W.

    1988-03-01

    The ion current and ion energy distribution (IED) of Ar+ and ArH+ impinging on a grounded surface immersed in capacitively coupled Ar plasmas have been measured as a function of pressure, applied rf voltage amplitude (Vrf), interelectrode gap, and sampling orifice size. A maximum in ion current occurs at high Vrf and intermediate electrode spacing. rf modulation of the collisionless IED occurs at high pressure and high Vrf and is caused by reduction of the sheath dimension under these conditions. Collisional shift to lower ion energy is also noted at high pressure. A low-energy peak at ˜10 eV is observed under high pressure and ion current conditions. Larger orifice sizes increase the collisions occurring downstream from the orifice as indicated by collisional energy shifts in the IED and a decrease in ion current density.

  10. Chemical derivation to enhance the chemical/oxidative stability of resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin

    SciTech Connect

    Hubler, T.L.; Shaw, W.J.; Brown, G.N.; Linehan, J.C.; Franz, J.A.; Hart, T.R.; Hogan, M.O.

    1996-09-01

    Tank wastes at Hanford and SRS contain highly alkaline supernate solutions of conc. Na, K nitrates with large amounts of {sup 137}Cs. It is desirable to remove and concentrate the highly radioactive fraction for vitrification. One candidate ion exchange material for removing the radiocesium is R-F resin. This report summarizes studies into synthesis and characterization of 4-derivatized R-F resins prepared in pursuit of more chemically/oxidatively robust resin. 85% 4-fluororesorcinol/15% phenol formaldehyde resin appears to have good stability in alkaline solution, although there may be some nucleophilic displacement reaction during synthesis; further studies are needed.

  11. Multigenerational Broadband Collision-Induced Dissociation of Precursor Ions in a Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Dalton T.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2016-09-01

    A method of fragmenting ions over a wide range of m/z values while balancing energy deposition into the precursor ion and available product ion mass range is demonstrated. In the method, which we refer to as "multigenerational collision-induced dissociation", the radiofrequency (rf) amplitude is first increased to bring the lowest m/z of the precursor ion of interest to just below the boundary of the Mathieu stability diagram (q = 0.908). A supplementary AC signal at a fixed Mathieu q in the range 0.2-0.35 (chosen to balance precursor ion potential well depth with available product ion mass range) is then used for ion excitation as the rf amplitude is scanned downward, thus fragmenting the precursor ion population from high to low m/z. The method is shown to generate high intensities of product ions compared with other broadband CID methods while retaining low mass ions during the fragmentation step, resulting in extensive fragment ion coverage for various components of complex mixtures. Because ions are fragmented from high to low m/z, space charge effects are minimized and multiple discrete generations of product ions are produced, thereby giving rise to "multigenerational" product ion mass spectra.

  12. Microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Thomae, Rainer W.

    2005-07-26

    A compact microwave ion source has a permanent magnet dipole field, a microwave launcher, and an extractor parallel to the source axis. The dipole field is in the form of a ring. The microwaves are launched from the middle of the dipole ring using a coaxial waveguide. Electrons are heated using ECR in the magnetic field. The ions are extracted from the side of the source from the middle of the dipole perpendicular to the source axis. The plasma density can be increased by boosting the microwave ion source by the addition of an RF antenna. Higher charge states can be achieved by increasing the microwave frequency. A xenon source with a magnetic pinch can be used to produce intense EUV radiation.

  13. Radio frequency sustained ion energy

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.; Hooke, William M.

    1977-01-01

    Electromagnetic (E.M.) energy injection method and apparatus for producing and sustaining suprathermal ordered ions in a neutral, two-ion-species, toroidal, bulk equilibrium plasma. More particularly, the ions are produced and sustained in an ordered suprathermal state of existence above the average energy and velocity of the bulk equilibrium plasma by resonant rf energy injection in resonance with the natural frequency of one of the ion species. In one embodiment, the electromagnetic energy is injected to clamp the energy and velocity of one of the ion species so that the ion energy is increased, sustained, prolonged and continued in a suprathermal ordered state of existence containing appreciable stored energy that counteracts the slowing down effects of the bulk equilibrium plasma drag. Thus, selective deuteron absorption may be used for ion-tail creation by radio-frequency excitation alone. Also, the rf can be used to increase the fusion output of a two-component neutral injected plasma by selective heating of the injected deuterons.

  14. Harmonic Ratcheting for Ferrite Tuned RF Acceleration of Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathan; Brennan, Mike

    2013-04-01

    One of the most persistent difficulties in the design of RF cavities for acceleration of charged particles is the rapid and efficient acceleration of particles over a large range of frequencies. From medical synchrotrons to accelerator driven systems, there is a strong need for fast acceleration of protons and light ions over hundreds of MeV. Conventionally, this is a costly undertaking, requiring specially designed ferrite loaded cavities to be tuned over a large range of frequencies. Ferromagnetic materials allow for the precise adjustment of cavity resonant frequency, but rapid changes in the frequency as well as operation outside material specific frequency ranges result in significant Q-loss to the cavity. This leads to a considerable increase in power required and is thus undesirable for regular operation. We introduce an acceleration scheme known as harmonic ratcheting which can be used to reduce the cavity frequency range needed for accelerating an ion beam in a synchrotron. In particular, this scheme addresses the need for high rep. rate machines for applications such as radiation therapy in which low beam intensity is needed. We demonstrate with simulations the type of ramps achievable using this technique and consider its advantages over h=1 acceleration schemes.

  15. Experimental evaluation of a negative ion source for a heavy ionfusion negative ion driver

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Hahto, S.K.; Hahto, S.T.; Kwan, J.W.; Leung, K.N.

