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Sample records for multi-charged ion atom

  1. Beam Extraction from Laser Driven Multi-Charged Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, O A; Logan, B G

    2001-03-19

    A newly proposed type of multicharged ion source offers the possibility of an economically advantageous high-charge-state fusion driver. Multiphoton absorption in an intense uniform laser focus can give multiple charge states of high purity, simplifying or eliminating the need for charge-state separation downstream. Very large currents (hundreds of amperes) can be extracted from this type of source. Several arrangements are possible. For example, the laser plasma could be tailored for storage in a magnetic bucket, with beam extracted from the bucket. A different approach, described in this report, is direct beam extraction from the expanding laser plasma. They discuss extraction and focusing for the particular case of a 4.1-MV beam of Xe{sup 16+} ions. The maximum duration of the beam pulse is limited by the total charge in the plasma, while the practical pulse length is determined by the range of plasma radii over which good beam optics can be achieved. The extraction electrode contains a solenoid for beam focusing. The design studies were carried out first with an envelope code and then with a self-consistent particle code. Results from the initial model showed that hundreds of amperes could be extracted, but that most of this current missed the solenoid entrance or was intercepted by the wall and that only a few amperes were able to pass through. They conclude with an improved design which increases the surviving beam to more than 70 amperes.

  2. Theoretical investigations of the IO,{sup q+} (q = 2, 3, 4) multi-charged ions: Metastability, characterization and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hammami, H.; Yazidi, O.; Ben El Hadj Rhouma, M.; Al Mogren, M. M.; Hochlaf, M.

    2014-07-07

    Using ab initio methodology, we studied the IO{sup q+} (q = 2, 3, 4) multi-charged ions. Benchmark computations on the IO(X{sup 2}Π) neutral species allow validate the current procedure. For IO{sup 2+}, several potential wells were found on the ground and the electronic excited states potentials with potential barriers with respect to dissociation, where this dication can exist in the gas phase as long-lived metastable molecules. We confirm hence the recent observation of the dication by mass spectrometry. Moreover, we predict the existence of the metastable IO{sup 3+} trication, where a shallow potential well along the IO internuclear distance is computed. This potential well supports more than 10 vibrational levels. The IO{sup 3+} excited states are repulsive in nature, as well as the computed potentials for the IO{sup 4+} tetracation. For the bound states, we give a set of spectroscopic parameters including excitation transition energies, equilibrium distances, harmonic and anharmonic vibrational terms, and rotational constants. At the MRCI + Q/aug-cc-pV5Z(-PP) level, the adiabatic double and triple ionization energies of IO are computed to be ∼28.1 eV and ∼55.0 eV, respectively.

  3. Theoretical investigations of the IO,q+ (q = 2, 3, 4) multi-charged ions: metastability, characterization and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hammami, H; Yazidi, O; Ben El Hadj Rhouma, M; Al Mogren, M M; Hochlaf, M

    2014-07-07

    Using ab initio methodology, we studied the IO(q+) (q = 2, 3, 4) multi-charged ions. Benchmark computations on the IO(X(2)Π) neutral species allow validate the current procedure. For IO(2+), several potential wells were found on the ground and the electronic excited states potentials with potential barriers with respect to dissociation, where this dication can exist in the gas phase as long-lived metastable molecules. We confirm hence the recent observation of the dication by mass spectrometry. Moreover, we predict the existence of the metastable IO(3+) trication, where a shallow potential well along the IO internuclear distance is computed. This potential well supports more than 10 vibrational levels. The IO(3+) excited states are repulsive in nature, as well as the computed potentials for the IO(4+) tetracation. For the bound states, we give a set of spectroscopic parameters including excitation transition energies, equilibrium distances, harmonic and anharmonic vibrational terms, and rotational constants. At the MRCI + Q/aug-cc-pV5Z(-PP) level, the adiabatic double and triple ionization energies of IO are computed to be ~28.1 eV and ~55.0 eV, respectively.

  4. Generation of multi-charged high current ion beams using the SMIS 37 gas-dynamic electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, M. A.; Zorin, V. G.; Sidorov, A. V.; Bokhanov, A. F.; Izotov, I. V.; Razin, S. V.; Skalyga, V. A.

    2013-06-02

    A gas-dynamic ECR ion source (GaDIS) is distinguished by its ability to produce high current and high brightness beams of moderately charged ions. Contrary to a classical ECR ion source where the plasma confinement is determined by the slow electron scattering into an empty loss-cone, the higher density and lower electron temperature in a GaDIS plasma lead to an isotropic electron distribution with the confinement time determined by the prompt gas-dynamic flow losses. As a result, much higher ion fluxes are available, however a decrease in the confinement time of the GaDIS plasma lowers the ion charge state. The gas-dynamic ECR ion source concept has been successfully realized in the SMIS 37 experimental facility operated at the Institute of Applied Physics, Russia. The use of high-power (~100 kW) microwave (37.5 GHz) radiation provides a dense plasma (~1013 cm-3) with a relatively low electron temperature (~50- 100 eV) and allows for the generation of high current (~1 A/cm2) beams of multi-charged ions. In this work we report on the present status of the SMIS 37 ion source and discuss the advanced numerical modeling of ion beam extraction using the particle-in-cell code WARP

  5. Atomic absorption spectroscopy in ion channel screening.

    PubMed

    Stankovich, Larisa; Wicks, David; Despotovski, Sasko; Liang, Dong

    2004-10-01

    This article examines the utility of atomic absorption spectroscopy, in conjunction with cold flux assays, to ion channel screening. The multiplicity of ion channels that can be interrogated using cold flux assays and atomic absorption spectroscopy is summarized. The importance of atomic absorption spectroscopy as a screening tool is further elaborated upon by providing examples of the relevance of ion channels to various physiological processes and targeted diseases.

  6. Ion-Atom Cold Collisions and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Collisions between ultracold neutral atoms have for some time been the subject of investigation, initially with hydrogen and more recently with laser cooled alkali atoms. Advances in laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms in a Magneto-Optic Trap (MOT) have made cold atoms available as the starting point for many laser cooled atomic physics investigations. The most spectacularly successful of these, the observation of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) in a dilute ultra-cold spin polarized atomic vapor, has accelerated the study of cold collisions. Experimental and theoretical studies of BEC and the long range interaction between cold alkali atoms is at the boundary of atomic and low temperature physics. Such studies have been difficult and would not have been possible without the development and advancement of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. By contrast, ion-atom interactions at low temperature, also very difficult to study prior to modern day laser cooling, have remained largely unexplored. But now, many laboratories worldwide have almost routine access to cold neutral atoms. The combined technologies of ion trapping, together with laser cooling of neutrals has made these studies experimentally feasible and several very important, novel applications might come out of such investigations . This paper is an investigation of ion-atom interactions in the cold and ultra-cold temperature regime. Some of the collisional ion-atom interactions present at room temperature are very much reduced in the low temperature regime. Reaction rates for charge transfer between unlike atoms, A + B(+) approaches A(+) + B, are expected to fall rapidly with temperature, approximately as T(sup 5/2). Thus, cold mixtures of atoms and ions are expected to coexist for very long times, unlike room temperature mixtures of the same ion-atom combination. Thus, it seems feasible to cool ions via collisions with laser cooled atoms. Many of the conventional collisional interactions

  7. Atomic Clock Based On Linear Ion Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. John

    1992-01-01

    Highly stable atomic clock based on excitation and measurement of hyperfine transition in 199Hg+ ions confined in linear quadrupole trap by radio-frequency and static electric fields. Configuration increases stability of clock by enabling use of enough ions to obtain adequate signal while reducing non-thermal component of motion of ions in trapping field, reducing second-order Doppler shift of hyperfine transition. Features described in NPO-17758 "Linear Ion Trap for Atomic Clock." Frequency standard based on hyperfine transition described in NPO-17456, "Trapped-Mercury-Ion Frequency Standard."

  8. Single atom devices by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    van Donkelaar, Jessica; Yang, C; Alves, A D C; McCallum, J C; Hougaard, C; Johnson, B C; Hudson, F E; Dzurak, A S; Morello, A; Spemann, D; Jamieson, D N

    2015-04-22

    To expand the capabilities of semiconductor devices for new functions exploiting the quantum states of single donors or other impurity atoms requires a deterministic fabrication method. Ion implantation is a standard tool of the semiconductor industry and we have developed pathways to deterministic ion implantation to address this challenge. Although ion straggling limits the precision with which atoms can be positioned, for single atom devices it is possible to use post-implantation techniques to locate favourably placed atoms in devices for control and readout. However, large-scale devices will require improved precision. We examine here how the method of ion beam induced charge, already demonstrated for the deterministic ion implantation of 14 keV P donor atoms in silicon, can be used to implant a non-Poisson distribution of ions in silicon. Further, we demonstrate the method can be developed to higher precision by the incorporation of new deterministic ion implantation strategies that employ on-chip detectors with internal charge gain. In a silicon device we show a pulse height spectrum for 14 keV P ion impact that shows an internal gain of 3 that has the potential of allowing deterministic implantation of sub-14 keV P ions with reduced straggling.

  9. Radioactive Ions and Atoms in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendooven, P.; Purushothaman, S.; Gloos, K.; ńystö, J.; Takahashi, N.; Huang, W. X.

    2006-04-01

    We are investigating the use of superfluid helium as a medium to handle and manipulate radioactive ions and atoms. Preliminary results on the extraction of positive ions from superfluid helium at temperatures close to 1 K are described. Increasing the electric field up to 1.2 kV/cm did not improve the extraction. Evaporating a thin surface layer of the liquid using second-sound pulses gave an extraction efficiency of 7.2 %.

  10. Atomic physics with highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, P.

    1991-08-01

    This report discusses: One electron outer shell processes in fast ion-atom collisions; role of electron-electron interaction in two-electron processes; multi-electron processes at low energy; multi-electron processes at high energy; inner shell processes; molecular fragmentation studies; theory; and, JRM laboratory operations.

  11. Quantum-classical electron distributions in atoms and atomic ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, Joseph A.

    1988-01-01

    A quantum-classical approach is used to obtain the velocity distributions in atoms and positive and negative ions in both ground and excited states. In the analysis, Hartree-Fock electronic wavefunctions are used to determine the radial electron distributions, and the central-field approximation is used to study the the dynamic properties of the localized electrons. The distributions for the outer and inner shells are found to agree well with exact results obtained by numerical calculations.

  12. Atomic ion clock with two ion traps, and method to transfer ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D. (Inventor); Chung, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An atomic ion clock with a first ion trap and a second ion trap, where the second ion trap is of higher order than the first ion trap. In one embodiment, ions may be shuttled back and forth from one ion trap to the other by application of voltage ramps to the electrodes in the ion traps, where microwave interrogation takes place when the ions are in the second ion trap, and fluorescence is induced and measured when the ions are in the first ion trap. In one embodiment, the RF voltages applied to the second ion trap to contain the ions are at a higher frequency than that applied to the first ion trap. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  13. Fully variational average atom model with ion-ion correlations.

    PubMed

    Starrett, C E; Saumon, D

    2012-02-01

    An average atom model for dense ionized fluids that includes ion correlations is presented. The model assumes spherical symmetry and is based on density functional theory, the integral equations for uniform fluids, and a variational principle applied to the grand potential. Starting from density functional theory for a mixture of classical ions and quantum mechanical electrons, an approximate grand potential is developed, with an external field being created by a central nucleus fixed at the origin. Minimization of this grand potential with respect to electron and ion densities is carried out, resulting in equations for effective interaction potentials. A third condition resulting from minimizing the grand potential with respect to the average ion charge determines the noninteracting electron chemical potential. This system is coupled to a system of point ions and electrons with an ion fixed at the origin, and a closed set of equations is obtained. Solution of these equations results in a self-consistent electronic and ionic structure for the plasma as well as the average ionization, which is continuous as a function of temperature and density. Other average atom models are recovered by application of simplifying assumptions.

  14. Cold atomic beam ion source for focused ion beam applications

    SciTech Connect

    Knuffman, B.; Steele, A. V.; McClelland, J. J.

    2013-07-28

    We report measurements and modeling of an ion source that is based on ionization of a laser-cooled atomic beam. We show a high brightness and a low energy spread, suitable for use in next-generation, high-resolution focused ion beam systems. Our measurements of total ion current as a function of ionization conditions support an analytical model that also predicts the cross-sectional current density and spatial distribution of ions created in the source. The model predicts a peak brightness of 2 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1} and an energy spread less than 0.34 eV. The model is also combined with Monte-Carlo simulations of the inter-ion Coulomb forces to show that the source can be operated at several picoamperes with a brightness above 1 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1}. We estimate that when combined with a conventional ion focusing column, an ion source with these properties could focus a 1 pA beam into a spot smaller than 1 nm. A total current greater than 5 nA was measured in a lower-brightness configuration of the ion source, demonstrating the possibility of a high current mode of operation.

  15. Cold atomic beam ion source for focused ion beam applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuffman, B.; Steele, A. V.; McClelland, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    We report measurements and modeling of an ion source that is based on ionization of a laser-cooled atomic beam. We show a high brightness and a low energy spread, suitable for use in next-generation, high-resolution focused ion beam systems. Our measurements of total ion current as a function of ionization conditions support an analytical model that also predicts the cross-sectional current density and spatial distribution of ions created in the source. The model predicts a peak brightness of 2 × 107 A m-2 sr-1 eV-1 and an energy spread less than 0.34 eV. The model is also combined with Monte-Carlo simulations of the inter-ion Coulomb forces to show that the source can be operated at several picoamperes with a brightness above 1 × 107 A m-2 sr-1 eV-1. We estimate that when combined with a conventional ion focusing column, an ion source with these properties could focus a 1 pA beam into a spot smaller than 1 nm. A total current greater than 5 nA was measured in a lower-brightness configuration of the ion source, demonstrating the possibility of a high current mode of operation.

  16. JPL Ultrastable Trapped Ion Atomic Frequency Standards.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric A; Yi, Lin; Tucker, Blake; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Recently, room temperature trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on three directions: 1) ultrastable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate stability performance and autonomous timekeeping; 2) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements; and 3) miniature clocks. In this paper, we concentrate on the first direction and present a design and the initial results from a new ultrastable clock referred to as L10 that achieves a short-term stability of 4.5 ×10(-14)/τ(1/2) and an initial measurement of no significant drift with an uncertainty of 2.4 ×10(-16) /day over a two-week period.

  17. Collisional Cooling of Light Ions by Cotrapped Heavy Atoms.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sourav; Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S A

    2017-03-17

    We experimentally demonstrate cooling of trapped ions by collisions with cotrapped, higher-mass neutral atoms. It is shown that the lighter ^{39}K^{+} ions, created by ionizing ^{39}K atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), when trapped in an ion trap and subsequently allowed to cool by collisions with ultracold, heavier ^{85}Rb atoms in a MOT, exhibit a longer trap lifetime than without the localized ^{85}Rb MOT atoms. A similar cooling of trapped ^{85}Rb^{+} ions by ultracold ^{133}Cs atoms in a MOT is also demonstrated in a different experimental configuration to validate this mechanism of ion cooling by localized and centered ultracold neutral atoms. Our results suggest that the cooling of ions by localized cold atoms holds for any mass ratio, thereby enabling studies on a wider class of atom-ion systems irrespective of their masses.

  18. Angular distributions of sputtered atoms for low-energy heavy ions, medium ions and light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, Yasunori; Mizuno, Yoshiyuki; Kimura, Hidetoshi

    1986-03-01

    The angular distributions of sputtered atoms for the near-threshold sputtering of heavy ions, medium ions, and light ions have been investigated by a few-collision model and the ACAT computer simulation code. For heavy-ion sputtering the preferential angle of sputtered atoms is about 50° which is measured from the surface normal, while in the case of the near-threshold light-ion sputtering the preferential angles are nearly equal to the surface normal and do not depend on angle of incidence. It is found that the agreement between the ACAT preferential angles and theoretical values due to a few-collision model is very good.

  19. Atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions for surface interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Outlaw, R. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base developed from analysis of the two-body potential data, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas surfaces and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  20. Continuum Absorption Coefficient of Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armaly, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of heat transfer to the heat shield of a Jupiter probe has been estimated to be one order of magnitude higher than any previously experienced in an outer space exploration program. More than one-third of this heat load is due to an emission of continuum radiation from atoms and ions. The existing computer code for calculating the continuum contribution to the total load utilizes a modified version of Biberman's approximate method. The continuum radiation absorption cross sections of a C - H - O - N ablation system were examined in detail. The present computer code was evaluated and updated by being compared with available exact and approximate calculations and correlations of experimental data. A detailed calculation procedure, which can be applied to other atomic species, is presented. The approximate correlations can be made to agree with the available exact and experimental data.

  1. Trapped Atomic Ions and Quantum Information Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Wineland, D. J.; Leibfried, D.; Bergquist, J. C.; Blakestad, R. B.; Bollinger, J. J.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Epstein, R. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Schaetz, T.; Schmidt, P. O.; Seidelin, S.; Shiga, N.

    2006-11-07

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a large-scale information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high-fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. This is still well in the future. NIST and other groups are addressing part of the scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly-parallel and scalable processing. In the near term, some simple quantum processing protocols are being used to aid in quantum metrology, such as in atomic clocks. As the number of qubits increases, Schroedinger's cat paradox and the measurement problem in quantum mechanics become more apparent; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on these fundamental issues.

  2. Trapped Atomic Ions and Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wineland, D. J.; Leibfried, D.; Bergquist, J. C.; Blakestad, R. B.; Bollinger, J. J.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Epstein, R. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Knill, M.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Schaetz, T.; Schmidt, P. O.; Seidelin, S.; Shiga, N.; Wesenberg, J. H.

    2006-11-01

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a large-scale information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high-fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. This is still well in the future. NIST and other groups are addressing part of the scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly-parallel and scalable processing. In the near term, some simple quantum processing protocols are being used to aid in quantum metrology, such as in atomic clocks. As the number of qubits increases, Schrödinger's cat paradox and the measurement problem in quantum mechanics become more apparent; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on these fundamental issues.

  3. Compact, Highly Stable Ion Atomic Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John

    2008-01-01

    A mercury-ion clock now at the breadboard stage of development (see figure) has a stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock: In tests, the clock exhibited an Allan deviation of between 2 x 10(exp -13) and 3 x 10(exp -13) at a measurement time of 1 second, averaging to about 10(exp -15) at 1 day. However, the clock occupies a volume of only about 2 liters . about a hundredth of the volume of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling parts of the apparatus are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein only a getter pump is used to maintain the vacuum. Hence, this apparatus is a prototype of a generation of small, potentially portable high-precision clocks for diverse ground- and space-based navigation and radio science applications. Furthermore, this new ion-clock technology is about 100 times more stable and precise than the rubidium atomic clocks currently in use in the NAV STAR GPS Earth-orbiting satellites. In this clock, mercury ions are shuttled between a quadrupole and a 16-pole linear radio-frequency trap. In the quadrupole trap, the ions are tightly confined and optical state selection from a Hg-202 radio-frequency-discharge ultraviolet lamp is carried out. In the 16-pole trap, the ions are more loosely confined and atomic transitions resonant at frequency of about 40.507 GHz are interrogated by use of a microwave beam at that frequency. The trapping of ions effectively eliminates the frequency pulling caused by wall collisions inherent to gas-cell clocks. The shuttling of the ions between the two traps enables separation of the state-selection process from the clock microwave- resonance process, so that each of these processes can be optimized independently of the other. The basic ion-shuttling, two-trap scheme as described thus far is not new: it has been the basis of designs of prior larger clocks. The novelty of the present development lies in major redesigns of its physics package (the ion traps and the vacuum and optical subsystems) to effect

  4. Reactions of atomic oxygen with the chlorate ion and the perchlorate ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anan'ev, Vladimir; Miklin, Mikhail; Kriger, Ludmila

    2014-06-01

    The reactions of the chlorate ion with atomic oxygen formed under photolysis of the nitrate ion introduced to potassium chlorate crystal by co-crystallization were studied by optical and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The perchlorate ion was found to form in solids as product of addition reaction of singlet atomic oxygen, formed under dissociation of the peroxynitrite ion - the product of isomerization of the excited nitrate ion. Triplet atomic oxygen does not react with the chlorate ion. The atomic oxygen formed under photolysis of the nitrate ion introduced to potassium perchlorate crystal by co-crystallization does not react with the perchlorate ion.

  5. Separation of metal ions in nitrate solution by ultrasonic atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masanori; Ikeno, Masayuki; Fujii, Toshitaka

    2004-11-01

    In the ultrasonic atomization of metal nitrate solutions, the molar ratio of metal ions is changed between solution and mist. Small molar metal ions tend to be transferred to mist by ultrasonic wave acceleration, while large molar ions tend to remain in solution. As a result, metal ions can be separated by ultrasonic atomization. We show experimental data and propose a conceptual mechanism for the ultrasonic separation of metal ions.

  6. Separation of metal ions in nitrate solution by ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masanori; Ikeno, Masayuki; Fujii, Toshitaka

    2004-11-15

    In the ultrasonic atomization of metal nitrate solutions, the molar ratio of metal ions is changed between solution and mist. Small molar metal ions tend to be transferred to mist by ultrasonic wave acceleration, while large molar ions tend to remain in solution. As a result, metal ions can be separated by ultrasonic atomization. We show experimental data and propose a conceptual mechanism for the ultrasonic separation of metal ions.

  7. Ionization Phenomena in Ion-Atom Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveney, Edward Francis

    Two many-electron ion-atom collision systems are used to investigate atomic and molecular structure and collisional interactions. Electrons emitted from MeV/u C^{3+} projectile target -atom collisions were measured with a high-resolution position -sensitive electron spectrometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The electrons are predominantly ionized by direct projectile -target interactions or autoionizing (AI) from doubly excited AI levels of the ion which were excited in the collision. The energy dependence of directly scattered target electrons, binary-encounter electrons (BEE), is investigated and compared with theory. AI levels of the projectile 1s to nl single electron excited series, (1s2snl) n = 2,3,4,....infty, including the series limit are identified uniquely using energy level calculations. Original Auger yield calculations using a code by Cowan were used to discover a 1/{n^3} scaling in intensities of Auger peaks in the aforementioned series. This is explained using scattering theory. A nonstatistical population of the terms in the (1s2s2l) configuration was identified and investigated as a function of the beam energy and for four different target atoms. Two electron excited configurations are identified and investigated. The angular distribution of a correlated transfer and excitation AI state is measured and compared to theory. The final scattered charge state distributions of Kr^ {n+}, n = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, projectiles are measured following collisions with Kr targets in the Van de Graaff Laboratory here at The University of Connecticut. Average scattered charge states as high as 12 are observed. It appears that these electrons are ionized during the lifetime of the quasimolecular state but a complete picture of the ionization mechanism(s) is not known. Calculations using a statistical model of ionization, modified in several ways, are compared with the experimental results to see if it is possible to isolate whether or not the electrons originate

  8. Storage rings for investigation of ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, R.

    1987-08-01

    In this survey, we give a brief description of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, and examples for their use in ion-atom collision physics. The compression of the phase space distribution of the ions by electron cooling, and the gain factors of in-ring experiments compared to single-pass experiments are explained. Some examples of a new generation of ion-atom collision experiments which may become feasible with storage rings are given. These include the studies of angular differential single- and double-electron capture cross sections, the production of slow highly charged recoil ions, and atomic collision processes using decelerated and crossed beam. 30 refs.

  9. Relative stopping powers for atomic and molecular ions in carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steuer, Malcolm F.

    1986-03-01

    Electronic stopping powers of carbon for atomic and molecular nitrogen ions have been calculated using semi-classical free electron scattering from Herman-Skillman potentials, parametrized to include an adjustable exponential screening factor F( tv, Z), representing atomic ions. For molecular ions, aligned along the beam direction and having velocity 1.2 a.u., the stopping powers for individual atomic components were calculated as a function of internuclear separation. Screening factors for the two centers of force were assumed to decrease linearly from the value at zero internuclear separation, equivalent to that of a silicon ion, to that for nitrogen ions at large separations. Results are consistent with the diminishment of average stopping power per atomic ion which has been observed for beam-aligned nitrogen molecular ions. Similar calculations for molecular hydrogen in carbon agree with the enhancement of stopping power which has been observed. Evidence of nonlinear effects is indicated.

  10. Problems with Accurate Atomic Lfetime Measurements of Multiply Charged Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2009-02-19

    A number of recent atomic lifetime measurements on multiply charged ions have reported uncertainties lower than 1%. Such a level of accuracy challenges theory, which is a good thing. However, a few lessons learned from earlier precision lifetime measurements on atoms and singly charged ions suggest to remain cautious about the systematic errors of experimental techniques.

  11. Quantum Electrodynamics Effects in Heavy Ions and Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Shabaev, V. M.; Andreev, O. V.; Bondarev, A. I.; Glazov, D. A.; Kozhedub, Y. S.; Maiorova, A. V.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Plunien, G.; Volotka, A. V.

    2011-05-11

    Quantum electrodynamics theory of heavy ions and atoms is considered. The current status of calculations of the binding energies, the hyperfine splitting and g factor values in heavy few-electron ions is reviewed. The theoretical predictions are compared with available experimental data. A special attention is focused on tests of quantum electrodynamics in strong electromagnetic fields and on determination of the fundamental constants. Recent progress in calculations of the parity nonconservation effects with heavy atoms and ions is also reported.

  12. Controlled long-range interactions between Rydberg atoms and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secker, T.; Gerritsma, R.; Glaetzle, A. W.; Negretti, A.

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate trapped ions interacting with atoms that are coupled to Rydberg states. The strong polarizabilities of the Rydberg levels increase the interaction strength between atoms and ions by many orders of magnitude, as compared to the case of ground-state atoms, and may be mediated over micrometers. We calculate that such interactions can be used to generate entanglement between an atom and the motion or internal state of an ion. Furthermore, the ion could be used as a bus for mediating spin-spin interactions between atomic spins in analogy to much employed techniques in ion-trap quantum simulation. The proposed scheme comes with attractive features as it maps the benefits of the trapped-ion quantum system onto the atomic one without obviously impeding its intrinsic scalability. No ground-state cooling of the ion or atom is required and the setup allows for full dynamical control. Moreover, the scheme is to a large extent immune to the micromotion of the ion. Our findings are of interest for developing hybrid quantum information platforms and for implementing quantum simulations of solid-state physics.

  13. Positron Interactions with Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2012-01-01

    Dirac, in 1928, combining the ideas of quantum mechanics and the ideas of relativity invented the well-known relativistic wave equation. In his formulation, he predicted an antiparticle of the electron of spin n-bar/2. He thought that this particle must be a proton. Dirac published his interpretation in a paper 'A theory of electrons and protons.' It was shown later by the mathematician Hermann Weyl that the Dirac theory was completely symmetric between negative and positive particles and the positive particle must have the same mass as that of the electron. In his J. Robert Oppenheimer Memorial Prize Acceptance Speech, Dirac notes that 'Blackett was really the first person to obtain hard evidence for the existence of a positron but he was afraid to publish it. He wanted confirmation, he was really over cautious.' Positron, produced by the collision of cosmic rays in a cloud chamber, was detected experimentally by Anderson in 1932. His paper was published in Physical Review in 1933. The concept of the positron and its detection were the important discoveries of the 20th century. I have tried to discuss various processes involving interactions of positrons with atoms and ions. This includes scattering, bound states and resonances. It has not been possible to include the enormous work which has been carried out during the last 40 or 50 years in theory and measurements.

  14. Analysis of the physical atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions and halogen ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The physical forces between atoms and molecules are important in a number of processes of practical importance, including line broadening in radiative processes, gas and crystal properties, adhesion, and thin films. The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base for the dispersion forces is developed from the literature based on evaluations with the harmonic oscillator dispersion model for higher order coefficients. The Zener model of the repulsive core is used in the context of the recent asymptotic wave functions of Handler and Smith; and an effective ionization potential within the Handler and Smith wave functions is defined to analyze the two body potential data of Waldman and Gordon, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  15. A dense gas of laser-cooled atoms for hybrid atom-ion trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höltkemeier, Bastian; Glässel, Julian; López-Carrera, Henry; Weidemüller, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We describe the realization of a dark spontaneous-force trap of rubidium atoms. The atoms are loaded from a beam provided by a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap yielding a capture efficiency of 75%. The dense and cold atomic sample is characterized by saturated absorption imaging. Up to 10^9 atoms are captured with a loading rate of 3× 10^9 atoms/s into a cloud at a temperature of 250 μK with the density exceeding 10^{11} atoms/cm^3. Under steady-state conditions, more than 90% of the atoms can be prepared into the absolute atomic ground state, which provides favorable conditions for the investigation of sympathetic cooling of ions in a hybrid atom-ion trap.

  16. Chemical stability of positronic complexes with atoms and atomic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, M.W.; Nakanishi, H.; Schrader, D.M.

    1984-10-01

    A simple theory for establishing the stability or instability of positron-atomic systems against dissociation is presented. The theory consists of assuming that Morse-potential parameters for protonic diatoms are transferrable to the corresponding positronic molecules, and making appropriate reduced-mass modifications in the calculation of binding energies. The surprisingly good reliability of the method is established by appealing to the well-known positronium affinities of atomic hydrogen and fluorine. Positronium (Ps) binding is found for about half of the 42 atoms tested. In addition, instability is indicated for all nine positron-atom systems tested, and stability is indicated for seven of eight negatively charged systems tested; e.g., PsO/sup -/.

  17. Atomic physics with highly charged ions. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, P.

    1994-08-01

    The study of inelastic collision phenomena with highly charged projectile ions and the interpretation of spectral features resulting from these collisions remain as the major focal points in the atomic physics research at the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas. The title of the research project, ``Atomic Physics with Highly Charged Ions,`` speaks to these points. The experimental work in the past few years has divided into collisions at high velocity using the primary beams from the tandem and LINAC accelerators and collisions at low velocity using the CRYEBIS facility. Theoretical calculations have been performed to accurately describe inelastic scattering processes of the one-electron and many-electron type, and to accurately predict atomic transition energies and intensities for x rays and Auger electrons. Brief research summaries are given for the following: (1) electron production in ion-atom collisions; (2) role of electron-electron interactions in two-electron processes; (3) multi-electron processes; (4) collisions with excited, aligned, Rydberg targets; (5) ion-ion collisions; (6) ion-molecule collisions; (7) ion-atom collision theory; and (8) ion-surface interactions.

  18. Atomic transport in ion mixed Pd/Co bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, K. H.; Jang, H. G.; Song, J. H.; Woo, J. J.; Choi, B. S.; Jeong, K.; Whang, C. N.

    1993-06-01

    Isotropic and anisotropic atomic transport in an ion beam mixed Pd/Co bilayer have been studied from the shifts of a marker layer in Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. A thin layer of Au (1 nm) was embedded as a marker at the interface between Pd and Co layers. 80 keV Ar + was used to irradiate the marker sample at 90K. The Pd/Co system shows near isotropic atomic transport ( JPd/ JCo = 0.86) due to the thermal spike effect. We present a simple relationship between the ration of atomic fluxes induced by ion mixing and the activation energies for the normal impurity diffusion of constituents in a bilayer to describe quantitatively the isotropic and anisotropic atomic transport in thermal spike induced ion mixing. Thermal spike induced atomic transport is closely related with the activation energy for normal impurity diffusion.

  19. Spectroscopy of atomic and molecular ions using quantum logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, P. O.; Rosenband, T.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Bergquist, J. C.; Wineland, D. J.

    2006-10-01

    Recently developed techniques for quantum computation using trapped ions allow precise coherent control of the internal and external states of single atoms. Here we report how these techniques can be employed to perform precision spectroscopy of atomic and molecular ions that lack accessible transitions for laser cooling and detection. Furthermore, we discuss how quantum logic can be used to laser-cool molecules to near their rotational and vibrational ground state by avoiding detrimental spontaneous emission of photons from the molecule.

  20. Newly appreciated roles for electrons in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I.A. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    Since the previous Debrecen workshop on High-Energy Ion-Atom Collisions there have been numerous experiments and substantial theoretical developments in the fields of fast ion-atom and ion- solid collisions concerned with explicating the previously largely underappreciated role of electrons as ionizing and exciting agents in such collisions. Examples to be discussed include the double electron ionization problem in He; transfer ionization by protons in He; double excitation in He; backward scattering of electrons in He; the role of electron-electron interaction in determining beta parameters for ELC; projectile K ionization by target electrons; electron spin exchange in transfer excitation; electron impact ionization in crystal channels; resonant coherent excitation in crystal channels; excitation and dielectronic recombination in crystal channels; resonant transfer and excitation; the similarity of recoil ion spectra observed in coincidence with electron capture vs. electron loss; and new research on ion-atom collisions at relativistic energies.

  1. Ion microscopy based on laser-cooled cesium atoms.

    PubMed

    Viteau, M; Reveillard, M; Kime, L; Rasser, B; Sudraud, P; Bruneau, Y; Khalili, G; Pillet, P; Comparat, D; Guerri, I; Fioretti, A; Ciampini, D; Allegrini, M; Fuso, F

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a prototype of a Focused Ion Beam machine based on the ionization of a laser-cooled cesium beam and adapted for imaging and modifying different surfaces in the few-tens nanometer range. Efficient atomic ionization is obtained by laser promoting ground-state atoms into a target excited Rydberg state, then field-ionizing them in an electric field gradient. The method allows obtaining ion currents up to 130pA. Comparison with the standard direct photo-ionization of the atomic beam shows, in our conditions, a 40-times larger ion yield. Preliminary imaging results at ion energies in the 1-5keV range are obtained with a resolution around 40nm, in the present version of the prototype. Our ion beam is expected to be extremely monochromatic, with an energy spread of the order of the eV, offering great prospects for lithography, imaging and surface analysis.

  2. A compact source for bunches of singly charged atomic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murböck, T.; Schmidt, S.; Andelkovic, Z.; Birkl, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Vogel, M.

    2016-04-01

    We have built, operated, and characterized a compact ion source for low-energy bunches of singly charged atomic ions in a vacuum beam line. It is based on atomic evaporation from an electrically heated oven and ionization by electron impact from a heated filament inside a grid-based ionization volume. An adjacent electrode arrangement is used for ion extraction and focusing by applying positive high-voltage pulses to the grid. The method is particularly suited for experimental environments which require low electromagnetic noise. It has proven simple yet reliable and has been used to produce μs-bunches of up to 106 Mg+ ions at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. We present the concept, setup and characterizing measurements. The instrument has been operated in the framework of the SpecTrap experiment at the HITRAP facility at GSI/FAIR to provide Mg+ ions for sympathetic cooling of highly charged ions by laser-cooled 24Mg+.

  3. Observation of Cold Collisions between Trapped Ions and Trapped Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, Andrew T.; Cetina, Marko; Oručević, Fedja; Vuletić, Vladan

    2009-06-01

    We study cold collisions between trapped ions and trapped atoms in the semiclassical (Langevin) regime. Using Yb+ ions confined in a Paul trap and Yb atoms in a magneto-optical trap, we investigate charge-exchange collisions of several isotopes over three decades of collision energies down to 3μeV (kB×35mK). The minimum measured rate coefficient of 6×10-10cm3s-1 is in good agreement with that derived from a Langevin model for an atomic polarizability of 143 a.u.

  4. Multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.

    1989-03-01

    Research in atomic physics at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Super-HILAC and Bevalac accelerators on multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions is described. Experiments have studied various aspects of the charge-transfer, ionization, and excitation processes. Examples of processes in which electron correlation plays a role are resonant transfer and excitation and Auger-electron emission. Processes in which electron behavior can generally be described as uncorrelated include ionization and charge transfer in high-energy ion-atom collisions. A variety of experiments and results for energies from 1 MeV/u to 420 MeV/u are presented. 20 refs., 15 figs.

  5. Next Generation JPL Ultra-Stable Trapped Ion Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric; Tucker, Blake; Larsen, Kameron; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on two directions: 1) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements, and 2) ultra-stable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate performance. In this paper we present a new ultra-stable trapped ion clock designed, built, and tested in the second category. The first new standard, L10, will be delivered to the Naval Research Laboratory for use in characterizing DoD space clocks.

  6. Hard and soft acids and bases: atoms and atomic ions.

    PubMed

    Reed, James L

    2008-07-07

    The structural origin of hard-soft behavior in atomic acids and bases has been explored using a simple orbital model. The Pearson principle of hard and soft acids and bases has been taken to be the defining statement about hard-soft behavior and as a definition of chemical hardness. There are a number of conditions that are imposed on any candidate structure and associated property by the Pearson principle, which have been exploited. The Pearson principle itself has been used to generate a thermodynamically based scale of relative hardness and softness for acids and bases (operational chemical hardness), and a modified Slater model has been used to discern the electronic origin of hard-soft behavior. Whereas chemical hardness is a chemical property of an acid or base and the operational chemical hardness is an experimental measure of it, the absolute hardness is a physical property of an atom or molecule. A critical examination of chemical hardness, which has been based on a more rigorous application of the Pearson principle and the availability of quantitative measures of chemical hardness, suggests that the origin of hard-soft behavior for both acids and bases resides in the relaxation of the electrons not undergoing transfer during the acid-base interaction. Furthermore, the results suggest that the absolute hardness should not be taken as synonymous with chemical hardness but that the relationship is somewhat more complex. Finally, this work provides additional groundwork for a better understanding of chemical hardness that will inform the understanding of hardness in molecules.

  7. New Atomic Ion SIMS Facility at the Naval Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, K. S.; Fazel, K. C.; Fahey, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mass spectrometry of particulates and few micrometer regions of samples by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is a very useful analytical tool. However, there are limitations caused by interferences from molecular species, such as hydrides, oxides, and carbides. Above mass 90 u, these interferences (> 104 M/ΔM) can exceed the resolving power of SIMS. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is capable of eliminating such molecular ion interferences, but lacks spatial information and generally requires use of negative ions. This requirement limits its sensitivity, since actinide and lanthanide elements preferentially generate positive atomic ions (~104 : 1). The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has installed a hybrid SIMS-AMS system, using a Single Stage AMS as a replacement for the normal Cameca IMS 4f SIMS electron multiplier detector. The NRL design enables analysis of either positive or negative ions. Thus, this system offers the potential to provide SIMS-like particle and micro-scale analysis without a forest of signals from molecular species, and is capable of measuring important positive atomic ions. This should improve measurement sensitivity and precision to determine isotopic distributions of actinides, lanthanides, and transition metals; and elemental abundances of trace species in particles or small features. Initial measurements show that molecule intensities can be reduced by seven orders of magnitude while atomic ion intensities are only diminished ~50%. We have chosen to call this instrument an atomic ion SIMS, or ai-SIMS, for short. The effect of basic operational parameters such as ion energy, charge state, molecule destruction gas and its pressure will be described, and examples of the benefits and capabilities of ai-SIMS will be presented.

  8. Bremsstrahlung spectra from atoms and ions at low relativistic energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdonina, N. B.; Pratt, R. H.

    1999-09-01

    Analytic expressions for bremsstrahlung spectra from neutral atoms and ions, including the polarizational bremsstrahlung contribution in a stripped atom approximation, are developed for electron scattering at energies of 10-2000 keV. A modified Elwert factor and a simple higher Born correction are used for the Coulomb spectrum, with ordinary bremsstrahlung screening effects in ions and atoms adequately characterized in the non-relativistic Born approximation. In parallel with the development of this analytic description, new numerical results are obtained for ordinary bremsstrahlung from ions and from bare nuclei, appreciably extending the available data set which can be used to study dependences on element, ionicity, energy and the fraction of incident energy radiated. The accuracy of predictions with the analytic expressions is then determined by comparison with the full numerical relativistic partial-wave results for ordinary bremsstrahlung and with non-relativistic numerical results in the Born approximation or in partial waves for the polarizational amplitude.

  9. Atomic physics experiments with stored cooled heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, S.

    1986-01-01

    The wide ranging interest in the development of heavy ion synchrotrons with electron beam cooling is evident from the number of projects presently under way. Although much of the initial motivation for these rings stemmed from nuclear and particle physics, a considerable amount of atomic physics experimentation is planned. This paper surveys some of the new opportunities in atomic physics which may be made available with storage ring systems. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  10. Saturation Effect of Projectile Excitation in Ion-Atom Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukoyama, Takeshi; Lin, Chii-Dong

    Calculations of projectile K-shell electron excitation cross sections for He-like ions during ion-atom collisions have been performed in the distortion approximation by the use of Herman-Skillman wave functions. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data for several targets. The excitation cross sections deviate from the first-Born approximation and show the saturation effect as a function of target atomic number. This effect can be explained as the distortion of the projectile electronic states by the target nucleus.

  11. A Modular Quantum System of Trapped Atomic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hucul, David Alexander

    Scaling up controlled quantum systems to involve large numbers of qubits remains one of the outstanding challenges of quantum information science. One path toward scalability is the use of a modular architecture where adjacent qubits may be entangled with applied electromagnetic fields, and remote qubits may be entangled using photon interference. Trapped atomic ion qubits are one of the most promising platforms for scaling up quantum systems by combining long coherence times with high fidelity entangling operations between proximate and remote qubits. In this thesis, I present experimental progress on combining entanglement between remote atomic ions separated by 1 meter with near-field entanglement between atomic ions in the same ion trap. I describe the experimental improvements to increase the remote entanglement rate by orders of magnitude to nearly 5 per second. This is the first experimental demonstration where the remote entanglement rate exceeds the decoherence rate of the entangled qubits. The flexibility of creating remote entanglement through photon interference is demonstrated by using the interference of distinguishable photons without sacrificing remote entanglement rate or fidelity. Next I describe the use of master clock in combination with a frequency comb to lock the phases of all laser-induced interactions between remote ion traps while removing optical phase stability requirements. The combination of both types of entanglement gates to create a small quantum network are described. Finally, I present ways to mitigate cross talk between photonic and memory qubits by using different trapped ion species. I show preliminary work on performing state detection of nuclear spin 0 ions by using entanglement between atomic ion spin and photon polarization. These control techniques may be important for building a large-scale modular quantum system.

  12. Phonon-Mediated Detection of Trapped Atomic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, David; Rosenband, Till; Wineland, David

    2008-03-01

    Both quantum information processing and quantum-limited metrology require sensitive detection of quantum states. Using trapped atomic ions, we investigate quantum non-demolition measurements in a two-species ion chain composed of Al^+ and Be^+. By mapping information from Al^+ to a shared phonon-mode then to Be^+ and detecting repetitively we have experimentally demonstrated a fidelity for state initialization and detection of 0.9994. We have also shown an increase in measurement efficiency through an adaptive procedure. Here we apply these ideas to the detection of states of multiple Al^+ using a single Be^+ ion, and describe the preparation of entangled states through measurement.

  13. Total Born approximation cross sections for single electron loss by atoms and ions colliding with atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    The first born approximation (FBA) is applied to the calculation of single electron loss cross sections for various ions and atoms containing from one to seven electrons. Screened hydrogenic wave functions were used for the states of the electron ejected from the projectile, and Hartree-Fock elastic and incoherent scattering factors were used to describe the target. The effect of the target atom on the scaling of projectile ionization cross sections with respect to the projectile nuclear charge was explored in the case of hydrogen-like ions. Scaling of the cross section with respect to the target nuclear charge for electron loss by Fe (+25) in collision with neutral atoms ranging from H to Fe is also examined. These results were compared to those of the binary encounter approximation and to the FBA for the case of ionization by completely stripped target ions.

  14. The Helium Atom and Isoelectronic Ions in Two Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patil, S. H.

    2008-01-01

    The energy levels of the helium atom and isoelectronic ions in two dimensions are considered. The difficulties encountered in the analytical evaluation of the perturbative and variational expressions for the ground state, promote an interesting factorization of the inter-electronic interaction, leading to simple expressions for the energy. This…

  15. Atom probe field ion microscopy of titanium aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.J.; Miller, M.K.

    1998-01-01

    Titanium aluminides have a number of potential high temperature applications due to their good elevated-temperature mechanical properties, low density, and good creep and oxidation resistance. However, fabrication of commercial components of these materials has been impeded by their poor mechanical properties at ambient temperatures. Significant efforts with various degrees of success have been made to improve the mechanical properties of these TiAl alloys by doping them with a variety of different elements including B, C, Cr, Er, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Nb, P, Si, Ta, V and W. One of the optimum analytical tools for investigating the effects of these additions on the microstructure is the atom probe field ion micro scope. However, relatively few studies of titanium aluminides, compared to some other intermetallic compounds, have performed by atom probe field ion microscopy. This lack of attention can be attributed to the brittle nature of the material, in-situ transformations that occur during the field ion microscopy and preferential evaporation problems that were encountered in some of the early studies. The atom probe field ion microscope used for the current experiments has a low base pressure ({approximately} 2 {times} 10{sup 9} Pa) and careful attention was paid to optimizing the experimental parameters. All the examples shown were obtained from specimens prepared by standard electropolishing techniques. To demonstrate the suitability of the technique to these materials, several different titanium aluminides have been characterized in the atom probe.

  16. Correlated eikonal initial state in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ciappina, M.F.; Otranto, S.; Garibotti, C.R.

    2002-11-01

    An approximation is developed to deal with the ionization of atoms by bare charged ions. In this method the transition amplitude describing the three-body final state is evaluated using a continuum correlated wave and that for the initial state by an analytical continuation of the {phi}{sub 2} model to complex momenta. This procedure introduces in the atomic bound state a kinematical correlation with the projectile motion. Doubly differential cross sections (DDCS's) are computed for collisions of H{sup +} and F{sup 9+} ions with He atoms. Results for the DDCS's in the forward direction are compared with experimental data and other theoretical models. We find an enhancement of the distribution for low energy electrons and that the asymmetry of the electron capture to the continuum (ECC) peak is correctly described.

  17. Scaling Cross Sections for Ion-atom Impact Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-06-06

    The values of ion-atom ionization cross sections are frequently needed for many applications that utilize the propagation of fast ions through matter. When experimental data and theoretical calculations are not available, approximate formulas are frequently used. This paper briefly summarizes the most important theoretical results and approaches to cross section calculations in order to place the discussion in historical perspective and offer a concise introduction to the topic. Based on experimental data and theoretical predictions, a new fit for ionization cross sections is proposed. The range of validity and accuracy of several frequently used approximations (classical trajectory, the Born approximation, and so forth) are discussed using, as examples, the ionization cross sections of hydrogen and helium atoms by various fully stripped ions.

  18. A new ion sensing deep atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, Barney; Randall, Connor; Bridges, Daniel; Hansma, Paul K.

    2014-08-15

    Here we describe a new deep atomic force microscope (AFM) capable of ion sensing. A novel probe assembly incorporates a micropipette that can be used both for sensing ion currents and as the tip for AFM imaging. The key advance of this instrument over previous ion sensing AFMs is that it uses conventional micropipettes in a novel suspension system. This paper focuses on sensing the ion current passively while using force feedback for the operation of the AFM in contact mode. Two images are obtained simultaneously: (1) an AFM topography image and (2) an ion current image. As an example, two images of a MEMS device with a microchannel show peaks in the ion current as the pipette tip goes over the edges of the channel. This ion sensing AFM can also be used in other modes including tapping mode with force feedback as well as in non-contact mode by utilizing the ion current for feedback, as in scanning ion conductance microscopy. The instrument is gentle enough to be used on some biological samples such as plant leaves.

  19. A compact source for bunches of singly charged atomic ions.

    PubMed

    Murböck, T; Schmidt, S; Andelkovic, Z; Birkl, G; Nörtershäuser, W; Vogel, M

    2016-04-01

    We have built, operated, and characterized a compact ion source for low-energy bunches of singly charged atomic ions in a vacuum beam line. It is based on atomic evaporation from an electrically heated oven and ionization by electron impact from a heated filament inside a grid-based ionization volume. An adjacent electrode arrangement is used for ion extraction and focusing by applying positive high-voltage pulses to the grid. The method is particularly suited for experimental environments which require low electromagnetic noise. It has proven simple yet reliable and has been used to produce μs-bunches of up to 10(6) Mg(+) ions at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. We present the concept, setup and characterizing measurements. The instrument has been operated in the framework of the SpecTrap experiment at the HITRAP facility at GSI/FAIR to provide Mg(+) ions for sympathetic cooling of highly charged ions by laser-cooled (24)Mg(+).

  20. Automated Atom-By-Atom Three-Dimensional (3D) Reconstruction of Field Ion Microscopy Data.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Michal; Gault, Baptiste; Smith, George D W; Bagot, Paul A J; Moody, Michael P

    2017-03-20

    An automated procedure has been developed for the reconstruction of field ion microscopy (FIM) data that maintains its atomistic nature. FIM characterizes individual atoms on the specimen's surface, evolving subject to field evaporation, in a series of two-dimensional (2D) images. Its unique spatial resolution enables direct imaging of crystal defects as small as single vacancies. To fully exploit FIM's potential, automated analysis tools are required. The reconstruction algorithm developed here relies on minimal assumptions and is sensitive to atomic coordinates of all imaged atoms. It tracks the atoms across a sequence of images, allocating each to its respective crystallographic plane. The result is a highly accurate 3D lattice-resolved reconstruction. The procedure is applied to over 2000 tungsten atoms, including ion-implanted planes. The approach is further adapted to analyze carbides in a steel matrix, demonstrating its applicability to a range of materials. A vast amount of information is collected during the experiment that can underpin advanced analyses such as automated detection of "out of sequence" events, subangstrom surface displacements and defects effects on neighboring atoms. These analyses have the potential to reveal new insights into the field evaporation process and contribute to improving accuracy and scope of 3D FIM and atom probe characterization.

  1. Atomic switch: atom/ion movement controlled devices for beyond von-neumann computers.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Terabe, Kazuya; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Aono, Masakazu

    2012-01-10

    An atomic switch is a nanoionic device that controls the diffusion of metal ions/atoms and their reduction/oxidation processes in the switching operation to form/annihilate a conductive path. Since metal atoms can provide a highly conductive channel even if their cluster size is in the nanometer scale, atomic switches may enable downscaling to smaller than the 11 nm technology node, which is a great challenge for semiconductor devices. Atomic switches also possess novel characteristics, such as high on/off ratios, very low power consumption and non-volatility. The unique operating mechanisms of these devices have enabled the development of various types of atomic switch, such as gap-type and gapless-type two-terminal atomic switches and three-terminal atomic switches. Novel functions, such as selective volatile/nonvolatile, synaptic, memristive, and photo-assisted operations have been demonstrated. Such atomic switch characteristics can not only improve the performance of present-day electronic systems, but also enable development of new types of electronic systems, such as beyond von- Neumann computers.

  2. Clustering of ions at atomic dimensions in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Padma K.; Eliasson, Bengt; Eliasson

    2013-08-01

    By means of particle simulations of the equations of motion for ions interacting among themselves under the influence of newly discovered Shukla-Eliasson attractive force (SEAF) in a dense quantum plasma, we demonstrate that the SEAF can bring ions closer at atomic dimensions. We present simulation results of the dynamics of an ensemble of ions in the presence of the SEAF without and with confining external potentials and collisions between ions and degenerate electrons. Our particle simulations reveal that under the SEAF, ions attract each other, come closer, and form ionic clusters in the bath of degenerate electrons that shield ions. Furthermore, an external confining potential produces robust ion clusters that can have cigar- and ball-like shapes, which remain stable when the confining potential is removed. The stability of ion clusters is discussed. Our results may have applications to solid density plasmas (density exceeding 1023 per cm3), where the electrons will be degenerate and quantum forces due to the electron recoil effect caused by the overlapping of electron wave functions and electron tunneling through the Bohm potential, electron-exchange and electron-exchange and electron correlations associated with electron-1/2 spin effect, and the quantum statistical pressure of the degenerate electrons play a decisive role.

  3. Suppressing Loss of Ions in an Atomic Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John; Chung, Sang

    2010-01-01

    An improvement has been made in the design of a compact, highly stable mercury- ion clock to suppress a loss of ions as they are transferred between the quadrupole and higher multipole ion traps. Such clocks are being developed for use aboard spacecraft for navigation and planetary radio science. The modification is also applicable to ion clocks operating on Earth: indeed, the success of the modification has been demonstrated in construction and operation of a terrestrial breadboard prototype of the compact, highly stable mercury-ion clock. Selected aspects of the breadboard prototype at different stages of development were described in previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. The following background information is reviewed from previous articles: In this clock as in some prior ion clocks, mercury ions are shuttled between two ion traps, one a 16- pole linear radio-frequency trap, while the other is a quadrupole radio-frequency trap. In the quadrupole trap, ions are tightly confined and optical state selection from a 202Hg lamp is carried out. In the 16-pole trap, the ions are more loosely confined and atomic transitions are interrogated by use of a microwave beam at approximately 40.507 GHz. The trapping of ions effectively eliminates the frequency pulling that would otherwise be caused by collisions between clock atoms and the wall of a gas cell. The shuttling of the ions between the two traps enables separation of the state-selection process from the clock microwave-resonance process, so that each of these processes can be optimized independently of the other. This is similar to the operation of an atomic beam clock, except that with ions the beam can be halted and reversed as ions are shuttled back and forth between the two traps. When the two traps are driven at the same radio frequency, the strength of confinement can be reduced near the junction between the two traps, depending upon the relative phase of the RF voltage used to operate each of the two traps, and

  4. Measurement of femtosecond atomic lifetimes using ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Träbert, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Two types of experiment are described that both employ an electron beam ion trap for the production of highly charged ion species with the aim of then measuring atomic level lifetimes in the femtosecond range. In one experiment (done by Beiersdorfer et al. some time ago), the lifetime measurement depends on the associated line broadening. In a recent string of experiments at Linac Coherent Light Source Stanford, the HI-LIGHT collaboration employed pump-probe excitation using the FEL as a short-pulse X-ray laser.

  5. Manipulating ion-atom collisions with coherent electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Tom

    2002-08-26

    Laser-assisted ion-atom collisions are considered in terms of a nonperturbative quantum mechanical description of the electronic motion. It is shown for the system He(2+) - H at 2 keV/amu that the collision dynamics depend strongly on the initial phase of the laser field and the applied wavelength. Whereas electronic transitions are caused by the concurrent action of the field and the projectile ion at relatively low frequencies, they can be separated into modified collisional capture and field ionization events in the region above the one-photon ionization threshold.

  6. Friction. Tuning friction atom-by-atom in an ion-crystal simulator.

    PubMed

    Bylinskii, Alexei; Gangloff, Dorian; Vuletić, Vladan

    2015-06-05

    Friction between ordered, atomically smooth surfaces at the nanoscale (nanofriction) is often governed by stick-slip processes. To test long-standing atomistic models of such processes, we implemented a synthetic nanofriction interface between a laser-cooled Coulomb crystal of individually addressable ions as the moving object and a periodic light-field potential as the substrate. We show that stick-slip friction can be tuned from maximal to nearly frictionless via arrangement of the ions relative to the substrate. By varying the ion number, we also show that this strong dependence of friction on the structural mismatch, as predicted by many-particle models, already emerges at the level of two or three atoms. This model system enables a microscopic and systematic investigation of friction, potentially even into the quantum many-body regime.

  7. Local density probing of atomic gas via cold Li-Ca+ inelastic collisions in an atom-ion hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Ryoichi; Haze, Shinsuke; Fujinaga, Munekazu; Kyuno, Kazuki; Mukaiyama, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold atoms in a harmonic trap inevitably has an inhomogeneous density distribution, which makes an atomic gas an ensemble of atoms in different physical phases. Recent technical advances in the determination of local physical quantities in an atomic gas overcome this complexity and make it possible to directly compare experimental results with many-body theories of a homogeneous atomic gas. A laser-cooled ion can be used as a high-spatial resolution probe of physical quantities of an atomic gas. The spatial spread of an ion can be reduced to sub-microns, which is even small enough for the application of the local probe of atoms in optical lattices. In our experiment, we constructed Li and Ca+ ultracold hybrid system and observed inelastic collisions as a loss of ions. The inelastic collision is confirmed to be a charge-exchange process, whose rate depends linearly on the local atomic density. From the measurement of the rate of the charge-exchange, we can reproduce an atomic density profile. This is an important step toward a local probe of physical quantities of atoms with cold ions. In this presentation, we report on the observation of charge-exchange collisions between Li atom and Ca+ ions, and discuss the feasibility of the ions as a probe of the atoms.

  8. Some properties of Stark states of hydrogenic atoms and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, J. D.

    2007-10-01

    The motivation for this work is the problem of providing accurate values of the atomic transition matrix elements for the Stark components of Rydberg Rydberg transitions in atomic hydrogen and hydrogenic ions, for use in spectral line broadening calculations applicable to cool, low-density plasmas, such as those found in H II regions. Since conventional methods of calculating these transition matrix elements cannot be used for the high principal quantum numbers now easily attained in radio astronomical spectra, we attempt to show that the recurrence relation (ladder operator) method recently employed by Watson (2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 1889 97) and Hey (2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 2641 64) can be taken over into the parabolic coordinate system used to describe the Stark states of the atomic (ionic) radiators. The present method is therefore suggested as potentially useful for extending the work of Griem (1967 Astrophys. J. 148 547 58, 2005 Astrophys. J. 620 L133 4), Watson (2006), Stambulchik et al (2007 Phys. Rev. E 75 016401(9 pp) on Stark broadening in transitions between states of high principal quantum number, to physical conditions where the binary, impact approximation is no longer strictly applicable to both electron and ion perturbers. Another possible field of application is the study of Stark mixing transitions in 'ultracold' Rydberg atoms perturbed by long-range interactions with slow atoms and ions. Preparatory to the derivation of recurrence relations for states of different principal quantum number, a number of properties and recurrence relations are also found for states of identical principal quantum number, including the analogue in parabolic coordinates to the relations of Pasternack (1937 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 23 91 4, 250) in spherical polar coordinates.

  9. EBIT in the Magnetic Trapping Mode: Mass Spectrometry, Atomic Lifetime Measurements, and Charge Transfer Reactions of Highly Charged Atomic Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Schweikhard, L; Beiersdorfer, P; Trabert, E

    2001-07-10

    Although it may sound like a contradiction in terms, the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) works as an ion trap even when the electron beam is switched off. We present various experiments that exploit the ''magnetic trapping mode'' for investigations of ion confinement, charge exchange processes, atomic lifetime and ion mass measurements.

  10. Observation of synchronized atomic motions in the field ion microscope.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Fhm F; Notte, John A; Livengood, Richard H; Tan, Shida

    2013-03-01

    For over half a century, the field ion microscope (FIM) has been used to visualize atomic structures at the apex of a sharpened needle by way of the ion beams which are created at the most protruding atoms. In this paper we used a conventional FIM to study the emission characteristics of the neon ion beams produced within the FIM. The neon emission pattern is observed to be relatively short lived and subject to temporal and angular fluctuations. The nature of these fluctuations is complex, often with different parts of the emission pattern changing in a synchronized fashion over timescales spanning from milliseconds to a few tens of seconds. In this paper, we characterize the observed instability of the neon emission. We also offer a simple model of adsorbed atom mobility that explains much of these observations. And finally, we present a method by which the stability can be greatly improved so that the produced neon beam can be used effectively for nanomachining applications.

  11. Hyperfine-mediated static polarizabilities of monovalent atoms and ions

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Beloy, K.; Derevianko, A.

    2010-12-15

    We apply relativistic many-body methods to compute static differential polarizabilities for transitions inside the ground-state hyperfine manifolds of monovalent atoms and ions. Knowledge of this transition polarizability is required in a number of high-precision experiments, such as microwave atomic clocks and searches for CP-violating permanent electric dipole moments. While the traditional polarizability arises in the second order of interaction with the externally applied electric field, the differential polarizability involves an additional contribution from the hyperfine interaction of atomic electrons with nuclear moments. We derive formulas for the scalar and tensor polarizabilities including contributions from magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole hyperfine interactions. Numerical results are presented for Al, Rb, Cs, Yb{sup +}, Hg{sup +}, and Fr.

  12. Calculation of anomalous scattering for ions and atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; Pratt, R. H.; Roy, S. C.; Kissel, Lynn

    1990-04-01

    The anomalous scattering factors g', g" for forward scattering are generated for neutral Ne and for Ne 2+, 4+, 6+ and 7+ ions, utilizing a dispersion relation integration method, for photon energies from 1 to 70 keV. Photoionization cross sections (i.e., g") above threshold are calculated in the relativistic Hartree-Slater potential; the code of Cromer and Liberman [1] is used to obtained the corresponding bound-free contribution to g' from g". However it is found that the contribution from bound-bound transitions to g' is much more important for ions than for the neutral atom. The primary reason is that in ions there are more inner-shell vacancies for which bound-bound transitions are allowed. Near the K threshold the major bound-bound transition for the neutral neon atom is 1s → 3p, whose oscillator strength is about ten times less than that of 1s → 2p transition which is allowed in neon ions. With the contribution from the major bound-bound transitions included in g', the Rayleigh scattering cross sections obtained in this way agree well with results of direct S-matrix calculations [2].