    2005-01-18

    Negative halogen ions have recently been proposed as a possible alternative to positive ions for heavy ion fusion drivers because electron accumulation would not be a problem in the accelerator, and if desired, the beams could be photodetached to neutrals [1,2,3]. To test the ability to make suitable quality beams, an experiment was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using chlorine in an RF-driven ion source. Without introducing any cesium (which is required to enhance negative ion production in hydrogen ion sources) a negative chlorine current density of 45 mA/cm{sup 2} was obtained under the same conditions that gave 57 mA/cm{sup 2} of positive chlorine, suggesting the presence of nearly as many negative ions as positive ions in the plasma near the extraction plane. The negative ion spectrum was 99.5% atomic chlorine ions, with only 0.5% molecular chlorine, and essentially no impurities. Although this experiment did not incorporate the type of electron suppression technology that is used in negative hydrogen beam extraction, the ratio of co-extracted electrons to Cl{sup -} was as low as 7 to 1, many times lower than the ratio of their mobilities, suggesting that few electrons are present in the near-extractor plasma. This, along with the near-equivalence of the positive and negative ion currents, suggests that the plasma in this region was mostly an ion-ion plasma. The negative chlorine current density was relatively insensitive to pressure, and scaled linearly with RF power. If this linear scaling continues to hold at higher RF powers, it should permit current densities of 100 mA/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for present heavy ion fusion injector concepts. The effective ion temperatures of the positive and negative ions appeared to be similar and relatively low for a plasma source.

  16. Biogenic syngenetic pyrite from tuffaceous sedimentary RF3-V rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyreva, Irina; Nikulova, Natalia

    2015-04-01

    Biogenic framboidal pyrite was found in intraformational tuffaceous sedimentary gravelites, within basic volcanites (RF3-V) in Subpolar Urals (Sablya Ridge). Pyrite grains (Fe 44.07-44,33, S 50.22-53.31 wt. %) are composed of ball-like microconcretions, sometimes intergrown with crystals of pentagondodecahedron and cubic habit. The microconcretions (20 to 40 mcm) are roundish and composed of microcrystals, which end faces form spherical surface. The nuclei of the microconcretions are represented by frambohedrons 4-5 mcm in size, which are pyritized cells of sulphate-reducing colonial coccoid microfossils. The formation of the frambohedrons occurred synchronously to sedimentation in stagnant reducing environment at interaction of biogenic hydrogen sulphide with water-dissolved iron. The biogenic hydrogen sulphide is reduced by microorganisms in the conditions of free and unrestricted access of dissolved sulphate ions sourced from sulphur of fumarole gases. Iron came from washed-out basic volcanites. The growth of outer radial parts of microconcretions occurred during compaction of sediments in diagenetic stage. The quantity of dissolved sulphate and iron during pyrite formation exceeded possibilitites of bacterial "starters" which resulted in the formation of pyrites of other morphological varieties. This is confirmed by the accretion of concentric rays of the concretions and cubic microcrystals of pyrite in the aggregate grains. The formation of tuffaceous sediments occurred during temporary decrease of volcanic activity in a continuous linear water flow with stagnant areas composed of water-displaced pebbles from underlying metaterrigenous rocks (RF 1-2), which were exposed beyond the development area of volcanic strata, unchanged clasts of recent and synchronously formed basic and medium volcanites with participation of air-driven ashes and influence of volcanic gases in the presence of sulphate-reducing bacteria. The work is financially supported by the Program

  17. Development of deflector cavity and RF amplifier for bunch length detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, H. K.; Bhattacharya, T. K.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2016-02-01

    A minimally-interceptive bunch length detector system is being developed for measurement of longitudinal dimension of the bunch beam from RFQ of the radioactive ion beam (RIB) facility at VECC. This detector system is based on secondary electrons emission produced by the primary ion beam hitting a thin tungsten wire placed in the beam path. In this paper we report the design, development and off line testing results of deflector cavity together with its RF sysytem. The deflector cavity is a capacitive loaded helical type λ/2 resonator driven by RF source of 500 W at 37.8 MHz solid state amplifier, realized by combining two amplifier modules of 300 W each. The measured RF characteristics of the resonator, such as frequency, Q value and shunt impedance have been found to be reasonably good and close to the analytical estimation and results of simulation. The design philosophy and test results of individual components of the amplifier are discussed. The test result upto full power shows a good harmonic separation at the individual module level and this is found to improve further when modules are combined together.The results of high power performance test of the deflector cavity together with amplifier are also reported.

  18. Experiments with Single Trapped Ytterbium Ions at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs of experiments performed with single trapped Ytterbium ions. The topics include: 1) Ytterbium ion level scheme; 2) Paul-Straubel rf trap and single ion image; 3) D5/2 state lifetime measurement; 4) D3/2 state lifetime measurement; 5) Trapped individual ions in an optical cavity; 6) Initial exploratory system: experimental goals; and 7) Future systems: trap-cavity integration II.

  19. Linear ion trap for second-order Doppler shift reduction in frequency standard applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Janik, Gary R.; Dick, G. John; Maleki, Lute

    1990-01-01

    The authors have designed and are presently testing a novel linear ion trap that permits storage of a large number of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the RF confining fields. This new trap should store about 20 times the number of ions as a conventional RF trap with no corresponding increase in second-order Doppler shift from the confining field. In addition, the sensitivity of this shift to trapping parameters, i.e., RF voltage, RF frequency, and trap size, is greatly reduced. The authors have succeeded in trapping mercury ions and xenon ions in the presence of helium buffer gas. Trap times as long as 2000 s have been measured.

  20. Velocity distribution of ions incident on a radio-frequency biased wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakayama, G.; Nanbu, K.

    2001-08-01

    The ion velocity distribution (IVD) is important in plasma etching of microfeatures. IVD at a rf biased wafer is studied, first analytically using probability theory and then numerically by using a particle simulation method. The analytic expression shows that IVD is governed by the parameter qVrf/miωl, where q is the charge of ion, Vrf is the rf bias amplitude, ω is the rf bias angular frequency, l is the penetration depth of bias potential, and mi is the mass of ion. The analytical expression is applicable to the case when the ion collisions in the penetration depth are negligibly few and the rf period of biasing is much shorter than the time that ions take in traversing the depth l. The IVDs for general conditions are also examined using the self-consistent particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulation.

  1. RUGGED CERAMIC WINDOW FOR RF APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    MIKE NEUBAUER

    2012-11-01

    High-current RF cavities that are needed for many accelerator applications are often limited by the power transmission capability of the pressure barriers (windows) that separate the cavity from the power source. Most efforts to improve RF window design have focused on alumina ceramic, the most popular historical choice, and have not taken advantage of new materials. Alternative window materials have been investigated using a novel Merit Factor comparison and likely candidates have been tested for the material properties which will enable construction in the self-matched window configuration. Window assemblies have also been modeled and fabricated using compressed window techniques which have proven to increase the power handling capability of waveguide windows. Candidate materials have been chosen to be used in fabricating a window for high power testing at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  2. High power rf klystrons for linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad, G.T.

    1984-04-01

    Recent klystron developments at SLAC are described. The standard 40 MW klyston, which typically operates at 35 MW on the SLAC linac, is the starting point for the push to higher peak and average power. The standard tube is capable of a 2.5 ..mu..s rf pulse width at 360 pps. For the SLC a 50 MW klystron capable of 5 ..mu..s pulse width at 180 pps is under development. Another tube currently being worked on is a 150 MW klystron capable of 1 ..mu..s rf and 180 pps. Design criteria and actual operating experience for both developmental tubes are described. 10 references, 11 figures, 3 tables.

  3. ILC RF System R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    The Linac Group at SLAC is actively pursuing a broad range of R&D to improve the reliability and reduce the cost of the L-band (1.3 GHz) rf system proposed for the ILC linacs. Current activities include the long-term evaluation of a 120 kV Marx Modulator driving a 10 MW Multi-Beam Klystron, design of a second-generation Marx Modulator, testing of a sheet-beam gun and beam transport system for a klystron, construction of an rf distribution system with remotely-adjustable power tapoffs, and development of a system to combine the power from many klystrons in low-loss circular waveguide where it would be tapped-off periodically to power groups of cavities. This paper surveys progress during the past few years.

  4. An Efficient RF Source for Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M.; Dudas, A.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng

    2013-12-01

    We propose the development of a highly reliable high efficiency RF source for JLAB with a lower lifetime cost operating at 80% efficiency with system operating costs of about 0.7M$/year for the 6 GeV machine. The design of the RF source will be based upon two injection locked magnetrons in a novel combining architecture for amplitude modulation and a cross field amplifier (CFA) as an output tube for the 12 GeV upgrade. A cost analysis including efficiency and reliability will be performed to determine the optimum system architecture. Several different system architectures will be designed and evaluated for a dual injection locked magnetron source using novel combining techniques and possibly a CFA as the output tube. A paper design for the 1497 MHz magnetron system will be completed. The optimum system architecture with all relevant specifications will be completed so that a prototype can be built.

  5. Rugged Ceramic Window for RF Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, Michael; Johnson, Rolland P.; Rimmer, Robert; Elliot, Tom; Stirbet, Mircea

    2009-05-04

    High-current RF cavities that are needed for many accelerator applications are often limited by the power transmission capability of the pressure barriers (windows) that separate the cavity from the power source. Most efforts to improve RF window design have focused on alumina ceramic, the most popular historical choice, and have not taken advantage of new materials. Alternative window materials have been investigated using a novel Merit Factor comparison and likely candidates have been tested for the material properties which will enable construction in the self-matched window configuration. Window assemblies have also been modeled and fabricated using compressed window techniques which have proven to increase the power handling capability of waveguide windows. Candidate materials have been chosen to be used in fabricating a window for high power testing at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  6. Spallation neutron source/proposed rf system

    SciTech Connect

    Meth, M.; Brennan, J.M.

    1993-09-30

    The rf system for the synchrotrons of the spallation neutron source is designed to accelerate 1.4 {times} 10{sup 14} protons/pulse to an energy of 3.6 GeV. Injection energy is 600 MeV. The synchrotron repetition frequency is 30 Hz, with a 50% duty factor. The choice of operating frequency is somewhat arbitrary. The authors propose a low frequency of 1.3 to 1.6 MHz, which is the second harmonic of the revolution frequency. The advantages of such a low frequency system are: (1) There will be two bunches in the machines and the time between bunches will be sufficiently long to allow for the rise time of the extraction kicker. No missing bunches will be necessary, which simplifies injection, and transient beam loading problems are avoided. (2) With only two bunches there are no unstable coupled-bunch modes of longitudinal instability. (3) In multi-gap low frequency cavities the transient time factor is essentially unity because the rf wavelength is much longer than the cavity dimensions. (4) Cavities in this low frequency range are basically lumped-element type structures, where the sources of the inductance and capacitance are clearly identified. This allows effective control of higher order mode impedances in such cavities. (5) Ferrite-loaded low-frequency cavities are necessarily low impedance structures; ferrites are lossy. This low impedance makes it possible to achieve system stability without large amounts of feedback in a heavily beam loaded system. (6) BNL has a good deal of experience in building rf systems in this range of frequency, voltage, and power level. This report outlines the essential parameters of a practical rf system for the synchrotrons of the Spallation Neutron Source. The design uses materials, ferrites and vacuum tubes, that are commercially available and with which the laboratory has recent experience.

  7. Wireless RF communication in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Inke; Ricciardi, Lucas; Hall, Leonard; Hansen, Hedley; Varadan, Vijay; Bertram, Chris; Maddocks, Simon; Enderling, Stefan; Saint, David; Al-Sarawi, Said; Abbott, Derek

    2008-02-01

    This paper focuses on wireless transcutaneous RF communication in biomedical applications. It discusses current technology, restrictions and applications and also illustrates possible future developments. It focuses on the application in biotelemetry where the system consists of a transmitter and a receiver with a transmission link in between. The transmitted information can either be a biopotential or a nonelectric value like arterial pressure, respiration, body temperature or pH value. In this paper the use of radio-frequency (RF) communication and identification for those applications is described. Basically, radio-frequency identification or RFID is a technology that is analogous to the working principle of magnetic barcode systems. Unlike magnetic barcodes, passive RFID can be used in extreme climatic conditions—also the tags do not need to be within close proximity of the reader. Our proposed solution is to exploit an exciting new development in making circuits on polymers without the need for battery power. This solution exploits the principle of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device on a polymer substrate. The SAW device is a set of interdigitated conducting fingers on the polymer substrate. If an appropriate RF signal is sent to the device, the fingers act as microantennas that pick up the signal, and this energy is then converted into acoustic waves that travel across the surface of the polymer substrate. Being a flexible polymer, the acoustic waves cause stresses that can either contract or stretch the material. In our case we mainly focus on an RF controllable microvalve that could ultimately be used for fertility control.