  13. Atomic layer deposition ultrathin film origami using focused ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supekar, O. D.; Brown, J. J.; Eigenfeld, N. T.; Gertsch, J. C.; Bright, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) micromachining is a powerful tool for maskless lithography and in recent years FIB has been explored as a tool for strain engineering. Ion beam induced deformation can be utilized as a means for folding freestanding thin films into complex 3D structures. FIB of high energy gallium (Ga+) ions induces stress by generation of dislocations and ion implantation within material layers, which create creases or folds upon mechanical relaxation enabled by motion of the material layers. One limitation on such processing is the ability to fabricate flat freestanding thin film structures. This capability is limited by the residual stresses formed during processing and fabrication of the films, which can result in initial curvature and deformation of films upon release from a sacrificial fabrication layer. This paper demonstrates folding in freestanding ultrathin films (<40 nm thin) of heterogeneous composition (metal, insulator, semiconductor, etc) with large lateral dimension structures (aspect ratio >1:1000) by ion-induced stress relaxation. The ultrathin flat structures are fabricated using atomic layer deposition on sacrificial polyimide. We have demonstrated vertical folding with 30 keV Ga+ ions in structures with lateral dimensions varying from 10 to 50 μm.

  14. Atomic layer deposition ultrathin film origami using focused ion beams.

    PubMed

    Supekar, O D; Brown, J J; Eigenfeld, N T; Gertsch, J C; Bright, V M

    2016-12-09

    Focused ion beam (FIB) micromachining is a powerful tool for maskless lithography and in recent years FIB has been explored as a tool for strain engineering. Ion beam induced deformation can be utilized as a means for folding freestanding thin films into complex 3D structures. FIB of high energy gallium (Ga(+)) ions induces stress by generation of dislocations and ion implantation within material layers, which create creases or folds upon mechanical relaxation enabled by motion of the material layers. One limitation on such processing is the ability to fabricate flat freestanding thin film structures. This capability is limited by the residual stresses formed during processing and fabrication of the films, which can result in initial curvature and deformation of films upon release from a sacrificial fabrication layer. This paper demonstrates folding in freestanding ultrathin films (<40 nm thin) of heterogeneous composition (metal, insulator, semiconductor, etc) with large lateral dimension structures (aspect ratio >1:1000) by ion-induced stress relaxation. The ultrathin flat structures are fabricated using atomic layer deposition on sacrificial polyimide. We have demonstrated vertical folding with 30 keV Ga(+) ions in structures with lateral dimensions varying from 10 to 50 μm.

  15. Atomic collisions with 33-TeV lead ions

    SciTech Connect

    Vane, C.R.; Datz, S.; Krause, H.F.

    1996-10-01

    Recent availability of relativistic and ultrarelativistic beams of heavy ions has permitted the first controlled studies of atomic collisions at energies sufficient to measure effects of several new basic phenomena. These include measurements substantiating recently predicted finite nuclear size effects resulting in a reduction in the total electronic energy loss of heavy ions in matter, and measurements of Coulomb collisions in which electrons are excited from the Dirac negative energy continuum. Measurements of total energy loss, free electron-positron pair production, and electron capture from pair production have been recently performed using 33-TeV Pb{sup 82+} ions from the CERN SPS accelerator in Geneva. Results of these studies are presented, along with comparisons with relevant theory.

  16. Structure of the alkali-metal-atom + strontium molecular ions: Towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O.; Guerout, R.

    2011-08-14

    The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold lithium or rubidium atom and a strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

  17. Gas field ion source current stability for trimer and single atom terminated W(111) tips

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Radovan; Wolkow, Robert A.; Pitters, Jason L.

    2012-06-25

    Tungsten W(111) oriented trimer-terminated tips as well as single atom tips, fabricated by a gas and field assisted etching and evaporation process, were investigated with a view to scanning ion microscopy and ion beam writing applications. In particular, ion current stability was studied for helium and neon imaging gases. Large ion current fluctuations from individual atomic sites were observed when a trimer-terminated tip was used for the creation of neon ion beam. However, neon ion current was stable when a single atom tip was employed. No such current oscillations were observed for either a trimer or a single atom tip when imaged with helium.

  18. Spin dynamics and entanglement growth with trapped ions, atoms & molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachenmayer, Johannes; Lanyon, Ben; Roos, Christian; Daley, Andrew; Zhu, Bihui; Rey, Ana Maria

    2014-03-01

    Trapped ions and systems of cold atoms or molecules in optical lattices offer controlled environments to experimentally study non-equilibrium dynamics of many-body quantum spin-models with interactions of varying range. Theoretically calculating dynamics of observables for these experiments is a major challenge both analytically and numerically. In 1D, the growth behavior of the entanglement entropy between different blocks of a many-body state determines whether the evolution of the system can be efficiently simulated on a classical computer or not. In return, the study of entanglement growth can guide experiments to regimes where a quantum simulator can outperform a numerical simulation. Here we present results on the entanglement growth behavior in 1D strings of ions after a quench, and show how the growth depends on the range of the interactions. Furthermore we report on progress on methods for higher dimensional systems. These can be used to model Ramsey-dynamics for current experiments with alkaline earth atoms or polar molecules in optical lattices, or for systems with Rydberg atoms.

  19. Multiple ionization of atoms by highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstikhina, Inga Yu; Shevelko, V. P.

    2015-06-01

    A method is suggested for quickly and easily estimating multiple ionization (MI) cross sections of heavy atoms colliding with highly charged ions, using the independent-particle model (IPM). One-electron ionization probabilities p(b) are calculated using the geometrical model for p(0) values at zero impact parameter b and the relativistic Born approximation for one-electron ionization cross sections. Numerical results of MI cross sections are presented for Ne and Ar atoms colliding with Ar8+, Fe20+, Au24+, Bi67+ and U90+ ions at energies 1 MeV u{}-1-10 GeV u{}-1and compared with available experimental data and CTMC (classical trajectory Monte Carlo) calculations. The present method of calculation describes experimental dependencies of MI cross sections on the number of ejected electrons m within a factor of two to three. Numerical calculations show that at intermediate ion energies E = 1 - 10 MeV u{}-1, the contribution of MI cross sections to the total, i.e. summed over all m values, is quite large ˜35% and decreases with increasing energy.

  20. Use of predissociation to enhance the atomic hydrogen ion fraction in ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jinchoon

    1979-01-01

    A duopigatron ion source is modified by replacing the normal oxide-coated wire filament cathode of the ion source with a hot tungsten oven through which hydrogen gas is fed into the arc chamber. The hydrogen gas is predissociated in the hot oven prior to the arc discharge, and the recombination rate is minimized by hot walls inside of the arc chamber. With the use of the above modifications, the atomic H.sub.1.sup.+ ion fraction output can be increased from the normal 50% to greater than 70% with a corresponding decrease in the H.sub.2.sup.+ and H.sub.3.sup.+ molecular ion fraction outputs from the ion source.

  1. Formation of molecular ions by radiative association of cold trapped atoms and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulieu, Olivier; da Silva, Humberto, Jr.; Aymar, Mireille; Raoult, Maurice

    2015-05-01

    Radiative emission during cold collisions between trapped laser-cooled Rb atoms and alkaline-earth ions (Ca+ , Sr+ , Ba+) and Yb+ are studied theoretically, using accurate effective-core-potential based quantum chemistry calculations of potential energy curves and transition dipole moments of the related molecular ions. Radiative association of molecular ions is predicted to occur for all systems with a cross section two to ten times larger than the radiative charge transfer one. Partial and total rate constants are also calculated and compared to available experiments. Narrow shape resonances are expected, which could be detectable at low temperature with an experimental resolution at the limit of the present standards. Vibrational distributions show that the final molecular ions are not created in their ground state level. Supported by the Marie-Curie ITN ``COMIQ: Cold Molecular Ions at the Quantum limit'' of the EU (#607491).

  2. Observation of a power-law energy distribution in atom-ion hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meir, Ziv; Akerman, Nitzan; Sikorsky, Tomas; Ben-Shlomi, Ruti; Dallal, Yehonatan; Ozeri, Roee

    2016-05-01

    Understanding atom-ion collision dynamics is at the heart of the growing field of ultra-cold atom-ion physics. The naive picture of a hot ion sympathetically-cooled by a cold atomic bath doesn't hold due to the time dependent potentials generated by the ion Paul trap. The energy scale of the atom-ion system is determined by a combination of the atomic bath temperature, the ion's excess micromotion (EMM) and the back action of the atom-ion attraction on the ion's position in the trap. However, it is the position dependent ion's inherent micromotion which acts as an amplifier for the ion's energy during random consecutive collisions. Due to this reason, the ion's energy distribution deviates from Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) characterized by an exponential tail to one with power-law tail described by Tsallis q-exponential function. Here we report on the observation of a strong deviation from MB to Tsallis energy distribution of a trapped ion. In our experiment, a ground-state cooled 88 Sr+ ion is immersed in an ultra-cold cloud of 87 Rb atoms. The energy scale is determined by either EMM or solely due to the back action on the ion position during a collision with an atom in the trap. Energy distributions are obtained using narrow optical clock spectroscopy.

  3. Charge exchange and ionization in hydrogen atom-fully stripped ion collisions in Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Wang, J. G.; He, B.; Qiu, Y. B.; Janev, R. K.

    2007-05-15

    The processes of charge exchange and ionization in collisions of ground state hydrogen atom with fully stripped ions in a weakly coupled plasma are studied by the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method in the collision energy range 10-900 keV/amu. The interparticle interactions are described by the Debye-Hueckel model with inclusion of dynamical effects associated with the projectile velocity. The microcanonical distribution of initial state electronic coordinates and momenta has been determined by inclusion of plasma screening effects. The cross section dependencies on plasma parameters and ion charge and velocity are investigated. It is shown that plasma effects on charge exchange and ionization cross sections are significant and particularly pronounced at low collision velocities. The results of systematic cross section calculations for different values of Debye screening length (in the range 1-50a{sub 0}) and ion charges (in the range 1-14) are presented.

  4. Transferable pseudoclassical electrons for aufbau of atomic ions.

    PubMed

    Ekesan, Solen; Kale, Seyit; Herzfeld, Judith

    2014-06-05

    Generalizing the LEWIS reactive force field from electron pairs to single electrons, we present LEWIS• in which explicit valence electrons interact with each other and with nuclear cores via pairwise interactions. The valence electrons are independently mobile particles, following classical equations of motion according to potentials modified from Coulombic as required to capture quantum characteristics. As proof of principle, the aufbau of atomic ions is described for diverse main group elements from the first three rows of the periodic table, using a single potential for interactions between electrons of like spin and another for electrons of unlike spin. The electrons of each spin are found to distribute themselves in a fashion akin to the major lobes of the hybrid atomic orbitals, suggesting a pointillist description of the electron density. The broader validity of the LEWIS• force field is illustrated by predicting the vibrational frequencies of diatomic and triatomic hydrogen species.

  5. Creation and recovery of a W(111) single atom gas field ion source.

    PubMed

    Pitters, Jason L; Urban, Radovan; Wolkow, Robert A

    2012-04-21

    Tungsten single atom tips have been prepared from a single crystal W(111) oriented wire using the chemical assisted field evaporation and etching method. Etching to a single atom tip occurs through a symmetric structure and leads to a predictable last atom unlike etching with polycrystalline tips. The single atom tip formation procedure is shown in an atom by atom removal process. Rebuilds of single atom tips occur on the same crystalline axis as the original tip such that ion emission emanates along a fixed direction for all tip rebuilds. This preparation method could be utilized and developed to prepare single atom tips for ion source development.

  6. Long-Lived Qubit Memory Using Atomic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Jost, J. D.; Chiaverini, J.; Demarco, B.; Ben-Kish, A.; Blakestad, R. B.; Britton, J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Leibfried, D.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Schaetz, T.; Schmidt, P. O.; Wineland, D. J.

    2005-08-01

    We demonstrate experimentally a robust quantum memory using a magnetic-field-independent hyperfine transition in 9Be+ atomic ion qubits at a magnetic field B≃0.01194 T. We observe that the single physical qubit memory coherence time is greater than 10 s, an improvement of approximately 5 orders of magnitude from previous experiments with 9Be+. We also observe long coherence times of decoherence-free subspace logical qubits comprising two entangled physical qubits and discuss the merits of each type of qubit.

  7. Metallic atoms and ions in comets: Comet Halley 1986 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibadov, S.

    1992-01-01

    The origin of metallic atoms and ions in the cometary comae is investigated theoretically. Two effects are revealed in the comas of bright comets: (1) the Na anomalous type effect is possible within the gas-dust jets of comet P/Halley 1986 3 due to cooling cometary dust by cryogenic gas flow from the nucleus; and (2) the production of ions of refractory elements (Fe(+), Si(+), etc.) at large heliocentric distances is possible in the comas of the Halley type dusty comets due to high-velocity impacts between cometary and zodiacal dust particles. Spectral observations of comets with high sensitivity and spatial resolution are important for studying both comets and interplanetary dust.

  8. Semiempirical Theories of the Affinities of Negative Atomic Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, John W.

    1961-01-01

    The determination of the electron affinities of negative atomic ions by means of direct experimental investigation is limited. To supplement the meager experimental results, several semiempirical theories have been advanced. One commonly used technique involves extrapolating the electron affinities along the isoelectronic sequences, The most recent of these extrapolations Is studied by extending the method to Include one more member of the isoelectronic sequence, When the results show that this extension does not increase the accuracy of the calculations, several possible explanations for this situation are explored. A different approach to the problem is suggested by the regularities appearing in the electron affinities. Noting that the regular linear pattern that exists for the ionization potentials of the p electrons as a function of Z, repeats itself for different degrees of ionization q, the slopes and intercepts of these curves are extrapolated to the case of the negative Ion. The method is placed on a theoretical basis by calculating the Slater parameters as functions of q and n, the number of equivalent p-electrons. These functions are no more than quadratic in q and n. The electron affinities are calculated by extending the linear relations that exist for the neutral atoms and positive ions to the negative ions. The extrapolated. slopes are apparently correct, but the intercepts must be slightly altered to agree with experiment. For this purpose one or two experimental affinities (depending on the extrapolation method) are used in each of the two short periods. The two extrapolation methods used are: (A) an isoelectronic sequence extrapolation of the linear pattern as such; (B) the same extrapolation of a linearization of this pattern (configuration centers) combined with an extrapolation of the other terms of the ground configurations. The latter method Is preferable, since it requires only experimental point for each period. The results agree within

  9. Atomic resolution of Lithium Ions in LiCoO

    SciTech Connect

    Shao-Horn, Yang; Croguennec, Laurence; Delmas, Claude; Nelson, Chris; O'Keefe, Michael A.

    2003-03-18

    LiCoO2 is the most common lithium storage material for lithium rechargeable batteries, used widely to power portable electronic devices such as laptop computers. Lithium arrangements in the CoO2 framework have a profound effect on the structural stability and electrochemical properties of LixCoO2 (0 < x < 1), however, probing lithium ions has been difficult using traditional X-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. Here we have succeeded in simultaneously resolving columns of cobalt, oxygen, and lithium atoms in layered LiCoO2 battery material using experimental focal series of LiCoO2 images obtained at sub-Angstrom resolution in a mid-voltage transmission electron microscope. Lithium atoms are the smallest and lightest metal atoms, and scatter electrons only very weakly. We believe our observations of lithium to be the first by electron microscopy, and that they show promise to direct visualization of the ordering of lithium and vacancy in LixCoO2.

  10. Cycle Time Reduction in Trapped Mercury Ion Atomic Frequency Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric A.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Taghavi, Shervin

    2011-01-01

    The use of the mercury ion isotope (201)Hg(+) was examined for an atomic clock. Taking advantage of the faster optical pumping time in (201)Hg(+) reduces both the state preparation and the state readout times, thereby decreasing the overall cycle time of the clock and reducing the impact of medium-term LO noise on the performance of the frequency standard. The spectral overlap between the plasma discharge lamp used for (201)Hg(+) state preparation and readout is much larger than that of the lamp used for the more conventional (199)Hg(+). There has been little study of (201)Hg(+) for clock applications (in fact, all trapped ion clock work in mercury has been with (199)Hg(+); however, recently the optical pumping time in (201)Hg(+) has been measured and found to be 0.45 second, or about three times faster than in (199)Hg(+) due largely to the better spectral overlap. This can be used to reduce the overall clock cycle time by over 2 seconds, or up to a factor of 2 improvement. The use of the (201)Hg(+) for an atomic clock is totally new. Most attempts to reduce the impact of LO noise have focused on reducing the interrogation time. In the trapped ion frequency standards built so far at JPL, the optical pumping time is already at its minimum so that no enhancement can be had by shortening it. However, by using (201)Hg(+), this is no longer the case. Furthermore, integrity monitoring, the mechanism that determines whether the clock is functioning normally, cannot happen faster than the clock cycle time. Therefore, a shorter cycle time will enable quicker detection of failure modes and recovery from them.

  11. Effects due to adsorbed atoms upon angular and energy distributions of surface produced negative hydrogen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, M.; Bacal, M.; Kasuya, T.; Kato, S.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2013-02-01

    Exposure to Cs added hydrogen discharge makes surface of plasma grid of a negative hydrogen ion source covered with Cs and hydrogen. A Monte-Carlo particle simulation code ACAT was run to evaluate the effects due to adsorbed Cs and H atoms upon the angular and energy distributions of H atoms leaving the surface. Accumulation of H atoms on the surface reduces particle reflection coefficients and the mean energy of backscattered H atoms. Angular distributions of H atoms reflected from the hydrogen covered surface tend to be under-cosine at lower energies. Desorption of adsorbed H atoms is more efficient for hydrogen positive ions than for Cs positive ions at lower incident energy. At higher energy more than 100 eV, Cs ions desorb adsorbed H atoms more efficiently than hydrogen ions.

  12. Energy loss straggling in collisions of fast finite-size ions with atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, D. N.; Matveev, V. I.

    2013-03-01

    The influence of ion size on straggling of energy losses by fast partially stripped ions is studied using the nonperturbative approach based on the eikonal approximation. It is shown that such a consideration of collisions of ions with complex atoms can lead to considerable corrections in calculating root-mean-square straggling of energy losses by fast ions compared to the results obtained for point ions. The root-mean-square straggling of energy losses are calculated for bromide and iodine ions in collisions with copper, silver, and aluminum atoms. It is shown that allowance for the size of the electron "coat" of an ion noticeably improves the agreement with experimental data.

  13. Energy loss straggling in collisions of fast finite-size ions with atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, D. N. Matveev, V. I.

    2013-03-15

    The influence of ion size on straggling of energy losses by fast partially stripped ions is studied using the nonperturbative approach based on the eikonal approximation. It is shown that such a consideration of collisions of ions with complex atoms can lead to considerable corrections in calculating root-mean-square straggling of energy losses by fast ions compared to the results obtained for point ions. The root-mean-square straggling of energy losses are calculated for bromide and iodine ions in collisions with copper, silver, and aluminum atoms. It is shown that allowance for the size of the electron 'coat' of an ion noticeably improves the agreement with experimental data.

  14. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a bibliography for 1991 on the following topics: Atom probe field ion microscopy; field desorption mass spectrometry; field emission; field ion microscopy; and field emission theory.

  15. Method for the production of atomic ion species from plasma ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Spence, David; Lykke, Keith

    1998-01-01

    A technique to enhance the yield of atomic ion species (H.sup.+, D.sup.+, O.sup.+, N.sup.+, etc.) from plasma ion sources. The technique involves the addition of catalyzing agents to the ion discharge. Effective catalysts include H.sub.2 O, D.sub.2 O, O.sub.2, and SF.sub.6, among others, with the most effective being water (H.sub.2 O) and deuterated water (D.sub.2 O). This technique has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory, where microwave generated plasmas have produced ion beams comprised of close to 100% purity protons (H.sup.+) and close to 100% purity deuterons (D.sup.+). The technique also increases the total yield of protons and deuterons by converting unwanted ion species, namely, H.sub.2.sup.+,H.sub.3.sup.+ and D.sub.2.sup.+, D.sub.3.sup.+, into the desired ion species, H.sup.+ and D.sup.+, respectively.

  16. Method for the production of atomic ion species from plasma ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Spence, D.; Lykke, K.

    1998-08-04

    A technique to enhance the yield of atomic ion species (H{sup +}, D{sup +}, O{sup +}, N{sup +}, etc.) from plasma ion sources. The technique involves the addition of catalyzing agents to the ion discharge. Effective catalysts include H{sub 2}O, D{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, and SF{sub 6}, among others, with the most effective being water (H{sub 2}O) and deuterated water (D{sub 2}O). This technique has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory, where microwave generated plasmas have produced ion beams comprised of close to 100% purity protons (H{sup +}) and close to 100% purity deuterons (D{sup +}). The technique also increases the total yield of protons and deuterons by converting unwanted ion species, namely, H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +} and D{sub 2}{sup +}, D{sub 3}{sup +}, into the desired ion species, H{sup +} and D{sup +}, respectively. 4 figs.

  17. Fluctuating Potentials In Micrometer Scale Atomic Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, J.; Seidelin, S.; Chiaverini, J.; Reichle, R.; Bollinger, J. J.; Leibfried, D.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Blakestad, R. B.; Epstein, R. J.; Shiga, N.; Amini, J. M.; Brown, K. R.; Home, J. P.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Wineland, D. J.

    2007-03-01

    Electromagnetic confinement of atomic ion qubits coupled with laser cooling has permitted observation of 10 minute coherence times [1, 2]. Recent work to miniaturize electromagnetic traps promises qubit densities attractive for large scale quantum computing [3]. However, motional heating resulting from poorly understood fluctuating trapping potentials is observed to increase as approximately dimensions-4 [4]. We discuss efforts to suppress this heating and present experimental results for several microtrap fabrication techniques [5, 6]. [1] P. T. H. Fisk et al., IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 44, 113 (1995). [2] J. J. Bollinger et al., IEEE Trans. Instrum. Measurement 40, 126 (1991). [3] A. Steane, quant-ph/0412165. [4] L. Deslauriers et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 103007 (2006). [5] S. Seidelin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 253003 (2006). [6] J. Britton et al., quant-ph/0605170.

  18. Characteristics of flows of energetic atoms reflected from metal targets during ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmichev, A.; Perevertaylo, V.; Tsybulsky, L.; Volpian, O.

    2016-07-01

    Particle number and energy reflection coefficients for energetic neutralized gas ions (Ar and O atoms) backscattered from metal targets during ion bombardment have been calculated using TRIM code. The energy distributions of reflected atoms are computed, too, and their dependence on the primary ion energy and the angle of ion incidence is determined. The obtained data confirm the possibility of employing energetic atoms reflection for generation of high energy neutral beams and point out to take this phenomenon into account under analysis of the ion technology for coating deposition.

  19. ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOMS: AN ADDITIONAL SOURCE FOR HELIOSPHERIC PICKUP IONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bochsler, Peter; Moebius, Eberhard

    2010-09-20

    Recently, Schwadron and McComas discussed the possibility of inner source pickup particles originating from the ionization of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), based on new data from the IBEX mission. This proposition has some interesting features, namely, it might be able to explain why inner source pickup ions (PUIs) have a composition resembling solar abundances and show no indication of overabundance of refractory elements, although this should be expected, if the conventional explanation of solar wind-dust interaction for the origin of this heliospheric component were correct. In this Letter, we explore further consequences for ENA-related PUIs and investigate their velocity distributions. We conclude that this model will not reproduce the observed velocity distributions of inner source PUIs and point out a substantial deviation in their composition. However, it seems likely that the ionization of ENAs as observed with IBEX could contribute a significant amount of heliospheric suprathermal tail ions. Some possible consequences of our investigation for heliospheric particle populations are briefly discussed.

  20. Independent-particle models for light negative atomic ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganas, P. S.; Talman, J. D.; Green, A. E. S.

    1980-01-01

    For the purposes of astrophysical, aeronomical, and laboratory application, a precise independent-particle model for electrons in negative atomic ions of the second and third period is discussed. The optimum-potential model (OPM) of Talman et al. (1979) is first used to generate numerical potentials for eight of these ions. Results for total energies and electron affinities are found to be very close to Hartree-Fock solutions. However, the OPM and HF electron affinities both depart significantly from experimental affinities. For this reason, two analytic potentials are developed whose inner energy levels are very close to the OPM and HF levels but whose last electron eigenvalues are adjusted precisely with the magnitudes of experimental affinities. These models are: (1) a four-parameter analytic characterization of the OPM potential and (2) a two-parameter potential model of the Green, Sellin, Zachor type. The system O(-) or e-O, which is important in upper atmospheric physics is examined in some detail.

  1. Spectr-W3 Online Database On Atomic Properties Of Atoms And Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faenov, A. Ya.; Magunov, A. I.; Pikuz, T. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Loboda, P. A.; Bakshayev, N. N.; Gagarin, S. V.; Komosko, V. V.; Kuznetsov, K. S.; Markelenkov, S. A.

    2002-10-01

    Recent progress in the novel information technologies based on the World-Wide Web (WWW) gives a new possibility for a worldwide exchange of atomic spectral and collisional data. This facilitates joint efforts of the international scientific community in basic and applied research, promising technological developments, and university education programs. Special-purpose atomic databases (ADBs) are needed for an effective employment of large-scale datasets. The ADB SPECTR developed at MISDC of VNIIFTRI has been used during the last decade in several laboratories in the world, including RFNC-VNIITF. The DB SPECTR accumulates a considerable amount of atomic data (about 500,000 records). These data were extracted from publications on experimental and theoretical studies in atomic physics, astrophysics, and plasma spectroscopy during the last few decades. The information for atoms and ions comprises the ionization potentials, the energy levels, the wavelengths and transition probabilities, and, to a lesser extent, -- also the autoionization rates, and the electron-ion collision cross-sections and rates. The data are supplied with source references and comments elucidating the details of computations or measurements. Our goal is to create an interactive WWW information resource based on the extended and updated Web-oriented database version SPECTR-W3 and its further integration into the family of specialized atomic databases on the Internet. The version will incorporate novel experimental and theoretical data. An appropriate revision of the previously accumulated data will be performed from the viewpoint of their consistency to the current state-of-the-art. We are particularly interested in cooperation for storing the atomic collision data. Presently, a software shell with the up-to-date Web-interface is being developed to work with the SPECTR-W3 database. The shell would include the subsystems of information retrieval, input, update, and output in/from the database and

  2. Forward electron production in heavy ion-atom and ion-solid collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I.A.

    1984-01-01

    A sharp cusp in the velocity spectrum of electrons, ejected in ion-atom and ion-solid collisions, is observed when the ejected electron velocity vector v/sub e/ matches that of the emergent ion vector v/sub p/ in both speed and direction. In ion-atom collisions, the electrons originate from capture to low-lying, projectile-centered continuum states (ECC) for fast bare or nearly bare projectiles, and from loss to those low-lying continuum states (ELC) when loosely bound projectile electrons are available. Most investigators now agree that ECC cusps are strongly skewed toward lower velocities, and exhibit full widths half maxima roughly proportional to v/sub p/ (neglecting target-shell effects, which are sometimes strong). A close examination of recent ELC data shows that ELC cusps are instead nearly symmetric, with widths nearly independent on v/sub p/ in the velocity range 6 to 18 a.u., a result only recently predicted by theory. Convoy electron cusps produced in heavy ion-solid collisions at MeV/u energies exhibit approximately velocity-independent widths very similar to ELC cusp widths. While the shape of the convoy peaks is approximately independent of projectile Z, velocity, and of target material, it is found that the yields in polycrystalline targets exhibit a strong dependence on projectile Z and velocity. While attempts have been made to link convoy electron production to binary ECC or ELC processes, sometimes at the last layer, or alternatively to a solid-state wake-riding model, our measured dependences of cusp shape and yield on projectile charge state and energy are inconsistent with the predictions of available theories. 10 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  3. Treatment of Ion-Atom Collisions Using a Partial-Wave Expansion of the Projectile Wavefunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, T. G.; Foster, M.; Colgan, J.; Madison, D. H.

    2009-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge…

  4. Highly charged ions as a basis of optical atomic clockwork of exceptional accuracy.

    PubMed

    Derevianko, Andrei; Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V

    2012-11-02

    We propose a novel class of atomic clocks based on highly charged ions. We consider highly forbidden laser-accessible transitions within the 4f(12) ground-state configurations of highly charged ions. Our evaluation of systematic effects demonstrates that these transitions may be used for building exceptionally accurate atomic clocks which may compete in accuracy with recently proposed nuclear clocks.

  5. Relevant ion time scales for electron impact processes of atoms in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Murillo, M.S.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper a new model for treating collisional atomic processes has been presented. This model simultaneously and self-consistently treats electron and ion processes. For transitions frequencies above the ion plasma frequency, it is argued that little ion motion occurs although the interaction is still strong; the ion microfield perturbs the atom. The electron impact processes may still be described by a DSF between levels of the perturbed atoms, suggesting the name Microfield Stochastic Model (MSM) for this method. Future work will be directed towards refining some of the approximations used here for application to realistic systems.

  6. A single-atom sharp iridium tip as an emitter of gas field ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Hong-Shi; Hwang, Ing-Shouh; Fu, Tsu-Yi; Hwang, Ying-Siang; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Lin, Chun-Yueh; Hou, Jin-Long; Tsong, Tien T.

    2009-08-01

    We report a reliable method for preparing a pure Ir single-atom tip by thermal treatment in oxygen. The atomic structure of the tip apex and its ion emission characteristics are investigated with field ion microscopy. We have shown that the Ir single-atom tip can be a good field ion emitter, capable of emitting a variety of gas ion beams, such as He+, H2+, N2+, and O2+, with high brightness and stability. In addition, this tip can easily be maintained and regenerated in vacuum, ensuring it has sufficient lifetime for practical applications.

  7. Screening-Antiscreening Effect in Ion-Atom Collisions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulskotter, Hans-Peter G.

    1990-01-01

    In a collision between an atomic projectile carrying one or more electrons and a target atom, one of the events that may occur is the ionization of a projectile electron. Projectile ionization, usually called electron loss, is normally attributed to the Coulomb interaction between the target nucleus and projectile electron. The effect of the target electrons can be accounted for partially by introducing a screened Coulomb interaction between the target and the projectile electron. However, the target electrons can not only act coherently as screening agents, but may also act incoherently as ionizing (antiscreening) agents. We have measured the cross sections for projectile K-shell ionization for 0.75 - 3.5 MeV/Nucleon Li^{2+ }, C^{5+}, and O^{7+} projectiles, for projectile electron loss of 100 and 380 MeV/Nucleon Au^{52+} projectiles in collisions with H_2, He, and N _2, and for 380 MeV/N Au^ {75+} projectiles in collisions with H _2 and N_2 targets. We unambiguously demonstrate that for energies where the target electrons have sufficient kinetic energy in the projectile frame to ionize the projectile electron, the electron-electron interaction can lead to a significant increase in the total ionization cross section. The largest relative increase we have been able to observe is 76%. The experimental results generally agree with plane-wave Born approximation calculations by Bates and Griffing and modified by Anholt which take into account the interaction between projectile and target electrons. We also describe the properties of a new target gas cell which has been designed and built for the use at the relativistic heavy-ion accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.

  8. Fine tuning the ionic liquid-vacuum outer atomic surface using ion mixtures.

    PubMed

    Villar-Garcia, Ignacio J; Fearn, Sarah; Ismail, Nur L; McIntosh, Alastair J S; Lovelock, Kevin R J

    2015-03-28

    Ionic liquid-vacuum outer atomic surfaces can be created that are remarkably different from the bulk composition. In this communication we demonstrate, using low-energy ion scattering (LEIS), that for ionic liquid mixtures the outer atomic surface shows significantly more atoms from anions with weaker cation-anion interactions (and vice versa).

  9. Angular Distributions of Sputtered Atoms from Semiconductor Targets at Grazing Ion Beam Incidence Angles

    SciTech Connect

    Sekowski, M.; Burenkov, A.; Martinez-Limia, A.; Hernandez-Mangas, J.; Ryssel, H.

    2008-11-03

    Angular distributions of ion sputtered germanium and silicon atoms are investigated within this work. Experiments are performed for the case of grazing ion incidence angles, where the resulting angular distributions are asymmetrical with respect to the polar angle of the sputtered atoms. The performed experiments are compared to Monte-Carlo simulations from different programs. We show here an improved model for the angular distribution, which has an additional dependence of the ion incidence angle.

  10. Atomic nuclei decay modes by spontaneous emission of heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Ivaşcu, M.; Sndulescu, A.; Greiner, Walter

    1985-08-01

    The great majority of the known nuclides with Z>40, including the so-called stable nuclides, are metastable with respect to several modes of spontaneous superasymmetric splitting. A model extended from the fission theory of alpha decay allows one to estimate the lifetimes and the branching ratios relative to the alpha decay for these natural radioactivities. From a huge amount of systematic calculations it is concluded that the process should proceed with maximum intensity in the trans-lead nuclei, where the minimum lifetime is obtained from parent-emitted heavy ion combinations leading to a magic (208Pb) or almost magic daughter nucleus. More than 140 nuclides with atomic number smaller than 25 are possible candidates to be emitted from heavy nuclei, with half-lives in the range of 1010-1030 s: 5He, 8-10Be, 11,12B, 12-16C, 13-17N, 15-22O, 18-23F, 20-26Ne, 23-28Na, 23-30Mg, 27-32Al, 28-36Si, 31-39P, 32-42S, 35-45Cl, 37-47Ar, 40-49 K, 42-51. . .Ca, 44-53 Sc, 46-53Ti, 48-54V, and 49-55 Cr. The shell structure and the pairing effects are clearly manifested in these new decay modes.

  11. Numerical calculation of ionization in fast ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horbatsch, Marko; Chassid, Michal

    1996-05-01

    Numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in a 1D model and in a realistic 3D setting^1,2 are analyzed to calculate excitation probabilities and differential electron emission probabilities for collisions of fast bare projectiles with hydrogen atoms. The results are tested for the expected scaling behaviour with projectile charge and collision energy. The ionization probabilities are calculated by first projecting out the bound-state contributions from the time-evolved wavefunction and then performing a discrete Fourier transform. Comparison is provided with recent experiments for helium targets using cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy^3. For fast (v=12 au) and highly charged projectiles (Z_p=24) bound-state excitations are dominantly produced at much larger impact parameters than b >= 3 au for which the ionization channel receives its largest contribution. ^1 M. Horbatsch, Phys. Rev. A 44, R5346 (1991) ^2 M. Chassid and M. Horbatsch, J. Phys. B 28,L621 (1995) ^3 R. Moshammer, J. Ullrich, et. al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 3371 (1994).

  12. Atomic-layer-deposition oxide nanoglue for sodium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaogang; Liu, Yang; Jia, Zheng; Chen, Yu-Chen; Wan, Jiayu; Weadock, Nicholas; Gaskell, Karen J; Li, Teng; Hu, Liangbing

    2014-01-08

    Atomic-layer-deposition (ALD) coatings have been increasingly used to improve battery performance. However, the electrochemical and mechanistic roles remain largely unclear, especially for ALD coatings on electrodes that undergo significant volume changes (up to 100%) during charging/discharging. Here we investigate an anode consisting of tin nanoparticles (SnNPs) with an ALD-Al2O3 coating. For the first time, in situ transmission electron microscopy unveiled the dynamic mechanical protection of the ALD-Al2O3 coating by coherently deforming with the SnNPs under the huge volume changes during charging/discharging. Battery tests in coin-cells further showed the ALD-Al2O3 coating remarkably boosts the cycling performance of the Sn anodes, comparing with those made of bare SnNPs. Chemomechanical simulations clearly revealed that a bare SnNP debonds and falls off the underlying substrate upon charging, and by contrast the ALD-Al2O3 coating, like ion-conductive nanoglue, robustly anchors the SnNP anode to the substrate during charging/discharging, a key to improving battery cycle performance.

  13. Atomic force microscope cantilever calibration using a focused ion beam.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Ashley D; Quinton, Jamie S; Gibson, Christopher T

    2012-07-20

    A calibration method is presented for determining the spring constant of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers, which is a modification of the established Cleveland added mass technique. A focused ion beam (FIB) is used to remove a well-defined volume from a cantilever with known density, substantially reducing the uncertainty usually present in the added mass method. The technique can be applied to any type of AFM cantilever; but for the lowest uncertainty it is best applied to silicon cantilevers with spring constants above 0.7 N m(-1), where uncertainty is demonstrated to be typically between 7 and 10%. Despite the removal of mass from the cantilever, the calibration method presented does not impair the probes' ability to acquire data. The technique has been extensively tested in order to verify the underlying assumptions in the method. This method was compared to a number of other calibration methods and practical improvements to some of these techniques were developed, as well as important insights into the behavior of FIB modified cantilevers. These results will prove useful to research groups concerned with the application of microcantilevers to nanoscience, in particular for cases where maintaining pristine AFM tip condition is critical.

  14. Dynamics of a Ground-State Cooled Ion Colliding with Ultracold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meir, Ziv; Sikorsky, Tomas; Ben-shlomi, Ruti; Akerman, Nitzan; Dallal, Yehonatan; Ozeri, Roee

    2016-12-01

    Ultracold atom-ion mixtures are gaining increasing interest due to their potential applications in ultracold and state-controlled chemistry, quantum computing, and many-body physics. Here, we studied the dynamics of a single ground-state cooled ion during few, to many, Langevin (spiraling) collisions with ultracold atoms. We measured the ion's energy distribution and observed a clear deviation from the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, characterized by an exponential tail, to a power-law distribution best described by a Tsallis function. Unlike previous experiments, the energy scale of atom-ion interactions is not determined by either the atomic cloud temperature or the ion's trap residual excess-micromotion energy. Instead, it is determined by the force the atom exerts on the ion during a collision which is then amplified by the trap dynamics. This effect is intrinsic to ion Paul traps and sets the lower bound of atom-ion steady-state interaction energy in these systems. Despite the fact that our system is eventually driven out of the ultracold regime, we are capable of studying quantum effects by limiting the interaction to the first collision when the ion is initialized in the ground state of the trap.

  15. Emulating solid-state physics with a hybrid system of ultracold ions and atoms.

    PubMed

    Bissbort, U; Cocks, D; Negretti, A; Idziaszek, Z; Calarco, T; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Hofstetter, W; Gerritsma, R

    2013-08-23

    We propose and theoretically investigate a hybrid system composed of a crystal of trapped ions coupled to a cloud of ultracold fermions. The ions form a periodic lattice and induce a band structure in the atoms. This system combines the advantages of high fidelity operations and detection offered by trapped ion systems with ultracold atomic systems. It also features close analogies to natural solid-state systems, as the atomic degrees of freedom couple to phonons of the ion lattice, thereby emulating a solid-state system. Starting from the microscopic many-body Hamiltonian, we derive the low energy Hamiltonian, including the atomic band structure, and give an expression for the atom-phonon coupling. We discuss possible experimental implementations such as a Peierls-like transition into a period-doubled dimerized state.

  16. An apparatus for immersing trapped ions into an ultracold gas of neutral atoms.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Stefan; Härter, Arne; Frisch, Albert; Hoinka, Sascha; Denschlag, Johannes Hecker

    2012-05-01

    We describe a hybrid vacuum system in which a single ion or a well-defined small number of trapped ions (in our case Ba(+) or Rb(+)) can be immersed into a cloud of ultracold neutral atoms (in our case Rb). This apparatus allows for the study of collisions and interactions between atoms and ions in the ultracold regime. Our setup is a combination of a Bose-Einstein condensation apparatus and a linear Paul trap. The main design feature of the apparatus is to first separate the production locations for the ion and the ultracold atoms and then to bring the two species together. This scheme has advantages in terms of stability and available access to the region where the atom-ion collision experiments are carried out. The ion and the atoms are brought together using a moving one-dimensional optical lattice transport which vertically lifts the atomic sample over a distance of 30 cm from its production chamber into the center of the Paul trap in another chamber. We present techniques to detect and control the relative position between the ion and the atom cloud.

  17. A New Formula for Energy Spectrum of Sputtered Atoms Due to Low-Energy Light Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Yamamura, Yasunori; Ono, Tadayoshi; Kawamura, Takaichi

    A new formula has been derived to describe the energy spectrum of sputtered atoms from a target material bombarded by light ions. We assume that sputtered atoms bombarded by low-energy light ions are mainly primary knock-on atoms which are created by large-angle backscattered light ions. The escape processes of recoil atoms are estimated on the basis of the Falcone-Sigmund model. The new formula has the dependence on the incident energy of a projectile. We have compared the new formula with simulation results calculated with ACAT code for a Fe target material bombarded by 50eV, 100eV and 500eV D+ ions. Good agreements are found for 50eV and 100eV D+ ions.

  18. Quantum State Control of Trapped Atomic and Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seck, Christopher M.

    Full quantum control of a molecule would have a significant impact in molecular coherent control (alignment and orientation) and ultracold and quantum chemistry, quantum computing and simulation as well as hybrid quantum devices, and precision spectroscopy of importance to fundamental physics research. Precision spectroscopy of even simple diatomic molecules offers the possibility of uncovering physics beyond the standard model, specifically time variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio, which is currently constrained by astronomical molecular observations at the 10-16 1/yr level and laboratory atomic measurements at the 10-17 1/yr level. To achieve this level of measurement and to avoid the complications of diatomic structure on traditional spectroscopy methods, molecular quantum logic spectroscopy (mQLS) will be the spectroscopy technique of choice. We discuss development of in-house external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) systems and improvements to the Libbrecht-Hall circuit, which is a well-known, low-noise current driver for narrow-linewidth diode lasers. However, as the current approaches the maximum set limit, the noise in the laser current increases dramatically. This behavior is documented and simple circuit modifications to alleviate this issue are explored. We cool trapped AlH+ molecules to their ground rotational-vibrational quantum state using an electronically-exciting broadband laser to simultaneously drive cooling resonances from many different rotational levels. We demonstrate rotational cooling on the 140(20) ms timescale from room temperature to 3.8 K, with the ground state population increasing from 3% to 95.4%. Since QLS does not require the high gate fidelities usually associated with quantum computation and quantum simulation, it is possible to make simplifying choices in ion species and quantum protocols at the expense of some fidelity. We demonstrate sideband cooling and motional state detection protocols for 138Ba+ of sufficient fidelity

  19. Two-atom model in enhanced ion backscattering near 180/sup 0/ scattering angles

    SciTech Connect

    Oen, O.S.

    1981-06-01

    The recent discovery by Pronko, Appleton, Holland, and Wilson of an unusual enhancement of the yield of ions backscattered through angles close to 180/sup 0/ from the near surface regions of solids is investigated using a two-atom scattering model. The model predicts an enhancement effect in amorphous solids whose physical origin arises from the tolerance of path for those ions whose inward and outward trajectories lie in the vicinity of the critical impact parameter. Predictions are given of the dependence of the yield enhancement on the following parameters: ion energy, backscattering depth, exit angle, scattering potential, atomic numbers of projectile and target, and atomic density of target.

  20. Level-energy-dependent mean velocities of excited tungsten atoms sputtered by krypton-ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Nogami, Keisuke; Sakai, Yasuhiro; Mineta, Shota; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Furuya, Kenji; Motohashi, Kenji

    2015-11-15

    Visible emission spectra were acquired from neutral atoms sputtered by 35–60 keV Kr{sup +} ions from a polycrystalline tungsten surface. Mean velocities of excited tungsten atoms in seven different 6p states were also obtained via the dependence of photon intensities on the distance from the surface. The average velocities parallel to the surface normal varied by factors of 2–4 for atoms in the different 6p energy levels. However, they were almost independent of the incident ion kinetic energy. The 6p-level energy dependence indicated that the velocities of the excited atoms were determined by inelastic processes that involve resonant charge exchange.

  1. Search for an explanation for neutralization rates of atomic ion-ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Thomas M.; Wiens, Justin P.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Viggiano, Albert A.

    2016-09-01

    We have measured well over a hundred rate coefficients k for cation-anion mutual neutralization reactions at thermal energies. For molecular ions, the k at 300 K tend not to vary more than a factor of two or three, presumably because a great many neutral states cross the incoming Coulombic potential energy curve. Atomic-atomic systems, for which there are few favorable curve crossings between the neutral and Coulombic curves, show variation of at least a factor of 60 in the measured k values at 300 K. For reactions involving the noble-gas cations, we assume that the final state is the lowest excited state of the neutral, plus the ground state of the neutralized anion, because otherwise the crossing distance R is so small that the curve-crossing probability is nil. We plotted measured k values (in cm3/s) vs the distance R (in bohr) at which the neutral and Coulombic curves cross, the found that the data are fairly well fit by a power law for k, 10-4R - 2 . 8 . The question is, is there a physical explanation for the observed dependence on R? We will discuss the data and the expectations of Landau-Zener theory. Supported by Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR-2303EP).

  2. Fragmentation of phosphorylated and singly charged peptide ions via interaction with metastable atoms

    PubMed Central

    Berkout, Vadym D.; Doroshenko, Vladimir M.

    2008-01-01

    Fragmentation of phosphorylated peptide ions via interaction with electronically excited metastable argon atoms was studied in a linear trap – time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Doubly charged ions of phosphorylated peptides from an Enolase digest were produced by electrospray ionization and subjected to a metastable atom beam in the linear trap. The metastable argon atoms were generated using a glow-discharge source. An intensive series of c- and z- ions were observed in all cases, with the phosphorylation group intact. The formation of molecular radical cations with reduced charge indicated that an electron transfer from a highly excited metastable state of argon to the peptide cation occurred. Additionally, singly charged Bradykinin, Substance P and Fibrinopeptide A molecular ions were fragmented via interaction with electronically excited metastable helium atoms. The fragmentation mechanism was different in this case and involved Penning ionization. PMID:19956340

  3. Fragmentation of phosphorylated and singly charged peptide ions via interaction with metastable atoms.

    PubMed

    Berkout, Vadym D; Doroshenko, Vladimir M

    2008-12-01

    Fragmentation of phosphorylated peptide ions via interaction with electronically excited metastable argon atoms was studied in a linear trap - time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Doubly charged ions of phosphorylated peptides from an Enolase digest were produced by electrospray ionization and subjected to a metastable atom beam in the linear trap. The metastable argon atoms were generated using a glow-discharge source. An intensive series of c- and z- ions were observed in all cases, with the phosphorylation group intact. The formation of molecular radical cations with reduced charge indicated that an electron transfer from a highly excited metastable state of argon to the peptide cation occurred. Additionally, singly charged Bradykinin, Substance P and Fibrinopeptide A molecular ions were fragmented via interaction with electronically excited metastable helium atoms. The fragmentation mechanism was different in this case and involved Penning ionization.

  4. Highly charged ions for atomic clocks and search for variation of the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    We review a number of highly charged ions which have optical transitions suitable for building extremely accurate atomic clocks. This includes ions from Hf 12+ to U 34+, which have the 4 f 12 configuration of valence electrons, the Ir 17+ ion, which has a hole in almost filled 4 f subshell, the Ho 14+, Cf 15+, Es 17+ and Es 16+ ions. Clock transitions in most of these ions are sensitive to variation of the fine structure constant, α (α = e2/hbar c). E.g., californium and einsteinium ions have largest known sensitivity to α-variation while holmium ion looks as the most suitable ion for experimental study. We study the spectra of the ions and their features relevant to the use as frequency standards.

  5. Proceedings of the workshop on opportunities for atomic physics using slow, highly-charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The study of atomic physics with highly-charged ions is an area of intense activity at the present time because of a convergence of theoretical interest and advances in experimental techniques. The purpose of the Argonne ''Workshop on Opportunities for Atomic Physics Using Slow, Highly-Charged Ions'' was to bring together atomic, nuclear, and accelerator physicists in order to identify what new facilities would be most useful for the atomic physics community. The program included discussion of existing once-through machines, advanced ion sources, recoil ion techniques, ion traps, and cooler rings. One of the topics of the Workshop was to discuss possible improvement to the ANL Tandem-Linac facility (ATLAS) to enhance the capability for slowing down ions after they are stripped to a high-charge state (the Accel/Decel technique). Another topic was the opportunity for atomic physics provided by the ECR ion source which is being built for the Uranium Upgrade of ATLAS. 18 analytics were prepared for the individual papers in this volume.

  6. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, K.F.; Godfrey, R.D.; Miller, M.K.

    1993-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations of books, conference proceedings, journals, and patents published in 1992 on the following types of microscopy: atom probe field ion microscopy (108 items); field emission microscopy (101 items); and field ion microscopy (48 items). An addendum of 34 items missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  7. Complex decay patterns in atomic core photoionization disentangled by ion-recoil measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guillemin, Renaud; Bomme, Cedric; Marin, Thierry; Journel, Loic; Marchenko, Tatiana; Kushawaha, Rajesh K.; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Simon, Marc; Trcera, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    Following core 1s ionization and resonant excitation of argon atoms, we measure the recoil energy of the ions due to momentum conservation during the emission of Auger electrons. We show that such ion momentum spectroscopy can be used to disentangle to some degree complex decay patterns, involving both radiative and nonradiative decays.

  8. Calculation Of Change-Changing Cross Sections Of IONS Or Atoms Colliding With Fast IONS Using The Classical Trajectory Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D., Shnidman, Ariel, Mebane, Harrison, Davidson, R.C.

    2008-10-10

    Evaluation of ion-atom charge-changing cross sections is needed for many accelerator applications. A classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) simulation has been used to calculate ionization and charge exchange cross sections. For benchmarking purposes, an extensive study has been performed for the simple case of hydrogen and helium targets in collisions with various ions. Despite the fact that the simulation only accounts for classical mechanics, the calculations are comparable to experimental results for projectile velocities in the region corresponding to the vicinity of the maximum cross section. Shortcomings of the CTMC method for multielectron target atoms are discussed.

  9. High efficiency direct detection of ions from resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Young, Charles E.

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for trace and other quantitative analysis with high efficiency of a component in a sample, with the analysis involving the removal by ion or other bombardment of a small quantity of ion and neutral atom groups from the sample, the conversion of selected neutral atom groups to photoions by laser initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, the selective deflection of the photoions for separation from original ion group emanating from the sample, and the detection of the photoions as a measure of the quantity of the component. In some embodiments, the original ion group is accelerated prior to the RIS step for separation purposes. Noise and other interference are reduced by shielding the detector from primary and secondary ions and deflecting the photoions sufficiently to avoid the primary and secondary ions.

  10. High efficiency direct detection of ions from resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Pellin, M.J.; Young, C.E.

    1985-01-16

    A method and apparatus are provided for trace and other quantitative analysis with high efficiency of a component in a sample, with the analysis involving the removal by ion or other bombardment of a small quantity of ion and neutral atom groups from the sample, the conversion of selected neutral atom groups to photoions by laser initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, the selective deflection of the photoions for separation from original ion group emanating from the sample, and the detection of the photoions as a measure of the quantity of the component. In some embodiments, the original ion group is accelerated prior to the RIS step for separation purposes. Noise and other interference are reduced by shielding the detector from primary and secondary ions and deflecting the photoions sufficiently to avoid the primary and secondary ions.

  11. First atomic physics experiments with cooled stored ion beams at the Heidelberg heavy-ion ring TSR

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.; Balykin, V.; Baumann, W.; Berger, J.; Bisoffi, G.; Blatt, P.; Blum, M.; Faulstich, A.; Friedrich, A.; Gerhard, M.; Geyer, C.; Grieser, M.; Grieser, R.; Habs, D.; Heyng, H.W.; Hochadel, B.; Holzer, B.; Huber, G.; Jaeschke, E.; Jung, M.; Karafillidis, A.; Kilgus, G.; Klein, R.; Kraemer, D.; Krause, P.; Krieg, M.; Kuehl, T.; Matl, K.; Mueller, A.; Music, M.; Neumann, R.; Neureither, G.; Ott, W.; Petrich, W.; Povh, B.; Repnow, R.; Schroeder, S.; Schuch, R.; Schwalm, D.; Sigray, P.; Steck, M.; Stokstad, R.; Szmola, E.; Wagner, M.; Wanner, B.; Welti, K.; Zwickler, S. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg Manne Siegbahn Institute , Stockholm Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Giessen, Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung , Darmstadt (Fed

    1990-06-01

    An overview of atomic physics experiments at the heavy ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) is given. Highly charged ions up to fully stripped silicon have been stored at energies between 4 and 12 MeV/u. The enhancement of the beam intensity by stacking, the beam lifetime, and electron cooling of these ion beams are discussed. Radiative and state-selective dielectronic recombination rates of hydrogen-like oxygen ions with free electrons from the electron cooler were measured. Beam noise spectra are being investigated with regard to collective effects caused by the Coulomb interaction in the cold ion beams. Resonance fluorescence from stored single-charged ions was observed using tunable narrow-band lasers. First indications of laser cooling in a storage ring were seen.

  12. PREFACE: Heavy-Ion Spectroscopy and QED Effects in Atomic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Ingvar; Martinson, Indrek; Schuch, Reinhold

    1993-01-01

    Experimental studies of heavy and highly charged ions have made remarkable progress in recent years. Today it is possible to produce virtually any ion up to hydrogen-like uranium; to study collisions of those ions with atoms, electrons, and solid surfaces; to excite such an ion and accurately measure the radiation emitted. This progress is largely due to the development of new experimental methods, for instance, the high-energy ion accelerators, laser-produced plasmas, advanced ion sources and ion traps (such as EBIS, EBIT, ECR, etc.), high temperature magnetically confined plasmas and heavy-ion storage rings. The motivations for studies of collisions with highly charged ions and for the understanding of the structure of heavy atomic systems are multi-faceted. Besides of the basic scientific aspects which are mainly the subject of this symposium, much incentive is experienced by applications, e.g., the interpretation of spectra from space (solar corona, solar flares and hot stars), the modelling of stellar atmospheres, the diagnostics of fusion plasma impurities, and the development of X-ray lasers. Since quite some time highly charged ions play a key role for high-precision metrology of atomic structure. These studies have been benchmarks for tests of advanced theories, including many-body theories of interelectronic correlations, relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic (QED) effects, effects due to the finite size of the nucleus and to parity non-conservation (PNC). The interest in QED effects in heavy ions has increased drastically in the last few years. The remarkable experiment on Li-like uranium, recently reported from Berkeley, has stimulated several groups to perform very accurate Lamb-shift calculations on such systems, and reports from three groups were given about such work. The agreement between the calculations as well as with experiment was generally very good, which implies that the problem of evaluating the first-order Lamb shift for any element is

  13. Rayleigh x-ray scattering from many-electron atoms and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhykov, A.; Yerokhin, V. A.; Stöhlker, Th; Fritzsche, S.

    2015-07-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented for the elastic Rayleigh scattering of x-rays by many-electron atoms and ions. Special emphasis is placed on the angular distribution and linear polarization of the scattered photons for the case when the incident light is completely (linearly) polarized. Based on second-order perturbation theory and the independent particle approximation, we found that the Rayleigh angular distribution is strongly affected by the charge state and shell structure of the target ions or atoms. This effect can be observed experimentally at modern synchrotron facilities and might provide further insight into the structure of heavy atomic systems.

  14. Atom probe field-ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Hawkins, A.R.

    1989-10-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: field-ion microscopy (FIM), field emission microscopy (FEM), atom probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM), and liquid metal ion sources (LMIS). Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles.

  15. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Hawkins, A.R.; Russell, K.F.

    1990-12-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion spectroscopy (FIM), field emission microscopy (FEM), liquid metal ion sources (LMIS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and theory. Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. This bibliography covers the period 1989. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications.

  16. Atomic physics with highly charged ions. Progress report, 15 September 1984-14 September 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, P.

    1985-09-01

    Advances are reported in the two areas of primary research: low-energy ion-atom collisions using secondary ion recoil sources, SIRS, and high-energy ion-atom collisions using the tandem Van de Graaff accelerator beams. We have investigated the feasibility of accel-decel with a tandem plus superconducting LINAC with great success, and we have continued to work on the designs of a stand-alone CRYEBIS and a superconducting Nb split-ring resonator LINAC as an appropriate booster for the EN tandem.

  17. New source of MeV negative ion and neutral atom beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Braenzel, J.; Schnürer, M.; Prasad, R.; Borghesi, M.; Jequier, S.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2016-02-15

    The scenario of “electron-capture and -loss” was recently proposed for the formation of negative ion and neutral atom beams with MeV kinetic energies. However, it does not explain why the formation of negative ions in a liquid spray is much more efficient than with an isolated atom. The role of atomic excited states in the charge-exchange processes is considered, and it is shown that it cannot account for the observed phenomena. The processes are more complex than the single electron-capture and -loss approach. It is suggested that the shell effects in the electronic structure of the projectile ion and/or target atoms may influence the capture/loss probabilities.

  18. Treatment of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, M; Colgan, J; Wong, T G; Madison, D H

    2008-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge scattering quantities. Here we show that such calculations are possible using modern high-performance computing. We demonstrate the utility of our method by examining elastic scattering of protons by hydrogen and helium atoms, problems familiar to undergraduate students of atomic scattering. Application to ionization of helium using partial-wave expansions of the projectile wavefunction, which has long been desirable in heavy-ion collision physics, is thus quite feasible.

  19. Metal vapor target for precise studies of ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W. Vorobyev, G.; Herfurth, F.; Hillenbrand, P.-M.; Spillmann, U.; Guo, D.; Trotsenko, S.; Gumberidze, A.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2014-05-15

    Although different ion-atom collisions have been studied in various contexts, precise values of cross-sections for many atomic processes were seldom obtained. One of the main uncertainties originates from the value of target densities. In this paper, we describe a unique method to measure a target density precisely with a combination of physical vapor deposition and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. This method is preliminarily applied to a charge transfer cross-section measurement in collisions between highly charged ions and magnesium vapor. The final relative uncertainty of the target density is less than 2.5%. This enables the precise studies of atomic processes in ion-atom collisions, even though in the trial test the deduction of precise capture cross-sections was limited by other systematic errors.

  20. Autoionization of He atoms by partially stripped ion impact

    SciTech Connect

    Otranto, S.; Olson, R.E.

    2005-08-15

    A study of the autoionization process induced by partially stripped ion impact is performed. Electron spectra in momentum space are predicted within a classical model for partially stripped ions. The results are compared with those obtained for pure Coulomb-like projectiles. A quantum-mechanical extension of the Barrachina-Macek model is proposed for partially stripped projectiles. Structure on the electron angular distribution arising in quantum and classical treatments is identified and compared. The presence of rainbow scattering interference is observed in the binary ring profile of the outgoing autoionized electrons for positive-ion impact.

  1. Atomic Physics Effects on Convergent, Child-Langmuir Ion Flow between Nearly Transparent Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Santarius, John F.; Emmert, Gilbert A.

    2013-11-07

    Research during this project at the University of Wisconsin Fusion Technology Institute (UW FTI) on ion and neutral flow through an arbitrary, monotonic potential difference created by nearly transparent electrodes accomplished the following: (1) developed and implemented an integral equation approach for atomic physics effects in helium plasmas; (2) extended the analysis to coupled integral equations that treat atomic and molecular deuterium ions and neutrals; (3) implemented the key deuterium and helium atomic and molecular cross sections; (4) added negative ion production and related cross sections; and (5) benchmarked the code against experimental results. The analysis and codes treat the species D0, D20, D+, D2+, D3+, D and, separately at present, He0 and He+. Extensions enhanced the analysis and related computer codes to include He++ ions plus planar and cylindrical geometries.

  2. Neutral atomic oxygen beam produced by ion charge exchange for Low Earth Orbital (LEO) simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce; Rutledge, Sharon; Brdar, Marko; Olen, Carl; Stidham, Curt

    1987-01-01

    A low energy neutral atomic oxygen beam system was designed and is currently being assembled at the Lewis Research Center. The system utilizes a 15 cm diameter Kaufman ion source to produce positive oxygen ions which are charge exchange neutralized to produce low energy (variable from 5 to 150 eV) oxygen atoms at a flux simulating real time low Earth orbital conditions. An electromagnet is used to direct only the singly charged oxygen ions from the ion source into the charge exchange cell. A retarding potential grid is used to slow down the oxygen ions to desired energies prior to their charge exchange. Cryogenically cooled diatomic oxygen gas in the charge exchange cell is then used to transfer charge to the oxygen ions to produce a neutral atomic oxygen beam. Remaining non-charge exchanged oxygen ions are then swept from the beam by electromagnetic or electrostatic deflection depending upon the desired experiment configuration. The resulting neutral oxygen beam of 5 to 10 cm in diameter impinges upon target materials within a sample holder fixture that can also provide for simultaneous heating and UV exposure during the atomic oxygen bombardment.

  3. Atomic-scale thermocapillary flow in focused ion beam milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Kallol; Johnson, Harley; Freund, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    Focused ion beams (FIB) offer an attractive tool for nanometer-scale manufacturing and material processing, particularly because they can be focused to a few nanometer diameter spot. This motivates their use for many applications, such as sample preparation for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), forming nanometer scale pores in thin films for DNA sequencing. Despite its widespread use, the specific mechanisms of FIB milling, especially at high ion fluxes for which significant phase change might occur, remains incompletely understood. Here we investigate the process of nanopore fabrication in thin Si films using molecular dynamics simulation where Ga+ ions are used as the focused ions. For a range of ion intensities in a realistic configuration, a recirculating melt region develops, which is seen to flow with a symmetrical pattern, counter to how it would flow were it is driven by the ion momentum flux. Such flow is potentially important for the shape and composition of the formed structures. Relevant stress scales and estimated physical properties of silicon under these extreme conditions support the importance thermocapillary effects. A continuum flow model with Marangoni forcing reproduces the flow.