  8. Safety assessment for the rf Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, A.; Beane, F.

    1984-08-01

    The Radio Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) is a part of the Magnetic Fusion Program's rf Heating Experiments. The goal of the Magnetic Fusion Program (MFP) is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion. RFTF is an experimental device which will provide an essential link in the research effort aiming at the realization of fusion power. This report was compiled as a summary of the analysis done to ensure the safe operation of RFTF.

  9. RF subsystem design for microwave communication receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickford, W. J.; Brodsky, W. G.

    A system review of the RF subsystems of (IFF) transponders, tropscatter receivers and SATCOM receivers is presented. The quantity potential for S-band and X-band IFF transponders establishes a baseline requirement. From this, the feasibility of a common design for these and other receivers is evaluated. Goals are established for a GaAs MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) device and related local oscillator preselector and self-test components.

  10. Microsystem packaging of an RF SAW correlator.

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, David A.; Brocato, Robert Wesley; Studor, George F.

    2005-01-01

    An electrically programmable surface acoustic wave (SAW) correlator was recently completed from design through small scale production in support of low power space-based communications for NASA. Three different versions of this RF microsystem were built to satisfy design requirements and overcome packaging and system reliability related issues. Flip-chip packaging and conventional thick film hybrid assembly techniques are compared in the fabrication of this microsystem.

  11. Superconducting RF systems for eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Belomestnykh S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; Hahn, H. et al

    2012-05-20

    The proposed electron-hadron collider eRHIC will consist of a six-pass 30-GeV electron Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and one of RHIC storage rings operating with energy up to 250 GeV. The collider design extensively utilizes superconducting RF (SRF) technology in both electron and hadron parts. This paper describes various SRF systems, their requirements and parameters.

  12. Momentum errors in an RF separated beam

    SciTech Connect

    T. Kobilarcik

    2002-09-19

    The purity of an RF separated beam is affected by the difference in mass of the particle types and the momentum bite of the beam. The resulting time-of-flight difference between different types allows separation to occur; the finite momentum bite results in chromatic aberration. Both these features also give rise to a particle type dependent velocity bite, which must also be taken into account. This memo demonstrates a generalizable method for calculating the effect.

  13. NSLS-II RF Cryogenic System

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.; Dilgen, T.; Gash, B.; Gosman, J.; Mortazavi, P.; Papu, J.; Ravindranath, V.; Sikora, R.; Sitnikov, A.; Wilhelm, H.; Jia, Y.; Monroe, C.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II is a 3 GeV X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. A new helium refrigerator system has been installed and commissioned to support the superconducting RF cavities in the storage ring. Special care was taken to provide very stable helium and LN2 pressures and flow rates to minimize microphonics and thermal effects at the cavities. Details of the system design along with commissioning and early operations data will be presented.

  14. Biologic response to microwave/RF energy

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelson, S.M.

    1980-01-01

    A systematic and up-to-date review of observations and theoretical approaches to the biological effects and health implications of exposure to microwave/radiofrequency energies is presented. A primary objective is to review and place available information and concepts in proper perspective to understand and encourage the full potential for the beneficial uses of these energies while at the same time preventing adverse effects to individuals exposed to microwaves/RF.

  15. New Developments on PBG RF Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. V.; Yu, D.

    2004-12-01

    Performance and design features of metal PBG and rod-loaded cavities for single-beam and multi-beam acceleration and rf power generation devices are considered. Fundamental differences of the performance between single-defect and multi-defect structures are identified. Rod-loaded cavity designs are considered for a 6-beam klystron. Preliminary design of the X-band MBK demonstrates feasibility of generating high power with high efficiency in a very compact construction.

  16. Comparison of RF heating operators in Monte-Carlo calculations of quasi-linear ICH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. L.; Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; RF-SciDAC Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    Experimental observations of ICH modification of the fast-ion distribution in Tokamak plasmas have previously been examined with self-consistent quasi-linear simulation (e.g., fast-ion D- alpha results on DIII-D and NSTX and the compact neutral particle analyzer on Alcator C-Mod). Discrepancies between zero-ion-orbit width simulation and observation have prompted the development of several finite-ion-orbit width codes, e.g., CQL3D- FOW (finite difference) and sMC (particle). Here we focus on the RF heating operator in Monte-Carlo particle codes. We compare results using the standard Stix operator which assumes a single RF wave-number, with an operator that contains the full wave- number spectrum calculated as part of the AORSA code. Scenarios where up-shift in the parallel wave-number is significant (NSTX), and not significant (C-Mod) are examined. Both operators are implemented in the GPGPU update to the sMC code. Work supported under US DOE contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  17. Silicon on Insulator MESFETs for RF Amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Seth J; Balijepalli, Asha; Ervin, Joseph; Lepkowski, William; Thornton, Trevor J

    2010-03-01

    CMOS compatible, high voltage SOI MESFETs have been fabricated using a standard 3.3V CMOS process without any changes to the process flow. A 0.6μm gate length device operates with a cut-off frequency of 7.3GHz and a maximum oscillation frequency of 21GHz. There is no degradation in device performance up to its breakdown voltage, which greatly exceeds that of CMOS devices on the same process. Other figures of merit of relevance to RF front-end design are presented, including the maximum stable gain and noise figure. An accurate representation of the device in SPICE has been developed using the commercially available TOM3 model. Using the SOI MESFET model, a source degenerated low noise RF amplifier targeting operation near 1GHz has been designed. The amplifier was fabricated on a PCB board and operates at 940MHz with a minimum NF of 3.8dB and RF gain of 9.9dB while only consuming 5mW of DC power. PMID:20657816

  18. Inductively coupled wireless RF coil arrays.

    PubMed

    Bulumulla, S B; Fiveland, E; Park, K J; Foo, T K; Hardy, C J

    2015-04-01

    As the number of coils increases in multi-channel MRI receiver-coil arrays, RF cables and connectors become increasingly bulky and heavy, degrading patient comfort and slowing workflow. Inductive coupling of signals provides an attractive "wireless" approach, with the potential to reduce coil weight and cost while simplifying patient setup. In this work, multi-channel inductively coupled anterior arrays were developed and characterized for 1.5T imaging. These comprised MR receiver coils inductively (or "wirelessly") linked to secondary or "sniffer" coils whose outputs were transmitted via preamps to the MR system cabinet. The induced currents in the imaging coils were blocked by passive diode circuits during RF transmit. The imaging arrays were totally passive, obviating the need to deliver power to the coils, and providing lightweight, untethered signal reception with easily positioned coils. Single-shot fast spin echo images were acquired from 5 volunteers using a 7-element inductively coupled coil array and a conventionally cabled 7-element coil array of identical geometry, with the inductively-coupled array showing a relative signal-to-noise ratio of 0.86 +/- 0.07. The concept was extended to a larger 9-element coil array to demonstrate the effect of coil element size on signal transfer and RF-transmit blocking. PMID:25523607

  19. Silicon Micromachining in RF and Photonic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Tsen-Hwang; Congdon, Phil; Magel, Gregory; Pang, Lily; Goldsmith, Chuck; Randall, John; Ho, Nguyen

    1995-01-01

    Texas Instruments (TI) has developed membrane and micromirror devices since the late 1970s. An eggcrate space membrane was used as the spatial light modulator in the early years. Discrete micromirrors supported by cantilever beams created a new era for micromirror devices. Torsional micromirror and flexure-beam micromirror devices were promising for mass production because of their stable supports. TI's digital torsional micromirror device is an amplitude modulator (known as the digital micromirror device (DMD) and is in production development, discussed elsewhere. We also use a torsional device for a 4 x 4 fiber-optic crossbar switch in a 2 cm x 2 cm package. The flexure-beam micromirror device is an analog phase modulator and is considered more efficient than amplitude modulators for use in optical processing systems. TI also developed millimeter-sized membranes for integrated optical switches for telecommunication and network applications. Using a member in radio frequency (RF) switch applications is a rapidly growing area because of the micromechanical device performance in microsecond-switching characteristics. Our preliminary membrane RF switch test structure results indicate promising speed and RF switching performance. TI collaborated with MIT for modeling of metal-based micromachining.

  20. RF Gun Photocathode Research at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Jongewaard, E.; Akre, R.; Brachmann, A.; Corbett, J.; Gilevich, S.; Grouev, K.; Hering, P.; P.Krejcik,; Lewandowski, J.; Loos, H.; Montagne, T.; Sheppard, J.C.; Stefan, P.; Vlieks, A.; Weathersby, S.; Zhou, F.; /SLAC

    2012-05-16

    LCLS is presently operating with a third copper photocathode in the original rf gun, with a quantum efficiency (QE) of {approx}1 x 10{sup -4} and projected emittance {gamma}{var_epsilon}{sub x,y} = 0.45 {micro}m at 250 pC bunch charge. The spare LCLS gun is installed in the SLAC Accelerator Structure Test Area (ASTA), fully processed to high rf power. As part of a wider photocathode R and D program, a UV laser system and additional gun diagnostics are being installed at ASTA to measure QE, QE lifetime, and electron beam emittance under a variety of operating conditions. The near-term goals are to test and verify the spare photocathode production/installation sequence, including transfer from the final holding chamber to the rf gun. Mid- and longer-term goals include development of a rigorous understanding of plasma and laser-assisted surface conditioning and investigation of new, high-QE photocathode materials. In parallel, an x-ray photoemission spectroscopy station is nearing completion, to analyze Cu photocathode surface chemistry. In this paper we review the status and anticipated operating parameters of ASTA and the spectroscopy test chamber.

  1. Silicon on Insulator MESFETs for RF Amplifiers

    PubMed Central

    Balijepalli, Asha; Ervin, Joseph; Lepkowski, William; Thornton, Trevor J.

    2010-01-01

    CMOS compatible, high voltage SOI MESFETs have been fabricated using a standard 3.3V CMOS process without any changes to the process flow. A 0.6μm gate length device operates with a cut-off frequency of 7.3GHz and a maximum oscillation frequency of 21GHz. There is no degradation in device performance up to its breakdown voltage, which greatly exceeds that of CMOS devices on the same process. Other figures of merit of relevance to RF front-end design are presented, including the maximum stable gain and noise figure. An accurate representation of the device in SPICE has been developed using the commercially available TOM3 model. Using the SOI MESFET model, a source degenerated low noise RF amplifier targeting operation near 1GHz has been designed. The amplifier was fabricated on a PCB board and operates at 940MHz with a minimum NF of 3.8dB and RF gain of 9.9dB while only consuming 5mW of DC power. PMID:20657816

  2. RF Photonic Technology in Optical Fiber Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, William S. C.

    2007-06-01

    List of contributors; Introduction and preface; 1. Figures of merit and performance analysis of photonic microwave links Charles Cox and William S. C. Chang; 2. RF subcarrier links in local access networks Xiaolin Lu; 3. Analog modulation of semiconductor lasers Joachim Piprek and John E. Bowers; 4. LiNbO3 external modulators and their use in high performance analog links Gary E. Betts; 5. Broadband traveling wave modulators in LiNbO3 Marta M. Howerton and William K. Burns; 6. Multiple quantum well electroabsorption modulators for RF photonic links William S. C. Chang; 7. Polymer modulators for RF photonics Timothy Van Eck; 8. Photodiodes for high performance analog links P. K. L. Yu and Ming C. Wu; 9. Opto-electronic oscillators X. Steve Yao; 10. Photonic link techniques for microwave frequency conversion Stephen A. Pappert, Roger Helkey and Ronald T. Logan Jr; 11. Antenna-coupled millimeter-wave electro-optical modulators William B. Bridges; 12. System design and performance of wideband photonic phased array antennas Greg L. Tangonan, Willie Ng, Daniel Yap and Ron Stephens; Acknowledgements; References; Index.

  3. Reducing the Heat Load on the LCLS 120 Hz RF Gun with RF Pulse Shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerge, J.

    2005-01-31

    The LCLS injector must operate at 120 Hz repetition frequency but to date the maximum operating frequency of an S-band rf gun has been 50 Hz. The high fields desired for the LCLS gun operation limit the repetition frequency due to thermal expansion causing rf detuning and field redistribution. One method of addressing the thermal loading problem is too reduce the power lost on the cavity walls by properly shaping the rf pulse incident on the gun. The idea is to reach the steady state field value in the gun faster than the time constant of the gun would allow when using a flat incident rf pulse. By increasing the incident power by about a factor of three and then decreasing the incident power when the field reaches the desired value in the gun, the field build up time can be decreased by more than a factor of three. Using this technique the heat load is also decreased by more than a factor of three. In addition the rf coupling coefficient can be increased from the typical critically coupled designs to an overcoupled design which also helps reduce the field build up time. Increasing the coupling coefficient from 1 to 2 reduces the heat load by another 25% and still limits the reflected power and coupling hole size to manageable levels.