  4. Direct detection of atomic ions from molecular photofragmentation during nonresonant multiphoton ionization of sputtered species

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, S.R.; Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J.; Burnett, J.W.; White, J.M.

    1993-09-01

    The photoionization of sputtered Cu, Al, and Ru atoms and dimers was investigated by measuring velocity distributions using both resonant and nonresonant photoionization. Nonresonant ionization produced an atomic distribution that peaked at the same velocity as the respective dimer distribution, indicating that virtually all the nonresonant atomic ion signal is from photofragmented dimers. Various mechanisms of dimer photofragmentation are discussed. Domination of the atomic photoion channel by molecule fragmentation appears to be a general phenomenon that must be accounted for in all gas-phase multiphoton nonresonant ionization experiments at easily achievable laser power densities ({le} 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}).

  5. Improved atomic model for charge transfer in multielectron ion-atom collisions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. D.; Tunnell, L. N.

    1980-07-01

    Electron capture to the K shell of projectiles from the K and other subshells of multielectron target atoms is studied in the intermediate energy region using the single-active-electron approximation and the two-state, two-center atomic eigenfunction expansion method. It is concluded that the theoretical capture cross section is not sensitive to the atomic models used at high collision energies where the projectile velocity v is near or greater than the orbital velocity ve of the active electron. For vatomic potential such as the Herman-Skillman potential is needed to represent the target atom. The insufficiency of various simple Coulomb model potentials is illustrated. Capture cross sections for a few collision systems are obtained and compared with experimental data when available to illustrate the reliability of the present model.

  6. Determination of Optimum Conditions for Distinguishing the Pulse Height Distributions of Atomic and Polyatomic Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kristo, M J

    2006-12-12

    This work explored the use of pulse height distributions (PHD) from multiplier-type detectors as a means of detecting and eliminating the effects of polyatomic interferences in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). We explored the behavior of PHD for {sup 235}U{sup +}, {sup 208}Pb{sup 27}Al{sup +} and {sup 207}Pb{sup 28}Si{sup +}, all with a nominal mass-to-charge ratio of 235. In every case, the distribution for the atomic ion ({sup 235}U{sup +}) was clearly shifted relative to the distributions for {sup 208}Pb{sup 27}Al{sup +} and {sup 207}Pb{sup 28}Si{sup +}. When the first surface of the detector is metallic in character, the polyatomic ions are shifted to larger pulse heights relative to the atomic ion. When the first surface of the detector is oxide in character, the atomic ion is shifted to larger pulse heights relative to the polyatomic ions. The relative positioning appear to be stable for a given detector over time at the same secondary ion impact energy. Consequently, it appears to be feasible to use PHD data to detect interfering polyatomic ions and eliminate their deleterious effects using peak deconvolution techniques. Consequently, the updated Ultrafast RAE detector will be designed to make the pulse height information available to the data acquisition system.

  7. Hybrid ion-atom trap for studying ultra-cold collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Oleg P.; Lin, Jian; Smith, W. W.

    2003-05-01

    We built an apparatus for studying ultra-cold collisions between atoms and atomic or molecular ions. Atomic sodium vapor is produced from getters in the ultra-high vacuum chamber. The atoms are trapped in a vapor-cell magneto-optical trap (MOT) by capturing a low-velocity component of a thermal distribution into the region between two anti-Helmholtz coils. A localized cloud of cold Na atoms was successfully generated for MOT types I and II. The cooling transitions were stimulated by the red-detuned Na D2 line emission from a single-frequency stabilized ring-dye laser. The repumping frequency was generated by an electro-optical modulator (EOM) at 1.712 GHz. The loading time constant, ˜ 500 ms, was measured from the fluorescence intensity increase when the magnetic field is suddenly turned on. A linear Paul ion trap, centered on the MOT, is designed to trap Ca^+ ions, produced by electronic bombardment of neutral calcium atoms from a tube oven. A detector is provided for product ions from charge-transfer collisions or photoassociative ionization. We are testing the various components of the completed apparatus. This work is supported by NSF grant # PHY-9988215 and in part by the University of CT Research Foundation.

  8. Atomic-scale thermocapillary flow in focused ion beam milling

    SciTech Connect

    Das, K.; Johnson, H. T.; Freund, J. B.

    2015-05-15

    Focused ion beams provide a means of nanometer-scale manufacturing and material processing, which is used for applications such as forming nanometer-scale pores in thin films for DNA sequencing. We investigate such a configuration with Ga{sup +} bombardment of a Si thin-film target using molecular dynamics simulation. For a range of ion intensities in a realistic configuration, a recirculating melt region develops, which is seen to flow with a symmetrical pattern, counter to how it would flow were it driven by the ion momentum flux. Such flow is potentially important for the shape and composition of the formed structures. Relevant stress scales and estimated physical properties of silicon under these extreme conditions support the importance thermocapillary effects. A flow model with Marangoni forcing, based upon the temperature gradient and geometry from the atomistic simulation, indeed reproduces the flow and thus could be used to anticipate such flows and their influence in applications.

  9. Distribution of Boron Atoms in Ion Implanted Compound Semiconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-22

    The nondestructive neutron depth profiling (NDP) technique has been used to measure the boron (10B) distributions in GaAs, CdTe, Hg0.7Cd0.3Te, and Hg0.85Mn0.15Te after multiple energy ion implants. The NDP results are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical ion ranges obtained from Monte Carlo computer simulations. Only minor changes in the boron profiles were seen for the chosen annealing conditions. Keywords

  10. Simultaneous ejection of two molecular ions from keV gold atomic and polyatomic projectile impacts.

    PubMed

    Rickman, R D; Verkhoturov, S V; Parilis, E S; Schweikert, E A

    2004-01-30

    We present the first experimental data on the simultaneous ejection of two molecular ions from the impact of Au(+)(n) (1< or =n< or =4) with energies ranging between 17 and 56 keV. The yields from single phenylalanine (Ph) emission, coemission of two Ph ions, and emission of the Ph dimer were measured. Large increases (1 to 2 orders of magnitude) in coemitted ion yields were observed with increasing projectile energy and complexity. Correlation coefficients were calculated for the coemission of two Ph ions; their behavior suggests differences in emission pathways for bombardment by atomic and polyatomic projectiles.

  11. Energetic neutral atoms emitted from ice by ion bombardment under Ganymede surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieser, Martin; Barabash, Stas; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Wurz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Magnetospheric or solar wind ions directly interacting with a planetary surface result in backscattering or sputtering of energetic neutral atoms. One example is the solar wind interaction with the surface of the Moon, where the produced energetic neutral atoms were observed by the Sub-keV Atom Reflecting Analyzer instrument (SARA) on Chandrayaan-1. At Jupiter, magnetospheric plasma interacts in a similar way with the surface of the Galilean moons. However, the emission of energetic neutral atoms from "dirty" ices as found e.g. on Ganymede's surface is poorly understood. We set up an experiment to study the ion to surface interaction under Ganymede surface environment conditions using the unique capabilities of the MEFISTO test facility at University of Bern. Ions of various species and energies up to 33 keV/q were impacted on a block of ice made from a mixture of water, NaCl and dry ice. The energetic neutral atoms produced by the interaction were detected with the prototype of the Jovian Neutrals Analyzer instrument (JNA.) JNA is proposed as part of the Particle Environment Package (PEP) for ESA's JUICE mission to Jupiter and instrument is based on the Energetic Energetic Neutral Atom instrument (ENA) built for the BepiColombo Magnetospheric Orbiter. We present energy spectra for different ion beam species and energetic neutral atom species combinations. The data show high yields for energetic neutral atoms up to the upper end of the instrument energy range of 3.3 keV. The energy spectra of the neutral atom flux emitted from the ice could only partially be fitted by the Sigmund-Thompson formula. In some cases, but not all, a Maxwellian distribution provides a reasonable description of the data.

  12. New atomic data for the FeXII coronal ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binello, A. M.; Mason, H. E.; Storey, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    Various FeXII spectroscopic lines in the UV and EUV range have been proved to be ideal diagnostic tools for measuring electron temperature, density and iron abundance in the solar corona. In the framework of the ``IRON PROJECT'' we have provided improved theoretical calculations of the atomic data required to analyse the intensity of these lines and to apply the results to SOHO (Solar Heliospheric Observatory) observations. Extensive configuration interaction and relativistic effects have been allowed for in the atomic structure computations which have provided energy levels and an extensive set of radiative data. The e-FeXII collisional problem has been tackled with the multichannel R-matrix method, a close-coupling calculation for the determination of electron impact collision strengths. Final results are presented for FeXII thermally averaged collision strengths, for fine-structure forbidden transitions within the ground configuration.

  13. Atoms and Ions Interacting with Particles and Fields: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Robicheaux, Francis

    2014-09-18

    This grant supported research in basic atomic, molecular and optical physics related to the interactions of atoms with particles and fields. The duration of the grant was the 10 year period from 8/2003 to 8/2013. All of the support from the grant was used to pay salaries of the PI, postdocs, graduate students, and undergraduates and travel to conferences and meetings. The results were in the form of publications in peer reviewed journals. There were 65 peer reviewed publications over these 10 years with 8 of the publications in Physical Review Letters; all of the other articles were in respected peer reviewed journals (Physical Review A, New Journal of Physics, Journal of Physics B, ...). I will disuss the results for the periods of time relevant for each grant period.

  14. Preparation and Analysis of Atom Probe Tips by Xenon Focused Ion Beam Milling.

    PubMed

    Estivill, Robert; Audoit, Guillaume; Barnes, Jean-Paul; Grenier, Adeline; Blavette, Didier

    2016-06-01

    The damage and ion distribution induced in Si by an inductively coupled plasma Xe focused ion beam was investigated by atom probe tomography. By using predefined patterns it was possible to prepare the atom probe tips with a sub 50 nm end radius in the ion beam microscope. The atom probe reconstruction shows good agreement with simulated implantation profiles and interplanar distances extracted from spatial distribution maps. The elemental profiles of O and C indicate co-implantation during the milling process. The presence of small disc-shaped Xe clusters are also found in the three-dimensional reconstruction. These are attributed to the presence of Xe nanocrystals or bubbles that open during the evaporation process. The expected accumulated dose points to a loss of >95% of the Xe during analysis, which escapes undetected.

  15. Formation of a Multi-Charged Plasma in the Directed Gas Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, I. S.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Shalashov, A. G.

    2016-05-01

    We consider a gas-dynamic model describing the formation of a plasma with multiply ionized ions under the conditions of resonant heating of the electron component. Based on the isothermal approximation, possible regimes of the plasma flow are classified, the influence of the geometric divergence of the flow on the formation of the ion charge distribution is studied, and optimal regimes for the achievement of the maximum ion charge are identified. The model can be used for optimization and interpretation of modern experiments on generation of the extreme ultraviolet radiation due to the excitation of lines of multiply ionized atoms in a gas flow heated by strong millimeter or submillimeter waves.

  16. Cohesive energy effects on the atomic transport induced by ion beam mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, G. S.; Jung, S. M.; Song, J. H.; Kim, H. B.; Woo, J. J.; Byun, D. H.; Whang, C. N.

    1997-01-01

    Atomic transport in the radiation enhanced diffusion (RED) region has been studied from the shifts of a marker layer in ion beam mixed {Pd}/{Co} and {Pd}/{Au} bilayers. 80 keV Ar + with a dose of 1.5 × 10 16 ions/cm 2 were irradiated into the bilayers at temperature region from 90 K to 700 K. In the {Pd}/{Co} system, the atomic flux of Pd ( JPd) transported across the interface is nearly same with JCo in the thermal spike region, while JPd is always larger than JCo in the RED regio However, in the {Pd}/{Au} system, JPd is nearly same with JAu in both of the thermal spike and RED regions. We have developed a model to describe the atomic transport in the RED region, which predicts that the atom with small cohesive energy has more mobility than that with large cohesive energy.

  17. Parity nonconservation in odd isotopes of single trapped atomic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, B. K.; Mandal, P.; Mukherjee, M.

    2011-03-15

    We have estimated the size of the light shifts due to parity-nonconservation (PNC) interactions in different isotopes of Ba{sup +} and Ra{sup +} ions based on the work of Fortson [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 2383 (1993)]. We have used the nuclear-spin-independent (NSI) amplitudes calculated earlier by us [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 163003 (2006); Phys. Rev. A 78, 050501(R) (2008)], and we have employed the third-order many-body perturbation theory [MBPT(3)] in this work to estimate the nuclear-spin-dependent (NSD) amplitudes in these ions. Ra{sup +} is found to be more favorable than Ba{sup +} for measuring both the NSI and NSD PNC observables.

  18. A new trapped ion atomic clock based on 201Hg+.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric A; Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2010-03-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy has been performed on the ground-state hyperfine transitions in trapped (201)Hg+ ions as part of a program to investigate the viability of (201)Hg+ for clock applications. Part of the spectroscopy work was directed at magnetic-field-sensitive hyperfine lines with delta m(F) = 0, which allow accurate Doppler-free measurement of the magnetic field experienced by the trapped ions. Although it is possible to measure Doppler-free magnetic-field-sensitive transitions in the commonly used clock isotope, (199)Hg+, it is more difficult. In this paper, we discuss how this (199)Hg+ feature may be exploited to produce a more stable clock or one requiring less magnetic shielding in environments with magnetic field fluctuations far in excess of what is normally found in the laboratory. We have also determined that in discharge-lamp-based trapped mercury ion clocks, the optical pumping time for (201)Hg+ is about 3 times shorter than that of (199)Hg+ This can be used to reduce dead time in the interrogation cycle for these types of clocks, thereby reducing the impact of local oscillator noise aliasing effects.

  19. The use of 133 Ba+ as a new candidate for trapped atomic ion qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hucul, David; Christiansen, Justin; Campbell, Wesley; Hudson, Eric

    2016-05-01

    Trapped atomic ions are qubit standards in quantum information science because of their long coherence times and high fidelity entangling gates. Many different atomic ions have been used as qubits, each with strengths and weaknesses dictated by its atomic structure. We propose to use 133 Ba+ as an atomic qubit. 133 Ba+ is a nearly ideal, all-purpose candidate by combining many of the strengths of different workhorse atomic ions. 133 Ba+, like 171 Yb+, has a nuclear spin 1/2, allowing for a robust hyperfine qubit with simple state preparation and readout via differential fluorescence. The lack of a low-lying F-state, like in Ca+, simplifies high-fidelity qubit state detection that relies on shelving a qubit level to a meta-stable excited state. In addition, 133 Ba+ can be used for background-free qubit state detection where the wavelength of the qubit detection light differs from all excitation light by at least 50 THz. Unlike all other ions in use, the optical transitions of barium are in the visible spectrum, enabling the use of high power lasers, low-loss fibers, high quantum efficiency detectors, and other technologies developed for visible wavelengths of light to ease some requirements toward scaling a quantum system.

  20. Ionization of hydrogen atoms by multiply charged ions at low energies: The scaling law

    SciTech Connect

    Janev, R.K.; Ivanovski, G.; Solov'ev, E.A. Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, St. Cyril and Methodius University, P.O. Box 162, 91000 Skopje, Macedonia )

    1994-02-01

    Using the adiabatic superpromotion model of low-energy atomic collisions, a simple scaling relationship is derived for the ionization cross section of hydrogen atoms colliding with multiply charged ions. Detailed ionization-cross-section calculations for the systems H(1[ital s])+He[sup 2+], C[sup 6+], and O[sup 8+] have been performed and used to determine three numerical constants in the cross-section-scaling relationship. The scaled cross section represents well the available data for fully stripped ions with charge [ital Z][ge]2 in the energy region below the cross-section maximum.

  1. State-selective charge transfer cross sections for light ion impact of atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D. R.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Havener, C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the utility of diagnosing plasma properties such as impurity concentration and spatial distribution, and plasma temperature and rotation, by detection of photon emission following capture of electrons from atomic hydrogen to excited states of multiply charged ions, new calculations of state-selective charge transfer involving light ions have been carried out using the atomic orbital close-coupling and the classical trajectory Monte Carlo methods. By comparing these with results of other approaches applicable in a lower impact energy regime, and by benchmarking them using key experimental data, knowledge of the cross sections can be made available across the range parameters needed by fusion plasma diagnostics.

  2. Observation of the continuous stern-gerlach effect on an electron bound in an atomic Ion

    PubMed

    Hermanspahn; Haffner; Kluge; Quint; Stahl; Verdu; Werth

    2000-01-17

    We report on the first observation of the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect on an electron bound in an atomic ion. The measurement was performed on a single hydrogenlike ion ( 12C5+) in a Penning trap. The measured g factor of the bound electron, g = 2.001 042(2), is in excellent agreement with the theoretical value, confirming the relativistic correction at a level of 0.1%. This proves the possibility of g-factor determinations on atomic ions to high precision by using the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect. The result demonstrates the feasibility of conducting experiments on single heavy highly charged ions to test quantum electrodynamics in the strong electric field of the nucleus.

  3. Forging Fast Ion Conducting Nanochannels with Swift Heavy Ions: The Correlated Role of Local Electronic and Atomic Structure

    DOE PAGES

    Sachan, Ritesh; Cooper, Valentino R.; Liu, Bin; ...

    2016-12-19

    Atomically disordered oxides have attracted significant attention in recent years due to the possibility of enhanced ionic conductivity. However, the correlation between atomic disorder, corresponding electronic structure, and the resulting oxygen diffusivity is not well understood. The disordered variants of the ordered pyrochlore structure in gadolinium titanate (Gd2Ti2O7) are seen as a particularly interesting prospect due to intrinsic presence of a vacant oxygen site in the unit atomic structure, which could provide a channel for fast oxygen conduction. In this paper, we provide insights into the subangstrom scale on the disordering-induced variations in the local atomic environment and its effectmore » on the electronic structure in high-energy ion irradiation-induced disordered nanochannels, which can be utilized as pathways for fast oxygen ion transport. With the help of an atomic plane-by-plane-resolved analyses, the work shows how the presence of various types of TiOx polyhedral that exist in the amorphous and disordered crystalline phase modify the electronic structures relative to the ordered pyrochlore phase in Gd2Ti2O7. Finally, the correlated molecular dynamics simulations on the disordered structures show a remarkable enhancement in oxygen diffusivity as compared with ordered pyrochlore lattice and make that a suitable candidate for applications requiring fast oxygen conduction.« less

  4. Forging Fast Ion Conducting Nanochannels with Swift Heavy Ions: The Correlated Role of Local Electronic and Atomic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sachan, Ritesh; Cooper, Valentino R.; Liu, Bin; Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Voas, Brian K.; Lang, Maik; Ou, Xin; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Weber, William J.

    2016-12-19

    Atomically disordered oxides have attracted significant attention in recent years due to the possibility of enhanced ionic conductivity. However, the correlation between atomic disorder, corresponding electronic structure, and the resulting oxygen diffusivity is not well understood. The disordered variants of the ordered pyrochlore structure in gadolinium titanate (Gd2Ti2O7) are seen as a particularly interesting prospect due to intrinsic presence of a vacant oxygen site in the unit atomic structure, which could provide a channel for fast oxygen conduction. In this paper, we provide insights into the subangstrom scale on the disordering-induced variations in the local atomic environment and its effect on the electronic structure in high-energy ion irradiation-induced disordered nanochannels, which can be utilized as pathways for fast oxygen ion transport. With the help of an atomic plane-by-plane-resolved analyses, the work shows how the presence of various types of TiOx polyhedral that exist in the amorphous and disordered crystalline phase modify the electronic structures relative to the ordered pyrochlore phase in Gd2Ti2O7. Finally, the correlated molecular dynamics simulations on the disordered structures show a remarkable enhancement in oxygen diffusivity as compared with ordered pyrochlore lattice and make that a suitable candidate for applications requiring fast oxygen conduction.

  5. Atomic physics with highly charged ions: Progress report, 15 August 1985--14 August 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, P.

    1988-08-01

    The study of inelastic collision phenomena with highly charged projectile ions and the interpretation of spectral features resulting from these collisions remain as the major focal points in the atomic physics research at the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas. The title of the research project ''Atomic Physics with Highly Charged Ions'' speaks to these points. The experimental work is made possible locally by the use of relatively high velocity, highly charged projectiles (v typically 5% c) as obtained from the 6 MV tandem Van de Graaff accelerator. The work in the past few years has divided into collisions at high velocity using the primary beams from the accelerator and collisions at low velocity using secondary beams (recoil ions produced in a high velocity collision) in a so-called SIRS (Secondary Ion Recoil Source) geometry. Theoretical calculations have been performed to accurately describe inelastic scattering processes of the one-electron and many-electron type, and to accurately predict atomic transition energies and intensities for x-rays and Auger electrons. Correlation effects and polarization phenomena in ion-atom collisions have been investigated.

  6. The Spectr-W3 database on the spectroscopic properties of atoms and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, I. Yu.; Loboda, P. A.; Gagarin, S. V.; Ivliev, S. V.; Kozlov, A. I.; Morozov, S. V.; Pikuz, S. A.; Pikuz, T. A.; Popova, V. V.; Faenov, A. Ya.

    2016-04-01

    The Spectr-W3 database was developed in 2001-2013 and is available online (http://spectrw3. snz.ru). The database contains information on various spectroscopic constants of atoms and ions such as the wavelengths and probabilities of radiative transitions, energy levels of atoms and ions, ionization potentials, autoionization rates, and the parameters of analytical approximation of cross sections and rates of collisional transitions in atoms and ions. Spectr-W3 presently contains around 450 thousand records and is the world's largest factual database on spectral properties of multicharged ions. A new stage of development of Spectr-W3, which involves adding a new section titled "Emission Spectrograms" to the database, commenced in 2014. In contrast to the already existing sections that contain tabulated data, this new section provides graphical data (with necessary explanatory notes) on the spectrograms of emission of atoms and ions excited in various plasma sources. The structure of sections of the Spectr-W3 database is characterized, and examples of queries and the corresponding search results are given.

  7. Pairing preferences of the model mono-valence mono-atomic ions investigated by molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Ruiting; Zhao, Ying; Li, HuanHuan; Zhuang, Wei E-mail: gaoyq@pku.edu.cn; Gao, Yi Qin E-mail: gaoyq@pku.edu.cn

    2014-05-14

    We carried out a series of potential of mean force calculations to study the pairing preferences of a series of model mono-atomic 1:1 ions with evenly varied sizes. The probabilities of forming the contact ion pair (CIP) and the single water separate ion pair (SIP) were presented in the two-dimensional plots with respect to the ion sizes. The pairing preferences reflected in these plots largely agree with the empirical rule of matching ion sizes in the small and big size regions. In the region that the ion sizes are close to the size of the water molecule; however, a significant deviation from this conventional rule is observed. Our further analysis indicated that this deviation originates from the competition between CIP and the water bridging SIP state. The competition is mainly an enthalpy modulated phenomenon in which the existing of the water bridging plays a significant role.

  8. Pairing preferences of the model mono-valence mono-atomic ions investigated by molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Ruiting; Zhao, Ying; Li, HuanHuan; Gao, Yi Qin; Zhuang, Wei

    2014-05-14

    We carried out a series of potential of mean force calculations to study the pairing preferences of a series of model mono-atomic 1:1 ions with evenly varied sizes. The probabilities of forming the contact ion pair (CIP) and the single water separate ion pair (SIP) were presented in the two-dimensional plots with respect to the ion sizes. The pairing preferences reflected in these plots largely agree with the empirical rule of matching ion sizes in the small and big size regions. In the region that the ion sizes are close to the size of the water molecule; however, a significant deviation from this conventional rule is observed. Our further analysis indicated that this deviation originates from the competition between CIP and the water bridging SIP state. The competition is mainly an enthalpy modulated phenomenon in which the existing of the water bridging plays a significant role.

  9. Coherence and correlations in fast ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdoerfer, J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper focusses on the description, classification and interpretation of coherent excitation of atomic or ionic systems with Coulombic two-body final state interactions. A group-theoretical approach is used to classify and interpret coherent excitation. The most significant result is that the state of excitation represented by a density operator can be mapped one to one onto expectation values of a set of operators. Examples are used to illustrate what can be learned about the collision process from investigations of coherent excitation. (JDH)

  10. Effects of Ion Atomic Number on Single-Event Gate Rupture (SEGR) Susceptibility of Power MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Goldsman, Neil; Liu, Sandra; Titus, Jeffrey L.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Kim, Hak S.; Phan, Anthony M.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Zafrani, Max; Sherman, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    The relative importance of heavy-ion interaction with the oxide, charge ionized in the epilayer, and charge ionized in the drain substrate, on the bias for SEGR failure in vertical power MOSFETs is experimentally investigated. The results indicate that both the charge ionized in the epilayer and the ion atomic number are important parameters of SEGR failure. Implications on SEGR hardness assurance are discussed.

  11. Distortion effects in electron excitation of hydrogen atoms by impact of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, C.A.; Rivarola, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    Electron excitation from the fundamental state of hydrogen atoms by impact of bare ions is studied at intermediate and high collision velocities. Total cross sections for final {ital np} states by impact of protons, alpha particles, and He{sup +} ions are calculated using the symmetric eikonal approximation and compared with experimental data. This comparison supports the existence of distortion effects recently predicted by Bugacov and co-workers [Phys. Rev. A {bold 47}, 1052 (1993)]. The validity of scaling laws is analyzed.

  12. Ion-beam induced atomic mixing in isotopically controlled silicon multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radek, M.; Bracht, H.; Liedke, B.; Böttger, R.; Posselt, M.

    2016-11-01

    Implantation of germanium (Ge), gallium (Ga), and arsenic (As) into crystalline and preamorphized isotopically controlled silicon (Si) multilayer structures at temperatures between 153 K and 973 K was performed to study the mechanisms mediating ion-beam induced atomic mixing. Secondary-ion-mass-spectrometry was applied to determine concentration-depth profiles of the stable isotopes before and after ion implantation. The intermixing is analytically described by a depth-dependent displacement function. The maximum displacement is found to depend not only on temperature and microstructure but also on the doping type of the implanted ion. Molecular dynamics calculations evaluate the contribution of cascade mixing, i.e., thermal-spike mixing, to the overall observed atomic mixing. Calculated and experimental results on the temperature dependence of ion-beam mixing in the amorphous and crystalline structures provide strong evidence for ion-beam induced enhanced crystallization and enhanced self-diffusion, respectively. On the other hand, the former process is confirmed by channeling Rutherford backscattering analyses of the amorphous layer thickness remaining after implantation, the latter process is consistently attributed to the formation of highly mobile Si di-interstitials formed under irradiation and in the course of damage annealing. The observed ion-beam mixing in Si is compared to recent results on ion-beam mixing of Ge isotope multilayers that, in contrast to Si, are fully described by thermal-spike mixing only.

  13. Hyperfine structure measurement of 87Rb atoms injected into superfluid helium as highly energetic ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Kei; Furukawa, Takeshi; Yang, Xiaofei; Fujita, Tomomi; Wakui, Takashi; Mitsuya, Yousuke; Hayasaka, Miki; Ichikawa, Yuichi; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Tohru; Odashima, Hitoshi; Ueno, Hideki; Matsuo, Yukari; Orochi Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a new nuclear laser spectroscopy technique that is called OROCHI (Optical RI-atoms Observation in Condensed Helium as Ioncatcher). In OROCHI, highly energetic ion beam is injected into superfluid helium (He II) and is trapped as atoms. Hyperfine structure (HFS) and Zeeman splitting of trapped atoms is measured using laser-microwave (MW)/radiofrequency (RF) double resonance method. We deduce nuclear moments and spin values from the measured splittings, respectively So far, we measured Zeeman splitting of 84-87Rb atoms To evaluate the validity of the OROCHI method, it is necessary to investigate the following two points not only for Zeeman but also for HFS splitings. (i) What is the accuracy in frequency in our measurement? (ii) How high beam intensity is necessary to observe resonance spectra? For this purpose we conducted online experiment using 87Rb beam and measured the HFS splitting of injected 87Rb atoms in He II.

  14. Role of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition reactor wall conditions on radical and ion substrate fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Sowa, Mark J.

    2014-01-15

    Chamber wall conditions, such as wall temperature and film deposits, have long been known to influence plasma source performance on thin film processing equipment. Plasma physical characteristics depend on conductive/insulating properties of chamber walls. Radical fluxes depend on plasma characteristics as well as wall recombination rates, which can be wall material and temperature dependent. Variations in substrate delivery of plasma generated species (radicals, ions, etc.) impact the resulting etch or deposition process resulting in process drift. Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition is known to depend strongly on substrate radical flux, but film properties can be influenced by other plasma generated phenomena, such as ion bombardment. In this paper, the chamber wall conditions on a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition process are investigated. The downstream oxygen radical and ion fluxes from an inductively coupled plasma source are indirectly monitored in temperature controlled (25–190 °C) stainless steel and quartz reactors over a range of oxygen flow rates. Etch rates of a photoresist coated quartz crystal microbalance are used to study the oxygen radical flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Plasma density estimates from Langmuir probe ion saturation current measurements are used to study the ion flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Reactor temperature was not found to impact radical and ion fluxes substantially. Radical and ion fluxes were higher for quartz walls compared to stainless steel walls over all oxygen flow rates considered. The radical flux to ion flux ratio is likely to be a critical parameter for the deposition of consistent film properties. Reactor wall material, gas flow rate/pressure, and distance from the plasma source all impact the radical to ion flux ratio. These results indicate maintaining chamber wall conditions will be important for delivering consistent results from plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

  15. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1991-12-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion microscopy (FIM), field emission (FE), ion sources, and field desorption mass microscopy (FDMM). Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. The bibliography covers the period 1990. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles. The references, listed alphabetically by authors, are subdivided into the categories listed in paragraph one above. An Addendum of references missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  16. Charge transfer reactions in multiply charged ion-atom collisions. [in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steigman, G.

    1975-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions in collisions between highly charged ions and neutral atoms of hydrogen and/or helium may be rapid at thermal energies. If these reactions are rapid, they will suppress highly charged ions in H I regions and guarantee that the observed absorption features from such ions cannot originate in the interstellar gas. A discussion of such charge-transfer reactions is presented and compared with the available experimental data. The possible implications of these reactions for observations of the interstellar medium, H II regions, and planetary nebulae are outlined.

  17. V. S. Lebedev and I. L. Beigman, Physics of Highly Excited Atoms and Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewe, R.

    1999-07-01

    This book contains a comprehensive description of the basic principles of the theoretical spectroscopy and experimental spectroscopic diagnostics of Rydberg atoms and ions, i.e., atoms in highly excited states with a very large principal quantum number (n≫1). Rydberg atoms are characterized by a number of peculiar physical properties as compared to atoms in the ground or a low excited state. They have a very small ionization potential (∝1/n2), the highly excited electron has a small orbital velocity (∝1/n), the radius (∝n2) is very large, the excited electron has a long orbital period (∝n3), and the radiation lifetime is very long (∝n3-5). At the same time the R. atom is very sensitive to perturbations from external fields in collisions with charged and neutral targets. In recent years, R. atoms have been observed in laboratory and cosmic conditions for n up to ˜1000, which means that the size amounts to about 0.1 mm, ˜106 times that of an atom in the ground state. The scope of this monograph is to familiarize the reader with today's approaches and methods for describing isolated R. atoms and ions, radiative transitions between highly excited states, and photoionization and photorecombination processes. The authors present a number of efficient methods for describing the structure and properties of R. atoms and calculating processes of collisions with neutral and charged particles as well as spectral-line broadening and shift of Rydberg atomic series in gases, cool and hot plasmas in laboratories and in astrophysical sources. Particular attention is paid to a comparison of theoretical results with available experimental data. The book contains 9 chapters. Chapter 1 gives an introduction to the basic properties of R. atoms (ions), Chapter 2 is devoted to an account of general methods describing an isolated Rydberg atom. Chapter 3 is focussed on the recent achievements in calculations of form factors and dipole matrix elements of different types of

  18. Understanding Molecular Ion-Neutral Atom Collisions for the Production of Ultracold Molecular Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-06

    molecular ions has emerged as a new discipline within AMO to bring molecules under control. It is now clear that a trapped sample of ultracold molecular...Angeles Office of Contract and Grant Administration 11000 Kinross Avenue, Suite 211 Los Angeles, CA 90095 -1406 ABSTRACT Final Report: Understanding...ions has emerged as a new discipline within AMO to bring molecules under control. It is now clear that a trapped sample of ultracold molecular ions

  19. An ion cyclotron resonance study of reactions of some atomic and simple polyatomic ions with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpas, Z.; Anicich, V. G.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Reactions of various positive ions with water vapor were studied by ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric techniques. Rate constants and product distributions were determined for reactions of the ions: Ar(+), Co(+), N2(+), and CO2(+), CH2(+), and CH4(+), CH2Cl(+), HCO(+), H2CO(+), H2COH(+), H2S(+) and HS(+). The results obtained in this work are compared with earlier reported data where available.

  20. Atomic physics with highly charged ions. Progress report, FY 1989--91

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, P.

    1991-08-01

    This report discusses: One electron outer shell processes in fast ion-atom collisions; role of electron-electron interaction in two-electron processes; multi-electron processes at low energy; multi-electron processes at high energy; inner shell processes; molecular fragmentation studies; theory; and, JRM laboratory operations.

  1. Design of a versatile pressure control system for gas targets in ion-atom collision studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuelling, S.; Bruch, R.

    1993-06-01

    In this work, a unique gas target pressure control system is described which has been developed to measure state selective absolute EUV cross sections subsequent to electron and ion impact on gaseous targets. This system can be used in any type of gas phase experiment using positively or negatively charged and neutral particle beams interacting with atomic and molecular targets.

  2. Field Ion Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography of Metamorphic Magnetite Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K.; Martens, R. L.; Kelly, T. F.; Evans, N. D.; Miller, M. K.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetite has been analysed using Field Ion Microscopy (FIM) and Atom Probe Tomography (APT), highly attractive techniques for the nanoanalysis of geological materials despite the difficulties inherent in analyzing semiconducting and insulating materials. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Preface: Photon and fast Ion induced Processes in Atoms, MOlecules and Nanostructures (PIPAMON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kövér, László

    2016-02-01

    This Special Issue contains selected papers of contributions presented in the International Workshop on Photon and fast Ion induced Processes in Atoms, MOlecules and Nanostructures (PIPAMON), held between March 24 and 26, 2015 in Debrecen, Hungary. The venue, the Aquaticum Thermal and Wellness Hotel provided a pleasant ;all-under-one-roof; environment for the event.

  4. Etching of Bacillus atrophaeus by oxygen atoms, molecules and argon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikt, J.; Flötgen, C.; Kussel, G.; Raball, V.; von Keudell, A.

    2008-10-01

    The etching of spores of Bacillus atrophaeus by oxygen atoms, molecules and argon ions is investigated in a particle beam experiment. Thereby, the conditions occurring in an argon oxygen plasma are mimicked and fundamental inactivation mechanisms are revealed. It is shown that only the combined impact of argon ions and of O atoms or O2 molecules causes significant etching of the spores. This is explained by the process of chemical sputtering, where an ion induced defect at the surface of the spore reacts with either the incident bi-radical O2 or with an incident O atom. This leads to the formation of CO, CO2 and H2O and thus to erosion. This process is compared to the plasma etching of hydrocarbon thin films as an atomistic model system for the spore coat. It is shown that the etch rate in an inductively coupled argon oxygen plasma is only maximal if both, the electron density and thus the ion flux towards the surface and the O atom flux are optimized simultaneously.

  5. In-Situ atomic force microscopic observation of ion beam bombarded plant cell envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Yu, L. D.; Brown, I. G.; Seprom, C.; Vilaithong, T.

    2007-04-01

    A program in ion beam bioengineering has been established at Chiang Mai University (CMU), Thailand, and ion beam induced transfer of plasmid DNA molecules into bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) has been demonstrated. However, a good understanding of the fundamental physical processes involved is lacking. In parallel work, onion skin cells have been bombarded with Ar+ ions at energy 25 keV and fluence1-2 × 1015 ions/cm2, revealing the formation of microcrater-like structures on the cell wall that could serve as channels for the transfer of large macromolecules into the cell interior. An in-situ atomic force microscope (AFM) system has been designed and installed in the CMU bio-implantation facility as a tool for the observation of these microcraters during ion beam bombardment. Here we describe some of the features of the in-situ AFM and outline some of the related work.

  6. An investigation of polarized atomic photofragments using the ion imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Bracker, A.S.

    1997-12-01

    This thesis describes measurement and analysis of the recoil angle dependence of atomic photofragment polarization (atomic v-J correlation). This property provides information on the electronic rearrangement which occurs during molecular photodissociation. Chapter 1 introduces concepts of photofragment vector correlations and reviews experimental and theoretical progress in this area. Chapter 2 described the photofragment ion imaging technique, which the author has used to study the atomic v-J correlation in chlorine and ozone dissociation. Chapter 3 outlines a method for isolating and describing the contribution to the image signal which is due exclusively to angular momentum alignment. Ion imaging results are presented and discussed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 discusses a different set of experiments on the three-fragment dissociation of azomethane. 122 refs.

  7. An independent-atom-model description of ion-molecule collisions including geometric screening corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüdde, Hans Jürgen; Achenbach, Alexander; Kalkbrenner, Thilo; Jankowiak, Hans-Christian; Kirchner, Tom

    2016-04-01

    A new model to account for geometric screening corrections in an independent-atom-model description of ion-molecule collisions is introduced. The ion-molecule cross sections for net capture and net ionization are represented as weighted sums of atomic cross sections with weight factors that are determined from a geometric model of overlapping cross section areas. Results are presented for proton collisions with targets ranging from diatomic to complex polyatomic molecules. Significant improvement compared to simple additivity rule results and in general good agreement with experimental data are found. The flexibility of the approach opens up the possibility to study more detailed observables such as orientation-dependent and charge-state-correlated cross sections for a large class of complex targets ranging from biomolecules to atomic clusters.

  8. Double K-shell photoionization of low-Z atoms and He-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoszowska, J.; Kheifets, A. S.; Berset, M.; Bray, I.; Cao, W.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Fennane, K.; Kavčič, M.; Kayser, Y.; Szlachetko, J.; Szlachetko, M.

    2009-03-01

    We report on the investigation of the photon energy dependence of double 1s photoionization of light atoms and compare the cross sections for hollow atom and He-like ion production. Measurements of the Kα hypersatellite x-ray spectra of Mg, Al, and Si were carried out using the Fribourg high-resolution x-ray spectrometer installed at the ID21 and ID26 beam lines at the ESRF. The double-to-single photoionization cross section ratios were derived as a function of the incident photon beam energy and compared to convergent close-coupling (CCC) calculations for He-like ions. The dynamical electron-electron scattering contribution to the DPI cross-sections was found to be more important for neutral atoms than for the He isoelectronic series.

  9. The truncated Wigner approximation for spin dynamics in systems of trapped ions, atoms & molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachenmayer, Johannes; Zhu, Bihui; Pikovski, Alexander; Hazzard, Kaden; Holland, Murray; Rey, Ana Maria

    2014-05-01

    Trapped ions and systems of cold atoms or molecules in optical lattices offer controlled environments to experimentally study non-equilibrium dynamics of many-body quantum spin-models with interactions of varying range. Theoretically calculating dynamics of observables for these experiments is a major challenge both analytically and numerically. While in one dimension, time-dependent density matrix renormalization group techniques (t-DMRG) allow for an efficient simulation of the dynamics as long as the time-dependent bi-partite entanglement growth remains moderate, a simulation for systems in two or three dimensions is more demanding. Here we present a numerical technique, which employs the truncated Wigner approximation (TWA) and which can be used to simulate Ramsey-dynamics for current experiments with trapped ions, alkaline earth atoms, polar molecules in optical lattices, or for systems with Rydberg atoms.

  10. Effects of anisotropic electron-ion interactions in atomic photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, D.; Starace, A. F.; Manson, S. T.

    1974-01-01

    The photoelectron asymmetry parameter beta in LS-coupling is obtained as an expansion into contributions from alternative angular momentum transfers j sub t. The physical significance of this expansion of beta is shown to be that: (1) the electric dipole interaction transfers to the atom a charcteristic single angular momentum j sub t = sub o, where sub o is the photoelectron's initial orbital momentum; and (2) angular momentum transfers indicate the presence of anisotropic interaction of the outgoing photoelectron with the residual ion. For open shell atoms the photoelectron-ion interaction is generally anisotropic; photoelectron phase shifts and electric dipole matrix elements depend on both the multiplet term of the residual ion and the total orbital momentum of the ion-photoelectron final state channel. Consequently beta depends on the term levels of the residual ion and contains contributions from all allowed values of j sub t. Numerical calculations of the asymmetry parameters and partial cross sections for photoionization of atomic sulfur are presented.

  11. Surpassing the mass restriction of buffer gas cooling: Cooling of low mass ions by localized heavier atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Sourav; Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    Cooling of trapped ions has resulted in fascinating science including the realization of some of the most accurate atomic clocks. It has also found widespread application, for example, in mass spectrometry and cold chemistry. Among the different methods for cooling ions, cooling by elastic collisions with ultracold neutral atoms is arguably the most generic. However, in spite of its widespread application, there is confusion with regards the collisional heating/cooling of light ions by heavier neutral atoms. We address the question experimentally and demonstrate, for the first time, cooling of light ions by co-trapped heavy atoms. We show that trapped 39 K+ ions are cooled by localized ultracold neutral 85 Rb atoms. The atom-ion mass ratio (= 2.18) is well beyond any theoretical predictions so far. We further argue that cooling of ions by localized cold atoms is possible for any mass ratio. The result opens up the possibility of reaching the elusive s-wave collision regime in atom-ion collisions. S.D. is supported by DST-INSPIRE Faculty Fellowship, India.

  12. A high-resolution pulsed-laser atom-probe field-ion microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelikov, Dmitriy V.

    2001-10-01

    The atom-probe field-ion microscope is a unique instrument for the analysis of materials on an atom-by- atom and atomic layer-by-atomic layer basis. It combines a point projection microscope, which allows one to observe individual atoms in direct lattice space on the surface of a sharply pointed tip under a high positive voltage, with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer that can measure mass-to-charge ratios of individual atoms field- evaporated from the surface of a tip during a few nanosecond wide high-voltage or laser pulse. The ability to distinguish atomic isotopes and molecular clusters of one species from the other is crucial in the atom-probe analysis of multi-component materials. One of the main sources of errors in such an analysis is energy deficits of field-evaporated ions inherent to the pulsed high- voltage evaporation process. Therefore, in this study the task of designing and fabricating an atom-probe field-ion microscope capable of compensating these energy deficits, and versatile enough to be able to analyze a wide spectrum of engineering materials, was undertaken. The instrument has the following features: (a)ultrahigh vacuum (UHV); (b)a specimen exchange device that will store up to 10 specimens and allows transferring specimens directly from atmospheric pressure to UHV conditions; (c)a closed cycle helium refrigerator with a temperature regulator capable of cooling the specimen to 10 K; (d)a 3D goniometer with +/-30° tilt in the horizontal and vertical planes; (e)a variable distance, high gain MCP assembly for field-ion microscopy; (f)a single stage reflectron lens; (g)a 1500 Hz solid-state high voltage pulser; (h)a 20 Hz, 300 μJ/pulse, 4 ns pulsed nitrogen laser analysis capability. The mass resolution of this instrument is D(/) /= / at full-width half-maximum (FWHM) with high-voltage pulsing and D(/) /= / at FWHM with laser pulsing.

  13. Spectr-W3 online database on atomic properties of multicharged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, I. Yu; Loboda, P. A.; Faenov, A. Ya; Gagarin, S. V.; Kozlov, A. I.; Morozov, S. V.; Pikuz, S. A.; Pikuz, T. A.; Popova, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    The Spectr-W3 information-reference system was developed in 2001-2013 and realized as an online Web resource based on the factual atomic database Spectr-W3. The information accumulated in the Spectr-W3 atomic database contains about 450,000 records and includes the experimental and theoretical data on ionization potentials, energy levels, wavelengths, radiation transition probabilities, and oscillator strengths, and the parameters of analytical approximations of electron-collisional cross-sections and rates for atoms and ions. Those data were extracted from publications in physical journals, proceedings of the related conferences, special-purpose publications on atomic data, provided directly by authors. The information is supplied with references to the original sources and comments, elucidating the details of experimental measurements or calculations. To date, the Spectr-W3 atomic database is still the largest factual database in the world, containing the information on spectral properties of multicharged ions. In 2014, the new stage in the development of the Spectr-W3 atomic database started. The purpose of this stage is the creation of a new information section of the Spectr-W3 database. This section would contain the information on the x-ray emission spectrograms registered from various plasma sources.

  14. Surface field analysis of splitting of orbitals of atoms and ions approaching a metal surface.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V. S.; Waber, J. T.

    1971-01-01

    The splitting of p- and d-orbitals of an atom or an ion which is caused by the locally varying potential near the surface of a realistic metal has been studied for bcc and fcc substrates. A quasi-ionic model is reasonable at close distance, inasmuch as the electron gas does not completely screen the ionic cores. The arrangement of ion cores near the surface causes the potential to vary in three dimensions. Expressions for energy levels were derived for an unsymmetric group using the quasi-ionic model and techniques used in the treatment of crystal field of nearest neighbors. A number of cases involving ions, as well as atoms in the vicinity of a metal substrate were numerically evaluated.

  15. Resonance and intercombination lines in Mg-like ions of atomic numbers Z=13–92

    DOE PAGES

    Santana, Juan A.; Trabert, Elmar

    2015-02-05

    While prominent lines of various Na-like ions have been measured with an accuracy of better than 100 ppm and corroborate equally accurate calculations, there have been remarkably large discrepancies between calculations for Mg-like ions of high atomic number. We present ab initio calculations using the multireference Moller-Plesset approach for Mg-like ions of atomic numbers Z = 13-92 and compare the results with other calculations of this isoelectronic sequence as well as with experimental data. Our results come very close to experiment (typically 100 ppm) over a wide range. Furthermore, data at high values of Z are sparse, which calls formore » further accurate measurements in this range where relativistic and QED effects are large.« less

  16. Gas-phase catalysis by atomic and cluster metal ions: the ultimate single-site catalysts.

    PubMed

    Böhme, Diethard K; Schwarz, Helmut

    2005-04-15

    Gas-phase experiments with state-of-the-art techniques of mass spectrometry provide detailed insights into numerous elementary processes. The focus of this Review is on elementary reactions of ions that achieve complete catalytic cycles under thermal conditions. The examples chosen cover aspects of catalysis pertinent to areas as diverse as atmospheric chemistry and surface chemistry. We describe how transfer of oxygen atoms, bond activation, and coupling of fragments can be mediated by atomic or cluster metal ions. In some cases truly unexpected analogies of the idealized gas-phase ion catalysis can be drawn with related chemical transformations in solution or the solid state, and so improve our understanding of the intrinsic operation of a practical catalyst at a strictly molecular level.

  17. Charge-transfer energy in closed-shell ion-atom interactions. [for H and Li ions in He

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez-Rizzatti, M.; Mason, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    The importance of charge-transfer energy in the interactions between closed-shell ions and atoms is investigated. Ab initio calculations on H(plus)-He and Li(plus)-He are used as a guide for the construction of approximate methods for the estimation of the charge-transfer energy for more complicated systems. For many alkali ion-rate gas systems the charge-transfer energy is comparable to the induction energy in the region of the potential minimum, although for doubly charged alkaline-earth ions in rare gases the induction energy always dominates. Surprisingly, an empirical combination of repulsion energy plus asymptotic induction energy plus asymptotic dispersion energy seems to give a fair representation of the total interaction, especially if the repulsion energy is parameterized, despite the omission of any explicit charge-transfer contribution. More refined interaction models should consider the charge-transfer energy contribution.

  18. a Study of Low Energy Electron-Molecule and Ion - Collisions Using Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollars, Byron George

    Low energy collisions between Rydberg atoms and neutral molecules have been investigated over a wide range of principal quantum numbers n, and for several different neutral targets. The results have been used to validate the free-electron, independent particle model of Rydberg atom collisions. Comparison between theory and experiment show that at large values of n, ionization of Rb(nS,nD) Rydberg atoms in the reaction: (UNFORMATTED TABLE FOLLOWS). Rb(nS,nD) + SF(,6) (--->) Rb('+) = SF(,6)('-) (1). (TABLE ENDS). proceeds by electron transfer from the Rydberg atom to the SF(,6) molecule. The rate constants measured for this reaction are much the same as for the attachment of free, low-energy electrons to SF(,6). Thus, Rydberg collision studies can provide information about low-energy free electron interactions. Studies of the rate constants for free ion production in the reaction: (UNFORMATTED TABLE FOLLOWS). K(nD) + SF(,6) (--->) K('+) + SF(,6)('-) (2). (TABLE ENDS). showed these to decrease sharply at smaller n, falling far below the value expected on the basis of Rydberg electron attachment to SF(,6). This behavior is attributed not to breakdown of the free-electron model, but to post -attachment electrostatic interactions between the product ions, which are formed closer to each other at lower n. Model calculations that take this electrostatic interaction into account confirm this prediction. Other Rydberg atom collision processes, such as: (UNFORMATTED TABLE FOLLOWS). K(nD) + O(,2) (--->) K('+) + O(,2)('-) (3). K(nD) + H(,2)O (--->) KH(,2)O('+) + e('-) (4). (TABLE ENDS). have been studied, as they require both the Rydberg ion core and electron to participate in the collision. Since O(,2)('-) ions formed by free electron attachment have short lifetimes against autodetachment, the observation of long-lived O(,2)('-) reaction product suggests that the K('+) core ion plays a role in stabilizing the excited O(,2)('-) ions formed by Rydberg electron attachment. Stable

  19. Atomic physics and synchrotron radiation: The production and accumulation of highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.M.; Meron, M.; Agagu, A.; Jones, K.W.

    1986-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation can be used to produce highly-charged ions, and to study photoexcitation and photoionization for ions of virtually any element in the periodic table. To date, with few exceptions, atomic physics studies have been limited to rare gases and a few metal vapors, and to photoexcitation energies in the VUV region of the electromagnetic spectrum. These limitations can now be overcome using photons produced by high-brightness synchrotron storage rings, such as the x-ray ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven. Furthermore, calculations indicate that irradiation of an ion trap with an intense energetic photon beam will result in a viable source of highly-charged ions that can be given the name PHOBIS: the PHOton Beam Ion Source. Promising results, which encourage the wider systematic use of synchrotron radiation in atomic physics research, have been obtained in recent experiments on VUV photoemission and the production and storage of multiply-charged ions. 26 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Self-consistent-field calculations of atoms and ions using a modified local-density approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Liberman, D.A.; Albritton, J.R.; Wilson, B.G.; Alley, W.E. )

    1994-07-01

    Local-density-approximation calculations of atomic structure are useful for the description of atoms and ions in plasmas. The large number of different atomic configurations that exist in typical plasmas leads one to consider the expression of total energies in terms of a Taylor series in the orbital occupation numbers. Two schemes for computing the second derivative Taylor-series coefficients are given; the second, and better one, uses the linear response method developed by Zangwill and Soven [Phys. Rev. A 21, 1561 (1980)] for the calculation of optical response in atoms. A defect in the local-density approximation causes some second derivatives involving Rydberg orbitals to be infinite. This is corrected by using a modified local-density approximation that had previously been proposed [Phys. Rev. B 2, 244 (1970)].

  1. Energy distributions of atomic and molecular ions sputtered by C 60+ projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcorte, A.; Poleunis, C.; Bertrand, P.

    2006-07-01

    In the process of investigating the interaction of fullerene projectiles with adsorbed organic layers, we measured the kinetic energy distributions (KEDs) of fragment and parent ions sputtered from an overlayer of polystyrene (PS) oligomers cast on silver under 15 keV C 60+ bombardment. These measurements have been conducted using our TRIFT™ spectrometer, recently equipped with the C 60+ source developed by Ionoptika, Ltd. For atomic ions, the intensity corresponding to the high energy tail decreases in the following order: C +( E-0.4) > H +( E-1.5) > Ag +( E-3.5). In particular, the distribution of Ag + is not broader than those of Ag 2+ and Ag 3+ clusters, in sharp contrast with 15 keV Ga + bombardment. On the other hand, molecular ions (fragments and parent-like species) exhibit a significantly wider distribution using C 60+ instead of Ga + as primary ions. For instance, the KED of Ag-cationized PS oligomers resembles that of Ag + and Ag n+ clusters. A specific feature of fullerene projectiles is that they induce the direct desorption of positively charged oligomers, without the need of a cationizing metal atom. The energy spectrum of these PS + ions is significantly narrower then that of Ag-cationized oligomers. For characteristic fragments of PS, such as C 7H 7+ and C 15H 13+ and polycyclic fragments, such as C 9H 7+ and C 14H 10+, the high energy decay is steep ( E-4 - E-8). In addition, reorganized ions generally show more pronounced high energy tails than characteristic ions, similar to the case of monoatomic ion bombardment. This observation is consistent with the higher excitation energy needed for their formation. Finally, the fraction of hydrocarbon ions formed in the gas phase via unimolecular dissociation of larger species is slightly larger with gallium than with fullerene projectiles.

  2. International Atomic Energy Agency intercomparison of ion beam analysis software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barradas, N. P.; Arstila, K.; Battistig, G.; Bianconi, M.; Dytlewski, N.; Jeynes, C.; Kótai, E.; Lulli, G.; Mayer, M.; Rauhala, E.; Szilágyi, E.; Thompson, M.

    2007-09-01

    Ion beam analysis (IBA) includes a group of techniques for the determination of elemental concentration depth profiles of thin film materials. Often the final results rely on simulations, fits and calculations, made by dedicated codes written for specific techniques. Here we evaluate numerical codes dedicated to the analysis of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, non-Rutherford elastic backscattering spectrometry, elastic recoil detection analysis and non-resonant nuclear reaction analysis data. Several software packages have been presented and made available to the community. New codes regularly appear, and old codes continue to be used and occasionally updated and expanded. However, those codes have to date not been validated, or even compared to each other. Consequently, IBA practitioners use codes whose validity, correctness and accuracy have never been validated beyond the authors' efforts. In this work, we present the results of an IBA software intercomparison exercise, where seven different packages participated. These were DEPTH, GISA, DataFurnace (NDF), RBX, RUMP, SIMNRA (all analytical codes) and MCERD (a Monte Carlo code). In a first step, a series of simulations were defined, testing different capabilities of the codes, for fixed conditions. In a second step, a set of real experimental data were analysed. The main conclusion is that the codes perform well within the limits of their design, and that the largest differences in the results obtained are due to differences in the fundamental databases used (stopping power and scattering cross section). In particular, spectra can be calculated including Rutherford cross sections with screening, energy resolution convolutions including energy straggling, and pileup effects, with agreement between the codes available at the 0.1% level. This same agreement is also available for the non-RBS techniques. This agreement is not limited to calculation of spectra from particular structures with predetermined

  3. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions. Progress report, February 16, 1990--February 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1993-02-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from February 16, 1990 through February 15, 1993. This work involves the experimental investigation of atomic interactions in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron-correlation effects. The processes studied are of interest both from fundamental and applied points of view. In the latter case, results are obtained which are relevant to the understanding of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, highly-excited (Rydberg) and continuum states of atoms and ions, atomic structure effects, the interaction of ions with surfaces, and the development of heavy-ion storage-rings. The results obtained have provided the basis for several M.A. thesis projects at Western Michigan and several Ph.D. dissertation projects are currently underway. Summaries of work completed and work in progress are given below in Section II. This research has resulted in 26 papers (in print and in press), 12 invited presentations at national and international meetings, and 28 contributed presentations as detailed in Section III.

  4. Bright focused ion beam sources based on laser-cooled atoms

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, J. J.; Steele, A. V.; Knuffman, B.; Twedt, K. A.; Schwarzkopf, A.; Wilson, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale focused ion beams (FIBs) represent one of the most useful tools in nanotechnology, enabling nanofabrication via milling and gas-assisted deposition, microscopy and microanalysis, and selective, spatially resolved doping of materials. Recently, a new type of FIB source has emerged, which uses ionization of laser cooled neutral atoms to produce the ion beam. The extremely cold temperatures attainable with laser cooling (in the range of 100 μK or below) result in a beam of ions with a very small transverse velocity distribution. This corresponds to a source with extremely high brightness that rivals or may even exceed the brightness of the industry standard Ga+ liquid metal ion source. In this review we discuss the context of ion beam technology in which these new ion sources can play a role, their principles of operation, and some examples of recent demonstrations. The field is relatively new, so only a few applications have been demonstrated, most notably low energy ion microscopy with Li ions. Nevertheless, a number of promising new approaches have been proposed and/or demonstrated, suggesting that a rapid evolution of this type of source is likely in the near future. PMID:27239245

  5. A (201)Hg+ Comagnetometer for (199)Hg+ Trapped Ion Space Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric A.; Taghavi, Shervin; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    A method has been developed for unambiguously measuring the exact magnetic field experienced by trapped mercury ions contained within an atomic clock intended for space applications. In general, atomic clocks are insensitive to external perturbations that would change the frequency at which the clocks operate. On a space platform, these perturbative effects can be much larger than they would be on the ground, especially in dealing with the magnetic field environment. The solution is to use a different isotope of mercury held within the same trap as the clock isotope. The magnetic field can be very accurately measured with a magnetic-field-sensitive atomic transition in the added isotope. Further, this measurement can be made simultaneously with normal clock operation, thereby not degrading clock performance. Instead of using a conventional magnetometer to measure ambient fields, which would necessarily be placed some distance away from the clock atoms, first order field-sensitive atomic transition frequency changes in the atoms themselves determine the variations in the magnetic field. As a result, all ambiguity over the exact field value experienced by the atoms is removed. Atoms used in atomic clocks always have an atomic transition (often referred to as the clock transition) that is sensitive to magnetic fields only in second order, and usually have one or more transitions that are first-order field sensitive. For operating parameters used in the (199)Hg(+) clock, the latter can be five orders of magnitude or more sensitive to field fluctuations than the clock transition, thereby providing an unambiguous probe of the magnetic field strength.

  6. High-coherence electron and ion bunches from laser-cooled atoms.

    PubMed

    Sparkes, Ben M; Thompson, Daniel J; McCulloch, Andrew J; Murphy, Dene; Speirs, Rory W; Torrance, Joshua S J; Scholten, Robert E

    2014-08-01

    Cold atom electron and ion sources produce electron bunches and ion beams by photoionization of laser-cooled atoms. They offer high coherence and the potential for high brightness, with applications including ultra-fast electron-diffractive imaging of dynamic processes at the nanoscale. The effective brightness of electron sources has been limited by nonlinear divergence caused by repulsive interactions between the electrons, known as the Coulomb explosion. It has been shown that electron bunches with ellipsoidal shape and uniform density distribution have linear internal Coulomb fields, such that the Coulomb explosion can be reversed using conventional optics. Our source can create bunches shaped in three dimensions and hence in principle achieve the transverse spatial coherence and brightness needed for picosecond-diffractive imaging with nanometer resolution. Here we present results showing how the shaping capability can be used to measure the spatial coherence properties of the cold electron source. We also investigate space-charge effects with ions and generate electron bunches with durations of a few hundred picoseconds. Future development of the cold atom electron and ion source will increase the bunch charge and charge density, demonstrate reversal of Coulomb explosion, and ultimately, ultra-fast coherent electron-diffractive imaging.

  7. The Heidelberg test storage ring for heavy ions and its use for atomic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, R.

    1986-11-01

    A brief description of the Heavy-Ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) presently being built at the Max-Planck Institut in Heidelberg is given. It will be able to store ions injected from the tandem postaccelerator combination up to about 30 MeV/nucleon for a charge to mass ratio of 0.5. One of the main purposes of the TSR will be the study of electron cooling. Some atomic physics experiments are discussed using the electron cooling device which provides an electron-ion collision facility with good energy resolution and ion beams of high currents and low emittances. Here the possibilities for measurements of spontaneous and laser-induced radiative recombination and dielectronic recombination in the electron cooling section are discussed.

  8. Effects of anisotropic electron-ion interactions in atomic photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, D.; Starace, A. F.; Manson, S. T.

    1975-01-01

    A summary of the angular momentum transfer formulation of the differential photoionization cross section is presented and photoionization amplitudes in LS coupling are considered. The application of the theoretical concepts and relations developed is illustrated with the aid of an example involving the calculation of the angular distribution of photoelectrons ionized from atomic sulfur according to a certain reaction. The investigation shows that anisotropic electron-ion interactions in atomic sulfur lead to measurable differences between photoelectron angular distribution asymmetry parameters corresponding to alternative ionic term levels.