  4. Similarities Between RF- and Lightning-Induced Airglow in the Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentman, D. D.; Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Moudry, D. R.; Sao Sabbas, F. T.

    2002-12-01

    Recent experiments in Alaska using the HAARP and HIPAS high power RF transmitters have succeeded in artificially generating oxygen neutral and molecular nitrogen ion emissions, or artificial airglow, in the ionosphere. An apparently different type of transient airglow generated by lightning, in the form of sprites and elves in the mesosphere and lower ionosphere, has been extensively studied in recent years. Despite occurring in vastly different atmospheric regimes, these seemingly disparate forms of optical emissions, one derived from artificial modification of the ionosphere and the other from natural thunderstorm processes, share a common underlying microphysical description based on electron heating by RF and quasi-DC electric fields, respectively, accompanied by impact excitation of ambient neutrals and subsequent optical relaxation and quenching of excited species. The theoretical description of these processes has its roots in work described by Zel'dovich and Raizer on the microphysics of shock waves and high temperature gasses. This work was subsequently adapted by Gurevich, Papadopoulis and coworkers to describe high power microwave interactions with the stratosphere. Extended to include nonlinear plasma interactions, it is the basis for understanding the effects of intense RF waves on the ionosphere, including creation of airglow, from high power transmitters currently operating in Alaska, Sweden and Russia. Pasko and coworkers have successfully adapted these theories to conditions appropriate to lightning impulse interactions with the upper atmosphere to describe the basic breakdown and streamer processes associated with sprite production. Thus, sprites and RF-induced airglow theories share a common set of concepts at the microphysical level and a common theoretical language. This talk outlines areas of especially strong overlap, and describes some possible high power RF ionospheric interaction experiments that could be performed to help study

  5. Investigation of analog/RF performance of staggered heterojunctions based nanowire tunneling field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Avik; Sarkar, Angsuman

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the analog/RF performance of an III-V semiconductor based staggered hetero-tunnel-junction (HETJ) n-type nanowire (NW) tunneling FET (n-TFET) is investigated, for the first time. The device performance figure-of-merits governing the analog/RF performance such as transconductance (gm), transconductance-to-drive current ratio (gm/IDS), output resistance (Rout), intrinsic gain and unity-gain cutoff frequency (fT) have been studied. The analog/RF performance parameters is compared between HETJ NW TFET and a homojunction (HJ) NW n-type TFET of similar dimensions. In addition to enhanced ION and subthreshold swing, a significant improvement in the analog/RF performance parameters obtained by the HETJ n-TFET over HJ counterpart for use in analog/mixed signal System-on-Chip (SoC) applications is reported. Moreover, the analog/RF performance parameters of a III-V based staggered HETJ NW TFET is also compared with a heterojunction (HETJ) NW n-type MOSFET having same material as HETJ n-TFET and equal dimension in order to provide a systematic comparison between HETJ-TFET and HETJ-MOSFET for use in analog/mixed-signal applications. The results reveal that HETJ n-TFET provides higher Rout and hence, a higher intrinsic gain, an improved gm/IDS ratio, and reasonable fT at lower values of gate-overdrive voltage as compared to the HETJ NW n-MOSFET.

  6. Calibration of a cylindrical RF capacitance probe. [for radio astronomical studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosier, S. R.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    The calibration is considered of an RF antenna capacitance probe carried aboard the RAE-1 spacecraft and the correction of the probe for external effects, believed to be primarily due to local positive ion sheaths and/or photoelectron sheaths surrounding the antenna. The RAE-1 spacecraft was launched in July 1968 into a 5850-km. Circular orbit of 121-degree inclination and carried several antenna and radiometer systems covering a frequency range of 0.2 to 9.2 MHz for radio astronomical studies. The RF capacitance probe measurements discussed utilized a 37-meter electric dipole antenna formed by two monopoles made of silver-coated beryllium-copper alloy tapes formed into hollow cylindrical tubes 1.3 cm in diameter.

  7. Resistive switching behavior of RF magnetron sputtered ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Rajalakshmi, R.; Angappane, S.

    2015-06-24

    The resistive switching characteristics of RF magnetron sputtered zinc oxide thin films have been studied. The x-ray diffraction studies confirm the formation of crystalline ZnO on Pt/TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub x}/Si substrate. We have fabricated Cu/ZnO/Pt device using a shadow masking technique for resistive switching study. Our Cu/ZnO/Pt device exhibits a unipolar resistive switching behaviour. The switching observed in our device could be related to oxygen vacancies or Cu ions that generate the conducting filaments responsible for resistive switching. We found HRS to LRS resistance ratio of as high as ∼200 for our Cu/ZnO/Pt device. The higher resistance ratio and stability of Cu/ZnO/Pt device would make our RF magnetron sputtered zinc oxide thin films suitable for non volatile memory applications.

  8. RF Pulse Signal Integrity Analysis for Nonlinear Ended Microstrip Line Atom-Probe Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Delamare, A.; Normand, A.; Delaroche, F.; Latry, O.; Vurpillot, F.; Ravelo, B.

    2016-03-01

    A signal integrity (SI) analysis of high voltage rectangular short pulses for the atom- probe system is explored in this paper. The operated RF transient pulse is considered for exciting on material sample inside an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) cryogenic chamber. The ns- duration pulse signal is injected into the cryogenic analysis chamber through the transmitting system mainly constituted by a microstrip interconnect line ended by optical controlled nonlinear load. The whole system frequency characterization is performed based on the S- parameter measurements. As expected, a challenging ultra-short rectangular shape pulse is exhibited by the pulser. Promising experimental results with the improvement of ion mass spectrum is demonstrated with the designed RF pulser.