  9. Multiphoton ionization of atoms and ions by high-intensity X-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Popruzhenko, S. B. Mur, V. D.; Popov, V. S.; Bauer, D.

    2009-06-15

    Coulomb corrections to the action function and rate of multiphoton ionization of atoms and ions in a strong linearly polarized electromagnetic field are calculated for high values of the Keldysh adiabaticity parameter. The Coulomb corrections significantly increase the ionization rate for atoms (by several orders of magnitude). An interpolation formula proposed for ionization rate is valid for arbitrary values of the adiabaticity parameter. The high accuracy of the formula is confirmed by comparison with the results of numerical calculations. The general case of elliptic polarization of laser radiation is also considered.

  10. Vibrationally resolved transitions in ion-molecule and atom-molecular ion slow collisions

    DOE Data Explorer

    The data tables and interactive graphs made available here contain theoretical integral cross sections for vibrational excitation and vibrationally resolved charge transfer from vibrationally excited states of H2 and H2+ with protons and hydrogen atoms, respectively. [From http://www-cfadc.phy.ornl.gov/h2mol/home.html] (Specialized Interface)

  11. Ion-Atom/Argon—Calculation of ionization cross sections by fast ion impact for neutral target atoms ranging from hydrogen to argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSherry, D. M.; O'Rourke, S. F. C.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    2003-10-01

    A FORTRAN 90 program is presented which calculates the total cross sections, and the electron energy spectra of the singly and doubly differential cross sections for the single target ionization of neutral atoms ranging from hydrogen up to and including argon. The code is applicable for the case of both high and low Z projectile impact in fast ion-atom collisions. The theoretical models provided for the program user are based on two quantum mechanical approximations which have proved to be very successful in the study of ionization in ion-atom collisions. These are the continuum-distorted-wave (CDW) and continuum-distorted-wave eikonal-initial-state (CDW-EIS) approximations. The codes presented here extend previously published codes for single ionization of target hydrogen [Crothers and McCartney, Comput. Phys. Commun. 72 (1992) 288], target helium [Nesbitt, O'Rourke and Crothers, Comput. Phys. Commun. 114 (1998) 385] and target atoms ranging from lithium to neon [O'Rourke, McSherry and Crothers, Comput. Phys. Commun. 131 (2000) 129]. Cross sections for all of these target atoms may be obtained as limiting cases from the present code. Program summaryTitle of program: ARGON Catalogue identifier: ADSE Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/cpc/summaries/ADSE Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: none Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it is operable: Computers: Four by 200 MHz Pro Pentium Linux server, DEC Alpha 21164; Four by 400 MHz Pentium 2 Xeon 450 Linux server, IBM SP2 and SUN Enterprise 3500 Installations: Queen's University, Belfast Operating systems under which the program has been tested: Red-hat Linux 5.2, Digital UNIX Version 4.0d, AIX, Solaris SunOS 5.7 Compilers: PGI workstations, DEC CAMPUS Programming language used: FORTRAN 90 with MPI directives No. of bits in a word: 64, except on Linux servers 32 Number of processors used: any number Has the

  12. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, R.D.; Miller, M.K.; Russell, K.F.

    1994-10-01

    This bibliography, covering the period 1993, includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field emission (FE), and field ion microscopy (FIM). Technique-oriented studies and applications are included. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles. The references are listed alphabetically by authors, an Addendum of references missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  13. Experimental Issues in Coherent Quantum-State Manipulation of Trapped Atomic Ions

    PubMed Central

    Wineland, D. J.; Monroe, C.; Itano, W. M.; Leibfried, D.; King, B. E.; Meekhof, D. M.

    1998-01-01

    Methods for, and limitations to, the generation of entangled states of trapped atomic ions are examined. As much as possible, state manipulations are described in terms of quantum logic operations since the conditional dynamics implicit in quantum logic is central to the creation of entanglement. Keeping with current interest, some experimental issues in the proposal for trappedion quantum computation by J. I. Cirac and P. Zoller (University of Innsbruck) are discussed. Several possible decoherence mechanisms are examined and what may be the more important of these are identified. Some potential applications for entangled states of trapped-ions which lie outside the immediate realm of quantum computation are also discussed. PMID:28009379

  14. Atomic Data and Spectral Line Intensities for Be-like Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand; Landi, E.

    2008-01-01

    Atomic data and collision rates are needed to model the spectrum of optically thin astrophysical sources. Recent observations from solar instrumentation such as SOH0 and Hinode have revealed the presence of hosts of lines emitted by high-energy configurations from ions belonging to the Be-like to the 0-like isoelectronic sequences. Data for such configurations are often unavailable in the literature. We have started a program to calculate the atomic parameters and rates for the high-energy configurations of Be-like ions of the type ls2.21.nl' where n=3,4,5. We report on the results of this project and on the diagnostic application of the predicted spectral lines.

  15. Understanding Molecular-Ion Neutral Atom Collisions for the Production of Ultracold Molecular Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-03

    Schowalter, Svetlana Kotochigova, Kuang Chen, Eric R. Hudson. Evidence for sympathetic vibrational cooling of translationally cold molecules, Nature...03 2013): 0. doi: 10.1038/nature11937 Wade G. Rellergert, Scott T. Sullivan, Svetlana Kotochigova, Eric R. Hudson. Role of Electronic Excitations...109.223002 Kuang Chen, Steven Schowalter, Svetlana Kotochigova, Alexander Petrov, Wade Rellergert, Scott Sullivan, Eric Hudson. Molecular-ion trap

  16. Impact Collision Ion Scattering Spectroscopy Applied to the Determination of Atomic Surface Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, Richard Stephen

    1990-08-01

    The technique of impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy (ICISS) was used to investigate the atomic structure and low energy ion scattering dynamics from various surfaces. A new formalism for calculating the three-dimensional cross section for an ion to scatter sequentially and classically from two atoms has been developed. This method can be used to assist in the interpretation of ICISS data in terms of quantitative surface-structure models. Shadowing and blocking effects for energetic ions scattering from more than one atom are shown to be special cases of rainbow scattering. Even at keV energies and above, the cross section at the critical angle for scattering must be evaluated by quantum or semi-classical means to avoid the singularity in the classically calculated cross sections. In an ICISS investigation of the Ag(110) surface, a surface flux peak analysis demonstrated that the surface was not a complete monolayer, but rather contained 10-15% random vacancies. Subsurface Li^+ scattering results confirmed the oscillatory relaxation of the first two atomic layers of the surface, with Delta_{12} = -7.5% and Delta_{23} = 4.0%. Modeling of the neutralization mechanism for the He^+ scattering gave a best fit time-dependent Auger neutralization time constant of 0.84 +/- 0.08 fs. A neutralization study of 5 keV He^+ ions scattered from Au adatoms on the Si(111)- sqrt{3} x sqrt {3}-Au surface showed the He^+ ICISS data contained false shadowing features that were actually the result of local neutralization effects. Good agreement was obtained for a radially dependent ion-atom neutralization theory with rate R = Aexp (-ar) , where A and a are 15.5 fs^{ -1} and 1.94 A^{-1} , respectively. A detailed examination of the Si(111)- sqrt{3} x sqrt{3 })-Ag surface was also made. The 5 keV Li ^+ ICISS data gave evidence for Ag island formation at single monolayer coverages of silver, while the LEED, AES and LEIS data showed that at relatively high coverages of Ag (35 ML

  17. Sympathetic cooling of the Ba{sup +} ion by collisions with ultracold Rb atoms: Theoretical prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Krych, Michal; Skomorowski, Wojciech; Pawlowski, Filip; Moszynski, Robert; Idziaszek, Zbigniew

    2011-03-15

    State-of-the-art ab initio techniques have been applied to compute the potential energy curves of the (BaRb){sup +} molecular ion in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for the singlet and triplet states dissociating into the ground-state {sup 1}S Rb{sup +} ion and the Ba atom in the ground {sup 1}S state or the lowest singlet or triplet d excited states, and for the singlet and triplet states dissociating into the ground-state {sup 2}S Rb atom and the ground-state {sup 2}S Ba{sup +} ion. The ground-state potential energy was obtained with the coupled-cluster method restricted to single, double, and nonperturbative triple excitations. The first triplet states in the {Sigma}, {Pi}, and {Delta} symmetries were computed with the restricted open-shell coupled-cluster method restricted to single, double, and nonperturbative triple excitations. All other excited-state potential energy curves were computed using the equation of motion approach within the coupled-cluster singles, doubles, and linear triples framework. The long-range coefficients describing the electrostatic, induction, and dispersion interactions at large interatomic distances are also reported. The electric transition dipole moments governing the x {sup 1{Sigma}{yields}1{Sigma}},{sup 1{Pi}} transitions have been obtained as the first residue of the polarization propagator computed with the linear response coupled-cluster method restricted to single and double excitations. Nonadiabatic radial and angular coupling matrix elements as well as the spin-orbit coupling matrix elements have been evaluated using the multireference configuration-interaction method restricted to single and double excitations with a large active space. With these couplings, the spin-orbit-coupled (relativistic) potential energy curves for the 0{sup +} and 1 states relevant for the running experiments have been obtained. Finally, relativistic transition moments and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements were obtained from the

  18. High charge state, ion-atom collision experiments using accel-decel

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, E.M.; Clark, M.W.; Tanis, J.A.; Graham, W.G.

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies of /sub 16/S/sup 13 +/ + He collisions between 2.5 and 200 MeV, which were made using the accel-decel technique with the Brookhaven National Laboratory coupled MP tandem Van de Graaff accelerators, are discussed. Cross sections were measured for single electron-capture and -loss as well as K x rays correlated to electron-capture. Other planned ion-atom collision experiments requiring accel-decel are also presented. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Highly charged ions for atomic clocks, quantum information, and search for α variation.

    PubMed

    Safronova, M S; Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V; Safronova, U I; Porsev, S G; Kozlov, M G

    2014-07-18

    We propose 10 highly charged ions as candidates for the development of next generation atomic clocks, quantum information, and search for α variation. They have long-lived metastable states with transition wavelengths to the ground state between 170-3000 nm, relatively simple electronic structure, stable isotopes, and high sensitivity to α variation (e.g., Sm(14+), Pr(10+), Sm(13+), Nd(10+)). We predict their properties crucial for the experimental exploration and highlight particularly attractive systems for these applications.

  20. Nonlinear effects in defect production by atomic and molecular ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    David, C. Dholakia, Manan; Chandra, Sharat; Nair, K. G. M.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Amirthapandian, S.; Amarendra, G.; Varghese Anto, C.; Santhana Raman, P.; Kennedy, John

    2015-01-07

    This report deals with studies concerning vacancy related defects created in silicon due to implantation of 200 keV per atom aluminium and its molecular ions up to a plurality of 4. The depth profiles of vacancy defects in samples in their as implanted condition are carried out by Doppler broadening spectroscopy using low energy positron beams. In contrast to studies in the literature reporting a progressive increase in damage with plurality, implantation of aluminium atomic and molecular ions up to Al{sub 3}, resulted in production of similar concentration of vacancy defects. However, a drastic increase in vacancy defects is observed due to Al{sub 4} implantation. The observed behavioural trend with respect to plurality has even translated to the number of vacancies locked in vacancy clusters, as determined through gold labelling experiments. The impact of aluminium atomic and molecular ions simulated using MD showed a monotonic increase in production of vacancy defects for cluster sizes up to 4. The trend in damage production with plurality has been explained on the basis of a defect evolution scheme in which for medium defect concentrations, there is a saturation of the as-implanted damage and an increase for higher defect concentrations.

  1. Spin-Orbit Interactions and Quantum Spin Dynamics in Cold Ion-Atom Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tscherbul, Timur V.; Brumer, Paul; Buchachenko, Alexei A.

    2016-09-01

    We present accurate ab initio and quantum scattering calculations on a prototypical hybrid ion-atom system Yb+ -Rb, recently suggested as a promising candidate for the experimental study of open quantum systems, quantum information processing, and quantum simulation. We identify the second-order spin-orbit (SO) interaction as the dominant source of hyperfine relaxation in cold Yb+ -Rb collisions. Our results are in good agreement with recent experimental observations [L. Ratschbacher et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 160402 (2013)] of hyperfine relaxation rates of trapped Yb+ immersed in an ultracold Rb gas. The calculated rates are 4 times smaller than is predicted by the Langevin capture theory and display a weak T-0.3 temperature dependence, indicating significant deviations from statistical behavior. Our analysis underscores the deleterious nature of the SO interaction and implies that light ion-atom combinations such as Yb+ -Li should be used to minimize hyperfine relaxation and decoherence of trapped ions in ultracold atomic gases.

  2. Atoms and Ions; Universality, Singularity and Particularity:. on Boltzmann's Vision a Century Later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Michael

    2008-12-01

    Ludwig Boltzmann died by his own hand 101 years ago last September. He was a passionate believer in atoms: underlying thermodynamics, he felt, lay a statistical world governed by the mechanics of individual particles. His struggles against critics -- "Have you ever seen an atom?" taunted Ernst Mach -- left him pessimistic. Nevertheless, following Maxwell and clarified by Gibbs, he established the science of Statistical Mechanics. But today, especially granted our understanding of critical singularities and their universality, how much do atomic particles and their charged partners, ions, really matter? The answers we have also met opposition. But Boltzmann would have welcomed the insights gained and approved of applications of statistical dynamics to biology, sociology, and other enterprises. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  3. Two-Centre Convergent Close-Coupling Approach to Ion-Atom Collisions: Current Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyrov, Alisher; Abdurakhmanov, Ilkhom; Bailey, Jackson; Bray, Igor

    2016-09-01

    There are two versions of the convergent close-coupling (CCC) approach to ion-atom collisions: quantum-mechanical (QM-CCC) and semi-classical (SC-CCC). Recently, both implementations have been extended to include electron-transfer channels. The SC-CCC approach has been applied to study the excitation and the electron-capture processes in proton-hydrogen collisions. The integral alignment parameter A20 for polarization of Lyman- α emission and the cross sections for excitation and electron-capture into the lowest excited states have been calculated for a wide range of the proton impact energies. It has been established that for convergence of the results a very wide range of impact parameters (typically, 0-50 a.u.) is required due to extremely long tails of transition probabilities for transitions into the 2 p states at high energies. The QM-CCC approach allowed to obtain an accurate solution of proton-hydrogen scattering problem including all underlying processes, namely, direct scattering and ionisation, and electron capture into bound and continuum states of the projectile. In this presentation we give a general overview of current progress in applications of the two-centre CCC approach to ion-atom and atom-atom collisions. The work is supported by the Australian Research Council.

  4. Molecular ion implantation technique for obtaining the same depth profile for the component atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Junzo; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Mimura, Masakazu; Gotoh, Yasuhito

    1996-12-31

    The molecular ion implantation, in which the ions of polyatomic molecule are used as an implantation particle, is expected to have two main advantages: (1) obtaining the similar depth profiles of implanted component atoms of different elements at a single implantation, and (2) achieving simultaneous implantation of different atoms at the same position. In this paper, we have showed these advantages by an analytical estimation of the projected ranges for each implanted atoms of a polyatomic molecule, and then, by the computer simulation by TRIM. In addition, the experimental results obtained by SIMS were also presented. As for the evaluation of depth profiles, the overlap areas between two depth distributions were calculated by a numerical integration as a degree of the similarity between two depth profiles of different atoms. As a result, the projected ranges and overlap areas showed that depth profiles are almost the same in a usual implantation energy range, except of hydrogen due to the lack of neutron in the nucleus. For the simple evaluation for the similarity of two depth profiles, a factor S was proposed instead of the overlap area.

  5. Influence of the plasma environment on atomic structure using an ion-sphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkhiri, Madeny; Fontes, Christopher J.; Poirier, Michel

    2015-09-01

    Plasma environment effects on atomic structure are analyzed using various atomic structure codes. To monitor the effect of high free-electron density or low temperatures, Fermi-Dirac and Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics are compared. After a discussion of the implementation of the Fermi-Dirac approach within the ion-sphere model, several applications are considered. In order to check the consistency of the modifications brought here to extant codes, calculations have been performed using the Los Alamos Cowan Atomic Structure (cats) code in its Hartree-Fock or Hartree-Fock-Slater form and the parametric potential Flexible Atomic Code (fac). The ground-state energy shifts due to the plasma effects for the six most ionized aluminum ions have been calculated using the fac and cats codes and fairly agree. For the intercombination resonance line in Fe22 +, the plasma effect within the uniform electron gas model results in a positive shift that agrees with the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock value of B. Saha and S. Fritzsche [J. Phys. B 40, 259 (2007), 10.1088/0953-4075/40/2/002]. Last, the present model is compared to experimental data in titanium measured on the terawatt Astra facility and provides values for electron temperature and density in agreement with the maria code.

  6. Electron-loss and excitation cross sections for a He+ ion colliding with various atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Toshiaki

    1985-10-01

    A unitarized impact-parameter method is applied to calculate the electron-loss and excitation cross sections for He+ ions colliding with atoms. The projectile ionization and excitation are dominantly caused by the average potential field of the target atom (atomic number Z2). The inelastic process of exciting the target atom contributes negligibly except for light target elements. We adopt the Molière potential to describe this average potential field. The energy dependences of the electron-loss cross sections in He, N2, and Ar targets are in good agreement with the reported data. In the case of the Kr target, the present theory yields larger cross sections than the data, especially below 1 MeV impact energy of a He+ projectile. The calculated loss cross sections at impact velocity ranging from 2v0 to 6v0 (v0=2.18×108 cm/s) show a weaker Z2 dependence in the large Z2 region than that given by the Bohr formula. As for the cross section for exciting the ground state of a projectile to the first excited state, a similar weak Z2 dependence can be found. The recent experimental results using 40-MeV F8+ ions colliding with He, Ne, Ar, and Kr targets have supported this tendency.

  7. Influence of the plasma environment on atomic structure using an ion-sphere model

    DOE PAGES

    Belkhiri, Madeny Jean; Fontes, Christopher John; Poirier, Michel

    2015-09-03

    Plasma environment effects on atomic structure are analyzed using various atomic structure codes. To monitor the effect of high free-electron density or low temperatures, Fermi-Dirac and Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics are compared. After a discussion of the implementation of the Fermi-Dirac approach within the ion-sphere model, several applications are considered. In order to check the consistency of the modifications brought here to extant codes, calculations have been performed using the Los Alamos Cowan Atomic Structure (cats) code in its Hartree-Fock or Hartree-Fock-Slater form and the parametric potential Flexible Atomic Code (fac). The ground-state energy shifts due to the plasma effects for themore » six most ionized aluminum ions have been calculated using the fac and cats codes and fairly agree. For the intercombination resonance line in Fe22+, the plasma effect within the uniform electron gas model results in a positive shift that agrees with the MCDF value of B. Saha et al.« less

  8. Influence of the plasma environment on atomic structure using an ion-sphere model

    SciTech Connect

    Belkhiri, Madeny Jean; Fontes, Christopher John; Poirier, Michel

    2015-09-03

    Plasma environment effects on atomic structure are analyzed using various atomic structure codes. To monitor the effect of high free-electron density or low temperatures, Fermi-Dirac and Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics are compared. After a discussion of the implementation of the Fermi-Dirac approach within the ion-sphere model, several applications are considered. In order to check the consistency of the modifications brought here to extant codes, calculations have been performed using the Los Alamos Cowan Atomic Structure (cats) code in its Hartree-Fock or Hartree-Fock-Slater form and the parametric potential Flexible Atomic Code (fac). The ground-state energy shifts due to the plasma effects for the six most ionized aluminum ions have been calculated using the fac and cats codes and fairly agree. For the intercombination resonance line in Fe22+, the plasma effect within the uniform electron gas model results in a positive shift that agrees with the MCDF value of B. Saha et al.

  9. A highly miniaturized vacuum package for a trapped ion atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Partner, Heather; Casias, Adrian; Wagner, Adrian R.; Moorman, Matthew; Manginell, Ronald P.; Kellogg, James R.; Prestage, John D.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the development of a highly miniaturized vacuum package for use in an atomic clock utilizing trapped ytterbium-171 ions. The vacuum package is approximately 1 cm3 in size and contains a linear quadrupole RF Paul ion trap, miniature neutral Yb sources, and a non-evaporable getter pump. We describe the fabrication process for making the Yb sources and assembling the vacuum package. To prepare the vacuum package for ion trapping, it was evacuated, baked at a high temperature, and then back filled with a helium buffer gas. Once appropriate vacuum conditions were achieved in the package, it was sealed with a copper pinch-off and was subsequently pumped only by the non-evaporable getter. We demonstrated ion trapping in this vacuum package and the operation of an atomic clock, stabilizing a local oscillator to the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of 171Y b+. The fractional frequency stability of the clock was measured to be 2 × 10-11/τ1/2.

  10. Time-of-flight mass spectrographs—From ions to neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möbius, E.; Galvin, A. B.; Kistler, L. M.; Kucharek, H.; Popecki, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    After their introduction to space physics in the mid 1980s time-of-flight (TOF) spectrographs have become a main staple in spaceborne mass spectrometry. They have largely replaced magnetic spectrometers, except when extremely high mass resolution is required to identify complex molecules, for example, in the vicinity of comets or in planetary atmospheres. In combination with electrostatic analyzers and often solid state detectors, TOF spectrographs have become key instruments to diagnose space plasma velocity distributions, mass, and ionic charge composition. With a variety of implementation schemes that also include isochronous electric field configurations, TOF spectrographs can respond to diverse science requirements. This includes a wide range in mass resolution to allow the separation of medium heavy isotopes or to simply provide distributions of the major species, such as H, He, and O, to obtain information on source tracers or mass fluxes. With a top-hat analyzer at the front end, or in combination with deflectors for three-axis stabilized spacecraft, the distribution function of ions can be obtained with good time resolution. Most recently, the reach of TOF ion mass spectrographs has been extended to include energetic neutral atoms. After selecting the arrival direction with mechanical collimation, followed by conversion to ions, adapted TOF sensors form a new branch of the spectrograph family tree. We review the requirements, challenges, and implementation schemes for ion and neutral atom spectrographs, including potential directions for the future, while largely avoiding overlap with complementary contributions in this special issue.

  11. A highly miniaturized vacuum package for a trapped ion atomic clock

    DOE PAGES

    Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Partner, Heather; ...

    2016-05-12

    We report on the development of a highly miniaturized vacuum package for use in an atomic clock utilizing trapped ytterbium-171 ions. The vacuum package is approximately 1 cm3 in size and contains a linear quadrupole RF Paul ion trap, miniature neutral Yb sources, and a non-evaporable getter pump. We describe the fabrication process for making the Yb sources and assembling the vacuum package. To prepare the vacuum package for ion trapping, it was evacuated, baked at a high temperature, and then back filled with a helium buffer gas. Once appropriate vacuum conditions were achieved in the package, the package wasmore » sealed with a copper pinch-off and was then pumped only by the non-evaporable getter. We demonstrated ion trapping in this vacuum package and the operation of an atomic clock, stabilizing a local oscillator to the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of 171Yb+. The fractional frequency stability of the clock was measured to be 2 × 10-11 / τ1/2.« less

  12. A highly miniaturized vacuum package for a trapped ion atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Partner, Heather; Casias, Adrian; Wagner, Adrian R.; Moorman, Matthew; Manginell, Ronald P.; Kellogg, James R.; Prestage, John D.

    2016-05-12

    We report on the development of a highly miniaturized vacuum package for use in an atomic clock utilizing trapped ytterbium-171 ions. The vacuum package is approximately 1 cm3 in size and contains a linear quadrupole RF Paul ion trap, miniature neutral Yb sources, and a non-evaporable getter pump. We describe the fabrication process for making the Yb sources and assembling the vacuum package. To prepare the vacuum package for ion trapping, it was evacuated, baked at a high temperature, and then back filled with a helium buffer gas. Once appropriate vacuum conditions were achieved in the package, the package was sealed with a copper pinch-off and was then pumped only by the non-evaporable getter. We demonstrated ion trapping in this vacuum package and the operation of an atomic clock, stabilizing a local oscillator to the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of 171Yb+. The fractional frequency stability of the clock was measured to be 2 × 10-11 / τ1/2.

  13. Dipole moments and orientation polarizabilities of diatomic molecular ions for precision atomic mass measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Michelle; Brown, John M.; Rosmus, Pavel; Linguerri, Roberto; Komiha, Najia; Myers, Edmund G.

    2007-01-01

    In high precision Penning trap mass spectrometry the cyclotron frequency of a polarizable ion is perturbed due to the Stark interaction with the motional electric field. For polar diatomic molecular ions, which have adjacent rotational levels of opposite parity, these shifts can be particularly large—especially for the lowest rotational levels, which are those occupied by ions stored for many hours in cryogenic Penning traps. In order to provide corrections to precision atomic mass measurements, we consider the calculation of orientation polarizabilities of CO+ and the positive ions of the first and second row diatomic hydrides, LiH+ to ArH+ . Dipole moments for these ions have been calculated using the restricted coupled cluster method with perturbative triples and large basis sets. Using these dipoles and an effective Hamiltonian, we have obtained rotational-state dependent polarizabilities of the open-shell diatomic ions CO+ , NH+ , OH+ , FH+ , PH+ , SH+ , and ClH+ . Results are given for those rotational levels that are significantly populated at 4.2K , for magnetic fields up to 10T . For the remaining first and second row hydride cations, polarizabilities at the magnetic fields of interest can be obtained from a simple formula valid for closed-shell molecules. Conversely, in cases where the polarizability shifts can be measured, our results enable experimental determination of dipole moments.

  14. The role of the auxiliary atomic ion beam in C60(+)-Ar+ co-sputtering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Chun; Liu, Chi-Ping; Kuo, Che-Hung; Chang, Hsun-Yun; Chang, Chi-Jen; Hsieh, Tung-Han; Lee, Szu-Hsian; You, Yun-Wen; Kao, Wei-Lun; Yen, Guo-Ji; Huang, Chih-Chieh; Shyue, Jing-Jong

    2011-03-07

    Cluster ion sputtering has been proven to be an effective technique for depth profiling of organic materials. In particular, C(60)(+) ion beams are widely used to profile soft matter. The limitation of carbon deposition associated with C(60)(+) sputtering can be alleviated by concurrently using a low-energy Ar(+) beam. In this work, the role of this auxiliary atomic ion beam was examined by using an apparatus that could analyze the sputtered materials and the remaining target simultaneously using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), respectively. It was found that the auxiliary 0.2 kV Ar(+) stream was capable of slowly removing the carbon deposition and suppresses the carbon from implantation. As a result, a more steady sputtering condition was achieved more quickly with co-sputtering than by using C(60)(+) alone. Additionally, the Ar(+) beam was found to interfere with the C(60)(+) beam and may lower the overall sputtering rate and secondary ion intensity in some cases. Therefore, the current of this auxiliary ion beam needs to be carefully optimized for successful depth profiling.

  15. Fabrication of ion conductive tin oxide-phosphate amorphous thin films by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Suk Won; Jang, Dong Young; Kim, Jun Woo; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2015-07-15

    This work reports the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of tin oxide-phosphate films using tetrakis(dimethylamino)tin and trimethyl phosphate as precursors. The growth rates were 1.23–1.84 Å/cycle depending upon the deposition temperature and precursor combination. The ionic conductivity of the ALD tin oxide-phosphate films was evaluated by cross-plane impedance measurements in the temperature range of 50–300 °C under atmospheric air, with the highest conductivity measured as 1.92 × 10{sup −5} S cm{sup −1} at 300 °C. Furthermore, high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy exhibited two O1s peaks that were classified as two subpeaks of hydroxyl ions and oxygen ions, revealing that the quantity of hydroxyl ions in the ALD tin oxide-phosphate films influences their ionic conductivity.

  16. Silicon dioxide mask by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition in focused ion beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengjun; Shah, Ali; Alasaarela, Tapani; Chekurov, Nikolai; Savin, Hele; Tittonen, Ilkka

    2017-02-01

    In this work, focused ion beam (FIB) lithography was developed for plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited (PEALD) silicon dioxide SiO2 hard mask. The PEALD process greatly decreases the deposition temperature of the SiO2 hard mask. FIB Ga+ ion implantation on the deposited SiO2 layer increases the wet etch resistivity of the irradiated region. A programmed exposure in FIB followed by development in a wet etchant enables the precisely defined nanoscale patterning. The combination of FIB exposure parameters and the development time provides greater freedom for optimization. The developed process provides high pattern dimension accuracy over the tested range of 90–210 nm. Utilizing the SiO2 mask developed in this work, silicon nanopillars with 40 nm diameter were successfully fabricated with cryogenic deep reactive ion etching and the aspect ratio reached 16:1. The fabricated mask is suitable for sub-100 nm high aspect ratio silicon structure fabrication.

  17. Silicon dioxide mask by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition in focused ion beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengjun; Shah, Ali; Alasaarela, Tapani; Chekurov, Nikolai; Savin, Hele; Tittonen, Ilkka

    2017-02-24

    In this work, focused ion beam (FIB) lithography was developed for plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited (PEALD) silicon dioxide SiO2 hard mask. The PEALD process greatly decreases the deposition temperature of the SiO2 hard mask. FIB Ga(+) ion implantation on the deposited SiO2 layer increases the wet etch resistivity of the irradiated region. A programmed exposure in FIB followed by development in a wet etchant enables the precisely defined nanoscale patterning. The combination of FIB exposure parameters and the development time provides greater freedom for optimization. The developed process provides high pattern dimension accuracy over the tested range of 90-210 nm. Utilizing the SiO2 mask developed in this work, silicon nanopillars with 40 nm diameter were successfully fabricated with cryogenic deep reactive ion etching and the aspect ratio reached 16:1. The fabricated mask is suitable for sub-100 nm high aspect ratio silicon structure fabrication.

  18. Atomic Scale Picture of the Ion Conduction Mechanism in Tetrahedral Network of Lanthanum Barium Gallate

    SciTech Connect

    Jalarvo, Niina H; Gourdon, Olivier; Bi, Zhonghe; Gout, Delphine J; Ohl, Michael E; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    2013-01-01

    Combined experimental study of impedance spectroscopy, neutron powder diffraction and quasielastic neutron scattering was performed to shed light into the atomic scale ion migration processes in proton and oxide ion conductor; La0.8Ba1.2GaO3.9 . This material consist of tetrahedral GaO4 units, which are rather flexible and rocking motion of these units promotes the ionic migration process. The oxide ion (vacancy) conduction takes place on channels along c axis, involving a single elementary step, which occurs between adjacent tetrahedron (inter-tetrahedron jump). The proton conduction mechanism consists of intra-tetrahedron and inter-tetrahedron elementary processes. The intra-tetrahedron proton transport is the rate-limiting process, with activation energy of 0.44 eV. The rocking motion of the GaO4 tetrahedron aids the inter-tetrahedral proton transport, which has the activation energy of 0.068 eV.

  19. Transition rates for lithium-like ions, sodium-like ions, and neutral alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Liu, Z.W.; Sapirstein, J.

    1996-11-01

    Third-order many-body perturbation theory is used to obtain E1 transition amplitudes for ions of the lithium and sodium isoelectronic sequences and for the neutral alkali-metal atoms potassium, rubidium, cesium, and francium. Complete angular reductions of the first, second, and third-order amplitudes are given. Tables of transition energies and rates are given for the 2p{sub {1/2}} {yields} 2s{sub {1/2}}, 2p{sub 3/2} {yields} 2s{sub {1/2}}, 3s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 2p{sub {1/2}}, and 3s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 2p{sub 3/2} transitions in the lithium isoelectronic sequence and for the corresponding 3p{sub 1/2} {yields} 3s{sub 1/2}, 3p{sub 3/2} {yields} 3s{sub {1/2}}, 4s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 3p{sub 1/2}, and 4s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 3p{sub 3/2} transitions in the sodium sequence. For neutral alkali atoms, amplitudes of np{sub {1/2}} {yields} ns{sub {1/2}}, np{sub 3/2} {yields} ns{sub {1/2}}, (n + 1)s{sub {1/2}} {yields} np{sub {1/2}}, and (n + 1)s{sub {1/2}} {yields} np{sub 3/2} transitions are evaluated, where n is the principal quantum number of the valence electron in the atomic ground state, Semi-empirical corrections for the omitted fourth- and higher-order terms in perturbation theory are given for the neutral alkali-metal atoms. Comparisons with previous high-precision calculations and with experiment are made. 42 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

  20. Arc plasma generator of atomic driver for steady-state negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. A.; Belchenko, Yu. I.; Davydenko, V. I.; Ivanov, I. A.; Kolmogorov, V. V.; Listopad, A. A. Mishagin, V. V.; Shulzhenko, G. I.; Putvinsky, S. V.; Smirnov, A.

    2014-02-15

    The paper reviews the results of development of steady-state arc-discharge plasma generator with directly heated LaB{sub 6} cathode. This arc-discharge plasma generator produces a plasma jet which is to be converted into an atomic one after recombination on a metallic plate. The plate is electrically biased relative to the plasma in order to control the atom energies. Such an intensive jet of hydrogen atoms can be used in negative ion sources for effective production of negative ions on a cesiated surface of plasma grid. All elements of the plasma generator have an augmented water cooling to operate in long pulse mode or in steady state. The thermo-mechanical stresses and deformations of the most critical elements of the plasma generator were determined by simulations. Magnetic field inside the discharge chamber was optimized to reduce the local power loads. The first tests of the steady-state arc plasma generator prototype have performed in long-pulse mode.

  1. Arc plasma generator of atomic driver for steady-state negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A A; Belchenko, Yu I; Davydenko, V I; Ivanov, I A; Kolmogorov, V V; Listopad, A A; Mishagin, V V; Putvinsky, S V; Shulzhenko, G I; Smirnov, A

    2014-02-01

    The paper reviews the results of development of steady-state arc-discharge plasma generator with directly heated LaB6 cathode. This arc-discharge plasma generator produces a plasma jet which is to be converted into an atomic one after recombination on a metallic plate. The plate is electrically biased relative to the plasma in order to control the atom energies. Such an intensive jet of hydrogen atoms can be used in negative ion sources for effective production of negative ions on a cesiated surface of plasma grid. All elements of the plasma generator have an augmented water cooling to operate in long pulse mode or in steady state. The thermo-mechanical stresses and deformations of the most critical elements of the plasma generator were determined by simulations. Magnetic field inside the discharge chamber was optimized to reduce the local power loads. The first tests of the steady-state arc plasma generator prototype have performed in long-pulse mode.

  2. Cross section database for carbon atoms and ions: Electron-impact ionization, excitation, and charge exchange in collisions with hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Suno, Hiroya . E-mail: suno@jamstec.go.jp; Kato, Takako

    2006-07-15

    A database has been constructed consisting of the recommended cross sections for electron-impact excitation and ionization of carbon atoms and ions C, C{sup +}-C{sup 5+}, asl as for charge exchange processes between carbon ions C{sup +}-C{sup 6+} and hydrogen atoms. We have collected a large amount of theoretical and experimental cross section data from the literature, and have critically assessed their accuracy. The recommended cross sections, the best values for use, are expressed in the form of simple analytical functions. These are also presented in graphical form.

  3. Short-range ordering of ion-implanted nitrogen atoms in SiC-graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Willke, P.; Druga, T.; Wenderoth, M.; Amani, J. A.; Weikert, S.; Hofsäss, H.; Thakur, S.; Maiti, K.

    2014-09-15

    We perform a structural analysis of nitrogen-doped graphene on SiC(0001) prepared by ultra low-energy ion bombardment. Using scanning tunneling microscopy, we show that nitrogen atoms are incorporated almost exclusively as graphitic substitution in the graphene honeycomb lattice. With an irradiation energy of 25 eV and a fluence of approximately 5 × 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2}, we achieve a nitrogen content of around 1%. By quantitatively comparing the position of the N-atoms in the topography measurements with simulated random distributions, we find statistically significant short-range correlations. Consequently, we are able to show that the dopants arrange preferably at lattice sites given by the 6 × 6-reconstruction of the underlying substrate. This selective incorporation is most likely triggered by adsorbate layers present during the ion bombardment. This study identifies low-energy ion irradiation as a promising method for controlled doping in epitaxial graphene.

  4. Performance predictions of a focused ion beam from a laser cooled and compressed atomic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Haaf, G.; Wouters, S. H. W.; van der Geer, S. B.; Vredenbregt, E. J. D.; Mutsaers, P. H. A.

    2014-12-01

    Focused ion beams are indispensable tools in the semiconductor industry because of their ability to image and modify structures at the nanometer length scale. Here, we report on performance predictions of a new type of focused ion beam based on photo-ionization of a laser cooled and compressed atomic beam. Particle tracing simulations are performed to investigate the effects of disorder-induced heating after ionization in a large electric field. They lead to a constraint on this electric field strength which is used as input for an analytical model which predicts the minimum attainable spot size as a function of, amongst others, the flux density of the atomic beam, the temperature of this beam, and the total current. At low currents (I < 10 pA), the spot size will be limited by a combination of spherical aberration and brightness, while at higher currents, this is a combination of chromatic aberration and brightness. It is expected that a nanometer size spot is possible at a current of 1 pA. The analytical model was verified with particle tracing simulations of a complete focused ion beam setup. A genetic algorithm was used to find the optimum acceleration electric field as a function of the current. At low currents, the result agrees well with the analytical model, while at higher currents, the spot sizes found are even lower due to effects that are not taken into account in the analytical model.

  5. Atomic physics measurements using an ECR ion source located on a 350-kV high-voltage platform

    SciTech Connect

    Dunford, R.W.; Berry, H.G.; Liu, C.J.; Hass, M.; Pardo, R.C.; Raphaelian, M.L.A.; Zabransky, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    We report on a new atomic physics facility at the Argonne PII ECR ion source which was built for the Uranium Upgrade of the ATLAS heavy-ion accelerator. An important feature of our ECR ion source is that it is on a high-voltage platform which provides beam energies of up to 350q keV, where q is the charge of the ion. We discuss the experimental program in progress at this ion source which includes measurements of state-selective electron capture cross sections, photon and electron spectroscopy, studies of quasi-molecular collisions, and polarization studies using an optically pumped Na target. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Implementation of atomically defined field ion microscopy tips in scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, William; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grütter, Peter

    2012-08-01

    The field ion microscope (FIM) can be used to characterize the atomic configuration of the apices of sharp tips. These tips are well suited for scanning probe microscope (SPM) use since they predetermine the SPM resolution and the electronic structure for spectroscopy. A protocol is proposed for preserving the atomic structure of the tip apex from etching due to gas impurities during the period of transfer from the FIM to the SPM, and estimations are made regarding the time limitations of such an experiment due to contamination with ultra-high vacuum rest gases. While avoiding any current setpoint overshoot to preserve the tip integrity, we present results from approaches of atomically defined tungsten tips to the tunneling regime with Au(111), HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) and Si(111) surfaces at room temperature. We conclude from these experiments that adatom mobility and physisorbed gas on the sample surface limit the choice of surfaces for which the tip integrity is preserved in tunneling experiments at room temperature. The atomic structure of FIM tip apices is unchanged only after tunneling to the highly reactive Si(111) surface.

  7. Modern Focused-Ion-Beam-Based Site-Specific Specimen Preparation for Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Prosa, Ty J; Larson, David J

    2017-02-06

    Approximately 30 years after the first use of focused ion beam (FIB) instruments to prepare atom probe tomography specimens, this technique has grown to be used by hundreds of researchers around the world. This past decade has seen tremendous advances in atom probe applications, enabled by the continued development of FIB-based specimen preparation methodologies. In this work, we provide a short review of the origin of the FIB method and the standard methods used today for lift-out and sharpening, using the annular milling method as applied to atom probe tomography specimens. Key steps for enabling correlative analysis with transmission electron-beam backscatter diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography are presented, and strategies for preparing specimens for modern microelectronic device structures are reviewed and discussed in detail. Examples are used for discussion of the steps for each of these methods. We conclude with examples of the challenges presented by complex topologies such as nanowires, nanoparticles, and organic materials.

  8. Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Arikawa, Hiroshi Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawamura, H.; Kato, K.; Kato, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Sakemi, Y.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Yoshida, H. P.; Imai, K.; and others

    2014-02-15

    The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a {sup 18}O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line.

  9. Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawamura, H.; Kato, K.; Kato, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2014-02-01

    The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a 18O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line.

  10. Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ando, S; Aoki, T; Ezure, S; Harada, K; Hayamizu, T; Inoue, T; Ishikawa, T; Itoh, M; Kawamura, H; Kato, K; Kato, T; Uchiyama, A; Aoki, T; Furukawa, T; Hatakeyama, A; Hatanaka, K; Imai, K; Murakami, T; Nataraj, H S; Sato, T; Shimizu, Y; Wakasa, T; Yoshida, H P; Sakemi, Y

    2014-02-01

    The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a (18)O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line.

  11. Atom Probe Field Ion Microscopy of Zr-Doped Polysynthetically Twinned Titanium Aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, H.; Larson, D.J.; Miller, M.K.; Yamaguchi, M.

    1999-02-28

    Interracial segregation and partitioning in a polysynthetically twinned Ti-48.4 at.% Al-0.6% Zr alloy were investigated by atom probe field ion microscopy and atom probe tomography. The compositions of the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases were determined to be Ti-47.5% Al-O.71% Zr-0.06% O and Ti-31.6% Al-0.68% Zr-2.4% O, respectively. These results indicate a high concentration of zirconium in both matrix phases, confirming a strength increase through solid-solution strengthening, but no significant zirconium partitioning to either phase. Although zirconium additions produced a refined lamellar microstructure in this material, compositional analysis of {gamma}/{gamma} and {gamma}/{alpha}{sub 2} interfaces showed no evidence of significant zirconium segregation. This suggests that zirconium additions may produce a refined lamellar microstructure, but may not be effective at providing resistance to growth and coarsening.

  12. Improved Roothaan-Hartree-Fock wave functions for atoms and ions with N <= 54

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Toshikatsu; Watanabe, Shinya; Kanayama, Katsutoshi; Yasuda, Ryuji; Thakkar, Ajit J.

    1995-08-01

    Improved Roothaan-Hartree-Fock wave functions are reported for the ground states of all the neutral atoms from He to Xe, singly charged cations from Li+ to Cs+, and stable singly charged anions from H- to I-. Our neutral atom wave functions are an improvement over those of Clementi and Roetti [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 14, 177 (1974)], Bunge et al. [Phys. Rev. A 46, 3691 (1992)] and Koga et al. [Phys. Rev. A 47, 4510 (1993)]. The ion wave functions are an improvement over those of Clementi and Roetti, and Koga et al. [J. Phys. B 26, 2529 (1993)]. In all cases, the current wave functions predict energies within 1.3×10-5 hartrees of the numerical Hartree-Fock limit.

  13. Hierarchical surface atomic structure of a manganese-based spinel cathode for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghan; Yoon, Gabin; Jeong, Minseul; Lee, Min-Joon; Kang, Kisuk; Cho, Jaephil

    2015-01-19

    The increasing use of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) in high-power applications requires improvement of their high-temperature electrochemical performance, including their cyclability and rate capability. Spinel lithium manganese oxide (LiMn2O4) is a promising cathode material because of its high stability and abundance. However, it exhibits poor cycling performance at high temperatures owing to Mn dissolution. Herein we show that when stoichiometric lithium manganese oxide is coated with highly doped spinels, the resulting epitaxial coating has a hierarchical atomic structure consisting of cubic-spinel, tetragonal-spinel, and layered structures, and no interfacial phase is formed. In a practical application of the coating to doped spinel, the material retained 90% of its capacity after 800 cycles at 60 °C. Thus, the formation of an epitaxial coating with a hierarchical atomic structure could enhance the electrochemical performance of LIB cathode materials while preventing large losses in capacity.

  14. Charge exchange transition probability for collisions between unlike ions and atoms within the adiabatic approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, John W.

    1989-01-01

    A simple formula for the transition probability for electron exchange between unlike ions and atoms is established within the adiabatic approximation by employing the Linear Combination of Atomic Orbitals (LCAO) method. The formula also involves an adiabatic parameter, introduced by Massey, and thus the difficulties arising from the internal energy defect and the adiabatic approximation are avoided. Specific reactions Li(+++) + H to Li(++) + H(+) and Be(4+) + H to Be(3+) + H(+) are considered as examples. The calculated capture cross section results of the present work are compared with the experimental data and with the calculation of other authors over the velocity range of 10(7) cm/sec to 10(8) cm/sec.

  15. Ion-biomolecule collisions studied within the independent atom model including geometric screening corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüdde, H. J.; Achenbach, A.; Kalkbrenner, T.; Jankowiak, H. C.; Kirchner, T.

    2016-05-01

    A recently introduced model to account for geometric screening corrections in an independent-atom-model description of ion-molecule collisions is applied to proton collisions from amino acids and DNA and RNA nucleobases. The correction coefficients are obtained from using a pixel counting method (PCM) for the exact calculation of the effective cross sectional area that emerges when the molecular cross section is pictured as a structure of (overlapping) atomic cross sections. This structure varies with the relative orientation of the molecule with respect to the projectile beam direction and, accordingly, orientation-independent total cross sections are obtained from averaging the pixel count over many orientations. We present net capture and net ionization cross sections over wide ranges of impact energy and analyze the strength of the screening effect by comparing the PCM results with Bragg additivity rule cross sections and with experimental data where available. Work supported by NSERC, Canada.

  16. Recent Applications of the Lattice, Time-Dependent Schr dinger Equation Approach for Ion-Atom Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, David Robert; Ovchinnikov, S. Yu.; Sternberg, J. B.; Macek, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary computational methods, such as the lattice, time-dependent Schroedinger equation (LTDSE) approach, have opened opportunities to study ion-atom collisions at a new level of detail and to uncover unexpected phenomena. Such interactions within gaseous, plasma, and material environments are fundamental to diverse applications such as low temperature plasma processing of materials, magnetic confinement fusion, and astrophysics. Results are briefly summarized here stemming from recent use of the LTDSE approach, with particular emphasis on elucidation of unexpected vortices in the ejected electron spectrum in ion-atom collisions and for an atom subject to an electric field pulse.

  17. High-power Ti:sapphire lasers for spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms and radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, M.; Dax, A.; Soter, A.

    2012-12-01

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed injection-seeded Ti:sapphire lasers of linewidth Γpl ˜ 6 MHz, pulse energy 50-100 mJ, and output wavelength λ = 726-941 nm. They are being used in two-photon spectroscopy experiments of antiprotonic helium atoms at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. Ti:sapphire lasers of larger linewidth Γpl ˜ 100 MHz but more robust design will also be used in collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiments of neutron-deficient francium ions at the ISOLDE facility.

  18. High-power Ti:sapphire lasers for spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms and radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, M.; Dax, A.; Soter, A.

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed injection-seeded Ti:sapphire lasers of linewidth Γpl ˜ 6 MHz, pulse energy 50-100 mJ, and output wavelength λ = 726-941 nm. They are being used in two-photon spectroscopy experiments of antiprotonic helium atoms at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. Ti:sapphire lasers of larger linewidth Γpl ˜ 100 MHz but more robust design will also be used in collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiments of neutron-deficient francium ions at the ISOLDE facility.

  19. One and a half centered expansion for ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Reading, J.F.; Ford, A.L.; Becker, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Fast ion-atom collisions in which charge transfer plays a dominant role have been traditionally treated by a two center expansion (TCE): the state wavefunction is approximated by a truncated set of Hilbert states centered on the target and projectile. This method is accurate but expensive in the use of computer time. A new method which allows charge transfer through variational time independent amplitudes, and target excitation and ionization through variational time dependent amplitudes is presented. The method retains the efficiency of a single centered expansion and yet reproduces the conventional TCE results in situations where charge transfer is dominant. Comparison to experiment is made.

  20. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-06-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology-based society.

  1. Atom probe field-ion microscopy characterization of nickel and titanium aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.J.; Miller, M.K.

    2000-02-01

    A review of the contributions of atom probe field-ion microscopy to the characterization of nickel and titanium aluminides is presented. The nickel aluminide systems studied include boron-doped Ni{sub 3}Al and boron-, carbon-, beryllium-, zirconium-, molybdenum-, and hafnium-doped NiAl. These systems have been characterized in terms of solute segregation to boundaries, dislocations, and other defects, matrix solubilities, precipitation, and site-occupation probabilities. The partitioning behavior of impurities and alloying additions, matrix solubilities, precipitate compositions, and interfacial segregation in several of {alpha}{sub 2} + {gamma} titanium aluminides and related alloys are also reviewed.

  2. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology.

    PubMed

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J

    2016-06-28

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology-based society.

  3. Challenges of Theoretical Spectroscopy of Heavy and Superheavy Atoms and Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Gaigalas, Gediminas; Rudzikas, Zenonas

    2011-05-11

    A review of methods of efficient accounting for correlation and relativistic effects is presented. A considerable part of efforts for these approaches must be devoted to coping with integrations over spin-angular variables, occurring in the matrix elements of the operators under consideration. Efficient methods to find the abovementioned quantities are described, based on the use of symmetry properties of operators and matrix elements in three spaces (orbital, spin and quasispin), on second quantization in coupled tensorial form, and on graphical technique. This allows to study and to generate fairly accurate their spectroscopic data practically for any atom and ion of periodical table.

  4. Dynamic dipole polarizabilities of the Li atom and the Be{sup +} ion

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Liyan; Yan Zongchao; Shi Tingyun; Mitroy, J.

    2010-04-15

    The dynamic dipole polarizabilities for Li atoms and Be{sup +} ions in the 2 {sup 2}S and 2 {sup 2}P states are calculated using the variational method with a Hylleraas basis. The present polarizabilities represent the definitive values in the nonrelativistic limit. Corrections due to relativistic effects are also estimated. Analytic representations of the polarizabilities for frequency ranges encompassing the n=3 excitations are presented. The recommended polarizabilities for {sup 7}Li and {sup 9}Be{sup +} are 164.11{+-}0.03 a{sub 0}{sup 3} and 24.489{+-}0.004 a{sub 0}{sup 3}, respectively.

  5. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology

    PubMed Central

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology–based society. PMID:27317740

  6. Ejection of atoms and molecules from Io by plasma-ion impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sieveka, E. M.; Johnson, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    The directions and energy distributions of neutral atoms and molecules ejected from Io are modeled analytically. The particles are emitted from the Io exosphere by collisions of incident plasma ions. Some of the Io atmosphere is attributed to particles sputtered off the surface by incoming plasma ions, while other departing particles originate at the top of volcanic plumes. Account is taken of the thermal motion of incident plasma and Io's gravitational field when calculating the distribution of the ejected particles. The distributions associated with each type of ejection force are projected to be different and highly dependent on the inclusion of realistic cross-sections. Attention is focused on Na-rich species and defining ejection processes which can be verified with ground-based observations. It is, however, concluded that no particles are ejected directly from the surface by Jean's escape.

  7. Unexplained features of capture and ionization for ion-aligned-Rydberg-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perumal, A. N.; Tripathi, D. N.

    2001-10-01

    Observed but unexplained features, namely, oscillations in the capture cross sections and an unexpected increase in the ionization cross sections at lower velocities, are discussed using classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulated results for ion-aligned-Rydberg-atom collisions. The initial alignment (m=0, 1, and 2) dependence of the cross sections shows evidence of ``capture through quasimolecular ion formation,'' identified as the most likely cause for the oscillations. Spatial overlap, in addition to the velocity matching mechanism, is shown to play an important role in the collision process. The unexpected rise in the ionization cross section toward lower reduced velocities is explained qualitatively in terms of the multiple encounter model [Perumal and Tripathi, Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 143, 429 (1998)].

  8. Wave packet dynamics of an atomic ion in a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemloo, A.; Dion, C. M.; Rahali, G.

    2016-07-01

    Using numerical simulations of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we study the full quantum dynamics of the motion of an atomic ion in a linear Paul trap. Such a trap is based on a time-varying, periodic electric field and hence corresponds to a time-dependent potential for the ion, which we model exactly. We compare the center-of-mass motion with that obtained from classical equations of motion, as well as to results based on a time-independent effective potential. We also study the oscillations of the width of the ion’s wave packet, including close to the border between stable (bounded) and unstable (unbounded) trajectories. Our results confirm that the center-of-mass motion always follows the classical trajectory, that the width of the wave packet is bounded for trapping within the stability region, and therefore that the classical trapping criterion is fully applicable to quantum motion.

  9. A fully relativistic approach for calculating atomic data for highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hong Lin; Fontes, Christopher J; Sampson, Douglas H

    2009-01-01

    We present a review of our fully relativistic approach to calculating atomic data for highly charged ions, highlighting a research effort that spans twenty years. Detailed discussions of both theoretical and numerical techniques are provided. Our basic approach is expected to provide accurate results for ions that range from approximately half ionized to fully stripped. Options for improving the accuracy and range of validity of this approach are also discussed. In developing numerical methods for calculating data within this framework, considerable emphasis is placed on techniques that are robust and efficient. A variety of fundamental processes are considered including: photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation, electron-impact ionization, autoionization, electron capture, photoionization and photorecombination. Resonance contributions to a variety of these processes are also considered, including discussions of autoionization, electron capture and dielectronic recombination. Ample numerical examples are provided in order to illustrate the approach and to demonstrate its usefulness in providing data for large-scale plasma modeling.

  10. Coating and functionalization of high density ion track structures by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mättö, Laura; Szilágyi, Imre M.; Laitinen, Mikko; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku; Sajavaara, Timo

    2016-10-01

    In this study flexible TiO2 coated porous Kapton membranes are presented having electron multiplication properties. 800 nm crossing pores were fabricated into 50 μm thick Kapton membranes using ion track technology and chemical etching. Consecutively, 50 nm TiO2 films were deposited into the pores of the Kapton membranes by atomic layer deposition using Ti(iOPr)4 and water as precursors at 250 °C. The TiO2 films and coated membranes were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray reflectometry (XRR). Au metal electrode fabrication onto both sides of the coated foils was achieved by electron beam evaporation. The electron multipliers were obtained by joining two coated membranes separated by a conductive spacer. The results show that electron multiplication can be achieved using ALD-coated flexible ion track polymer foils.

  11. Extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy and atomic models of highly charged heavy ions in the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, C.; Murakami, I.; Koike, F.; Tamura, N.; Sakaue, H. A.; Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Kato, D.; Ohashi, H.; Higashiguchi, T.; Sudo, S.; O'Sullivan, G.

    2017-01-01

    We report recent results of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectroscopy of highly charged heavy ions in plasmas produced in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The LHD is an ideal source of experimental databases of EUV spectra because of high brightness and low opacity, combined with the availability of pellet injection systems and reliable diagnostic tools. The measured heavy elements include tungsten, tin, lanthanides and bismuth, which are motivated by ITER as well as a variety of plasma applications such as EUV lithography and biological microscopy. The observed spectral features drastically change between quasicontinuum and discrete depending on the plasma temperature, which leads to some new experimental identifications of spectral lines. We have developed collisional-radiative models for some of these ions based on the measurements. The atomic number dependence of the spectral feature is also discussed.

  12. Hg-201 (+) CO-Magnetometer for HG-199(+) Trapped Ion Space Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Taghavi, Shervin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Local magnetic field strength in a trapped ion atomic clock is measured in real time, with high accuracy and without degrading clock performance, and the measurement is used to compensate for ambient magnetic field perturbations. First and second isotopes of an element are co-located within the linear ion trap. The first isotope has a resonant microwave transition between two hyperfine energy states, and the second isotope has a resonant Zeeman transition. Optical sources emit ultraviolet light that optically pump both isotopes. A microwave radiation source simultaneously emits microwave fields resonant with the first isotope's clock transition and the second isotope's Zeeman transition, and an optical detector measures the fluorescence from optically pumping both isotopes. The second isotope's Zeeman transition provides the measure of magnetic field strength, and the measurement is used to compensate the first isotope's clock transition or to adjust the applied C-field to reduce the effects of ambient magnetic field perturbations.

  13. Near-threshold photoionization of hydrogenlike uranium studied in ion-atom collisions via the time-reversed process.

    PubMed

    Stöhlker, T; Ma, X; Ludziejewski, T; Beyer, H F; Bosch, F; Brinzanescu, O; Dunford, R W; Eichler, J; Hagmann, S; Ichihara, A; Kozhuharov, C; Krämer, A; Liesen, D; Mokler, P H; Stachura, Z; Swiat, P; Warczak, A

    2001-02-05

    Radiative electron capture, the time-reversed photoionization process occurring in ion-atom collisions, provides presently the only access to photoionization studies for very highly charged ions. By applying the deceleration mode of the ESR storage ring, we studied this process in low-energy collisions of bare uranium ions with low- Z target atoms. This technique allows us to extend the current information about photoionization to much lower energies than those accessible for neutral heavy elements in the direct reaction channel. The results prove that for high- Z systems, higher-order multipole contributions and magnetic corrections persist even at energies close to the threshold.

  14. Two Azimuthally Separated Regions of Cusp Ion Injection Observed via Energetic Neutral Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, M.; Taguchi, S.; Collier, M. R.; Moore, T. E.

    2011-01-01

    The low-energy neutral atom (LENA) imager on the IMAGE spacecraft can detect energetic neutral atoms produced by ion injection into the cusp through a charge exchange with the Earth's hydrogen exosphere. We examined the occurrence of the LENA cusp signal during positive IMF B(sub z) in terms of the arrival direction and the IMF clock angle theta(sub CA). Results of statistical analyses show that the occurrence frequency is high on the postnoon side when theta(sub CA) is between approximately 20 degrees and approximately 50 degrees. This is ascribed to ion injection caused by cusp reconnection typical of positive IMF B(sub z). Our results also show that there is another situation of high occurrence frequency, which can be identified with theta(sub CA) of approximately 30 degrees to approximately 80 degrees. When theta(sub CA) is relatively large (60 degrees - 80 degrees), occurrence frequencies are high at relatively low latitudes over a wide extent spanning both prenoon and postnoon sectors. This feature suggests that the ion injection is caused by reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. Its postnoon side boundary shifts toward the prenoon as theta(sub CA) decreases. When theta(sub CA) is less than approximately 50 degrees, the high occurrence frequency exists well inside the prenoon sector, which is azimuthally separated from the postnoon region ascribed to cusp reconnection. The prenoon region, which is thought due to ion injection caused by dayside reconnection, may explain the recent report that proton aurora brightening occurs in the unanticipated prenoon sector of the northern high-latitude ionosphere for IMF B(sub y) greater than 0 and B(sub z) greater than 0.

  15. Atomic Data for Nebular Abundance Determinations: Photoionization and Recombination Properties of Xenon Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Nicholas C.; Kerlin, Austin B.

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a study of the photoionization (PI) and recombination properties of low-charge Xe ions. The abundances of neutron(n)-capture elements (atomic number Z > 30) are of interest in planetary nebulae (PNe) since they can be enriched by slow n-capture nucleosynthesis (the ``s-process'') in the progenitor asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Xe is particularly valuable, because it is the most widely-observed ``heavy-s'' species (Z > 40) in PNe. Its abundance relative to lighter n-capture elements can be used to determine s-process neutron exposures, and constrain s-process enrichment patterns as a function of progenitor metallicity. Using the atomic structure code AUTOSTRUCTURE (Badnell 2011, Comp. Phys. Comm., 182, 1528), we have computed multi-configuration Breit-Pauli distorted-wave PI cross sections and radiative recombination (RR) and dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for neutral through six-times ionized Xe, data which are critically needed for accurate Xe abundance determinations in ionized nebulae. We find good agreement between our computed direct PI cross sections and experimental measurements. Internal uncertainties are estimated for our calculations by using three different configuration interaction expansions for each ion, and by testing the sensitivity of our results to the radial orbital scaling parameters. As found for other n-capture elements (Sterling & Witthoeft 2011, A&A, 529, A147; Sterling 2011, A&A, 533, A62), DR is the dominant recombination mechanism for Xe ions at nebular temperatures (~104 K). Following Sterling et al. (2015, ApJS, 218, 25), these data will be added to nebular modeling codes to compute ionization correction factors for unobserved Xe ions in PNe, which will enable elemental Xe abundances to be determined with much higher accuracy than is currently possible. This work is supported by NSF award AST-1412928.

  16. Atomic Scale Verification of Oxide-Ion Vacancy Distribution near a Single Grain Boundary in YSZ

    PubMed Central

    An, Jihwan; Park, Joong Sun; Koh, Ai Leen; Lee, Hark B.; Jung, Hee Joon; Schoonman, Joop; Sinclair, Robert; Gür, Turgut M.; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents atomic scale characterization of grain boundary defect structure in a functional oxide with implications for a wide range of electrochemical and electronic behavior. Indeed, grain boundary engineering can alter transport and kinetic properties by several orders of magnitude. Here we report experimental observation and determination of oxide-ion vacancy concentration near the Σ13 (510)/[001] symmetric tilt grain-boundary of YSZ bicrystal using aberration-corrected TEM operated under negative spherical aberration coefficient imaging condition. We show significant oxygen deficiency due to segregation of oxide-ion vacancies near the grain-boundary core with half-width < 0.6 nm. Electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements with scanning TEM indicated increased oxide-ion vacancy concentration at the grain boundary core. Oxide-ion density distribution near a grain boundary simulated by molecular dynamics corroborated well with experimental results. Such column-by-column quantification of defect concentration in functional materials can provide new insights that may lead to engineered grain boundaries designed for specific functionalities. PMID:24042150

  17. Diagnosing Pickup Ion Distributions beyond the Termination Shock through Ener-getic Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, E.; Lee, M. A.; Wu, X.

    2008-12-01

    The solar wind accumulates interstellar pickup ions throughout the heliosphere, which can be described with an isotropic velocity distribution in the plasma frame with a cut-off at the solar wind speed. This distribution is then transported across the termination shock where it is slowed down and heated, thus producing a distribution with a significant portion of ions that show velocity components towards the Sun. In the interaction with the interstellar gas flow through the heliosphere a fraction of these pickup ions is turned into energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), the sunward pointing portion of which can then be observed by ENA sensors in the inner heliosphere, such as instruments on Mars Express, STEREO, and IBEX. In this contribution we generate a simplified analytical model of the pickup ions and their ENA counterparts for a hydrodynamic flow pattern in the heliosheath. The energy distribution of the ENAs is sensitive to the radial component of the heliosheath flow. The attempt is made to predict spatial patterns of the ENA spectra based on the heliosheath flow pattern for comparison with future IBEX maps. These patterns will also be compared with angular variations and temporal changes in the recently published ENA observations with STEREO STE (Wang, L., R.P. Lin, D.E. Larson, J. Luhman, Nature, 454, 81-83, 2008).

  18. Single-Ion Deconvolution of Mass Peak Overlaps for Atom Probe Microscopy.

    PubMed

    London, Andrew J; Haley, Daniel; Moody, Michael P

    2017-03-16

    Due to the intrinsic evaporation properties of the material studied, insufficient mass-resolving power and lack of knowledge of the kinetic energy of incident ions, peaks in the atom probe mass-to-charge spectrum can overlap and result in incorrect composition measurements. Contributions to these peak overlaps can be deconvoluted globally, by simply examining adjacent peaks combined with knowledge of natural isotopic abundances. However, this strategy does not account for the fact that the relative contributions to this convoluted signal can often vary significantly in different regions of the analysis volume; e.g., across interfaces and within clusters. Some progress has been made with spatially localized deconvolution in cases where the discrete microstructural regions can be easily identified within the reconstruction, but this means no further point cloud analyses are possible. Hence, we present an ion-by-ion methodology where the identity of each ion, normally obscured by peak overlap, is resolved by examining the isotopic abundance of their immediate surroundings. The resulting peak-deconvoluted data are a point cloud and can be analyzed with any existing tools. We present two detailed case studies and discussion of the limitations of this new technique.

  19. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H. Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-04-08

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure.

  20. Atomic displacement in solids: analysis of the primary event and the collision cascade. Part I: Neutron and positive ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, P.; Räisänen, J.

    2005-05-01

    A modern, mathematical-physics introduction to the analytical problem of atomic displacement in solids which is both technically adequate and relevant to an introductory graduate students' curriculum in radiation damage theory is reported. The problematic of atomic displacement in solids is introduced didactically, deriving first the primary event (that is, the formation of the primary knock-on atom) and then building on that specific set of results in order to extend their basics to secondary, tertiary and higher-order progeny—the collision cascade—for both neutrons and positive ions, namely, their average damage functions, displacement cross-sections and energy spectra. A comparison of atomic displacement in solids under neutron and positive ion irradiation is discussed in terms of the physical concept of concentration of displaced atoms (or displacement dose).

  1. Energetic negative ion and neutral atom beam generation at passage of laser accelerated high energy positive ions through a liquid spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abicht, F.; Prasad, R.; Priebe, G.; Braenzel, J.; Ehrentraut, L.; Andreev, A.; Nickles, P. V.; Schnürer, M.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Ter-Avetisyan, Sargis

    2013-05-01

    Beams of energetic negative ions and neutral atoms are obtained from water and ethanol spray targets irradiated by high intensity (5×1019 W/cm2) and ultrashort (50 fs) laser pulses. The resulting spectra were measured with the Thomson parabola spectrometer, which enabled absolute measurements of both: positive and negative ions. The generation of a beam of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms was confirmed with CR-39 track detectors and their spectral characteristics have been measured using time of flight technique. Generation is ascribed to electron-capture and -loss processes in the collisions of laser-accelerated high-energy protons with spray of droplets. The same method can be applied to generate energetic negative ions and neutral atoms of different species.

  2. State selective Rydberg charge transfer and ionization in low energy ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perumal, A. N.; Tripathi, D. N.

    1998-10-01

    The Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) simulation method with a core modified interaction potential has been used to study the single charge transfer in Na +and Ar + ions colliding with a variety of state selected Na Rydberg atom targets ( n=24, 28, 33, 40 and l=2) in the reduced velocity region v=0.2-2.0. The experimentally observed structures in the total capture cross section versus reduced velocity curves are reproduced by CTMC method. The n-distribution of final capture state has got two peaks viz. first one at nf= ni and the second one at a higher nf depending on the initial angular momentum in the velocity regime 0.4-0.6. These structures have been explained in terms of quasimolecular-ion formation and a classical model proposed by Roy et al. (B.N. Roy, D.N. Tripathi, D.K. Rai, Phys. Rev. A 5 (1972) 1252). The CTMC ionization cross section results are benchmarked with the recent experimental measurement of Makarov et al. (O.P. Makarov, D.M. Homan, O.P. Sorokina, K.B. MacAdam, in: F. Aumayr, G. Betz, H.P. Winter (Eds.), Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on the Physics of Electronics and Atomic Collisions, Vienna, 1997, p. FR052) for Na +-Na(24 d).

  3. Drifts and Environmental Disturbances in Atomic Clock Subsystems: Quantifying Local Oscillator, Control Loop, & Ion Resonance Interactions.

    PubMed

    Enzer, Daphna G; Diener, William A; Murphy, David W; Rao, Shanti R; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2016-12-19

    Linear ion trap frequency standards are among the most stable continuously-operating frequency references and clocks. Depending on the application, they have been operated with a variety of Local Oscillators (LO) including quartz Ultra-Stable Oscillators (USO), Hydrogen-masers, and Cryogenic Sapphire Oscillators. The short, intermediate, and long term stability of the frequency output is a complicated function of the fundamental performances, the time dependence of environmental disturbances, the atomic interrogation algorithm, the implemented control loop, and the environmental sensitivity of the LO and atomic system components. For applications that require moving these references out of controlled lab-spaces and into less stable environments such as field-work or space-flight, a deeper understanding is needed of how disturbances at different time-scales impact the various subsystems of the clock and ultimately the output stability. In this paper, we analyze which perturbations have an impact and to what degree. We also report on a computational model of a control loop which keeps the microwave source locked to the ion resonance. This model is shown to agree with laboratory measurements of how well the feedback removes various disturbances and also with a useful analytic approach we developed for predicting these impacts.

  4. Energy and angular distributions of detached electrons in a solvable model of ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, J.H.; Ovchinnikov, S.Y. |; Solovev, E.A.

    1999-08-01

    Electron energy and angular distributions are computed for a model of atom{endash}negative-ion collisions. In this model, electron-atom interactions are represented by zero-range potentials in an approximation where two identical atoms move along straight-line classical trajectories in head-on collisions. Analytic expressions for the ionization amplitudes are interpreted in terms of Sturmian eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. At high velocity, the computed distributions exhibit direct excitation and continuum capture cusps in addition to the binary encounter ridge. At low velocities, a single feature corresponding to an electron distribution centered midway between the target and projectile emerges. For initial conditions corresponding to gerade symmetry a single broad peak appears, while for ungerade symmetry there is a node at the midpoint so that the peak splits into two parts. It is confirmed that the advanced adiabatic approximation gives an accurate description of the ungerade distribution at low and intermediate velocities. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Energy and angular distributions of detached electrons in a solvable model of ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, J.H.; Ovchinnikov, S.Y. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 ); Solovev, E.A. )

    1999-08-01

    Electron energy and angular distributions are computed for a model of atom[endash]negative-ion collisions. In this model, electron-atom interactions are represented by zero-range potentials in an approximation where two identical atoms move along straight-line classical trajectories in head-on collisions. Analytic expressions for the ionization amplitudes are interpreted in terms of Sturmian eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. At high velocity, the computed distributions exhibit direct excitation and continuum capture cusps in addition to the binary encounter ridge. At low velocities, a single feature corresponding to an electron distribution centered midway between the target and projectile emerges. For initial conditions corresponding to gerade symmetry a single broad peak appears, while for ungerade symmetry there is a node at the midpoint so that the peak splits into two parts. It is confirmed that the advanced adiabatic approximation gives an accurate description of the ungerade distribution at low and intermediate velocities. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  6. Electron capture in collisions of Al2+ ions with He atoms at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, A.; Sato, H.; Gu, J. P.; Hirsch, G.; Buenker, R. J.; Kimura, M.

    2001-09-01

    Electron capture resulting from collisions of Al2+ ions with He atoms from 0.15 to 1000 keV/u is investigated using a molecular-orbital representation within a semiclassical frame. Molecular electronic states and corresponding couplings are determined by the ALCHEMY program. Sixteen molecular states all connecting to single-electron-capture processes are included, and hence radial and rotational couplings among these channels are fully considered. The trajectory effect arising from the straight-line, Coulomb, and ground-state potential trajectories for electron-capture and excitation processes is carefully assessed. The electron-capture cross section by ground-state Al2+(2S) ions slowly increases before it reaches a maximum of 1.3×10-16 cm2 at 100 keV/u. Those for metastable Al2+(2P) ions sharply increase with increasing energy, and reach a peak at 1 keV/u with a value of 1.5×10-16 cm2. The earlier experimental data are found to be larger by an order of magnitude although their energy dependence is in good accord with the present result. Excitation cross sections for both the ground and metastable states are found to be much larger by a factor of 2-3 than corresponding capture cross sections above 1 keV/u although they become comparable below this energy.

  7. Temporal behavior of unresolved transition array emission in water window soft x-ray spectral region from multiply charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Suzuki, Yuhei; Arai, Goki; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Hasegawa, Noboru; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Nishikino, Masaharu; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    We have characterized the spectral structure and the temporal history of the laser-produced high-Z multi-charged ion plasmas for the efficient water window soft x-ray sources. Strong unresolved transition array emission was observed due to 4d-4f and 4f-5g transitions from Au, Pb, and Bi plasmas in the 280-700 eV photon energy region. The temporal behavior of the emission was essentially similar of that of the laser pulse with a slight delay between different transitions. These results provide feedback for accurate modeling of the atomic processes with the radiative hydrodynamic simulations.

  8. Development of the negative ion beams relevant to ITER and JT-60SA at Japan Atomic Energy Agency

    SciTech Connect

    Hanada, M. Kojima, A.; Tobari, H.; Nishikiori, R.; Hiratsuka, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Yoshida, M.; Ichikawa, M.; Watanabe, K.; Yamano, Y.; Grisham, L. R.

    2016-02-15

    In order to realize negative ion sources and accelerators to be applicable to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and JT-60 Super Advanced, a large cesium (Cs)-seeded negative ion source and a multi-aperture and multi-stage electric acceleration have been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Long pulse production and acceleration of the negative ion beams have been independently carried out. The long pulse production of the high current beams has achieved 100 s at the beam current of 15 A by modifying the JT-60 negative ion source. The pulse duration time is increased three times longer than that before the modification. As for the acceleration, a pulse duration time has been also extended two orders of magnitudes from 0.4 s to 60 s. The developments of the negative ion source and acceleration at JAEA are well in progress towards the realization of the negative ion sources and accelerators for fusion applications.

  9. Development of the negative ion beams relevant to ITER and JT-60SA at Japan Atomic Energy Agency.

    PubMed

    Hanada, M; Kojima, A; Tobari, H; Nishikiori, R; Hiratsuka, J; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Yoshida, M; Ichikawa, M; Watanabe, K; Yamano, Y; Grisham, L R

    2016-02-01

    In order to realize negative ion sources and accelerators to be applicable to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and JT-60 Super Advanced, a large cesium (Cs)-seeded negative ion source and a multi-aperture and multi-stage electric acceleration have been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Long pulse production and acceleration of the negative ion beams have been independently carried out. The long pulse production of the high current beams has achieved 100 s at the beam current of 15 A by modifying the JT-60 negative ion source. The pulse duration time is increased three times longer than that before the modification. As for the acceleration, a pulse duration time has been also extended two orders of magnitudes from 0.4 s to 60 s. The developments of the negative ion source and acceleration at JAEA are well in progress towards the realization of the negative ion sources and accelerators for fusion applications.

  10. Suppression of Emittance Growth Using a Shaped Cold Atom Electron and Ion Source.

    PubMed

    Thompson, D J; Murphy, D; Speirs, R W; van Bijnen, R M W; McCulloch, A J; Scholten, R E; Sparkes, B M

    2016-11-04

    We demonstrate precise control of charged particle bunch shape with a cold atom electron and ion source to create bunches with linear and, therefore, reversible Coulomb expansion. Using ultracold charged particles enables detailed observation of space-charge effects without loss of information from thermal diffusion, unambiguously demonstrating that shaping in three dimensions can result in a marked reduction of Coulomb-driven emittance growth. We show that the emittance growth suppression is accompanied by an increase in bunch focusability and brightness, improvements necessary for the development of sources capable of coherent single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction of noncrystalline objects, with applications ranging from femtosecond chemistry to materials science and rational drug design.

  11. Comparison of scanning ion conductance microscopy with atomic force microscopy for cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Rheinlaender, Johannes; Geisse, Nicholas A; Proksch, Roger; Schäffer, Tilman E

    2011-01-18

    We present the first direct comparison of scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) with atomic force microscopy (AFM) for cell imaging. By imaging the same fibroblast or myoblast cell with both technologies in series, we highlight their advantages and disadvantages with respect to cell imaging. The finite imaging force applied to the sample in AFM imaging results in a coupling of mechanical sample properties into the measured sample topography. For soft samples such as cells this leads to artifacts in the measured topography and to elastic deformation, which we demonstrate by imaging whole fixed cells and cell extensions at high resolution. SICM imaging, on the other hand, has a noncontact character and can provide the true topography of soft samples at a comparable resolution.

  12. Coordinate space translation technique for simulation of electronic process in the ion-atom collision.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Hong, Xuhai; Wang, Jian; Kim, Kwang S

    2011-04-21

    Recently we developed a theoretical model of ion-atom collisions, which was made on the basis of a time-dependent density functional theory description of the electron dynamics and a classical treatment of the heavy particle motion. Taking advantage of the real-space grid method, we introduce a "coordinate space translation" technique to allow one to focus on a certain space of interest such as the region around the projectile or the target. Benchmark calculations are given for collisions between proton and oxygen over a wide range of impact energy. To extract the probability of charge transfer, the formulation of Lüdde and Dreizler [J. Phys. B 16, 3973 (1983)] has been generalized to ensemble-averaging application in the particular case of O((3)P). Charge transfer total cross sections are calculated, showing fairly good agreements between experimental data and present theoretical results.

  13. H type of hidden crossings in atomic collisions involving highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jakimovski, D.; Savichev, V.I.; Solovev, E.A. ||

    1996-10-01

    We examine the structure of the hidden crossings of the adiabatic potential curves {ital E}({ital R}) in the problem of two Coulomb centers with charges {ital Z}{sub 2} and {ital Z}{sub 1}, when {ital Z}{sub 2}{gt}{ital Z}{sub 1}. In this case we observe a new type of hidden crossing between the states ({ital n},{ital l},{ital m})-({ital n},{ital l}+1,{ital m}), where {ital n}, {ital l}, and {ital m} are the spherical quantum numbers of the united atom. This leads to the appearance of a mechanism of nonadiabatic transitions in hydrogen{emdash}multicharged ion collisions. As an example of this mechanism we present results of a calculation of inelastic transitions in O{sup 7+}(1{ital s})+H collisions. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  14. Charge-state-dependent energy loss of slow ions. II. Statistical atom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Richard A.; Möller, Wolfhard

    2016-05-01

    A model for charge-dependent energy loss of slow ions is developed based on the Thomas-Fermi statistical model of atoms. Using a modified electrostatic potential which takes the ionic charge into account, nuclear and electronic energy transfers are calculated, the latter by an extension of the Firsov model. To evaluate the importance of multiple collisions even in nanometer-thick target materials we use the charge-state-dependent potentials in a Monte Carlo simulation in the binary collision approximation and compare the results to experiment. The Monte Carlo results reproduce the incident charge-state dependence of measured data well [see R. A. Wilhelm et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 052708 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.052708], even though the experimentally observed charge exchange dependence is not included in the model.

  15. Reaction of anthracene with atomic ions of interstellar interest. A FALP measurement at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canosa, A.; Laubé, S.; Rebrion, C.; Pasquerault, D.; Gomet, J. C.; Rowe, B. R.

    1995-11-01

    We present the results obtained on studying the reaction of anthracene with some atomic ions of interstellar interest (He + and C +) and with Ar +. Rate coefficients have been measured at room temperature (293 K) in afterglow experiments using flowing afterglow Langmuir probe-mass spectrometer apparatus. Reactions proceed with rate coefficients of respectively 5.2 × 10 -9, 3 × 10 -9, 1 × 10 -9 cm 3 s -1 for He +, C + and Ar +. The results were obtained with an uncertainty of about 30% and were found to be close to the Langevin rate. The nature of the products has also been investigated. More particularly, the evidence for carbon accretion and for the production of doubly charged species is discussed.

  16. Suppression of Emittance Growth Using a Shaped Cold Atom Electron and Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Murphy, D.; Speirs, R. W.; van Bijnen, R. M. W.; McCulloch, A. J.; Scholten, R. E.; Sparkes, B. M.

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate precise control of charged particle bunch shape with a cold atom electron and ion source to create bunches with linear and, therefore, reversible Coulomb expansion. Using ultracold charged particles enables detailed observation of space-charge effects without loss of information from thermal diffusion, unambiguously demonstrating that shaping in three dimensions can result in a marked reduction of Coulomb-driven emittance growth. We show that the emittance growth suppression is accompanied by an increase in bunch focusability and brightness, improvements necessary for the development of sources capable of coherent single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction of noncrystalline objects, with applications ranging from femtosecond chemistry to materials science and rational drug design.

  17. Numerical analysis of atomic density distribution in arc driven negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, T. Shibata, T.; Hatayama, A.; Kashiwagi, M.; Hanada, M.; Sawada, K.

    2014-02-15

    The purpose of this study is to calculate atomic (H{sup 0}) density distribution in JAEA 10 ampere negative ion source. A collisional radiative model is developed for the calculation of the H{sup 0} density distribution. The non-equilibrium feature of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF), which mainly determines the H{sup 0} production rate, is included by substituting the EEDF calculated from 3D electron transport analysis. In this paper, the H{sup 0} production rate, the ionization rate, and the density distribution in the source chamber are calculated. In the region where high energy electrons exist, the H{sup 0} production and the ionization are enhanced. The calculated H{sup 0} density distribution without the effect of the H{sup 0} transport is relatively small in the upper region. In the next step, the effect should be taken into account to obtain more realistic H{sup 0} distribution.

  18. Emerging applications of atomic layer deposition for lithium-ion battery studies.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangbo; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Sun, Xueliang

    2012-07-17

    Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are used widely in today's consumer electronics and offer great potential for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in HEVs, pure EVs, and also in smart grids as future energy-storage devices. However, many challenges must be addressed before these future applications of LIBs are realized, such as the energy and power density of LIBs, their cycle and calendar life, safety characteristics, and costs. Recently, a technique called atomic layer deposition (ALD) attracted great interest as a novel tool and approach for resolving these issues. In this article, recent advances in using ALD for LIB studies are thoroughly reviewed, covering two technical routes: 1) ALD for designing and synthesizing new LIB components, i.e., anodes, cathodes, and solid electrolytes, and; 2) ALD used in modifying electrode properties via surface coating. This review will hopefully stimulate more extensive and insightful studies on using ALD for developing high-performance LIBs.

  19. Simultaneous Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy with Microchanneled Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossola, Dario; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Dermutz, Harald; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2015-12-01

    We combined scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) into a single tool using AFM cantilevers with an embedded microchannel flowing into the nanosized aperture at the apex of the hollow pyramid. An electrode was positioned in the AFM fluidic circuit connected to a second electrode in the bath. We could thus simultaneously measure the ionic current and the cantilever bending (in optical beam deflection mode). First, we quantitatively compared the SICM and AFM contact points on the approach curves. Second, we estimated where the probe in SICM mode touches the sample during scanning on a calibration grid and applied the finding to image a network of neurites on a Petri dish. Finally, we assessed the feasibility of a double controller using both the ionic current and the deflection as input signals of the piezofeedback. The experimental data were rationalized in the framework of finite elements simulations.

  20. Heavy-Rydberg ion-pair formation in Rydberg atom collisions: Probing dissociative electron attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael; Buathong, Sitti; Dunning, F. Barry

    2015-05-01

    While electron transfer in Rydberg atom collisions with attaching targets forms a valuable technique with which to create heavy-Rydberg ion pairs to examine their properties, we demonstrate here that measurements of their velocity distributions can also provide insights into the behavior of the excited intermediates formed through initial electron transfer. The experimental results are analyzed with the aid of a Monte Carlo collision code that models the details of electron transfer reactions. Results for a variety of targets are presented that demonstrate the use of this approach to examine the dynamics of dissociative electron attachment, the lifetimes of the intermediates created, and the channels by which they decay. Research supported by the Robert A. Welch Foundation under Grant C-0734.

  1. Vortices Associated with the Wave Function of a Single Electron Emitted in Slow Ion-Atom Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, L. Ph. H.; Goihl, C.; Metz, D.; Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Dörner, R.; Ovchinnikov, S. Yu.; Macek, J. H.; Schultz, D. R.

    2014-02-01

    We present measurements and calculations of the momentum distribution of electrons emitted during the ion-atom collision 10 keV/u He2++He→He++He2++e-, which show rich structures for ion scattering angles above 2 mrad arising dominantly from two-electron states. Our calculations reveal that minima in the measured distributions are zeros in the electronic probability density resulting from vortices in the electronic current.

  2. Wave-packet continuum-discretization approach to ion-atom collisions: Nonrearrangement scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurakhmanov, I. B.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2016-08-01

    A general single-center close-coupling approach based on a continuum-discretization procedure is developed to calculate excitation and ionization processes in ion-atom collisions. The continuous spectrum of the target is discretized using stationary wave packets constructed from the Coulomb wave functions, the eigenstates of the target Hamiltonian. Such continuum discretization allows one to generate pseudostates with arbitrary energies and distribution. These features are ideal for detailed differential ionization studies. The approach starts from the semiclassical three-body Schrödinger equation for the scattering wave function and leads to a set of coupled differential equations for the transition probability amplitudes. To demonstrate its utility the method is applied to calculate collisions of antiprotons with atomic hydrogen. A comprehensive set of benchmark results from integrated to fully differential cross sections for antiproton-impact ionization of hydrogen in the energy range from 1 keV to 1 MeV is provided. Contrary to previous predictions, we find that at low incident energies the singly differential cross section has a maximum away from the zero emission energy. This feature could not be seen without a fine discretization of the low-energy part of the continuum.

  3. Atom ejection from a fast-ion track: A molecular-dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Urbassek, H.M. ); Kafemann, H. ); Johnson, R.E. )

    1994-01-01

    As a model for atom ejection from fast-ion tracks, molecular-dynamics simulations of a cylindrical track of energized particles are performed. An idealized situation is studied where every atom in a cylindrical track of radius [ital R][sub 0] is energized with energy [ital E][sub 0]. The emission yield [ital Y]([ital E][sub 0],[ital R][sub 0]) shows the existence of two ejection regimes. If the particle energy [ital E][sub 0] is below the sublimation energy [ital U] of the material, a threshold regime is seen in which [ital Y] rises roughly like the third power of [ital E][sub 0]; for high-energy densities [ital E][sub 0][approx gt][ital U], the yield rises much more slowly, roughly linearly. In both cases, ejected particles mostly originate from the track, rather than from its surroundings, and from the first or the first few monolayers. The behavior found is interpreted here in terms of emission due to a pressure-driven jet (linear regime) or due to a pressure pulse (threshold regime). These both behave differently from the often-used thermal-spike sputtering model.

  4. Determination of mercury(II) ion by electrochemical cold vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arbab-Zavar, M Hosein; Rounaghi, G Hosein; Chamsaz, Mahmoud; Masrournia, Mahboube

    2003-05-01

    A technique for determination of mercury is described; it is based on electrolytic reduction of Hg(II) ion on a graphite cathode, the trapping of mercury vapor and its volatilization into a quartz tube aligned in the optical path of an atomic absorption spectrometer. The electrochemical cell consisted of a graphite cathode and an anode operating with constant direct current for the production of mercury atoms. A pre-activated graphite rod was used as the cathode material. The optimum conditions for electrochemical generation of mercury cold vapor (the electrolysis time and current, the flow rate, the type of electrode and electrolyte) were investigated. The characteristic electrochemical data with chemical cold vapor using NaBH4-acid were compared. The presence of cadmium(II), arsenic(III), antimony(III), selenium(IV), bismuth(III), silver(I), lead(II), lithium(I), sodium(I) and potassium(I) showed interference effects which were eliminated by suitable separation techniques. The calibration curve is linear over the range of 5-90 ng ml(-1) mercury(II). The detection limit is 2 ng ml(-1) of Hg(II) and the RSD is 2.5% (n = 10) for 40 ng ml(-1). The accuracy and recovery of the method were investigated by analyzing spiked tap water and river water.

  5. Cold interactions between an Yb+ ion and a Li atom: Prospects for sympathetic cooling, radiative association, and Feshbach resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomza, Michał; Koch, Christiane P.; Moszynski, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The electronic structure of the (LiYb )+ molecular ion is investigated with two variants of the coupled cluster method restricted to single, double, and noniterative or linear triple excitations. Potential-energy curves for the ground and excited states, permanent and transition electric dipole moments, and long-range interaction coefficients C4 and C6 are reported. The data are subsequently employed in scattering calculations and photoassociation studies. Feshbach resonances are shown to be measurable, despite the ion's micromotion in the Paul trap. Molecular ions can be formed in their singlet electronic ground state by one-photon photoassociation and in triplet states by two-photon photoassociation; and control of cold atom-ion chemistry based on Feshbach resonances should be feasible. Conditions for sympathetic cooling of an Yb+ ion by an ultracold gas of Li atoms are found to be favorable in the temperature range 10 nK -10 mK , and further improvements using Feshbach resonances should be possible. Overall, these results suggest excellent prospects for building a quantum simulator with ultracold Yb+ ions and Li atoms.

  6. Electron emission in collisions of fast highly charged bare ions with helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Abhoy; Mandal, Chittranjan; Purkait, Malay

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the electron emission from ground state helium atom in collision with fast bare heavy ions at intermediate and high incident energies. In the present study, we have applied the present three-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-3B) model and the previously adopted four-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-4B). To represent the active electron in the helium atom in the 3C-3B model, the initial bound state wavefunction is chosen to be hydrogenic with an effective nuclear charge. The wavefunction for the ejected electron in the exit channel has been approximated to be a Coulomb continuum wavefunction with same effective nuclear charge. Effectively the continuum-continuum correlation effect has been considered in the present investigation. Here we have calculated the energy and angular distribution of double differential cross sections (DDCS) at low and high energy electron emission from helium atom. The large forward-backward asymmetry is observed in the angular distribution which is explained in terms of the two-center effect (TCE). Our theoretical results are compared with available experimental results as well as other theoretical calculations based on the plain wave Born approximation (PWBA), continuum-distorted wave (CDW) approximation, continuum-distorted wave eikonal-initial state (CDW-EIS) approximation, and the corresponding values obtained from the 3C-4B model [S. Jana, R. Samanta, M. Purkait, Phys. Scr. 88, 055301 (2013)] respectively. It is observed that the four-body version of the present investigation produces results which are in better agreement with experimental observations for all cases.

  7. Atomic layer deposited tungsten nitride thin films as a new lithium-ion battery anode.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Dip K; Sen, Uttam K; Sinha, Soumyadeep; Dhara, Arpan; Mitra, Sagar; Sarkar, Shaibal K

    2015-07-14

    This article demonstrates the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of tungsten nitride using tungsten hexacarbonyl [W(CO)6] and ammonia [NH3] and its use as a lithium-ion battery anode. In situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), ellipsometry and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurements are carried out to confirm the self-limiting behaviour of the deposition. A saturated growth rate of ca. 0.35 Å per ALD cycle is found within a narrow temperature window of 180-195 °C. In situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) vibrational spectroscopy is used to determine the reaction pathways of the surface bound species after each ALD half cycle. The elemental presence and chemical composition is determined by XPS. The as-deposited material is found to be amorphous and crystallized to h-W2N upon annealing at an elevated temperature under an ammonia atmosphere. The as-deposited materials are found to be n-type, conducting with an average carrier concentration of ca. 10(20) at room temperature. Electrochemical studies of the as-deposited films open up the possibility of this material to be used as an anode material in Li-ion batteries. The incorporation of MWCNTs as a scaffold layer further enhances the electrochemical storage capacity of the ALD grown tungsten nitride (WNx). Ex situ XRD analysis confirms the conversion based reaction mechanism of the as-grown material with Li under operation.

  8. Conversion of an atomic to a molecular argon ion and low pressure argon relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, N. Stankov; A, P. Jovanović; V, Lj Marković; S, N. Stamenković

    2016-01-01

    The dominant process in relaxation of DC glow discharge between two plane parallel electrodes in argon at pressure 200 Pa is analyzed by measuring the breakdown time delay and by analytical and numerical models. By using the approximate analytical model it is found that the relaxation in a range from 20 to 60 ms in afterglow is dominated by ions, produced by atomic-to-molecular conversion of Ar+ ions in the first several milliseconds after the cessation of the discharge. This conversion is confirmed by the presence of double-Gaussian distribution for the formative time delay, as well as conversion maxima in a set of memory curves measured in different conditions. Finally, the numerical one-dimensional (1D) model for determining the number densities of dominant particles in stationary DC glow discharge and two-dimensional (2D) model for the relaxation are used to confirm the previous assumptions and to determine the corresponding collision and transport coefficients of dominant species and processes. Project supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia (Grant No. ON171025).

  9. Organic surfaces excited by low-energy ions: atomic collisions, molecular desorption and buckminsterfullerenes.

    PubMed

    Delcorte, Arnaud

    2005-10-07

    This article reviews the recent progress in the understanding of kiloelectronvolt particle interactions with organic solids, including atomic displacements in a light organic medium, vibrational excitation and desorption of fragments and entire molecules. This new insight is the result of a combination of theoretical and experimental approaches, essentially molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Classical MD simulations provide us with a detailed microscopic view of the processes occurring in the bombarded target, from the collision cascade specifics to the scenarios of molecular emission. Time-of-flight SIMS measures the mass and energy distributions of sputtered ionized fragments and molecular species, a precious source of information concerning their formation, desorption, ionization and delayed unimolecular dissociation in the gas phase. The mechanisms of energy transfer and sputtering are compared for bulk molecular solids, organic overlayers on metal and large molecules embedded in a low-molecular weight matrix. These comparisons help understand some of the beneficial effects of metal substrates and matrices for the analysis of molecules by SIMS. In parallel, I briefly describe the distinct ionization channels of molecules sputtered from organic solids and overlayers. The specific processes induced by polyatomic projectile bombardment, especially fullerenes, are discussed on the basis of new measurements and calculations. Finally, the perspective addresses the state-of-the-art and potential developments in the fields of surface modification and analysis of organic materials by kiloelectronvolt ion beams.

  10. Electron capture by Ne{sup 4+} ions from atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Havener, C.C.; Rejoub, R.; Vane, C.R.; Krause, H.F.; Savin, D.W.; Schnell, M.; Wang, J.G.; Stancil, P.C.

    2005-03-01

    Using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory ion-atom merged-beams apparatus, the absolute total electron-capture cross section has been measured for collisions of Ne{sup 4+} with hydrogen and deuterium at relative energies in the center-of-mass frame between 0.10 and 1006 eV/u. Comparison with previous measurements shows large discrepancies between 80 and 600 eV/u. For energies below {approx}1 eV/u, a sharply increasing cross section is attributed to the ion-induced dipole attraction between the reactants. Multichannel Landau-Zener calculations are performed between 0.01 and 5000 eV/u and compare well to the measured total cross sections. Below {approx}5 eV/u, the present total cross section calculations show a significant target isotope effect. At 0.01 eV/u, the H:D total cross section ratio is predicted to be {approx}1.4 where capture is dominated by transitions into the Ne{sup 3+} (2s{sup 2}2p{sup 2}3d) configuration.

  11. The plasma focus as a source of collimated beams of negative ion clusters and of neutral deuterium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardi, V.; Powell, C.

    1984-03-01

    We report the space anisotropy and brightness B4 (i.e., the momentum normalized density in four dimensional transverse phase space) of a high-intensity pulsed source of neutral-atom and negative-ion-cluster beams with energy/atom E≳0.2 Mev, ion clusters with m/Z (a.u.) ≳200. The source is formed in an 0.5 MA plasma focus-PF-discharge. The energy spectrum of different particle species is obtained from a 12.2 kG magnetic analyzer, energy filters and time resolved detectors. Collimated particle beams are ejected within a <6° cone along the discharge axis inside a ≳3 mm diameter plasma channel (neutral atoms, ion clusters, impurity heavy ions at 0°, electron beams, clusters and negatively-charged ion clumps at 180°). Pulsed kA currents of ions (and neutral fluence of comparable intensity at 180°) are detected in the 6° cone at 0° with B4˜107 (mA/cm2rad2) for particle energies E≳200 KeV. In the 180° direction the soruce ejects multiple pulses of electron and ion beams in alternating sequency (typical pulse duration ˜10 ns) with a net negative charge which provide charge neutralization for ion and ion cluster beams. The source which can operate—in principle—at a high repetition rate has a scaling law in which the particle-intensity increases without a detectable increase of the angular dispersion.

  12. Self-consistent field tight-binding model for neutral and (multi-) charged carbon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnon, Laurent; Spiegelman, Fernand

    2007-08-01

    A semiempirical model for carbon clusters modeling is presented, along with structural and dynamical applications. The model is a tight-binding scheme with additional one- and two-center distance-dependent electrostatic interactions treated self-consistently. This approach, which explicitly accounts for charge relaxation, allows us to treat neutral and (multi-) charged clusters not only at equilibrium but also in dissociative regions. The equilibrium properties, geometries, harmonic spectra, and relative stabilities of the stable isomers of neutral and singly charged clusters in the range n =1-14, for C20 and C60, are found to reproduce the results of ab initio calculations. The model is also shown to be successful in describing the stability and fragmentation energies of dictations in the range n =2-10 and allows the determination of their Coulomb barriers, as examplified for the smallest sizes (C22+,C32+,C42+). We also present time-dependent mean-field and linear response optical spectra for the C8 and C60 clusters and discuss their relevance with respect to existing calculations.

  13. Validation of an atomic absorption rubidium ion efflux assay for KCNQ/M-channels using the ion Channel Reader 8000.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kewei; McIlvain, Beal; Tseng, Eugene; Kowal, Dianne; Jow, Flora; Shen, Ru; Zhang, Howard; Shan, Qin Jennifer; He, Lan; Chen, Diana; Lu, Qiang; Dunlop, John

    2004-10-01

    M-channels (M-current), encoded by KCNQ2/3 K(+) channel genes, have emerged as novel drug targets for a number of neurological disorders. The lack of direct high throughput assays combined with the low throughput of conventional electrophysiology (EP) has impeded rapid screening and evaluation of K(+)-channel modulators. Development of a sensitive and efficient assay for the direct measurement of M-current activity is critical for identifying novel M-channel modulators and subsequent investigation of their therapeutic potential. Using a stable CHO cell line expressing rat KCNQ2/3 K(+) channels confirmed by EP, we have developed and validated a nonradioactive rubidium (Rb(+)) efflux assay in a 96-well plate format. The Rb(+) efflux assay directly measures the activity of functional channels by atomic absorption spectroscopy using the automated Ion Channel Reader (ICR) 8000. The stimulated Rb(+) efflux from KCNQ2/3-expressing cells was blocked by the channel blockers XE991 and linopirdine with IC(50) values of 0.15 microM and 1.3 microM, respectively. Twelve compounds identified as KCNQ2/3 openers were further assessed in this assay, and their EC(50) values were compared with those obtained with EP. A higher positive correlation coefficient between these two assays (r = 0.60) was observed than that between FlexStation membrane potential and EP assays (r = 0.23). To simplify the assay and increase the throughput, we demonstrate that EC(50) values obtained by measuring Rb(+) levels in the supernatant are as robust and consistent as those obtained from the ratio of Rb(+) in supernatant/lysate. By measuring the supernatant only, the throughput of ICR8000 in an eight-point titration is estimated to be 40 compounds per day, which is suitable for a secondary confirmation assay.

  14. Shorting time of magnetically insulated reflex-ion diodes from the neutral-atom charge-exchange mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Strobel, G.

    1981-10-01

    In a magnetically insulated diode, collision-free electrons return to the cathode and no electron current is present at the anode. Electron transport to the anode is studied in this paper. Steady-state space-charge-limited flow is assumed initially. Breakdown of ion flow occurs when static neutral atoms at the anode undergo charge exchange, which results in neutral atoms drifting across the diode. These are subsequently ionized by reflexing ions producing electrons trapped in Larmor orbits throughout the diode. These electrons drift to the anode via ionization and inelastic collisions with other neutral atoms. Model calculations compare the effects of foil and mesh cathodes. Steady-state space-charge-limited ion current densities are calculated. The neutral atom density at the cathode is determined as a function of time. The shorting time of the diode is scaled versus the electrode separation d, the diode potential V/sub 0/, the magnetic field, and the initial concentration of static neutron atoms.

  15. The impact of gas-surface reactions on mass spectrometric measurements of atomic nitrogen. [determination of atmosphere ion sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Mauersberger, K.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents a simplified model of the ion source chemistry, explains several details of the data reduction method used in obtaining atomic-nitrogen (N) densities from OSS data, and discusses implications of gas-surface reactions for the design of future satellite-borne mass spectrometers. Because of various surface reactions, N appears in three different forms in the ion source, as N, NO, and NO2. Considering the rather small spin modulation of NO and NO2 in the semi-open ionization chamber used in the OSS instrument, it is not surprising that these reaction products have not been previously identified in closed source instruments as a measure of the presence of atomic nitrogen. Warmup and/or outgassing of the ion source are shown to drastically reduce the NO2 concentration, thereby making possible reliable measurement of ambient N densities.

  16. An extended formula for the energy spectrum of sputtered atoms from a material irradiated by light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, T.; Aoki, Y.; Kawamura, T.; Kenmotsu, T.; Yamamura, Y.

    2005-03-01

    We extend a formula proposed by Kenmotsu et al. (hereafter Paper I), which fits with the energy spectrum of atoms sputtered from a heavy material hit by low-energy light ions (H +, D +, T +, He +) by taking into account an inelastic energy loss neglected in Paper I. We assume that primary knock-on atoms produced by ions backscattered at large angles do not lose energy while penetrating the material up to the surface, instead of the energy-loss model used in Paper I. The extended formula is expressed in terms of a normalized energy-distribution function and is compared with the data calculated with the ACAT code for 50 eV, 100 eV and 1 keV D + ions impinging on a Fe target. Our formula fits well with the data in a wide range of incident energy.

  17. Formation and atomic configuration of binary metallic glasses studied by ion beam mixing and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, K. P.; Gao, N.; Dai, X. D.; Li, J. H.; Liu, B. X.

    2007-06-15

    Metallic glasses are obtained in an immiscible Ag-Nb system with overall composition ranging from 25 to 90 at. % of Nb by ion beam mixing. Interestingly, the diffraction analysis shows that the formed Nb-rich metallic glass features are two distinct atomic configurations. In atomistic modeling, an n-body Ag-Nb potential is derived, under the assistance of ab initio calculation, and then applied in molecular dynamics simulations. An atomic configuration is discovered, i.e., an icositetrahedral ordering, and as well as an icosahedral ordering observed in the Ag-Nb metallic glasses and in some previously reported systems. Simulations confirm that the two dominate local atomic packing units are formed through a structural phase transition from the Nb-based bcc and fcc solid solutions, respectively, suggesting a concept of structural heredity that the crystalline structure of the constituent metals play a decisive role in determining the atomic structure of the resultant metallic glasses.

  18. Near-resonant versus nonresonant chemiluminescent charge-transfer reactions of atomic ions with HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenewinkel-Meyer, Th.; Ottinger, Ch.

    1994-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions of C+, O+, F+, Ar+ and some other atomic ions with hydrogen chloride were investigated at collision energies between <1 eV and 1 keV. The electronically excited products HCl+ (A 2Σ+) were detected by means of the A 2Σ+→X 2Πi optical emission. In some cases the spectra showed, at low collision energies, an enhanced excitation of specific vibrational HCl+(A,v') levels: for C+, v'=1; for O+, v'=3 as well as v'=1; and for F+, v'=6. These levels are populated in near-resonant, slightly exothermic processes. Their rotational temperature was on the order of 600-700 K. For the other vibrational levels the excitation is off-resonance, mostly endothermic, and here the rotational temperature was 1000-4000 K. Corresponding data are also given for DCl. The selectivity for certain vibrational states is explained by crossings between the vibronic entrance and exit state energy surfaces, calculated from classical electrostatic multipole potentials. The cross sections for the near-resonant reactions decrease monotonically with increasing collision energy, while for the endothermic channels they rise steeply from threshold to a plateau. With argon ions the excitation function exhibits an unusual shape. Here the charge-transfer cross sections for all vibrational levels go through a maximum just above threshold, which is followed by a distinct minimum at about 10 eVc.m.. This may be due to formation of a long-lived collision complex (Ar-HCl)+.

  19. Investigating Global Ion and Neutral Atom Populations with IBEX and Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florinski, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this project was to investigate pickup ion (PUI) production in the solar wind and heliosheath (the region between the termination shock and the heliopause) and compute the distributed energetic neutral atom fluxes throughout the helioshpere. The simulations were constrained by comparing the model output against observations from Ulysses, New Horizons, Voyager 1 and 2, and IBEX space probes. As evidenced by the number of peer reviewed journal publications resulting from the project (13 plus three submitted) and their citation rate (156 citations over three years), the project has made a lasting contribution to the field. The outcome is a significant improvement of our understanding of the pickup ion production and distribution in the distant heliosphere. The team has accomplished the entire set of tasks A-H set forth in the proposal. Namely, the transport modeling framework has been augmented with two populations of pickup ions (PUIs), the boundary conditions for the plasma and interstellar neutral hydrogen were verified against Ulysses and New Horizons PUI and an optimal set of velocity diffusion parameters established. The multi-component fluxes of PUIs were computed and isotropic velocity distributions generated for each cell in the computer simulation that covered the heliosphere from 1.5 AU to the heliopause. The distributions were carefully compared with in situ measurements at 3 AU (Ulysses), 12 AU (New Horizons), and 80-90 AU (Voyager 1 and 2) as well as those inferred from ENA fluxes measured by Cassini and IBEX (Wu et al., 2016). Some examples of modeldata comparison are shown in Figure 1. We have used coupled MHD-plasma and kinetic-neutral code to investigate the likely range of plasma and magnetic field parameters in the local interstellar medium (LISM), based on the assumption that the shape of the IBEX ribbon could be used to determine the orientation of the interstellar magnetic field. While the magnetic field is believed to be

  20. Reactions of State-Selected Atomic Oxygen Ions O(+)((4)S, (2)D, (2)P) with Methane.

    PubMed

    Cunha de Miranda, Barbara; Romanzin, Claire; Chefdeville, Simon; Vuitton, Véronique; Žabka, Jan; Polášek, Miroslav; Alcaraz, Christian

    2015-06-11

    An experimental study has been carried out on the reactions of state selected O(+)((4)S, (2)D, (2)P) ions with methane with the aims of characterizing the effects of both the parent ion internal energy and collision energy on the reaction dynamics and determining the fate of oxygen species in complex media, in particular the Titan ionosphere. Absolute cross sections and product velocity distributions have been determined for the reactions of (16)O(+) or (18)O(+) ions with CH4 or CD4 from thermal to 5 eV collision energies by using the guided ion beam (GIB) technique. Dissociative photoionization of O2 with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation delivered by the DESIRS beamline at the SOLEIL storage ring and the threshold photoion photoelectron coincidence (TPEPICO) technique are used for the preparation of purely state-selected O(+)((4)S, (2)D, (2)P) ions. A complete inversion of the product branching ratio between CH4(+) and CH3(+) ions in favor of the latter is observed for excitation of O(+) ions from the (4)S ground state to either the (2)D or the (2)P metastable state. CH4(+) and CH3(+) ions, which are by far the major products for the reaction of ground state and excited states, are strongly backward scattered in the center of mass frame relative to O(+) parent ions. For the reaction of O(+)((4)S), CH3(+) production also rises with increasing collision energy but with much less efficiency than with O(+) excitation. We found that a mechanism of dissociative charge transfer, mediated by an initial charge transfer step, can account very well for all the observations, indicating that CH3(+) production is associated with the formation of H and O atoms (CH3(+) + H + O) rather than with OH formation by an hydride transfer process (CH3(+) + OH). Therefore, as the CH4(+) production by charge transfer is also associated with O atoms, the fate of oxygen species in these reactions is essentially the O production, except for the reaction of O(+)((4)S), which also

  1. Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Andrew; Butte, Manish J.

    2014-08-04

    We present a technique for transferring separately fabricated tips onto tipless atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers, performed using focused ion beam-assisted nanomanipulation. This method addresses the need in scanning probe microscopy for certain tip geometries that cannot be achieved by conventional lithography. For example, in probing complex layered materials or tall biological cells using AFM, a tall tip with a high-aspect-ratio is required to avoid artifacts caused by collisions of the tip's sides with the material being probed. We show experimentally that tall (18 μm) cantilever tips fabricated by this approach reduce squeeze-film damping, which fits predictions from hydrodynamic theory, and results in an increased quality factor (Q) of the fundamental flexural mode. We demonstrate that a customized tip's well-defined geometry, tall tip height, and aspect ratio enable improved measurement of elastic moduli by allowing access to low-laying portions of tall cells (T lymphocytes). This technique can be generally used to attach tips to any micromechanical device when conventional lithography of tips cannot be accomplished.

  2. Atomic Force Microscopy of Vertically Stacked Focused-Ion-Beam Induced Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luengo-Kovac, Marta; Saucer, Timothy; Martin, Andrew; Millunchick, Joanna; Sih, Vanessa

    2013-03-01

    Control over the positioning of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) could facilitate the coupling of QDs to photonic crystal cavities and has applications in the development of high-efficiency solar cells. QDs grown through self-assembly nucleate at random spatial locations. However, a focused ion beam (FIB) can be used to create preferential sites for QD nucleation, and this pattern can be transferred to subsequent layers of QDs, either due to strain or residual effects of the templating. Multilayer QD stacks can therefore maintain the lateral pattern of the initial layer while separating QDs from material damage induced by the patterning. Multilayer QD structures were grown on FIB-patterned GaAs(001) substrates with 10 nm thick GaAs spacers between the layers. The substrates were patterned with sixteen square arrays of holes with spacings of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 μm each at FIB dwell times of 1.0, 3.0, 6.0, and 9.0 ms. We report on the effects of multilayer QD growth on the initial layers through atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging of single, two-, and three-layer FIB-templated QD samples.

  3. Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Andrew; Butte, Manish J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a technique for transferring separately fabricated tips onto tipless atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers, performed using focused ion beam-assisted nanomanipulation. This method addresses the need in scanning probe microscopy for certain tip geometries that cannot be achieved by conventional lithography. For example, in probing complex layered materials or tall biological cells using AFM, a tall tip with a high-aspect-ratio is required to avoid artifacts caused by collisions of the tip's sides with the material being probed. We show experimentally that tall (18 μm) cantilever tips fabricated by this approach reduce squeeze-film damping, which fits predictions from hydrodynamic theory, and results in an increased quality factor (Q) of the fundamental flexural mode. We demonstrate that a customized tip's well-defined geometry, tall tip height, and aspect ratio enable improved measurement of elastic moduli by allowing access to low-laying portions of tall cells (T lymphocytes). This technique can be generally used to attach tips to any micromechanical device when conventional lithography of tips cannot be accomplished. PMID:25161320

  4. Dynamics of the fully stripped ion-hydrogen atom charge exchange process in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ling-yu; Wan, Jiang-feng; Zhao, Xiao-ying; Xiao, Guo-qing; Duan, Wen-shan; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2014-09-15

    The plasma screening effects of dense quantum plasmas on charge exchange processes of a fully stripped ion colliding with a hydrogen atom are studied by the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. The inter-particle interactions are described by the exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. It is found that in weak screening conditions, cross sections increase with the increase of the ionic charge Z. However, in strong screening conditions, the dependence of cross sections on the ionic charge is related to the incident particle energy. At high energies, cross sections show a linear increase with the increase of Z, whereas at low energies, cross sections for Z≥4 become approximately the same. The He{sup 2+} and C{sup 6+} impacting charge exchange cross sections in dense quantum plasmas are also compared with those in weakly coupled plasmas. The interactions are described by the static screened Coulomb potential. It is found that for both He{sup 2+} and C{sup 6+}, the oscillatory screening effects of dense quantum plasmas are almost negligible in weak screening conditions. However, in strong screening conditions, the oscillatory screening effects enhance the screening effects of dense quantum plasmas, and the enhancement becomes more and more significant with the increase of the screening parameter and the ionic charge.

  5. A recoil ion momentum spectrometer for molecular and atomic fragmentation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Arnab; Tribedi, Lokesh C.; Misra, Deepankar

    2015-04-01

    We report the development and performance studies of a newly built recoil ion momentum spectrometer for the study of atomic and molecular fragmentation dynamics in gas phase upon the impact of charged particles and photons. The present design is a two-stage Wiley-McLaren type spectrometer which satisfies both time and velocity focusing conditions and is capable of measuring singly charged ionic fragments up-to 13 eV in all directions. An electrostatic lens has been introduced in order to achieve velocity imaging. Effects of the lens on time-of-flight as well as on the position have been investigated in detail, both, by simulation and in experiment. We have used 120 keV proton beam on molecular nitrogen gas target. Complete momentum distributions and kinetic energy release distributions have been derived from the measured position and time-of-flight spectra. Along with this, the kinetic energy release spectra of fragmentation of doubly ionized nitrogen molecule upon various projectile impacts are presented.

  6. SPEX (Plasma Code Spectral Fitting Tool). Collisional ionization for atoms and ions of H to Zn.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urdampilleta, I.; Kaastra, J. S.

    2017-03-01

    Every observation of astrophysical objects involving a spectrum requires atomic data for the interpretation of line fluxes, ratios and ionization state of the emitting plasma. One of processes which determines it is collisional ionization. In this study an update of the direct ionization (DI) and excitation-autoionization (EA) processes is discussed for the H to Zn-like isoelectronic sequences. The previous assessments were performed by Dere (2007, A&A 466, 771) for H to Zn isoelectronc sequences, Arnaud & Raymond (1992, ApJ. 398, 394) for Fe and Arnaud & Rothenflug (1985, A&AS, 60, 425). However, in the last years new laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations of ionization cross sections have become accessible. We provide a review, extension and update of this previous work and fit the cross sections of all individuals shells of all ions from H to Zn. These data are described using an extension of Younger's formula, suitable for integration over a Maxwellian velocity distribution to derive the subshell ionization rate coefficients. These ionization rate coefficients are included together with the radiative recombination rates data (Mao et al. 2016, A&AS, 27568) and a change-exchange model (Gu et al. 2016, A&A 588, A52, 11) into the high-resolution plasma code and spectral fit tool SPEX V3.0 (Kaastra et al. 1996, UV and X-ray Spectroscopy of Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas).

  7. An alumina stabilized ZnO-graphene anode for lithium ion batteries via atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mingpeng; Wang, Aiji; Wang, Yinshu; Li, Chun; Shi, Gaoquan

    2014-10-07

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was applied to deposit ZnO on graphene aerogel, and this composite was used as an anode material for lithium ion batteries. This electrode material was further modified by an ultrathin Al2O3 layer via ALD to stabilize its electrochemical stability. These two metal oxides were uniformly immobilized on graphene frameworks, and the Al2O3 coating strongly improved the electrochemical performances of ZnO-graphene aerogel composite anodes. Particularly, the composite with 10 ALD cycles of Al2O3 coating (denoted as ZnO-G-10) exhibited a high initial discharge capacity of 1513 mA h g(-1) and maintained a reversible capacity of 490 mA h g(-1) after 100 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g(-1). Furthermore, the capacity retention rate increased from 70% to 90% in comparison with its uncoated counterpart after 100 cycles. The ZnO-G-10 anode also showed good rate-capability, delivering a discharge capacity of 415 mA h g(-1) at 1000 mA g(-1). The improved electrochemical performance is attributed to the formation of an artificial solid electrolyte interphase layer, stabilizing ZnO and the electrolyte by preventing the aggregation of Zn/ZnO nanograins and the side reaction that would cause the degradation of anodes.

  8. Effect of electron-nuclei interaction on internuclear motions in slow ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstikhina, Inga Yu.; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.

    2015-10-01

    The electron-nuclei interaction affects the internuclear motion in slow ion-atom collisions, which in turn affects theoretical results for the cross sections of various collision processes. The results are especially sensitive to the details of the internuclear dynamics in the presence of a strong isotope effect on the cross sections, as is the case, e.g., for the charge transfer in low-energy collisions of He2+ with H, D, and T. By considering this system as an example, we show that internuclear trajectories defined by the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potential in the entrance collision channel, which effectively accounts for the electron-nuclei interaction, are in much better agreement with trajectories obtained in the ab initio electron-nuclear dynamics approach [R. Cabrera-Trujillo et al., Phys. Rev. A 83, 012715 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.83.012715] than the corresponding Coulomb trajectories. We also show that the use of the BO trajectory instead of the Coulomb trajectory in the calculations of the charge-transfer cross sections within the adiabatic approach improves the agreement of the results with ab initio calculations.

  9. Experimental study of interactions of highly charged ions with atoms at keV energies. Progress report, February 16, 1993--April 15, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kostroun, V.O.

    1994-04-27

    Experimental study of low energy, highly charged ions with other atomic species requires an advanced ion source such as an electron beam ion source, EBIS or an electron cyclotron ion source, ECRIS. Five years ago we finished the design and construction of the Cornell superconducting solenoid, cryogenic EBIS (CEBIS). Since then, this source has been in continuous operation in a program whose main purpose is the experimental study of interactions of highly charged ions with atoms at keV energies. This progress report for the period February 16, 1993 to April 15, 1994 describes the work accomplished during this time in the form of short abstracts.

  10. Icositetrahedral and icosahedral atomic configurations observed in the Nb-Ag metallic glasses synthesized by ion beam mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, K. P.; Gao, N.; Dai, X. D.; Li, J. H.; Lai, W. S.; Liu, B. X.

    2006-08-28

    Metallic glasses are obtained in an immiscible Nb-Ag system by ion beam mixing and an atomic configuration in the amorphous structure is discovered, i.e., an icositetrahedral ordering, which, together with an icosahedral ordering also observed in the Nb-Ag metallic glasses and in some previously reported systems, helps in formulating a structural spectrum of the amorphous solids. The experimental characterization and atomistic modeling with an ab initio derived Nb-Ag potential demonstrate the significance of structural heredity, i.e., the crystalline structures of the constituent metals play a decisive role in determining the atomic structure of the metallic glasses in the system.

  11. The identification of autoionizing states of atomic chromium for the resonance ionization laser ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day Goodacre, T.; Chrysalidis, K.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Marsh, B. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Seiffert, C.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into autoionizing states of atomic chromium, in the service of the resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS): the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility based at CERN. The multi-step resonance photo-ionization process enables element selective ionization which, in combination with mass separation, allows isotope specific selectivity in the production of radioactive ion beams at ISOLDE. The element selective nature of the process requires a multi-step "ionization scheme" to be developed for each element. Using the method of in-source resonance ionization spectroscopy, an optimal three-step, three-resonance photo-ionization scheme originating from the 3d5(6S)4s a7S3 atomic ground state has been developed for chromium. The scheme uses an ionizing transition to one of the 15 newly observed autoionizing states reported here. Details of the spectroscopic studies are described and the new ionization scheme is summarized.

  12. Effects of metal nanoparticles on the secondary ion yields of a model alkane molecule upon atomic and polyatomic projectiles in secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wehbe, Nimer; Heile, Andreas; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Bertrand, Patrick; Delcorte, Arnaud

    2008-08-15

    A model alkane molecule, triacontane, is used to assess the effects of condensed gold and silver nanoparticles on the molecular ion yields upon atomic (Ga(+) and In(+)) and polyatomic (C60(+) and Bi3(+)) ion bombardment in metal-assisted secondary ion mass spectrometry (MetA-SIMS). Molecular films spin-coated on silicon were metallized using a sputter-coater system, in order to deposit controlled quantities of gold and silver on the surface (from 0 to 15 nm equivalent thickness). The effects of gold and silver islets condensed on triacontane are also compared to the situation of thin triacontane overlayers on metallic substrates (gold and silver). The results focus primarily on the measured yields of quasi-molecular ions, such as (M - H)(+) and (2M - 2H)(+), and metal-cationized molecules, such as (M + Au)(+) and (M + Ag)(+), as a function of the quantity of metal on the surface. They confirm the absence of a simple rule to explain the secondary ion yield improvement in MetA-SIMS. The behavior is strongly dependent on the specific projectile/metal couple used for the experiment. Under atomic bombardment (Ga(+), In(+)), the characteristic ion yields an increase with the gold dose up to approximately 6 nm equivalent thickness. The yield enhancement factor between gold-metallized and pristine samples can be as large as approximately 70 (for (M - H)(+) under Ga(+) bombardment; 10 nm of Au). In contrast, with cluster projectiles such as Bi3(+) and C60(+), the presence of gold and silver leads to a dramatic molecular ion yield decrease. Cluster projectiles prove to be beneficial for triacontane overlayers spin-coated on silicon or metal substrates (Au, Ag) but not in the situation of MetA-SIMS. The fundamental difference of behavior between atomic and cluster primary ions is tentatively explained by arguments involving the different energy deposition mechanisms of these projectiles. Our results also show that Au and Ag nanoparticles do not induce the same behavior in Met

  13. Precision measurements of cross-sections for inelastic processes in collisions of alkali metal ions with atoms of rare gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomsadze, R. A.; Gochitashvili, M. R.; Kezerashvili, R. Ya.

    2017-01-01

    A multifaceted experimental study of collisions of Na+ and K+ ions in the energy range of 0.5-10 keV with He and Ar atoms is presented. Absolute cross-sections for charge-exchange, ionization, stripping and excitation processes were measured using a refined version of the transfer electric field method, angle- and energy-dependent collection of product ions, energy loss and optical spectroscopy methods. The experimental data and the schematic correlation diagrams are employed to analyze and determine the mechanisms for these processes.

  14. Secondary ion yields produced by keV atomic and polyatomic ion impacts on a self-assembled monolayer surface

    PubMed

    Harris; Baker; Van Stipdonk MJ; Crooks; Schweikert

    1999-01-01

    A suite of keV polyatomic or 'cluster' projectiles was used to bombard unoxidized and oxidized self-assembled monolayer surfaces. Negative secondary ion yields, collected at the limit of single ion impacts, were measured and compared for both molecular and fragment ions. In contrast to targets that are orders of magnitude thicker than the penetration range of the primary ions, secondary ion yields from polyatomic projectile impacts on self-assembled monolayers show little to no enhancement when compared with monatomic projectiles at the same velocity. This unusual trend is most likely due to the structural arrangement and bonding characteristics of the monolayer molecules with the Au(111). Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. An atomic absorption spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace amounts of zinc in canned juices after ion exchange separation.

    PubMed

    Aziz-Alrahman, A M

    1984-01-01

    An atomic absorption spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of microgram quantities of zinc in canned juices. After sample digestion in concentrated nitric acid, the solution is evaporated till near dryness, and then a solution of 2 M HCl is added to form tetrachlorozincate (II) ion. This acid solution, containing the zinc complex is passed through an ion-exchange column (anion exchange resin, chloride form, which is preconditioned by passing 1 M HCl solution). Zinc is eluted from the column with 0.01 M HCl solution. After evaporation to dryness, the residue is dissolved in 1% (v/v) HNO3, and then atomized into an air-acetylene flame. The limit of detection of the method is 0.15 micrograms ml-1 Zn. The analytical aspects of the proposed method, including the standard addition technique are discussed.

  16. Synthesis of Nine-atom Deltahedral Zintl Ions of Germanium and their Functionalization with Organic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Gillett-Kunnath, Miriam M.; Sevov, Slavi C.