  9. Characterization of the transition from collisional to stochastic heating in a RF discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canal, G. P.; Luna, H.; Galvão, R. M. O.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we have studied the transition from collisional to stochastic heating regime in a RF inductively coupled plasma discharge, in which the exciting antenna is placed inside the vacuum chamber. The electron and ion energy distribution functions are obtained using an RF filtered electrostatic probe and a Faraday cup. The analysis of the energy distribution functions as a function of the working pressure reveals the existence of two distinct discharge regimes, which are governed by the heating processes. Our results show that while the electron distribution function is Druyvesteyn-like for high pressures, p >= 4.0 × 10-2 mbar, it becomes bi-Druyvesteyn, and not bi-Maxwellian, as found in other works, for low pressures, p <= 1.0 × 10-2 mbar.

  10. Use of Near-Infrared Detector to Sense RF Antenna Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Legg, R.A.; Lee, R.L.; Baity, W.F.

    1999-11-01

    The three antennas used for ion cyclotron heating (ICH) experiments on DIII-D have experienced localized heating of the Faraday shield rods during plasma operations which has resulted in some melting. This melting is of great concern not only because of the damage it does to the rf system's ability to deliver rf to the plasma, but because of its potential to contaminate the plasma during a shot and cast the experimental results from the shot into question. A real-time sensor to detect the temperature of the antennae during plasma operations is described. The sensor uses an avalanche photo diode (APD) with sensitivity from 0.4 to 1.0 {micro}m to monitor the temperature of the antennae. Calculations for the detector sensitivity based on Planck's law are compared with experimental results and detector data taken during plasma operations are presented.

  11. Dynamics of Pulsed Chlorine Plasmas with and without Substrate RF-Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Vincent M.

    2000-10-01

    Pulsed plasmas can significantly decrease plasma-process-induced damage and reduce unwanted etch profile anomalies. In electronegative plasmas (e.g. chlorine), these benefits are often attributed to the build-up of negative ions (e.g. Cl-) in the OFF time, and the charge reduction that occurs when these negative ions reach the wafer. A reduction of the period-averaged electron temperature (Te) and impingement of low-energy positive ions are also thought to be important in reducing charge build-up and damage. We report results of a study of a chlorine, inductively-coupled pulsed plasma operated with and without a continuous radio frequency (rf) bias applied to the wafer stage. Without stage bias, Te decays rapidly in the OFF period, as does electron density (ne) on a somewhat longer time scale. The decay in ne is accompanied by a buildup in Cl-. The plasma dynamics in the presence of rf bias power are nearly the same as with no bias in the first 20 us of the OFF period. Then, however, after reaching a minimum of 0.5 eV, Te starts to increase rapidly and reaches values even higher than the steady state ON time values. Since ne is still quite high when Te goes through the minimum, the sheath near the wafer does not collapse and negative ions do not reach the wafer. In a previous study in a similar reactor, damage to thin gate oxide layers during aluminum etching was reduced while operating with a pulsed source and a continuous bias. This implies that the decreased damage cannot be attributed to a reduction of charging of the wafer by negative ions. We further show that increasing the duration of the OFF time or increasing the bias power leads to the transition of the plasma into a reactive ion etching (RIE) mode, when the decaying positive ion density reaches the level sustained by the stage power.

  12. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Large signal RF power transmission characterization of InGaP HBT for RF power amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lixin, Zhao; Zhi, Jin; Xinyu, Liu

    2010-01-01

    The large signal RF power transmission characteristics of an advanced InGaP HBT in an RF power amplifier are investigated and analyzed experimentally. The realistic RF powers reflected by the transistor, transmitted from the transistor and reflected by the load are investigated at small signal and large signal levels. The RF power multiple frequency components at the input and output ports are investigated at small signal and large signal levels, including their effects on RF power gain compression and nonlinearity. The results show that the RF power reflections are different between the output and input ports. At the input port the reflected power is not always proportional to input power level; at large power levels the reflected power becomes more serious than that at small signal levels, and there is a knee point at large power levels. The results also show the effects of the power multiple frequency components on RF amplification.

  13. Ion Bernstein wave heating research

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Masayuki.

    1992-03-01

    Ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) utilizes the ion Bernstein wave (IBW), a hot plasma wave, to carry the radio frequency (rf) power to heat tokamak reactor core. Earlier wave accessibility studies have shown that this finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) mode should penetrate into a hot dense reactor plasma core without significant attenuation. Moreover, the IBW's low phase velocity ({omega}/k{sub {perpendicular}} {approx} V{sub Ti} {much lt} V{sub {alpha}}) greatly reduces the otherwise serious wave absorption by the 3.5 MeV fusion {alpha}-particles. In addition, the property of IBW's that k{sub {perpendicular}} {rho}{sub i} {approx} 1 makes localized bulk ion heating possible at the ion cyclotron harmonic layers. Such bulk ion heating can prove useful in optimizing fusion reactivity. In another vein, with proper selection of parameters, IBW's can be made subject to strong localized electron Landau damping near the major ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layers. This property can be useful, for example, for rf current drive in the reactor plasma core. This paper discusses this research.

  14. Ion Bernstein wave heating research

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Masayuki

    1992-03-01

    Ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) utilizes the ion Bernstein wave (IBW), a hot plasma wave, to carry the radio frequency (rf) power to heat tokamak reactor core. Earlier wave accessibility studies have shown that this finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) mode should penetrate into a hot dense reactor plasma core without significant attenuation. Moreover, the IBW`s low phase velocity ({omega}/k{sub {perpendicular}} {approx} V{sub Ti} {much_lt} V{sub {alpha}}) greatly reduces the otherwise serious wave absorption by the 3.5 MeV fusion {alpha}-particles. In addition, the property of IBW`s that k{sub {perpendicular}} {rho}{sub i} {approx} 1 makes localized bulk ion heating possible at the ion cyclotron harmonic layers. Such bulk ion heating can prove useful in optimizing fusion reactivity. In another vein, with proper selection of parameters, IBW`s can be made subject to strong localized electron Landau damping near the major ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layers. This property can be useful, for example, for rf current drive in the reactor plasma core. This paper discusses this research.

  15. Ion source for tests of ion behavior in the Karlsruhe tritium neutrino experiment beam line

    SciTech Connect

    Lukic, S.; Bornschein, B.; Drexlin, G.; Glueck, F.; Kazachenko, O.; Zoll, M. C. R.; Schoeppner, M.; Weinheimer, Ch.