    2012-01-01

    Although the first studies of Zintl ions date between the late 1890's and early 1930's they were not structurally characterized until many years later.1,2 Their redox chemistry is even younger, just about ten years old, but despite this short history these deltahedral clusters ions E9n- (E = Si, Ge, Sn, Pb; n = 2, 3, 4) have already shown interesting and diverse reactivity and have been at the forefront of rapidly developing and exciting new chemistry.3-6 Notable milestones are the oxidative coupling of Ge94- clusters to oligomers and infinite chains,7-19 their metallation,14-16,20-25 capping by transition-metal organometallic fragments,26-34 insertion of a transition-metal atom at the center of the cluster which is sometimes combined with capping and oligomerization,35-47 addition of main-group organometallic fragments as exo-bonded substituents,48-50 and functionalization with various organic residues by reactions with organic halides and alkynes.51-58 This latter development of attaching organic fragments directly to the clusters has opened up a new field, namely organo-Zintl chemistry, that is potentially fertile for further synthetic explorations, and it is the step-by-step procedure for the synthesis of germanium-divinyl clusters described herein. The initial steps outline the synthesis of an intermetallic precursor of K4Ge9 from which the Ge94- clusters are extracted later in solution. This involves fused-silica glass blowing, arc-welding of niobium containers, and handling of highly air-sensitive materials in a glove box. The air-sensitive K4Ge9 is then dissolved in ethylenediamine in the box and then alkenylated by a reaction with Me3SiC≡CSiMe3. The reaction is followed by electrospray mass spectrometry while the resulting solution is used for obtaining single crystals containing the functionalized clusters [H2C=CH-Ge9-CH=CH2]2-. For this purpose the solution is centrifuged, filtered, and carefully layered with a toluene solution of 18-crown-6. Left

  17. Synthesis of nine-atom deltahedral Zintl ions of germanium and their functionalization with organic groups.

    PubMed

    Gillett-Kunnath, Miriam M; Sevov, Slavi C

    2012-02-11

    Although the first studies of Zintl ions date between the late 1890's and early 1930's they were not structurally characterized until many years later. Their redox chemistry is even younger, just about ten years old, but despite this short history these deltahedral clusters ions E9(n-) (E = Si, Ge, Sn, Pb; n = 2, 3, 4) have already shown interesting and diverse reactivity and have been at the forefront of rapidly developing and exciting new chemistry. Notable milestones are the oxidative coupling of Ge9(4-) clusters to oligomers and infinite chains, their metallation, capping by transition-metal organometallic fragments, insertion of a transition-metal atom at the center of the cluster which is sometimes combined with capping and oligomerization, addition of main-group organometallic fragments as exo-bonded substituents, and functionalization with various organic residues by reactions with organic halides and alkynes. This latter development of attaching organic fragments directly to the clusters has opened up a new field, namely organo-Zintl chemistry, that is potentially fertile for further synthetic explorations, and it is the step-by-step procedure for the synthesis of germanium-divinyl clusters described herein. The initial steps outline the synthesis of an intermetallic precursor of K4Ge9 from which the Ge9(4-) clusters are extracted later in solution. This involves fused-silica glass blowing, arc-welding of niobium containers, and handling of highly air-sensitive materials in a glove box. The air-sensitive K4Ge9 is then dissolved in ethylenediamine in the box and then alkenylated by a reaction with Me3SiC≡CSiMe3. The reaction is followed by electrospray mass spectrometry while the resulting solution is used for obtaining single crystals containing the functionalized clusters [H2C=CH-Ge9-CH=CH2](2-). For this purpose the solution is centrifuged, filtered, and carefully layered with a toluene solution of 18-crown-6. Left undisturbed for a few days, the so

  18. Thermodynamics of various F420 coenzyme models as sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke; Shen, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2015-06-14

    32 F420 coenzyme models with alkylation of the three different N atoms (N1, N3 and N10) in the core structure (XFH(-)) were designed and synthesized and the thermodynamic driving forces (defined in terms of the molar enthalpy changes or the standard redox potentials in this work) of the 32 XFH(-) releasing hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and electrons, the thermodynamic driving forces of the 32 XFH˙ releasing protons and hydrogen atoms and the thermodynamic driving forces of XF(-)˙ releasing electrons in acetonitrile were determined using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The effects of the methyl group at N1, N3 and N10 and a negative charge on N1 and N10 atoms on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were examined; the results show that seating arrangements of the methyl group and the negative charge have remarkably different effects on the thermodynamic properties of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates. The effects of the substituents at C7 and C8 on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were also examined; the results show that the substituents at C7 and C8 have good Hammett linear free energy relationships with the six thermodynamic parameters. Meanwhile, a reasonable determination of possible reactions between members of the F420 family and NADH family in vivo was given according to a thermodynamic analysis platform constructed using the elementary step thermodynamic parameter of F420 coenzyme model 2FH(-) and NADH model MNAH releasing hydride ions in acetonitrile. The information disclosed in this work can not only fill a gap in the chemical thermodynamics of F420 coenzyme models as a class of very important organic sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons, but also strongly promote the fast development of the chemistry and applications of F420 coenzyme.

  19. PICK-UP ION DISTRIBUTIONS AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM SPECTRAL CURVATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Randol, B. M.; Schwadron, N. A.; Dayeh, M. A.; Funsten, H. O.; Moebius, E. S.; Zank, G. P.; Frisch, P. C.

    2012-05-20

    This paper focuses on the analysis and significance of the spectral curvature of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) detected by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer. The flux versus energy spectrum is analytically expressed in terms of the source proton distributions, namely: (1) the solar wind kappa distribution of protons and (2) the coexisting filled spherical shell distribution of pick-up ions (PUIs). The influence of PUIs on the spectral index and curvature is modeled and investigated in detail. It is analytically shown that (1) the PUI speed upper limit is restricted by the Earthward PUI velocity vector, (2) the PUI distribution causes a positive spectral curvature, and (3) the exact expressions of the spectral index and curvature can be used to extract information about the governing parameters of the parent proton distributions. The sky maps of the spectral curvature reveal a possible band-like configuration of positive spectral curvature that is missing in the original flux sky maps. This band can be roughly separated into the north/south polar regions and two ecliptic meridional 'columns' located around the ecliptic longitudes {approx}5 Degree-Sign and {approx}150 Degree-Sign . The geometric locus between the two cones with noseward axis, and apertures {approx}60 Degree-Sign and {approx}120 Degree-Sign , configures the band-like region of (1) the positive curvature and (2) the maximum values of PUI distribution. Indeed, the observed curvature band is highly correlated with PUI distributions, and is possibly caused by the influence of PUIs on bending the spectrum from linear (log-log scale) to concave upward, thus increasing its spectral curvature.

  20. Synthesis of atomic layers of hybridized h-BNC by depositing h-BN on graphene via ion beam sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, J. H.; Zhang, X. W.; Liu, H.; Yin, Z. G.; Wang, D. G.; Wang, Y.; You, J. B.; Wu, J. L.

    2016-10-01

    We report the deposition of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) on graphene by ion beam sputtering deposition. Both graphene domains and films synthesized by chemical vapor deposition were used as substrates. In the case of graphene domains, it was found that the h-BN domains were preferentially grown on the baked Cu surface instead of graphene due to the highly catalytic activity of Cu. On the other hand, the higher ejection energy of sputtered particles leads to the mixing of boron/nitrogen atoms and carbon atoms. Consequently, the h-BNC films consisting of the hybrid atomic layers of h-BN and graphene domains were formed when the graphene films were used as substrates. This work provides a promising and accessible route for the synthesis of hybridized h-BNC material.

  1. Equation-Of Coupled-Cluster Calculations of Photodetachment Cross Sections for Atomic Negative Ions across the Periodic Table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichino, Takatoshi; Cheng, Lan; Stanton, John F.

    2016-06-01

    The innovative application of the ion-trap technique by Wester and coworkers has yielded definitive experimental values of photodetachment cross sections for the atomic oxygen radical anion (Obullet -) [Hlavenka et al., J. Chem. Phys. 130, 061105 (2009)]. In the present study, equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-CC) calculations have been performed to derive theoretical values of photodetachment cross sections for the negative ions of atoms in the first two periods of the periodic table as well as of those which belong to the alkali metal and halogen groups. Two methods have been employed to derive the cross sections. One involves the Dyson orbitals obtained from EOM-CC calculations and plane wave functions for the detached electron in the transition dipole moment integrals. The other method utilizes the moment theory following EOM-CC calculations of transition dipole moments for a large number of pseudo-states. The cross sections so evaluated for Obullet - match the experimental values very well. Generally good agreement has been found between the theoretical and experimental values of the cross sections for the atoms in the first two periods, while the present calculations cast some doubt on reported experimental values for some atoms beyond the second period. Substantial relativistic effects on the cross section have been observed for heavy elements in the alkali metal and halogen groups.

  2. Atom penetration from a thin film into the substrate during sputtering by polyenergetic Ar{sup +} ion beam with mean energy of 9.4 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Kalin, B.A.; Gladkov, V.P.; Volkov, N.V.; Sabo, S.E.

    1995-12-31

    Penetration of alien atoms (Be, Ni) into Be, Al, Zr, Si and diamond was investigated under Ar{sup +} ion bombardment of samples having thermally evaporated films of 30--50 nm. Sputtering was carried out using a wide energy spectrum beam of Ar{sup +} ions of 9.4 keV to dose D = 1 {times} 10{sup 16}--10{sup 19} ion/cm{sup 2}. Implanted atom distribution in the targets was measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) of H{sup +} and He{sup +} ions with energy of 1.6 MeV as well as secondary ion mass-spectrometry (SIMS). During the bombardment, the penetration depth of Ar atoms increases with dose linearly. This depth is more than 3--20 times deeper than the projected range of bombarding ions and recoil atoms. This is a deep action effect. The analysis shows that the experimental data for foreign atoms penetration depth are similar to the data calculated for atom migration through the interstitial site in a field of internal (lateral) compressive stresses created in the near-surface layer of the substrate as a result of implantation. Under these experimental conditions atom ratio r{sub i}/r{sub m} (r{sub i} -- radius of dopant, r{sub m} -- radius target of substrate) can play a principal determining role.

  3. 'Programming' Electron Beam Ion Traps To Produce Atomic Data Relevant To Plasma Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Currell, Fred; O'Rourke, Brian; Kavanagh, Anthony; Li Yueming; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Ohtani, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Hirofumi

    2009-09-10

    After a brief review of the processes taking place in electron beam ions traps (EBITs), the means by which EBITs are used to make measurements of electron impact ionization cross-sections and dielectronic recombination resonance strengths are discussed. In particular, results from a study involving holmium ions extracted from an electron beam ion trap are used to illustrate a technique for studying dielectronic recombination in open-shell target ions.

  4. Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging at Low Altitudes from the Swedish Microsatellite Astrid: Extraction of the Equatorial Ion Distribution. Paper 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Pontus C:son; Barabash, Stas; Roelof, Edmond C.; Chase, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    Energetic neutral atom (ENA) images obtained by the ENA imager on- board the Astrid satellite in the polar cap at 1000 km during a moderate magnetic storm (Dst greater than or equal to 80 nT) on 8 February 1995 are simulated using a parameterized model of the equatorial ion distribution and a six-component Chamberlain exo-sphere with parameters from the MSISE-90 model. By changing the ion parameters until a matching ENA image is obtained one can extract the equatorial ion distribution. Four consecutive images from different view points several of minutes apart are simulated assuming H(+) and O(+), respectively, as parent ions. The optimal set of parameters is extracted by minimizing the chi(exp 2) difference between simulated and observed ENA image using Powell's minimization algorithm. The optimal equatorial model ion distribution consists of O(+) peaked in around dusk. The lower intensity of fluxes obtained from vantage points closer to the pole is an effect of the loss cone of the parent ion distribution being empty.

  5. Role of silver ions in destabilization of intermolecular adhesion forces measured by atomic force microscopy in Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Chaw, K C; Manimaran, M; Tay, Francis E H

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, we report on the potential use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) as a tool to measure the intermolecular forces in biofilm structures and to study the effect of silver ions on sessile Staphylococcus epidermidis cell viability and stability. We propose a strategy of destabilizing the biofilm matrix by reducing the intermolecular forces within the extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) using a low concentration (50 ppb) of silver ions. Our AFM studies on the intermolecular forces within the EPSs of S. epidermidis RP62A and S.epidermidis 1457 biofilms suggest that the silver ions can destabilize the biofilm matrix by binding to electron donor groups of the biological molecules. This leads to reductions in the number of binding sites for hydrogen bonds and electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions and, hence, the destabilization of the biofilm structure.

  6. Atomic emission spectrometric determination of ephedrine, cinchonine, chlorpheniramine, atropine and diphenhydramine based on formation of ion associates with ammonium reineckate.

    PubMed

    Khalil, S

    1999-12-01

    Ion-associate complexes of ephedrine HCl (I), cinchonine HCl (II), chlorpheniramine maleate (III), atropine sulphate (IV) and diphenhydramine HCl (V) with ammonium reineckate were precipitated and their solubilities were studied as a function of pH, ionic strength and temperature. Saturated solutions of each ion-associate under the optimum precipitation conditions were prepared and the Cr ion content in the supernatant was determined. The solubility products were thus elucidated at different temperatures. A new accurate and precise method using direct current plasma-atomic emission spectrometry for the determination of the investigated drugs in pure solutions and in pharmaceutical preparations is described. The drugs can determined by the present method in the ranges 1.6-52,2.64-85.8,3.12-101.4,5.52-180.4 and 2.72-75.85 microg/ml solutions of I, II, III, IV and V, respectively.

  7. Indirect atomic absorption determination of atropine, diphenhydramine, tolazoline, and levamisole based on formation of ion-associates with potassium tetraiodometrcurate.

    PubMed

    El Ries, M A; Khalil, S

    2001-04-01

    Ion-associate complexes of atropine sulphate (I), diphenhydramine HCl (II), tolazoline HCl (III) and levamisole HCl (IV) with potassium tetraiodomercurate were precipitated and their solubilities were studied as a function of pH, ionic strength and temperature. Saturated solutions of each ion-associate under the optimum precipitation conditions were prepared and the metal ion-content in the supernatant was determined. The solubility products were thus calculated at different temperatures. A new accurate and precise method using atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of the investigated drugs in pure solutions and in pharmaceutical preparations is described. The drugs can be determined by the present method in the ranges 13.6--138.8, 5.6-58, 3.6--39.6 and 4.8--48 microg/ml solutions of I--IV, respectively.

  8. Thomson spectrometer-microchannel plate assembly calibration for MeV-range positive and negative ions, and neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, R.; Abicht, F.; Braenzel, J.; Priebe, G.; Schnuerer, M.; Borghesi, M.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Nickles, P. V.

    2013-05-15

    We report on the absolute calibration of a microchannel plate (MCP) detector, used in conjunction with a Thomson parabola spectrometer. The calibration delivers the relation between a registered count numbers in the CCD camera (on which the MCP phosphor screen is imaged) and the number of ions incident on MCP. The particle response of the MCP is evaluated for positive, negative, and neutral particles at energies below 1 MeV. As the response of MCP depends on the energy and the species of the ions, the calibration is fundamental for the correct interpretation of the experimental results. The calibration method and arrangement exploits the unique emission symmetry of a specific source of fast ions and atoms driven by a high power laser.

  9. Thomson spectrometer-microchannel plate assembly calibration for MeV-range positive and negative ions, and neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, R.; Abicht, F.; Borghesi, M.; Braenzel, J.; Nickles, P. V.; Priebe, G.; Schnürer, M.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.

    2013-05-01

    We report on the absolute calibration of a microchannel plate (MCP) detector, used in conjunction with a Thomson parabola spectrometer. The calibration delivers the relation between a registered count numbers in the CCD camera (on which the MCP phosphor screen is imaged) and the number of ions incident on MCP. The particle response of the MCP is evaluated for positive, negative, and neutral particles at energies below 1 MeV. As the response of MCP depends on the energy and the species of the ions, the calibration is fundamental for the correct interpretation of the experimental results. The calibration method and arrangement exploits the unique emission symmetry of a specific source of fast ions and atoms driven by a high power laser.

  10. Formation rate for Rb 2 + molecular ions created in collisions of Rb Rydberg and ground-state atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanojevic, Jovica; Côté, Robin

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the formation rate of the molecular Rb2+ion in its various bound states produced in the associative ionization of a Rydberg and a ground-state atom. Before the formation takes place, the colliding atoms are accelerated by an attractive force between the collision partners. In this way the ground-state atom is first captured by the Rydberg electron and then guided towards the positive ion-core where a molecular ion is subsequently formed. As recently demonstrated, this process results in giant collisional cross sections for the molecular ion formation, with the cross sections essentially determined by the size of the Rydberg atom. For sufficient high principal quantum numbers and atomic densities, many ground-state atoms are already located inside the Rydberg atom and ready to participate in the associative ionization. The same process can occur between a Rydberg and a ground-state atom that form a long-range Rydberg molecule, possibly contributing to the shortening of the lifetimes of Rydberg atoms and molecules. Partial support from the US Army Research Office (ARO-MURI W911NF-14-1-0378), and from NSF (Grant No. PHY-1415560).

  11. Simulation of the low earth orbital atomic oxygen interaction with materials by means of an oxygen ion beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Paulsen, Phillip E.; Steuber, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    Atomic oxygen is the predominant species in low-Earth orbit between the altitudes of 180 and 650 km. These highly reactive atoms are a result of photodissociation of diatomic oxygen molecules from solar photons having a wavelength less than or equal to 2430A. Spacecraft in low-Earth orbit collide with atomic oxygen in the 3P ground state at impact energies of approximately 4.2 to 4.5 eV. As a consequence, organic materials previously used for high altitude geosynchronous spacecraft are severely oxidized in the low-Earth orbital environment. The evaluation of materials durability to atomic oxygen requires ground simulation of this environment to cost effectively screen materials for durability. Directed broad beam oxygen sources are necessary to evaluate potential spacecraft materials performance before and after exposure to the simulated low-Earth orbital environment. This paper presents a description of a low energy, broad oxygen ion beam source used to simulate the low-Earth orbital atomic oxygen environment. The results of materials interaction with this beam and comparison with actual in-space tests of the same meterials will be discussed. Resulting surface morphologies appear to closely replicate those observed in space tests.

  12. Low-Altitude Emission of Energetic Neutral Atoms: A New Diagnostic of the Energetics of Ion Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelof, E. C.; Nair, H.

    2010-12-01

    We describe a new theoretical understanding of the emission of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) generated by the precipitation of energetic magnetospheric ions into the Earth’s monatomic oxygen (O) exosphere (200-800 km). This low altitude emission (LAE) is the brightest ENA source in images obtained from Astrid-1/PIPPI, IMAGE/MENA/HENA, and TWINS1/2. The upward ENA “albedo” from the precipitating protons in the energy range 1-100 keV can approach 50% of the incident proton intensity. Unlike FUV imaging, ENA imaging of the LAE allows us to extract the detailed (not integrated) energy spectrum of the precipitating protons. We have verified this claim by comparing ENA images from TWINS 1/2 with in situ ion spectra measured by DMSP spacecraft (~825 km altitude) flying simultaneously under the ENA LAE regions (Bazell et al., J. Geophys. Res., in press 2010, and also this Conference). Quantitative extraction of proton spectra from the ENA images requires a “thick-target” theory that treats properly the multiple atomic collisions (charge exchange of protons, stripping ENA H-atoms) and associated energy losses (including ionization and excitation). Analytic solutions to the coupled proton/H-atom transport equations have been obtained, and they provide quantitative insight into the strong dependence of the ENA LAE upon the pitch angle and the energy of the precipitating protons. Since global ENA images of LAE can be obtained with exposure times of a minute or so during large geomagnetic storms, the distribution in magnetic latitude and local time of their evolving spectra contain critical diagnostics of the physics of not only the precipitation process, but also of the acceleration of the energetic ions themselves. Simulated 24 keV ENA low altitude emission viewed from TWINS-2 generated by precipitating protons below a DMSP pass (Bazell et al., JGR, in press, 2010).

  13. Investigations of ion-irradiated uranium dioxide nuclear fuel with laser-assisted atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valderrama, Billy

    Performance in commercial light water reactors is dictated by the ability of its fuel material, uranium dioxide (UO2), to transport heat generated during the fission process. It is widely known that the service lifetime is limited by irradiation-induced microstructural changes that degrade the thermal performance of UO2. Studying the role of complex, often interacting mechanisms that occur during the early stages of microstructural evolution presents a challenge. Phenomena of particular interest are the segregation of fission products to form bubbles and their resultant effect on grain boundary (GB) mobility, and the effect of irradiation on fuel stoichiometry. Each mechanism has a profound consequence on fuel thermal conductivity. Several advanced analytical techniques, such as transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, etc. have been used to study these mechanisms. However, they each have limitations and cannot individually provide the necessary information for deeper understanding. One technique that has been under utilized is atom probe tomography (APT), which has a unique ability to spatially resolve small-scale chemical variations. APT uses the principle of field ionization to evaporate surface ions for chemical analysis. For low electrical conductivity systems, a pulsed laser is used to thermally assist in the evaporation process. One factor complicating the analysis is that laser-material interactions are poorly understood for oxide materials and literature using this technique with UO2 is lacking. Therefore, an initial systematic study to identify the optimal conditions for the analysis of UO2 using laser-assisted APT was conducted. A comparative study on the evaporation behavior between CeO2 and UO2 was followed. CeO2 was chosen due to its technological relevancy and availability of comparative studies with laser-assisted APT. Dissimilar evaporation behavior between these materials was identified and attributed

  14. Transfer of a weakly bound electron in collisions of Rydberg atoms with neutral particles. II. Ion-pair formation and resonant quenching of the Rb(nl) and Ne(nl) States by Ca, Sr, and Ba atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Narits, A. A.; Mironchuk, E. S.; Lebedev, V. S.

    2013-10-15

    Electron-transfer processes are studied in thermal collisions of Rydberg atoms with alkaline-earth Ca(4s{sup 2}), Sr(5s{sup 2}), and Ba(6s{sup 2}) atoms capable of forming negative ions with a weakly bound outermost p-electron. We consider the ion-pair formation and resonant quenching of highly excited atomic states caused by transitions between Rydberg covalent and ionic terms of a quasi-molecule produced in collisions of particles. The contributions of these reaction channels to the total depopulation cross section of Rydberg states of Rb(nl) and Ne(nl) atoms as functions of the principal quantum number n are compared for selectively excited nl-levels with l Much-Less-Than n and for states with large orbital quantum numbers l = n - 1, n - 2. It is shown that the contribution from resonant quenching dominates at small values of n, and the ion-pair formation process begins to dominate with increasing n. The values and positions of the maxima of cross sections for both processes strongly depend on the electron affinity of an alkaline-earth atom and on the orbital angular momentum l of a highly excited atom. It is shown that in the case of Rydberg atoms in states with large l {approx} n - 1, the rate constants of ion-pair formation and collisional quenching are considerably lower than those for nl-levels with l Much-Less-Than n.

  15. Preconcentration of gold ions from water samples by modified organo-nanoclay sorbent prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Afzali, Daryoush; Mostafavi, Ali; Mirzaei, Mohammad

    2010-09-15

    In this work, the applicability of modified organo nanoclay as a new and easy prepared solid sorbent for the preconcentration of trace amounts of Au(III) ion from water samples is studied. The organo nanoclay was modified with 5-(4'-dimethylamino benzyliden)-rhodanine and used as a sorbent for separation of Au(III) ions. The sorption of gold ions was quantitative in the pH range of 2.0-6.0. Quantitative desorption occurred with 6.0 mL of 1.0 mol L(-1) Na(2)S(2)O(3). The amount of eluted Au(III) was measured using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In the initial solution the linear dynamic range was in the range of 0.45 ng mL(-1) to 10.0 microg mL(-1), the detection limit was 0.1 ng mL(-1) and the preconcentration factor was 105. Also, the relative standard deviation was +/-2.3% (n=8 and C=2.0 microg mL(-1)) and the maximum capacity of the sorbent was 3.9 mg of Au(III) per gram of modified organo nanoclay. The influences of the experimental parameters including sample pH, eluent volume and eluent type, sample volume, and interference of some ions on the recoveries of the gold ion were investigated. The proposed method was applied for preconcentration and determination of gold in different samples.

  16. Two-color above-threshold ionization of atoms and ions in XUV Bessel beams and intense laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seipt, D.; Müller, R. A.; Surzhykov, A.; Fritzsche, S.

    2016-11-01

    The two-color above-threshold ionization (ATI) of atoms and ions is investigated for a vortex Bessel beam in the presence of a strong near-infrared (NIR) light field. While the photoionization is caused by the photons from the weak but extreme ultraviolet (XUV) vortex Bessel beam, the energy and angular distribution of the photoelectrons and their sideband structure are affected by the plane-wave NIR field. We here explore the energy spectra and angular emission of the photoelectrons in such two-color fields as a function of the size and location of the target atoms with regard to the beam axis. In addition, analog to the circular dichroism in typical two-color ATI experiments with circularly polarized light, we define and discuss seven different dichroism signals for such vortex Bessel beams that arise from the various combinations of the orbital and spin angular momenta of the two light fields. For localized targets, it is found that these dichroism signals strongly depend on the size and position of the atoms relative to the beam. For macroscopically extended targets, in contrast, three of these dichroism signals tend to zero, while the other four just coincide with the standard circular dichroism, similar as for Bessel beams with a small opening angle. Detailed computations of the dichroism are performed and discussed for the 4 s valence-shell photoionization of Ca+ ions.

  17. Role of ionization-excitation processes in the cross section for direct ionization of heavy atomic ions by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, J. L.; Liu, L. P.; Liu, P. F.; Yuan, J. M.

    2014-10-01

    The contribution to the ionization cross section of ionization-excitation processes by electron impact is usually negligibly small for low- and medium-Z elements. We demonstrate here, however, that for heavy atomic ions with the outermost shell being n d (n =4 ,5 ) the ionization-excitation processes play an evident role in the ionization cross section. For the 4 s24 p64 d10 ground level of Gd18 +, the ionization-excitation cross section due to the excitation of levels in the 4 s24 p64 d84 f configuration is comparable to the direct 4 p and 4 s ionization cross sections of (4s24 p54 d10) 1 /2 and (4s 4 p64 d10) 1 /2. The total ionization cross section will be underestimated by 15% without including the contribution from ionization-excitation processes. This is a general conclusion for heavy atomic ions, which is verified by taking Pd-like ions of Sn4 +,Ba10 +,Nd14 +,Tb19 +,Yb24 +, and W28 + as examples. The role of ionization-excitation processes can be understood from the overlapping of the wave functions between the 4 d and 4 f orbitals.

  18. Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric determination of mucolytic drug ambroxol through ion-pair formation with iron and thiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Levent, Abdulkadir; Sentürk, Zühre

    2010-09-01

    Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric methods have been developed for the determination of mucolytic drug Ambroxol. These procedures depend upon the reaction of iron(III) metal ion with the drug in the presence of thiocyanate ion to form stable ion-pair complex which extractable chloroform. The red-coloured complex was determined either colorimetrically at 510 nm or by indirect atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) via the determination of the iron content in the formed complex. The optimum experimental conditions for pH, concentrations of Fe(3+) and SCN(-), shaking time, phase ratio, and the number of extractions were determined. Under the proposed conditions, linearity was obeyed in the concentration ranges 4.1x10(-6) - 5.7x10(-5) M (1.7-23.6 µg mL(-1)) using both methods, with detection limits of 4.6x10(-7) M (0.19 µg mL(-1)) for colorimetry and 1.1x10(-6) M (0.46 µg mL(-1)) for AAS. The proposed methods were applied for the determination of Ambroxol in tablet dosage forms. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the high-performance liquid chromatographic method with diode-array detection.

  19. Time-dependence ion charge state distributions of vacuum arcs: An interpretation involving atoms and charge exchange collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2004-08-27

    Experimentally observed charge state distributions are known to be higher at the beginning of each arc discharge. Up to know, this has been attributed to cathode surface effects in terms of changes of temperature, chemical composition and spot mode. Here it is shown that the initial decay of charge states of cathodic arc plasmas may at least in part due to charge exchange collisions of ions with neutrals that gradually fill the discharge volume. Sources of neutrals may include evaporated atoms from macroparticles and still-hot craters of previously active arc spots. More importantly, atoms are also produced by energetic condensation of the cathodic arc plasma. Self-sputtering is significant when ions impact with near-normal angle of incidence, and ions have low sticking probability when impacting at oblique angle of incidence. Estimates show that the characteristic time for filling the near-cathode discharge volume agrees well with the charge state decay time, and the likelihood of charge exchange is reasonably large to be taken into account.

  20. Measurement of a large chemical reaction rate between ultracold closed-shell 40Ca atoms and open-shell 174Yb+ ions held in a hybrid atom-ion trap.

    PubMed

    Rellergert, Wade G; Sullivan, Scott T; Kotochigova, Svetlana; Petrov, Alexander; Chen, Kuang; Schowalter, Steven J; Hudson, Eric R

    2011-12-09

    Ultracold 174Yb+ ions and 40Ca atoms are confined in a hybrid trap. The charge exchange chemical reaction rate constant between these two species is measured and found to be 4 orders of magnitude larger than recent measurements in other heteronuclear systems. The structure of the CaYb+ molecule is determined and used in a calculation that explains the fast chemical reaction as a consequence of strong radiative charge transfer. A possible explanation is offered for the apparent contradiction between typical theoretical predictions and measurements of the radiative association process in this and other recent experiments.

  1. Measurement of a Large Chemical Reaction Rate between Ultracold Closed-Shell {sup 40}Ca Atoms and Open-Shell {sup 174}Yb{sup +} Ions Held in a Hybrid Atom-Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Rellergert, Wade G.; Sullivan, Scott T.; Chen Kuang; Schowalter, Steven J.; Hudson, Eric R.; Kotochigova, Svetlana; Petrov, Alexander

    2011-12-09

    Ultracold {sup 174}Yb{sup +} ions and {sup 40}Ca atoms are confined in a hybrid trap. The charge exchange chemical reaction rate constant between these two species is measured and found to be 4 orders of magnitude larger than recent measurements in other heteronuclear systems. The structure of the CaYb{sup +} molecule is determined and used in a calculation that explains the fast chemical reaction as a consequence of strong radiative charge transfer. A possible explanation is offered for the apparent contradiction between typical theoretical predictions and measurements of the radiative association process in this and other recent experiments.

  2. Bias in bonding behavior among boron, carbon, and nitrogen atoms in ion implanted a-BN, a-BC, and diamond like carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Genisel, Mustafa Fatih; Uddin, Md. Nizam; Say, Zafer; Bengu, Erman; Kulakci, Mustafa; Turan, Rasit; Gulseren, Oguz

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we implanted N{sup +} and N{sub 2}{sup +} ions into sputter deposited amorphous boron carbide (a-BC) and diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films in an effort to understand the chemical bonding involved and investigate possible phase separation routes in boron carbon nitride (BCN) films. In addition, we investigated the effect of implanted C{sup +} ions in sputter deposited amorphous boron nitride (a-BN) films. Implanted ion energies for all ion species were set at 40 KeV. Implanted films were then analyzed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The changes in the chemical composition and bonding chemistry due to ion-implantation were examined at different depths of the films using sequential ion-beam etching and high resolution XPS analysis cycles. A comparative analysis has been made with the results from sputter deposited BCN films suggesting that implanted nitrogen and carbon atoms behaved very similar to nitrogen and carbon atoms in sputter deposited BCN films. We found that implanted nitrogen atoms would prefer bonding to carbon atoms in the films only if there is no boron atom in the vicinity or after all available boron atoms have been saturated with nitrogen. Implanted carbon atoms also preferred to either bond with available boron atoms or, more likely bonded with other implanted carbon atoms. These results were also supported by ab-initio density functional theory calculations which indicated that carbon-carbon bonds were energetically preferable to carbon-boron and carbon-nitrogen bonds.

  3. X-ray spectroscopy of highly-ionized atoms in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R.E.; Bennett, C.; Chen, M.H.; Cowan, T.; Dietrich, D.; Henderson, J.R.; Knapp, D.A.; Levine, M.A.; Schneider, M.B.; Scofield, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    An Electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged-ions (q /le/ 70+) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of dielectronic recombination, electron impact excitation and transition energies are presented. 15 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Photodissociation of Trapped Rb2+: Implications for Simultaneous Trapping of Atoms and Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyothi, S.; Ray, Tridib; Dutta, Sourav; Allouche, A. R.; Vexiau, Romain; Dulieu, Olivier; Rangwala, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    The direct photodissociation of trapped 85Rb2+ (rubidium) molecular ions by the cooling light for the 85Rb magneto-optical trap (MOT) is studied, both experimentally and theoretically. Vibrationally excited Rb2+ ions are created by photoionization of Rb2 molecules formed photoassociatively in the Rb MOT and are trapped in a modified spherical Paul trap. The decay rate of the trapped Rb2+ ion signal in the presence of the MOT cooling light is measured and agreement with our calculated rates for molecular ion photodissociation is observed. The photodissociation mechanism due to the MOT light is expected to be active and therefore universal for all homonuclear diatomic alkali metal molecular ions.

  5. Photodissociation of Trapped Rb_{2}^{+}: Implications for Simultaneous Trapping of Atoms and Molecular Ions.

    PubMed

    Jyothi, S; Ray, Tridib; Dutta, Sourav; Allouche, A R; Vexiau, Romain; Dulieu, Olivier; Rangwala, S A

    2016-11-18

    The direct photodissociation of trapped ^{85}Rb_{2}^{+} (rubidium) molecular ions by the cooling light for the ^{85}Rb magneto-optical trap (MOT) is studied, both experimentally and theoretically. Vibrationally excited Rb_{2}^{+} ions are created by photoionization of Rb_{2} molecules formed photoassociatively in the Rb MOT and are trapped in a modified spherical Paul trap. The decay rate of the trapped Rb_{2}^{+} ion signal in the presence of the MOT cooling light is measured and agreement with our calculated rates for molecular ion photodissociation is observed. The photodissociation mechanism due to the MOT light is expected to be active and therefore universal for all homonuclear diatomic alkali metal molecular ions.

  6. Measurements of scattering processes in negative ion: Atom collisions. Technical progress report, 1 September 1991--31 December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kvale, T.J.

    1994-09-27

    This report describes the progress made on the research objectives during the past three years of the grant. This research project is designed to study various scattering processes which occur in H{sup {minus}} collisions with atomic (specifically, noble gas and atomic hydrogen) targets in the intermediate energy region. These processes include: elastic scattering, single- and double-electron detachment, and target excitation/ionization. For the elastic and target inelastic processes where H{sup {minus}} is scattered intact, the experimental technique of Ion Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (IELS) will be employed to identify the final target state(s). In most of the above processes, cross sections are unknown both experimentally and theoretically. The measurements will provide total cross sections (TCS) initially, and once the angular positioning apparatus is installed, will provide angular differential cross sections (ADCS).

  7. An independent atom model description of ion-molecule collisions including geometric screening corrections: application to biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüdde, H. J.; Achenbach, A.; Kalkbrenner, T.; Jankowiak, H. C.; Kirchner, T.

    2016-09-01

    Recently, we proposed to calculate electron removal cross sections for ion-molecule collisions in an independent atom model that accounts for geometric screening corrections. The correction coefficients are obtained from using a pixel counting method (PCM) for the exact calculation of the effective cross sectional area that emerges when the molecular cross section is pictured as a structure of (overlapping) atomic cross sections. This structure varies with the relative orientation of the molecule with respect to the projectile beam direction and, accordingly, orientation-independent total cross sections are obtained from averaging the pixel count over many orientations. In this contribution, we apply the PCM to proton collisions from amino acids and DNA and RNA nucleobases. The strength of the screening effect is analyzed by comparing the PCM results with Bragg additivity rule cross sections and with experimental data where available. Work supported by NSERC, Canada.

  8. A suggested periodic table up to Z≤ 172, based on Dirac-Fock calculations on atoms and ions.

    PubMed

    Pyykkö, Pekka

    2011-01-07

    Extended Average Level (EAL) Dirac-Fock calculations on atoms and ions agree with earlier work in that a rough shell-filling order for the elements 119-172 is 8s < 5g≤ 8p(1/2) < 6f < 7d < 9s < 9p(1/2) < 8p(3/2). The present Periodic Table develops further that of Fricke, Greiner and Waber [Theor. Chim. Acta 1971, 21, 235] by formally assigning the elements 121-164 to (nlj) slots on the basis of the electron configurations of their ions. Simple estimates are made for likely maximum oxidation states, i, of these elements M in their MX(i) compounds, such as i = 6 for UF(6). Particularly high i are predicted for the 6f elements.

  9. The Role of High-Energy Ion-Atom/Molecule Collisions in Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkić, Dževad

    2014-12-01

    The need for ions in radiotherapy stems from the most favorable localization of the largest energy deposition, precisely at the tumor site with small energy losses away from the target. Such a dose conformity to the target is due to heavy masses of ions that scatter predominantly in the forward direction and lose maximal energy mainly near the end of their path in the vicinity of the Bragg peak. The heavy masses of nuclei preclude noticeable multiple scattering of the primary ion beam. This occurrence is responsible for only about 30% of ion efficiency in killing tumor cells. However, ionization of targets by fast ions yields electrons that might be of sufficient energy to produce further radiation damage. These δ-electrons, alongside radicals produced by ion-water collisions, can accomplish the remaining 70% of tumor cell eradication. Electrons achieve this chiefly through multiple scattering due to their small mass. Therefore, energy depositions by both heavy (nuclei) and light (electrons) particles as well as highly reactive radicals need to be simultaneously transported in Monte Carlo simulations. This threefold transport of particles is yet to be developed for the existing Monte Carlo codes. Critical to accomplishing this key goal is the availability of accurate cross section databases. To this end, the leading continuum distorted wave methodologies are poised to play a pivotal role in predicting energy losses of ions in tissue as discussed in this work.

  10. Role of low-energy ion irradiation in the formation of an aluminum germanate layer on a germanium substrate by radical-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Yukio Yamada, Daichi; Yokohira, Tomoya; Yanachi, Kosei; Yamamoto, Chiaya; Yoo, Byeonghak; Sato, Tetsuya; Yamanaka, Junji; Takamatsu, Toshiyuki; Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-03-15

    Radical-enhanced atomic layer deposition uses oxygen radicals generated by a remote microwave-induced plasma as an oxidant to change the surface reactions of the alternately supplied trimethylaluminum precursor and oxygen radicals on a Ge substrate, which leads to the spontaneous formation of an aluminum germanate layer. In this paper, the effects that low-energy ions, supplied from a remote microwave plasma to the substrate along with the oxygen radicals, have on the surface reactions were studied. From a comparative study of aluminum oxide deposition under controlled ion flux irradiation on the deposition surface, it was found that the ions enhance the formation of the aluminum germanate layer. The plasma potential measured at the substrate position by the Langmuir probe method was 5.4 V. Assuming that the kinetic energy of ions arriving at the substrate surface is comparable to that gained by this plasma potential, such ions have sufficient energy to induce exchange reactions of surface-adsorbed Al atoms with the underlying Ge atoms without causing significant damage to the substrate. This ion-induced exchange reaction between Al and Ge atoms is inferred to be the background kinetics of the aluminum germanate formation by radical-enhanced atomic layer deposition.

  11. Redox-inactive metal ions promoted the catalytic reactivity of non-heme manganese complexes towards oxygen atom transfer.

    PubMed

    Choe, Cholho; Yang, Ling; Lv, Zhanao; Mo, Wanling; Chen, Zhuqi; Li, Guangxin; Yin, Guochuan

    2015-05-21

    Redox-inactive metal ions can modulate the reactivity of redox-active metal ions in a variety of biological and chemical oxidations. Many synthetic models have been developed to help address the elusive roles of these redox-inactive metal ions. Using a non-heme manganese(II) complex as the model, the influence of redox-inactive metal ions as a Lewis acid on its catalytic efficiency in oxygen atom transfer was investigated. In the absence of redox-inactive metal ions, the manganese(II) catalyst is very sluggish, for example, in cyclooctene epoxidation, providing only 9.9% conversion with 4.1% yield of epoxide. However, addition of 2 equiv. of Al(3+) to the manganese(II) catalyst sharply improves the epoxidation, providing up to 97.8% conversion with 91.4% yield of epoxide. EPR studies of the manganese(II) catalyst in the presence of an oxidant reveal a 16-line hyperfine structure centered at g = 2.0, clearly indicating the formation of a mixed valent di-μ-oxo-bridged diamond core, Mn(III)-(μ-O)2-Mn(IV). The presence of a Lewis acid like Al(3+) causes the dissociation of this diamond Mn(III)-(μ-O)2-Mn(IV) core to form monomeric manganese(iv) species which is responsible for improved epoxidation efficiency. This promotional effect has also been observed in other manganese complexes bearing various non-heme ligands. The findings presented here have provided a promising strategy to explore the catalytic reactivity of some di-μ-oxo-bridged complexes by adding non-redox metal ions to in situ dissociate those dimeric cores and may also provide clues to understand the mechanism of methane monooxygenase which has a similar diiron diamond core as the intermediate.

  12. Au Colloids Formed by Ion Implantation in Muscovite Mica Studied by Vibrational and Electronic Spectroscopes and Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tung, Y. S.; Henderson, D. O.; Mu, R.; Ueda, A.; Collins, W. E.; White, C. W.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zhu, Jane G.

    1997-01-01

    Au was implanted into the (001) surface of Muscovite mica at an energy of 1.1 MeV and at doses of 1, 3, 6, and 10 x 10(exp 16) ions/cu cm. Optical spectra of the as-implanted samples revealed a peak at 2.28 eV (545 nm) which is attributed to the surface plasmon absorption of Au colloids. The infrared reflectance measurements show a decreasing reflectivity with increasing ion dose in the Si-O stretching region (900-1200 /cm). A new peak observed at 967 /cm increases with the ion dose and is assigned to an Si-O dangling bond. Atomic force microscopy images of freshly cleaved samples implanted with 6 and 10 x 10(exp 16) ions/sq cm indicated metal colloids with diameters between 0.9- 1.5 nm. AFM images of the annealed samples showed irregularly shaped structures with a topology that results from the fusion of smaller colloids.

  13. Multiple ionization of neon atoms in collisions with bare and dressed ions: A mean-field description considering target response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Gerald; Kirchner, Tom

    2015-05-01

    We investigate projectile-charge-state-differential electron removal from neon atoms by impact of He2+, Li3+, B2+, and C3+ ions at intermediate projectile energies (25 keV/u to 1 MeV/u ). The many-electron problem is described with an independent electron model in which active electrons at both collision centers are propagated in a common mean-field potential. Response to electron removal is taken into account in terms of a time-dependent screening potential, and a Slater-determinant-based method is used for the final-state analysis. Total cross sections for net recoil ion production, multiple ionization, and capture channels are mostly in good agreement with published experimental data. Results from equicharged bare and dressed ions are compared and the net recoil ion production cross section is broken down into contributions associated with different final projectile charge states in order to shed light on the role of the projectile electrons.

  14. Kinetics of interlayer ion migration in non-swelling clays: An atomic-scale study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammers, L. N.; Kolluri, K.

    2015-12-01

    Clay-rich geologic repositories serve as hosts for fossil methane reserves and as traps for contaminant radionuclides and sequestered CO2. Despite the abundance of non-swelling clay minerals in sedimentary formations, the mechanisms of ion exchange and mass transport mediated by these minerals are not well understood. Ion exchange kinetics in collapsed clays are characterized by a long tail of slow exchange, which suggests that interlayer ions can exchange with the bulk solution. Recent High-Resolution TEM evidence suggests that Cs+ ion exchange K+ in collapsed interlayers leads to interstratified structures, where entire interlayers are completely exchanged while others remain pristine [Okamura T et al., (2005) Microscopy 6365-72]. This phenomenon could be explained by kinetic feedbacks arising when a larger ion substitutes for a smaller one, although the details of this exchange mechanism are currently unknown. We investigated the kinetics and mechanisms of interlayer cation migration in illite (K0.7Al2[Al0.7Si3.3O10](OH)2) using molecular simulations. A Monte Carlo scheme was used to distribute interlayer K ions, and these ions were found to prefer sites neighboring two or more Al3+ substitutions in the tetrahedral sheets. Interlayer K+ ion migration between stable ditrigonal cavity sites was observed directly in molecular dynamics simulations performed at temperatures ranging from 500 K to 900 K and at constant volume. The Climbing Image Nudged Elastic Band method was used to determine the activation energy barrier on 660 K+ ion migration paths. Interlayer ions were observed to migrate between stable lattice sites with migration barriers of 2.35 ± 1.06 eV. Only about 20% of this variation is statistically explained by the distribution of charge deficit sites in the layer caused by Al3+ substitution for Si4+. Remarkably, we find that migration barriers decrease as we increase interlayer spacing. These results suggest that frayed edge sites - local regions with

  15. Ion exchange in the atomic energy industry with particular reference to actinide and fission product separation

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, I.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviewed are some of the uses of ion exchange processes used by the nuclear industry for the period April, 1978 to April, 1983. The topics dealt with are: thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, cesium and actinide-lanthanide separations; the higher actinides - Cm, Bk, Cf, Es and Fm; fission products; ion exchange in the geological disposal of radioactive waste. Consideration is given to safety in the use of ion exchangers and in safe methods of disposal of such materials. Full scale and pilot plant process descriptions are included as well as summaries of laboratory studies. 130 references.

  16. Design study of low-energy beam transport for multi-charge beams at RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Qiang, Ji; Kim, Eun-San

    2015-12-01

    The Rare isotope Accelerator Of Newness (RAON) at the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) is being designed to simultaneously accelerate beams with multiple charge states. It includes a driver superconducting (SC) linac for producing 200 MeV/u and 400 kW continuous wave (CW) heavy ion beams from protons to uranium. The RAON consists of a few electron cyclotron resonance ion sources, a low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system, a CW 81.25 MHz, 500 keV/u radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, a medium-energy beam transport system, the SC linac, and a charge-stripper system. The LEBT system for the RISP accelerator facility consists of a high-voltage platform, two 90° dipoles, a multi-harmonic buncher (MHB), solenoids, electrostatic quadrupoles, a velocity equalizer, and a diagnostic system. The ECR ion sources are located on a high-voltage platform to reach an initial beam energy of 10 keV/u. After extraction, the ion beam is transported through the LEBT system to the RFQ accelerator. The generated charge states are selected by an achromatic bending system and then bunched by the MHB in the LEBT system. The MHB is used to achieve a small longitudinal emittance in the RFQ by generating a sawtooth wave with three harmonics. In this paper, we present the results and issues of the beam dynamics of the LEBT system.

  17. Effects of Ion Atomic Number on Single-Event Gate Rupture (SEGR) Susceptibility of Power MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, J.-M.; Goldsman, N.; Liu, S.; Titus, J.; Ladbury, R. L.; Kim, H. S.; Phan, A. M.; Zafrani, M.; Sherman, P.

    2011-01-01

    The relative importance of heavy-ion interaction with the oxide, charge ionized in the epilayer, and charge ionized in the drain substrate, on the bias for SEGR failure is experimentally investigated.

  18. Distribution of boron atoms in ion-implanted-compound semiconductors. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, R.C.; Knudsen, J.F.; Downing, R.G.; Kremer, R.E.

    1988-11-22

    The nondestructive neutron depth profiling (NDP) technique was used to measure the boron (10B) distributions in GaAs, CdTe, Hg0.7Cd0.3Te, and Hg0.85Mn0.15Te after multiple energy ion implants. The NDP results are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical ion ranges obtained from Monte Carlo computer simulations. Only minor changes in the boron profiles were seen for the chosen annealing conditions.

  19. Cascade Problems in Some Atomic Lifetime Measurements at a Heavy-Ion Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E; Hoffmann, J; Krantz, C; Wolf, A; Ishikawa, Y; Santana, J

    2008-10-09

    Lifetimes of 3s{sup 2}3p{sup k} ground configuration levels of Al-, Si-, P-, and S-like ions of Be, Co, and Ni have been measured at a heavy-ion storage ring. Some of the observed decay curves show strong evidence of cascade repopulation from specific 3d levels that feature lifetimes in the same multi-millisecond range as the levels of the ground configuration.

  20. Reactivity Control of Rhodium Cluster Ions by Alloying with Tantalum Atoms.

    PubMed

    Mafuné, Fumitaka; Tawaraya, Yuki; Kudoh, Satoshi

    2016-02-18

    Gas phase, bielement rhodium and tantalum clusters, RhnTam(+) (n + m = 6), were prepared by the double laser ablation of Rh and Ta rods in He carrier gas. The clusters were introduced into a reaction gas cell filled with nitric oxide (NO) diluted with He and were subjected to collisions with NO and He at room temperature. The product species were observed by mass spectrometry, demonstrating that the NO molecules were sequentially adsorbed on the RhnTam(+) clusters to form RhnTam(+)NxOx (x = 1, 2, 3, ...) species. In addition, oxide clusters, RhnTam(+)O2, were also observed, suggesting that the NO molecules were dissociatively adsorbed on the cluster, the N atoms migrated on the surface to form N2, and the N2 molecules were released from RhnTam(+)N2O2. The reactivity, leading to oxide formation, was composition dependent: oxide clusters were dominantly formed for the bielement clusters containing both Rh and Ta atoms, whereas such clusters were hardly formed for the single-element Rhn(+) and Tam(+) clusters. DFT calculations indicated that the Ta atoms induce dissociation of NO on the clusters by lowering the dissociation energy, whereas the Rh atoms enable release of N2 by lowering the binding energy of the N atoms on the clusters.

  1. The dynamics on migrations of Li + ion and Li atom at 700 K around the circumference of graphite cluster model: A direct molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Akira; Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2001-05-01

    For the diffusion species of Li + ion and Li atom stabilized at the same site of the circumference of the graphite, migration processes are simulated using the direct molecular orbital (MO) dynamics calculation on the hydrogen terminated cluster model, C54H18, at AM1 level. Although Li + forms ionic bond with two carbon atoms in the circumference, Li bonds covalently with one atom through sp3 hybrid orbital at 0 K. At 700 K, Li+ dissociated goes across the bulk and escapes from the cluster model after 0.6 ps. On the other hand, Li circulates only around the carbon atom, keeping the covalent bond.

  2. Interactions and low-energy collisions between an alkali ion and an alkali atom of a different nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Arpita; Ghanmi, Chedli; Berriche, Hamid; Deb, Bimalendu

    2016-05-01

    We study theoretically interaction potentials and low-energy collisions between different alkali atoms and alkali ions. Specifically, we consider systems such as X + {{{Y}}}+, where X({{{Y}}}+) is either Li(Cs+) or Cs(Li+), Na(Cs+) or Cs(Na+) and Li(Rb+) or Rb(Li+). We calculate the molecular potentials of the ground and first two excited states of these three systems using a pseudopotential method and compare our results with those obtained by others. We derive ground-state scattering wave functions and analyze the cold collisional properties of these systems for a wide range of energies. We find that, in order to get convergent results for the total scattering cross sections for energies of the order 1 K, one needs to take into account at least 60 partial waves. The low-energy scattering properties calculated in this paper may serve as a precursor for experimental exploration of quantum collisions between an alkali atom and an alkali ion of a different nucleus.

  3. On the role of atomic metastability in the production of Balmer line radiation from ‘cold’ atomic hydrogen, deuterium and hydrogenic ion impurities in fusion edge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, J. D.

    2012-03-01

    Published arguments, which assign an important role to atomic metastability in the production of ‘narrow’ Zeeman component radiation from the boundary region of fusion plasmas, are examined critically in relation to l-redistribution by proton and electron collisions, and mixing of unperturbed atomic states by the ion microfield and microfield gradient. It is concluded that these important processes indeed severely constrain the contribution from ‘metastable’ states to the generation of the hydrogen Balmer spectra, for electron concentrations above 1012 cm-3, as pointed out before by the present author (Hey et al 1999 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 32 3555). The analysis of collision-induced l-redistribution represents an extension of that used previously (Hey et al 1996 Contrib. Plasma Phys. 36 583), applicable up to higher electron densities. For comparison purposes, we also consider the question of metastability of ionized helium in a low-temperature plasma, and that of some common hydrogenic impurities (C5+ and Ne9+) in a hydrogen (deuterium) fusion plasma. While for low nuclear charge Z the metastability of 2s1/2 levels is quenched by the plasma environment, it is much reduced in high-Z ions owing to the rapid increase with Z of the two-photon electric dipole (2E1) and magnetic dipole (M1) spontaneous transition rates to the ground state, whereas the role of the plasma in these cases is less important. The main new principle elaborated in this work is the sensitivity of atomic line strengths, and hence collision strengths, to perturbation by the plasma environment for transitions between fine-structure sublevels of the same principal quantum number. As the plasma microfield strength grows, ‘allowed’ transitions diminish in strength, while ‘forbidden’ transitions grow. However, owing to violation of the parity selection rule, there is an overall loss of collision strength available to transitions, resulting from the appearance of significant

  4. X-ray emission from charge exchange of highly-charged ions in atoms and molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, J. B.; Williams, I. D.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2000-01-01

    Charge exchange followed by radiative stabilization are the main processes responsible for the recent observations of X-ray emission from comets in their approach to the Sun. A new apparatus was constructed to measure, in collisions of HCIs with atoms and molecules, (a) absolute cross sections for single and multiple charge exchange, and (b) normalized X-ray emission cross sections.

  5. Interaction of atomic and low-energy deuterium with tungsten pre-irradiated with self-ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Markelj, S.; Toussaint, U. von

    2016-02-07

    Polycrystalline tungsten (W) specimens were pre-irradiated with self-ions to create identical samples with high density of defects up to ∼2.5 μm near the surface. Then, W specimens were exposed to either thermal atomic deuterium (D) beam with an incident energy of ∼0.2 eV or low energy D plasma with the incident energy varied between 5 and 200 eV at different sample temperatures. Each sample was exposed once at certain temperature and fluence. The D migration and accumulation in W were studied post-mortem by nuclear reaction method. It was shown that the rate of the D to occupy radiation-induced defects increases with increasing the incident energy, ion flux, and temperature. Experimental investigation was accompanied by modelling using the rate-equation model. Moreover, the analytical model was developed and benchmarked against numerical model. The calculations of the deuterium diffusion with trapping at radiation-induced defects in tungsten by analytical model are consistent with numerical calculations using rate-equation model. The data of reflection and penetration of atomic and low-energy D were taking from calculations using molecular dynamics (MD) with Juslin interatomic potentials and a binary collision code TRIM. MD calculations show an agreement with a binary collision code TRIM only in a very narrow range of deuterium energies between 1 and 20 eV. Incorporation of the data of reflection and penetration of deuterium in the macroscopic modelling has been done to verify the range of validity of calculations using MD and binary collision code TRIM by comparison of modelling results with experimental data. Modelling results are consistent with experiments using reflection and penetration data of D obtained from TRIM code for incident ion energy above 1 eV. Otherwise, the parameters obtained from MD should be incorporated in the rate-equation model to have a good agreement with the experiments.

  6. Atomically precise doping of monomanganese ion into coreless supertetrahedral chalcogenide nanocluster inducing unusual red shift in Mn(2+) emission.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Le; Liu, Xiaochun; Yan, Wenbo; Wu, Tao; Bu, Xianhui; Feng, Pingyun

    2014-03-26

    We report a simple and yet effective method to introduce Mn(2+) ions into semiconducting nanoclusters with atomically precise control. Our method utilizes one type of micrometer-sized crystals, composed of well-defined isolated supertetrahedral chalcogenide nanoclusters (∼2 nm, [Cd6In28S52(SH)4]) whose core metal site is unoccupied in as-synthesized pristine form. This unique model structure with vacant core site makes it possible to achieve ordered distribution of Mn(2+) dopants, and at the same time effectively preclude the formation of Mn(2+) clusters in the host matrix. A two-step synthesis strategy is applied to realize an atomically precise doping of Mn(2+) ion into the core site of the nanoclusters, and to achieve uniform distribution of Mn(2+) dopants in the crystal lattice. The PL, X-ray photoelectron (XPS), as well as the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra reveal the successful incorporation of Mn(2+) ion into the core site of the nanocluster. Different from the pristine host material with weak green emission (∼490 nm), the Mn(2+)-doped material shows a strong red emission (630 nm at room temperature and 654 nm at 30 K), which is significantly red-shifted relative to the orange emission (∼585 nm) observed in traditional Mn(2+)-doped II-VI semiconductors. Various experiments including extensive synthetic variations and PL dynamics have been performed to probe the mechanistic aspects of synthesis process and resultant unusual structural and PL properties. The quaternary semiconductor material reported here extends the emission window of Mn(2+)-doped II-VI semiconductor from yellow-orange to red, opening up new opportunities in applications involving photonic devices and bioimaging.

  7. Multiple ionization and capture in relativistic heavy-ion atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerhof, W.E.; Anholt, R.; Xu, Xiang-Yuan; Gould, H.; Feinberg, B.; McDonald, R.J.; Wegner, H.E.; Thieberger, P.

    1987-02-01

    We show that in relativistic heavy-ion collisions the independent electron model can be used to predict cross sections for multiple inner-shell ionization and capture in a single collision. Charge distributions of 82- to 200-MeV/amu Xe and 105- to 955-MeV/amu U ion beams emerging from thin solid targets were used to obtain single- and multiple-electron stripping and capture cross sections. The probabilities of stripping electrons from the K, L, or M shells were calculated using the semiclassical approximation and Dirac hydrogenic wavefunctions. For capture, a simplified model for electron capture was uded. The data generally agree with theory.

  8. Chemical Dynamics of State-Selected Atomic and Diatomic Ions of Aerospace Relevance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    modified the triple - quadrupole -double-octopole y<t&te Cy» LJMW • • Figure 1. Schematic diagram of the comprehensive VUV laser system, which...H. Xu, and C. Y. Ng, "The Study of State-Selected Ion-Molecule Reactions using the Pulsed-Field Ionization- Photoion Technique ", J. Chem. Phys...8217==0-4) + He collisions in the ET range of 0-3 eV have also been measured using the VUV-photoionization-guided-ion beam mass spectrometric technique

  9. Rotational state-dependent attachment of He atoms to cold molecular ions: An action spectroscopic scheme for rotational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünken, Sandra; Kluge, Lars; Stoffels, Alexander; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2017-02-01

    We present a kinetics model description of a newly developed action spectroscopic method for rotational spectroscopy based on rotational state-dependent three-body attachment of He atoms to cold molecular ions stored in a cryogenic 22-pole ion trap. The model results from numerical simulations and an approximate analytical expression are compared to measurements of the J = 1- 0 rotational transition of CD+, for which we obtain a refined transition frequency of 453.5218509(7) GHz. From the analysis of the spectroscopic data recorded at varying experimental conditions, e.g. over a wide range of He number densities and excitation powers, we deduce that the ternary rate coefficient in the first excited rotational state of CD+ is reduced to (55 ± 5) % of the rotational ground state value. This decrease in the rate coefficient can be rationalized as an increase of the redissociation probability in the ternary collision process. A summary of rotational spectroscopy measurements of other molecular ions using the new method will be given, and its general applicability is discussed.

  10. He-Ion and Self-Atom Induced Damage and Surface-Morphology Changes of a Hot W Target

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Fred W; Hijazi, Hussein Dib; Krstic, Predrag S; Dadras, Mostafa Jonny; Meyer III, Harry M; Parish, Chad M; Bannister, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    We report results of measurements on the evolution of the surface morphology of a hot tungsten surface due to impacting low-energy (80 12,000 eV) He ions and of simulations of damage caused by cumulative bombardment of 1 and 10 keV W self-atoms. The measurements were performed at the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF), while the simulations were done at the Kraken supercomputing facility of the University of Tennessee. At 1 keV, the simulations show strong defect-recombination effects that lead to a saturation of the total defect number after a few hundreds impacts, while sputtering leads to an imbalance of the vacancy and interstitial number. On the experimental side, surface morphology changes were investigated over a broad range of fluences for both virgin and pre-damaged W-targets. At the lowest accumulated fluences, small surface-grain features and near-surface He bubbles are observed. At the largest fluences, individual grain characteristics disappear in FIB/SEM scans, and the entire surface is covered by a multitude of near-surface bubbles with a broad range of sizes, and disordered whisker growth, while in top-down SEM imaging the surface is virtually indistinguishable from the nano-fuzz produced on linear plasma devices. These features are evident at progressively lower fluences as the He-ion energy is increased.

  11. Cloud point extraction for the determination of copper, nickel and cobalt ions in environmental samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Shokrollahi, A; Ahmadi, F; Rajabi, H R; Soylak, M

    2008-02-11

    A cloud point extraction procedure was presented for the preconcentration of copper, nickel and cobalt ions in various samples. After complexation with methyl-2-pyridylketone oxime (MPKO) in basic medium, analyte ions are quantitatively extracted to the phase rich in Triton X-114 following centrifugation. 1.0 mol L(-1) HNO(3) nitric acid in methanol was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The adopted concentrations for MPKO, Triton X-114 and HNO(3), bath temperature, centrifuge rate and time were optimized. Detection limits (3 SDb/m) of 1.6, 2.1 and 1.9 ng mL(-1) for Cu(2+), Co(2+) and Ni(2+) along with preconcentration factors of 30 and for these ions and enrichment factor of 65, 58 and 67 for Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Co(2+), respectively. The high efficiency of cloud point extraction to carry out the determination of analytes in complex matrices was demonstrated. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of biological, natural and wastewater, soil and blood samples.

  12. Hybrid compounds of Keggin polyoxotungstate with transition metal ion as the central atom. Synthesis, structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Min; Chen, Ya-Guang; Shi, Tian

    2016-02-01

    The compounds (Hbipy)2[Co(bipy)2(H2O)4]2(CoW12O40)·2bipy·7H2O (1) and [Ni2(Hbipy)2(bipy)(H2O)4(H2W12O40)]·5H2O (2) (bipy = 4,4-bipyridine) were synthesized hydrothermally and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, TG analyses, solid ultraviolet diffuse spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction method. In 1 the complex ions, [Co(bipy)2(H2O)4]2+, construct a supramolecular layer through π-π stacking interaction. The heteropolyanions with central Co atom and supramolecular layers are linked by hydrogen bonds. In 2 a 2D structure is formed from metatungstate anions and binuclear Ni-bipy complexes through the coordination of metatungstate anions and bipy to Ni ions. Between the layers and bipyridine molecules are the hydrogen bond interactions. The formation of 1 and 2 shows that the solution acidity and metal ions influence greatly the structure of the compounds. Solid ultraviolet diffusion results indicate that the compounds 1 and 2 are potential semiconductor materials. In 1 and 2 there exists a weak antiferromagnetic interaction.

  13. Atomic layer deposition of amorphous TiO2 on graphene as an anode for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Chunmei; Xie, Ming; Sun, Xiang; Travis, Jonathan J.; Wang, Gongkai; Sun, Hongtao; Dillon, Anne C.; Lian, Jie; George, Steven M.

    2013-10-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to deposit TiO2 anode material on high surface area graphene (reduced graphene oxide) sheets for Li-ion batteries. An Al2O3 ALD ultrathin layer was used as an adhesion layer for conformal deposition of the TiO2 ALD films at 120 ° C onto the conducting graphene sheets. The TiO2 ALD films on the Al2O3 ALD adhesion layer were nearly amorphous and conformal to the graphene sheets. These nanoscale TiO2 coatings minimized the effect of the low diffusion coefficient of lithium ions in bulk TiO2. The TiO2 ALD films exhibited stable capacities of ˜120 mAh g-1 and ˜100 mAh g-1 at high cycling rates of 1 A g-1 and 2 A g-1, respectively. The TiO2 ALD films also displayed excellent cycling stability with ˜95% of the initial capacity remaining after 500 cycles. These results illustrate that ALD can provide a useful method to deposit electrode materials on high surface area substrates for Li-ion batteries.

  14. Absolute Transition Probabilities of Lines in the Spectra of Astrophysical Atoms, Molecules, and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Smith, P. L.; Yoshino, K.

    1984-01-01

    Progress in the investigation of absolute transition probabilities (A-values or F values) for ultraviolet lines is reported. A radio frequency ion trap was used for measurement of transition probabilities for intersystem lines seen in astronomical spectra. The intersystem line at 2670 A in Al II, which is seen in pre-main sequence stars and symbiotic stars, was studied.

  15. Algebraic tools for dealing with the atomic shell model. I. Wavefunctions and integrals for hydrogen-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhykov, Andrey; Koval, Peter; Fritzsche, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    Today, the 'hydrogen atom model' is known to play its role not only in teaching the basic elements of quantum mechanics but also for building up effective theories in atomic and molecular physics, quantum optics, plasma physics, or even in the design of semiconductor devices. Therefore, the analytical as well as numerical solutions of the hydrogen-like ions are frequently required both, for analyzing experimental data and for carrying out quite advanced theoretical studies. In order to support a fast and consistent access to these (Coulomb-field) solutions, here we present the DIRAC program which has been developed originally for studying the properties and dynamical behavior of the (hydrogen-like) ions. In the present version, a set of MAPLE procedures is provided for the Coulomb wave and Green's functions by applying the (wave) equations from both, the nonrelativistic and relativistic theory. Apart from the interactive access to these functions, moreover, a number of radial integrals are also implemented in the DIRAC program which may help the user to construct transition amplitudes and cross sections as they occur frequently in the theory of ion-atom and ion-photon collisions. Program summaryTitle of program:DIRAC Catalogue number: ADUQ Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUQ Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: None Computer for which the program is designed and has been tested: All computers with a license of the computer algebra package MAPLE [1] Program language used: Maple 8 and 9 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:2186 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 162 591 Distribution format: tar gzip file CPC Program Library subprograms required: None Nature of the physical problem: Analytical solutions of the hydrogen atom are widely used in very different fields of physics [2,3]. Despite of the rather simple structure

  16. Single ionization in highly charged ion-atom collisions at low to intermediate velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Mohammad Abdallah

    1998-11-01

    Single electron ejection from neutral targets (He and Ne) by the impact of low to highly charged ions (p, He+,/ Ne+,/ He2+,/ C6+,/ O8+, and Ne10+) at low to intermediate impact velocities is studied. A novel technique of electron momentum imaging is implemented. In this technique two-dimensional electron momentum distributions are produced in coincidence with recoil ions and projectile ions. In first generation experiments we studied the ejected electron momentum distributions without analyzing recoil ions momentum. This series of experiments revealed a charge-state dependence and velocity dependence that are contradictory to a dominant saddle point ionization mechanism at intermediate velocities. It showed a possibility of an agreement with a saddle centered distributions for low charge states at low collision velocities. To pursue the problem in more detail, we developed a second generation spectrometer which allowed us to fully determine the recoil ions momentum. This allowed us to determine the collision plane, energy loss (Q-value), and impact parameter for every collision that resulted in a single (target) electron ejection. This series of experiments revealed for the first time very marked structure in electron spectra that were impossible to observe in other experiments. These structures indicate the quasi-molecular nature of the collision process even at velocities comparable to the electron 'classical' orbital velocity. For the collisions of p, He+, and He2+ with He, a π-orbital shape of the electron momentum distribution is observed. This indicates the importance of the rotational coupling 2p/sigma/to2p/pi in the initial promotion of the ground state electron. This is followed by further promotions to the continuum. This agrees with the 'classical' description implied by the saddle-point ionization mechanism picture.

  17. Structural properties of reciprocal form factor in neutral atoms and singly charged ions.

    PubMed

    Romera, E; Angulo, J C

    2004-04-22

    Structural characteristics of the spherically averaged internally folded density or reciprocal form factor Br are studied within the Hartree-Fock framework for 103 neutral atoms, 54 singly charged cations, and 43 anions in their ground state. The function Br is classified throughout the Periodic Table into three types: (i) monotonic decrease from the origin, (ii) maximum at r=0 and a negative minimum at r>0, and (iii) a local maximum at r=0 and a pair maximum-minimum out of the origin. A detailed study of the corresponding properties for individual subshells as well as their relative weight for the total Br is also carried out. For completeness, the analytical Br for hydrogenlike atoms in both ground and excited states is also analyzed.

  18. Ultra-precise single-ion atomic mass measurements on deuterium and helium-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafonte, S. L.; Van Dyck, R. S., Jr.

    2015-04-01

    The former University of Washington Penning Trap Mass Spectrometer (UW-PTMS), now located at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany, was used in the decade before the move to determine new values for the deuteron atomic mass, M (2H+) = 2.013 553 212 745(40) u, and the deuterium atomic mass, M (2H) = 2.014 101 778 052(40) u, both of which are now more than an order-of-magnitude more accurate than the previous best 1994-MIT measurements of these quantities. The new value for the deuteron’s mass can then be used with the accepted 2010-CODATA proton mass and the most recent 1999-measurement of the 2.2 MeV gamma-ray binding energy of the deuteron to refine the neutron’s mass to mn = 1.008 664 916 018(435) u which has about half the uncertainty relative to the value computed using that previous 1994-MIT deuterium measurement. As a result, further improvements of mn must now come from a more accurate determination of the wavelength of this gamma ray. In this same period of time, this spectrometer has also been used to determine new values for the helion atomic mass, M (3He2+) = 3.014 932 246 668(43) u, and the neutral helium-3 atomic mass, M (3He) = 3.016 029 321 675(43) u, which are both about 60 times more accurate than the 2006-SMILETRAP measurements, but disagree with the 4.4-times less-accurate 2015-Florida-State measurements by 0.76 nu. It is expected that these helium-3 results will be used in the future 3H/3He mass ratio (to be determined by the Heidelberg, Germany version of the old UW-PTMS) in order to generate a more accurate value for the tritium atomic mass.

  19. Atomic Data for Neutron-capture Elements I. Photoionization and Recombination Properties of Low-charge Selenium Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, N. C.; Witthoeft, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We present multi-configuration Breit-Pauli AUTOSTRUCTURE calculations of distorted-wave photoionization (PI) cross sections. and total and partial final-state resolved radiative recombination (RR) and dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for the first six ions of the trans-iron element Se. These calculations were motivated by the recent detection of Se emission lines in a large number of planetary nebulae. Se is a potentially useful tracer of neutron-capture nucleosynthesis. but accurate determinations of its abundance in photoionized nebulae have been hindered by the lack of atomic data governing its ionization balance. Our calculations were carried out in intermediate coupling with semi re1ativistic radial wavefunctions. PI and recombination data were determined for levels within the ground configuration of each ion, and experimental PI cross-section measurements were used to benchmark our results. For DR, we allowed (Delta)n = 0 core excitations, which are important at photoionized plasma temperatures. We find that DR is the dominant recombination process for each of these Se ions at temperatures representative of photoionized nebulae (approx.10(exp 4) K). In order to estimate the uncertainties of these data, we compared results from three different configuration-interaction expansions for each ion, and also tested the sensitivity of the results to the radial scaling factors in the structure calculations. We find that the internal uncertainties are typically 30-50% for the direct PI cross sections and approx.10% for the computed RR rate coefficients, while those for low-temperature DR can be considerably larger (from 15-30% up to two orders of magnitude) due to the unknown energies of near-threshold autoionization resonances. These data are available at the CDS, and fitting coefficients to the total RR and DR rate coefficients are presented. The results are suitable for incorporation into photoionization codes used to numerically simulate

  20. Atomic hydrogen escape rate due to charge exchange with hot plasmaspheric ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maher, L. J.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Data on ion and electron temperatures and concentrations to several thousand kilometers of altitude were obtained from the Atmosphere Explorer C satellite for 1974 and to 850 km from Arecibo incoherent scatter radar measurements. These data were used to normalize diffusive equilibrium profiles. From these profiles and by using the neutral atmospheric model of Jacchia (1971) and a new hydrogen model, the charge-exchange-induced neutral hydrogen escape fluxes for equatorial and middle latitudes were calculated. The data confirm earlier estimates that the charge exchange loss is more important than Jeans escape for the earth. It is also found that inside the plasmapause this charge exchange process with hot plasmapheric ions is the major production and loss process for the satellite population in the hydrogen geocorona.

  1. Mechanism of 'GSI oscillations' in electron capture by highly charged hydrogen-like atomic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Krainov, V. P.

    2012-07-15

    We suggest a qualitative explanation of oscillations in electron capture decays of hydrogen-like {sup 140}Pr and {sup 142}Pm ions observed recently in an ion experimental storage ring (ESR) of Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) mbH, Darmstadt, Germany. This explanation is based on the electron multiphoton Rabi oscillations between two Zeeman states of the hyperfine ground level with the total angular momentum F = 1/2. The Zeeman splitting is produced by a constant magnetic field in the ESR. Transitions between these states are produced by the second, sufficiently strong alternating magnetic field that approximates realistic fields in the GSI ESR. The Zeeman splitting amounts to only about 10{sup -5} eV. This allows explaining the observed quantum beats with the period 7 s.

  2. Theory Of Anomalous X-Ray Scattering From Atoms And Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, R. H.; Kissel, Lynn

    1988-07-01

    New developments in the theory of anomalous x-ray scattering are reviewed. The second order S-matrix calculations remove several previous discrepancies, in particular it is now known that there is an error in the Cromer-Liberman tables. In high Z elements a window is found in near threshold scattering at back angles. New results obtained for ions indicate that with increasing degrees of ionization the anomalous behavior near threshold weakens.

  3. Experimental Issues in Coherent Quantum-State Manipulation of Trapped Atomic Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-01

    given other conditions. For example, Huelga et al. [198] assume that the ions are subject to a certain dephasing decoherence rate (decoherence time...by the reduced value of TR. ( Huelga et al. [198] actually show that a modest improvement can be obtained under these conditions by use of partially...198] S. F. Huelga , C. Macchiavello, T. Pellizzari, A. K. Ekert, M. B. Plenio, and J. I. Cirac, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3865 (1997). [199] J. R. Anglin

  4. Collaborative Research: A Model of Partially Ionized Plasma Flows with Kinetic Treatment of Neutral Atoms and Nonthermal Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, Nikolai; Zhang, Ming

    2016-07-31

    Interactions of flows of partially ionized, magnetized plasma are frequently accompanied by the presence of both thermal and non-thermal (pickup) ion components. Such interactions cannot be modeled using traditional MHD equations and require more advanced approaches to treat them. If a nonthermal component of ions is formed due to charge exchange and collisions between the thermal (core) ions and neutrals, it experiences the action of magnetic field, its distribution function is isotropized, and it soon acquires the velocity of the ambient plasma without being thermodynamically equilibrated. This situation, e. g., takes place in the outer heliosphere –- the part of interstellar space beyond the solar system whose properties are determined by the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. This is also possible in laboratory, at million degrees and above, when plasma is conducting electricity far too well, which makes Ohmic heating ineffective. To attain the target temperatures one needs additional heating eventually playing a dominant role. Among such sources is a so-called neutral particle beam heating. This is a wide-spread technique (Joint European Torus and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor experiments) based on the injection of powerful beams of neutral atoms into ohmically preheated plasma. In this project we have investigated the energy and density separation between the thermal and nonthermal components in the solar wind and interstellar plasmas. A new model has been developed in which we solve the ideal MHD equations for mixture of all ions and the kinetic Boltzmann equation to describe the transport of neutral atoms. As a separate capability, we can treat the flow of neutral atoms in a multi-component fashion, where neutral atoms born in each thermodynamically distinct region are governed by the Euler gas dynamic equations. We also describe the behavior of pickup ions either kinetically, using the Fokker--Planck equation

  5. Collaborative Research: A Model of Partially Ionized Plasma Flows with Kinetic Treatment of Neutral Atoms and Nonthermal Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, Nikolai; Zhang, Ming; Borovikov, Sergey; Heerikhuisen, Jacob; Zank, Gary; Gamayunov, Konstantin; Colella, Phillip

    2016-07-31

    Interactions of flows of partially ionized, magnetized plasma are frequently accompanied by the presence of both thermal and non-thermal (pickup) ion components. Such interactions cannot be modeled using traditional MHD equations and require more advanced approaches to treat them. If a nonthermal component of ions is formed due to charge exchange and collisions between the thermal (core) ions and neutrals, it experiences the action of magnetic field, its distribution function is isotropized, and it soon acquires the velocity of the ambient plasma without being thermodynamically equilibrated. This situation, e. g., takes place in the outer heliosphere - the part of interstellar space beyond the solar system whose properties are determined by the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. This is also possible in laboratory, at million degrees and above, when plasma is conducting electricity far too well, which makes Ohmic heating ineffective. To attain the target temperatures one needs additional heating eventually playing a dominant role. Among such sources is a so-called neutral particle beam heating. This is a wide-spread technique (Joint European Torus and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor experiments) based on the injection of powerful beams of neutral atoms into ohmically preheated plasma. In this project we have investigated the energy and density separation between the thermal and nonthermal components in the solar wind and interstellar plasmas. A new model has been developed in which we solve the ideal MHD equations for mixture of all ions and the kinetic Boltzmann equation to describe the transport of neutral atoms. As a separate capability, we can treat the flow of neutral atoms in a multi-component fashion, where neutral atoms born in each thermodynamically distinct regions are governed by the Euler gas dynamic equations. We also describe the behavior of pickup ions either kinetically, using the Fokker–Planck equation, or

  6. Single-Ion Atomic Clock with 3×10(-18) Systematic Uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Huntemann, N; Sanner, C; Lipphardt, B; Tamm, Chr; Peik, E

    2016-02-12

    We experimentally investigate an optical frequency standard based on the (2)S1/2(F=0)→(2)F7/2(F=3) electric octupole (E3) transition of a single trapped (171)Yb+ ion. For the spectroscopy of this strongly forbidden transition, we utilize a Ramsey-type excitation scheme that provides immunity to probe-induced frequency shifts. The cancellation of these shifts is controlled by interleaved single-pulse Rabi spectroscopy, which reduces the related relative frequency uncertainty to 1.1×10(-18). To determine the frequency shift due to thermal radiation emitted by the ion's environment, we measure the static scalar differential polarizability of the E3 transition as 0.888(16)×10(-40)  J m(2)/V(2) and a dynamic correction η(300  K)=-0.0015(7). This reduces the uncertainty due to thermal radiation to 1.8×10(-18). The residual motion of the ion yields the largest contribution (2.1×10(-18)) to the total systematic relative uncertainty of the clock of 3.2×10(-18).

  7. Metal ions and flexibility in a viral RNA pseudoknot at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, Martin; Minasov, George; Su, Li; Rich, Alexander

    2010-03-05

    Many pathogenic viruses use programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting to regulate translation of their structural and enzymatic proteins from polycistronic mRNAs. Frameshifting is commonly stimulated by a pseudoknot located downstream from a slippery sequence, the latter positioned at the ribosomal A and P sites. We report here the structures of two crystal forms of the frameshifting RNA pseudoknot from beet western yellow virus at resolutions of 1.25 and 2.85 {angstrom}. Because of the very high resolution of 1.25 {angstrom}, ten mono- and divalent metal ions per asymmetric unit could be identified, giving insight into potential roles of metal ions in stabilizing the pseudoknot. A magnesium ion located at the junction of the two pseudoknot stems appears to play a crucial role in stabilizing the structure. Because the two crystal forms exhibit mostly unrelated packing interactions and local crystallographic disorder in the high-resolution form was resolvable, the two structures offer the most detailed view yet of the conformational preference and flexibility of an RNA pseudoknot.

  8. Damage effects of {ion}/{atom} beam milling on MNOS (Al/Si 3N 4/SiO 2/Si) capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, U.; Belson, J.; Wilson, I. H.

    1984-02-01

    Low energy argon ion and atom beams produced by saddle field sources have been used to study changes in CVD Si 3N 4/SiO 2/Si structures after bombardment of the bare nitride at a particle energy of 2.9 keV. Interface state densities Nst and flatband voltages VFB were extracted from high frequency (1.3 MHz) and quasi-static C- V curves. Bombardment was found to induce an increase in Nst and positive and negative charge storage associated with the nitride (or the nitride/oxide interface). The effect was more pronounced under ion bombardment. On the supposition that displacement damage is similar for ion and atom bombardments the differences in charge storage are interpreted in terms of enhanced trapping under the field associated with ion bombardment.

  9. Classical-quantum correspondence for ionization in fast ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdoerfer, J. |; Reinhold, C.O.

    1994-10-01

    We analyze the interplay between classical and quantum dynamics in ionization of atoms by fast charged particles The convergence to the classical limit is studied as a function of the momentum transferred to the electron during the collision, the impact parameter. the energy and angle of the emitted electron, and the initial state of the target. One goal is to assess the validity of exact classical (CTMC) methods and approximate classical models such as the Thomson model. Applications to data for electron ejection at large angles are presented. The connection between collisional ionization by charged particles and ionization by half-cycle pulses is discussed.

  10. Atom probe field ion microscopy of Type 308 CRE stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Miller, M.K.

    1995-12-31

    Addition of controlled residual elements (CRE), such as 0.007 wt % B, to type 308 stainless steel welds, improved creep-rupture properties. In this paper, B distribution and microstructure development were studied. The microstructural evolution during high-temperature aging was found to similar to that of commercial SS308 welds. Atom probe analysis showed that B and C segregate to the ferrite-austenite interface. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the segregation is due to preferential partitioning of B and C to the liquid during solidification. Further work is needed to study B redistribution in aging stages.

  11. Stability of nanoclusters in 14YWT oxide dispersion strengthened steel under heavy ion-irradiation by atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jianchao He; Farong Wan; Kumar Sridharan; Todd R. Allen; A. Certain; V. Shutthanandan; Y.Q. Wu

    2014-12-01

    14YWT oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel was irradiated with of 5 MeV Ni2+ ions, at 300 C, 450 C, and 600 C to a damage level of 100 dpa. The stability of Ti–Y–O nanoclusters was investigated by applying atom probe tomography (APT) in voltage mode, of the samples before and after irradiations. The average size and number density of the nanoclusters was determined using the maximum separation method. These techniques allowed for the imaging of nanoclusters to sizes well below the resolution limit of conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques. The most significant changes were observed for samples irradiated at 300 C where the size (average Guinier radius) and number density of nanoclusters were observed to decrease from 1.1 nm to 0.8 nm and 12 1023 to 3.6 1023, respectively. In this study, the nanoclusters are more stable at higher temperature.

  12. Combined use of atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry for cell surface analysis.

    PubMed

    Dague, Etienne; Delcorte, Arnaud; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2008-04-01

    Understanding the surface properties of microbial cells is a major challenge of current microbiological research and a key to efficiently exploit them in biotechnology. Here, we used three advanced surface analysis techniques with different sensitivity, probing depth, and lateral resolution, that is, in situ atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry, to gain insight into the surface properties of the conidia of the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. We show that the native ultrastructure, surface protein and polysaccharide concentrations, and amino acid composition of three mutants affected in hydrophobin production are markedly different from those of the wild-type, thereby providing novel insight into the cell wall architecture of A. fumigatus. The results demonstrate the power of using multiple complementary techniques for probing microbial cell surfaces.

  13. Interplay between atomic disorder, lattice swelling and defect energy in ion-irradiation-induced amorphization of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Debelle, Aurelien; Boulle, Alexandre; Chartier, Alain; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J

    2014-11-25

    We present a combination of experimental and computational evaluations of disorder level and lattice swelling in ion-irradiated materials. Information obtained from X-ray diffraction experiments is compared to X-ray diffraction data generated using atomic-scale simulations. The proposed methodology, which can be applied to a wide range of crystalline materials, is used to study the amorphization process in irradiated SiC. Results show that this process can be divided into two steps. In the first step, point defects and small defect clusters are produced and generate both large lattice swelling and high elastic energy. In the second step, enhanced coalescence of defects and defect clusters occurs to limit this increase in energy, which rapidly leads to complete amorphization.

  14. Single-particle detection of products from atomic and molecular reactions in a cryogenic ion storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, C.; Novotný, O.; Becker, A.; George, S.; Grieser, M.; Hahn, R. von; Meyer, C.; Schippers, S.; Spruck, K.; Vogel, S.; Wolf, A.

    2017-04-01

    We have used a single-particle detector system, based on secondary electron emission, for counting low-energetic (∼keV/u) massive products originating from atomic and molecular ion reactions in the electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR). The detector is movable within the cryogenic vacuum chamber of CSR, and was used to measure production rates of a variety of charged and neutral daughter particles. In operation at a temperature of ∼ 6 K , the detector is characterised by a high dynamic range, combining a low dark event rate with good high-rate particle counting capability. On-line measurement of the pulse height distributions proved to be an important monitor of the detector response at low temperature. Statistical pulse-height analysis allows to infer the particle detection efficiency of the detector, which has been found to be close to unity also in cryogenic operation at 6 K.

  15. Microstructural evolution and age hardening in aluminium alloys: Atom probe field-ion microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ringer, S.P.; Hono, K.

    2000-02-01

    This paper examines the microstructural evolution in selected aluminum alloys based on commercial age hardenable 2000, 6000, and 7000 series alloys. Atom probe field-ion microscopy and transmission electron microscopy have been used to examine the effects of microalloying and the origins of hardening. The combined application of these techniques is particularly important in the study of nanoscale precipitation processes. It is shown that the nature and kinetics of the precipitation process depend on the solute-solute interactions that produce solute clusters. The solute clusters precede the formation of GP zones or precipitation, and have a defining role on the nature and kinetics of the subsequent precipitation processes. Moreover, interactions between solute clustering and dislocations can have a significant hardening effect, the origins of which seem to be distinctly different from the conventional notion of precipitation hardening.

  16. Atom and molecule emission caused by ion impact into a frozen oxygen target: Role of rovibrational excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Christian; Pedrys, Roman; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2013-11-01

    Translational energy distributions of particles sputtered by 750 eV Ne+ ion impact into a cryogenic O2 target are studied using molecular-dynamics simulation. When comparing the energy distribution of emitted molecules to a Thompson distribution, good agreement can only be found for energies E with Uatomic O). These originate from direct projectile-molecule collisions; they are emitted early in the collision cascade and feature a strong high-energy contribution.

  17. Interplay between atomic disorder, lattice swelling and defect energy in ion-irradiation-induced amorphization of SiC

    DOE PAGES

    Debelle, Aurelien; Boulle, Alexandre; Chartier, Alain; ...

    2014-11-25

    We present a combination of experimental and computational evaluations of disorder level and lattice swelling in ion-irradiated materials. Information obtained from X-ray diffraction experiments is compared to X-ray diffraction data generated using atomic-scale simulations. The proposed methodology, which can be applied to a wide range of crystalline materials, is used to study the amorphization process in irradiated SiC. Results show that this process can be divided into two steps. In the first step, point defects and small defect clusters are produced and generate both large lattice swelling and high elastic energy. In the second step, enhanced coalescence of defects andmore » defect clusters occurs to limit this increase in energy, which rapidly leads to complete amorphization.« less

  18. Atom trap for 221Fr from 225Ac ion beam implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandecki, M.; Behr, J. A.; Pearson, M. R.; Zhang, J.; Orozco, L.; Collister, R.; Gwinner, G.; Gomez, E.; Aubin, S.

    2012-10-01

    A neutral atom trap for francium parity violation experiments is being set up at TRIUMF. The half-lives of the longest isotopes are minutes, which mostly will be produced by the online mass separator of the ISAC facility. For systematic error studies for precision measurements, it can help to have a longer-lived source. ^221Fr is produced by t1/2=10 day ^225Ac α decay, and has been trapped at JILA [Z.-T. Lu PRL 79 994 (1997)]. Our approach would implant the mass-separated ^225Ac beam produced by ISAC at 1x10^7/s for a day after the production proton beam is turned off. The scheme to be tested: 30 keV ^225Ac beam is implanted in tantalum for a day; the sample is held in front of an yttrium foil (normally used to stop a mass-separated Fr beam) for 1 minute; 100 keV ^221Fr recoils escape and implant in the yttrium; tantalum is withdrawn, yttrium is moved to trap and heated; cycle repeats. First tests are planned for September, and one goal is precise measurements of atomic hyperfine splittings sensitive to the spatial distribution of nuclear magnetism.

  19. Study of the evolution of the atomic composition of thin NbN films under irradiation with mixed ion beams by methods of electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dement'eva, M. M.; Prikhod'ko, K. E.; Gurovich, B. A.; Kutuzov, L. V.; Komarov, D. A.

    2016-11-01

    The variation in the atomic composition of ultrathin NbN films under irradiation by mixed ion beams to a doze of 4 dpa (for nitrogen) is experimentally studied by methods of electron energy loss spectroscopy with a transmission electron microscope in the transmission scan mode on cross-cut samples. The behavior of the substitution of nitrogen atoms by oxygen atoms has been established; it is characterized by changing the composition of the conducting part of the film from NbN to NbNO.

  20. Electron loss of fast many-electron ions colliding with neutral atoms: possible scaling rules for the total cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevelko, V. P.; Litsarev, M. S.; Song, M.-Y.; Tawara, H.; Yoon, J.-S.

    2009-03-01

    General features of the total electron-loss (projectile ionization) cross sections, σtot, for fast many-electron ions colliding with neutral atoms are investigated. Two independent scaling laws for σtot are obtained: one follows from the experimental data and another one from the classical calculations based on the n-particle classical trajectory Monte Carlo (nCTMC) and semi-classical treatments. The semi-classical method has recently been developed based upon the energy deposition model and the statistical ionization probabilities. Both scaling relations are expressed in terms of the projectile velocity v, its first ionization potential I1 and the nuclear charge ZA of the target atom. The accuracy of the scaling relations suggested is a factor of 2-3. At the high-velocity region (v2 Gt I1), experimental data are found to decrease approximately as σtot ~ v-2, i.e., close to the Born ionization cross section. At low energies, the σtot values are better described by the classical approximation which accounts for multi-electron-loss processes. These scaling laws obtained are compared with a known scaling law for the Ar target and are used for the prediction of the total electron-loss cross sections in a wide range of the collision parameters. The predicted cross sections σtot can be approximately evaluated as a minimum cross section obtained from two scaling formulae.

  1. CASCADES AFTER K-VACANCY PRODUCTION IN ATOMS AND IONS OF LIGHT ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kucas, S.; Karazija, R.; Momkauskaite, A.

    2012-05-10

    The results of detailed level-by-level calculations of Auger and radiative cascades after K-vacancy production are presented for the astrophysically important elements, namely Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Ar. Calculations are performed using the single-configuration, quasi-relativistic approximation. The whole isonuclear sequence of ions for a given element is considered. For the first time, the dependence of the cascade on the initial vacancy state is investigated. The populations are presented not only for the levels of the final configurations, but also for the levels of the excited configurations after the Auger transitions. An intense characteristic emission can be observed from such levels.

  2. Studies of Compound States of Atomic Negative Ions Using Laser Beams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    Miller, J. Inorg. NucL Chem. 7, 351 (1958). 13. D. R. Bates, Proc. Roy . Irish Acad. A 51, 151 (1947). 14. H.S.W. Massey, NEGATIVE IONS (3rd Ed...Beam are Collinear. RESUME NAME: Thomas Jay Kvale TITLE: Postdoctoral Fellow in Physics EDUCATION: A.B. Gustavus Adolphus College (Cum Laude), 1975 M.S...Photography ___ __’ii Thomas Jay Kvale REFEREED PAPERS 1. J. E. Aldag, J. L. Peacher, P. J. Martin, V. C. Sutcliffe, J. George, E. Redd, T. J. Kvale, D

  3. Comparison Of Quantum Mechanical And Classical Trajectory Calculations Of Cross Sections For Ion-Atom Impact Ionization of Negative - And Positive -Ions For Heavy Ion Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-05-15

    Stripping cross sections in nitrogen have been calculated using the classical trajectory approximation and the Born approximation of quantum mechanics for the outer shell electrons of 3.2GeV I{sup -} and Cs{sup +} ions. A large difference in cross section, up to a factor of six, calculated in quantum mechanics and classical mechanics, has been obtained. Because at such high velocities the Born approximation is well validated, the classical trajectory approach fails to correctly predict the stripping cross sections at high energies for electron orbitals with low ionization potential.

  4. Focused ion beam-assisted fabrication of soft high-aspect ratio silicon nanowire atomic force microscopy probes.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Peter; Hibst, Nicolas; Mizaikoff, Boris; Strehle, Steffen; Kranz, Christine

    2017-03-28

    In this study, high-aspect ratio silicon nanowire (SiNW) - modified atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes are fabricated using focused ion beam (FIB) microfabrication technology and vapor-solid-solid synthesis. Commercially available soft silicon nitride probes are used for localized nanowire growth yielding soft high-aspect ratio AFM probes. The SiNW-modified cantilevers are used here for imaging in PeakForce Tappingۛ (PFT) mode, which offers high force control along with valuable information about tip-sample adhesion. A platinum catalyst, deposited accurately at a truncated AFM tip by ion beam-induced deposition (IBID), was used for localized nanowire synthesis. It could be shown that the deposition of a thin silicon dioxide layer prior to the catalyst deposition resulted in controlled SiNW growth on silicon as well as silicon nitride probes. In addition, a FIB-based method for post-growth alignment of the fabricated SiNW tips is presented, which allows tilt-compensation specifically tailored to the specifications of the used AFM instrumentation. To demonstrate the capability of such soft, high-aspect ratio AFM probes, optical gratings fabricated in GaAs and silver halide fibers were imaged in PFT mode. Additionally, the mechanical stability of these high-aspect AFM probes was evaluated on a sapphire substrate.

  5. Atomic force microscopy imaging reveals the formation of ASIC/ENaC cross-clade ion channels

    SciTech Connect

    Jeggle, Pia; Smith, Ewan St. J.; Stewart, Andrew P.; Haerteis, Silke; Korbmacher, Christoph; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2015-08-14

    ASIC and ENaC are co-expressed in various cell types, and there is evidence for a close association between them. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine whether ASIC1a and ENaC subunits are able to form cross-clade hybrid ion channels. ASIC1a and ENaC could be co-isolated from detergent extracts of tsA 201 cells co-expressing the two subunits. Isolated proteins were incubated with antibodies against ENaC and Fab fragments against ASIC1a. AFM imaging revealed proteins that were decorated by both an antibody and a Fab fragment with an angle of ∼120° between them, indicating the formation of ASIC1a/ENaC heterotrimers. - Highlights: • There is evidence for a close association between ASIC and ENaC. • We used AFM to test whether ASIC1a and ENaC subunits form cross-clade ion channels. • Isolated proteins were incubated with subunit-specific antibodies and Fab fragments. • Some proteins were doubly decorated at ∼120° by an antibody and a Fab fragment. • Our results indicate the formation of ASIC1a/ENaC heterotrimers.

  6. Slow Collisions of Si3+ with Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, D. C.; Gu, J.-P.; Saha, B. C.; Liebermann, H. P.; Funke, P.; Buenker, R. J.

    2010-03-01

    Low energy electron capture from hydrogen atom by multi-charged ions continues to be of interest and applications include both magnetically confined fusion and astrophysical plasmas. The charge exchange process reported here, Si^3+ + H -> Si^2+ + H^+ is an important destruction mechanism of Si^3+ in photo-ionized gas. The soft X-ray emission from comets has been explained by charge transfer of solar wind ions, among them Si^3+, with neutrals in the cometary gas vapor. The state selective cross sections are evaluated using the full quantum [1] and semi-classical molecular orbital close coupling (MOCC) [2] methods. Adiabatic potentials and wave functions for a number of low-lying singlet and triplet states of and symmetry are calculated wing the MRD-CI package [3]. Details will be presented at the conference. [4pt] [1] L. B. Zhao, D. C. Joseph, B. C. Saha, H. P. Liebermann, P. Funke and R. J. Buenker, Phys. Rev A, 79, 034701 (1009).[0pt] [2] M. Kimura and N. F. Lane, At. Mol. Opt. Phys 26, 79 (1990).[0pt] [3] R. J. Buenker, ``Current Aspects of Quantum Chemistry 1981, Vol 21, edited by R. Carbo (Elsevier, Amsterdam) p 17.

  7. Atomic-Scale Mechanisms for Electrolyte Decomposition in Li-ion Battery Cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhst, Mallory; Siegel, Donald

    Li-ion batteries using high energy density LiCoO2 (LCO) intercalation cathodes are known to generate gaseous species inside the cell, which can lead to venting flammable solvent vapor. It has been hypothesized that reactions at the cathode/electrolyte interface catalyze the production of these gaseous species. To elucidate the underlying reaction mechanism, first principles calculations were used to model interactions between LCO surfaces and Ethylene Carbonate (EC), a commonly used solvent in Li-ion batteries. A Metropolis Monte Carlo algorithm was used to identify likely low energy adsorption configurations for EC on the (10-14) surface of LCO. Several of these geometries were further analyzed with DFT. The thermodynamics and kinetics of EC decomposition were evaluated for plausible reaction pathways and associated various solvent decomposition mechanisms, such as hydrogen abstraction. Preliminary results indicate that hydrogen abstraction may lead to the spontaneous decomposition of EC into CO and other adsorbed species at the surface. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE 1256260.

  8. Scaling Atomic Partial Charges of Carbonate Solvents for Lithium Ion Solvation and Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; Nair, Jijeesh R.; Pratt, Lawrence R.; Soto, Fernando A.; Balbuena, Perla B.; Rempe, Susan B.

    2016-10-21

    Lithium-ion solvation and diffusion properties in ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) were studied by molecular simulation, experiments, and electronic structure calculations. Studies carried out in water provide a reference for interpretation. Classical molecular dynamics simulation results are compared to ab initio molecular dynamics to assess nonpolarizable force field parameters for solvation structure of the carbonate solvents. Quasi-chemical theory (QCT) was adapted to take advantage of fourfold occupancy of the near-neighbor solvation structure observed in simulations and used to calculate solvation free energies. The computed free energy for transfer of Li+ to PC from water, based on electronic structure calculations with cluster-QCT, agrees with the experimental value. The simulation-based direct-QCT results with scaled partial charges agree with the electronic structure-based QCT values. The computed Li+/PF6- transference numbers of 0.35/0.65 (EC) and 0.31/0.69 (PC) agree well with NMR experimental values of 0.31/0.69 (EC) and 0.34/0.66 (PC) and similar values obtained here with impedance spectroscopy. These combined results demonstrate that solvent partial charges can be scaled in systems dominated by strong electrostatic interactions to achieve trends in ion solvation and transport properties that are comparable to ab initio and experimental results. Thus, the results support the use of scaled partial charges in simple, nonpolarizable force fields in future studies of these electrolyte solutions.

  9. HISTRAP: Proposal for a Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the physics capabilities of HISTRAP together with a brief description of the facility and a sampling of the beams which will be available for experimentation, and surveys some of the lines of investigation in the physics of multicharged ions, molecular ion spectroscopy, condensed beams, and nuclear physics that will become possible with the advent of HISTRAP. Details of the accelerator design are discussed, including computer studies of beam tracking in the HISTRAP lattice, a discussion of the HHIRF tandem and ECR/RFQ injectors, and a description of the electron beam cooling system. In the past three years, HISTRAP has received substantial support from Oak Ridge National Laboratory management and staff. The project has used discretionary funds to develop hardware prototypes and carry out design studies. Construction has been completed on a vacuum test stand which models 1/16 of the storage ring and has attained a pressure of 4 x 10/sup -12/ Torr; a prototype rf cavity capable of accelerating beams up to 90 MeV/nucleon and decelerating to 20 keV/nucleon; and a prototype dipole magnet, one of the eight required for the HISTRAP lattice. This paper also contains a summary of the work on electron cooling carried out by one of our staff members at CERN. Building structures and services are described. Details of cost and schedule are also discussed. 77 refs.

  10. Resolving a discrepancy between experimental and theoretical lifetimes in atomic negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brage, Tomas; Grumer, Jon

    2017-01-01

    A recent measurement of the lifetime of the excited 3p5 {}2{P}1/2 state in the S- negative ion, which is dominated by a forbidden magnetic dipole transition to the {}2{P}3/2 ground state, reveals a discrepancy with earlier theoretical predictions. To investigate this we have performed systematic and large-scale multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations for this system. After including a careful treatment of correlation and relativistic effects, we predict a well-converged value for this lifetime, with an uncertainty considerably less than 1%, thereby removing the apparent conflict between theory and experiment. We also show that this result corresponds to the non-relativistic limit in the LS coupling approximation for the magnetic dipole transition within this 2 P term. In addition we demonstrate the usefulness of the latter approach for 2 P transitions in O-, Se- and Te-, as well as for analogous M1 transitions within 2 D terms in Ni- and Pt- ions.

  11. Scaling Atomic Partial Charges of Carbonate Solvents for Lithium Ion Solvation and Diffusion

    DOE PAGES

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; Nair, Jijeesh R.; Pratt, Lawrence R.; ...

    2016-10-21

    Lithium-ion solvation and diffusion properties in ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) were studied by molecular simulation, experiments, and electronic structure calculations. Studies carried out in water provide a reference for interpretation. Classical molecular dynamics simulation results are compared to ab initio molecular dynamics to assess nonpolarizable force field parameters for solvation structure of the carbonate solvents. Quasi-chemical theory (QCT) was adapted to take advantage of fourfold occupancy of the near-neighbor solvation structure observed in simulations and used to calculate solvation free energies. The computed free energy for transfer of Li+ to PC from water, based on electronic structuremore » calculations with cluster-QCT, agrees with the experimental value. The simulation-based direct-QCT results with scaled partial charges agree with the electronic structure-based QCT values. The computed Li+/PF6- transference numbers of 0.35/0.65 (EC) and 0.31/0.69 (PC) agree well with NMR experimental values of 0.31/0.69 (EC) and 0.34/0.66 (PC) and similar values obtained here with impedance spectroscopy. These combined results demonstrate that solvent partial charges can be scaled in systems dominated by strong electrostatic interactions to achieve trends in ion solvation and transport properties that are comparable to ab initio and experimental results. Thus, the results support the use of scaled partial charges in simple, nonpolarizable force fields in future studies of these electrolyte solutions.« less

  12. Theory of inelastic ion-atom scattering at low and intermediate energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, G. B.; Garcia, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are presented of inelastic energy loss and ionization phenomena associated with Ar(+)-Ar collisions at small distances of closest approach and for laboratory collision energies ranging from several keV to several hundred keV. Outer-shell excitations are handled statistically; inner-shell excitations are calculated from the viewpoint of quasidiabatic molecular orbital promotion. Auger electron yield, average state of ionization, and average inelastic energy loss are calculated per collision as a function of distance of closest approach of the collision partners for several laboratory collision energies. Average charge-state probabilities per collision partner are calculated as a function of the average inelastic energy loss per atom. It is shown that the structure in the data is due to the underlying structure in the inner-shell independent-electron quasimolecular promotion probabilities.

  13. Magnetic circular dichroism in the ion yield of polarized chromium atoms at the 2p edge

    SciTech Connect

    Pruemper, G.; Viefhaus, J.; Becker, U.; Kroeger, S.; Mueller, R.; Zimmermann, P.; Martins, M.

    2003-09-01

    The effect of magnetic dichroism in the partial and total ion yield of chromium, i.e., the absorption of polarized chromium vapor was observed in the gas phase. The measurements were performed at the 2p edge and at photon energies above the 2p edge. The structure of the dichroism at the 2p edge can be understood by including the coupling of the 2p hole with the 3d and 4s shells. Our experimental results for the dichroism at the 2p edge are similar to results of solid-state experiments. Implications for the sum rules used as a standard tool to calculate the spin and orbital momentum are discussed.

  14. Photodetachment Studies Of Atomic Negative Ions Through Velocity-Map Imaging Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartkunchand, Kiattichart

    The technique of velocity-map imaging (VMI) spectroscopy as been adapted to a keV-level negative ion beamline for studies of photon-negative ion collisions. The design and operation of the VMI spectrometer takes into consideration the use of continuous, fast-moving (5 keV to 10 keV) ion beams, as well as a continuous wave (CW) laser as the source of photons. The VMI spectrometer has been used in photodetachment studies of the Group 14 negative ions Ge--, Sn--, and Pb-- at a photon wavelength of 532 nm. Measurements of the photoelectron angular distributions and asymmetry parameters for Ge-- and Sn-- were benchmarked against those measured previously [W. W. Williams, D. L. Carpenter, A. M. Covington, and J. S. Thompson, Phys. Rev. A 59, 4368 (1999), V. T. Davis, J. Ashokkumar, and J. S. Thompson, Phys. Rev. A 65, 024702 (2002)], while fine-structure-resolved asymmetry parameters for Pb-- were measured for the first time. Definitive evidence of a "forbidden" 4S 3/2→1D2 transition was observed in both the Ge-- and Sn-- photoelectron kinetic energy spectra. This transition is explained in terms of the inadequacy of the single-configuration description for the 1D2 excited state in the corresponding neutral. Near-threshold photodetachment studies of S-- were carried out in order to measure the spectral dependence of the photoelectron angular distribution. The resulting asymmetry parameters were measured at several photon wavelengths in the range of 575 nm (2.156 eV photon energy) to 615 nm (2.016 eV photon energy). Comparison of the measurements to a qualitative model of p-electron photodetachment [D. Hanstorp, C. Bengtsson, and D. J. Larson, Phys. Rev. A 40, 670 (1989)] were made. Deviations of the measured asymmetry parameters from the Hanstorp model near photodetachment thresholds suggests a reduced degree of suppression of d partial-waves than predicted by models. Measurement of the electron affinity of terbium was performed along with a determination of the

  15. Measurement of Atomic Oxygen in Diffuse Aurora and Ion Density in the E-Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, William E.

    1997-01-01

    An ion mass spectrometer (IMS) was refurbished, calibrated and supplied to the University of Colorado payload (Dr. Charles Barth, P.I.) which was launched from White Sands in September of 1993 as NASA 33.062. The nose cone failed to deploy and their were problems with the ACS so the mission was declared a failure. However, the door covering the IMS deployed and the instrument obtained data. The launch occurred shortly after a payload carrying solar x-ray detectors was launched. Thus a small portion of the Colorado payload science was salvaged; namely, the NO(+)/O2(+) ratio to compare with the measured x-ray flux. Figure I shows the NO(+) to O2(+) ratio vs. altitude. The behavior is typical of the E-region.

  16. The Effects of the Pauli Exclusion Principle in Determining the Ionization Energies of the Helium Atom and Helium-Like Ions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeney, F. A.; O'Leary, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    For helium and helium-like ions, we have examined the differences between the values of the ionization energies as calculated from the Bohr theory and those measured in experiments. We find that these differences vary linearly with the atomic number of the system. Using this result, we show how the Bohr model for single-electron systems may be…

  17. Analytic basis set for high-Z atomic QED calculations: Heavy He-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hylton, D. J.; Snyderman, N. J.

    1997-04-01

    A relativistic Sturmian analytic basis set representation for the Coulomb-Dirac Green function, previously studied by Zapryagaev, Manakov, and Pal'chikov [Opt. Spectrosc. 52, 248 (1982)], is investigated for application to high-Z atomic QED calculations. This pseudoeigenfunction representation follows from exact identities starting from the Whittaker function representation. It eliminates the radial ordering problem of that representation, and so is particularly useful for numerical calculation of the perturbation theory Feynman diagrams with more than one electron Green function. While the Green function represents discrete bound states, and both positive and negative energy continuum states, the Sturmian (bound-state-like) form for the pseudoeigenfunctions makes it possible to more analytically calculate matrix elements for full photon exchange, reducing numerical problems for high photon frequency. For He-like Fm (Z=100) we calculate the perturbation theory equivalent of the Dirac-Fock-Breit ground-state energy, agreeing well with the Grant code and with the numerical B-spline basis set approach results of Blundell, Mohr, Johnson, and Sapirstein [Phys. Rev. A 48, 2615 (1993)]. Preliminary results on the relativistic and QED correlation are also reported.

  18. Analytic basis set for high-Z atomic QED calculations: Heavy He-like ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hylton, D.J.; Snyderman, N.J.

    1997-04-01

    A relativistic Sturmian analytic basis set representation for the Coulomb-Dirac Green function, previously studied by Zapryagaev, Manakov, and Pal{close_quote}chikov [Opt. Spectrosc. {bold 52}, 248 (1982)], is investigated for application to high-Z atomic QED calculations. This pseudoeigenfunction representation follows from exact identities starting from the Whittaker function representation. It eliminates the radial ordering problem of that representation, and so is particularly useful for numerical calculation of the perturbation theory Feynman diagrams with more than one electron Green function. While the Green function represents discrete bound states, and both positive and negative energy continuum states, the Sturmian (bound-state-like) form for the pseudoeigenfunctions makes it possible to more analytically calculate matrix elements for full photon exchange, reducing numerical problems for high photon frequency. For He-like Fm (Z=100) we calculate the perturbation theory equivalent of the Dirac-Fock-Breit ground-state energy, agreeing well with the Grant code and with the numerical B-spline basis set approach results of Blundell, Mohr, Johnson, and Sapirstein [Phys. Rev. A {bold 48}, 2615 (1993)]. Preliminary results on the relativistic and QED correlation are also reported. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Dispersion coefficients for the interactions of the alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal ions and inert-gas atoms with a graphene layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-09-01

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the van der Waals dispersion coefficients C3 of the alkali-metal ions Li+,Na+,K+, and Rb+, the alkaline-earth-metal ions Ca+,Sr+,Ba+, and Ra+, and the inert-gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, and Kr with a graphene layer are determined precisely within the framework of the Dirac model. For these calculations, we evaluate the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atomic systems very accurately by evaluating the transition matrix elements employing relativistic many-body methods and using the experimental values of the excitation energies. The dispersion coefficients are given as functions of the separation distance of an atomic system from the graphene layer and the ambiance temperature during the interactions. For easy extraction of these coefficients, we give a logistic fit to the functional forms of the dispersion coefficients in terms of the separation distances at room temperature.

  20. Models including electron correlation in relation to Fock's proposed expansion of the ground-state wave function of He-like atomic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, M. L.; March, N. H.; Nieto, L. M.

    2011-12-15

    Here attention is first drawn to the importance of gaining insight into Fock's early proposal for expanding the ground-state wave function for He-like atomic ions in hyperspherical coordinates. We approach the problem via two solvable models, namely, (i) the s-term model put forth by Temkin [Phys. Rev. 126, 130 (1962)] and (ii) the Hookean atom model proposed by Kestner and Sinanoglu [Phys. Rev. 128, 2687 (1962)]. In both cases the local kinetic energy can be obtained explicitly in hyperspherical coordinates. Separation of variables occurs in both model wave functions, though in a different context in the two cases. Finally, a k-space formulation is proposed that should eventually result in distinctive identifying characteristics of Fock's nonanalyticities for He-like atomic ions when both electrons are close to the nucleus.

  1. Atomic supersymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostelecky, V. Alan

    1993-01-01

    Atomic supersymmetry is a quantum-mechanical supersymmetry connecting the properties of different atoms and ions. A short description of some established results in the subject are provided and a few recent developments are discussed including the extension to parabolic coordinates and the calculation of Stark maps using supersymmetry-based models.

  2. Modeling of neutrals in the Linac4 H(-) ion source plasma: hydrogen atom production density profile and Hα intensity by collisional radiative model.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Shibata, T; Ohta, M; Yasumoto, M; Nishida, K; Hatayama, A; Mattei, S; Lettry, J; Sawada, K; Fantz, U

    2014-02-01

    To control the H(0) atom production profile in the H(-) ion sources is one of the important issues for the efficient and uniform surface H(-) production. The purpose of this study is to construct a collisional radiative (CR) model to calculate the effective production rate of H(0) atoms from H2 molecules in the model geometry of the radio-frequency (RF) H(-) ion source for Linac4 accelerator. In order to validate the CR model by comparison with the experimental results from the optical emission spectroscopy, it is also necessary for the model to calculate Balmer photon emission rate in the source. As a basic test of the model, the time evolutions of H(0) production and the Balmer Hα photon emission rate are calculated for given electron energy distribution functions in the Linac4 RF H(-) ion source. Reasonable test results are obtained and basis for the detailed comparisons with experimental results have been established.

  3. Charge transfer in collisions of Be3+ ions with H atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. H.; Wang, J. G.

    2013-04-01

    The nonradiative charge-transfer processes for the Be3+(1s)+H(1s) collisions are investigated by the quantum-mechanical molecular orbital close-coupling method in the energy range of 0.01-10 keV/u. The radiative charge-transfer cross sections are calculated by the optical potential and semiclassical methods in the energy range 10-6-103 eV/u. The needed molecular data are obtained by the ab initio multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction method. Total and state-selective cross sections are presented and compared with other available theoretical data. Our calculation agrees well with the atomic orbital close-coupling results of Liu [L. Liu, D. Jakimovski, J. G. Wang, and R. K. Janev, J. Phys. BJPAPEH0953-407510.1088/0953-4075/43/14/144005 43, 144005 (2010)], but there exist some discrepancies with the semiclassical molecular orbital close-coupling results of Shimakura [N. Shimakura, J. Phys. BJPAMA40953-407510.1088/0953-4075/21/13/015 21, 2485 (1988)]. The present results show that the capture to Si2+(1s3l) states is dominant in the whole energy range with the exception of a narrow range of 2-4 keV/u. Rotational couplings play an important role not only in the state-selective cross sections, but also in the total charge-transfer results. At energies below 40 eV/u, the radiative charge transfer exceeds the nonradiative process.

  4. Thermal spike model interpretation of sputtering yield data for Bi thin films irradiated by MeV 84Kr15+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammeri, S.; Ouichaoui, S.; Ammi, H.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Dib, A.; Msimanga, M.

    2015-07-01

    A modified thermal spike model initially proposed to account for defect formation in metals within the high heavy ion energy regime is adapted for describing the sputtering of Bi thin films under MeV Kr ions. Surface temperature profiles for both the electronic and atomic subsystems have been carefully evaluated versus the radial distance and time with introducing appropriate values of the Bi target electronic stopping power for multi-charged Kr15+ heavy ions as well as different target physical proprieties like specific heats and thermal conductivities. Then, the total sputtering yields of the irradiated Bi thin films have been determined from a spatiotemporal integration of the local atomic evaporation rate. Besides, an expected non negligible contribution of elastic nuclear collisions to the Bi target sputtering yields and ion-induced surface effects has also been considered in our calculation. Finally, the latter thermal spike model allowed us to derive numerical sputtering yields in satisfactorily agreement with existing experimental data both over the low and high heavy ion energy regions, respectively, dominated by elastic nuclear collisions and inelastic electronic collisions, in particular with our data taken recently for Bi thin films irradiated by 27.5 MeV Kr15+ heavy ions. An overall consistency of our model calculation with the predictions of sputtering yield theoretical models within the target nuclear stopping power regime was also pointed out.

  5. Determination of selected elements in whole coal and in coal ash from the eight argonne premium coal samples by atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry, and ion-selective electrode

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doughten, M.W.; Gillison, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Methods for the determination of 24 elements in whole coal and coal ash by inductively coupled argon plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, flame, graphite furnace, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, and by ion-selective electrode are described. Coal ashes were analyzed in triplicate to determine the precision of the methods. Results of the analyses of NBS Standard Reference Materials 1633, 1633a, 1632a, and 1635 are reported. Accuracy of the methods is determined by comparison of the analysis of standard reference materials to their certified values as well as other values in the literature.

  6. Interaction of ions, atoms, and small molecules with quantized vortex lines in superfluid {sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect

    Mateo, David; Eloranta, Jussi; Williams, Gary A.

    2015-02-14

    The interaction of a number of impurities (H{sub 2}, Ag, Cu, Ag{sub 2}, Cu{sub 2}, Li, He{sub 3}{sup +}, He{sup *} ({sup 3}S), He{sub 2}{sup ∗} ({sup 3}Σ{sub u}), and e{sup −}) with quantized rectilinear vortex lines in superfluid {sup 4}He is calculated by using the Orsay-Trento density functional theory (DFT) method at 0 K. The Donnelly-Parks (DP) potential function binding ions to the vortex is combined with DFT data, yielding the impurity radius as well as the vortex line core parameter. The vortex core parameter at 0 K (0.74 Å) obtained either directly from the vortex line geometry or through the DP potential fitting is smaller than previously suggested but is compatible with the value obtained from re-analysis of the Rayfield-Reif experiment. All of the impurities have significantly higher binding energies to vortex lines below 1 K than the available thermal energy, where the thermally assisted escape process becomes exponentially negligible. Even at higher temperatures 1.5-2.0 K, the trapping times for larger metal clusters are sufficiently long that the previously observed metal nanowire assembly in superfluid helium can take place at vortex lines. The binding energy of the electron bubble is predicted to decrease as a function of both temperature and pressure, which allows adjusting the trap depth for either permanent trapping or to allow thermally assisted escape. Finally, a new scheme for determining the trapping of impurities on vortex lines by optical absorption spectroscopy is outlined and demonstrated for He{sup *}.

  7. THE APPLICATION OF SOME HARTREE-FOCK MODEL CALCULATION TO THE ANALYSIS OF ATOMIC AND FREE-ION OPTICAL SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Hayhurst, Thomas Laine

    1980-08-06

    Techniques for applying ab-initio calculations to the is of atomic spectra are investigated, along with the relationship between the semi-empirical and ab-initio forms of Slater-Condon theory. Slater-Condon theory is reviewed with a focus on the essential features that lead to the effective Hamiltonians associated with the semi-empirical form of the theory. Ab-initio spectroscopic parameters are calculated from wavefunctions obtained via self-consistent field methods, while multi-configuration Hamiltonian matrices are constructed and diagonalized with computer codes written by Robert Cowan of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Group theoretical analysis demonstrates that wavefunctions more general than Slater determinants (i.e. wavefunctions with radial correlations between electrons) lead to essentially the same parameterization of effective Hamiltonians. In the spirit of this analysis, a strategy is developed for adjusting ab-initio values of the spectroscopic parameters, reproducing parameters obtained by fitting the corresponding effective Hamiltonian. Secondary parameters are used to "screen" the calculated (primary) spectroscopic parameters, their values determined by least squares. Extrapolations of the secondary parameters determined from analyzed spectra are attempted to correct calculations of atoms and ions without experimental levels. The adjustment strategy and extrapolations are tested on the K I sequence from K{sup 0+} through Fe{sup 7+}, fitting to experimental levels for V{sup 4+}, and Cr{sup 5+}; unobserved levels and spectra are predicted for several members of the sequence. A related problem is also discussed: Energy levels of the Uranium hexahalide complexes, (UX{sub 6}){sup 2-} for X= F, Cl, Br, and I, are fit to an effective Hamiltonian (the f{sup 2} configuration in O{sub h} symmetry) with corrections proposed by Brian Judd.

  8. Electron-Electron Interaction in Ion-Atom Collisions Studied by Projectile State-Resolved Auger Electron Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Do-Hyung

    1990-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the problem of dynamic electron-electron interactions in fast ion-atom collisions using projectile Auger electron spectroscopy. The study was carried out by measuring high-resolution projectile KLL Auger electron spectra as a function of projectile energy for the various collision systems of 0.25-2 MeV/u O^{q+} and F^ {q+} incident on H_2 and He targets. The electrons were detected in the beam direction, where the kinematic broadening is minimized. A zero-degree tandem electron spectrometer system was developed and showed the versatility of zero-degree measurements of collisionally-produced atomic states. The zero-degree binary encounter electrons (BEe), quasifree target electrons ionized by the projectiles in head-on collisions, were observed as a strong background in the KLL Auger electron spectrum. They were studied by treating the target ionization as 180^circ Rutherford elastic scattering in the projectile frame, and resulted in a validity test of the impulse approximation (IA) and a way to determine the spectrometer efficiency. An anomalous q-dependence, in which the zero-degree BEe yields increase with decreasing projectile charge state (q), was observed. State-resolved KLL Auger cross sections were determined by using the BEe normalization and thus the cross sections of the electron -electron interactions such as resonant transfer-excitation (RTE), electron-electron excitation (eeE), and electron -electron ionization (eeI) were determined. Projectile 2l capture with 1s to 2p excitation by the captured target electron was observed as an RTE process with Li-like and He-like projectiles and the measured RTEA (RTE followed by Auger decay) cross sections showed good agreement with an RTE-IA treatment and RTE alignment theory. Projectile 1s to 2p excitation by a target electron was observed an an eeE process with Li-like projectiles. Projectile 1s ionization by a target electron was observed as an eeI process with Be-like projectiles

  9. Surface Passivation of MoO₃ Nanorods by Atomic Layer Deposition toward High Rate Durable Li Ion Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, B; Shahid, Muhammad; Nagaraju, D H; Anjum, D H; Hedhili, Mohamed N; Alshareef, H N

    2015-06-24

    We demonstrate an effective strategy to overcome the degradation of MoO3 nanorod anodes in lithium (Li) ion batteries at high-rate cycling. This is achieved by conformal nanoscale surface passivation of the MoO3 nanorods by HfO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD). At high current density such as 1500 mA/g, the specific capacity of HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes is 68% higher than that of bare MoO3 electrodes after 50 charge/discharge cycles. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes exhibited specific capacity of 657 mAh/g; on the other hand, bare MoO3 showed only 460 mAh/g. Furthermore, we observed that HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes tend to stabilize faster than bare MoO3 electrodes because nanoscale HfO2 layer prevents structural degradation of MoO3 nanorods. Additionally, the growth temperature of MoO3 nanorods and the effect of HfO2 layer thickness was studied and found to be important parameters for optimum battery performance. The growth temperature defines the microstructural features and HfO2 layer thickness defines the diffusion coefficient of Li-ions through the passivation layer to the active material. Furthermore, ex situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction were carried out to explain the capacity retention mechanism after HfO2 coating.

  10. Stabilities and structures in cluster ions of five-membered heterocyclic compounds containing O, N, and S atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraoka, K.; Takimoto, H.; Yamabe, S.