    2011-01-15

    An electron-impact ion source based on photoelectron emission was developed for ionization of gases at pressures below 10{sup -4} mbar in an axial magnetic field in the order of 5 T. The ion source applies only dc fields, which makes it suitable for use in the presence of equipment sensitive to radio-frequency (RF) fields. The ion source was successfully tested under varying conditions regarding pressure, magnetic field, and magnetic-field gradient, and the results were studied with the help of simulations. The processes in the ion source are well understood, and possibilities for further optimization of generated ion currents are clarified.

  16. Small radio frequency driven multicusp ion source for positive hydrogen ion beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.T.; Herz, P.R.; Leung, K.N.; Pickard, D.S. )

    1994-04-01

    A compact, 2.5 cm diam rf-driven multicusp ion source has been developed and tested for H[sup +] ion production in pulse mode operation. The source is optimized for atomic hydrogen ion species and extractable current. It is found that hydrogen ion beam current densities in excess of 650 mA/cm[sup 2] can be achieved with H[sup +] species above 80%. The geometry and position of the porcelain-coated copper antenna were found to be of great significance in relation to the efficiency of the ion source.

  17. Functional and Expression Analysis of the Metal-Inducible dmeRF System from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Sanz, L.; Prieto, R. I.; Imperial, J.; Brito, B.

    2013-01-01

    A gene encoding a homolog to the cation diffusion facilitator protein DmeF from Cupriavidus metallidurans has been identified in the genome of Rhizobium leguminosarum UPM791. The R. leguminosarum dmeF gene is located downstream of an open reading frame (designated dmeR) encoding a protein homologous to the nickel- and cobalt-responsive transcriptional regulator RcnR from Escherichia coli. Analysis of gene expression showed that the R. leguminosarum dmeRF genes are organized as a transcriptional unit whose expression is strongly induced by nickel and cobalt ions, likely by alleviating the repressor activity of DmeR on dmeRF transcription. An R. leguminosarum dmeRF mutant strain displayed increased sensitivity to Co(II) and Ni(II), whereas no alterations of its resistance to Cd(II), Cu(II), or Zn(II) were observed. A decrease of symbiotic performance was observed when pea plants inoculated with an R. leguminosarum dmeRF deletion mutant strain were grown in the presence of high concentrations of nickel and cobalt. The same mutant induced significantly lower activity levels of NiFe hydrogenase in microaerobic cultures. These results indicate that the R. leguminosarum DmeRF system is a metal-responsive efflux mechanism acting as a key element for metal homeostasis in R. leguminosarum under free-living and symbiotic conditions. The presence of similar dmeRF gene clusters in other Rhizobiaceae suggests that the dmeRF system is a conserved mechanism for metal tolerance in legume endosymbiotic bacteria. PMID:23934501

  18. Functional and expression analysis of the metal-inducible dmeRF system from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Sanz, L; Prieto, R I; Imperial, J; Palacios, J M; Brito, B

    2013-10-01

    A gene encoding a homolog to the cation diffusion facilitator protein DmeF from Cupriavidus metallidurans has been identified in the genome of Rhizobium leguminosarum UPM791. The R. leguminosarum dmeF gene is located downstream of an open reading frame (designated dmeR) encoding a protein homologous to the nickel- and cobalt-responsive transcriptional regulator RcnR from Escherichia coli. Analysis of gene expression showed that the R. leguminosarum dmeRF genes are organized as a transcriptional unit whose expression is strongly induced by nickel and cobalt ions, likely by alleviating the repressor activity of DmeR on dmeRF transcription. An R. leguminosarum dmeRF mutant strain displayed increased sensitivity to Co(II) and Ni(II), whereas no alterations of its resistance to Cd(II), Cu(II), or Zn(II) were observed. A decrease of symbiotic performance was observed when pea plants inoculated with an R. leguminosarum dmeRF deletion mutant strain were grown in the presence of high concentrations of nickel and cobalt. The same mutant induced significantly lower activity levels of NiFe hydrogenase in microaerobic cultures. These results indicate that the R. leguminosarum DmeRF system is a metal-responsive efflux mechanism acting as a key element for metal homeostasis in R. leguminosarum under free-living and symbiotic conditions. The presence of similar dmeRF gene clusters in other Rhizobiaceae suggests that the dmeRF system is a conserved mechanism for metal tolerance in legume endosymbiotic bacteria.

  19. Limiting temperature of sympathetically cooled ions in a radio-frequency trap

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Taro; Shimizu, Tadao

    2003-01-01

    The limiting temperature achieved by sympathetic cooling in an rf trap is calculated with a theoretical model in which no fitting parameters are used. The calculated result agrees well with observation. The dependence of the temperature on trapping parameters and ion mass is also analyzed. The results can be used for designing an rf trap system.

  20. Technology development of RF MEMS switches on printed circuit boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hung-Pin

    Today, some engineers have shifted their focus on the micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) to pursue better technological advancements. Recent development in RF MEMS technologies have lead to superior switch characteristics, i.e., very low insertion loss, very low power requirements, and high isolation comparing to the conventional semiconductor devices. This success has promised the potential of MEMS to revolutionize RF and microwave system implementation for the next generation of communication applications. However, RF MEMS switches integrated monolithically with various RF functional components on the same substrate to create multifunctional and reconfigurable complete communication systems remains to be a challenge research topic due to the concerns of the high cost of packaging process and the high cost of RF matching requirements in module board implementation. Furthermore, the fabrication of most RF MEMS switches requires thickness control and surface planarization of wide metal lines prior to deposition of a metal membrane bridge, which poses a major challenge to manufacturability. To ease the fabrication of RF MEMS switches and to facilitate their integration with other RF components such as antennas, phase delay lines, tunable filters, it is imperative to develop a manufacturable RF MEMS switch technology on a common substrate housing all essential RF components. Development of a novel RF MEMS technology to build a RF MEMS switch and provide a system-level packaging on microwave laminated printed circuit boards (PCBs) are proposed in this dissertation. Two key processes, high-density inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (HDICP CVD) for low temperature dielectric deposition, and compressive molding planarization (COMP) for the temporary sacrificial polymer planarization have been developed for fabricating RF MEMS switches on PCBs. Several membrane-type capacitive switches have been fabricated showing excellent RF performance and dynamic