    1987-11-25

    Clustering and hydration reactions of protonated and radical cations of heterocyclic compounds, e.g., furan, tetrahydrofuran, pyrrole, pyrrolidine, thiophene, and tetrahydrothiophene, have been studied using a pulsed electron beam mass spectrometer. The bond energies of proton-held dimer cations for furan, pyrrole, and thiophene are much smaller than those for tetrahydrofuran, pyrrolidine, and tetrahydrothiophene, respectively. This result suggests that not the heteroatoms but the ..cap alpha.. carbon atoms are protonated for furan, pyrrole, and thiophene. The hydrogen-bond site for the protonated furan and thiophene is calculated to be the unprotonated ..cap alpha.. hydrogen (C-H/sub ..cap alpha../ adjacent to the heteroatom) which is the most acidic one. On the other hand, the N-H hydrogen is the best hydrogen-bond site for the protonated pyrrole. It was found that the radical-cations dimers have greater bond energies than the proton-held dimer cations for furan and thiophene. This suggests that the bonds of the former have more covalent nature. Some unique reactions of C/sub 4/H/sub 4/O/sup .+/ and C/sub 4/H/sub 5/O/sup +/ with a furan molecule were observed. With an increase of temperature, the ions with m/z which are the same as those for (C/sub 4/H/sub 4/O)/sub 2//sup .+/ and H/sup +/(C/sub 4/H/sub 4/O)/sub 2/ are found to be formed at the expense of C/sup 4/H/sub 4/O/sup .+/ and C/sub 4/H/sub 5/O/sup +/ ions, respectively. It is suggested that the reactions observed are Diels-Alder type condensation reactions.

  11. Imaging atomic-scale effects of high-energy ion irradiation on superconductivity and vortex pinning in Fe(Se,Te).

    PubMed

    Massee, Freek; Sprau, Peter Oliver; Wang, Yong-Lei; Davis, J C Séamus; Ghigo, Gianluca; Gu, Genda D; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2015-05-01

    Maximizing the sustainable supercurrent density, J C, is crucial to high-current applications of superconductivity. To achieve this, preventing dissipative motion of quantized vortices is key. Irradiation of superconductors with high-energy heavy ions can be used to create nanoscale defects that act as deep pinning potentials for vortices. This approach holds unique promise for high-current applications of iron-based superconductors because J C amplification persists to much higher radiation doses than in cuprate superconductors without significantly altering the superconducting critical temperature. However, for these compounds, virtually nothing is known about the atomic-scale interplay of the crystal damage from the high-energy ions, the superconducting order parameter, and the vortex pinning processes. We visualize the atomic-scale effects of irradiating FeSe x Te1-x with 249-MeV Au ions and find two distinct effects: compact nanometer-sized regions of crystal disruption or "columnar defects," plus a higher density of single atomic site "point" defects probably from secondary scattering. We directly show that the superconducting order is virtually annihilated within the former and suppressed by the latter. Simultaneous atomically resolved images of the columnar crystal defects, the superconductivity, and the vortex configurations then reveal how a mixed pinning landscape is created, with the strongest vortex pinning occurring at metallic core columnar defects and secondary pinning at clusters of point-like defects, followed by collective pinning at higher fields.

  12. Imaging atomic-scale effects of high-energy ion irradiation on superconductivity and vortex pinning in Fe(Se,Te)

    PubMed Central

    Massee, Freek; Sprau, Peter Oliver; Wang, Yong-Lei; Davis, J. C. Séamus; Ghigo, Gianluca; Gu, Genda D.; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Maximizing the sustainable supercurrent density, JC, is crucial to high-current applications of superconductivity. To achieve this, preventing dissipative motion of quantized vortices is key. Irradiation of superconductors with high-energy heavy ions can be used to create nanoscale defects that act as deep pinning potentials for vortices. This approach holds unique promise for high-current applications of iron-based superconductors because JC amplification persists to much higher radiation doses than in cuprate superconductors without significantly altering the superconducting critical temperature. However, for these compounds, virtually nothing is known about the atomic-scale interplay of the crystal damage from the high-energy ions, the superconducting order parameter, and the vortex pinning processes. We visualize the atomic-scale effects of irradiating FeSexTe1−x with 249-MeV Au ions and find two distinct effects: compact nanometer-sized regions of crystal disruption or “columnar defects,” plus a higher density of single atomic site “point” defects probably from secondary scattering. We directly show that the superconducting order is virtually annihilated within the former and suppressed by the latter. Simultaneous atomically resolved images of the columnar crystal defects, the superconductivity, and the vortex configurations then reveal how a mixed pinning landscape is created, with the strongest vortex pinning occurring at metallic core columnar defects and secondary pinning at clusters of point-like defects, followed by collective pinning at higher fields. PMID:26601180

  13. Metal atom and ion layers observed by a frequency-tunable resonance scattering lidar in the midlatitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Nakamura, Takuji; Kawahara, Takuya D.; Tsuno, Katsuhiko; Abo, Makoto; Nishiyama, Takanori; Tsuda, Takuo; Wada, Satoshi; Ogawa, Takayo

    2016-07-01

    The National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) is leading a six year prioritized project of the Antarctic research observations since 2010. One of the sub-project is entitled the global environmental change revealed through the Antarctic middle and upper atmosphere. Profiling dynamical parameters such as temperature and wind, as well as minor constituents is the key component of observations in this project, together with a long term observations using existent various instruments in Syowa, the Antarctica (69S). As a part of the sub-project, we are developing a new resonance lidar system with multiple wavelengths and plan to install and operate it at Syowa, Antarctica. The lidar will observe temperature profiles and variations of minor constituents such as Fe, K, Ca+, and aurorally excited N2+. The lidar system is being developed with trial and error in test observations of the metal atom and ion density and the MLT temperature profiles. The lidar will be installed at Syowa in Antarctica by the 58th Japan Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE 58). In this presentation, we will report current status of the system developments and discuss results of the test observations.

  14. Stability Of Nanoclusters In 14YWT Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel Under Heavy Ion-irradiation By Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jianchao; Wan, F.; Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd R.; Certain, Alicia G.; Shutthanandan, V.; Wu, Yaqiao

    2014-12-01

    14YWT oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel was irradiated with of 5 MeV Ni2+ ions, at 300 °C, 450 °C, and 600 °C to a damage level of 100 dpa. The stability of Ti–Y–O nanoclusters was investigated by applying atom probe tomography (APT) in voltage mode, of the samples before and after irradiations. The average size and number density of the nanoclusters was determined using the maximum separation method. These techniques allowed for the imaging of nanoclusters to sizes well below the resolution limit of conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques. The most significant changes were observed for samples irradiated at 300 °C where the size (average Guinier radius) and number density of nanoclusters were observed to decrease from 1.1 nm to 0.8 nm and 12 × 1023 to 3.6 × 1023, respectively. In this study, the nanoclusters are more stable at higher temperature.

  15. Spin exchange in the excitation of spin-polarized Na atoms by Ne/sup +/-ion impact

    SciTech Connect

    Jitschin, W.; Osimitsch, S.; Reihl, H.; Mueller, D.W.; Kleinpoppen, H.; Lutz, H.O.

    1986-11-01

    The 3s-3p excitation of spin-polarized Na atoms by Ne/sup +/ ions has been studied for impact energies E/sub lab/ = 200 eV to 6 keV, i.e., in the adiabatic regime. The total excitation cross section and the three Stokes polarization parameters of the fluorescence light have been measured. The linear polarization of the light shows a preferential excitation of the chemically bondm/sub l/chemically bond = 1 magnetic substates. The circular polarization probes the spin orientation of the excited 3p state. At the highest impact energies investigated the experimental data are compatible with conservation of spin orientation during the collision. With decreasing impact energy, the spin polarization of the final 3p state becomes smaller than the spin polarization of the initial 3s state. This apparent spin depolarization is attributed to the exchange interaction between the Na valence electron and the unfilled Ne/sup +/ 2p/sup 5/ core in the quasimolecule formed during the collision.

  16. Atomic/Molecular Layer Deposition of Lithium Terephthalate Thin Films as High Rate Capability Li-Ion Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Nisula, Mikko; Karppinen, Maarit

    2016-02-10

    We demonstrate the fabrication of high-quality electrochemically active organic lithium electrode thin films by the currently strongly emerging combined atomic/molecular layer deposition (ALD/MLD) technique using lithium terephthalate, a recently found anode material for lithium-ion battery (LIB), as a proof-of-the-concept material. Our deposition process for Li-terephthalate is shown to well comply with the basic principles of ALD-type growth including the sequential self-saturated surface reactions, a necessity when aiming at micro-LIB devices with three-dimensional architectures. The as-deposited films are found crystalline across the deposition temperature range of 200-280 °C, which is a trait highly desired for an electrode material but rather unusual for hybrid inorganic-organic thin films. Excellent rate capability is ascertained for the Li-terephthalate films with no conductive additives required. The electrode performance can be further enhanced by depositing a thin protective LiPON solid-state electrolyte layer on top of Li-terephthalate; this yields highly stable structures with capacity retention of over 97% after 200 charge/discharge cycles at 3.2 C.

  17. Core-shell Si@TiO2 nanosphere anode by atomic layer deposition for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ying; Yan, Dong; Yu, Caiyan; Cao, Lina; Wang, Chunlei; Zhang, Jinshui; Zhu, Huiyuan; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Dai, Sheng; Lu, Junling; Zhang, Weifeng

    2016-03-01

    Silicon (Si) has been regarded as next-generation anode for high-energy lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) due to its high Li storage capacity (4200 mA h g-1). However, the mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade critically hinder its practical application. In this regard, we demonstrate that nanocoating of Si spheres with a 3 nm titanium dioxide (TiO2) layer via atomic layer deposition (ALD) can utmostly balance the high conductivity and the good structural stability to improve the cycling stability of Si core material. The resultant sample, Si@TiO2-3 nm core-shell nanospheres, exhibits the best electrochemical performance of all with a highest initial Coulombic efficiency and specific charge capacity retention after 50 cycles at 0.1C (82.39% and 1580.3 mA h g-1). In addition to making full advantage of the ALD technique, we believe that our strategy and comprehension in coating the electrode and the active material could provide a useful pathway towards enhancing Si anode material itself and community of LIBs.

  18. Using atomic layer deposition to hinder solvent decomposition in lithium ion batteries: first-principles modeling and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Leung, Kevin; Qi, Yue; Zavadil, Kevin R; Jung, Yoon Seok; Dillon, Anne C; Cavanagh, Andrew S; Lee, Se-Hee; George, Steven M

    2011-09-21

    Passivating lithium ion (Li) battery electrode surfaces to prevent electrolyte decomposition is critical for battery operations. Recent work on conformal atomic layer deposition (ALD) coating of anodes and cathodes has shown significant technological promise. ALD further provides well-characterized model platforms for understanding electrolyte decomposition initiated by electron tunneling through a passivating layer. First-principles calculations reveal two regimes of electron transfer to adsorbed ethylene carbonate molecules (EC, a main component of commercial electrolyte), depending on whether the electrode is alumina coated. On bare Li metal electrode surfaces, EC accepts electrons and decomposes within picoseconds. In contrast, constrained density functional theory calculations in an ultrahigh vacuum setting show that, with the oxide coating, e(-) tunneling to the adsorbed EC falls within the nonadiabatic regime. Here the molecular reorganization energy, computed in the harmonic approximation, plays a key role in slowing down electron transfer. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations conducted at liquid EC electrode interfaces are consistent with the view that reactions and electron transfer occur right at the interface. Microgravimetric measurements demonstrate that the ALD coating decreases electrolyte decomposition and corroborates the theoretical predictions.

  19. Dimensional comparison between amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy and scanning ion conductance microscopy of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joonhui; Choi, MyungHoon; Jung, Goo-Eun; Rahim Ferhan, Abdul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Cho, Sang-Joon

    2016-08-01

    The range of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) applications for atomic force microscopy (AFM) is expanding in the biological sciences field, reflecting an increasing demand for tools that can improve our fundamental understanding of the physics behind biological systems. However, the complexity associated with applying SPM techniques in biomedical research hampers the full exploitation of its capabilities. Recently, the development of scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) has overcome these limitations and enabled contact-free, high resolution imaging of live biological specimens. In this work, we demonstrate the limitation of AFM for imaging biological samples in liquid due to artifacts arising from AFM tip-sample interaction, and how SICM imaging is able to overcome those limitations with contact-free scanning. We also demonstrate that SICM measurements, when compared to AFM, show better fit to the actual dimensions of the biological samples. Our results highlight the superiority of SICM imaging, enabling it to be widely adopted as a general and versatile research tool for biological studies in the nanoscale.

  20. Core-shell Si@TiO2 nanosphere anode by atomic layer deposition for Li-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Dai, Sheng

    2016-01-28

    Silicon (Si) is regarded as next-generation anode for high-energy lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) due to its high Li storage capacity (4200 mA h g-1). However, the mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade critically hinder its practical application. In this regard, we demonstrate that nanocoating of Si spheres with a 3 nm titanium dioxide (TiO2) layer via atomic layer deposition (ALD) can utmostly balance the high conductivity and the good structural stability to improve the cycling stability of Si core material. The resultant sample, Si@TiO2-3 nm core–shell nanospheres, exhibits the best electrochemical performance of all with a highest initial Coulombic efficiency andmore » specific charge capacity retention after 50 cycles at 0.1C (82.39% and 1580.3 mA h g-1). In addition to making full advantage of the ALD technique, we believe that our strategy and comprehension in coating the electrode and the active material could provide a useful pathway towards enhancing Si anode material itself and community of LIBs.« less

  1. Significant impact on cathode performance of lithium-ion batteries by precisely controlled metal oxide nanocoatings via atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xifei; Liu, Jian; Meng, Xiangbo; Tang, Yongji; Banis, Mohammad Norouzi; Yang, Jinli; Hu, Yuhai; Li, Ruying; Cai, Mei; Sun, Xueliang

    2014-02-01

    LiCoO2 in the commercial lithium ion batteries has been suffering from its poor cycling performance at high cutoff voltages. In this study, we employ an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique to surface-modify a LiCoO2 material with various thickness-controlled metal oxide (TiO2, ZrO2 and Al2O3) coatings to improve its battery performance. The effects of the metal oxide coatings on the electrochemical performance of LiCoO2 electrode are studied in detail. It is demonstrated that a uniform and dense coating via the ALD route on LiCoO2 powder can lower the battery performance due to an obvious decrease in lithium diffusion and electron transport with the coating layers. In contrast, it is revealed that a direct coating on prefabricated LiCoO2 electrodes performs much better than a coating on LiCoO2 powders. It is further disclosed that the improved electrochemical performance of coated LiCoO2 electrode is highly dependent on the coating materials. Of the three coating materials, the Al2O3 coating results in the best cycling stability while the ZrO2 coating contributes to the best rate capability. It is thus suggested that the coating materials are functionally specific, and for the best improvement of a cathode, a particular coating material should be sought.

  2. Determination of arsenic speciation in sulfidic waters by Ion Chromatography Hydride-Generation Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry (IC-HG-AFS).

    PubMed

    Keller, Nicole S; Stefánsson, Andri; Sigfússon, Bergur

    2014-10-01

    A method for the analysis of arsenic species in aqueous sulfide samples is presented. The method uses an ion chromatography system connected with a Hydride-Generation Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometer (IC-HG-AFS). With this method inorganic As(III) and As(V) species in water samples can be analyzed, including arsenite (HnAs(III)O3(n-3)), thioarsenite (HnAs(III)S3(n-3)), arsenate (HnAs(V)O4(n-3)), monothioarsenate (HnAs(V)SO3(n-3)), dithioarsenate (HnAs(V)S2O2(n-3)), trithioarsenate (HnAs(V)S3O(n-3)) and tetrathioarsenate (HnAs(V)S4(n-3)). The peak identification and retention times were determined based on standard analysis of the various arsenic compounds. The analytical detection limit was ~1-3 µg L(-1) (LOD), depending on the quality of the baseline. This low detection limit makes this method also applicable to discriminate between waters meeting the drinking water standard of max. 10 µg L(-1) As, and waters that do not meet this standard. The new method was successfully applied for on-site determination of arsenic species in natural sulfidic waters, in which seven species were unambiguously identified.

  3. Linkage analysis of chromophore-labeled disaccharides and linear oligosaccharides by negative ion fast atom bombardment ionization and collisional-induced dissociation with B/E scanning.

    PubMed

    Li, D T; Her, G R

    1993-06-01

    Negative ion fast atom bombardment ionization in combination with collisional-induced dissociation mass spectrometry differentiates the linkage position(s) of chromophore-labeled di- and oligosaccharides. The formation of glycosylamines rather than the more popular reductive amination has been used to label the reducing end of sugars with ultraviolet or fluorescence tags. Two types of fragment ions were detected, one with the charge carried on the chromophore end and the other with the charge carried on the nonreducing terminus. These ions are essential to the determination of interglycosidic linkage and they are produced from the ring cleavage of the reducing end monosaccharide. Additionally, the anomeric configuration of the 1-4-linked residue could be assigned according to the relative abundance of the fragment ions.

  4. Cross sections of electron capture and electron capture with ionization of argon atoms by fast 3He2+ ions at various impact parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrosimov, V. V.; Basalaev, A. A.; Panov, M. N.

    2017-01-01

    The absolute differential cross sections of scattering of fast particles formed in processes with capture of one or two electrons from Ar atoms have been measured for 6-keV He2+ ions in the interval of scattering angles within 0°-2.5°. The cross sections of electron capture and electron capture with ionization have been determined as functions of the impact parameter. The probabilities of these processes are compared to the distribution of electron density in various shells of target atoms. Applicability of the models of screened Coulomb interaction potentials to description of the scattering of recharged particles is assessed.

  5. Atomic force microscopy imaging and electrical recording of lipid bilayers supported over microfabricated silicon chip nanopores: lab-on-a-chip system for lipid membranes and ion channels.

    PubMed

    Quist, Arjan P; Chand, Ami; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Daraio, Chiara; Jin, Sungho; Lal, Ratnesh

    2007-01-30

    We describe a silicon chip-based supported bilayer system to detect the presence of ion channels and their electrical conductance in lipid bilayers. Nanopores were produced in microfabricated silicon membranes by electron beam lithography as well as by using a finely focused ion beam. Thermal oxide was used to shrink pore sizes, if necessary, and to create an insulating surface. The chips with well-defined pores were easily mounted on a double-chamber plastic cell recording system, allowing for controlling the buffer conditions both above and below the window. The double-chamber system allowed using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip as one electrode and inserting a platinum wire as the second electrode under the membrane window, to measure electrical current across lipid bilayers that are suspended over the pores. Atomic force imaging, stiffness measurement, and electrical capacitance measurement show the feasibility of supporting lipid bilayers over defined nanopores: a key requirement to use any such technique for structure-function study of ion channels. Online addition of gramicidin, an ion-channel-forming peptide, resulted in electrical current flow across the bilayer, and the I-V curve that was measured using the conducting AFM tip indicates the presence of many conducting gramicidin ion channels.

  6. Vibrational CD (VCD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of DNA interaction with Cr3+ ions: VCD and AFM evidence of DNA condensation.

    PubMed

    Andrushchenko, V; Leonenko, Z; Cramb, D; van de Sande, H; Wieser, H

    The interaction of natural calf thymus DNA with Cr(3+) ions was studied at room temperature by means of vibrational CD (VCD) and infrared absorption (ir) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cr(3+) ion binding mainly to N(7) (G) and to phosphate groups was demonstrated. Psi-type VCD spectra resembling electronic CD (ECD) spectra, which appear during psi-type DNA condensation, were observed. These spectra are characterized mainly by an anomalous, severalfold increase of VCD intensity. Such anomalous VCD spectra were assigned to DNA condensation with formation of large and dense particles of a size comparable to the wavelength of the probing ir beam and possessing large-scale helicity. Atomic force microscopy confirmed DNA condensation by Cr(3+) ions and the formation of tight DNA particles responsible for the psi-type VCD spectra. Upon increasing the Cr(3+) ion concentration the shape of the condensates changed from loose flower-like structures to highly packed dense spheres. No DNA denaturation was seen even at the highest concentration of Cr(3+) ions studied. The secondary structure of DNA remained in a B-form before and after the condensation. VCD and ir as well as AFM proved to be an effective combination for investigating DNA condensation. In addition to the ability of VCD to determine DNA condensation, VCD and ir can in the same experiment provide unambiguous information about the secondary structure of DNA contained in the condensed particles.

  7. Experimental investigations of low-energy (4-40 eV) collisions of O-(2P) ions and O(3P) atoms with surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orient, O. J.; Chutjian, A.; Murad, E.

    1990-01-01

    Using a newly-developed, magnetically confined source, low-energy, ground state oxygen negative ions and neutral atoms are generated. The energy range is variable, and atom and neutrals have been generated at energies varying from 2 eV to 40 eV and higher. It was found that the interaction of these low-energy species with a solid magnesium fluoride target leads to optical emissions in the (at least) visible and infrared regions of the spectrum. Researchers describe y details of the photodetachment source, and present spectra of the neutral and ion glows in the wavelength range 250 to 850 nm (for O/-/) and 600 to 850 nm (for O), and discuss the variability of the emissions for incident energies between 4 and 40 eV.

  8. RCCPAC: A parallel relativistic coupled-cluster program for closed-shell and one-valence atoms and ions in FORTRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, B. K.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Angom, D.

    2017-04-01

    We report the development of a parallel FORTRAN code, RCCPAC, to solve the relativistic coupled-cluster equations for closed-shell and one-valence atoms and ions. The parallelization is implemented through the use of message passing interface, which is suitable for distributed memory computers. The coupled-cluster equations are defined in terms of the reduced matrix elements, and solved iteratively using Jacobi method. The ground and excited states of coupled-cluster wave functions obtained from the code could be used to compute different properties of closed-shell and one-valence atom or ion. As an example we compute the ground state correlation energy, attachment energies, E1 reduced matrix elements and hyperfine structure constants.

  9. Experimental investigations of low-energy (4 to 40 eV) collisions of O(-)(P2) ions and O(P3) atoms with surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Orient, O. J.; Murad, E.

    1990-01-01

    Using a newly-developed, magnetically confined source, low-energy, ground state oxygen negative ions and neutral atoms are generated. The energy range is variable, and atom and neutrals have been generated at energies varying from 2 eV to 40 eV and higher. It was found that the interaction of these low-energy species with a solid magnesium fluoride target leads to optical emissions in the (at least) visible and infrared regions of the spectrum. Researchers describe y details of the photodetachment source, and present spectra of the neutral and ion glows in the wavelength range 250 to 850 nm (for O(-)) and 600 to 850 nm (for O), and discuss the variability of the emissions for incident energies between 4 and 40 eV.

  10. Atomic and Molecular Layer Deposition for Enhanced Lithium Ion Battery Electrodes and Development of Conductive Metal Oxide/Carbon Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travis, Jonathan

    The performance and safety of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are dependent on interfacial processes at the positive and negative electrodes. For example, the surface layers that form on cathodes and anodes are known to affect the kinetics and capacity of LIBs. Interfacial reactions between the electrolyte and the electrodes are also known to initiate electrolyte combustion during thermal runaway events that compromise battery safety. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) and molecular layer deposition (MLD) are thin film deposition techniques based on sequential, self-limiting surface reactions. ALD and MLD can deposit ultrathin and conformal films on high aspect ratio and porous substrates such as composite particulate electrodes in lithium-ion batteries. The effects of electrode surface modification via ALD and MLD are studied using a variety of techniques. It was found that sub-nm thick coatings of Al2O 3 deposited via ALD have beneficial effects on the stability of LIB anodes and cathodes. These same Al2O3 ALD films were found to improve the safety of graphite based anodes through prevention of exothermic solid electrolyte interface (SEI) degradation at elevated temperatures. Ultrathin and conformal metal alkoxide polymer films known as "metalcones" were grown utilizing MLD techniques with trimethylaluminum (TMA) or titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) and organic diols or triols, such as ethylene glycol (EG), glycerol (GL) or hydroquinone (HQ), as the reactants. Pyrolysis of these metalcone films under inert gas conditions led to the development of conductive metal oxide/carbon composites. The composites were found to contain sp2 carbon using micro-Raman spectroscopy in the pyrolyzed films with pyrolysis temperatures ≥ 600°C. Four point probe measurements demonstrated that the graphitic sp2 carbon domains in the metalcone films grown using GL and HQ led to significant conductivity. The pyrolysis of conformal MLD films to obtain conductive metal oxide/carbon composite films

  11. A system for systematically preparing atom-probe field-ion-microscope specimens for the study of internal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krakauer, B. W.; Hu, J. G.; Kuo, S.-M.; Mallick, R. L.; Seki, A.; Seidman, D. N.; Baker, J. P.; Loyd, R. J.

    1990-11-01

    A versatile system has been designed and fabricated to prepare atom-probe field-ion-microscope (APFIM) specimens in a systematic manner, such that internal interfaces can be positioned in the tips of these wire specimens for subsequent analysis of their chemical composition. This system incorporates both beaker electrolytic and zone electrolytic cell configurations, a specially constructed power supply, and a special transmission electron microscope holder for wires. The power supply enables ac electroetching or dc electropolishing in the automated or manual modes. The ac wave forms available are sine (0.002 Hz-200 kHz) or square (10 Hz-20 kHz). Triggering and gating are performed manually or with a pulse generator. The dc output is gated manually to produce a continuous output or with a pulse generator to produce single pulses with widths in the range 50 μs-1 s. A counter indicates the number of periods of voltage applied, and the total charge transferred in the electrolytic cell is integrated in the range 10 μA s-1 kA s. The power supply provides 0 to ±48 V peak at 1 A peak. A double-tilt stage for an Hitachi H-700H 200 kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) was radically modified to hold APFIM specimens; this stage is vibrationless at 310 000× magnification. It has a tilting range of ±30° and ±27° for the x and y tilts, respectively. Examples are given of the controlled backpolishing of W-3 at. % Re, W-25 at. % Re, Mo-5.4 at. % Re, and Fe-3 at. % Si specimens, and their observation by TEM, to selectively place grain boundaries in the tip region. The analysis of the chemical composition of a grain boundary, which is first located in a W-25 at. % Re specimen via TEM, by the APFIM technique is presented.

  12. Selective cloud point extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of molybdenum (VI) ion in seawater samples.

    PubMed

    Filik, Hayati; Cengel, Tayfun; Apak, Reşat

    2009-09-30

    A cloud point extraction process using the nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 to extract molybdenum from aqueous solutions was investigated. The method is based on the complexation reaction of Mo(VI) with 1,2,5,8-tetrahydroxyanthracene-9,10-dione (quinalizarine: QA) and micelle-mediated extraction of the complex. The enriched analyte in the surfactant-rich phase was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g. pH, reagent and surfactant concentrations, temperature, incubation and centrifugation times) were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for Mo(VI) was 7.0 ng L(-1) with an preconcentration factor of approximately 25 when 10 mL of sample solution was preconcentrated to 0.4 mL. The proposed method (with extraction) showed linear calibration within the range 0.03-0.6 microg L(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) was found to be 3.7% (C(Mo(VI))=0.05 microg L(-1), n=5) for pure standard solutions, whereas RSD for the recoveries from real samples ranged between 2 and 8% (mean RSD=3.9%). The method was applied to the determination of Mo(VI) in seawater and tap water samples with a recovery for the spiked samples in the range of 98-103%. The interference effect of some cations and anions was also studied. In the presence of foreign ions, no significant interference was observed. In order to verify the accuracy of the method, a certified reference water sample was analysed and the results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values.

  13. The use of ion chromatography-dc plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the speciation of trace metals

    SciTech Connect

    Urasa, I.T.

    1991-09-20

    The original objects of this research program were: to interface d.c. plasma atomic emission spectrometer with an ion chromatograph; to characterize and optimize the combined systems for application in the speciation of metals in aqueous solutions; to use this system in the study of the solution chemistry of various metals; and to find ways in which the measurement sensitivity of the method can be enhanced, thereby allowing the detection of metal species at low ppb concentration levels. This approach has been used to study the chemistry of and speciate several elements in solution including: arsenic, chromium, iron, manganese, nickel phosphorus, platinum, selenium, and vanadium. During the course of this research, we have found that the solution chemistry of the elements studied and the speciation data obtained can vary considerably depending on the solution, and the chromatographic conditions employed. The speciation of chromium, iron, and vanadium was found to be highly influenced by the acidity of the sample. The element selective nature of the d.c. plasma detector allows these changes to be monitored, thereby providing quantitative information on the new moieties formed. New approaches are being developed including the use of chelating ligands as preconcentration agents for purposes of reducing further the detection limits of the elements of interest and to improve the overall element speciation scheme. New thrusts are being directed towards the employment of post-column derivatization method coupled with colorimetric measurements to detect and quantify metal species eluting from the chromatographic column. The influence of sample acidity on these investigations will be carefully evaluated. These new thrusts are described in the accompanying Project Renewal Proposal.

  14. Spectroscopic investigation of H atom transfer in a gas-phase dissociation reaction: McLafferty rearrangement of model gas-phase peptide ions.

    PubMed

    Van Stipdonk, Michael J; Kerstetter, Dale R; Leavitt, Christopher M; Groenewold, Gary S; Steill, Jeffrey; Oomens, Jos

    2008-06-14

    Wavelength-selective infrared multiple-photon photodissociation (WS-IRMPD) was used to study isotopically-labeled ions generated by McLafferty rearrangement of nicotinyl-glycine-tert-butyl ester and betaine-glycine-tert-butyl ester. The tert-butyl esters were incubated in a mixture of D(2)O and CH(3)OD to induce solution-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange and then converted to gas-phase ions using electrospray ionization. McLafferty rearrangement was used to generate the free-acid forms of the respective model peptides through transfer of an H atom and elimination of butene. The specific aim was to use vibrational spectra generated by WS-IRMPD to determine whether the H atom remains at the acid group, or migrates to one or more of the other exchangeable sites. Comparison of the IRMPD results in the region from 1200-1900 cm(-1) to theoretical spectra for different isotopically-labeled isomers clearly shows that the H atom is situated at the C-terminal acid group and migration to amide positions is negligible on the time scale of the experiment. The results of this study suggest that use of the McLafferty rearrangement for peptide esters could be an effective approach for generation of H-atom isotope tracers, in situ, for subsequent investigation of intramolecular proton migration during peptide fragmentation studies.

  15. Spectroscopic Investigation of H Atom Transfer in a Gas-phase Dissociation Reaction: McLafferty Rearrangement of Model Gas-phase Peptide Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Van Stipdonk; Dale R. Kersetter; Christopher M. Leavitt; Gary S. Groenewold; Jeffrey Steill; Jos Oomens

    2008-07-01

    Wavelength-selective infrared multiple-photon photodissociation (WS-IRMPD) was used to study isotopically-labeled ions generated by McLafferty rearrangement of nicotinyl-glycine-tert-butyl ester and betaine-glycine-tert-butyl ester. The tert-butyl esters were incubated in a mixture of D2O and CH3OD to induce solution-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange and then converted to gas-phase ions using electrospray ionization. McLafferty rearrangement was used to generate the free-acid forms of the respective model peptides through transfer of an H atom and elimination of butene. The specific aim was to use vibrational spectra generated by WS-IRMPD technique to determine whether the H atom remains at the acid group, or migrates to one or more of the other exchangeable sites. Comparison of the IRMPD results in the region from 1200-1900 cm-1 to theoretical spectra for different isotopically-labeled isomers clearly shows that the H atom is situated at the C-terminal acid group and migration to amide positions is negligible on the time scale of the experiment. The results of this study suggest that use of the McLafferty rearrangement for peptide esters could be an effective approach for generation of H-atom isotope tracers, in-situ, for subsequent investigation of intra-molecular proton migration during peptide fragmentation studies.

  16. An electrostatic ion pump with nanostructured Si field emission electron source and Ti particle collectors for supporting an ultra-high vacuum in miniaturized atom interferometry systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Anirban; Velásquez-García, Luis F.

    2016-12-01

    We report a field emission-based, magnetic-less ion pump architecture for helping maintain a high vacuum within a small chamber that is compatible with miniaturized cold-atom interferometry systems. A nanostructured silicon field emitter array, with each nano-sharp tip surrounded by a self-aligned proximal gate electrode, is used to generate a surplus of electrons that cause impact ionization of gas molecules. A two-stage cylindrical electron collector, made of titanium, is used to increase the travel distance of the electrons, augmenting the ionization probability; gas ionization is subsequently followed by gettering of the ions by a negatively charged, annular-shaped titanium electrode. A proof-of-concept pump prototype was characterized using a 25 cm3 stainless steel vacuum chamber backed up by an external turbomolecular pump, a diaphragm pump, and a standard ion pump. Pumping action was observed with the electrostatic pump operating alone after an initial rapid rise of the chamber pressure due to electron/ion scrubbing. In addition, running the electrostatic pump in combination with the standard ion pump results in a lower vacuum level compared to the vacuum level produced by the standard ion pump acting alone. A proposed reduced-order model accurately predicts the functional dependence of the pressure versus time data and provides a good estimate of the characteristic pumping time constant inferred from the experiments.

  17. Lattice-constant and electron-affinity effects on negative-ion conversion in atom-ionic-crystal-surface grazing scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wang; Zhou, Hu; Zhang, Meixiao; Zhou, Lihua; Li, Yuan; Li, Bowen; Chen, Ximeng

    2016-11-01

    The effects of the lattice constant and electron affinity on the negative-ion conversion of a neutral atom undergoing grazing scattering on an ionic-crystal surface over the complete velocity range were investigated. Here, a comparison of negative-ion conversion of neutral O0-KCl (100 ) , F0-KCl (100 ) , and O0-KI (100 ) surface systems shows that the pronounced difference in the efficiency of negative-ion formation between F0-KCl (100 ) and O0-KCl (100 ) is caused by the large difference in their projectile electron affinities, whereas the difference between O0-KI (100 ) and O0-KCl (100 ) is caused by the difference in their lattice constants.

  18. Speciation of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite using kiloelectronvolt energy atomic and polyatomic and megaelectronvolt energy atomic projectiles with secondary ion mass spectrometry

    PubMed

    Van Stipdonk MJ; Justes; Force; Schweikert

    2000-06-01

    The negative-ion mass spectra produced by kiloelectronvolt energy (CsI)nCs+ (n = 0-2) and megaelectronvolt energy 252Cf fission fragment projectile impacts on NaNO3 and NaNO2 were collected and compared. The mass spectra generated by impacts of the kiloelectronvolt polyatomic primary ions on NaNO3 were markedly different from those derived from the fission fragment impacts, featuring higher relative intensities of nitrate (NO3-) specific secondary ions (those that reflect the sample stoichiometry). The most prominent secondary ion (SI) peaks produced from NaNO3 by the kiloelectronvolt energy projectiles were NO3- and Na(NO3)2-, both of which relate directly back to the chemical composition of the staring material. Likewise, the most prominent peaks produced by the kiloelectronvolt energy polyatomic projectile impacts on NaNO2 were NO2- and Na(NO2)2-. The fission fragment projectiles produced SI spectra from NaNO3 that were dominated by signals characteristic more of NaNO2, indicating that the megaelectronvolt energy ions induce considerable degradation of the nitrate solid. In addition, the fission fragment projectile produced relative negative SI intensity distributions that are remarkably similar to those reported in earlier studies of the use of laser desorption to produce SI signals from NaNO3. Of the projectiles examined in this study, the 20 keV (CsI)Cs+ projectile generated negative-ion mass spectra that best differentiated NaNO3 and NaNO2, primarily by producing a base peak in the NaNO3 spectrum that was unambiguously representative of the original sample stoichiometry.

  19. Atomic Oxygen (ATOX) simulation of Teflon FEP and Kapton H surfaces using a high intensity, low energy, mass selected, ion beam facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vered, R.; Grossman, E.; Lempert, G. D.; Lifshitz, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A high intensity (greater than 10(exp 15) ions/sq cm) low energy (down to 5 eV) mass selected ion beam (MSIB) facility was used to study the effects of ATOX on two polymers commonly used for space applications (Kapton H and Teflon FEP). The polymers were exposed to O(+) and Ne(+) fluences on 10(exp 15) - 10(exp 19) ions/sq cm, using 30eV ions. A variety of analytical methods were used to analyze the eroded surfaces including: (1) atomic force microscopy (AFM) for morphology measurements; (2) total mass loss measurements using a microbalance; (3) surface chemical composition using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and (4) residual gas analysis (RGA) of the released gases during bombardment. The relative significance of the collisional and chemical degradation processes was evaluated by comparing the effects of Ne(+) and O(+) bombardment. For 30 eV ions it was found that the Kapton is eroded via chemical mechanisms while Teflon FEP is eroded via collisional mechanisms. AFM analysis was found very powerful in revealing the evolution of the damage from its initial atomic scale (roughness of approx. 1 nm) to its final microscopic scale (roughness greater than 1 micron). Both the surface morphology and the average roughness of the bombarded surfaces (averaged over 1 micron x 1 micron images by the system's computer) were determined for each sample. For 30 eV a non linear increase of the Kapton roughness with the O(+) fluence was discovered (a slow increase rate for fluences phi less than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm, and a rapid increase rate for phi greater than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm). Comparative studies on the same materials exposed to RF and DC oxygen plasmas indicate that the specific details of the erosion depend on the simulation facility emphasizing the advantages of the ion beam facility.

  20. Atomic Oxygen (ATOX) simulation of Teflon FEP and Kapton H surfaces using a high intensity, low energy, mass selected, ion beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vered, R.; Grossman, E.; Lempert, G. D.; Lifshitz, Y.

    1994-11-01

    A high intensity (greater than 10(exp 15) ions/sq cm) low energy (down to 5 eV) mass selected ion beam (MSIB) facility was used to study the effects of ATOX on two polymers commonly used for space applications (Kapton H and Teflon FEP). The polymers were exposed to O(+) and Ne(+) fluences on 10(exp 15) - 10(exp 19) ions/sq cm, using 30eV ions. A variety of analytical methods were used to analyze the eroded surfaces including: (1) atomic force microscopy (AFM) for morphology measurements; (2) total mass loss measurements using a microbalance; (3) surface chemical composition using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and (4) residual gas analysis (RGA) of the released gases during bombardment. The relative significance of the collisional and chemical degradation processes was evaluated by comparing the effects of Ne(+) and O(+) bombardment. For 30 eV ions it was found that the Kapton is eroded via chemical mechanisms while Teflon FEP is eroded via collisional mechanisms. AFM analysis was found very powerful in revealing the evolution of the damage from its initial atomic scale (roughness of approx. 1 nm) to its final microscopic scale (roughness greater than 1 micron). Both the surface morphology and the average roughness of the bombarded surfaces (averaged over 1 micron x 1 micron images by the system's computer) were determined for each sample. For 30 eV a non linear increase of the Kapton roughness with the O(+) fluence was discovered (a slow increase rate for fluences phi less than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm, and a rapid increase rate for phi greater than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm). Comparative studies on the same materials exposed to RF and DC oxygen plasmas indicate that the specific details of the erosion depend on the simulation facility emphasizing the advantages of the ion beam facility.

  1. Search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles in pp collisions at √s = 8  TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    None

    2015-08-08

    A search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles is performed using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Data collected in 2012 at √s = 8 TeV from pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 are examined. Particles producing anomalously high ionisation, consistent with long-lived massive particles with electric charges from |q| = 2e to |q| = 6e are searched for. No signal candidate events are observed, and 95 % confidence level cross-section upper limits are interpreted as lower mass limits for a Drell–Yan production model. The mass limits range between 660 and 785 GeV.

  2. QED Theory of Radiation Emission and Absorption Lines for Atoms and Ions in a Strong Laser Field

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, A. V.

    2008-10-22

    The results of numerical calculating the multi-photon resonance shift and width for transition 6S-6F in the atom of Cs (wavelength 1059nm) in a laser pulse of the Gaussian and soliton-like shapes are presented. QED theory of radiation atomic lines is used.

  3. Investigation of the transported heavy metal ions in xylem sap of cucumber plants by size exclusion chromatography and atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mihucz, V G; Tatár, E; Kmethy, B; Záray, G; Cseh, E

    2000-07-15

    An 'off-line' high performance liquid chromatography-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HPLC-GF-AAS) method using a size exclusion chromatography (SEC) column was developed to investigate heavy metal ions in xylem sap samples of cucumber plants grown in hydroponics containing iron as Fe(III)-ethylenediaminetetraacetate (Fe(III) EDTA), Fe(III) citrate or FeCl3 and exposed to lead, nickel or vanadium contamination. The SEC chromatogram of the samples contained the peak of nitrate ions (in significant concentration approximately 1400 microg/ml) and some small, unidentified compounds with molecular weight lower than 700 Da. The results indicate that Cu and Mn--which were added to the hydroponics as nutrient elements--determined in the collected fractions during the chromatographic runs are transported in the xylem vessels together with small inorganic ions like nitrate ions. In case of nickel other low-molecular weight compounds eluting earlier than the nitrate ions may take part in its transport toward the shoots. Lead could not be detected in the above mentioned fractions. Determination of vanadium in the fractions was not expected since it could not be detected in the sap samples.

  4. Preparation of modified magnetic nanoparticles as a sorbent for the preconcentration and determination of cadmium ions in food and environmental water samples prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabi, Ali; Dalirandeh, Zeinab; Rad, Ali Shokuhi

    2015-05-01

    A new method has been developed for the separation/preconcentration of trace level cadmium ions using diphenyl carbazone/sodium dodecyl sulfate immobilized on magnetic nanoparticle Fe3O4 as a new sorbent SPE and their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Synthesized nanoparticle was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Various influencing parameters on the separation and preconcentration of trace level cadmium ions such as, pH value, amount of nanoparticles, amount of diphenyl carbazone, condition of eluting solution, the effects of matrix ions were examined. The cadmium ions can be eluted from the modified magnetic nanoparticle using 1 mol L-1 HCl as a desorption reagent. The detection limit of this method for cadmium was 3.71 ng ml-1 and the R.S.D. was 0.503% (n=6). The advantages of this new method include rapidity, easy preparation of sorbents and a high concentration factor. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of Cd ions at trace levels in real samples such as, green tea, rice, tobacco, carrot, lettuce, ginseng, spice, tap water, river water, sea water with satisfactory results.

  5. Electronic structure and local atomic arrangement of transition metal ions in nanoporous iron-substituted nickel phosphates, VSB-1 and VSB-5.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Woo; Oh, Eun-Jin; Jhung, Sung Hwa; Chang, Jong-San; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2010-01-01

    The electronic structure and local atomic arrangement of transition metal ions in nanoporous iron-substituted nickel phosphates VSB-1 and VSB-5 have been investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at Fe K- and Ni K-edges. The Fe K-edge XANES study clearly demonstrated that substituted iron ions were stabilized in octahedral nickel sites of nanoporous nickel phosphate lattice. A comparison with several Fe-references revealed that the substituted irons have mixed Fe2+/Fe3+ oxidation state with the average valence of +2.8-3.0. According to the Ni K-edge XANES analysis, the aliovalent substitution of Ni2+ with Fe2+/Fe3+ induced a slight reduction of divalent nickel ions in VSB-5 to meet a charge balance. On the contrary, Fe substitution for the VSB-1 phase did not cause notable decrease in the oxidation state of nickel ions, which would be related either to the accompanying decrease of pentavalent phosphorus cations or to the increase of oxygen anions. In conclusion, the present findings clearly demonstrated that the nanoporous lattice of nickel phosphate can accommodate effectively iron ions in its octahedral nickel sites.

  6. Imidazole-Modified Nanoporous Silica for Lead Ion Solid Phase Extraction Prior to Determination from Industrial Wastewaters by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, Ali; Ardjmand, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    A new method was applied to produce modified nanoporous silica as a novel sorbent for Pb(II) ion SPE from industrial wastewater samples. In this modified method, the produced nanoporous silica has a higher functional group loading, which leads to a higher preconcentration factor as well as a lower LOD. This modified nanoporous silica was used for preconcentration prior to subsequent determination of Pb(II) ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Various parameters such as the eluent, pH of the sample solution, and flow rate were optimized during this work. Also, the effect of a variety of ions on preconcentration and recovery of Pb(II) ions was investigated. The LOD, defined as five times the SD of the blank, was determined to be lower than 0.1 mg/L with an RSD of <2%. The accuracy of the method was established by analyzing standard reference materials with certified Pb concentrations. Finally, the established method was successfully applied for determination of the Pb(II) ion concentration in industrial wastewater samples.

  7. An experimental setup for studying the core-excited atoms and molecules by electron impact using energy analysed electron-ion coincidence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Prajapati, S.; Singh, B.; Singh, B. K.; Shanker, R.

    2017-02-01

    Operation and performance of an apparatus for studying the decay dynamics relevant to core-hole decay processes in atoms and molecules excited by energetic electrons using an energy analysed electron-ion coincidence technique are described in some detail. The setup consists of a time- and position sensitive double-field linear TOF mass spectrometer coupled with a dual MCP detector and a single-pass CMA to select the energy of detected electrons. Details of different components involved in the setup are presented and discussed. To demonstrate the performance and capability of the apparatus, we present some typical results extracted from the TOF argon ion-mass spectra observed in coincidence with 18-energy selected electrons emitted from interaction of a continuous beam of 3.5 keV electrons with a dilute gaseous target of argon atoms. Specifically, the variation of relative correlation probability for the final ion-charge states Ar1+ to Ar4+ produced in the considered collision reactions as a function of energy of emitted electrons is determined and discussed.

  8. Enhanced and selective adsorption of mercury ions on chitosan beads grafted with polyacrylamide via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Bai, Renbi; Liu, Changkun

    2005-12-06

    Enhanced and selective removal of mercury ions was achieved with chitosan beads grafted with polyacrylamide (chitosan-g-polyacrylamide) via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The chitosan-g-polyacrylamide beads were found to have significantly greater adsorption capacities and faster adsorption kinetics for mercury ions than the chitosan beads. At pH 4 and with initial mercury concentrations of 10-200 mg/L, the chitosan-g-polyacrylamide beads can achieve a maximum adsorption capacity of up to 322.6 mg/g (in comparison with 181.8 mg/g for the chitosan beads) and displayed a short adsorption equilibrium time of less than 60 min (compared to more than 15 h for the chitosan beads). Coadsorption experiments with both mercury and lead ions showed that the chitosan-g-polyacrylamide beads had excellent selectivity in the adsorption of mercury ions over lead ions at pH < 6, in contrast to the chitosan beads, which did not show clear selectivity for either of the two metal species. Mechanism study suggested that the enhanced mercury adsorption was due to the many amide groups grafted onto the surfaces of the beads, and the selectivity in mercury adsorption can be attributed to the ability of mercury ions to form covalent bonds with the amide. It was found that adsorbed mercury ions on the chitosan-g-polyacrylamide beads can be effectively desorbed in a perchloric acid solution, and the regenerated beads can be reused almost without any loss of adsorption capacity.

  9. Preconcentration and determination of trace silver ion using benzothiazole calix[4]arene modified silica by flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Waluvanaruk, Jitwilai; Aeungmaitrepirom, Wanlapa; Tuntulani, Thawatchai; Ngamukot, Passapol

    2014-01-01

    The silica gel modified with benzothiazole calix[4]arene (APS-L1) via Schiff's base reaction was applied as a sorbent in an online system for preconcentration and determination of silver ion by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). APS-L1 was used as an effective sorbent for solid phase extraction (SPE) of silver(I) ion in both batch and column methods. The optimum experimental parameters such as pH, eluent type, sample flow rate, eluent volume and eluent flow rate including the effect of interfering ions were investigated. Silver(I) ion was determined at pH 6-7. The capacity of APS-L1 sorbent was found to be 12.2 mg/g of sorbent. The high affinity was obtained without interference from the interfering ions. The optimum conditions of the online flow injection preconcentration coupled with the FAAS (FI-FAAS system) were evaluated. The sample flow rate was 3.0 mL min(-1) using sample volume of 5-10 mL. Elution was performed with 250 μL of 0.1 mol L(-1) thiosulfate at the flow rate of 1.5 mL min(-1). The analytical characteristics and performance of the FI-FAAS system were studied under optimum conditions using a solution spiked with standard silver(I) ion at 20 and 50 μg L(-1). The detection limit of 0.44 μg L(-1) was obtained. The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated and percentages of recovery at 20 and 50 μg L(-1) were 100.2 and 99.5%, respectively. The percent relative standard deviations (%RSD) at 20 and 50 μg L(-1) were 6.1 and 3.3%, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to determine trace silver(I) ion in drinking and tap water samples.

  10. Atom probe tomography and nano secondary ion mass spectroscopy investigation of the segregation of boron at austenite grain boundaries in 0.5 wt.% carbon steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, J. B.; Lim, N. S.; Lee, B. H.; Renaud, L.; Park, C. G.

    2011-06-01

    The grain boundary segregation of boron atoms in high strength low alloy steels containing 50 ppm boron was accomplished using atom probe tomography (APT) and nano-beam secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The formation of boro-carbides under an excessive addition of boron to the steels was identified through the SIMS and TEM. The APT was performed in order to evaluate the composition of the alloying elements, such as, boron and carbon, segregated at prior austenite grain boundaries. The boron contents at the prior austenite grain boundaries were approximately 1.7 ± 0.2 at.%, which was approximately 70 times more than the amount of boron added to the steels.

  11. Spectroscopic and NMR identification of novel hydride ions in fractional quantum energy states formed by an exothermic reaction of atomic hydrogen with certain catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, R.; Ray, P.; Dhandapani, B.; Good, W.; Jansson, P.; Nansteel, M.; He, J.; Voigt, A.

    2004-10-01

    2K+ to K + K2+ and K to K3+ provide a reaction with a net enthalpy equal to one and three times the potential energy of atomic hydrogen, respectively. The presence of these gaseous ions or atoms with thermally dissociated hydrogen formed a so-called resonance transfer (rt)-plasma having strong VUV emission with a stationary inverted Lyman population. Significant line broadening of the Balmer α , β , and γ lines of 18 eV was observed, compared to 3 4 eV from a hydrogen microwave plasma. Emission from rt-plasmas occurred even when the electric field applied to the plasma was zero. The reaction was exothermic since excess power of 20 mW cm-3 was measured by Calvet calorimetry. An energetic catalytic reaction was proposed involving a resonant energy transfer between hydrogen atoms and 2K+ or K to form very stable novel hydride ions H-(1/p) called hydrino hydrides having a fractional principal quantum numbers p = 2 and p = 4, respectively. Characteristic emission was observed from K2+ and K3+ that confirmed the resonant nonradiative energy transfer of 27.2 eV and 3 × 27.2 eV from atomic hydrogen to 2K+ and K, respectively. The product hydride ion H-(1/4) was observed spectroscopically at 110 nm corresponding to its predicted binding energy of 11.2 eV. The 1H MAS NMR spectrum of novel compound KH*Cl relative to external tetramethylsilane (TMS) showed a large distinct upfield resonance at 4.4 corresponding to an absolute resonance shift of 35.9 ppm that matched the theoretical prediction of p = 4. A novel peak of KH*I at 1.5 ppm relative to TMS corresponding to an absolute resonance shift of 33.0 ppm matched the theoretical prediction of p = 2. The predicted catalyst reactions, position of the upfield-shifted NMR peaks for H-(1/4) and H-(1/2), and spectroscopic data for H-(1/4) were found to be in agreement with the experimental observations as well as previously reported spectroscopic data for H-(1/2) and analysis of KH*Cl and KH*I containing these hydride ions.

  12. Theoretical Demonstration of the Feasibility of Observing Vortices in the Ejected Electron Spectrum in Bare-Ion Two-Electron-Atom Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, S. Yu.; Macek, Joseph H; Schmidt, L. Ph.H; Schultz, David Robert

    2011-01-01

    Using a fully correlated, 4-dimensional lattice, time-dependent Schr dinger equation (LTDSE) model of the collisions of bare projectile ions with two-electron atoms (H+, He2+ + He), we demonstrate the existence vortices in the resulting spectrum of ejected electrons. Following the uncovering of these features in collisions involving only one electron (H+ + H) [Macek et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 143201 (2009)], this demonstration provides impetus for seeking these features in more readily feasible experimental conditions using a cold helium target and the reaction microscope technique.

  13. Benchmark values of chemical potential and chemical hardness for atoms and atomic ions (including unstable anions) from the energies of isoelectronic series.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Carlos; Heidar-Zadeh, Farnaz; Ayers, Paul W

    2016-09-14

    We present benchmark values for the electronic chemical potential and chemical hardness from reference data for ionization potentials and electron affinities. In cases where the energies needed to compute these quantities are not available, we estimate the ionization potential of the metastable (di)anions by extrapolation along the isoelectronic series, taking care to ensure that the extrapolated data satisfy reasonable intuitive rules to the maximum possible extent. We also propose suitable values for the chemical potential and chemical hardness of zero-electron species. Because the values we report are faithful to the trends in accurate data on atomic energies, we believe that our proposed values for the chemical potential and chemical hardness are ideally suited to conceptual studies of chemical trends across the periodic table. The critical nuclear charge (Z critical) of the isoelectronic series with 2 < N < 96 has also been reported for the first time.

  14. The DEPOSIT computer code: Calculations of electron-loss cross-sections for complex ions colliding with neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litsarev, Mikhail S.

    2013-02-01

    A description of the DEPOSIT computer code is presented. The code is intended to calculate total and m-fold electron-loss cross-sections (m is the number of ionized electrons) and the energy T(b) deposited to the projectile (positive or negative ion) during a collision with a neutral atom at low and intermediate collision energies as a function of the impact parameter b. The deposited energy is calculated as a 3D integral over the projectile coordinate space in the classical energy-deposition model. Examples of the calculated deposited energies, ionization probabilities and electron-loss cross-sections are given as well as the description of the input and output data. Program summaryProgram title: DEPOSIT Catalogue identifier: AENP_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENP_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 8726 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 126650 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Any computer that can run C++ compiler. Operating system: Any operating system that can run C++. Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: An MPI version is included in the distribution. Classification: 2.4, 2.6, 4.10, 4.11. Nature of problem: For a given impact parameter b to calculate the deposited energy T(b) as a 3D integral over a coordinate space, and ionization probabilities Pm(b). For a given energy to calculate the total and m-fold electron-loss cross-sections using T(b) values. Solution method: Direct calculation of the 3D integral T(b). The one-dimensional quadrature formula of the highest accuracy based upon the nodes of the Yacobi polynomials for the cosθ=x∈[-1,1] angular variable is applied. The Simpson rule for the φ∈[0,2π] angular variable is used. The Newton-Cotes pattern of the seventh order

  15. Quinalizarin anchored on Amberlite XAD-2. A new matrix for solid-phase extraction of metal ions for flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M; Rathore, D P; Singh, A K

    2001-06-01

    Amberlite XAD-2 has been functionalized by coupling it to quinalizarin [1,2,5,8-tetrahydroxyanthraquinone] by means of an -N = N- spacer. Elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and infrared spectra were used to characterize the resulting new polymer matrix. The matrix has been used to preconcentrate Cu(II), Cd(II), Co(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), and Mn(II) before their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). UO2(II) has been preconcentrated for fluorimetric determination. The optimum pH values for maximum adsorption of the metals are between 5.0 and 7.0. All these metal ions are desorbed (recovery 91-99%) with 4 mol L(-1) HNO3. The adsorptive capacity of the resin was found to be in the range 0.94-5.28 mg metal g(-1) resin and loading half-life (t1/2) between 5.3 and 15.0 min. The effects of NaF, NaCl, NaNO3, Na2SO4, Na3PO4, Ca(II), and Mg(II) on the adsorption of these metal ions (0.2 microg mL(-1)) are reported. The lower limits of detection for these metal ions are between 1 and 15.0 microg L(-1). After enrichment on this matrix flame AAS has been used to determine these metal ions (except the uranyl ion) in river water samples (RSD < or = 6.5%); fluorimetry was used to determine uranyl ion in well water samples (RSD < or = 6.3%). Cobalt from pharmaceutical vitamin tablets was preconcentrated by use of this chelating resin and estimated by FAAS (RSD approximately 4%).

  16. Solid-phase chelate extractive preconcentration of heavy metal ions prior to their ultratrace determination by microsample injection system coupled flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sarı, Serdar; Kartal, Aslıhan Arslan; Elçi, Aydan; Akdoğan, Abdullah; Höl, Aysen; Siyal, Ali Nawaz; Elçi, Latif

    2013-01-01

    Chromosorb-105 resin/1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) system was developed for solid phase chelate extractive preconcentration of heavy metal ions. The metal ions on Chromosorb-105 resin column were eluted with 3.0 mL of 2.0 mol L-1 HNO3 and determined by microsample injection system coupled flame atomic spectrometry (MIS-FAAS) using 75.0 µL of sample solution for single element determination. The influence of pH, resin amount, reagent amount, flow rate and volume of eluent and sample solution was optimized. The quantitative recoveries (≥95%) of Fe(III), Zn(II), Cu(II) and Pb(II) ions were achieved at pH 9; resin amount, 700 mg; reagent amount, 6.0 µmol; flow rate of eluent and sample solution, 1.0 mL min-1 and 5.0 mL min-1, respectively. The limit of detection and limit of quantification of understudied analytes were found to be 0.17-1.74 µg L-1 and 0.40-2.98 µg L-1, respectively with preconcentration factor of 150-300. The proposed method was validated by analysis of waste water (BCR-715) as a certified reference material. The method was applied successfully for ultratrace determination of studied metal ions in tap water and hot spring water samples.

  17. Formation of nitrate and ammonium ions in titanium dioxide mediated photocatalytic degradation of organic compounds containing nitrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Low, G.K.-C.; McEvoy, S.R.; Matthews, R.W. )

    1991-03-01

    The photocatalytic oxidation of a related series of primary, secondary, and tertiary amines and other nitrogen- and sulfur-containing organic compounds over a UV-illuminated film of TiO{sub 2} has been studied. The compounds were as follows: n-pentylamine, piperidine, pyridine, phenylalanine, desipramine, thioridazine, penicillamine, isosorbide dinitrate, 4-nitrocatechol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, atrazine, ethylenediaminetetracetic acid, and tetrabutylammonium phosphate. Both ammonium and nitrate ions were formed. The relative concentration of the two ions depended on the nature of the nitrogen in a compound, but was also influenced by the illumination time and concentration of the solute. It was found that for n-pentylamine, piperidine and pyridine, the rate of formation of ammonium ions was n-pentylamine {much gt} pyridine > piperidine. The order of rates of nitrate formation was pyridine = piperidine {much gt} pentylamine. For n-pentylamine the rate of formation of ammonium ions was {approximately}100 times that of nitrate.

  18. Dynamics of multiple ionization of atoms and molecules by electron, photon, and ion impact—investigated by the COLTRIMS imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Schmidt, L.; Weber, Th.; Mergel, V.; Jagutzki, O.; Czasch, A.; Hagmann, S.; Doerner, R.; Demkov, Y.; Jahnke, T.; Prior, M.; Cocke, C. L.; Osipov, T.; Landers, A.

    2004-10-01

    Fully differential cross-sections in momentum space for multiple ionization processes of atoms and molecules have been investigated by a multi-coincidence imaging technique, called COLTRIMS (cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy) (J. Phys. B 30 (1997) 2917; Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 108 (1996) 425; In: Ullrich, J., Shevelko, V.P. (Eds.), Many Particle Quantum Dynamics in Atomic Fragmentation, Series Atomic, Optical, and Plasma Physics, Vol. 35. Springer, Berlin, 2003; Phys. Rep. 330 (2000) 95). This technique is as powerful as the bubble chamber system in high-energy physics. It has opened a new observation window into the hidden world of many-particle dynamics: correlated many-particle dynamics in Coulombic systems can now be experimentally approached with unprecedented completeness and precision. The principle of the method, namely measuring the momentum of the emitted charged particles from an atomic or molecular fragmentation process, is as simple as determining the trajectory of a thrown stone. From knowing the position from where the stone was slung and where it hits the target, as well as measuring its time-of-flight, the trajectory of the stone and thus its initial velocity vector can be determined precisely. Furthermore, in order to achieve good precision we have to know whether the person, who throws the stone, was at rest in the frame of observation or with which relative velocity this person was moving. Thus, to obtain optimal momentum resolution for the exploding fragments one has to bring the fragmenting object to a complete rest in the frame of measurement before the reaction occurs, i.e. if the object is a gas atom or molecule one has to cool it down to sub-milli Kelvin temperatures.

  19. Order within disorder: The atomic structure of ion-beam sputtered amorphous tantala (a-Ta₂O₅)

    DOE PAGES

    Bassiri, Riccardo; Liou, Franklin; Abernathy, Matthew R.; ...

    2015-03-01

    Amorphous tantala (a-Ta₂O₅) is a technologically important material often used in high-performance coatings. Understanding this material at the atomic level provides a way to further improve performance. This work details extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements of a-Ta₂O₅ coatings, where high-quality experimental data and theoretical fits have allowed a detailed interpretation of the nearest-neighbor distributions. It was found that the tantalum atom is surrounded by four shells of atoms in sequence; oxygen, tantalum, oxygen, and tantalum. A discussion is also included on how these models can be interpreted within the context of published crystalline Ta₂O₅ and other a-T₂O₅ studies.

  20. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.